WorldWideScience

Sample records for month collaborative effort

  1. Job Migration: A Collaborative Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    Music teachers often change jobs several times during their careers. Reasons for job changes vary, but regardless, these changes bring a different set of challenges. Sharing knowledge and learning are part and parcel of collaboration. So what if, as education professionals, music teachers decided to collaborate during job migrations? For all music…

  2. Job Migration: A Collaborative Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    Music teachers often change jobs several times during their careers. Reasons for job changes vary, but regardless, these changes bring a different set of challenges. Sharing knowledge and learning are part and parcel of collaboration. So what if, as education professionals, music teachers decided to collaborate during job migrations? For all music…

  3. Collaborative Proposal to Extend ONR YIP Research with BRC Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Collaborative Proposal to Extend ONR YIP research with BRC Efforts...SEP 2013 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Collaborative Proposal to Extend ONR YIP research with

  4. ADAM: A Collaborative Effort To Prepare Future Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Michael D.; And Others

    ADAM (Administrative Development and Management), an administrator preparation partnership between Greenwood (South Carolina) School District 50 and Clemson University, is described in this paper. The program uses practicing administrators in collaboration with college faculty to train prospective school administrators. The purpose is to provide…

  5. Sport Skills for Students with Disabilities: A Collaborative Effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasser, Susan L.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Provides justification for a cross-disciplinary approach to program delivery in physical education for students with physical and cognitive disabilities. Details the positive outcomes possible through a bidirectional relationship between physical education and physical therapy and presents guidelines for collaboration and for sport skill…

  6. Manage changes in the requirements definition through a collaborative effort

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Joseph-Malherbe, S

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Updating or changing the requirements statement during the systems engineering process may impact adversely on project parameters such as sequence, dependencies, effort, and duration of tasks, usually with an increase in development time and cost...

  7. Collaborative Divorce: An Effort to Reduce the Damage of Divorce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alba-Fisch, Maria

    2016-05-01

    Divorce has been trapped in the adversarial system of the courts, a system ill suited to the needs of a family attempting to reorganize itself and still safeguard the well-being of its members. Collaborative divorce (CD) is a relatively new approach comprising an interdisciplinary professional team trained to help the divorcing family arrive at a financial, legal, and emotional settlement. The CD approach is designed to assist both members of the couple and their children transition into a more constructive future wherein they can still be a family. The structure and adversarial approach of the courts have been replaced by collaborative structures and principles developed to encourage honesty and cooperation. The case presented illustrates how this actually works.

  8. High Performance EVA Glove Collaboration: Glove Injury Data Mining Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, C. R.; Benosn, E.; England, S.; Norcross, J. R.; McFarland, S. M.; Rajulu, S.

    2014-01-01

    Human hands play a significant role during extravehicular activity (EVA) missions and Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) training events, as they are needed for translating and performing tasks in the weightless environment. It is because of this high frequency usage that hand- and arm-related injuries and discomfort are known to occur during training in the NBL and while conducting EVAs. Hand-related injuries and discomforts have been occurring to crewmembers since the days of Apollo. While there have been numerous engineering changes to the glove design, hand-related issues still persist. The primary objectives of this study are therefore to: 1) document all known EVA glove-related injuries and the circumstances of these incidents, 2) determine likely risk factors, and 3) recommend ergonomic mitigations or design strategies that can be implemented in the current and future glove designs. METHODS: The investigator team conducted an initial set of literature reviews, data mining of Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health (LSAH) databases, and data distribution analyses to understand the ergonomic issues related to glove-related injuries and discomforts. The investigation focused on the injuries and discomforts of U.S. crewmembers who had worn pressurized suits and experienced glove-related incidents during the 1980 to 2010 time frame, either during training or on-orbit EVA. In addition to data mining of the LSAH database, the other objective of the study was to find complimentary sources of information such as training experience, EVA experience, suit-related sizing data, and hand-arm anthropometric data to be tied to the injury data from LSAH. RESULTS: Past studies indicated that the hand was the most frequently injured part of the body during both EVA and NBL training. This study effort thus focused primarily on crew training data in the NBL between 2002 and 2010. Of the 87 recorded training incidents, 19 occurred to women and 68 to men. While crew ages ranged from

  9. Unifying a fragmented effort: a qualitative framework for improving international surgical teaching collaborations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallah, Parisa Nicole; Bernstein, Mark

    2017-09-07

    Access to adequate surgical care is limited globally, particularly in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). To address this issue, surgeons are becoming increasingly involved in international surgical teaching collaborations (ISTCs), which include educational partnerships between surgical teams in high-income countries and those in LMICs. The purpose of this study is to determine a framework for unifying, systematizing, and improving the quality of ISTCs so that they can better address the global surgical need. A convenience sample of 68 surgeons, anesthesiologists, physicians, residents, nurses, academics, and administrators from the U.S., Canada, and Norway was used for the study. Participants all had some involvement in ISTCs and came from multiple specialties and institutions. Qualitative methodology was used, and participants were interviewed using a pre-determined set of open-ended questions. Data was gathered over two months either in-person, over the phone, or on Skype. Data was evaluated using thematic content analysis. To organize and systematize ISTCs, participants reported a need for a centralized/systematized process with designated leaders, a universal data bank of current efforts/progress, communication amongst involved parties, full-time administrative staff, dedicated funds, a scholarly approach, increased use of technology, and more research on needs and outcomes. By taking steps towards unifying and systematizing ISTCs, the quality of ISTCs can be improved. This could lead to an advancement in efforts to increase access to surgical care worldwide.

  10. Imaging social motivation: distinct brain mechanisms drive effort production during collaboration versus competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bouc, Raphaël; Pessiglione, Mathias

    2013-10-01

    Collaborative and competitive interactions have been investigated extensively so as to understand how the brain makes choices in the context of strategic games, yet such interactions are known to influence a more basic dimension of behavior: the energy invested in the task. The cognitive mechanisms that motivate effort production in social situations remain poorly understood, and their neural counterparts have not been explored so far. A dominant idea is that the motivation provided by the social context is reducible to the personal utility of effort production, which decreases in collaboration and increases in competition. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we scanned human participants while they produced a physical effort in a collaborative or competitive context. We found that motivation was indeed primarily driven by personal utility, which was reflected in brain regions devoted to reward processing (the ventral basal ganglia). However, subjects who departed from utility maximization, working more in collaborative situations, showed greater functional activation and anatomical volume in a brain region implicated previously in social cognition (the temporoparietal junction). Therefore, this region might mediate a purely pro-social motivation to produce greater effort in the context of collaboration. More generally, our findings suggest that the individual propensity to invest energy in collaborative work might have an identifiable counterpart in the brain functional architecture.

  11. Herbivory Network: An international, collaborative effort to study herbivory in Arctic and alpine ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrio, I. C.; Hik, D. S.; Jónsdóttir, I. S.; Bueno, C. G.; Mörsdorf, M. A.; Ravolainen, V. T.

    2016-09-01

    Plant-herbivore interactions are central to the functioning of tundra ecosystems, but their outcomes vary over space and time. Accurate forecasting of ecosystem responses to ongoing environmental changes requires a better understanding of the processes responsible for this heterogeneity. To effectively address this complexity at a global scale, coordinated research efforts, including multi-site comparisons within and across disciplines, are needed. The Herbivory Network was established as a forum for researchers from Arctic and alpine regions to collaboratively investigate the multifunctional role of herbivores in these changing ecosystems. One of the priorities is to integrate sites, methodologies, and metrics used in previous work, to develop a set of common protocols and design long-term geographically-balanced, coordinated experiments. The implementation of these collaborative research efforts will also improve our understanding of traditional human-managed systems that encompass significant portions of the sub-Arctic and alpine areas worldwide. A deeper understanding of the role of herbivory in these systems under ongoing environmental changes will guide appropriate adaptive strategies to preserve their natural values and related ecosystem services.

  12. The Environmental Management Core Laboratories - A Collaborative Effort to Enhance Cleanup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birrer, Steve Allen; Griebenow, Bret Lee; Frandsen, Greg Bryan; Kearns, Paul Kenneth

    2002-08-01

    Acknowledging that the magnitude and diversity of the critical issues facing the DOE-EM cannot be addressed by a single institution, the Laboratory Directors established the EM Core Laboratories. This collaborative network ensures that the best available resources are addressing environmental quality issues through the introduction of critical new science and technology. Based upon the Top-to-Bottom Review, the EM program is shifting the focus of its cleanup efforts to accelerate schedules to reduce cost and the most significant risks. To facilitate this acceleration, the Office of Science and Technology has restructured their research and development program towards two new thrusts. These thrusts, Closure Site Support and Alternative Development, are aimed at the high priority needs to support the re-baselined cleanup program. The EM Core Laboratories are well positioned to ensure the successful implementation of this new direction.

  13. The Environmental Management Core Laboratories - A Collaborative Effort to Enhance Cleanup

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birrer, S.A.; Frandsen, G.B.; Kearns, P.K.

    2002-05-16

    Acknowledging that the magnitude and diversity of the critical issues facing the DOE-EM cannot be addressed by a single institution, the Laboratory Directors established the EM Core Laboratories. This collaborative network ensures that the best available resources are addressing environmental quality issues through the introduction of critical new science and technology. Based upon the Top-to-Bottom Review, the EM program is shifting the focus of its cleanup efforts to accelerate schedules to reduce cost and the most significant risks. To facilitate this acceleration, the Office of Science and Technology has restructured their research and development program towards two new thrusts. These thrusts, Closure Site Support and Alternative Development, are aimed at the high priority needs to support the re-baselined cleanup program. The EM Core Laboratories are well positioned to ensure the successful implementation of this new direction.

  14. An Open, Large-Scale, Collaborative Effort to Estimate the Reproducibility of Psychological Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Reproducibility is a defining feature of science. However, because of strong incentives for innovation and weak incentives for confirmation, direct replication is rarely practiced or published. The Reproducibility Project is an open, large-scale, collaborative effort to systematically examine the rate and predictors of reproducibility in psychological science. So far, 72 volunteer researchers from 41 institutions have organized to openly and transparently replicate studies published in three prominent psychological journals in 2008. Multiple methods will be used to evaluate the findings, calculate an empirical rate of replication, and investigate factors that predict reproducibility. Whatever the result, a better understanding of reproducibility will ultimately improve confidence in scientific methodology and findings. © The Author(s) 2012.

  15. Status Report of the DPHEP Collaboration: A Global Effort for Sustainable Data Preservation in High Energy Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Amerio, Silvia; Berghaus, Frank; Blomer, Jakob; Branson, Andrew; Cancio, Germán; Cartaro, Concetta; Chen, Gang; Dallmeier-Tiessen, Sünje; Diaconu, Cristinel; Ganis, Gerardo; Gheata, Mihaela; Hara, Takanori; Herner, Ken; Hildreth, Mike; Jones, Roger; Kluth, Stefan; Krücker, Dirk; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Maggi, Marcello; Marco de Lucas, Jesus; Mele, Salvatore; Pace, Alberto; Schröder, Matthias; Shamdasani, Jetendr; Shiers, Jamie; Smith, Tim; Sobie, Randall; South, David Michael; Verbytskyi, Andrii; Viljoen, Matthew; Wang, Lu; Zimmermann, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Data from High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments are collected with significant financial and human effort and are mostly unique. An inter-experimental study group on HEP data preservation and long-term analysis was convened as a panel of the International Committee for Future Accelerators (ICFA). The group was formed by large collider-based experiments and investigated the technical and organizational aspects of HEP data preservation. An intermediate report was released in November 2009 addressing the general issues of data preservation in HEP and an extended blueprint paper was published in 2012. In July 2014 the DPHEP collaboration was formed as a result of the signature of the Collaboration Agreement by seven large funding agencies (others have since joined or are in the process of acquisition) and in June 2015 the first DPHEP Collaboration Workshop and Collaboration Board meeting took place. This status report of the DPHEP collaboration details the progress during the period from 2013 to 2015 inclusive.

  16. Using a Model of Team Collaboration to Investigate Inter-Organizational Collaboration During the Relief Effort of the January 2010 Haiti Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    whack, it’ll be tough. TKS SM 2. This question of security and the rumors of security and the racism behind the idea of security has been our major...of team collaboration is not likely at this point of diminishing returns. As such, further validation efforts are warranted. The March 2011 Japan

  17. Effects of Transformational and Transactional Leadership on Cognitive Effort and Outcomes during Collaborative Learning within a Virtual World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahai, Surinder; Jestire, Rebecca; Huang, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Computer-supported collaborative learning is a common e-learning activity. Instructors have to create appropriate social and instructional interventions in order to promote effective learning. We performed a study that examined the effects of two popular leadership interventions, transformational and transactional, on cognitive effort and outcomes…

  18. Effects of Transformational and Transactional Leadership on Cognitive Effort and Outcomes during Collaborative Learning within a Virtual World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahai, Surinder; Jestire, Rebecca; Huang, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Computer-supported collaborative learning is a common e-learning activity. Instructors have to create appropriate social and instructional interventions in order to promote effective learning. We performed a study that examined the effects of two popular leadership interventions, transformational and transactional, on cognitive effort and outcomes…

  19. Developing a primary care research agenda through collaborative efforts - a proposed "6E" model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ngiap Chuan; Ng, Chirk Jenn; Rosemary, Mitchell; Wahid, Khan; Goh, Lee Gan

    2014-01-01

    Primary care research is at a crossroad in South Pacific. A steering committee comprising a member of WONCA Asia Pacific Regional (APR) council and the President of Fiji College of General Practitioners garnered sponsorship from Fiji Ministry of Health, WONCA APR and pharmaceutical agencies to organize the event in October 2013. This paper describes the processes needed to set up a national primary research agenda through the collaborative efforts of local stakeholders and external facilitators using a test case in South Pacific. The setting was a 2-day primary care research workshop in Fiji. The steering committee invited a team of three external facilitators from the Asia-Pacific region to organize and operationalize the workshop. The eventual participants were 3 external facilitators, 6 local facilitators, and 29 local primary care physicians, academics, and local medical leaders from Fiji and South Pacific Islands. Pre-workshop and main workshop programs were drawn up by the external facilitators, using participants' input of research topics relating to their local clinical issues of interest. Course notes were prepared and distributed before the workshop. In the workshop, proposed research topics were shortlisted by group discussion and consensus. Study designs were proposed, scrutinized, and adopted for further research development. The facilitators reviewed the processes in setting the research agenda after the workshop and conceived the proposed 6E model. These processes can be grouped for easy reference, comprising the pre-workshop stages of "entreat", "enlist", "engage", and the workshop stages of "educe", "empower", and "encapsulate". The 6E model to establish a research agenda is conceptually logical. Its feasibility can be further tested in its application in other situation where research agenda setting is the critical step to improve the quality of primary care.

  20. Preservation and publication of IPY data – a collaborative effort of PANGAEA, ICSTII, and the ICSU WD

    OpenAIRE

    Diepenbroek, Michael; Bücker, Amelie; Grobe, Hannes

    2013-01-01

    In a collaborative effort between PANGAEA – Data Publisher for Earth and Environmental Science, the ICSU World Data System (WDS), and the International Council for Scientific and Technical Information (ICSTII) data resulting from projects related to the International Polar Year (IPY) have been extracted from literature for long time preservation and publication. In a first step ICSTII staff compiled a bibliography using keywords relevant to IPY projects. This bibliography referencing around 5...

  1. The Student Voice Collaborative: An Effort to Systematize Student Participation in School and District Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Ari

    2015-01-01

    This chapter recounts the first 3 years of the Student Voice Collaborative (SVC) in New York City, a district supported student leadership initiative that engages high school aged youth in school reform work at school and district levels. Based on his experiences developing and running the SVC, the author identifies nine design and implementation…

  2. Collaborative Efforts to Improve System Response to Families Who Are Experiencing Child Maltreatment and Domestic Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Duren; Dutch, Nicole; Wang, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    The "Greenbook" demonstration initiative provided federal funding and other support to six communities to establish collaborations to plan and implement policy and practice changes in systems that serve families who are experiencing domestic violence and child maltreatment or child exposure to domestic violence. The demonstration sites established…

  3. A collaborative effort to address the distribution of plutonium-contaminated sludge in Livermore, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Patrice; Cabasso, Jacqueline; Barreau, Tracy; Kelley, Marylia

    2012-01-01

    Plutonium releases from the U.S. nuclear weapons laboratory in Livermore, California resulted in the contamination of sewage sludge. Two research models to address the potential public health impacts of plutonium-contaminated sludge distribution were undertaken. One model was a collaborative approach that emphasized incorporating local knowledge into the scientific analysis and fostering the growth of mutually respectful relationships between scientists, governmental, and non-governmental collaborators. The second was a dose-assessment approach that utilized existing data to estimate radiological doses from exposure to plutonium contaminated sewage sludge and compared the estimated doses with those that have caused sickness or death. The two models reached different conclusions; neither addressed issues of intergenerational equity and primary prevention of exposure. Advancing an ethical research agenda will involve looking upstream of the contamination and working toward sustainable solutions to security that do not involve the public health threats embedded in the global embrace of nuclear weapons.

  4. Best Practices of Collaboration in Arctic Research: How to Succeed, or Fail, in Cross-Disciplinary Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, H. V.

    2014-12-01

    The rapid physical and social changes currently underway in the Arctic - and changes in the way in which we study and manage the region - require coordinated research efforts to improve our understanding of the Arctic's physical, biological, and social systems. At the same time, policy-makers and Arctic communities need decision-support tools and synthesized information to respond and adapt to the "new arctic". There are enormous challenges, however, in collaboration among the disparate groups of people needed for such efforts. A carefully planned strategic approach is required to bridge the scientific disciplinary and organizational boundaries, foster cooperation between local communities and science programs, and effectively communicate between scientists and policy-makers. Efforts must draw on bodies of knowledge from project management, strategic planning, organizational development, group dynamics, and other fields. In addition, collaborations between scientific disciplines face challenges unique to scientific culture. This poster presentation will discuss best practices of building and sustaining networks of people to catalyze successful cross-disciplinary activities. Specific examples and case studies - both successes and failures - will be presented that draw on several projects at the Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S. (ARCUS; www.arcus.org), a nonprofit membership organization composed of universities and institutions that have a substantial commitment to research in the Arctic.

  5. Enhancing the "Science" in Elementary Science Methods: A Collaborative Effort between Science Education and Entomology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boardman, Leigh Ann; Zembal-Saul, Carla; Frazier, Maryann; Appel, Heidi; Weiss, Robinne

    Teachers' subject matter knowledge is a particularly important issue in science education in that it influences instructional practices across subject areas and at different grade levels. This paper provides an overview of efforts to develop a unique elementary science methods course and related field experience through a partnership between…

  6. Comprehensive yet scalable health information systems for low resource settings: a collaborative effort in sierra leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braa, Jørn; Kanter, Andrew S; Lesh, Neal; Crichton, Ryan; Jolliffe, Bob; Sæbø, Johan; Kossi, Edem; Seebregts, Christopher J

    2010-11-13

    We address the problem of how to integrate health information systems in low-income African countries in which technical infrastructure and human resources vary wildly within countries. We describe a set of tools to meet the needs of different service areas including managing aggregate indicators, patient level record systems, and mobile tools for community outreach. We present the case of Sierra Leone and use this case to motivate and illustrate an architecture that allows us to provide services at each level of the health system (national, regional, facility and community) and provide different configurations of the tools as appropriate for the individual area. Finally, we present a, collaborative implementation of this approach in Sierra Leone.

  7. Connecting the dots: a collaborative USGS-NPS effort to expand the utility of monitoring data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, James B.; Schoolmaster, Donald R.; Schweiger, E. William; Mitchell, Brian R.; Miller, Kathryn; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.

    2014-01-01

    The Natural Resource Challenge (National Park Service 1999) was a call to action. It constituted a mandate for monitoring based on the twin premises that (1) natural resources in national parks require active management and stewardship if we are to protect them from gradual degradation, and (2) we cannot protect what we do not understand. The intent of the challenge was embodied in its original description: We must expand existing inventory programs and develop efficient ways to monitor the vital signs of natural systems. We must enlist others in the scientific community to help, and also facilitate their inquiry. Managers must have and apply this information to preserve our natural resources. In this article, we report on ongoing collaborative work between the National Park Service (NPS) and the US Geological Survey (USGS) that seeks to add to our scientific understanding of the ecological processes operating behind vital signs monitoring data. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide insights that can facilitate an understanding of the systems and identify potential opportunities for active stewardship by NPS managers (Bennetts et al. 2007; Mitchell et al. 2014). The bulk of the work thus far has involved Acadia and Rocky Mountain national parks, but there are plans for extending the work to additional parks. Our story stats with work designed to consider ways of assessing the status and condition of natural resources and the potential for historical or ongoing influences of human activities. In the 1990s, the concept of "biotic integrity" began to take hold as an aspiration for developing quantitative indices describing how closely the conditions at a site resemble those found at pristine, unimpacted sites. Quantitative methods for developing indices of biotic integrity (IBIs) and elaborations of that idea (e.g., ecological integrity) have received considerable attention and application of these methods to natural resources has become widespread (Karr 1991

  8. The Genetic Etiology of Tourette Syndrome: Large-Scale Collaborative Efforts on the Precipice of Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgitsi, Marianthi; Willsey, A Jeremy; Mathews, Carol A; State, Matthew; Scharf, Jeremiah M; Paschou, Peristera

    2016-01-01

    Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a childhood-onset neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by multiple motor and phonic tics. It has a complex etiology with multiple genes likely interacting with environmental factors to lead to the onset of symptoms. The genetic basis of the disorder remains elusive. However, multiple resources and large-scale projects are coming together, launching a new era in the field and bringing us on the verge of discovery. The large-scale efforts outlined in this report are complementary and represent a range of different approaches to the study of disorders with complex inheritance. The Tourette Syndrome Association International Consortium for Genetics (TSAICG) has focused on large families, parent-proband trios and cases for large case-control designs such as genomewide association studies (GWAS), copy number variation (CNV) scans, and exome/genome sequencing. TIC Genetics targets rare, large effect size mutations in simplex trios, and multigenerational families. The European Multicentre Tics in Children Study (EMTICS) seeks to elucidate gene-environment interactions including the involvement of infection and immune mechanisms in TS etiology. Finally, TS-EUROTRAIN, a Marie Curie Initial Training Network, aims to act as a platform to unify large-scale projects in the field and to educate the next generation of experts. Importantly, these complementary large-scale efforts are joining forces to uncover the full range of genetic variation and environmental risk factors for TS, holding great promise for identifying definitive TS susceptibility genes and shedding light into the complex pathophysiology of this disorder.

  9. The genetic etiology of Tourette Syndrome: Large-scale collaborative efforts on the precipice of discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianthi Georgitsi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome (TS is a childhood-onset neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by multiple motor and phonic tics. It has a complex etiology with multiple genes likely interacting with environmental factors to lead to the onset of symptoms. The genetic basis of the disorder remains elusive;however, multiple resources and large-scale projects are coming together, launching a new era in the field and bringing us on the verge of discovery. The large-scale efforts outlined in this report, are complementary and represent a range of different approaches to the study of disorders with complex inheritance. The Tourette Syndrome Association International Consortium for Genetics (TSAICG has focused on large families, parent-proband trios and cases for large case-control designs such as genomewide association studies (GWAS, copy number variation (CNV scans and exome/genome sequencing. TIC Genetics targets rare, large effect size mutations in simplex trios and multigenerational families. The European Multicentre Tics in Children Study (EMTICS seeks to elucidate gene-environment interactions including the involvement of infection and immune mechanisms in TS etiology. Finally, TS-EUROTRAIN, a Marie Curie Initial Training Network, aims to act as a platform to unify large-scale projects in the field and to educate the next generation of experts. Importantly, these complementary large-scale efforts are joining forces to uncover the full range of genetic variation and environmental risk factors for TS, holding great promise for indentifying definitive TS susceptibility genes and shedding light into the complex pathophysiology of this disorder.

  10. The NGS WikiBook: a dynamic collaborative online training effort with long-term sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing-Woei; Bolser, Dan; Manske, Magnus; Giorgi, Federico Manuel; Vyahhi, Nikolay; Usadel, Björn; Clavijo, Bernardo J; Chan, Ting-Fung; Wong, Nathalie; Zerbino, Daniel; Schneider, Maria Victoria

    2013-09-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is increasingly being adopted as the backbone of biomedical research. With the commercialization of various affordable desktop sequencers, NGS will be reached by increasing numbers of cellular and molecular biologists, necessitating community consensus on bioinformatics protocols to tackle the exponential increase in quantity of sequence data. The current resources for NGS informatics are extremely fragmented. Finding a centralized synthesis is difficult. A multitude of tools exist for NGS data analysis; however, none of these satisfies all possible uses and needs. This gap in functionality could be filled by integrating different methods in customized pipelines, an approach helped by the open-source nature of many NGS programmes. Drawing from community spirit and with the use of the Wikipedia framework, we have initiated a collaborative NGS resource: The NGS WikiBook. We have collected a sufficient amount of text to incentivize a broader community to contribute to it. Users can search, browse, edit and create new content, so as to facilitate self-learning and feedback to the community. The overall structure and style for this dynamic material is designed for the bench biologists and non-bioinformaticians. The flexibility of online material allows the readers to ignore details in a first read, yet have immediate access to the information they need. Each chapter comes with practical exercises so readers may familiarize themselves with each step. The NGS WikiBook aims to create a collective laboratory book and protocol that explains the key concepts and describes best practices in this fast-evolving field.

  11. Up Close and Personal: A Statewide Collaborative's Effort to Get Individual Surgeon Quality Improvement Data to the Practitioner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Brian J; Cecil, William; Cofer, Joseph B; Clarke, P Chris; Guillamondegui, Oscar

    2016-03-01

    Ranking of surgeons and hospitals focuses on procedure volume and hospitality. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program provides vetted outcomes of surgical quality and therefore can direct improvement. Our statewide collaborative's analysis creates personalized surgeon data to drive quality improvement. Statewide National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data generated specific measures from 103,656 general/vascular cases and identified individual surgeon's outcome of occurrences and length of procedure. We assumed a normal distribution and called the top 2.5 per cent as exemplars and the bottom 2.5 per cent as outliers. For length of operation, a standard duration was calculated, and identified outliers as longer than the 95th percentile of the upper confidence interval/procedure. Since 2009, sharing best practice reduced statewide mortality rate by 31.5 per cent and postoperative morbidity by 33.3 per cent. For length of surgery, long outliers have more complications (urinary tract infection, organ space/surgical site infection, sepsis, septic shock, prolonged intubation, pneumonia, deep venous thrombosis, deep incisional infection, and wound disruption). No significant trends in surgeon performance were seen over 24 months. A statewide collaborative has resulted in substantial risk-adjusted reductions in surgical morbidity and mortality. These results of the individual surgeon demonstrate best practices are shared, a proven tool for improvement in our collaborative.

  12. The Geology Robot: A Collaborative Effort for improving Outcrop Visualization and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredrick, K. C.; Valoski, M. P.; Rodi, A. F.

    2010-12-01

    ) an opportunity to use a simple tool to accomplish previously difficult, dangerous, or even impossible tasks. This work is an example of cross-discipline collaboration on our campus. It was conceived from a Geologist’s point of view, shared with a Robotics expert, and offered as a challenge to the university’s Robotics students. Several interested students designed and built the robot from scratch as an extra-curricular project. This is a great demonstration of capturing the interests of students across disciplinary boundaries to achieve a unique and creative outcome.

  13. Clinical Use of Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells-Harmonization Approach in European Collaborative Effort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Ten Brinke

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of patients with autoimmune diseases and severe allergies and recipients of transplants increases worldwide. Currently, these patients require lifelong administration of immunomodulatory drugs. Often, these drugs are expensive and show immediate or late-occurring severe side effects. Treatment would be greatly improved by targeting the cause of autoimmunity, that is, loss of tolerance to self-antigens. Accumulating knowledge on immune mechanisms has led to the development of tolerogenic dendritic cells (tolDC, with the specific objective to restrain unwanted immune reactions in the long term. The first clinical trials with tolDC have recently been conducted and more tolDC trials are underway. Although the safety trials have been encouraging, many questions relating to tolDC, for example, cell-manufacturing protocols, administration route, amount and frequency, or mechanism of action, remain to be answered. Aiming to join efforts in translating tolDC and other tolerogenic cellular products (e.g., Tregs and macrophages to the clinic, a European COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology network has been initiated—A FACTT (action to focus and accelerate cell-based tolerance-inducing therapies. A FACTT aims to minimize overlap and maximize comparison of tolDC approaches through establishment of minimum information models and consensus monitoring parameters, ensuring that progress will be in an efficient, safe, and cost-effective way.

  14. Collaboration in Arctic Research: Best Practices to Build and Sustain Successful Cross- and Trans-disciplinary Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, H. V.; Rich, R. H.

    2015-12-01

    The rapid physical and social changes currently underway in the Arctic - and changes in the way in which we study and manage the region -- require coordinated research efforts to improve our understanding of the Arctic's physical, biological, and social systems and the implications of change at many scales. At the same time, policy-makers and Arctic communities need decision-support tools and synthesized information to respond and adapt to the "new Arctic". There are enormous challenges, however, in collaboration among the disparate groups of people needed for such efforts. A carefully planned strategic approach is required to bridge the scientific disciplinary and organizational boundaries, foster cooperation between local communities and science programs, and effectively communicate between scientists and policy-makers. Efforts must draw on bodies of knowledge from project management, strategic planning, organizational development, and group dynamics. This poster presentation will discuss best practices of building and sustaining networks of people to catalyze successful cross-disciplinary activities. Specific examples and case studies - both successes and failures -- will be presented that draw on several projects at the Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S. (ARCUS; www.arcus.org), a nonprofit membership organization composed of universities and institutions that have a substantial commitment to research in the Arctic.

  15. Hidden leprosy cases in tribal population groups and how to reach them through a collaborative effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, M Santhosh; Padmavathi, S; Shivakumar, M; Charles, U; Appalanaidu, M; Perumal, R; Thiagarajan, P N; Somasekhar, Y

    2015-12-01

    Tribal populations are an underserved population group and access to health services is a major challenge for them. Since leprosy treatment is integrated with the general health services, identifying leprosy cases is not be easy in these settings and they remain as endemic reservoirs, unless greater efforts are made to reach them. An active search operation was conducted in the tribal colonies in four pre-identified Health & Nutrition Clusters, Nellore district, Andhra Pradesh, India, in 2013. After a brief training, village health nurses and selected volunteers covered all the households, showing flash cards with photos of leprosy cases and enquiring if there was any resident with a similar condition. Suspects were listed and examined by the district leprosy supervisor and field coordinators from Damien Foundation. Follow up interviews were done after one year to assess the treatment completion rate. Village health workers covered 47,574 people living in the tribal colonies and identified 325 leprosy suspects. Among them, 70 were confirmed as new leprosy cases. The prevalence of previously undetected leprosy cases was found to be 14.7/10,000. Out of 70 cases, 19 (27%) were children, 35 (50%) were female, 32 (45.7%) were classified as MB leprosy, 6 (8.6%) had a leprosy reaction and 11 (15.7%) persons had Grade 2 disability at the time of diagnosis. The treatment completion rate was found to be 74% at the end of one year. The study reveals a very high burden of leprosy among the tribal population and demonstrates how resources can be mobilized from government, NGO and local community sources to promote early case detection among underserved population groups.

  16. A Collaborative Effort to Increase Enrollment and Retention in Geoscience Majors in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, C. J.; Fountain, J. C.; Bartek, C. S.; Tang, G.

    2004-12-01

    Under an NSF Opportunities for Enhancement of Diversity in Geosciences grant, the Department of Marine, Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at North Carolina State University partnered with NC A&T University, a HBCU, to implement a multi-faceted effort to increase enrollment and retention in geoscience majors, with particular emphasis on under represented groups. New student recruitment is facilitated by a trained graduate student who visits high schools and presents a multi-media presentation on research at NCSU and career opportunities in the geosciences. Interested high school students are then invited to participate in a hands-on, summer science camp. Community college students are recruited through a new introductory geology course developed for and offered at Robeson Community College (77% of students from under represented groups). NC A&T has developed a track in their physics curriculum to prepare students for a geophysics career. The track includes a planned semester in residence at NCSU. Students who choose to enroll at NCSU, register for an introductory course developed as part of our NSF STEP grant, Environmental Issues in Water Resources, during which geoscience careers are highlighted and in-class research focuses on a local watershed. The emphasis on undergraduate research continues with Environmental Geology, an upper division course in which the entire class studies water and sediment contamination on local watersheds. All courses developed build upon our physics department's successful model of integrating lectures and laboratories and engaging first-year students in group-oriented, undergraduate research (http://www.physics.ncsu.edu/physics_ed/). Following the group research courses, advanced undergraduate students are placed in traditional research labs with faculty mentors while participating in a career development seminar in which research methods, proposal writing and presentation skills are introduced. Tutoring and mentoring programs provide

  17. Collaboration as a Strategy to Transform the Impact of EPO Efforts in the New York Center for Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svirsky, A.; Rogers, K. L.; Meissner, M.; Busby, G.; Roberge, W.

    2014-12-01

    The New York Center for Astrobiology (NYCA) EPO effort is a collaboration combining expertise in evaluation and assessment of STEM educational modules with disciplinary expertise in astrobiology. In practice, the NYCA partners with external experts in professional development, informal education and evaluation to assist in developing and implementing certain programs of the NYCA EPO activities. Two specific program initiatives of the NYCA EPO effort offer excellent examples of programs with strong science content knowledge as well as using effective tools to address the NSF impact categories. These are the ExxonMobil Bernard Harris Summer Science Camp (EMBHSSC, in conjunction with RPI's STEM Pipeline Initiative) and the Astrobiology Teachers Academy (ATA). The EMBHSSC for middle school students focuses on NASA astrobiology initiatives around the "Quest for Life" theme. The Camp has a comprehensive evaluation component and uses pre-and post- assessment of student knowledge and interest in STEM. Recent data suggest that every student has shown a measurable gain in these areas. The ATA is a weeklong summer intensive professional development program for P-12 STEM teachers that combines discipline scientists in the NYCA with an external evaluation organization, the Association for the Cooperative Advancement of Science and Education (ACASE). The goal is for teachers to develop a new learning module for a course they teach that uses astrobiology as a content focus to engage students. The Academy has scientists collaborating with teachers in this effort, providing content and assistance in designing instructional activities. Assessments are woven into the fabric of the work in a few ways: 1. There is a purposeful focus on assessment as part of the learning module, and the content of the ATA; 2. ACASE offers teachers a tool for tracking their students' attainment of the learning goals identified in their learning module; 3. There are daily evaluations of the teachers

  18. A multidisciplinary monitoring network at Mayon volcano, Philippines: A collaborative effort between PHIVOLCS and EOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandner, F. M.; Hidayat, D.; Laguerta, E. P.; Baloloy, A. V.; Valerio, R.; Vaquilar, R.; Arpa, M. C.; Marcial, S. S.; Novianti, M. L.

    2012-04-01

    Mount Mayon in Albay province (Philippines) is an openly-degassing basaltic-andesitic stratovolcano, located on the northern edge of the northwest-trending OAS graben. Its latest eruptions were in Aug-Sept 2006 and Dec 2009. Mayon's current status is PHIVOLCS' level 1 with low seismicity dominated mostly local and regional tectonic earthquakes and continuous emission of SO2 from its summit crater. A research collaboration between the Earth Observatory of Singapore-NTU and the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (PHIVOLCS) was initiated in 2009, aimed at developing a multi-disciplinary monitoring network around Mayon. The network design comprises a network of co-located geophysical, geochemical, hydrological and meteorological sensors, in both radial and circular arrangements. Radially arranged stations are intended to capture and distinguish vertical conduit processes, while the circular station design (including existing PHIVOLCS stations in cooperation with JICA, Japan) is meant to distinguish locations and sector activity of subsurface events. Geophysical instrumentation from EOS currently includes 4 broadband seismographs (in addition to 3 existing broadbands and 3 short period instruments from PHIVOLCS & JICA), and 5 tiltmeters. Four continuous cGPS stations will be installed in 2012, complementing 5 existing PHIVOLCS stations. Stations are also designed to house a multi-sensor package of static subsurface soil CO2 monitoring stations, the first of which was installed in early 2012, and which include subsoil sensors for heat flux, temperature, and moisture, as well as meteorological stations (with sonic anemometers and contact rain gages). These latter sensors are all controlled from one control box per station. Meteorological stations will help us to validate tilt, gas permeability, and also know lahar initiation potential. Since early 2011, separate stations downwind of the two prevailing wind directions from the summit continuously monitor

  19. Seeing through the Smoke: A collaborative, multidisciplinary effort to address the interplay between wildfire, climate, air quality, and health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brey, S. J.; Fischer, E. V.; Pierce, J. R.; Ford, B.; Lassman, W.; Pfister, G.; Volckens, J.; Gan, R.; Magzamen, S.; Barnes, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to wildfire smoke plumes represents an episodic, uncertain, and potentially growing threat to public health in the western United States. The area burned by wildfires in this region has increased over recent decades, and the future of fires within this region is largely unknown. Future fire emissions are intimately linked to future meteorological conditions, which are uncertain due to the variability of climate model outputs and differences between representative concentration pathways (RCP) scenarios. We know that exposure to wildfire smoke is harmful, particularly for vulnerable populations. However the literature on the heath effects of wildfire smoke exposure is thin, particularly when compared to the depth of information we have on the effects of exposure to smoke of anthropogenic origin. We are exploring the relationships between climate, fires, air quality and public health through multiple interdisciplinary collaborations. We will present several examples from these projects including 1) an analysis of the influence of fire on ozone abundances over the United States, and 2) efforts to use a high-resolution weather forecasting model to nail down exposure within specific smoke plumes. We will also highlight how our team works together. This discussion will include examples of the university structure that facilitates our current collaborations, and the lessons we have learned by seeking stakeholder input to make our science more useful.

  20. Coordinating collaborative joint efforts with suppliers: the effects of trust transaction specific investment and information network in the Dutch flower industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claro, D.P.; Oliveira Claro, de P.B.; Hagelaar, J.L.F.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: It is the aim of this paper to discuss the value of trust and the effects of transaction specific investments for the relative degree of collaborative joint efforts, and also to assess the moderating effect of the information network on such joint efforts. Design/methodology/approach: The p

  1. Biomedical Big Data Training Collaborative (BBDTC): An effort to bridge the talent gap in biomedical science and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purawat, Shweta; Cowart, Charles; Amaro, Rommie E; Altintas, Ilkay

    2016-06-01

    The BBDTC (https://biobigdata.ucsd.edu) is a community-oriented platform to encourage high-quality knowledge dissemination with the aim of growing a well-informed biomedical big data community through collaborative efforts on training and education. The BBDTC collaborative is an e-learning platform that supports the biomedical community to access, develop and deploy open training materials. The BBDTC supports Big Data skill training for biomedical scientists at all levels, and from varied backgrounds. The natural hierarchy of courses allows them to be broken into and handled as modules. Modules can be reused in the context of multiple courses and reshuffled, producing a new and different, dynamic course called a playlist. Users may create playlists to suit their learning requirements and share it with individual users or the wider public. BBDTC leverages the maturity and design of the HUBzero content-management platform for delivering educational content. To facilitate the migration of existing content, the BBDTC supports importing and exporting course material from the edX platform. Migration tools will be extended in the future to support other platforms. Hands-on training software packages, i.e., toolboxes, are supported through Amazon EC2 and Virtualbox virtualization technologies, and they are available as: (i) downloadable lightweight Virtualbox Images providing a standardized software tool environment with software packages and test data on their personal machines, and (ii) remotely accessible Amazon EC2 Virtual Machines for accessing biomedical big data tools and scalable big data experiments. At the moment, the BBDTC site contains three open Biomedical big data training courses with lecture contents, videos and hands-on training utilizing VM toolboxes, covering diverse topics. The courses have enhanced the hands-on learning environment by providing structured content that users can use at their own pace. A four course biomedical big data series is planned

  2. Biomedical Big Data Training Collaborative (BBDTC): An effort to bridge the talent gap in biomedical science and research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purawat, Shweta; Cowart, Charles; Amaro, Rommie E.; Altintas, Ilkay

    2016-01-01

    The BBDTC (https://biobigdata.ucsd.edu) is a community-oriented platform to encourage high-quality knowledge dissemination with the aim of growing a well-informed biomedical big data community through collaborative efforts on training and education. The BBDTC collaborative is an e-learning platform that supports the biomedical community to access, develop and deploy open training materials. The BBDTC supports Big Data skill training for biomedical scientists at all levels, and from varied backgrounds. The natural hierarchy of courses allows them to be broken into and handled as modules. Modules can be reused in the context of multiple courses and reshuffled, producing a new and different, dynamic course called a playlist. Users may create playlists to suit their learning requirements and share it with individual users or the wider public. BBDTC leverages the maturity and design of the HUBzero content-management platform for delivering educational content. To facilitate the migration of existing content, the BBDTC supports importing and exporting course material from the edX platform. Migration tools will be extended in the future to support other platforms. Hands-on training software packages, i.e., toolboxes, are supported through Amazon EC2 and Virtualbox virtualization technologies, and they are available as: (i) downloadable lightweight Virtualbox Images providing a standardized software tool environment with software packages and test data on their personal machines, and (ii) remotely accessible Amazon EC2 Virtual Machines for accessing biomedical big data tools and scalable big data experiments. At the moment, the BBDTC site contains three open Biomedical big data training courses with lecture contents, videos and hands-on training utilizing VM toolboxes, covering diverse topics. The courses have enhanced the hands-on learning environment by providing structured content that users can use at their own pace. A four course biomedical big data series is planned

  3. Using the Internet in Middle Schools: A Model for Success. A Collaborative Effort between Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Los Alamos Middle School (LAMS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addessio, Barbara K.; And Others

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) developed a model for school networking using Los Alamos Middle School as a testbed. The project was a collaborative effort between the school and the laboratory. The school secured administrative funding for hardware and software; and LANL provided the network architecture, installation, consulting, and…

  4. Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michelle L.

    2010-01-01

    This article explores collaboration between library media educators and regular classroom teachers. The article focuses on the context of the issue, positions on the issue, the impact of collaboration, and how to implement effective collaboration into the school system. Various books and professional journals are used to support conclusions…

  5. European collaboration for improved monitoring of Icelandic volcanoes: Status of the FUTUREVOLC project after the initial 18 months

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Stéphanie; Parks, Michelle; Sigmundsson, Freysteinn; Vogfjörð, Kristín; Einarsdóttir, Heiðveig Maria; Tumi Gudmundsson, Magnús; Kristinsson, Ingvar; Loughlin, Sue; Ilyinskaya, Evgenia; Hooper, Andrew; Kylling, Arve; Witham, Claire; Bean, Chris; Braiden, Aoife; Ripepe, Maurizio; Prata, Fred; Pétur Heiðarsson, Einar; Other Members Of The Futurevolc Team

    2014-05-01

    The FUTUREVOLC project funded by the European Union (FP7) is devoted to volcanic hazard assessment and establishing an integrated volcanological monitoring procedure through a European collaboration. To reach these objectives the project combines broad expertise from 26 partners from 10 countries, focusing on the four most active volcanoes of Iceland: Grímsvötn, Katla, Hekla and Bárdarbunga. The geological setting of Iceland, the high rate of eruptions and the various eruption styles make this country an optimal natural laboratory to study volcanic processes from crustal depths to the atmosphere. The project, which began on 1 October 2012, integrates advanced monitoring and analytical techniques in an innovative way, focusing on (i) detailed monitoring to improve our understanding of the seismic/magmatic unrest, in order to estimate the amount of magma available for an eruption and to provide early warnings (ii) the dynamics of magma in the conduit and a near real time estimation of the mass eruption rate and (iii) observing and modelling the plume dynamics. The project design considers effective collaboration between partners and aims for efficient cross-disciplinary workflows. A major step during the first 18 months of the project was the installation of additional equipment in the volcanic regions of Iceland to reinforce and complement the existing monitoring. The instruments include: seismometers, GPS stations, MultigGAS detectors, DOAS, infrasonic arrays, electric field sensors, radars, and optical particle sizers. Data streaming is designed to withstand extreme weather conditions. The FUTUREVOLC project has an open data policy for real and near-time data. Implementation of a data hub is currently under way, based on open access to data from the 2010 Eyjafjallajökull eruption. Access to volcano monitoring data through a common interface will allow timely information on magma movements facilitated through combined analysis. A key part of the project is to

  6. Keep Kids in School: A Collaborative Community Effort to Increase Compliance with State-Mandated Health Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Valerie; Salzeider, Christine; Holzum, Laura; Milbrandt, Tracy; Zahnd, Whitney; Puczynski, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is important that collaborative relationships exist in a community to improve access to needed services for children. Such partnerships foster preventive services, such as immunizations, and other services that protect the health and well-being of all children. Methods: A collaborative relationship in Illinois involving an academic…

  7. Keep Kids in School: A Collaborative Community Effort to Increase Compliance with State-Mandated Health Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Valerie; Salzeider, Christine; Holzum, Laura; Milbrandt, Tracy; Zahnd, Whitney; Puczynski, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is important that collaborative relationships exist in a community to improve access to needed services for children. Such partnerships foster preventive services, such as immunizations, and other services that protect the health and well-being of all children. Methods: A collaborative relationship in Illinois involving an academic…

  8. Improving Physical Health in Patients With Chronic Mental Disorders: Twelve-Month Results From a Randomized Controlled Collaborative Care Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Amy M; Barbaresso, Michelle M; Lai, Zongshan; Nord, Kristina M; Bramlet, Margretta; Goodrich, David E; Post, Edward P; Almirall, Daniel; Bauer, Mark S

    2017-01-01

    Persons with chronic mental disorders are disproportionately burdened with physical health conditions. We determined whether Life Goals Collaborative Care compared to usual care improves physical health in patients with mental disorders within 12 months. This single-blind randomized controlled effectiveness study of a collaborative care model was conducted at a midwestern Veterans Affairs urban outpatient mental health clinic. Patients (N = 293 out of 474 eligible approached) with an ICD-9-CM diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder and at least 1 cardiovascular disease risk factor provided informed consent and were randomized (February 24, 2010, to April 29, 2015) to Life Goals (n = 146) or usual care (n = 147). A total of 287 completed baseline assessments, and 245 completed 12-month follow-up assessments. Life Goals included 5 weekly sessions that provided semistructured guidance on managing physical and mental health symptoms through healthy behavior changes, augmented by ongoing care coordination. The primary outcome was change in physical health-related quality of life score (Veterans RAND 12-item Short Form Health Survey [VR-12] physical health component score). Secondary outcomes included control of cardiovascular risk factors from baseline to 12 months (blood pressure, lipids, weight), mental health-related quality of life, and mental health symptoms. Among patients completing baseline and 12-month outcomes assessments (N = 245), the mean age was 55.3 years (SD = 10.8; range, 25-78 years), and 15.4% were female. Intent-to-treat analysis revealed that compared to those in usual care, patients randomized to Life Goals had slightly increased VR-12 physical health scores (coefficient = 3.21; P = .01). Patients with chronic mental disorders and cardiovascular disease risk who received Life Goals had improved physical health-related quality of life. ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT01487668 and NCT01244854.

  9. Improving Physical Health in Patients with Chronic Mental Disorders: 12-Month Results from a Randomized Controlled Collaborative Care Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbourne, Amy M.; Barbaresso, Michelle M.; Lai, Zongshan; Nord, Kristina M.; Bramlet, Margretta; Goodrich, David E.; Post, Edward P.; Almirall, Daniel; Bauer, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Persons with chronic mental disorders are disproportionately burdened with physical health conditions. We determined whether Life Goals Collaborative Care compared to usual care improves physical health in patients with mental disorders within 12 months. Method This single-blind randomized controlled effectiveness study of a collaborative care model was conducted at a mid-western Veterans Affairs urban outpatient mental health clinic. Patients (N=293 out of 474 eligible approached) with an ICD-9-CM diagnosis of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or major depressive disorder and at least one cardiovascular disease risk factor were consented and randomized (02/24/10 to 04/29/15) to Life Goals (N=146) or usual care (N=147). A total of 287 completed baseline assessments and 245 completed 12-month follow-up assessments. Life Goals included five weekly sessions that provided semi-structured guidance on managing physical and mental health symptoms through healthy behavior changes, augmented by ongoing care coordination. The primary outcome was change in physical health-related quality of life score (VR-12 physical health component score). Secondary outcomes included control of cardiovascular risk factors from baseline to 12 months (blood pressure, lipids, weight), mental health-related quality of life, and mental health symptoms. Results Among patients completing baseline and 12-month outcomes assessments (N=245), the mean age was 55.3 (SD=10.8; range 28-75 years) and 15.4% were female. Intent-to-treat analysis revealed that compared to those in usual care, patients randomized to Life Goals had slightly increased VR-12 physical health scores (coefficient=3.21;p=0.01). Conclusion Patients with chronic mental disorders and cardiovascular disease risk who received Life Goals had improved physical health-related quality of life. PMID:27780336

  10. An archetype of the collaborative efforts of psychotherapy and psychopharmacology in successfully treating dissociative identity disorder with comorbid bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmanan, Manu N; Meier, Stacey L Colton; Meier, Robert S; Lakshmanan, Ramaswamy

    2010-07-01

    We present a case where dissociative identity disorder was effectively treated with memory retrieval psychotherapy. However, the patient's comorbid bipolar disorder contributed to the patient's instability and fortified the amnesiac barriers that exist between alter personality states in dissociative identity disorder, which made memory retrieval difficult to achieve. Implications from this case indicate that a close collaboration between psychologist and psychiatrist focused on carefully diagnosing and treating existing comorbid conditions may be the most important aspect in treating dissociative identity disorder. We present our experience of successfully treating a patient with dissociative identity disorder and bipolar disorder using this collaborative method.

  11. Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Meme; Pryor, Boori Monty

    2000-01-01

    Describes, in the words of two Australian authors (one Aboriginal and one European-Australian), how they work together when they write books together, and how their collaboration goes beyond the two of them. (SR)

  12. Changing Policy and Practice in the Child Welfare System through Collaborative Efforts to Identify and Respond Effectively to Family Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Duren; Landsverk, John; Wang, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    The "Greenbook" provides a roadmap for child welfare agencies to collaborate and provide effective responses to families who are experiencing co-occurring child maltreatment and domestic violence. A multisite developmental evaluation was conducted of six demonstration sites that received federal funding to implement "Greenbook" recommendations for…

  13. Necessity and Requirements of a Collaborative Effort to Develop a Large Wind Turbine Blade Test Facility in North America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotrell, J.; Musial, W.; Hughes, S.

    2006-05-01

    The wind power industry in North America has an immediate need for larger blade test facilities to ensure the survival of the industry. Blade testing is necessary to meet certification and investor requirements and is critical to achieving the reliability and blade life needed for the wind turbine industry to succeed. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Wind Program is exploring options for collaborating with government, private, or academic entities in a partnership to build larger blade test facilities in North America capable of testing blades up to at least 70 m in length. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) prepared this report for DOE to describe the immediate need to pursue larger blade test facilities in North America, categorize the numerous prospective partners for a North American collaboration, and document the requirements for a North American test facility.

  14. Chimpanzee research and conservation in Bossou and the Nimba Mountains: a long-term international collaborative effort in West Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granier, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    The Nimba Mountains are a West African Natural World Heritage site located in the range of the Guineo-equatorial evergreen rainforest, renowned for its rich biodiversity with a high level of endemism. In 1976, Yukimaru Sugiyama from Kyoto University initiated the long-term study of chimpanzees at Bossou, a Guinean village situated 5 km from the northern foothills of Nimba. This Japanese initiative has provided key discoveries and insights on our closest living evolutionary relatives over the 40 past years, and has grown to become an international collaboration with a research focus extended to adjacent chimpanzee communities. The present paper describes a mid-term behavioral and ecological study on wild chimpanzees populating the southern slope of the Nimba Mountains, conducted in the framework of this collaborative project. It aimed to assess the status and ecological requirements of chimpanzees in order to formulate purpose-built actions for their conservation. We estimated a density of 0.46 chimpanzee per km(2) using nest count methods from line transects. We used logistic and Poisson regressions to investigate basic ecological characteristics of chimpanzees in relation to habitat composition and structure, topography and seasonality. We performed an in-depth analysis of their nesting and feeding behaviors, and identified important components of their diet; we also recorded their year-round ranging patterns. Our findings highlight the importance of old secondary forest and high-altitude habitats for these chimpanzees. We discuss the results in the light of other studies from the perspective of the conservation of the species and its natural habitat.

  15. Toward the Cure of All Children With Cancer Through Collaborative Efforts: Pediatric Oncology As a Global Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Friedrich, Paola; Alcasabas, Patricia; Antillon, Federico; Banavali, Shripad; Castillo, Luis; Israels, Trijn; Jeha, Sima; Harif, Mhammed; Sullivan, Michael J.; Quah, Thuan Chong; Patte, Catherine; Pui, Ching-Hon; Barr, Ronald; Gross, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Advances in the treatment of childhood cancers have resulted in part from the development of national and international collaborative initiatives that have defined biologic determinants and generated risk-adapted therapies that maximize cure while minimizing acute and long-term effects. Currently, more than 80% of children with cancer who are treated with modern multidisciplinary treatments in developed countries are cured; however, of the approximately 160,000 children and adolescents who are diagnosed with cancer every year worldwide, 80% live in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where access to quality care is limited and chances of cure are low. In addition, the disease burden is not fully known because of the lack of population-based cancer registries in low-resource countries. Regional and ethnic variations in the incidence of the different childhood cancers suggest unique interactions between genetic and environmental factors that could provide opportunities for etiologic research. Regional collaborative initiatives have been developed in Central and South America and the Caribbean, Africa, the Middle East, Asia, and Oceania. These initiatives integrate regional capacity building, education of health care providers, implementation of intensity-graduated treatments, and establishment of research programs that are adjusted to local capacity and local needs. Together, the existing consortia and regional networks operating in LMICs have the potential to reach out to almost 60% of all children with cancer worldwide. In summary, childhood cancer burden has been shifted toward LMICs and, for that reason, global initiatives directed at pediatric cancer care and control are needed. Regional networks aiming to build capacity while incorporating research on epidemiology, health services, and outcomes should be supported. PMID:26304881

  16. Establishing a Collaborative Effort to Assess The Contribution to High Asian Runoff from Ice and Snow (CHARIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Richard; Barrett, Andrew; Brodzik, Mary Jo; Fetterer, Florence; Horodyskyj, Ulyana; Jodha Khalsa, Siri; Racoviteanu, Adina; Rasmussen, Al; Raup, Bruce; Williams, Mark; Wilson, Alana

    2013-04-01

    The improved understanding of the regional water resources of High Asia is a cross-boundary exercise and in order to achieve this goal, University of Colorado scientists are working directly with researchers at institutions in nine different nations where these ice and snow resources are located across High Asia (Bhutan, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan). These countries contain the headwaters of the Brahmaputra, Ganges, Indus, Syr Darya and Amu Darya rivers. This collaboration includes both joint research and capacity building that will enhance the scientific understanding of the regional hydrology through augmented field programs and technical training. The fundamental objective of this collaborative study is to develop a thorough and systematic assessment of the separate contributions from seasonal snow melt and from glacier ice melt to the water resources originating across the Himalaya, Karakoram, Hindu Kush, Pamir and Tien Shan mountain ranges. While it is generally accepted that the melt from glacier ice and seasonal snow is a significant component of High Asian water resources, the actual water volume available from these two individual sources remains uncertain. To accomplish project objectives, a suite of satellite remote sensing, reanalysis and ground based data are applied as input to specific snow and ice melt models. Gridded maps of snow and glacier area/elevation are used as input to temperature-index melt models to estimate runoff from snow covered grid cells, based on cell area and melt depth. Glacier melt is estimated in the same way, once snow has disappeared from glacierized grid cells. The melt models are driven by daily mean temperature from reanalysis data. We are comparing the melt volume time series generated from temperature-index models with measured river discharge volumes and comparing the regional scale results with local sub-basin studies based on energy balance modeling approaches

  17. Cross-border collaboration for neglected tropical disease efforts-Lessons learned from onchocerciasis control and elimination in the Mano River Union (West Africa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustavsen, Kenneth; Sodahlon, Yao; Bush, Simon

    2016-08-22

    Diseases don't respect borders, so efforts to control and eliminate diseases must also be flexible and adaptable enough to effectively reach the populations that live in the areas around national frontiers. Onchocerciasis, commonly known as river blindness is a tropical disease that has historically affected millions of people in 35 countries in Africa and Latin America. In Africa, programs and partnerships to address river blindness through mass drug administration have been active for more than 25 years. While in many cases the disease is found in isolated foci that fall entirely within national boundaries, the geographic scope of many affected areas crosses country borders. National river blindness programs are the responsibility of each nation's Ministry of Health, so in cross-border situations there is a need for effective country-country collaboration. Cross-border collaboration for onchocerciasis control efforts in the countries of the Mano River Basin illustrates the positive impact of a creative model, and offers lessons for expanded application for onchocerciasis elimination as well as other neglected tropical disease (NTD) control and elimination programs.

  18. Good neighbors. A collaborative effort develops housing for the low-income elderly on Chicago's southeast side.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peregrine, M W; Lanctot, T E; Drinan, D; Kilbourne, B J

    1991-06-01

    On Chicago's southeast side, the Claretian missionaries--in collaboration with the Oblates of Mary Immaculate, members of the local community, and local business interests--will soon open Villa Guadalupe, a housing project for low-income seniors. Recent developments have combined to make the creation of low-income housing for the elderly more compelling than ever from a mission perspective and more feasible from a structuring and financing perspective. Since 1925, the Claretians have served a predominantly Hispanic population in south Chicago. The neighborhood suffered economic devastation in the 1960s with the collapse of the local steel industry. A 1985 needs assessment determined that nearly one in five elderly residents in the area lives at or near the poverty level. As a result of the assessment, the Claretians decided to develop the Villa Guadalupe project. For assistance in managing and financing the project, the Claretians drew on the resources and expertise of the Oblates of Mary Immaculate, who have a history of ministering to the elderly. The project also had to overcome legal obstacles to securing property tax exemption from the state of Illinois. The project cleared another hurdle when it secured financing by issuing tax-exempt bonds secured by a letter of credit issued by a commercial bank. In addition, interest in monies from an endowment fund will make up the difference between funds Villa Guadalupe will receive through rents and the income that is required to support the project.

  19. The Effects of Teacher and Teacher-librarian High-end Collaboration on Inquiry-based Project Reports and School Monthly Test Scores of Fifth-grade Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Hon Chen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was twofold. The first purpose was to establish the high level collaboration of integrated instruction model between social studies teacher and teacher-librarian. The second purpose was to investigate the effects of high-end collaboration on the individual and groups’ inquiry-based project reports, as well as monthly test scores of fifth-grade students. A quasi-experimental method was adopted, two classes of elementary school fifth graders in Tainan Municipal city, Taiwan were used as samples. Students were randomly assigned to experimental conditions by class. Twenty eight students of the experimental group were taught by the collaboration of social studies teacher and teacher-librarian; while 27 students of the controlled group were taught separately by teacher in didactic teaching method. Inquiry-Based Project Record, Inquiry-Based Project Rubrics, and school monthly test scores were used as instruments for collecting data. A t-test and correlation were used to analyze the data. The results indicate that: (1 High-end collaboration model between social studies teacher and teacher-librarian was established and implemented well in the classroom. (2There was a significant difference between the experimental group and the controlled group in individual and groups’ inquiry-based project reports. Students that were taught by the collaborative teachers got both higher inquiry-based project reports’ scores than those that were taught separately by the teachers. Experimental group’s students got higher school monthly test scores than controlled groups. Suggestions for teachers’ high-end collaboration and future researcher are provided in this paper.

  20. NASA Ames DEVELOP Interns Collaborate with the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project to Monitor and Study Restoration Efforts using NASA's Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcomer, Michelle E.; Kuss, Amber Jean; Nguyen, Andrew; Schmidt, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    In the past, natural tidal marshes in the south bay were segmented by levees and converted into ponds for use in salt production. In an effort to provide habitat for migratory birds and other native plants and animals, as well as to rebuild natural capital, the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project (SBSPRP) is focused on restoring a portion of the over 15,000 acres of wetlands in California's South San Francisco Bay. The process of restoration begins when a levee is breached; the bay water and sediment flow into the ponds and eventually restore natural tidal marshes. Since the spring of 2010 the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) DEVELOP student internship program has collaborated with the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project (SBSPRP) to study the effects of these restoration efforts and to provide valuable information to assist in habitat management and ecological forecasting. All of the studies were based on remote sensing techniques -- NASA's area of expertise in the field of Earth Science, and used various analytical techniques such as predictive modeling, flora and fauna classification, and spectral detection, to name a few. Each study was conducted by a team of aspiring scientists as a part of the DEVELOP program at Ames.

  1. Establishing a collaborative effort to assess the role of glaciers and seasonal snow cover in the hydrology of the mountains of High Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, R. L.; Barrett, A. P.; Brodzik, M.; Khalsa, S.; Racoviteanu, A.; Raup, B. H.; Williams, M. W.

    2012-12-01

    The fundamental objective of this collaborative study is to develop a thorough and systematic assessment of the individual contributions from seasonal snow and from glacier ice melt to the water resources originating across the Himalaya, Karakoram, Hindu Kush, Pamir and Tien Shan mountain ranges, referred to here as High Asia. While it is generally accepted that the melt from glacier ice and seasonal snow is a significant component of High Asian water resources, the actual water volume available from these two individual sources remains generally unknown. To improve our understanding of the High Asia regional water resources, a cross-boundary effort is required. In order to achieve this goal, University of Colorado scientists are working directly with researchers at institutions in nine different nations where these ice and snow resources are located across High Asia (Bhutan, Nepal, India, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan). These countries contain the headwaters of the Brahmaputra, Ganges, Indus, Syr Darya and Amu Darya rivers. This collaboration includes joint research activities, including cooperative field research, as well as capacity building (technical training, graduate student support) that will enhance the scientific understanding of the regional hydrology among our Asian partners. To accomplish basic project objectives, a suite of satellite remote sensing, reanalysis and ground based data are applied as input to specific snow and ice melt models. Gridded maps of snow and glacier area/elevation are used as input to a temperature-index melt model. The melt model estimates runoff from snow covered grid cells, based on cell area and melt depth. Glacier melt is estimated in the same way, once snow has disappeared from glacierized grid cells. The melt model is driven by daily mean temperature from reanalysis data. Validation efforts for the regional scale results will involve comparison with measured discharge data as well

  2. Remote access directional drilling : an innovative technological advancement in directional drilling based on a collaborative and strategic R and D effort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buker, M. [Phoenix Income Trust, Toronto, ON (Canada); Gillett, G. [EnCana Oil and Gas Partnership, Bonnyville, AB (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    EnCana and Phoenix Income Trust identified an opportunity to develop a system that could reduce directional personnel in the field because of numerous rigs that were in close proximity to each other and the repetitive nature of well profiles. Directional personnel also had familiarity with drilling programs. This presentation discussed an innovative technological advancement in directional drilling based on a collaborative and strategic research and development effort between EnCana and Phoenix Income Trust called remote access directional drilling (RADD). The RADD system and process were presented in detail. Challenges that were addressed included the development of a system that could provide all the necessary drilling information remotely; establishing effective communication between the command center and rig; and training of Phoenix and EnCana personnel. The presentation also reviewed equipment solutions and re-defining job roles. A total of 265 wells have been drilled with this system at a cost savings of $350,000 and a savings of 12-15 per cent of total directional costs. It was concluded that fewer wellsite trailers are needed when field personnel is reduced, resulting in reduced cost and reduced safety liability. 2 figs.

  3. Hydrogeophysical Cyberinfrastructure For Real-Time Interactive Browser Controlled Monitoring Of Near Surface Hydrology: Results Of A 13 Month Monitoring Effort At The Hanford 300 Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versteeg, R. J.; Johnson, T.; Henrie, A.; Johnson, D.

    2013-12-01

    The Hanford 300 Area, located adjacent to the Columbia River in south-central Washington, USA, is the site of former research and uranium fuel rod fabrication facilities. Waste disposal practices at the site included discharging between 33 and 59 metric tons of uranium over a 40 year period into shallow infiltration galleries, resulting in persistent uranium contamination within the vadose and saturated zones. Uranium transport from the vadose zone to the saturated zone is intimately linked with water table fluctuations and river water driven by upstream dam operations. Different remedial efforts have occurred at the site to address uranium contamination. Numerous investigations are occurring at the site, both to investigate remedial performance and to increase the understanding of uranium dynamics. Several of these studies include acquisition of large hydrological and time lapse electrical geophysical data sets. Such datasets contain large amounts of information on hydrological processes. There are substantial challenges in how to effectively deal with the data volumes of such datasets, how to process such datasets and how to provide users with the ability to effectively access and synergize the hydrological information contained in raw and processed data. These challenges motivated the development of a cloud based cyberinfrastructure for dealing with large electrical hydrogeophysical datasets. This cyberinfrastructure is modular and extensible and includes datamanagement, data processing, visualization and result mining capabilities. Specifically, it provides for data transmission to a central server, data parsing in a relational database and processing of the data using a PNNL developed parallel inversion code on either dedicated or commodity compute clusters. Access to results is done through a browser with interactive tools allowing for generation of on demand visualization of the inversion results as well as interactive data mining and statistical calculation

  4. How a collaborative integrated taxonomic effort has trained new spongiologists and improved knowledge of Martinique Island (French Antilles, eastern Caribbean Sea) marine biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Although sponges are important components of benthic ecosystems of the Caribbean Sea, their diversity remained poorly investigated in the Lesser Antilles. By organizing a training course in Martinique, we wanted both to promote taxonomy and to provide a first inventory of the sponge diversity on this island. The course was like a naturalist expedition, with a field laboratory and a classroom nearby. Early-career scientists and environmental managers were trained in sponge taxonomy. We gathered unpublished data and conducted an inventory at 13 coastal sites. We explored only shallow water habitats (0–30 m), such as mangroves, reefs or rocky bottoms and underwater caves. According to this study, the sponge fauna of Martinique is currently represented by a minimum of 191 species, 134 of which we could assign species names. One third of the remaining non-identified sponge species we consider to be new to science. Martinique appears very remarkable because of its littoral marine fauna harboring sponge aggregations with high biomass and species diversity dominating over coral species. In mangroves, sponges cover about 10% of the surface of subtidal roots. Several submarine caves are true reservoirs of hidden and insufficiently described sponge diversity. Thanks to this new collaborative effort, the Eastern Caribbean has gained a significant increase of knowledge, with sponge diversity of this area potentially representing 40% of the total in the Caribbean Sea. We thus demonstrated the importance of developing exploratory and educational research in areas historically devoid of biodiversity inventories and systematics studies. Finally, we believe in the necessity to consider not only the number of species but their distribution in space to evaluate their putative contribution to ecosystem services and our willingness to preserve them. PMID:28329020

  5. Functional and motor outcome 5 years after stroke is equivalent to outcome at 2 months: follow-up of the collaborative evaluation of rehabilitation in stroke across Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sarah; Verheyden, Geert; Brinkmann, Nadine; Dejaeger, Eddy; De Weerdt, Willy; Feys, Hilde; Gantenbein, Andreas R; Jenni, Walter; Laenen, Annouschka; Lincoln, Nadina; Putman, Koen; Schuback, Birgit; Schupp, Wilfried; Thijs, Vincent; De Wit, Liesbet

    2015-06-01

    Recovery of patients within the first 6 months after stroke is well documented, but there has been little research on long-term recovery. The aim of this study was to analyze functional and motor recovery between admission to rehabilitation centres and 5 years after stroke. This follow-up of the Collaborative Evaluation of Rehabilitation in Stroke Across Europe study, included patients from 4 European rehabilitation centres. Patients were assessed on admission, at 2 and 6 months, and 5 years after stroke, using the Barthel Index, Rivermead Motor Assessment Gross Function, Leg and Trunk function, and Arm function. Linear mixed models were used, corrected for baseline characteristics. To account for the drop-out during follow-up, the analysis is likelihood-based (assumption of missingness at random). A total of 532 patients were included in this study, of which 238 were followed up at 5 years post stroke. Mean age at stroke onset was 69 (±10 SD) years, 53% were men, 84% had ischemic strokes, and 53% had left-sided motor impairment. Linear mixed model analysis revealed a significant deterioration for all 4 outcomes between 6 months and 5 years (Pstroke. Higher age (Pstroke severity on admission (Pstroke severity negatively affected recovery up to 5 years after stroke. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Non-carious cervical lesions associated with multiple gingival recessions in the maxillary arch. A restorative-periodontal effort for esthetic success. A 12-month case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegri, Mario Alessio; Landi, Luca; Zucchelli, Giovanni

    2010-01-01

    Restoration of non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs) represents a major challenge for resin materials due to the different adhesive properties of the tooth structure, the biomechanical aspects of the cervical area, and the difficulties in the access and isolation of the operative field. Furthermore, NCCLs should be approached with a complete understanding of the role played by the marginal periodontal tissue. Whenever a cervical lesion is associated with a gingival recession, the interplay between restorative dentistry and periodontology is decisive for full esthetic and long-term success. A case report is presented dealing with the treatment of NCCLs associated with multiple gingival recessions using a combined restorative and periodontal treatment with a 12-month follow-up.

  7. NREL and SDG&E Collaboration to Support SDG&E Grid and Storage Efforts: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-14-562

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baggu, Murali [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This project will enable effective utilization of high penetration of photovoltaics (PV) in islanded microgrids, increasing overall system efficiency, decreased fuel costs and resiliency of the overall system to help meet the SunShot goals of enhancing system integration methods to increase penetration of PV. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) will collaborate with San Diego Gas & Electric (SDG&E) to provide research and testing support to address their needs in energy storage sizing and placement, Integrated Test Facility (ITF) development, Real Time Digital Simulator (RTDS) Modeling and simulation support at ITF, Visualization and Virtual connection to Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF), and microgrid simulation and testing areas. Specifically in this project a real microgrid scenario with high penetration of PV (existing in SDG&E territory) is tested in the ESIF laboratory. Multiple control cases for firming PV using storage in a microgrid scenario will be investigated and tested in the laboratory setup.

  8. SWFSC/MMTD: Collaborative Large Whale Survey (CLaWS) 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Collaborative Large Whale Survey is a joint field effort by Southwest Fisheries Science Center (SWFSC) and Alaska Fisheries Science Center (AFSC). The 4-month...

  9. Let's Go to the Zoo: Guiding Elementary Students through Research; Ladders of Collaboration; Information Literacy and Assessment: Web Resources Too Good To Miss; Top Secret: Collaborative Efforts Really Do Make a Difference; What Is Collaboration to You?; Volunteering for Information Literacy; Getting an Early Start on Using Technology for Research; Collaborations: Working with Restrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futch, Lynn; Asper, Vicki; Repman, Judi; Tschamler, Addie; Thomas, Melody; Kearns, Jodi; Farmer, Lesley S. J.; Buzzeo, Toni

    2002-01-01

    Includes eight articles that address the role of the elementary school librarian in developing information literacy, focusing on collaboration between media specialists and classroom teachers. Highlights include student research, including a research planning sheet; Web resources on information literacy and assessment; and helping students use…

  10. Mental effort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschner, Paul A.; Kirschner, Femke

    2013-01-01

    Kirschner, P. A., & Kirschner, F. (2012). Mental effort. In N. Seel (Ed.), Encyclopedia of the sciences of learning, Volume 5 (pp. 2182-2184). New York, NY: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-1-4419-1428-6_226

  11. Effortful echolalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadano, K; Nakamura, H; Hamanaka, T

    1998-02-01

    We report three cases of effortful echolalia in patients with cerebral infarction. The clinical picture of speech disturbance is associated with Type 1 Transcortical Motor Aphasia (TCMA, Goldstein, 1915). The patients always spoke nonfluently with loss of speech initiative, dysarthria, dysprosody, agrammatism, and increased effort and were unable to repeat sentences longer than those containing four or six words. In conversation, they first repeated a few words spoken to them, and then produced self initiated speech. The initial repetition as well as the subsequent self initiated speech, which were realized equally laboriously, can be regarded as mitigated echolalia (Pick, 1924). They were always aware of their own echolalia and tried to control it without effect. These cases demonstrate that neither the ability to repeat nor fluent speech are always necessary for echolalia. The possibility that a lesion in the left medial frontal lobe, including the supplementary motor area, plays an important role in effortful echolalia is discussed.

  12. International Collaboration Enhances Cancer Screening Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    CGH is working with the International Agency for Research on CancerExit Disclaimer (IARC) and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) on the ESTAMPA Study, a multi-centric study of cervical cancer screening and triage with HPV testing.

  13. Collaborative Efforts in the School Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscovici, Hedy; Alfaro-Varela, Gilberto

    This paper presents findings of a study that examined how school participants in two schools in a Florida city coped with conflict, with a focus on developing a cooperative school climate. Constructivism, which states that learning is the making-sense of experiences in a social environment, provides the theoretical framework. From this…

  14. Collaborative innovation effort and size in alliances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asikainen, Anna-Leena; Radziwon, Agnieszka

    Innovation Survey 2010 – 12 and covers the representation of 12 EU Member States. The main findings indicate that product and process innovations do not seem to show any significant influence on the likelihood of building the alliances, whereas this likelihood increases along with the introduction......This study presents quantitative investigation of the factors that influence the process of forming strategic alliances with a special focus on the role of innovation strategies and firm’s size in alliance building process. The empirical sample is based on a large scale data from the Community...... of organisational and marketing innovations. Additionally, small firms were more likely (than large) to engage into alliances as a part of their strategy. On more general level our data also confirm that factors such as: number of highly educated employees, foreign ownership of a firm and presence of firm...

  15. The Collaborative Leader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Carolyn Grubbs

    1998-01-01

    Uses the Los Angeles Partners Advocating Student Success, an interinstitutional educational reform effort, as a case study in collaboration. Discusses the role of the president, and contends that collaboration provides community colleges with new opportunities to promote access and enhance the educational success of underserved students by…

  16. Collaboration 'Engineerability'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolfschoten, Gwendolyn L.; de Vreede, Gert-Jan; Briggs, Robert O.; Sol, Henk G.

    2010-01-01

    Collaboration Engineering is an approach to create sustained collaboration support by designing collaborative work practices for high-value recurring tasks, and transferring those designs to practitioners to execute for themselves without ongoing support from collaboration professionals. A key assum

  17. ASME Code Efforts Supporting HTGRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.K. Morton

    2011-09-01

    In 1999, an international collaborative initiative for the development of advanced (Generation IV) reactors was started. The idea behind this effort was to bring nuclear energy closer to the needs of sustainability, to increase proliferation resistance, and to support concepts able to produce energy (both electricity and process heat) at competitive costs. The U.S. Department of Energy has supported this effort by pursuing the development of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. This support has included research and development of pertinent data, initial regulatory discussions, and engineering support of various codes and standards development. This report discusses the various applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes and standards that are being developed to support these high temperature gascooled reactors during construction and operation. ASME is aggressively pursuing these codes and standards to support an international effort to build the next generation of advanced reactors so that all can benefit.

  18. ASME Code Efforts Supporting HTGRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.K. Morton

    2010-09-01

    In 1999, an international collaborative initiative for the development of advanced (Generation IV) reactors was started. The idea behind this effort was to bring nuclear energy closer to the needs of sustainability, to increase proliferation resistance, and to support concepts able to produce energy (both electricity and process heat) at competitive costs. The U.S. Department of Energy has supported this effort by pursuing the development of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. This support has included research and development of pertinent data, initial regulatory discussions, and engineering support of various codes and standards development. This report discusses the various applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes and standards that are being developed to support these high temperature gascooled reactors during construction and operation. ASME is aggressively pursuing these codes and standards to support an international effort to build the next generation of advanced reactors so that all can benefit.

  19. ASME Code Efforts Supporting HTGRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.K. Morton

    2012-09-01

    In 1999, an international collaborative initiative for the development of advanced (Generation IV) reactors was started. The idea behind this effort was to bring nuclear energy closer to the needs of sustainability, to increase proliferation resistance, and to support concepts able to produce energy (both electricity and process heat) at competitive costs. The U.S. Department of Energy has supported this effort by pursuing the development of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a high temperature gas-cooled reactor. This support has included research and development of pertinent data, initial regulatory discussions, and engineering support of various codes and standards development. This report discusses the various applicable American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) codes and standards that are being developed to support these high temperature gascooled reactors during construction and operation. ASME is aggressively pursuing these codes and standards to support an international effort to build the next generation of advanced reactors so that all can benefit.

  20. Creating Networks through Interinstitutional Faculty Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Sarah R.

    2002-01-01

    Describes efforts by the consortium Associated Colleges of the Midwest to support interinstitutional faculty collaboration and development. Focuses on three programs: the Global Partners Project, an information literacy grant, and an academic collaboration grant. (EV)

  1. EFFORTS Technical annex for the twelve month progress report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jan Lasson; Eriksen, Morten; Thomas christensen, Thomas Vennick;

    The present report is documentation for the work carried out at DTU during the second year of project activity. The report describes the work completed by DTU in general as well as on the active sub-tasks within materials properties, friction modelling and physical modelling, over the last twelve...

  2. EFFORTS Technical annex for the twelve month progress report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Niels; Andreasen, Jan Lasson; Eriksen, Morten;

    1998-01-01

    The present report is documentation for the work carried out at DTU during the previous first year of project activity. The report describes the work completed by DTU in general as well as on the active sub-tasks within materials properties, friction modelling and physical modelling, over the last...

  3. The CEIDEN technology platform. A collaborative effort to promote nuclear R and D in Spain; La Plataforma Tecnologica Ceiden. Un esfuerzo colaborativo para promover la I+D nuclear en Espana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmena Servet, P.

    2012-11-01

    The Spanish fission nuclear energy research and development Technological Platform, CEIDEN, is an entity aimed to coordinate the R and D needs and efforts related to fission nuclear technology in all the Spanish nuclear sector. Its activities are aimed to propose and develop joint projects by the partners that have to deal with similar problems and to present a single national position related to international proposals and compromises. All the Sectors related to the Spanish nuclear R and D are represented in the CEIDEN Technological Platform, that is involved both in plants in operation and future reactor designs. (Author)

  4. Collaboration and E-collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmerita, Liana; Kirchner, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding student’s perception of collaboration and how collaboration is supported by ICT is important for its efficient use in the classroom. This article aims to investigate how students perceive collaboration and how they use new technologies in collaborative group work. Furthermore, it tr...

  5. Monthly errors

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The 2006 monthly average statistical metrics for 2m Q (g kg-1) domain-wide for the base and MODIS WRF simulations against MADIS observations. This dataset is...

  6. Using Remotely Sensed Data for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation: A Collaborative Effort Between the Climate Change Adaptation Science Investigators Workgroup (CASI), NASA Johnson Space Center, and Jacobs Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagge, Amy

    2016-01-01

    With ever changing landscapes and environmental conditions due to human induced climate change, adaptability is imperative for the long-term success of facilities and Federal agency missions. To mitigate the effects of climate change, indicators such as above-ground biomass change must be identified to establish a comprehensive monitoring effort. Researching the varying effects of climate change on ecosystems can provide a scientific framework that will help produce informative, strategic and tactical policies for environmental adaptation. As a proactive approach to climate change mitigation, NASA tasked the Climate Change Adaptation Science Investigators Workgroup (CASI) to provide climate change expertise and data to Center facility managers and planners in order to ensure sustainability based on predictive models and current research. Generation of historical datasets that will be used in an agency-wide effort to establish strategies for climate change mitigation and adaptation at NASA facilities is part of the CASI strategy. Using time series of historical remotely sensed data is well-established means of measuring change over time. CASI investigators have acquired multispectral and hyperspectral optical and LiDAR remotely sensed datasets from NASA Earth Observation Satellites (including the International Space Station), airborne sensors, and astronaut photography using hand held digital cameras to create a historical dataset for the Johnson Space Center, as well as the Houston and Galveston area. The raster imagery within each dataset has been georectified, and the multispectral and hyperspectral imagery has been atmospherically corrected. Using ArcGIS for Server, the CASI-Regional Remote Sensing data has been published as an image service, and can be visualized through a basic web mapping application. Future work will include a customized web mapping application created using a JavaScript Application Programming Interface (API), and inclusion of the CASI data

  7. Joint collaborative technology experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Michael; Ciccimaro, Donny; Yee, See; Denewiler, Thomas; Stroumtsos, Nicholas; Messamore, John; Brown, Rodney; Skibba, Brian; Clapp, Daniel; Wit, Jeff; Shirts, Randy J.; Dion, Gary N.; Anselmo, Gary S.

    2009-05-01

    Use of unmanned systems is rapidly growing within the military and civilian sectors in a variety of roles including reconnaissance, surveillance, explosive ordinance disposal (EOD), and force-protection and perimeter security. As utilization of these systems grows at an ever increasing rate, the need for unmanned systems teaming and inter-system collaboration becomes apparent. Collaboration provides a means of enhancing individual system capabilities through relevant data exchange that contributes to cooperative behaviors between systems and enables new capabilities not possible if the systems operate independently. A collaborative networked approach to development holds the promise of adding mission capability while simultaneously reducing the workload of system operators. The Joint Collaborative Technology Experiment (JCTE) joins individual technology development efforts within the Air Force, Navy, and Army to demonstrate the potential benefits of interoperable multiple system collaboration in a force-protection application. JCTE participants are the Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Airbase Technologies Division, Force Protection Branch (AFRL/RXQF); the Army Aviation and Missile Research, Development, and Engineering Center Software Engineering Directorate (AMRDEC SED); and the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center - Pacific (SSC Pacific) Unmanned Systems Branch operating with funding provided by the Joint Ground Robotics Enterprise (JGRE). This paper will describe the efforts to date in system development by the three partner organizations, development of collaborative behaviors and experimentation in the force-protection application, results and lessons learned at a technical demonstration, simulation results, and a path forward for future work.

  8. Collaboration in Print

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    During the Second World War, Germany's National Socialist regime mobilized German universities in order to support the war efforts through academic collaboration and a number of publications that were meant to legitimize Germany's territorial ambitions. The rector of the University of Kiel, Dr Paul...

  9. Geo-collaboration under stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looije, R.; Brake, G.M. te; Neerincx, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    “Most of the science and decision making involved in geo-information is the product of collaborative teams. Current geospatial technologies are a limiting factor because they do not provide any direct support for group efforts. In this paper we present a method to enhance geo-collaboration by commun

  10. English Language Learner Engineering Collaborative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergraft, Katy; Daugherty, Michael K.; Rossetti, Charles

    2009-01-01

    In an effort to develop an engineering design project that would deliver the necessary content and reach out to the English Language Learner (ELL) community, faculty in the Engineering Academy at Springdale High School in Springdale, Arkansas instituted the ELL Engineering Collaborative. The ELL Engineering Collaborative has four primary goals…

  11. Agencies Collaborate, Develop a Cyanobacteria Assessment Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    This collaborative effort integrates the efforts of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to provide an approach for mainstrea...

  12. Analysis and evaluation of collaborative modeling processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ssebuggwawo, D.

    2012-01-01

    Analysis and evaluation of collaborative modeling processes is confronted with many challenges. On the one hand, many systems design and re-engineering projects require collaborative modeling approaches that can enhance their productivity. But, such collaborative efforts, which often consist of the

  13. Organizing for Asymmetric Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørn Flohr; Sørensen, Henrik B.

      The vision of new organizational forms consists of less-organized networks and alliances between organizations, in which collaborative capabilities are assumed to be crucial (Miles et al., 2005). The path to such new forms may go through fragile cooperative efforts. Despite the good will of many...... complexity to already complex models, we claim that our approach has practical implications: it offers rather simple diagnostic cues to change agents that are coping with the barriers to management and collaboration among loosely coupled units....

  14. Collaborative experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Thomas Bøtker

    Literature review: Collaborative experience has been shown to have a positive effect on the collaborative outcome in general (Anand & Khanna, 2000; Kale, Dyer & Singh, 2002). Furthermore, it has been linked to the ability to exploit the network of the firm for learning (Powell, Koput and Smith...... experience was largest the higher the hypothesized ambiguity. Theoretically contribution: This research project aims at contributing to existing literature by arguing, that collaborative experience is a moderating variable which moderates the effects on collaborative outcome from the level of complexity......, that the largest effects from collaborative experience is from recent collaborative experience, since knowledge depreciates when it is not used. Methodologically contribution: The research project studies the dyad and aims at introducing, to this field of research, an established way of collecting data, a new...

  15. Working Collaboratively

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holder, Anna; Lovett, George

    2009-01-01

    Working collaboratively is arguably an essential skill in architectural practice as the complexity of contemporary projects involves multiple agents in the conception, construction and use of architecture. This has been emphasised by recent government rhetoric. Mass collaboration has been...... identified as a transformative global force of the last decade, most notably in knowledge and information publishing, communication and creation. This paper presents a structured conversation on changing understandings of collaboration, and the realities of collaborative methodology in architectural work....... Ideas of the platforms and structures necessary to support ‘creative’ collaborations are advanced and tested, and a vocabulary of key terms is developed. The conversation extends to reflect on the role of the architecture profession in supporting or enabling collaboration in architectural works....

  16. Explaining interindividual differences in toddlers’ collaboration with unfamiliar peers: Individual, dyadic, and social factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils eSchuhmacher

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available During their third year of life, toddlers become increasingly skillful at coordinating their actions with peer partners and they form joint commitments in collaborative situations. However, little effort has been made to explain interindividual differences in collaboration among toddlers. Therefore, we examined the relative influence of distinct individual, dyadic, and social factors on toddlers’ collaborative activities (i.e., level of coordination and preference for joint activity in joint problem-solving situations with unfamiliar peer partners (n = 23 dyads aged M = 35.7 months. We analyzed the dyadic nonindependent data with mixed models. Results indicated that mothers’ expectations regarding their children’s social behaviors significantly predicted toddlers’ level of coordination. Furthermore, the models revealed that toddlers’ positive mutual experiences with the unfamiliar partner assessed during an initial free play period (Phase 1 and their level of coordination in an obligatory collaboration task (Phase 2 promoted toddlers’ preference for joint activity in a subsequent optional collaboration task (Phase 3. In contrast, children’s mastery motivation and shyness conflicted with their collaborative efforts. We discuss the role of parents’ socialization goals in toddlers’ development toward becoming active collaborators and discuss possible mechanisms underlying the differences in toddlers’ commitment to joint activities, namely social preferences and the trust in reliable cooperation partners.

  17. Collaborative experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Thomas Bøtker

    sample of firms, an establish way of measuring the outcome of product development and a new way of measuring experience. Where the previous research in this field primarily uses secondary databases, this research project collects primary data by an online questionnaire to the NPD manager from one......, that the largest effects from collaborative experience is from recent collaborative experience, since knowledge depreciates when it is not used. Methodologically contribution: The research project studies the dyad and aims at introducing, to this field of research, an established way of collecting data, a new...... of the new product development as a performance measure. Finally, where previous research primarily has used the number of collaborations as a measure of collaborative experience, this research includes the recency in the measure of collaborative experience. Results: Since data has not yet been collected...

  18. Collaborative Prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Marcel; Horst, Willem

    2014-01-01

    of the prototyping process, the actual prototype was used as a tool for communication or development, thus serving as a platform for the cross-fertilization of knowledge. In this way, collaborative prototyping leads to a better balance between functionality and usability; it translates usability problems into design......This paper presents an inductive study that shows how collaborative prototyping across functional, hierarchical, and organizational boundaries can improve the overall prototyping process. Our combined action research and case study approach provides new insights into how collaborative prototyping...... can provide a platform for prototype-driven problem solving in early new product development (NPD). Our findings have important implications for how to facilitate multistakeholder collaboration in prototyping and problem solving, and more generally for how to organize collaborative and open innovation...

  19. Collaborative Prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Marcel; Horst, Willem

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an inductive study that shows how collaborative prototyping across functional, hierarchical, and organizational boundaries can improve the overall prototyping process. Our combined action research and case study approach provides new insights into how collaborative prototyping...... constraints in involving the appropriate stakeholders at the right time. The paper specifically elaborates on the role of users in collaborative prototyping, which is important in order to cover all phases of the problem-solving cycle but triggers an interesting challenge due to the “reverse empathy...... can provide a platform for prototype-driven problem solving in early new product development (NPD). Our findings have important implications for how to facilitate multistakeholder collaboration in prototyping and problem solving, and more generally for how to organize collaborative and open innovation...

  20. Collaborative Movie Annotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zad, Damon Daylamani; Agius, Harry

    In this paper, we focus on metadata for self-created movies like those found on YouTube and Google Video, the duration of which are increasing in line with falling upload restrictions. While simple tags may have been sufficient for most purposes for traditionally very short video footage that contains a relatively small amount of semantic content, this is not the case for movies of longer duration which embody more intricate semantics. Creating metadata is a time-consuming process that takes a great deal of individual effort; however, this effort can be greatly reduced by harnessing the power of Web 2.0 communities to create, update and maintain it. Consequently, we consider the annotation of movies within Web 2.0 environments, such that users create and share that metadata collaboratively and propose an architecture for collaborative movie annotation. This architecture arises from the results of an empirical experiment where metadata creation tools, YouTube and an MPEG-7 modelling tool, were used by users to create movie metadata. The next section discusses related work in the areas of collaborative retrieval and tagging. Then, we describe the experiments that were undertaken on a sample of 50 users. Next, the results are presented which provide some insight into how users interact with existing tools and systems for annotating movies. Based on these results, the paper then develops an architecture for collaborative movie annotation.

  1. Collaborative efforts driving progress in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.M. Zwaan (Michel); E.A. Kolb (Edward A.); D. Reinhardt (Dirk); J. Abrahamsson; S. Adachi (Susumu); R. Aplenc (Richard); E.S.J.M. de Bont (Eveline); B. de Moerloose (Barbara); M.N. Dworzak (Michael); B. Gibson (Brenda); H. Hasle (Henrik); G. Leverger (Guy); F. Locatelli (Franco); C. Ragu (Christine); R.C. Ribeiro (Raul C.); C. Rizzari (Carmelo); J.E. Rubnitz (Jeffrey); O.P. Smith (Owen Patrick); L. Sung (Lillian); D. Tomizawa (Daisuke); M.M. van den Heuvel-Eibrink (Marry); U. Creutzig; G.J. Kaspers (Gertjan)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDiagnosis, treatment, response monitoring, and outcome of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have made enormous progress during the past decades. Because AML is a rare type of childhood cancer, with an incidence of approximately seven occurrences per 1 million children annually, nati

  2. Facilitating Collaborative Efforts to Redesign Community Managed Water Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyson, Ben; Edgar, Nick; Robertson, Gretchen

    2011-01-01

    The Upper Taieri River catchment is an arid area in the Otago region of the South Island of New Zealand faced with intensifying agriculture production. This article describes an assessment of the education/communication processes of a water resource management project and the effects on farmer beliefs/attitudes and targeted outcomes. Lessons…

  3. Synchronizing USG Efforts Toward Collaborative Healthcare Policy Making in Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Kaufmann (Carlisle Barracks, PA: U.S. Army War College, Strategic Studies Institute, October 2008), v. 37 LTC Lisa Forsyth of the Stabilization Office...some of the previous pitfalls experienced with training forces in Iraq. 61 Jane Ward, Kerrie Lindberg, Daniel McNulty and Mona Ternus, “A Global

  4. Collaborative Efforts Driving Progress in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaan, C. Michel; Kolb, Edward A.; Reinhardt, Dirk; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Adachi, Souichi; Aplenc, Richard; De Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; De Moerloose, Barbara; Dworzak, Michael; Gibson, Brenda E. S.; Hasle, Henrik; Leverger, Guy; Locatelli, Franco; Ragu, Christine; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Rizzari, Carmelo; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Smith, Owen P.; Sung, Lillian; Tomizawa, Daisuke; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Creutzig, Ursula; Kaspers, Gertjan J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis, treatment, response monitoring, and outcome of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have made enormous progress during the past decades. Because AML is a rare type of childhood cancer, with an incidence of approximately seven occurrences per 1 million children annually, national and int

  5. Collaborative efforts to solve problems in permafrost science and engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinzman, Larry D.; Hinkel, Kenneth M.; Romanovsky, Vladimir E.

    2012-10-01

    Tenth International Conference on Permafrost; Salekhard, Russia, 25-29 June 2012 To recognize permafrost's growing significance in the Earth climate system, to stimulate interaction among the scientific communities, and to share results of the increasing numbers of permafrost investigations and discoveries currently taking place, the Tenth International Conference on Permafrost (TICOP) was held in late June in Salekhard, a town in the Yamal-Nenets autonomous district of Russia that is situated precisely on the Arctic Circle and underlain by discontinuous permafrost. TICOP marked the tenth iteration of the long-running conference series, which started in 1963, and is the conference's first return to Russia since the Second International Conference on Permafrost in 1973.

  6. A collaborative effort to build a modular course on Geoethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Vincent; Di Capua, Giuseppe; Palinkas, Cindy; Pappas Maenz, Catherine; Peppoloni, Silvia; Ryan, Anne-Marie

    2015-04-01

    The need to promote ethical practice in the geosciences has long been recognized. Governmental boards for licensing professional geoscientists commonly require participation in continuing-education courses or workshops about professional ethics as part of the license-renewal processes. Geoscience-based companies and organizations of professional geoscientists have developed ethical codes for their members or employees. Ethical problems have been reported that involve the practice of science applied to Earth studies, interpersonal relationships within geoscience departments, business practices in geoscience-based companies, field work and the destructive modification of geologic sites, public policy development or implementation related to Earth resources, extractive resource industries, development that modifies landscapes in significant ways, interactions with the press and other media professionals, and even interactions with individuals or groups that have a significantly different worldview. We are working toward the creation of a modular semester-long course in Geoethics. The modules will be free-standing, so each could be repurposed for use in a different course; however, the Geoethics course will provide an useful overall introduction to a variety of topics in ethics applied in the context of geoscience. Such a course might be an excellent capstone course for undergraduate geoscientists, or an introductory course for graduate students. The first module will cover basics intended to provide a common vocabulary of words, ideas and practices that will be used throughout the course. The remaining 5-6 modules will focus on aspects of geoscience in which ethical considerations play an important role. We feel that the geoscience classroom can provide a safe, controlled environment in which students can confront a representative sample of the types of ethical issues they might encounter in their professional or academic careers. Our goal is to help students develop effective strategies for working through these dilemmas. Our modules will utilize formal discussion, role-playing, debate, and reflective writing, among other techniques. We hope that this will lead students to internalize these lessons so that they lead careers in which ethical practice is an essential element.

  7. West Virginia Interpretive Guide Training: A Collaborative Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcarczyk, Kelly; McKenney, Kathryn; Smaldone, Dave; Arborgast, Doug

    2013-01-01

    West Virginia University's Extension Service partnered with the Recreation, Parks, and Tourism Resources Program to improve guide performance in West Virginia's tourism industry. The result of this partnership is a West Virginia Interpretive Guide Training program aimed at providing low-cost, widely available training to guides…

  8. High Performance EVA Glove Collaboration: Glove Injury Data Mining Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, C. R.; Benson, E.; England, S.; Charvat, J.; Norcross, J. R.; McFarland, S. M.; Rajulu, S.

    2015-01-01

    Human hands play a significant role during Extravehicular Activity (EVA) missions and Neutral Buoyancy Lab (NBL) training events, as they are needed for translating and performing tasks in the weightless environment. Because of this high frequency usage, hand and arm related injuries are known to occur during EVA and EVA training in the NBL. The primary objectives of this investigation were to: 1) document all known EVA glove related injuries and circumstances of these incidents, 2) determine likely risk factors, and 3) recommend interventions where possible that could be implemented in the current and future glove designs. METHODS: The investigation focused on the discomforts and injuries of U.S. crewmembers who had worn the pressurized Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU) spacesuit and experienced 4000 Series or Phase VI glove related incidents during 1981 to 2010 for either EVA ground training or in-orbit flight. We conducted an observational retrospective case-control investigation using 1) a literature review of known injuries, 2) data mining of crew injury, glove sizing, and hand anthropometry databases, 3) descriptive statistical analyses, and finally 4) statistical risk correlation and predictor analyses to better understand injury prevalence and potential causation. Specific predictor statistical analyses included use of principal component analyses (PCA), multiple logistic regression, and survival analyses (Cox proportional hazards regression). Results of these analyses were computed risk variables in the forms of odds ratios (likelihood of an injury occurring given the magnitude of a risk variable) and hazard ratios (likelihood of time to injury occurrence). Due to the exploratory nature of this investigation, we selected predictor variables significant at p=0.15. RESULTS: Through 2010, there have been a total of 330 NASA crewmembers, from which 96 crewmembers performed 322 EVAs during 1981-2010, resulting in 50 crewmembers being injured inflight and 44 injured during 11,704 ground EVA training events. Of the 196 glove related injury incidents, 106 related to EVA and 90 to EVA training. Over these 196 incidents, 277 total injuries (126 flight; 151 training) were reported and were then grouped into 23 types of injuries. Of EVA flight injuries, 65% were commonly reported to the hand (in general), metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joint, and finger (not including thumb) with fatigue, abrasion, and paresthesia being the most common injury types (44% of total flight injuries). Training injuries totaled to more than 70% being distributed to the fingernail, MCP joint, and finger crotch with 88% of the specific injuries listed as pain, erythema, and onycholysis. Of these training injuries, when reporting pain or erythema, the most common location was the index finger, but when reporting onycholysis, it was the middle finger. Predictor variables specific to increased risk of onycholysis included: female sex (OR=2.622), older age (OR=1.065), increased duration in hours of the flight or training event (OR=1.570), middle finger length differences in inches between the finger and the EVA glove (OR=7.709), and use of the Phase VI glove (OR=8.535). Differentiation between training and flight and injury reporting during 2002-2004 were significant control variables. For likelihood of time to first onycholysis injury, there was a 24% reduction in rate of reporting for each year increase in age. Also, more experienced crewmembers, based on number of EVA flight or training events completed, were less likely to report an onycholysis injury (3% less for every event). Longer duration events also found reporting rates to occur 2.37 times faster for every hour of length. Crewmembers with larger hand size reported onycholysis 23% faster than those with smaller hand size. Finally, for every 1/10th of an inch increase in difference between the middle finger length and the glove, the rate of reporting increased by 60%. DISCUSSION: One key finding was that the Series 4000 glove had a lower injury risk than the Phase VI, which provides a platform for further evaluation. General interventions that reduce hand overexertion and repetitive use exposure through tool development, procedural changes and shorter exposures may be one mitigation path, but due to the way the training event times were reported, we cannot provide a guideline for a specific event duration change. When the finger length was different from the glove length, the risk of injury increased indicating that the use of larger finger take-ups could be contributing to injury and therefore may not be recommended. Prior to this investigation, there was one previous investigation indicating hand anthropometry may be related to onycholysis. We found different hand anthropometry variables indicated by this investigation as compared to the prior, specifically differences in middle finger length compared to glove finger length, which point more towards a sizing issue than a specific anthropometry issue. Additionally, although this investigation has identified sizing as an issue, the force and environmental-related variables of the EVA glove that could also cause injury were not accounted for.

  9. Revenue-sharing Contract Design for Vertical Collaborative New Product Development with Complementary Efforts%互补性研发努力下垂直合作新产品开发中的收益共享契约设计

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    来向红; 王文平

    2013-01-01

    研发努力表现为互补还是替代关系,对于合作新产品开发中激励契约的设计有重要影响.在研发努力存在互补关系的情形下,探讨垂直合作新产品开发中的收益共享机制.研究表明,新产品开发的组织安排取决于由研发努力弹性和成本参数所确定的研发投入产出效率,当双方的研发投入产出效率相差悬殊时,新产品开发应由效率更高的一方独自承担;当双方各自承担部分开发任务时,收益共享契约可以有效调节合作者的研发努力水平;最优收益共享率介于使合作者分别达到各自最大努力水平的不同收益共享率之间,且取决于双方的研发努力弹性,而与双方的研发成本参数、新产品市场风险等因素无直接关系;研发努力弹性较高的一方应分享到更多收益,而当双方研发努力弹性相同时,应均分收益.%The relationship between the efforts of two partners in new product development can be assumed as complementation or substitution, which has an important affect on design of the incentive contract. The paper discusses the design of revenue-sharing contract in vertically collaborative new product development under the premise of complementary efforts. The analysis shows that; if two partners7 input-output efficiencies have great disparity, the partner with higher one should undertake all the tasks of new product development alone; if two partners develop a new product jointly, revenue-sharing contract can regulate partners' efforts effectively; the optimal revenue-sharing ratio in the contract locates between two different revenue-sharing ratio at which the two partners' efforts can reach their respective maximums; and it does not rely on development costs, market risk, etc. , but depends on two partners' efforts elasticity, at the same time, the partner with higher effort elasticity has more share of profits, and fifty-fifty if they have the same effort elasticity.

  10. Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and communities 13.Embedding social values in tourism management: Community currencies as laboratories of social entrepreneurship? Rita Cannas 14.Improvising Economy: Everyday encounters and tourism consumption Gunnar Thór Jóhannesson and Katrín Anna Lund 15.Community and connection: Exploring the outcomes......This book employs an interdisciplinary, cross-sectoral lens to explore the collaborative dynamics that are currently disrupting, re-creating and transforming the production and consumption of tourism. House swapping, ridesharing, voluntourism, couchsurfing, dinner hosting, social enterprise...... collaborative economy and tourism Dianne Dredge and Szilvia Gyimóthy PART I - Theoretical explorations 2.Definitions and mapping the landscape in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy and Dianne Dredge 3.Business models of the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 4.Responsibility and care...

  11. Collaborative tools

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J. Manickam

    2007-01-01

    @@ A successful next generation fusion experiment, such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project, will need experimentalists, theorists, and computational scientists to collaborate efficiently, to understand the overwhelming amount of information from experiments, codes, and theory.

  12. Collaborative Appropriation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, Michael; Neureiter, Katja; Verdezoto, Nervo;

    2016-01-01

    Previous workshops and papers have examined how individual users adopt and adapt technologies to meet their own local needs, by “completing design through use.” However, there has been little systematic study of how groups of people engage collaboratively in these activities. This workshop opens ...... a discussion for these under-studied forms of collaborative appropriation, using a broad range of perspectives including empirical data, design explorations, research, and critique....

  13. Maternal regulation and toddlers’ effortful control

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Effortful control is a regulatory component of emotion (Calkins & Hill, 2007). This descriptive study analyzed the relation between maternal co-regulation strategies and children self-regulation strategies in order to evaluate their effortful control skills.19 dyads [mother-child] with children between 18 and 36 months old participated and were divided in three groups, the sample was taken from government´s nurseries. A transversal study with direct observation of the experimental situati...

  14. Providers’ perspectives on collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Bruner

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Changes in models of health care are required to better meet the needs of diverse, underserved patient populations. Collaboration among providers is one way to promote accessible, comprehensive and continuous care in healthcare organizations. This paper describes the quantitative findings from two time points that examined providers' views of collaboration among a sample of diverse personnel (e.g. clinical nurses, social workers, dental providers, mental health providers, clerical staff, medical assistants, public health staff, and administrators within a federally qualified nurse managed health care centre in the United States. Methods: The quantitative arm of a mixed-method study is presented in this paper. Two instruments, the Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale and the University of the West of England Interprofessional Questionnaire (comprised of 4 subscales-Communication and Teamwork Scale, Interprofessional Learning Scale, Interprofessional Interaction Scale, and Interprofessional Relationships Scale were administered to providers at baseline and three to eight months following six same discipline focus group discussions on collaboration, in order to evaluate whether participating in the focus group discussions changed providers' views of collaboration. A summary of the focus group data which were published elsewhere is additionally summarized to help provide insight to the quantitative findings. Thirty-nine staff participated. Results: Paired t-tests revealed that only one scale out of the five, Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale (33.97 at time one and 37.45 at time two, significantly and positively changed after the focus group discussion (p=0.046. Providers' views on collaboration ranged from positive to moderate views of collaboration; most measures revealed a non-significant improvement after the focus group discussions. Staff with some graduate school reported the greatest

  15. Providers’ perspectives on collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Bruner

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Changes in models of health care are required to better meet the needs of diverse, underserved patient populations. Collaboration among providers is one way to promote accessible, comprehensive and continuous care in healthcare organizations. This paper describes the quantitative findings from two time points that examined providers' views of collaboration among a sample of diverse personnel (e.g. clinical nurses, social workers, dental providers, mental health providers, clerical staff, medical assistants, public health staff, and administrators within a federally qualified nurse managed health care centre in the United States.Methods: The quantitative arm of a mixed-method study is presented in this paper. Two instruments, the Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale and the University of the West of England Interprofessional Questionnaire (comprised of 4 subscales-Communication and Teamwork Scale, Interprofessional Learning Scale, Interprofessional Interaction Scale, and Interprofessional Relationships Scale were administered to providers at baseline and three to eight months following six same discipline focus group discussions on collaboration, in order to evaluate whether participating in the focus group discussions changed providers' views of collaboration. A summary of the focus group data which were published elsewhere is additionally summarized to help provide insight to the quantitative findings. Thirty-nine staff participated.Results: Paired t-tests revealed that only one scale out of the five, Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale (33.97 at time one and 37.45 at time two, significantly and positively changed after the focus group discussion (p=0.046. Providers' views on collaboration ranged from positive to moderate views of collaboration; most measures revealed a non-significant improvement after the focus group discussions. Staff with some graduate school reported the greatest

  16. Collaborative Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Rasmus

    The thesis data have been collected in the EU-sponsored project: Collaborative Improvement Tool for the Extended Manufacturing Enterprise, CO-IMPROVE. In this project four universities (Denmark, Ireland, Italy, and The Netherlands), two software vendors (Greece and Sweden) and three companies (De...... learn how to improve operations in (hopefully) a win-win like manner through collaboration.......The thesis data have been collected in the EU-sponsored project: Collaborative Improvement Tool for the Extended Manufacturing Enterprise, CO-IMPROVE. In this project four universities (Denmark, Ireland, Italy, and The Netherlands), two software vendors (Greece and Sweden) and three companies...... (Denmark, Italy and The Netherlands) each with three to five suppliers were involved. The CO-IMPROVE project and the thesis is based on “action research” and “action learning”. The main aim of the whole project is through actual involvement and actions make the researchers, companies and selected suppliers...

  17. Interprofessional Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Prentice

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this hermeneutic phenomenological study, we examined the experience of interprofessional collaboration from the perspective of nursing and medical students. Seventeen medical and nursing students from two different universities participated in the study. We used guiding questions in face-to-face, conversational interviews to explore students’ experience and expectations of interprofessional collaboration within learning situations. Three themes emerged from the data: the great divide, learning means content, and breaking the ice. The findings suggest that the experience of interprofessional collaboration within learning events is influenced by the natural clustering of shared interests among students. Furthermore, the carry-forward of impressions about physician–nurse relationships prior to the educational programs and during clinical placements dominate the formation of new relationships and acquisition of new knowledge about roles, which might have implications for future practice.

  18. Innovating through collaborative business models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerding, Allan Næs; Kringelum, Louise Tina Brøns

    -ered as a coherent system. The generalization is explicated in terms of different domi-nant market logics in which collaborative efforts can be positioned. Underlying this presentation, the paper argues that business model innovation involves uncertainty to the degree that innovation is based on cooperative efforts......, and that there exists a dialec-tical relationship between sources of selection and sources of survival, which tend to re-inforce one another. This constitutes a new aspect of business model innovation....

  19. Collaborative Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Rasmus

    -called Extended Manufacturing Enterprises (EMEs). In effect, the battlefield of competition is increasingly moving from the level of individual firms to that of EMEs. Consequently, new approaches must be developed not only to enhance the business performance of EMEs, but also, in particular, the inter-organisational......Many companies have gradually moved from vertically aligned operations to horizontally aligned operations, a change implying that co-ordination is shifting from the hierarchy to the market place with emphasis on collaboration with other companies. One form of collaboration with companies is so...

  20. Comparison of two doses of intravitreal bevacizumab as primary treatment for macular edema secondary to central retinal vein occlusion: results of the pan American collaborative retina study group at 24 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lihteh; Arevalo, J Fernando; Berrocal, Maria H; Maia, Mauricio; Roca, José A; Morales-Cantón, Virgilio; Alezzandrini, Arturo A; Díaz-Llopis, Manuel J

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the injection burden, central macular thickness (CMT), and change in best-corrected visual acuity after injecting 1.25 mg or 2.5 mg bevacizumab as needed in patients with primary macular edema secondary to central retinal vein occlusion. This is an interventional, retrospective, comparative multicenter study of 86 eyes with macular edema secondary to central retinal vein occlusion that were treated primarily with intravitreal bevacizumab (44 eyes, 1.25 mg; 42 eyes, 2.5 mg). The main outcome measures were the CMT and the change of best-corrected visual acuity at 24 months. All patients completed at least 24 months of follow-up. The mean number of injections per eye were 7.2 for the 1.25-mg dose group and 8.1 for the 2.5-mg dose group (P = 0.4492). At 24 months, in the 1.25-mg dose group, the logarithm of the minimal angle of resolution best-corrected visual acuity improved from baseline 0.35 +/- 0.57 units (P or=3 lines of Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study visual acuity and 6 (13.6%) lost >or=3 lines of Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study visual acuity. In the 2.5-mg dose group, 24 (57.1 %) eyes improved >or=3 lines of Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study visual acuity and 7 (16.7%) lost >or=3 lines of Early Treatment of Diabetic Retinopathy Study visual acuity. The CMT in the 1.25-mg dose group improved from 635 +/- 324 microm to 264 +/- 160 microm (P central retinal vein occlusion. There were no statistically significant differences between the two dose groups with regard to the number of injections, CMT, and change in visual acuity.

  1. Navy superconductivity efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubser, D. U.

    1990-04-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion, etc.) use LTS materials while space applications (MMW electronics, etc.) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment being conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity, with particular emphasis on the related SDIO sponsored program on HTS applications.

  2. Navy superconductivity efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubser, D. U.

    1990-01-01

    Both the new high temperature superconductors (HTS) and the low temperature superconductors (LTS) are important components of Navy's total plan to integrate superconductivity into field operational systems. Fundamental research is an important component of the total Navy program and focuses on the HTS materials. Power applications (ship propulsion, etc.) use LTS materials while space applications (MMW electronics, etc.) use HTS materials. The Space Experiment being conducted at NRL will involve space flight testing of HTS devices built by industry and will demonstrate the ability to engineer and space qualify these devices for systems use. Another important component of the Navy's effort is the development of Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometers. This program will use LTS materials initially, but plans to implement HTS materials as soon as possible. Hybrid HTS/LTS systems are probable in many applications. A review of the status of the Navy's HTS materials research is given as well as an update on the Navy's development efforts in superconductivity, with particular emphasis on the related SDIO sponsored program on HTS applications.

  3. Collaborative Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Debora

    2014-01-01

    This practitioner research study investigates the power of multimodal texts within a real-world context and argues that a participatory culture focused on literary arts offers marginalized high school students opportunities for collaborative design and authoring. Additionally, this article invites educators to rethink the at-risk label. This…

  4. Cassini launch contingency effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yale; O'Neil, John M.; McGrath, Brian E.; Heyler, Gene A.; Brenza, Pete T.

    2002-01-01

    On 15 October 1997 at 4:43 AM EDT, the Cassini spacecraft was successfully launched on a Titan IVB/Centaur on a mission to explore the Saturnian system. It carried three Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) and 117 Light Weight Radioisotope Heater Units (LWRHUs). As part of the joint National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) safety effort, a contingency plan was prepared to address the unlikely events of an accidental suborbital reentry or out-of-orbital reentry. The objective of the plan was to develop procedures to predict, within hours, the Earth impact footprints (EIFs) for the nuclear heat sources released during the atmospheric reentry. The footprint predictions would be used in subsequent notification and recovery efforts. As part of a multi-agency team, The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) had the responsibility to predict the EIFs of the heat sources after a reentry, given the heat sources' release conditions from the main spacecraft. (No ablation burn-through of the heat sources' aeroshells was expected, as a result of earlier testing.) JHU/APL's other role was to predict the time of reentry from a potential orbital decay. The tools used were a three degree-of-freedom trajectory code, a database of aerodynamic coefficients for the heat sources, secure links to obtain tracking data, and a high fidelity special perturbation orbit integrator code to predict time of spacecraft reentry from orbital decay. In the weeks and days prior to launch, all the codes and procedures were exercised. Notional EIFs were derived from hypothetical reentry conditions. EIFs predicted by JHU/APL were compared to those by JPL and US SPACECOM, and were found to be in good agreement. The reentry time from orbital decay for a booster rocket for the Russian Progress M-36 freighter, a cargo ship for the Mir space station, was predicted to within 5 minutes more than two hours before reentry. For the

  5. Breckinridge Project, initial effort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1982-09-01

    Report III, Volume 1 contains those specifications numbered A through J, as follows: General Specifications (A); Specifications for Pressure Vessels (C); Specifications for Tanks (D); Specifications for Exchangers (E); Specifications for Fired Heaters (F); Specifications for Pumps and Drivers (G); and Specifications for Instrumentation (J). The standard specifications of Bechtel Petroleum Incorporated have been amended as necessary to reflect the specific requirements of the Breckinridge Project, and the more stringent specifications of Ashland Synthetic Fuels, Inc. These standard specifications are available to the Initial Effort (Phase Zero) work performed by all contractors and subcontractors. Report III, Volume 1 also contains the unique specifications prepared for Plants 8, 15, and 27. These specifications will be substantially reviewed during Phase I of the project, and modified as necessary for use during the engineering, procurement, and construction of this project.

  6. Mapping telemedicine efforts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kierkegaard, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    are being utilized? What medical disciplines are being addressed using telemedicine systems? Methods: All data was surveyed from the "Telemedicinsk Landkort", a newly created database designed to provide a comprehensive and systematic overview of all telemedicine technologies in Denmark. Results......Objectives: The aim of this study is to survey telemedicine services currently in operation across Denmark. The study specifically seeks to answer the following questions: What initiatives are deployed within the different regions? What are the motivations behind the projects? What technologies......: The results of this study suggest that a growing number of telemedicine initiatives are currently in operation across Denmark but that considerable variations existed in terms of regional efforts as the number of operational telemedicine projects varied from region to region. Conclusions: The results...

  7. Hubble Exoplanet Pro/Am Collaboration (Abstract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, D. M.

    2016-06-01

    (Abstract only) A collaborative effort is being organized between a world-wide network of amateur astronomers and a Hubble Space Telescope (HST) science team. The purpose of this collaboration is to supplement an HST near-infrared spectroscopy survey of some 15 exoplanets with ground-based observations in the visible range.

  8. Ethics of Collaboration: A Quest for Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesel, Patricia

    "Collaboration" appears to be a popular trend in business and education as it is discussed more and more frequently in publications. One of the problems associated with collaboration is the lack of clear definition among similar terms such as cooperation, team effort, and partnerships. This paper briefly reviews the literature related to the…

  9. Student Collaboration and Standards-Based Music Learning: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangro, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This article is a review of relevant literature on collaborative, standards-based music learning. The review is organized as follows: (a) historical perspective, (b) collaborative music learning, (c) collaboration and creating, (d) collaboration and performing, (e) collaboration and responding, and (f) conclusions. In an effort to bridge the gap…

  10. Student Collaboration and Standards-Based Music Learning: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangro, Richard

    2016-01-01

    This article is a review of relevant literature on collaborative, standards-based music learning. The review is organized as follows: (a) historical perspective, (b) collaborative music learning, (c) collaboration and creating, (d) collaboration and performing, (e) collaboration and responding, and (f) conclusions. In an effort to bridge the gap…

  11. Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration and Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deana D. Pennington

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Complex environmental problem solving depends on cross-disciplinary collaboration among scientists. Collaborative research must be preceded by an exploratory phase of collective thinking that creates shared conceptual frameworks. Collective thinking, in a cross-disciplinary setting, depends on the facility with which collaborators are able to learn and understand each others' perspectives. This paper applies three perspectives on learning to the problem of enabling cross-disciplinary collaboration: Maslow's hierarchy of needs, constructivism, and organizational learning. Application of learning frameworks to collaboration provides insights regarding receptive environments for collaboration, and processes that facilitate cross-disciplinary interactions. These environments and interactions need time to develop and require a long phase of idea generation preceding any focused research effort. The findings highlight that collaboration is itself a complex system of people, scientific theory, and tools that must be intentionally managed. Effective management of the system requires leaders who are facilitators and are capable of orchestrating effective environments and interactions.

  12. Swedish nuclear waste efforts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rydberg, J.

    1981-09-01

    After the introduction of a law prohibiting the start-up of any new nuclear power plant until the utility had shown that the waste produced by the plant could be taken care of in an absolutely safe way, the Swedish nuclear utilities in December 1976 embarked on the Nuclear Fuel Safety Project, which in November 1977 presented a first report, Handling of Spent Nuclear Fuel and Final Storage of Vitrified Waste (KBS-I), and in November 1978 a second report, Handling and Final Storage of Unreprocessed Spent Nuclear Fuel (KBS II). These summary reports were supported by 120 technical reports prepared by 450 experts. The project engaged 70 private and governmental institutions at a total cost of US $15 million. The KBS-I and KBS-II reports are summarized in this document, as are also continued waste research efforts carried out by KBS, SKBF, PRAV, ASEA and other Swedish organizations. The KBS reports describe all steps (except reprocessing) in handling chain from removal from a reactor of spent fuel elements until their radioactive waste products are finally disposed of, in canisters, in an underground granite depository. The KBS concept relies on engineered multibarrier systems in combination with final storage in thoroughly investigated stable geologic formations. This report also briefly describes other activities carried out by the nuclear industry, namely, the construction of a central storage facility for spent fuel elements (to be in operation by 1985), a repository for reactor waste (to be in operation by 1988), and an intermediate storage facility for vitrified high-level waste (to be in operation by 1990). The R and D activities are updated to September 1981.

  13. Is Effort Praise Motivational? The Role of Beliefs in the Effort-Ability Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Shui-fong; Yim, Pui-shan; Ng, Yee-lam

    2008-01-01

    In two studies, we investigated how beliefs in the effort-ability relationship moderated the effects of effort praise on student motivation. Study 1 showed that the more the participants believed that effort and ability were related positively (the positive rule) versus related negatively (the inverse rule), the more they would have positive…

  14. Collaborative Care

    OpenAIRE

    コラボレイティブケア研究科

    2005-01-01

    本書を著したHornbyは英国のソーシャルワーカーである。彼女は1983年に「Collaboration in social work(Journal of social work practice,1.1)」を発表し、ソーシャルワークでの職種間の連携の重要性について報告している。さらに1993年に発刊した本書では、同一機関内の人間関係 ...

  15. Timeline Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohøj, Morten; Borchorst, Nikolaj Gandrup; Bouvin, Niels Olof

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores timelines as a web-based tool for collaboration between citizens and municipal caseworkers. The paper takes its outset in a case study of planning and control of parental leave; a process that may involve surprisingly many actors. As part of the case study, a web-based timeline......, CaseLine, was designed. This design crosses the boundaries between leisure and work, in ways that are different from what is often seen in current HCI. The timeline has several roles on these boundaries: It is a shared planning and visualization tool that may be used by parents and caseworkers alone......, and beyond this case....

  16. Children's collaborative encounters in pre-school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svinth, Lone

    2013-01-01

    ’s collaboration and how the institutional demands influence children’s collaborative encounters. The study is based on video recordings of paedagogical activities (workshops and circle times) in two Danish pre-schools over a period of 11 months. Although institutional demands challenge children’s initiatives...

  17. Using Collaborative Engineering to Inform Collaboration Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration is a critical competency for modern organizations as they struggle to compete in an increasingly complex, global environment. A large body of research on collaboration in the workplace focuses both on teams, investigating how groups use teamwork to perform their task work, and on the use of information systems to support team processes ("collaboration engineering"). This research essay presents collaboration from an engineering perspective ("collaborative engineering"). It uses examples from professional and student engineering teams to illustrate key differences in collaborative versus collaboration engineering and investigates how challenges in the former can inform opportunities for the latter.

  18. Using Collaborative Engineering to Inform Collaboration Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration is a critical competency for modern organizations as they struggle to compete in an increasingly complex, global environment. A large body of research on collaboration in the workplace focuses both on teams, investigating how groups use teamwork to perform their task work, and on the use of information systems to support team processes ("collaboration engineering"). This research essay presents collaboration from an engineering perspective ("collaborative engineering"). It uses examples from professional and student engineering teams to illustrate key differences in collaborative versus collaboration engineering and investigates how challenges in the former can inform opportunities for the latter.

  19. Collaborative Environments. Considerations Concerning Some Collaborative Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela I. MUNTEAN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It is obvious, that all collaborative environments (workgroups, communities of practice, collaborative enterprises are based on knowledge and between collaboration and knowledge management there is a strong interdependence. The evolution of information systems in these collaborative environments led to the sudden necessity to adopt, for maintaining the virtual activities and processes, the latest technologies/systems, which are capable to support integrated collaboration in business services. In these environments, portal-based IT platforms will integrate multi-agent collaborative systems, collaborative tools, different enterprise applications and other useful information systems.

  20. Effort rights-based management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Squires, Dale; Maunder, Mark; Allen, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Effort rights-based fisheries management (RBM) is less widely used than catch rights, whether for groups or individuals. Because RBM on catch or effort necessarily requires a total allowable catch (TAC) or total allowable effort (TAE), RBM is discussed in conjunction with issues in assessing fish...

  1. Collaborative Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum Pedersen, Esben Rahbek; Netter, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore barriers and opportunities for business models based on the ideas of collaborative consumption within the fashion industry. Design/methodology/approach – The analysis is based on a multiple-case study of Scandinavian fashion libraries – a new......, clothes-sharing concept that has emerged as a fashion niche within the last decade. Findings – It is concluded that fashion libraries offers interesting perspectives, e.g. by allowing people to experiment with styles without having to pay the full cost and becoming a meeting place for young designers...... and end consumers. However, at present fashion libraries remain a small-scale phenomenon with difficulties reaching the mainstream market, not least due to limited financial and human resources as well as conventional fashion consumption patterns. Research limitations/implications – The study is limited...

  2. Collaborative Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum Pedersen, Esben Rahbek; Netter, Sarah

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore barriers and opportunities for business models based on the ideas of collaborative consumption within the fashion industry. Design/methodology/approach: The analysis is based on a multiple-­‐‑case study of Scandinavian fashion libraries – a new......, clothes-­‐‑sharing concept that has emerged as a fashion niche within the last decade. Findings: It is concluded that fashion libraries offers interesting perspectives, e.g. by allowing people to experiment with styles without having to pay the full cost and becoming a meeting place for young designers...... and end consumers. However, at present fashion libraries remain a small-­‐‑scale phenomenon with difficulties reaching the mainstream market, not least due to limited financial and human resources as well as conventional fashion consumption patterns. Research limitations/implications: The study is limited...

  3. Contested collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    1995-01-01

    support patterns of work activities, social groups, and personal beliefs. In these situations, design is fundamentally an interactive process that requires communication among users, designers, and developers. However, communication among these groups is often difficult although of paramount importance...... to design outcomes. Through a qualitative analysis of a house, expert system, and telecommunications network architecture and management system design situations, a descriptive model of design that characterizes communication among users, designers, and developers as they create an artifact was developed....... The model describes design phases, roles, themes, and intergroup communication networks as they evolve throughout the design process and characterizes design as a process of "contested collaboration". It is a first step towards a predictive design model that suggests strategies which may help participants...

  4. Technology collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Jacob [Halliburton (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to present Halliburton's Brazilian technology center. Halliburton has technology centers in the United States, Saudi Arabia, India, Singapore and Brazil, all of which aim at delivering accelerated innovation in the oil sector. The technology centers engage in research and development activities with the help of various universities and in collaboration with the customer or supplier. The Halliburton Brazil technology center provides its customers with timely research and development solutions for enhancing recovery and mitigating reservoir uncertainty; they are specialized in finding solutions for pre- and post-salt carbonate drilling and in the enhancement of production from mature fields. This presentation showcased the work carried out by the Halliburton Brazil technology center to help customers develop their deepwater field activities.

  5. Interprofessional collaboration and collaboration among nurses in Northern Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstadinidou-Straukou A.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A I M : This study aimed at assessing satisfaction from collaboration among nursing staff members as well as betweennurses and physicians, and to determine factors influencing their collaboration.B A C K G R O U N D : Studies investigating the collaboration among nursing staff members are mainly focusedon its negative effects in their work, on horizontal violence among nurses, on colleagues’ aggression, and on verbalabuse. Multidisciplinary and interprofessional working is currently a priority in health care.M A T E R I A L - M E T H O D : The study is descriptive. The data collection was carried out through a self-administeredquestionnaire, which was developed by the researchers. The participants were 336 nursing staff membersworking in hospitals in the greater area of Thessaloniki.R E S U L T S : 87.8% agree that colleagues in the hospital help one the other, and 76.9% agree that there is teamworkand collaboration between the various levels of nursing staff. Almost half (50.5% disagree that no-one doesnot undermine the efforts of the other. Many nursing staff members (50.6% agree that physicians collaborate verywell with them. More than a half of the sample (56% disagree that physicians have a complete picture of the activitiesof a nurse and 57.7% disagree that physicians underestimate too much the nursing staff.C O N C L U S I O N S : Since the nursing work environment has a critical impact on patient safety, nursing staffmembers and physicians should make an effort to collaborate well and to provide quality services.

  6. Monthly Meteorological Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly forms that do not fit into any regular submission. Tabulation sheets and generic monthly forms designed to capture miscellaneous monthly observations.

  7. Collaborative information seeking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2008-01-01

    , the activities involved in information seeking are often performed by varying subgroups of actors. Consequently, collaborative grounding is necessary to share information among collaborating actors and, thereby, establish and maintain the common ground necessary for their collaborative work. By focusing......Since common ground is pivotal to collaboration, this paper proposes to define collaborative information seeking as the combined activity of information seeking and collaborative grounding. While information-seeking activities are necessary for collaborating actors to acquire new information...... on the collaborative level, collaborative information seeking aims to avoid both individual reductionism and group reductionism, while at the same time recognizing that only some information and understanding need be shared....

  8. Collaborative Partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    This article gives an introduction to the Executive Master of Public Governance degree program in Copenhagen, Denmark—a joint effort by the University of Copenhagen and Copenhagen Business School, aided by Aalborg University— which in the winter of 2012 had enrolled 600+ public managers from Denm...... are highlighted: (a) Sustained dialogue is important; (b) Engage in a multiple sector project to improve public management; (c) Public funding helps fuel enthusiasm; and (d) Efficient organizing and alignment with faculty interests are crucial to success....

  9. Freaky: Collaborative Enactments of Emotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leahu, Lucian; Sengers, Phoebe

    2015-01-01

    The field of CSCW is increasingly drawing on theories and approaches from feminist philosophy of science. To date such efforts have focused on understanding users and their practices. We present a research prototype showing that feminist theories can lead to novel design solutions. Freaky...... is a mobile, interactive system that collaborates with its users in the enactment of emotion. Informed by the feminist literature, the system introduces a novel approach to emotion: designing for human-machine co-production of emotion....

  10. Organizing for Asymmetric Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørn Flohr; Sørensen, Henrik B.

    participants and optimistic plans for cooperation between equals there are still poorly understood barriers, and attempts at interorganizational cooperation may lead to frustration. It is too often assumed that the parties are equally eager, trusting, and dependent or at least have some symmetry in how......' different motives and different situational factors appear in an interorganizational setting. We classify interfaces according to the symmetry/asymmetry in the respective parent organizations' resources, commitment, and control of representatives and indicate how  classification schemes can be used......  The vision of new organizational forms consists of less-organized networks and alliances between organizations, in which collaborative capabilities are assumed to be crucial (Miles et al., 2005). The path to such new forms may go through fragile cooperative efforts. Despite the good will of many...

  11. Oblivious Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Afek, Yehuda; Feige, Uriel; Gafni, Eli; Linial, Nati; Sudakov, Benny

    2011-01-01

    Communication is a crucial ingredient in every kind of collaborative work. But what is the least possible amount of communication required for a given task? We formalize this question by introducing a new framework for distributed computation, called {\\em oblivious protocols}. We investigate the power of this model by considering two concrete examples, the {\\em musical chairs} task $MC(n,m)$ and the well-known {\\em Renaming} problem. The $MC(n,m)$ game is played by $n$ players (processors) with $m$ chairs. Players can {\\em occupy} chairs, and the game terminates as soon as each player occupies a unique chair. Thus we say that player $P$ is {\\em in conflict} if some other player $Q$ is occupying the same chair, i.e., termination means there are no conflicts. By known results from distributed computing, if $m \\le 2n-2$, no strategy of the players can guarantee termination. However, there is a protocol with $m = 2n-1$ chairs that always terminates. Here we consider an oblivious protocol where in every time step ...

  12. State Technologies Advancement Collaborative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David S. Terry

    2012-01-30

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO), and Association of State Energy Research and Technology Transfer Institutions (ASERTTI) signed an intergovernmental agreement on November 14, 2002, that allowed states and territories and the Federal Government to better collaborate on energy research, development, demonstration and deployment (RDD&D) projects. The agreement established the State Technologies Advancement Collaborative (STAC) which allowed the states and DOE to move RDD&D forward using an innovative competitive project selection and funding process. A cooperative agreement between DOE and NASEO served as the contracting instrument for this innovative federal-state partnership obligating funds from DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Office of Fossil Energy to plan, fund, and implement RDD&D projects that were consistent with the common priorities of the states and DOE. DOE's Golden Field Office provided Federal oversight and guidance for the STAC cooperative agreement. The STAC program was built on the foundation of prior Federal-State efforts to collaborate on and engage in joint planning for RDD&D. Although STAC builds on existing, successful programs, it is important to note that it was not intended to replace other successful joint DOE/State initiatives such as the State Energy Program or EERE Special Projects. Overall the STAC process was used to fund, through three competitive solicitations, 35 successful multi-state research, development, deployment, and demonstration projects with an overall average non-federal cost share of 43%. Twenty-two states were awarded at least one prime contract, and organizations in all 50 states and some territories were involved as subcontractors in at least one STAC project. Projects were funded in seven program areas: (1) Building Technologies, (2) Industrial Technologies, (3) Transportation Technologies, (4) Distributed Energy

  13. Managing collaborative design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sebastian, R.

    2007-01-01

    Collaborative design has been emerging in building projects everywhere. The more complex a building project becomes, the closer and more intensive collaboration between the design actors is required. This research focuses on collaborative design in the conceptual architecture design phase,

  14. Facilitating Collaboration Among Academic Generalist Disciplines: A Call to Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutner, Jean S.; Westfall, John M.; Morrison, Elizabeth H.; Beach, Mary Catherine; Jacobs, Elizabeth A.; Rosenblatt, Roger A.

    2006-01-01

    To meet its population’s health needs, the United States must have a coherent system to train and support primary care physicians. This goal can be achieved only though genuine collaboration between academic generalist disciplines. Academic general pediatrics, general internal medicine, and family medicine may be hampering this effort and their own futures by lack of collaboration. This essay addresses the necessity of collaboration among generalist physicians in research, medical education, clinical care, and advocacy. Academic generalists should collaborate by (1) making a clear decision to collaborate, (2) proactively discussing the flow of money, (3) rewarding collaboration, (4) initiating regular generalist meetings, (5) refusing to tolerate denigration of other generalist disciplines, (6) facilitating strategic planning for collaboration among generalist disciplines, and (7) learning from previous collaborative successes and failures. Collaboration among academic generalists will enhance opportunities for trainees, primary care research, and advocacy; conserve resources; and improve patient care. PMID:16569722

  15. Collaborative Service Arrangements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Søren; J. May, Peter

    2007-01-01

    in particular differs among collaborators. Our modeling of the influence of collaboration on perceived employment outcomes suggests that these impacts are relatively minor. They are greater when there is active involvement of municipal employment managers in fostering cooperative relationships...... with collaborators. In short, collaboration requires a healthy and active relationship to foster improved outcomes. These findings have implications for future research about collaborative service delivery concerning the measurement of collaboration, different bases for it, and potential impacts....

  16. Collaborative Service Arrangements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    J. May, Peter; Winter, Søren

    in particular differs among collaborators. Our modeling of the influence of collaboration on perceived employment outcomes suggests that these impacts are relatively minor. They are greater when there is active involvement of municipal employment managers in fostering cooperative relationships...... with collaborators. In short, collaboration requires a healthy and active relationship to foster improved outcomes. These findings have implications for future research about collaborative service delivery concerning the measurement of collaboration, different bases for it, and potential impacts....

  17. Collaborative Service Arrangements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    J. May, Peter; Winter, Søren

    While much of prior research on collaboration addresses the service delivery network as a whole, we address collaborative relationships between one type of organization—municipal employment services—and a range of governmental and non-governmental partners for employment services in Denmark...... with collaborators. In short, collaboration requires a healthy and active relationship to foster improved outcomes. These findings have implications for future research about collaborative service delivery concerning the measurement of collaboration, different bases for it, and potential impacts....

  18. Use of a consultant to assist a dietetic association in its media and public relations efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visocan, B J; Lazin, B

    1989-04-01

    During 1987, the Philadelphia Dietetic Association (PDA) enlisted the aid of a public relations consultant to increase media contacts and thereby accomplish a threefold goal of (a) establishing the dietetic association and its registered dietitian members as the local nutrition experts; (b) distributing reliable, current nutrition information; and (c) marketing the PDA's DIAL-A-DIETITIAN service. Through the advice of the consultant, a media tipsheet, published monthly, was created. This publication, the Nutrition Informationist, effectively increased media contacts from two in 1986 to 19 in 1987 and resulted in a total of 8 hours of air time. Weight reduction, fad diets, and sports nutrition proved to be the most popular topics. Public service announcements (PSAs) concerning the DIAL-A-DIETITIAN program were developed by the consultant to assist the public in gaining access to local registered dietitians. Calls to that service increased 75% (from an average of 47.5 to 83.0 calls) the month following the distribution of PSAs to radio stations. The positive outcome of this collaborative effort shows that public relations consultants can be a useful resource for local dietetic associations, aiding them in their efforts to reach the media and the public and to improve their image.

  19. NASA Software Engineering Benchmarking Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Sally; Rarick, Heather

    2012-01-01

    Benchmarking was very interesting and provided a wealth of information (1) We did see potential solutions to some of our "top 10" issues (2) We have an assessment of where NASA stands with relation to other aerospace/defense groups We formed new contacts and potential collaborations (1) Several organizations sent us examples of their templates, processes (2) Many of the organizations were interested in future collaboration: sharing of training, metrics, Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) appraisers, instructors, etc. We received feedback from some of our contractors/ partners (1) Desires to participate in our training; provide feedback on procedures (2) Welcomed opportunity to provide feedback on working with NASA

  20. Learning Environment and Student Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopland, Arnt O.; Nyhus, Ole Henning

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between satisfaction with learning environment and student effort, both in class and with homework assignments. Design/methodology/approach: The authors use data from a nationwide and compulsory survey to analyze the relationship between learning environment and student effort. The…

  1. Collaboration rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Philip; Wolf, Bob

    2005-01-01

    Corporate leaders seeking to boost growth, learning, and innovation may find the answer in a surprising place: the Linux open-source software community. Linux is developed by an essentially volunteer, self-organizing community of thousands of programmers. Most leaders would sell their grandmothers for workforces that collaborate as efficiently, frictionlessly, and creatively as the self-styled Linux hackers. But Linux is software, and software is hardly a model for mainstream business. The authors have, nonetheless, found surprising parallels between the anarchistic, caffeinated, hirsute world of Linux hackers and the disciplined, tea-sipping, clean-cut world of Toyota engineering. Specifically, Toyota and Linux operate by rules that blend the self-organizing advantages of markets with the low transaction costs of hierarchies. In place of markets' cash and contracts and hierarchies' authority are rules about how individuals and groups work together (with rigorous discipline); how they communicate (widely and with granularity); and how leaders guide them toward a common goal (through example). Those rules, augmented by simple communication technologies and a lack of legal barriers to sharing information, create rich common knowledge, the ability to organize teams modularly, extraordinary motivation, and high levels of trust, which radically lowers transaction costs. Low transaction costs, in turn, make it profitable for organizations to perform more and smaller transactions--and so increase the pace and flexibility typical of high-performance organizations. Once the system achieves critical mass, it feeds on itself. The larger the system, the more broadly shared the knowledge, language, and work style. The greater individuals' reputational capital, the louder the applause and the stronger the motivation. The success of Linux is evidence of the power of that virtuous circle. Toyota's success is evidence that it is also powerful in conventional companies.

  2. Collaborative outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanmarti-Vila, Lydia; García-Matos, Marta; Beduini, Federica; Carrasco, Silvia

    2016-09-01

    Many research projects and scientific initiatives multiple their impact and relevance through collaborations. It is the contact and exchange with others that often brings a scientist's work to the next level. The same happens with outreach: sharing activities, concepts, materials and knowhow may lead to greater impact, more innovative, inspirational ideas with enough potential to create pioneering outreach activities. A good example for this is the FP7 European project "GoPhoton!", an initiative of ECOP (European Centres of Outreach in Photonics) that ran through 2014 and 2015 and finished at the beginning of 2016 and was directed at the general public, young minds as well as current and future entrepreneurs. This project was based on the idea of sharing activities - which is at the core of ECOP's identity- already existing in other nodes (institutions within the project), or created within GoPhoton! The main concept was the effective leverage of local links such as the networks of educators and professionals in general, industrial clusters, museums, universities, governmental and non-governmental organizations, all from a Pan-European perspective possible through ECOP. This has resulted in over 200 events impacting over two million people. The sharing of activities across institutions that have different resources, facilities, and cultural environments is not straightforward. One of the biggest challenges for the consortium was to be able to extract the concept and identity of each activity, so that it could be realistically adapted to each local context. A crucial point was being able to effectively use the knowhow gained from a partner's activity, in a way that the essence of the activity remained untainted across the participating nodes, while still triggering innovation locally.

  3. International Arctic Research Collaborations: Past, Present and Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintisch, E. S.

    2015-12-01

    International cooperation on Arctic research has a long and storied history, predating even the first International Polar Year in 1881. But scientists want to improve and expand current efforts to conduct international Arctic research, despite politcal and legal barriers that can hamper it. A review of the past and present aspects of such research can inform that effort. As part of a six month fellowship at the Center for Science Diplomacy at the American Association for the Advancement of Science I studied the history and current status of international cooperation in the Arctic. I will report on my findings, which include the fact that some of the first substantial international environmental research and regulatory cooperation began in the far North. My session will identify the elements that make international research collaborations successful, for example more than a century of cooperative work by Russian and Norwegian fishery scientists to monitor and regulate the cod trade in the Barents Sea. And it will explore the challenges that can threaten such collaborations. These can include rules that stymie data collection, block the import of certain analytical equipment across national boundaries, and bar the export of soil or water samples. I will mention specific complications to recent international arctic research projects. These include the SWERUS cruise, a joint effort between Sweden, Russia and the US, an effort to study carbon fluxes over the East Siberian Arctic Shelf in 2014. The session will also review progress towards a new international agreeement, first proposed by the US, on improving arctic research cooperation. That deal is focused on removing the bureacratic and legal barriers to scientists seeking to conduct arctic research on foreign waters and land.

  4. India joins the ISOLDE collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    On 18 April India signed a Memorandum of Understanding with the ISOLDE collaboration, thus strengthening its links with CERN. Three experiments led by Indian scientists at ISOLDE have been recommended by the Research Board and will be performed in the coming months, and more projects are being designed for the future HIE-ISOLDE scientific programme.   Shaking hands: Rüdiger Voss (left), adviser for India in CERN’s International Relations Office, and SINP Director Milan Kumar Sanyal (right). Also photographed: ISOLDE spokesperson Yorick Blumenfeld, (centre left) and Sunanda Banerjee, head of high-energy at SINP (centre right).  The new Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) was signed in Kolkata at the Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics (SINP). India thus becomes the 15th member of the ISOLDE collaboration, after having signed similar collaboration documents with the CMS and ALICE experiments. “This agreement will a...

  5. Gearbox Reliability Collaborative (GRC) Description and Loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyague, F.

    2011-11-01

    This document describes simulated turbine load cases in accordance to the IEC 61400-1 Ed.3 standard, which is representative of the typical wind turbine design process. The information presented herein is intended to provide a broad understanding of the gearbox reliability collaborative 750kW drivetrain and turbine configuration. In addition, fatigue and ultimate strength drivetrain loads resulting from simulations are presented. This information provides the bases for the analytical work of the gearbox reliability collaborative effort.

  6. Official crime data versus collaborative crime mapping at a Brazilian city

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, P. L.; Jesus, E. G. V.; Sant'Ana, R. M. S.; Martins, C.; Delgado, J. P. M.; Fernandes, V. O.

    2014-11-01

    In July of 2013 a group of undergraduate students from the Federal University of Bahia, Brazil, published a collaborative web map called "Where I Was Robbed". Their initial efforts in publicizing their web map were restricted to announce it at a local radio as a tool of social interest. In two months the map had almost 10.000 reports, 155 reports per day and people from more the 350 cities had already reported a crime. The present study consists in an investigation about this collaborative web map spatial correlation to official robbery data registered at the Secretary of Public Safety database, for the city of Salvador, Bahia. Kernel density estimator combined with map algebra was used to the investigation. Spatial correlations with official robbery data for the city of Salvador were not found initially, but after standardizing collaborative data and mining official registers, both data pointed at very similar areas as the main hot spots for pedestrian robbery. Both areas are located at two of the most economical active areas of the city, although web map crimes reports were more concentrated in an area with higher income population. This results and discussions indicates that this collaborative application is been used mainly by mid class and upper class parcel of the city population, but can still provide significant information on public safety priority areas. Therefore, extended divulgation, on local papers, radio and TV, of the collaborative crime map application and partnership with official agencies are strongly recommended.

  7. Surface computing and collaborative analysis work

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Judith; Gossage, Stevenson; Hack, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Large surface computing devices (wall-mounted or tabletop) with touch interfaces and their application to collaborative data analysis, an increasingly important and prevalent activity, is the primary topic of this book. Our goals are to outline the fundamentals of surface computing (a still maturing technology), review relevant work on collaborative data analysis, describe frameworks for understanding collaborative processes, and provide a better understanding of the opportunities for research and development. We describe surfaces as display technologies with which people can interact directly, and emphasize how interaction design changes when designing for large surfaces. We review efforts to use large displays, surfaces or mixed display environments to enable collaborative analytic activity. Collaborative analysis is important in many domains, but to provide concrete examples and a specific focus, we frequently consider analysis work in the security domain, and in particular the challenges security personne...

  8. Monthly Weather Review

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Supplements to the Monthly Weather Review publication. The Weather Bureau published the Monthly weather review Supplement irregularly from 1914 to 1949. The...

  9. Proposing Chinese Pharmacists Month

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ Dear Pharmacists: Today I would like to share with you about the American Pharmacists Month which is celebrated in October every year.This month-long observance is promoted by American Pharmacist Association.

  10. Natural gas monthly, August 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This analysis presents the most recent data on natural gas prices, supply, and consumption from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The presentation of the latest monthly data is followed by an update on natural gas markets. The markets section examines the behavior of daily spot and futures prices based on information from trade press, as well as regional, weekly data on natural gas storage from the American Gas Association (AGA). This {open_quotes}Highlights{close_quotes} closes with a special section comparing and contrasting EIA and AGA storage data on a monthly and regional basis. The regions used are those defined by the AGA for their weekly data collection effort: the Producing Region, the Consuming Region East, and the Consuming Region West. While data on working gas levels have tracked fairly closely between the two data sources, differences have developed recently. The largest difference is in estimates of working gas levels in the East consuming region during the heating season.

  11. Enhancing the Impact of NASA Astrophysics Education and Public Outreach: Community Collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Denise A.; Lawton, B. L.; Bartolone, L.; Schultz, G. R.; Blair, W. P.; Astrophysics E/PO Community, NASA; NASA Astrophysics Forum Team

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Astrophysics Science Education and Public Outreach Forum is one of four scientist-educator teams that support NASA's Science Mission Directorate and its nationwide education and public outreach community in increasing the coherence, efficiency, and effectiveness of their education and public outreach efforts. NASA Astrophysics education and outreach teams collaborate with each other through the Astrophysics Forum to place individual programs in context, connect with broader education and public outreach activities, learn and share successful strategies and techniques, and develop new partnerships. This poster highlights examples of collaborative efforts designed to engage youth and adults across the full spectrum of learning environments, from public outreach venues, to centers of informal learning, to K-12 and higher education classrooms. These include coordinated efforts to support major outreach events such as the USA Science and Engineering Festival; pilot "Astro4Girls" activities in public libraries to engage girls and their families in science during Women’s History Month; and a pilot "NASA's Multiwavelength Universe" online professional development course for middle and high school educators. Resources to assist scientists and Astro101 instructors in incorporating NASA Astrophysics discoveries into their education and public outreach efforts are also discussed.

  12. Shopping For Danger: E-commerce techniques applied to collaboration in cyber security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce, Joseph R.; Fink, Glenn A.

    2012-05-24

    Collaboration among cyber security analysts is essential to a successful protection strategy on the Internet today, but it is uncommonly practiced or encouraged in operating environments. Barriers to productive collaboration often include data sensitivity, time and effort to communicate, institutional policy, and protection of domain knowledge. We propose an ambient collaboration framework, Vulcan, designed to remove the barriers of time and effort and mitigate the others. Vulcan automated data collection, collaborative filtering, and asynchronous dissemination, eliminating the effort implied by explicit collaboration among peers. We instrumented two analytic applications and performed a mock analysis session to build a dataset and test the output of the system.

  13. Dopamine, behavioral economics, and effort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Salamone

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. There are numerous problems with the hypothesis that brain dopamine (DA systems, particularly in the nucleus accumbens, directly mediate the rewarding or primary motivational characteristics of natural stimuli such as food. Research and theory related to the functions of mesolimbic DA are undergoing a substantial conceptual restructuring, with the traditional emphasis on hedonia and primary reward yielding to other concepts and lines of inquiry. The present review is focused upon the involvement of nucleus accumbens DA in behavioral activation and effort-related processes. Viewed from the framework of behavioral economics, the effects of accumbens DA depletions and antagonism on food-reinforced behavior are highly dependent upon the work requirements of the instrumental task, and DA depleted rats are more sensitive to increases in response costs (i.e., ratio requirements. Moreover, interference with accumbens DA transmission exerts a powerful influence over effort-related choice behavior. Rats with accumbens DA depletions or antagonism reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks that have high response requirements, and instead these rats select a less-effortful type of food-seeking behavior. Nucleus accumbens DA and adenosine interact in the regulation of effort-related functions, and other brain structures (anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala, ventral pallidum also are involved. Studies of the brain systems regulating effort-based processes may have implications for understanding drug abuse, as well as energy-related disorders such as psychomotor slowing, fatigue or anergia in depression and other neurological disorders.

  14. Dopamine, behavioral economics, and effort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamone, John D; Correa, Merce; Farrar, Andrew M; Nunes, Eric J; Pardo, Marta

    2009-01-01

    There are numerous problems with the hypothesis that brain dopamine (DA) systems, particularly in the nucleus accumbens, directly mediate the rewarding or primary motivational characteristics of natural stimuli such as food. Research and theory related to the functions of mesolimbic DA are undergoing a substantial conceptual restructuring, with the traditional emphasis on hedonia and primary reward yielding to other concepts and lines of inquiry. The present review is focused upon the involvement of nucleus accumbens DA in behavioral activation and effort-related processes. Viewed from the framework of behavioral economics, the effects of accumbens DA depletions and antagonism on food-reinforced behavior are highly dependent upon the work requirements of the instrumental task, and DA depleted rats are more sensitive to increases in response costs (i.e., ratio requirements). Moreover, interference with accumbens DA transmission exerts a powerful influence over effort-related choice behavior. Rats with accumbens DA depletions or antagonism reallocate their instrumental behavior away from food-reinforced tasks that have high response requirements, and instead these rats select a less-effortful type of food-seeking behavior. Nucleus accumbens DA and adenosine interact in the regulation of effort-related functions, and other brain structures (anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala, ventral pallidum) also are involved. Studies of the brain systems regulating effort-based processes may have implications for understanding drug abuse, as well as energy-related disorders such as psychomotor slowing, fatigue or anergia in depression and other neurological disorders.

  15. "Let's work together": what do infants understand about collaborative goals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Annette M E; Woodward, Amanda L

    2011-10-01

    Collaboration is fundamental to our daily lives, yet little is known about how humans come to understand these activities. The present research was conducted to fill this void by using a novel visual habituation paradigm to investigate infants' understanding of the collaborative-goal structure of collaborative action. The findings of the three experiments reported here suggest that 14-month-old infants understand that the actions of collaborative partners are complementary and critical to the attainment of a common collaborative goal. Importantly, 14-month-olds do not interpret the actions of two individuals in terms of a collaborative goal when their actions are not causally related. The implications of our findings for theories of collaboration and folk psychology are discussed.

  16. Effort problem of chemical pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okrajni, J.; Ciesla, M.; Mutwil, K. [Silesian Technical University, Katowice (Poland)

    1998-12-31

    The problem of the technical state assessment of the chemical pipelines working under mechanical and thermal loading has been shown in the paper. The pipelines effort after the long time operating period has been analysed. Material geometrical and loading conditions of the crack initiation and crack growth process in the chosen object has been discussed. Areas of the maximal effort have been determined. The material structure charges after the long time operating period have been described. Mechanisms of the crack initiation and crack growth in the pipeline elements have been analysed and mutual relations between the chemical and mechanical influences have been shown. (orig.) 16 refs.

  17. Towards the collaborative hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prætorius, Thim; Hasle, Peter; Edwards, Kasper;

    2015-01-01

    of the collaborative hospital concern the creation of an appropriate balance between standardization and local autonomy, shared purpose centred around providing the best possible care, and use of enabling structures that sustain the new ways of collaborative work. The chapter builds on the theoretical framework...... for the collaborative hospital as new organizational form which is better equipped to respond to the challenges facing modern hospitals. The collaborative hospital is an ambidextrous organization that opens for pursuing both exploration and exploitation within the same organizational structure. The basic principles...... of the collaborative organization which is used for a discussion of theoretical and empirical aspects of the collaborative hospital....

  18. The AstroHDF Effort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Masters; A. Alexov; M. Folk; R. Hanisch; G. Heber; M. Wise

    2011-01-01

    Here we update the astronomy community on our effort to deal with the demands of ever-increasing astronomical data size and complexity, using the Hierarchical Data Format, version 5 (HDF5) format (Wise et al. 2011). NRAO, LOFAR and VAO have joined forces with The HDF Group to write an NSF grant, req

  19. Reproductive effort in viscous populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pen, Ido

    2000-01-01

    Here I study a kin selection model of reproductive effort, the allocation of resources to fecundity versus survival, in a patch-structured population. Breeding females remain in the same patch for life. Offspring have costly, partial long-distance dispersal and compete for breeding sites, which beco

  20. Enhanced virtual microscopy for collaborative education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holloway William J

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Curricular reform efforts and a desire to use novel educational strategies that foster student collaboration are challenging the traditional microscope-based teaching of histology. Computer-based histology teaching tools and Virtual Microscopes (VM, computer-based digital slide viewers, have been shown to be effective and efficient educational strategies. We developed an open-source VM system based on the Google Maps engine to transform our histology education and introduce new teaching methods. This VM allows students and faculty to collaboratively create content, annotate slides with markers, and it is enhanced with social networking features to give the community of learners more control over the system. Results We currently have 1,037 slides in our VM system comprised of 39,386,941 individual JPEG files that take up 349 gigabytes of server storage space. Of those slides 682 are for general teaching and available to our students and the public; the remaining 355 slides are used for practical exams and have restricted access. The system has seen extensive use with 289,352 unique slide views to date. Students viewed an average of 56.3 slides per month during the histology course and accessed the system at all hours of the day. Of the 621 annotations added to 126 slides 26.2% were added by faculty and 73.8% by students. The use of the VM system reduced the amount of time faculty spent administering the course by 210 hours, but did not reduce the number of laboratory sessions or the number of required faculty. Laboratory sessions were reduced from three hours to two hours each due to the efficiencies in the workflow of the VM system. Conclusions Our virtual microscope system has been an effective solution to the challenges facing traditional histopathology laboratories and the novel needs of our revised curriculum. The web-based system allowed us to empower learners to have greater control over their content, as well as the

  1. Collaborating at the ECB: A Reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiroz, Sharon

    1998-01-01

    Overviews the 20-year history of the English Composition Board at the University of Michigan, an independent unit directed by a policy board until it was effectively ended by being placed under the English Department in 1997. Describes its early cooperative and later collaborative approach to management style. Argues efforts to institutionalize…

  2. Benefits of Collaborative Finance Research in Business Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration in business research provides outcomes and results that are more efficient than those due to individual efforts. The integration of diverse environments and disciplines often generates creative ideas. Collaboration increases the quality of research and effectiveness of discoveries, and promotes the dissemination of knowledge. Cases…

  3. Groundwater Policy Research: Collaboration with Groundwater Conservation Districts in Texas

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Jeffrey W.; Johnson, Phillip N.; Guerrero, Bridget L.; Weinheimer, Justin; Amosson, Stephen H.; Almas, Lal K.; Golden, Bill B.; Wheeler-Cook, Erin

    2011-01-01

    The unique nature of the Ogallala Aquifer presents interesting and confounding problems for water policymakers who are coping with changing groundwater rules in Texas. The purpose of this article is to link previous efforts in water policy research for the Ogallala Aquifer in Texas with current collaborations that are ongoing with regional water planners. A chronological progression of economic water modeling efforts for the region is reviewed. The results of two recent collaborative studies ...

  4. Groundwater Policy Research: Collaboration with Groundwater Conservation Districts in Texas

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Jeffrey W.; Johnson, Phillip N.; Guerrero, Bridget L.; Weinheimer, Justin; Amosson, Stephen H.; Almas, Lal K.; Golden, Bill B.; Wheeler-Cook, Erin

    2011-01-01

    The unique nature of the Ogallala Aquifer presents interesting and confounding problems for water policymakers who are coping with changing groundwater rules in Texas. The purpose of this article is to link previous efforts in water policy research for the Ogallala Aquifer in Texas with current collaborations that are ongoing with regional water planners. A chronological progression of economic water modeling efforts for the region is reviewed. The results of two recent collaborative studies ...

  5. Hispanic Heritage Month

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Sherry

    2004-01-01

    Hispanic heritage month is from September 15 to October 15. One problem that arises when grouping people into categories such as Hispanic or Latino is stereotyping, stereotypes can be promoted or used in this Hispanic month to promote a greater understanding of Latino cultures.

  6. Progress report, 24 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    The work performed during the past 12 months (months 13 – 24) of the project has included the conclusion of Task 1 – Fundamental Studies and Task 2 – Multimirror Cutting Head Design. Work on Task 3 – Compact Cutting Head Design, and Task 4 – Interface Design has been carried out and the tests...... of the multimirror cutting head have been started....

  7. Progress report, 36 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    The work performed during the past 12 months (months 13 – 24) of the project has included the conclusion of Task 1 – Fundamental Studies and Task 2 – Multimirror Cutting Head Design. Work on Task 3 – Compact Cutting Head Design, and Task 4 – Interface Design has been carried out and the tests...... of the multimirror cutting head have been started....

  8. Progress report, 36 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    The work performed during the past 12 months (months 13 – 24) of the project has included the conclusion of Task 1 – Fundamental Studies and Task 2 – Multimirror Cutting Head Design. Work on Task 3 – Compact Cutting Head Design, and Task 4 – Interface Design has been carried out and the tests of ...

  9. Progress report, 24 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Thomas Winther; Nielsen, Jakob Skov

    The work performed during the past 12 months (months 13 – 24) of the project has included the conclusion of Task 1 – Fundamental Studies and Task 2 – Multimirror Cutting Head Design. Work on Task 3 – Compact Cutting Head Design, and Task 4 – Interface Design has been carried out and the tests of ...

  10. Collaborative Contracting in Projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suprapto, M.

    2016-01-01

    Project practitioners have increasingly recognized the importance of collaborative relationships to ensure successful executions of projects. However, the ability to sustain and consistenly drive real collaborative attitudes and behavior for achieving the desired outcomes remains of enduring practic

  11. Collaborative Contracting in Projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suprapto, M.

    2016-01-01

    Project practitioners have increasingly recognized the importance of collaborative relationships to ensure successful executions of projects. However, the ability to sustain and consistenly drive real collaborative attitudes and behavior for achieving the desired outcomes remains of enduring

  12. Global Collaborative STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meabh Kelly, Susan; Smith, Walter

    2016-04-01

    Global Collaborative STEM Education, as the name suggests, simultaneously supports two sets of knowledge and skills. The first set is STEM -- science, technology, engineering and math. The other set of content knowledge and skills is that of global collaboration. Successful global partnerships require awareness of one's own culture, the biases embedded within that culture, as well as developing awareness of the collaborators' culture. Workforce skills fostered include open-mindedness, perseverance when faced with obstacles, and resourceful use of technological "bridges" to facilitate and sustain communication. In respect for the 2016 GIFT Workshop focus, Global Collaborative STEM Education projects dedicated to astronomy research will be presented. The projects represent different benchmarks within the Global Collaborative STEM Education continuum, culminating in an astronomy research experience that fully reflects how the global STEM workforce collaborates. To facilitate wider engagement in Global Collaborative STEM Education, project summaries, classroom resources and contact information for established international collaborative astronomy research projects will be disseminated.

  13. Collaboration in Agricultural Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Roland L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Theme articles discuss environment, food, agriculture, and renewal resources as they relate to science education, learning partnerships, collaboration in Kyrghyzstan, leadership development, opportunities for collaboration, networking, and the creation of a shared course between agribusiness and biology. (JOW)

  14. Collaboration in Agricultural Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Roland L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Theme articles discuss environment, food, agriculture, and renewal resources as they relate to science education, learning partnerships, collaboration in Kyrghyzstan, leadership development, opportunities for collaboration, networking, and the creation of a shared course between agribusiness and biology. (JOW)

  15. More black box to explore: how quality improvement collaboratives shape practice change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Eric K; Chase, Sabrina M; Howard, Jenna; Nutting, Paul A; Crabtree, Benjamin F

    2012-01-01

    Quality improvement collaboratives (QICs) are used extensively to promote quality improvement in health care. Evidence of their effectiveness is limited, prompting calls to "open up the black box" to better understand how and why such collaboratives work. We selected a cohort of 5 primary care practices that participated in a 6-month intervention study aimed at improving colorectal cancer screening rates. Using an immersion/crystallization technique, we analyzed qualitative data that included audio recordings and field notes of QICs and practice-based team meetings. Three themes emerged from our analysis: (1) practice staff became empowered through and drew on the QICs to advance change efforts in the face of leader/physician resistance; (2) a mix of content and media in the QIC program was important for reaching all participants; (3) resources offered at the QIC did little to spur practice change efforts. QICs offer a potentially powerful way of disseminating health care innovations through enhanced strategies for learning and change. Creating collaborative environments in which diverse participants learn, listen, reflect, and share together can enable them to take back to their own organizations key messages and change strategies that benefit them the most.

  16. The Impact of Virtual Collaboration and Collaboration Technologies on Knowledge Transfer and Team Performance in Distributed Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoma, Ngoma Sylvestre

    2013-01-01

    Virtual teams are increasingly viewed as a powerful determinant of competitive advantage in geographically distributed organizations. This study was designed to provide insights into the interdependencies between virtual collaboration, collaboration technologies, knowledge transfer, and virtual team performance in an effort to understand whether…

  17. The Impact of Virtual Collaboration and Collaboration Technologies on Knowledge Transfer and Team Performance in Distributed Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngoma, Ngoma Sylvestre

    2013-01-01

    Virtual teams are increasingly viewed as a powerful determinant of competitive advantage in geographically distributed organizations. This study was designed to provide insights into the interdependencies between virtual collaboration, collaboration technologies, knowledge transfer, and virtual team performance in an effort to understand whether…

  18. Collaboratively Patching Linked Data

    CERN Document Server

    Knuth, Magnus; Sack, Harald

    2012-01-01

    Today's Web of Data is noisy. Linked Data often needs extensive preprocessing to enable efficient use of heterogeneous resources. While consistent and valid data provides the key to efficient data processing and aggregation we are facing two main challenges: (1st) Identification of erroneous facts and tracking their origins in dynamically connected datasets is a difficult task, and (2nd) efforts in the curation of deficient facts in Linked Data are exchanged rather rarely. Since erroneous data often is duplicated and (re-)distributed by mashup applications it is not only the responsibility of a few original publishers to keep their data tidy, but progresses to be a mission for all distributers and consumers of Linked Data too. We present a new approach to expose and to reuse patches on erroneous data to enhance and to add quality information to the Web of Data. The feasibility of our approach is demonstrated by example of a collaborative game that patches statements in DBpedia data and provides notifications ...

  19. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, November 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-12-23

    The November, 1957 monthly report for the Chemical Processing Department of the Hanford Atomic Products Operation includes information regarding research and engineering efforts with respect to the Purex and Redox process technology. Also discussed is the production operation, finished product operation, power and general maintenance, financial operation, engineering and research operations, and employee operation. (MB)

  20. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, February 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-03-21

    The February, 1958 monthly report for the Chemical Processing Department of the Hanford Atomic Products Operation includes information regarding research and engineering efforts with respect to the Purex and Redox process technology. Also discussed is the production operation, finished product operation, power and general maintenance, financial operation, engineering and research operations, and employee operation. (MB)

  1. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, May 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-06-21

    The May, 1957 monthly report for the Chemical Processing Department of the Hanford Atomic Products Operation includes information regarding research and engineering efforts with respect to the Purex and Redox process technology. Also discussed is the production operation, finished product operation, power and general maintenance, financial operation, engineering and research operations, and employee operation.(MB)

  2. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, November 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-12-21

    The November 1956 monthly report for the Chemical Processing Department of Hanford Atomic Products Operation includes information regarding research and engineering efforts with respect to the Purex and Redox process technology. Also discussed was the production operation, finished product operation, power and general maintenance, financial operation, engineering and research operations, and employee operations. (MB)

  3. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, September 1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-10-22

    The September, 1957 monthly report for the Chemical Processing Department of the Hanford Atomic Products Operation includes information regarding research and engineering efforts with respect to the Purex and Redox process technology. Also discussed is the production operation, finished product operation, power and general maintenance, financial operation, engineering and research operations, and employee operation.

  4. Chemical Processing Department monthly report, September 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-10-18

    The September, 1956 monthly report for the Chemical Processing Department of Hanford Atomic Products Operation includes information regarding research and engineering efforts with respect to the Purex and Redox process technology. Also discussed is the production operation, finished products operation, power and general maintenance, financial operation, engineering and research operations, and employee operations. (MB)

  5. Interorganizational collaboration in public health data sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Colleen; Li, Jianling; Berry, Michele

    2016-09-19

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to analyze the institutional and social forces that influence collaborative data sharing practices in cross-sector interorganizational networks. The analysis focusses on the data sharing practices between professionals in the transportation and public health sectors, areas prioritized for collaborative action to improve public health. Design/methodology/approach A mixed methods design is utilized. Electronic surveys were sent to 57 public health and 157 transportation professionals in a large major metropolitan area in the USA (response rate 39.7 percent). Focus groups were held with 12 organizational leaders representing professionals in both sectors. Findings The application of the institutional-social capital framework suggests that professional specialization and organizational forces make it challenging for professionals to develop the cross-sector relationships necessary for cross-sector collaborative data sharing. Research limitations/implications The findings suggest that developing the social relationships necessary for cross-sector collaboration may be resource intensive. Investments are necessary at the organizational level to overcome the professional divides that limit the development of cross-sector relationships critical for collaborative data sharing. The results are limited to the data sharing practices of professionals in one metropolitan area. Originality/value Despite mandates and calls for increased cross-sector collaboration to improve public health, such efforts often fail to produce true collaboration. The study's value is that it adds to the theoretical conceptualization of collaboration and provides a deeper understanding as to why collaborative action remains difficult to achieve. Future study of collaboration must consider the interaction between professional specialization and the social relationships necessary for success.

  6. Experiences of Collaborative Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahneman, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    The author's personal history of the research that led to his recognition in economics is described, focusing on the process of collaboration and on the experience of controversy. The author's collaboration with Amos Tversky dealt with 3 major topics: judgment under uncertainty, decision making, and framing effects. A subsequent collaboration,…

  7. Trust repertoires for collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Lars

    little about how such processes develop and how trust, understood as “confident positive expectations” (Lewicki et al. 1998) to collaborative activities, arises out of collaboration. The paper contributes by showing how trust and collaboration are intertwined. The main finding is that a facilitator can...

  8. The Telemetry Agile Manufacturing Effort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, K.D.

    1995-01-01

    The Telemetry Agile Manufacturing Effort (TAME) is an agile enterprising demonstration sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE). The project experimented with new approaches to product realization and assessed their impacts on performance, cost, flow time, and agility. The purpose of the project was to design the electrical and mechanical features of an integrated telemetry processor, establish the manufacturing processes, and produce an initial production lot of two to six units. This paper outlines the major methodologies utilized by the TAME, describes the accomplishments that can be attributed to each methodology, and finally, examines the lessons learned and explores the opportunities for improvement associated with the overall effort. The areas for improvement are discussed relative to an ideal vision of the future for agile enterprises. By the end of the experiment, the TAME reduced production flow time by approximately 50% and life cycle cost by more than 30%. Product performance was improved compared with conventional DOE production approaches.

  9. Collaborative implementation for ecological restoration on US public lands: implications for legal context, accountability, and adaptive management

    Science.gov (United States)

    William H. Butler; Ashley Monroe; Sarah. McCaffrey

    2015-01-01

    The Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program (CFLRP), established in 2009, encourages collaborative landscape scale ecosystem restoration efforts on United States Forest Service (USFS) lands. Although the USFS employees have experience engaging in collaborative planning, CFLRP requires collaboration in implementation, a domain where little prior experience...

  10. Practitioner's knowledge representation a pathway to improve software effort estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Mendes, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this book is to help organizations improve their effort estimates and effort estimation processes by providing a step-by-step methodology that takes them through the creation and validation of models that are based on their own knowledge and experience. Such models, once validated, can then be used to obtain predictions, carry out risk analyses, enhance their estimation processes for new projects and generally advance them as learning organizations.Emilia Mendes presents the Expert-Based Knowledge Engineering of Bayesian Networks (EKEBNs) methodology, which she has used and adapted during the course of several industry collaborations with different companies world-wide over more than 6 years. The book itself consists of two major parts: first, the methodology's foundations in knowledge management, effort estimation (with special emphasis on the intricacies of software and Web development) and Bayesian networks are detailed; then six industry case studies are presented which illustrate the pra...

  11. Global efforts inconquering lung cancer in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiYan; LiXu

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer, the most prevalent and deadly malignancy in the world, poses a particularly critical healthcare challenge to China due to the rapidly increasing new cases and the unique cancer genetics in Chinese patient population. Sub-stantial progress has been made in molecular diagnosis and personalized treatment of the disease. The ifeld is now moving towards multiple new directions to include (1) new generation of targeted agents such as epidermal growth factor receptor and anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitors to overcome resistance to their early generation counter-parts; and (2) deeper understanding of tumor genetics of each individual patient and consequently the application of biomarkers to guide personalized treatment as well as novel drug development including combination therapy. The increasing capacity in innovative cancer drug research and development is supported by extensive collaboration within China and globally, and across academia and industry, to build up expertise and infrastructure in early-phase clinical testing of novel drugs. With these combined efforts, new and better medicines will be available for lung can-cer patients in China in the near future.

  12. TARP Monthly Housing Scorecard

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Treasury — Treasury and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) jointly produce a Monthly Housing Scorecard on the health of the nation’s housing market. The...

  13. Lightship Monthly Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Daily Weather Observations (Monthly Form 1001) from lightship stations in the United States. Please see the 'Surface Weather Observations (1001)' library for more...

  14. Oceanographic Monthly Summary

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic Monthly Summary contains sea surface temperature (SST) analyses on both regional and ocean basin scales for the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans....

  15. Trust repertoires for collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Lars

    This case study analyses the role of trust in a public private innovation network that involved a private consultancy company as a facilitator. We know that collaboration is a important for innovation, and that collaboration across organizational boundaries is not a trivial issue. But we know very...... little about how such processes develop and how trust, understood as “confident positive expectations” (Lewicki et al. 1998) to collaborative activities, arises out of collaboration. The paper contributes by showing how trust and collaboration are intertwined. The main finding is that a facilitator can...

  16. Voluntary versus Enforced Team Effort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Keser

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a model where each of two players chooses between remuneration based on either private or team effort. Although at least one of the players has the equilibrium strategy to choose private remuneration, we frequently observe both players to choose team remuneration in a series of laboratory experiments. This allows for high cooperation payoffs but also provides individual free-riding incentives. Due to significant cooperation, we observe that, in team remuneration, participants make higher profits than in private remuneration. We also observe that, when participants are not given the option of private remuneration, they cooperate significantly less.

  17. American Society of Clinical Oncology Multidisciplinary Cancer Management Course: Connecting Lives, Cancer Care, Education, and Compassion in Zimbabwe—A Pilot for Efforts of Sustainable Benefit?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Ndarukwa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The burden of cancer in low- to middle-income countries is growing and is expected to rise dramatically while resources to manage this disease remain inadequate. All authorities for the management of cancer recommend multidisciplinary care. Educational efforts by international organizations to assist local professionals in caring for their patients tend to have a lasting impact because they empower local professionals and enhance their skills. A multidisciplinary cancer management course was designed by American Society of Clinical Oncology staff and local experts to provide a roadmap for cross-specialty interaction and coordination of care in Zimbabwe. The outcome of the course was measured through feedback obtained from participants and impact on local workforce. The cancer management course was relevant to daily practice and fostered long-lasting partnerships and collaborations. Furthermore, it resulted in a more motivated local workforce and strengthened existing multidisciplinary practices. Cancer care is in a critical state in low- to middle-income countries. Educational efforts and collaborative partnerships may provide a cost-effective strategy with sustainable benefits. A multidisciplinary approach to optimize therapy is desirable. Evaluation of the course impact after a period of 6 months to 1 year is needed to determine the sustainability and impact of such efforts.

  18. Applying Collaborative Learning and Quality Improvement to Public Health: Lessons from the Collaborative Improvement and Innovation Network (CoIIN) to Reduce Infant Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghandour, Reem M; Flaherty, Katherine; Hirai, Ashley; Lee, Vanessa; Walker, Deborah Klein; Lu, Michael C

    2017-06-01

    Infant mortality remains a significant public health problem in the U.S. The Collaborative Improvement & Innovation Network (CoIIN) model is an innovative approach, using the science of quality improvement and collaborative learning, which was applied across 13 Southern states in Public Health Regions IV and VI to reduce infant mortality and improve birth outcomes. We provide an in-depth discussion of the history, development, implementation, and adaptation of the model based on the experience of the original CoIIN organizers and participants. In addition to the political genesis and functional components of the initiative, 8 key lessons related to staffing, planning, and implementing future CoIINs are described in detail. This paper reports the findings from a process evaluation of the model. Data on the states' progress toward reducing infant mortality and improving birth outcomes were collected through a survey in the final months of a 24-month implementation period, as well as through ongoing team communications. The peer-to-peer exchange and platform for collaborative learning, as well as the sharing of data across the states, were major strengths and form the foundation for future CoIIN efforts. A lasting legacy of the initiative is the unique application and sharing of provisional "real time" data to inform "real time" decision-making. The CoIIN model of collaborative learning, QI, and innovation offers a promising approach to strengthening partnerships within and across states, bolstering data systems to inform and track progress more rapidly, and ultimately accelerating improvement toward healthier communities, States, and the Nation as a whole.

  19. APS Education and Diversity Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestridge, Katherine; Hodapp, Theodore

    2015-11-01

    American Physical Society (APS) has a wide range of education and diversity programs and activities, including programs that improve physics education, increase diversity, provide outreach to the public, and impact public policy. We present the latest programs spearheaded by the Committee on the Status of Women in Physics (CSWP), with highlights from other diversity and education efforts. The CSWP is working to increase the fraction of women in physics, understand and implement solutions for gender-specific issues, enhance professional development opportunities for women in physics, and remedy issues that impact gender inequality in physics. The Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics, Professional Skills Development Workshops, and our new Professional Skills program for students and postdocs are all working towards meeting these goals. The CSWP also has site visit and conversation visit programs, where department chairs request that the APS assess the climate for women in their departments or facilitate climate discussions. APS also has two significant programs to increase participation by underrepresented minorities (URM). The newest program, the APS National Mentoring Community, is working to provide mentoring to URM undergraduates, and the APS Bridge Program is an established effort that is dramatically increasing the number of URM PhDs in physics.

  20. Developing collaborative environments - A Holistic software development methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PETERSEN,MARJORIE B.; MITCHINER,JOHN L.

    2000-03-08

    Sandia National Laboratories has been developing technologies to support person-to-person collaboration and the efforts of teams in the business and research communities. The technologies developed include knowledge-based design advisors, knowledge management systems, and streamlined manufacturing supply chains. These collaborative environments in which people can work together sharing information and knowledge have required a new approach to software development. The approach includes an emphasis on the requisite change in business practice that often inhibits user acceptance of collaborative technology. Leveraging the experience from this work, they have established a multidisciplinary approach for developing collaborative software environments. They call this approach ``A Holistic Software Development Methodology''.

  1. Benefits of Collaborative Finance Research in Business Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Kao, PhD

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Collaboration in business research provides outcomes and results that are more efficient than those due to individual efforts. The integration of diverse environments and disciplines often generates creative ideas. Collaboration increases the quality of research and effectiveness of discoveries, and promotes the dissemination of knowledge. Cases of collaborative finance research in the business schools are illustrated in this study. The findings include many significant benefits in knowledge stimulation, education advancement, community connections, and other rewarding results. Benefits of collaborative research outweigh the challenges and contribute to faculty development, student education, and advancements in the field of business.

  2. Community Efforts Bringing Research on Learning to the Geosciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manduca, C. A.; Mogk, D. W.; Kastens, K. A.

    2009-12-01

    Individual, departmental and community efforts have all played a major role in developing a thriving research effort addressing thinking and learning in the geosciences. Community efforts have been effective in elevating the importance of the field, defining a research agenda, fostering collaborations with cognitive science and education communities, building capacity within the geosciences, and developing reviewer awareness of the importance and opportunities within geoscience education research. Important community efforts include a call for geoscience education research in the 1997 NSF report Geoscience Education: A Recommended Strategy and in the subsequent 2000 NSF report ‘Bridges: Connecting Research and Education in the Earth System Sciences’. A research agenda and supporting recommendations for collaboration and capacity building were jointly developed by geoscience educators, cognitive scientists and education researchers at the 2002 NSF/Johnson Foundation funded workshop Bringing Research on Learning to the Geosciences. This research agenda emphasized studies of geoscience expertise, learning pathways (and their challenges) that are critical to the development of that expertise, and materials and environments that support this learning, with a focus on learning in the field and from large data sets, complex systems and deep time, spatial skills, and the synthesis of understanding from multiple sources of incomplete data. Collaboration and capacity building have been further supported by the NAGT sponsored professional development program “On the Cutting Edge” with workshops bringing together cognitive scientists, educators and geoscientists on topics including developing on-line learning resources, teaching with visualizations, the role of the affective domain in geoscience learning, teaching metacognition, and teaching with data. 40 successful educational research proposals are attributed to participation in On the Cutting Edge. An NSF funded

  3. Building collaborative relationships with distributors in the Dutch potted flower and plant industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Claro, D.P.; Omta, S.W.F.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to discuss the impact of the information network and trust on collaborative relationships as well as the impact of the collaboration on the performance of suppliers (i.e. growers). Combining network and trust, growers can build collaborative efforts, namely joint actio

  4. An Intervention Framework Designed to Develop the Collaborative Problem-Solving Skills of Primary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaoqing; Chen, Shan; Zhu, Wenbo; Lin, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Considerable effort has been invested in innovative learning practices such as collaborative inquiry. Collaborative problem solving is becoming popular in school settings, but there is limited knowledge on how to develop skills crucial in collaborative problem solving in students. Based on the intervention design in social interaction of…

  5. An Intervention Framework Designed to Develop the Collaborative Problem-Solving Skills of Primary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Xiaoqing; Chen, Shan; Zhu, Wenbo; Lin, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Considerable effort has been invested in innovative learning practices such as collaborative inquiry. Collaborative problem solving is becoming popular in school settings, but there is limited knowledge on how to develop skills crucial in collaborative problem solving in students. Based on the intervention design in social interaction of…

  6. Mothers' Teaching Strategies and Children's Effortful Control: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Nancy; Vidmar, Masa; Spinrad, Tracy L.; Eggum, Natalie D.; Edwards, Alison; Gaertner, Bridget; Kupfer, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Findings on the relation of maternal verbal teaching strategies to children's effortful control (EC; i.e., self-regulation) are limited in quantity and somewhat inconsistent. In this study, children's EC was assessed at 18, 30, and 42 months (ns = 255, 229, and 209, respectively) with adults' reports and a behavioral measure. Mothers' verbal…

  7. The Development of Effortful Control in Children Born Preterm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poehlmann, Julie; Schwichtenberg, A. J. Miller; Shah, Prachi E.; Shlafer, Rebecca J.; Hahn, Emily; Maleck, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    This prospective longitudinal study examined emerging effortful control skills at 24- and 36-months postterm in 172 children born preterm (less than 36 weeks gestation). Infant (neonatal health risks), family (sociodemographic risks), and maternal risk factors (depressive symptoms, anger expressions during play interactions) were assessed at six…

  8. The Development of Effortful Control in Children Born Preterm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poehlmann, Julie; Schwichtenberg, A. J. Miller; Shah, Prachi E.; Shlafer, Rebecca J.; Hahn, Emily; Maleck, Sarah

    2010-01-01

    This prospective longitudinal study examined emerging effortful control skills at 24- and 36-months postterm in 172 children born preterm (less than 36 weeks gestation). Infant (neonatal health risks), family (sociodemographic risks), and maternal risk factors (depressive symptoms, anger expressions during play interactions) were assessed at six…

  9. Mothers' Teaching Strategies and Children's Effortful Control: A Longitudinal Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Nancy; Vidmar, Masa; Spinrad, Tracy L.; Eggum, Natalie D.; Edwards, Alison; Gaertner, Bridget; Kupfer, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Findings on the relation of maternal verbal teaching strategies to children's effortful control (EC; i.e., self-regulation) are limited in quantity and somewhat inconsistent. In this study, children's EC was assessed at 18, 30, and 42 months (ns = 255, 229, and 209, respectively) with adults' reports and a behavioral measure. Mothers' verbal…

  10. Children's Effortful Control and Academic Achievement: Mediation through Social Functioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiente, Carlos; Eisenberg, Nancy; Haugen, Rg; Spinrad, Tracy L.; Hofer, Claire; Liew, Jeffrey; Kupfer, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Research Findings: The purpose of this study was to test the premise that children's effortful control (EC) is prospectively related to their academic achievement and to specify mechanisms through which EC is related to academic success. We used data from 214 children (M age at Time 1 [T1] = 73 months) to test whether social functioning (e.g.,…

  11. Often Difficult--But Worth It. Collaboration among Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Joyce A.

    1988-01-01

    A joint effort between the Minnesota Extension Service and University of Minnesota School of Medicine produced a community-based research and educational program on stress, depression, and suicide prevention. The Teens in Distress program represents a successful collaborative effort and illustrates the potential problems when Extension…

  12. Research Program of the TEXONO Collaboration Status and Highlights

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, H T K; Wong, Henry Tsz-King; Li, Jin

    2002-01-01

    This article reviews the research program and efforts for the TEXONO Collaboration among scientists from Taiwan and China. These include reactor-based neutrino physics at the Kuo-Sheng Power Plant in Taiwan as well as various R&D efforts related to the various experimental techniques in neutrino and astro-particle physics.

  13. A Technology-Neutral Role-Based Collaboration Model for Software Ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanciulescu, Stefan; Rabiser, Daniela; Seidl, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    efforts and information of ongoing development efforts. Finally, using the collaborations defined in the formalism we model real artifacts from Marlin, a firmware for 3D printers, and we show that for the selected scenarios, the five collaborations were sufficient to raise awareness and make implicit...

  14. A Technology-Neutral Role-Based Collaboration Model for Software Ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stanciulescu, Stefan; Rabiser, Daniela; Seidl, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    efforts and information of ongoing development efforts. Finally, using the collaborations defined in the formalism we model real artifacts from Marlin, a firmware for 3D printers, and we show that for the selected scenarios, the five collaborations were sufficient to raise awareness and make implicit...

  15. Expanding the collaboration between CERN and Pakistan

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Parvez Butt, chairman of the Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission, and CERN Director General, Luciano Maiani, signed a letter of intent last week to expand collaboration. Through an agreement which should be formalized within a few months, Pakistan would make a substantial contribution to the LHC and its detectors, coordinated by the Pakistani National Centre of Physics.

  16. Catch, effort and sampling strategies in the highly variable sardine fisheries around East Java, Indonesia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pet, J.S.; Densen, van W.L.T.; Machiels, M.A.M.; Sukkel, M.; Setyohady, D.; Tumuljadi, A.

    1997-01-01

    Temporal and spatial patterns in the fishery for Sardinella spp. around East Java, Indonesia, were studied in an attempt to develop an efficient catch and effort sampling strategy for this highly variable fishery. The inter-annual and monthly variation in catch, effort and catch per unit of effort (

  17. Catch, effort and sampling strategies in the highly variable sardine fisheries around East Java, Indonesia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pet, J.S.; Densen, van W.L.T.; Machiels, M.A.M.; Sukkel, M.; Setyohady, D.; Tumuljadi, A.

    1997-01-01

    Temporal and spatial patterns in the fishery for Sardinella spp. around East Java, Indonesia, were studied in an attempt to develop an efficient catch and effort sampling strategy for this highly variable fishery. The inter-annual and monthly variation in catch, effort and catch per unit of effort

  18. Monitoring Student Activity in Collaborative Software Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietsch, Daniel; Podelski, Andreas; Nam, Jaechang

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents data analysis from a course on Software Engineering in an effort to identify metrics and techniques that would allow instructor to act proactively and identify patterns of low engagement and inefficient peer collaboration. Over the last two terms, 106 students in their second...... by weekly meetings with teaching assistants and instructors regarding group progress, code quality, and management issues. Through these meetings and their interactions with the software tools, students leave a detailed trace of data related to their individual engagement and their collaboration behavior...

  19. Software Configuration Management For Multiple Releases: Influence On Development Effort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sławomir P. Maludziński

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Software Configuration Management (SCM evolves together with the discipline of softwareengineering. Teams working on software products become larger and are geographically distributedat multiple sites. Collaboration between such groups requires well evaluated SCMplans and strategies to easy cooperation and decrease software development cost by reducingtime spent on SCM activities – branching and merging, that is effort utilized on creation ofrevisions (’serial’ versions and variants (’parallel’ versions. This paper suggests that SCMpractices should be combined with modular design and code refactoring to reduce cost relatedto maintenance of the same code line. Teams which produce several variants of thesame code line at the same time should use approaches like components, modularization, orplug-ins over code alternations maintained on version branches. Findings described in thispaper were taken by teams in charge of development of radio communication systems inMotorola GEMS divisions. Each team collaborating on similar projects used different SCMstrategies to develop parts of this system.

  20. Termination of prehospital resuscitative efforts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Søren; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Caroline; Binderup, Lars Grassmé

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Discussions on ethical aspects of life-and-death decisions within the hospital are often made in plenary. The prehospital physician, however, may be faced with ethical dilemmas in life-and-death decisions when time-critical decisions to initiate or refrain from resuscitative efforts...... need to be taken without the possibility to discuss matters with colleagues. Little is known whether these considerations regarding ethical issues in crucial life-and-death decisions are documented prehospitally. This is a review of the ethical considerations documented in the prehospital medical....... The medical records with possible documentation of ethical issues were independently reviewed by two philosophers in order to identify explicit ethical or philosophical considerations pertaining to the decision to resuscitate or not. RESULTS: In total, 1275 patients were either declared dead at the scene...

  1. Monthly energy review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    This document presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors.

  2. Photos of the month

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni de Oliveira

    Congratulations to Adele Rimoldi, ATLAS physicist from Pavia, who ran her first marathon in New York last month. Adele completed the 42.2 km in a time of 4:49:19. She sure makes it look easy!!! The ATLAS pixel service quarter panel in SR1

  3. Monthly Energy Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-28

    This publication presents an overview of the Energy information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. Two brief ``energy plugs`` (reviews of EIA publications) are included, as well.

  4. Application Protocol Design for Collaborative Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joung-Souk Sung

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This presentation will describe the effort to construct an effective educational support environment and to develop meaningful educational applications, This system is a framework supporting interactive collaboration which enables both teachers and students to interact in real-time from remote sites. The purpose of this collaboration is to bring interactive multimedia learning in real-time. In order to induce collaborative learning, this paperproposes protocol design process that shares knowledge awareness information for learning environments. The protocol helps learner to mediate and recognize collaborators in the shared knowledge space. We are developing an open-ended collaborative learning supportsystem, which is called prototype system for protocol design, and facilities to share individual knowledge and to learn through collaboration. This system architecture can be viewed asdivided in four logical parts: the infrastructure, the service functions, the advanced service functions and the application. The session management is creates/destroys the sessions and performs the functions controlling the QOS by detaching the network load. Session manager include: session control, floor control, media instance control, packet interpreter, event interpreter, media server instance, media interface, network interface private applicationinterface and media server control.

  5. Tools for collaboration across STEM fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Ejiwale

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Supporting learners at different stages of learning is essential to achieve positive learning, critical thinking, technical and problem solving skills, and gainful employment upon graduation. Collaboration is critical to providing strong foundational educational support to all learners as they advance to higher level of learning. More important is the need to promote collaboration among educators and other professionals across the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM fields who educate the learners throughout their academic pursuit in their respective institutions of learning. To reap the value in diverse teams, the promotion of emergent interdependence fosters seamless collaborative activities across STEM disciplines.  For industrial technology programs to prepare students with skills necessary to supervise and manage the future workforce of any organization successfully, necessary tools must be utilized for the success of the collaborative effort. This paper addresses leadership and knowledge sharing among collaborators, the educational aspects of research facilities and research clusters as some of the tools necessary to develop program through collaboration in STEM fields.  

  6. The Collaborative Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Marlowe

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Collaboration has become an important goal in modern ventures, across the spectrum of commercial, social, and intellectual activities, sometimes as a mediating factor, and sometimes as a driving, foundational principle. Research, development, social programs, and ongoing ventures of all sorts benefit from interactions between teams, groups, and organizations, across intellectual disciplines and across facets and features of the inquiry, product, entity, or activity under consideration. We present a survey of the state of collaboration and collaborative enterprise, in the context of papers and presentations at the International Symposium on Collaborative Enterprises 2011 (CENT 2011, and the extended papers appearing in this special issue.

  7. Staging Collaborative Innovation Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Signe; Clausen, Christian

    Organisations are currently challenged by demands for increased collaborative innovation internally as well as with external and new entities - e.g. across the value chain. The authors seek to develop new approaches to managing collaborative innovative processes in the context of open innovation...... and public private innovation partnerships. Based on a case study of a collaborative design process in a large electronics company the paper points to the key importance of staging and navigation of collaborative innovation process. Staging and navigation is presented as a combined activity: 1) to translate...

  8. Your Child's Development: 9 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Your Baby's Growth: 9 Months Your Baby's Hearing, Vision, and Other Senses: 9 Months Your Child's Checkup: 9 Months Medical Care and Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Sleep and Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Contact ...

  9. About Parallel Programming: Paradigms, Parallel Execution and Collaborative Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana MOCEAN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, there were made efforts for delineation of a stabile and unitary frame, where the problems of logical parallel processing must find solutions at least at the level of imperative languages. The results obtained by now are not at the level of the made efforts. This paper wants to be a little contribution at these efforts. We propose an overview in parallel programming, parallel execution and collaborative systems.

  10. The Diesel Combustion Collaboratory: Combustion Researchers Collaborating over the Internet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. M. Pancerella; L. A. Rahn; C. Yang

    2000-02-01

    The Diesel Combustion Collaborator (DCC) is a pilot project to develop and deploy collaborative technologies to combustion researchers distributed throughout the DOE national laboratories, academia, and industry. The result is a problem-solving environment for combustion research. Researchers collaborate over the Internet using DCC tools, which include: a distributed execution management system for running combustion models on widely distributed computers, including supercomputers; web-accessible data archiving capabilities for sharing graphical experimental or modeling data; electronic notebooks and shared workspaces for facilitating collaboration; visualization of combustion data; and video-conferencing and data-conferencing among researchers at remote sites. Security is a key aspect of the collaborative tools. In many cases, the authors have integrated these tools to allow data, including large combustion data sets, to flow seamlessly, for example, from modeling tools to data archives. In this paper the authors describe the work of a larger collaborative effort to design, implement and deploy the DCC.

  11. Petroleum marketing monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PPM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o. b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  12. Petroleum marketing monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly.

  13. Electric power monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) prepares the Electric Power Monthly (EPM) for a wide audience including Congress, Federal and State agencies, the electric utility industry, and the general public. This publication provides monthly statistics for net generation, fossil fuel consumption and stocks, quantity and quality of fossil fuels, cost of fossil fuels, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fossil fuels are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. The EIA publishes statistics in the EPM on net generation by energy source, consumption, stocks, quantity, quality, and cost of fossil fuels; and capability of new generating units by company and plant. The purpose of this publication is to provide energy decisionmakers with accurate and timely information that may be used in forming various perspectives on electric issues that lie ahead.

  14. Electric power monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Sandra R.; Johnson, Melvin; McClevey, Kenneth; Calopedis, Stephen; Bolden, Deborah

    1992-05-01

    The Electric Power Monthly is prepared by the Survey Management Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), Department of Energy. This publication provides monthly statistics at the national, Census division, and State levels for net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, cost of fuel, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on net generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and cost of fuel are also displayed for the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC) regions. Additionally, statistics by company and plant are published in the EPM on capability of new plants, new generation, fuel consumption, fuel stocks, quantity and quality of fuel, and cost of fuel.

  15. Mental and physical effort affect vigilance differently

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, A.S.; Eling, P.A.T.M.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Coenen, A.M.L.

    2005-01-01

    Both physical and mental effort are thought to affect vigilance. Mental effort is known for its vigilance declining effects, but the effects of physical effort are less clear. This study investigated whether these two forms of effort affect the EEG and subjective alertness differently. Participants

  16. Mental and physical effort affect vigilance differently.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, A.S.; Eling, P.A.T.M.; Hopman, M.T.E.; Coenen, A.M.L.

    2005-01-01

    Both physical and mental effort are thought to affect vigilance. Mental effort is known for its vigilance declining effects, but the effects of physical effort are less clear. This study investigated whether these two forms of effort affect the EEG and subjective alertness differently. Participants

  17. Collaborative essay testing: group work that counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Peggy A

    2009-01-01

    Because much of a nurse's work is accomplished through working in groups, nursing students need an understanding of group process as well as opportunities to problem-solve in groups. Despite an emphasis on group activities as critical for classroom learning, there is a lack of evidence in the nursing literature that describes collaborative essay testing as a teaching strategy. In this class, nursing students worked together in small groups to answer examination questions before submitting a common set of answers. In a follow-up survey, students reported that collaborative testing was a positive experience (e.g., promoting critical thinking, confidence in knowledge, and teamwork). Faculty were excited by the lively dialog heard during the testing in what appeared to be an atmosphere of teamwork. Future efforts could include providing nursing students with direct instruction on group process and more opportunities to work and test collaboratively.

  18. Monitoring Student Activity in Collaborative Software Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietsch, Daniel; Podelski, Andreas; Nam, Jaechang

    2013-01-01

    by weekly meetings with teaching assistants and instructors regarding group progress, code quality, and management issues. Through these meetings and their interactions with the software tools, students leave a detailed trace of data related to their individual engagement and their collaboration behavior......This paper presents data analysis from a course on Software Engineering in an effort to identify metrics and techniques that would allow instructor to act proactively and identify patterns of low engagement and inefficient peer collaboration. Over the last two terms, 106 students in their second...... year of studies formed 20 groups and worked collaboratively to develop video games. Throughout the lab, students have to use a variety of tools for managing and developing their projects, such as software version control, static analysis tools, wikis, mailing lists, etc. The students are also supported...

  19. The Undergraduate ALFALFA Team: Collaborative Research Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, John M.; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Haynes, Martha P.; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team, ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    The NSF-sponsored Undergraduate ALFALFA (Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA) Team (UAT) has allowed faculty and students from a wide range of public and private colleges and especially those with small astronomy programs to learn how science is accomplished in a large collaboration while contributing to the scientific goals of a legacy radio astronomy survey. The UAT has achieved this through close collaboration with ALFALFA PIs to identify research areas accessible to undergraduates. In this talk we will summarize the main research efforts of the UAT, including multiwavelength followup observations of ALFALFA sources, the UAT Collaborative Groups Project, the Survey of HI in Extremely Low-mass Dwarfs (SHIELD), and the Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey. This work has been supported by NSF grants AST-0724918/0902211, AST-075267/0903394, AST-0725380, and AST-1211005.

  20. Scientific collaboration and collective knowledge new essays

    CERN Document Server

    Mayo-Wilson, Conor; Weisberg, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Descartes once argued that, with sufficient effort and skill, a single scientist could uncover fundamental truths about our world. Contemporary science proves the limits of this claim. From synthesizing the human genome to predicting the effects of climate change, some current scientific research requires the collaboration of hundreds (if not thousands) of scientists with various specializations. Additionally, the majority of published scientific research is now co-authored, including more than 80% of articles in the natural sciences, meaning small collaborative teams have become the norm in science. This volume is the first to address critical philosophical questions regarding how collective scientific research could be organized differently and how it should be organized. For example, should scientists be required to share knowledge with competing research teams? How can universities and grant-giving institutions promote successful collaborations? When hundreds of researchers contribute to a discovery, how ...

  1. Search, Effort, and Locus of Control

    OpenAIRE

    McGee, Andrew; McGee, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We test the hypothesis that locus of control – one's perception of control over events in life – influences search by affecting beliefs about the efficacy of search effort in a laboratory experiment. We find that reservation offers and effort are increasing in the belief that one's efforts influence outcomes when subjects exert effort without knowing how effort influences the generation of offers but are unrelated to locus of control beliefs when subjects are informed about the relationship b...

  2. Collaboration in teacher teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, P.

    2011-01-01

    In order to deal with innovations and the associated complexity of work, ongoing collaboration between teachers has become more important in secondary education. Teacher collaboration is one of the factors that contribute to the successful implementation of innovations in secondary schools. However,

  3. Corrections for collaborators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    NN,

    1953-01-01

    In the ”Directions and Hints” for collaborators in Flora Malesiana, which has been forwarded to all collaborators, two corrections should be made, viz: 1) p. 12; Omit the explanatory notes under Jamaica Plain, Mass., and Cambridge, Mass. 2) p. 13; Add as number 12a; Stockholm, Paleobotaniska Avdelni

  4. Enabling distributed collaborative science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hudson, T.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Maglaughlin, K.

    2000-01-01

    To enable collaboration over distance, a collaborative environment that uses a specialized scientific instrument called a nanoManipulator is evaluated. The nanoManipulator incorporates visualization and force feedback technology to allow scientists to see, feel, and modify biological samples being...... studied with an Atomic Force Microscope....

  5. Sensemaking in collaborative networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peronard, Jean-Paul; Brix, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    be redesigned to strengthen the collaboration between companies. To enable this discussion we delve into the sensemaking literature and theory from loosely coupled systems. Our discussion leads to the development of the Balanced Activity System (BAS) model. The paper’s key contribution is the prescriptive BAS...... model that can be used strategically in collaborative networks to redesign or create new joint activities....

  6. Toward Collaboration Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Bertrand; Pea, Roy

    2014-01-01

    We describe preliminary applications of network analysis techniques to eye-tracking data collected during a collaborative learning activity. This paper makes three contributions: first, we visualize collaborative eye-tracking data as networks, where the nodes of the graph represent fixations and edges represent saccades. We found that those…

  7. Collaboration in teacher teams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, P.

    2011-01-01

    In order to deal with innovations and the associated complexity of work, ongoing collaboration between teachers has become more important in secondary education. Teacher collaboration is one of the factors that contribute to the successful implementation of innovations in secondary schools. However,

  8. Enabling distributed collaborative science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hudson, T.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Maglaughlin, K.

    2000-01-01

    To enable collaboration over distance, a collaborative environment that uses a specialized scientific instrument called a nanoManipulator is evaluated. The nanoManipulator incorporates visualization and force feedback technology to allow scientists to see, feel, and modify biological samples bein...

  9. Collaborative augmented reality environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Büscher, Monika; Christensen, Michael; Grønbæk, Kaj

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes Manufaktur, a prototype of a concept and infrastructure that goes beyond the classical CVE systems toward a collaborative augmented reality environment, where users? documents and objects appear as live representations in a 3D workspace. Manufaktur supports collaborative...

  10. Physics Education Research efforts to promote diversity: Challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmia, Suzanne

    2015-04-01

    We begin this talk with a brief description of the gender and ethnic diversity of the physics community. We then discuss several current efforts within Physics Education Research that have the potential to further our understanding of issues surrounding underrepresentation. These efforts include research into (1) the role of community and strategies for developing effective communities; (2) physics identity and self-efficacy; (3) the affordances that students from underrepresented groups bring to physics learning; (4) socioeconomics and its impact on mathematization. One of the challenges to conducting this research is the relatively small proportion of underrepresented minority students in current physics classes, and the small number of women in physics and engineering majors. In collaboration with Stephen Kanim, New Mexico State University.

  11. Learning by collaborating on the Internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundsgaard, Jeppe

    2007-01-01

    demands greater efforts of the writer than does speech, and that with forum technology social relations are created solely on the verbal level and therefore has to be encouraged by the students’ entourage and promoted in the organization of the collaboration. To promote learning is not just a question...... of preparing the cognitive subject matter, but also of organizing a motivating learning environ ment that incorporate and appreciate social relations so that the students experience benefits that counter - balance the greater efforts of writing and relating in virtual forums.These deliberations lead......This study discusses the importance of considering motivational and not only cognitive factors when organizing collaborative learning on the Internet. The argument is based on thorough analysis of the characteristics of the modality of writing and forum technology. A study which shows that writing...

  12. Nurse-patient collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dorthe; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Groefte, Thorbjoern

    2013-01-01

    at three intensive care units and one general respiratory ward in Denmark. Results: Succeeding emerged as the nurses’ main concern in the nurse-patient collaboration during non-invasive ventilation treatment. Four collaborative typologies emerged as processing their main concern: (1) twofold oriented......Objectives: This paper provides a theoretical account of nurses’ collaboration with patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease during non-invasive ventilation treatment in hospital. Background: Despite strong evidence for the effect of non-invasive ventilation treatment, success remains...... a huge challenge. Nurse-patient collaboration may be vital for treatment tolerance and success. A better understanding of how nurses and patients collaborate during non-invasive ventilation may therefore contribute to improvement in treatment success. Design: A constant comparative classical grounded...

  13. Nurse–patient collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Dorthe; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Grøfte, Thorbjørn;

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: This paper provides a theoretical account of nurses’ collaboration with patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease during non-invasive ventilation treatment in hospital. Background: Despite strong evidence for the effect of non-invasive ventilation treatment, success remains...... a huge challenge. Nurse-patient collaboration may be vital for treatment tolerance and success. A better understanding of how nurses and patients collaborate during non-invasive ventilation may therefore contribute to improvement in treatment success. Design: A constant comparative classical grounded...... at three intensive care units and one general respiratory ward in Denmark. Results: Succeeding emerged as the nurses’ main concern in the nurse-patient collaboration during non-invasive ventilation treatment. Four collaborative typologies emerged as processing their main concern: (1) twofold oriented...

  14. On Coordinating Collaborative Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Imine, Abdessamad

    2010-01-01

    A collaborative object represents a data type (such as a text document) designed to be shared by a group of dispersed users. The Operational Transformation (OT) is a coordination approach used for supporting optimistic replication for these objects. It allows the users to concurrently update the shared data and exchange their updates in any order since the convergence of all replicas, i.e. the fact that all users view the same data, is ensured in all cases. However, designing algorithms for achieving convergence with the OT approach is a critical and challenging issue. In this paper, we propose a formal compositional method for specifying complex collaborative objects. The most important feature of our method is that designing an OT algorithm for the composed collaborative object can be done by reusing the OT algorithms of component collaborative objects. By using our method, we can start from correct small collaborative objects which are relatively easy to handle and incrementally combine them to build more ...

  15. OGC Collaborative Platform undercover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehler, G.; Arctur, D. K.; Bermudez, L. E.

    2012-12-01

    The mission of the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) is to serve as a global forum for the collaboration of developers and users of spatial data products and services, and to advance the development of international standards for geospatial interoperability. The OGC coordinates with over 400 institutions in the development of geospatial standards. OGC has a dedicated staff supported by a Collaborative Web Platform to enable sophisticated and successful coordination among its members. Since its origins in the early 1990s, the OGC Collaborative Web Platform has evolved organically to be the collaboration hub for standards development in the exchange of geospatial and related types of information, among a global network of thousands of technical, scientific and management professionals spanning numerous disparate application domains. This presentation describes the structure of this collaboration hub, the relationships enabled (both among and beyond OGC members), and how this network fits in a broader ecosystem of technology development and information standards organizations.

  16. Theoretical foundations for collaboration engineering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolfschoten, G.L.

    2007-01-01

    Collaboration is often presented as the solution to numerous problems in business and society. However, collaboration is challenging, and collaboration support is not an off-the-shelf-product. This research offers theoretical foundations for Collaboration Engineering. Collaboration Engineering is an

  17. International Collaboration for Venus Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutts, James; Limaye, Sanjay; Zasova, Ludmila; Wilson, Colin; Ocampo, Adriana; Glaze, Lori; Svedhem, H.; Nakamura, Masato; Widemann, Thomas

    The Venus Exploration Analysis Group (VEXAG) was established by NASA in July 2005 to identify scientific priorities and strategy for exploration of Venus. From the outset, VEXAG has been open to the international community participation and has followed the progress of the ESA Venus Express Mission and the JAXA Akasuki mission as well exploring potential broad international partnerships for Venus exploration through coordinated science and missions. This paper discussed three mechanisms through which these collaborations are being explored in which VEXAG members participate One pathway for international collaboration has been through COSPAR. The International Venus Exploration Working Group (IVEWG) was formed during the 2012 COSPAR general assembly in Mysore, India. Another potentially significant outcome has been the IVEWG’s efforts to foster a formal dialog between IKI and NASA/PSD on the proposed Venera D mission resulting in a meeting in June 2013 to be followed by a discussion at the 4MS3 conference in October 2013. This has now resulted in an agreement between NASA/PSD and IKI to form a joint Science Definition Team for Venera D. A second pathway has been through an international focus on comparative climatology. Scientists from the established space faring nations participated in a first international conference on Comparative Climatology for Terrestrial Planet (CCTP) in Boulder Colorado in June 2012 sponsored by several international scientific organizations. A second conference is planned for 2015. The Planetary Robotics Exploration Coordinating Group (PRECG) of International Academy of Astronautics (IAA) the IAA has been focusing on exploring affordable contributions to the robotic exploration by non-space-faring nations wishing to get involved in planetary exploration. PRECG has sponsored a two year study of Comparative Climatology for which Venus is the focal point and focused on engaging nations without deep space exploration capabilities. A third

  18. Sidoarjo mudflow phenomenon and its mitigation efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, H. T.; Williams, V.

    2009-12-01

    Hot mud first erupted in Siring village, Porong, Sidoarjo May 29th 2006. The mud first appeared approximately 200 meters from Banjarpanji-1 gas-drilling well. The mud volume increased day by day, from 5000 cubic meters per day on June 2006 to 50,000 cubic meters per day during the last of 2006, and then increased to 100,000-120,000 cubic meters per day during 2007. Flow still continues at a high rate. Moreover, as the water content has gone down, the clast content has gone up. Consequently, there is now the threat of large amounts of solid material being erupted throughout the area. Also, there is the issue of subsurface collapse and ground surface subsidence. The Indonesian government has set up a permanent team to support communities affected by the mudflow that has swamped a number of villages near LUSI. Toll roads, railway tracks and factories also have been submerged and over 35,000 people have been displaced to date. The Sidoarjo Mudflow Mitigation Agency [SMMA, BPLS (Indonesia)] replaces a temporary team called National Team PSLS which was installed for seven months and ended their work on 7 April 2007. BPLS was set up by Presidential Regulation No. 14 / 2007, and it will have to cover the costs related to the social impact of the disaster, especially outside the swamped area. BPLS is the central government institution designated to handle the disaster by coordination with both the drilling company and local (provincial and district) governments. It takes a comprehensive, integrated and holistic approach for its mission and challenges. Those are: 1) How to stop the mudflow, 2) How to mitigate the impacts of the mudflow, and 3) How to minimize the social, economic, environmental impacts, and infrastructure impacts. The mudflow mitigation efforts were constrained by dynamic geology conditions, as well as resistance to certain measures by residents of impacted areas. Giant dykes were built to retain the spreading mud, and the mudflow from the main vent was

  19. Petroleum marketing monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysts, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the f.o.b. and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data.

  20. Pictures of the month

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni de Oliveira

    Starting with this issue, we will publish special pictures illustrating the ongoing construction and commissioning efforts. If you wish to have a professionnal photographer immortalize your detector before it disappears in the heart of ATLAS or for a special event, don't hesitate to contact Claudia Marcelloni de Oliveira (16-3687) from the CERN photo service. Members of the pixel team preparing to insert the outermost layer (the outer of the three barrel pixel layers) into the Global Support Frame for the Pixel Detector in SR1. Ongoing work on the first Big Wheel on the C side. Exploded view of the side-C Big Wheel and the barrel cryostat. The TRT Barrel services (HV, LV, cooling liquid, active gas, flushing gas) are now completely connected and tested. Hats off to Kirill Egorov, Mike Reilly, Ben Legeyt and Godwin Mayers who managed to fit everything within the small clearance margin!

  1. Helen Kim as New Woman and Collaborator: A Comprehensive Assessment of Korean Collaboration under Japanese Colonial Rule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AhRan Ellie Bae

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Although almost seventy years has passed since Korea's liberation from Japanese rule, the issue of collaboration still haunts Korea today. Attempts to resolve this issue have tended to focus attention on the traitorous actions of "collaborators" without considering the gray areas that surround their actions such as the circumstances that influenced the accused to commit their alleged traitorous acts and the intentions that drove their decisions. Helen Kim, as a "new woman" and an educator, valued the necessity of providing education for women. Yet, her efforts to realize this goal, to the contrary, forced her into actions that would later be used to construct a reputation as a Japanese collaborator. Korea's nationalist historiography has a tendency to polarize this issue by categorizing a "collaborator" as either a traitor or a patriot. However, when we take a closer look at these collaborators' lives, we discover that most collaboration happened in gray areas where it is often difficult to clearly draw a line between treason and collaboration. Helen Kim's case suggests that the issue of collaboration cannot be fully explained by nationalist historiography's framework and we must give attention to these gray areas. Through her story I hope to complicate the issue of collaboration by raising questions that address the gray areas that surround the actions of "collaborators." In doing so, I hope to challenge the nationalist historiography's propensity to oversimplify this issue and present a more nuanced understanding of it.

  2. Collaboration leads to enhanced curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerius, J; Mohan, V; Doctor, D; Hersh, W

    2015-01-01

    In 2007, we initiated a health information management (HIM) track of our biomedical informatics graduate program, and subsequent ongoing program assessment revealed a confluence of topics and courses within HIM and clinical informatics (CI) tracks. We completed a thorough comparative analysis of competencies derived from AMIA, AHIMA, and CAHIIM. Coupled with the need to streamline course offerings, the process, described in this paper allowed new opportunities for faculty collaboration, resulted in the creation of a model assessment for best practice in courses, and led to new avenues of growth within the program. The objective of the case study is to provide others in the informatics educational community with a model for analysis of curriculum in order to improve quality of student learning. We describe a case study where an academic informatics program realigned its course offerings to better reflect the HIM of today, and prepare for challenges of the future. Visionary leadership, intra-departmental self-analysis and alignment of the curriculum through defined mapping process reduced overlap within the CI and HIM tracks. Teaching within courses was optimized through the work of core faculty collaboration. The analysis of curriculum resulted in reduction of overlap within course curriculum. This allowed for additional and new course content to be added to existing courses. Leadership fostered an environment where top-down as well as bottom-up collaborative assessment activities resulted in a model to consolidate learning and reduce unnecessary duplication within courses. A focus on curriculum integration, emphasis on course alignment and strategic consolidation of course content raised the quality of informatics education provided to students. Faculty synergy was an essential component of this redesign process. Continuous quality improvement strategy included an ongoing alignment of curriculum and competencies through a comparative analysis approach. Through

  3. Energy Efficiency Collaboratives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Michael [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States); Bryson, Joe [US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Collaboratives for energy efficiency have a long and successful history and are currently used, in some form, in more than half of the states. Historically, many state utility commissions have used some form of collaborative group process to resolve complex issues that emerge during a rate proceeding. Rather than debate the issues through the formality of a commission proceeding, disagreeing parties are sent to discuss issues in a less-formal setting and bring back resolutions to the commission. Energy efficiency collaboratives take this concept and apply it specifically to energy efficiency programs—often in anticipation of future issues as opposed to reacting to a present disagreement. Energy efficiency collaboratives can operate long term and can address the full suite of issues associated with designing, implementing, and improving energy efficiency programs. Collaboratives can be useful to gather stakeholder input on changing program budgets and program changes in response to performance or market shifts, as well as to provide continuity while regulators come and go, identify additional energy efficiency opportunities and innovations, assess the role of energy efficiency in new regulatory contexts, and draw on lessons learned and best practices from a diverse group. Details about specific collaboratives in the United States are in the appendix to this guide. Collectively, they demonstrate the value of collaborative stakeholder processes in producing successful energy efficiency programs.

  4. Commissioners' Monthly Case Activity Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission — Total cases pending at the beginning of the month, total cases added to the docket during the month, total cases disposed of during the month, and total cases...

  5. Collaborative Learning in the Cloud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirchner, Kathrin; Razmerita, Liana

    2015-01-01

    This present study aims to investigate how students perceive collaboration and identifies associated technologies used to collaborate. In particular we aim to address the following research questions: What are the factors that impact satisfaction with collaboration? How do these factors differ...... in different collaborative settings? Based on data from 75 students from Denmark and Germany, the article identifies collaborative practices and factors that impact positively and negatively satisfaction with collaboration....

  6. Collaborative Policy Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva; Boch Waldorff, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    Governments all over the Western world currently face wicked problems that call for policy innovation. A new strand of research in public innovation points to collaboration between public authorities and relevant and affected stakeholders as an important driver of public innovation. A case study...... and policy ideas produced in collaborative governance arenas are not diffused to the formal political institutions of representative democracy because the participating politicians only to a limited extent function as boundary spanners between the collaborative governance arena and the decision making arenas...

  7. Innovation and network collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesting, Peter; Müller, Sabine; Jørgensen, Frances

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can benefit from network collaboration by enhancing opportunities for innovation. Managing the necessary collaboration to benefit from network participation may however be particularly challenging for SMEs due to their size...... and their inherent shortage of resources. In this paper, we propose that human resource management (HRM) practices may provide a means by which SMEs can increase their innovation capacity through network collaboration. Following a brief presentation of the relevant literature on networks, and innovation in networks...

  8. Collaboration in experiential therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdondini, Lucia; Elliott, Robert; Shearer, Joan

    2012-02-01

    We offer a view of the nature and role of client-therapist collaboration in experiential psychotherapy, focusing on Gestalt and emotion-focused therapy (EFT). We distinguish between the necessary condition of mutual trust (the emotional bond between client and therapist) and effective collaboration (regarding the goals and tasks of therapy). Using a case study of experiential therapy for social anxiety, we illustrate how the development of collaboration can be both complex and pivotal for therapeutic success, and how it can involve client and therapist encountering one another through taking risks by openly and nonjudgementally disclosing difficult experiences in order to enrich and advance the work.

  9. Writing as collaborative inquiry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth; Pedersen, Christina Hee; Novak, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In our presentation we strive to disturb and unravel the romantic discourses of collaboration, dialogue and empowerment in relation to qualitative inquiry. For more than two years we (five Danish and Czech researchers) have been exploring the complex obstructions, difficulties and potentials...... involved in collaborative knowledge production across difference (including age, professional position, life situation, nation). We tell about our experiences with how collaboration can lead toward re-invention of our research practices and methods, as well as our own subjectivities, through involvement...

  10. Collaboration in Augmented Reality

    OpenAIRE

    Lukosch, S.; Billinghurst, M; Alem, L.; Kiyokawa, K.

    2015-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is a technology that allows users to view and interact in real time with virtual images seamlessly superimposed over the real world. AR systems can be used to create unique collaborative experiences. For example, co-located users can see shared 3D virtual objects that they interact with, or a user can annotate the live video view of a remote worker, enabling them to collaborate at a distance. The overall goal is to augment the face-to-face collaborative experience, or t...

  11. Designing collaborative policy innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Annika; Sørensen, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Recent approaches to enhancing public innovation suffer from two shortcomings: They overemphasize competition as a driver of innovation and overlook the fact that public sector innovation involves policy innovation as well as service innovation. Drawing on governance research and innovation theory......, the chapter investigates the extent to which and how collaboration between politicians and relevant stakeholders can spur the formulation, implementation and diffusion of new innovative policies. A case study of a process of collaborative policy innovation in a Danish municipality shows that collaborative...... policy arenas do contribute to policy innovation but also that the degree to which they do so depends on the institutional design of these arenas....

  12. Advancing MCH Interdisciplinary/Interprofessional Leadership Training and Practice Through a Learning Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Meaghan C; Margolis, Lewis H; Rosenberg, Angela; Humphreys, Elizabeth

    2016-11-01

    Purpose The Interdisciplinary Leadership Learning Collaborative (ILLC), under the sponsorship of AUCD and the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, brought together six teams, composed of 14 MCHB and UCEDD training programs to enhance their leadership training. Description Using adult learning principles, interactive training methods, and skill-focused learning, the ILLC built upon the evidence-based Interdisciplinary Leadership Development Program of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The program began with a 4-day on-site intensive and then continued through monthly conference calls, a mid-term on-site workshop, and a summary virtual workshop to present programmatic accomplishments and share plans for sustainability. Coaching/consultation for the teams around particular challenges was also part of the program. Assessment All teams reported enhancements in intentional leadership training, threading of leadership concepts across clinical, didactic, and workshop settings, and new collaborative partnerships for leadership training. Teams also identified a number of strategies to increase sustainability of their intentional leadership training efforts. Conclusion for Practice The learning collaborative is a productive model to address the growing need for interdisciplinary MCH leaders.

  13. Benchmarking monthly homogenization algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. C. Venema

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The COST (European Cooperation in Science and Technology Action ES0601: Advances in homogenization methods of climate series: an integrated approach (HOME has executed a blind intercomparison and validation study for monthly homogenization algorithms. Time series of monthly temperature and precipitation were evaluated because of their importance for climate studies and because they represent two important types of statistics (additive and multiplicative. The algorithms were validated against a realistic benchmark dataset. The benchmark contains real inhomogeneous data as well as simulated data with inserted inhomogeneities. Random break-type inhomogeneities were added to the simulated datasets modeled as a Poisson process with normally distributed breakpoint sizes. To approximate real world conditions, breaks were introduced that occur simultaneously in multiple station series within a simulated network of station data. The simulated time series also contained outliers, missing data periods and local station trends. Further, a stochastic nonlinear global (network-wide trend was added.

    Participants provided 25 separate homogenized contributions as part of the blind study as well as 22 additional solutions submitted after the details of the imposed inhomogeneities were revealed. These homogenized datasets were assessed by a number of performance metrics including (i the centered root mean square error relative to the true homogeneous value at various averaging scales, (ii the error in linear trend estimates and (iii traditional contingency skill scores. The metrics were computed both using the individual station series as well as the network average regional series. The performance of the contributions depends significantly on the error metric considered. Contingency scores by themselves are not very informative. Although relative homogenization algorithms typically improve the homogeneity of temperature data, only the best ones improve

  14. Creating a charter of collaboration for international university partnerships: the Elmina Declaration for Human Resources for Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Frank; Donkor, Peter; de Vries, Raymond; Appiah-Denkyira, Ebenezer; Dakpallah, George Fidelis; Rominski, Sarah; Hassinger, Jane; Lou, Airong; Kwansah, Janet; Moyer, Cheryl; Rana, Gurpreet K; Lawson, Aaron; Ayettey, Seth

    2014-08-01

    The potential of international academic partnerships to build global capacity is critical in efforts to improve health in poorer countries. Academic collaborations, however, are challenged by distance, communication issues, cultural differences, and historical context. The Collaborative Health Alliance for Reshaping Training, Education, and Research project (funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and implemented through academic medicine and public health and governmental institutions in Michigan and Ghana) took a prospective approach to address these issues. The project had four objectives: to create a "charter for collaboration" (CFC), to improve data-driven policy making, to enhance health care provider education, and to increase research capacity. The goal of the CFC was to establish principles to guide the course of the technical work. All participants participated at an initial conference in Elmina, Ghana. Nine months later, the CFC had been revised and adopted. A qualitative investigation of the CFC's effects identified three themes: the CFC's unique value, the influence of the process of creating the CFC on patterns of communication, and the creation of a context for research and collaboration. Creating the CFC established a context in which implementing technical interventions became an opportunity for dialogue and developing a mutually beneficial partnership. To increase the likelihood that research results would be translated into policy reforms, the CFC made explicit the opportunities, potential problems, and institutional barriers to be overcome. The process of creating a CFC and the resulting document define a new standard in academic and governmental partnerships.

  15. After the Tournament: Outcomes and Effort Provision

    OpenAIRE

    McGee, Andrew; McGee, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Modeling the incentive effects of competitions among employees for promotions or financial rewards, economists have largely ignored the effects of competition on effort provision once the competition is finished. In a laboratory experiment, we examine how competition outcomes affect the provision of post-competition effort. We find that subjects who lose arbitrarily decided competitions choose lower subsequent effort levels than subjects who lose competitions decided by their effort choices. ...

  16. Collaboration during visual search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolmson, Kelly A; Reynolds, Michael G; Smilek, Daniel

    2007-08-01

    Two experiments examine how collaboration influences visual search performance. Working with a partner or on their own, participants reported whether a target was present or absent in briefly presented search displays. We compared the search performance of individuals working together (collaborative pairs) with the pooled responses of the individuals working alone (nominal pairs). Collaborative pairs were less likely than nominal pairs to correctly detect a target and they were less likely to make false alarms. Signal detection analyses revealed that collaborative pairs were more sensitive to the presence of the target and had a more conservative response bias than the nominal pairs. This pattern was observed even when the presence of another individual was matched across pairs. The results are discussed in the context of task-sharing, social loafing and current theories of visual search.

  17. Configurable Project Collaboration Portal

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SplashNote Systems is proposing to develop a more effective and innovative approach to project collaboration in distributed teams. The proposed system uniquely gives...

  18. Drivers of Collaborative Advantage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weihe, Gudrid

    Drawing upon extant alliance literature, this article substantiates the argument that we need to look beyond mere structural and formative aspects of cooperation in order to fully understand the performance antecedents of public-private partnerships. Currently, scholarly work on operational...... processes and behavioural dimensions is practically non-existent. This article tries to remedy the current gap in the literature by reviewing research findings on interfirm collaboration (alliances). On that basis a conceptual framework for analyzing partnership processes is developed. Finally......, the antecedents of collaborative advantage are theoretically examined, and the organizational competences contributing to collaborative success are identified. The conclusion is that operational processes and social dynamics are vital drivers of collaborative advantage. Another significant conclusion...

  19. Indico: CERN Collaboration Hub

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Indico development is also moving towards a broader collaboration where other institutes, hosting their own Indico instance, can contribute to the project in order make it a better and more complete tool.

  20. Collaborative software development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, M. de; Visser, E.; Visser, J.M.W.

    2001-01-01

    We present an approach to collaborative software development where obtaining components and contributing components across organizational boundaries are explicit phases in the development process. A lightweight generative infrastructure supports this approach with an online package base, and several

  1. EPA Collaboration with Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States and Israel focus on scientific and technical collaboration to protect the environment, by exchanging scientific and technical information, arranging visits of scientific personnel, cooperating in scientific symposia and workshops, etc.

  2. EPA Collaboration with Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    For the last four years, EPA has been collaborating with Morocco on environmental governance through the Middle East Partnership Initiative (MEPI). Initial work with Morocco focused on water pollution from the textile industry.

  3. CMS Collaboration Board Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Hoch, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The first CMS Collaboration Board meeting of the year (2013) provided an opportunity to thank Teresa Rodrigo, Matthias Kasemann and Randy Ruchti, the 2011-12 CB Chair, Deputy Chair and Secretary, respectively.

  4. Opposing incentives for collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dorch, Bertil F.; Wien, Charlotte; Larsen, Asger Væring

    The Danish Bibliometric Research Indicator (BFI) is part of the performance-based model for the distribution of a special pool of baseline funding for universities and public research institutions in Denmark. BFI rewards the research publications published in the most recognized scientific journals...... collaboration is associated with a higher number of citations than single authorship which may present the author with two opposing incentives for research collaboration....

  5. Creating collaborative learning environments for transforming primary care practices now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, William L; Cohen-Katz, Joanne

    2010-12-01

    The renewal of primary care waits just ahead. The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) movement and a refreshing breeze of collaboration signal its arrival with demonstration projects and pilots appearing across the country. An early message from this work suggests that the development of collaborative, cross-disciplinary teams may be essential for the success of the PCMH. Our focus in this article is on training existing health care professionals toward being thriving members of this transformed clinical care team in a relationship-centered PCMH. Our description of the optimal conditions for collaborative training begins with delineating three types of teams and how they relate to levels of collaboration. We then describe how to create a supportive, safe learning environment for this type of training, using a different model of professional socialization, and tools for building culture. Critical skills related to practice development and the cross-disciplinary collaborative processes are also included. Despite significant obstacles in readying current clinicians to be members of thriving collaborative teams, a few next steps toward implementing collaborative training programs for existing professionals are possible using competency-based and adult learning approaches. Grasping the long awaited arrival of collaborative primary health care will also require delivery system and payment reform. Until that happens, there is an abundance of work to be done envisioning new collaborative training programs and initiating a nation-wide effort to motivate and reeducate our colleagues. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Counselors and Principals, a Team Effort: Small/Rural Schools in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmore, Elaine L.

    Principals from small and rural elementary, middle, and high schools in Texas participated in a 3-year study of the role of the school counselor and the extent of collaborative efforts between counselors and principals. Principals reported a strong dependence on the assistance their counselors provided, often crediting them with assuming the…

  7. A Semantic Web-Based Methodology for Describing Scientific Research Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, Aida

    2013-01-01

    Scientists produce research resources that are useful to future research and innovative efforts. In a typical scientific scenario, the results created by a collaborative team often include numerous artifacts, observations and relationships relevant to research findings, such as programs that generate data, parameters that impact outputs, workflows…

  8. A Semantic Web-Based Methodology for Describing Scientific Research Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandara, Aida

    2013-01-01

    Scientists produce research resources that are useful to future research and innovative efforts. In a typical scientific scenario, the results created by a collaborative team often include numerous artifacts, observations and relationships relevant to research findings, such as programs that generate data, parameters that impact outputs, workflows…

  9. Petroleum supply monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major US geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blends, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

  10. Petroleum Supply Monthly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is one of a family of four publications produced by the Petroleum Supply Division within the Energy Information Administration (EIA) reflecting different levels of data timeliness and completeness. The other publications are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR), the Winter Fuels Report, and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major U.S. geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply. Included are: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States. Data presented in the PSM are divided into two sections: Summary Statistics and Detailed Statistics.

  11. COSMIC monthly progress report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Activities of the Computer Software Management and Information Center (COSMIC) are summarized for the month of May 1994. Tables showing the current inventory of programs available from COSMIC are presented and program processing and evaluation activities are summarized. Nine articles were prepared for publication in the NASA Tech Brief Journal. These articles (included in this report) describe the following software items: (1) WFI - Windowing System for Test and Simulation; (2) HZETRN - A Free Space Radiation Transport and Shielding Program; (3) COMGEN-BEM - Composite Model Generation-Boundary Element Method; (4) IDDS - Interactive Data Display System; (5) CET93/PC - Chemical Equilibrium with Transport Properties, 1993; (6) SDVIC - Sub-pixel Digital Video Image Correlation; (7) TRASYS - Thermal Radiation Analyzer System (HP9000 Series 700/800 Version without NASADIG); (8) NASADIG - NASA Device Independent Graphics Library, Version 6.0 (VAX VMS Version); and (9) NASADIG - NASA Device Independent Graphics Library, Version 6.0 (UNIX Version). Activities in the areas of marketing, customer service, benefits identification, maintenance and support, and dissemination are also described along with a budget summary.

  12. Meeting the challenge of consultation and collaboration: developing interactive teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coben, S S; Thomas, C C; Sattler, R O; Morsink, C V

    1997-01-01

    The roles of special educators as consultants and collaborators have long been established and supported. The rationale for these roles is also well documented. Many models--consultative, collaborative, and teaming--have been suggested in the literature; sometimes, these models exhibit similar goals, competencies, and processes. Because of intensified pressures to collaborate, successful implementation of collaborative and team efforts requires that special educators expand their roles as interactive professionals. The purpose of this article is to define and describe the consultation, collaboration, and teaming models that have been implemented, discuss their strengths and limitations, delineate how these models contribute to interactive teaming, outline key features of the interactive team, and provide some guiding principles for successful implementation.

  13. International Collaboration Activities in Different Geologic Disposal Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkholzer, Jens [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report describes the current status of international collaboration regarding geologic disposal research in the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign. Since 2012, in an effort coordinated by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, UFD has advanced active collaboration with several international geologic disposal programs in Europe and Asia. Such collaboration allows the UFD Campaign to benefit from a deep knowledge base with regards to alternative repository environments developed over decades, and to utilize international investments in research facilities (such as underground research laboratories), saving millions of R&D dollars that have been and are being provided by other countries. To date, UFD’s International Disposal R&D Program has established formal collaboration agreements with five international initiatives and several international partners, and national lab scientists associated with UFD have conducted specific collaborative R&D activities that align well with its R&D priorities.

  14. How to Effect Change Through Cross-sector Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, R.; Elinich, K.; Johnson, R.; Allen, L. B.; Crowley, K. J.; Bachrach, E.

    2014-12-01

    Collaboration is important for effecting large-scale changes, but it is difficult, time-consuming, and requires sustained effort on the part of all collaborating parties. Collaboration among organizations within a single sector (education, policy, or advocacy, for example) is easier than collaboration across sectors, where differences in language, expertise, expectations, and goals can be barriers to shared outcomes. Improving our collective response to climate change is an outcome shared across sectors, providing an opportunity for cross-sector collaboration. The Climate and Urban System Partnership is a network of cross-sector organizations in four cities, with each city forming a local Community of Practice, a group of learners coming together to try new things and learn from each other. We present findings from the first two years of this CCEP-II project, including results from learning sciences, evaluation, and design studies in Pittsburgh, New York, Washington, DC, and Philadelphia.

  15. Evolving technologies support mobile and collaborative curriculum: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Ber, Jeanne M; Lombardo, Nancy T

    2012-01-01

    This case study describes the efforts of librarians to integrate mobile devices, collaboration tools, and resources into a School of Medicine third-year pediatric clerkship. Additional class emphasis is on evidence-based searching and journal article evaluation and presentation. The class objectives ensure that students are comfortable with mobile devices and collaboration tools. Over the eight-year history of the course, student acceptance of the mobile devices used diminished as the devices aged, necessitating the evaluation and selection of new technologies. Collaboration tools and mobile applications employed in the course evolved to accommodate curriculum changes.

  16. Ghostly Collaboration: the Authorship of False Criminal Confession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Laughlin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Drawing on a body of confession scholarship, “Ghostly Collaboration” defines “coercive ghostwriting,” an authorship-inspired term for collaborative practices enacted between custodial criminal suspects and professional police interrogators resulting in coerced, potentially false confession. Within the United States, still-prominent notions of a Romantically-influenced autonomous Author problematically intersect with public perception of collaborative texts; the coercive ghostwriting label is intended to draw explicit attention to co-authorship via coercive collaboration, hopefully contributing to the ongoing efforts of researchers working to challenge inaccurate views of false confessions.

  17. Analysis of Empirical Software Effort Estimation Models

    CERN Document Server

    Basha, Saleem

    2010-01-01

    Reliable effort estimation remains an ongoing challenge to software engineers. Accurate effort estimation is the state of art of software engineering, effort estimation of software is the preliminary phase between the client and the business enterprise. The relationship between the client and the business enterprise begins with the estimation of the software. The credibility of the client to the business enterprise increases with the accurate estimation. Effort estimation often requires generalizing from a small number of historical projects. Generalization from such limited experience is an inherently under constrained problem. Accurate estimation is a complex process because it can be visualized as software effort prediction, as the term indicates prediction never becomes an actual. This work follows the basics of the empirical software effort estimation models. The goal of this paper is to study the empirical software effort estimation. The primary conclusion is that no single technique is best for all sit...

  18. Next Generation Environment for Collaborative Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.Collados; G.Denis; 等

    2001-01-01

    Collaborative environments supporting point to point and multipoint videoconferencing,document and application sharing across both local and wide area networks,video on demand (Broadcast and playback)and interactive text facilities will be a crucial element for the development of the next generation of HEP experiments by geographically dispersed collaborations.The "Virtual Room Videoconferencing System"(VRVS) has been developed since 1995,in order to provide a low cost,bandwidth-efficient,extensible means for videoconferencing and remote collaboration over networks within the high Energy and Nuclear Physics communities.The VRVS(Virtual Rooms Videoconferencing System) provides worldwide videoconferencing service and collaborative environment to the research and education communities,VRVS uses the Internet2 and ESnet high-performance networks infrastructure to deploy its Web-based system,which now includes more than 5790 registered hosts running VRVS software in more than 50 different countries,VRVS hosts an average of 100-multipoint videconference and collaborative sessions worldwide every month.There are around 35 reflectors that manage the traffic flow.at HENP labs and universities in the US and Europe,So far,there are 7 Virtual Rooms for World Wide Conferences(involving more than one contient),and 4 Virtual Rooms each for intra-continental conferences in the US,Europe and Asia,VRVS continues to expand and implement new digital video technologies,including H.323 ITU standard integration,MPEG-2 videoconferencing integration,shared environments,and Quality of Service.

  19. Collaborative Preference: The Role of Homophily, Multiplexity, and Advantageous Network Position across Small and Medium-Sized Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelker, Troy A.; McDowell, William C.; Harris, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine collaboration between individuals across organizations. While both for profit and not-for-profit organizations utilize collaborative efforts, the factors that are important for bringing individuals and businesses together for collaboration still remain somewhat unresolved. In this paper, colleague…

  20. Collaborative Visualization for Large-Scale Accelerator Electromagnetic Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schussman, Greg; /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    In the Phase I SBIR we proposed a ParaView-based solution to provide an environment for individuals to actively collaborate in the visualization process. The technical objectives of Phase I were: (1) to determine the set of features required for an effect collaborative system; (2) to implement a two-person collaborative prototype; and (3) to implement key collaborative features such as control locking and annotation. Accordingly, we implemented a ParaView-based collaboration prototype with support for collaborating with up to four simultaneous clients. We also implemented collaborative features such as control locking, chatting, annotation etc. Due to in part of the flexibility provided by the ParaView framework and the design features implemented in the prototype, we were able to support collaboration with multiple views, instead of a simple give as initially proposed in Phase I. In this section we will summarize the results we obtained during the Phase I project. ParaView is complex, scalable, client-server application framework built on top of the VTK visualization engine. During the implementation of the Phase I prototype, we realized that the ParaView framework naturally supports collaboration technology; hence we were able to go beyond the proposed Phase I prototype in several ways. For example, we were able to support for multiple views, enable server-as well as client-side rendering, and manage up to four heterogeneous clients. The success we achieved with Phase I clearly demonstrated the technical feasibility of the ParaView based collaborative framework we are proposing in the Phase II effort. We also investigated using the web browser as one of the means of participating in a collaborative session. This would enable non-visualization experts to participate in the collaboration process without being intimidated by a complex application such as ParaView. Hence we also developed a prototype web visualization applet that makes it possible for interactive

  1. Reputational Information and Strategic Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Houman; Bendix, Henrik B.

    1998-01-01

    What types of information do decision-makers use when deciding on collaboration? What are the role of reputational information in relation to decisions on collaboration......What types of information do decision-makers use when deciding on collaboration? What are the role of reputational information in relation to decisions on collaboration...

  2. RBANS embedded measures of suboptimal effort in dementia: effort scale has a lower failure rate than the effort index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burton, Rachel L; Enright, Joe; O'Connell, Megan E; Lanting, Shawnda; Morgan, Debra

    2015-02-01

    The importance of evaluating effort in neuropsychological assessments has been widely acknowledged, but measuring effort in the context of dementia remains challenging due to the impact of dementia severity on effort measure scores. Two embedded measures have been developed for the repeatable battery for the assessment of neuropsychological status (RBANS; Randolph, C., Tierney, M. C., Mohr, E., & Chase, T. N. (1998). The repeatable battery for the assessment of neuropsychological status (RBANS): Preliminary clinical validity. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 20 (3), 310-319): the Effort Index (EI; Silverberg, N. D., Wertheimer, J. C., & Fichtenberg, N. L. (2007). An effort index for the repeatable battery for the assessment of neuropsychological status (RBANS). Clinical Neuropsychologist, 21 (5), 841-854) and the Effort Scale (ES; Novitski, J., Steele, S., Karantzoulis, S., & Randolph, C. (2012). The repeatable battery for the assessment of neuropsychological status effort scale. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 27 (2), 190-195). We explored failure rates on these effort measures in a non-litigating mixed dementia sample (N = 145). Failure rate on the EI was high (48%) and associated with dementia severity. In contrast, failure on the ES was 14% but differed based on type of dementia. ES failure was low (4%) when dementia was due to Alzheimer disease (AD), but high (31%) for non-AD dementias. These data raise concerns about use of the RBANS embedded effort measures in dementia evaluations.

  3. Perceived distributed effort in team ball sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beniscelli, Violeta; Tenenbaum, Gershon; Schinke, Robert Joel; Torregrosa, Miquel

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we explored the multifaceted concept of perceived mental and physical effort in team sport contexts where athletes must invest individual and shared efforts to reach a common goal. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with a convenience sample of 15 Catalan professional coaches (3 women and 12 men, 3 each from the following sports: volleyball, basketball, handball, soccer, and water polo) to gain their views of three perceived effort-related dimensions: physical, psychological, and tactical. From a theoretical thematic analysis, it was found that the perception of effort is closely related to how effort is distributed within the team. Moreover, coaches viewed physical effort in relation to the frequency and intensity of the players' involvement in the game. They identified psychological effort in situations where players pay attention to proper cues, and manage emotions under difficult circumstances. Tactical effort addressed the decision-making process of players and how they fulfilled their roles while taking into account the actions of their teammates and opponents. Based on these findings, a model of perceived distributed effort was developed, which delineates the elements that compose each of the aforementioned dimensions. Implications of perceived distributed effort in team coordination and shared mental models are discussed.

  4. Barriers and challenges in seeking psychiatric intervention in a General Hospital, by the collaborative child response unit, (A multidisciplinary team approach to handling child abuse A qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyjayanthi Kanugodu Srinivasa Subramaniyan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Child abuse is a serious criminal act against children in our country and punishable according to protection of children from sexual offenses act 2012. No one agency has the ability to respond completely to the abuse. Hence a multidisciplinary team approach was developed in India. Aim is to narrate the collaborative effort among the multiple disciplines in a general hospital to deliver child protection services and explore the barriers to integrate psychiatric services. Methodology: Members of the team were recruited from different disciplines and trained by experts. A mission statement, protocol to assess the victims and provide treatment was formulated as an algorithm. The barriers to psychiatric treatment among the stakeholders were analyzed using framework method of qualitative analysis. Results (After 20 months the unit received 27 referrals in 20 months, 24 females, and 3 males. Age of the victims was between 8 months and 17 years. Two cases found to be physically abused. Penetrative sexual abuse was found in 23 cases, pregnant victims were 4. Most referrals were by police, trafficking found in 6 cases. Discussion: It was possible to provide multidisciplinary care to the victims and families. Recurrent themes of barriers to psychiatric treatment were stigma, victim blaming; focus on termination of pregnancy, minimization of abuse in males by stakeholders. Conclusion is collaboration needs more effort to integrate psychiatric services but can minimize the reduplication of services.

  5. Barriers and Challenges in Seeking Psychiatric Intervention in a General Hospital, by the Collaborative Child Response Unit, (A Multidisciplinary Team Approach to Handling Child Abuse) A Qualitative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniyan, Vyjayanthi Kanugodu Srinivasa; Mital, Anukant; Rao, Chandrika; Chandra, Girish

    2017-01-01

    Child abuse is a serious criminal act against children in our country and punishable according to protection of children from sexual offenses act 2012. No one agency has the ability to respond completely to the abuse. Hence a multidisciplinary team approach was developed in India. Aim is to narrate the collaborative effort among the multiple disciplines in a general hospital to deliver child protection services and explore the barriers to integrate psychiatric services. Methodology: Members of the team were recruited from different disciplines and trained by experts. A mission statement, protocol to assess the victims and provide treatment was formulated as an algorithm. The barriers to psychiatric treatment among the stakeholders were analyzed using framework method of qualitative analysis. Results (After 20 months) the unit received 27 referrals in 20 months, 24 females, and 3 males. Age of the victims was between 8 months and 17 years. Two cases found to be physically abused. Penetrative sexual abuse was found in 23 cases, pregnant victims were 4. Most referrals were by police, trafficking found in 6 cases. Discussion: It was possible to provide multidisciplinary care to the victims and families. Recurrent themes of barriers to psychiatric treatment were stigma, victim blaming; focus on termination of pregnancy, minimization of abuse in males by stakeholders. Conclusion is collaboration needs more effort to integrate psychiatric services but can minimize the reduplication of services.

  6. Mothers' teaching strategies and children's effortful control: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberg, Nancy; Vidmar, Masa; Spinrad, Tracy L; Eggum, Natalie D; Edwards, Alison; Gaertner, Bridget; Kupfer, Anne

    2010-09-01

    Findings on the relation of maternal verbal teaching strategies to children's effortful control (EC; i.e., self-regulation) are limited in quantity and somewhat inconsistent. In this study, children's EC was assessed at 18, 30, and 42 months (ns = 255, 229, and 209, respectively) with adults' reports and a behavioral measure. Mothers' verbal teaching strategies were assessed while the mother and child worked on a task together. Children's general vocabulary also was measured. In a structural panel model taking into account prior levels of constructs and correlations within time, as well as the relations of EC and teaching strategies to children's vocabulary, socioeconomic status, age, and sex of the child, 18-month EC positively predicted mothers' 30-month cognitive assistance and questioning strategies and negatively predicted 30-month maternal directive strategies. In addition, high 30-month EC predicted greater 42-month maternal cognitive assistance and fewer directive strategies. Thus, mothers' teaching strategies were predicted by individual differences in self-regulatory skills, supporting potential evocative child effects on mothers' teaching strategies.

  7. COLLABORATION BOARD (CB55)

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Cousins

    Open Access Publication Policy ATLAS had recently issued a short statement in support of open access publishing. The mood of the discussions in the December CMS Collaboration Board had appeared to be in favour and so it was being proposed that CMS issue the same statement as that made by ATLAS (the statement is attached to the agenda of this meeting). The Collaboration Board agreed. Election of the Chair of the Collaboration Board Following the agreement to shorten the terms of both the Spokesperson and the Collaboration Board Chair, and to introduce a longer overlap period between the election and the start of the term, the election for the next Collaboration Board Chair was due in December 2007. If the old standard schedule specified in the Constitution were adapted to this date, then the Board should be informed at the present meeting that the election was being prepared. However, it was felt that the experience of the previous year's election of the Spokesperson had shown that it would be desirable to...

  8. Synchronizing U.S. Government Efforts Toward Collaborative Health Care Policymaking in Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Leadership : Theory and Practice 3rd Ed., Peter G. Northouse , Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, Inc., 2004, p. 297; see also Forsyth, interview by author...evaluate their practices ; we have to use their lens. Lastly, not only do we need to take leadership and cultural elements into consideration in...2003, pp. 63-73. 128. Warner W. Burke, “Organization Change: Epidemics, Integration, and Future Needs,” in Organization Change: Theory and Practice

  9. Investigating Inter-Organizational Collaboration during the Haiti Relief Effort from a Macrocognition Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    on hand to do that. TIE PD 3. But the roads are not yet all named in the Montagne Noire area. TIE PD 4. We safely dropped shelter boxes...have money on hand to do that. TIE PD 3. But the roads are not yet all named in the Montagne Noire area. TIE PD 4. We safely dropped shelter boxes

  10. 78 FR 10167 - Pollinator Summit: Status of Ongoing Collaborative Efforts To Protect Pollinators; Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-13

    ... of honey bees and pollinators to pesticides. Invited presenters will provide briefings on current... are several factors affecting honey bee health, pesticides are among these variables; and, new... which may lead to pesticide exposure to bees. The public meeting will also include best...

  11. Collaborative efforts are needed to ensure proper knowledge dissemination of telemedicine projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Neel Kolthoff; Jensen, Lena Sundby; Kayser, Lars

    2014-01-01

    . The investigators should ensure proper documentation and dissemination of changes both during and after the projects in order to ensure transparency, and national or international organisations should establish a database with relevant data fields. FUNDING: not relevant. TRIAL REGISTRATION: not relevant....

  12. A Collective Locus of Leadership: Exploring Leadership in Higher Education through a Paradigm of Collaborative Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Kendra E.

    2010-01-01

    This single-case qualitative study examines leadership in an institution of higher education using the Responsible Leadership for Performance (RLP) model (Lynham & Chermack, 2006) as a framework. The study explores how using a paradigm of collective leadership as an alternative to models of individual leadership could inform understanding of…

  13. The Canadian Geoscience Education Network: a collaborative grassroots effort to support geoscience education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bank, C.; Halfkenny, B.; Hymers, L.; Clinton, L.; Heenan, S.; Jackson, D.; Nowlan, G.; Haidl, F.; Vodden, C.

    2009-12-01

    The Canadian Geoscience Education Network (CGEN) numbers over 300 members who are active in promoting geoscience to the general public and especially in schools. Our membership spreads from coast to coast to coast in Canada and represents the wide range of geosciences. Most members work in education, government, industry, academia, or not-for-profit organizations. Our common goals are to (1) provide resources to teachers for the K-12 curriculum, (2) encourage students to pursue higher education and a rewarding career in geoscience, and (3) lobby to effect change to the school curriculum. Our strength is grounded in a grassroots approach (eg, regional chapters), flexible organization, and emphasis on a cost-effective style. Together we have created and maintain resources for teachers; for example, EdGEO (local workshops for teachers), Geoscape (community-based posters and lesson plans), and EarthNet (virtual resource centre). A new website showcases careers in the Earth sciences. CGEN members ensure that these resources remain current, promote them at individual outreach activities, and see to it that they are maintained. Although we have limited funding we draw strength from the networks of our members and capitalize on partnerships between seemingly disparate organizations and groups to get experts involved in the education of future geoscientists. (Details about CGEN may be found at http://www.geoscience.ca/cgen/principal.html.)

  14. FY13 High Performance EVA Glove (HPEG) Collaboration: Glove Injury Data Mining Effort - Training Data Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Christopher; Benson, Elizabeth; England, Scott; Charvat, Jacqueline; Norcross, Jason; McFarland, Shane; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2014-01-01

    From the time hand-intensive tasks were first created for EVAs, discomforts and injuries have been noted.. There have been numerous versions of EVA gloves for US crew over the past 50 years, yet pain and injuries persist. The investigation team was tasked with assisting in a glove injury assessment for the High Performance EVA Glove (HPEG) project.center dot To aid in this assessment, the team was asked to complete the following objectives: - First, to develop the best current understanding of what glove-related injuries have occurred to date, and when possible, identify the specific mechanisms that caused those injuries - Second, to create a standardized method for comparison of glove injury potential from one glove to another. center dot The overall goal of the gloved hand injury assessment is to utilize ergonomics in understanding how these glove injuries are occurring, and to propose mitigations to current designs or design changes in the next generation of EVA gloves.

  15. The global survey of physicists: A collaborative effort illuminates the situation of women in physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivie, Rachel; Tesfaye, Casey Langer; Czujko, Roman; Chu, Raymond

    2013-03-01

    The results of the Global Survey of Physicists draw attention to the need to focus on factors other than representation when discussing the situation of women in physics. Previous studies of women in physics have mostly focused on the lack of women in the field. This study goes beyond the obvious shortage of women and shows that there are much deeper issues. For the first time, a multinational study was conducted with approximately 15,000 respondents from 130 countries, showing that problems for women in physics transcend national borders. Across all countries, women have fewer resources and opportunities and are more affected by cultural expectations concerning child care. We show that limited resources and opportunities hurt career progress, and because women have fewer opportunities and resources, their careers progress more slowly. We also show the disproportionate effects of children on women physicists' careers. Cultural expectations about home and family are difficult to change. However, for women to have successful outcomes and advance in physics, they must have equal access to resources and opportunities.

  16. Collaborative efforts for managing Melaleuca in the Ciénega de Zapata, Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Ciénega de Zapata Biosphere Reserve is the largest protected area not only in Cuba but also throughout the Caribbean. This swamp ecosystem is characterized by a high biodiversity that comprises several endemic birds, reptiles and invertebrates and is visited by 65 species of birds during their a...

  17. Bullying Prevention: A Call for Collaborative Efforts between School Nurses and School Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kub, Joan; Feldman, Marissa A.

    2015-01-01

    Bullying among children and adolescents is recognized as a significant global public health problem, as it has serious health consequences. Schools are important sites in which to address violence prevention, specifically bullying prevention, and to promote positive youth development. The Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion outlines five action…

  18. Progesterone receptor gene polymorphisms and risk of endometriosis: results from an international collaborative effort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Near, Aimee M; Wu, Anna H; Templeman, Claire;

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the association between self-reported endometriosis and the putative functional promoter +331C/T single nucleotide polymorphism and the PROGINS allele.......To investigate the association between self-reported endometriosis and the putative functional promoter +331C/T single nucleotide polymorphism and the PROGINS allele....

  19. Collaborative efforts are needed to ensure proper knowledge dissemination of telemedicine projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Neel Kolthoff; Jensen, Lena Sundby; Kayser, Lars

    2014-01-01

    documented and disseminated. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Public and private funds were contacted for information about telemedicine studies focusing on people residing in their homes. After an initial screening of titles and abstracts, 19 projects were identified. The managers of the projects were contacted......INTRODUCTION: Telemedicine is often seen as the solution to the challenge of providing health care for an increasing number of people with chronic conditions. Projects are often organised locally and based on the involvement of stakeholders with a wide range of backgrounds. It can be challenging...... to ensure that projects are based on previous experience and that they do not repeat previous studies. To better understand these challenges and current practice, we examined telemedicine projects funded in the 2008-2010 period to explore where, how and to what extent results from the projects were...

  20. A Collaborative Effort at Marketing the University: Detailing a Student-Centered Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Judith H.; Petroshius, Susan M.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe the use of an experiential team-based project in a capstone marketing management course. In the project, students worked with the university administration to develop a marketing plan for the Admissions Office's Tour Guide Program. The authors discuss why such marketing activities are important to colleges and…

  1. Cultivating a Teacher Community of Practice for Sustainable Professional Development: Beyond Planned Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Barley; Pun, Shuk-Han

    2015-01-01

    This ethnographic study-cum-action research documents the cultivation of a community of practice for sustainable professional development among a group of 18 teachers of English as second language in Hong Kong through a series of planned efforts over 10?months. By juxtaposing the theory-driven planned efforts and the spontaneous actions and…

  2. The collaboration imperative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidumolu, Ram; Ellison, Jib; Whalen, John; Billman, Erin

    2014-04-01

    Addressing global sustainability challenges--including climate change, resource depletion, and ecosystem loss--is beyond the individual capabilities of even the largest companies. To tackle these threats, and unleash new value, companies and other stakeholders must collaborate in new ways that treat fragile and complex ecosystems as a whole. In this article, the authors draw on cases including the Latin American Water Funds Partnership, the Sustainable Apparel Coalition (led by Nike, Patagonia, and Walmart), and Action to Accelerate Recycling (a partnership between Alcoa, consumer packaged goods companies, and local governments, among others) to describe four new collaboration models that create shared value and address environmental protection across the value stream. Optimal collaborations focus on improving either business processes or outcomes. They start with a small group of key organizations, bring in project management expertise, link self-interest to shared interest, encourage productive competition, create quick wins, and, above all, build and maintain trust.

  3. Indico: A Collaboration Hub

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, P; Bossy, C; Gonzalez, J B; Pugh, M; Resco, A; Trzaskoma, J; Wachter, C

    2012-01-01

    Since 2009, the development of Indico has focused on usability, performance and new features, especially the ones related to meeting collaboration. Usability studies have resulted in the biggest change Indico has experienced up to now, a new web layout that makes user experience better. Performance improvements were also a key goal since 2010; the main features of Indico have been optimized remarkably. Along with usability and performance, new features have been added to Indico such as webchat integration, video services bookings, webcast and recording requests, designed to really reinforce Indico position as the main hub for all CERN collaboration services, and many others which aim is to complete the conference lifecycle management. Indico development is also moving towards a broader collaboration where other institutes, hosting their own Indico instance, can contribute to the project in order make it a better and more complete tool.

  4. Collaborative Economy and Tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    or spare capacity make it difficult to theorise. In this chapter, we lay the foundation for a social science approach to the exploration of the collaborative economy and its relationship with tourism. We argue that “collaborative” and “economy” should be conceptualised in a broad and inclusive manner......The digital collaborative economy is one of the most fascinating developments to have claimed our attention in the last decade. Not only does it defy clear definition, but its historical links back to non-monetised sharing and gift economies and its contemporary foundations in monetising idling...... in order to avoid narrow theorisations and blinkered accounts that focus only on digitally-mediated, monetised transactions. A balance between individual and collective dimensions of the collaborative economy is also necessary if we are to understand its societal implications....

  5. Innovation and network collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesting, Peter; Müller, Sabine; Jørgensen, Frances

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) can benefit from network collaboration by enhancing opportunities for innovation. Managing the necessary collaboration to benefit from network participation may however be particularly challenging for SMEs due to their size...... and their inherent shortage of resources. In this paper, we propose that human resource management (HRM) practices may provide a means by which SMEs can increase their innovation capacity through network collaboration. Following a brief presentation of the relevant literature on networks, and innovation in networks...... in particular, and HRM, we analyse and evaluate the potential applicability of existing models for supporting innovation in SMEs participating in networks. Finally, we propose several lines of inquiry arising from our analysis that provide directions for future research....

  6. Collaborative Economy and Tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    The digital collaborative economy is one of the most fascinating developments to have claimed our attention in the last decade. Not only does it defy clear definition, but its historical links back to non-monetised sharing and gift economies and its contemporary foundations in monetising idling...... or spare capacity make it difficult to theorise. In this chapter, we lay the foundation for a social science approach to the exploration of the collaborative economy and its relationship with tourism. We argue that “collaborative” and “economy” should be conceptualised in a broad and inclusive manner...... in order to avoid narrow theorisations and blinkered accounts that focus only on digitally-mediated, monetised transactions. A balance between individual and collective dimensions of the collaborative economy is also necessary if we are to understand its societal implications....

  7. Communication and collaboration technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheeseman, Susan E

    2012-01-01

    This is the third in a series of columns exploring health information technology (HIT) in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The first column provided background information on the implementation of information technology throughout the health care delivery system, as well as the requisite informatics competencies needed for nurses to fully engage in the digital era of health care. The second column focused on information and resources to master basic computer competencies described by the TIGER initiative (Technology Informatics Guiding Education Reform) as learning about computers, computer networks, and the transfer of data.1 This column will provide additional information related to basic computer competencies, focusing on communication and collaboration technologies. Computers and the Internet have transformed the way we communicate and collaborate. Electronic communication is the ability to exchange information through the use of computer equipment and software.2 Broadly defined, any technology that facilitates linking one or more individuals together is a collaborative tool. Collaboration using technology encompasses an extensive range of applications that enable groups of individuals to work together including e-mail, instant messaging (IM ), and several web applications collectively referred to as Web 2.0 technologies. The term Web 2.0 refers to web applications where users interact and collaborate with each other in a collective exchange of ideas generating content in a virtual community. Examples of Web 2.0 technologies include social networking sites, blogs, wikis, video sharing sites, and mashups. Many organizations are developing collaborative strategies and tools for employees to connect and interact using web-based social media technologies.3.

  8. Productive and Ineffective Efforts: How Student Effort in High School Mathematics Relates to College Calculus Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, M.D.; Sonnert, G.; Sadler, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Relativizing the popular belief that student effort is the key to success, this article finds that effort in the most advanced mathematics course in US high schools is not consistently associated with college calculus performance. We distinguish two types of student effort: productive and ineffective efforts. Whereas the former carries the…

  9. Productive and Ineffective Efforts: How Student Effort in High School Mathematics Relates to College Calculus Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, M.D.; Sonnert, G.; Sadler, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Relativizing the popular belief that student effort is the key to success, this article finds that effort in the most advanced mathematics course in US high schools is not consistently associated with college calculus performance. We distinguish two types of student effort: productive and ineffective efforts. Whereas the former carries the…

  10. Citizen participation in collaborative watershed partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Brandi; Koontz, Tomas M

    2008-02-01

    Collaborative efforts are increasingly being used to address complex environmental problems, both in the United States and abroad. This is especially true in the growing field of collaborative watershed management, where diverse stakeholders work together to develop and advance water-quality goals. Active citizen participation is viewed as a key component, yet groups often struggle to attract and maintain citizen engagement. This study examined citizen participation behavior in collaborative watershed partnerships by way of a written survey administered to citizen members of 12 collaborative watershed groups in Ohio. Results for the determination of who joins such groups were consistent with the dominant-status model of participation because group members were not demographically representative of the broader community. The dominant-status model, however, does not explain which members are more likely to actively participate in group activities. Instead, individual characteristics, including political activity, knowledge, and comfort in sharing opinions with others, were positively correlated with active participation. In addition, group characteristics, including government-based membership, rural location, perceptions of open communication, perceptions that the group has enough technical support to accomplish its goals, and perceived homogeneity of participant opinions, were positively correlated with active participation. Overall, many group members did not actively participate in group activities.

  11. Collaboration Portals for NASA's Airborne Field Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conover, Helen; Kulkami, Ajinkya; Garrett, Michele; Goodman, Michael; Peterson, Walter Arthur; Drewry, Marilyn; Hardin, Danny M.; He, Matt

    2011-01-01

    The University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), in collaboration with the Global Hydrology Resource Center, a NASA Earth Science Data Center, has provided information management for a number of NASA Airborne Field campaigns, both hurricane science investigations and satellite instrument validation. Effective field campaign management requires communication and coordination tools, including utilities for personnel to upload and share flight plans, weather forecasts, a variety of mission reports, preliminary science data, and personal photos. Beginning with the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP) hurricane field campaign in 2010, we have provided these capabilities via a Drupal-based collaboration portal. This portal was reused and modified for the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), part of the Global Precipitation Measurement mission ground validation program. An end goal of these development efforts is the creation of a Drupal profile for field campaign management. This presentation will discuss experiences with Drupal in developing and using these collaboration portals. Topics will include Drupal modules used, advantages and disadvantages of working with Drupal in this context, and how the science teams used the portals in comparison with other communication and collaboration tools.

  12. INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION ON CO2 SEQUESTRATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard J. Herzog; E. Eric Adams

    2005-04-01

    On December 4, 1997, the US Department of Energy (DOE), the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization of Japan (NEDO), and the Norwegian Research Council (NRC) entered into a ''Project Agreement for International Collaboration on CO{sub 2} Ocean Sequestration''. Government organizations from Japan, Canada, and Australia, and a Swiss/Swedish engineering firm later joined the agreement, which outlined a research strategy for ocean carbon sequestration via direct injection. The members agreed to an initial field experiment, with the hope that if the initial experiment was successful, there would be subsequent field evaluations of increasingly larger scale to evaluate environmental impacts of sequestration and the potential for commercialization. This report is a summary of the evolution of the collaborative effort, the supporting research, and results for the International Collaboration on CO{sub 2} Ocean Sequestration. Almost 100 papers and reports resulted from this collaboration, including 18 peer reviewed journal articles, 46 papers, 28 reports, and 4 graduate theses. A full listing of these publications is in the reference section.

  13. Collaborating Across Borders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flatten, Amy

    Physicists transcend national boundaries, ethnic differences, and scientific disciplines to address globally shared problems and questions. This talk will highlight how scientists have collaborated across borders - both geographic and scientific - to achieve ground-breaking discoveries through international scientific cooperation. The speaker also will address how international collaborations will be even more crucial for addressing future challenges faced by the physics community, such as building large-scale research facilities, strengthening scientific capacity in developing countries, fostering ''science for diplomacy'' in times of political tensions and other critical issues.

  14. Playful Collaboration (or Not)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Marcel; Sproedt, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    also be conducive to deep learning. As such, a game can engage different dimensions of learning and embed elements of active, collaborative, cooperative and problem-based learning. Building on this logic, we present an exploratory case study of the use of a particular board game in a class of a course......This paper explores how games and play, which are deeply rooted in human beings as a way to learn and interact, can be used to teach certain concepts and practices related to open collaborative innovation. We discuss how playing games can be a source of creativity, imagination and fun, while it can...

  15. Electronic Services Monthly MI Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — This electronic services monthly MI report contains monthly MI data for most public facing online online applications such as iClaim, electronic access, Mobile wage...

  16. Interlocal collaboration on energy efficiency, sustainability and climate change issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ssu-Hsien

    Interlocal energy collaboration builds upon network structures among local policy actors dealing with energy, climate change and sustainability issues. Collaboration efforts overcome institutional collective action (ICA) dilemmas, and cope with the problems spanning jurisdictional boundaries, externalities, and free-rider problems. Interlocal energy collaboration emerges as the agreements in greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction, pollution control, land use, purchasing, retrofits, transportation, and so forth. Cities work collaboratively through contractual mechanisms (i.e. formal/informal agreements) and collective mechanisms (i.e. regional partnerships or membership organizations) on a variety of energy issues. What factors facilitate interlocal energy collaboration? To what extent is collaboration through interlocal contractual mechanisms different from collective mechanisms? This dissertation tries to answer these questions by examining: city goal priority on energy related issues as well as other ICA explanatory factors. Research data are drawn mainly from the 2010 national survey "Implementation of energy efficiency and sustainability program" supported by National Science Foundation and the IBM Endowment for the Business of Government. The research results show that city emphasis on common pool resource, scale economies and externality issues significantly affect individual selection of tools for energy collaboration. When expected transaction costs are extremely high or low, the contractual mechanism of informal agreement is more likely to be selected to preserve most local autonomy and flexibility; otherwise, written and formal tools for collaboration are preferred to impose constraints on individual behavior and reduce the risks of defection.

  17. Collaborative Planetary GIS with JMARS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickenshied, S.; Christensen, P. R.; Edwards, C. S.; Prashad, L. C.; Anwar, S.; Engle, E.; Noss, D.; Jmars Development Team

    2010-12-01

    Traditional GIS tools have allowed users to work locally with their own datasets in their own computing environment. More recently, data providers have started offering online repositories of preprocessed data which helps minimize the learning curve required to access new datasets. The ideal collaborative GIS tool provides the functionality of a traditional GIS and easy access to preprocessed data repositories while also enabling users to contribute data, analysis, and ideas back into the very tools they're using. JMARS (Java Mission-planning and Analysis for Remote Sensing) is a suite of geospatial applications developed by the Mars Space Flight Facility at Arizona State University. This software is used for mission planning and scientific data analysis by several NASA missions, including Mars Odyssey, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, and the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter. It is used by scientists, researchers and students of all ages from more than 40 countries around the world. In addition to offering a rich set of global and regional maps and publicly released orbiter images, the JMARS software development team has been working on ways to encourage the creation of collaborative datasets. Bringing together users from diverse teams and backgrounds allows new features to be developed with an interest in making the application useful and accessible to as wide a potential audience as possible. Actively engaging the scientific community in development strategy and hands on tasks allows the creation of user driven data content that would not otherwise be possible. The first community generated dataset to result from this effort is a tool mapping peer-reviewed papers to the locations they relate to on Mars with links to ancillary data. This allows users of JMARS to browse to an area of interest and then quickly locate papers corresponding to that area. Alternately, users can search for published papers over a specified time interval and visually see what areas of Mars have

  18. Your Baby's Growth: 3 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Be Smart About Social Media Your Baby's Growth: 3 Months KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Baby's Growth: 3 Months Print A A A What's in ... months of life are a period of rapid growth. Your baby will gain about 1 to 1½ ...

  19. Monthly energy review, August 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-08-01

    The Monthly Energy Review for the month of August 1997, presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors.

  20. The STEMWiki Hyperlibrary: A Collaborative Multidisciplinary Textbook Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halpern, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    The STEMWiki Hyperlibrary Project is a collaborative effort directed by Prof. Delmar Larsen of UC Davis to replace printed textbooks with a no-fee, high quality, on line textbook environment for STEM courses and informal education. Instructors can build textbooks for their students by linking modules in the Hyperlibrary, write their own texts or use those built by others. The flexibility of the Hyperlibrary allows instructors to address the needs of diverse students in all types of institutions. At present over 4 million people per month visit the site, which makes it a primary global source of STEM educational material. The seed was the ChemWiki, which is the most developed, but there is also a GeoWiki that is being used for courses on Structural Geology, Sediments and Strata and Oceanography at UC Davis as well as including core components on geochemistry, geophysics, mineralogy, oceanography, paleobiology, paleoenvironments, petrology and plate tectonics. In addition to using and contributing to the GeoWiki, AGU members can participate in the other STEMWikis by writing (or editing) core components that involve geophysical topics and make use of the core components in the other areas for their teaching. The GeoWiki can be accessed at http://geowiki.ucdavis.edu/

  1. Science For The Public: Collaboration and Humor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wargo, Richard

    2013-04-01

    The transformation of all things media and information into a dynamic environment of user access has created what seems infinite possibilities to inform the public in many different ways - as well as seemingly infinite possibilities to confuse. This talk will describe a rather non-conventional collaboration between two different creative cultures and its significance to maintaining scientific accuracy and devising strategies important to audience engagement - among them, humor. While focusing on the award-winning effort ``When Things Get Small'' created by University of California Television producer R. Wargo in collaboration with condensed matter physicist I.K. Schuller and actor Adam J. Smith, with both NSF and private support, the case study provides insight into a model and modes which can be used successfully by other scientists to engage the public in what they do.

  2. Dreams and creativity--collaborative psychoanalytic work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, César A; Wellington, Augusta

    2002-01-01

    Walter Bonime's contributions to the understanding and interpretation of dreams highlight collaboration and creative effort as essential to achieve appropriate attunement and effective emotional growth. The authors incorporate the theoretical constructs and technical recommendations of Bonime into their clinical work with artists. They describe how creative psychoanalytic work with artists' dreams can promote productivity, spontaneity, emotional growth, and facilitate conflict resolution, functional regression, and affective regulation. Psychoanalytic theories on creativity and the creative personality are reviewed and case material is presented to illustrate some of the technical aspects of the collaborative interpretation of artists' dreams. The authors propose that the process of dream interpretation may also foster the functional regression characteristic of creative work and motivate artists to more freely create works of art. The critic's transference is defined, and with examples the authors show how the exploration of this transference may lead to decreased resistance by allowing a reparative experience to exist within the analytic setting.

  3. A collaborative approach to botnet protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevanovic, Matija; Revsbech, Kasper; Pedersen, Jens Myrup;

    2012-01-01

    Botnets are collections of compromised computers which have come under the control of a malicious person or organisation via malicious software stored on the computers, and which can then be used to interfere with, misuse, or deny access to a wide range of Internet-based services. With the current...... detection techniques and argue why a new, composite detection approach is needed to provide efficient and effective neutralisation of botnets. This approach should combine existing detection efforts into a collaborative botnet protection framework that receives input from a range of different sources......, such as packet sniffers, on-access anti-virus software and behavioural analysis of network traffic, computer sub-systems and application programs. Finally, we introduce ContraBot, a collaborative botnet detection framework which combines approaches that analyse network traffic to identify patterns of botnet...

  4. Dopamine and Effort-Based Decision Making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irma Triasih Kurniawan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Motivational theories of choice focus on the influence of goal values and strength of reinforcement to explain behavior. By contrast relatively little is known concerning how the cost of an action, such as effort expended, contributes to a decision to act. Effort-based decision making addresses how we make an action choice based on an integration of action and goal values. Here we review behavioral and neurobiological data regarding the representation of effort as action cost, and how this impacts on decision making. Although organisms expend effort to obtain a desired reward there is a striking sensitivity to the amount of effort required, such that the net preference for an action decreases as effort cost increases. We discuss the contribution of the neurotransmitter dopamine (DA towards overcoming response costs and in enhancing an animal’s motivation towards effortful actions. We also consider the contribution of brain structures, including the basal ganglia (BG and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, in the internal generation of action involving a translation of reward expectation into effortful action.

  5. Time preferences, study effort, and academic performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Non, J.A.; Tempelaar, D.T.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the relation between time preferences, study effort, and academic performance among first-year Business and Economics students. Time preferences are measured by stated preferences for an immediate payment over larger delayed payments. Data on study efforts are derived from an electronic l

  6. Visual Cues and Listening Effort: Individual Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picou, Erin M.; Ricketts, Todd A; Hornsby, Benjamin W. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the effect of visual cues on listening effort as well as whether predictive variables such as working memory capacity (WMC) and lipreading ability affect the magnitude of listening effort. Method: Twenty participants with normal hearing were tested using a paired-associates recall task in 2 conditions (quiet and noise) and…

  7. Endogenous Effort Norms in Hierarchical Firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Tichem (Jan)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This paper studies how a three-layer hierarchical firm (principal-supervisor-agent) optimally creates effort norms for its employees. The key assumption is that effort norms are affected by the example of superiors. In equilibrium, norms are eroded as one moves down

  8. The Effect of Age on Listening Effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeest, Sofie; Keppler, Hannah; Corthals, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of age on listening effort. Method: A dual-task paradigm was used to evaluate listening effort in different conditions of background noise. Sixty adults ranging in age from 20 to 77 years were included. A primary speech-recognition task and a secondary memory task were performed…

  9. Listening Effort With Cochlear Implant Simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pals, Carina; Sarampalis, Anastasios; Başkent, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Fitting a cochlear implant (CI) for optimal speech perception does not necessarily optimize listening effort. This study aimed to show that listening effort may change between CI processing conditions for which speech intelligibility remains constant. Method: Nineteen normal-hearing partici

  10. Listening Effort with Cochlear Implant Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pals, Carina; Sarampalis, Anastasios; Baskent, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Fitting a cochlear implant (CI) for optimal speech perception does not necessarily optimize listening effort. This study aimed to show that listening effort may change between CI processing conditions for which speech intelligibility remains constant. Method: Nineteen normal-hearing participants listened to CI simulations with varying…

  11. Recent Efforts in Data Compilations for Nuclear Astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Dillmann, I

    2008-01-01

    Some recent efforts in compiling data for astrophysical purposes are introduced, which were discussed during a JINA-CARINA Collaboration meeting on "Nuclear Physics Data Compilation for Nucleosynthesis Modeling" held at the ECT* in Trento/ Italy from May 29th- June 3rd, 2007. The main goal of this collaboration is to develop an updated and unified nuclear reaction database for modeling a wide variety of stellar nucleosynthesis scenarios. Presently a large number of different reaction libraries (REACLIB) are used by the astrophysics community. The "JINA Reaclib Database" on http://www.nscl.msu.edu/\\~nero/db/ aims to merge and fit the latest experimental stellar cross sections and reaction rate data of various compilations, e.g. NACRE and its extension for Big Bang nucleosynthesis, Caughlan and Fowler, Iliadis et al., and KADoNiS. The KADoNiS (Karlsruhe Astrophysical Database of Nucleosynthesis in Stars, http://nuclear-astrophysics.fzk.de/kadonis) project is an online database for neutron capture cross sections...

  12. Collaborative form(s)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunn, Wendy

    Gunn asks us to consider beauty as collaborative forms of action generated by moving between design by means of anthropology and anthropology by means of design. Specifically, she gives focus to play-like reflexions on practices of designing energy products, systems and infrastructure. Design...

  13. The Promise of Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauml, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Whether a teacher loves it or dreads it, lesson planning is a crucial step in the teaching process. Done effectively, collaborative lesson planning--in which teachers work together to design lessons--leads to increased professional learning, higher job satisfaction for teachers, and better lesson plans. The process poses challenges for both…

  14. Learning Music from Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, R. Keith

    2008-01-01

    I draw on two traditions of research: the social psychology of collaborative groups, and the ethnographic study of improvisational performance. I outline a general model of group creativity derived from these traditions. I show how the model can be used to better understand musical competence and performance, and I provide recommendations for how…

  15. The RD11 Collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Unit

    1993-01-01

    Presentation of the RD11 Collaboration which is specialized in elaborating the second level trigger for the LHC. Also named EAST (Embedded Architectures for Second-level Triggering) in LHC Experiments.With John Strong, Rudy Bock, Werner Krischer, Gennaddi Klioutchnikov, Claudia Bondila, Iosif Legrand and Erwin Denes.

  16. Thematising Intercultural Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmgreen, Lise-Lotte; Askehave, Inger

    2013-01-01

    Taking a critical discursive approach (Potter and Wetherell, 1987; Wetherell and Potter, 1988, 1992) to analysing interview data, the article discusses the possible implications of top and middle managers’ constructions of intercultural collaboration for the day-to-day workings of a Danish...

  17. Collaboration Between Multistakeholder Standards

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasche, Andreas; Maclean, Camilla

    responsibility is unlikely to support a great variety of partly competing and overlapping standards. Increased collaboration between these standards would enhance both their impact and their adoption by firms. This report examines the nature, benefits, and shortcomings of existing multistakeholder standards...

  18. Team Collaboration Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yeou-Fang; Schrock, Mitchell; Baldwin, John R.; Borden, Charles S.

    2010-01-01

    The Ground Resource Allocation and Planning Environment (GRAPE 1.0) is a Web-based, collaborative team environment based on the Microsoft SharePoint platform, which provides Deep Space Network (DSN) resource planners tools and services for sharing information and performing analysis.

  19. Playful Collaboration (Or Not)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Marcel; Sproedt, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    This article explores how playing games can be used to teach intangible social interaction across boundaries, in particular within open collaborative innovation. We present an exploratory case study of how students learned from playing a board game in a graduate course of the international...... imply several opportunities and challenges within education and beyond....

  20. Collaboration in Augmented Reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukosch, S.; Billinghurst, M.; Alem, L.; Kiyokawa, K.

    2015-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is a technology that allows users to view and interact in real time with virtual images seamlessly superimposed over the real world. AR systems can be used to create unique collaborative experiences. For example, co-located users can see shared 3D virtual objects that they int

  1. Learning Music from Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, R. Keith

    2008-01-01

    I draw on two traditions of research: the social psychology of collaborative groups, and the ethnographic study of improvisational performance. I outline a general model of group creativity derived from these traditions. I show how the model can be used to better understand musical competence and performance, and I provide recommendations for how…

  2. Collaborative Support for Inclusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanahuja-Gavaldà, Josep M.; Olmos-Rueda, Patricia; Morón-Velasco, Mar

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, in Catalonia, students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are increasingly in regular schools although their presence, participation, learning and success are unequal. Barriers towards inclusion often depend on how to organise supporting at regular schools and the teachers' collaboration during this process. In this paper, the support…

  3. Collaboration in Augmented Reality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lukosch, S.; Billinghurst, M.; Alem, L.; Kiyokawa, K.

    2015-01-01

    Augmented Reality (AR) is a technology that allows users to view and interact in real time with virtual images seamlessly superimposed over the real world. AR systems can be used to create unique collaborative experiences. For example, co-located users can see shared 3D virtual objects that they int

  4. Intercultural Collaboration Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gertsen, Martine Cardel; Søderberg, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    follows their recognizing new dimensions of their conflicts, eventually furthering their collaboration. We explain how Greimas's actantial model is valuable when mapping differences between and changes in the narrators’ projects, alliances and oppositions in the course of their interaction. Thus, we make...

  5. Driving collaborative improvement processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middel, Rick; Gieskes, José; Fisscher, Olaf

    2002-01-01

    Continuous Improvement is a consolidated concept in theory and practice, mainly in the context of stand-alone companies. However, the battlefield of competition is increasingly moving from the level of individual firms to that of organisational settings based on loose company boundaries and collabor

  6. Driving collaborative improvement processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middel, R.; Gieskes, J.; Fisscher, O.

    2005-01-01

    Continuous improvement is a consolidated concept in theory and practice, mainly in the context of stand-alone companies. However, the battlefield of competition is increasingly moving from the level of individual firms to that of organizational settings based on loose company boundaries and collabor

  7. Longitudinal Relations of Intrusive Parenting and Effortful Control to Ego-Resiliency during Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Zoe E.; Eisenberg, Nancy; Spinrad, Tracy L.; Widaman, Keith F.

    2013-01-01

    Longitudinal relations among ego-resiliency (ER), effortful control (EC), and observed intrusive parenting were examined at 18, 30, and 42 months of age ("Ns" = 256, 230, and 210) using structural equation modeling. Intrusive parenting at 18 and 30 months negatively predicted EC a year later, over and above earlier levels. EC at…

  8. Reputation Management System for Fostering Trust in Collaborative and Cohesive Disaster Management

    OpenAIRE

    Sabeen Javed; Hammad Afzal; Fahim Arif; Awais Majeed

    2016-01-01

    The best management of a disaster requires knowledge, skills and other resources not only for relief and rehabilitation but also for recovery and mitigation of its effects. These multifaceted goals cannot be achieved by a single organization and require collaborative efforts in an agile manner. Blind trust cannot be applied while selecting collaborators/team members/partners therefore good reputation of a collaborator is mandatory. Currently, various Information and Communication Technology b...

  9. A Multi-University Economic Capability-Building Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Shelley; Briar-Lawson, Katharine

    2017-01-01

    To prepare students to work competently with financially at-risk individuals, families, and communities, social work schools need to bring economic literacy skills into the curriculum. This article describes an ambitious financial capability education initiative in New York City. It reports on a unique collaborative effort to develop, use, and…

  10. Usability Evaluation of a Research Repository and Collaboration Web Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Maron, Deborah J.; Charles, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports results from an empirical usability evaluation of Human-Animal Bond Research Initiative Central as part of the effort to develop an open access research repository and collaboration platform for human-animal bond researchers. By repurposing and altering key features of the original HUBzero system, Human-Animal Bond Research…

  11. Innovation in institutional collaboration : The role of interlocutors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. Fowler (Alan)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe world is said to be confronted with complex issues working against the long term well-being of people and planet that can only be effectively addressed through (hyper) collective effort. How necessary collaboration comes about and progresses shows numerous approaches, professional sp

  12. An Acquisition Leader’s Model for Building Collaborative Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    together is success.” - Henry Ford “The achievements of an organization are the results of the combined effort of each individual.” – Vince...stakeholders. That is, collaboration factors should be measured with key stakeholders where teamwork is needed to accomplish the mission

  13. Virtual laboratory for development and execution of biomedical collaborative applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bubak, M.; Gubala, T.; Malawski, M.; Balis, B.; Funika, W.; Bartynski, T.; Ciepiela, E.; Harezlak, D.; Kasztelnik, M.; Kocot, J.; Krol, D.; Nowakowski, P.; Pelczar, M.; Wach, J.; Assel, M.; Tirado-Ramos, A.; Puuronen, S.; Pechenizkiy, M.; Tsymbal, A.; Lee, D.-J.

    2008-01-01

    The ViroLab Virtual Laboratory is a collaborative platform for scientists representing multiple fields of expertise while working together on common scientific goals. This environment makes it possible to combine efforts of computer scientists, virology and epidemiology experts and experienced physi

  14. Developing Collaboration Skills in Team Undergraduate Research Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturner, Kelly K.; Bishop, Pamela; Lenhart, Suzanne M.

    2017-01-01

    Interdisciplinary undergraduate research experiences often require students to work in teams with other students and researchers from different disciplines, creating a need for development of new skills in interdisciplinary collaboration. In this paper, we describe our unique efforts to mentor participants in developing these skills during our…

  15. A Multi-University Economic Capability-Building Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwitz, Shelley; Briar-Lawson, Katharine

    2017-01-01

    To prepare students to work competently with financially at-risk individuals, families, and communities, social work schools need to bring economic literacy skills into the curriculum. This article describes an ambitious financial capability education initiative in New York City. It reports on a unique collaborative effort to develop, use, and…

  16. Toward a Collaborative Approach to Curriculum Development: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David

    1989-01-01

    Describes the National Curriculum Project, an effort in curriculum renewal set up within the Australian Adult Migrant Education Program. The rationale for and the effectiveness of a collaborative approach between teachers and curriculum specialists in school-based English-as-a-Second-Language curriculum development are discussed. Project…

  17. Toward a Collaborative Approach to Curriculum Development: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunan, David

    1989-01-01

    Describes the National Curriculum Project, an effort in curriculum renewal set up within the Australian Adult Migrant Education Program. The rationale for and the effectiveness of a collaborative approach between teachers and curriculum specialists in school-based English-as-a-Second-Language curriculum development are discussed. Project…

  18. Detecting Coordination Problems in Collaborative Software Development Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amrit, Chintan Amrit; van Hillegersberg, Jos

    2008-01-01

    Software development is rarely an individual effort and generally involves teams of developers collaborating to generate good reliable code. Among the software code there exist technical dependencies that arise from software components using services from other components. The different ways of

  19. Case Study in the Power of Collaboration: Planning Process for the Kansas Educational Leadership Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devin, Mary

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on the collaborative efforts undertaken for systematic statewide support for the recruitment, development, and retention of quality leaders in schools and school districts in Kansas, USA. The author presents the case of a strong sense of "collaboration" that made the difference and stimulated movement from vision…

  20. University Student Knowledge of Alcohol: A Collaborative Model of Assessment and Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minatoya, Lydia Yuriko; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Surveyed college students' (N=180) knowledge of the effects of alcohol. The collaborative effort between a university counseling center and health center showed that while 70 percent of the students rated themselves as informed drinkers, their answers were less accurate. The study also provided a model of innovative collaboration. (JAC)

  1. Case Study in the Power of Collaboration: Planning Process for the Kansas Educational Leadership Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devin, Mary

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on the collaborative efforts undertaken for systematic statewide support for the recruitment, development, and retention of quality leaders in schools and school districts in Kansas, USA. The author presents the case of a strong sense of "collaboration" that made the difference and stimulated movement from vision…

  2. A Two-Dimension Process in Explaining Learners' Collaborative Behaviors in CSCL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jung-Lung; Chou, Huey-Wen; Hwang, Wu-Yuin; Chou, Shyan-Bin

    2008-01-01

    Computer supported collaborative learning (CSCL) has captured many educators and researchers to contribute their efforts on this domain. This study proposed a two-dimension concept to explain learners' collaboration behaviors in a CSCL laboratory setting. A two-dimension process, namely perceptual dimensions and supportive dimensions, is useful to…

  3. Convergence of Two Independent Roads Leads to Collaboration between Education and Neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Kourtland R.; Timmerman, L.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Laurienti, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Collaboration is the foundation for innovative discoveries, as individuals with different backgrounds come together and combine their unique expertise. In the current article, an educational researcher and two neuroscientists relate their experiences in establishing a successful collaborative effort. The marriage of neuroscientific findings with…

  4. Developing Subject-Related Web Sites Collaboratively: The Virtual Business Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abels, Eileen G.; White, Marilyn Domas; Kim, Soojung

    2007-01-01

    This article is a case study of the Virtual Business Information Center (VBIC), a collaborative effort since 1998 of the College of Information Studies, Robert H. Smith School of Business, and the University of Maryland Libraries. The case study traces its development, implementation, and evaluation and addresses collaboration among academic…

  5. Understanding and reducing obstacles in a collaboration between a minority institution and a cancer center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Beti; O'Connell, Mary; Löest, Helena; Anderson, Jennifer; Westcott, Rick

    2013-11-01

    Reducing the cancer incidence and mortality rates of underserved populations will require multidisciplinary efforts involving diverse teams of investigators. We describe a collaborative program between a National Cancer Institute-designated cancer center and a minority-serving institution. The organizations worked together to discover institutional and cultural barriers and facilitators to productive collaboration.

  6. Epilepsy in 2014. Novel and large collaborations drive advances in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perucca, Piero; O'Brien, Terence J

    2015-02-01

    In 2014, novel, large-scale collaborative efforts and frameworks resulted in major advances in the epilepsy field, from publication of a new definition of epilepsy to important discoveries regarding aetiology, pathophysiology and management. These collaborative works provide a platform from which further advances are anticipated, and a model for future research.

  7. Assessing Collaboration Networks in Educational Research: A Co-Authorship-Based Social Network Analysis Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, David Andres; Queupil, Juan Pablo; Fraser, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze collaboration networks and their patterns among higher education institutions (HEIs) in Chile and the Latin American region. This will provide evidence to educational managements in order to properly allocate their efforts to improve collaboration. Design/methodology/approach: This quantitative…

  8. Power and Collaboration-Consensus/Conflict in Curriculum Leadership: Status Quo or Change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylimaki, Rose M.; Brunner, C. Cryss

    2011-01-01

    This exploratory article draws on multiple theoretical lenses and empirical research to focus on collaboration-consensus/conflict and power as experienced within literacy curriculum change efforts. Conflict and collaboration processes are discussed in the literature but remain dualistic and lack the nuance of deeper understanding. The article…

  9. Teacher and Speech-Language Therapist Collaboration: Being Equal and Achieving a Common Goal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartas, D.

    2004-01-01

    Collaboration is a key aspect in developing effective educational provision for pupils with special educational needs. In this study, collaboration is conceptualized as a dynamic system for educational efforts which endorses collegial, interdependent and co-equal styles of interaction between teachers and speech and language therapists (SLTs).…

  10. Making science accessible through collaborative science teacher action research on feminist pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capobianco, Brenda M.

    The underrepresentation of women and minorities in science is an extensively studied yet persistent concern of our society. Major reform movements in science education suggest that better teaching, higher standards, and sensitivity to student differences can overcome long-standing obstacles to participation among women and minorities. In response to these major reform movements, researchers have suggested teachers transform their goals, science content, and instructional practices to make science more attractive and inviting to all students, particularly young women and minorities (Barton, 1998; Brickhouse, 1994; Mayberry & Rees, 1999; Rodriguez, 1999; Roychoudhury, Tippins, & Nichols, 1995). One of the more dominant approaches currently heralded is the use of feminist pedagogy in science education. The purpose of this study was to examine the ways eleven middle and high school science teachers worked collaboratively to engage in systematic, self-critical inquiry of their own practice and join with other science teachers to engage in collaborative conversations in effort to transform their practice for a more equitable science education. Data were gathered via semi-structured interviews, whole group discussions, classroom observations, and review of supporting documents. Data analysis was based on grounded theory (Strauss & Corbin, 1990) and open coding (Miles and Huberman, 1994). This study described the collective processes the science teachers and university researcher employed to facilitate regular collaborative action research meetings over the course of six months. Findings indicated that engaging in collaborative action research allowed teachers to gain new knowledge about feminist science teaching, generate a cluster of pedagogical possibilities for inclusive pedagogy, and enhance their understanding for science teaching. Additional findings indicated dilemmas teachers experienced including resistance to a feminist agenda and concerns for validity in action

  11. Collaborative Research of Open Star Clusters

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alisher S. Hojaev

    2005-06-01

    Preliminary results on observations of open clusters are presented. The project has been initiated in the framework of the Uzbek–Taiwan and Taiwan–Baltic collaboration, mainly to upgrade and make use of facilities at Maidanak Observatory. We present detailed, multiwavelength studies of the young cluster NGC 6823 and the associated complex nebulosity, to diagnose the young stellar population and star formation history in the region. In addition, 7 compact open clusters have been monitored for stellar variability. We show how observations like these could feasibly be used to look for exoplanet transit events. We also expect to join the Whole-Earth Telescope effort in future campaigns for asteroseismology.

  12. A collaborative approach to botnet protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stevanovic, Matija; Revsbech, Kasper; Pedersen, Jens Myrup

    2012-01-01

    Botnets are collections of compromised computers which have come under the control of a malicious person or organisation via malicious software stored on the computers, and which can then be used to interfere with, misuse, or deny access to a wide range of Internet-based services. With the current...... detection techniques and argue why a new, composite detection approach is needed to provide efficient and effective neutralisation of botnets. This approach should combine existing detection efforts into a collaborative botnet protection framework that receives input from a range of different sources...

  13. Collaborations in Open Learning Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, Howard

    2015-01-01

    This thesis researches automated services for professionals aiming at starting collaborative learning projects in open learning environments, such as MOOCs. It investigates the theoretical backgrounds of team formation for collaborative learning. Based on the outcomes, a model is developed describin

  14. Collaborations in Open Learning Environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, Howard

    2015-01-01

    This thesis researches automated services for professionals aiming at starting collaborative learning projects in open learning environments, such as MOOCs. It investigates the theoretical backgrounds of team formation for collaborative learning. Based on the outcomes, a model is developed

  15. Composition of the ATLAS Collaboration

    CERN Document Server

    Pater, Joleen; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS collaboration consists of about 5,000 members from 178 institutes in 38 countries. About half of the members of the collaboration are scientific authors of the papers, and there are about 1,200 students in the collaboration. This note presents data showing aspects of the composition of the collaboration; in particular the relative fraction of women is described at several levels within the hierarchy of the ATLAS experiment.

  16. Life Science Professional Societies Expand Undergraduate Education Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyas, Marsha Lakes; Ruedi, Elizabeth A.; Engen, Katie; Chang, Amy L.

    2017-01-01

    The Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education reports cite the critical role of professional societies in undergraduate life science education and, since 2008, have called for the increased involvement of professional societies in support of undergraduate education. Our study explored the level of support being provided by societies for undergraduate education and documented changes in support during the Vision and Change era. Society representatives responded to a survey on programs, awards, meetings, membership, teaching resources, publications, staffing, finances, evaluation, and collaborations that address undergraduate faculty and students. A longitudinal comparison group of societies responded to surveys in both 2008 and 2014. Results indicate that life science professional societies are extensively engaged in undergraduate education in their fields, setting standards for their discipline, providing vetted education resources, engaging students in both research and education, and enhancing professional development and recognition/status for educators. Societies are devoting funding and staff to these efforts and engaging volunteer leadership. Longitudinal comparison group responses indicate there have been significant and quantifiable expansions of undergraduate efforts in many areas since 2008. These indicators can serve as a baseline for defining, aligning, and measuring how professional societies can promote sustainable, evidence-based support of undergraduate education initiatives. PMID:28130272

  17. International Scientific Collaboration of China: Collaborating Countries, Institutions and Individuals

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xianwen; Wang, Zhi; Peng, Lian; Wang, Chuanli

    2014-01-01

    Using bibliometric methods, we investigate China's international scientific collaboration from 3 levels of collaborating countries, institutions and individuals. We design a database in SQL Server, and make analysis of Chinese SCI papers based on the corresponding author field. We find that China's international scientific collaboration is focused on a handful of countries. Nearly 95% international co-authored papers are collaborated with only 20 countries, among which the USA account for more than 40% of all. Results also show that Chinese lineage in the international co-authorship is obvious, which means Chinese immigrant scientists are playing an important role in China's international scientific collaboration, especially in English-speaking countries.

  18. Security for ICT collaboration tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broenink, E.G.; Kleinhuis, G.; Fransen, F.

    2011-01-01

    In order for collaboration tools to be productive in an operational setting, an information base that is shared across the collaborating parties is needed. Therefore, a lot of research is done for tooling to create such a common information base in a collaboration tool. However, security is often no

  19. Developing and Evaluating Collaborative Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-11-01

    undertaking. This paper considers the topic of assessing collaborative technologies in the context of military logistics . A historical view of collaborative...research in military logistics is provided, as well as a discussion of current research aimed at developing a framework for assessing collaborative technologies.

  20. International collaborations through the internet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olson, Gary M.; David, Paul A.; Eksteen, Johan

    2007-01-01

    The past decade has seen remarkable advances in the availability of tools to support scientific collaboration at a distance. This is especially good news for international collaborations, where in the past constraints on collocation and travel have made such collaborations a major challenge. The ...

  1. Regulating Collaboration in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobber, Marjolein; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Verloop, Nico; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2014-01-01

    Collaboration in teacher education can be seen as a way to prepare student teachers for future social practices at school. When people collaborate with each other, they have to regulate their collaboration. In the Dutch teacher education programme that was investigated, student teachers were members of different types of groups, each of which had…

  2. Realities of Supply Chain Collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampstra, R.P.; Ashayeri, J.; Gattorna, J.

    2006-01-01

    Successful supply chain collaboration (SCC) practices are rather exceptional, yet collaboration is believed to be the single most pressing need in supply chain management.In this paper we discuss the realities of SCC, present prerequisites for the collaboration process, indicate where the process

  3. Security for ICT collaboration tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broenink, E.G.; Kleinhuis, G.; Fransen, F.

    2010-01-01

    In order for collaboration tools to be productive in an operational setting, an information base that is shared across the collaborating parties is needed. Therefore, a lot of research is done for tooling to create such a common information base in a collaboration tool. However, security is often

  4. Task modeling for collaborative authoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, van der Gerrit; Kulyk, Olga; Vyas, Dhaval; Kubbe, Onno; Ebert, Achim; Dittmar, A.; Forbrig, P.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation –Task analysis for designing modern collaborative work needs a more fine grained approach. Especially in a complex task domain, like collaborative scientific authoring, when there is a single overall goal that can only be accomplished only by collaboration between multiple roles, each req

  5. Natural Gas Monthly, October 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-10

    The (NGM) Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. This month`s feature articles are: US Production of Natural Gas from Tight Reservoirs: and Expanding Rule of Underground Storage.

  6. Natural gas monthly, May 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-25

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The featured articles for this month are: Opportunities with fuel cells, and revisions to monthly natural gas data.

  7. Monthly energy review, January 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This report presents an overview of recent monthly energy statistics. Major activities covered include production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for fossil fuels, electricity, and nuclear energy.

  8. Natural gas monthly, July 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is entitled ``Intricate puzzle of oil and gas reserves growth.`` A special report is included on revisions to monthly natural gas data. 6 figs., 24 tabs.

  9. Monthly Program Cost Report (MPCR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Monthly Program Cost Report (MPCR) replaces the Cost Distribution Report (CDR). The MPCR provides summary information about Veterans Affairs operational costs,...

  10. Information problem solving and mental effort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; Frerejean, Jimmy

    2012-01-01

    Brand-Gruwel, S., & Frerejean, J. (2012, 5 September). Information problem solving and mental effort. Presentation at the EARLI ASC 2012 "Using eye tracking to design and evaluate education & training methods", Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  11. Software Development Effort Estimation Techniques: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rshma Chawla

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The most important activity in software project management process is the estimation of Software development effort. The literature shows many algorithmic cost estimation models such as Boehm’s COCOMO, Albrecht's Function Point Analysis, Putnam’s SLIM, ESTIMACS, Soft computing based techniques etc., but each model have their own advantages and disadvantages in predicting development cost and effort. This is because of the availability of project data in the initial stages of development process is often incomplete, inconsistent and vague. The accurate effort estimation in software project management process is major challenge. This paper is a systematic reviewof classic and contemporary literature on software effort estimation. A systematicsearch is done across data sources to understand the issues and research problems ineffort estimation problem domain

  12. EU grid computing effort takes on malaria

    CERN Multimedia

    Lawrence, Stacy

    2006-01-01

    Malaria is the world's most common parasitic infection, affecting more thatn 500 million people annually and killing more than 1 million. In order to help combat malaria, CERN has launched a grid computing effort (1 page)

  13. Collaboration in scientific practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagenknecht, Susann

    2014-01-01

    This monograph investigates the collaborative creation of scientific knowledge in research groups. To do so, I combine philosophical analysis with a first-hand comparative case study of two research groups in experimental science. Qualitative data are gained through observation and interviews......, and I combine empirical insights with existing approaches to knowledge creation in philosophy of science and social epistemology. On the basis of my empirically-grounded analysis I make several conceptual contributions. I study scientific collaboration as the interaction of scientists within research...... groups. Thereby, I argue that research groups and their role in scientific practice deserve more philosophical attention than they have hitherto received. In contemporary natural science, research groups are key to the formulation and corroboration of scientific knowledge claims prior...

  14. Collaborative Tax Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen

    2016-01-01

    their customer bases decline to commercially non-viable levels. The analysis is framed by public governance literature and argues that the regulation is an example of collaborative or interactive governance, because the tax administrators do not regulate non-compliance directly, but activate external...... stakeholders, i.e. the consumers, in the regulatory craft. The study is based on a qualitative methodology and draws on a unique case of regulation in the cleaning sector. This sector is at high risk of tax evasion and human exploitation of vulnerable workers operating in the informal economy. The article has...... implications for how tax practitioners think about collaborative and interactive regulatory initiatives. While the tax administration in the study sees the approach as effective, the analysis shows that there are a number of caveats in relation to regularity, public listing, costs and revenue focus...

  15. Collaborative Knowledge Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Birgitte Ravn

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author reflects on the conditions for working with collaborative research in current academic settings. On the basis of reflections on goals, challenges and results of earlier projects, the author looks into how economic and political shifts and transformations in work have...... changed the conditions for shared knowledge production with the institutionalization of neo-liberal discourse of the knowledge economy as managerial regimes. She questions if context-specific enactments of the discourse of participation can be handled, when neoliberal managerial regimes guide research...... activities and other working practices and the identities of academics and other professionals who are inscribed as subjects in these regimes. The conclusion is, that we have to look for cracks in the wall and insist on collaborative research because it is it the process of “being in relation that forms...

  16. Collaborative Tax Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen

    2016-01-01

    This article shows a new form of regulation within a tax administration where tax administrators abate tax evasion by nudging and motivating consumers to only purchase services from tax compliant businesses. This indirectly closes or forces tax evading businesses to change their practices, because...... their customer bases decline to commercially non-viable levels. The analysis is framed by public governance literature and argues that the regulation is an example of collaborative or interactive governance, because the tax administrators do not regulate non-compliance directly, but activate external...... implications for how tax practitioners think about collaborative and interactive regulatory initiatives. While the tax administration in the study sees the approach as effective, the analysis shows that there are a number of caveats in relation to regularity, public listing, costs and revenue focus...

  17. The Collaborative Heliophysics Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlburt, N.; Freeland, S.; Cheung, M.; Bose, P.

    2007-12-01

    The Collaborative Heliophysics Observatory (CHO) would provide a robust framework and enabling tools to fully utilize the VOs for scientific discovery and collaboration. Scientists across the realm of heliophysics would be able to create, use and share applications -- either as services using familiar tools or through intuitive workflows -- that orchestrate access to data across all virtual observatories. These applications can be shared freely knowing that proper recognition of data and processing components are acknowledged; that erroneous use of data is flagged; and that results from the analysis runs will in themselves be shared Ð all in a transparent and automatic fashion. In addition, the CHO would incorporate cross-VO models and tools to weave the various virtual observatories into a unified system. These provide starting points for interactions across the solar/heliospheric and heliospheric/magnetospheric boundaries.

  18. The Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avital, Michel; Andersson, Magnus; Nickerson, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    An economy based on the exchange of capital, assets and services between individuals has grown significantly, spurred by proliferation of internet-based platforms that allow people to share underutilized resources and trade with reasonably low transaction costs. The movement toward this economy...... of “sharing” translates into market efficiencies that bear new products, reframe established services, have positive environmental effects, and may generate overall economic growth. This emerging paradigm, entitled the collaborative economy, is disruptive to the conventional company-driven economic paradigm...... as evidenced by the large number of peer-to-peer based services that have captured impressive market shares sectors ranging from transportation and hospitality to banking and risk capital. The panel explores economic, social, and technological implications of the collaborative economy, how digital technologies...

  19. Influences on Interdisciplinary Collaboration among Social Work and Health Sciences Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Jung Lee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Interdisciplinary collaboration is an effective and satisfying way to provide health care services and learning across professions. This study aimed to explore interdisciplinary collaboration experiences amongst social work and allied health sciences graduate students and examined factors that contributed to their interdisciplinary collaboration. An interdisciplinary survey was conducted in a Mid-Atlantic public university. Analysis was conducted using hierarchical regressions from 112 health sciences and social work students. Students with positive attitudes toward interdisciplinary health care teams and part-time students compared to full-time students presented higher flexibility of interdisciplinary collaboration. Students with positive experiences of interdisciplinary collaboration demonstrated higher levels of interdependence, compared to those with no and negative experiences of interdisciplinary collaboration. Students in medicine were less likely to show interdependence, compared to those in social work. Professional disciplines and educators should put efforts in offering opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration practice and building curricula to promote positive attitudes toward interdisciplinary teamwork.

  20. EXPERIENCE WITH COLLABORATIVE DEVELOPMENT FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE FROM A PARTNER LAB PERSPECTIVE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOFF, L.T.

    2005-10-10

    Collaborative development and operation of large physics experiments is fairly common. Less common is the collaborative development or operation of accelerators. A current example of the latter is the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The SNS project was conceived as a collaborative effort between six DOE facilities. In the SNS case, the control system was also developed collaboratively. The SNS project has now moved beyond the collaborative development phase and into the phase where Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) is integrating contributions from collaborating ''partner labs'' and is beginning accelerator operations. In this paper, the author reflects on the benefits and drawbacks of the collaborative development of an accelerator control system as implemented for the SNS project from the perspective of a partner lab.

  1. EXPERIENCE WITH COLLABORATIVE DEVELOPMENT FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE FROM A PARTNER LAB PERSPECTIVE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOFF, L.T.

    2005-10-10

    Collaborative development and operation of large physics experiments is fairly common. Less common is the collaborative development or operation of accelerators. A current example of the latter is the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). The SNS project was conceived as a collaborative effort between six DOE facilities. In the SNS case, the control system was also developed collaboratively. The SNS project has now moved beyond the collaborative development phase and into the phase where Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) is integrating contributions from collaborating ''partner labs'' and is beginning accelerator operations. In this paper, the author reflects on the benefits and drawbacks of the collaborative development of an accelerator control system as implemented for the SNS project from the perspective of a partner lab.

  2. A survey of Bureau of Land Management employees on collaboration and alternative dispute resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruell, Emily W.; Burkardt, Nina; Donovan, Ryan M.

    2015-01-01

    The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has been actively expanding its capacity to work cooperatively with other agencies, Tribes, the public, and other stakeholders using collaborative and alternative dispute resolution (ADR) approaches. In 1997, the BLM created the BLM’s Collaboration and Alternative Dispute Resolution Program (Collaboration/ADR Program) to centralize, strengthen, and coordinate these efforts. Specifically, the Collaboration/ADR Program is charged with developing ADR policies; ensuring that statutory and regulatory requirements are met; and providing training, resources, and direct support for collaboration and ADR in the BLM. At the request of the Collaboration/ADR Program, the Policy Analysis and Science Assistance Branch of the U.S. Geological Survey, located in the Fort Collins Science Center, conducted an online survey of BLM employees in early 2013 to address four overarching questions: What information sources and assistance resources are BLM employees currently accessing to fill their conflict/dispute resolution and collaboration needs? 

  3. Making Collaborative Innovation Accountable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Eva

    The public sector is increasingly expected to be innovative, but the prize for a more innovative public sector might be that it becomes difficult to hold public authorities to account for their actions. The article explores the tensions between innovative and accountable governance, describes...... the foundation for these tensions in different accountability models, and suggest directions to take in analyzing the accountability of collaborative innovation processes....

  4. Collaborative Robotics Design Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-05-06

    in Multirobot Systems," IEEE Transactions on Robotics and Automation, Vol. 18, No. 5, October 2002 [3] Batavia, P., "A Survey of Collaborative... Transactions on Robotics and Automation, Vol. 18, No.5, Oct. 2002, pp 781-795. [21]Scholtz, J.C., "Human-Robot Interactions: Creating Synergistic Cyber...Parker, L.E, eds., Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2002, pp 185-193. [20] Roumeliotis, S., Bekey, G.A., "Distributed Multirobot Localization," IEEE

  5. Collaborative Public Management and Collaborative Governance: Conceptual Similarities and Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naim Kapucu

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been considerable interest among Public Administration scholars in collaborative public management and governance. However, there is a need for conceptual analysis of the two terms which share common aspects and differ essentially in scope and substance. We found that collaborative public management has a more local approach and focuses on the substance of collaboration practiced to solve societal problems and reach community goals at the organizational level. On the other hand, widely researched in management, political science, and public administration disciplines, collaborative governance has a global scope and focuses on both substance and process of collaboration in effectively solving societal problems with improved structures of nonhierarchical and decentralized institutions and mechanisms of citizen participation both through partnership projects and e-governance tools. The paper contributes to the better understanding of collaborative public management and collaborative governance with implications for both future research and practice.

  6. Monthly energy review, November 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  7. Natural gas monthly, February 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  8. Monthly energy review: April 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This monthly report presents an overview of energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. A section is also included on international energy. The feature paper which is included each month is entitled ``Energy equipment choices: Fuel costs and other determinants.`` 37 figs., 59 tabs.

  9. ULTRAPLATE 30 month management report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jens Dahl

    2003-01-01

    In the period from month 24 to month 30 focus has been on the work-package 3 activities concerning optimisation of the newly developed ULTRAPLATE technology towards specific industrial applications. Three main application areas have been pursued: 1) High- speed plating of lead free solder contact...

  10. Your Baby's Growth: 5 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Be Smart About Social Media Your Baby's Growth: 5 Months KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Baby's Growth: 5 Months Print A A A What's in ... your child's birth, the doctor has been recording growth in weight, length, and head size (circumference) during ...

  11. Monthly energy review, November 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 91 tabs.

  12. Natural gas monthly, November 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  13. Natural gas monthly, January 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  14. Monthly energy review, October 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  15. Monthly energy review, June 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 36 figs., 61 tabs.

  16. Monthly energy review, May 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  17. Monthly energy review, January 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-01-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 61 tabs.

  18. Monthly energy review, February 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-02-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 73 tabs.

  19. Monthly energy review, March 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs., 74 tabs.

  20. Natural gas monthly, December 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. 6 figs., 28 tabs.

  1. Left behind by Birth Month

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solli, Ingeborg Foldøy

    2017-01-01

    Utilizing comprehensive administrative data from Norway I investigate long-term birth month effects. I demonstrate that the oldest children in class have a substantially higher GPA than their younger peers. The birth month differences are larger for low-SES children. Furthermore, I find that the youngest children in class are lagging significantly…

  2. Monthly Energy Review, February 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-26

    This monthly publication presents an overview of EIA`s recent monthly energy statistics, covering the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. Two brief descriptions (`energy plugs`) on two EIA publications are presented at the start.

  3. Haida Months of the Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogo, Robert

    Students are introduced to Haida vocabulary in this booklet which briefly describes the seasons and traditional seasonal activities of Southeastern Alaska Natives. The first section lists the months in English and Haida; e.g., January is "Taan Kungaay," or "Bear Hunting Month." The second section contains seasonal names in…

  4. Monthly energy review, November 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-11-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 75 tabs.

  5. Monthly energy review, July 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    The Monthly Energy Review (MER) presents an overview of the Energy Information Administration`s recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of US production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, and nuclear energy. Also included are international energy and thermal and metric conversion factors. 37 figs. 73 tabs.

  6. Supply Chain Coordination with Sales Effort Effects and Impact of Loss Aversion on Effort Decision

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUO Hansheng; WANG Jingchun; JIN Yihui

    2005-01-01

    A new supply contract based on sharing the sales profits as well as the cost of effort was developed to coordinate the supply chain with sales effort effects. The contract coordinates the supplier's actions with voluntary compliance; the contract is symmetric in the sense that both the supplier's and retailer's profits are linearly correlated and is more easily implemented in some situations. The impact of the retailer's loss aversion on his effort is investigated based on the contract. After characterizing the retailer's optimal solutions, this paper demonstrates that contrary to intuition, loss aversion weakens incentives for retailer's sales effort and the retailer's optimal effort decreases as the loss aversion increases.

  7. Productive and ineffective efforts: how student effort in high school mathematics relates to college calculus success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, M. D.; Sonnert, G.; Sadler, P. M.

    2014-10-01

    Relativizing the popular belief that student effort is the key to success, this article finds that effort in the most advanced mathematics course in US high schools is not consistently associated with college calculus performance. We distinguish two types of student effort: productive and ineffective efforts. Whereas the former carries the commonly expected benefits, the latter is associated with negative consequences. Time spent reading the course text in US high schools was negatively related to college calculus performance. Daily study time, however, was found to be either a productive or an ineffective effort, depending on the level of high school mathematics course and the student's performance in it.

  8. Collaborative exams: Cheating? Or learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyewon; Lasry, Nathaniel; Miller, Kelly; Mazur, Eric

    2017-03-01

    Virtually all human activity involves collaboration, and yet, collaboration during an examination is typically considered cheating. Collaborative assessments have not been widely adopted because of the perceived lack of individual accountability and the notion that collaboration during assessments simply causes propagation of correct answers. Hence, collaboration could help weaker students without providing much benefit to stronger students. In this paper, we examine student performance in open-ended, two-stage collaborative assessments comprised of an individually accountable round followed by an automatically scored, collaborative round. We show that collaboration entails more than just propagation of correct answers. We find greater rates of correct answers after collaboration for all students, including the strongest members of a team. We also find that half of teams that begin without a correct answer to propagate still obtain the correct answer in the collaborative round. Our findings, combined with the convenience of automatic feedback and grading of open-ended questions, provide a strong argument for adopting collaborative assessments as an integral part of education.

  9. NASA HRP Plans for Collaboration at the IBMP Ground-Based Experimental Facility (NEK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, Ronita L.

    2016-01-01

    NASA and IBMP are planning research collaborations using the IBMP Ground-based Experimental Facility (NEK). The NEK offers unique capabilities to study the effects of isolation on behavioral health and performance as it relates to spaceflight. The NEK is comprised of multiple interconnected modules that range in size from 50-250m(sup3). Modules can be included or excluded in a given mission allowing for flexibility of platform design. The NEK complex includes a Mission Control Center for communications and monitoring of crew members. In an effort to begin these collaborations, a 2-week mission is planned for 2017. In this mission, scientific studies will be conducted to assess facility capabilities in preparation for longer duration missions. A second follow-on 2-week mission may be planned for early in 2018. In future years, long duration missions of 4, 8 and 12 months are being considered. Missions will include scenarios that simulate for example, transit to and from asteroids, the moon, or other interplanetary travel. Mission operations will be structured to include stressors such as, high workloads, communication delays, and sleep deprivation. Studies completed at the NEK will support International Space Station expeditions, and future exploration missions. Topics studied will include communication, crew autonomy, cultural diversity, human factors, and medical capabilities.

  10. Vocal effort and voice handicap among teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, Márcio Cardoso; dos Reis, Eduardo José Farias Borges; Carvalho, Fernando Martins; Porto, Lauro Antonio; Araújo, Tânia Maria

    2012-11-01

    The relationship between voice handicap and professional vocal effort was investigated among teachers in a cross-sectional study of census nature on 4496 teachers within the public elementary education network in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. Voice handicap (the outcome of interest) was evaluated using the Voice Handicap Index 10. The main exposure, the lifetime vocal effort index, was obtained as the product of the number of years working as a teacher multiplied by the mean weekly working hours. The prevalence of voice handicap was 28.8% among teachers with high professional vocal effort and 21.3% among those with acceptable vocal effort, thus yielding a crude prevalence ratio (PR) of 1.36 (95% confidence interval [CI]=1.14-1.61). In the final logistic model, the prevalence of voice handicap was statistically associated with the professional vocal effort index (PR=1.47; 95% CI=1.19-1.82), adjusted according to sex, microphone availability in the classroom, excessive noise, pressure from the school management, heartburn, and rhinitis.

  11. 78 FR 26219 - National Foster Care Month, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ...;#0; ] Proclamation 8968 of April 30, 2013 National Foster Care Month, 2013 By the President of the.... Thanks to those efforts, the number of young people in foster care is falling and fewer children are... services that strengthen the foster care system and encourage adoption. We will keep working to ensure...

  12. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for October 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1956-11-21

    The October, 1956 monthly report for the Chemical Processing Department of the Hanford Atomic Products Operation includes information regarding research and engineering efforts with respect to the Purex and Redox process technology. Also discussed is the production operation, finished product operation, power and general maintenance, financial operation, engineering and research operations, and employee operation. (MB)

  13. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for December 1956

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1957-01-21

    The December, 1956 monthly report for the Chemical Processing Department of Hanford Atomic Products Operation includes information regarding research and engineering efforts with respect to the Purex and Redox process technology. Also discussed is the production operation, finished product operation, power and general maintenance, financial operation, engineering and research operations, and employee operations. (MB)

  14. Chemical Processing Department monthly report for September 1958

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1958-10-22

    The September, 1958 monthly report for the Chemical Processing Department of the Hanford Atomic Products Operation includes information regarding research and engineering efforts with respect to the Purex and Redox process technology. Also discussed is the production operation, finished product operation, power and general maintenance, financial operation, engineering and research operations, and employee operation. (MB)

  15. Natural gas monthly, May 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is ``Restructuring energy industries: Lessons from natural gas.`` 6 figs., 26 tabs.

  16. Natural gas monthly, June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The feature article this month is the executive summary from Natural Gas 1994: Issues and Trends. 6 figs., 31 tabs.

  17. Natural gas monthly, January 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The featured article for this month is on US coalbed methane production.

  18. Natural gas monthly, December 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The Natural Gas Monthly highlights activities, events, and analyses of interest to public and private sector organizations associated with the natural gas industry. Volume and price data are presented each month for natural gas production, distribution, consumption, and interstate pipeline activities. Producer-related activities and underground storage data are also reported. From time to time, the NGM features articles designed to assist readers in using and interpreting natural gas information. The article this month is entitled ``Recent Trends in Natural Gas Spot Prices.`` 6 figs., 27 tabs.

  19. Pride and Prejudice – Identity and Collaboration in Construction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thuesen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Based on an 18 month ethnographic case study of a construction partnering project, the paper adopts practice based theory for understanding the identity formation and practices of collaboration in construction. Drawing upon practice based theory in general and actor network theory and communities...... practices – enabling and inhibiting collaboration. Pride and prejudice are thus central constitutive elements of present construction practices in the formation of identity and development of collaboration processes........ Overtime they learn to behave competently at the boundaries between professions forming their identity and a sense of belonging in relation to an institutionalized role and the realization of the physical building. In this process the actors develop “pride” in terms of authorship of the physical building...... and membership their profession. However another consequence of these learning processes is the development of prejudices. Prejudices are often viewed as a negative aspect of building processes as it hinders collaboration among the professions. Consequently prejudices is often seen as something which should...

  20. ICT as a tool for collaboration in the classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Jacob; Georgsen, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents data and results from a study on collaboration and self-directed learning in two second year-classes in a Danish school. Learners at ages eight and nine use interactive screens as a learning tool, and more than 150 hours of video data have been collected from the classrooms over...... a period of ten months. Through detailed inspection of video data, patterns of interaction and ways of collaborating are analysed. Analyses show that the participation patterns of the young learners are crucial to their learning outcome, and also that the role and actions of the teacher are decisive...... factors in the successful employment of this specific learning design. This paper presents examples of detailed analyses of parts of the data material. Among other things, findings include that collaboration between learners have gender issues, and that addressing topics such as collaborative...

  1. Optimal Work Effort and Monitoring Cost

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Todorova

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Using a simple job market equilibrium model we study the relationship between work effort and monitoring by firms. Some other determinants of work effort investigated include the educational level of the worker, the minimum or start-up salary as well as the economic conjuncture. As common logic dictates, optimal work effort increases with the amount of monitoring done by the employer. Quite contrary to common logic, though, we find that at the optimum employers observe and control good workers much more stringently and meticulously than poor workers. This is because under profit maximization most of the employer’s profit and surplus result from good workers and he risks losing a large amount of profit by not observing those. Managers monitor strictly more productive workers, fast learners and those starting at a higher autonomous level of monitoring, as those contribute more substantially to the firm’s profit.

  2. Examining Requirements Change Rework Effort: A Study

    CERN Document Server

    Chua, Bee Bee; 10.5121/ijsea.2010.1304

    2010-01-01

    Although software managers are generally good at new project estimation, their experience of scheduling rework tends to be poor. Inconsistent or incorrect effort estimation can increase the risk that the completion time for a project will be problematic. To continually alter software maintenance schedules during software maintenance is a daunting task. Our proposed framework, validated in a case study confirms that the variables resulting from requirements changes suffer from a number of problems, e.g., the coding used, end user involvement and user documentation. Our results clearly show a significant impact on rework effort as a result of unexpected errors that correlate with 1) weak characteristics and attributes as described in the program's source lines of code, especially in data declarations and data statements, 2) lack of communication between developers and users on a change effects, and 3) unavailability of user documentation. To keep rework effort under control, new criteria in change request forms...

  3. Teacher Collaboration Praxis: Conflicts, Borders, and Ideologies From a Micropolitical Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Keranen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper looks at a feature of teacher collaboration within Achinstein’s (2002 micropolitics of collaboration but from an intrapersonal perspective. Results discussed feature issues of conflict, borders, and ideologies within each participating teacher rather than between teachers. Unresolved or unacknowledged intrapersonal conflict might lead to interpersonal conflict of the type that does not enrich collaborative efforts. Findings from this study reveal that participating teachers did experience intrapersonal conflicts that fit within Achinstein’s micropolitical framework. These intrapersonal conflicts were not regarded as aberrant or pathological behavior, but as a natural effect of collaboration and growth.

  4. International Collaboration on CO2 Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter H. Israelsson; E. Eric Adams

    2007-06-30

    On December 4, 1997, the US Department of Energy (USDOE), the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization of Japan (NEDO), and the Norwegian Research Council (NRC) entered into a Project Agreement for International Collaboration on CO{sub 2} Ocean Sequestration. Government organizations from Japan, Canada, and Australia, and a Swiss/Swedish engineering firm later joined the agreement, which outlined a research strategy for ocean carbon sequestration via direct injection. The members agreed to an initial field experiment, with the hope that if the initial experiment was successful, there would be subsequent field evaluations of increasingly larger scale to evaluate environmental impacts of sequestration and the potential for commercialization. The evolution of the collaborative effort, the supporting research, and results for the International Collaboration on CO{sub 2} Ocean Sequestration were documented in almost 100 papers and reports, including 18 peer-reviewed journal articles, 46 papers, 28 reports, and 4 graduate theses. These efforts were summarized in our project report issued January 2005 and covering the period August 23, 1998-October 23, 2004. An accompanying CD contained electronic copies of all the papers and reports. This report focuses on results of a two-year sub-task to update an environmental assessment of acute marine impacts resulting from direct ocean sequestration. The approach is based on the work of Auerbach et al. [6] and Caulfield et al. [20] to assess mortality to zooplankton, but uses updated information concerning bioassays, an updated modeling approach and three modified injection scenarios: a point release of negatively buoyant solid CO{sub 2} hydrate particles from a moving ship; a long, bottom-mounted diffuser discharging buoyant liquid CO{sub 2} droplets; and a stationary point release of hydrate particles forming a sinking plume. Results suggest that in particular the first two discharge modes could be

  5. Collaborative editing within the pervasive collaborative computing environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, Marcia [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Agarwal, Deb [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-09-11

    Scientific collaborations are established for a wide variety of tasks for which several communication modes are necessary, including messaging, file-sharing, and collaborative editing. In this position paper, we describe our work on the Pervasive Collaborative Computing Environment (PCCE) which aims to facilitate scientific collaboration within widely distributed environments. The PCCE provides a persistent space in which collaborators can locate each other, exchange messages synchronously and asynchronously and archive conversations. Our current interest is in exploring research and development of shared editing systems with the goal of integrating this technology into the PCCE. We hope to inspire discussion of technology solutions for an integrated approach to synchronous and asynchronous communication and collaborative editing.

  6. Collaboratively Constructed Contradictory Accounts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tunby Gulbrandsen, Ib; Just, Sine Nørholm

    2013-01-01

    the theoretical and methodological implications of the empirical findings. It is argued that although the findings are not in themselves surprising, they adequately reflect that online meaning formation is, indeed, a collaborative process in which centrifugal forces have centripetal consequences. Furthermore......Based on a mixed-method case study of online communication about the Danish pharmaceutical company Novo Nordisk, this article argues that online communication plays out as a centrifugal narration process with centripetal consequences. Through a content analysis of communication about Novo Nordisk...

  7. Blade reliability collaborative :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashwill, Thomas D.; Ogilvie, Alistair B.; Paquette, Joshua A.

    2013-04-01

    The Blade Reliability Collaborative (BRC) was started by the Wind Energy Technologies Department of Sandia National Laboratories and DOE in 2010 with the goal of gaining insight into planned and unplanned O&M issues associated with wind turbine blades. A significant part of BRC is the Blade Defect, Damage and Repair Survey task, which will gather data from blade manufacturers, service companies, operators and prior studies to determine details about the largest sources of blade unreliability. This report summarizes the initial findings from this work.

  8. Advances in Collaborative Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koren, Yehuda; Bell, Robert

    The collaborative filtering (CF) approach to recommenders has recently enjoyed much interest and progress. The fact that it played a central role within the recently completed Netflix competition has contributed to its popularity. This chapter surveys the recent progress in the field. Matrix factorization techniques, which became a first choice for implementing CF, are described together with recent innovations. We also describe several extensions that bring competitive accuracy into neighborhood methods, which used to dominate the field. The chapter demonstrates how to utilize temporal models and implicit feedback to extend models accuracy. In passing, we include detailed descriptions of some the central methods developed for tackling the challenge of the Netflix Prize competition.

  9. Collaboration or contestation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Middleton, Geoff; Evans, Adam Brian; Henderson, Hannah;

    2016-01-01

    -agency approach. The strength of health promotion initiatives relies on formed ‘coalitions’ or partnerships and the subsequent collaboration in the design, delivery and administration of the programme’s multiple components. Advantages of partnership are the pooling of resources, avoiding duplication...... and potentially understanding the social context more holistically given the engagement of stakeholders’ from different perspectives. Despite best intentions, these large community-based programmes are not without difficulties and recent literature exposes stakeholder concerns particularly in relation...... in the administration of community-based obesity prevention programmes should carefully consider the components which lead to facilitation of efficiency in the capacity building process discussed in this commentary....

  10. The Efficient Windows Collaborative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petermann, Nils

    2006-03-31

    The Efficient Windows Collaborative (EWC) is a coalition of manufacturers, component suppliers, government agencies, research institutions, and others who partner to expand the market for energy efficient window products. Funded through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy, the EWC provides education, communication and outreach in order to transform the residential window market to 70% energy efficient products by 2005. Implementation of the EWC is managed by the Alliance to Save Energy, with support from the University of Minnesota and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  11. Monitoring, Operational Manager Efforts and Inventory Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Alfaro, J A; Tribó, J. (Josep)

    2003-01-01

    Operations managers are becoming more important in modern corporations. They do not only care on firms’ inventory management but also they are involved in firms’ strategic decisions. Within this setting we ask about the consequences in the inventory policy of this new role undertaken by these managers. To do so, we develop a model where a firm’s Operations Manager can devote some efforts to develop non-inventory related activities. These efforts, although non-verifiable, may be known with a c...

  12. Collaborative architectural design management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sebastian, R.; Prins, M.

    2008-01-01

    A building project goes through a long process from project conception to realisation, handover, and operation, and involves a large number of people and organisations. As a project becomes more complex, more teams of specialists are required to combine their effort with considerable enthusiasm and

  13. National High Frequency Radar Network (hfrnet) and Pacific Research Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazard, L.; Terrill, E. J.; Cook, T.; de Paolo, T.; Otero, M. P.; Rogowski, P.; Schramek, T. A.

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. High Frequency Radar Network (HFRNet) has been in operation for over ten years with representation from 31 organizations spanning academic institutions, state and local government agencies, and private organizations. HFRNet currently holds a collection from over 130 radar installations totaling over 10 million records of surface ocean velocity measurements. HFRNet is a primary example of inter-agency and inter-institutional partnerships for improving oceanographic research and operations. HF radar derived surface currents have been used in several societal applications including coastal search and rescue, oil spill response, water quality monitoring and marine navigation. Central to the operational success of the large scale network is an efficient data management, storage, access, and delivery system. The networking of surface current mapping systems is characterized by a tiered structure that extends from the individual field installations to local regional operations maintaining multiple sites and on to centralized locations aggregating data from all regions. The data system development effort focuses on building robust data communications from remote field locations (sites) for ingestion into the data system via data on-ramps (Portals or Site Aggregators) to centralized data repositories (Nodes). Centralized surface current data enables the aggregation of national surface current grids and allows for ingestion into displays, management tools, and models. The Coastal Observing Research and Development Center has been involved in international relationships and research in the Philippines, Palau, and Vietnam. CORDC extends this IT architecture of surface current mapping data systems leveraging existing developments and furthering standardization of data services for seamless integration of higher level applications. Collaborations include the Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA), The Coral Reef Research

  14. US Monthly Pilot Balloon Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Monthly winds aloft summary forms summarizing Pilot Balloon observational data for the United States. Generally labeled as Form 1114, and then transitioning to Form...

  15. Monthly energy review, August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-26

    This publication presents information for the month of August, 1993 on the following: Energy overview; energy consumption; petroleum; natural gas; oil and gas resource development; coal; electricity; nuclear energy; energy prices, and international energy.

  16. Monthly Energy Review, July 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1992-07-27

    The Monthly Energy Review is prepared by the Energy Information Administration. Topics discussed include: Energy Overview, Energy Consumption, Petroleum, Natural Gas, Oil and Gas Resource Development, Coal, Electricity, Nuclear Energy, Energy Prices, International Energy. (VC)

  17. Monthly energy review, July 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    This document presents an overview of recent monthly energy statistics. Activities covered include: U.S. production, consumption, trade, stock, and prices for petroleum, coal, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear energy.

  18. Monthly energy review, August 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This report presents an overview of recent monthly energy statistics. The statistics cover the major activities of U.S. production, consumption, trade, stocks, and prices for petroleum, coal, natural gas, electricity, and nuclear energy.

  19. Monthly energy review, August 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-08-26

    This publication presents information for the month of August, 1993 on the following: Energy overview; energy consumption; petroleum; natural gas; oil and gas resource development; coal; electricity; nuclear energy; energy prices, and international energy.

  20. Your Child's Development: 15 Months

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Child Too Busy? Helping Your Child Adjust to Preschool School Lunches Kids and Food: 10 Tips for Parents Healthy Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet Your Child's Development: 15 Months KidsHealth > For Parents > Your Child's Development: ...