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Sample records for monthly malaria cases

  1. Cutaneous findings in five cases of malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jignesh B Vaishnani

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is an infectious disease caused by protozoa of the genus Plasmodium. Cutaneous lesions in malaria are rarely reported and include urticaria, angioedema, petechiae, purpura, and disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC. Here, five malaria cases associated with cutaneous lesions have been described. Out of the five cases of malaria, two were associated with urticaria and angioedema, one case was associated with urticaria, and other two were associated with reticulated blotchy erythema with petechiae. Most of the cutaneous lesions in malaria were nonspecific and reflected the different immunopathological mechanism in malarial infection.

  2. [Diagnosis and treatment for three imported Plasmodium malariae malaria cases in Henan Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yan; Zhou, Rui-Min; Zhang, Hong-Wei; Qian, Dan; Liu, Ying; Chen, Wei-Qi; Zhao, Xu-Dong

    2014-02-01

    Giemsa-stained blood film microscopy, CareStart rapid detection and PCR were used to detect the three cases who returned from Angola and Equatorial Guinea to Henan Province. Onset of malaria symptoms for two patients occurred 15 d and 27 d after their return from Angola, respectively. Two months after returning home, another case relapsed who had suffered from malaria in Equatorial Guinea. All three patients had the symptoms such as irregular fever, headache, chills and so on. Two cases had elevated total bilirubin and splenomegaly. The cases were confirmed as P. malariae infection by microscopic morphological examination. Amplified bands were produced by 18S rRNA nested PCR, which was the same with P. malariae in size, whereas the results of CareStart repaid detection test were all negative. They were cured by using artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT).

  3. Commissioners' Monthly Case Activity Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission — Total cases pending at the beginning of the month, total cases added to the docket during the month, total cases disposed of during the month, and total cases...

  4. Sources of variability of estimates of malaria case counts, active and reserve components, U.S. Armed Forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Each January, the Medical Surveillance Monthly Report (MSMR) estimates numbers of malaria infections among U.S. service members using a surveillance case definition to identify "malaria cases". These cases include individuals with a hospital discharge diagnosis of malaria and those who were reported with malaria through military notifiable event reporting systems. This report compares the MSMR surveillance case definition with other proposed case definitions to demonstrate the degree to which estimates of numbers of malaria cases are dependent upon clinical settings, data sources and case-defining rules used to produce such estimates. For example, including outpatient diagnoses as malaria cases would more than double the 2010 case count. As compared with cases defined using other proposed case definitions, many more MSMR-defined cases had records of a specific Plasmodium species, a laboratory test for malaria and recent travel to a malaria-endemic country. Interpretations of the results of MSMR reports should consider how "cases" are defined.

  5. Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupasquier, Isabelle

    1989-01-01

    Malaria, the greatest pandemia in the world, claims an estimated one million lives each year in Africa alone. While it may still be said that for the most part malaria is found in what is known as the world's poverty belt, cases are now frequently diagnosed in western countries. Due to resistant strains of malaria which have developed because of…

  6. Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupasquier, Isabelle

    1989-01-01

    Malaria, the greatest pandemia in the world, claims an estimated one million lives each year in Africa alone. While it may still be said that for the most part malaria is found in what is known as the world's poverty belt, cases are now frequently diagnosed in western countries. Due to resistant strains of malaria which have developed because of…

  7. Protective efficacy of malaria case management and intermittent preventive treatment for preventing malaria mortality in children: a systematic review for the Lives Saved Tool

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    Steketee Richard W

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Lives Saved Tool (LiST model was developed to estimate the impact of the scale-up of child survival interventions on child mortality. New advances in antimalarials have improved their efficacy of treating uncomplicated and severe malaria. Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs for uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria and parenteral or rectal artemisinin or quinine for severe malaria syndromes have been shown to be very effective for the treatment of malaria in children. These interventions are now being considered for inclusion in the LiST model. However, for obvious ethical reasons, their protective efficacy (PE compared to placebo is unknown and their impact on reducing malaria-attributable mortality has not been quantified. Methods We performed systematic literature reviews of published studies in P. falciparum endemic settings to determine the protective efficacy (PE of ACT treatment against malaria deaths among children with uncomplicated malaria, as well as the PE of effective case management including parenteral quinine against malaria deaths among all hospitalized children. As no randomized placebo-controlled trials of malaria treatment have been conducted, we used multiple data sources to ascertain estimates of PE, including a previously performed Delphi estimate for treatment of uncomplicated malaria. Results Based on multiple data sources, we estimate the PE of ACT treatment of uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria on reducing malaria mortality in children 1–23 months to be 99% (range: 94-100%, and in children 24-59 months to be 97% (range: 86-99%. We estimate the PE of treatment of severe P. falciparum malaria with effective case management including intravenous quinine on reducing malaria mortality in children 1-59 months to be 82% (range: 63-94% compared to no treatment. Conclusions This systematic review quantifies the PE of ACT used for treating uncomplicated malaria and effective case

  8. Late relapse of imported Plasmodium ovale malaria: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siala, Emna; Gastli, Mondher; Essid, Rym; Jemal, Sana; Ben Abdallah, Rym; Ben Abda, Imène; Aoun, Karim; Bouratbine, Aida

    2015-06-01

    We report the first case of an imported Plasmodium ovale relapse in a Tunisian man who developed malaria three years after leaving sub- Saharan Africa. A 29-year-old Tunisian man consulted in September 2011 because of a fever, myalgia, and headache that had begun eight days earlier and persisted despite treatment with oral antibiotics. On questioning, the patient stated that he had resided three years ago for six months in Ivory Coast, where he acquired malaria. He was treated with artemether-lumefantrine. The patient said he had no recent travel to any other malaria-endemic area and had not received a blood transfusion. A first microscopy of peripheral blood smears was negative for malaria parasites. The diagnosis was established 17 days after onset of symptoms. A repeat microscopic examination of blood smears confirmed the presence of Plasmodium ovale with a parasitemia lower than 0.1%. The patient was treated with artemether lumefantrine, followed by primaquine. This case emphasizes the possibility of relapse of some plasmodial species. It highlights the importance of repeating microscopic examination of blood when the diagnosis of malaria is suspected.

  9. Contemporary epidemiological overview of malaria in Madagascar: operational utility of reported routine case data for malaria control planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Rosalind E; Mioramalala, Sedera Aurélien; Ramiranirina, Brune; Franchard, Thierry; Rakotorahalahy, Andry Joeliarijaona; Bisanzio, Donal; Gething, Peter W; Zimmerman, Peter A; Ratsimbasoa, Arsène

    2016-10-18

    Malaria remains a major public health problem in Madagascar. Widespread scale-up of intervention coverage has led to substantial reductions in case numbers since 2000. However, political instability since 2009 has disrupted these efforts, and a resurgence of malaria has since followed. This paper re-visits the sub-national stratification of malaria transmission across Madagascar to propose a contemporary update, and evaluates the reported routine case data reported at this sub-national scale. Two independent malariometrics were evaluated to re-examine the status of malaria across Madagascar. First, modelled maps of Plasmodium falciparum infection prevalence (PfPR) from the Malaria Atlas Project were used to update the sub-national stratification into 'ecozones' based on transmission intensity. Second, routine reports of case data from health facilities were synthesized from 2010 to 2015 to compare the sub-national epidemiology across the updated ecozones over time. Proxy indicators of data completeness are investigated. The epidemiology of malaria is highly diverse across the island's ecological regions, with eight contiguous ecozones emerging from the transmission intensity PfPR map. East and west coastal areas have highest transmission year-round, contrasting with the central highlands and desert south where trends appear more closely associated with epidemic outbreak events. Ecozones have shown steady increases in reported malaria cases since 2010, with a near doubling of raw reported case numbers from 2014 to 2015. Gauges of data completeness suggest that interpretation of raw reported case numbers will underestimate true caseload as only approximately 60-75 % of health facility data are reported to the central level each month. A sub-national perspective is essential when monitoring the epidemiology of malaria in Madagascar and assessing local control needs. A robust assessment of the status of malaria at a time when intervention coverage efforts are being

  10. Malaria Laboratory Diagnostic Performance: Case studies of two ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malaria Laboratory Diagnostic Performance: Case studies of two ... laboratory for malaria test. ... affected by high humidity and provide no quantification of parasite density (World Health ... Zomba District Health Office reports not less than 250.

  11. From "forest malaria" to "bromeliad malaria": a case-study of scientific controversy and malaria control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadelha, P

    1994-08-01

    The article analyses the evolution of knowledge and rationale of control of a special case of malaria transmission based on Bromelia-Kerteszia complex. Since bromeliaceae function as a 'host of the carrier' and were previously associated with natural forests, the elucidation of bromeliad malaria historically elicited controversies concerning the imputation of Kertesziae as transmitters as well as over control strategies directed to bromelia eradication (manual removal, herbicides and deforestation), use of insecticides and chemoprophylaxis. Established authority, disciplinary traditions, conceptual premises and contemporary criteria for validating knowledge in the field partly explain the long time gap since Adolpho Lutz announced at the beginning of the century the existence of a new mosquito and breeding site as responsible for a 'forest malaria' epidemic occurring at a high altitude. The article brings attention to how economic, political and institutional determinants played an important role in redefining studies that led both in Trinidad and Brazil to the recognition of the importance of kerteszia transmission, including urban areas, and establishing new approaches to its study, most relevant of all the concurrence of broad ecological research. The article then describes the Brazilian campaign strategies which showed significant short-term results but had to wait four decades to achieve the goal of eradication due to the peculiar characteristics of this pathogenic complex. Finally, it brings attention to the importance of encompassing social values and discourses, in this case, environmental preservation, to understanding historical trends of malaria control programs.

  12. Forecasting malaria cases using climatic factors in delhi, India: a time series analysis.

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    Kumar, Varun; Mangal, Abha; Panesar, Sanjeet; Yadav, Geeta; Talwar, Richa; Raut, Deepak; Singh, Saudan

    2014-01-01

    Background. Malaria still remains a public health problem in developing countries and changing environmental and climatic factors pose the biggest challenge in fighting against the scourge of malaria. Therefore, the study was designed to forecast malaria cases using climatic factors as predictors in Delhi, India. Methods. The total number of monthly cases of malaria slide positives occurring from January 2006 to December 2013 was taken from the register maintained at the malaria clinic at Rural Health Training Centre (RHTC), Najafgarh, Delhi. Climatic data of monthly mean rainfall, relative humidity, and mean maximum temperature were taken from Regional Meteorological Centre, Delhi. Expert modeler of SPSS ver. 21 was used for analyzing the time series data. Results. Autoregressive integrated moving average, ARIMA (0,1,1) (0,1,0)(12), was the best fit model and it could explain 72.5% variability in the time series data. Rainfall (P value = 0.004) and relative humidity (P value = 0.001) were found to be significant predictors for malaria transmission in the study area. Seasonal adjusted factor (SAF) for malaria cases shows peak during the months of August and September. Conclusion. ARIMA models of time series analysis is a simple and reliable tool for producing reliable forecasts for malaria in Delhi, India.

  13. Forecasting Malaria Cases Using Climatic Factors in Delhi, India: A Time Series Analysis

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    Varun Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Malaria still remains a public health problem in developing countries and changing environmental and climatic factors pose the biggest challenge in fighting against the scourge of malaria. Therefore, the study was designed to forecast malaria cases using climatic factors as predictors in Delhi, India. Methods. The total number of monthly cases of malaria slide positives occurring from January 2006 to December 2013 was taken from the register maintained at the malaria clinic at Rural Health Training Centre (RHTC, Najafgarh, Delhi. Climatic data of monthly mean rainfall, relative humidity, and mean maximum temperature were taken from Regional Meteorological Centre, Delhi. Expert modeler of SPSS ver. 21 was used for analyzing the time series data. Results. Autoregressive integrated moving average, ARIMA (0,1,1 (0,1,012, was the best fit model and it could explain 72.5% variability in the time series data. Rainfall (P value = 0.004 and relative humidity (P value = 0.001 were found to be significant predictors for malaria transmission in the study area. Seasonal adjusted factor (SAF for malaria cases shows peak during the months of August and September. Conclusion. ARIMA models of time series analysis is a simple and reliable tool for producing reliable forecasts for malaria in Delhi, India.

  14. Hyperglycemia in Severe Falciparum Malaria: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo Chianura; Isabella Corinna Errante; Giovanna Travi; Roberto Rossotti; Massimo Puoti

    2012-01-01

    Occasionally, malaria may present with unusual signs and symptoms. We report a case of an uncommon presentation of Plasmodium falciparum infection in a 59-year-old Ethiopian immigrant, which initially presented with hyperglycaemia and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS). Reports of unusual presentations of malaria are few and cases of severe malaria with hyperglycaemia are rarely described. As hyperglycaemia is associated to most severe malaria and high mortality, our aim is to catch ...

  15. Compliance to the treatment of malaria cases in Ahmedabad City- A Qualitative Study

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    Sonal Parikh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Malaria is a serious public health problem in India, accounting for sizeable morbidity, mortality and economic loss 1,2 . A Revised National Drug Policy on Malaria adopted and the guidelines have been prepared for healthcare personnel including clinicians involved in the treatment of malaria 2. Aim: 1 To study adherence to the protocol in diagnosis & management of malaria cases by private medical practitioners and Urban Health Centres (UHC of Ahmedabad Municipal Corporation (AMC. Methodology- This was a qualitative study in which 29 UHCs and 97 private practitioners of three zones of Ahmedabad Municipal Corporation were visited. Case papers of last 2 months and all malaria related registers maintained at UHCs were evaluated and home visit of 115 malaria cases was carried out. Observation & Discussion- 93.7% of patient with confirmed vivax malaria were prescribed Chloroquine and 99.1% patient with confirmed malaria prescribed Primaquine with correct dose as per age & schedule. Only 78.8% private practitioner was following the guideline dose. 20.2% of private practitioner were not prescribing Primaquine at all. Conclusion & Recommendation There was lack of sensitization in some M.O. of U.H.C & private practitioners (other than M.D. Medicine regarding prescribing treatment as per National Drug Policy for treatment of Malaria especially primaquine. Sensitization & involvement of private doctors for rational prescription through the Indian / Ahmedabad Medical Association must be carried out.

  16. Disseminated intravascular coagulation in malaria: A case report

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    Laltanpuii Sailo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC is seen in <5% of patients with severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria and is more common in cerebral malaria. Here, we report the diagnosis and management of a case of severe P. falciparum malaria with DIC.

  17. Malaria morbidity and temperature variation in a low risk Kenyan district: a case of overdiagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njuguna, John; Muita, James; Mundia, George

    2009-05-01

    Diagnosis of malaria using only clinical means leads to overdiagnosis. This has implications due to safety concerns and the recent introduction of more expensive drugs. Temperature is a major climatic factor influencing the transmission dynamics of malaria. This study looked at trends in malaria morbidity in the low risk Kenyan district of Nyandarua, coupled with data on temperature and precipitation for the years 2003-2006. July had the highest number of cases (12.2% of all cases) followed by August (10.2% of all cases). July and August also had the lowest mean maximum temperatures, 20.1 and 20.2 °C respectively. April, July and August had the highest rainfall, with daily means of 4.0, 4.3 and 4.9 mm, respectively. Observation showed that the coldest months experienced the highest number of cases of malaria. Despite the high rainfall, transmission of malaria tends to be limited by low temperatures due to the long duration required for sporogony, with fewer vectors surviving. These cold months also tend to have the highest number of cases of respiratory infections. There is a possibility that some of these were misdiagnosed as malaria based on the fact that only a small proportion of malaria cases were diagnosed using microscopy or rapid diagnostic tests. We conclude that overdiagnosis may be prevalent in this district and there may be a need to design an intervention to minimise it.

  18. Clinical malaria case definition and malaria attributable fraction in the highlands of western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrane, Yaw A; Zhou, Guofa; Githeko, Andrew K; Yan, Guiyun

    2014-10-15

    In African highland areas where endemicity of malaria varies greatly according to altitude and topography, parasitaemia accompanied by fever may not be sufficient to define an episode of clinical malaria in endemic areas. To evaluate the effectiveness of malaria interventions, age-specific case definitions of clinical malaria needs to be determined. Cases of clinical malaria through active case surveillance were quantified in a highland area in Kenya and defined clinical malaria for different age groups. A cohort of over 1,800 participants from all age groups was selected randomly from over 350 houses in 10 villages stratified by topography and followed for two-and-a-half years. Participants were visited every two weeks and screened for clinical malaria, defined as an individual with malaria-related symptoms (fever [axillary temperature≥37.5°C], chills, severe malaise, headache or vomiting) at the time of examination or 1-2 days prior to the examination in the presence of a Plasmodium falciparum positive blood smear. Individuals in the same cohort were screened for asymptomatic malaria infection during the low and high malaria transmission seasons. Parasite densities and temperature were used to define clinical malaria by age in the population. The proportion of fevers attributable to malaria was calculated using logistic regression models. Incidence of clinical malaria was highest in valley bottom population (5.0% cases per 1,000 population per year) compared to mid-hill (2.2% cases per 1,000 population per year) and up-hill (1.1% cases per 1,000 population per year) populations. The optimum cut-off parasite densities through the determination of the sensitivity and specificity showed that in children less than five years of age, 500 parasites per μl of blood could be used to define the malaria attributable fever cases for this age group. In children between the ages of 5-14, a parasite density of 1,000 parasites per μl of blood could be used to define the

  19. The use of insecticide-treated nets for reducing malaria morbidity among children aged 6-59 months, in an area of high malaria transmission in central Côte d'Ivoire

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    Nsanzabana Christian

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs are an important tool for controlling malaria. Much attention has been devoted to determine both the effect of LLINs on the reduction of Plasmodium infection rate and on clinically-confirmed malaria cases in sub-Saharan Africa. We carried out an epidemiological study to investigate whether LLINs impact on Plasmodium prevalence rate and the proportion of clinically-confirmed malaria cases, in five villages in the district of Toumodi, central Côte d'Ivoire. Methods From April 2007 to November 2008, a community-based malaria control programme was implemented in the study villages, which involved large-scale distribution of LLINs, and training and sensitization activities within the community. We determined the effect of this programme on Plasmodium prevalence rate, clinically-confirmed malaria cases and proportion of high parasitaemia rates in children aged 6-59 months through a series of cross-sectional surveys starting in April 2007 and repeated once every 6 months. Results We observed a significant decrease in the mean P. falciparum prevalence rate from April 2007 to April 2008 (p = 0.029. An opposite trend was observed from November 2007 to November 2008 when P. falciparum prevalence rate increased significantly (p = 0.003. Highly significant decreases in the proportions of clinical malaria cases were observed between April 2007 and April 2008 (p Conclusions Large-scale distribution of LLINs, accompanied by training and sensitization activities, significantly reduced Plasmodium prevalence rates among young children in the first year of the project, whereas overall clinical malaria rates dropped over the entire 18-month project period. A decrease in community motivation to sleep under bed nets, perhaps along with changing patterns of malaria transmission, might explain the observed increase in the Plasmodium prevalence rate between November 2007 and November 2008.

  20. Acceptability by community health workers in Senegal of combining community case management of malaria and seasonal malaria chemoprevention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tine, Roger Ck; Ndiaye, Pascal; Ndour, Cheikh T;

    2013-01-01

    Community case management of malaria (CCMm) and seasonal malaria chemoprevention (SMC) are anti-malarial interventions that can lead to substantial reduction in malaria burden acting in synergy. However, little is known about the social acceptability of these interventions. A study was undertaken...... to assess whether combining the interventions would be an acceptable approach to malaria control for community health workers (CHWs).......Community case management of malaria (CCMm) and seasonal malaria chemoprevention (SMC) are anti-malarial interventions that can lead to substantial reduction in malaria burden acting in synergy. However, little is known about the social acceptability of these interventions. A study was undertaken...

  1. Contemporary epidemiological overview of malaria in Madagascar: operational utility of reported routine case data for malaria control planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalind E. Howes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria remains a major public health problem in Madagascar. Widespread scale-up of intervention coverage has led to substantial reductions in case numbers since 2000. However, political instability since 2009 has disrupted these efforts, and a resurgence of malaria has since followed. This paper re-visits the sub-national stratification of malaria transmission across Madagascar to propose a contemporary update, and evaluates the reported routine case data reported at this sub-national scale. Methods Two independent malariometrics were evaluated to re-examine the status of malaria across Madagascar. First, modelled maps of Plasmodium falciparum infection prevalence (PfPR from the Malaria Atlas Project were used to update the sub-national stratification into ‘ecozones’ based on transmission intensity. Second, routine reports of case data from health facilities were synthesized from 2010 to 2015 to compare the sub-national epidemiology across the updated ecozones over time. Proxy indicators of data completeness are investigated. Results The epidemiology of malaria is highly diverse across the island’s ecological regions, with eight contiguous ecozones emerging from the transmission intensity PfPR map. East and west coastal areas have highest transmission year-round, contrasting with the central highlands and desert south where trends appear more closely associated with epidemic outbreak events. Ecozones have shown steady increases in reported malaria cases since 2010, with a near doubling of raw reported case numbers from 2014 to 2015. Gauges of data completeness suggest that interpretation of raw reported case numbers will underestimate true caseload as only approximately 60–75 % of health facility data are reported to the central level each month. Discussion A sub-national perspective is essential when monitoring the epidemiology of malaria in Madagascar and assessing local control needs. A robust assessment of the

  2. A case of cerebral malaria and dengue concurrent infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anwar Alam; Md Dm

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral malaria and dengue are the common infections which cause higher mortality and morbidities in every part of the world especially in India. Concurrent infection of cerebral malaria and dengue is rare entity due to different habitat of vectors and it was reported rarely from Southeast Asia. In this case report, the authors reported a case of concurrent cerebral malaria and dengue which was recovered after eight days of admission with increase in morbidity.

  3. Myocarditis associated with Plasmodium vivax malaria: a case report

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    Ana Maria Revoredo da Silva Ventura

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Malaria remains a major public health problem in Brazil where Plasmodium vivax is the predominant species, responsible for 82% of registered cases in 2013. Though benign, P. vivax infection may sometimes evolve with complications and a fatal outcome. Here, we report a severe case of P. vivax malaria in a 35-year-old Brazilian man from a malaria endemic area, who presented with reversible myocarditis.

  4. Malaria or flu? A case report of misdiagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Seif Ali Mahdavi; Ahmad Raeesi; Leyla Faraji; Mohammad Reza Youssefi; Mohammad Taghi Rahimi

    2014-01-01

    We present and discuss elaborately a case of malaria misdiagnosis in a 27-year-old woman in Chalus, Mazandaran Province, North Iran in 2013. The patient has been complaining of fever, shivering and myalgia for three months. Although she visited two physicians during this time, the problem still remained owing to misdiagnose. Eventually in hospital after a precise examination on her thick and thin blood film, the causative agent of disease was diagnosed as plasmodiumvivax. The patient received treatment accordingly and all clinical manifestations were vanished.

  5. Delay in diagnosis and treatment of patients with cases of imported malaria in Poland – one center’s experience

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    Jacek Czepiel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background . Increasingly, Polish citizens are traveling to malaria endemic regions; thus, physicians, especially primary care physicians, should be educated to recognize and treat malaria. Diagnosis and treatment of malaria encounters many difficulties in Poland. Objectives . The aim of the study was to analyze malaria chemoprophylaxis, the time from first symptoms to hospitalization and the process of diagnosis and treatment of patients with malaria. Material and methods . The medical records of patients diagnosed with malaria, hospitalized between 2012 and 2016 in the Department of Infectious Diseases of the University Hospital, Cracow, Poland, were analyzed. Results . 37 subjects with a median age of 32 years (interquartile range IQR: 28–40, mostly returning from Africa (78%, n = 29, were studied. Proper chemoprophylaxis was used in 6 cases (16%. The median length of stay in malaria endemic countries was one month. Plasmodium falciparum was the most frequent species (74%. The mean time to treatment after symptom onset was 5 days (range: 1–27 days. Conclusions . The clinical presentation of malaria in the study group was usually typical. Diagnostic delay resulted from not taking malaria into consideration during the initial differential diagnosis of fever. Few travelers use chemoprophylaxis, hence the awareness of malaria in individuals who have traveled to endemic zones should be enhanced. In a patient presenting with fever, malaria should always be considered in a differential diagnosis if there is a history of travel to a malaria-endemic zone.

  6. A case of misdiagnose of malaria infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mahdavi Seif Ali; Raeesi Ahmad; Faraji Leyla; Youssefi Mohammad Reza; Rahimi Mohammad Taghi

    2013-01-01

    A case of malaria infection in a 42-year-old woman in rural area of Mahmodabad, Mazandaran Province, North Iran was reported and discussed elaborately. She was complaining about recurrent fevers, sweating, headache and myalgia in back. After her first admission to hospital due to misdiagnose she did not receive proper treatment and the patient suffered from clinical manifestations again. Eventually in the second admission to another hospital, after a precise examination on her thick and thin blood smear the agent of disease was recognized appropriately as Plasmodium vivax and treated accordingly.

  7. [Malaria. Analysis of 149 cases (1981-1987)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parellada, N; Caylà, J A; Batalla, J; Plasencia, J A

    1990-01-01

    The epidemiological features of the 149 cases of malaria reported to the Institut Municipal de la Salut in Barcelona from 1981 to 1987 are reported. The yearly evolution of the number of cases showed a tendency to increase predominating in the summer months. The incidence rate for 1977 was 1.99/100,000. The districts with the highest rate of involvement were districts I (Ciutat Vella), owing to the immigration, and V (Sarrià-Sant Gervasi), probably owing to overseas visitors. There was a remarkable predominance of males (63.8%), patients aged 20-40 years, and cases of African origin (81.81%); 50.42% of these came from Equatorial Guinea. The most commonly isolated plasmodium was P. falciparum (52.53%), with a progressive increase throughout the years. Only 13.43% of patients had followed a correct chemoprophylaxis. Malaria is still the most important protozoan infection in the world. In the present study its possible reintroduction in Spain is discussed. The malarial endemic used to be very important in this country, and its eradication was not achieved until 1964.

  8. Quality of malaria case management at outpatient health facilities in Angola

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    Santelli Ana

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Angola's malaria case-management policy recommends treatment with artemether-lumefantrine (AL. In 2006, AL implementation began in Huambo Province, which involved training health workers (HWs, supervision, delivering AL to health facilities, and improving malaria testing with microscopy and rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs. Implementation was complicated by a policy that was sometimes ambiguous. Methods Fourteen months after implementation began, a cross-sectional survey was conducted in 33 outpatient facilities in Huambo Province to assess their readiness to manage malaria and the quality of malaria case-management for patients of all ages. Consultations were observed, patients were interviewed and re-examined, and HWs were interviewed. Results Ninety-three HWs and 177 consultations were evaluated, although many sampled consultations were missed. All facilities had AL in-stock and at least one HW trained to use AL and RDTs. However, anti-malarial stock-outs in the previous three months were common, clinical supervision was infrequent, and HWs had important knowledge gaps. Except for fever history, clinical assessments were often incomplete. Although testing was recommended for all patients with suspected malaria, only 30.7% of such patients were tested. Correct testing was significantly associated with caseloads Conclusion By late-2007, substantial progress had been made to implement the malaria case-management policy in a setting with weak infrastructure. However, policy ambiguities, under-use of malaria testing, and distrust of negative test results led to many incorrect malaria diagnoses and treatments. In 2009, Angola published a policy that clarified many issues. As problems identified in this survey are not unique to Angola, better strategies for improving HW performance are urgently needed.

  9. Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartan malaria; Falciparum malaria; Biduoterian fever; Blackwater fever; Tertian malaria; Plasmodium ... now only suggested for use in areas where Plasmodium vivax , P. ... is becoming increasingly resistant to anti-malarial medications ...

  10. [Severe malaria in Palmas, State of Tocantins: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parise, Eldi Vendrame

    2009-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum causes the most severe clinical form of malaria. In this study, we report a severe case of malaria, through following up the patient and from notes in the medical files at the Palmas General Hospital. We discuss the outcome of this case and the complications caused by this infection, recognizing the potential risk of occurrences of severe malaria in not-endemic areas because of the delay in treatment, and the importance of intensifying surveillance measures involving all health unit employees, with emphasis on the reception areas for migrants from endemic regions.

  11. Two cases of Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the Netherlands without recent travel to a malaria-endemic country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arends, Joop E; Oosterheert, Jan Jelrik; Kraaij-Dirkzwager, Marleen M; Kaan, Jan A; Fanoy, Ewout B; Haas, Pieter-Jan; Scholte, Ernst-Jan; Kortbeek, Laetitia M; Sankatsing, Sanjay U C

    2013-09-01

    Recently, two patients of African origin were given a diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum malaria without recent travel to a malaria-endemic country. This observation highlights the importance for clinicians to consider tropical malaria in patients with fever. Possible transmission routes of P. falciparum to these patients will be discussed. From a public health perspective, international collaboration is crucial when potential cases of European autochthonous P. falciparum malaria in Europe re considered.

  12. Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and can even be fatal. SymptomsWhat are the symptoms of malaria?The symptoms of malaria include:High fever (can often be 104° F ... give someone else malaria?If I do get malaria, should I travel while I have symptoms? Other organizationsInternational Society of Travel MedicineCenters for Disease ...

  13. Efficacy of RTS,S/AS01E vaccine against malaria in children 5 to 17 months of age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bejon, Philip; Lusingu, John; Olotu, Ally

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Plasmodium falciparum malaria is a pressing global health problem. A previous study of the malaria vaccine RTS,S (which targets the circumsporozoite protein), given with an adjuvant system (AS02A), showed a 30% rate of protection against clinical malaria in children 1 to 4 years of age....... We evaluated the efficacy of RTS,S given with a more immunogenic adjuvant system (AS01E) in children 5 to 17 months of age, a target population for vaccine licensure. METHODS: We conducted a double-blind, randomized trial of RTS,S/AS01E vaccine as compared with rabies vaccine in children in Kilifi...

  14. Efficacy of integrated school based de-worming and prompt malaria treatment on helminths -Plasmodium falciparum co-infections: A 33 months follow up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadukura Vivian

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The geographical congruency in distribution of helminths and Plasmodium falciparum makes polyparasitism a common phenomenon in Sub Saharan Africa. The devastating effects of helminths-Plasmodium co-infections on primary school health have raised global interest for integrated control. However little is known on the feasibility, timing and efficacy of integrated helminths-Plasmodium control strategies. A study was conducted in Zimbabwe to evaluate the efficacy of repeated combined school based antihelminthic and prompt malaria treatment. Methods A cohort of primary schoolchildren (5-17 years received combined Praziquantel, albendazole treatment at baseline, and again during 6, 12 and 33 months follow up surveys and sustained prompt malaria treatment. Sustained prompt malaria treatment was carried out throughout the study period. Children's infection status with helminths, Plasmodium and helminths-Plasmodium co-infections was determined by parasitological examinations at baseline and at each treatment point. The prevalence of S. haematobium, S. mansoni, STH, malaria, helminths-Plasmodium co-infections and helminths infection intensities before and after treatment were analysed. Results Longitudinal data showed that two rounds of combined Praziquantel and albendazole treatment for schistosomiasis and STHs at 6 monthly intervals and sustained prompt malaria treatment significantly reduced the overall prevalence of S. haematobium, S. mansoni, hookworms and P. falciparum infection in primary schoolchildren by 73.5%, 70.8%, 67.3% and 58.8% respectively (p P. f + schistosomes, and P. f + STHs + schistosomes co-infections were reduced by 68.0%, 84.2%, and 90.7%, respectively. The absence of anti-helminthic treatment between the 12 mth and 33 mth follow-up surveys resulted in the sharp increase in STHs + schistosomes co-infection from 3.3% at 12 months follow up survey to 10.7%, slightly more than the baseline level (10.3% while other

  15. Postpartal endomyometritis in a case of unknown tertian malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, A; Bogner, G; Hasenöhrl, G

    1997-01-01

    A 28-year-old woman developed puerperal endomyometritis and tertian malaria simultaneously. She delivered her child by vacuum extraction during week 41 of pregnancy in September 1994. The peripartal period was uneventful. Nine days post partum the patient was readmitted to hospital with fever and pain in the area of the episiotomy. On day 13 post partum a hysterectomy was performed because of suspected abscess-forming endomyometritis. Two days after the hysterectomy the patient developed septic temperatures, which persisted for 10 days. Tertian malaria due to Plasmodium vivax was found to be the cause of fever. The patient had been in Indonesia without anti-malarial prophylaxis in 1991. Two years later she travelled to Ghana, having taken mefloquine as prophylaxis. Malaria was obviously caused by reactivated hypnozoites in the liver, although the patient had never had an episode of fever associated with malaria before. This case proves that tertian malaria may "recur" even without previous manifestation, years after a stay in a region endemic for malaria.

  16. Case report and clinical databased research study on malaria

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    Naitik D Trivedi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is endemic in Gujarat and the adjoining areas like many other parts of the India. Depending upon the environmental conditions different species of malarial parasite are found in different areas. The present study was planned to see the pattern of malarial infection diagnosed at B.J. Desai Trust Hospital, Kheda, Gujarat. Methods: Giemsa stained thick and thin blood films of indoor and outdoor febrile patients sent to the laboratory of B.J. Desai Trust Hospital, Kheda, Gujarat with a suspicion of malaria, were examined. Thick film was examined for the diagnosis of malaria while thin films were seen to know the species. Results: Out of 1994 patients screened, 145 (7.2% were found infected. Plasmodium vivax was seen in the majority (72.47.2%. Plasmodium falciparum was the second common species detected in 24.1 % cases. Mixed infection was seen in 3.44% cases while Plasmodium malariae and ovale was not seen in any patient. Conclusion: Plasmodium vivax was the commonest type of malaria diagnosed at Kheda District in Gujarat, during 2008- 2009.

  17. CASE REPORT AND CLINICAL DATABASED RESEARCH STUDY ON MALARIA

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    Madhubhai M. Patel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is endemic in Gujarat and the adjoining areas like many other parts of theIndia. Depending upon the environmental conditions different species of malarial parasiteare found in different areas. The present study was planned to see the pattern of malarialinfection diagnosed at B.J. Desai Trust Hospital, Kheda, Gujarat. Methods: Giemsastained thick and thin blood films of indoor and outdoor febrile patients sent to thelaboratory of B.J. Desai Trust Hospital, Kheda, Gujarat with a suspicion of malaria, wereexamined. Thick film was examined for the diagnosis of malaria while thin films wereseen to know the species. Results: Out of 1994 patients screened, 145 (7.2% were foundinfected. Plasmodium vivax was seen in the majority (72.47.2%. Plasmodium falciparumwas the second common species detected in 24.1 % cases. Mixed infection was seen in3.44% cases while Plasmodium malariae and ovale was not seen in any patient.Conclusion: Plasmodium vivax was the commonest type of malaria diagnosed at KhedaDistrict in Gujarat, during 2008- 2009.

  18. Environmental risk factors for clinical malaria: a case-control study in the Grau region of Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthmann, J P; Hall, A J; Jaffar, S; Palacios, A; Lines, J; Llanos-Cuentas, A

    2001-01-01

    The role of environmental risk factors in clinical malaria has been studied mainly in Africa and Asia, few investigations have been carried out in Latin America. Field observations in northern coastal Peru, where the prevalence of malaria is high during the agricultural season, suggested that the risk of disease varied according to the characteristics of the house and the house environment. Environmental determinants of the risk of clinical malaria were therefore investigated through a case-control study: 323 clinical cases of malaria, recruited through community-based active case-finding, and 969 age-, sex- and village-matched controls were recruited into the study over a period of 12 months ending June 1997. Residual spraying of houses in the previous 6 months, living more than 100 m from a canal, a level of education equal to primary school or above and working in agriculture conferred significant protection from the risk of developing clinical malaria. The presence of spaces between the wall and roof in the subject's bedroom (eaves) and a house aged > 4 years statistically significantly increased the risk of disease. Based on these results we discuss possible control measures for malaria in this area of the country.

  19. The importance of accuracy in diagnosis of positive malaria cases in a country progressing towards malaria elimination

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    Sumadhya Deepika Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: With Sri Lanka aiming towards malaria elimination by 2015, the National Anti Malaria Campaign has stressed on the importance of identification of the species of Plasmodium either by examination of stained blood smears for malaria parasites or by Rapid Diagnostic Tests for malaria antigens before the initiation of treatment. This study aims at confirmation of the accuracy of clinical and/or microscopical malaria diagnosis using serology. Materials and Methods: Study population comprised 51 individuals diagnosed with malaria either microscopically or clinically during the first half of 2011. ELISA for detection of the two significant blood antigens (AMA-1 and MSP1-19 was carried out in these individuals, 14-28 days after being diagnosed as being positive for malaria microscopically. Results: ELISA confirmed the microscopic diagnosis in all 47 of the patients including two mixed infections which flagged positive for both parasite antigens. However, four individuals diagnosed clinically as being positive for P. vivax by Health Care Providers were negative for malaria antibodies by ELISA. Conclusions: With 175 cases of malaria reported in 2011, a formidable challenge exists to diagnose malaria positive blood smears due to the large number of negative blood smears being seen daily. After routine cross checking of positive slides, it is heartening to note that there were no false positives detected through serological assays amongst patients who were diagnosed as malaria positive by microscopy. Presumptive treatment of febrile patients with anti-malarials can lead to waste of resources and adversely impact the condition of the patient if the fever is not due to malaria.

  20. Malaria Cases in the U.S. Reach 40-Year High: Information and Guidance for Clinicians

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-02-26

    This podcast is an overview of the Clinician Outreach and Communication Activity (COCA) Call: Malaria Cases in the U.S. Reach 40-Year High: Information and Guidance for Clinicians. The number of malaria cases reported in the United States in 2011 was the largest since 1971, representing a 14 percent increase from 2010 and a 48 percent increase from 2008. A CDC subject matter expert describes malaria prevention strategies aimed at reducing the risk of malaria in travelers, discusses the diagnosis of malaria in patients with suspect malaria, and explains the treatment options for confirmed malaria cases.  Created: 2/26/2014 by Center for Global Health (CGH); Malaria Branch; Emergency Risk Communication Branch (ERCB); Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response (OPHPR).   Date Released: 2/26/2014.

  1. Placental malaria is associated with attenuated CD4 T-cell responses to tuberculin PPD 12 months after BCG vaccination

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    Walther Brigitte

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Placental malaria (PM is associated with prenatal malaise, but many PM+ infants are born without symptoms. As malaria has powerful immunomodulatory effects, we tested the hypothesis that PM predicts reduced T-cell responses to vaccine challenge. Methods We recruited healthy PM+ and PM- infants at birth. At six and 12 months, we stimulated PBMCs with tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD and compared expression of CD154, IL-2 and IFNγ by CD4 T-cells to a negative control using flow cytometry. We measured the length, weight and head circumference at birth and 12 months. Results IL-2 and CD154 expression were low in both groups at both timepoints, without discernable differences. Expression of IFNγ was similarly low at 6 months but by 12 months, the median response was higher in PM- than PM + infants (p = 0.026. The PM+ infants also had a lower weight (p = 0.032 and head circumference (p = 0.041 at 12 months, indicating lower growth rates. At birth, the size and weight of the PM+ and PM- infants were equivalent. By 12 months, the PM+ infants had a lower weight and head circumference than the PM- infants. Conclusions Placental malaria was associated with reduced immune responses 12 months after immune challenge in infants apparently healthy at birth.

  2. High proportion of knowlesi malaria in recent malaria cases in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Ruhani; Lau, Yee Ling; Mahmud, Rohela; Fong, Mun Yik; Jelip, Jenarun; Ngian, Hie Ung; Mustakim, Sahlawati; Hussin, Hani Mat; Marzuki, Noradilah; Mohd Ali, Marlindawati

    2014-05-03

    Plasmodium knowlesi is a simian parasite that has been recognized as the fifth species causing human malaria. Naturally-acquired P. knowlesi infection is widespread among human populations in Southeast Asia. The aim of this epidemiological study was to determine the incidence and distribution of malaria parasites, with a particular focus on human P. knowlesi infection in Malaysia. A total of 457 microscopically confirmed, malaria-positive blood samples were collected from 22 state and main district hospitals in Malaysia between September 2012 and December 2013. Nested PCR assay targeting the 18S rRNA gene was used to determine the infecting Plasmodium species. A total of 453 samples were positive for Plasmodium species by using nested PCR assay. Plasmodium knowlesi was identified in 256 (56.5%) samples, followed by 133 (29.4%) cases of Plasmodium vivax, 49 (10.8%) cases of Plasmodium falciparum, two (0.4%) cases of Plasmodium ovale and one (0.2%) case of Plasmodium malariae. Twelve mixed infections were detected, including P. knowlesi/P. vivax (n = 10), P. knowlesi/P. falciparum (n = 1), and P. falciparum/P. vivax (n = 1). Notably, P. knowlesi (Included mixed infections involving P. knowlesi (P. knowlesi/P. vivax and P. knowlesi /P. falciparum)) showed the highest proportion in Sabah (84/115 cases, prevalence of 73.0%), Sarawak (83/120, 69.2%), Kelantan (42/56, 75.0%), Pahang (24/25, 96.0%), Johor (7/9, 77.8%), and Terengganu (4/5, 80.0%,). In contrast, the rates of P. knowlesi infection in Selangor and Negeri Sembilan were found to be 16.2% (18/111 cases) and 50.0% (5/10 cases), respectively. Sample of P. knowlesi was not obtained from Kuala Lumpur, Melaka, Perak, Pulau Pinang, and Perlis during the study period, while a microscopically-positive sample from Kedah was negative by PCR. In addition to Sabah and Sarawak, which have been known for high prevalence of P. knowlesi infection, the findings from this study highlight the widespread distribution of P

  3. Malaria in infants below six months of age: retrospective surveillance of hospital admission records in Blantyre, Malawi

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    ter Kuile Feiko O

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Information on the burden of malaria in early infancy is scarce. Young infants are relatively protected against clinical malaria during the first six months of life due to the presence of maternal antibodies and foetal haemoglobin, and have received relatively little attention with respect to research and treatment guidelines. The World Health Organization provides treatment guidelines for children from six months onwards, without specific treatment guidelines for the younger infants. A number of recent reports however suggest that the burden in this young age group may be underestimated. Methods A retrospective review of paediatric hospital records at the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital in Blantyre from 1998 to 2008 from three data sources was carried out. The number of admitted infants Results Retrospective analysis of hospital records showed that over the course of these years, the average annual proportion of paediatric admissions in children ≤ 15 years with confirmed malaria aged Conclusions These findings are consistent with recent reports suggesting that the burden of malaria during the six first months of life may be substantial, and highlight that more research is needed on dose-optimization, safety and efficacy of anti-malarials that are currently used off-label in this vulnerable patient group.

  4. Reactive Case Detection for Plasmodium vivax Malaria Elimination in Rural Amazonia.

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    Pablo S Fontoura

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Malaria burden in Brazil has reached its lowest levels in 35 years and Plasmodium vivax now accounts for 84% of cases countrywide. Targeting residual malaria transmission entrenched in the Amazon is the next major challenge for ongoing elimination efforts. Better strategies are urgently needed to address the vast reservoir of asymptomatic P. vivax carriers in this and other areas approaching malaria elimination.We evaluated a reactive case detection (RCD strategy tailored for P. vivax transmission in farming settlements in the Amazon Basin of Brazil. Over six months, 41 cases detected by passive surveillance triggered four rounds of RCD (0, 30, 60, and 180 days after index case enrollment, using microscopy- and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR-based diagnosis, comprising subjects sharing the household (HH with the index case (n = 163, those living in the 5 nearest HHs within 3 km (n = 878, and individuals from 5 randomly chosen control HHs located > 5 km away from index cases (n = 841. Correlates of infection were identified with mixed-effects logistic regression models. Molecular genotyping was used to infer local parasite transmission networks.Subjects in index and neighbor HHs were significantly more likely to be parasitemic than control HH members, after adjusting for potential confounders, and together harbored > 90% of the P. vivax biomass in study subjects. Clustering patterns were temporally stable. Four rounds of microscopy-based RCD would identify only 49.5% of the infections diagnosed by qPCR, but 76.8% of the total parasite biomass circulating in the proximity of index HHs. However, control HHs accounted for 27.6% of qPCR-positive samples, 92.6% of them from asymptomatic carriers beyond the reach of RCD. Molecular genotyping revealed high P. vivax diversity, consistent with complex transmission networks and multiple sources of infection within clusters, potentially complicating malaria elimination efforts.

  5. Reactive Case Detection for Plasmodium vivax Malaria Elimination in Rural Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontoura, Pablo S.; Finco, Bruna F.; Lima, Nathália F.; de Carvalho, Jaques F.; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Malaria burden in Brazil has reached its lowest levels in 35 years and Plasmodium vivax now accounts for 84% of cases countrywide. Targeting residual malaria transmission entrenched in the Amazon is the next major challenge for ongoing elimination efforts. Better strategies are urgently needed to address the vast reservoir of asymptomatic P. vivax carriers in this and other areas approaching malaria elimination. Methods We evaluated a reactive case detection (RCD) strategy tailored for P. vivax transmission in farming settlements in the Amazon Basin of Brazil. Over six months, 41 cases detected by passive surveillance triggered four rounds of RCD (0, 30, 60, and 180 days after index case enrollment), using microscopy- and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)-based diagnosis, comprising subjects sharing the household (HH) with the index case (n = 163), those living in the 5 nearest HHs within 3 km (n = 878), and individuals from 5 randomly chosen control HHs located > 5 km away from index cases (n = 841). Correlates of infection were identified with mixed-effects logistic regression models. Molecular genotyping was used to infer local parasite transmission networks. Principal findings/Conclusions Subjects in index and neighbor HHs were significantly more likely to be parasitemic than control HH members, after adjusting for potential confounders, and together harbored > 90% of the P. vivax biomass in study subjects. Clustering patterns were temporally stable. Four rounds of microscopy-based RCD would identify only 49.5% of the infections diagnosed by qPCR, but 76.8% of the total parasite biomass circulating in the proximity of index HHs. However, control HHs accounted for 27.6% of qPCR-positive samples, 92.6% of them from asymptomatic carriers beyond the reach of RCD. Molecular genotyping revealed high P. vivax diversity, consistent with complex transmission networks and multiple sources of infection within clusters, potentially

  6. Quality of Malaria Case Management in Malawi: Results from a Nationally Representative Health Facility Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhardt, Laura C.; Chinkhumba, Jobiba; Wolkon, Adam; Luka, Madalitso; Luhanga, Misheck; Sande, John; Oyugi, Jessica; Ali, Doreen; Mathanga, Don; Skarbinski, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Background Malaria is endemic throughout Malawi, but little is known about quality of malaria case management at publicly-funded health facilities, which are the major source of care for febrile patients. Methods In April–May 2011, we conducted a nationwide, geographically-stratified health facility survey to assess the quality of outpatient malaria diagnosis and treatment. We enrolled patients presenting for care and conducted exit interviews and re-examinations, including reference blood smears. Moreover, we assessed health worker readiness (e.g., training, supervision) and health facility capacity (e.g. availability of diagnostics and antimalarials) to provide malaria case management. All analyses accounted for clustering and unequal selection probabilities. We also used survey weights to produce estimates of national caseloads. Results At the 107 facilities surveyed, most of the 136 health workers interviewed (83%) had received training on malaria case management. However, only 24% of facilities had functional microscopy, 15% lacked a thermometer, and 19% did not have the first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT), artemether-lumefantrine, in stock. Of 2,019 participating patients, 34% had clinical malaria (measured fever or self-reported history of fever plus a positive reference blood smear). Only 67% (95% confidence interval (CI): 59%, 76%) of patients with malaria were correctly prescribed an ACT, primarily due to missed malaria diagnosis. Among patients without clinical malaria, 31% (95% CI: 24%, 39%) were prescribed an ACT. By our estimates, 1.5 million of the 4.4 million malaria patients seen in public facilities annually did not receive correct treatment, and 2.7 million patients without clinical malaria were inappropriately given an ACT. Conclusions Malawi has a high burden of uncomplicated malaria but nearly one-third of all patients receive incorrect malaria treatment, including under- and over-treatment. To improve malaria case

  7. Quality of malaria case management in Malawi: results from a nationally representative health facility survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura C Steinhardt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malaria is endemic throughout Malawi, but little is known about quality of malaria case management at publicly-funded health facilities, which are the major source of care for febrile patients. METHODS: In April-May 2011, we conducted a nationwide, geographically-stratified health facility survey to assess the quality of outpatient malaria diagnosis and treatment. We enrolled patients presenting for care and conducted exit interviews and re-examinations, including reference blood smears. Moreover, we assessed health worker readiness (e.g., training, supervision and health facility capacity (e.g. availability of diagnostics and antimalarials to provide malaria case management. All analyses accounted for clustering and unequal selection probabilities. We also used survey weights to produce estimates of national caseloads. RESULTS: At the 107 facilities surveyed, most of the 136 health workers interviewed (83% had received training on malaria case management. However, only 24% of facilities had functional microscopy, 15% lacked a thermometer, and 19% did not have the first-line artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT, artemether-lumefantrine, in stock. Of 2,019 participating patients, 34% had clinical malaria (measured fever or self-reported history of fever plus a positive reference blood smear. Only 67% (95% confidence interval (CI: 59%, 76% of patients with malaria were correctly prescribed an ACT, primarily due to missed malaria diagnosis. Among patients without clinical malaria, 31% (95% CI: 24%, 39% were prescribed an ACT. By our estimates, 1.5 million of the 4.4 million malaria patients seen in public facilities annually did not receive correct treatment, and 2.7 million patients without clinical malaria were inappropriately given an ACT. CONCLUSIONS: Malawi has a high burden of uncomplicated malaria but nearly one-third of all patients receive incorrect malaria treatment, including under- and over-treatment. To improve

  8. A STUDY OF HEALTH SEEKING BEHAVIOR, HEALTH CARE SPENDING AND AWARENESS AMONG CASES OF MALARIA LIKE ILLNESS IN A TRIBAL AREA

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    Deodatt M

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Tribal malaria is a cause of high morbidity in India. Lack of affordable and accessible health care leads to out of pocket expenditure on malaria which is easily treatable under the NVBDCP. Lack of knowledge about causation and preventive measures about malaria predisposes to high incidence among Tribal. OBJECTIVES: 1 To study the prevalence of malaria like illness in the population 2 To study the health seeking behavior of the respondents 3 Study the health care spending on malaria like illness 4 Awareness among cases about malaria causation, prevention and control. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A descriptive cross sectional study was carried out during the month of September 2009 in three villages which fell under the Rural Health training center of a tertiary care medical .A Semi structured questionnaire was used to collect data from only those who had suffered from Malaria like illness with investigator visiting each household to enquire about malaria like illness in past 3 months. All the respondents who gave a positive history were included in the study. RESULTS: The study findings include (11% of people suffered Malaria like illness, 80% of patients took treatment other than sub center and PHC, mean cost of spending per visit was 62 rs, 62% had no knowledge of malaria causation while 52% used cow dung smoke to drive out the mosquitoes. CONCLUSION: Health seeking behavior of tribal people in malaria like illness is inclined more towards the Private physicians and faith healers. Out of pocket expenditure was high on diseases which can be treated free of cost under government sponsored programme. There was a general lack of knowledge about modes of transmission of malaria and methods of mosquito control. Inadequate active surveillance by the health worker was noted.

  9. Distribution of Malaria Case in Simpenan Public Health Centre Sukabumi District in 2011

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    Hubullah Fuadzy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The number of malaria in Simpenan public health centre area needs a quick step in the patients finding by malaria microscopic officers, both by Active Case Detection (ACD and Passive Case Detection (PCD. The objective of th is article is to determine the distribution of malaria cases at Simpenan public health centre in Sukabumi during 2011. Data collection was carried out by malaria officersfrom Simpenan public health centre by identifying malaria parasite with microscope to any gold miners who just got home and was having a highfever. Malaria cases during the year 2011 experienced an increasing trend (R2 = 0.0175 from January (8.86% to December (15.18%, 79 cases of malaria was found and the peak of cases happened in December. Malaria was notfound in the age group of 0-14 years, but cases ofmalaria were found in productive age group (15-44 years old = 83%, 45-59 years old = 14%, 2: 60 years old = 3%, and also to all people working as gold miners in malaria-endemic areas i.e. Aceh, Bangka, Jambi, Kalimantan, Medan, Papua, Riau, and Sumbawa. This indicated that malaria in Simpenan was predicted as import cases.

  10. Malaria risk in young male travellers but local transmission persists: a case-control study in low transmission Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jennifer L; Auala, Joyce; Haindongo, Erastus; Uusiku, Petrina; Gosling, Roly; Kleinschmidt, Immo; Mumbengegwi, Davis; Sturrock, Hugh J W

    2017-02-10

    A key component of malaria elimination campaigns is the identification and targeting of high risk populations. To characterize high risk populations in north central Namibia, a prospective health facility-based case-control study was conducted from December 2012-July 2014. Cases (n = 107) were all patients presenting to any of the 46 health clinics located in the study districts with a confirmed Plasmodium infection by multi-species rapid diagnostic test (RDT). Population controls (n = 679) for each district were RDT negative individuals residing within a household that was randomly selected from a census listing using a two-stage sampling procedure. Demographic, travel, socio-economic, behavioural, climate and vegetation data were also collected. Spatial patterns of malaria risk were analysed. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for malaria. Malaria risk was observed to cluster along the border with Angola, and travel patterns among cases were comparatively restricted to northern Namibia and Angola. Travel to Angola was associated with excessive risk of malaria in males (OR 43.58 95% CI 2.12-896), but there was no corresponding risk associated with travel by females. This is the first study to reveal that gender can modify the effect of travel on risk of malaria. Amongst non-travellers, male gender was also associated with a higher risk of malaria compared with females (OR 1.95 95% CI 1.25-3.04). Other strong risk factors were sleeping away from the household the previous night, lower socioeconomic status, living in an area with moderate vegetation around their house, experiencing moderate rainfall in the month prior to diagnosis and living malaria interventions to young male travellers, who have a disproportionate risk of malaria in northern Namibia, to coordinate cross-border regional malaria prevention initiatives and to scale up coverage of prevention measures such as indoor residual spraying and long-lasting insecticide nets

  11. Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, J E

    1991-03-01

    Human malaria is caused by four species of the genus plasmodium. The sexual stage of the parasite occurs in the mosquito and asexual reproduction occurs in man. Symptoms of fever, chills, headache, and myalgia result from the invasion and rupture of erythrocytes. Merozoites are released from erythrocytes and invade other cells, thus propagating the infection. The most vulnerable hosts are nonimmune travelers, young children living in the tropics, and pregnant women. P. falciparum causes the most severe infections because it infects RBCs of all ages and has the propensity to develop resistance to antimalarials. Rapid diagnosis can be made with a malarial smear, and treatment should be initiated promptly. In some regions (Mexico, Central America except Panama, and North Africa) chloroquine phosphate is effective therapy. In subsaharan Africa, South America, and Southeast Asia, chloroquine resistance has become widespread, and other antimalarials are necessary. The primary care physician should have a high index of suspicion for malaria in the traveler returning from the tropics. Malaria should also be suspected in the febrile transfusion recipient and newborns of mothers with malaria.

  12. Case report of Plasmodium falciparum malaria presenting as wide complex tachycardia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sunil Kumar; Diwan SK; Mahajan SN; Shilpa Bawankule; Chetan Mahure

    2011-01-01

    Malaria caused by Plasmodium falciparum is a multisystem disorder and may have diversity of clinical presentations. We are presenting a case report of patients of falciparum malaria who presented to us with palpitation and fever. On electrocardiogram he had wide complex tachycardia. This case reiterates the need to think of malaria in any case with symptoms of fever with chills, even with various unusual presentations like palpitation due to wide complex tachycardia, especially in endemic country like India.

  13. Congenital malaria with atypical presentation: A case report from low transmission area in India

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    Biswas Sukla

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria during first few months of life may be due to transplacental transfer of parasitized maternal erythrocytes. Although IgG and IgM antimalarial antibodies can be detected in maternal blood, only IgG antibodies are present in the infant's blood. These antibodies can delay and modify the onset of clinical manifestations. Case Presentation An infant is described who presented with irritability and feeding problems. Clinical examination and investigations revealed that the infant was afebrile, had jaundice, hepatosplenomegaly and haemolytic anaemia. Peripheral smear demonstrated Plasmodium vivax. While the mother had significant levels of immunoglobulin G (IgG, the infant was found negative for IgG and had low immunoglobulin M (IgM levels. The mother had a history of febrile illness during pregnancy and her peripheral smear was also positive for P. vivax. Both were successfully treated with chloroquine in the dose of 25 mg/kg/day over three days. Conclusion The case emphasizes the importance of considering the diagnosis of malaria even in infants in low transmission area, who may not present with typical symptoms of malaria, such as fever, but have other clinical manifestations like jaundice and haemolytic anaemia.

  14. Malaria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    ceived the Nobel prize in 1902. Grassi et al later proved that anopheline mosquitoes transmit malaria to humans.2 In 2002, researchers sequenced the...Malarial pigment is the end product of hemoglobin diges- tion into a porphyrin conjugated with a protein derived from the globin portion of...location, parasite strain, and the patient’s age, immune status, and treatment.27 Investigating the patient’s travel history may provide clues to the spe

  15. Satisfactory safety and immunogenicity of MSP3 malaria vaccine candidate in Tanzanian children aged 12–24 months

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Segeja Method D

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development and deployment of an effective malaria vaccine would complement existing malaria control measures. A blood stage malaria vaccine candidate, Merozoite Surface Protein-3 (MSP3, produced as a long synthetic peptide, has been shown to be safe in non-immune and semi-immune adults. A phase Ib dose-escalating study was conducted to assess the vaccine's safety and immunogenicity in children aged 12 to 24 months in Korogwe, Tanzania (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT00469651. Methods This was a double-blind, randomized, controlled, dose escalation phase Ib trial, in which children were given one of two different doses of the MSP3 antigen (15 μg or 30 μg or a control vaccine (Engerix B. Children were randomly allocated either to the MSP3 candidate malaria vaccine or the control vaccine administered at a schedule of 0, 1, and 2 months. Immunization with lower and higher doses was staggered for safety reasons starting with the lower dose. The primary endpoint was safety and reactogenicity within 28 days post-vaccination. Blood samples were obtained at different time points to measure immunological responses. Results are presented up to 84 days post-vaccination. Results A total of 45 children were enrolled, 15 in each of the two MSP3 dose groups and 15 in the Engerix B group. There were no important differences in reactogenicity between the two MSP3 groups and Engerix B. Grade 3 adverse events were infrequent; only five were detected throughout the study, all of which were transient and resolved without sequelae. No serious adverse event reported was considered to be related to MSP3 vaccine. Both MSP3 dose regimens elicited strong cytophilic IgG responses (subclasses IgG1 and IgG3, the isotypes involved in the monocyte-dependant mechanism of Plasmodium falciparum parasite-killing. The titers reached are similar to those from African adults having reached a state of premunition. Furthermore, vaccination induced seroconversion in

  16. A retrospective review of malaria cases seen in a non-endemic area of South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dube, S; Ismail, N; Hoosen, A A

    2008-09-01

    Malaria is a risk for travelers to endemic areas. We describe the diagnosis and treatment of malaria in Pretoria, a non-endemic area in South Africa. Records of specimens submitted to the medical microbiology laboratory for malaria investigations over 3 years were reviewed with follow up of hospital records for positive specimens for clinical data. The laboratory performs malaria smears and uses HRP2-Ag testing for rapid diagnosis of Plasmodium falciparum. A total of 516 specimens were received, with a 211/516 (41%) malaria smear positive rate. The number of malaria positive specimens has been increasing overtime and this increase was statistically significant in children [p=0.005]. HRP2-Ag testing was done on 430 specimens with124/430 (29%) being positive, of which 10/124 (8%) were smear negative, giving 98% sensitivity. Hospital records for 198/211 (94%) smear positive cases showed that 190/198 (96%) of the patients had a travel history with 170/190 (71%) having traveled to Mozambique, a malaria endemic country. Most patients presented with uncomplicated malaria; the CFR was 4/198 (2%). Treatment mainly followed South African national guidelines. Imported malaria is increasingly being diagnosed in returning travelers, especially from Mozambique. Rapid antigen tests remain useful for the diagnosis of malaria in non-endemic areas.

  17. Case Report: Severe and Complicated Cynomolgi Malaria in a Rhesus Macaque Resulted in Similar Histopathological Changes as Those Seen in Human Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J Joyner, Chester; Consortium, The MaHPIC; Wood, Jennifer S; Moreno, Alberto; Garcia, Anapatricia; Galinski, Mary R

    2017-08-01

    Histopathological data collected from patients with severe malaria have been instrumental for studying malaria pathogenesis. Animal models of malaria are critical to complement such studies. Here, the histopathological changes observed in a rhesus macaque with severe and complicated Plasmodium cynomolgi malaria are reported. The animal presented with thrombocytopenia, severe anemia, and hyperparasitemia during the acute infection. The macaque was given subcurative antimalarial treatment, fluid support, and a blood transfusion to treat the clinical complications, but at the time of transfusion, kidney function was compromised. These interventions did not restore kidney function, and the animal was euthanized due to irreversible renal failure. Gross pathological and histological examinations revealed that the lungs, kidneys, liver, spleen, and bone marrow exhibited abnormalities similar to those described in patients with malaria. Overall, this case report illustrates the similarities in the pathophysiological complications that can occur in human malaria and cynomolgi malaria in rhesus macaques.

  18. The Stateville penitentiary malaria experiments: a case study in retrospective ethical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Franklin G

    2013-01-01

    During World War II, malaria research was conducted in prisons. A notable example was the experiments at Stateville Penitentiary in Illinois, in which prisoner-subjects were infected with malaria for the purpose of testing the safety and efficacy of novel anti-malaria drugs. Over time, commentators have shifted from viewing the malaria research at Stateville as a model of ethical clinical research to seeing the experiments as paradigmatic of abusive human experimentation. This essay undertakes a retrospective ethical assessment of the Stateville malaria research during the 1940s in light of basic ethical principles and the Nuremberg Code, as well as contemporary malaria research. In addition to its historical interest, this case study provides a rich context for addressing basic issues of research ethics, including the voluntariness of consent, the justification of risks, and the exploitation of vulnerable subjects.

  19. Mobile phones improve case detection and management of malaria in rural Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prue Chai S

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent introduction of mobile phones into the rural Bandarban district of Bangladesh provided a resource to improve case detection and treatment of patients with malaria. Methods During studies to define the epidemiology of malaria in villages in south-eastern Bangladesh, an area with hypoendemic malaria, the project recorded 986 mobile phone calls from families because of illness suspected to be malaria between June 2010 and June 2012. Results Based on phone calls, field workers visited the homes with ill persons, and collected blood samples for malaria on 1,046 people. 265 (25% of the patients tested were positive for malaria. Of the 509 symptomatic malaria cases diagnosed during this study period, 265 (52% were detected because of an initial mobile phone call. Conclusion Mobile phone technology was found to be an efficient and effective method for rapidly detecting and treating patients with malaria in this remote area. This technology, when combined with local knowledge and field support, may be applicable to other hard-to-reach areas to improve malaria control.

  20. Efficacy of RTS,S/AS01E malaria vaccine and exploratory analysis on anti-circumsporozoite antibody titres and protection in children aged 5-17 months in Kenya and Tanzania: a randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olotu, Ally; Lusingu, John; Leach, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    RTS,S/AS01E is the lead candidate malaria vaccine. We recently showed efficacy against clinical falciparum malaria in 5-17 month old children, during an average of 8 months follow-up. We aimed to assess the efficacy of RTS,S/AS01E during 15 months of follow-up.......RTS,S/AS01E is the lead candidate malaria vaccine. We recently showed efficacy against clinical falciparum malaria in 5-17 month old children, during an average of 8 months follow-up. We aimed to assess the efficacy of RTS,S/AS01E during 15 months of follow-up....

  1. Malaria Prevention and Treatment Using Educational Animations: A Case Study in Kakamega County, Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello-Bravo, Julia; Namatsi Lutomia, Anne; Madela, Lawrence Mbhekiseni; Pittendrigh, Barry Robert

    2017-01-01

    Despite worldwide efforts to prevent malaria, the disease continues to take its strongest toll in sub-Saharan Africa. Kenya is no exception, with millions of cases and thousands of deaths reported annually. This pilot study looks at knowledge on malaria prevention and treatment among peri-urban communities in Western Kenya. Through a study on the…

  2. Characterizing the malaria rural-to-urban transmission interface: The importance of reactive case detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina Gómez, Karen; Caicedo, M Alejandra; Gaitán, Alexandra; Herrera-Varela, Manuela; Arce, María Isabel; Vallejo, Andrés F; Padilla, Julio; Chaparro, Pablo; Pacheco, M Andreína; Escalante, Ananias A; Arevalo-Herrera, Myriam; Herrera, Sócrates

    2017-07-01

    Reported urban malaria cases are increasing in Latin America, however, evidence of such trend remains insufficient. Here, we propose an integrated approach that allows characterizing malaria transmission at the rural-to-urban interface by combining epidemiological, entomological, and parasite genotyping methods. A descriptive study that combines active (ACD), passive (PCD), and reactive (RCD) case detection was performed in urban and peri-urban neighborhoods of Quibdó, Colombia. Heads of households were interviewed and epidemiological surveys were conducted to assess malaria prevalence and identify potential risk factors. Sixteen primary cases, eight by ACD and eight by PCD were recruited for RCD. Using the RCD strategy, prevalence of 1% by microscopy (6/604) and 9% by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) (52/604) were found. A total of 73 houses and 289 volunteers were screened leading to 41 secondary cases, all of them in peri-urban settings (14% prevalence). Most secondary cases were genetically distinct from primary cases indicating that there were independent occurrences. Plasmodium vivax was the predominant species (76.3%, 71/93), most of them being asymptomatic (46/71). Urban and peri-urban neighborhoods had significant sociodemographic differences. Twenty-four potential breeding sites were identified, all in peri-urban areas. The predominant vectors for 1,305 adults were Anopheles nuneztovari (56,2%) and An. Darlingi (42,5%). One An. nuneztovari specimen was confirmed naturally infected with P. falciparum by ELISA. This study found no evidence supporting the existence of urban malaria transmission in Quibdó. RCD strategy was more efficient for identifying malaria cases than ACD alone in areas where malaria transmission is variable and unstable. Incorporating parasite genotyping allows discovering hidden patterns of malaria transmission that cannot be detected otherwise. We propose to use the term "focal case" for those primary cases that lead to

  3. Exploring the seasonality of reported treated malaria cases in Mpumalanga, South Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheetal Prakash Silal

    Full Text Available South Africa, having met the World Health Organisation's pre-elimination criteria, has set a goal to achieve malaria elimination by 2018. Mpumalanga, one of three provinces where malaria transmission still occurs, has a malaria season subject to unstable transmission that is prone to sporadic outbreaks. As South Africa prepares to intensify efforts towards malaria elimination, there is a need to understand patterns in malaria transmission so that efforts may be targeted appropriately. This paper describes the seasonality of transmission by exploring the relationship between malaria cases and three potential drivers: rainfall, geography (physical location and the source of infection (local/imported. Seasonal decomposition of the time series by Locally estimated scatterplot smoothing is applied to the case data for the geographical and source of infection sub-groups. The relationship between cases and rainfall is assessed using a cross-correlation analysis. The malaria season was found to have a short period of no/low level of reported cases and a triple peak in reported cases between September and May; the three peaks occurring in October, January and May. The seasonal pattern of locally-sourced infection mimics the triple-peak characteristic of the total series while imported infections contribute mostly to the second and third peak of the season (Christmas and Easter respectively. Geographically, Bushbuckridge municipality, which exhibits a different pattern of cases, contributed mostly to the first and second peaks in cases while Maputo province (Mozambique experienced a similar pattern in transmission to the imported cases. Though rainfall lagged at 4 weeks was significantly correlated with malaria cases, this effect was dampened due to the growing proportion of imported cases since 2006. These findings may be useful as they enhance the understanding of the current incidence pattern and may inform mathematical models that enable one to

  4. Assessment of iron status among preschool children (6 to 59 months) with and without malaria in Western Province, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisiangani, Isaac; Mbakaya, Charles; Makokha, Anzelimo; Magu, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Iron deficiency is a major public health concern. Globally, iron deficiency ranks number 9 and is responsible for about 60% of all anemia cases among preschool children. In Africa iron deficiency is 43-52% while in Kenya, children under 5 years constitute the largest burden with 69% of them being deficient. There is limited iron deficiency data in Kenya. This study determined haemoglobin levels, serum ferritin levels, nutritional status and P.falciparum malaria infection in preschool children. A household cross sectional study was undertaken among 125 preschoolers in Western province, drawn from 37 clusters. Systematic random sampling was used for sample selection. Data was collected using pretested structured questionnaires, entered in Microsoft package. Data analysis was done in Statistical package for social science (SPSS) version 20 using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression and differences were considered significant at P malaria were 20.8%, 25% and 6.8% respectively. There was a significant association between iron deficiency and anaemia (OR = 3.43, 95% CI: 1.33-8.84, p = 0.008). A preschool child with anaemia was 3.43 times likely to be iron deficient compared to a preschool child who was not anaemic. Iron deficiency, anaemia and plasmodium falciparum malaria was prevalent among preschool children. The findings revealed a significant association between iron deficiency and anaemia. Therefore effective interventions to improve iron status will have large health benefits by greatly reducing anaemia in preschool children.

  5. A description of malaria-related knowledge, perceptions, and practices in the Artibonite Valley of Haiti: implications for malaria control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Joseph; Eisele, Thomas P; Bennett, Adam; Johnson, Dawn; Macintyre, Kate

    2008-02-01

    A two-stage cluster survey (n = 200 households) was conducted in the Artibonite Valley of Haiti during the high malaria transmission season in November-December 2006. Knowledge, perceptions, and practices related to malaria were obtained from household representatives using a standardized questionnaire. Blood drops were obtained on filter paper from all household members more than one month of age (n = 714). Determinants of malaria infections and correct malaria-related knowledge were assessed using logistic regression. Respondents in households with more assets were significantly more likely than those in households with fewer assets to have correct malaria-related knowledge. Respondents from households with at least one malaria infection were less likely to have correct malaria-related knowledge. Older children (5-9 years of age) were shown to be at increased risk of malaria infection. Results suggest malaria control in Haiti should focus on enhanced surveillance and case management, with expanded information campaigns about malaria prevention and treatment options.

  6. The increasing importance of Plasmodium ovale and Plasmodium malariae in a malaria elimination setting: an observational study of imported cases in Jiangsu Province, China, 2011-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuanyuan; Wang, Weiming; Liu, Yaobao; Cotter, Chris; Zhou, Huayun; Zhu, Guoding; Tang, Jianxia; Tang, Feng; Lu, Feng; Xu, Sui; Gu, Yaping; Zhang, Chao; Li, Julin; Cao, Jun

    2016-09-07

    Following initiation of China's National Malaria Elimination Action Plan in 2010, indigenous malaria infections in Jiangsu Province decreased significantly. Meanwhile imported Plasmodium infections have increased substantially, particularly Plasmodium ovale and Plasmodium malariae. Given the risk for malaria resurgence, there is an urgent need to understand the increase in imported P. ovale and P. malariae infections as China works to achieve national malaria elimination. An observational study of imported malaria cases in Jiangsu Province, China was carried out for the period of 2011-2014. A total of 1268 malaria cases were reported in Jiangsu Province from 2011 to 2014. Although imported Plasmodium falciparum cases (n = 1058) accounted for 83.4 % of all reported cases in Jiangsu, P. ovale cases (14, 19, 30, and 46) and their proportion (3.7, 9.6, 8.8, and 13.0 %) of all malaria cases increased over the 4 years. Similarly, P. malariae cases (seven, two, nine, and 10) and proportion (1.9, 1.0, 2.6, and 2.8 %) of all malaria cases increased slightly during this time. A total of 98 cases of Plasmodium ovale curtisi (47/98, 48 %) and Plasmodium ovale wallikeri (51/98, 52 %) were identified as well. Latency periods were significant among these Plasmodium infections (p = 0.00). Also, this study found that the latency periods of P. ovale sp., P. malariae and Plasmodium vivax were significantly longer than P. falciparum. However, for both P. ovale curtisi and P. ovale wallikeri infections, the latency period analysis was not significant (p = 0.81). Misdiagnosis of both P. ovale and P. malariae was greater than 71.5 and 71.4 %, respectively. The P. ovale cases were misdiagnosed as P. falciparum (35 cases, 32.1 %), P. vivax (43 cases, 39.4 %) by lower levels of CDCs or hospitals. And, the P. malariae cases were misdiagnosed as P. falciparum (ten cases, 35.7 %), P. vivax (nine cases, 32.1 %) and P. ovale sp. (one case, 3.6 %). Geographic distribution of

  7. Climate variability as a threat for countries progressing towards malaria elimination: The case study of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousam, Aneela; Maggioni, Viviana; Quispe, Antonio; Aquila, Valentina

    2015-04-01

    Malaria cases reported by the Peruvian Ministry of Health demonstrate a 61% reduction of malaria in the last decade (2001- 2010). However, during the years 2011-14 malaria increased by ~2.7 folds in Peru and ~5 folds in Loreto, an Amazonian department that continues contributing over 90% of the malaria cases in Peru. Past studies have indicated that there is a strong association between climate variability and malaria rates. The purpose of this study is to test the hypothesis that climate variables have played a key role in the recent increase of malaria cases in Peru. Climate data, such as precipitation, temperature, humidity and surface pressure simulated by the NASA MERRA model during a 10-year ling time series (2004-2013) are used to verify this hypothesis. Preliminary data analyses show large deviations from the 10-year mean (i.e., climatological anomalies) in humidity, surface pressure, and temperature during 2010 up to four times larger than previous and subsequent years. An increase of 8% in precipitation yearly averages is observed in 2010, which also corresponds with the following reverse of the downward trend of malaria incidence, particularly in Loreto. The sudden amplification of climatological anomalies in 2010 could have set the environmental conditions that caused the re-emergence of malaria in 2011. Investigation is underway to link weekly malaria data from different districts in Peru to the climate conditions at those locations during the past ten years. This will be crucial in understanding why some countries, despite all necessary efforts, are unable to completely eliminate malaria.

  8. September 2013 imaging case of the month

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gotway MB

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after the first page. A 61-year-old man presented with a 6-month history of easy fatigability and worsening shortness of breath. The patient noted that his difficulty breathing improved somewhat when lying flat. Frontal chest radiography (Figure 1 was performed. Which of the following statements regarding the chest radiograph is most accurate? 1. The chest radiograph shows basal predominant fibrotic lung disease 2. The chest radiograph shows large lung volumes with cystic change 3. The chest radiograph shows multiple nodules 4. The chest radiograph shows tubular opacities in the lower lobes bilaterally 5. The chest radiograph shows upper lobe peripheral consolidation and reticulation

  9. October 2016 imaging case of the month

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gotway MB

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first page. Clinical History: A 35-year-old woman presented with a several month history of slowly worsening shortness of breath and dry cough. Laboratory data, include white blood cell count and serum chemistries were within normal limits. Oxygen saturation on room air was 99%. Frontal and lateral chest radiographs (Figure 1 were performed. Which of the following statements regarding the chest radiograph is most accurate? 1. Frontal and lateral chest radiography appears normal; 2. Frontal and lateral chest radiography shows abnormally diminished lung volumes; 3. Frontal and lateral chest radiography shows bilateral peribronchial and mediastinal lymph node enlargement; 4. Frontal and lateral chest radiography shows cardiomegaly; 5. Frontal and lateral chest radiography shows upper lobe bilateral linear and reticular abnormalities. ...

  10. Initial evidence of reduction of malaria cases and deaths in Rwanda and Ethiopia due to rapid scale-up of malaria prevention and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Mac; Aregawi, Maru; Were, Wilson; Karema, Corine; Medin, Ambachew; Bekele, Worku; Jima, Daddi; Gausi, Khoti; Komatsu, Ryuichi; Korenromp, Eline; Low-Beer, Daniel; Grabowsky, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Background An increasing number of malaria-endemic African countries are rapidly scaling up malaria prevention and treatment. To have an initial estimate of the impact of these efforts, time trends in health facility records were evaluated in selected districts in Ethiopia and Rwanda, where long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLIN) and artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) had been distributed nationwide by 2007. Methods In Ethiopia, a stratified convenience sample covered four major regions where (moderately) endemic malaria occurs. In Rwanda, two districts were sampled in all five provinces, with one rural health centre and one rural hospital selected in each district. The main impact indicator was percentage change in number of in-patient malaria cases and deaths in children < 5 years old prior to (2001–2005/6) and after (2007) nationwide implementation of LLIN and ACT. Results In-patient malaria cases and deaths in children < 5 years old in Rwanda fell by 55% and 67%, respectively, and in Ethiopia by 73% and 62%. Over this same time period, non-malaria cases and deaths generally remained stable or increased. Conclusion Initial evidence indicated that the combination of mass distribution of LLIN to all children < 5 years or all households and nationwide distribution of ACT in the public sector was associated with substantial declines of in-patient malaria cases and deaths in Rwanda and Ethiopia. Clinic-based data was a useful tool for local monitoring of the impact of malaria programmes. PMID:19144183

  11. 境外输入性三日疟1例%One case of overseas imported quartan malaria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    隋苗苗; 赵帅; 李瑾; 许艳

    2015-01-01

    本文报道了威海市1例境外输入性三日疟病例的诊疗经过。患者曾在非洲务工多年,未到过国内其他疟疾流行区,也无输血史。回国后半月初次出现不规则发热、出汗和头痛等疑似疟疾症状。经基层医院血检,威海市疾病预防控制中心镜检复核,山东省寄生虫防治研究所疟疾诊断参比实验室镜检复核及PCR扩增,确诊为三日疟。经氯喹/伯氨喹8d足量全程规范化治疗后痊愈,随访3个月未见复发和再燃。%A case of overseas imported quartan malaria was reported in Weihai City. The patient worked in Africa for many years had no blood transfusion history and had not been to malaria endemic regions of China. In approximately half a month af⁃ter returning from Africa the patient appeared suspected malaria symptoms such as irregular fever sweating and headache. The patient was diagnosed as quartan malaria by a blood test in basic hospital reviewed with a microscope by Weihai Centre for Disease Control and Prevention and checked through the microscopic examination of malaria diagnosis and reference laboratory and PCR amplification by Shandong Institute of Parasitic Diseases. The patient was cured after the treatment with chloroquine/primaquine for 8 days and did not recur in the 3⁃month following up.

  12. December 2016 pulmonary case of the month

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wesselius LJ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. History of Present Illness: The patient is a 29-year-old man who presented to the emergency room with right-sided pleuritic chest pain, fever, cough, and progressive dyspnea over 2 weeks. Past Medical History, Social History and Family History: He had no prior significant medical issues and had been well until 2 weeks ago. A native of India, he has been in the US for about 5 months and works at American Express. He is a nonsmoker. Family history is noncontributory. Physical Examination: Vitals signs: Temperature 38.0◦ C, Blood Pressure 155/85 mm Hg, Heart Rate 140 beats/min, Respirations 24 breaths/min; General: Appears to be in moderate pain and respiratory distress; Lungs: Decreased breath sounds on the right; Heart: regular rhythm with a tachycardia; Abdomen: unremarkable; Extremities: unremarkable; Neurologic: unremarkable. Radiography: His initial chest x-ray is shown in Figure 1. Which of the following best describes the chest x-ray? 1. Elevated right hemidiaphragm …

  13. July 2015 imaging case of the month

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    Gotway MB

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. Clinical History: A 40-year-old woman with a history of left breast malignancy diagnosed 11 years earlier, initially treated with lumpectomy, radiation, and chemotherapy (doxorubicin, cyclophosphamide, paclitaxel, followed by Herceptin, later treated with mastectomy following recurrence 2 years after diagnosis, presented with a several month history of upper respiratory infectious symptoms, including congestion, productive cough, and rhinorrhea. The patient also complained of some fatigue, although she was still active; she denied shortness of breath initially, but claimed that increasing breathlessness had developed more recently, limiting her exercise tolerance. The patient denied gastrointestinal, gynecological, musculoskeletal, or neurological complaints and no weight loss had occurred. On admission to the hospital, her white blood cell count was mildly elevated at 14 x 109 cells/L, with anemia as well (hemoglobin / hematocrit= 10 gm/dL / 28%, respectively. Her platelet count was also borderline decreased at 183 x 109 cells/L. Electrolyte and liver panels showed normal ...

  14. January 2015 imaging case of the month

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gotway MB

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. Clinical History: A 68-year-old woman with a history of myelodysplastic syndrome associated with transfusion-dependent anemia and thrombocytopenia presented with recent onset left chest pain and fever. The patient had a remote history of total right knee arthroplasty, hypertension, asthma, and schizoaffective disorder. Several months earlier the patient was hospitalized with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus infection involving the right knee arthroplasty, associated with bacteremia and a septic right elbow. This infection was treated with incision and drainage of the elbow, antibiotic bead placement about the right knee arthroplasty with an antibiotic-impregnated spacer, and antibiotics (6 weeks intravenous cefazolin followed by chronic doxycycline suppression therapy, the former later switched to nafcillin and rifampin. The patient had been discharged from the hospital with only compression hose for deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis, owing to her episodes of epistaxis in the setting of transfusion-dependent anemia. Upon presentation, the patient was hypotensive, tachycardic, and hypotensive. Laboratory data ...

  15. November 2015 pulmonary case of the month

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi K

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. History of Present Illness: A 66 year-old woman was admitted to neurology with acute-onset dysarthria, right facial droop, and right-sided hemiparesis as a stroke alert. She also had a nonproductive cough and intermittent dyspnea for 4 months. Past Medical History, Social History and Family History: She has a history of hypertension and hyperlipidemia. She smoked 1-2 packs/day for 15 years but quit 35 years ago. She drinks two glasses of wine per day. There is a family history of bowel and breast cancer. Physical Examination: Vital signs: T 36.8, HR 81, BP 129/75, RR 18, O2 sat 93% RA. General: No acute distress. Awake and alert. Heart, abdomen, and lungs: No significant abnormalities. Neurological: Mild right-sided nasolabial fold flattening. Evidence of ptosis o the right eyelid. Hemiparesis on the right, the arm greater than leg. Sensation intact. Dysmetria on the right upper and lower extremities. Laboratory Evaluation: CBC: Hemoglobin 11.9 ...

  16. Assessment of severe malaria in a multicenter, phase III, RTS, S/AS01 malaria candidate vaccine trial: case definition, standardization of data collection and patient care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vekemans Johan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An effective malaria vaccine, deployed in conjunction with other malaria interventions, is likely to substantially reduce the malaria burden. Efficacy against severe malaria will be a key driver for decisions on implementation. An initial study of an RTS, S vaccine candidate showed promising efficacy against severe malaria in children in Mozambique. Further evidence of its protective efficacy will be gained in a pivotal, multi-centre, phase III study. This paper describes the case definitions of severe malaria used in this study and the programme for standardized assessment of severe malaria according to the case definition. Methods Case definitions of severe malaria were developed from a literature review and a consensus meeting of expert consultants and the RTS, S Clinical Trial Partnership Committee, in collaboration with the World Health Organization and the Malaria Clinical Trials Alliance. The same groups, with input from an Independent Data Monitoring Committee, developed and implemented a programme for standardized data collection. The case definitions developed reflect the typical presentations of severe malaria in African hospitals. Markers of disease severity were chosen on the basis of their association with poor outcome, occurrence in a significant proportion of cases and on an ability to standardize their measurement across research centres. For the primary case definition, one or more clinical and/or laboratory markers of disease severity have to be present, four major co-morbidities (pneumonia, meningitis, bacteraemia or gastroenteritis with severe dehydration are excluded, and a Plasmodium falciparum parasite density threshold is introduced, in order to maximize the specificity of the case definition. Secondary case definitions allow inclusion of co-morbidities and/or allow for the presence of parasitaemia at any density. The programmatic implementation of standardized case assessment included a clinical

  17. Assessment of severe malaria in a multicenter, phase III, RTS, S/AS01 malaria candidate vaccine trial: case definition, standardization of data collection and patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vekemans, Johan; Marsh, Kevin; Greenwood, Brian; Leach, Amanda; Kabore, William; Soulanoudjingar, Solange; Asante, Kwaku Poku; Ansong, Daniel; Evans, Jennifer; Sacarlal, Jahit; Bejon, Philip; Kamthunzi, Portia; Salim, Nahya; Njuguna, Patricia; Hamel, Mary J; Otieno, Walter; Gesase, Samwel; Schellenberg, David

    2011-08-04

    An effective malaria vaccine, deployed in conjunction with other malaria interventions, is likely to substantially reduce the malaria burden. Efficacy against severe malaria will be a key driver for decisions on implementation. An initial study of an RTS, S vaccine candidate showed promising efficacy against severe malaria in children in Mozambique. Further evidence of its protective efficacy will be gained in a pivotal, multi-centre, phase III study. This paper describes the case definitions of severe malaria used in this study and the programme for standardized assessment of severe malaria according to the case definition. Case definitions of severe malaria were developed from a literature review and a consensus meeting of expert consultants and the RTS, S Clinical Trial Partnership Committee, in collaboration with the World Health Organization and the Malaria Clinical Trials Alliance. The same groups, with input from an Independent Data Monitoring Committee, developed and implemented a programme for standardized data collection.The case definitions developed reflect the typical presentations of severe malaria in African hospitals. Markers of disease severity were chosen on the basis of their association with poor outcome, occurrence in a significant proportion of cases and on an ability to standardize their measurement across research centres. For the primary case definition, one or more clinical and/or laboratory markers of disease severity have to be present, four major co-morbidities (pneumonia, meningitis, bacteraemia or gastroenteritis with severe dehydration) are excluded, and a Plasmodium falciparum parasite density threshold is introduced, in order to maximize the specificity of the case definition. Secondary case definitions allow inclusion of co-morbidities and/or allow for the presence of parasitaemia at any density. The programmatic implementation of standardized case assessment included a clinical algorithm for evaluating seriously sick children

  18. Evaluating malaria case management at public health facilities in two provinces in Angola.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plucinski, Mateusz M; Ferreira, Manzambi; Ferreira, Carolina Miguel; Burns, Jordan; Gaparayi, Patrick; João, Lubaki; da Costa, Olinda; Gill, Parambir; Samutondo, Claudete; Quivinja, Joltim; Mbounga, Eliane; de León, Gabriel Ponce; Halsey, Eric S; Dimbu, Pedro Rafael; Fortes, Filomeno

    2017-05-03

    Malaria accounts for the largest portion of healthcare demand in Angola. A pillar of malaria control in Angola is the appropriate management of malaria illness, including testing of suspect cases with rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) and treatment of confirmed cases with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT). Periodic systematic evaluations of malaria case management are recommended to measure health facility readiness and adherence to national case management guidelines. Cross-sectional health facility surveys were performed in low-transmission Huambo and high-transmission Uíge Provinces in early 2016. In each province, 45 health facilities were randomly selected from among all public health facilities stratified by level of care. Survey teams performed inventories of malaria commodities and conducted exit interviews and re-examinations, including RDT testing, of a random selection of all patients completing outpatient consultations. Key health facility readiness and case management indicators were calculated adjusting for the cluster sampling design and utilization. Availability of RDTs or microscopy on the day of the survey was 71% (54-83) in Huambo and 85% (67-94) in Uíge. At least one unit dose pack of one formulation of an ACT (usually artemether-lumefantrine) was available in 83% (66-92) of health facilities in Huambo and 79% (61-90) of health facilities in Uíge. Testing rates of suspect malaria cases in Huambo were 30% (23-38) versus 69% (53-81) in Uíge. Overall, 28% (13-49) of patients with uncomplicated malaria, as determined during the re-examination, were appropriately treated with an ACT with the correct dose in Huambo, compared to 60% (42-75) in Uíge. Incorrect case management of suspect malaria cases was associated with lack of healthcare worker training in Huambo and ACT stock-outs in Uíge. The results reveal important differences between provinces. Despite similar availability of testing and ACT, testing and treatment rates were lower in

  19. Malaria-associated peripheral gangrene

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    Deborah B. Martins

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Malaria is a common parasitic disease endemic in tropical and subtropical areas, including Mozambique. Symmetrical peripheral gangrene is a rare complication of malaria. The purpose of this study was to review cases of malaria-associated peripheral gangrene that were evaluated by the pediatric surgical service at Hospital Central. Four patients ranging in age from 11 months to 7 years with documented Plasmodium falciparum infection and peripheral gangrene were identified. Amputation was required in cases of wet-gangrene. The majority of cases were allowed to self-demarcate, and one was allowed to auto-amputate.

  20. Initial evidence of reduction of malaria cases and deaths in Rwanda and Ethiopia due to rapid scale-up of malaria prevention and treatment

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    Gausi Khoti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An increasing number of malaria-endemic African countries are rapidly scaling up malaria prevention and treatment. To have an initial estimate of the impact of these efforts, time trends in health facility records were evaluated in selected districts in Ethiopia and Rwanda, where long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLIN and artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT had been distributed nationwide by 2007. Methods In Ethiopia, a stratified convenience sample covered four major regions where (moderately endemic malaria occurs. In Rwanda, two districts were sampled in all five provinces, with one rural health centre and one rural hospital selected in each district. The main impact indicator was percentage change in number of in-patient malaria cases and deaths in children Results In-patient malaria cases and deaths in children Conclusion Initial evidence indicated that the combination of mass distribution of LLIN to all children

  1. Comparison of Routine Health Management Information System Versus Enhanced Inpatient Malaria Surveillance for Estimating the Burden of Malaria Among Children Admitted to Four Hospitals in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mpimbaza, Arthur; Miles, Melody; Sserwanga, Asadu; Kigozi, Ruth; Wanzira, Humphrey; Rubahika, Denis; Nasr, Sussann; Kapella, Bryan K.; Yoon, Steven S.; Chang, Michelle; Yeka, Adoke; Staedke, Sarah G.; Kamya, Moses R.; Dorsey, Grant

    2015-01-01

    The primary source of malaria surveillance data in Uganda is the Health Management Information System (HMIS), which does not require laboratory confirmation of reported malaria cases. To improve data quality, an enhanced inpatient malaria surveillance system (EIMSS) was implemented with emphasis on malaria testing of all children admitted in select hospitals. Data were compared between the HMIS and the EIMSS at four hospitals over a period of 12 months. After the implementation of the EIMSS, over 96% of admitted children under 5 years of age underwent laboratory testing for malaria. The HMIS significantly overreported the proportion of children under 5 years of age admitted with malaria (average absolute difference = 19%, range = 8–27% across the four hospitals) compared with the EIMSS. To improve the quality of the HMIS data for malaria surveillance, the National Malaria Control Program should, in addition to increasing malaria testing rates, focus on linking laboratory test results to reported malaria cases. PMID:25422396

  2. Malaria Treatment Policy Change and Implementation: The Case of Uganda

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    Miriam Nanyunja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria due to P. falciparum is the number one cause of morbidity and mortality in Uganda where it is highly endemic in 95% of the country. The use of efficacious and effective antimalarial medicines is one of the key strategies for malaria control. Until 2000, Chloroquine (CQ was the first-line drug for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in Uganda. Due to progressive resistance to CQ and to a combination of CQ with Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine, Uganda in 2004 adopted the use of ACTs as first-line drug for treating uncomplicated malaria. A review of the drug policy change process and postimplementation reports highlight the importance of managing the policy change process, generating evidence for policy decisions and availability of adequate and predictable funding for effective policy roll-out. These and other lessons learnt can be used to guide countries that are considering anti-malarial drug change in future.

  3. Malaria treatment policy change and implementation: the case of Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanyunja, Miriam; Nabyonga Orem, Juliet; Kato, Frederick; Kaggwa, Mugagga; Katureebe, Charles; Saweka, Joaquim

    2011-01-01

    Malaria due to P. falciparum is the number one cause of morbidity and mortality in Uganda where it is highly endemic in 95% of the country. The use of efficacious and effective antimalarial medicines is one of the key strategies for malaria control. Until 2000, Chloroquine (CQ) was the first-line drug for treatment of uncomplicated malaria in Uganda. Due to progressive resistance to CQ and to a combination of CQ with Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine, Uganda in 2004 adopted the use of ACTs as first-line drug for treating uncomplicated malaria. A review of the drug policy change process and postimplementation reports highlight the importance of managing the policy change process, generating evidence for policy decisions and availability of adequate and predictable funding for effective policy roll-out. These and other lessons learnt can be used to guide countries that are considering anti-malarial drug change in future.

  4. [Descriptive study of malaria cases in a general hospital in Madrid between 1996 and 2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paredes, P; Pérez, E; Guizar, M; Penín, M; Gómez Carrasco, J A

    2014-11-01

    Malaria causes around 863,000 deaths per year, mostly of them in children under 5 years old. We have reviewed the epidemiological data of malaria cases in a pediatric department in a Hospital in the Community of Madrid, in the period 1996-2011. In the period reviewed, 103 cases of malaria were diagnosed in children under 14 years old. Sixty percent were males and the average age was 4.5 years. In most cases, the infection arose during a visit to relatives in the country of origin. The vast majority did not have malaria prophylaxis. Twenty-five percent of the cases were diagnosed as complicated malaria, the main criteria being hyperparasitemia, of which 80% of the patients did not present any other complications A high level of suspicion must be maintained in any patient who comes from a malaria endemic area. The key factor responsible for the infection was the lack of chemoprophylaxis. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Quality of uncomplicated malaria case management in Ghana among insured and uninsured patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenny, Ama P; Hansen, Kristian S; Enemark, Ulrika

    2014-01-01

    of health insurance on the quality of case management for patients with uncomplicated malaria, ascertaining any significant differences in treatment between insured and non-insured patients. METHOD: A structured questionnaire was used to collect data from 523 respondents diagnosed with malaria....... This is especially the case for parasitological confirmation of all suspected malaria patients before treatment with an antimalarial as currently recommended for the effective management of malaria in the country. The results show that about 16 percent of total sample were parasitologically tested. Effective...... management of the disease demands proper diagnosis and treatment and therefore facilities need to be adequately supplied with RDTs or be equipped with well functioning laboratories to provide adequate testing....

  6. An Investment Case to Prevent the Reintroduction of Malaria in Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shretta, Rima; Baral, Ranju; Avanceña, Anton L. V.; Fox, Katie; Dannoruwa, Asoka Premasiri; Jayanetti, Ravindra; Jeyakumaran, Arumainayagam; Hasantha, Rasike; Peris, Lalanthika; Premaratne, Risintha

    2017-01-01

    Sri Lanka has made remarkable gains in reducing the burden of malaria, recording no locally transmitted malaria cases since November 2012 and zero deaths since 2007. The country was recently certified as malaria free by World Health Organization in September 2016. Sri Lanka, however, continues to face a risk of resurgence due to persistent receptivity and vulnerability to malaria transmission. Maintaining the gains will require continued financing to the malaria program to maintain the activities aimed at preventing reintroduction. This article presents an investment case for malaria in Sri Lanka by estimating the costs and benefits of sustaining investments to prevent the reintroduction of the disease. An ingredient-based approach was used to estimate the cost of the existing program. The cost of potential resurgence was estimated using a hypothetical scenario in which resurgence assumed to occur, if all prevention of reintroduction activities were halted. These estimates were used to compute a benefit–cost ratio and a return on investment. The total economic cost of the malaria program in 2014 was estimated at U.S. dollars (USD) 0.57 per capita per year with a financial cost of USD0.37 per capita. The cost of potential malaria resurgence was, however, much higher estimated at 13 times the cost of maintaining existing activities or 21 times based on financial costs alone. This evidence suggests a substantial return on investment providing a compelling argument for advocacy for continued prioritization of funding for the prevention of reintroduction of malaria in Sri Lanka. PMID:28115673

  7. An Investment Case to Prevent the Reintroduction of Malaria in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shretta, Rima; Baral, Ranju; Avanceña, Anton L V; Fox, Katie; Dannoruwa, Asoka Premasiri; Jayanetti, Ravindra; Jeyakumaran, Arumainayagam; Hasantha, Rasike; Peris, Lalanthika; Premaratne, Risintha

    2017-03-01

    AbstractSri Lanka has made remarkable gains in reducing the burden of malaria, recording no locally transmitted malaria cases since November 2012 and zero deaths since 2007. The country was recently certified as malaria free by World Health Organization in September 2016. Sri Lanka, however, continues to face a risk of resurgence due to persistent receptivity and vulnerability to malaria transmission. Maintaining the gains will require continued financing to the malaria program to maintain the activities aimed at preventing reintroduction. This article presents an investment case for malaria in Sri Lanka by estimating the costs and benefits of sustaining investments to prevent the reintroduction of the disease. An ingredient-based approach was used to estimate the cost of the existing program. The cost of potential resurgence was estimated using a hypothetical scenario in which resurgence assumed to occur, if all prevention of reintroduction activities were halted. These estimates were used to compute a benefit-cost ratio and a return on investment. The total economic cost of the malaria program in 2014 was estimated at U.S. dollars (USD) 0.57 per capita per year with a financial cost of USD0.37 per capita. The cost of potential malaria resurgence was, however, much higher estimated at 13 times the cost of maintaining existing activities or 21 times based on financial costs alone. This evidence suggests a substantial return on investment providing a compelling argument for advocacy for continued prioritization of funding for the prevention of reintroduction of malaria in Sri Lanka.

  8. Evaluation of severe malaria case management in Mazowe District, Zimbabwe, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makumbe, Bargley; Tshuma, Cremence; Shambira, Gerald; Mungati, More; Gombe, Notion Tafara; Bangure, Donewell; Juru, Tsitsi Patience; Tshimanga, Mufuta

    2017-01-01

    Malaria is a preventable and curable disease. Mazowe district had been experiencing a lower malaria transmission rate in comparison to other districts in the Mashonaland Central province but it experienced a huge outbreak in the 2013-2014 rainy seasons with a case fatality rate (CFR) of 0.21%. This CFR was the highest in the province and it was twice as much as the national CFR (0.12%) for the same period. We evaluated severe malaria case management in Mazowe district to determine if practice is as per standard treatment guidelines. A descriptive cross sectional study was conducted in Mazowe district using the Logical Framework approach. District Health Executives (DHE) members, nurses and severe malaria case notes were purposively and conveniently selected into the study. Key informant Interviews and review of case notes were carried out. All data were analysed using Epi Info 3.5.1.to calculate means and frequencies. Permission to conduct the study was obtained from the Mashonaland Central Provincial Medical Directorate (PMD) Institutional Ethical Review Board (IRB). The median age in years of the cases was 16 (Q1=7.3; Q3=30.8) and up to 58.1% of the cases were female. Inputs including staff, medicines and medical and laboratory equipment for severe case management were inadequate in the district. Only 60% of severe cases were diagnosed using blood slides and up to 95.6% of cases presented with one or more of the clinical signs of severe malaria. All severe cases were treated using correct anti-malarial and analgesic doses. Patient monitoring was not done as per prerequisite intervals and up to 5% of cases died. The health workers had above average knowledge on severe malaria. Severe malaria case management inputs were inadequate in the district. For many cases, the district did not follow complicated malaria treatment guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring. Untrained staff needs training in Severe Malaria Case Management and monitoring of commodity

  9. Severe imported malaria in an intensive care unit: a review of 59 cases

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    Santos Lurdes C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In view of the close relationship of Portugal with African countries, particularly former Portuguese colonies, the diagnosis of malaria is not a rare thing. When a traveller returns ill from endemic areas, malaria should be the number one suspect. World Health Organization treatment guidelines recommend that adults with severe malaria should be admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU. Methods Severe cases of malaria in patients admitted to an ICU were reviewed retrospectively (1990-2011 and identification of variables associated with in-ICU mortality performed. Malaria prediction score (MPS, malaria score for adults (MSA, simplified acute physiology score (SAPSII and a score based on WHO's malaria severe criteria were applied. Statistical analysis was performed using StataV12. Results Fifty nine patients were included in the study, all but three were adults; 47 (79,6% were male; parasitaemia on admission, quantified in 48/59 (81.3% patients, was equal or greater than 2% in 47 of them (97.9%; the most common complications were thrombocytopaenia in 54 (91.5% patients, associated with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC in seven (11.8%, renal failure in 31 (52.5% patients, 18 of which (30.5% oliguric, shock in 29 (49.1% patients, liver dysfunction in 27 (45.7% patients, acidaemia in 23 (38.9% patients, cerebral dysfunction in 22 (37.2% patients, 11 of whom with unrousable coma, pulmonary oedema/ARDS in 22 (37.2% patients, hypoglycaemia in 18 (30.5% patients; 29 (49.1% patients presented five or more dysfunctions. The case fatality rate was 15.2%. Comparing the four scores, the SAPS II and the WHO score were the most sensitive to death prediction. In the univariate analysis, death was associated with the SAPS II score, cerebral malaria, acute renal and respiratory failure, DIC, spontaneous bleeding, acidosis and hypoglycaemia. Age, partial immunity to malaria, delay in malaria diagnosis and the level of parasitaemia were

  10. Malaria in rural Mozambique. Part II: children admitted to hospital

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    Macete Eusébio

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Characterization of severe malaria cases on arrival to hospital may lead to early recognition and improved management. Minimum community based-incidence rates (MCBIRs complement hospital data, describing the malaria burden in the community. Methods A retrospective analysis of all admitted malaria cases to a Mozambican rural hospital between June 2003 and May 2005 was conducted. Prevalence and case fatality rates (CFR for each sign and symptom were calculated. Logistic regression was used to identify variables which were independent risk factors for death. MCBIRs for malaria and severe malaria were calculated using data from the Demographic Surveillance System. Results Almost half of the 8,311 patients admitted during the study period had malaria and 13,2% had severe malaria. Children under two years accounted for almost 60% of all malaria cases. CFR for malaria was 1.6% and for severe malaria 4.4%. Almost 19% of all paediatric hospital deaths were due to malaria. Prostration (55.0%, respiratory distress (41.1% and severe anaemia (17.3% were the most prevalent signs among severe malaria cases. Severe anaemia and inability to look for mother's breast were independent risk factors for death in infants younger than eight months. For children aged eight months to four years, the risk factors were malnutrition, hypoglycaemia, chest indrawing, inability to sit and a history of vomiting. MCBIRs for severe malaria cases were highest in children aged six months to two years of age. MCBIRs for severe malaria per 1,000 child years at risk for the whole study period were 27 in infants, 23 in children aged 1 to Conclusion Malaria remains the number one cause of admission in this area of rural Mozambique, predominantly affecting young children, which are also at higher risk of dying. Measures envisaged to protect children during their first two years of life are likely to have a greater impact than at any other age.

  11. Malaria in rural Mozambique. Part II: children admitted to hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassat, Quique; Guinovart, Caterina; Sigaúque, Betuel; Aide, Pedro; Sacarlal, Jahit; Nhampossa, Tacilta; Bardají, Azucena; Nhacolo, Ariel; Macete, Eusébio; Mandomando, Inácio; Aponte, John J; Menéndez, Clara; Alonso, Pedro L

    2008-02-26

    Characterization of severe malaria cases on arrival to hospital may lead to early recognition and improved management. Minimum community based-incidence rates (MCBIRs) complement hospital data, describing the malaria burden in the community. A retrospective analysis of all admitted malaria cases to a Mozambican rural hospital between June 2003 and May 2005 was conducted. Prevalence and case fatality rates (CFR) for each sign and symptom were calculated. Logistic regression was used to identify variables which were independent risk factors for death. MCBIRs for malaria and severe malaria were calculated using data from the Demographic Surveillance System. Almost half of the 8,311 patients admitted during the study period had malaria and 13,2% had severe malaria. Children under two years accounted for almost 60% of all malaria cases. CFR for malaria was 1.6% and for severe malaria 4.4%. Almost 19% of all paediatric hospital deaths were due to malaria. Prostration (55.0%), respiratory distress (41.1%) and severe anaemia (17.3%) were the most prevalent signs among severe malaria cases. Severe anaemia and inability to look for mother's breast were independent risk factors for death in infants younger than eight months. For children aged eight months to four years, the risk factors were malnutrition, hypoglycaemia, chest indrawing, inability to sit and a history of vomiting.MCBIRs for severe malaria cases were highest in children aged six months to two years of age. MCBIRs for severe malaria per 1,000 child years at risk for the whole study period were 27 in infants, 23 in children aged 1 to or =5 years. Malaria remains the number one cause of admission in this area of rural Mozambique, predominantly affecting young children, which are also at higher risk of dying. Measures envisaged to protect children during their first two years of life are likely to have a greater impact than at any other age.

  12. Use of integrated malaria management reduces malaria in Kenya.

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    Bernard A Okech

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: During an entomological survey in preparation for malaria control interventions in Mwea division, the number of malaria cases at the Kimbimbi sub-district hospital was in a steady decline. The underlying factors for this reduction were unknown and needed to be identified before any malaria intervention tools were deployed in the area. We therefore set out to investigate the potential factors that could have contributed to the decline of malaria cases in the hospital by analyzing the malaria control knowledge, attitudes and practices (KAP that the residents in Mwea applied in an integrated fashion, also known as integrated malaria management (IMM. METHODS: Integrated Malaria Management was assessed among community members of Mwea division, central Kenya using KAP survey. The KAP study evaluated community members' malaria disease management practices at the home and hospitals, personal protection measures used at the household level and malaria transmission prevention methods relating to vector control. Concurrently, we also passively examined the prevalence of malaria parasite infection via outpatient admission records at the major referral hospital in the area. In addition we studied the mosquito vector population dynamics, the malaria sporozoite infection status and entomological inoculation rates (EIR over an 8 month period in 6 villages to determine the risk of malaria transmission in the entire division. RESULTS: A total of 389 households in Mwea division were interviewed in the KAP study while 90 houses were surveyed in the entomological study. Ninety eight percent of the households knew about malaria disease while approximately 70% of households knew its symptoms and methods to manage it. Ninety seven percent of the interviewed households went to a health center for malaria diagnosis and treatment. Similarly a higher proportion (81% used anti-malarial medicines bought from local pharmacies. Almost 90% of households reported

  13. [A case of malaria with uveitis, hyperglycemia, and rasha in a Turkish radiologist who went to Africa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altun, Şerife; Koçak Tufan, Zeliha; Kaçar, Mahmut; Ataman Hatipoğlu, Çiğdem; Kınıklı, Sami; Demiröz, Ali Pekcan

    2014-12-01

    Malaria is still an important health problem worldwide, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. In Turkey, the most common type of malaria is Plasmodium vivax, and endemic regions are South-Eastern Anatolia and Çukurova. Due to globalization and tourism, travel-associated infection due to P. falciparum is also seen more frequently in Turkey. P. falciparum malaria can be highly fatal despite optimal antimalarial treatment. We present a case of falciparum malaria in a Turkish radiologist who went to Africa for occupational reasons and come back with malaria accompanied by uveitis, hyperglycemia, and purpuric rash.

  14. Congenital Plasmodium falciparum Malaria in Washington, DC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Castillo, Melissa; Szymanski, Ann Marie; Slovin, Ariella; Wong, Edward C C; DeBiasi, Roberta L

    2017-01-11

    Congenital malaria is rare in the United States, but is an important diagnosis to consider when evaluating febrile infants. Herein, we describe a case of congenital Plasmodium falciparum malaria in a 2-week-old infant born in the United States to a mother who had emigrated from Nigeria 3 months before delivery. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  15. Change of strategy is required for malaria elimination: a case study in Purworejo District, Central Java Province, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murhandarwati, E Elsa Herdiana; Fuad, Anis; Sulistyawati; Wijayanti, Mahardika Agus; Bia, Michael Badi; Widartono, Barandi Sapta; Kuswantoro; Lobo, Neil F; Supargiyono; Hawley, William A

    2015-08-16

    Malaria has been targeted for elimination from Indonesia by 2030, with varying timelines for specific geographical areas based on disease endemicity. The regional deadline for malaria elimination for Java island, given the steady decrease of malaria cases, was the end of 2015. Purworejo District, a malaria-endemic area in Java with an annual parasite incidence (API) of 0.05 per 1,000 population in 2009, aims to enter this elimination stage. This study documents factors that affect incidence and spatial distribution of malaria in Purworejo, such as geomorphology, topography, health system issues, and identifies potential constraints and challenges to achieve the elimination stage, such as inter-districts coordination, decentralization policy and allocation of financial resources for the programme. Historical malaria data from 2007 to 2011 were collected through secondary data, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions during study year (2010-2011). Malaria cases were mapped using the village-centroid shape file to visualize its distribution with geomorphologic characteristics overlay and spatial distribution of malaria. API in each village in Purworejo and its surrounding districts from 2007 to 2011 was stratified into high, middle or low case incidence to show the spatiotemporal mapping pattern. The spatiotemporal pattern of malaria cases in Purworejo and the adjacent districts demonstrate repeated concentrated occurrences of malaria in specific areas from 2007 to 2011. District health system issues, i.e., suboptimal coordination between primary care and referral systems, suboptimal inter-district collaboration for malaria surveillance, decentralization policy and the lack of resources, especially district budget allocations for the malaria programme, were major constraints for programme sustainability. A new malaria elimination approach that fits the local disease transmission, intervention and political system is required. These changes include timely

  16. A strange case of Malaria in a Nigerian native boy.

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    Paola Magro

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The protective role of SCT in malaria endemic areas has been proved and prevalence of HbS gene in malaria endemic areas is high. Splenic infarction is a well-known complication of SCT, rarely associated with malaria. A Nigerian boy was admitted to our ward after returning from his country of origin, for P. falciparum malaria. He underwent abdominal US for upper right abdominal pain, showing cholecystitis and multiple splenic abscesses. Empiric antibiotic therapy was undertaken. Bartonella, Echinococcus, Entamoeba serologies, blood cultures, Quantiferon test, coproparasitologic exam were negative; endocarditis was excluded. He underwent further blood exams and abdomen MRI, confirming the presence of signal alterations areas, with radiographic appearance of recent post-infarction outcomes. Hemoglobin electrophoresis showed a percentage of HbS of 40.6% and a diagnosis of SCT was made. Splenic infarction should be taken into account in patients with malaria and localized abdominal pain.  Moreover, diagnosis of SCT should be considered.

  17. Malaria after living donor liver transplantation:report of two cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Durgatosh Pandey; Kan-Hoe Lee; Sin-Yew Wong; Kai-Chah Tan

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Infectious complications are common during the postoperative course of a liver transplant recipient. Malaria, however, is a rare complication in such a setting. METHOD:We report post-transplantation malaria causing elevation of liver enzymes in two recipients. RESULTS:Both patients who had undergone living donor liver transplantation showed elevated levels of liver enzymes and fever during the postoperative course. Investigations (including liver biopsy in one patient) were initially inconclusive in determining the cause of liver dysfunction. The diagnosis of malaria was established in both cases by peripheral blood smear. Liver function transiently worsened with antimalarial treatment but subsequently became normal. CONCLUSION:This report highlights the importance of excluding such uncommon causes of post-transplantation liver dysfunction, especially when either the recipient or the donor comes from a region endemic for malaria.

  18. The central role of national programme management for the achievement of malaria elimination: a cross case-study analysis of nine malaria programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith Gueye, Cara; Newby, Gretchen; Tulloch, Jim; Slutsker, Laurence; Tanner, Marcel; Gosling, Roland D

    2016-09-22

    A malaria eradication goal has been proposed, at the same time as a new global strategy and implementation framework. Countries are considering the strategies and tools that will enable progress towards malaria goals. The eliminating malaria case-study series reports were reviewed to identify successful programme management components using a cross-case study analytic approach. Nine out of ten case-study reports were included in the analysis (Bhutan, Cape Verde, Malaysia, Mauritius, Namibia, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Turkey, Turkmenistan). A conceptual framework for malaria elimination programme management was developed and data were extracted and synthesized. Findings were reviewed at a consultative workshop, which led to a revision of the framework and further data extraction and synthesis. Success factors of implementation, programme choices and changes, and enabling factors were distilled. Decentralized programmes enhanced engagement in malaria elimination by sub-national units and communities. Integration of the malaria programme into other health services was also common. Decentralization and integration were often challenging due to the skill and experience levels of newly tasked staff. Accountability for programme impact was not clarified for most programmes. Motivation of work force was a key factor in maintaining programme quality but there were few clear, detailed strategies provided. Different incentive schemes targeted various stakeholders. Training and supervision, although not well described, were prioritized by most programmes. Multi-sectoral collaboration helped some programmes share information, build strategies and interventions and achieve a higher quality of implementation. In most cases programme action was spurred by malaria outbreaks or a new elimination goal with strong leadership. Some programmes showed high capacity for flexibility through introduction of new strategies and tools. Several case-studies described methods for monitoring

  19. Severe malaria - a case of fatal Plasmodium knowlesi infection with post-mortem findings: a case report

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    Adem Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Zoonotic malaria caused by Plasmodium knowlesi is an important, but newly recognized, human pathogen. For the first time, post-mortem findings from a fatal case of knowlesi malaria are reported here. Case presentation A formerly healthy 40 year-old male became symptomatic 10 days after spending time in the jungle of North Borneo. Four days later, he presented to hospital in a state of collapse and died within two hours. He was hyponatraemic and had elevated blood urea, potassium, lactate dehydrogenase and amino transferase values; he was also thrombocytopenic and eosinophilic. Dengue haemorrhagic shock was suspected and a post-mortem examination performed. Investigations for dengue virus were negative. Blood for malaria parasites indicated hyperparasitaemia and single species P. knowlesi infection was confirmed by nested-PCR. Macroscopic pathology of the brain and endocardium showed multiple petechial haemorrhages, the liver and spleen were enlarged and lungs had features consistent with ARDS. Microscopic pathology showed sequestration of pigmented parasitized red blood cells in the vessels of the cerebrum, cerebellum, heart and kidney without evidence of chronic inflammatory reaction in the brain or any other organ examined. Brain sections were negative for intracellular adhesion molecule-1. The spleen and liver had abundant pigment containing macrophages and parasitized red blood cells. The kidney had evidence of acute tubular necrosis and endothelial cells in heart sections were prominent. Conclusions The overall picture in this case was one of systemic malaria infection that fit the WHO classification for severe malaria. Post-mortem findings in this case were unexpectedly similar to those that define fatal falciparum malaria, including cerebral pathology. There were important differences including the absence of coma despite petechial haemorrhages and parasite sequestration in the brain. These results suggest that further

  20. Health service providers in Somalia: their readiness to provide malaria case-management

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    Moonen Bruno

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies have highlighted the inadequacies of the public health sector in sub-Saharan African countries in providing appropriate malaria case management. The readiness of the public health sector to provide malaria case-management in Somalia, a country where there has been no functioning central government for almost two decades, was investigated. Methods Three districts were purposively sampled in each of the two self-declared states of Puntland and Somaliland and the south-central region of Somalia, in April-November 2007. A survey and mapping of all public and private health service providers was undertaken. Information was recorded on services provided, types of anti-malarial drugs used and stock, numbers and qualifications of staff, sources of financial support and presence of malaria diagnostic services, new treatment guidelines and job aides for malaria case-management. All settlements were mapped and a semi-quantitative approach was used to estimate their population size. Distances from settlements to public health services were computed. Results There were 45 public health facilities, 227 public health professionals, and 194 private pharmacies for approximately 0.6 million people in the three districts. The median distance to public health facilities was 6 km. 62.3% of public health facilities prescribed the nationally recommended anti-malarial drug and 37.7% prescribed chloroquine as first-line therapy. 66.7% of public facilities did not have in stock the recommended first-line malaria therapy. Diagnosis of malaria using rapid diagnostic tests (RDT or microscopy was performed routinely in over 90% of the recommended public facilities but only 50% of these had RDT in stock at the time of survey. National treatment guidelines were available in 31.3% of public health facilities recommended by the national strategy. Only 8.8% of the private pharmacies prescribed artesunate plus sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine, while 53

  1. Malaria immunity in infants: a special case of a general phenomenon?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, Lars; Staalsoe, Trine

    2004-01-01

    Newborn infants in endemic areas are markedly resistant to Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Consequently, severe disease is rare during the first few months of life, and infections tend to be low density and relatively asymptomatic during this period. Although this is generally ascribed to passively...

  2. Active case surveillance, passive case surveillance and asymptomatic malaria parasite screening illustrate different age distribution, spatial clustering and seasonality in western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guofa; Afrane, Yaw A; Malla, Sameer; Githeko, Andrew K; Yan, Guiyun

    2015-01-28

    Epidemiological characteristics of clinical malaria may differ from asymptomatic infections, thus both cross-sectional parasite screening and longitudinal clinical case surveillance are necessary for malaria transmission monitoring and control. In order to monitor malaria transmission, surveillance of clinical malaria from two years of active case surveillance in three cohorts of 6,750 individuals, asymptomatic parasitaemia cases of 5,300 individuals and clinical cases in three study areas were carried out in the western Kenyan highlands in 2009 and 2010. Age distribution, seasonality and spatial clustering were analysed. The results revealed a significant difference in the age distribution of clinical cases between passive and active case surveillance, and between clinical case rate and asymptomatic parasite rate. The number of reported cases from health facilities significantly underestimated clinical malaria incidence. The increase in asymptomatic parasite prevalence from low to high transmission seasons was significantly higher for infants (malaria cases emerged in the uphill areas during the peak season. Different surveillance methods revealed different characteristics of malaria infections. The new transmission hotspots identified during the peak season with only active case surveillance is an important observation with clear implications in the context of malaria elimination. Both mass parasite screening and active case surveillance are essential for malaria transmission monitoring and control.

  3. Malaria past and present: the case of North Sulawesi, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henley, D

    2001-09-01

    The incidence and impact of malaria in North Sulawesi have declined both in the short term during the 1990s, and over a much longer timespan (though perhaps less continuously) since the end of the colonial period. The improvement already seems to have been well underway before deliberate vector control activities became extensive in the second half of the 1970s, and environmental changes affecting the Anopheles mosquito fauna, in particular the replacement of primary and secondary forest by permanent farmland, are probably the principal reasons for the long-term trend; other possible factors include the increasing use of antimalarial drugs. The well-documented decline in malaria incidence over the years 1991-1997, nevertheless, probably reflects the unprecedented scale of residual insecticide spraying in the province during that period, while the slight resurgence of the disease in the last three years corresponds to the subsequent cessation of house spraying as a result of the current economic crisis. Despite the evident importance of environmental change as a factor ameliorating the malaria situation in the long term, experience from the colonial era suggests that the prospects for deliberate environmental management (species sanitation) as an alternative malaria control strategy are poor.

  4. Acute kidney injury in a shepherd with severe malaria: a case report

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    Boushab BM

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Boushab Mohamed Boushab,1 Fatim-Zahra Fall-Malick,2 Mamoudou Savadogo,3 Leonardo Kishi Basco,4 1Department of Internal Medicine, Aïoun Regional Hospital, Hodh El Gharbi, Mauritania; 2National Institute of Hepatology-Virology in Nouakchott, School of Medicine, Nouakchott, Mauritania; 3Department of Infectious Diseases, University Teaching Hospital Yalgado Ouédrago, Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso; 4Research Unit of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (Research Institute for Development, Aix-Marseille University, Marseille, France Abstract: Malaria is one of the main reasons for outpatient consultation and hospitalization in Mauritania. Although four Plasmodium species, ie, Plasmodium (P. falciparum, P. vivax, P. malariae, and P. ovale, cause malaria in Mauritania, recent data on their frequency is ­lacking. Since infections with P. falciparum generally result in serious disease, their identification is important. We report a case of oliguric renal injury associated with malaria in a 65-year-old shepherd. Clinical manifestations included anemia, oliguria, and elevated creatinine and urea. The rapid diagnostic test for malaria and microscopic examination of blood smears were positive for P. falciparum. On the basis of this, the patient was diagnosed as having acute kidney injury as a complication of severe malaria. The patient was treated for malaria with intravenous quinine for 4 days, followed by 3 days of oral treatment. Volume expansion, antipyretic treatment, and diuretics were administered. He also had two rounds of dialysis after which he partially recovered renal function. This outcome is not always the rule. Prognosis depends much on early diagnosis and appropriate supportive treatment. Keywords: malaria, oliguric kidney injury, shepherd, quinine, dialysis

  5. Safety of the malaria vaccine candidate, RTS,S/AS01E in 5 to 17 month old Kenyan and Tanzanian Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lusingu, John; Olotu, Ally; Leach, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    The malaria vaccine candidate, RTS,S/AS01(E), showed promising protective efficacy in a trial of Kenyan and Tanzanian children aged 5 to 17 months. Here we report on the vaccine's safety and tolerability. The experimental design was a Phase 2b, two-centre, double-blind (observer- and participant...... after each vaccination. Serious adverse events (SAEs) were recorded throughout the study period which lasted for 14 months after dose 1 in Korogwe, Tanzania and an average of 18 months post-dose 1 in Kilifi, Kenya. Blood samples for safety monitoring of haematological, renal and hepatic functions were......) recipient and nine episodes among eight rabies vaccine recipients met the criteria for severe malaria. Unsolicited AEs were reported in 78% of subjects in the RTS,S/AS01(E) group and 74% of subjects in the rabies vaccine group. In both vaccine groups, gastroenteritis and pneumonia were the most frequently...

  6. Toll-like receptor polymorphisms and cerebral malaria: TLR2 Δ22 polymorphism is associated with protection from cerebral malaria in a case control study

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    Greene Jennifer A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In malaria endemic areas, host genetics influence whether a Plasmodium falciparum-infected child develops uncomplicated or severe malaria. TLR2 has been identified as a receptor for P. falciparum-derived glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI, and polymorphisms within the TLR2 gene may affect disease pathogenesis. There are two common polymorphisms in the 5' un-translated region (UTR of TLR2, a 22 base pair deletion in the first unstranslated exon (Δ22, and a GT dinucleotide repeat in the second intron (GTn. Methods These polymorphisms were examined in a Ugandan case control study on children with either cerebral malaria or uncomplicated malaria. Serum cytokine levels were analysed by ELISA, according to genotype and disease status. In vitro TLR2 expression was measured according to genotype. Results Both Δ22 and GTn polymorphisms were highly frequent, but only Δ22 heterozygosity was associated with protection from cerebral malaria (OR 0.34, 95% confidence intervals 0.16, 0.73. In vitro, heterozygosity for Δ22 was associated with reduced pam3cys inducible TLR2 expression in human monocyte derived macrophages. In uncomplicated malaria patients, Δ22 homozygosity was associated with elevated serum IL-6 (p = 0.04, and long GT repeat alleles were associated with elevated TNF (p = 0.007. Conclusion Reduced inducible TLR2 expression may lead to attenuated pro-inflammatory responses, a potential mechanism of protection from cerebral malaria present in individuals heterozygous for the TLR2 Δ22 polymorphism.

  7. Reductions in malaria and anaemia case and death burden at hospitals following scale-up of malaria control in Zanzibar, 1999-2008

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    Hosseini Mehran

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Zanzibar, the Ministry of Health and partners accelerated malaria control from September 2003 onwards. The impact of the scale-up of insecticide-treated nets (ITN, indoor-residual spraying (IRS and artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT combined on malaria burden was assessed at six out of seven in-patient health facilities. Methods Numbers of outpatient and inpatient cases and deaths were compared between 2008 and the pre-intervention period 1999-2003. Reductions were estimated by segmented log-linear regression, adjusting the effect size for time trends during the pre-intervention period. Results In 2008, for all age groups combined, malaria deaths had fallen by an estimated 90% (95% confidence interval 55-98%(p Conclusions Scaling-up effective malaria interventions reduced malaria-related burden at health facilities by over 75% within 5 years. In high-malaria settings, intensified malaria control can substantially contribute to reaching the Millennium Development Goal 4 target of reducing under-five mortality by two-thirds between 1990 and 2015.

  8. Spatial correlation between malaria cases and water-bodies in Anopheles sinensis dominated areas of Huang-Huai plain, China

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    Zhou Shui-sen

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria re-emerged in the Huang-Huai Plain of central China during 2006–2008, dominated with Anopheles sinensis as a vector. However, there is no information on strategies based on multi-factor analysis to effectively control the re-emergence of malaria in these areas. Previous experience indicates some relationship between the distribution of water bodies and malaria cases, but more detailed data are not available and in-depth studies have not been conducted up to now. The objective of this study was to identify the relationship between the distribution of water bodies and presentation of malaria cases using spatial analysis tools in order to provide guidance to help formulate effective strategies for use in controlling the sources of malaria infection, based on the identification of risk areas and population. Methods The geographic information of malaria cases and their surrounding water bodies were collected from Suixi, Guoyang, Guzhen, Yingshang, Fengyang and Yongqiao County in Anhui province, Yongcheng and Tongbai County in Henan province. All malaria cases distributed in 113 villages in these 8 counties were collected from the China Information System for Disease Control and Prevention and confirmed by household investigation. Data on GIS and malaria cases were mapped and analyzed with the software of ArcGIS 9.2 to identify the spatial correlation between malaria cases and water bodies. The distance from households with malaria cases to the nearest water bodies was used to calculate the OR value by Chi-square test. The risk area was identified through the comparison of OR values in different distances. Results 357 malaria cases and their GPS data as well as surrounding water bodies were collected and analyzed. 74% of malaria cases were located within the extent of 60 m proximity to the water bodies. The risk rate of people living there and presenting with malaria was significantly higher than others (OR = 1

  9. Acute respiratory distress syndrome due to vivax malaria: case report and literature review

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    André V. Lomar

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Severe pulmonary involvement in malaria has been frequently reported in cases of Plasmodium falciparum infection, but rarely in vivax malaria. Among the 11 previous cases of vivax-related severe respiratory involvement described in the literature, all except one developed it after the beginning of anti-malarial treatment; these appear to correspond to an exacerbation of the inflammatory response. We report the case of a 43-year-old Brazilian woman living in a malaria-endemic area, who presented acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS caused by P. vivax before starting anti-malarial treatment. The diagnosis was made based on microscopic methods. A negative rapid immunochromatographic assay, based on the detection of Histidine Rich Protein-2 (HRP-2 of P. falciparum, indicated that falciparum malaria was unlikely. After specific anti-plasmodial therapy and intensive supportive care, the patient was discharged from the hospital. We conclude that vivax malaria-associated ARDS can develop before anti-malarial therapy.

  10. Application of advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR)-based vegetation health indices for estimation of malaria cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Atiqur; Krakauer, Nir; Roytman, Leonid; Goldberg, Mitch; Kogan, Felix

    2010-06-01

    Satellite data may be used to map climatic conditions conducive to malaria outbreaks, assisting in the targeting of public health interventions to mitigate the worldwide increase in incidence of the mosquito-transmitted disease. This work analyzes correlation between malaria cases and vegetation health (VH) indices derived from satellite remote sensing for each week over a period of 14 years for Bandarban, Bangladesh. Correlation analysis showed that years with a high summer temperature condition index (TCI) tended to be those with high malaria incidence. Principal components regression was performed on patterns of weekly TCI during each of the two annual malaria seasons to construct a model as a function of the TCI. These models reduced the malaria estimation error variance by 57% if first-peak (June-July) TCI was used as the estimator and 74% if second-peak (August-September) was used, compared with an estimation of average number of malaria cases for each year.

  11. Possible artemisinin-based combination therapy-resistant malaria in Nigeria: a report of three cases

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    Nnennaya Anthony Ajayi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Artemisinin-based combination therapy-resistant malaria is rare in Sub-Saharan Africa. The World Health Organization identifies monitoring and surveillance using day-3 parasitaemia post-treatment as the standard test for identifying suspected artemisinin resistance. We report three cases of early treatment failure due to possible artemisinin-based combination therapy-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria. All cases showed adequate clinical and parasitological responses to quinine. This study reveals a need to re-evaluate the quality and efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapy agents in Nigeria and Sub-Saharan Africa.

  12. Malaria control in Bhutan: case study of a country embarking on elimination

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    Yangzom Thinley

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bhutan has achieved a major reduction in malaria incidence amid multiple challenges. This case study seeks to characterize the Bhutan malaria control programme over the last 10 years. Methods A review of the malaria epidemiology, control strategies, and elimination strategies employed in Bhutan was carried out through a literature review of peer-reviewed and grey national and international literature with the addition of reviewing the surveillance and vector control records of the Bhutan Vector-Borne Disease Control Programme (VDCP. Data triangulation was used to identify trends in epidemiology and key strategies and interventions through analysis of the VDCP surveillance and programme records and the literature review. Enabling and challenging factors were identified through analysis of socio-economic and health indicators, corroborated through a review of national and international reports and peer-review articles. Findings Confirmed malaria cases in Bhutan declined by 98.7% from 1994 to 2010. The majority of indigenous cases were due to Plasmodium vivax (59.9% and adult males are most at-risk of malaria. Imported cases, or those in foreign nationals, varied over the years, reaching 21.8% of all confirmed cases in 2006. Strategies implemented by the VDCP are likely to be related to the decline in cases over the last 10 years. Access to malaria diagnosis in treatment was expanded throughout the country and evidence-based case management, including the introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT for P. falciparum, increasing coverage of high risk areas with Indoor Residual Spraying, insecticide-treated bed nets, and long-lasting insecticidal nets are likely to have contributed to the decline alongside enabling factors such as economic development and increasing access to health services. Conclusion Bhutan has made significant strides towards elimination and has adopted a goal of national elimination. A major

  13. TRALI Syndrome During the Treatment of a Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çaşkurlu, Hülya; Nurmuhammedov, Rahman; Htway, Zarni

    2016-12-01

    Malaria, which is one of the three most important infectious diseases globally, is endemic in many areas of the world. Plasmodium falciparum is not endemic to Turkey but can be seen after travel to epidemic countries. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) syndrome is a rare disease, which may develop following the transfusion of all types of blood products, including plasma. Here we describe a case of TRALI syndrome in a 29-year-old male, who presented with fever after 15 days of returning from a business trip to Burkina Faso. It developed immediately after the infusion of fresh frozen plasma during the treatment of P. falciparum malaria. The patient's condition improved on respiratory support treatment in the intensive care unit for 48 hours without the need of mechanical ventilation. This case indicated that TRALI syndrome has to be considered in the differential diagnosis as an emerging acute lung disease during the treatment of malaria.

  14. Community case management of malaria: a pro-poor intervention in rural Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siekmans, Kendra; Sohani, Salim; Kisia, James; Kiilu, Kioko; Wamalwa, Emmanuel; Nelima, Florence; Otieno, David Odhiambo; Nyandigisi, Andrew; Akhwale, Willis; Ngindu, Augustine

    2013-09-01

    Access to prompt and effective treatment of malaria is a fundamental right of all populations at risk; many countries have not met the target of 60% of children treated with effective antimalarial drugs within 24 h of fever onset. While community case management of malaria is effective for increasing coverage, evidence is mixed on whether it improves equity. The objective of this study was to assess whether a community case management of a malaria programme delivered by community health workers (CHW) in two districts of Kenya improved access and equity. Data on child fever treatment practices, malaria prevention and CHW visits was collected through cross-sectional household surveys in project communities before (December 2008) and after 1 year of intervention (December 2009). Indicators were analysed by household wealth rank (grouped into poorest [bottom 20%], poor [middle 60%] and least poor [top 20%]) and survey. Data were available from 763 households at baseline and 856 households at endline. At endline, access to prompt and effective malaria treatment was higher compared with baseline for all groups, with the highest proportions among the poorest (67.6%) and the poor (63.2%), and the lowest proportion among the least poor (43.4%). Corresponding data suggest this was linked to the household's interaction with a CHW as the source of advice/treatment for child fever. These findings provide evidence that in a resource-poor setting, CHWs can provide lifesaving interventions to the poorest.

  15. Potential of using remote sensing for forecasting malaria in Tripura, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nizamuddin, Mohammad; Roytman, Leonid; Goldberg, Mitch; Kogan, Felix

    2010-08-01

    This study examined the relationship between environmental factors and malaria epidemic. The objective is to use NOAA environmental satellite data to produce weather seasonal forecasts as a proxy for predicting malaria epidemics in Tripura, India which has the one of the highest endemic of malaria cases in the country. An algorithm uses the Vegetation Health (VH) Indices (Vegetation Condition Index( VCI) and Temperature Condition Index (TCI)) computed from Advance Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data flown on NOAA afternoon poler orbiting satellite.. A good correlation was found between malaria cases and TCI two months earlier than the malaria transmission period. Principal components regression (PCR) method was used to develop a model to predict malaria as a function of the TCI. The simulated results were compared with observed malaria statistics showing that the error of the estimates of malaria is small. Remote sensing therefore is a valuable tool for estimating malaria well in advance thus preventive measures can be taken.

  16. Three cases of ARDS: An emerging complication of Plasmodium vivax malaria

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    Sarkar Supriya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium (P. vivax malaria is rarely associated with severe complications like acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. We report three cases of ARDS, which occurred as a complication of vivax malaria, from the city of Kolkata. A middle aged man who developed ARDS along with hepatic and renal dysfunction on the day 7 after completion of antimalarial treatment; a 36-year-old man who developed ARDS on the day 5 after completion of antimalarial treatment and a 15-year-old boy who developed ARDS on day 2, before starting anti-malarial drug. In all cases, vivax malaria was diagnosed by peripheral blood film (PBF examination. Associated falciparum infection was excluded by repeated PBF examination, and by negative P. falciparum malaria antigen tests. In all cases, ARDS was diagnosed by the presence of hypoxia with PaO 2 / FiO 2 ratio < 200 and bilateral pulmonary infiltration, and by excluding cardiac disease by echocardiography. All cases typically had dramatic onset of ARDS, and required immediate (within hour of onset of dyspnea institution of mechanical ventilation with high positive end expiratory pressure. All three cases recovered completely, and early ventilator support was life-saving.

  17. Case management of malaria fever at community pharmacies in Pakistan: a threat to rational drug use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Madeeha; Hassali, Mohamed A.; Shafie, Asrul A.; Hussain, Azhar; Aljadhey, Hisham; Saleem, Fahad

    Objective To document the case management of uncomplicated malaria fever at community pharmacies located in the two major cities of Pakistan; Islamabad (national capital) and Rawalpindi (twin city). Methods A comparative, cross-sectional study was designed to document the management of uncomplicated malaria fever at community pharmacies in twin cities of Pakistan through simulated patient visits. Visits were conducted in 238 randomly selected pharmacies to request advice for a simulated patient case of malaria. The pharmacy’s management was scored on a checklist including history taking and provision of advice and information. Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test were used to compare management of uncomplicated malaria fever by different types of dispensers working at community pharmacies situated at different locations in the twin cities. Results The simulated patients were handled by salesmen (74.8%, n=178), pharmacist (5.4%, n=13) and diploma holders (19.8 %, n=47). Medication was dispensed in 83.1 % (n=198) of the visits, but only few of the treated cases were in accordance to standard treatment guidelines for malaria. However, in 14.8% (n=35) of the cases the simulated patients were directly referred to a physician. There was a significant difference observed in the process of history taking performed by different dispensers (e.g. pharmacist, pharmacy assistant, pharmacy diploma holders and salesman) while no significant differences in the provision of advice by these dispensers was observed. Pharmacists were seen more frequently involved in the process of history taking if available at the community pharmacies. On the other hand, no significant differences were observed in the case management (history taking and provision of advice) for the treatment of malaria fever among community pharmacies situated at different locations (e.g. near hospital/super market/small market) in the twin cities. Conclusions The results of the study revealed that the

  18. Case management of malaria fever at community pharmacies in Pakistan; a threat to rational drug use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassali MA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To document the case management of uncomplicated malaria fever at community pharmacies located in the two major cities of Pakistan; Islamabad (national capital and Rawalpindi (twin city. Method: A comparative, cross-sectional study was designed to document the management of uncomplicated malaria fever at community pharmacies in twin cities of Pakistan through simulated patient visits. Visits were conducted in 238 randomly selected pharmacies to request advice for a simulated patient case of malaria. The pharmacy’s management was scored on a checklist including history taking and provision of advice and information. Kruskal-Wallis test and Mann-Whitney U test were used to compare management of uncomplicated malaria fever by different types of dispensers working at community pharmacies situated at different locations in the twin cities.Results: The simulated patients were handled by salesmen (74.8%, n=178, pharmacist (5.4%, n=13 and diploma holders (19.8 %, n=47. Medication was dispensed in 83.1 % (n=198 of the visits, but only few of the treated cases were in accordance to standard treatment guidelines for malaria. However, in 14.8% (n=35 of the cases the simulated patients were directly referred to a physician. There was a significant difference observed in the process of history taking performed by different dispensers (e.g. pharmacist, pharmacy assistant, pharmacy diploma holders and salesman while no significant differences in the provision of advice by these dispensers was observed. Pharmacists were seen more frequently involved in the process of history taking if available at the community pharmacies. On the other hand, no significant differences were observed in the case management (history taking and provision of advice for the treatment of malaria fever among community pharmacies situated at different locations (e.g. near hospital/super market/small market in the twin cities.Conclusion: The results of the study revealed that

  19. [Evaluation of imported Plasmodium falciparum malaria cases: the use of polymerase chain reaction in diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiraslan, Hayati; Erdoğan, Emrah; Türe, Zeynep; Kuk, Salih; Yazar, Süleyman; Metan, Gökhan

    2013-10-01

    Malaria affecting almost half of the world population continues to be an important health problem. Although domestic malaria cases have been decreasing in Turkey recently, cases caused by Plasmodium falciparum have increased due to the frequent travelling to Africa. The aims of this study were to evaluate demographic characteristics, clinical and laboratory findings in cases with falciparum malaria who attended to our clinic in 2012-2013 period, and the impact of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for diagnosis. Nine patients evaluated were all male with a mean age of 34.3 (age range: 18-48) years, with the history of travel to Africa. Six cases did not take prophylaxis against malaria and other three cases used insufficient time. Mean duration of symptoms after return was 18.4 (range: 1-75) days, and the patients were admitted to the clinic within a mean of 5.2 (range: 1-15) days. Two patients had leucopenia, two patients had anemia, and eight patients had thrombocytopenia on admission. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels in four cases and total bilirubin levels of six cases were over upper normal limits. Definitive diagnosis of cases was performed with the detection of ring and/or gametocytes forms of the parasite in Giemsa-stained peripheral blood smears. Furthermore, samples from seven patients were studied by nested PCR by using genus (Plasmodium rPLU 1 and 5) and species (rFAL 1 and 2, rVIV 1 and 2, rMAL 1 and 2, rOVA 1 and 2) specific primers. All of these seven samples yielded positive results with primers specific for P.falciparum ssrRNA. In the treatment, arthemeter/lumefantrin and doxycycline combination was used in seven patients, while intravenous artesunate and doxycycline combination was given to two patients, resulting with complete cure. Mean duration for the resolving of fever was 3.3 days, and mean duration for clearing the parasitemia from peripheral blood was 4.9 days. Initial ALT values and the duration of fever resolution (-796; p= 0.010), as

  20. Economic burden of malaria on businesses in Ghana: a case for private sector investment in malaria control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nonvignon, Justice; Aryeetey, Genevieve Cecilia; Malm, Keziah L; Agyemang, Samuel Agyei; Aubyn, Vivian N A; Peprah, Nana Yaw; Bart-Plange, Constance N; Aikins, Moses

    2016-09-06

    Despite the significant gains made globally in reducing the burden of malaria, the disease remains a major public health challenge, especially in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) including Ghana. There is a significant gap in financing malaria control globally. The private sector could become a significant source of financing malaria control. To get the private sector to appreciate the need to invest in malaria control, it is important to provide evidence of the economic burden of malaria on businesses. The objective of this study, therefore, was to estimate the economic burden on malaria on businesses in Ghana, so as to stimulate the sector's investment in malaria control. Data covering 2012-2014 were collected from 62 businesses sampled from Greater Accra, Ashanti and Western Regions of Ghana, which have the highest concentration of businesses in the country. Data on the cost of businesses' spending on treatment and prevention of malaria in staff and their dependants as well as staff absenteeism due to malaria and expenditure on other health-related activities were collected. Views of business leaders on the effect of malaria on their businesses were also compiled. The analysis was extrapolated to cover 5828 businesses across the country. The results show that businesses in Ghana lost about US$6.58 million to malaria in 2014, 90 % of which were direct costs. A total of 3913 workdays were lost due to malaria in firms in the study sample during the period 2012-2014. Businesses in the study sample spent an average of 0.5 % of the annual corporate returns on treatment of malaria in employees and their dependants, 0.3 % on malaria prevention, and 0.5 % on other health-related corporate social responsibilities. Again business leaders affirmed that malaria affects their businesses' efficiency, employee attendance and productivity and expenses. Finally, about 93 % of business leaders expressed the need private sector investment in malaria control. The economic burden of

  1. Molecular Characterization of a Cluster of Imported Malaria Cases in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenet, Stella M; Silva-Flannery, Luciana; Lucchi, Naomi W; Dragan, Ljolje; Dirlikov, Emilio; Mace, Kimberly; Rivera-García, Brenda; Arguin, Paul M; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2017-09-01

    The Caribbean island of Hispaniola is targeted for malaria elimination. Currently, this is the only island with ongoing transmission of malaria in the Caribbean. In 2015, six patients from Puerto Rico and one from Massachusetts, who traveled to Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, were confirmed to be infected with Plasmodium falciparum. Additional molecular analysis was performed at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to characterize the drug-resistant alleles and Plasmodium population genetic markers. All specimens carried wildtype genotypes for chloroquine, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, and artemisinin resistance genetic markers. A mutation in codon 184 (Y/F) of Pfmdr-1 gene was observed in all samples and they shared an identical genetic lineage as determined by microsatellite analysis. This genetic profile was similar to one previously reported from Hispaniola suggesting that a clonal P. falciparum residual parasite population present in Punta Cana is the source population for these imported malaria cases.

  2. Malaria--Great Exuma, Bahamas, May-June 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-22

    Malaria in humans is caused by four distinct protozoan species of the genus Plasmodium (P. falciparum, P. vivax, P. ovale, and P. malariae). These parasites are transmitted by the bite of an infective female Anopheles mosquito. In the Caribbean region, malaria has been eliminated from all islands except Hispaniola, the island consisting of Haiti and the Dominican Republic. Elimination of malaria elsewhere resulted from a combination of integrated control measures, socioeconomic development, and close public health surveillance. However, even Caribbean islands where malaria is no longer endemic remain at constant risk for reintroduction of the disease because of their tropical climate, presence of competent malaria vectors, and proximity to other countries where malaria is endemic. This susceptibility was underscored by the recent outbreak of malaria on the island of Great Exuma in the Bahamas; during May-June 2006, a total of 19 malaria cases were identified. Four of the cases, in travelers from North America and Europe, are described in this report; such cases of imported malaria can signal the presence of a malaria problem in the country visited and thus assist local health authorities in their investigations. On September 19, after 3 months with no report of new cases, CDC rescinded its previous recommendation that U.S.-based travelers take preventive doses of the antimalarial drug chloroquine before, during, and after travel to Great Exuma.

  3. [A plasmodium alciparum malaria case originated from Mozambique: clues for the diagnosis and therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkaya, Gülşen; Yildirim, Tolga; Aydin, Kadriye; Ergüven, Sibel; Unal, Serhat

    2006-10-01

    The aim of this report was the presentation of a falciparum malaria case originated from Mozambique and the evaluation of diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Sixty years old Canadian male patient who has been working in Mozambique for 13 years was admitted to hospital with the complaints of high fever (39.6 degrees C), weakness, nausea and vomiting, when returned to Turkey. The patient was sleepiness and has undulating confusions with the laboratory findings of thrombocytopenia, hypoglycemia, hyperlactatemia, increased BUN/creatinine levels, increased LDH levels and hypocholesterolemia. The diagnosis was based on the detection of multiple ring formed trophozoites in the thick blood film and the presence of multiple ring forms inside the erythrocytes and the absence of trophozoite and shizont forms in the thin blood film. His medical history revealed that he experienced another falciparum malaria infection one year ago, although he has been using mefloquine prophylaxis during his stay in Mozambique. Since chloroquine resistance was thought to be high in this region, the patient was treated with quinine sulphate and doxycycline. Six days after the onset of therapy, the biochemical markers turned to normal and 14 days later the blood films were free of the parasite. The patient was given doxycycline prophylaxis since he would return to Mozambique. In conclusion, the followings should be taken into consideration for the diagnosis and therapy: (i) cyclic type of fever which is characteristic for malaria, might not be detected in falciparum malaria; (ii) some of the clinical symptoms might be blocked by partial immune response in case of recurrent infections; (iii) thrombocytopenia and hypocholesterolemia might indicate the presence of falciparum malaria; and when falciparum malaria is confirmed by parasitological examinations the patient should be treated as if he/she is accepted as resistant to chloroquine.

  4. Malaria in British military personnel deployed to Sierra Leone: a case series.

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    Quantick, Oliver; Howlett-Shipley, R; Roughton, S; Ross, D

    2017-02-01

    From December 2014 to April 2015, seven cases of malaria were seen in 1530 military personnel deployed to Sierra Leone on Operation GRITROCK in response to the West African Ebola outbreak, despite predeployment briefings, prescription of chemoprophylactic agents and bite prevention measures. The cases have prompted discussion regarding the efficacy of current measures and how to prevent future cases in deployed military personnel or more widely, those working in malaria-risk environments. All of the cases have made a full recovery and returned to work. We discuss what can be learnt concerning the choice of chemoprophylactic agent and whether anything further be added to standard operating procedures regarding bite prevention and treatment of cases.

  5. Temporal correlation between malaria and rainfall in Sri Lanka

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    Galappaththy Gawrie NL

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rainfall data have potential use for malaria prediction. However, the relationship between rainfall and the number of malaria cases is indirect and complex. Methods The statistical relationships between monthly malaria case count data series and monthly mean rainfall series (extracted from interpolated station data over the period 1972 – 2005 in districts in Sri Lanka was explored in four analyses: cross-correlation; cross-correlation with pre-whitening; inter-annual; and seasonal inter-annual regression. Results For most districts, strong positive correlations were found for malaria time series lagging zero to three months behind rainfall, and negative correlations were found for malaria time series lagging four to nine months behind rainfall. However, analysis with pre-whitening showed that most of these correlations were spurious. Only for a few districts, weak positive (at lags zero and one or weak negative (at lags two to six correlations were found in pre-whitened series. Inter-annual analysis showed strong negative correlations between malaria and rainfall for a group of districts in the centre-west of the country. Seasonal inter-annual analysis showed that the effect of rainfall on malaria varied according to the season and geography. Conclusion Seasonally varying effects of rainfall on malaria case counts may explain weak overall cross-correlations found in pre-whitened series, and should be taken into account in malaria predictive models making use of rainfall as a covariate.

  6. Therapeutic efficacy of chloroquine for treatment of Plasmodium vivax malaria cases in Halaba district, South Ethiopia

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    Bacha Ketema

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chloroquine is an anti-malarial drug being used to treat Plasmodium vivax malaria cases in Ethiopia. However, emergence of chloroquine resistant strains of the parasite has challenged the current efficacy of the drug. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of chloroquine against P. vivax strains in one of the malaria endemic areas of Ethiopia, namely Halaba district, located in South Nations and Nationalities Peoples Region (SNNPR of South Ethiopia Results Among 87 malaria patients enrolled in the study, only 80 of them completed the 28-days follow-up. Seven of them dropped from the study for different reasons. Among those study participants that completed their follow-up, 69 were classified under the category of adequate clinical and parasitological response (ACPR. However, the remaining 11 cases were considered as under treatment failure mainly due to recurrence of parasitemia on day 7 (four patients, day 14 (six patients, and day 21 (one patient. The age of all cases of treatment failures was found to be less than 20 years. The load of parasitemia of patients with treatment failure on day of admission (4709.4/μl was higher than day of recurrence (372.37/μl. Parasite reduction ratio (PRR of treatment failure cases was 12.6/μl. Conclusion This report revealed the rise in treatment failure (13% [95% CI = 0.074 - 0.217] as compared to earlier reports from Ethiopia. It signals the spreading of chloroquine resistant P. vivax (CRPv strains to malaria endemic areas of Ethiopia. It is recommended that all concerned bodies should act aggressively before further expansion of the current drug resistant malaria.

  7. Time trends and changes in the distribution of malaria cases in the Brazilian Amazon Region, 2004-2013

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    Isac da SF Lima

    Full Text Available Recent efforts to reduce malaria incidence have had some successes. Nevertheless, malaria persists as a significant public health problem in the Brazilian Amazon. The objective of this study was to describe changes in malaria case characteristics and to identify trends in malaria incidence in the Brazilian Amazon. This study used data from the Malaria Epidemiological Surveillance and Case Notification Information System from 2004 to 2013. The annual parasite incidence (API was calculated and joinpoint regression was used to assess the trends in API over time. There was a sharp increase in API in the state of Acre, followed by two periods of decrease. Pará also presented inconsistent decreases over the study period. Amapá, Amazonas, Rondônia, and Roraima showed statistically significant decreases over the period. The sharpest decrease occurred in Rondônia, with a reduction of 21.7% in the average annual percent change (AAPC (AAPC: -21.7%; 95% confidence interval: -25.4%, -17.8%; p < 0.05. This panorama of malaria incidence highlights the importance of integrating evidence-based malaria surveillance and control. Malaria is highly preventable, and eliminating its transmission should be a goal in coming decades.

  8. Time series analysis of trends in malaria cases and deaths at hospitals and the effect of antimalarial interventions, 2001-2011, Ethiopia.

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    Maru Aregawi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Government of Ethiopia and its partners have deployed artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACT since 2004 and long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs since 2005. Malaria interventions and trends in malaria cases and deaths were assessed at hospitals in malaria transmission areas during 2001-2011. METHODS: Regional LLINs distribution records were used to estimate the proportion of the population-at-risk protected by LLINs. Hospital records were reviewed to estimate ACT availability. Time-series analysis was applied to data from 41 hospitals in malaria risk areas to assess trends of malaria cases and deaths during pre-intervention (2001-2005 and post-interventions (2006-2011 periods. FINDINGS: The proportion of the population-at-risk potentially protected by LLINs increased to 51% in 2011. The proportion of facilities with ACTs in stock exceeded 87% during 2006-2011. Among all ages, confirmed malaria cases in 2011 declined by 66% (95% confidence interval [CI], 44-79% and SPR by 37% (CI, 20%-51% compared to the level predicted by pre-intervention trends. In children under 5 years of age, malaria admissions and deaths fell by 81% (CI, 47%-94% and 73% (CI, 48%-86% respectively. Optimal breakpoint of the trendlines occurred between January and June 2006, consistent with the timing of malaria interventions. Over the same period, non-malaria cases and deaths either increased or remained unchanged, the number of malaria diagnostic tests performed reflected the decline in malaria cases, and rainfall remained at levels supportive of malaria transmission. CONCLUSIONS: Malaria cases and deaths in Ethiopian hospitals decreased substantially during 2006-2011 in conjunction with scale-up of malaria interventions. The decrease could not be accounted for by changes in hospital visits, malaria diagnostic testing or rainfall. However, given the history of variable malaria transmission in Ethiopia, more data would be required to exclude the

  9. A retrospective evaluation of the quality of malaria case management at twelve health facilities in four districts in Zambia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pascalina Chanda-Kapata; Emmanuel Chanda; Freddie Masaninga; Annette Habluetzel; Felix Masiye; Ibrahima Soce Fall

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To establish the appropriateness of malaria case management at health facility level in four districts in Zambia. Methods: This study was a retrospective evaluation of the quality of malaria case management at health facilities in four districts conveniently sampled to represent both urban and rural settings in different epidemiological zones and health facility coverage. The review period was from January to December 2008. The sample included twelve lower level health facilities from four districts. The Pearson Chi-square test was used to identify characteristics which affected the quality of case management.Results:Out of 4891 suspected malaria cases recorded at the 12 health facilities, more than 80% of the patients had a temperature taken to establish their fever status. About 67% (CI95 66.1-68.7) were tested for parasitemia by either rapid diagnostic test or microscopy, whereas the remaining 22.5% (CI95 21.3.1-23.7) were not subjected to any malaria test. Of the 2247 malaria cases reported (complicated and uncomplicated), 71% were parasitologically confirmed while 29% were clinically diagnosed (unconfirmed). About 56% (CI95 53.9-58.1) of the malaria cases reported were treated with artemether-lumefantrine (AL), 35% (CI95 33.1-37.0) with sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine, 8% (CI95 6.9-9.2) with quinine and 1% did not receive any anti-malarial. Approximately 30% of patients WHO were found negative for malaria parasites were still prescribed an anti-malarial, contrary to the guidelines. There were marked inter-district variations in the proportion of patients in WHOm a diagnostic tool was used, and in the choice of anti-malarials for the treatment of malaria confirmed cases. Association between health worker characteristics and quality of case malaria management showed that nurses performed better than environmental health technicians and clinical officers on the decision whether to use the rapid diagnostic test or not. Gender, in service training on malaria

  10. Non-falciparum malaria in Dakar: a confirmed case of Plasmodium ovale wallikeri infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diallo, Mamadou A; Badiane, Aida S; Diongue, Khadim; Deme, Awa; Lucchi, Naomi W; Gaye, Marie; Ndiaye, Tolla; Ndiaye, Mouhamadou; Sene, Louise K; Diop, Abdoulaye; Gaye, Amy; Ndiaye, Yaye D; Samb, Diama; Yade, Mamadou S; Ndir, Omar; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam; Ndiaye, Daouda

    2016-08-24

    Plasmodium ovale is rarely described in Senegal. A case of clinical malaria due to P. ovale wallikeri in West Central of Senegal is reported. A 34-year-old male baker in Dakar, with no significant previous medical history, was admitted to a health clinic with fever and vomiting. Fever had been lasting for 4 days with peaks every 48 h. As monospecific Plasmodium falciparum HRP-2 RDT was negative, he was treated with antibiotics. However, owing to persisting symptoms, he was referred to the emergency unit of the Youssou Mbargane Diop Hospital, Dakar, Senegal. Clinical examination found impaired general condition. All other physical examinations were normal. Laboratory tests showed anaemia (haemoglobin 11.4 g/dl), severe thrombocytopaenia (platelets 30 × 10(9)/mm(3)), leukopenia (3650/mm(3)), lymphocytopenia (650/mm(3)). Renal function was normal as indicated by creatininaemia and uraemia (11 mg/l and 0.25 g/l, respectively) and liver enzymes were slightly elevated (aspartate aminotransferase 77 UI/l and alanine aminotransferase 82 UI/l). Blood smear evaluations in Parasitology Laboratory of Aristide Le Dantec Hospital showed malaria parasites of the species P. ovale with a 0.08 % parasitaemia. Molecular confirmation was done by real time PCR targeting the 18S rRNA gene. The P. ovale infection was further analysed to species level targeting the potra gene and was identified as P. ovale wallikeri. According to the hospital's malaria treatment guidelines for severe malaria, treatment consisted of intravenous quinine at hour 0 (start of treatment) and 24 h after initial treatment, followed by artemether-lumefantrine 24 h later. A negative microscopy was noted on day 3 post-treatment and the patient reported no further symptoms. Malaria due to non-falciparum species is probably underestimated in Senegal. RDTs specific to non-falciparum species and/or pan specific RDTs should be included as tools of diagnosis to fight against malaria in Senegal. In addition

  11. Preparation of malaria resurgence in China: case study of vivax malaria re-emergence and outbreak in Huang-Huai Plain in 2006.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Wei; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Shao-Sen; Xu, Bian-Li; Li, Wei-Dong; Tang, Ji-Hai; Zhou, Shui-Sen; Huang, Fang

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the patterns of malaria re-emergence and outbreak that occurred in the Huang-Huai Plain of China in 2006, and the way of quick response to curtail the outbreak by mass drug administration and case management. The contribution of the each intervention in quick response is discussed. Particularly due to the special ecological characteristics in the Huang-Huai Plain, the intervention of vector control is not implemented. Finally, the challenges in the elimination of malaria in this region are highlighted.

  12. Effective coverage and systems effectiveness for malaria case management in sub-Saharan African countries.

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    Katya Galactionova

    Full Text Available Scale-up of malaria preventive and control interventions over the last decade resulted in substantial declines in mortality and morbidity from the disease in sub-Saharan Africa and many other parts of the world. Sustaining these gains will depend on the health system performance. Treatment provides individual benefits by curing infection and preventing progression to severe disease as well as community-level benefits by reducing the infectious reservoir and averting emergence and spread of drug resistance. However many patients with malaria do not access care, providers do not comply with treatment guidelines, and hence, patients do not necessarily receive the correct regimen. Even when the correct regimen is administered some patients will not adhere and others will be treated with counterfeit or substandard medication leading to treatment failures and spread of drug resistance. We apply systems effectiveness concepts that explicitly consider implications of health system factors such as treatment seeking, provider compliance, adherence, and quality of medication to estimate treatment outcomes for malaria case management. We compile data for these indicators to derive estimates of effective coverage for 43 high-burden Sub-Saharan African countries. Parameters are populated from the Demographic and Health Surveys and other published sources. We assess the relative importance of these factors on the level of effective coverage and consider variation in these health systems indicators across countries. Our findings suggest that effective coverage for malaria case management ranges from 8% to 72% in the region. Different factors account for health system inefficiencies in different countries. Significant losses in effectiveness of treatment are estimated in all countries. The patterns of inter-country variation suggest that these are system failures that are amenable to change. Identifying the reasons for the poor health system performance and

  13. Effective coverage and systems effectiveness for malaria case management in sub-Saharan African countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galactionova, Katya; Tediosi, Fabrizio; de Savigny, Don; Smith, Thomas; Tanner, Marcel

    2015-01-01

    Scale-up of malaria preventive and control interventions over the last decade resulted in substantial declines in mortality and morbidity from the disease in sub-Saharan Africa and many other parts of the world. Sustaining these gains will depend on the health system performance. Treatment provides individual benefits by curing infection and preventing progression to severe disease as well as community-level benefits by reducing the infectious reservoir and averting emergence and spread of drug resistance. However many patients with malaria do not access care, providers do not comply with treatment guidelines, and hence, patients do not necessarily receive the correct regimen. Even when the correct regimen is administered some patients will not adhere and others will be treated with counterfeit or substandard medication leading to treatment failures and spread of drug resistance. We apply systems effectiveness concepts that explicitly consider implications of health system factors such as treatment seeking, provider compliance, adherence, and quality of medication to estimate treatment outcomes for malaria case management. We compile data for these indicators to derive estimates of effective coverage for 43 high-burden Sub-Saharan African countries. Parameters are populated from the Demographic and Health Surveys and other published sources. We assess the relative importance of these factors on the level of effective coverage and consider variation in these health systems indicators across countries. Our findings suggest that effective coverage for malaria case management ranges from 8% to 72% in the region. Different factors account for health system inefficiencies in different countries. Significant losses in effectiveness of treatment are estimated in all countries. The patterns of inter-country variation suggest that these are system failures that are amenable to change. Identifying the reasons for the poor health system performance and intervening to tackle

  14. Comparison of Malaria Simulations Driven by Meteorological Observations and Reanalysis Products in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diouf, Ibrahima; Rodriguez-Fonseca, Belen; Deme, Abdoulaye; Caminade, Cyril; Morse, Andrew P; Cisse, Moustapha; Sy, Ibrahima; Dia, Ibrahima; Ermert, Volker; Ndione, Jacques-André; Gaye, Amadou Thierno

    2017-09-25

    The analysis of the spatial and temporal variability of climate parameters is crucial to study the impact of climate-sensitive vector-borne diseases such as malaria. The use of malaria models is an alternative way of producing potential malaria historical data for Senegal due to the lack of reliable observations for malaria outbreaks over a long time period. Consequently, here we use the Liverpool Malaria Model (LMM), driven by different climatic datasets, in order to study and validate simulated malaria parameters over Senegal. The findings confirm that the risk of malaria transmission is mainly linked to climate variables such as rainfall and temperature as well as specific landscape characteristics. For the whole of Senegal, a lag of two months is generally observed between the peak of rainfall in August and the maximum number of reported malaria cases in October. The malaria transmission season usually takes place from September to November, corresponding to the second peak of temperature occurring in October. Observed malaria data from the Programme National de Lutte contre le Paludisme (PNLP, National Malaria control Programme in Senegal) and outputs from the meteorological data used in this study were compared. The malaria model outputs present some consistencies with observed malaria dynamics over Senegal, and further allow the exploration of simulations performed with reanalysis data sets over a longer time period. The simulated malaria risk significantly decreased during the 1970s and 1980s over Senegal. This result is consistent with the observed decrease of malaria vectors and malaria cases reported by field entomologists and clinicians in the literature. The main differences between model outputs and observations regard amplitude, but can be related not only to reanalysis deficiencies but also to other environmental and socio-economic factors that are not included in this mechanistic malaria model framework. The present study can be considered as a

  15. To report a case of unilateral proliferative retinopathy following noncerebral malaria with Plasmodium falciparum in Southern India

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    Aditya Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The retinopathy in association with malaria fever described so far includes retinal hemorrhages, vessel changes, retinal discoloration/whitening and papilledema. Malaria retinopathy has been mostly described in severe cases, associated with Plasmodium falciparum, correlating the patho-physiology of retinal and cerebral manifestations. We report an unusual case of proliferative retinopathy as a manifestation of malaria fever, caused by P. falciparum with no cerebral involvement. The patient had features of unilateral retinal vascular occlusion with proliferative changes and vitreous hemorrhage. To the best of our knowledge, such a case has never been reported so far in the literature. This report highlights the possible occurrence of severe proliferative changes associated with malaria fever, which if diagnosed early can prevent possible blindness.

  16. Extended safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of a blood-stage malaria vaccine in malian children: 24-month follow-up of a randomized, double-blinded phase 2 trial.

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    Matthew B Laurens

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The FMP2.1/AS02A candidate malaria vaccine was tested in a Phase 2 study in Mali. Based on results from the first eight months of follow-up, the vaccine appeared well-tolerated and immunogenic. It had no significant efficacy based on the primary endpoint, clinical malaria, but marginal efficacy against clinical malaria in secondary analyses, and high allele-specific efficacy. Extended follow-up was conducted to evaluate extended safety, immunogenicity and efficacy. METHODS: A randomized, double-blinded trial of safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of the candidate Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1 vaccine FMP2.1/AS02A was conducted in Bandiagara, Mali. Children aged 1-6 years were randomized in a 1∶1 ratio to receive FMP2.1/AS02A or control rabies vaccine on days 0, 30 and 60. Using active and passive surveillance, clinical malaria and adverse events as well as antibodies against P. falciparum AMA1 were monitored for 24 months after the first vaccination, spanning two malaria seasons. FINDINGS: 400 children were enrolled. Serious adverse events occurred in nine participants in the FMP2.1/AS02A group and three in the control group; none was considered related to study vaccination. After two years, anti-AMA1 immune responses remained significantly higher in the FMP2.1/AS02A group than in the control group. For the entire 24-month follow-up period, vaccine efficacy was 7.6% (p = 0.51 against first clinical malaria episodes and 9.9% (p = 0.19 against all malaria episodes. For the final 16-month follow-up period, vaccine efficacy was 0.9% (p = 0.98 against all malaria episodes. Allele-specific efficacy seen in the first malaria season did not extend into the second season of follow-up. INTERPRETATION: Allele-specific vaccine efficacy was not sustained in the second malaria season, despite continued high levels of anti-AMA1 antibodies. This study presents an opportunity to evaluate correlates of partial

  17. Effectiveness of reactive case detection for malaria elimination in three archetypical transmission settings: a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerardin, Jaline; Bever, Caitlin A; Bridenbecker, Daniel; Hamainza, Busiku; Silumbe, Kafula; Miller, John M; Eisele, Thomas P; Eckhoff, Philip A; Wenger, Edward A

    2017-06-12

    Reactive case detection could be a powerful tool in malaria elimination, as it selectively targets transmission pockets. However, field operations have yet to demonstrate under which conditions, if any, reactive case detection is best poised to push a region to elimination. This study uses mathematical modelling to assess how baseline transmission intensity and local interconnectedness affect the impact of reactive activities in the context of other possible intervention packages. Communities in Southern Province, Zambia, where elimination operations are currently underway, were used as representatives of three archetypes of malaria transmission: low-transmission, high household density; high-transmission, low household density; and high-transmission, high household density. Transmission at the spatially-connected household level was simulated with a dynamical model of malaria transmission, and local variation in vectorial capacity and intervention coverage were parameterized according to data collected from the area. Various potential intervention packages were imposed on each of the archetypical settings and the resulting likelihoods of elimination by the end of 2020 were compared. Simulations predict that success of elimination campaigns in both low- and high-transmission areas is strongly dependent on stemming the flow of imported infections, underscoring the need for regional-scale strategies capable of reducing transmission concurrently across many connected areas. In historically low-transmission areas, treatment of clinical malaria should form the cornerstone of elimination operations, as most malaria infections in these areas are symptomatic and onward transmission would be mitigated through health system strengthening; reactive case detection has minimal impact in these settings. In historically high-transmission areas, vector control and case management are crucial for limiting outbreak size, and the asymptomatic reservoir must be addressed through

  18. [The first monkey malaria in Turkey: a case of Plasmodium knowlesi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özbilgin, Ahmet; Çavuş, İbrahim; Yıldırım, Ahmet; Gündüz, Cumhur

    2016-07-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi is now added to the known four Plasmodium species (P.vivax, P.falciparum, P.malariae, P.ovale) as a cause of malaria in humans because of the recent increasing rate of cases reported from countries of southeastern Asia. P.knowlesi which infects macaque monkeys (Macaca fascicularis and M.nemestrina) is transmitted to humans especially by Anopheles leucosphyrus and An.hackeri mosquitos. First human cases of P.knowlesi malaria have been detected in Malaysia which have reached high numbers in recent years and also have been reported from countries of Southeast Asia such as Thailand, Philippines, Myanmar, Singapore and Vietnam. However the number of cases reported from western countries are rare and limited only within voyagers. This report is the first presentation of an imported case of P.knowlesi malaria in Turkey and aims to draw attention to the point that it could also be detected in future. A 33-year-old male patient from Myanmar who has migrated to Turkey as a refugee, was admitted to a health center with the complaints of fever with a periodicity of 24 hours, headache, fatigue, cough, sore throat, anorexia, myalgia and arthralgia. He was prediagnosed as upper respiratory tract infection, however because of his periodical fever and background in Myanmar, thick and thin blood films were prepared and sent to our laboratory for further examinations. Microscopic examination of the thin blood films revealed erythrocytic stages compatible with P.knowlesi (three large early trophozoites in an erythrocyte, three late trophozoites with compact view, and three late band-form trophozoites). Upon this, both real-time polymerase chain reaction (Rt-PCR) targeting the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU-rRNA) genes of Plasmodium genus and DNA sequence analysis targeting P.knowlesi rRNA gene were performed. As a result, the suspected identification of P.knowlesi by microscopy was confirmed by Rt-PCR and DNA sequencing. The patient was treated with chloroquine

  19. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency and the risk of malaria and other diseases in children in Kenya: a case-control and a cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyoga, Sophie; Ndila, Carolyne M; Macharia, Alex W; Nyutu, Gideon; Shah, Shivang; Peshu, Norbert; Clarke, Geraldine M; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P; Rockett, Kirk A; Williams, Thomas N

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background The global prevalence of X-linked glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is thought to be a result of selection by malaria, but epidemiological studies have yielded confusing results. We investigated the relationships between G6PD deficiency and both malaria and non-malarial illnesses among children in Kenya. Methods We did this study in Kilifi County, Kenya, where the G6PD c.202T allele is the only significant cause of G6PD deficiency. We tested the associations between G6PD deficiency and severe and complicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria through a case-control study of 2220 case and 3940 control children. Cases were children aged younger than 14 years, who visited the high dependency ward of Kilifi County Hospital with severe malaria between March 1, 1998, and Feb 28, 2010. Controls were children aged between 3–12 months who were born within the same study area between August 2006, and September 2010. We assessed the association between G6PD deficiency and both uncomplicated malaria and other common diseases of childhood in a cohort study of 752 children aged younger than 10 years. Participants of this study were recruited from a representative sample of households within the Ngerenya and Chonyi areas of Kilifi County between Aug 1, 1998, and July 31, 2001. The primary outcome measure for the case-control study was the odds ratio for hospital admission with severe malaria (computed by logistic regression) while for the cohort study it was the incidence rate ratio for uncomplicated malaria and non-malaria illnesses (computed by Poisson regression), by G6PD deficiency category. Findings 2863 (73%) children in the control group versus 1643 (74%) in the case group had the G6PD normal genotype, 639 (16%) versus 306 (14%) were girls heterozygous for G6PD c.202T, and 438 (11%) versus 271 (12%) children were either homozygous girls or hemizygous boys. Compared with boys and girls without G6PD deficiency, we found significant

  20. PGMS: A Case Study of Collecting PDA-Based Geo-Tagged Malaria-Related Survey Data.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Y; Lobo, NF; Wolkon, A; Gimnig, JE; Malishee, A; Stevenson, J; Sulistyawati,; Collins, FH; Madey, G

    2014-01-01

    : Using mobile devices, such as personal digital assistants (PDAs), smartphones, tablet computers, etc., to electronically collect malaria-related field data is the way for the field questionnaires in the future. This case study seeks to design a generic survey framework PDA-based geo-tagged malaria-related data collection tool (PGMS) that can be used not only for large-scale community-level geo-tagged electronic malaria-related surveys, but also for a wide variety of electronic data collecti...

  1. Adaptation costs for climate change-related cases of diarrhoeal disease, malnutrition, and malaria in 2030

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebi, Kristie L

    2008-01-01

    Background Climate change has begun to negatively affect human health, with larger burdens projected in the future as weather patterns continue to change. The climate change-related health consequences of diarrhoeal diseases, malnutrition, and malaria are projected to pose the largest risks to future populations. Limited work has been done to estimate the costs of adapting to these additional health burdens. Methods The costs of treating diarrhoeal diseases, malnutrition (stunting and wasting only), and malaria in 2030 were estimated under three climate scenarios using (1) the current numbers of cases; (2) the projected relative risks of these diseases in 2030; and (3) current treatment costs. The analysis assumed that the number of annual cases and costs of treatment would remain constant. There was limited consideration of socioeconomic development. Results Under a scenario assuming emissions reductions resulting in stabilization at 750 ppm CO2 equivalent in 2210, the costs of treating diarrhoeal diseases, malnutrition, and malaria in 2030 were estimated to be $4 to 12 billion. This is almost as much as current total annual overseas development assistance for health. Conclusion The investment needs in the health sector to address climate-sensitive health outcomes are large. Additional human and financial resources will be needed to prevent and control the projected increased burden of health outcomes due to climate change. PMID:18803827

  2. Adaptation costs for climate change-related cases of diarrhoeal disease, malnutrition, and malaria in 2030

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebi Kristie L

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Climate change has begun to negatively affect human health, with larger burdens projected in the future as weather patterns continue to change. The climate change-related health consequences of diarrhoeal diseases, malnutrition, and malaria are projected to pose the largest risks to future populations. Limited work has been done to estimate the costs of adapting to these additional health burdens. Methods The costs of treating diarrhoeal diseases, malnutrition (stunting and wasting only, and malaria in 2030 were estimated under three climate scenarios using (1 the current numbers of cases; (2 the projected relative risks of these diseases in 2030; and (3 current treatment costs. The analysis assumed that the number of annual cases and costs of treatment would remain constant. There was limited consideration of socioeconomic development. Results Under a scenario assuming emissions reductions resulting in stabilization at 750 ppm CO2 equivalent in 2210, the costs of treating diarrhoeal diseases, malnutrition, and malaria in 2030 were estimated to be $4 to 12 billion. This is almost as much as current total annual overseas development assistance for health. Conclusion The investment needs in the health sector to address climate-sensitive health outcomes are large. Additional human and financial resources will be needed to prevent and control the projected increased burden of health outcomes due to climate change.

  3. Development, malaria and adaptation to climate change: a case study from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Amit; Dhiman, R C; Bhattacharya, Sumana; Shukla, P R

    2009-05-01

    India has reasons to be concerned about climate change. Over 650 million people depend on climate-sensitive sectors, such as rain-fed agriculture and forestry, for livelihood and over 973 million people are exposed to vector borne malarial parasites. Projection of climatic factors indicates a wider exposure to malaria for the Indian population in the future. If precautionary measures are not taken and development processes are not managed properly some developmental activities, such as hydro-electric dams and irrigation canal systems, may also exacerbate breeding grounds for malaria. This article integrates climate change and developmental variables in articulating a framework for integrated impact assessment and adaptation responses, with malaria incidence in India as a case study. The climate change variables include temperature, rainfall, humidity, extreme events, and other secondary variables. Development variables are income levels, institutional mechanisms to implement preventive measures, infrastructure development that could promote malarial breeding grounds, and other policies. The case study indicates that sustainable development variables may sometimes reduce the adverse impacts on the system due to climate change alone, while it may sometimes also exacerbate these impacts if the development variables are not managed well and therefore they produce a negative impact on the system. The study concludes that well crafted and well managed developmental policies could result in enhanced resilience of communities and systems, and lower health impacts due to climate change.

  4. Development, Malaria and Adaptation to Climate Change: A Case Study from India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Amit; Dhiman, R. C.; Bhattacharya, Sumana; Shukla, P. R.

    2009-05-01

    India has reasons to be concerned about climate change. Over 650 million people depend on climate-sensitive sectors, such as rain-fed agriculture and forestry, for livelihood and over 973 million people are exposed to vector borne malarial parasites. Projection of climatic factors indicates a wider exposure to malaria for the Indian population in the future. If precautionary measures are not taken and development processes are not managed properly some developmental activities, such as hydro-electric dams and irrigation canal systems, may also exacerbate breeding grounds for malaria. This article integrates climate change and developmental variables in articulating a framework for integrated impact assessment and adaptation responses, with malaria incidence in India as a case study. The climate change variables include temperature, rainfall, humidity, extreme events, and other secondary variables. Development variables are income levels, institutional mechanisms to implement preventive measures, infrastructure development that could promote malarial breeding grounds, and other policies. The case study indicates that sustainable development variables may sometimes reduce the adverse impacts on the system due to climate change alone, while it may sometimes also exacerbate these impacts if the development variables are not managed well and therefore they produce a negative impact on the system. The study concludes that well crafted and well managed developmental policies could result in enhanced resilience of communities and systems, and lower health impacts due to climate change.

  5. Spatiotemporal Bayesian Networks for Malaria Prediction: Case Study of Northern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddawy, Peter; Kasantikul, Rangwan; Hasan, A H M Imrul; Rattanabumrung, Chunyanuch; Rungrun, Pichamon; Suksopee, Natwipa; Tantiwaranpant, Saran; Niruntasuk, Natcha

    2016-01-01

    While a diversity of modeling technique have been used to create predictive models of malaria, no work has made use of Bayesian networks. Bayes nets are attractive due to their ability to represent uncertainty, model time lagged and nonlinear relations, and provide explanations of inferences. This paper explores the use of Bayesian networks to model malaria, demonstrating the approach by creating a village level model with weekly temporal resolution for Tha Song Yang district in northern Thailand. The network is learned using data on cases and environmental covariates. The network models incidence over time as well as evolution of the environmental variables, and captures time lagged and nonlinear effects. Out of sample evaluation shows the model to have high accuracy for one and two week predictions.

  6. [Current malaria situation in Turkey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gockchinar, T; Kalipsi, S

    2001-01-01

    are important in transmitting the diseases. The districts where malaria cases occur are the places where population moves are rapid, agriculture is the main occupation, the increase in the population is high and the education/cultural level is low. Within years, the districts with high malaria cases also differ. Before 1990 Cucurova and Amikova were the places that showed the highest incidence of malaria. Since 1990, the number of cases from south-eastern Anatolia has started to rise. The main reasons for this change are a comprehensive malaria prevention programme, regional development, developed agricultural systems, and lower population movements. The 1999 statistical data indicate that 83 and 17% of all malaria cases are observed in the GAP and other districts, respectively. The distribution of malaria cases in Turkey differs by months and climatic conditions. The incidence of malaria starts to rise in March, reaching its peak in July, August and September, begins to fall in October. In other words, the number of malaria cases is lowest in winter and reaches its peak in summer and autumn. This is not due to the parasite itself, but a climatic change is a main reason. In the past years the comprehensive malaria prevention programme has started bearing its fruits. Within the WHO Roll Back Malaria strategies, Turkey has started to implement its national malaria control projects, the meeting held on March 22, 2000, coordinated the country's international cooperation for this purpose. The meeting considered the aim of the project to be introduced into other organizations. In this regards, the target for 2002 is to halve the incidence of malaria as compared to 1999. The middle--and long-term incidence of malaria will be lowered to even smaller figures. The objectives of this project are as follows: to integrate malaria services with primary health care services to prove more effective studies; to develop early diagnosis and treatment systems, to provide better

  7. Spatial and temporal distribution of falciparum malaria in China

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    Lin Hualiang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Falciparum malaria is the most deadly among the four main types of human malaria. Although great success has been achieved since the launch of the National Malaria Control Programme in 1955, malaria remains a serious public health problem in China. This paper aimed to analyse the geographic distribution, demographic patterns and time trends of falciparum malaria in China. Methods The annual numbers of falciparum malaria cases during 1992–2003 and the individual case reports of each clinical falciparum malaria during 2004–2005 were extracted from communicable disease information systems in China Center for Diseases Control and Prevention. The annual number of cases and the annual incidence were mapped by matching them to corresponding province- and county-level administrative units in a geographic information system. The distribution of falciparum malaria by age, gender and origin of infection was analysed. Time-series analysis was conducted to investigate the relationship between the falciparum malaria in the endemic provinces and the imported falciparum malaria in non-endemic provinces. Results Falciparum malaria was endemic in two provinces of China during 2004–05. Imported malaria was reported in 26 non-endemic provinces. Annual incidence of falciparum malaria was mapped at county level in the two endemic provinces of China: Yunnan and Hainan. The sex ratio (male vs. female for the number of cases in Yunnan was 1.6 in the children of 0–15 years and it reached 5.7 in the adults over 15 years of age. The number of malaria cases in Yunnan was positively correlated with the imported malaria of concurrent months in the non-endemic provinces. Conclusion The endemic area of falciparum malaria in China has remained restricted to two provinces, Yunnan and Hainan. Stable transmission occurs in the bordering region of Yunnan and the hilly-forested south of Hainan. The age and gender distribution in the endemic area is

  8. Piebaldism in a 3-month-old infant: Case report

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    Milankov Olgica

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Piebaldism is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by the congenital absence of melanocytes in the affected areas of skin and hair due to mutations of the KIT protooncogene, which affects the differentiation and migration of melanoblasts. Case report. A 3 ½ month old male infant was admitted to hospital due to depigmentation of skin in the area of forehead, trunk and extremities. On admission, he had multiple, irregularly shaped areas of leucoderma present at the forehead, abdomen, lower legs and left forearm. Based on the characteristic skin features and family history, we diagnosed the boy’s leucoderma as piebaldism. Conclusion. Vitiligo differs from piebaldism by the presence of unstable hypopigmented lesions that are acquired later in life. Albinism presents with widespread skin involvement and lacks the characteristic hyperpigmented macules within hypopigmented areas.

  9. Safety of the malaria vaccine candidate, RTS,S/AS01E in 5 to 17 month old Kenyan and Tanzanian Children.

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    John Lusingu

    Full Text Available The malaria vaccine candidate, RTS,S/AS01(E, showed promising protective efficacy in a trial of Kenyan and Tanzanian children aged 5 to 17 months. Here we report on the vaccine's safety and tolerability. The experimental design was a Phase 2b, two-centre, double-blind (observer- and participant-blind, randomised (1∶1 ratio controlled trial. Three doses of study or control (rabies vaccines were administered intramuscularly at 1 month intervals. Solicited adverse events (AEs were collected for 7 days after each vaccination. There was surveillance and reporting for unsolicited adverse events for 30 days after each vaccination. Serious adverse events (SAEs were recorded throughout the study period which lasted for 14 months after dose 1 in Korogwe, Tanzania and an average of 18 months post-dose 1 in Kilifi, Kenya. Blood samples for safety monitoring of haematological, renal and hepatic functions were taken at baseline, 3, 10 and 14 months after dose 1. A total of 894 children received RTS,S/AS01(E or rabies vaccine between March and August 2007. Overall, children vaccinated with RTS,S/AS01(E had fewer SAEs (51/447 than children in the control group (88/447. One SAE episode in a RTS,S/AS01(E recipient and nine episodes among eight rabies vaccine recipients met the criteria for severe malaria. Unsolicited AEs were reported in 78% of subjects in the RTS,S/AS01(E group and 74% of subjects in the rabies vaccine group. In both vaccine groups, gastroenteritis and pneumonia were the most frequently reported unsolicited AE. Fever was the most frequently observed solicited AE and was recorded after 11% of RTS,S/AS01(E doses compared to 31% of doses of rabies vaccine. The candidate vaccine RTS,S/AS01(E showed an acceptable safety profile in children living in a malaria-endemic area in East Africa. More data on the safety of RTS,S/AS01(E will become available from the Phase 3 programme.

  10. Kompliceret malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønn, A M; Bygbjerg, Ib Christian; Jacobsen, E

    1989-01-01

    An increasing number of cases of malaria, imported to Denmark, are caused by Plasmodium falciparum and severe and complicated cases are more often seen. In the Department of Infectious Diseases, Rigshospitalet, 23 out of 32 cases, hospitalized from 1.1-30.6.1988, i.e. 72%, were caused by P...

  11. Using the information value method in a geographic information system and remote sensing for malaria mapping: a case study from India

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    Praveen Kumar Rai

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background This paper explores the scope of malaria-susceptibility modelling to predict malaria occurrence in an area.Objective An attempt has been made in Varanasi district, India, to evaluate the status of malaria disease and to develop a model by which malaria-prone zones could be predicted using five classes of relative malaria susceptibility, i.e. very low, low, moderate, high and very high categories.The information value (Info Val method was used to assess malaria occurrence and various time-were used as the independent variables. A geographical information system (GIS is employed to investigate associations between such variables and distribution of different mosquitoes responsible for malaria transmission. Accurate prediction of risk depends on a number of variables, such as land use, NDVI, climatic factors, population, distance to health centres, ponds, streams and roads etc., all of which have an influence on malaria transmission or reporting. Climatic factors, particularly rainfall, temperature and relative humidity, are known to have a major influence on the biology of mosquitoes. To produce a malaria-susceptibility map using this method, weightings are calculated for various classes in each group. The groups are then superimposed to prepare a Malaria Susceptibility Index (MSI map.Results We found that 3.87% of the malaria cases were found in areas with a low malaria-susceptibility level predicted from the model, whereas 39.86% and 26.29% of malaria cases were found in predicted high and very high susceptibility level areas, respectively.Conclusions Malaria susceptibility modelled using a GIS may have a role in predicting the risks of malaria and enable public health interventions to be better targeted.

  12. Travel patterns and demographic characteristics of malaria cases in Swaziland, 2010-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejedor-Garavito, Natalia; Dlamini, Nomcebo; Pindolia, Deepa; Soble, Adam; Ruktanonchai, Nick W; Alegana, Victor; Le Menach, Arnaud; Ntshalintshali, Nyasatu; Dlamini, Bongani; Smith, David L; Tatem, Andrew J; Kunene, Simon

    2017-09-08

    As Swaziland progresses towards national malaria elimination, the importation of parasites into receptive areas becomes increasingly important. Imported infections have the potential to instigate local transmission and sustain local parasite reservoirs. Travel histories from Swaziland's routine surveillance data from January 2010 to June 2014 were extracted and analysed. The travel patterns and demographics of rapid diagnostic test (RDT)-confirmed positive cases identified through passive and reactive case detection (RACD) were analysed and compared to those found to be negative through RACD. Of 1517 confirmed cases identified through passive surveillance, 67% reported travel history. A large proportion of positive cases reported domestic or international travel history (65%) compared to negative cases (10%). The primary risk factor for malaria infection in Swaziland was shown to be travel, more specifically international travel to Mozambique by 25- to 44-year old males, who spent on average 28 nights away. Maputo City, Inhambane and Gaza districts were the most likely travel destinations in Mozambique, and 96% of RDT-positive international travellers were either Swazi (52%) or Mozambican (44%) nationals, with Swazis being more likely to test negative. All international travellers were unlikely to have a bed net at home or use protection of any type while travelling. Additionally, paths of transmission, important border crossings and means of transport were identified. Results from this analysis can be used to direct national and well as cross-border targeting of interventions, over space, time and by sub-population. The results also highlight that collaboration between neighbouring countries is needed to tackle the importation of malaria at the regional level.

  13. To what extent does climate explain variations in reported malaria cases in early 20th century Uganda?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, Adrian M; Larsen, Laragh; McCreesh, Nicky; Taylor, David

    2016-03-31

    Malaria case statistics were analysed for the period 1926 to 1960 to identify inter-annual variations in malaria cases for the Uganda Protectorate. The analysis shows the mid-to-late 1930s to be a period of increased reported cases. After World War II, malaria cases trend down to a relative minimum in the early 1950s, before increasing rapidly after 1953 to the end of the decade. Data for the Western Province confirm these national trends, which at the time were attributed to a wide range of causes, including land development and management schemes, population mobility, interventions and misdiagnosis. Climate was occasionally proposed as a contributor to enhanced case numbers, and unusual precipitation patterns were held responsible; temperature was rarely, if ever, considered. In this study, a dynamical malaria model was driven with available precipitation and temperature data from the period for five stations located across a range of environments in Uganda. In line with the historical data, the simulations produced relatively enhanced transmission in the 1930s, although there is considerable variability between locations. In all locations, malaria transmission was low in the late 1940s and early 1950s, steeply increasing after 1954. Results indicate that past climate variability explains some of the variations in numbers of reported malaria cases. The impact of multiannual variability in temperature, while only on the order of 0.5°C, was sufficient to drive some of the trends observed in the statistics and thus the role of climate was likely underestimated in the contemporary reports. As the elimination campaigns of the 1960s followed this partly climate-driven increase in malaria, this emphasises the need to account for climate when planning and evaluating intervention strategies.

  14. To what extent does climate explain variations in reported malaria cases in early 20th century Uganda?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian M. Tompkins

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Malaria case statistics were analysed for the period 1926 to 1960 to identify inter-annual variations in malaria cases for the Uganda Protectorate. The analysis shows the mid-to-late 1930s to be a period of increased reported cases. After World War II, malaria cases trend down to a relative minimum in the early 1950s, before increasing rapidly after 1953 to the end of the decade. Data for the Western Province confirm these national trends, which at the time were attributed to a wide range of causes, including land development and management schemes, population mobility, interventions and misdiagnosis. Climate was occasionally proposed as a contributor to enhanced case numbers, and unusual precipitation patterns were held responsible; temperature was rarely, if ever, considered. In this study, a dynamical malaria model was driven with available precipitation and temperature data from the period for five stations located across a range of environments in Uganda. In line with the historical data, the simulations produced relatively enhanced transmission in the 1930s, although there is considerable variability between locations. In all locations, malaria transmission was low in the late 1940s and early 1950s, steeply increasing after 1954. Results indicate that past climate variability explains some of the variations in numbers of reported malaria cases. The impact of multiannual variability in temperature, while only on the order of 0.5°C, was sufficient to drive some of the trends observed in the statistics and thus the role of climate was likely underestimated in the contemporary reports. As the elimination campaigns of the 1960s followed this partly climate-driven increase in malaria, this emphasises the need to account for climate when planning and evaluating intervention strategies.

  15. The relationship between terrorist activities and cases of malaria in the eastern and south-eastern regions of Turkey, 1984-1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetin, Ilhan; Egri, Mucahit; Celbis, Osman; Toprak, Sadik; Ozag, Kadir

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether cases of malaria are related to terrorist activities that have occurred in the eastern and south-eastern regions of Turkey. Some of the determinants related to malaria have been investigated using a national dataset for 11 provinces located in these regions of Turkey. In these regions, both terrorist activity and cases of malaria were common from 1984 to 1998. A multiple regression technique was used to identify the variables that are significantly associated with cases of malaria. Annual incidence of malaria was chosen as the dependent variable along with three independent (explanatory) variables: annual number of terrorist incidences, people per healthcare technician and number of thick blood films per 100,000 people. Based on this analysis, it is determined that the annual number of terrorist incidences has been associated with the annual number of malaria cases in these regions of Turkey since the beginning of terrorist activity in 1984.

  16. Effect of anti-malarial interventions on trends of malaria cases, hospital admissions and deaths, 2005-2015, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aregawi, Maru; Malm, Keziah L; Wahjib, Mohammed; Kofi, Osae; Allotey, Naa-Korkor; Yaw, Peprah Nana; Abba-Baffoe, Wilmot; Segbaya, Sylvester; Owusu-Antwi, Felicia; Kharchi, Abderahmane T; Williams, Ryan O; Saalfeld, Mark; Workneh, Nibretie; Shargie, Estifanos Biru; Noor, Abdisalan M; Bart-Plange, Constance

    2017-04-26

    Since 2005, the Government of Ghana and its partners, in concerted efforts to control malaria, scaled up the use of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) and insecticide-treated nets (ITNs). Beginning in 2011, a mass campaign of long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLINs) was implemented, targeting all the population. The impact of these interventions on malaria cases, admissions and deaths was assessed using data from district hospitals. Records of malaria cases and deaths and availability of ACT in 88 hospitals, as well as at district level, ITN distribution, and indoor residual spraying were reviewed. Annual proportion of the population potentially protected by ITNs was estimated with the assumption that each LLIN covered 1.8 persons for 3 years. Changes in trends of cases and deaths in 2015 were estimated by segmented log-linear regression, comparing trends in post-scale-up (2011-2015) with that of pre-scale-up (2005-2010) period. Trends of mortality in children under 5 years old from population-based household surveys were also compared with the trends observed in hospitals for the same time period. Among all ages, the number of outpatient malaria cases (confirmed and presumed) declined by 57% (95% confidence interval [CI], 47-66%) by first half of 2015 (during the post-scale-up) compared to the pre-scale-up (2005-2010) period. The number of microscopically confirmed cases decreased by 53% (28-69%) while microscopic testing was stable. Test positivity rate (TPR) decreased by 41% (19-57%). The change in malaria admissions was insignificant while malaria deaths fell significantly by 65% (52-75%). In children under 5 years old, total malaria outpatient cases, admissions and deaths decreased by 50% (32-63%), 46% (19-75%) and 70% (49-82%), respectively. The proportion of outpatient malaria cases, admissions and deaths of all-cause conditions in both all ages and children under five also fell significantly by >30%. Similar decreases in the main malaria

  17. Malaria infection has spatial, temporal, and spatiotemporal heterogeneity in unstable malaria transmission areas in northwest Ethiopia.

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    Kassahun Alemu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malaria elimination requires successful nationwide control efforts. Detecting the spatiotemporal distribution and mapping high-risk areas are useful to effectively target pockets of malaria endemic regions for interventions. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to identify patterns of malaria distribution by space and time in unstable malaria transmission areas in northwest Ethiopia. METHODS: Data were retrieved from the monthly reports stored in the district malaria offices for the period between 2003 and 2012. Eighteen districts in the highland and fringe malaria areas were included and geo-coded for the purpose of this study. The spatial data were created in ArcGIS10 for each district. The Poisson model was used by applying Kulldorff methods using the SaTScan™ software to analyze the purely temporal, spatial and space-time clusters of malaria at a district levels. RESULTS: The study revealed that malaria case distribution has spatial, temporal, and spatiotemporal heterogeneity in unstable transmission areas. Most likely spatial malaria clusters were detected at Dera, Fogera, Farta, Libokemkem and Misrak Este districts (LLR =197764.1, p<0.001. Significant spatiotemporal malaria clusters were detected at Dera, Fogera, Farta, Libokemkem and Misrak Este districts (LLR=197764.1, p<0.001 between 2003/1/1 and 2012/12/31. A temporal scan statistics identified two high risk periods from 2009/1/1 to 2010/12/31 (LLR=72490.5, p<0.001 and from 2003/1/1 to 2005/12/31 (LLR=26988.7, p<0.001. CONCLUSION: In unstable malaria transmission areas, detecting and considering the spatiotemporal heterogeneity would be useful to strengthen malaria control efforts and ultimately achieve elimination.

  18. The role of climate variability in the spread of malaria in Bangladeshi highlands.

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    Ubydul Haque

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malaria is a major public health problem in Bangladesh, frequently occurring as epidemics since the 1990s. Many factors affect increases in malaria cases, including changes in land use, drug resistance, malaria control programs, socioeconomic issues, and climatic factors. No study has examined the relationship between malaria epidemics and climatic factors in Bangladesh. Here, we investigate the relationship between climatic parameters [rainfall, temperature, humidity, sea surface temperature (SST, El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO, the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI], and malaria cases over the last 20 years in the malaria endemic district of Chittagong Hill Tracts (CHT. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Monthly malaria case data from January 1989 to December 2008, monthly rainfall, temperature, humidity sea surface temperature in the Bay of Bengal and ENSO index at the Niño Region 3 (NIÑO3 were used. A generalized linear negative binomial regression model was developed using the number of monthly malaria cases and each of the climatic parameters. After adjusting for potential mutual confounding between climatic factors there was no evidence for any association between the number of malaria cases and temperature, rainfall and humidity. Only a low NDVI was associated with an increase in the number of malaria cases. There was no evidence of an association between malaria cases and SST in the Bay of Bengal and NIÑO3. CONCLUSION AND SIGNIFICANCE: It seems counterintuitive that a low NDVI, an indicator of low vegetation greenness, is associated with increases in malaria cases, since the primary vectors in Bangladesh, such as An. dirus, are associated with forests. This relationship can be explained by the drying up of rivers and streams creating suitable breeding sites for the vector fauna. Bangladesh has very high vector species diversity and vectors suited to these habitats may be responsible for the observed results.

  19. Reduction of incidence and relapse or recrudescence cases of malaria in the western region of the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Gabriel de Deus; Gim, Karla Nayma Mundt; Zaqueo, Guilherme Mendes; Alves, Thaianne da Cunha; Katsuragawa, Tony Hiroshi; Basano, Sergio de Almeida; Camargo, Luís Marcelo Aranha; Maciel de Sousa, Camila

    2014-09-12

    Malaria is one of the major parasitic diseases in the State of Rondônia, located in the western Brazilian Amazon. The basic treatment scheme for this disease is chloroquine and primaquine. This study evaluated the epidemiological profile of malaria in Rondônia between 2008 and 2012. The epidemiological data were provided by the Health Surveillance Agency from the State of Rondônia, and socioeconomic indicators were obtained from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics, Department of Informatics of the Unified Health System, and from the National Institute for Space Research. The analyzed variables included year of diagnosis, gender, age group, main activity performed in the 15 days previous to the diagnosis, parasite species, level of parasitemia, number of relapse/recrudescence cases, and socioeconomic and environmental data for Rondônia. A total of 238,626 cases of malaria were recorded in Rondônia during the study period. Of this total, 65.6% were men and the most prevalent age group was 20-39 years. Plasmodium vivax was the most common parasite (89.8%), followed by Plasmodium   falciparum (9.4%). An average of 30.9% of the individuals who were tested presented with relapse/recrudescence malaria. The API value was highest in 2008 and lowest in 2012, corresponding to 42.3 cases and 19.2 cases per 1,000 inhabitants, respectively. A 58% reduction in the number of malaria cases and a 36.2% reduction in the number of relapse/recrudescence malaria cases were observed, due to increases in the economy, improvements in the health system, and reduction of deforestation in this region.

  20. Chitinase 3-like 1 is induced by Plasmodium falciparum malaria and predicts outcome of cerebral malaria and severe malarial anaemia in a case-control study of African children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdman, Laura K; Petes, Carlene; Lu, Ziyue; Dhabangi, Aggrey; Musoke, Charles; Cserti-Gazdewich, Christine M; Lee, Chun Geun; Liles, Wayne Conrad; Elias, Jack A; Kain, Kevin C

    2014-07-21

    Severe and fatal malaria are associated with dysregulated host inflammatory responses to infection. Chitinase 3-like 1 (CHI3L1) is a secreted glycoprotein implicated in regulating immune responses. Expression and function of CHI3L1 in malaria infection were investigated. Plasma levels of CHI3L1 were quantified in a case-control study of Ugandan children presenting with Plasmodium falciparum malaria. CHI3L1 levels were compared in children with uncomplicated malaria (UM; n = 53), severe malarial anaemia (SMA; n = 59) and cerebral malaria (CM; n = 44) using the Kruskall Wallis-test, and evaluated for utility in predicting fatal (n = 23) versus non-fatal (n = 80) outcomes in severe disease using the Mann Whitney U test, receiver operating characteristic curves, and combinatorial analysis. Co-culture of P. falciparum with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the Plasmodium berghei ANKA experimental model of cerebral malaria were used to examine the role of CHI3L1 in severe malaria. In children presenting with falciparum malaria, CHI3L1 levels were increased in SMA and CM versus UM (p Plasmodium falciparum stimulated CHI3L1 production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. CHI3L1 was increased in plasma and brain tissue in experimental cerebral malaria, but targeted Chi3l1 deletion did not alter cytokine production or survival in this model. These data suggest that plasma CHI3L1 measured at presentation correlates with malaria severity and predicts outcome in paediatric SMA and CM, but do not support a causal role for CHI3L1 in cerebral malaria pathobiology in the model tested.

  1. Evaluation of Renal Function in Pregnant Women with Malaria: A Case-Control Study in a Mesoendemic Area

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    Justice Afrifa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Malaria is known to have devastating effects on mortality in tropical and subtropical regions with the effect being magnified in people with weakened immunity such as those in pregnancy. We assessed the effect of malaria on renal function of pregnant women receiving antenatal care in a mesoendemic area of Ghana. Methodology. A case-control study that enrolled a total of 100 pregnant women (50 with confirmed gestational malaria as cases and 50 without malaria as controls. Sociodemographic characteristics, obstetric history (obtained with a questionnaire, urea, creatinine, sodium, and potassium were analyzed using a chemistry automated analyzer. Results. Plasma urea and creatinine were significantly increased (P=0.0003 and P<0.0001, resp. among cases compared to the controls. Also the levels of urea (P=0.033, creatinine (P=0.032, and parasitaemia (0.016 were significantly increased with increasing gestational age. Conclusion. Malaria has a significant impact on renal function (most importantly, urea and creatinine and is also significantly associated with increasing gestational age among our study participants.

  2. The Current Situation on Malaria in Astrakhan Region

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    R.S. Arakelian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study. To describe the current situation on malaria in Astrakhan region for 2000–2014. Materials and methods. The first data on malarious situation in the Astrakhan region belongs to 1894, when in the Astrakhan province there were registered 54 952 cases of malaria. The results of the study. In Astrakhan region for the period from 2000 to 2014 there were registered 90 cases of human malaria, including imported cases from the CIS — 70 (78 %, secondary from imported — 11 (12 % and relapse — 9 (10 %. Geographically, the foci of malaria were distributed as follows: Astrakhan — 58 foci (65 %, including Leninskyi district — 27 cases (46 % of all urban cases, the Kirov and the Soviet districts — 15 foci (26 % and Truso district — 1 case (2 % and passing through Astrakhan — 2 foci (2 %; Astrakhan region — 30 sites (33 %, including Krasnoyarsk district — 9 sites (30 %, Narimanov district — 8 CL. (27 % of all rural cases, Akhtubinsky district — 5 cases (17 %, Kharabalinskyi district — 4 sites (13 %, Chernoyarskyi district — 2 sites (7 %, Kamyziakskyi and Limansky districts 1 site (3 %. Conclusions. On the territory of Astrakhan region throughout the transmission season of effective contamination of mosquitoes (May — September over the last 10 years there have been imported cases of malaria. The maximum number of reported imported malaria cases was observed in 2001 — 35 cases. In Astrakhan region the most frequently recorded is the three-day malaria — 94 %. The importation of malaria in the region was carried out in 78 % of cases from Azerbaijan and Tajikistan. After a long break, in Astrakhan region there were registered new active lesions, indicating the presence of secondary from imported malaria cases and the emergence of new active foci of the 1st degree. The disease was recorded more often in the warmer months, as evidenced by the incidence — 80 % of all reported cases.

  3. Can timely vector control interventions triggered by atypical environmental conditions prevent malaria epidemics? A case-study from Wajir County, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Peter; Harries, Anthony D; Van den Bergh, Rafael; Noor, Abdisalan; Snow, Robert W; Tayler-Smith, Katherine; Hinderaker, Sven Gudmund; Zachariah, Rony; Allan, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Atypical environmental conditions with drought followed by heavy rainfall and flooding in arid areas in sub-Saharan Africa can lead to explosive epidemics of malaria, which might be prevented through timely vector-control interventions. Wajir County in Northeast Kenya is classified as having seasonal malaria transmission. The aim of this study was to describe in Wajir town the environmental conditions, the scope and timing of vector-control interventions and the associated resulting burden of malaria at two time periods (1996-1998 and 2005-2007). This is a cross-sectional descriptive and ecological study using data collected for routine program monitoring and evaluation. In both time periods, there were atypical environmental conditions with drought and malnutrition followed by massive monthly rainfall resulting in flooding and animal/human Rift Valley Fever. In 1998, this was associated with a large and explosive malaria epidemic (weekly incidence rates peaking at 54/1,000 population/week) with vector-control interventions starting over six months after the massive rainfall and when the malaria epidemic was abating. In 2007, vector-control interventions started sooner within about three months after the massive rainfall and no malaria epidemic was recorded with weekly malaria incidence rates never exceeding 0.5 per 1,000 population per week. Did timely vector-control interventions in Wajir town prevent a malaria epidemic? In 2007, the neighboring county of Garissa experienced similar climatic events as Wajir, but vector-control interventions started six months after the heavy un-seasonal rainfall and large scale flooding resulted in a malaria epidemic with monthly incidence rates peaking at 40/1,000 population. In conclusion, this study suggests that atypical environmental conditions can herald a malaria outbreak in certain settings. In turn, this should alert responsible stakeholders about the need to act rapidly and preemptively with appropriate and wide

  4. Use of RDTs to improve malaria diagnosis and fever case management at primary health care facilities in Uganda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabakooza Jane

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early and accurate diagnosis of malaria followed by prompt treatment reduces the risk of severe disease in malaria endemic regions. Presumptive treatment of malaria is widely practised where microscopy or rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs are not readily available. With the introduction of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT for treatment of malaria in many low-resource settings, there is need to target treatment to patients with parasitologically confirmed malaria in order to improve quality of care, reduce over consumption of anti-malarials, reduce drug pressure and in turn delay development and spread of drug resistance. This study evaluated the effect of malaria RDTs on health workers' anti-malarial drug (AMD prescriptions among outpatients at low level health care facilities (LLHCF within different malaria epidemiological settings in Uganda. Methods All health workers (HWs in 21 selected intervention (where RDTs were deployed LLHF were invited for training on the use RDTs. All HWs were trained to use RDTs for parasitological diagnosis of all suspected malaria cases irrespective of age. Five LLHCFs with clinical diagnosis (CD only were included for comparison. Subsequently AMD prescriptions were compared using both a 'pre - post' and 'intervention - control' analysis designs. In-depth interviews of the HWs were conducted to explore any factors that influence AMD prescription practices. Results A total of 166,131 out-patient attendances (OPD were evaluated at 21 intervention LLHCFs. Overall use of RDTs resulted in a 38% point reduction in AMD prescriptions. There was a two-fold reduction (RR 0.62, 95% CI 0.55-0.70 in AMD prescription with the greatest reduction in the hypo-endemic setting (RR 0.46 95% CI 0.51-0.53 but no significant change in the urban setting (RR1.01, p-value = 0.820. Over 90% of all eligible OPD patients were offered a test. An average of 30% (range 25%-35% of the RDT-negative fever patients received

  5. Prevalence of multiple drug-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria cases in Northeast India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Jitendra; Khan, Siraj Ahmed; Soni, Monika; Dutta, Prafulla

    2017-01-01

    Two numbers of Plasmodium falciparum field isolates from Gossingpara, Runikhata area in Chirang district of Assam had shown multiple mutations in Pfcrt-dhfr-dhps gene (up to seven mutations: One mutation in Pfcrt gene, three mutations in Pfdhfr gene and three mutations in Pfdhps gene). Similarly, two cases in Bat camp, Miao area under Changlang district of Arunachal Pradesh had shown a total of eight mutations, of which one mutation in Pfcrt gene, three mutations in Pfdhfr gene, three mutations in Pfdhps gene and one mutation in PfATPase6 gene. One case in 3 Miles, Miao area of Changlang district has shown mutations in Pfcrt(one mutation), Pfdhfr(four mutations) and Pfdhps(three mutations) gene. These results indicated that there is an existence of multiple mutant P. falciparum malaria cases in northeastern region of India.

  6. Case management of malaria fever in Cambodia: results from national anti-malarial outlet and household surveys

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    Littrell Megan

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Continued progress towards global reduction in morbidity and mortality due to malaria requires scale-up of effective case management with artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT. The first case of artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum was documented in western Cambodia. Spread of artemisinin resistance would threaten recent gains in global malaria control. As such, the anti-malarial market and malaria case management practices in Cambodia have global significance. Methods Nationally-representative household and outlet surveys were conducted in 2009 among areas in Cambodia with malaria risk. An anti-malarial audit was conducted among all public and private outlets with the potential to sell anti-malarials. Indicators on availability, price and relative volumes sold/distributed were calculated across types of anti-malarials and outlets. The household survey collected information about management of recent "malaria fevers." Case management in the public versus private sector, and anti-malarial treatment based on malaria diagnostic testing were examined. Results Most public outlets (85% and nearly half of private pharmacies, clinics and drug stores stock ACT. Oral artemisinin monotherapy was found in pharmacies/clinics (9%, drug stores (14%, mobile providers (4% and grocery stores (2%. Among total anti-malarial volumes sold/distributed nationally, 6% are artemisinin monotherapies and 72% are ACT. Only 45% of people with recent "malaria fever" reportedly receive a diagnostic test, and the most common treatment acquired is a drug cocktail containing no identifiable anti-malarial. A self-reported positive diagnostic test, particularly when received in the public sector, improves likelihood of receiving anti-malarial treatment. Nonetheless, anti-malarial treatment of reportedly positive cases is low among people who seek treatment exclusively in the public (61% and private (42% sectors. Conclusions While data on the anti

  7. Malaria Transmission Risk Factor In West Java (Epidemiology Study About Vector, Plasmodium parasite and Environmental Risk Factors For Malaria Cases

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    Lukman Hakim

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the territory is divided with the province of Banten, in West Java there are five regencies that defined as malaria endemic area, there are Ciamis, Tasikmalaya, Garut, Cianjur and Sukabumi. Sufferer, concentrated in southern coastal areas (Indonesian Ocean starting from the beach of Kalipucang at Ciamis up to coast of Cikakak at Sukabumi which borders the province of Banten and also mountain and plantations areas. Malaria morbidity incidence risk factors is differ in each of these endemic areas. In general is the presence of malaria patients without symptoms who can be a source of infection that so difficult to know its existence. Still the number of standing water that can become mosqui-to breeding places of Anopheles spp, such as fish pond, small puddle on the riverside, shrimp pond, mangrove forests that potentially at the beginning of the rainy season, the fields during rice that potential when the rice growing and the river that potential in the dry season. The existence of high population mobility and also the number of vegetation in the surrounding residential population and the existence of cattle are placed close to settle-ments.

  8. Exploring the relationship between malaria, rainfall intermittency, and spatial variation in rainfall seasonality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkord, C. L.; Wimberly, M. C.; Henebry, G. M.; Senay, G. B.

    2014-12-01

    Malaria is a major public health problem throughout tropical regions of the world. Successful prevention and treatment of malaria requires an understanding of the environmental factors that affect the life cycle of both the malaria pathogens, protozoan parasites, and its vectors, anopheline mosquitos. Because the egg, larval, and pupal stages of mosquito development occur in aquatic habitats, information about the spatial and temporal distribution of rainfall is critical for modeling malaria risk. Potential sources of hydrological data include satellite-derived rainfall estimates (TRMM and GPM), evapotranspiration derived from a simplified surface energy balance, and estimates of soil moisture and fractional water cover from passive microwave imagery. Previous studies have found links between malaria cases and total monthly or weekly rainfall in areas where both are highly seasonal. However it is far from clear that monthly or weekly summaries are the best metrics to use to explain malaria outbreaks. It is possible that particular temporal or spatial patterns of rainfall result in better mosquito habitat and thus higher malaria risk. We used malaria case data from the Amhara region of Ethiopia and satellite-derived rainfall estimates to explore the relationship between malaria outbreaks and rainfall with the goal of identifying the most useful rainfall metrics for modeling malaria occurrence. First, we explored spatial variation in the seasonal patterns of both rainfall and malaria cases in Amhara. Second, we assessed the relative importance of different metrics of rainfall intermittency, including alternation of wet and dry spells, the strength of intensity fluctuations, and spatial variability in these measures, in determining the length and severity of malaria outbreaks. We also explored the sensitivity of our results to the choice of method for describing rainfall intermittency and the spatial and temporal scale at which metrics were calculated. Results

  9. Assessing the impact of meteorological factors on malaria patients in demilitarized zones in Republic of Korea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Se-Min Hwang; Seok-Joon Yoon; Yoo-Mi Jung; Geun-Yong Kwon; Soo-Nam Jo; Eun-Jeong Jang; Myoung-Ok Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Background:The trend of military patients becoming infected with vivox malaria reemerged in the Republic of Korea (ROK) in 1993.The common explanation has been that infective Anopheles mosquitoes from the Democratic People's Republic of Korea have invaded Republic of Korea's demilitarized zone (DMZ).The aim of this study was to verify the relationship between meteorological factors and the number of malaria patients in the military in this region.Methods:The authors estimated the effects of meteorological factors on vivax malaria patients from the military based on the monthly number of malaria cases between 2006 and 2011.Temperature,precipitation,snow depth,wind velocity,relative humidity,duration of sunshine,and cloud cover were selected as the meteorological factors to be studied.A systematic pattern in the spatial distribution of malaria cases was assessed using the Moran's Index.Granger causality tests and cross-correlation coefficients were used to evaluate the relationship between meteorological factors and malaria patients in the military.Results:Spatial analysis revealed significant clusters of malaria patients in the military in Republic of Korea in 2011 (Moran's l=0.136,p-value =0.026).In the six years investigated,the number of malaria patients in the military in Paju decreased,but the number of malaria patients in the military in Hwacheon and Chuncheon increased.Monthly average,maximum and minimum temperatures;wind velocity;and relative humidity were found to be predicting factors of malaria in patients in the military in Paju.In contrast,wind velocity alone was not able to predict malaria in Hwacheon and Chuncheon,however,precipitation and cloud cover were able to predict malaria in Hwacheon and Chuncheon.Conclusions:This study demonstrated that the number of malaria patients in the military is correlated with meteorological factors.The variation in occurrence of malaria cases was principally attributed to differences in meteorological factors by

  10. Towards eliminating malaria in high endemic countries: the roles of community health workers and related cadres and their challenges in integrated community case management for malaria: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunguya, Bruno F; Mlunde, Linda B; Ayer, Rakesh; Jimba, Masamine

    2017-01-03

    Human resource for health crisis has impaired global efforts against malaria in highly endemic countries. To address this, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended scaling-up of community health workers (CHWs) and related cadres owing to their documented success in malaria and other disease prevention and management. Evidence is inconsistent on the roles and challenges they encounter in malaria interventions. This systematic review aims to summarize evidence on roles and challenges of CHWs and related cadres in integrated community case management for malaria (iCCM). This systematic review retrieved evidence from PubMed, CINAHL, ISI Web of Knowledge, and WHO regional databases. Terms extracted from the Boolean phrase used for PubMed were also used in other databases. The review included studies with Randomized Control Trial, Quasi-experimental, Pre-post interventional, Longitudinal and cohort, Cross-sectional, Case study, and Secondary data analysis. Because of heterogeneity, only narrative synthesis was conducted for this review. A total of 66 articles were eligible for analysis out of 1380 studies retrieved. CHWs and related cadre roles in malaria interventions included: malaria case management, prevention including health surveillance and health promotion specific to malaria. Despite their documented success, CHWs and related cadres succumb to health system challenges. These are poor and unsustainable finance for iCCM, workforce related challenges, lack of and unsustainable supply of medicines and diagnostics, lack of information and research, service delivery and leadership challenges. Community health workers and related cadres had important preventive, case management and promotive roles in malaria interventions. To enable their effective integration into the health systems, the identified challenges should be addressed. They include: introducing sustainable financing on iCCM programmes, tailoring their training to address the identified gaps

  11. Malaria og graviditet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, A L; Rønn, A M; Langhoff-Roos, J

    1992-01-01

    In regions where malaria is endemism, the disease is a recognised cause of complications of pregnancy such as spontaneous abortion, premature delivery, intrauterine growth retardation and foetal death. Malaria is seldom seen in pregnant women in Denmark but, during the past two years, the authors...... the patients but also their practitioners were unaware that malaria can occur several years after exposure. Three out of the four patients had employed malaria prophylaxis. As resistance to malarial prophylactics in current use is increasing steadily, chemoprophylaxis should be supplemented by mechanical...... protection against malaria and insect repellents. As a rule, malaria is treated with chloroquine. In cases of Falciparum malaria in whom chloroquine resistance is suspected, treatment with mefloquine may be employed although this should only be employed in cases of dire necessity in pregnant patients during...

  12. "Even if you know everything you can forget": health worker perceptions of mobile phone text-messaging to improve malaria case-management in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Caroline O H; Wasunna, Beatrice; Sudoi, Raymond; Githinji, Sophie; Snow, Robert W; Zurovac, Dejan

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a qualitative study to investigate the perceptions and experiences of health workers involved in a a cluster-randomized controlled trial of a novel intervention to improve health worker malaria case-management in 107 government health facilities in Kenya. The intervention involved sending text-messages about paediatric outpatient malaria case-management accompanied by "motivating" quotes to health workers' mobile phones. Ten malaria messages were developed reflecting recommendations from the Kenyan national guidelines. Two messages were delivered per day for 5 working days and the process was repeated for 26 weeks (May to October 2009). The accompanying quotes were unique to each message. The intervention was delivered to 119 health workers and there were significant improvements in correct artemether-lumefantrine (AL) management both immediately after the intervention (November 2009) and 6 months later (May 2010). In-depth interviews with 24 health workers were undertaken to investigate the possible drivers of this change. The results suggest high acceptance of all components of the intervention, with the active delivery of information in an on the job setting, the ready availability of new and stored text messages and the perception of being kept 'up to date' as important factors influencing practice. Applying the construct of stages of change we infer that in this intervention the SMS messages were operating primarily at the action and maintenance stages of behaviour change achieving their effect by creating an enabling environment and providing a prompt to action for the implementation of case management practices that had already been accepted as the clinical norm by the health workers. Future trials testing the effectiveness of SMS reminders in creating an enabling environment for the establishment of new norms in clinical practice as well as in providing a prompt to action for the implementation of the new case

  13. "Even if you know everything you can forget": health worker perceptions of mobile phone text-messaging to improve malaria case-management in Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline O H Jones

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a qualitative study to investigate the perceptions and experiences of health workers involved in a a cluster-randomized controlled trial of a novel intervention to improve health worker malaria case-management in 107 government health facilities in Kenya. The intervention involved sending text-messages about paediatric outpatient malaria case-management accompanied by "motivating" quotes to health workers' mobile phones. Ten malaria messages were developed reflecting recommendations from the Kenyan national guidelines. Two messages were delivered per day for 5 working days and the process was repeated for 26 weeks (May to October 2009. The accompanying quotes were unique to each message. The intervention was delivered to 119 health workers and there were significant improvements in correct artemether-lumefantrine (AL management both immediately after the intervention (November 2009 and 6 months later (May 2010. In-depth interviews with 24 health workers were undertaken to investigate the possible drivers of this change. The results suggest high acceptance of all components of the intervention, with the active delivery of information in an on the job setting, the ready availability of new and stored text messages and the perception of being kept 'up to date' as important factors influencing practice. Applying the construct of stages of change we infer that in this intervention the SMS messages were operating primarily at the action and maintenance stages of behaviour change achieving their effect by creating an enabling environment and providing a prompt to action for the implementation of case management practices that had already been accepted as the clinical norm by the health workers. Future trials testing the effectiveness of SMS reminders in creating an enabling environment for the establishment of new norms in clinical practice as well as in providing a prompt to action for the implementation of the new

  14. Malaria Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CDC Malaria Branch clinician. malaria@cdc.gov Malaria Facts Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Malaria in ... to determine definitively which species are involved. Other Facts Five times, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or ...

  15. A case of Plasmodium vivax malaria associated with severe autoimmune hemolytic anaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anemia in malaria is multifactorial. Autoimmune hemolysis is an extremely rare cause of anemia in malaria and more so in vivax malaria. A 35-year-old female presented to us with fever and anemia. She was diagnosed as vivax malaria with autoimmune hemolytc anemia by a positive Direct Coomb′s test. We treated her with antimalarial durgs, corticosteroids, and transfused her with the least incompatible blood. The patient recovered and was discharged. Hence, we suggest that autoimmune hemolysis be considered an important cause of anemia in Plasmodium vivax (P. vivax malaria.

  16. Spatial and temporal patterns of malaria incidence in Mozambique

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    Zacarias Orlando P

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study is to analyze the spatial and temporal patterns of malaria incidence as to determine the means by which climatic factors such as temperature, rainfall and humidity affect its distribution in Maputo province, Mozambique. Methods This study presents a model of malaria that evolves in space and time in Maputo province-Mozambique, over a ten years period (1999-2008. The model incorporates malaria cases and their relation to environmental variables. Due to incompleteness of climatic data, a multiple imputation technique is employed. Additionally, the whole province is interpolated through a Gaussian process. This method overcomes the misalignment problem of environmental variables (available at meteorological stations - points and malaria cases (available as aggregates for every district - area. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC methods are used to obtain posterior inference and Deviance Information Criteria (DIC to perform model comparison. Results A Bayesian model with interaction terms was found to be the best fitted model. Malaria incidence was associated to humidity and maximum temperature. Malaria risk increased with maximum temperature over 28°C (relative risk (RR of 0.0060 and 95% Bayesian credible interval (CI of 0.00033-0.0095 and humidity (relative risk (RR of 0.00741 and 95% Bayesian CI 0.005141-0.0093. The results would suggest that additional non-climatic factors including socio-economic status, elevation, etc. also influence malaria transmission in Mozambique. Conclusions These results demonstrate the potential of climate predictors particularly, humidity and maximum temperature in explaining malaria incidence risk for the studied period in Maputo province. Smoothed maps obtained as monthly average of malaria incidence allowed to visualize months of initial and peak transmission. They also illustrate a variation on malaria incidence risk that might not be related to climatic factors

  17. Malaria investigation and treatment of children admitted to county hospitals in western Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amboko, Beatrice I; Ayieko, Philip; Ogero, Morris; Julius, Thomas; Irimu, Grace; English, Mike

    2016-10-18

    Up to 90 % of the global burden of malaria morbidity and mortality occurs in sub-Saharan Africa and children under-five bear a disproportionately high malaria burden. Effective inpatient case management can reduce severe malaria mortality and morbidity, but there are few reports of how successfully international and national recommendations are adopted in management of inpatient childhood malaria. A descriptive cross-sectional study of inpatient malaria case management practices was conducted using data collected over 24 months in five hospitals from high malaria risk areas participating in the Clinical Information Network (CIN) in Kenya. This study describes documented clinical features, laboratory investigations and treatment of malaria in children (2-59 months) and adherence to national guidelines. A total of 13,014 children had a malaria diagnosis on admission to the five hospitals between March, 2014 and February, 2016. Their median age was 24 months (IQR 12-36 months). The proportion with a diagnostic test for malaria requested was 11,981 (92.1 %). Of 10,388 patients with malaria test results documented, 8050 (77.5 %) were positive and anti-malarials were prescribed in 6745 (83.8 %). Malaria treatment was prescribed in 1613/2338 (69.0 %) children with a negative malaria result out of which only 52 (3.2 %) had a repeat malaria test done as recommended in national guidelines. Documentation of clinical features was good across all hospitals, but quinine remained the most prescribed malaria drug (47.2 % of positive cases) although a transition to artesunate (46.1 %) was observed. Although documented clinical features suggested approximately half of positive malaria patients were not severe cases artemether-lumefantrine was prescribed on admission in only 3.7 % cases. Despite improvements in inpatient malaria care, high rates of presumptive treatment for test negative children and likely over-use of injectable anti-malarial drugs were observed. Three

  18. Malaria investigation and treatment of children admitted to county hospitals in western Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatrice I. Amboko

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Up to 90 % of the global burden of malaria morbidity and mortality occurs in sub-Saharan Africa and children under-five bear a disproportionately high malaria burden. Effective inpatient case management can reduce severe malaria mortality and morbidity, but there are few reports of how successfully international and national recommendations are adopted in management of inpatient childhood malaria. Methods A descriptive cross-sectional study of inpatient malaria case management practices was conducted using data collected over 24 months in five hospitals from high malaria risk areas participating in the Clinical Information Network (CIN in Kenya. This study describes documented clinical features, laboratory investigations and treatment of malaria in children (2–59 months and adherence to national guidelines. Results A total of 13,014 children had a malaria diagnosis on admission to the five hospitals between March, 2014 and February, 2016. Their median age was 24 months (IQR 12–36 months. The proportion with a diagnostic test for malaria requested was 11,981 (92.1 %. Of 10,388 patients with malaria test results documented, 8050 (77.5 % were positive and anti-malarials were prescribed in 6745 (83.8 %. Malaria treatment was prescribed in 1613/2338 (69.0 % children with a negative malaria result out of which only 52 (3.2 % had a repeat malaria test done as recommended in national guidelines. Documentation of clinical features was good across all hospitals, but quinine remained the most prescribed malaria drug (47.2 % of positive cases although a transition to artesunate (46.1 % was observed. Although documented clinical features suggested approximately half of positive malaria patients were not severe cases artemether-lumefantrine was prescribed on admission in only 3.7 % cases. Conclusions Despite improvements in inpatient malaria care, high rates of presumptive treatment for test negative children and likely

  19. Influence of risk perception, preventive behavior, movement and environment on malaria infection in Lundu district, Sarawak, Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norliza Jusoh

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of malaria in Sarawak is among the highest in Malaysia despite its downward trend since 2002. This study was conducted to identify the dominant risk factors related to malaria infection. A case-control study was conducted in Lundu District, Sarawak. Cases were 96 indigenous malaria cases registered from January to September 2005 at Lundu District Health Office. Controls were selected among those who never contracted malaria originating from the same villages as cases. Cases and control were similarly distributed with respect to age, number of household and total household income per month. Cases were more likely than controls to report high risk occupation, opened eaves, ever had movement for those aged 50 years or over and car ownership. Older age, male, lower socioeconomic level and perception of fatality toward malaria increased risk to malaria infection. Male than female had seven-fold risk to be malaria infected [adjusted odds ratio (ORa = 7.09; 95% confidence interval (CI = 3.21-15.65]. In term of perception of fatality toward malaria, those who did not have than did have perception of fatality toward malaria had six-fold risk to be malaria infected (ORa = 6.38; 95% CI = 1.32-30.87. On contrary, those who had lower than middle and high per capita income per month had 85% lowered risk to be malaria infected (ORa = 0.15; 95% CI = 0.03-0.72. Male, older age, lower education and socioeconomy level, lower perception towards malaria, or lower environment sanitation had increased risk to be malaria infected. (Med J Indones 2007; 16:267-71Keywords: malaria, gender, sosioeconomics, perception, protective personal measure, environmental

  20. Tuberculous meningitis in a 3 month old infanta case report

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    M.J. Saffar

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis especially tuberculous meningitis rarely accurs before 3 months of age. Though treatable, it may be fatal despite modern treatment. The diagnosis of congenital TB/TB meningitis should be considered in any neonate/infant with pneumonia –meningitis who fails to respond to conventional treatment, particularly in a child from ethnic or socioeconomic environment where tuberculosis is prevalent.

  1. Tuberculous meningitis in a 3 month old infanta case report

    OpenAIRE

    M.J. Saffar; V. Ghafari Saravi

    2006-01-01

    Tuberculosis especially tuberculous meningitis rarely accurs before 3 months of age. Though treatable, it may be fatal despite modern treatment. The diagnosis of congenital TB/TB meningitis should be considered in any neonate/infant with pneumonia –meningitis who fails to respond to conventional treatment, particularly in a child from ethnic or socioeconomic environment where tuberculosis is prevalent.

  2. Strategies For Malaria Control In Mangalore City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Udaya .N

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Research questions: What different strategies should be used to effectively control problem of malaria? Objectives: 1 To study the problem of malaria. 2 To study different strategies for effective control of malaria. Study design: Observational and record based. The problem of malaria was studied for three years from 1996-1998 Participants: Individuals having fever. Setting: Community based in Mangalore City. Study variables: Fever cases, blood slides prepared, slides found positive, agency-wise, species-wise and year-wise positivity. Statistical methods: Simple proportions. Results: The yield of cases has been shown to highest in passive surveillance, as reflected in high slide positivity rates. A total of 95,898 slides were prepared, out of which 19,169 were positive for malaria parasite. Thus, the overall side positivity was 20%. The SPR in passive surveillance was 34.5%. Month-wise distribution of positive cases showed high SPR and low Pv/Pf ratios during non-malaria seasons. It is suggested to improve passive surveillance to achieve high SPR thereby leading to substantial saving on slides, laboratory services and transport expenditure.

  3. A case of Plasmodium vivax malaria with spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage and acute renal failure, severe thrombocytopenia, with anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govind S Shiddapur

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available When we talk about severe malaria, we usually think of Plasmodium falciparum. However, in recent times, Plasmodium vivax has also been reported to cause severe multi-organ dysfunction and life-threatening disease similar to P. falciparum. We report here a case of P. vivax malaria in a young boy from an endemic zone, who developed acute renal failure, severe thrombocytopenia, and anemia and later developed spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage. Multisystem involvement in a patient with P. vivax is rare, and subarachnoid hemorrhage is an unusual presentation.

  4. [Establishment of malaria early warning system in Jiangsu Province III effect of automatic early warning information system on the response of malaria elimination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Ming; Zhou, Hua-Yun; Liu, Yao-Bao; Cao, Yuan-Yuan; Cao, Jun; Gao, Qi

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of automatic early warning information system on the response of malaria elimination in Jiangsu Province through the operation of the national automatic early warning system of infectious diseases. The malaria early warning information was collected from the automatic early warning information subsystem in the national information system for diseases control and prevention. Malaria early warning signals were analyzed from September 1 to December 31, 2012. The statistical analysis was conducted for the completion rates of case investigation within 3 days before and after the application of malaria early warning information system. Jiangsu Province received 85 mobile phone short messages (SMS) of malaria case from early warning system from September 1 to December 31, 2012. After judgments, 23 cases were deleted including 8 repeated cases and 15 cases that were excluded through the microscopy examination and epidemiological investigation by the confirmation of county CDC. From July to December in 2012, the monthly completion rates of case investigation within 3 days were 55.56%, 78.57%, 90.00%, 100%, 100% and 100%, respectively. The completion rates of case investigation within 3 days in July, August, September and October were significantly different by chi2 test ( chi2 = 10.66, P system. The malaria warning system from the national infectious diseases can effectively improve the response to malaria cases for primary CDC. It also plays an important role for the timely confirmation and diagnosis of malaria cases.

  5. A description of malaria sentinel surveillance: a case study in Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukich, Joshua O; Butts, Jessica; Miles, Melody; Berhane, Yemane; Nahusenay, Honelgn; Malone, Joseph L; Dissanayake, Gunawardena; Reithinger, Richard; Keating, Joseph

    2014-03-11

    In the context of the massive scale up of malaria interventions, there is increasing recognition that the current capacity of routine malaria surveillance conducted in most African countries through integrated health management information systems is inadequate. The timeliness of reporting to higher levels of the health system through health management information systems is often too slow for rapid action on focal infectious diseases such as malaria. The purpose of this paper is to: 1) describe the implementation of a malaria sentinel surveillance system in Ethiopia to help fill this gap; 2) describe data use for epidemic detection and response as well as programmatic decision making; and 3) discuss lessons learned in the context of creating and running this system. As part of a comprehensive strategy to monitor malaria trends in Oromia Regional State, Ethiopia, a system of ten malaria sentinel sites was established to collect data on key malaria morbidity and mortality indicators. To ensure the sentinel surveillance system provides timely, actionable data, the sentinel facilities send aggregate data weekly through short message service (SMS) to a central database server. Bland-Altman plots and Poisson regression models were used to investigate concordance of malaria indicator reports and malaria trends over time, respectively. This paper describes three implementation challenges that impacted system performance in terms of: 1) ensuring a timely and accurate data reporting process; 2) capturing complete and accurate patient-level data; and 3) expanding the usefulness and generalizability of the system's data to monitor progress towards the national malaria control goals of reducing malaria deaths and eventual elimination of transmission. The use of SMS for reporting surveillance data was identified as a promising practice for accurately tracking malaria trends in Oromia. The rapid spread of this technology across Africa offers promising opportunities to collect

  6. Major Improvements in the Quality of Malaria Case-Management under the “Test and Treat” Policy in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurovac, Dejan; Githinji, Sophie; Memusi, Dorothy; Kigen, Samuel; Machini, Beatrice; Muturi, Alex; Otieno, Gabriel; Snow, Robert W.; Nyandigisi, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Background Monitoring implementation of the “test and treat” case-management policy for malaria is an important component of all malaria control programmes in Africa. Unfortunately, routine information systems are commonly deficient to provide necessary information. Using health facility surveys we monitored health systems readiness and malaria case-management practices prior to and following implementation of the 2010 “test and treat” policy in Kenya. Methods/Findings Between 2010 and 2013 six national, cross-sectional, health facility surveys were undertaken. The number of facilities assessed ranged between 172 and 176, health workers interviewed between 216 and 237 and outpatient consultations for febrile patients evaluated between 1,208 and 2,408 across six surveys. Comparing baseline and the last survey results, all readiness indicators showed significant (pmalaria test (RDT vs microscopy). Of eight dosing, dispensing and counseling tasks, improvements were observed for four tasks. Overall AL use for febrile patients decreased from 63.5% to 35.6% (pKenya. Some gaps towards universal targets still remained. Other countries facing similar needs and challenges may consider health facility surveys to monitor malaria case-management. PMID:24663961

  7. Major improvements in the quality of malaria case-management under the "test and treat" policy in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurovac, Dejan; Githinji, Sophie; Memusi, Dorothy; Kigen, Samuel; Machini, Beatrice; Muturi, Alex; Otieno, Gabriel; Snow, Robert W; Nyandigisi, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring implementation of the "test and treat" case-management policy for malaria is an important component of all malaria control programmes in Africa. Unfortunately, routine information systems are commonly deficient to provide necessary information. Using health facility surveys we monitored health systems readiness and malaria case-management practices prior to and following implementation of the 2010 "test and treat" policy in Kenya. Between 2010 and 2013 six national, cross-sectional, health facility surveys were undertaken. The number of facilities assessed ranged between 172 and 176, health workers interviewed between 216 and 237 and outpatient consultations for febrile patients evaluated between 1,208 and 2,408 across six surveys. Comparing baseline and the last survey results, all readiness indicators showed significant (pmalaria test (RDT vs microscopy). Of eight dosing, dispensing and counseling tasks, improvements were observed for four tasks. Overall AL use for febrile patients decreased from 63.5% to 35.6% (pKenya. Some gaps towards universal targets still remained. Other countries facing similar needs and challenges may consider health facility surveys to monitor malaria case-management.

  8. April 2015 pulmonary case of the month: get down

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pham M

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. History of Present Illness: A 59 year old woman was admitted with hypercapnic respiratory failure and an altered mental state. She had progressive “breathing issues” for the last year and was increasingly error prone with decreased mental acuity at the end of her work shift for the last 6 months. She receives oxygen at 2 L by nasal cannula at home and has had several admissions over the last 3 months for hypercapnic respiratory failure. Past Medical History: She has a history of obstructive sleep apnea with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP intolerance, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and fibromyalgia. She is a life-long nonsmoker. Physical Examination: Vital signs: T 36.9º C, P 116 beats/min, R 42 breaths/min, BP 134/80 mm Hg, SpO2 93% on room air. General: She appeared very short of breath. Neck: No jugular venous distention. Lungs: Clear anteriorly. Heart: RR with a tachycardia. Abdomen: no organomegaly or ...

  9. [WHO's malaria program Roll Back Malaria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrvang, B; Godal, T

    2000-05-30

    Malaria is one of the main health problems in the world with 300-500 millions cases yearly and about one million deaths, mainly children in Sub-Saharan Africa. In the 1990s the malaria problem in Africa has increased, although we have methods to control the disease. In 1998 the new secretary general of WHO, Gro Harlem Brundtland, established the Roll Back Malaria programme, with the aim to markedly reduce malaria morbidity and mortality. Governments in malaria-affected countries have to take the lead in Roll Back Malaria. Their health systems must be improved and malaria control integrated into the general health system, and the methods available for prevention and treatment have to be intensified and improved. At the same time, Roll Back Malaria will encourage and promote malaria research which hopefully will result in new medicines, vaccines and other tools which will improve the chances of reducing malaria-related deaths and suffering. Roll Back Malaria is a cabinet project within the WHO, and the organisation has a key role as manager, co-ordinator and monitor of the project. However, it depends for resources on international support and commitment from other UN bodies, the World Bank, governments in the western world, pharmaceutical industry, philanthropists and other sources. At present an optimistic view prevails, and the preliminary aim, to halve the malaria mortality by the year 2010, seems realistic even with the control methods of today. However, if research efforts result in new and better tools to combat the disease, the task will definitely be easier.

  10. Annual variations in the number of malaria cases related to two different patterns of Anopheles darlingi transmission potential in the Maroni area of French Guiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Issaly Jean

    2010-03-01

    to August with a very low transmission during the other months. The risks were higher during the first part of the night and an EIR of 10 infective bites per person and per year was estimated. In the village of Twenke (Wayanas, high level of transmission was reported all year with small peaks in March and October. The risk was higher during the second part of the night and an EIR of 5 infective bites per person and per year was estimated. Conclusion For the first time in the past 40 years, the mosquito bionomics was related to the malaria transmission patterns in French Guiana. The peak of malaria cases reported from August to October in the Maroni region is concomitant with the significant peak of An. darlingi IMT, reported from the village of Loca where transmission is higher. However, the persistent number of cases reported all year long may also be related to the transmission in the Amerindian villages. The An. darlingi bionomics for these two close populations were found significantly different and may explain why a uniform vector control method is inadequate. Following these findings, malaria prevention measures adapted to the local conditions are needed. Finally, the question of the presence of An. darlingi sub-species is raised.

  11. Epidemiologia de la malaria falciparum complicada: estudio de casos y controles en Tumaco y Turbo, Colombia, 2003 The epidemiology of complicated falciparum malaria: case and controls study in Tumaco and Turbo, Colombia, 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Tobón C.

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Identificar aspectos del hospedero, del parásito y del ambiente asociados con ocurrencia de malaria por Plasmodium falciparum complicada. MÉTODOS: Estudio de casos y controles en pacientes de Tumaco y Turbo (Colombia aplicando los criterios de complicación de la Organización Mundial de la Salud. RESULTADOS: Entre noviembre 2002 y julio 2003 se captaron 64 casos (malaria complicada y 135 controles (malaria no complicada. Las complicaciones fueron: hiperparasitemia (40%, falla hepática (36%, síndrome dificultad respiratoria aguda (7%, falla renal (4%, trombocitopenia grave (3%, anemia grave (2%, malaria cerebral (2% e hipoglicemia grave (1%. Se encontraron como factores de riesgo para malaria falciparum complicada: a Los antecedentes de malaria falciparum durante el último año fueron menores en los casos (OR= 7.0 (1.2-43.6 P=0.019; b Mayor uso previo de antimaláricos en los casos (OR=2.2 (1.1-4.4 P=0.031 y c mayor uso de cloroquina en los casos (OR=7.4 (1.1-7.8 P=0.017. Se hallaron los alelos MAD-20 y K1 del gen msp1 y FC-27 e IC-1 del gen msp2, cuya distribución de frecuencias fue similar entre casos y controles, aunque el alelo K1 mostró una variación importante entre grupos (casos: 9.4%, controles: 3.5%. La frecuencia de "signos de peligro" fue significativamente mayor en los casos (OR= 3.3, (1.5-7.4 P=0.001. Los criterios de complicación malárica de la Organización Mundial de la Salud se comparan con otros y se discuten algunas implicaciones. CONCLUSIÓN: Se identificaron como factores de riesgo para malaria falciparum complicada, la ausencia de antecedentes de malaria falciparum en el último año y el uso de antimaláricos antes de llegar al hospital.OBJECTIVES: Aimed at identifying host and parasite aspects associated to the presence of Plasmodium falciparum complicated malaria. METHODS: Case and controls study in patients from Tumaco and Turbo (Colombia. We used the World Health Organization criteria to assess the

  12. 山东省2例输入性卵形疟病例报告%Two cases report of the imported ovale malaria in Shandong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖婷; 于振华; 李继民; 李登俊; 马巧荣; 付婷霞; 魏庆宽; 魏艳彬; 刘凡; 李瑾; 黄炳成; 王用斌; 张本光; 尹昆; 孔庆安

    2012-01-01

    本文报告了2例国外输入卵形疟病例.两患者均为非洲几内亚务工返乡人员,回国后数月因发热、乏力而就医.入院血膜镜检见多期卵形疟疟原虫,环状体较粗大,大滋养体期、配子体期颗粒较粗;受染红细胞明显变形,呈多种不规则形状,具备卵形疟原虫特点.PCR基因产物约800 bp,与卵形疟相符.对两患者应用蒿甲醚肌注和伯氨喹口服规范治疗,分别于7d、10 d痊愈出院.%This paper reported two ovale malaria cases who were imported from abroad. They both had worked in E-quatorial Guinea, and they had received our medical treatment due to the fatigued fever after they returned to China few months later. Many stages of ovale malaria protozoa, thick ring forms, thick granulas in big trophozoite stage and game-tophyte stage were found in blood test. The infected RBC were obviously disfigured, showed irregular shape, and the PCR results of gene diagnosis in two cases were 800 bp fragment size, all being ovals malaria characteristics. The patients received standard treatment with artemetheri intramuscularly and Primaquine orally, and finally they both were cured and discharged after seven and ten days respectively.

  13. Community health workers and stand-alone or integrated case management of malaria: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith Paintain, Lucy; Willey, Barbara; Kedenge, Sarah; Sharkey, Alyssa; Kim, Julia; Buj, Valentina; Webster, Jayne; Schellenberg, David; Ngongo, Ngashi

    2014-09-01

    A systematic literature review was conducted to assess the effectiveness of strategies to improve community case management (CCM) of malaria. Forty-three studies were included; most (38) reported indicators of community health worker (CHW) performance, 14 reported on malaria CCM integrated with other child health interventions, 16 reported on health system capacity, and 13 reported on referral. The CHWs are able to provide good quality malaria care, including performing procedures such as rapid diagnostic tests. Appropriate training, clear guidelines, and regular supportive supervision are important facilitating factors. Crucial to sustainable success of CHW programs is strengthening health system capacity to support commodity supply, supervision, and appropriate treatment of referred cases. The little evidence available on referral from community to health facility level suggests that this is an area that needs priority attention. The studies of integrated CCM suggest that additional tasks do not reduce the quality of malaria CCM provided sufficient training and supervision is maintained. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  14. Monkey malaria kills four humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galinski, Mary R; Barnwell, John W

    2009-05-01

    Four human deaths caused by Plasmodium knowlesi, a simian malaria species, are stimulating a surge of public health interest and clinical vigilance in vulnerable areas of Southeast Asia. We, and other colleagues, emphasize that these cases, identified in Malaysia, are a clear warning that health facilities and clinicians must rethink the diagnosis and treatment of malaria cases presumed to be caused by a less virulent human malaria species, Plasmodium malariae.

  15. Efficacy and Safety of the RTS,S/AS01 Malaria Vaccine during 18 Months after Vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theander, Thor Grundtvig; Lusingu, John Peter Andrea

    2014-01-01

    among infants were -10 to 1,402 and -13 to 37, respectively (ITT). Meningitis was reported as a serious adverse event in 16/5,949 and 1/2,974 children and in 9/4,358 and 3/2,179 infants in the RTS,S/AS01 and control groups, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: RTS,S/AS01 prevented many cases of clinical...

  16. February 2015 pulmonary case of the month: severe asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uppalapu S

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. History of present illness: A 50-year-old African-American woman with a history of asthma presented to the emergency department with a chief complaint of shortness of breath for 2 weeks. She reported some chest tightness, wheezing and dry cough. She denied fever, chills, myalgias or arthralgias at the time of admission. PMH, SH and FH: In addition to asthma, she has a past medical history of type 2 diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and multiple sclerosis. She admitted to social smoking but states she quit 6 to 7 months ago. She denies alcohol, recreational drug use, or a family history of early coronary artery disease, strokes or cancers. Medications: montelukast 10 mg daily; salmeterol/fluticasone 250/50 inhaled twice a day; albuterol inhaler as needed for shortness of breath; metformin 500 mg bid; dimethyl fumarate 240 mg bid; omega 3 fish oil; calcium carbonate 600 mg daily; naproxen 500 mg bid; lisinopril 10 mg daily ...

  17. August 2016 critical care case of the month

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deangelis JL

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. History of Present Illness: The patient is a previously healthy, albeit anxious, 15-year-old girl seen by her primary care physician. She has had several months of general malaise and ongoing fatigue and an increased frequency in night terrors over the past few weeks. Her family attributes this to stress of school and her new job. She was noted to have lost 3 kg in the previous nine weeks. PMH, SH, and FH: Her PMH was unremarkable. She is a student and denies smoking, drinking or drug abuse. Her family history is noncontributory. Physical Examination: Vital signs: BP 100/60 mm Hg, P 90 beats/min and regular, R 16 breaths/min, T 100.8 ºF, BMI 15; Diffuse, non-tender lymphadenopathy through the submandibular and upper anterior cervical chains; Lungs: clear; Heart: regular rhythm without murmur: Abdomen: slightly rounded and firm. Which of the following are diagnostic considerations at this time? 1. Anorexia nervosa 2. ...

  18. May 2016 critical care case of the month

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Jashaami L

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after first 150 words. History of Present Illness: A 50-year-old African American woman presented with weakness, altered mental status and constipation of 12 days duration. She was complaining of abdominal distension with diffuse pain and bloating. She denied melena, hematochezia or hematemesis. She had a history weight loss, anorexia and fatigue which had evolved over the past few months leading to recent severe weakness and inability to get out of bed. Past Medical History, Social History and Family History: Her past medical history included HIV infection with AIDS and noncompliance with her antiretroviral medications. Her most recent CD4 count was <20 cells/uL and viral load of 554,483 copies/mL. Physical Examination: Vital signs: Blood pressure, 120/80 mmHg, heart rate, 105/min, temperature, 98.6° and respiratory rate, 20/min. General: Physical examination showed a lethargic female who was poorly responsive to questioning. Abdomen: Distended, tympanic abdomen with hypoactive bowel sounds and diffuse tenderness. Radiography: Plain x-ray examination of ...

  19. October 2013 pulmonary case of the month: a hidden connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cawcutt K

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. History of Present Illness A 58 year old woman, former smoker, presented to the pulmonary outpatient clinic at Mayo Clinic Rochester with dyspnea on exertion. In clinic, she was found to be tachycardic and febrile, and therefore, she was directly admitted to a medicine ward for possible sepsis. She had progressive dyspnea on exertion, accompanied by symptoms of dry cough, muscle weakness, dry mouth, easy bruising and constipation without weight loss for approximately 9 months. During this time, she was also diagnosed with an idiopathic pulmonary embolus with initiation of warfarin. PMH, SH, FH During an extensive work-up for these symptoms she was found to have a Ca2+ channel antibody, with concern raised for possible paraneoplastic etiology, as positron emission tomography (PET imaging also revealed abnormal uptake in lungs along with multiple lymph nodes, pancreatic tail, decreased cerebral metabolism suggestive of a diffuse encephalopathy and bilateral pulmonary infiltrates with cavitation …

  20. December 2014 pulmonary case of the month: bronchiolitis in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaqub K

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. History of Present Illness: A 61-year-old man was admitted to the hospital with cough, dyspnea and hypoxemia. He had some prior respiratory symptoms about a month prior to admission, but his symptoms worsened recently. He was seen in Family Medicine Clinic on the day of admission and noted to have saturations of 88 – 89%. A thoracic CT scan was done shortly after his initial symptoms but was negative for lung consolidation or pulmonary embolus. He currently was having fever with temperatures of 99 to 103 degrees and cough that was only slightly productive. PMH, FH, SH: He had a history of hypertension and obstructive sleep apnea although he was not using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP. Medications: nifedipine, lisinopril/hydrochlorothiazide, cough medication. Physical Examination: General: SpO2 95% on 2l/min by nasal cannula Chest: his breath sounds were coarse, but there were no wheezes or crackles. Cardiovascular: regular rate and rhythm with ...

  1. Climatic variables and malaria transmission dynamics in Jimma town, South West Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abebe Gemeda

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background:- In Ethiopia, malaria is seasonal and unstable, causing frequent epidemics. It usually occurs at altitudes 2,000 m above sea level. For transmission of malaria parasite, climatic factors are important determinants as well as non-climatic factors that can negate climatic influences. Indeed, there is a scarcity of information on the correlation between climatic variability and malaria transmission risk in Ethiopia in general and in the study area in particular. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the level of correlation between meteorological variables and malaria cases. Methods: - Time-series analysis was conducted using data on monthly meteorological variables and monthly total malaria in Jimma town, south west Ethiopia, for the period 2000-2009. All the data were entered and analyzed using SPSS-15 database program. Spearman correlation and linear regression analysis were used to asses association between the variables. Results: - During last ten years (2000-2009, a fluctuating trend of malaria transmission was observed with P.vivax becoming predominant species. Spearman correlation analysis showed that monthly minimum temperature, total rainfall and two measures of relative humidity were positively related with malaria but monthly maximum temperature negatively related. Also regression analysis suggested that monthly minimum (p = 0.008, monthly maximum temperature (p = 0.013 and monthly total rainfall (p = 0.040, at one month lagged effect, were significant meteorological factors for transmission of malaria in the study area. Conclusion: - Malaria incidences in the last decade seem to have a significant association with meteorological variables. In future, prospective and multidisciplinary cooperative research involving researchers from the fields of parasitology, epidemiology, botany, agriculture and climatology is necessary to identify the real effect of meteorological factors on vector- borne diseases like

  2. Mapping hypoendemic, seasonal malaria in rural Bandarban, Bangladesh: a prospective surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glass Gregory

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Until recently the Chittagong Hill tracts have been hyperendemic for malaria. A past cross-sectional RDT based survey in 2007 recorded rates of approximately 15%. This study was designed to understand the present epidemiology of malaria in this region, to monitor and facilitate the uptake of malaria intervention activities of the national malaria programme and to serve as an area for developing new and innovative control strategies for malaria. Methods This research field area was established in two rural unions of Bandarban District of Bangladesh north of Bandarban city, which are known to be endemic for malaria due to Plasmodium falciparum. The project included the following elements: a a demographic surveillance system including an initial census with updates every four months, b periodic surveys of knowledge attitude and practice, c a geographic information system, d weekly active and continuous passive surveillance for malaria infections using smears, rapid tests and PCR, f monthly mosquito surveillance, and e daily weather measures. The programme included both traditional and molecular methods for detecting malaria as well as lab methods for speciating mosquitoes and detecting mosquitoes infected with sporozoites. Results The demographic surveillance enumerated and mapped 20,563 people, 75% of which were tribal non-Bengali. The monthly mosquito surveys identified 22 Anopheles species, eight of which were positive by circumsporozoite ELISA. The annual rate of malaria was close to 1% with 85% of cases in the rainy months of May-October. Definitive clustering identified in the low transmission season persisted during the high transmission season. Conclusion This demographically and geographically defined area, near to the Myanmar border, which is also hypoendemic for malaria, will be useful for future studies of the epidemiology of malaria and for evaluation of strategies for malaria control including new drugs and

  3. Fatal complications of Plasmodium vivax malaria: A series of three case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Sundriyal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium vivax malaria once thought to be benign, is now being seen increasingly as complicated disease in various manifestations. These complications include cerebral malaria, acute respiratory distress syndrome, acute pancreatitis, hepatic dysfunction, coagulopathy-associated hemorrhages, and others. Even if at the onset, disease appears benign, clinicians should be careful to watch for the complications and timely management.

  4. A case report of transfusion-transmitted Plasmodium malariae from an asymptomatic non-immune traveller

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.E. Brouwer (Emmaline E); J.J. van Hellemond (Jaap); P.J.J. van Genderen (Perry); E. Slot (Ed); L. van Lieshout (Lisette); L.G. Visser; P.J. Wismans (Pieter)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The incidence of transfusion-transmitted malaria is very low in non-endemic countries due to strict donor selection. The optimal strategy to mitigate the risk of transfusion-transmitted malaria in non-endemic countries without unnecessary exclusion of blood donations is, howe

  5. pfk13-Independent Treatment Failure in Four Imported Cases of Plasmodium falciparum Malaria Treated with Artemether-Lumefantrine in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Colin J; Lansdell, Paul; Sanders, Mandy; Muwanguzi, Julian; van Schalkwyk, Donelly A; Kaur, Harparkash; Nolder, Debbie; Tucker, Julie; Bennett, Hayley M; Otto, Thomas D; Berriman, Matthew; Patel, Trupti A; Lynn, Roderick; Gkrania-Klotsas, Effrossyni; Chiodini, Peter L

    2017-03-01

    We present case histories of four patients treated with artemether-lumefantrine for falciparum malaria in UK hospitals in 2015 to 2016. Each subsequently presented with recurrent symptoms and Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia within 6 weeks of treatment with no intervening travel to countries where malaria is endemic. Parasite isolates, all of African origin, harbored variants at some candidate resistance loci. No evidence of pfk13-mediated artemisinin resistance was found. Vigilance for signs of unsatisfactory antimalarial efficacy among imported cases of malaria is recommended. Copyright © 2017 Sutherland et al.

  6. Malária grave importada: relato de caso Severe imported malaria: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Alves

    2007-06-01

    intensivo rápidos, pois o atraso aumenta a morbimortalidade do paciente.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Malaria is still considered a major global health problem. The severity form of the disease is caused, mainly by P. falciparum and may occur together with cerebral, kidney, pulmonary, hematologic, circulatory and hepatic complications. This report is about a patient with a case of severe imported malaria. CASE REPORT: A 30-years-old man, mulatto, Philippine, sailor, coming from a ship arriving from Nigeria, with a history of abdominal pain on the right hypochondrium, jaundice, fever, decreased in the consciousness. Lab tests made upon his admission showed hyperbilirubinemia at a level of 50 mg/dL, severe metabolic acidosis, thrombocytopenia, creatinine levels of 5.6 mg/dL and leukocytosis with deviation through metamyelocytes. The APACHE II score was 37, with death estimated risk of 88%. During his stay at the hospital, P. Falciparum Malaria was diagnosed through the thick drop test. And, even with the adequate anti-malaria therapy, the patient’s condition evolved to an acute renal failure requiring hemodialis; acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS; septic shock, and hematological disorders, forming a multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS. After being discharged from the hospital, the patient did not present any cerebral, pulmonary or kidney sequel. CONCLUSIONS: From the criteria described in medical literature to define critical malaria, the patient fulfilled the following: acute renal failure, ARDS, metabolic acidosis, altered level of consciousness, macroscopic hemoglobinuria, hyperparasitism and hyperbilirubinemia, related to a lethality rate of over 10%, depending on early treatment and available resources. Severe malaria requires fast diagnosis allied to a quick access to an intensive care treatment, since any delay increases the morbid-mortality of the disease.

  7. Post-treatment haemolysis in severe imported malaria after intravenous artesunate: case report of three patients with hyperparasitaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolling Thierry

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Parenteral artesunate has been shown to be a superior treatment option compared to parenteral quinine in adults and children with severe malaria. Little evidence, however, is available on long-term safety. Recently, cases of late-onset haemolysis after parenteral treatment with artesunate have been reported in European travellers with imported Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Therefore, an extended follow-up of adult patients treated for severe imported malaria was started in August 2011 at the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf. Until January 2012, three patients with hyperparasitaemia (range: 14-21% were included for analysis. In all three patients, delayed haemolysis was detected in the second week after the first dose of intravenous artesunate. Reticulocyte production index remained inadequately low in the 7 – 14 days following the first dose of artesunate despite rapid parasite clearance. Post-treatment haemolysis after parenteral artesunate may be of clinical relevance in particular in imported severe malaria characterized by high parasite levels. Extended follow-up of at least 30 days including controls of haematological parameters after artesunate treatment seems to be indicated. Further investigations are needed to assess frequency and pathophysiological background of this complication.

  8. The challenge of diagnosing Plasmodium ovale malaria in travellers: report of six clustered cases in french soldiers returning from West Africa

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Plasmodium ovale is responsible for 5% of imported malaria in French travellers. The clinical and biological features of six clustered cases of P. ovale malaria in an army unit of 62 French soldiers returning from the Ivory Coast are reported. Case report All patients were symptomatic and developed symptoms on average 50 days after their return and 20 days after the end of chemoprophylaxis (doxycycline). Clinical features included fever (6/6), mostly tertian (4/6), aches (...

  9. UK malaria treatment guidelines 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalloo, David G; Shingadia, Delane; Bell, David J; Beeching, Nicholas J; Whitty, Christopher J M; Chiodini, Peter L

    2016-06-01

    1.Malaria is the tropical disease most commonly imported into the UK, with 1300-1800 cases reported each year, and 2-11 deaths. 2. Approximately three quarters of reported malaria cases in the UK are caused by Plasmodium falciparum, which is capable of invading a high proportion of red blood cells and rapidly leading to severe or life-threatening multi-organ disease. 3. Most non-falciparum malaria cases are caused by Plasmodium vivax; a few cases are caused by the other species of plasmodium: Plasmodium ovale, Plasmodium malariae or Plasmodium knowlesi. 4. Mixed infections with more than one species of parasite can occur; they commonly involve P. falciparum with the attendant risks of severe malaria. 5. There are no typical clinical features of malaria; even fever is not invariably present. Malaria in children (and sometimes in adults) may present with misleading symptoms such as gastrointestinal features, sore throat or lower respiratory complaints. 6. A diagnosis of malaria must always be sought in a feverish or sick child or adult who has visited malaria-endemic areas. Specific country information on malaria can be found at http://travelhealthpro.org.uk/. P. falciparum infection rarely presents more than six months after exposure but presentation of other species can occur more than a year after exposure. 7. Management of malaria depends on awareness of the diagnosis and on performing the correct diagnostic tests: the diagnosis cannot be excluded until more than one blood specimen has been examined. Other travel related infections, especially viral haemorrhagic fevers, should also be considered. 8. The optimum diagnostic procedure is examination of thick and thin blood films by an expert to detect and speciate the malarial parasites. P. falciparum and P. vivax (depending upon the product) malaria can be diagnosed almost as accurately using rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) which detect plasmodial antigens. RDTs for other Plasmodium species are not as reliable. 9

  10. Malaria in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E E Okpere

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria remains one of the highest contributors to the precarious maternal mortality figures in sub-Saharan Africa. At least 6 million women worldwide are at risk of malaria infection in pregnancy. Malaria contributes to at least 10, 000 maternal deaths and to at least 200, 000 newborn deaths annually. Malaria is a contributor or aetiologic factor in pregnancy complications including anaemia, spontaneous abortion, prematurity and stillbirths. Pregnancy results in increased incidence and severity of malaria. Cerebral malaria, acute renal failure and severe anaemia, rare complications in adults living in malaria endemic areas, may complicate malaria in pregnancy. Research implicate reduced maternal immunity from increased steroid levels in pregnancy, increased attractiveness of pregnant women to mosquito bites and increased adherence of parasitized erythrocytes to Chondroitin sulphate A expressed in the placentae. This is worse in the first and second pregnancies. With infection with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus [HIV], the effects of malaria in pregnancy are even worse. Over the decades, there have been concerted worldwide collaborative efforts, spearheaded by the World Health Organization [WHO] and including governments and allied agencies to tackle the scourge of malaria in pregnancy. The main thrusts of such efforts have been: to increase the use of insecticide treated mosquito bed nets [ITN]; intermittent preventive treatment of malaria [IPT]; and adequate case treatment of acute malaria attacks in pregnancy. While for IPT, Sulfadoxine-Pyrimethamine [SP] combination has been proven to be of benefit in preventing acute and latent malaria in pregnancy and its associated complications, the WHO has introduced the use of Artemisinin-Combination Therapy [ACT] for the first-line treatment of uncomplicated malaria in pregnancy, the need to confirm malaria before treatment and the enforcement of completion of therapy once started. The Roll Back

  11. Malaria risk factors in north-east Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mtove George

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the factors which determine a household's or individual's risk of malaria infection is important for targeting control interventions at all intensities of transmission. Malaria ecology in Tanzania appears to have reduced over recent years. This study investigated potential risk factors and clustering in face of changing infection dynamics. Methods Household survey data were collected in villages of rural Muheza district. Children aged between six months and thirteen years were tested for presence of malaria parasites using microscopy. A multivariable logistic regression model was constructed to identify significant risk factors for children. Geographical information systems combined with global positioning data and spatial scan statistic analysis were used to identify clusters of malaria. Results Using an insecticide-treated mosquito net of any type proved to be highly protective against malaria (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.59-0.96. Children aged five to thirteen years were at higher risk of having malaria than those aged under five years (OR 1.71, 95% CI 1.01-2.91. The odds of malaria were less for females when compared to males (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.39-0.98. Two spatial clusters of significantly increased malaria risk were identified in two out of five villages. Conclusions This study provides evidence that recent declines in malaria transmission and prevalence may shift the age groups at risk of malaria infection to older children. Risk factor analysis provides support for universal coverage and targeting of long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLINs to all age groups. Clustering of cases indicates heterogeneity of risk. Improved targeting of LLINs or additional supplementary control interventions to high risk clusters may improve outcomes and efficiency as malaria transmission continues to fall under intensified control.

  12. Malaria and HIV among pediatric inpatients in two Tanzanian referral hospitals: A prospective study.

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    Smart, Luke R; Orgenes, Neema; Mazigo, Humphrey D; Minde, Mercy; Hokororo, Adolfine; Shakir, Muhammad; Verweij, Jaco J; Downs, Jennifer A; Peck, Robert N

    2016-07-01

    Malaria remains common in sub-Saharan Africa, but it is frequently over-diagnosed and over-treated in hospitalized children. HIV is prevalent in many malaria endemic areas and may delay parasite clearance and increase mortality among children with malaria. This prospective cohort study enrolled children with suspected malaria between 3 months and 12 years of age hospitalized at two referral hospitals in Tanzania. Both a thick blood smear (BS) and a malaria rapid diagnostic test (mRDT) were performed. If discordant results were obtained, PCR was performed for Plasmodium falciparum. Malaria was confirmed if two out of three tests were positive. Malaria parasite densities were determined for two consecutive days after diagnosis and treatment of malaria. All participants were tested for HIV. Among 1492 hospitalized children, 400 (26.8%) were enrolled with suspected malaria infection. There were 196/400 (49.0%) males, and the median age was 18 [9-36] months. BS was positive in 95/400 (23.8%), and mRDT was positive in 70/400 (17.5%), with moderate agreement (Kappa=0.598). Concordant results excluded malaria in 291/400 (72.8%) and confirmed malaria in 56/400 (14.0%). PCR performed on 53 discordant results confirmed malaria in 1/39 of the BS-positive/mRDT-negative cases, and 6/14 of the BS-negative/mRDT-positive cases. The prevalence of confirmed malaria was 63/400 (15.8%). In multivariable logistic regression, malaria was associated with HIV (OR 3.45 [1.65-7.20], p=0.001). Current breastfeeding (OR 0.25 [0.11-0.56], p=0.001) and higher hemoglobin (OR 0.70 [0.60-0.81], pmalaria. Malaria parasite clearance was delayed in HIV-infected participants (pMalaria is over-diagnosed even at referral centers in high transmission areas. Hospitalized HIV-infected children are more likely to have malaria and exhibit delayed clearance of parasites. Hospitals should consider using mRDTs as a first step for malaria testing among hospitalized children in sub-Saharan Africa.

  13. Vector control in a malaria epidemic occurring within a complex emergency situation in Burundi: a case study

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    D'Alessandro Umberto

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background African highlands often suffer of devastating malaria epidemics, sometimes in conjunction with complex emergencies, making their control even more difficult. In 2000, Burundian highlands experienced a large malaria outbreak at a time of civil unrest, constant insecurity and nutritional emergency. Because of suspected high resistance to the first and second line treatments, the provincial health authority and Médecins Sans Frontières (Belgium decided to implement vector control activities in an attempt to curtail the epidemic. There are few reported interventions of this type to control malaria epidemics in complex emergency contexts. Here, decisions and actions taken to control this epidemic, their impact and the lessons learned from this experience are reported. Case description Twenty nine hills (administrative areas were selected in collaboration with the provincial health authorities for the vector control interventions combining indoor residual spraying with deltamethrin and insecticide-treated nets. Impact was evaluated by entomological and parasitological surveys. Almost all houses (99% were sprayed and nets use varied between 48% and 63%. Anopheles indoor resting density was significantly lower in treated as compared to untreated hills, the latter taken as controls. Despite this impact on the vector, malaria prevalence was not significantly lower in treated hills except for people sleeping under a net. Discussion Indoor spraying was feasible and resulted in high coverage despite being a logistically complex intervention in the Burundian context (scattered houses and emergency situation. However, it had little impact on the prevalence of malaria infection, possibly because it was implemented after the epidemic's peak. Nevertheless, after this outbreak the Ministry of Health improved the surveillance system, changed its policy with introduction of effective drugs and implementation of vector control to prevent new

  14. Community response to artemisinin-based combination therapy for childhood malaria: a case study from Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

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    Nyato Daniel J

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New malaria treatment guidelines in Tanzania have led to the large-scale deployment of artemether-lumefantrine (Coartem®, popularly known as ALu or dawa mseto. Very little is known about how people in malaria endemic areas interpret policy makers' decision to replace existing anti-malarials, such as sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP with "new" treatment regimens, such as ALu or other formulations of ACT. This study was conducted to examine community level understandings and interpretations of ALu's efficacy and side-effects. The paper specifically examines the perceived efficacy of ALu as articulated by the mothers of young children diagnosed with malaria and prescribed ALu. Methods Participant observation, six focus group discussions in two large villages, followed by interviews with a random sample of 110 mothers of children less than five years of age, who were diagnosed with malaria and prescribed ALu. Additionally, observations were conducted in two village dispensaries involving interactions between mothers/caretakers and health care providers. Results While more than two-thirds of the mothers had an overall negative disposition toward SP, 97.5% of them spoke favourably about ALu, emphasizing it's ability to help their children to rapidly recover from malaria, without undesirable side-effects. 62.5% of the mothers reported that they were spending less money dealing with malaria than previously when their child was treated with SP. 88% of the mothers had waited for 48 hours or more after the onset of fever before taking their child to the dispensary. Mothers' knowledge and reporting of ALu's dosage was, in many cases, inconsistent with the recommended dosage schedule for children. Conclusion Deployment of ALu has significantly changed community level perceptions of anti-malarial treatment. However, mothers continue to delay seeking care before accessing ALu, limiting the impact of highly subsidized rollout of the drug

  15. Comparison of Malaria Simulations Driven by Meteorological Observations and Reanalysis Products in Senegal

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    Ibrahima Diouf

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the spatial and temporal variability of climate parameters is crucial to study the impact of climate-sensitive vector-borne diseases such as malaria. The use of malaria models is an alternative way of producing potential malaria historical data for Senegal due to the lack of reliable observations for malaria outbreaks over a long time period. Consequently, here we use the Liverpool Malaria Model (LMM, driven by different climatic datasets, in order to study and validate simulated malaria parameters over Senegal. The findings confirm that the risk of malaria transmission is mainly linked to climate variables such as rainfall and temperature as well as specific landscape characteristics. For the whole of Senegal, a lag of two months is generally observed between the peak of rainfall in August and the maximum number of reported malaria cases in October. The malaria transmission season usually takes place from September to November, corresponding to the second peak of temperature occurring in October. Observed malaria data from the Programme National de Lutte contre le Paludisme (PNLP, National Malaria control Programme in Senegal and outputs from the meteorological data used in this study were compared. The malaria model outputs present some consistencies with observed malaria dynamics over Senegal, and further allow the exploration of simulations performed with reanalysis data sets over a longer time period. The simulated malaria risk significantly decreased during the 1970s and 1980s over Senegal. This result is consistent with the observed decrease of malaria vectors and malaria cases reported by field entomologists and clinicians in the literature. The main differences between model outputs and observations regard amplitude, but can be related not only to reanalysis deficiencies but also to other environmental and socio-economic factors that are not included in this mechanistic malaria model framework. The present study can be

  16. Progress towards implementation of ACT malaria case-management in public health facilities in the Republic of Sudan: a cluster-sample survey

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    Abdelgader Tarig M

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective malaria case-management based on artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT and parasitological diagnosis is a major pillar within the 2007-2012 National Malaria Strategic Plan in the Sudan. Three years after the launch of the strategy a health facility survey was undertaken to evaluate case-management practices and readiness of the health facilities and health workers to implement a new malaria case-management strategy. Methods A cross-sectional, cluster sample survey was undertaken at public health facilities in 15 states of Sudan. Data were collected using quality-of-care assessment methods. The main outcomes were the proportions of facilities with ACTs and malaria diagnostics; proportions of health workers exposed to malaria related health systems support activities; and composite and individual indicators of case-management practices for febrile outpatients stratified by age, availability of ACTs and diagnostics, use of malaria diagnostics, and test result. Results We evaluated 244 facilities, 294 health workers and 1,643 consultations for febrile outpatients (425 Conclusions Five years following change of the policy from chloroquine to ACTs and 3 years before the end of the new malaria strategic plan chloroquine was successfully phased out from public facilities in Sudan, however, an important gap remained in the availability of ACTs, diagnostic capacities and coverage with malaria case-management activities. The national scale-up of diagnostics, using the findings of this survey as well as future qualitative research, should present an opportunity not only to expand existing testing capacities but also to implement effective support interventions to bridge the health systems gaps and support corrective case-management measures, including the discontinuation of artemether monotherapy treatment.

  17. Can timely vector control interventions triggered by atypical environmental conditions prevent malaria epidemics? A case-study from Wajir County, Kenya.

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    Peter Maes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Atypical environmental conditions with drought followed by heavy rainfall and flooding in arid areas in sub-Saharan Africa can lead to explosive epidemics of malaria, which might be prevented through timely vector-control interventions. OBJECTIVES: Wajir County in Northeast Kenya is classified as having seasonal malaria transmission. The aim of this study was to describe in Wajir town the environmental conditions, the scope and timing of vector-control interventions and the associated resulting burden of malaria at two time periods (1996-1998 and 2005-2007. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional descriptive and ecological study using data collected for routine program monitoring and evaluation. RESULTS: In both time periods, there were atypical environmental conditions with drought and malnutrition followed by massive monthly rainfall resulting in flooding and animal/human Rift Valley Fever. In 1998, this was associated with a large and explosive malaria epidemic (weekly incidence rates peaking at 54/1,000 population/week with vector-control interventions starting over six months after the massive rainfall and when the malaria epidemic was abating. In 2007, vector-control interventions started sooner within about three months after the massive rainfall and no malaria epidemic was recorded with weekly malaria incidence rates never exceeding 0.5 per 1,000 population per week. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Did timely vector-control interventions in Wajir town prevent a malaria epidemic? In 2007, the neighboring county of Garissa experienced similar climatic events as Wajir, but vector-control interventions started six months after the heavy un-seasonal rainfall and large scale flooding resulted in a malaria epidemic with monthly incidence rates peaking at 40/1,000 population. In conclusion, this study suggests that atypical environmental conditions can herald a malaria outbreak in certain settings. In turn, this should alert responsible

  18. [Study of 6 cases of malaria acquired near Roissy-Charles-de-Gaulle in 1994. Necessary prevention measures in airports].

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    Giacomini, T; Mouchet, J; Mathieu, P; Petithory, J C

    1995-02-01

    During the very hot 1994 summer, six new cases of airport malaria have been observed in and around Roissy-Charles-de-Gaulle airport. Four patients were regular or occasional airport employees. The two other cases were inhabitants of a city at 7 km. Entomological investigations suggest that cars of airport employees served to disseminate anophelines outside the airport areas. The six cases were very severe. One patient died. Apparently, W.H.O. recommendations on aircraft disinsecting procedures have not been fully followed. There is obviously a threat for areas near the airports.

  19. [Malaria in Algerian Sahara].

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    Hammadi, D; Boubidi, S C; Chaib, S E; Saber, A; Khechache, Y; Gasmi, M; Harrat, Z

    2009-08-01

    Thanks to the malaria eradication campaign launched in Algeria in 1968, the number of malaria cases fell down significantly from 95,424 cases in 1960 to 30 cases in 1978. At that time the northern part of the country was declared free of Plasmodium falciparum. Only few cases belonging to P. vivax persisted in residual foci in the middle part of the country. In the beginning of the eighties, the south of the country was marked by an increase of imported malaria cases. The resurgence of the disease in the oases coincided with the opening of the Trans-Saharan road and the booming trade with the neighbouring southern countries. Several authors insisted on the risk of introduction of malaria or its exotic potential vectors in Algeria via this new road. Now, the totality of malaria autochthonous cases in Algeria are located in the south of the country where 300 cases were declared during the period (1980-2007). The recent outbreak recorded in 2007 at the borders with Mall and the introduction of Anopheles gambiae into the Algerian territory show the vulnerability of this area to malaria which is probably emphasized by the local environmental changes. The authors assess the evolution of malaria in the Sahara region and draw up the distribution of the anopheles in this area.

  20. Effects of a malaria elimination program: a retrospective study of 623 cases from 2008 to 2013 in a Chinese county hospital near the China – Myanmar border

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    Wang, Xinyu; Yang, Linlin; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Bingyan; Wang, Shuqing; Wu, Xingfen; Wang, Tianying; Li, Yanlin; Liu, Min; Peng, Quanbang; Zhang, Wenhong

    2016-01-01

    The southwestern region of China, along the Myanmar border, has accounted for the highest number of cases of imported malaria since China shifted from a malaria control program to an elimination strategy in 2010. We conducted a retrospective study, in which 623 medical charts were analyzed to provide an epidemiological characterization of malaria cases that were diagnosed and treated at the People's Hospital of Tengchong County (PHTC), located in southwestern China, from 2008 to 2013. Our aim was to understand the characteristics of malaria in this region, which is a high-endemic region with imported cases. The majority of patients were male (91.7%), and the average age was 32.4 years. Most of the patients (86.4%) had visited Myanmar; labor was the purpose of travel for 63.9% of the patients. Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum were responsible for 53.8% and 34.9% of the infections, respectively. The number of hospitalized patients rose gradually from 2008 to 2010 and reached its peak in 2010 (191). After 2010, the number of hospitalized cases fell rapidly from 191 (2010) to 45 (2013), and the proportion of patients who lived in the forest and the number infected with P. falciparum also fell. In conclusion, the number of hospitalized patients in the southwestern region of China, Tengchong county, decreased after China implemented a malaria elimination strategy in 2010. However, migrant workers returning from Myanmar remained important contributors to cases of imported malaria. The management of imported malaria should be targeted by the malaria elimination program in China. PMID:26785944

  1. Effects of a malaria elimination program: a retrospective study of 623 cases from 2008 to 2013 in a Chinese county hospital near the China--Myanmar border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinyu; Yang, Linlin; Jiang, Tao; Zhang, Bingyan; Wang, Shuqing; Wu, Xingfen; Wang, Tianying; Li, Yanlin; Liu, Min; Peng, Quanbang; Zhang, Wenhong

    2016-01-20

    The southwestern region of China, along the Myanmar border, has accounted for the highest number of cases of imported malaria since China shifted from a malaria control program to an elimination strategy in 2010. We conducted a retrospective study, in which 623 medical charts were analyzed to provide an epidemiological characterization of malaria cases that were diagnosed and treated at the People's Hospital of Tengchong County (PHTC), located in southwestern China, from 2008 to 2013. Our aim was to understand the characteristics of malaria in this region, which is a high-endemic region with imported cases. The majority of patients were male (91.7%), and the average age was 32.4 years. Most of the patients (86.4%) had visited Myanmar; labor was the purpose of travel for 63.9% of the patients. Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum were responsible for 53.8% and 34.9% of the infections, respectively. The number of hospitalized patients rose gradually from 2008 to 2010 and reached its peak in 2010 (191). After 2010, the number of hospitalized cases fell rapidly from 191 (2010) to 45 (2013), and the proportion of patients who lived in the forest and the number infected with P. falciparum also fell. In conclusion, the number of hospitalized patients in the southwestern region of China, Tengchong county, decreased after China implemented a malaria elimination strategy in 2010. However, migrant workers returning from Myanmar remained important contributors to cases of imported malaria. The management of imported malaria should be targeted by the malaria elimination program in China.

  2. The dangers of accepting a single diagnosis: case report of concurrent Plasmodium knowlesi malaria and dengue infection.

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    Chong, Soon Eu; Mohamad Zaini, Rhendra Hardy; Suraiya, Siti; Lee, Kok Tong; Lim, Jo Anne

    2017-01-03

    Dengue and malaria are two common, mosquito-borne infections, which may lead to mortality if not managed properly. Concurrent infections of dengue and malaria are rare due to the different habitats of its vectors and activities of different carrier mosquitoes. The first case reported was in 2005. Since then, several concurrent infections have been reported between the dengue virus (DENV) and the malaria protozoans, Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax. Symptoms of each infection may be masked by a simultaneous second infection, resulting in late treatment and severe complications. Plasmodium knowlesi is also a common cause of malaria in Malaysia with one of the highest rates of mortality. This report is one of the earliest in literature of concomitant infection between DENV and P. knowlesi in which a delay in diagnosis had placed a patient in a life-threatening situation. A 59-year old man staying near the Belum-Temengor rainforest at the Malaysia-Thailand border was admitted with fever for 6 days, with respiratory distress. His non-structural protein 1 antigen and Anti-DENV Immunoglobulin M tests were positive. He was treated for severe dengue with compensated shock. Treating the dengue had so distracted the clinicians that a blood film for the malaria parasite was not done. Despite aggressive supportive treatment in the intensive care unit (ICU), the patient had unresolved acidosis as well as multi-organ failure involving respiratory, renal, liver, and haematological systems. It was due to the presentation of shivering in the ICU, that a blood film was done on the second day that revealed the presence of P. knowlesi with a parasite count of 520,000/μL. The patient was subsequently treated with artesunate-doxycycline and made a good recovery after nine days in ICU. This case contributes to the body of literature on co-infection between DENV and P. knowlesi and highlights the clinical consequences, which can be severe. Awareness should be raised among

  3. MIGRATION AND MALARIA IN EUROPE

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    Begoña Monge-Maillo

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The proportion of imported malaria cases due to immigrants in Europe has increased during the lasts decades, being the higher rates for those settled immigrants who travel to visit friends and relatives (VFRs at their country of origin. Cases are mainly due to P. falciparum and Sub-Saharan Africa is the most common origin. Clinically, malaria in immigrants is characterized by a mild clinical presentation with even asymptomatic o delayed malaria cases and low parasitemic level. These characteristics may be explained by a semi-immunity acquired after long periods of time exposed to stable transmission of malaria. Malaria cases among immigrants, even those asymptomatic patients with sub-microscopic parasitemia, could increase the risk of transmission and reintroduction of malaria in certain areas with the adequate vectors and climate conditions. Moreover imported malaria cases by immigrants can also play an important role in the non-vectorial transmission out of endemic area, by blood transfusions, organ transplantation or congenital or occupational exposures. Probably, out of endemic areas, screening of malaria among recent arrived immigrants coming from malaria endemic countries should be performed. These aim to reduce the risk of clinical malaria in the individual as well as to prevent autochthonous transmission of malaria in areas where it had been eradicated.

  4. Community referral in home management of malaria in western Uganda: A case series study

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    Nsungwa-Sabiiti Jesca

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Home Based Management of fever (HBM was introduced as a national policy in Uganda to increase access to prompt presumptive treatment of malaria. Pre-packed Chloroquine/Fansidar combination is distributed free of charge to febrile children Methods A case-series study was performed during 20 weeks in a West-Ugandan sub-county with an under-five population of 3,600. Community drug distributors (DDs were visited fortnightly and recording forms collected. Referred children were located and primary caretaker interviewed in the household. Referral health facility records were studied for those stating having completed referral. Results Overall referral rate was 8% (117/1454. Fever was the main reason for mothers to seek DD care and for DDs to refer. Twenty-six of the 28 (93% "urgent referrals" accessed referral care but 8 (31% delayed >24 hours. Waiting for antimalarial drugs to finish caused most delays. Of 32 possible pneumonias only 16 (50% were urgently referred; most delayed ≥ 2 days before accessing referral care. Conclusion The HBM has high referral compliance and extends primary health care to the communities by maintaining linkages with formal health services. Referral non-completion was not a major issue but failure to recognise pneumonia symptoms and delays in referral care access for respiratory illnesses may pose hazards for children with acute respiratory infections. Extending HBM to also include pneumonia may increase prompt and effective care of the sick child in sub-Saharan Africa.

  5. Determinants of malaria program expenditures during elimination: case study evidence from select provinces in the Philippines.

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    Liu, Jenny X; Newby, Gretchen; Brackery, Aprielle; Smith Gueye, Cara; Candari, Christine J; Escubil, Luz R; Vestergaard, Lasse S; Baquilod, Mario

    2013-01-01

    ...Even though eliminating malaria from the endemic margins is a part of the Global Malaria Action Plan, little guidance exists on what resources are needed to transition from controlling malaria to eliminating it. Using Philippines as an example, this study aimed to (1) estimate the financial resources used by sub-national malaria programs in different phases during elimination and (2) understand how different environmental and organizational factors may influence expenditure levels and spending proportions. The Philippines provides an opportunity to study variations in sub-national programs because its epidemiological and ecological diversity, devolved health system, and progressive elimination strategy all allow greater flexibility for lower-level governments to direct activities, but also create challenges for coordination and resource mobilization. Through key informant interviews and archival record retrieval in four selected provinces chosen based on eco-epidemiological variation, expenditures associated with provincial malaria programs were collected for selected years (mid-1990s to 2010). Results show that expenditures per person at risk per year decrease as programs progress from a state of controlled low-endemic malaria to elimination to prevention of reintroduction regardless of whether elimination was deliberately planned. However, wide variation across provinces were found: expenditures were generally higher if mainly financed with donor grants, but were moderated by the level of economic development, the level of malaria transmission and receptivity, and the capacity of program staff. Across all provinces, strong leadership appears to be a necessary condition for maintaining progress and is vital in controlling outbreaks. While sampled provinces and years may not be representative of other sub-national malaria programs, these findings suggest that the marginal yearly cost declines with each phase during elimination.

  6. Determinants of malaria program expenditures during elimination: case study evidence from select provinces in the Philippines.

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    Jenny X Liu

    Full Text Available ...Even though eliminating malaria from the endemic margins is a part of the Global Malaria Action Plan, little guidance exists on what resources are needed to transition from controlling malaria to eliminating it. Using Philippines as an example, this study aimed to (1 estimate the financial resources used by sub-national malaria programs in different phases during elimination and (2 understand how different environmental and organizational factors may influence expenditure levels and spending proportions. The Philippines provides an opportunity to study variations in sub-national programs because its epidemiological and ecological diversity, devolved health system, and progressive elimination strategy all allow greater flexibility for lower-level governments to direct activities, but also create challenges for coordination and resource mobilization. Through key informant interviews and archival record retrieval in four selected provinces chosen based on eco-epidemiological variation, expenditures associated with provincial malaria programs were collected for selected years (mid-1990s to 2010. Results show that expenditures per person at risk per year decrease as programs progress from a state of controlled low-endemic malaria to elimination to prevention of reintroduction regardless of whether elimination was deliberately planned. However, wide variation across provinces were found: expenditures were generally higher if mainly financed with donor grants, but were moderated by the level of economic development, the level of malaria transmission and receptivity, and the capacity of program staff. Across all provinces, strong leadership appears to be a necessary condition for maintaining progress and is vital in controlling outbreaks. While sampled provinces and years may not be representative of other sub-national malaria programs, these findings suggest that the marginal yearly cost declines with each phase during elimination.

  7. The decline in paediatric malaria admissions on the coast of Kenya

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    Peshu Norbert

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is only limited information on the health impact of expanded coverage of malaria control and preventative strategies in Africa. Methods Paediatric admission data were assembled over 8.25 years from three District Hospitals; Kilifi, Msambweni and Malindi, situated along the Kenyan Coast. Trends in monthly malaria admissions between January 1999 and March 2007 were analysed using several time-series models that adjusted for monthly non-malaria admission rates and the seasonality and trends in rainfall. Results Since January 1999 paediatric malaria admissions have significantly declined at all hospitals. This trend was observed against a background of rising or constant non-malaria admissions and unaffected by long-term rainfall throughout the surveillance period. By March 2007 the estimated proportional decline in malaria cases was 63% in Kilifi, 53% in Kwale and 28% in Malindi. Time-series models strongly suggest that the observed decline in malaria admissions was a result of malaria-specific control efforts in the hospital catchment areas. Conclusion This study provides evidence of a changing disease burden on the Kenyan coast and that the most parsimonious explanation is an expansion in the coverage of interventions such as the use of insecticide-treated nets and the availability of anti-malarial medicines. While specific attribution to intervention coverage cannot be computed what is clear is that this area of Kenya is experiencing a malaria epidemiological transition.

  8. Baseline results of the first malaria indicator survey in Iran at the health facility level

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    Taghizadeh-Asl Rahim

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria continues to be a global public health challenge, particularly in developing countries. Delivery of prompt and effective diagnosis and treatment of malaria cases, detection of malaria epidemics within one week of onset and control them in less than a month, regular disease monitoring and operational classification of malaria are among the major responsibilities of the national malaria programme. The study was conducted to determine these indicators at the different level of primary health care facilities in malaria-affected provinces of Iran Methods In this survey, data was collected from 223 health facilities including health centres, malaria posts, health houses and hospitals as well as the profile of all 5, 836 recorded malaria cases in these facilities during the year preceding the survey. Descriptive statistics (i.e. frequencies, percentages were used to summarize the results and Chi square test was used to analyse data. Results All but one percent of uncomplicated cases took appropriate and correctly-dosed of anti-malarial drugs in accordance to the national treatment guideline. A larger proportion of patients [85.8%; 95% CI: 84.8 - 86.8] were also given complete treatment including anti-relapse course, in line with national guidelines. About one third [35.0%; 95% CI: 33.6 - 36.4] of uncomplicated malaria cases were treated more than 48 hours after first symptoms onset. Correspondingly, half of severe malaria cases took recommended anti-malarial drugs for severe or complicated disease more than 48 hours of onset of first symptoms. The latter cases had given regular anti-malarial drugs promptly. The majority of malaria epidemics [97%; 95% CI: 90.6 - 100] in study areas were detected within one week of onset, but only half of epidemics were controlled within four weeks of detection. Just half of target districts had at least one health facility/emergency site with adequate supply and equipment stocks. Nevertheless

  9. Baseline results of the first malaria indicator survey in Iran at the health facility level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raiesi, Ahmad; Nikpour, Fatemeh; Ansari-Moghaddam, Alireza; Ranjbar, Mansoor; Rakhshani, Fatemeh; Mohammadi, Mahdi; Haghdost, Aliakbar; Taghizadeh-Asl, Rahim; Sakeni, Mohammad; Safari, Reza; Saffari, Mehdi

    2011-10-27

    Malaria continues to be a global public health challenge, particularly in developing countries. Delivery of prompt and effective diagnosis and treatment of malaria cases, detection of malaria epidemics within one week of onset and control them in less than a month, regular disease monitoring and operational classification of malaria are among the major responsibilities of the national malaria programme. The study was conducted to determine these indicators at the different level of primary health care facilities in malaria-affected provinces of Iran In this survey, data was collected from 223 health facilities including health centres, malaria posts, health houses and hospitals as well as the profile of all 5, 836 recorded malaria cases in these facilities during the year preceding the survey. Descriptive statistics (i.e. frequencies, percentages) were used to summarize the results and Chi square test was used to analyse data. All but one percent of uncomplicated cases took appropriate and correctly-dosed of anti-malarial drugs in accordance to the national treatment guideline. A larger proportion of patients [85.8%; 95% CI: 84.8 - 86.8] were also given complete treatment including anti-relapse course, in line with national guidelines. About one third [35.0%; 95% CI: 33.6 - 36.4] of uncomplicated malaria cases were treated more than 48 hours after first symptoms onset. Correspondingly, half of severe malaria cases took recommended anti-malarial drugs for severe or complicated disease more than 48 hours of onset of first symptoms. The latter cases had given regular anti-malarial drugs promptly.The majority of malaria epidemics [97%; 95% CI: 90.6 - 100] in study areas were detected within one week of onset, but only half of epidemics were controlled within four weeks of detection. Just half of target districts had at least one health facility/emergency site with adequate supply and equipment stocks. Nevertheless, only one-third of them [33% (95% CI: 0.00 - 67.8)] had

  10. [Peasant strategies for economic reproduction and malaria epidemiology in the ravines microregion of the Chiapas mountains, Mexico: a case study

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    Gutiérrez Ortega M

    1996-07-01

    The goal of this investigation was to establish an initial correlation between farming activities and malaria and to define risk factors and prevalence of the latter through an analysis of the integration of farm production strategies by members of an indigenous peasant community in the Chiapas mountains in Mexico. Information was obtained on places of work, land use, coffee, corn, and bean farming, and number of family members involved in farming activities, wage labor, and handicrafts production. Migration of farm workers to warmer climates was also analyzed. The study compared families with and without cases of malaria from 1987 to 1993 in the town of Yibeljoj, Chenalhó county. The most outstanding characteristics of this analysis were the following: strategies involving greater risk and prevalence of malaria were those which combined corn farming and wage labor; on the other hand, strategies in which handicraft production was the activity of primary or secundary importance were associated with few or no cases of the disease.

  11. An imported case of severe falciparum malaria with prolonged hemolytic anemia clinically mimicking a coinfection with babesiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Young Ju; Chai, Jong-Yil; Jung, Bong-Kwang; Lee, Hyun Jung; Song, Ji Young; Je, Ji Hye; Seo, Ji Hye; Park, Sung Hun; Choi, Ji Seon; Kim, Min Ja

    2014-12-01

    While imported falciparum malaria has been increasingly reported in recent years in Korea, clinicians have difficulties in making a clinical diagnosis as well as in having accessibility to effective anti-malarial agents. Here we describe an unusual case of imported falciparum malaria with severe hemolytic anemia lasting over 2 weeks, clinically mimicking a coinfection with babesiosis. A 48-year old Korean man was diagnosed with severe falciparum malaria in France after traveling to the Republic of Benin, West Africa. He received a 1-day course of intravenous artesunate and a 7-day course of Malarone (atovaquone/proguanil) with supportive hemodialysis. Coming back to Korea 5 days after discharge, he was readmitted due to recurrent fever, and further treated with Malarone for 3 days. Both the peripheral blood smears and PCR test were positive for Plasmodium falciparum. However, he had prolonged severe hemolytic anemia (Hb 5.6 g/dl). Therefore, 10 days after the hospitalization, Babesia was considered to be potentially coinfected. A 7-day course of Malarone and azithromycin was empirically started. He became afebrile within 3 days of this babesiosis treatment, and hemolytic anemia profiles began to improve at the completion of the treatment. He has remained stable since his discharge. Unexpectedly, the PCR assays failed to detect DNA of Babesia spp. from blood. In addition, during the retrospective review of the case, the artesunate-induced delayed hemolytic anemia was considered as an alternative cause of the unexplained hemolytic anemia.

  12. Malaria paediatric hospitalization between 1999 and 2008 across Kenya.

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    Okiro, Emelda A; Alegana, Victor A; Noor, Abdisalan M; Mutheu, Juliette J; Juma, Elizabeth; Snow, Robert W

    2009-12-09

    Intervention coverage and funding for the control of malaria in Africa has increased in recent years, however, there are few descriptions of changing disease burden and the few reports available are from isolated, single site observations or are of reports at country-level. Here we present a nationwide assessment of changes over 10 years in paediatric malaria hospitalization across Kenya. Paediatric admission data on malaria and non-malaria diagnoses were assembled for the period 1999 to 2008 from in-patient registers at 17 district hospitals in Kenya and represented the diverse malaria ecology of the country. These data were then analysed using autoregressive moving average time series models with malaria and all-cause admissions as the main outcomes adjusted for rainfall, changes in service use and populations-at-risk within each hospital's catchment to establish whether there has been a statistically significant decline in paediatric malaria hospitalization during the observation period. Among the 17 hospital sites, adjusted paediatric malaria admissions had significantly declined at 10 hospitals over 10 years since 1999; had significantly increased at four hospitals, and remained unchanged in three hospitals. The overall estimated average reduction in malaria admission rates was 0.0063 cases per 1,000 children aged 0 to 14 years per month representing an average percentage reduction of 49% across the 10 hospitals registering a significant decline by the end of 2008. Paediatric admissions for all-causes had declined significantly with a reduction in admission rates of greater than 0.0050 cases per 1,000 children aged 0 to 14 years per month at 6 of 17 hospitals. Where malaria admissions had increased three of the four sites were located in Western Kenya close to Lake Victoria. Conversely there was an indication that areas with the largest declines in malaria admission rates were areas located along the Kenyan coast and some sites in the highlands of Kenya. A

  13. Models for short term malaria prediction in Sri Lanka

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    Galappaththy Gawrie NL

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria in Sri Lanka is unstable and fluctuates in intensity both spatially and temporally. Although the case counts are dwindling at present, given the past history of resurgence of outbreaks despite effective control measures, the control programmes have to stay prepared. The availability of long time series of monitored/diagnosed malaria cases allows for the study of forecasting models, with an aim to developing a forecasting system which could assist in the efficient allocation of resources for malaria control. Methods Exponentially weighted moving average models, autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA models with seasonal components, and seasonal multiplicative autoregressive integrated moving average (SARIMA models were compared on monthly time series of district malaria cases for their ability to predict the number of malaria cases one to four months ahead. The addition of covariates such as the number of malaria cases in neighbouring districts or rainfall were assessed for their ability to improve prediction of selected (seasonal ARIMA models. Results The best model for forecasting and the forecasting error varied strongly among the districts. The addition of rainfall as a covariate improved prediction of selected (seasonal ARIMA models modestly in some districts but worsened prediction in other districts. Improvement by adding rainfall was more frequent at larger forecasting horizons. Conclusion Heterogeneity of patterns of malaria in Sri Lanka requires regionally specific prediction models. Prediction error was large at a minimum of 22% (for one of the districts for one month ahead predictions. The modest improvement made in short term prediction by adding rainfall as a covariate to these prediction models may not be sufficient to merit investing in a forecasting system for which rainfall data are routinely processed.

  14. Reductions in malaria and anaemia case and death burden at hospitals following scale-up of malaria control in Zanzibar, 1999-2008

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W. Aregawi (Maru); A.S. Ali (Abdullah); A.-W. Al-Mafazy; F. Molteni (Fabrizio); S. Katikiti (Samson); M. Warsame (Marian); R.J. Njau; R. Komatsu (Ryuichi); E.L. Korenromp (Eline); M. Hosseini (Mehran); D. Low-Beer (Daniel); A. Bjorkman (Anders); U. D'Alessandro (Umberto); M. Coosemans (Marc); M. Otten (Mac)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In Zanzibar, the Ministry of Health and partners accelerated malaria control from September 2003 onwards. The impact of the scale-up of insecticide-treated nets (ITN), indoor-residual spraying (IRS) and artemisinin-combination therapy (ACT) combined on malaria burden was

  15. Using the social entrepreneurship approach to generate innovative and sustainable malaria diagnosis interventions in Tanzania: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background There have been a number of interventions to date aimed at improving malaria diagnostic accuracy in sub-Saharan Africa. Yet, limited success is often reported for a number of reasons, especially in rural settings. This paper seeks to provide a framework for applied research aimed to improve malaria diagnosis using a combination of the established methods, participatory action research and social entrepreneurship. Methods This case study introduces the idea of using the social entrepreneurship approach (SEA) to create innovative and sustainable applied health research outcomes. The following key elements define the SEA: (1) identifying a locally relevant research topic and plan, (2) recognizing the importance of international multi-disciplinary teams and the incorporation of local knowledge, (3) engaging in a process of continuous innovation, adaptation and learning, (4) remaining motivated and determined to achieve sustainable long-term research outcomes and, (5) sharing and transferring ownership of the project with the international and local partner. Evaluation The SEA approach has a strong emphasis on innovation lead by local stakeholders. In this case, innovation resulted in a unique holistic research program aimed at understanding patient, laboratory and physician influences on accurate diagnosis of malaria. An evaluation of milestones for each SEA element revealed that the success of one element is intricately related to the success of other elements. Conclusions The SEA will provide an additional framework for researchers and local stakeholders that promotes innovation and adaptability. This approach will facilitate the development of new ideas, strategies and approaches to understand how health issues, such as malaria, affect vulnerable communities. PMID:20128922

  16. Using the social entrepreneurship approach to generate innovative and sustainable malaria diagnosis interventions in Tanzania: a case study

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    Hatfield Jennifer M

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There have been a number of interventions to date aimed at improving malaria diagnostic accuracy in sub-Saharan Africa. Yet, limited success is often reported for a number of reasons, especially in rural settings. This paper seeks to provide a framework for applied research aimed to improve malaria diagnosis using a combination of the established methods, participatory action research and social entrepreneurship. Methods This case study introduces the idea of using the social entrepreneurship approach (SEA to create innovative and sustainable applied health research outcomes. The following key elements define the SEA: (1 identifying a locally relevant research topic and plan, (2 recognizing the importance of international multi-disciplinary teams and the incorporation of local knowledge, (3 engaging in a process of continuous innovation, adaptation and learning, (4 remaining motivated and determined to achieve sustainable long-term research outcomes and, (5 sharing and transferring ownership of the project with the international and local partner. Evaluation The SEA approach has a strong emphasis on innovation lead by local stakeholders. In this case, innovation resulted in a unique holistic research program aimed at understanding patient, laboratory and physician influences on accurate diagnosis of malaria. An evaluation of milestones for each SEA element revealed that the success of one element is intricately related to the success of other elements. Conclusions The SEA will provide an additional framework for researchers and local stakeholders that promotes innovation and adaptability. This approach will facilitate the development of new ideas, strategies and approaches to understand how health issues, such as malaria, affect vulnerable communities.

  17. First imported Plasmodium ovale malaria in Central America: case report of a Guatemalan soldier and a call to improve its accurate diagnosis.

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    Castellanos, María Eugenia; Díaz, Sheilee; Parsons, Emily; Peruski, Leonard F; Enríquez, Fabiola; Ramírez, Juan Luis; Padilla, Norma

    2015-01-01

    The Mesoamerican Ministers of Health have set 2020 as the target for malaria elimination to be achieved in the region. Imported malaria cases are a potential threat to countries attempting elimination or working to prevent resurgence. We report the first imported Plasmodium ovale infection with molecular confirmation in Central America, which occurred in a Guatemalan soldier that had been deployed in Africa. The obstacles for its diagnosis using the standard microscopy technique and the need to improve its detection are discussed.

  18. The burden of malaria in post-emergency refugee sites: A retrospective study

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    Spiegel Paul

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Almost two-thirds of refugees, internally displaced persons, returnees and other persons affected by humanitarian emergencies live in malaria endemic regions. Malaria remains a significant threat to the health of these populations. Methods Data on malaria incidence and mortality were analyzed from January 2006 to December 2009 from the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees Health Information System database collected at sites in Burundi, Chad, Cameroon, Ethiopia, Kenya, Sudan, Tanzania, Thailand, and Uganda. Data from three countries during 2006 and 2007, and all nine countries from 2008 to 2009, were used to describe trends in malaria incidence and mortality. Monthly counts of malaria morbidity and mortality were aggregated into an annual country rate averaged over the study period. Results An average of 1.18 million refugees resided in 60 refugee sites within nine countries with at least 50 cases of malaria per 1000 refugees during the study period 2008-2009. The highest incidence of malaria was in refugee sites in Tanzania, where the annual incidence of malaria was 399 confirmed cases per 1,000 refugees and 728 confirmed cases per 1,000 refugee children younger than five years. Malaria incidence in children younger than five years of age, based on the sum of confirmed and suspected cases, declined substantially at sites in two countries between 2006 and 2009, but a slight increase was reported at sites within four of seven countries between 2008 and 2009. Annual malaria mortality rates were highest in sites in Sudan (0.9 deaths per 1,000 refugees, Uganda and Tanzania (0.7 deaths per 1000 refugees each. Malaria was the cause of 16% of deaths in refugee children younger than five years of age in all study sites. Conclusions These findings represent one of the most extensive reports on malaria among refugees in post-emergency sites. Despite declines in malaria incidence among refugees in several countries, malaria

  19. Magnitude of Malaria and Factors among Febrile Cases in Low Transmission Areas of Hadiya Zone, Ethiopia: A Facility Based Cross Sectional Study.

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    Romedan Kedir Delil

    Full Text Available Despite a remarkable decline in morbidity and mortality since the era of malaria roll back strategy, it still poses a huge challenge in Ethiopia in general and in Hadiya Zone in particular. Although, there are data from routine health management information on few indicators, there is scarcity of data showing magnitude of malaria and associated factors including knowledge and practice in the study area. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess magnitude and factors affecting malaria in low transmission areas among febrile cases attending public health facilities in Hadiya Zone, Ethiopia.A facility based cross-sectional study was conducted in Hadiya Zone from May 15 to June 15, 2014. Simple random sampling was used to select the health facility while systematic random sampling technique was used to reach febrile patients attending public health facilities. Data were collected by a pre-tested structured questionnaire containing sections of socio demographic risk factors and knowledge and prevention practices of malaria. Data were entered to Epi-Info software version 3.5.4 and exported to SPSS version 16 for descriptive and logistic regression analysis.One hundred six (25.8% of participating febrile patients attending at sampled health facilities were found to have malaria by microscopy. Of which, P.vivax, P.falciparum and mixed infection accounted for 76(71. 7%, 27 (25.5% and 3 (2.8%, respectively. History of travel to malaria endemic area, [AOR: 2.59, 95% CI: (1.24, 5.38], not using bed net, [AOR: 4.67, 95%CI:, (2.11, 10.37], poor practice related to malaria prevention and control, [AOR: 2.28, (95%CI: (1.10, 4.74], poor knowledge about malaria, [AOR: 5.09,95%CI: (2.26,11.50] and estimated distance of stagnant water near to the residence, [AOR: 3.32, (95%CI: (1.13, 9.76] were significantly associated factors of malaria positivity in the study.The present study revealed that malaria is still a major source of morbidity in the study area among

  20. Chondrodysplasia punctata after warfarin. Case report with 18-month follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamburrini, O.; Bartolomeo-De Iuri, A.; Di Guglielmo, G.L.

    1987-05-01

    Administration of warfarin during pregnancy may cause a rare syndrome characterized by nasal hypoplasia, usually associated with stippled epiphyseal and extraepiphyseal calcifications ressembling chondrodysplasia punctata. A case of chondrodysplasia punctata after warfarin with 18 months follow-up is reported.

  1. Development of vaccines for Plasmodium vivax malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Ivo; Shakri, Ahmad Rushdi; Chitnis, Chetan E

    2015-12-22

    Plasmodium vivax continues to cause significant morbidity outside Africa with more than 50% of malaria cases in many parts of South and South-east Asia, Pacific islands, Central and South America being attributed to P. vivax infections. The unique biology of P. vivax, including its ability to form latent hypnozoites that emerge months to years later to cause blood stage infections, early appearance of gametocytes before clinical symptoms are apparent and a shorter development cycle in the vector makes elimination of P. vivax using standard control tools difficult. The availability of an effective vaccine that provides protection and prevents transmission would be a valuable tool in efforts to eliminate P. vivax. Here, we review the latest developments related to P. vivax malaria vaccines and discuss the challenges as well as directions toward the goal of developing highly efficacious vaccines against P. vivax malaria.

  2. The changing importance of key factors associated with anaemia in 6- to 59-month-old children in a sub-Saharan African setting where malaria is on the decline: analysis of the Rwanda Demographic and Health Survey 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkulikiyinka, Richard; Binagwaho, Agnes; Palmer, Katie

    2015-12-01

    To estimate the relative contribution of malaria and other potential determinants to current anaemia prevalence in Rwanda. The database for this study was the Rwanda Demographic and Health Survey 2010. Haemoglobin and malaria test results, and additional exposures ascertained through mothers' interviews, were analysed for all eligible children age 6-59 months (n = 4068), in addition to diet data available for the youngest under 5-year-old per household. We examined anaemia-exposure associations through forward logistic regression, first for the overall population (n = 3685), and second, for the subpopulation with diet data (n = 1934). In the overall study population, malaria was strongly associated with anaemia (OR = 6.83, 95% CI: 2.90-16.05), but population impact was modest (population-attributable fraction = 2.5%). Factors associated with lower odds of anaemia were recent de-worming medication (six months; OR = 0.60, 95% CI: 0.49-0.74), female sex (OR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.66-0.87), increasing age, residence in North Province and educated mother. Being underweight and recent fever (two weeks) were associated with higher odds. In the subpopulation with diet data, odds were lower with consumption of vitamin A-rich foods (OR = 0.66, 95% CI: 0.50-0.88); and higher in households with many young children. Malaria remains a strong determinant of anaemia for the individual child: transmission control efforts must be maintained. At population level, to further reduce anaemia prevalence, promoting regular vitamin A intake from natural sources and reducing intestinal helminths burden appear the most promising strategies to explore; exploring potential hitherto unidentified sex-linked factors is warranted. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Community case management of malaria: exploring support, capacity and motivation of community medicine distributors in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banek, Kristin; Nankabirwa, Joaniter; Maiteki-Sebuguzi, Catherine; DiLiberto, Deborah; Taaka, Lilian; Chandler, Clare I R; Staedke, Sarah G

    2015-05-01

    In Uganda, community services for febrile children are expanding from presumptive treatment of fever with anti-malarials through the home-based management of fever (HBMF) programme, to include treatment for malaria, diarrhoea and pneumonia through Integrated Community Case Management (ICCM). To understand the level of support available, and the capacity and motivation of community health workers to deliver these expanded services, we interviewed community medicine distributors (CMDs), who had been involved in the HBMF programme in Tororo district, shortly before ICCM was adopted. Between October 2009 and April 2010, 100 CMDs were recruited to participate by convenience sampling. The survey included questionnaires to gather information about the CMDs' work experience and to assess knowledge of fever case management, and in-depth interviews to discuss experiences as CMDs including motivation, supervision and relationships with the community. All questionnaires and knowledge assessments were analysed. Summary contact sheets were made for each of the 100 interviews and 35 were chosen for full transcription and analysis. CMDs faced multiple challenges including high patient load, limited knowledge and supervision, lack of compensation, limited drugs and supplies, and unrealistic expectations of community members. CMDs described being motivated to volunteer for altruistic reasons; however, the main benefits of their work appeared related to 'becoming someone important', with the potential for social mobility for self and family, including building relationships with health workers. At the time of the survey, over half of CMDs felt demotivated due to limited support from communities and the health system. Community health worker programmes rely on the support of communities and health systems to operate sustainably. When this support falls short, motivation of volunteers can wane. If community interventions, in increasingly complex forms, are to become the solution to

  4. Improved clinical and laboratory skills after team-based, malaria case management training of health care professionals in Uganda

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    Namagembe Allen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deployment of highly effective artemisinin-based combination therapy for treating uncomplicated malaria calls for better targeting of malaria treatment to improve case management and minimize drug pressure for selecting resistant parasites. The Integrated Management of Malaria curriculum was developed to train multi-disciplinary teams of clinical, laboratory and health information assistants. Methods Evaluation of training was conducted in nine health facilities that were Uganda Malaria Surveillance Programme (UMSP sites. From December 2006 to June 2007, 194 health professionals attended a six-day course. One-hundred and one of 118 (86% clinicians were observed during patient encounters by expert clinicians at baseline and during three follow-up visits approximately six weeks, 12 weeks and one year after the course. Experts used a standardized tool for children less than five years of age and similar tool for patients five or more years of age. Seventeen of 30 laboratory professionals (57% were assessed for preparation of malaria blood smears and ability to interpret smear results of 30 quality control slides. Results Percentage of patients at baseline and first follow-up, respectively, with proper history-taking was 21% and 43%, thorough physical examination 18% and 56%, correct diagnosis 51% and 98%, treatment in compliance with national policy 42% and 86%, and appropriate patient education 17% and 83%. In estimates that adjusted for individual effects and a matched sample, relative risks were 1.86 (95% CI: 1.20,2.88 for history-taking, 2.66 (95%CI: 1.60,4.41 for physical examination, 1.77 (95%CI: 1.41,2.23 for diagnosis, 1.96 (95%CI: 1.46,2.63 for treatment, and 4.47 (95%CI: 2.68,7.46 for patient education. Results were similar for subsequent follow-up and in sub-samples stratified by patient age. Quality of malaria blood smear preparation improved from 21.6% at baseline to 67.3% at first follow-up (p p p p Conclusion A

  5. Determinants of delay in malaria treatment-seeking behaviour for under-five children in south-west Ethiopia: a case control study

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    Deribew Amare

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prompt diagnosis and timely treatment of malaria within 24 hours after onset of first symptoms can reduce illness progression to severe stages and therefore, decrease mortality. The reason why mothers/caretakers delay in malaria diagnosis and treatment for under-five children is not well studied in Ethiopia. The objective of this study was to assess determinants of malaria treatment delay in under-five children in three districts of south-west Ethiopia. Methods A case control study was conducted from March 15 to April 20, 2010. Cases were under-five children who had clinical malaria and sought treatment after 24 hours of developing sign and symptom, and controls were under-five children who had clinical malaria and sought treatment within 24 hours of developing sign and symptom of malaria. Data were collected by trained enumerators using structured questionnaire. Data were entered in to Epi Info version 6.04 and analyzed using SPSS version 16.0. To identify determinants, multiple logistic regression was done. Results A total of 155 mothers of cases and 155 mothers of controls were interviewed. Mothers of children who were in a monogamous marriage (OR = 3.41, 95% CI: 1.39, 8.34, who complained about the side effects of anti-malarial drugs (OR = 4.96, 95% CI: 1.21, 20.36, who had no history of child death (OR = 3.50, 95% CI: 1.82, 6.42 and who complained about the higher cost of transportation to reach the health institutions (OR = 2.01, 95% CI: 1.17, 3.45 were more likely to be late for the treatment of malaria in under-five children. Conclusion Effective malaria control programmes should address reducing delayed presentation of children for treatment. Efforts to reduce delay should address transport cost, decentralization of services and increasing awareness of the community on early diagnosis and treatment.

  6. Major improvements in the quality of malaria case-management under the "test and treat" policy in Kenya.

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    Dejan Zurovac

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Monitoring implementation of the "test and treat" case-management policy for malaria is an important component of all malaria control programmes in Africa. Unfortunately, routine information systems are commonly deficient to provide necessary information. Using health facility surveys we monitored health systems readiness and malaria case-management practices prior to and following implementation of the 2010 "test and treat" policy in Kenya. METHODS/FINDINGS: Between 2010 and 2013 six national, cross-sectional, health facility surveys were undertaken. The number of facilities assessed ranged between 172 and 176, health workers interviewed between 216 and 237 and outpatient consultations for febrile patients evaluated between 1,208 and 2,408 across six surveys. Comparing baseline and the last survey results, all readiness indicators showed significant (p<0.005 improvements: availability of parasitological diagnosis (55.2% to 90.7%; RDT availability (7.5% to 69.8%; total artemether-lumefantrine (AL stock-out (27.2% to 7.0%; stock-out of one or more AL packs (59.5% to 21.6%; training coverage (0 to 50.2%; guidelines access (0 to 58.1% and supervision (17.9% to 30.8%. Testing increased by 34.0% (23.9% to 57.9%; p<0.001 while testing and treatment according to test result increased by 34.2% (15.7% to 49.9%; p<0.001. Treatment adherence for test positive patients improved from 83.3% to 90.3% (p = 0.138 and for test negative patients from 47.9% to 83.4% (p<0.001. Significant testing and treatment improvements were observed in children and adults. There was no difference in practices with respect to the type and result of malaria test (RDT vs microscopy. Of eight dosing, dispensing and counseling tasks, improvements were observed for four tasks. Overall AL use for febrile patients decreased from 63.5% to 35.6% (p<0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Major improvements in the implementation of "test and treat" policy were observed in Kenya. Some gaps

  7. Feasibility and acceptability of ACT for the community case management of malaria in urban settings in five African sites

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    Traoré Abdoulaye

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The community case management of malaria (CCMm is now an established route for distribution of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT in rural areas, but the feasibility and acceptability of the approach through community medicine distributors (CMD in urban areas has not been explored. It is estimated that in 15 years time 50% of the African population will live in urban areas and transmission of the malaria parasite occurs in these densely populated areas. Methods Pre- and post-implementation studies were conducted in five African cities: Ghana, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia and Malawi. CMDs were trained to educate caregivers, diagnose and treat malaria cases in Results Qualitative findings: In all sites, interviews revealed that caregivers' knowledge of malaria signs and symptoms improved after the intervention. Preference for CMDs as preferred providers for malaria increased in all sites. Quantitative findings: 9001 children with an episode of fever were treated by 199 CMDs in the five study sites. Results from the CHWs registers show that of these, 6974 were treated with an ACT and 6933 (99% were prescribed the correct dose for their age. Fifty-four percent of the 3,025 children for which information about the promptness of treatment was available were treated within 24 hours from the onset of symptoms. From the household survey 3700 children were identified who had an episode of fever during the preceding two weeks. 1480 (40% of them sought treatment from a CMD and 1213 of them (82% had received an ACT. Of these, 1123 (92.6% were administered the ACT for the correct number of doses and days; 773 of the 1118 (69.1% children for which information about the promptness of treatment was available were treated within 24 hours from onset of symptoms, and 768 (68.7% were treated promptly and correctly. Conclusions The concept of CCMm in an urban environment was positive, and caregivers were generally satisfied with the services

  8. Malaria in Mauritania: retrospective and prospective overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekweiry, Khadijetou Mint; Salem, Mohamed Salem Ould Ahmedou; Basco, Leonardo K; Briolant, Sébastien; Hafid, Jamaleddine; Boukhary, Ali Ould Mohamed Salem

    2015-03-04

    Malaria has become a major public health problem in Mauritania since the 1990s, with an average of 181,000 cases per year and 2,233,066 persons at risk during 1995-2012. This paper provides the first publicly available overview of malaria incidence and distribution in Mauritania. Information on the burden and malaria species distribution is critical for guiding national efforts in malaria control. As the incidence of malaria changes over time, regular updates of epidemiological data are necessary.

  9. Precipitation Based Malaria Patterns in the Amazon -- Will Deforestation Alter Risk?

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    Olson, S. H.; Durieux, L.; Elguero, E.; Foley, J.; Gagnon, R.; Guegan, J.; Patz, J.

    2007-12-01

    The World Health Organization, estimates that forty-two percent of malaria cases are "associated with policies and practices regarding land use, deforestation, water resource management, settlement siting and modified house design". This estimate was drawn from expert opinion and studies performed at local scales, but little research has investigated the cumulative impacts of land use and land cover changes occurring in the Amazon Basin on malaria. Much less is understood about the impact of changing land use and subsequent precipitation regimes on malaria risk. To understand how land use practices may alter malaria patterns in the Basin we present an analysis of municipio (n=755) malaria case data and monthly precipitation patterns between 1996 and 1999. Climate data originated from the CRU TS 2.1 half-degree grid resolution climate data set. We present a hierarchical (random coefficients) log-linear Poisson model relating malaria incidence to precipitation for both municipos and states. At the Basin scale precipitation and cases show strong relationships. Precipitation and cases are asynchronous across the period of observation, but detailed inspection of states and individual municipios reveal geographic dependencies of precipitation and malaria incidence. Future research will link the patterns of precipitation and malaria to anticipated changes in climate from deforestation in the Basin.

  10. The effect of iron-fortified complementary food and intermittent preventive treatment of malaria on anaemia in 12- to 36-month-old children: a cluster-randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinz, Dominik; Hurrell, Richard F; Ouattara, Mamadou; Zimmermann, Michael B; Brittenham, Gary M; Adiossan, Lukas G; Righetti, Aurélie A; Seifert, Burkhardt; Diakité, Victorine G; Utzinger, Jürg; N'Goran, Eliézer K; Wegmüller, Rita

    2015-09-17

    Iron deficiency (ID) and malaria co-exist in tropical regions and both contribute to high rates of anaemia in young children. It is unclear whether iron fortification combined with intermittent preventive treatment (IPT) of malaria would be an efficacious strategy for reducing anaemia in young children. A 9-month cluster-randomised, single-blinded, placebo-controlled intervention trial was carried out in children aged 12-36 months in south-central Côte d'Ivoire, an area of intense and perennial malaria transmission. The study groups were: group 1: normal diet and IPT-placebo (n = 125); group 2: consumption of porridge, an iron-fortified complementary food (CF) with optimised composition providing 2 mg iron as NaFeEDTA and 3.8 mg iron as ferrous fumarate 6 days per week (CF-FeFum) and IPT-placebo (n = 126); group 3: IPT of malaria at 3-month intervals, using sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine and amodiaquine and no dietary intervention (n = 127); group 4: both CF-FeFum and IPT (n = 124); and group 5: consumption of porridge, an iron-fortified CF with the composition currently on the Ivorian market providing 2 mg iron as NaFeEDTA and 3.8 mg iron as ferric pyrophosphate 6 days per week (CF-FePP) and IPT-placebo (n = 127). The primary outcome was haemoglobin (Hb) concentration. Linear and logistic regression mixed-effect models were used for the comparison of the five study groups, and a 2 × 2 factorial analysis was used to assess treatment interactions of CF-FeFum and IPT (study groups 1-4). After 9 months, the Hb concentration increased in all groups to a similar extent with no statistically significant difference between groups. In the 2 × 2 factorial analysis after 9 months, no treatment interaction was found on Hb (P = 0.89). The adjusted differences in Hb were 0.24 g/dl (95 % CI -0.10 to 0.59; P = 0.16) in children receiving IPT and -0.08 g/dl (95 % CI -0.42 to 0.26; P = 0.65) in children receiving CF-FeFum. At baseline, anaemia (Hb

  11. Capacity and readiness of civil society organisations to implement community case management of malaria in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marita, Enock; Oule, Jared; Mungai, Margaret; Thiam, Sylla; Ilako, Festus

    2016-01-01

    Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) contribute to achieving development goals through advocacy, social mobilisation and provision of health services. CSO programming is a key component of Global Fund (GF) grants; however, CSOs face technical and governance capacity challenges in grant utilisation leading to missed opportunities for improving health at community level. Amref Health Africa was appointed Principal Recipient of a GF grant aimed at scaling up community case management of malaria through CSOs as sub-recipients in western Kenya. To identify potential risks and strengthen grant management, Amref Health Africa and the Ministry of Health conducted a capacity needs assessment to determine the capacity of CSOs to effectively utilise grants. 26 selected CSOs participated in this study. Document reviews and on-site assessments and observations were conducted using structured tool. The five main assessment areas were: governance and risk management; strategic and operational planning; monitoring and evaluation; programme management; and financial management. Overall performance was grouped into four categories: 3.0-2.5 (excellent), 2.0-2.4 (good), 1.5-1.9 (fair), and 1.0-1.4 (poor). Data were collected and analysed using Excel software. Twenty five out of 26 CSOs were legally compliant. 14(54%) CSOs were categorized as good; 7(27%) as excellent; 3(12%) as poor and 2(8%) as fair. Most CSOs had good programme management capacity but monitoring and evaluation presented the most capacity gaps. More than 75% of the CSOs were rated as excellent or good. A capacity building plan, programme risk management plan and oversight mechanisms were important for successful grant implementation.

  12. Spatial trend, environmental and socioeconomic factors associated with malaria prevalence in Chennai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Divya Subash; Andimuthu, Ramachandran; Rajan, Rupa; Venkatesan, Mada Suresh

    2014-01-08

    Urban malaria is considered to be one of the most significant infectious diseases due to varied socioeconomic problems especially in tropical countries like India. Among the south Indian cities, Chennai is endemic for malaria. The present study aimed to identify the hot spots of malaria prevalence and the relationship with other factors in Chennai during 2005-2011. Data on zone-wise and ward-wise monthly malaria positive cases were collected from the Vector Control Office, Chennai Corporation, for the year 2005 to 2011 and verified using field data. This data was used to calculate the prevalence among thousand people. Hotspot analysis for all the years in the study period was done to observe the spatial trend. Association of environmental factors like altitude, population density and climatic variables was assessed using ArcGIS 9.3 version and SPSS 11.5. Pearson's correlation of climate parameters at 95% and 99% was considered to be the most significant. Social parameters of the highly malaria prone region were evaluated through a structured random questionnaire field survey. Among the ten zones of Chennai Corporation, Basin Bridge zone showed high malaria prevalence during the study period. The 'hotspot' analysis of malaria prevalence showed the emergence of newer hotspots in the Adyar zone. These hotspots of high prevalence are places of moderately populated and moderately elevated areas. The prevalence of malaria in Chennai could be due to rainfall and temperature, as there is a significant correlation with monthly rainfall and one month lag of monthly mean temperature. Further it has been observed that the socioeconomic status of people in the malaria hotspot regions and unhygienic living conditions were likely to aggravate the malaria problem. Malaria hotspots will be the best method to use for targeting malaria control activities. Proper awareness and periodical monitoring of malaria is one of the quintessential steps to control this infectious disease. It

  13. Malaria cerebral Cerebral malaria

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Hugo Zapata Zapata; Silvia Blair Trujillo

    2003-01-01

    La malaria Cerebral (MC) es la complicación más frecuente de la malaria por P. falciparum; aproximadamente el 90% de las personas que la han padecido se recuperan completamente sin secuelas neurológicas. Aún no se conoce con claridad su patogénesis pero se han postulado cuatro hipótesis o mecanismos posibles: 1) citoadherencia y secuestro de glóbulos rojos parasitados en la microvasculatura cerebral; 2) formación de rosetas y aglutinación de glóbulos rojos parasitados; 3) producción de citoqu...

  14. Long-lasting permethrin-impregnated clothing: protective efficacy against malaria in hyperendemic foci, and laundering, wearing, and weathering effects on residual bioactivity after worst-case use in the rain forests of French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most, Bruno; Pommier de Santi, Vincent; Pagès, Frédéric; Mura, Marie; Uedelhoven, Waltraud M; Faulde, Michael K

    2017-02-01

    Personal protective measures against hematophagous vectors constitute the first line of defense against arthropod-borne diseases. However, guidelines for the standardized testing and licensing of insecticide-treated clothing are still lacking. The aim of this study was to analyze the preventive effect of long-lasting polymer-coated permethrin-impregnated clothing (PTBDU) against malaria after exposure to high-level disease transmission sites as well as the corresponding loss of permethrin and bioactivity during worst-case field use. Between August 2011 and June 2012, 25 personnel wearing PTBDUs and exposed for 9.5 person-months in hyperendemic malaria foci in the rain forest of French Guiana contracted no cases of malaria, whereas 125 persons wearing untreated uniforms only, exposed for 30.5 person-months, contracted 11 cases of malaria, indicating that PTBDU use significantly (p = 0.0139) protected against malaria infection. In the field, PTBDUs were laundered between 1 and 218 times (mean 25.2 ± 44.8). After field use, the mean remaining permethrin concentration in PTBDU fabric was 732.1 ± 321.1 min varying between 130 and 1270 mg/m(2) (mean 743.9 ± 304.2 mg/m(2)) in blouses, and between 95 and 1290 mg/m(2) (mean 720.2 ± 336.9 mg/m(2)) in trousers. Corresponding bioactivity, measured according to internal licensing conditions as KD99 times against Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, varied between 27.5 and 142.5 min (mean 47.7 ± 22.1 min) for blouses, and between 25.0 and 360 min (mean 60.2 ± 66.1 min) for trousers. We strongly recommend the use of long-lasting permethrin-impregnated clothing for the prevention of mosquito-borne diseases, including chikungunya, dengue, and zika fevers, which are currently resurging globally.

  15. Determinants of prompt and adequate care among presumed malaria cases in a community in eastern Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingabire, Chantal Marie; Kateera, Fredrick; Hakizimana, Emmanuel; Rulisa, Alexis; Muvunyi, Claude; Mens, Petra; Koenraadt, Sander; Mutesa, Leon; Vugt, Van Michele; Borne, Van Den Bart; Alaii, Jane

    2016-01-01

    Background: In order to understand factors influencing fever/malaria management practices among community-based individuals, the study evaluated psychosocial, socio-demographic and environmental determinants of prompt and adequate healthcare-seeking behaviours. Methods: A quantitative household (

  16. Epidemiology of disappearing Plasmodium vivax malaria: a case study in rural Amazonia.

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    Susana Barbosa

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available New frontier settlements across the Amazon Basin pose a major challenge for malaria elimination in Brazil. Here we describe the epidemiology of malaria during the early phases of occupation of farming settlements in Remansinho area, Brazilian Amazonia. We examine the relative contribution of low-density and asymptomatic parasitemias to the overall Plasmodium vivax burden over a period of declining transmission and discuss potential hurdles for malaria elimination in Remansinho and similar settings.Eight community-wide cross-sectional surveys, involving 584 subjects, were carried out in Remansinho over 3 years and complemented by active and passive surveillance of febrile illnesses between the surveys. We used quantitative PCR to detect low-density asexual parasitemias and gametocytemias missed by conventional microscopy. Mixed-effects multiple logistic regression models were used to characterize independent risk factors for P. vivax infection and disease.P. vivax prevalence decreased from 23.8% (March-April 2010 to 3.0% (April-May 2013, with no P. falciparum infections diagnosed after March-April 2011. Although migrants from malaria-free areas were at increased risk of malaria, their odds of having P. vivax infection and disease decreased by 2-3% with each year of residence in Amazonia. Several findings indicate that low-density and asymptomatic P. vivax parasitemias may complicate residual malaria elimination in Remansinho: (a the proportion of subpatent infections (i.e. missed by microscopy increased from 43.8% to 73.1% as P. vivax transmission declined; (b most (56.6% P. vivax infections were asymptomatic and 32.8% of them were both subpatent and asymptomatic; (c asymptomatic parasite carriers accounted for 54.4% of the total P. vivax biomass in the host population; (d over 90% subpatent and asymptomatic P. vivax had PCR-detectable gametocytemias; and (e few (17.0% asymptomatic and subpatent P. vivax infections that were left untreated

  17. Ten years experience with 497 cases of neuroinfections in tropic: in limited laboratory infrastructure initially treat both, cerebral malaria and meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benca, J; Ondrusova, A; Adamcova, J; Takacova, M; Polonova, J; Taziarova, M

    2007-06-01

    Review of 497 cases of neuroinfections in 7 tropical clinics in Ethiopia, Uganda, Burundi, Kenya, Sudan within 2000-2007 was performed. 97.5% of all cases was cerebral malaria (40.1%) and bacterial meningitis (56.4%). TB meningitis, cerebral cryptococcosis and sleeping sickness were very rare.

  18. The clinical burden of malaria in Nairobi: a historical review and contemporary audit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Widespread urbanization over the next 20 years has the potential to drastically change the risk of malaria within Africa. The burden of the disease, its management, risk factors and appropriateness of targeted intervention across varied urban environments in Africa remain largely undefined. This paper presents a combined historical and contemporary review of the clinical burden of malaria within one of Africa's largest urban settlements, Nairobi, Kenya. Methods A review of historical reported malaria case burdens since 1911 within Nairobi was undertaken using archived government and city council reports. Contemporary information on out-patient case burdens due to malaria were assembled from the National Health Management and Information System (HMIS). Finally, an audit of 22 randomly selected health facilities within Nairobi was undertaken covering 12 months 2009-2010. The audit included interviews with health workers, and a checklist of commodities and guidelines necessary to diagnose, treat and record malaria. Results From the 1930's through to the mid-1960's malaria incidence declined coincidental with rapid population growth. During this period malaria notification and prevention were a priority for the city council. From 2001-2008 reporting systems for malaria were inadequate to define the extent or distribution of malaria risk within Nairobi. A more detailed facility review suggests, however that malaria remains a common diagnosis (11% of all paediatric diagnoses made) and where laboratories (n = 15) exist slide positivity rates are on average 15%. Information on the quality of diagnosis, slide reading and whether those reported as positive were imported infections was not established. The facilities and health workers included in this study were not universally prepared to treat malaria according to national guidelines or identify foci of risks due to shortages of national first-line drugs, inadequate record keeping and a view among some health

  19. A study of presentation and complications among the malaria death cases from three municipal corporation hospitals and civil hospital of Ahmedabad during the year 2007

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    S Vyas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Characterization of severe malaria cases on arrival to hospital may lead to early recognition and improved management. Understanding of symptoms, signs, and laboratory parameters which are associated with high case-fatality rate (CFR can help in appropriate and early management of cases. Aims: To study the profile, symptoms, signs, and laboratory parameters of malaria death cases. Materials and Methods: Information about deaths due to malaria, as reported to malaria Department of Ahmedabad Municipal Corporation by three municipal corporation hospitals and civil hospital Ahmedabad between January 2007 and December 2007, was used to locate details of those deaths in respective hospitals. Indoor case papers and death reports of those cases were obtained from Medical Record Section of respective hospitals and were analyzed by using appropriate statistical software. Results: A total of 57 malaria deaths occurred in the abovementioned four hospitals. Overall CFR was 3.03% for indoor malaria cases. Complete information could be obtained for about 42 cases. Mean age of cases was 36.50 years. There were 45.23% of patients falling in the age group >=40 years. There were 57.1% males and 42.9% females. Fifty-five cases were positive for Plasmodium falciparum, one case for Plasmodium vivax, and one case was having mixed infection. Average duration of hospital stay was 2.87 days and average total duration of illness was 6.82 days. The most common presenting symptom was intermittent fever with vomiting and altered sensorium in 38.88% of cases. Acute renal failure was the most common complication seen in 45.2% of the cases. Paired t-test was applied on the investigations carried out on the day of admission and those carried out on the day or before a day of death and found significant for the levels of hemoglobin, blood urea, and serum bilirubin. Conclusions: Malaria still remains one of the important causes of admission and mortality. In view of

  20. A new malaria protocol in a Congolese refugee camp in West Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Maria G; Charle, Pilar; Jimenez, Sylvia; Nunez, Milton

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of a new malaria protocol introduced in 2007 at Nyarugusu Refugee Camp. In accordance with this protocol, the delivery of a diagnostic test (rapid diagnostic test or microscopy) was made compulsory prior to the administration of antimalarial drugs (ACTs: artemisinin-based combination therapies). We collected camp clinic records on outpatient malaria diagnoses from 2004 through 2007 and compared the morbidity percentages attributed to malaria during these years, as well as the actual incidence of malaria in 2006 and 2007. Our analyses demonstrate that malaria accounted for 45.8% of all morbidity in 2004 (64,557 malaria cases out of 1,40,669 total morbidity), followed by corresponding figures of 47.8% for 2005 (94,389 malaria cases out of 1,97,400) and 47.9% for 2006 (60,760 malaria cases out of 1,26,754); however, the values dropped sharply to 22.8% in 2007 (20,136 malaria cases out of 88,254). We found a similar drastic drop in the incidence of malaria from an average of 182.415 cases/1000 inhabitants/month in 2006 to only 35.635 cases/1000 inhabitants/month in 2007. The results of our study suggest that because of the overlap of symptoms from malarial and non-malarial febrile illnesses, diagnosing malaria on clinical and epidemiological bases may lead to its overdiagnosis. This could result in both the overprescription of antimalarials and the underdiagnosis and inappropriate treatment of non-malarial febrile processes. The use of affordable and available tests can increase the accuracy of malaria diagnoses, so that only real malaria cases would be treated as such. This would help curb the uncontrolled administration of antimalarials to prevent the development of resistance to new malarial treatments and thus decrease treatment expenses. This way, financial, material and human resources can be allocated to other health issues that currently go unnoticed.

  1. A Rare Adrenal Mass in a 3-Month-Old: A Case Report and Literature Review

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    Ashish Garg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-month-old female infant presented with abdominal distention for 2 months. A large palpable mass in right upper quadrant was noted on physical exam. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a large heterogeneous mass with multiple cystic components. Mass was surgically excised and pathology was consistent with mature adrenal teratoma. Teratoma is a germ cell tumor mainly found in gonadal tissues. Occurrence of adrenal gland teratoma in children is very rare with less than 10 pediatric case reports in English literature. We present a rare case of primary adrenal tumor in an infant and a review of the literature.

  2. Control of malaria: the rapid fever surveillance programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premanath, M

    1997-11-01

    Eighty-five villages out of nearly 300 villages of Tiptur taluka covering a population of 47,271 where the incidence of Plasmodium falciparum (PF) malaria was very high, were selected for a programme during Aug 93 which lasted for 29 months until the end of Dec 95. Ten days of fever radical treatment (FRT) and 54 weekly and 29 fortnightly rapid fever surveillance (RFS) programmes were conducted. 64,142 blood smears were examined out of which 21,542 were positive for malaria and 14,291 were of PF type. There were 9858 PF cases during the last 5 months of 1993, which came down to 349 by the end of 1995. Fever morbidity which was nearly 1000 new cases per day during FRT came down to 120, 78, and 30 new cases per day during 1993, 1994 and 1995, respectively. Parasite index (PI) for PF Malaria was 140-321 during 1993, came down to 0.6-15 at the end of the study. Four rounds of DDT, two rounds of Ikon and one round of Delta-methrin were sprayed in four and two PHC areas, respectively during this period. Asymptomatic carriers for PF malaria were detected in the children under 14 years of age (3.1%). This programme did prove very effective in bringing down morbidity and mortality due to PF Malaria in the community.

  3. Malaria prevention in travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genton, Blaise; D'Acremont, Valérie

    2012-09-01

    A common approach to malaria prevention is to follow the "A, B, C, D" rule: Awareness of risk, Bite avoidance, Compliance with chemoprophylaxis, and prompt Diagnosis in case of fever. The risk of acquiring malaria depends on the length and intensity of exposure; the risk of developing severe disease is primarily determined by the health status of the traveler. These parameters need to be assessed before recommending chemoprophylaxis and/or stand-by emergency treatment. This review discusses the different strategies and drug options available for the prevention of malaria during and post travel.

  4. Malaria and water resource development: the case of Gilgel-Gibe hydroelectric dam in Ethiopia

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    Kloos Helmut

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ethiopia plans to increase its electricity power supply by five-fold over the next five years to fulfill the needs of its people and support the economic growth based on large hydropower dams. Building large dams for hydropower generation may increase the transmission of malaria since they transform ecosystems and create new vector breeding habitats. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of Gilgel-Gibe hydroelectric dam in Ethiopia on malaria transmission and changing levels of prevalence in children. Methods A cross-sectional, community-based study was carried out between October and December 2005 in Jimma Zone, south-western Ethiopia, among children under 10 years of age living in three 'at-risk' villages (within 3 km from dam and three 'control' villages (5 to 8 km from dam. The man-made Gilgel-Gibe dam is operating since 2004. Households with children less than 10 years of age were selected and children from the selected households were sampled from all the six villages. This included 1,081 children from 'at-risk' villages and 774 children from 'control' villages. Blood samples collected from children using finger prick were examined microscopically to determine malaria prevalence, density of parasitaemia and identify malarial parasite species. Results Overall 1,855 children (905 girls and 950 boys were surveyed. A total of 194 (10.5% children were positive for malaria, of which, 117 (60.3% for Plasmodium vivax, 76 (39.2% for Plasmodium falciparum and one (0.5% for both P. vivax and P. falciparum. A multivariate design-based analysis indicated that, while controlling for age, sex and time of data collection, children who resided in 'at-risk' villages close to the dam were more likely to have P. vivax infection than children who resided farther away (odds ratio (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.15, 2.32 and showed a higher OR to have P. falciparum infection than children who resided in 'control' villages, but this was not

  5. Epidemiological, clinical and biological features of malaria among children in Niamey, Niger

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    Ibrahim Maman

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria takes a heavy toll in Niger, one of the world's poorest countries. Previous evaluations conducted in the context of the strategy for the Integrated Management of Childhood Illness, showed that 84% of severe malaria cases and 64 % of ordinary cases are not correctly managed. The aim of this survey was to describe epidemiological, clinical and biological features of malaria among Methods The study was performed in 2003 during the rainy season from July 25th to October 25th. Microscopic diagnosis of malaria, complete blood cell counts and measurement of glycaemia were performed in compliance with the routine procedure of the laboratory. Epidemiological data was collected through interviews with mothers. Results 256 children aged 3–60 months were included in the study. Anthropometrics and epidemiological data were typical of a very underprivileged population: 58% of the children were suffering from malnutrition and all were from poor families. Diagnosis of malaria was confirmed by microscopy in 52% of the cases. Clinical symptoms upon admission were non-specific, but there was a significant combination between a positive thick blood smear and neurological symptoms, and between a positive thick blood smear and splenomegaly. Thrombopaenia was also statistically more frequent among confirmed cases of malaria. The prevalence of severe malaria was 86%, including cases of severe anaemia among Conclusions The study confirmed that malaria was a major burden for the National Hospital of Niamey. Children hospitalized for malaria had an underprivileged background. Two distinctive features were the prevalence of severe malaria and a high mortality rate. Medical and non-medical underlying factors which may explain such a situation are discussed.

  6. Healthcare-seeking strategies among displaced children in war-ridden northern Uganda: the case of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akello-Ayebare, G; Richters, J M; Polderman, A M; Visser, L G

    2010-07-01

    A field study was performed to examine suffering and treatment seeking from the perspective of children aged 8-16 years living in war-affected northern Uganda. Various techniques for collecting qualitative and quantitative data were used, including a semi-structured questionnaire about illness experiences and medicine use over a 1-month recall period. The 165 children who were interviewed were attending primary schools for displaced children and/or commuters' night shelters. The children frequently attributed their common febrile ailments to malaria and used a variety of pharmaceuticals and herbal remedies, as self-medication, for their self-diagnosed malarial episodes. Misdiagnosis of febrile illnesses by the children (as well as by the local healthcare providers) and frequent misuse of medicines in the treatment of these illnesses appeared to be very common. Improvement of the health conditions of these children requires a change of focus. Firstly, children above the age of 5 years who are not under adult care and who are often no longer welcome in the local hospital's paediatric ward need to be accepted at the outpatient clinics currently intended for adults. Secondly, the local diagnostic system needs to be improved, not only so that malaria can be reliably diagnosed but also so that alternative diagnoses can be confirmed or rejected, otherwise the current over-consumption of antimalarial drugs may simply be replaced with an over-consumption of antibiotics.

  7. Recrudescence of Plasmodium falciparum malaria contracted in Lombok, Indonesia after quinine/doxycycline and mefloquine: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tish, K N; Pillans, P I

    1997-07-11

    A patient is reported who contracted Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Lombok, Indonesia. The infection recrudesced after quinine/doxycycline and mefloquine. Treatment with halofantrine was successful after he developed cerebral malaria with recovery.

  8. Plasmodium vivax hospitalizations in a monoendemic malaria region: severe vivax malaria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quispe, Antonio M; Pozo, Edwar; Guerrero, Edith; Durand, Salomón; Baldeviano, G Christian; Edgel, Kimberly A; Graf, Paul C F; Lescano, Andres G

    2014-07-01

    Severe malaria caused by Plasmodium vivax is no longer considered rare. To describe its clinical features, we performed a retrospective case control study in the subregion of Luciano Castillo Colonna, Piura, Peru, an area with nearly exclusive vivax malaria transmission. Severe cases and the subset of critically ill cases were compared with a random set of uncomplicated malaria cases (1:4). Between 2008 and 2009, 6,502 malaria cases were reported, including 106 hospitalized cases, 81 of which fit the World Health Organization definition for severe malaria. Of these 81 individuals, 28 individuals were critically ill (0.4%, 95% confidence interval = 0.2-0.6%) with severe anemia (57%), shock (25%), lung injury (21%), acute renal failure (14%), or cerebral malaria (11%). Two potentially malaria-related deaths occurred. Compared with uncomplicated cases, individuals critically ill were older (38 versus 26 years old, P malaria monoinfection with critical illness is more common than previously thought.

  9. Associations between Burkitt lymphoma among children in Malawi and infection with HIV, EBV and malaria: results from a case-control study.

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    Nora Mutalima

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Burkitt lymphoma, a childhood cancer common in parts of sub-Saharan Africa, has been associated with Epstein Barr Virus (EBV and malaria, but its association with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV is not clear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a case-control study of Burkitt lymphoma among children (aged < or = 15 years admitted to the pediatric oncology unit in Blantyre, Malawi between July 2005 and July 2006. Cases were 148 children diagnosed with Burkitt lymphoma and controls were 104 children admitted with non-malignant conditions or cancers other than hematological malignancies and Kaposi sarcoma. Interviews were conducted and serological samples tested for antibodies against HIV, EBV and malaria. Odds ratios for Burkitt lymphoma were estimated using unconditional logistic regression adjusting for sex, age, and residential district. Cases had a mean age of 7.1 years and 60% were male. Cases were more likely than controls to be HIV positive (Odds ratio (OR = 12.4, 95% Confidence Interval (CI 1.3 to 116.2, p = 0.03. ORs for Burkitt lymphoma increased with increasing antibody titers against EBV (p = 0.001 and malaria (p = 0.01. Among HIV negative participants, cases were thirteen times more likely than controls to have raised levels of both EBV and malaria antibodies (OR = 13.2; 95% CI 3.8 to 46.6; p = 0.001. Reported use of mosquito nets was associated with a lower risk of Burkitt lymphoma (OR = 0.2, 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.9, p = 0.04. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings support prior evidence that EBV and malaria act jointly in the pathogenesis of Burkitt lymphoma, suggesting that malaria prevention may decrease the risk of Burkitt lymphoma. HIV may also play a role in the etiology of this childhood tumor.

  10. Patterns and determinants of malaria risk in urban and peri-urban areas of Blantyre, Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathanga, Don P; Tembo, Atupele Kapito; Mzilahowa, Themba; Bauleni, Andy; Mtimaukenena, Kondwani; Taylor, Terrie E; Valim, Clarissa; Walker, Edward D; Wilson, Mark L

    2016-12-08

    Although malaria disease in urban and peri-urban areas of sub-Saharan Africa is a growing concern, the epidemiologic patterns and drivers of transmission in these settings remain poorly understood. Factors associated with variation in malaria risk in urban and peri-urban areas were evaluated in this study. A health facility-based, age and location-matched, case-control study of children 6-59 months of age was conducted in four urban and two peri-urban health facilities (HF) of Blantyre city, Malawi. Children with fever who sought care from the same HF were tested for malaria parasites by microscopy and PCR. Those testing positive or negative on both were defined as malaria cases or controls, respectively. A total of 187 cases and 286 controls were studied. In univariate analyses, higher level of education, possession of TV, and electricity in the house were negatively associated with malaria illness; these associations were similar in urban and peri-urban zones. Having travelled in the month before testing was strongly associated with clinical malaria, but only for participants living in the urban zones (OR = 5.1; 95% CI = 1.62, 15.8). Use of long-lasting insecticide nets (LLINs) the previous night was not associated with protection from malaria disease in any setting. In multivariate analyses, electricity in the house, travel within the previous month, and a higher level of education were all associated with decreased odds of malaria disease. Only a limited number of Anopheles mosquitoes were found by aspiration inside the households in the peri-urban areas, and none was collected from the urban households. Travel was the main factor influencing the incidence of malaria illness among residents of urban Blantyre compared with peri-urban areas. Identification and understanding of key mobile demographic groups, their behaviours, and the pattern of parasite dispersal is critical to the design of more targeted interventions for the urban setting.

  11. Deployment and use of mobile phone technology for real-time reporting of fever cases and malaria treatment failure in areas of declining malaria transmission in Muheza district north-eastern Tanzania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Filbert; Ishengoma, Deus S; Mmbando, Bruno P; Rutta, Acleus S M; Malecela, Mwelecele N; Mayala, Benjamin; Lemnge, Martha M; Michael, Edwin

    2017-08-01

    Early detection of febrile illnesses at community level is essential for improved malaria case management and control. Currently, mobile phone-based technology has been commonly used to collect and transfer health information and services in different settings. This study assessed the applicability of mobile phone-based technology in real-time reporting of fever cases and management of malaria by village health workers (VHWs) in north-eastern Tanzania. The community mobile phone-based disease surveillance and treatment for malaria (ComDSTM) platform, combined with mobile phones and web applications, was developed and implemented in three villages and one dispensary in Muheza district from November 2013 to October 2014. A baseline census was conducted in May 2013. The data were uploaded on a web-based database and updated during follow-up home visits by VHWs. Active and passive case detection (ACD, PCD) of febrile cases were done by VHWs and cases found positive by malaria rapid diagnostic test (RDT) were given the first dose of artemether-lumefantrine (AL) at the dispensary. Each patient was visited at home by VHWs daily for the first 3 days to supervise intake of anti-malarial and on day 7 to monitor the recovery process. The data were captured and transmitted to the database using mobile phones. The baseline population in the three villages was 2934 in 678 households. A total of 1907 febrile cases were recorded by VHWs and 1828 (95.9%) were captured using mobile phones. At the dispensary, 1778 (93.2%) febrile cases were registered and of these, 84.2% were captured through PCD. Positivity rates were 48.2 and 45.8% by RDT and microscopy, respectively. Nine cases had treatment failure reported on day 7 post-treatment and adherence to treatment was 98%. One patient with severe febrile illness was referred to Muheza district hospital. The study showed that mobile phone-based technology can be successfully used by VHWs in surveillance and timely reporting of fever

  12. Childhood Malaria Admission Rates to Four Hospitals in Malawi between 2000 and 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okiro, Emelda A.; Kazembe, Lawrence N.; Kabaria, Caroline W.; Ligomeka, Jeffrey; Noor, Abdisalan M.; Ali, Doreen; Snow, Robert W.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The last few years have witnessed rapid scaling-up of key malaria interventions in several African countries following increases in development assistance. However, there is only limited country-specific information on the health impact of expanded coverage of these interventions. Methods Paediatric admission data were assembled from 4 hospitals in Malawi reflecting different malaria ecologies. Trends in monthly clinical malaria admissions between January 2000 and December 2010 were analysed using time-series models controlling for covariates related to climate and service use to establish whether changes in admissions can be related to expanded coverage of interventions aimed at reducing malaria infection. Results In 3 of 4 sites there was an increase in clinical malaria admission rates. Results from time series models indicate a significant month-to-month increase in the mean clinical malaria admission rates at two hospitals (trend Pmalaria admissions had increased from 2000 by 41% to 100%. Comparison of changes in malaria risk and ITN coverage appear to correspond to a lack of disease declines over the period. Changes in intervention coverage within hospital catchments showed minimal increases in ITN coverage from malaria transmission intensity remained unchanged between 2000–2010 across all sites. Discussion Despite modest increases in coverage of measures to reduce infection there has been minimal changes in paediatric clinical malaria cases in four hospitals in Malawi. Studies across Africa are increasingly showing a mixed set of impact results and it is important to assemble more data from more sites to understand the wider implications of malaria funding investment. We also caution that impact surveillance should continue in areas where intervention coverage is increasing with time, for example Malawi, as decline may become evident within a period when coverage reaches optimal levels. PMID:23638008

  13. Malaria Genome Sequencing Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    million cases and up to 2.7 million A whole chromosome shotgun sequencing strategy was used to deaths from malaria each year. The mortality levels are...deaths from malaria each year. The mortality levels are greatest in determine the genome sequence of P. falciparum clone 3D7. This sub-Saharan Africa...aminolevulinic acid dehydratase. Cura . Genet. 40, 391-398 (2002). 15. Lasonder, E. et al Analysis of the Plasmodium falciparum proteome by high-accuracy mass

  14. Changing malaria transmission and implications in China towards National Malaria Elimination Programme between 2010 and 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-hai Yin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Towards the implementation of national malaria elimination programme in China since 2010, the epidemiology of malaria has changed dramatically, and the lowest malaria burden was achieved yearly. It is time to analyze the changes of malaria situation based on surveillance data from 2010 to 2012 to reconsider the strategies for malaria elimination. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Malaria epidemiological data was extracted from the provincial annual reports in China between 2010 and 2012. The trends of the general, autochthonous and imported malaria were analyzed, and epidemic areas were reclassified according to Action Plan of China Malaria Elimination (2010-2020. As a result, there reported 2743 malaria cases with a continued decline in 2012, and around 7% autochthonous malaria cases accounted. Three hundred and fifty-three individual counties from 19 provincial regions had autochthonous malaria between 2010 and 2012, and only one county was reclassified into Type I (local infections detected in 3 consecutive years and the annual incidences ≥ 1/10,000 again. However, the imported malaria cases reported of each year were widespread, and 598 counties in 29 provinces were suffered in 2012. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Malaria was reduced significantly from 2010 to 2012 in China, and malaria importation became an increasing challenge. It is necessary to adjust or update the interventions for subsequent malaria elimination planning and resource allocation.

  15. Etiology of pediatric fever in western Kenya: a case-control study of falciparum malaria, respiratory viruses, and streptococcal pharyngitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Meara, Wendy P; Mott, Joshua A; Laktabai, Jeremiah; Wamburu, Kabura; Fields, Barry; Armstrong, Janice; Taylor, Steve M; MacIntyre, Charles; Sen, Reeshi; Menya, Diana; Pan, William; Nicholson, Bradly P; Woods, Christopher W; Holland, Thomas L

    2015-05-01

    In Kenya, more than 10 million episodes of acute febrile illness are treated annually among children under 5 years. Most are clinically managed as malaria without parasitological confirmation. There is an unmet need to describe pathogen-specific etiologies of fever. We enrolled 370 febrile children and 184 healthy controls. We report demographic and clinical characteristics of patients with Plasmodium falciparum, group A streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis, and respiratory viruses (influenza A and B, respiratory syncytial virus [RSV], parainfluenza [PIV] types 1-3, adenovirus, human metapneumovirus [hMPV]), as well as those with undifferentiated fever. Of febrile children, 79.7% were treated for malaria. However, P. falciparum was detected infrequently in both cases and controls (14/268 [5.2%] versus 3/133 [2.3%], P = 0.165), whereas 41% (117/282) of febrile children had a respiratory viral infection, compared with 24.8% (29/117) of controls (P = 0.002). Only 9/515 (1.7%) children had streptococcal infection. Of febrile children, 22/269 (8.2%) were infected with > 1 pathogen, and 102/275 (37.1%) had fevers of unknown etiology. Respiratory viruses were common in both groups, but only influenza or parainfluenza was more likely to be associated with symptomatic disease (attributable fraction [AF] 67.5% and 59%, respectively). Malaria was overdiagnosed and overtreated. Few children presented to the hospital with GAS pharyngitis. An enhanced understanding of carriage of common pathogens, improved diagnostic capacity, and better-informed clinical algorithms for febrile illness are needed.

  16. Case Study Analyses of Play Behaviors of 12-Month-Old Infants Later Diagnosed with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Shelley

    2015-01-01

    Case study research methodology was used to describe the play behaviors of three infants at 12 months of age, who were later diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. Data included standardized test scores, and analyses of video footage of semi-structured play sessions from infants identified as high risk for autism, because of having a sibling…

  17. Geo-additive modelling of malaria in Burundi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebhardt Albrecht

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is a major public health issue in Burundi in terms of both morbidity and mortality, with around 2.5 million clinical cases and more than 15,000 deaths each year. It is still the single main cause of mortality in pregnant women and children below five years of age. Because of the severe health and economic burden of malaria, there is still a growing need for methods that will help to understand the influencing factors. Several studies/researches have been done on the subject yielding different results as which factors are most responsible for the increase in malaria transmission. This paper considers the modelling of the dependence of malaria cases on spatial determinants and climatic covariates including rainfall, temperature and humidity in Burundi. Methods The analysis carried out in this work exploits real monthly data collected in the area of Burundi over 12 years (1996-2007. Semi-parametric regression models are used. The spatial analysis is based on a geo-additive model using provinces as the geographic units of study. The spatial effect is split into structured (correlated and unstructured (uncorrelated components. Inference is fully Bayesian and uses Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques. The effects of the continuous covariates are modelled by cubic p-splines with 20 equidistant knots and second order random walk penalty. For the spatially correlated effect, Markov random field prior is chosen. The spatially uncorrelated effects are assumed to be i.i.d. Gaussian. The effects of climatic covariates and the effects of other spatial determinants are estimated simultaneously in a unified regression framework. Results The results obtained from the proposed model suggest that although malaria incidence in a given month is strongly positively associated with the minimum temperature of the previous months, regional patterns of malaria that are related to factors other than climatic variables have been identified

  18. “Souls of the ancestor that knock us out” and other tales. A qualitative study to identify demand-side factors influencing malaria case management in Cambodia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O’Connell Kathryn A

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Appropriate case management of suspected malaria in Cambodia is critical given anti-malarial drug resistance in the region. Improving diagnosis and the use of recommended malarial treatments is a challenge in Cambodia where self-treatment and usage of drug cocktails is widespread, a notable difference from malaria treatment seeking in other countries. This qualitative study adds to the limited evidence base on Cambodian practices, aiming to understand the demand-side factors influencing treatment-seeking behaviour, including the types of home treatments, perceptions of cocktail medicines and reasons for diagnostic testing. The findings may help guide intervention design. Methods The study used in-depth interviews (IDIs (N = 16 and focus group discussions (FGDs (N = 12 with Cambodian adults from malaria-endemic areas who had experienced malaria fever in the previous two weeks. Data were analysed using NVivo software. Results Findings suggest that Cambodians initially treat suspected malaria at home with home remedies and traditional medicines. When seeking treatment outside the home, respondents frequently reported receiving a cocktail of medicines from trusted providers. Cocktails are perceived as less expensive and more effective than full-course, pre-packaged medicines. Barriers to diagnostic testing include a belief in the ability to self-diagnose based on symptoms, cost and reliance on providers to recommend a test. Factors that facilitate testing include recommendation by trusted providers and a belief that anti-malarial treatment for illnesses other than malaria can be harmful. Conclusions Treatment-seeking behaviour for malaria in Cambodia is complex, driven by cultural norms, practicalities and episode-related factors. Effective malaria treatment programmes will benefit from interventions and communication materials that leverage these demand-side factors, promoting prompt visits to facilities for suspected

  19. A molecular survey of febrile cases in malaria-endemic areas along China-Myanmar border in Yunnan province, People’s Republic of China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Xia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Imported malaria is a major threat to neighboring malaria-eliminating countries such as P.R. China and is difficult to monitor. A molecular survey of febrile patients with a history of traveling abroad along the Myanmar-China endemic border areas from January 2008 to August 2012 was carried out. The rates of infection with species of Plasmodium and compliance of microscopy diagnosis with nested PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction results were calculated.\tResults:\tPlasmodium genus-specific nested PCR confirmed that 384 cases were positive. Further species-specific nested PCR showed that the rate of Plasmodium vivax infection was 55% (213/384; that of Plasmodium falciparum was 21% (81/384 and 17% (67/384 of cases were co-infection cases of P. vivax and P. falciparum; the remaining 6% (23/384 of cases were caused by other species, such as Plasmodium ovale, P. malaria, P. knowlesi or mixed infections of Plasmodium. In total there was 13% (50/384 false microscopy diagnosis including 6% (22/384 error in species diagnosis and 7% (28/384 undiagnosed cases in co-infection or low parasitemia malaria cases.\tConclusions: This study indicates that there are considerable numbers of malaria cases in the China-Myanmar endemic border areas that remain undiagnosed or misdiagnosed by microscopy, especially in low-level and/or complex co-infection cases. It is urgent to develop accurate rapid diagnostic tests and apply PCR confirmation for efficient surveillance.

  20. Cerebral malaria Malaria cerebral

    OpenAIRE

    Silvia Blair Trujillo; Carlos Hugo Zapata Zapata

    2003-01-01

    Is the most common complication of P. falciparum malaria; nearly 90% of people who have suffered CM can recover without neurological problems. Currently there are four hypotheses that explain pathogenesis of CM: cytoadherence and sequestering of parasitized red blood cells to cerebral capillaries; rosette formation and parasitized red blood cells agglutination; production of cytokines and activation of second messengers and opening of the blood-brain barrier. However the main question remains...

  1. A rare case of thymoma in a 15-month-old girl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boylan, Emma; Wyers, Mary; Jaffar, Reema [Children' s Memorial Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2011-11-15

    We report a case of thymoma in a 15-month-old girl successfully treated with thymectomy. This case is unique due to the very young age of the child and a family history of thymoma in the father, who was treated with resection at age 10. Radiographic and CT findings mimicked thymic hyperplasia, and highlight the difficulty of distinguishing between these two conditions, since the latter is more common in children. The case is followed by a discussion of thymic hyperplasia and thymoma. (orig.)

  2. The economic benefits of malaria elimination: do they include increases in tourism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modrek, Sepideh; Liu, Jenny; Gosling, Roland; Feachem, Richard G A

    2012-07-28

    Policy makers have speculated that one of the economic benefits of malaria elimination includes increases in foreign direct investment, particularly tourism. This study examines the empirical relationship between the demand for travel and malaria cases in two countries with large tourism industries around the time in which they carried out malaria-elimination campaigns. In Mauritius, this analysis examines historical, yearly tourist arrivals and malaria cases from 1978-1999, accounting for the background secular trend of increasing international travel. In Dominican Republic, a country embarking upon malaria elimination, it employs a time-series analysis of the monthly, international tourist arrivals from 1998-2010 to determine whether the timing of significant deviations in tourist arrivals coincides with malaria outbreaks. While naïve relationships exist in both cases, the results show that the relationships between tourist arrivals and malaria cases are relatively weak and statistically insignificant once secular confounders are accounted for. This suggests that any economic benefits from tourism that may be derived from actively pursuing elimination in countries that have high tourism potential are likely to be small when measured at a national level. Rather, tourism benefits are likely to be experienced with greater impact in more concentrated tourist areas within countries, and future studies should seek to assess these relationships at a regional or local level.

  3. Seasonal dynamics and microgeographical spatial heterogeneity of malaria along the China-Myanmar border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue; Zhou, Guofa; Ruan, Yonghua; Lee, Ming-chieh; Xu, Xin; Deng, Shuang; Bai, Yao; Zhang, Jie; Morris, James; Liu, Huaie; Wang, Ying; Fan, Qi; Li, Peipei; Wu, Yanrui; Yang, Zhaoqing; Yan, Guiyun; Cui, Liwang

    2016-05-01

    Malaria transmission is heterogeneous in the Greater Mekong Subregion with most of the cases occurring along international borders. Knowledge of transmission hotspots is essential for targeted malaria control and elimination in this region. This study aimed to determine the dynamics of malaria transmission and possible existence of transmission hotspots on a microgeographical scale along the China-Myanmar border. Microscopically confirmed clinical malaria cases were recorded in five border villages through a recently established surveillance system between January 2011 and December 2014. A total of 424 clinical cases with confirmed spatial and temporal information were analyzed, of which 330 (77.8%) were Plasmodium vivax and 88 (20.8%) were Plasmodium falciparum, respectively. The P. vivax and P. falciparum case ratio increased dramatically from 2.2 in 2011 to 4.7 in 2014, demonstrating that P. vivax malaria has become the predominant parasite species. Clinical infections showed a strong bimodal seasonality. There were significant differences in monthly average incidence rates among the study villages with rates in a village in China being 3-8 folds lower than those in nearby villages in Myanmar. Spatial analysis revealed the presence of clinical malaria hotspots in four villages. This information on malaria seasonal dynamics and transmission hotspots should be harnessed for planning targeted control.

  4. Diagnostic approaches to malaria in Zambia, 2009-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukonka, Victor M; Chanda, Emmanuel; Kamuliwo, Mulakwa; Elbadry, Maha A; Wamulume, Pauline K; Mwanza-Ingwe, Mercy; Lubinda, Jailos; Laytner, Lindsey A; Zhang, Wenyi; Mushinge, Gabriel; Haque, Ubydul

    2015-06-03

    Malaria is an important health burden in Zambia with proper diagnosis remaining as one of the biggest challenges. The need for reliable diagnostics is being addressed through the introduction of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). However, without sufficient laboratory amenities in many parts of the country, diagnosis often still relies on non-specific, clinical symptoms. In this study, geographical information systems were used to both visualize and analyze the spatial distribution and the risk factors related to the diagnosis of malaria. The monthly reported, district-level number of malaria cases from January 2009 to December 2014 were collected from the National Malaria Control Center (NMCC). Spatial statistics were used to reveal cluster tendencies that were subsequently linked to possible risk factors, using a non-spatial regression model. Significant, spatio-temporal clusters of malaria were spotted while the introduction of RDTs made the number of clinically diagnosed malaria cases decrease by 33% from 2009 to 2014. The limited access to road network(s) was found to be associated with higher levels of malaria, which can be traced by the expansion of health promotion interventions by the NMCC, indicating enhanced diagnostic capability. The capacity of health facilities has been strengthened with the increased availability of proper diagnostic tools and through retraining of community health workers. To further enhance spatial decision support systems, a multifaceted approach is required to ensure mobilization and availability of human, infrastructural and technological resources. Surveillance based on standardized geospatial or other analytical methods should be used by program managers to design, target, monitor and assess the spatio-temporal dynamics of malaria diagnostic resources country-wide.

  5. Malaria transmission in two localities in north-western Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantur Juri, María J; Zaidenberg, Mario; Claps, Guillermo L; Santana, Mirta; Almirón, Walter R

    2009-01-01

    mosquito abundance and three months later, peaks of malaria cases were observed. The study reported here will help to increase knowledge about not only vectors and malaria seasonality but also their relationships with the climatic variables that influence their appearances and abundances. PMID:19152707

  6. [Epidemiological stratification of malaria in Madagascar].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouchet, J; Blanchy, S; Rakotonjanabelo, A; Ranaivoson, G; Rajaonarivelo, E; Laventure, S; Rossella, M; Aknouche, F

    1993-01-01

    Madagascar is considered as a sub-region of the Afrotropical geographical Region in spite of the high endemicity of 95% of the invertebrates. Nevertheless the three malaria vectors An. gambiae s.s., An. arabiensis and An. funestus are quite similar to those of the continental Africa. This support the hypothesis of their recent introduction. Plasmodium falciparum is the dominant parasite but the prevalence of P. vivax is not negligible. It is linked to the Asian component of the human population. P. malariae and P. ovale are of minor importance. The main epidemiological "facies" of Africa are found in Madagascar. The equatorial facies on the East Coast is characterized by a high transmission all year long. In the tropical facies on the West Coast transmission is seasonal (7 months at least). In both areas, malaria is stable and the inhabitants acquire a high immunity before the age of ten; most of the severe cases touch children below 10. The three vectors can be found but An. gambiae s.s. is dominant. In the exophilic southern facies the transmission is seasonal (two to four months). The only vector is An. arabiensis. Malaria is unstable and severe epidemics occur during the years of high rainfall. All age groups are vulnerable because the population is not immune in the Plateaux facies above 1,000 m., malaria is unstable. Severe epidemics occurred in 1987-1988. The vectors are An. Arabiensis and An. funestus. The occurrence of P. falciparum on the Plateaux seems linked to the development of irrigation of rice farming in the XIXth century. Most of the anopheles breeding places on the Plateaux are dependent on rice cultivation. Urban development has brought the inhabitants of the suburbs in close contact with rice fields. Despite the high number of anopheline bites the number of malaria cases remains by far lower than in the neighbouring rural areas. Regional migrations inside the island bring non-immune populations, from the south and the plateaux, in highly

  7. The association between malaria and malnutrition among under-five children in Shashogo District, Southern Ethiopia: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gone, Terefe; Lemango, Fiseha; Eliso, Endale; Yohannes, Samuel; Yohannes, Tadele

    2017-01-13

    Recent studies have presented conflicting findings about whether malaria is associated with an increased or decreased risk of malnutrition. Therefore, assessing the relationship between these two disastrous diseases in the most vulnerable groups, such as in children aged below 5 years (under-five children), may lead to the discovery of new low-cost and effective aides to current methods of malnutrition prevention in malaria-endemic areas. Therefore, this study was conducted to assess the relationship between malaria and malnutrition among under five children in an area with a high degree of malaria transmission. The study involved comparing malnourished children aged 6-59 months and nourished children of the same age for their past exposure to malaria, in Shashogo District, Southern Ethiopia. A validated structured questionnaire was used to collect home to home socioeconomic data and anthropometric instruments for clinical data. The collected data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics by means of EpiData entry software and STATA data analysis software. A total of 356 (89 malnourished and 267 nourished) under-five children participated in the study. Previous exposure to Plasmodium infection was found to be a predictor for the manifestation of malnutrition in under-five children (P = 0.02 [OR = 1.87, CI = 1.115-3.138]). Children from a household with a monthly income of less than USD 15 were 4.5 more likely to be malnourished as compared to the other children (P = 0.001 [OR = 0.422, CI = 0.181-0.978]). This study found that exposure to Plasmodium has a significant impact on the nutritional status of children. In addition, socio-demographic factors, such as family income, may play a role in determining whether children are malnourished or not and may lead to increased morbidity due to malnourishment in children living in malaria-endemic areas. Therefore, malnutrition control interventions should be consolidated with

  8. Spatial patterns of incident malaria cases and their household contacts in a single clinic catchment area of Chongwe District, Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinchoff, Jessie; Henostroza, German; Carter, Bryan S; Roberts, Sarah T; Hatwiinda, Sisa; Hamainza, Busiku; Hawela, Moonga; Curriero, Frank C

    2015-08-07

    Reactive case detection (RACD) for malaria is a strategy that may be used to complement passive surveillance, as passive surveillance fails to identify infections that are asymptomatic or do not seek care. The spatial and seasonal patterns of incident (index) cases reported at a single clinic in Chongwe District were explored. A RACD strategy was implemented from June 2012 to June 2013 in a single catchment area in Chongwe District. Incident (index) cases recorded at the clinic were followed up at their household, and all household contacts were tested for malaria using rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs). GPS coordinates were taken at each index household. Spatial analyses were conducted to assess characteristics related to clustering, cluster detection and spatial variation in risk of index houses. Effects of season (rainy versus dry), distance to the clinic and distance to the main road were considered as modifying factors. Lastly, logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with the proportion of household contacts testing RDT positive. A total of 426 index households were enrolled, with 1,621 household contacts (45% RDT positive). Two space-time clusters were identified in the rainy season, with ten times and six times higher risk than expected. Significantly increased spatial clustering of index households was found in the rainy season as compared to the dry season (based on K-function methodology). However, no seasonal difference in mapped spatial intensity of index households was identified. Logistic regression analysis identified two main factors associated with a higher proportion of RDT positive household contacts. There was a 41% increased odds of RDT positive household contacts in households where the index case was under 5 years of age [OR = 1.41, 95% confidence intervals (1.15, 1.73)]. For every 500-m increase in distance from the road, there was a 5% increased odds of RDT positive household contacts [OR = 1.05 (1.02, 1.07)], controlling

  9. Atypical aetiology of a conjugal fever: autochthonous airport malaria between Paris and French Riviera: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomares-Estran, Christelle; Delaunay, Pascal; Mottard, Annie; Cua, Eric; Roger, Pierre-Marie; Pradines, Bruno; Parzy, Daniel; Bogreau, Hervé; Rogier, Christophe; Jeannin, Charles; Karch, Saïd; Fontenille, Didier; Dejour-Salamanca, Dominique; Legros, Fabrice; Marty, Pierre

    2009-08-23

    Endemic malaria has been eradicated from France, but some falciparum malaria cases have been described in patients who have never travelled outside the country. Ms. V. 21 year-old and Mr. M. 23 year-old living together in Paris were on holiday in Saint Raphaël (French Riviera). They presented with fever, vertigo and nausea. A blood smear made to control thrombocytopaenia revealed intra-erythrocytic forms of Plasmodium falciparum. The parasitaemia level was 0.15% for Ms. V and 3.2% for Mr. M. This couple had no history of blood transfusion or intravenous drug use. They had never travelled outside metropolitan France, but had recently travelled around France: to Saint Mard (close to Paris Charles de Gaulle (CdG) airport), to Barneville plage (in Normandy) and finally to Saint Raphaël. The most probable hypothesis is an infection transmitted in Saint Mard by an imported anopheline mosquito at CdG airport. The DNA analysis of parasites from Ms. V.'s and Mr. M.'s blood revealed identical genotypes. Because it is unlikely that two different anopheline mosquitoes would be infected by exactly the same clones, the two infections must have been caused by the infective bites of the same infected mosquito.

  10. Atypical aetiology of a conjugal fever: autochthonous airport malaria between Paris and French Riviera: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontenille Didier

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Endemic malaria has been eradicated from France, but some falciparum malaria cases have been described in patients who have never travelled outside the country. Ms. V. 21 year-old and Mr. M. 23 year-old living together in Paris were on holiday in Saint Raphaël (French Riviera. They presented with fever, vertigo and nausea. A blood smear made to control thrombocytopaenia revealed intra-erythrocytic forms of Plasmodium falciparum. The parasitaemia level was 0.15% for Ms. V and 3.2% for Mr. M. This couple had no history of blood transfusion or intravenous drug use. They had never travelled outside metropolitan France, but had recently travelled around France: to Saint Mard (close to Paris Charles de Gaulle (CdG airport, to Barneville plage (in Normandy and finally to Saint Raphaël. The most probable hypothesis is an infection transmitted in Saint Mard by an imported anopheline mosquito at CdG airport. The DNA analysis of parasites from Ms. V.'s and Mr. M.'s blood revealed identical genotypes. Because it is unlikely that two different anopheline mosquitoes would be infected by exactly the same clones, the two infections must have been caused by the infective bites of the same infected mosquito.

  11. Hypoxanthine urolithiasis in an 11-month-old child: A case report of

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Midhat Elmacı

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary xanthinuria is a novel autosomal recessive disorder of purine metabolism resulting from the deficiency of xanthine dehydrogenase. An 11-month-old boy admitted with the complaints of irritability for 6 months, darkening of the urine and spontaneous passage of stone. Both serum and urine levels of uric acid were below normal. Urinary ultrasonography was normal. Stone analysis revealed that it was a hypoxanthine stone. The case is reported because hereditary xanthinuria is a rare cause of childhood urolithiasis. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (1: 128-130

  12. 146例输入性疟疾的临床分析%Clinical Analysis of 146 Cases of Imported Malaria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李慧情; 高丽芳

    2014-01-01

    目的:我院为湖北省疟疾防治定点医院之一,分析在我院体检及就诊的输入性疟疾的临床特点,做到早预防、早发现、早诊断、早治疗这种疾病,减少误诊、并发症的发生、降低病死率,防止出现疟疾的流行。方法主要对2007年7月至2013年12月在我院就诊的146例输入性疟疾进行回顾性分析。结果在146例疟疾患者中间日疟124例,恶性疟疾病22例;其中体检发现79例,另外67例为就诊的患者,表现为典型症状:畏寒、发热、汗出、热退的占66例,1例仅表现为乏力,头痛。出现溶血性贫血3例、黑热病2例、脑型疟1例。平均住院16.3 d,治愈率100%,治疗后复发3例。结论早预防、早发现、早诊断、早治疗是在疟疾的防治中的关键。及时切断传染源可以阻止疟疾的流行。%ObjectiveMy hospital for one of malaria control in Hubei Province designated hospitals, to analyze the clinical characteristics of imported malaria in the hospital examination and treatment, early prevention, early detection, early diagnosis, early treatment of the disease, reduce misdiagnosis, complications, mortality, prevent the spread of malaria.MethodsIn 2007 July to 2013 December, mainly in the 146 imported malaria cases in our hospital were retrospectively analyzed.ResultsIn 146 cases of malaria malaria patients among 124 cases, 22 cases of malignant malaria; the medical examination found 79 cases, the other 67 cases patients, showed typical symptoms: fever, chills, sweating, fever accounted for 66 cases, 1 cases showed only weak, headache. Hemolytic anemia appeared in 3 cases, 1 cases of kala Azar in 2 cases, cerebral malaria. The average hospital stay was 16.3 days, the cure rate was 100%, 3 cases relapse after treatment.ConclusionEarly prevention, early detection, early diagnosis, early treatment is the key to the prevention and treatment of malaria. Cut off the source of infection can prevent

  13. Maps of the Sri Lanka malaria situation preceding the tsunami and key aspects to be considered in the emergency phase and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konradsen Flemming

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Following the tsunami, a detailed overview of the area specific transmission levels is essential in assessing the risk of malaria in Sri Lanka. Recent information on vector insecticide resistance, parasite drug resistance, and insights into the national policy for malaria diagnosis and treatment are important in assisting national and international agencies in their control efforts. Methods Monthly records over the period January 1995 – October 2004 of confirmed malaria cases were used to perform an analysis of malaria distribution at district spatial resolution. Also, a focused review of published reports and routinely collected information was performed. Results The incidence of malaria was only 1 case per thousand population in the 10 months leading up to the disaster, in the districts with the highest transmission. Conclusion Although relocated people may be more exposed to mosquito bites, and their capacity to handle diseases affected, the environmental changes caused by the tsunami are unlikely to enhance breeding of the principal vector, and, given the present low parasite reservoir, the likelihood of a malaria outbreak is low. However, close monitoring of the situation is necessary, especially as December – February is normally the peak transmission season. Despite some losses, the Sri Lanka public health system is capable of dealing with the possible threat of a malaria outbreak after the tsunami. The influx of foreign medical assistance, drugs, and insecticides may interfere with malaria surveillance, and the long term malaria control strategy of Sri Lanka, if not in accordance with government policy.

  14. History of malaria treatment as a predictor of subsequent subclinical parasitaemia: A cross-sectional survey and malaria case records from three villages in Pailin, western Cambodia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.J. Peto (Thomas J.); S.E. Kloprogge (Sabine E.); R. Tripura (Rupam); C. Nguon (Chea); N. Sanann (Nou); S. Yok (Sovann); C. Heng (Chhouen); C. Promnarate (Cholrawee); J. Chalk (Jeremy); N. Song (Ngak); S.J. Lee (Sue J.); Y. Lubell (Yoel); M. Dhorda (Mehul); M. Imwong (Mallika); N.J. White (Nicholas J.); L. Von Seidlein (Lorenz); A.M. Dondorp

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Treatment of the sub-clinical reservoir of malaria, which may maintain transmission, could be an important component of elimination strategies. The reliable detection of asymptomatic infections with low levels of parasitaemia requires high-volume quantitative polymerase chain

  15. Malaria (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Malaria KidsHealth > For Parents > Malaria A A A What's ... Prevention Diagnosis and Treatment en español Malaria About Malaria Malaria is a common infection in hot, tropical ...

  16. Reduction of childhood malaria by social marketing of insecticide-treated nets: a case-control study of effectiveness in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathanga, Don P; Campbell, Carl H; Taylor, Terrie E; Barlow, Robin; Wilson, Mark L

    2005-09-01

    Use of an insecticide-treated net (ITN) is now the central focus for the Roll Back Malaria campaign, and disease-endemic countries have embarked on large-scale ITN distribution programs. We assessed the impact of an ITN social marketing program on clinical malaria in children less than five years of age. A case-control study was undertaken at Ndirande Health Center in the peri-urban area of the city of Blantyre, Malawi. Cases were defined by an axillary temperature > or = 37.5 degrees C or a history of fever within the last 48 hours and a positive blood smear for Plasmodium falciparum. The individual effectiveness of ITN use was 40% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 10-60%) when cases were compared with clinic controls and 50% (95% CI = 0-60%) in comparison with community controls. With ITN coverage of 42%, the community effectiveness of this program was estimated to range from 17% to 21%. This represents 1,480 malaria cases averted by the intervention in a population of 15,000 children. Our results show that the benefits of ITN social marketing programs in reducing malaria are enormous. Targeting the poor could increase those benefits.

  17. Clinical practice: the diagnosis of imported malaria in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltha, Jessica; Jacobs, Jan

    2011-07-01

    The present paper reviews the diagnosis of imported malaria in children. Malaria is caused by a parasite called Plasmodium and occurs in over 100 countries worldwide. Children account for 10-15% of all patients with imported malaria and are at risk to develop severe and life-threatening complications especially when infected with Plasmodium falciparum. Case-fatality ratios vary between 0.2% and 0.4%. Children visiting friends and relatives in malaria endemic areas and immigrants and refugees account for the vast majority of cases. Symptoms are non-specific and delayed infections (more than 3 months after return from an endemic country) may occur. Microscopic analysis of the thick blood film is the cornerstone of laboratory diagnosis. For pragmatic reasons, EDTA-anticoagulated blood is accepted, provided that slides are prepared within 1 h after collection. Information about the Plasmodium species (in particular P. falciparum versus the non-falciparum species) and the parasite density is essential for patient management. Molecular methods in reference settings are an adjunct for species differentiation. Signals generated by automated hematology analyzers may trigger the diagnosis of malaria in non-suspected cases. Malaria rapid diagnostic tests are reliable in the diagnosis of P. falciparum but not for the detection of the non-falciparum species. They do not provide information about parasite density and should be used as an adjunct (and not a substitute) to microscopy. In case of persistent suspicion and negative microscopy results, repeat testing every 8-12 h for at least three consecutive samplings is recommended. A high index of suspicion and a close interaction with the laboratory may assure timely diagnosis of imported malaria.

  18. World Malaria Report: time to acknowledge Plasmodium knowlesi malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Bridget E; Rajahram, Giri S; Grigg, Matthew J; William, Timothy; Anstey, Nicholas M

    2017-03-31

    The 2016 World Health Organization (WHO) World Malaria Report documents substantial progress towards control and elimination of malaria. However, major challenges remain. In some regions of Southeast Asia, the simian parasite Plasmodium knowlesi has emerged as an important cause of human malaria, and the authors believe this species warrants regular inclusion in the World Malaria Report. Plasmodium knowlesi is the most common cause of malaria in Malaysia, and cases have also been reported in nearly all countries of Southeast Asia. Outside of Malaysia, P. knowlesi is frequently misdiagnosed by microscopy as Plasmodium falciparum or Plasmodium vivax. Thus, P. knowlesi may be underdiagnosed in affected regions and its true incidence underestimated. Acknowledgement in the World Malaria Report of the regional importance of P. knowlesi will facilitate efforts to improve surveillance of this emerging parasite. Furthermore, increased recognition will likely lead to improved delivery of effective treatment for this potentially fatal infection, as has occurred in Malaysia where P. knowlesi case-fatality rates have fallen despite rising incidence. In a number of knowlesi-endemic countries, substantial progress has been made towards the elimination of P. vivax and P. falciparum. However, efforts to eliminate these human-only species should not preclude efforts to reduce human malaria from P. knowlesi. The regional importance of knowlesi malaria was recognized by the WHO with its recent Evidence Review Group meeting on knowlesi malaria to address strategies for prevention and mitigation. The WHO World Malaria Report has an appropriate focus on falciparum and vivax malaria, the major causes of global mortality and morbidity. However, the authors hope that in future years this important publication will also incorporate data on the progress and challenges in reducing knowlesi malaria in regions where transmission occurs.

  19. Quality assurance of malaria case management in an urban and in sub-rural health centres in Goma, Congo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prosper M. Lutala

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Every year, up to three million deaths throughout the world occur as a result of malaria, 90% of which occur in Africa. Despite training providers in malaria case management and the availability of appropriate medical suppliers, there are still weaknesses in the management chain of malaria.Objectives: Our aim was to assess the quality of malaria case management in two primary health care centres in the Goma health district. Specific objectives were the assessment of quality accuracy in the dosage, the duration of treatment, the intervals between administrations, and the routes of administration of anti-malarial medication in two health centres, as well as the subsequent comparison of those two sites. Method: A descriptive retrospective study was conducted using the malaria register’s review to assess two health centres in the Goma health district. Socio-demographical and clinical data were recorded and the quality was assessed against the national guidelines. Descriptive statistics with percentages and Chi-square values were computed. Results: Under-dosage was more common in CCLK (Centre Chrétien du Lac Kivu [Lake Kivu Christian Centre] with 55 patients (62.5%; 95% CI, 52% – 71.8% patients, whilst the over-dosage was present in 64 patients (80%; 95% CI, 69.9% – 87.2% in CASOP (Caisse de Solidarité Ouvrière et Paysanne [Fund of Solidarity Workers and Peasants]. The duration of treatment was shorter in CCLK in 15 patients (93.7%; 95% CI, 71.6% – 98.8%; CASOP had a high rate of inappropriate intervals between the administration of drugs in 14 patients (82.3%; 95% CI, 58.9% – 93.8%. Intravenous administration rates were high in both sites with respectively 102 patients in CASOP (62.5%; 95% CI, 54.9% – 69.6% and 61 patients in CCLK (37.4%; 95% CI, 30.3% – 45.0%. Significant differences were found between the two sites with regard to intervals of administration (χ2 = 7.11, p = 0.007, duration of treatment (χ2 = 8.51, p

  20. Relationship of Transmission Factors with Malaria Incidence on Migration Workers from Lengkong sub-district Sukabumi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marliah Santi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Lengkong sub-district is malaria-endemic areas with a high morbidity. In the past three years, there is a decrease in the number of malaria cas es, but the number of imported malaria cases has increased significantly from the migration of workers return ing from ma­laria-endemic areas outside Java. Epidemiological studies have been conducted with the aim of knowing the transmission factors associated with malaria incidence in the population of Lengkong, Sukabumi who ever migrated. Research conducted in the Cilangkap and Langkapjaya Village held in November 2011. The type of research is quantitative with a cross-sectional study design. The study population is the all of community that perform mi­grate in 2011 and at the time of the study was in the villages. The data was collected by in­terviewing with respondents about the des ti nation of migration, length of stay in the area of migration, the use of chemoprophylaxis before leaving for migration, history of malaria at before, the health seeking, installation of wire netting on ventilation of house, the use of bed nets, and also the incidence of malaria as long as migration and at period of one month after discharge. The collected data is analyzed to determine relationship of each independent var­iable with the dependent variable. The results obtained from 100 respondents, 97% migra­tion to malaria-endemic areas, length of stay was 96% in > 1 month, 55% did not use chem­oprophylaxis, 57% had been sick with malaria at before, 69% seeking health to non health officer, 100% did not use bed nets, and house without wire netting, and also 26% had been exposed wit malaria. Bivariate analysis shows, the use of chemoprophylaxis, previous histo­ry of malaria and sought health treatment are factor associated with the incidence of malar­ia on labor migration.

  1. 凶险型恶性疟7例的临床特点分析%Clinical analysis of 7 cases with severe falciparum malaria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许夕海; 叶英; 苗秀英; 章磊; 李家斌

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the characteristics of severe falciparum malaria and control measures. Methods The data of 7 severe malignant malaria cases were analyzed retrospectively. Results All the 7 severe falciparum malaria cases got the infection abroad and returned to Anhui Province with obvious life history in endemic falciparum malaria area.The symptoms of these patients were not typical but conditions developed rapidly. Patients easily got involved in severe complications. The artemisinin is effective on these patients. Conclusions Enhancing recognition of the severe malaria, anti-malaria and anti-complication early and effectively is the key to recovery for the patients.%目的:探讨凶险型恶性疟的特征及防治措施。方法对本院收治的7例凶险型恶性疟病例临床资料进行回顾性分析。结果7例凶险型恶性疟患者均为境外输入,有明确的疫区生活史。该类患者临床症状不典型,病情发展迅速,容易出现严重并发症,急性肾功能不全、DIC和继发细菌感染是该类患者最常见的并发症。青蒿素及其衍生物对凶险型疟疾患者疗效确切。结论加强对凶险型恶性疟疾的认识,及时有效的抗疟治疗和并发症的积极治疗是抢救这类患者的关键。

  2. Immunoinformatics of Placental Malaria Vaccine Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jessen, Leon Eyrich

    Malaria is an infectious disease caused by a protozoan parasite of the genus Plasmodium, which is transferred by female Anopheles mosquitos. WHO estimates that in 2012 there were 207 million cases of malaria, of which 627,000 were fatal. People living in malaria-endemic areas, gradually acquire...

  3. Role of traditional healers in the management of severe malaria among children below five years of age: the case of Kilosa and Handeni Districts, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitua Andrew Y

    2006-07-01

    challenging the common view that traditional healers are an important factor of delay for malaria treatment, they actually play a pivotal role by giving "bio-medically accepted first aid" which leads to reduction in body temperature hence increasing chances of survival for the child. Increasing the collaboration between traditional healers and modern health care providers was shown to improve the management of severe malaria in the studied areas. Interpretation and conclusion Traditional health care is not necessarily a significant impediment or a delaying factor in the treatment of severe malaria. There is a need to foster training on the management of severe cases, periodically involving both traditional health practitioners and health workers to identify modalities of better collaboration.

  4. Growing skull fracture in a 5-month old child: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Michael; Schmidt, John H; Trenton, Brooke A; Sheets, Nicholas W

    2010-01-01

    Growing skull fractures are a rare complication of linear skull fractures in children. The authors report a case of a growing skull fracture in a 5-month-old patient with a review of the literature. CT and MRI scans revealed a growing skull fracture with complication of leptomeningeal cyst formation. Surgical removal of the cyst, duraplasty and cranial reconstruction were performed. Follow up showed that the patient was stable neurologically and had improving left upper extremity weakness.

  5. Removal of a below knee plaster cast worn for 28 months: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elson David W

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction An unusual situation in which a below knee cast was removed after 28 months is reported. To the best of our knowledge no similar cases have been reported in the literature. Case presentation The cast was removed from the leg of a 45-year-old Caucasian woman. Significant muscle atrophy and dense skin scales were present but the underlying skin surface was relatively healthy with only small pitted 1-2 mm ulcers. No pathogenic organisms were cultured from this environment. Conclusion It seems likely that skin can tolerate cast immobilization for prolonged duration.

  6. Strategies For Malaria Control In Mangalore City

    OpenAIRE

    Kiran Udaya .N

    1999-01-01

    Research questions: What different strategies should be used to effectively control problem of malaria? Objectives: 1) To study the problem of malaria. 2) To study different strategies for effective control of malaria. Study design: Observational and record based. The problem of malaria was studied for three years from 1996-1998 Participants: Individuals having fever. Setting: Community based in Mangalore City. Study variables: Fever cases, blood slides prepared, slides found positive, agency...

  7. Active case detection, treatment of falciparum malaria with combined chloroquine and sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine and vivax malaria with chloroquine and molecular markers of anti-malarial resistance in the Republic of Vanuatu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogers William O

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chloroquine-resistant Plasmodium falciparum was first described in the Republic of Vanuatu in the early 1980s. In 1991, the Vanuatu Ministry of Health instituted new treatment guidelines for uncomplicated P. falciparum infection consisting of chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine combination therapy. Chloroquine remains the recommended treatment for Plasmodium vivax. Methods In 2005, cross-sectional blood surveys at 45 sites on Malo Island were conducted and 4,060 adults and children screened for malaria. Of those screened, 203 volunteer study subjects without malaria at the time of screening were followed for 13 weeks to observe peak seasonal incidence of infection. Another 54 subjects with malaria were followed over a 28-day period to determine efficacy of anti-malarial therapy; chloroquine alone for P. vivax and chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine for P. falciparum infections. Results The overall prevalence of parasitaemia by mass blood screening was 6%, equally divided between P. falciparum and P. vivax. Twenty percent and 23% of participants with patent P. vivax and P. falciparum parasitaemia, respectively, were febrile at the time of screening. In the incidence study cohort, after 2,303 person-weeks of follow-up, the incidence density of malaria was 1.3 cases per person-year with P. vivax predominating. Among individuals participating in the clinical trial, the 28-day chloroquine P. vivax cure rate was 100%. The 28-day chloroquine/sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine P. falciparum cure rate was 97%. The single treatment failure, confirmed by merozoite surface protein-2 genotyping, was classified as a day 28 late parasitological treatment failure. All P. falciparum isolates carried the Thr-76 pfcrt mutant allele and the double Asn-108 + Arg-59 dhfr mutant alleles. Dhps mutant alleles were not detected in the study sample. Conclusion Peak seasonal malaria prevalence on Malo Island reached hypoendemic levels during the study

  8. The case for a rational genome-based vaccine against malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla eProietti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Historically, vaccines have been designed to mimic the immunity induced by natural exposure to the target pathogen, but this approach has not been effective for any parasitic pathogens of humans or complex pathogens that cause chronic disease in humans, such as Plasmodium. Despite intense efforts by many laboratories around the world on different aspects of Plasmodium spp. molecular and cell biology, epidemiology and immunology, progress towards the goal of an effective malaria vaccine has been disappointing. The premise of rational vaccine design is to induce the desired immune response against the key pathogen antigens or epitopes targeted by protective immune responses. We advocate that development of an optimally efficacious malaria vaccine will need to improve on nature, and that this can be accomplished by rational vaccine design facilitated by mining genomic, proteomic and transcriptomic datasets in the context of relevant biological function. In our opinion, modern genome-based rational vaccine design offers enormous potential above and beyond that of whole-organism vaccines approaches established over 200 years ago where immunity is likely suboptimal due to the many genetic and immunological host-parasite adaptations evolved to allow the Plasmodium parasite to coexist in the human host, and which are associated with logistic and regulatory hurdles for production and delivery.

  9. Malaria during pregnancy in Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rulisa, S.

    2014-01-01

    It appears that malaria in Rwanda is not a major contributor to adverse outcomes of pregnancy anymore from a public health perspective but it can still give problems in individual patients, also in areas of low malaria transmission. This thesis shows that for individual cases the current treatment o

  10. [Malaria websites].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genton, B

    2007-05-16

    One click on google.com, key-word "Malaria", 24,900,000 entries. How to choose among this jungle of websites? Ten sites are proposed to meet the needs of the general practitioner They are categorized by focus of interest, namely 1) detailed information on pre- and post-travel advice and management of travelers with illness upon return, 2) the essential on the parasite, the diagnosis and the treatment, 3) the malaria problem worldwide and 4) malaria maps.

  11. 2 Cases of Imported Falciparum Malaria Survey Analgsis%2例输入性恶性疟病例调查分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈凯

    2014-01-01

    目的:加强对来自疟疾疫区回国人员的传染病监测,防止输入性疟疾进一步扩散。方法对2例输入性恶性疟疾病例进行了确诊、治疗、流行病学调查和处置。结果通过临床诊断、实验室检查和流行病学调查,确诊2例输入性疟疾患者。结论近年来,输入性疟疾病例呈上升趋势,各相关部门要协作配合,掌握从高发区务工回国人员的相关信息及健康状况,加强对出国劳务人员传染病防治知识的宣传教育,各级医疗单位和临床医生应提高对疟疾等传染病的认识,做好输入性疟疾的防控工作。%Objective To strengthen the monitoring of infectious diseases from malaria endemic areas of returnees, to prevent the further spread of malaria.Methods 2 cases of malignant malaria cases were diagnosed,treatment, epidemiology investigation and disposal.Results Through the laboratory examination and epidemiological survey, clinical diagnosis,confirmed 2 cases of imported malaria cases.Conclusion In recent years,imported malaria cases is rising.Al relevant departments should coordinate,acquire the relevant information and health status of migrant workers return home from high incidence area,strengthen the workers infectious disease prevention knowledge propaganda education,medical units at al levels,and clinicians should improve the understanding of malaria and other communicable disease,do a good job of imported malaria prevention and control work.

  12. Transfusion-transmitted severe Plasmodium knowlesi malaria in a splenectomized patient with beta-thalassaemia major in Sabah, Malaysia: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Elspeth M; Parameswaran, Uma; William, Timothy; Khoo, Tien Meng; Grigg, Matthew J; Aziz, Ammar; Marfurt, Jutta; Yeo, Tsin W; Auburn, Sarah; Anstey, Nicholas M; Barber, Bridget E

    2016-07-12

    Transfusion-transmitted malaria (TTM) is a well-recognized risk of receiving blood transfusions, and has occurred with Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium vivax, Plasmodium ovale, and Plasmodium malariae. The simian parasite Plasmodium knowlesi is also known to be transmissible through inoculation of infected blood, and this species is now the most common cause of malaria in Malaysia with a high rate of severity and fatal cases reported. No confirmed case of accidental transfusion-transmitted P. knowlesi has yet been reported. A 23-year old splenectomized patient with beta thalassaemia major presented with fever 11 days after receiving a blood transfusion from a pre-symptomatic donor who presented with knowlesi malaria 12 days following blood donation. The infection resulted in severe disease in the recipient, with a parasite count of 84,000/µL and associated metabolic acidosis and multi-organ failure. She was treated with intravenous artesunate and made a good recovery. Sequencing of a highly diverse 649-base pair fragment of the P. knowlesi bifunctional dihydrofolate reductase-thymidylate synthase gene (pkdhfr) revealed that the recipient and donor shared the same haplotype. This case demonstrates that acquisition of P. knowlesi from blood transfusion can occur, and that clinical consequences can be severe. Furthermore, this case raises the possibility that thalassaemic patients, particularly those who are splenectomized, may represent a high-risk group for TTM and severe malaria. With rising P. knowlesi incidence, further studies in Sabah are required to determine the risk of TTM in order to guide screening strategies for blood transfusion services.

  13. Effect of meteorological variables on Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum malaria in outbreak prone districts of Rajasthan, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingala, Mercy A L

    2017-03-09

    Malaria is a public health problem caused by Plasmodium parasite and transmitted by anopheline mosquitoes. Arid and semi-arid regions of western India are prone to malaria outbreaks. Malaria outbreak prone districts viz. Bikaner, Barmer and Jodhpur were selected to study the effect of meteorological variables on Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum malaria outbreaks for the period of 2009-2012. The data of monthly malaria cases and meteorological variables was analysed using SPSS 20v. Spearman correlation analysis was conducted to examine the strength of the relationship between meteorological variables, P. vivax and P. falciparum malaria cases. Pearson's correlation analysis was carried out among the meteorological variables to observe the independent effect of each independent variable on the outcome. Results indicate that malaria outbreaks have occurred in Bikaner and Barmer due to continuous rains for more than two months. Rainfall has shown to be an important predictor of malaria outbreaks in Rajasthan. P. vivax is more significantly correlated with rainfall, minimum temperature (P<0.01) and less significantly with relative humidity (P<0.05); whereas P. falciparum is significantly correlated with rainfall, relative humidity (P<0.01) and less significantly with temperature (P<0.05). The determination of the lag period for P. vivax is relative humidity and for P. falciparum is temperature. The lag period between malaria cases and rainfall is shorter for P. vivax than P. falciparum. In conclusion, the knowledge generated is not only useful to take prompt malaria control interventions but also helpful to develop better forecasting model in outbreak prone regions. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. [Current epidemiological malaria situation in Kyrgyzstan (1995-1999)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdikarimov, S T

    2001-01-01

    Kyzgyzstan is situated in an area which is potentially at risk for malaria. In 1995-1999, 58 cases of malaria were recorded, six of them were local cases. The factors that promote the spread of malaria in Kyrgyzstan are the widespread and constant migration of people from Tajikistan and close economic ties between Kyrgyzstan and a number of Asian countries with widespread malaria epidemics. Most cases of malaria in Kyrgyzstan were imported from Tajikistan (39 cases or 75% of all imported cases). Plasmodium vivax, P. falciparum and P. malariae were identified in 95.9, 1.7, and 2.1%, respectively. There is a widespread irrigation network in the country, along with a large number of reservoirs, ponds, lakes, springs, streams, gullies, and marshy floodplains. As of 1 January 2000, there are 2833 water areas that can support Anopheles mosquitoes, with a total area of 5008.5 ha. The total length of the sewerage and drainage system is 5,440 km. There is a great potential for the spread of malaria in the south of the republic, i.e. the Osh and Zhalalabad Regions, especially due to a large number of state rice (paddy) fields covering an area of over 3,500 ha. Small rice-growing plots close to private dwellings, which are cultivated without any mosquito control measures, currently provide further breeding grounds for mosquitoes. Almost 80% of the population of these areas is at risk for malaria. Almost all species of malaria mosquitoes have been identified in Kyrgyzstan. An. claviger and An. messeae have too, two other species have also spread through the country, these are An. martinius and An. superpictus which became the main vectors of malaria epidemics in the south in the 1930s-1950s. Large-scale development of the pre-imago stages of the mosquito (a larval, water-based stage) takes place 5-7 months within which 4-6 mosquito generations develop. At present, there is a shortage of staff in Kyrgyzstan, especially at a local level, who has thorough knowledge of malaria and

  15. Is malaria illness among young children a cause or a consequence of low socioeconomic status? evidence from the united Republic of Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Castro Marcia

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria is commonly considered a disease of the poor, but there is very little evidence of a possible two-way causality in the association between malaria and poverty. Until now, limitations to examine that dual relationship were the availability of representative data on confirmed malaria cases, the use of a good proxy for poverty, and accounting for endogeneity in regression models. Methods A simultaneous equation model was estimated with nationally representative data for Tanzania that included malaria parasite testing with RDTs for young children (six-59 months, and accounted for environmental variables assembled with the aid of GIS. A wealth index based on assets, access to utilities/infrastructure, and housing characteristics was used as a proxy for socioeconomic status. Model estimation was done with instrumental variables regression. Results Results show that households with a child who tested positive for malaria at the time of the survey had a wealth index that was, on average, 1.9 units lower (p-value  Conclusion If malaria is indeed a cause of poverty, as the findings of this study suggest, then malaria control activities, and particularly the current efforts to eliminate/eradicate malaria, are much more than just a public health policy, but also a poverty alleviation strategy. However, if poverty has no causal effect on malaria, then poverty alleviation policies should not be advertised as having the potential additional effect of reducing the prevalence of malaria.

  16. Efficiency of household reactive case detection for malaria in rural Southern Zambia: simulations based on cross-sectional surveys from two epidemiological settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly M Searle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Case detection and treatment are critical to malaria control and elimination as infected individuals who do not seek medical care can serve as persistent reservoirs for transmission. METHODS: Household malaria surveys were conducted in two study areas within Southern Province, Zambia in 2007 and 2008. Cross-sectional surveys were conducted approximately five times throughout the year in each of the two study areas. During study visits, adults and caretakers of children were administered a questionnaire and a blood sample was obtained for a rapid diagnostic test (RDT for malaria. These data were used to estimate the proportions of individuals with malaria potentially identified through passive case detection at health care facilities and those potentially identified through reactive case finding. Simulations were performed to extrapolate data from sampled to non-sampled households. Radii of increasing size surrounding households with an index case were examined to determine the proportion of households with an infected individual that would be identified through reactive case detection. RESULTS: In the 2007 high transmission setting, with a parasite prevalence of 23%, screening neighboring households within 500 meters of an index case could have identified 89% of all households with an RDT positive resident and 90% of all RDT positive individuals. In the 2008 low transmission setting, with a parasite prevalence of 8%, screening neighboring households within 500 meters of a household with an index case could have identified 77% of all households with an RDT positive resident and 76% of all RDT positive individuals. CONCLUSIONS: Testing and treating individuals residing within a defined radius from an index case has the potential to be an effective strategy to identify and treat a large proportion of infected individuals who do not seek medical care, although the efficiency of this strategy is likely to decrease with declining parasite

  17. Autogenous wisdom tooth transplantation: A case series with 6-9 months follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatjana Nimcenko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tooth transplantation can be considered a valid and predictable treatment option for rehabilitating young patients with permanent teeth loss. This study presents several cases of successful autogenous tooth transplantation with a 6-9 months follow-up. Tooth auto-transplantation can be considered a reasonable option for replacing missing teeth when a donor tooth is available. The auto-transplantation of a right mandibular third molar with compromised function and esthetics to replace the residual roots resulting from coronal destruction due to extensive carious lesion of the second molar in the same quadrant as shown in the presented cases can result a viable treatment alternative especially in a young patient that cannot undergo dental implant therapy. Transplantation of mature third molar seems to be a promising method for replacing a lost permanent molar tooth and restoring esthetics and function. This clinical procedure showed excellent functional and esthetical long-term results in the analyzed cases.

  18. Autogenous wisdom tooth transplantation: A case series with 6-9 months follow-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimčenko, Tatjana; Omerca, Gražvydas; Bramanti, Ennio; Cervino, Gabriele; Laino, Luigi; Cicciù, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Tooth transplantation can be considered a valid and predictable treatment option for rehabilitating young patients with permanent teeth loss. This study presents several cases of successful autogenous tooth transplantation with a 6-9 months follow-up. Tooth auto-transplantation can be considered a reasonable option for replacing missing teeth when a donor tooth is available. The auto-transplantation of a right mandibular third molar with compromised function and esthetics to replace the residual roots resulting from coronal destruction due to extensive carious lesion of the second molar in the same quadrant as shown in the presented cases can result a viable treatment alternative especially in a young patient that cannot undergo dental implant therapy. Transplantation of mature third molar seems to be a promising method for replacing a lost permanent molar tooth and restoring esthetics and function. This clinical procedure showed excellent functional and esthetical long-term results in the analyzed cases. PMID:25540668

  19. Meteorological, environmental remote sensing and neural network analysis of the epidemiology of malaria transmission in Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Kiang

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available In many malarious regions malaria transmission roughly coincides with rainy seasons, which provide for more abundant larval habitats. In addition to precipitation, other meteorological and environmental factors may also influence malaria transmission. These factors can be remotely sensed using earth observing environmental satellites and estimated with seasonal climate forecasts. The use of remote sensing usage as an early warning tool for malaria epidemics have been broadly studied in recent years, especially for Africa, where the majority of the world’s malaria occurs. Although the Greater Mekong Subregion (GMS, which includes Thailand and the surrounding countries, is an epicenter of multidrug resistant falciparum malaria, the meteorological and environmental factors affecting malaria transmissions in the GMS have not been examined in detail. In this study, the parasitological data used consisted of the monthly malaria epidemiology data at the provincial level compiled by the Thai Ministry of Public Health. Precipitation, temperature, relative humidity, and vegetation index obtained from both climate time series and satellite measurements were used as independent variables to model malaria. We used neural network methods, an artificial-intelligence technique, to model the dependency of malaria transmission on these variables. The average training accuracy of the neural network analysis for three provinces (Kanchanaburi, Mae Hong Son, and Tak which are among the provinces most endemic for malaria, is 72.8% and the average testing accuracy is 62.9% based on the 1994-1999 data. A more complex neural network architecture resulted in higher training accuracy but also lower testing accuracy. Taking into account of the uncertainty regarding reported malaria cases, we divided the malaria cases into bands (classes to compute training accuracy. Using the same neural network architecture on the 19 most endemic provinces for years 1994 to 2000, the

  20. UK malaria treatment guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalloo, David G; Shingadia, Delane; Pasvol, Geoffrey; Chiodini, Peter L; Whitty, Christopher J; Beeching, Nicholas J; Hill, David R; Warrell, David A; Bannister, Barbara A

    2007-02-01

    Malaria is the tropical disease most commonly imported into the UK, with 1500-2000 cases reported each year, and 10-20 deaths. Approximately three-quarters of reported malaria cases in the UK are caused by Plasmodium falciparum, which is capable of invading a high proportion of red blood cells and rapidly leading to severe or life-threatening multi-organ disease. Most non-falciparum malaria cases are caused by Plasmodium vivax; a few cases are caused by the other two species of Plasmodium: Plasmodium ovale or Plasmodium malariae. Mixed infections with more than 1 species of parasite can occur; they commonly involve P. falciparum with the attendant risks of severe malaria. Management of malaria depends on awareness of the diagnosis and on performing the correct diagnostic tests: the diagnosis cannot be excluded until 3 blood specimens have been examined by an experienced microscopist. There are no typical clinical features of malaria, even fever is not invariably present. The optimum diagnostic procedure is examination of thick and thin blood films by an expert to detect and speciate the malarial parasites; P. falciparum malaria can be diagnosed almost as accurately using rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) which detect plasmodial antigens or enzymes, although RDTs for other Plasmodium species are not as reliable. The treatment of choice for non-falciparum malaria is a 3-day course of oral chloroquine, to which only a limited proportion of P. vivax strains have gained resistance. Dormant parasites (hypnozoites) persist in the liver after treatment of P. vivax or P. ovale infection: the only currently effective drug for eradication of hypnozoites is primaquine. This must be avoided or given with caution under expert supervision in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency (G6PD), in whom it may cause severe haemolysis. Uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria can be treated orally with quinine, atovaquone plus proguanil (Malarone) or co-artemether (Riamet

  1. Multifocal hepatoblastoma in a 6-month-old girl with trisomy 18: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitanovski Lidija

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Edward's syndrome (trisomy 18 is a rare entity with a reported incidence of 1/3000 to 1/7000 births. Less than 10% of patients survive beyond the first year of life, which may influence the fact that malignant tumors are rarely reported in association with this syndrome. Case presentation The authors report a rare case of a 6-month-old girl with trisomy 18 and multifocal hepatoblastoma. The course of the disease, autopsy results and review of the literature are presented. Conclusion Our case represents the seventh published case of hepatoblastoma in a patient with trisomy 18. All of the seven published cases were women, possibly due to the high preponderance of females among the children with Edward's syndrome and longer survival of females with trisomy 18 compared to males. Since both trisomy 18 and hepatoblastoma are rare conditions, the probability that a child with trisomy 18 will independently develop a hepatoblastoma is very low. Therefore, we believe that the existence of these cases in children with trisomy 18 indicates a significant association. It can be assumed that trisomy 18 potentiates the development of hepatoblastoma. Careful clinical and post-mortem studies are needed to recognize the real frequency of hepatoblastoma in children with trisomy 18, who might die from different causes with unrecognizable hepatoblastoma.

  2. Cerebral malaria Malaria cerebral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Blair Trujillo

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Is the most common complication of P. falciparum malaria; nearly 90% of people who have suffered CM can recover without neurological problems. Currently there are four hypotheses that explain pathogenesis of CM: cytoadherence and sequestering of parasitized red blood cells to cerebral capillaries; rosette formation and parasitized red blood cells agglutination; production of cytokines and activation of second messengers and opening of the blood-brain barrier. However the main question remains to be answered; how the host-parasite interaction in the vascular space interferes transiently with cerebral function? Recently, the beta amyloid precursor peptide has been employed as marker of neural injury in CM. It is expected that the beta amyloid precursor peptide will help to understand the pathogenesis of CM in complicated patients of endemic areas of Colombia. La malaria Cerebral (MC es la complicación más frecuente de la malaria por P. falciparum; aproximadamente el 90% de las personas que la han padecido se recuperan completamente sin secuelas neurológicas. Aún no se conoce con claridad su patogénesis pero se han postulado cuatro hipótesis o mecanismos posibles: 1 citoadherencia y secuestro de glóbulos rojos parasitados en la microvasculatura cerebral; 2 formación de rosetas y aglutinación de glóbulos rojos parasitados; 3 producción de citoquinas y activación de segundos mensajeros y, 4 apertura de la barrera hematoencefálica. Sin embargo, queda un interrogante sin resolver aún: ¿qué proceso se lleva a cabo para que el parásito, desde el espacio microvascular, pueda interferir transitoriamente con la función cerebral? Recientemente se ha utilizado el precursor de la proteína b-Amiloide como un marcador de daño neuronal en MC; este precursor será de gran ayuda en futuras investigaciones realizadas en nuestro medio que aporten información para comprender la patogénesis de la MC.

  3. Prevalence of malaria, prevention measures, and main clinical features in febrile children admitted to the Franceville Regional Hospital, Gabon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maghendji-Nzondo Sydney

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, major progress has been made in controlling malaria in Africa. However, in Gabon, little information is available on the role of malaria in childhood febrile syndromes, the use and efficacy of preventive measures, and Plasmodium species distribution. Here, we characterized malaria in febrile children in Franceville, Gabon through a cross-sectional study at the pediatric unit of the Franceville Regional Hospital. We registered 940 febrile children. Their general condition was markedly altered in 11.7% of cases (n = 89/760; among them 19 (21.4% had a severely altered condition. Malaria was the second most frequent etiology (22.0%; n = 162/738, after respiratory tract infections (37.3%; n = 275/738. Children with malaria (63 ± 39 months were older than children without malaria (40 ± 37 months (p = 0.0013. Hemoglobin, red blood cell, white blood cell, and platelet values were lower in children with malaria than in those without malaria (p < 0.0001. Anemia was the most common feature of severe malaria (70.6%; n = 12/17, followed by neurological involvement (23.5%; n = 4/17. The prevalence of malaria was significantly higher in children older than 60 months than in younger children (40% vs. 15.5%; p < 0.0001. Plasmodium falciparum accounted for 97.5% of cases (158/162, followed by Plasmodium malariae (2.5%; n = 4/162. Bed net use was high (74.4%; n = 697/936 and contributed to malaria prevention (p = 0.001. Good basic knowledge of malaria also had a preventive effect (p < 0.0001. The prevalence of malaria in children in Franceville did not decrease significantly from 2009 to 2012, remaining at about 20%, highlighting that preventive measures should be reinforced.

  4. Malaria Matters

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-04-18

    This podcast gives an overview of malaria, including prevention and treatment, and what CDC is doing to help control and prevent malaria globally.  Created: 4/18/2008 by National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne, and Enteric Diseases (NCZVED).   Date Released: 4/18/2008.

  5. Reducing six-month inpatient psychiatric recidivism and costs through case management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbasovsky, Andrew; Reich, Leonard; Meyerkopf, Neil

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the reduction in inpatient psychiatric recidivism and costs associated with an intensive case management (ICM) program among high-risk adults with chronic mental health conditions. An intent-to-treat, historical control design was used to examine utilization differences between 306 intervention group (IG) members eligible to receive ICM services and a cohort of 290 baseline group (BG) members over a six-month outcome period. Members were identified retrospectively using identical criteria during one year prior to implementation of the program. The six-month recidivism rate for BG members was 49.67% compared to 22.07% among IG members. Forward stepwise regression results indicated a significant main effect for the ICM intervention on inpatient psychiatric costs. Inpatient psychiatric costs for the six-month outcome period were $4,982.90 lower per member in the IG group. Additional models demonstrated that the ICM intervention was associated with significantly lower inpatient substance abuse costs and psychiatric emergency department costs. There were no statistically significant increases in utilization associated with the ICM intervention. After factoring in program costs, it is estimated that the ICM services contributed to almost $1,500,000 in cost savings over the six-month outcome period. The ICM intervention was associated with significant reductions in inpatient, psychiatric six-month readmission rates and associated costs among adult members who are at elevated risk of inpatient, psychiatric recidivism. The intervention, enrollment process, and measurement strategies can be adapted for use by health plans looking to reduce psychiatric costs.

  6. High anorectal malformation in a five-month-old boy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey Anand

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Anorectal malformation, one of the most common congenital defects, may present with a wide spectrum of defects. Almost all male patients present within first few days of life. Case presentation A five-month-old baby boy of Indian origin and nationality presented with anal atresia and associated rectourethral prostatic fistula. The anatomy of the malformation and our patient's good condition permitted a primary definitive repair of the anomaly. A brief review of the relevant literature is included. Conclusion Delayed presentation of a patient with high anorectal malformation is rare. The appropriate treatment can be rewarding.

  7. Individual-level factors associated with the risk of acquiring human Plasmodium knowlesi malaria in Malaysia: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigg, Matthew J; Cox, Jonathan; William, Timothy; Jelip, Jenarun; Fornace, Kimberly M; Brock, Patrick M; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Barber, Bridget E; Anstey, Nicholas M; Yeo, Tsin W; Drakeley, Christopher J

    2017-06-09

    The emergence of human malaria due to the monkey parasite Plasmodium knowlesi threatens elimination efforts in southeast Asia. Changes in land use are thought to be driving the rise in reported P knowlesi cases, but the role of individual-level factors is unclear. To address this knowledge gap we assessed human and environmental factors associated with zoonotic knowlesi malaria risk. We did this population-based case-control study over a 2 year period in the state of Sabah in Malaysia. We enrolled cases with microscopy-positive, PCR-confirmed malaria who presented to two primary referral hospitals serving the adjacent districts of Kudat and Kota Marudu. We randomly selected three malaria-negative community controls per case, who were matched by village within 2 weeks of case detection. We obtained questionnaire data on demographics, behaviour, and residential malaria risk factors, and we also assessed glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) enzyme activity. We used conditional logistic regression models to evaluate exposure risk between P knowlesi cases and controls, and between P knowlesi and human-only Plasmodium spp malaria cases. From Dec 5, 2012, to Jan 30, 2015, we screened 414 patients and subsequently enrolled 229 cases with P knowlesi malaria mono-infection and 91 cases with other Plasmodium spp infection. We enrolled 953 matched controls, including 683 matched to P knowlesi cases and 270 matched to non-P knowlesi cases. Age 15 years or older (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 4·16, 95% CI 2·09-8·29, ptravel (2·48, 1·45-4·23, p=0·0010), being aware of the presence of monkeys in the past 4 weeks (3·35, 1·91-5·88, p<0·0001), and having open eaves or gaps in walls (2·18, 1·33-3·59, p=0·0021) were independently associated with increased risk of symptomatic P knowlesi infection. Farming occupation (aOR 1·89, 95% CI 1·07-3·35, p=0·028), clearing vegetation (1·89, 1·11-3·22, p=0·020), and having long grass around the house (2·08, 1·25-3·46, p=0

  8. Malaria control at the district level in Africa: the case of the muheza district in northeastern Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alilio, Martin S; Kitua, Andrew; Njunwa, Kato;

    2004-01-01

    An assessment was done in Tanzania to determine the extent to which the primary health care services have contributed to reducing the burden of malaria since the system was initiated in the 1980s. Seven descriptive processes and outcome indicators of effectiveness were used: changes of malaria tr...

  9. 威海市48例疟疾病例流行病学及临床特征分析%Clinical and epidemiological features of 48 cases of malaria in the City of Weihai, Shandong Province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李馥; 于京平

    2011-01-01

    Forty-eight cases of malaria were reported in the City of Weihai from 2004 to 2008. Thirty-seven of the cases were vivax malaria, 6 were falciparum malaria, and 5 were malaria of an undetermined type. Of the 48 cases, 31 involved males while 17 involved females. In 37 cases of vivax malaria, 26 patients had a fever every day (70. 27% , 26/37), 8 had a fever every other day, and 3 had a fever at irregular intervals. All 6 patients with falciparum malaria had returned from Africa; 5 patients had a fever every day while 1 continued to run a high fever. Symptoms were more serious than those of vivax malaria. In 5 cases of malaria of an undetermined type, 4 patients had a fever every day and 1 had a fever at irregular intervals. Dihydroartemisinin piperaquine tablets are a truly effective method of treating falciparum malaria.%威海市2004~2008年共报告疟疾病例48例,其中间日疟37例,恶性疟6例,未分型5例;男性31例,女性17例.37例间日疟中,每日发热26例,间日发热8例,不规律发热3例.6例恶性疟病例均为非洲回乡人员,每日发热5例,持续高热不退1例,症状较间日疟凶险.5例未分型病人每日发热4例,不规律发热1例.恶性疟用科泰复进行治疗,效果肯定.

  10. The diagnosis of mesenteric fibromatosis: A 90-month five patients case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peixin; Zhang, Zhongtao; Qin, Shengqi; Li, Jianshe

    2016-01-01

    Mesenteric fibromatosis (MF) is a rare tumor (2-4 cases per 1 million people annually) with few presented features. In this case study, we reported five MF patients, one of whom suffered a recurrence. Patients received renogram, colonoscopy, cystoscopy, and gastrointestinal examinations. Histology and immunohistochemistry evaluations were performed after the surgical resection. Hormone levels were measured before and after the surgery. It was found that clinical imaging readily confirmed an abnormal mass but was unable to distinguish MF from other tumors. Histology and immunohistochemistry were definitive diagnoses because the tissue was vimentin ± β-catenin ± CD117-/CD34-. Furthermore, the patient who suffered a recurrence showed an elevated estrogen level. A 6-month postoperative administration of letrozole drove the estrogen down to normal level. Our study showed that vimentin, β-catenin, CD117, and CD34 were the markers for MF whereas medical imaging, and estrogen level could be used for the complimentary purpose.

  11. Double lung point in an 18-month-old child: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongheng

    2015-03-01

    Double lung point is a rare sign of pneumothorax in clinical practice. In this report I presented an 18-month-old child who presented with bilateral pneumothorax. Ultrasonography examination revealed conventional lung point sign on the right and double lung point on the left side. Thoracentesis was attempted and closed thoracic drainage was performed on the right side, but no gas was drawn on the left side. Clinical implication of double lung point sign found in chest ultrasonography is that the size of pneumothorax is limited and conservative treatment is enough. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of double lung point identified with ultrasonography in child. The strength of the case is that the double lung point sign is supported by computed tomography (CT). Furthermore, we propose that the presence of double lung point indicates limited pneumothorax and conservative management may well be attempted.

  12. A 15-Month-Old Boy With Respiratory Distress and Parapharyngeal Abscess: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib, Behdad; Mohammadpour, Masoud; Sharifzadeh, Meisam; Mirashrafi, Fatemeh; Yaghmaie, Bahareh; Pak, Neda; Mehdizadeh, Mehrzad; Eshaghi, Hamid; Gorji, Mojtaba; Memarian, Sara

    2016-12-01

    Parapharyngeal abscess is a life-threatening disease. Upper respiratory tract infection is the main cause in children. We present a 15-month-old boy admitted to the emergency ward with the chief complaint of difficulty in breathing caused by parapharyngealabscess. His condition deteriorated gradually, and he transferred to the operation theater quickly for abscess drainage and because of the difficulty in orotracheal intubation; a tracheostomy was performed. His respiratory condition deteriorated 2 days after PICU admission, and the medical team noticed an unexplainable respiratory distress. A chest x ray obtained and showed a right side pneumothorax and subcutaneous emphysema around theneck area. The case presented here, had not been diagnosed at the first examination; however, there were enough clinical clues (such as respiratory distress, drooling, torticollis, bulging of theneck, previous viral respiratory infection, possible pharyngeal trauma). The story of this case reminds us the importance of the precise physical exam and history taking which could be life-saving.

  13. A new clinical variant of the post-malaria neurological syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Adrian A; Edwards, Simon; Weatherby, Stuart

    2013-11-15

    Post-malaria neurological syndrome (PMNS) is an uncommon, monophasic illness that occurs within two months following recovery from Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) malaria. Clinical manifestations of PMNS are variable, but published cases uniformly feature neurological and/or psychiatric symptoms without long tract signs. We describe a case of severe brainstem and spinal cord inflammation with paraplegia and sphincter involvement in a 48 year old woman following recovery from a Pf malarial illness. We propose that this case represents a previously unreported form of PMNS, which has features that distinguish it from acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and that the recognised clinical spectrum of PMNS should be extended to include brainstem and spinal cord inflammation.

  14. Waardenburg syndrome type2 in a 10 month old infant; a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salar Behzadnia

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available (Received 17 August, 2009 ; Accepted 9 December, 2009AbstractBackground and purpose: Waardenburg syndrome (WS is a rare disease characterized by sensor neural deafness in association with pigmentary anomalies and defects of neural-crest-derived tissues. WS is caused by mutations in the microphthalmia-associated with transcription factor gene.Materials and methods: This case is a 10 month old infant girl in which during a routine physical examination found that she has hetetrochromia and unilateral hearing loss. Regard to waardenburg syndrome criteria Type 2, this case report was diagnosed as WS.Results: WS is classified into four types. WS 2 is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss, lateral displacement of medial canthi (dystopia canthorum, pigmentary disorders of eyes, hair, and skin.Conclusion: Waardenburg syndrome can be diagnosed easily in the first few months of life, due to prominent phenotypic features. Earlier diagnosis means a more successful rehabilitation of hearing.J Mazand Univ Med Sci 2009; 19(72: 77-80 (Persian.

  15. Local Langerhans cell histiocytosis (eosinophilic granuloma in a six-month baby: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahador M

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH is a group of idiopathic disorders characterized by the proliferation of specialized bone marrow-derived Langerhans cells and mature eosinophils. The estimated annual incidence ranges from 0.5-2 cases per 100,000 persons per year. The pathogenesis of LCH is unknown. The prevalence of LCH seems to be higher among whites and males. The most common complaints at presentation are those related to bone lesions. Treatment consists of surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy alone or in combination. The age of onset varies according to the variety of LCH. Solitary lesions may occur in bones or skin. Cutaneous lesions present with firm, painless papulonodules or vesicles. "nCase report: This six-month-old baby presented with firm papulonodules on her temporal skin, but fortunately her other organs were healthy. She underwent two surgeries, separated by a one-month interval. Due to local recurrence after a short period of time, she underwent a 10-Gy dose of radiation. Her response proved good during follow-up. "nConclusion: Radiotherapy is good for controlling local recurrence in LCH, with few sequelae related to treatment.

  16. Malaria in India: Challenges and opportunities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A P Dash; Neena Valecha; A R Anvikar; A Kumar

    2008-11-01

    India contributes about 70% of malaria in the South East Asian Region of WHO. Although annually India reports about two million cases and 1000 deaths attributable to malaria, there is an increasing trend in the proportion of Plasmodium falciparum as the agent. There exists heterogeneity and variability in the risk of malaria transmission between and within the states of the country as many ecotypes/paradigms of malaria have been recognized. The pattern of clinical presentation of severe malaria has also changed and while multi-organ failure is more frequently observed in falciparum malaria, there are reports of vivax malaria presenting with severe manifestations. The high burden populations are ethnic tribes living in the forested pockets of the states like Orissa, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh, Chhattisgarh and the North Eastern states which contribute bulk of morbidity and mortality due to malaria in the country. Drug resistance, insecticide resistance, lack of knowledge of actual disease burden along with new paradigms of malaria pose a challenge for malaria control in the country. Considering the existing gaps in reported and estimated morbidity and mortality, need for estimation of true burden of malaria has been stressed. Administrative, financial, technical and operational challenges faced by the national programme have been elucidated. Approaches and priorities that may be helpful in tackling serious issues confronting malaria programme have been outlined.

  17. MALARIA ERADICATION AND ITS TECHNICAL, OPERATIONAL AND ADMINISTRATIONAL PROBLEMS IN IRAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AV. Manouchehri

    1977-06-01

    Full Text Available Malaria has always been regarded as one of the most important health problems with which Iran is faced. Most parts of the country, especially densely populated areas, were known as malarious areas. Records of 1947 show that 25% of cases referred to health centers and dispensaries of the Ministry of Health were due to malaria in Khuzestan and Caspian Sea areas. The mortality rate of malaria in the Khuzestan and Caspian littoral areas and Khuzestan province was reported to be about Caspian littoral areas and Khuzestan province was reported to about 30-40% of total deaths. It has been estimated that each year the number of malaria cases was between 4-5 millions. At present 2/3 of the country with a population of 23 millions is under consolidation phase and the number of positive cases in this area was 4312 in 1976. In the Southern part of Iran, which has a tropical climate with the average temperature ranging between 12-50 and the average relative humidity between 40- 50%, the malaria campaign has not been as successful as in the Northern parts. In this part of the country our malaria eradication program is faced with technical problems such as malaria eradication program is faced with technical problems such as resistance of A. stephensi to organochlrine insecticides. The development of DDT and dieldrise the resistance by A. stephensi in 1957 and 1959 practically stopped the eradication of malaria in subsequent years in this part of the country. In October 1967, the Southern part of the country with a population of about 4 millions was sprayed with malathion 2-3 times per year. This spraying was supported by monthly positive case detection, treatment of positive cases, introduction of Gambusia fish in active and potential breeding places and mass – drug administration. In the first 4 years of this campaign the annual parasite incidence came down from 8.41 per thousand to 2.1 per thousand.

  18. Utility of health facility-based malaria data for malaria surveillance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaw A Afrane

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Currently, intensive malaria control programs are being implemented in Africa to reduce the malaria burden. Clinical malaria data from hospitals are valuable for monitoring trends in malaria morbidity and for evaluating the impacts of these interventions. However, the reliability of hospital-based data for true malaria incidence is often questioned because of diagnosis accuracy issues and variation in access to healthcare facilities among sub-groups of the population. This study investigated how diagnosis and treatment practices of malaria cases in hospitals affect reliability of hospital malaria data. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study was undertaken in health facilities in western Kenya. A total of 3,569 blood smears were analyzed after being collected from patients who were requested by clinicians to go to the hospital's laboratory for malaria testing. We applied several quality control measures for clinical malaria diagnosis. We compared our slide reading results with those from the hospital technicians. Among the 3,390 patients whose diagnoses were analyzed, only 36% had clinical malaria defined as presence of any level of parasitaemia and fever. Sensitivity and specificity of clinicians' diagnoses were 60.1% (95% CI: 61.1-67.5 and 75.0% (95% CI: 30.8-35.7, respectively. Among the 980 patients presumptively treated with an anti-malarial by the clinicians without laboratory diagnosis, only 47% had clinical malaria. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings revealed substantial over-prescription of anti-malarials and misdiagnosis of clinical malaria. More than half of the febrile cases were not truly clinical malaria, but were wrongly diagnosed and treated as such. Deficiency in malaria diagnosis makes health facility data unreliable for monitoring trends in malaria morbidity and for evaluating impacts of malaria interventions. Improving malaria diagnosis should be a top priority in rural African health centers.

  19. 濮阳市63例输入性恶性疟流行病学分析%Epidemiologocal analysis of 63 cases with imported falciparum malaria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾伟; 王兰珍

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the epidemic situation and epidemiological characteristics of imported falciparum malaria in Puyang and provide reference for controlling imported falciparum malaria.Methods Basic information and epidemiology investigation data of imported falciparum malaria cases in Puyang in since 2010 were collected from the Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention Information System,and statistically analyzed of epidemiological characteristics of the disease.Results There were a total of 63 imported falciparum malaria cases reported in Puyang from 2010 to 2014,all of whom were males. 58 cases were infected in Africa countries,mainly including Equatorial Guinea(26 cases) and Angola (9 cases). The 63 cases were young and middle age males with cultural level of junior middle school. Their ages were 23 to 50 years old and the median age was 37. The main vocations of those 63 cases were farmer,migrant worker and worker,accounting for 92.06%. Imported falciparum malaria cases were reported in oil fields of all five counties and two districts of the whole city, mainly in county of Puyang, accounted for 50.79%. The median of diagnosis time were 5 days after the onset of the disease.Conclusions Epidemic situation of imported falciparum malaria was in serious situation in Puyang. There is a need to strengthen the management,publicity and detection of malaria of overseas workers. Good clinician training and implement various prevention and control measures are necessary to improve the prevention and control of imported falciparum malaria.%目的 分析濮阳市输入性恶性疟疫情及流行特征,为输入性恶性疟防治工作提供参考.方法 通过中国疾病预防控制中心信息系统收集2010年以来濮阳市输入性恶性疟病例的基本信息、流行病学调查资料,统计分析濮阳市输入性恶性疟流行病学特征.结果 2010-2014年濮阳市共报告输入性恶性疟病例63例,均为男性.58例感染于非洲

  20. IgE- and IgG mediated severe anaphylactic platelet transfusion reaction in a known case of cerebral malaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Shanthi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Allergic reactions occur commonly in transfusion practice. However, severe anaphylactic reactions are rare; anti-IgA (IgA: Immunoglobulin A in IgA-deficient patients is one of the well-illustrated and reported causes for such reactions. However, IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reaction through blood component transfusion may be caused in parasitic hyperimmunization for IgG and IgE antibodies. Case Report: We have evaluated here a severe anaphylactic transfusion reaction retrospectively in an 18year-old male, a known case of cerebral malaria, developed after platelet transfusions. The examination and investigations revealed classical signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis along with a significant rise in the serum IgE antibody level and IgG by hemagglutination method. Initial mild allergic reaction was followed by severe anaphylactic reaction after the second transfusion of platelets. Conclusion: Based on these results, screening of patients and donors with mild allergic reactions to IgE antibodies may help in understanding the pathogenesis as well as in planning for preventive desensitization and measures for safe transfusion.

  1. Malaria and Travelers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a CDC Malaria Branch clinician. malaria@cdc.gov Malaria and Travelers Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... may be at risk for infection. Determine if malaria transmission occurs at the destinations Obtain a detailed ...

  2. Malaria Treatment (United States)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a CDC Malaria Branch clinician. malaria@cdc.gov Malaria Treatment (United States) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Treatment of Malaria: Guidelines For Clinicians (United States) Download PDF version ...

  3. Malaria successes and challenges in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Rajesh; Rastogi, Rakesh Mani; Ortega, Leonard

    2013-12-01

    Asia ranks second to Africa in terms of malaria burden. In 19 countries of Asia, malaria is endemic and 2.31 billion people or 62% of the total population in these countries are at risk of malaria. In 2010, WHO estimated around 34.8 million cases and 45,600 deaths due to malaria in Asia. In 2011, 2.7 million cases and > 2000 deaths were reported. India, Indonesia, Myanmar and Pakistan are responsible for >85% of the reported cases (confirmed) and deaths in Asia. In last 10 yr, due to availability of donor's fund specially from Global fund, significant progress has been made by the countries in Asia in scaling-up malaria control interventions which were instrumental in reducing malaria morbidity and mortality significantly. There is a large heterogeneity in malaria epidemiology in Asia. As a result, the success in malaria control/elimination is also diverse. As compared to the data of the year 2000, out of 19 malaria endemic countries, 12 countries were able to reduce malaria incidence (microscopically confirmed cases only) by 75%. Two countries, namely Bangladesh and Malaysia are projected to reach 75% reduction by 2015 while India is projected to reach 50-75% only by 2015. The trend could not be assessed in four countries, namely Indonesia, Myanmar, Pakistan and Timor-Leste due to insufficient consistent data. Numerous key challenges need to be addressed to sustain the gains and eliminate malaria in most parts of Asia. Some of these are to control the spread of resistance in Plasmodium falciparum to artemisinin, control of outdoor transmission, control of vivax malaria and ensuring universal coverage of key interventions. Asia has the potential to influence the malaria epidemiology all over the world as well as to support the global efforts in controlling and eliminating malaria through production of quality-assured ACTs, RDTs and long-lasting insecticidal nets.

  4. Analysis of six imported malaria cases in Shenzhen port%深圳口岸6例输入性疟疾的调查分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    欧青叶; 刘春晓; 赵纯中; 顾大勇; 徐云庆; 史蕾; 徐媛; 李薇薇

    2012-01-01

    目的 分析深圳口岸输入性疟疾病例的相关资料和追踪调查,为输入性疟疾防控工作提供依据.方法 对经深圳口岸入境疑似疟疾者进行流行病学个案调查和实验室检查.结果 通过现场体温监测、医学巡查、流行病学个案调查和实验室检测,从某劳务派遣入境团体人群中流行病学确诊6例输入性疟疾病例,并对确诊的病例进行了跟踪.结论 深圳口岸面临输入性疟疾的威胁,需对来自疟疾流行区的人群加强检疫,以防止疟疾传入.%Objective The Aim of this study was to investigate of recent reports of malaria in Shenzhen port region in order to provide evidence for the prevention and control of imported malaria. Methods In the present study the laboratory diagnosis for malaria and the epidemiological method were used for the investigation of travelers from endemic areas. Results Based on on-site tempeiature monitoring, epidemiological investigation as well as laboratory test, six suspected maiaria cases were identified among the travelers returning from endemic areas. Conclusion The results suggested that Shenzhen port region is facing the threat of imported malaria. All relevant departments should enhance cooperation and coordination in health education among migrant worker to increase their awareness of malaria prevention and to take some effective measures in this regard.

  5. Longitudinal analysis of antibody responses in symptomatic malaria cases do not mirror parasite transmission in peri-urban area of Cote d’Ivoire between 2010 and 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loucoubar, Cheikh; Beourou, Sylvain; Vigan-Womas, Inès; Touré, Aissatou; Djaman, Joseph Allico

    2017-01-01

    Background In the agenda towards malaria eradication, assessment of both malaria exposure and efficacy of anti-vectorial and therapeutic strategies is a key component of management and the follow-up of field interventions. The simultaneous use of several antigens (Ags) as serological markers has the potential for accurate evaluation of malaria exposure. Here we aimed to measure the longitudinal evolution of the background levels of immunity in an urban setting in confirmed clinical cases of malaria. Methods A retrospective serological cross-sectional study on was carried out using 234 samples taken from 2010 to 2013 in peri-urban sentinel facility of Cote d’Ivoire. Antibody responses to recombinant proteins or BSA-peptides, 8 Plasmodium falciparum (PfAMA1, PfMSP4, PfMSP1, PfEMP1-DBL1α1-PF13, PfLSA1-41, PfLSA3-NR2, PfGLURP and PfCSP), one P. malariae (PmCSP) and one Anopheles gambiae salivary (gSG6-P1) antigens were measured using magnetic bead-based multiplex immunoassay (MBA). Total anti- P. falciparum IgG responses against schizont lysate from african 07/03 strain (adapted to culture) and 3D7 strain was measured by ELISA. Results High prevalence (7–93%) and levels of antibody responses to most of the antigens were evidenced. However, analysis showed only marginal decreasing trend of Ab responses from 2010 to 2013 that did not parallel the reduction of clinical malaria prevalence following the implementation of intervention in this area. There was a significant inverse correlation between Ab responses and parasitaemia (P<10−3, rho = 0.3). The particular recruitment of asymptomatic individuals in 2011 underlined a high background level of immunity almost equivalent to symptomatic patients, possibly obscuring observable yearly variations. Conclusion The use of cross-sectional clinical malaria surveys and MBA can help to identify endemic sites where control measures have unequal impact providing relevant information about population immunity and possible

  6. Awareness, attitudes and prevention of malaria in the cities of Douala and Yaoundé (Cameroon).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndo, Cyrille; Menze-Djantio, Benjamin; Antonio-Nkondjio, Christophe

    2011-09-20

    There is little information on the social perception of malaria and the use of prevention methods in Cameroon. This study was designed to assess knowledge, attitude and management of malaria in households living in the cities of Douala and Yaoundé. Over 82% of people interviewed associated malaria transmission to mosquito bites. Methods used for malaria prevention were: environmental sanitation 1645 (76.1%), use of bed nets 1491 (69%), insecticide spray/coils 265 (12.3%) and netting of doors or windows 42 (1.9%). Bed net ownership was significantly high in Yaoundé (73.8%) (P problems experienced by families using ITN were the difficulty in finding chemicals for the retreatment of nets 702 (47%), insufficient financial means to buy new bed nets to replace old ones 366 (24.5%) or, to provide bed nets to everybody in the household 289 (19.4%) and the sensation of feeling excessive heat when sleeping under a bed net 74 (5%). The amount spent monthly by a household for vector control and malaria treatment was estimated at 2377 fcfa (3.6 euros) and 4562 fcfa (6.95 euros) respectively. These amounts were not significantly different between households of Douala and Yaoundé. Concerning management of malaria cases, 18.6% of people declare going to the hospital when suffering from malaria. The majority of people (81.4%) do self medication - they either buy drugs from the pharmacists, street sellers or they use plants to cure malaria. The study revealed a high awareness of populations on malaria and ITNs. However some attitudes hindering the use of ITN or related to the management of clinical cases need further attention.

  7. Imported malaria in Okayama prefecture

    OpenAIRE

    安治, 敏樹; 頓宮, 廉正; 頼, 俊雄; 何, 黎星; 下野, 國夫; 稲臣, 成一; 村主,節雄; 塩田, 哲也; 桜井, 浩一

    1981-01-01

    Two cases of imported malaria which occurred in Okayama prefecture are reported. One was infected with Plasmodium vivax in India, the other with P. falciparum at Nigeria, Africa. The efficacy of some antimalarial drugs in these cases is discussed. One patient was infected with P. falciparum, despite taking the medicine Daraprim® regularly. The efficacy of Daraprim® for suppressive cure in Nigeria is doutful. The therapy of chloroquine-resistance tropical malaria is also discussed.

  8. Assessing the future threat from vivax malaria in the United Kingdom using two markedly different modelling approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richards Shane A

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The world is facing an increased threat from new and emerging diseases, and there is concern that climate change will expand areas suitable for transmission of vector borne diseases. The likelihood of vivax malaria returning to the UK was explored using two markedly different modelling approaches. First, a simple temperature-dependent, process-based model of malaria growth transmitted by Anopheles atroparvus, the historical vector of malaria in the UK. Second, a statistical model using logistic-regression was used to predict historical malaria incidence between 1917 and 1918 in the UK, based on environmental and demographic data. Using findings from these models and saltmarsh distributions, future risk maps for malaria in the UK were produced based on UKCIP02 climate change scenarios. Results The process-based model of climate suitability showed good correspondence with historical records of malaria cases. An analysis of the statistical models showed that mean temperature of the warmest month of the year was the major factor explaining the distribution of malaria, further supporting the use of the temperature-driven processed-based model. The risk maps indicate that large areas of central and southern England could support malaria transmission today and could increase in extent in the future. Confidence in these predictions is increased by the concordance between the processed-based and statistical models. Conclusion Although the future climate in the UK is favourable for the transmission of vivax malaria, the future risk of locally transmitted malaria is considered low because of low vector biting rates and the low probability of vectors feeding on a malaria-infected person.

  9. Malaria vaccine: a step toward elimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika; Malik, Jagbir S; Sk, Shashikantha; Mehta, Bharti

    2014-01-01

    Malaria has long been recognized as a public health problem. At the community level, vector control, and antimalarial medicines are the main means for reducing incidence, morbidity, and mortality of malaria. A vaccine not only would bring streamlining in the prevention of morbidity and mortality from malaria but also would be more accessible if integrated with Expanded Programme of Immunization (EPI). Globally, an estimated 3.4 billion people are at risk of malaria. Most cases (80%) and deaths (90%) occurred in Africa, and most deaths (77%) are in children under 5 years of age. An effective vaccine has long been envisaged as a valuable addition to the available tools for malaria control. Although research toward the development of malaria vaccines has been pursued since the 1960s, there are no licensed malaria vaccines. The RTS,S/AS01 vaccine, which targets P. falciparum, has reached phase 3 clinical trials and results are promising. Malaria Vaccine Technology Road Map 2013 has envisaged the world aiming for a licensed vaccine by 2030 that would reduce malaria cases by 75% and be capable of eliminating malaria. It will not only fill the gaps of today's interventions but also be a cost-effective method of decreasing morbidity and mortality from malaria.

  10. The challenge of diagnosing Plasmodium ovale malaria in travellers: report of six clustered cases in french soldiers returning from West Africa

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    Deparis Xavier

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium ovale is responsible for 5% of imported malaria in French travellers. The clinical and biological features of six clustered cases of P. ovale malaria in an army unit of 62 French soldiers returning from the Ivory Coast are reported. Case report All patients were symptomatic and developed symptoms on average 50 days after their return and 20 days after the end of chemoprophylaxis (doxycycline. Clinical features included fever (6/6, mostly tertian (4/6, aches (6/6, nausea (3/6, abdominal pain (2/6, diarrhoea (2/6, or cough (2/6. Thrombocytopaenia was lower than 100,000/mm3 in half the cases only, and the haemoglobin count was normal for all patients. The diagnosis was made after at least three thick and thin blood smear searches. Parasitaemia was always lower than 0.5%. All rapid diagnostic tests were negative for HRP2 and pLDH antigens. Discussion Plasmodium ovale malaria is currently a problem to diagnose in travellers, notably in French soldiers returning from the Ivory Coast. Early attempts at diagnosis are difficult due to the lack of specific clinical features, the rarity of biological changes and the poor sensitivity of diagnostic tools to detect low parasitaemia. Thus, the diagnosis is commonly delayed or missed. Physicians should be aware of this diagnostic challenge to avoid relapses and provide prompt and adequate treatment with chloroquine and radical cure with primaquine.

  11. Rabies in a Vaccinated 9-Month-Old German Shepherd Dog, Akure, 2010: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Qasim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available After the onset of symptoms, the clinical course of rabies is almost invariably fatal. Rabies has traditionally been associated with dogs more than any other animal, and in parts of the world where domestic animal control and vaccination programs are limited, dogs remain the most important reservoir of the disease. We report a case of canine rabies in a vaccinated 9-month-old German shepherd female dog. The presenting clinical sign was jaw muscle paralysis with a hanging bronze color like tongue without salivation. Following encephalectomy, a rabies positive diagnosis was confirmed by fluorescent antibody technique at the Rabies Laboratory, National Veterinary Research Institute, Vom. The epidemiology of the rabies case is not understood. This case is of public health significance because of the at-risk population including animal health care service provider and animals. The following were recommended, (a a reinvigorated control measure that includes the awareness program on prevention, responsible dog ownership with dog registration at veterinary hospitals, and registered veterinary clinics by the government and (b a yearly rabies vaccination campaign that must be improved through the veterinary public health and other health departments collaborating.

  12. 泰州市海陵区27例输入性恶性疟个案分析%Taizhou 'area of 27 cases of imported falciparum malaria case analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵扬

    2014-01-01

    objective to taizhou 'area from 2010 to 2013 imported falciparum case analysis, to study the epidemic characteristics of the disease. [methods] taizhou 'area 2010-2013, 27 cases of imported falciparum malaria cases retrospective investigation and case information classification statistics. [result] 27 cases of imported falciparum malaria cases are from Africa malaria area high return, have a clear area life cycle, part of the patients with atypical clinical symptoms. . [conclusion] to strengthen staff of high epidemic area labor export to Africa, to improve their self-protection awareness of malaria prevention; Clinicians to return from high malaria researchers fuo should first consider falciparum, microscopic examination of the laboratory personnel should have strong ability of the parasite detection.%目的:通过对泰州市海陵区2010-2013年输入性恶性疟的个案分析,研究该病的流行特征。方法对泰州市海陵区2010-2013年27例输入性恶性疟病例的个案资料进行回顾性调查和分类统计。结果27例输入性恶性疟病例均为从非洲高疟区回归人员,有明确的疫区生活史,部分患者临床症状不典型。结论加强对到非洲高疫区劳务输出人员宣传,提高他们的疟疾防治自我保护意识;临床医生对从高疟区回归人员不明原因发热应首先考虑恶性疟,化验室镜检人员要有较强的疟原虫检出能力。

  13. Survey of 82 cases of meningitis in infants under 2 months of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatehi I

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study we review 82 infants under two months with bacterial meningitis admitted in Tehran University's hospitals during a 14 year period. Male to female ratio was 1.4 to 1. The patterns of predominance among bacterial pathogens changed during the period of study. During the first six years the most common pathogens were Salmonella-SP., but during the later years E.coli became the predominant pathogen, and also meningitis caused by GBS and Staph. epidermidis was observed. The case fatality rate was 37.8 percent. The antibiogram revealed that E.coli were hundred percent resistant to ampicillin and 50% resistant to gentamicin, 40% of all bacteria isolated were resistant to ampicillin and gentamicin. These findings provide guidelines for the selection of empiric antimicrobial agents in our country

  14. Malignant Transformation Six Months after Removal of Intracranial Epidermoid Cyst: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayçal Lakhdar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial epidermoid cysts are uncommon benign tumors of developmental origin; malignant transformation of benign epidermoid cysts is rare, and their prognosis remains poor. We report a case of squamous cell carcinoma arising in the cerebellopontine angle. A 52-year-old man presented with left facial paralysis and cerebellar ataxia. He had undergone total removal of a benign epidermoid cyst six months previously. Postoperative magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed a heterogeneous and cystic lesion in the left cerebellopontine angle with hydrocephalus. The cyst wall was enhanced by gadolinium. He underwent ventricle-peritoneal shunt and removal again; the histopathological examination revealed a squamous cell carcinoma possibly arising from an underlying epidermoid cyst. This entity is being reported for its rarity. The presence of contrast enhancement at the site of an epidermoid cyst combined with an acute, progressive neurological deficit should alert the neurosurgeon to the possibility of a malignant transformation.

  15. Congenital microtia in a neonate due to maternal isotretinoin exposure 1 month before pregnancy: Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Mahboobeh; Abbariki, Ezzat; Pirjani, Reihaneh; Akhavan, Setareh; Dastgerdy, Ebrahim

    2015-06-01

    Isotretinoin is a drug used for treating severe cystic/nodular acne. Severe malformations have been documented in neonates whose mothers had taken isotretinoin during pregnancy. Women who became pregnant one cycle after completing therapy are believed to be at teratogenic risk not higher than baseline. We describe the case of a newborn whose mother had taken the drug for 4 weeks. The woman then had contraception for 4 weeks (after the drug treatment had finished), and became pregnant after that period. The newborn had isolated bilateral microtia due to suspected isotretinoin exposure. His mother also had a history of urine tract infection in the second week of pregnancy that was treated with cephalexin. The parents were not from a consanguineous marriage and had no family history of congenital malformations. To reduce the risk, effective contraception should be continued in fertile women more than 1 month after completing therapy.

  16. A Weather-Based Prediction Model of Malaria Prevalence in Amenfi West District, Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larbi, John Aseidu; Lawer, Eric Adjei

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of climatic variables, particularly, rainfall and temperature, on malaria incidence using time series analysis. Our preliminary analysis revealed that malaria incidence in the study area decreased at about 0.35% annually. Also, the month of November recorded approximately 21% more malaria cases than the other months while September had a decreased effect of about 14%. The forecast model developed for this investigation indicated that mean minimum (P = 0.01928) and maximum (P = 0.00321) monthly temperatures lagged at three months were significant predictors of malaria incidence while rainfall was not. Diagnostic tests using Ljung-Box and ARCH-LM tests revealed that the model developed was adequate for forecasting. Forecast values for 2016 to 2020 generated by our model suggest a possible future decline in malaria incidence. This goes to suggest that intervention strategies put in place by some nongovernmental and governmental agencies to combat the disease are effective and thus should be encouraged and routinely monitored to yield more desirable outcomes. PMID:28255497

  17. Theoretical investigation of malaria prevalence in two Indian cities using the response surface method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarkar Ram

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elucidation of the relationships between malaria incidence and climatic and non-climatic factors in a region is of utmost importance in understanding the causative factors of disease spread and design of control strategies. Very often malaria prevalence data is restricted to short time scales (months to few years. This demands application of rigorous statistical modelling techniques for analysis and prediction. The monthly malaria prevalence data for three to five years from two cities in southern India, situated in two different climatic zones, are studied to capture their dependence on climatic factors. Methods The statistical technique of response surface method (RSM is applied for the first time to study any epidemiological data. A new step-by-step model reduction technique is proposed to refine the initial model obtained from RSM. This provides a simpler structure and gives better fit. This combined approach is applied to two types of epidemiological data (Slide Positivity Rates values and Total Malaria cases, for two cities in India with varying strengths of disease prevalence and environmental conditions. Results The study on these data sets reveals that RSM can be used successfully to elucidate the important environmental factors influencing the transmission of the disease by analysing short epidemiological time series. The proposed approach has high predictive ability over relatively long time horizons. Conclusions This method promises to provide reliable forecast of malaria incidence across varying environmental conditions, which may help in designing useful control programmes for malaria.

  18. Determinants of prompt and adequate care among presumed malaria cases in a community in eastern Rwanda: A cross sectional study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingabire, C.M.; Kateera, F.; Hakizimana, E.; Rulisa, A.; Muvunyi, C.; Mens, P.; Koenraadt, C.J.M.; Mutesa, L.; Vugt, M. van; Borne, B. van den; Alaii, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: In order to understand factors influencing fever/malaria management practices among community-based individuals, the study evaluated psychosocial, socio-demographic and environmental determinants of prompt and adequate healthcare-seeking behaviours. Methods: A quantitative household (HH)

  19. Plasmodium vivax malaria: An unusual presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kasliwal Prasad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS, hypoglycemia, coma, or epileptic seizures are manifestations of severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria. On the other hand, Plasmodium vivax malaria seldom results in pulmonary damage, and pulmonary complications are exceedingly rare. We report the case of a 42-year-old male living in a malaria-endemic area who presented with ARDS and was diagnosed as having Plasmodium vivax malaria. A diagnosis of Plasmodium vivax malaria was established by a positive Plasmodium LDH immunochromatographic assay while a negative PfHRP2 based assay ruled out P. falciparum malaria. After specific anti-plasmodial therapy and intensive supportive care, the patient recovered and was discharged from hospital. The use of NIPPV in vivax-malaria related ARDS was associated with a good outcome.

  20. Artemisinin resistance containment project in Thailand. (I): Implementation of electronic-based malaria information system for early case detection and individual case management in provinces along the Thai-Cambodian border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamsiriwatchara, Amnat; Sudathip, Prayuth; Sawang, Surasak; Vijakadge, Saowanit; Potithavoranan, Thanapon; Sangvichean, Aumnuyphan; Satimai, Wichai; Delacollette, Charles; Singhasivanon, Pratap; Lawpoolsri, Saranath; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit

    2012-07-29

    The Bureau of Vector-borne Diseases, Ministry of Public Health, Thailand, has implemented an electronic Malaria Information System (eMIS) as part of a strategy to contain artemisinin resistance. The attempt corresponds to the WHO initiative, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, to contain anti-malarial drug resistance in Southeast Asia. The main objective of this study was to demonstrate the eMIS' functionality and outputs after implementation for use in the Thailand artemisinin-resistance containment project. The eMIS had been functioning since 2009 in seven Thai-Cambodian border provinces. The eMIS has covered 61 malaria posts/clinics, 27 Vector-borne Disease Units covering 12,508 hamlets at risk of malaria infections. The eMIS was designed as an evidence-based and near real-time system to capture data for early case detection, intensive case investigation, monitoring drug compliance and on/off-site tracking of malarial patients, as well as collecting data indicating potential drug resistance among patients. Data captured by the eMIS in 2008-2011 were extracted and presented. The core functionalities of the eMIS have been utilized by malaria staff at all levels, from local operational units to ministerial management. The eMIS case detection module suggested decreasing trends during 2009-2011; the number of malaria cases detected in the project areas over the years studied were 3818, 2695, and 2566, with sero-positive rates of 1.24, 0.98, and 1.16%, respectively. The eMIS case investigation module revealed different trends in weekly Plasmodium falciparum case numbers, when classified by responsible operational unit, local and migrant status, and case-detection type. It was shown that most Thai patients were infected within their own residential district, while migrants were infected either at their working village or from across the border. The data mapped in the system suggested that P. falciparum-infected cases and potential drug-resistant cases were

  1. Molecular method for the diagnosis of imported pediatric malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delhaes Jeanne, L; Berry, A; Dutoit, E; Leclerc, F; Beaudou, J; Leteurtre, S; Camus, D; Benoit-Vical, F

    2010-02-01

    Malaria is a polymorphous disease; it can be life threatening especially for children. We report a case of imported malaria in a boy, illustrating the epidemiological and clinical aspects of severe pediatric malaria. In this case real-time PCR was used to quantify Plasmodium falciparum DNA levels, to monitor the evolution under treatment, and to determine genetic mutations involved in chloroquine resistance. The major epidemiological features of imported malaria, and the difficulty to diagnose childhood severe malaria are described. The contribution of molecular methods for the diagnosis of imported malaria is discussed.

  2. Malária grave em Palmas, Estado do Tocantins: relato de caso Severe malaria in Palmas, State of Tocantins: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Éldi Vendrame Parise

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum causa a forma clínica mais grave da malária. Neste estudo, relatamos um caso de malária grave, através do acompanhamento do paciente e das anotações em prontuários médicos encontrados no Hospital Geral de Palmas. Discutimos o desfecho do caso e as complicações provocadas pela infecção, reconhecendo o risco potencial de ocorrência de malária grave em zona não endêmica, em consequência do retardo do tratamento e, a importância de intensificar medidas de vigilância que envolve todos os servidores das unidades de saúde, com ênfase para as áreas receptivas de migrantes oriundos de regiões endêmicas.Plasmodium falciparum causes the most severe clinical form of malaria. In this study, we report a severe case of malaria, through following up the patient and from notes in the medical files at the Palmas General Hospital. We discuss the outcome of this case and the complications caused by this infection, recognizing the potential risk of occurrences of severe malaria in not-endemic areas because of the delay in treatment, and the importance of intensifying surveillance measures involving all health unit employees, with emphasis on the reception areas for migrants from endemic regions.

  3. A 15-Month-Old Boy With Respiratory Distress and Parapharyngeal Abscess: A Case Report

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    Behdad Gharib

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Parapharyngeal abscess is a life-threatening disease. Upper respiratory tract infection is the main cause in children. We present a 15-month-old boy admitted to the emergency ward with the chief complaint of difficulty in breathing caused by parapharyngealabscess. His condition deteriorated gradually, and he transferred to the operation theater quickly for abscess drainage and because of the difficulty in orotracheal intubation; a tracheostomy was performed. His respiratory condition deteriorated 2 days after PICU admission, and the medical team noticed an unexplainable respiratory distress. A chest x ray obtained and showed a right side pneumothorax and subcutaneous emphysema around theneck area. The case presented here, had not been diagnosed at the first examination; however, there were enough clinical clues (such as respiratory distress, drooling, torticollis, bulging of theneck, previous viral respiratory infection, possible pharyngeal trauma. The story of this case reminds us the importance of the precise physical exam and history taking which could be life-saving.

  4. Aripiprazole once-monthly as treatment for psychosis in Turner syndrome: literature review and case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlone, Cristiano; Pompili, Enrico; Silvestrini, Cristiana; Nicolò, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is a neurogenetic disorder characterized by partial or complete monosomy-X, usually resulting of a sporadic chromosomal nondisjunction. It is one of the most common sex chromosome abnormalities, affecting approximately 1 in 2,000 live born females. There are sporadic few case reports of concomitant TS with schizophrenia worldwide. No defined psychiatric condition has been traditionally related to TS, and it is not mentioned in DSM-IV. Although it is not associated with any psychiatric syndrome, several case reports in the literature describe a similar constellation of symptoms in TS that may represent a biologically-based entity. Aripiprazole once-monthly is a second generation antipsychotic recently developed. Its efficacy and non-inferiority to oral aripiprazole have been demonstrated in preventing relapse in patients with schizophrenia. Experience with oral aripiprazole and the current availability of the long-acting formulation suggest a potential benefit in a variety of clinical scenarios and therefore consideration as a treatment option in the treatment of schizophrenia and psychotic symptoms in several disease like TS.

  5. [Evaluation of epidemiological data of malaria between 2001-2011 in Sanliurfa, Turkey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yentür Doni, Nebiye; Yıldız Zeyrek, Fadile; Seyrek, Adnan; Şimşek, Zeynep; Gürses, Gülcan; Topluoğlu, Seher

    2016-04-01

    Although Plasmodium vivax is the only cause of malaria cases detected in Turkey, an increase number of imported P.falciparum cases have begun to be observed recently. Sanliurfa is a province located at Southeastern region of Turkey where malaria is endemic and also one of the two largest malaria epidemics of Turkey was experienced with 84.345 cases in 1994. As this region has borders with countries like Iraq, Iran and Syria, cross border migration caused an increase in imported cases. In addition, climate change, alteration in temperature and humidity due to the Southeastern Anatolian Irrigation Project have led an increase in suitable breeding grounds for mosquitoes. Since new indigenous malaria cases, except imported ones are not detected in Sanliurfa nowadays, there is not enough data on the malaria epidemiology in this region including recent years. The aim of this study was to evaluate the epidemiological data in connection with malaria cases observed in Sanliurfa which is a critical region for this infection for a 11-year-period, between the years of 2001 to 2011, retrospectively. Data obtained from the Malaria Control Unit of the Communicable Diseases Division of Sanliurfa Provincial Health Directorate were analized in terms of frequency of the cases, distribution of the cases in years and months, demographical characteristics, the source and species distribution of the parasite and the locations of the disease. A total of 1.149.196 blood smear samples have been examined during 11-year-period as part of surveillance programme and 4394 (0.4%) of them were positive for Plasmodium spp. The agent was P.vivax in 99.9% (4391/4394) of the cases, while in three cases (0.07%) who were diagnosed after 2010, it was P.falciparum. Of the patients 2351 (53.5%) were male and 2043 (46.5%) were female (p> 0.05), whose age ranging from 3 months to 80 years (mean age: 19.21 ± 16.12 years). The frequencies of the cases according to the age groups 0-11 months, 1-4 years, 5

  6. 治疗输入性疟疾30例临床特征分析%Clinical Characteristics Analysis of 30 Cases of Imported Malaria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘义; 苏菲

    2014-01-01

    目的:了解输入性疟疾的临床特点、抗疟药治疗效果,为临床诊治提供参考依据。方法对收治的30例非洲务工疟疾患者的临床表现、实验室检查、治疗方案进行回顾性分析。结果血检疟原虫阳性19例,其中,恶性疟原虫6例,间日疟原虫5例,分型不详8例;30例中单用蒿甲醚治疗10例,青蒿琥酯治疗8例,双氢青蒿素哌喹片治疗5例,氯喹治疗1例,蒿甲醚联合双氢青蒿素哌喹片治疗6例;疗程最短2 d,最长15 d,所有病例最终均有效控制症状。结论输入性疟疾临床症状典型,有急性肝损害、急性血管内溶血、急性肾衰竭、脑型疟疾及肺病变等常见并发症,血检疟原虫阳性率较高,常用抗疟药物能有效控制症状。%Objective To investigate the clinical characteristics of imported malaria and the therapeutic effect of anti-malaria to provide the reference for the clinical diagnosis of malaria. Method A retrospective analysis was performed on the clinical manifestations, laboratory examination and therapeutic regimens of 30 cases of Africa workers with malaria. Results The blood tests showed that there were 19 cases with positive plasmodium, of which there were 6 cases with P. falciparum and 5 cases with P. vivax,and types of 8 cases were unknown;10 cases among of 30 cases were treated with artemether alone, 8 cases with artesunate and 5 cases with dihydroartemisinin piperaquine tablets, one case with chloroquine, and 6 cases with artemether combined with dihydroartemisinin piperaquine;The shortest treatment course was 2 d and the longest treatment course was 15 d. The symptoms of all cases were effectively controlled ultimately. Conclusion The typical clinical symptoms of imported malaria may be characterized by complications of acute liver injury,acute intravascular hemolysis,acute renal failure,cerebral malaria and pulmonary lesions. The positive rate of plasmodium by blood test is high and the commonly used

  7. A Secure, Social Media-Based "Case of the Month" Module in a Neurocritical Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherspoon, Briana; Braunlin, Kathryn; Kumar, Avinash B

    2016-07-01

    Systems to meet the on-demand learning needs of nurses in intensive care units are not well studied beyond the traditional classroom models. To study the feasibility and effect of implementing an online discussion forum for nurses in a busy neuroscience intensive care unit. A baseline survey was done to highlight the areas of educational need in the unit. Freeform-a password-protected, online discussion forum supported by the university-was used for the pilot project. Freeform has functions similar to Facebook, with "likes," "follow," discussion/comment spaces, and the capacity for uploading images and files. A page called "All things NeuroCritical Care" was created. All nurses working in the intensive care unit were automatically enrolled. Clinical vignettes relevant to neurocritical care were posted once a month with 1 to 2 lead questions. All participation was voluntary, and topics were chosen on the basis of the needs survey. At the end of each case, a recent review article on the topic was posted for secure download. Eight sentinel diagnoses have been presented as clinical vignettes, and 34 of 76 members formally follow the page. The mean number of discussion strings per case is 8.3 posts. The number of unique visitors to the page during active case discussions exceeds 100. A secure, online, problem-based learning discussion format is a feasible point-of-care learning opportunity that can help overcome some of the traditional barriers to ongoing nursing education needs in a busy intensive care unit. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  8. The Experience of Detecting a Case of Plagiarism in Hepatitis Monthly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Goodarzi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Plagiarism is the unauthorized use or close imitation of the language and thoughts of another author and the representation of them as one's own original work (1. The National Library of Medicine (NLM defines a duplicate publication as one that 'substantially duplicates another article without acknowledgement' (2. Scientific misconduct may take place simply out of reasons of reputation - academic scientists are under pressure to produce publications in peer-reviewed journals. Alternatively, there may be commercial or political motivations where the financial or political success of a project depends on publishing evidence of efficacy (1, 3. While plagiarism in scholarship and journalism has a centuries-old history, the development of the Internet, where articles appear as electronic text, has made the physical act of copying the work of others much easier, simply by copying and pasting text from one web page to another (1, 2. The ease with which electronic text can be reproduced from online sources has lured a number of reporters into acts of plagiarism: Journalists have been caught "copying-and-pasting" articles and text from a number of websites (1, 4, 5. Although detecting the cases of plagiarism is very complex and challenging, we have to consider plagiarism as the first part of the manuscript review process (6. In Iran, we have neither an online tool for detecting suspicious and doubtful articles, nor a national database for including cases of plagiarism. So what can we do?We introduce a case of plagiarism in Hepatitis Monthly and present some valuable ways to tackle this complicated problem since we believe that prevention of duplicate publication can be achieved through increasing editors' awareness and reviewers' knowledge.

  9. Spatially variable risk factors for malaria in a geographically heterogeneous landscape, western Kenya: an explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, Tobias; Maire, Nicolas; Hiscox, Alexandra; Di Pasquale, Aurelio; Kiche, Ibrahim; Onoka, Kelvin; Mweresa, Collins; Mukabana, Wolfgang R; Ross, Amanda; Smith, Thomas A; Takken, Willem

    2016-01-04

    Large reductions in malaria transmission and mortality have been achieved over the last decade, and this has mainly been attributed to the scale-up of long-lasting insecticidal bed nets and indoor residual spraying with insecticides. Despite these gains considerable residual, spatially heterogeneous, transmission remains. To reduce transmission in these foci, researchers need to consider the local demographical, environmental and social context, and design an appropriate set of interventions. Exploring spatially variable risk factors for malaria can give insight into which human and environmental characteristics play important roles in sustaining malaria transmission. On Rusinga Island, western Kenya, malaria infection was tested by rapid diagnostic tests during two cross-sectional surveys conducted 3 months apart in 3632 individuals from 790 households. For all households demographic data were collected by means of questionnaires. Environmental variables were derived using Quickbird satellite images. Analyses were performed on 81 project clusters constructed by a traveling salesman algorithm, each containing 50-51 households. A standard linear regression model was fitted containing multiple variables to determine how much of the spatial variation in malaria prevalence could be explained by the demographic and environmental data. Subsequently, a geographically-weighted regression (GWR) was performed assuming non-stationarity of risk factors. Special attention was taken to investigate the effect of residual spatial autocorrelation and local multicollinearity. Combining the data from both surveys, overall malaria prevalence was 24%. Scan statistics revealed two clusters which had significantly elevated numbers of malaria cases compared to the background prevalence across the rest of the study area. A multivariable linear model including environmental and household factors revealed that higher socioeconomic status, outdoor occupation and population density were

  10. Parasite-based malaria diagnosis: Are Health Systems in Uganda equipped enough to implement the policy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyabayinze Daniel J

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria case management is a key strategy for malaria control. Effective coverage of parasite-based malaria diagnosis (PMD remains limited in malaria endemic countries. This study assessed the health system's capacity to absorb PMD at primary health care facilities in Uganda. Methods In a cross sectional survey, using multi-stage cluster sampling, lower level health facilities (LLHF in 11 districts in Uganda were assessed for 1 tools, 2 skills, 3 staff and infrastructure, and 4 structures, systems and roles necessary for the implementing of PMD. Results Tools for PMD (microscopy and/or RDTs were available at 30 (24% of the 125 LLHF. All LLHF had patient registers and 15% had functional in-patient facilities. Three months’ long stock-out periods were reported for oral and parenteral quinine at 39% and 47% of LLHF respectively. Out of 131 health workers interviewed, 86 (66% were nursing assistants; 56 (43% had received on-job training on malaria case management and 47 (36% had adequate knowledge in malaria case management. Overall, only 18% (131/730 Ministry of Health approved staff positions were filled by qualified personnel and 12% were recruited or transferred within six months preceding the survey. Of 186 patients that received referrals from LLHF, 130(70% had received pre-referral anti-malarial drugs, none received pre-referral rectal artesunate and 35% had been referred due to poor response to antimalarial drugs. Conclusion Primary health care facilities had inadequate human and infrastructural capacity to effectively implement universal parasite-based malaria diagnosis. The priority capacity building needs identified were: 1 recruitment and retention of qualified staff, 2 comprehensive training of health workers in fever management, 3 malaria diagnosis quality control systems and 4 strengthening of supply chain, stock management and referral systems.

  11. Spatiotemporal monthly rainfall reconstruction via artificial neural network – case study: south of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. O. Cardoso

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Climatological records users, frequently, request time series for geographical locations where there is no observed meteorological attributes. Climatological conditions of the areas or points of interest have to be calculated interpolating observations in the time of neighboring stations and climate proxy. The aim of the present work is the application of reliable and robust procedures for monthly reconstruction of precipitation time series. Time series is a special case of symbolic regression and we can use Artificial Neural Network (ANN to explore the spatiotemporal dependence of meteorological attributes. The ANN seems to be an important tool for the propagation of the related weather information to provide practical solution of uncertainties associated with interpolation, capturing the spatiotemporal structure of the data. In practice, one determines the embedding dimension of the time series attractor (delay time that determine how data are processed and uses these numbers to define the network's architecture. Meteorological attributes can be accurately predicted by the ANN model architecture: designing, training, validation and testing; the best generalization of new data is obtained when the mapping represents the systematic aspects of the data, rather capturing the specific details of the particular training set. As illustration one takes monthly total rainfall series recorded in the period 1961–2005 in the Rio Grande do Sul – Brazil. This reliable and robust reconstruction method has good performance and in particular, they were able to capture the intrinsic dynamic of atmospheric activities. The regional rainfall has been related to high-frequency atmospheric phenomena, such as El Niño and La Niña events, and low frequency phenomena, such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation.

  12. Improving the modeling of disease data from the government surveillance system: a case study on malaria in the Brazilian Amazon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Valle

    Full Text Available The study of the effect of large-scale drivers (e.g., climate of human diseases typically relies on aggregate disease data collected by the government surveillance network. The usual approach to analyze these data, however, often ignores a changes in the total number of individuals examined, b the bias towards symptomatic individuals in routine government surveillance, and; c the influence that observations can have on disease dynamics. Here, we highlight the consequences of ignoring the problems listed above and develop a novel modeling framework to circumvent them, which is illustrated using simulations and real malaria data. Our simulations reveal that trends in the number of disease cases do not necessarily imply similar trends in infection prevalence or incidence, due to the strong influence of concurrent changes in sampling effort. We also show that ignoring decreases in the pool of infected individuals due to the treatment of part of these individuals can hamper reliable inference on infection incidence. We propose a model that avoids these problems, being a compromise between phenomenological statistical models and mechanistic disease dynamics models; in particular, a cross-validation exercise reveals that it has better out-of-sample predictive performance than both of these alternative models. Our case study in the Brazilian Amazon reveals that infection prevalence was high in 2004-2008 (prevalence of 4% with 95% CI of 3-5%, with outbreaks (prevalence up to 18% occurring during the dry season of the year. After this period, infection prevalence decreased substantially (0.9% with 95% CI of 0.8-1.1%, which is due to a large reduction in infection incidence (i.e., incidence in 2008-2010 was approximately one fifth of the incidence in 2004-2008.We believe that our approach to modeling government surveillance disease data will be useful to advance current understanding of large-scale drivers of several diseases.

  13. Estimating the malaria risk of African mosquito movement by air travel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogers David J

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The expansion of global travel has resulted in the importation of African Anopheles mosquitoes, giving rise to cases of local malaria transmission. Here, cases of 'airport malaria' are used to quantify, using a combination of global climate and air traffic volume, where and when are the greatest risks of a Plasmodium falciparum-carrying mosquito being importated by air. This prioritises areas at risk of further airport malaria and possible importation or reemergence of the disease. Methods Monthly data on climate at the World's major airports were combined with air traffic information and African malaria seasonality maps to identify, month-by-month, those existing and future air routes at greatest risk of African malaria-carrying mosquito importation and temporary establishment. Results The location and timing of recorded airport malaria cases proved predictable using a combination of climate and air traffic data. Extending the analysis beyond the current air network architecture enabled identification of the airports and months with greatest climatic similarity to P. falciparum endemic regions of Africa within their principal transmission seasons, and therefore at risk should new aviation routes become operational. Conclusion With the growth of long haul air travel from Africa, the identification of the seasonality and routes of mosquito importation is important in guiding effective aircraft disinsection and vector control. The recent and continued addition of air routes from Africa to more climatically similar regions than Europe will increase movement risks. The approach outlined here is capable of identifying when and where these risks are greatest.

  14. 2009~2011年南通市128例疟疾病例流行病学特征分析%Analysis of epidemic characteristics of 128 malaria cases in Nantong City

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹彩群

    2012-01-01

    Objective To understand the prevalence of malaria in Nantong City, and provide scientific basis for the prevention and control of malaria. Methods The epidemiological data of the network-reported malaria cases during 2009 to 2011 were collected and statistically analyzed. Results 128 malaria cases were reported in Nantong City during 2009 to 2011, with an annual incidence of less than 1/100000. The plasmodi-um detective rate of 128 malaria cases were 83.5%. From 2009 to 2010, the number of local malaria cases were 12, 5 and 0, respectively, the 17 cases were tertain malaria. The number of imported malaria cases were 26, 32 and 53, respectively, in the three years. All the 111 imported cases, the falciparum, tertain malaria ones accounted for 83.8%(93/lll), 13.5%(15/111), respectively, and one case of quartan malaria and two cases of o-vale malaria being firstly reported in 2011. The cases were mainly in the age group of 20-59 years old. Conclusion The imported malaria cases of Nantong City increased yearly, and the malaria species showed diversity. Therefore, it should be strengthened on surveillance and management of migrant workers to reduce the risk of imported malaria cases.%目的 掌握南通市疟疾疫情发展趋势,为制订疟疾防控措施提供科学依据.方法 收集南通市2009~2011 年网络报告的疟疾病例流行病学调查资料并统计分析.结果 2009~2011 年南通市共报告疟疾病例128 例,疟-虫血检阳性率83.5%,疟疾年发病率均在1/10 万以下.2009~2011 年本地感染疟疾分别为12、5 和0 例,共计17 例,均为间日疟;输入性疟疾分别为26、32 和53 例,共计111 例,其中恶性疟占83.8%(93/111)、间日虐占13.5%(15/111),2011 年首次发现了输入性三日疟1 例,卵形疟2 例.20~59 岁年龄组病例占报告病例的89.06%(114/128).结论 南通市境外输入性恶性疟病例呈逐年上升趋势,且感染的疟疾虫种呈多样性,故应加强对劳务输出人员的监测和管理,

  15. Impact of combining intermittent preventive treatment with home management of malaria in children less than 10 years in a rural area of Senegal: a cluster randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tine Roger CK

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current malaria control strategies recommend (i early case detection using rapid diagnostic tests (RDT and treatment with artemisinin combination therapy (ACT, (ii pre-referral rectal artesunate, (iii intermittent preventive treatment and (iv impregnated bed nets. However, these individual malaria control interventions provide only partial protection in most epidemiological situations. Therefore, there is a need to investigate the potential benefits of integrating several malaria interventions to reduce malaria prevalence and morbidity. Methods A randomized controlled trial was carried out to assess the impact of combining seasonal intermittent preventive treatment in children (IPTc with home-based management of malaria (HMM by community health workers (CHWs in Senegal. Eight CHWs in eight villages covered by the Bonconto health post, (South Eastern part of Senegal were trained to diagnose malaria using RDT, provide prompt treatment with artemether-lumefantrine for uncomplicated malaria cases and pre-referral rectal artesunate for complicated malaria occurring in children under 10 years. Four CHWs were randomized to also administer monthly IPTc as single dose of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP plus three doses of amodiaquine (AQ in the malaria transmission season, October and November 2010. Primary end point was incidence of single episode of malaria attacks over 8 weeks of follow up. Secondary end points included prevalence of malaria parasitaemia, and prevalence of anaemia at the end of the transmission season. Primary analysis was by intention to treat. The study protocol was approved by the Senegalese National Ethical Committee (approval 0027/MSP/DS/CNRS, 18/03/2010. Results A total of 1,000 children were enrolled. The incidence of malaria episodes was 7.1/100 child months at risk [95% CI (3.7-13.7] in communities with IPTc + HMM compared to 35.6/100 child months at risk [95% CI (26.7-47.4] in communities with only HMM (a

  16. Effectiveness and impact of the cross-border healthcare model as implemented by non-governmental organizations: case study of the malaria control programs by health poverty action on the China-Myanmar border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Dong, Jia-Qiang; Li, Jia-Ying; Zhang, Yue; Tian, Yang-Hui; Sun, Xiao-Ying; Zhang, Guang-Yun; Li, Qing-Pu; Xu, Xiao-Yu; Cai, Tao

    2016-09-01

    In the Yunnan province of China, 18 counties in six prefectures border Myanmar. Due to its particular combination of geographic features, climate conditions, and cultural landscape, the area provides a suitable environment for the spread of insect-borne diseases such as malaria. In five identified Myanmar Special Regions along the China-Myanmar border, economic development is lagging, people live in extreme poverty, and the healthcare system is fragile. Coupled with political and other reasons, this precludes malaria control work to be effectively carried out in Myanmar, resulting in a heavy burden of the disease. Frequent population movements and favorable conditions for malaria transmission on the border fuel difficulties in controlling and eliminating the spread of the disease in the area. To reduce the prevalence of malaria in the China-Myanmar border area and improve healthcare services for local residents in this particular environment, Health Poverty Action (HPA) has provided malaria aid in the area since the beginning of 2006, as a sub-recipient of the China Global Fund Malaria Programs. In this case study, we examined HPA's activities as part of its malaria control programs in the area, analyzed and summarized the effectiveness and impact of the cross-border healthcare model as implemented by non-governmental organizations, and put forward suggestions for cross-border health aid models and for the prevention of malaria transmission in the Greater Mekong Subregion. HPA had carried out a great quantity of successful malaria control activities in border areas between China and Myanmar, strengthened the partnership and established the collaboration, coordination and cooperation channels among stakeholders. HPA has laid good groundwork and developed its valuable model that could be highlighted and referenced.

  17. Ongoing challenges in the management of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokwaro, Gilbert

    2009-10-12

    This article gives an overview of some of the ongoing challenges that are faced in the prevention, diagnosis and treatment of malaria. Malaria causes approximately 881,000 deaths every year, with nine out of ten deaths occurring in sub-Saharan Africa. In addition to the human burden of malaria, the economic burden is vast. It is thought to cost African countries more than US$12 billion every year in direct losses. However, great progress in malaria control has been made in some highly endemic countries. Vector control is assuming a new importance with the significant reductions in malaria burden achieved using combined malaria control interventions in countries such as Zanzibar, Zambia and Rwanda. The proportion of patients treated for malaria who have a confirmed diagnosis is low in Africa compared with other regions of the world, with the result that anti-malarials could be used to treat patients without malaria, especially in areas where progress has been made in reducing the malaria burden and malaria epidemiology is changing. Inappropriate administration of anti-malarials could contribute to the spread of resistance and incurs unnecessary costs. Parasite resistance to almost all commonly used anti-malarials has been observed in the most lethal parasite species, Plasmodium falciparum. This has presented a major barrier to successful disease management in malaria-endemic areas. ACT (artemisinin-based combination therapy) has made a significant contribution to malaria control and to reducing disease transmission through reducing gametocyte carriage. Administering ACT to infants and small children can be difficult and time consuming. Specially formulating anti-malarials for this vulnerable population is vital to ease administration and help ensure that an accurate dose is received. Education of healthworkers and communities about malaria prevention, diagnosis and treatment is a vital component of effective case management, especially as diagnostic policies change

  18. [Malaria in Poland in 2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepień, Małgorzata

    2010-01-01

    There were 22 malaria cases confirmed according to the European Union cases definition registered in Poland in 2008. All of them were imported, 13 cases (59%) from Africa, 3 from Asia, 5 from Oceania and 1 from South America. Invasion with Plasmodium falciparum was confirmed in 14 cases, P. vivax in 4 cases, mixed invasion in 2 cases and in 2 cases species of Plasmodium was undetermined. There were 13 cases in males and 9 in females. Age at onset ranged from 23 to 58 years and majority of cases were in the age group 25-40. Common reason for travel to endemic countries were tourism (11 cases) and work-related visits (7 cases). Clinical course was severe in 6 cases of P. falciparum malaria and 1 person died because of the disease. Nine cases used chemoprophylaxis during their travel but only one of them appropriately, relevant information was missing in 6 cases.

  19. Toxoplasmosis in a 17-month-old Nigerian: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oge F Amadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Toxoplasmosis is the most serious manifestation of infection, resulting from the vertical transmission of Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii transplacentally, from a parasitemic mother to her offspring. It could also be acquired. Case Presentation: E.B is a 17-month-old female baby who presented with recurrent fever x 16/12., chronic cough x 16/12, recurrent stooling x 15/12, recurrent ear discharge x 15/12, failure to gain weight x 15/12, and delayed developmental milestones. Examination revealed an acutely ill- or chronically ill-looking child in mild respiratory distress, afebrile (36.5°C, anicteric, acyanozed, moderately pale, well hydrated with generalized lymphadenopathy (axillary, inguinal, cervical, no digital clubbing, and no pedal fullness. Computed tomography (CT scan revealed bilateral basal ganglia calcifications with a focal cystic area in the left basal ganglia; bilateral multifocal intracerebral hypodensities were noted from the frontal to the occipital lobes at different levels bilaterally, with calcifications limited to the basal ganglia. Serological test revealed the patient′s serum to be positive for toxoplasma immunoglobulin G (IgG. Conclusion: Toxoplasmosis, though rare, can cause mortality and morbidity in children. Thus, a high index of suspicion is warranted in management.

  20. Utilizing direct skin feeding assays for development of vaccines that interrupt malaria transmission: A systematic review of methods and case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickley, Elizabeth B; Coulibaly, Mamadou; Gabriel, Erin E; Healy, Sara A; Hume, Jen C C; Sagara, Issaka; Traore, Sekou F; Doumbo, Ogobara; Duffy, Patrick E

    2016-11-21

    Shifting the malaria priorities from a paradigm of control and elimination to a goal of global eradication calls for renewed attention to the interruption of malaria transmission. Sustained progress toward eradication will require both improved understanding of infectious reservoirs and efficient development of novel transmission-blocking interventions, such as rapidly acting and highly efficacious therapeutics and vaccines. Here, we review the direct skin feeding assay (DSF), which has been proposed as a valuable tool for measuring the in natura transmission of malaria parasites from human hosts to mosquito vectors across heterogeneous populations. To capture the methodological breadth of this assay's use, we first systematically review and qualitatively synthesize previously published investigations using DSFs to study malaria transmission in humans. Then, using a recent Phase 1 trial in Mali of the Pfs25H-EPA/Alhydrogel® vaccine candidate (NCT01867463) designed to interrupt Plasmodium falciparum transmission as a case study, we describe the potential opportunities and current limitations of utilizing the endpoints measured by DSF in making early clinical decisions for individually randomized transmission-interrupting intervention candidates. Using simulations based on the data collected in the clinical trial, we demonstrate that the capacity of the DSF to serve as an evaluative tool is limited by the statistical power constraints of the "effective sample size" (i.e. the number of subjects that are capable of transmitting at the time of feeding). Altogether, our findings suggest DSFs have great potential utility for assessing the public health impacts of emerging antimalarial tools, but additional research is needed to address issues of scalability and to establish correlation with community-wide clinical endpoints as well as complementary in vitro measures, such as standard membrane feeding assays.

  1. The association between malaria parasitaemia, erythrocyte polymorphisms, malnutrition and anaemia in children less than 10 years in Senegal: a case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tine Roger CK

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria and anaemia (Haemoglobin Methods Study participants were randomly selected from a list of children who participated in a survey in December 2010. Children aged from 1 to 10 years with haemoglobin level below 11 g/dl represented cases (anaemic children. Control participants were eligible if of same age group and their haemoglobin level was >= 11 g/dl. For each participant, a physical examination was done and anthropometric data collected prior to a biological assessment which included: malaria parasitaemia infection, intestinal worm carriage, G6PD deficiency, sickle cell disorders, and alpha-talassaemia. Results Three hundred and fifty two children 5 years (aOR=0.03, 95%CI[0.01-0.08]. Stratified by age group, anaemia was significantly associated with stunting in children less than 5 years (aOR=3.1 95%CI[1.4 – 6.8], with, sickle cell disorders (aOR=3.5 95%CI [1.4 – 9.0], alpha-thalassemia (or=2.4 95%CI[1.1–5.3] and stunting (aOR=3.6 95%CI [1.6–8.2] for children above 5 years. No association was found between G6PD deficiency, intestinal worm carriage and children’s gender. Conclusion Malaria parasitaemia, stunting and haemoglobin genetic disorders represented the major causes of anaemia among study participants. Anaemia control in this area could be achieved by developing integrated interventions targeting both malaria and malnutrition.

  2. Maps of the Sri Lanka malaria situation preceding the tsunami and key aspects to be considered in the emergency phase and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Briët, Olivier J T; Galappaththy, Gawrie N L; Konradsen, Flemming

    2005-01-01

    and treatment are important in assisting national and international agencies in their control efforts. METHODS: Monthly records over the period January 1995-October 2004 of confirmed malaria cases were used to perform an analysis of malaria distribution at district spatial resolution. Also, a focused review...... bites, and their capacity to handle diseases affected, the environmental changes caused by the tsunami are unlikely to enhance breeding of the principal vector, and, given the present low parasite reservoir, the likelihood of a malaria outbreak is low. However, close monitoring of the situation...

  3. Coping Card Usage can Further Reduce Suicide Reattempt in Suicide Attempter Case Management Within 3-Month Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying-Chuan; Hsieh, Ling-Yu; Wang, Ming-Yu; Chou, Cheng-Hsiang; Huang, Min-Wei; Ko, Huei-Chen

    2016-02-01

    This randomized controlled trial was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of using crisis coping cards (n = 32) in the case management of suicide prevention compared with case management without the use of coping cards (n = 32) over a 3-month intervention period. The generalized estimating equation was used to examine the interaction effect between treatments and time on suicide risk, depression, anxiety, and hopelessness. Results indicated that subsequent suicidal behaviors, severity of suicide risk, depression, anxiety, and hopelessness were reduced more in the coping card intervention group compared to the case management only group. Moreover, for the survival curves of time to suicide reattempt, the coping card group showed a significantly longer time to reattempt than the case management only group at 2-month and 3-month intervention periods.

  4. A CLINICAL STUDY OF HOSPITALISED PATIENTS OF MALARIA WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO HEPATITIS

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    Dipen Kumar Bhattacharyya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND An alarming incidence and severity of jaundice in Malaria, especially in the Plasmodium falciparum variety, has been reported from various parts of the world and at times it causes diagnostic dilemma in both endemic and non-endemic areas, even sometimes affecting the outcome adversely. There are reports depicting association of severe jaundice with falciparum malaria masquerading as fulminant hepatic failure. This study is done to clinically evaluate the cases of malaria with hepatitis in terms of its presentations, extent of hepatic involvement and biochemical parameters. MATERIAL AND METHOD This study was done on 100 confirmed cases of malaria with jaundice, who were admitted in Gauhati Medical College and Hospital during a period of 12 months (1 st July 2012 to 30 th June 2013. Patients were admitted due to complications of malaria like jaundice, nausea and vomiting, pain abdomen, respiratory difficulty, oliguria, altered sensorium, etc. Detailed history, clinical examination, biochemical parameters for liver function test and other blood tests were done in all patients. RESULTS Age of the patients ranged from 13-55 years. Among all patients, 96% cases were P. falciparum and 4% cases were P. vivax. Fever and jaundice were present in 100% of cases. Among the cases, 14% had only splenomegaly, 30% had only hepatomegaly whereas 56% had enlargement of both the organs. The mean serum bilirubin level was 8.9 ± 8 mg/dL with predominantly conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia. Majority of the cases had elevated transaminases and alkaline phosphatase levels. Lowering of serum albumin level and derangement of prothrombin time was also noted in more than half of the patients while serum ammonia was elevated in small number of cases. Acute renal failure and cerebral malaria were the other complications noted frequently in cases of Malaria presenting with jaundice. CONCLUSION The evidence of predominant conjugated hyperbilirubinaemia, increased levels

  5. [Recurrent psychiatric manifestations during malaria prevention with mefloquine. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodor, F; Bianchi, G; Grignon, S; Samuelian, J C; Jouglard, J

    1990-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 22 years old woman without psychiatric antecedent who started a prophylaxis with mefloquine for a journey in a chloroquino resistant area. The first tablet induced an acute psychiatric syndrome which lasted five days; the second tablet induced the recidive of the psychiatric data and a suicide attempt by drowning.

  6. Trends in ouTpaTienT malaria cases, following mass long lasTing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nETs (llin) disTribuTion in EpidEMic pronE And EndEMic ArEAs of KEnyA b. ... cases stratified by age category, and iii) the proportion of the population potentially protected by ... Setting: Kenya's coast endemic, lake endemic and Highland epidemic zones. Subjects: all ... altitude, rainfall patterns and temperature as well as.

  7. Laboratory diagnosis on three cases of imported plasmodium ovale malaria infection%三例输入性卵形疟的实验室诊断

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田斌; 段绩辉; 徐明忠; 张兵; 廖瑜; 申晓君; 文岚

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze 3 cases of imported malaria infection,in order to reduce the misdiagnosis and missed diagnosis of ovale malaria infection. Methods By morphological test,nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequence analysis were used to confirm the 3 cases of imported malaria infection.Results The morphological test results showed no plasmodium (laboratory initial inspection),plasmodium ovale mixed infection with plasmodium falciparum and plasmodium ovale.However,plasmodium ovale,plasmodium ovale mixed infection with plasmodium falciparum and plasmodium ovale mixed infection with plasmodium vivax were detected by nested PCR by follow.Conclusions The morphological technique training and the application of molecular biology techniques should be strengthen for imported plasmodium ovale malaria infection,and can reduce the misdiagnosis and missed diagnosis of imported plasmodium ovale malaria infection.%目的:分析3例输入性疟疾的实验室诊断,减少卵形疟的误诊与漏诊。方法采用形态学检查、巢氏聚合酶链反应(PCR)及序列分析等方法确诊3例输入性疟疾病例。结果3例患者形态学检查结果分别是未检出疟原虫(实验室初次检查)、检出卵形与恶性疟原虫和检出卵形疟原虫;巢氏PCR检测结果依次是卵形疟原虫感染、卵形与恶性疟原虫混合感染和卵形与间日疟原虫混合感染。结论需加强疟疾消除地区疟原虫形态学检查技术的培训和推广。应用分子生物学检查技术可减少输入性卵形疟的误诊与漏诊。

  8. [Malaria in Poland in 2006].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosińska, Magdalena

    2008-01-01

    There were 19 cases of malaria meeting European Union case definition for confirmed case registered in Poland in 2006. All of them were imported, including 1 case of relapse: 17 from Africa, 1 from Asia and 1 from Oceania. Species of Plasmodium was determined for 12 cases (68%): P. falciparum in 12 cases and P. vivax in one. There were 15 cases in males and 4 in females. Age at onset ranged from 17 to 59 years and a considerable number of cases occurred in persons 50 years old or older (5.26%). Common reasons for travel to endemic countries included tourism or family visits (10 cases) and professional or missionary travel (5 cases). Only four cases used chemoprophylaxis and the relevant information was missing in 4 cases. In two cases of malaria caused by Pl. falciparum the clinical course was severe and one of them died.

  9. Epidemiological Study of the Association Between Malaria and Helminth Infections in Nigeria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efunshile, Akinwale Michael; Olawale, Temitope; Stensvold, Christen Rune

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between intestinal helminth infection and susceptibility to malaria remains unclear. We studied the relationship between these infections. Seven schools in Ilero, Nigeria referred all pupils with febrile illness to our study center for free malaria treatment during a 3-month study...... period. At the end, all pupils submitted a stool sample for microscopic investigation for helminth eggs. We used an unmatched case-control design to calculate the odds ratios for helminth infection in children with at least one attack of malaria (cases) and children with no malaria episodes during...... the study (controls). We recorded 115 malaria cases in 82 of 354 (23.2%), 16 of 736 (2.2%), and 17 of 348 (4.7%) children ages ≤ 5, 6-10, and 11-15 years old, respectively (P = 0.001). Helminth infection rate in cases was 21 of 115 (18.3%) compared with 456 of 1,327 (34.4%) in controls. Weighted odds ratio...

  10. CLINICO - HAEMATOLOGICAL PROFILE AND OUTCOME OF CEREBRAL MALARIA IN A TEACHING HOSPITAL OF SOUTH EAST RAJASTHAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautam Lal

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: Evaluation of Clinico - hematological profile and outcome of cerebral malaria in semi urban hospital situated in endemic area. MATERIAL AND METHODS : A cross - sectional hospital - based study was conducted from August to November, 2014 at Department of Paediatrics SRG Zanana Hospital, Jhalawar Rajasthan. Every child, except who was previously abnormal neurologically, of the age of six month to 12 years, presented with a history of fever in the last 7 days, with o r without convulsion, and/or impaired consciousness, screened for malaria by peripheral blood smear examination and rapid diagnostic test for malaria parasite. On the basis of this screening examination, these children were classified definite cerebral mal aria where the peripheral smear was positive and probable cerebral malaria where the peripheral smear was negative. If the patients presented with fever, convulsion, and/or impaired level of consciousness, they were treated with Artesunate intravenously em pirically. Patients were followed - up regularly till they regained consciousness and when, they were able to swallow, treated with oral Artisunate and single dose of Sulphadoxine and Pyrimethamine combination is also given. RESULTS: Of the3332 admissions, 8 69 (26.08% were admitted for fever. Out of these 869 febrile patients 352 patients were having other obvious clinical diagnosis for fever. In remaining 517(59.49% cases were suspected to be suffering from malaria, but all of these children who were admit ted with the diagnosis of fever, were screened for malaria and 74(08.51%were found to be positive for malaria parasite either by peripheral blood smear or rapid diagnostic test or both. Cerebral malaria developed in 37 patients. Most cases were of age gro up of 2 - 5 years, 14children had definite cerebral malaria and 9 were labelled as suspected to have probable cerebral malaria. Neurological symptoms of altered sensorium, convulsion and abnormal behaviour ranged from 35

  11. Artesunate: Investigational Drug for the Treatment of Severe Falciparum Malaria in Hawai‘i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsue, Gunther

    2011-01-01

    Introduction There are hundreds of millions of cases of malaria each year worldwide resulting in a million deaths. These deaths are mostly due to Plasmodium falciparum. The only Federal Drug Administration approved treatment for severe malaria is intravenous quinidine gluconate. Intravenous quinidine is increasingly unavailable in the United States. In 2007, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention implemented an investigational new drug protocol to allow the use of intravenous artesunate for cases of severe malaria in the United States. The authors present such a case treated under this protocol at Tripler Army Medical Center, Hawai‘i. Case Report A 49-year-old man presented to Tripler Army Medical Center, Hawai‘i in February 2009 with a one-month history of fever, chills, and weight loss. He recently travelled to multiple malaria endemic areas. Physical examination was significant for fever and prostration. Laboratory studies revealed anemia, thrombocytopenia, and a high parasite load of Plasmodium falciparum. A strategic network was activated to obtain and administer intravenous artesunate. His condition rapidly improved as his parasitemia cleared. He was discharged after six days with no adverse medication effects and full recovery upon six-month follow-up. Discussion Our patient met the criteria for severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria. He was immediately treated with intravenous artesunate and manifested a quick and durable response to therapy. At present, intravenous artesunate is awaiting Federal Drug Administration approval but available via a strategic network controlled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This case highlights a common delay in diagnosis, importance of optimal prophylaxis, and attention to travel history as they relate to the development of severe malaria. PMID:21785506

  12. Malaria, helminths, co-infection and anaemia in a cohort of children from Mutengene, south western Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njua-Yafi, Clarisse; Achidi, Eric A; Anchang-Kimbi, Judith K; Apinjoh, Tobias O; Mugri, Regina N; Chi, Hanesh F; Tata, Rolland B; Njumkeng, Charles; Nkock, Emmanuel N; Nkuo-Akenji, Theresa

    2016-02-06

    Malaria and helminthiases frequently co-infect the same individuals in endemic zones. Plasmodium falciparum and helminth infections have long been recognized as major contributors to anaemia in endemic countries. Several studies have explored the influence of helminth infections on the course of malaria in humans but how these parasites interact within co-infected individuals remains controversial. In a community-based longitudinal study from March 2011 to February 2012, the clinical and malaria parasitaemia status of a cohort of 357 children aged 6 months to 10 years living in Mutengene, south-western region of Cameroon, was monitored. Following the determination of baseline malaria/helminths status and haemoglobin levels, the incidence of malaria and anaemia status was determined in a 12 months longitudinal study by both active and passive case detection. Among all the children who completed the study, 32.5 % (116/357) of them had at least one malaria episode. The mean (±SEM) number of malaria attacks per year was 1.44 ± 0.062 (range: 1-4 episodes) with the highest incidence of episodes occuring during the rainy season months of March-October. Children anaemia [OR = 2.24, 95 % CI (1.85-4.23), p = 0.013] compared to older children (5-10 years old). Likewise children with malaria episodes [OR = 4.45, 95 % CI (1.66-11.94), p = 0.003] as well as those with asymptomatic parasitaemia [OR = 2.41, 95 % CI (1.58-3.69) p anaemia compared to their malaria parasitaemia negative counterparts. Considering children infected with Plasmodium alone as the reference, children infected with helminths alone were associated with protection from anaemia [OR = 0.357, 95 % CI (0.141-0.901), p = 0.029]. The mean haemoglobin level (g/dl) of participants co-infected with Plasmodium and helminths was higher (p = 0.006) compared to participants infected with Plasmodium or helminths alone. Children below 5 years of age were more susceptible to malaria and anaemia. The high prevalence of

  13. falciparum malaria?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Wassermann reactions and then lupus anticoagu- lant are now known ... ACA levels in the patient group, or between the ... bral malaria could lead to more effective therapy and an improved ... each patient and a physical examination performed. Particular .... a thrombotic subset of SLE: distinct profiles for epitope specificiry.

  14. Symptomatic malaria diagnosis overestimate malaria prevalence, but underestimate anaemia burdens in children: results of a follow up study in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choge, Joseph K; Magak, Ng'wena G; Akhwale, Willis; Koech, Julius; Ngeiywa, Moses M; Oyoo-Okoth, Elijah; Esamai, Fabian; Osano, Odipo; Khayeka-Wandabwa, Christopher; Kweka, Eliningaya J

    2014-04-09

    The commonly accepted gold standard diagnostic method for detecting malaria is a microscopic reading of Giemsa-stained blood films. However, symptomatic diagnosis remains the basis of therapeutic care for the majority of febrile patients in malaria endemic areas. This study aims to compare the discrepancy in malaria and anaemia burdens between symptomatic diagnosed patients with those diagnosed through the laboratory. Data were collected from Western Kenya during a follow-up study of 887 children with suspected cases of malaria visiting the health facilities. In the laboratory, blood samples were analysed for malaria parasite and haemoglobin levels. Differences in malaria prevalence between symptomatic diagnosis and laboratory diagnosis were analysed by Chi-square test. Bayesian probabilities were used for the approximation of the malaria and anaemia burdens. Regression analysis was applied to: (1) determine the relationships between haemoglobin levels, and malaria parasite density and (2) relate the prevalence of anaemia and the prevalence of malaria. The prevalence of malaria and anaemia ranged from 10% to 34%, being highest during the rainy seasons. The predominant malaria parasite was P. falciparum (92.3%), which occurred in higher density in children aged 2‒5 years. Fever, high temperature, sweating, shivering, vomiting and severe headache symptoms were associated with malaria during presumptive diagnosis. After conducting laboratory diagnosis, lower malaria prevalence was reported among the presumptively diagnosed patients. Surprisingly, there were no attempts to detect anaemia in the same cohort. There was a significant negative correlation between Hb levels and parasite density. We also found a positive correlation between the prevalence of anaemia and the prevalence of malaria after laboratory diagnosis indicating possible co-occurrence of malaria and anaemia. Symptomatic diagnosis of malaria overestimates malaria prevalence, but underestimates the

  15. February 2013 pulmonary case of the month: one thing leads to another

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raschke RA

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. History of Present IllnessA 63 year-old man from Minnesota with a history of sarcoidosis managed with low-dose prednisone (average 6 mg/day with periodic bursts for the past 15 years was transferred to our hospital for a higher level of care. Eight weeks prior to admission he was in Costa Rica for a 3 week vacation where he engulfed himself in local traditions, swam in marine and fresh water, slept in rural areas, ate unprocessed foods, wore no insect repellent and had no prophylactic vaccines or medications. He returned to northern Minnesota and visited his cabin where he noted numerous dog tics. Four weeks prior to admission he developed intermittent fevers to 102°, rigors and drenching night sweats. Workup initiated in Minnesota was unrevealing. Specifically he had negative malaria smears, blood cultures, leptospirosis and hepatitis panels. Transaminases were elevated in the 100s. An empiric 1 week trial of doxycycline resulted …

  16. Long-run relative importance of temperature as the main driver to malaria transmission in Limpopo Province, South Africa: a simple econometric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komen, Kibii; Olwoch, Jane; Rautenbach, Hannes; Botai, Joel; Adebayo, Adetunji

    2015-03-01

    Malaria in Limpopo Province of South Africa is shifting and now observed in originally non-malaria districts, and it is unclear whether climate change drives this shift. This study examines the distribution of malaria at district level in the province, determines direction and strength of the linear relationship and causality between malaria with the meteorological variables (rainfall and temperature) and ascertains their short- and long-run variations. Spatio-temporal method, Correlation analysis and econometric methods are applied. Time series monthly meteorological data (1998-2007) were obtained from South Africa Weather Services, while clinical malaria data came from Malaria Control Centre in Tzaneen (Limpopo Province) and South African Department of Health. We find that malaria changes and pressures vary in different districts with a strong positive correlation between temperature with malaria, r = 0.5212, and a weak positive relationship for rainfall, r = 0.2810. Strong unidirectional causality runs from rainfall and temperature to malaria cases (and not vice versa): F (1, 117) = 3.89, ρ = 0.0232 and F (1, 117) = 20.08, P < 0.001 and between rainfall and temperature, a bi-directional causality exists: F (1, 117) = 19.80; F (1,117) = 17.14, P < 0.001, respectively, meaning that rainfall affects temperature and vice versa. Results show evidence of strong existence of a long-run relationship between climate variables and malaria, with temperature maintaining very high level of significance than rainfall. Temperature, therefore, is more important in influencing malaria transmission in Limpopo Province.

  17. False-positive rapid plasma reagin testing in patients with acute Plasmodium vivax malaria: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maves, Ryan C; Dean, Katherine; Gadea, Nilda; Halsey, Eric S; Graf, Paul C F; Lescano, Andres G

    2014-01-01

    Non-treponemal tests such as the rapid plasma reagin (RPR) assay are mainstays of syphilis diagnosis, but false-positive tests are common. We identified false-positive RPR titers in 8.2% of patients with malaria due to Plasmodium vivax in northern Peru. Similar rates were not detected in patients with other acute febrile illnesses.

  18. Incidence and risk factors for Malaria, pneumonia and diarrhea in children under 5 in UNHCR refugee camps: A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hershey Christine L

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR refugee camps are located predominantly in rural areas of Africa and Asia in protracted or post-emergency contexts. Recognizing the importance of malaria, pneumonia and diarrheal diseases as major causes of child morbidity and mortality in refugee camps, we analyzed data from the UNHCR Health Information System (HIS to estimate incidence and risk factors for these diseases in refugee children younger than five years of age. Methods Data from 90 UNHCR camps in 16 countries, including morbidity, mortality, health services and refugee health status, were obtained from the UNHCR HIS for the period January 2006 to February 2010. Monthly camp-level data were aggregated to yearly estimates for analysis and stratified by location in Africa (including Yemen or Asia. Poisson regression models with random effects were constructed to identify factors associated with malaria, pneumonia and diarrheal diseases. Spatial patterns in the incidence of malaria, pneumonia and diarrheal diseases were mapped to identify regional heterogeneities. Results Malaria and pneumonia were the two most common causes of mortality, with confirmed malaria and pneumonia each accounting for 20% of child deaths. Suspected and confirmed malaria accounted for 23% of child morbidity and pneumonia accounted for 17% of child morbidity. Diarrheal diseases were the cause of 7% of deaths and 10% of morbidity in children under five. Mean under-five incidence rates across all refugee camps by region were: malaria [Africa 84.7 cases/1000 U5 population/month (95% CI 67.5-102.0, Asia 2.2/1000/month (95% CI 1.4-3.0]; pneumonia [Africa 59.2/1000/month (95% CI 49.8-68.7, Asia 254.5/1000/month (95% CI 207.1-301.8]; and diarrheal disease [Africa 35.5/1000/month (95% CI 28.7-42.4, Asia 69.2/1000/month (95% CI 61.0-77.5]. Measles was infrequent and accounted for a small proportion of child morbidity (503 cases, Conclusions As in

  19. Towards seasonal forecasting of malaria in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauderdale, Jonathan M; Caminade, Cyril; Heath, Andrew E; Jones, Anne E; MacLeod, David A; Gouda, Krushna C; Murty, Upadhyayula Suryanarayana; Goswami, Prashant; Mutheneni, Srinivasa R; Morse, Andrew P

    2014-08-10

    Malaria presents public health challenge despite extensive intervention campaigns. A 30-year hindcast of the climatic suitability for malaria transmission in India is presented, using meteorological variables from a state of the art seasonal forecast model to drive a process-based, dynamic disease model. The spatial distribution and seasonal cycles of temperature and precipitation from the forecast model are compared to three observationally-based meteorological datasets. These time series are then used to drive the disease model, producing a simulated forecast of malaria and three synthetic malaria time series that are qualitatively compared to contemporary and pre-intervention malaria estimates. The area under the Relative Operator Characteristic (ROC) curve is calculated as a quantitative metric of forecast skill, comparing the forecast to the meteorologically-driven synthetic malaria time series. The forecast shows probabilistic skill in predicting the spatial distribution of Plasmodium falciparum incidence when compared to the simulated meteorologically-driven malaria time series, particularly where modelled incidence shows high seasonal and interannual variability such as in Orissa, West Bengal, and Jharkhand (North-east India), and Gujarat, Rajastan, Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra (North-west India). Focusing on these two regions, the malaria forecast is able to distinguish between years of "high", "above average" and "low" malaria incidence in the peak malaria transmission seasons, with more than 70% sensitivity and a statistically significant area under the ROC curve. These results are encouraging given that the three month forecast lead time used is well in excess of the target for early warning systems adopted by the World Health Organization. This approach could form the basis of an operational system to identify the probability of regional malaria epidemics, allowing advanced and targeted allocation of resources for combatting malaria in India.

  20. Two cases of imported malaria in Western Romania, 2010-2011 Raul Neghina1, Elena Doina Nicola2, Camelia Nita3, Virgil Musta1,3, Emilia Nicoara1,3, Tudor Rares Olariu1,2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Raul Neghina; Elena Doina Nicola; Camelia Nita; Virgil Musta; Emilia Nicoara; Tudor Rares Olariu

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Malaria is a major problem for European travelers to endemic regions. In Romania during 1980-2007 approximately20 imported cases were detected annually. The aim of our short communication is to present2 interesting cases of imported malaria detected in Western Romania. The first patient was a20-year female who traveled to India and acquired an infection with Plasmodium vivax (P. vivax). The second patient, a60-year female, contracted an infection withPlasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) during a trip to Ghana; the evolution of the disease was severe with many complications and the patient finally died. The cases presented revealed the difficulties in establishing a correct diagnosis of malaria in a non-endemic country, consequences of an incomplete taken anamnesis. Travel history should always represent a mandatory part of a well conducted investigation. At the same time, we must underline the importance of a correct and complete prophylaxis prior to every departure to tropical countries.

  1. NNDSS - Table II. Legionellosis to Malaria

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Legionellosis to Malaria - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  2. Community coverage of an antimalarial combination of artesunate and amodiaquine in Makamba Province, Burundi, nine months after its introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brasher Christopher

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2003, artesunate-amodiaquine (AS+AQ was introduced as the new first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria in Burundi. After confirmed diagnosis, treatment was delivered at subsidized prices in public health centres. Nine months after its implementation a study was carried out to assess whether children below five years of age with uncomplicated malaria were actually receiving AS+AQ. Methods A community-based study was conducted in Makamba province. Randomly selected households containing one or more children under five with reported fever onset within fourteen days before the study date were eligible. Case-management information was collected based on caregiver recall. A case definition of symptomatic malaria from observations of children presenting a confirmed malaria episode on the day of the survey was developed. Based on this definition, those children who had probable malaria among those with fever onset in the 14 days prior to the study were identified retrospectively. Treatment coverage with AS+AQ was then estimated among these probable malaria cases. Results Out of 195 children with fever on the day of the study, 92 were confirmed as true malaria cases and 103 tested negative. The combination of 'loss of appetite', 'sweating', 'shivering' and 'intermittent fever' yielded the highest possible positive predictive value, and was chosen as the case definition of malaria. Out of 526 children who had had fever 14 days prior to the survey, 165 (31.4% were defined as probable malaria cases using this definition. Among them, 20 (14.1% had been treated with AS+AQ, 10 with quinine (5%, 68 (41% received non-malaria treatments, and 67 got traditional treatment or nothing (39.9%. Most people sought treatment from public health centres (23/99 followed by private clinics (15/99, 14.1%. The median price paid for AS+AQ was 0.5 US$. Conclusion AS+AQ was the most common treatment for patients with probable malaria at public health

  3. Artesunate: investigational drug for the treatment of severe falciparum malaria in Hawai'i.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callender, David M; Hsue, Gunther

    2011-04-01

    There are hundreds of millions of cases of malaria each year worldwide resulting in a million deaths. These deaths are mostly due to Plasmodium falciparum. The only Federal Drug Administration approved treatment for severe malaria is intravenous quinidine gluconate. Intravenous quinidine is increasingly unavailable in the United States. In 2007, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention implemented an investigational new drug protocol to allow the use of intravenous artesunate for cases of severe malaria in the United States. The authors present such a case treated under this protocol at Tripler Army Medical Center, Hawai'i. A 49-year-old man presented to Tripler Army Medical Center, Hawai'i in February 2009 with a one-month history of fever, chills, and weight loss. He recently travelled to multiple malaria endemic areas. Physical examination was significant for fever and prostration. Laboratory studies revealed anemia, thrombocytopenia, and a high parasite load of Plasmodium falciparum. A strategic network was activated to obtain and administer intravenous artesunate. His condition rapidly improved as his parasitemia cleared. He was discharged after six days with no adverse medication effects and full recovery upon six-month follow-up. Our patient met the criteria for severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria. He was immediately treated with intravenous artesunate and manifested a quick and durable response to therapy. At present, intravenous artesunate is awaiting Federal Drug Administration approval but available via a strategic network controlled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. This case highlights a common delay in diagnosis, importance of optimal prophylaxis, and attention to travel history as they relate to the development of severe malaria.

  4. Knowledge and Adherence to the National Guidelines for Malaria Case Management in Pregnancy among Healthcare Providers and Drug Outlet Dispensers in Rural, Western Kenya.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Riley

    Full Text Available Although prompt, effective treatment is a cornerstone of malaria control, information on provider adherence to malaria in pregnancy (MIP treatment guidelines is limited. Incorrect or sub-optimal treatment can adversely affect the mother and fetus. This study assessed provider knowledge of and adherence to national case management guidelines for uncomplicated MIP.We conducted a cross-sectional study from September to November 2013, in 51 health facilities (HF and a randomly-selected sample of 39 drug outlets (DO in the KEMRI/CDC Health and Demographic Surveillance System area in western Kenya. Provider knowledge of national treatment guidelines was assessed with standardized questionnaires. Correct practice required adequate diagnosis, pregnancy assessment, and treatment with correct drug and dosage. In HF, we conducted exit interviews in all women of childbearing age assessed for fever. In DO, simulated clients posing as first trimester pregnant women or as relatives of third trimester pregnant women collected standardized information.Correct MIP case management knowledge and practice were observed in 45% and 31% of HF and 0% and 3% of DO encounters, respectively. The correct drug and dosage for pregnancy trimester was prescribed in 62% of HF and 42% of DO encounters; correct prescription occurred less often in first than in second/ third trimesters (HF: 24% vs. 65%, p<0.01; DO: 0% vs. 40%, p<0.01. Sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, which is not recommended for malaria treatment, was prescribed in 3% of HF and 18% of DO encounters. Exposure to artemether-lumefantrine in first trimester, which is contraindicated, occurred in 29% and 49% of HF and DO encounters, respectively.This study highlights knowledge inadequacies and incorrect prescribing practices in the treatment of MIP. Particularly concerning is the prescription of contraindicated medications in the first trimester. These issues should be addressed through comprehensive trainings and increased

  5. Factors impeding the acceptability and use of malaria preventive measures: implications for malaria elimination in eastern Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingabire, C.M.; Rulisa, A.; Kempen, van L.; Muvunyi, C.; Koenraadt, C.J.M.; Vugt, van M.; Mutesa, L.; Borne, van den B.; Alaii, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLIN), indoor residual spraying (IRS) and malaria case treatment with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) have been proven to significantly reduce malaria, but may not necessarily lead to malaria elimination. This study explored factors hindering th

  6. Factors impeding the acceptability and use of malaria preventive measures: implications for malaria elimination in eastern Rwanda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ingabire, C.; Rulisa, A.; Kempen, L.A.C.M. van; Muvunyi, C.; Koenraadt, C.J.M.; Vugt, M. van; Mutesa, L.; Borne, B. Van Den; Alaii, J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Long-lasting insecticidal nets (LLIN), indoor residual spraying (IRS) and malaria case treatment with artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) have been proven to significantly reduce malaria, but may not necessarily lead to malaria elimination. This study explored factors hindering

  7. Epidemiological survey on the first imported falciparum malaria case in Bozhou City, Anhui Province%安徽亳州市首例输入性恶性疟病例的流行病学调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐慧文

    2012-01-01

    Objective To collect and analyze epidemiological data about the first imported falciparum malaria case in Bozhou city, and provide basis on malaria prevention and control. Methods The case was investigated by epidemiological method, and the early blood specimen was collected for test. Results The case was the first imported falciparum malaria with severe liver damage in Bozhou city, and recovered after treatment. Conclusion It is key on falciparum malaria prevention and control to strengthen surveillance of malaria, improve the ability for microscopic examination and carry out standard treats and health education.%目的 收集亳州市首例输入性恶性疟病例流行病学资料,为预防控制该病提供依据.方法 运用流行病学方法进行个案调查并采集病人的早期血标本进行血检.结果 该病例为亳州市首次报告的输入性重型肝损害型恶性疟病例,经治疗好转.结论 加强疟疾监测、提高镜检能力、规范治疗和开展健康教育是恶性疟防控的关键.

  8. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF RDTS v/s MICROSCOPY FOR THE DIAGNOSIS OF MALARIA IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Malaria presents a diagnostic challenge in most tropical countries. Rapid detection of the malaria parasite and early treatment of infection still remain the most important goals of disease management. Therefore, performance characteristics of the indigenous RDTs was determined among children with suspected malaria fever attending pediatrics OPD or admitted in indoor of UP RIMS n R Saifai central India, to assess whether this rapid diagnostic test (RDT could be used for diagnosis of malaria and results were compared with Gold Standard microscopy test. We also assessed the logical utilization of RDTs to monitor treatment outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 03 months to 12 years old children who were presented with acute fever without any focus to the OPD or IPD of our department from May 2011 to April 2013 were selected for the study. A finger prick blood sample was collected from each clinically suspected case of malaria to prepare blood smear and for testing with the RDT after taking informed consent. The blood smears were read by an experienced microscopist blinded to the RDT results and clinical status of the subjects. The figures for specificity, sensitivity, accuracy and predictive values were calculated using microscopy as gold standard. RESULTS: Analysis revealed that overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the RDT were approx. 90%, while RDT is useful to confirm the diagnosis of new symptomatic cases of suspected malaria infection, the persistence of parasite antigen leading to false positives even after clearance of asexual Parasitaemia has limited its utility as a prognostic tool. The study showed that RDTs was easy to use, reliable and cheap for diagnosing new malaria cases, and is an appropriate test for the use in the fields and remote areas.

  9. Bio-ecology of malaria vectors in an endemic area, Southeast of Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masoud Yeryan; Hamid Rreza Basseri; Ahamd Ali Hanafi-Bojd; Ahmad Raeisi; Hamideh Edalat; Reza Safari

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine some bio-ecological aspects of malaria vectors in Jask County, where is targeted for malaria elimination in the national program. Methods: Mosquitoes were collected monthly during 2013-2014 using different collection methods. Subsequently, ELISA test was used to detect the human blood index of mosquitoes. The susceptibility status of Anopheles stephensi was evaluated against the diagnostic dosages of seven WHO recommended insecticides. Results: A total of 3 650 female and 4 736 Anopheles larvae were collected including Anopheles stephensi, Anopheles culicifacies s.l., Anopheles dthali, Anopheles fluviatilis s.l., Anopheles moghulensis and Anopheles turkhodi species. Anopheles stephensi was the dominant collected species on human baits and indoors with high rate of unfed and gravid specimens in internal and external window traps. Human blood index was calculated as 14.3% for this species. It was also found to be resistant to DDT and Dieldrin. Conclusions: The collected species had a wide range of habitats, and resting behaviors. With regarding to the presence of most important malaria vectors in Jask, control of the disease may be so complicated; as based on the weather condition it can be transmitted during the whole year, except for cold months. With this strong potential of transmission, existing population movements in the area may lead to imported cases of malaria and local outbreak(s). So, more specific studies on malaria vectors in high risk areas of Jask County are recommended.

  10. Malaria Surveillance - United States, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mace, Kimberly E; Arguin, Paul M

    2017-05-26

    Malaria in humans is caused by intraerythrocytic protozoa of the genus Plasmodium. These parasites are transmitted by the bite of an infective female Anopheles mosquito. The majority of malaria infections in the United States occur among persons who have traveled to regions with ongoing malaria transmission. However, malaria is occasionally acquired by persons who have not traveled out of the country through exposure to infected blood products, congenital transmission, laboratory exposure, or local mosquitoborne transmission. Malaria surveillance in the United States is conducted to identify episodes of local transmission and to guide prevention recommendations for travelers. This report summarizes cases in persons with onset of illness in 2014 and trends during previous years. Malaria cases diagnosed by blood film, polymerase chain reaction, or rapid diagnostic tests are reported to local and state health departments by health care providers or laboratory staff. Case investigations are conducted by local and state health departments, and reports are transmitted to CDC through the National Malaria Surveillance System, National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System, or direct CDC consultations. CDC conducts antimalarial drug resistance marker testing on blood samples submitted by health care providers or local or state health departments. Data from these reporting systems serve as the basis for this report. CDC received reports of 1,724 confirmed malaria cases, including one congenital case and two cryptic cases, with onset of symptoms in 2014 among persons in the United States. The number of confirmed cases in 2014 is consistent with the number of confirmed cases reported in 2013 (n = 1,741; this number has been updated from a previous publication to account for delayed reporting for persons with symptom onset occurring in late 2013). Plasmodium falciparum, P. vivax, P. ovale, and P. malariae were identified in 66.1%, 13.3%, 5.2%, and 2.7% of cases, respectively

  11. Report on diagnosis, treatment and management of an imported falciparum malaria case in Xinjiang%新疆一例输入性恶性疟病例的诊治与处理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何冰; 王晓蓉; 包拉提别克·斯兰木; 陈访贤; 李玉革

    2013-01-01

    Objective To report the diagnosis,treatment and epidemiological analysis of one case of imported falciparum malaria in Xinjiang,to provide reference of monitoring and control for the imported falciparum malaria in Xinjiang region.Methods One case of imported falciparum malaria at Xinjiang International Travel Healthcare Center was diagnosed through clinical and laboratory testing.The patient was timely treated with artesunate 600 mg five days' therapy and follow-up observed.Results The Equatorial Guinea migrant returnee who appeared the typical malaria symptoms after returning 18 days later.The patient was diagnosed with blood smear detection of Plasmodium falciparum and treated with five days of anti-malarial therapy by oral artesunate upon the confirmed diagnosis.Medical observation and propaganda of prevention on malaria were complemented to the patient and his close contacts.Conclusion Propaganda of anti-malaria knowledge to the persons who are going to malaria-endemic nationas and malaria detection on the returned laborers should be strengthened,so that the malaria infected patients can receive standard treatment timely to avoid the spread of malaria.%目的 对新疆一例输入性恶性疟疾进行诊治及流行病学分析,为新疆输入性疟疾的监测和防治提供参考.方法 对新疆国际旅行卫生保健中心收治的一例输入性恶性疟病例进行诊治及流行病学分析,通过临床、实验室检测明确诊断,及时采用青蒿琥酯600 mg 5日疗法进行治疗并追踪观察.对患者及密切接触者进行疟疾防治知识宣传及医学观察.结果 该病例为赤道几内亚务工归国人员,返回后18d出现典型疟疾发作症状,血涂片检出恶性疟原虫.经用口服青蒿琥酯进行5d抗疟而治愈.结论 应加强赴疟疾流行国家的人员防疟知识的宣传及归国劳务人员的疟疾检测,使患者得到规范治疗,避免疟疾的传播.

  12. Imported malaria in children: A national surveillance in the Netherlands and a review of European studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.J.A. Driessen (Gertjan); R. Pereira (Rob Rodrigues); B.J. Brabin (Bernard John); N.G. Hartwig (Nico)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Falciparum malaria or malaria tropica is one of the leading causes of childhood mortality worldwide. Malaria-related deaths occur mainly in sub-Saharan Africa, where an estimated 365 million clinical cases of Plasmodium falciparum malaria occur each year. In Europe, imported

  13. DILI (drug induced liver injury in a 9-month-old infant: a rare case of phenobarbital-induced hepatotoxicity

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    Anna Paola Pinna

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Phenobarbital is one of the most commonly prescribed antiepileptic drugs in childhood, but it can rarely cause serious adverse effects, such as hepatotoxicity that includes a broad clinical spectrum (from isolate hypertransaminasemia to acute liver failure. We describe a case of DILI in a 9-month-old infant caused by chronic therapy with phenobarbital.

  14. 输入性恶性疟疾病例的调查报告%Survey report on imported pernicious malaria cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁少平; 龙妍娇

    2011-01-01

    Objective To strengthen observations on infectious diseases among those who come from the quarantine area, and to prevent further spreading of epidemic. Methods After phone call of health department, the epidemiological investigation was conducted to 2 suspected malaria cases accordingly. Results By clinical diagnosis, laboratory examination and epidemiological survey, 2 suspected malaria cases were identified, and control epidemic situation, sanitary treatment, public education were performed. Conclusion At present, the epidemic situation of kinds of communicable diseases transported from abroad was becoming more severe and a lot of areas are menaced by imported pernicious malaria. All medical setting and practitioners should give the priorities to infectious disease such as malaria prevention and control. All relevant departments should enhance cooperation and coordination in health education among migrant worker to increase their awareness of communicable disease prevention and to take some effective measures in this regard.%目的 加强对来自疟疾疫区的回国人员的传染病监测,防止输入性疟疾进一步扩散.方法 接卫生部门电话通报后,对2例确诊输入性恶性疟疾病例进行了流行病学调查和处置.结果 通过临床诊断、实验室检查和流行病学调查,确诊2例输入性疟疾病例,并采取疫情监控、卫生处理、宣传教育等处理措施.结论 目前,各类输入性传染病疫情越来越严重,许多地区受到输入性恶性疟疾的威胁.各级医疗单位和临床医生应提高对疟疾等传染病的认识;各相关部门协作配合,加强对出国劳务人员传染病防治知识的宣传教育,制定有效措施,以达到防止传染病传人的目的.

  15. PENELITIAN OBAT ANTI MALARIA

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    Emiliana Tjitra

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Some sensitivity tests of antimalarial drugs had been done by National Institute of Health Research and Development in collaboration with Directorate General of Communicable Disease Control and Environment Health, Naval Medical Research Unit No.2 and Faculty of Medicine University of Indonesia. In-vivo and or in-vitro Plasmodium falciparum multidrug resistance was reported from 11 provinces : Aceh, North Sumatera, Riau, Lampung, West Java, Jakarta (imported case, Central Java, East Kalimantan, South Sulawesi, East Nusa Tenggara and Irian Jaya. Only quinine had a good response for treatment of falciparum malaria resistant to multidrug. R falciparum resistant to mefloquine or halofantrine was found although it was not available in Indonesia yet. Chloroquine prophylaxis using standard dose was still effective in Tanjung Pinang and Central Java. To support the successfulness of treatment in malaria control programme, further studies on alternative antimalaria drugs is needed.

  16. The association between nutritional status and malaria in children from a rural community in the Amazonian region: a longitudinal study.

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    Márcia Almeida Araújo Alexandre

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between malaria and undernutrition is controversial and complex. Synergistic associations between malnutrition and malaria morbidity and mortality have been suggested, as well as undernutrition being protective against infection, while other studies found no association. We sought to evaluate the relationship between the number of malaria episodes and nutritional statuses in a cohort of children below 15 years of age living in a rural community in the Brazilian Amazon.Following a baseline survey of clinical, malaria and nutritional assessment including anthropometry measurements and hemoglobin concentration, 202 children ranging from 1 month to 14 years of age were followed for one year through passive case detection for malaria episodes. After follow-up, all children were assessed again in order to detect changes in nutritional indicators associated with malaria infection. We also examined the risk of presenting malaria episodes during follow-up according to presence of stunting at baseline. Children who suffered malaria episodes during follow-up presented worse anthropometric parameters values during this period. The main change was a reduction of the linear growth velocity, associated with both the number of episodes and how close the last or only malaria episode and the second anthropometric assessment were. Changes were also observed for indices associated with chronic changes, such as weight-for-age and BMI-for-age, which conversely, were more frequently observed in children with the last or only episode occurring between 6 and 12 months preceding the second nutritional assessment survey. Children with inadequate height-for-age at baseline (Z-score < -2 presented lower risk of suffering malaria episodes during follow-up as assessed by both the log-rank test (p =0.057 and the multivariable Cox-proportional hazards regression (Hazard Ratio = 0.31, 95%CI [0.10; 0.99] p=0.049.Malaria was associated with impaired nutritional

  17. Cord blood IgG and the risk of severe Plasmodium falciparum malaria in the first year of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murungi, Linda M; Sondén, Klara; Odera, Dennis; Oduor, Loureen B; Guleid, Fatuma; Nkumama, Irene N; Otiende, Mark; Kangoye, David T; Fegan, Greg; Färnert, Anna; Marsh, Kevin; Osier, Faith H A

    2017-02-01

    Young infants are less susceptible to severe episodes of malaria but the targets and mechanisms of protection are not clear. Cord blood antibodies may play an important role in mediating protection but many studies have examined their association with the outcome of infection or non-severe malaria. Here, we investigated whether cord blood IgG to Plasmodium falciparum merozoite antigens and antibody-mediated effector functions were associated with reduced odds of developing severe malaria at different time points during the first year of life. We conducted a case-control study of well-defined severe falciparum malaria nested within a longitudinal birth cohort of Kenyan children. We measured cord blood total IgG levels against five recombinant merozoite antigens and antibody function in the growth inhibition activity and neutrophil antibody-dependent respiratory burst assays. We also assessed the decay of maternal antibodies during the first 6months of life. The mean antibody half-life range was 2.51months (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.19-2.92) to 4.91months (95% CI: 4.47-6.07). The rate of decline of maternal antibodies was inversely proportional to the starting concentration. The functional assay of antibody-dependent respiratory burst activity predicted significantly reduced odds of developing severe malaria during the first 6months of life (Odds ratio (OR) 0.07, 95% CI: 0.007-0.74, P=0.007). Identification of the targets of antibodies mediating antibody-dependent respiratory burst activity could contribute to the development of malaria vaccines that protect against severe episodes of malaria in early infancy. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. The amount and value of work time of community medicine distributors in community case management of malaria among children under five years in the Ejisu-Juaben District of Ghana

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    Agyei-Baffour Peter

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The contribution of community medicine distributors (CMD to prompt health service delivery in areas described as “hard-to-reach” is important but the value of their work time remains unknown and thus makes it difficult to design appropriate regular financial incentives to motivate them. This makes CMDs feel their efforts are not recognized. An attempt to estimate the value of 54 CMDs’ work time involved in community case management of malaria (CCMm in a rural district in Ghana is presented. Methods Time spent by CMDs on CCMm activities were recorded for a period of 12 months to determine the work-time value. Cost analysis was performed in Microsoft Excel with data from CMD records and at 2007 market price in Ghana. Results A CMD spent 4.8 hours, [95% CI: 3.9; 5.3] on all CCMm-related activities per day. The time value of CMD work ranged from GH¢ 2.04 (US$ 2.24 to GH¢ 4.1 [US$ 4.6] per week and GH¢ 19.2 - 86.4 (US$ 21.10-94.95 per month. The gross wage outside CCMm as reported by CMD was GH¢ 58.4 [US$ 64.69] and value of foregone income of GH¢ 86.40 (US$94.95 per month, about 14-times higher than the monthly incentives of GH¢ 6.0 given by the CCMm programme. Conclusion The value of work time and the foregone income of CMDs in CCMm are high and yet there are no regular and sustainable incentives provided for them. The results are significant to policy in designing incentives to motivate CMDs in large-scale implementation of CCMm.

  19. Malaria treatment services in Nigeria: A review

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    Benjamin SC Uzochukwu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Malaria remains a major Public Health problem in Nigeria and causes death and illness in children and adults, especially pregnant women. Malaria case management remains a vital component of the malaria control strategies. This entails early diagnosis and prompt treatment with effective antimalarial medicines. The objectives of this review is to enable health professionals to understand the magnitude of malaria treatment services in Nigeria, to improve knowledge for rational malaria management within different health system contexts with a view to improving access to malaria treatment. The review therefore looks at the following areas: clinical disease and epidemiology; the burden of malaria in Nigeria; objectives of treatment; antimalarial treatment policy; malaria diagnosis, treatment strategies/ National responses; treatment sources. The review concludes that for improved malaria treatment services in Nigeria, there is an urgent need to develop adequate strategies that will ensure better access to medicines by getting evidence-based and effective medicines to the people who need them, whether by reducing their costs, promoting equity in access, improving their distribution, increasing their efficacy and acceptability, or slowing down the development of antimicrobial resistance.

  20. Effects of Changing Jaw Height on F1 during Babble: A Case Study at 9 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steeve, Roger W.

    2012-01-01

    An empirical gap exists in our understanding of the extent that mandibular kinematics modulate acoustic changes in natural babble productions of infants. Data were recorded from a normal developing 9-month-old infant. Mandibular position was tracked from the infant during vowel and canonical babble. Linear predictive coding analysis was used to…

  1. Adverse events following 12 and 18 month vaccinations: a population-based, self-controlled case series analysis.

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    Kumanan Wilson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Live vaccines have distinct safety profiles, potentially causing systemic reactions one to 2 weeks after administration. In the province of Ontario, Canada, live MMR vaccine is currently recommended at age 12 months and 18 months. METHODS: Using the self-controlled case series design we examined 271,495 12 month vaccinations and 184,312 18 month vaccinations to examine the relative incidence of the composite endpoint of emergency room visits or hospital admissions in consecutive one day intervals following vaccination. These were compared to a control period 20 to 28 days later. In a post-hoc analysis we examined the reasons for emergency room visits and the average acuity score at presentation for children during the at-risk period following the 12 month vaccine. RESULTS: Four to 12 days post 12 month vaccination, children had a 1.33 (1.29-1.38 increased relative incidence of the combined endpoint compared to the control period, or at least one event during the risk interval for every 168 children vaccinated. Ten to 12 days post 18 month vaccination, the relative incidence was 1.25 (95%, 1.17-1.33 which represented at least one excess event for every 730 children vaccinated. The primary reason for increased events was statistically significant elevations in emergency room visits following all vaccinations. There were non-significant increases in hospital admissions. There were an additional 20 febrile seizures for every 100,000 vaccinated at 12 months. CONCLUSIONS: There are significantly elevated risks of primarily emergency room visits approximately one to two weeks following 12 and 18 month vaccination. Future studies should examine whether these events could be predicted or prevented.

  2. Trend and manifestations of falciparum malaria in a tertiary care hospital of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saya, Rama Prakasha; Saya, Ganesh Kumar; Debabrata, Goswami

    2016-01-01

    The recent focus is on the increase in the burden of falciparum cases with a varied spectrum of presentation and outcome, especially in developing countries like India. This study was undertaken to analyze the trend and manifestations of falciparum malaria in a tertiary care hospital. This descriptive study was carried out at the Gauhati Government Medical College and Hospital from June 2006 to May 2007. The data were collected on demographic and time characteristics, clinical and laboratory findings, the outcome of disease and expressed in proportion or percentages. Out of the 100 cases, around 2(nd)/3(rd) (63%) of cases were in the age group of 15-30 years and the mean age was found to be 29.51 years. About 66% of them were males. Clinical presentations included pain abdomen (42, 42%), nausea and vomiting (35, 35%), jaundice (34, 34%), oliguria (24, 24%), altered sensorium (24, 24%), breathing difficulty (10, 10%), and seizures (5, 5%). Number of cases and mortality were more with a peak in the month of May and September. Manifestations of severe falciparum malaria included hepatopathy (38%), renal failure (28%), shock (9%), acute respiratory distress syndrome (7%), hypoglycemia (3%), and severe anemia (1%). Eighty-two cases (82%) recovered and 18 cases (18%) expired. Falciparum malaria is more among younger adult age group and males. Complications and mortality are also more due to falciparum malaria.

  3. 恶性疟的诊断及治疗:附23例报告%Clinical Manifestation of Plasmodium Falciparum Malaria:a Report of 23 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶伟; 赵伟; 魏红霞; 成骢; 池云

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the clinical characteristics of plasmodium falciparum malaria. Methods:The Epidemiologi cal data and clinical data of 23 patients with plasmodium falciparum malaria were retrospectively analyzed. Results: All of the patients had African inhabitation history. Most of the patients had the symptoms of irregular fever, chills, sweating, nausea, vomiting. Among them, 7 casesOO. 4%) suffered from anemia;18 cases(78. 3%) had a decline in platelet count;10 cases (43.5%) had abnormal liver function;and 2 cases(8. 7%)had abnormal renal function. All of the patients were cured after antimalarial treatment. Conclusions: All of the patients with plasmodium falciparum malaria in this study were infused cases. These patients had complicated clinical manifestation. The antimalarial drugs are effective and safe.%目的:探讨恶性疟的临床特征.方法:回顾分析23例恶性疟患者的流行病学资料及临床资料.结果:23例恶性疟患者均有非洲地区居留史,临床症状主要表现为不规则发热、畏寒、寒战、大汗、恶心、呕吐.7例(30.4%)患者有不同程度的贫血,18例(78.3%)患者有不同程度的血小板数减少,10例(43.5%)患者有不同程度的肝功能异常,2例(8.7%)患者肾功能异常.经过积极抗疟治疗后,23例患者均获痊愈.结论:本组恶性疟病例均为输入性疟疾,临床表现多样,并发症多,抗疟治疗安全有效、预后好.

  4. Determinan Kejadian Malaria di Wilayah Endemis

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    Hamzah Hasyim

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Kabupaten Lahat adalah salah satu wilayah endemis malaria di Sumatera Selatan dengan prevalensi 16,4% dan Annual Malaria Incidence 22,08. Tujuan penelitian ini untuk mengetahui faktor risiko lingkungan dengan kejadian malaria. Faktor risiko lingkungan genangan air (breeding place berhubungan dengan kejadian malaria dengan nilai p= 0,000. Analisis multivariat menemukan determinan utama kejadian malaria adalah breeding place di sekitar rumah responden dengan odds ratio (OR = 5,034 dan 95% CI = 2,65 _ 9,56. Responden yang tinggal di sekitar breeding place berisiko 5,03 kali lebih besar untuk menderita malaria dibandingkan dengan responden yang di sekitar rumah tidak terdapat breeding place setelah dikontrol variabel jarak rumah ke breeding place, ventilasi rumah, penggunaan kelambu, penggunaan obat anti nyamuk, dan kebiasaan keluar rumah pada malam hari. Lahat district is one of the malaria endemic area in South Sumatra Province with a prevalence of 16.4% and Annual Malaria Incidence of 22.08. The case control reports were carried out of 240 respondents. This study aimed to understand the relationship among of environmental risk factors with the incidence of malaria. After primary data collection followed by processing and data analysis in a multimedia laboratory. There was association between breeding place and malaria cases (p value= 0.000. The results of multivariate analysis of variables revealed the determinant risk was breeding place, with OR = 5.034 and CI 95%= 2.65 _ 9.56. Respondents who live around the breeding place has 5.034 times chance of affected malaria compared with respondents around the house there are no breeding place after the controlled distance to the breeding place house, use of mosquito nets, use of anti-mosquito, and habits out of the house at night variables.

  5. Climate, environment and transmission of malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossati, Antonella; Bargiacchi, Olivia; Kroumova, Vesselina; Zaramella, Marco; Caputo, Annamaria; Garavelli, Pietro Luigi

    2016-06-01

    Malaria, the most common parasitic disease in the world, is transmitted to the human host by mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles. The transmission of malaria requires the interaction between the host, the vector and the parasite.The four species of parasites responsible for human malaria are Plasmodium falciparum, Plasmodium ovale, Plasmodium malariae and Plasmodium vivax. Occasionally humans can be infected by several simian species, like Plasmodium knowlesi, recognised as a major cause of human malaria in South-East Asia since 2004. While P. falciparum is responsible for most malaria cases, about 8% of estimated cases globally are caused by P. vivax. The different Plasmodia are not uniformly distributed although there are areas of species overlap. The life cycle of all species of human malaria parasites is characterised by an exogenous sexual phase in which multiplication occurs in several species of Anopheles mosquitoes, and an endogenous asexual phase in the vertebrate host. The time span required for mature oocyst development in the salivary glands is quite variable (7-30 days), characteristic of each species and influenced by ambient temperature. The vector Anopheles includes 465 formally recognised species. Approximately 70 of these species have the capacity to transmit Plasmodium spp. to humans and 41 are considered as dominant vector capable of transmitting malaria. The intensity of transmission is dependent on the vectorial capacity and competence of local mosquitoes. An efficient system for malaria transmission needs strong interaction between humans, the ecosystem and infected vectors. Global warming induced by human activities has increased the risk of vector-borne diseases such as malaria. Recent decades have witnessed changes in the ecosystem and climate without precedent in human history although the emphasis in the role of temperature on the epidemiology of malaria has given way to predisposing conditions such as ecosystem changes, political

  6. AN ECONOMETRICAL ANALYSIS OF THE HOUSEHOLDS SAVING BEHAVIOUR IN ROMANIA CASE STUDY: THE MONTHLY BANK DEPOSITS

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    BABUCEA ANA-GABRIELA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim is also to identify a statistical regression models appropriate and as relevant to explain the evolution of the monthly household deposits although, in this respect, of all sorts of factors identified in the literature: demographic factors and the demographic change , of income, monetary factors, factors related to the fiscal-budgetary policies, behavioral factors that seem to become determinants, and the age structure of the population of Romania, were selected only those which have been identified monthly data series from January 2012. To verify the existence of causal relationships identified and determining the nature and intensity of their methodology was used the parametric statistical analysis of the correlation resorting to specialized software package SPSS v.23 for Windows. The paper is structured as follows: first is dedicate to the introduction and a short literature review, second part is about data overview and summary statistics, third section captures methodology and results and last section reflects conclusions.

  7. Determinants of the accuracy of rapid diagnostic tests in malaria case management: evidence from low and moderate transmission settings in the East African highlands

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    Rapuoda Beth

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The accuracy of malaria diagnosis has received renewed interest in recent years due to changes in treatment policies in favour of relatively high-cost artemisinin-based combination therapies. The use of rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs based on histidine-rich protein 2 (HRP2 synthesized by Plasmodium falciparum has been widely advocated to save costs and to minimize inappropriate treatment of non-malarial febrile illnesses. HRP2-based RDTs are highly sensitive and stable; however, their specificity is a cause for concern, particularly in areas of intense malaria transmission due to persistence of HRP2 antigens from previous infections. Methods In this study, 78,454 clinically diagnosed malaria patients were tested using HRP2-based RDTs over a period of approximately four years in four highland sites in Kenya and Uganda representing hypoendemic to mesoendemic settings. In addition, the utility of the tests was evaluated in comparison with expert microscopy for disease management in 2,241 subjects in two sites with different endemicity levels over four months. Results RDT positivity rates varied by season and year, indicating temporal changes in accuracy of clinical diagnosis. Compared to expert microscopy, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of the RDTs in a hypoendemic site were 90.0%, 99.9%, 90.0% and 99.9%, respectively. Corresponding measures at a mesoendemic site were 91.0%, 65.0%, 71.6% and 88.1%. Although sensitivities at the two sites were broadly comparable, levels of specificity varied considerably between the sites as well as according to month of test, age of patient, and presence or absence of fever during consultation. Specificity was relatively high in older age groups and increased towards the end of the transmission season, indicating the role played by anti-HRP2 antibodies. Patients with high parasite densities were more likely to test positive with RDTs than

  8. Endothelium-based biomarkers are associated with cerebral malaria in Malawian children: a retrospective case-control study.

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    Andrea L Conroy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Differentiating cerebral malaria (CM from other causes of serious illness in African children is problematic, owing to the non-specific nature of the clinical presentation and the high prevalence of incidental parasitaemia. CM is associated with endothelial activation. In this study we tested the hypothesis that endothelium-derived biomarkers are associated with the pathophysiology of severe malaria and may help identify children with CM. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Plasma samples were tested from children recruited with uncomplicated malaria (UM; n = 32, cerebral malaria with retinopathy (CM-R; n = 38, clinically defined CM without retinopathy (CM-N; n = 29, or non-malaria febrile illness with decreased consciousness (CNS; n = 24. Admission levels of angiopoietin-2 (Ang-2, Ang-1, soluble Tie-2 (sTie-2, von Willebrand factor (VWF, its propeptide (VWFpp, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, soluble ICAM-1 (sICAM-1 and interferon-inducible protein 10 (IP-10 were measured by ELISA. Children with CM-R had significantly higher median levels of Ang-2, Ang-2:Ang-1, sTie-2, VWFpp and sICAM-1 compared to children with CM-N. Children with CM-R had significantly lower median levels of Ang-1 and higher median concentrations of Ang-2:Ang-1, sTie-2, VWF, VWFpp, VEGF and sICAM-1 compared to UM, and significantly lower median levels of Ang-1 and higher median levels of Ang-2, Ang-2:Ang-1, VWF and VWFpp compared to children with fever and altered consciousness due to other causes. Ang-1 was the best discriminator between UM and CM-R and between CNS and CM-R (areas under the ROC curve of 0.96 and 0.93, respectively. A comparison of biomarker levels in CM-R between admission and recovery showed uniform increases in Ang-1 levels, suggesting this biomarker may have utility in monitoring clinical response. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that endothelial proteins are informative biomarkers of malarial disease severity. These results

  9. A rare case of isolated Cushing syndrome in a 3-month-old boy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garge, Saurabh; Bawa, Monika; Kanojia, Ravi P; Gupta, Kirti; Rao, Kattragadda Laxmi Narain

    2013-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare malignancy in children. Most of these are endocrinologically active tumors, with virilizing features being typically dominant. Its presentation with isolated Cushing syndrome is rare. We report a 3-month-old infant with Cushing syndrome without the clinical features of androgen or mineralocorticoid excess consequently diagnosed with ACC. We discuss the different presentations, diagnosis, and management of this rare tumor with a rarer presentation.

  10. Retrospective Analysis on 135 Cases of Malaria in Africa%非洲135例疟疾回顾性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈晓红; 赵志刚; 王慧媛

    2012-01-01

    目的 了解非洲疟疾的临床特点、诊治方法及其转归.方法 分析135例疟疾患者的临床资料.结果 临床表现中,发热135例(占100%),其中以贫血31例(占22.96%),脾肿大27例(占20.00%),腹泻21例(占15.56%),呕吐19例(占14.07%)最为常见;其次是咳嗽17例(占12.59%),寒战7例(占5.19%)等多种症状.135例均接受青蒿素类抗疟药的综合治疗,治愈135例,无死亡病例.结论 非洲疟疾大多数是恶性疟,且发病率很高,临床表现复杂多样且不够典型;尽早诊断、及时治疗是改善本病预后的关键;青蒿素类药物是治疗疟疾安全、有效的首选药物.%Objective To understand the clinical characteristics, treatment and its outcome of African malaria Methods Clinical data of 135 malaria patients are analyzed. Results Among the clinical manifestations, 135 cases (accounting for 100%) got fever, in which there are 31 patients with anemia(accounting for 22.96%), 27 patients with splenomegaly (accounting for 20.00%), 21 patients with diarrhea(accounting for 15.56%), and 19 patients with vomiting(accounting for 14.07%). All above are the most common clinical manifestations. Then mere are various symptoms as cough(17 patients, accounting for 12.59%), chill(7 patients, accounting for 5.19%) and so on. 135 patients all accepted antimalarial treatment with artesunate drugs. These 135 patients were cured and no one died. Conclusion Most African malaria is malignant with a high mortality, and clinical manifestations are complicated and not typical. So early diagnosis and prompt treatment are the key to improve the disease prognosis. Artesunate drugs are safe, effective and the first choice to malaria treatment.

  11. Artemisinin resistance containment project in Thailand. (I: Implementation of electronic-based malaria information system for early case detection and individual case management in provinces along the Thai-Cambodian border

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khamsiriwatchara Amnat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Bureau of Vector-borne Diseases, Ministry of Public Health, Thailand, has implemented an electronic Malaria Information System (eMIS as part of a strategy to contain artemisinin resistance. The attempt corresponds to the WHO initiative, funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, to contain anti-malarial drug resistance in Southeast Asia. The main objective of this study was to demonstrate the eMIS’ functionality and outputs after implementation for use in the Thailand artemisinin-resistance containment project. Methods The eMIS had been functioning since 2009 in seven Thai-Cambodian border provinces. The eMIS has covered 61 malaria posts/clinics, 27 Vector-borne Disease Units covering 12,508 hamlets at risk of malaria infections. The eMIS was designed as an evidence-based and near real-time system to capture data for early case detection, intensive case investigation, monitoring drug compliance and on/off-site tracking of malarial patients, as well as collecting data indicating potential drug resistance among patients. Data captured by the eMIS in 2008–2011 were extracted and presented. Results The core functionalities of the eMIS have been utilized by malaria staff at all levels, from local operational units to ministerial management. The eMIS case detection module suggested decreasing trends during 2009–2011; the number of malaria cases detected in the project areas over the years studied were 3818, 2695, and 2566, with sero-positive rates of 1.24, 0.98, and 1.16%, respectively. The eMIS case investigation module revealed different trends in weekly Plasmodium falciparum case numbers, when classified by responsible operational unit, local and migrant status, and case-detection type. It was shown that most Thai patients were infected within their own residential district, while migrants were infected either at their working village or from across the border. The data mapped in the system suggested that P

  12. Lipid-based nutrient supplements do not affect the risk of malaria or respiratory morbidity in 6- to 18-month-old Malawian children in a randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is evidence to support the use of lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNSs) to promote child growth and development in low-income countries, but there is also a concern regarding the safety of using iron-fortified products in malaria-endemic areas. The objective of this study was to test the hyp...

  13. The malaria testing and treatment landscape in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinsou, Cyprien; Cherifath, Adjibabi Bello

    2017-04-26

    Since 2004, artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) has been the first-line treatment for uncomplicated malaria in Benin. In 2016, a medicine outlet survey was implemented to investigate the availability, price, and market share of anti-malarial treatment and malaria diagnostics. Results provide a timely and important benchmark to measure future interventions aimed at i