WorldWideScience

Sample records for monterey ca campus

  1. 78 FR 45964 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Monterey Museum of Art, Monterey, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Monterey Museum of Art, Monterey, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Monterey Museum of Art, in... cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of objects of cultural patrimony....

  2. 33 CFR 80.1134 - Monterey Harbor, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monterey Harbor, CA. 80.1134 Section 80.1134 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1134 Monterey Harbor, CA. A line drawn...

  3. 76 FR 47237 - Notice of Realty Action: Direct Sale of Public Land in Monterey County, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-04

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Realty Action: Direct Sale of Public Land in Monterey County, CA... normal business hours. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The following public land is proposed for direct sale... appraised fair market value of $25,000. DATES: Written comments regarding the proposed sale must be...

  4. Marine debris in central California: quantifying type and abundance of beach litter in Monterey Bay, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosevelt, C; Los Huertos, M; Garza, C; Nevins, H M

    2013-06-15

    Monitoring beach litter is essential for reducing ecological threats towards humans and wildlife. In Monterey Bay, CA information on seasonal and spatial patterns is understudied. Central California's coastal managers require reliable information on debris abundance, distribution, and type, to support policy aimed at reducing litter. We developed a survey method that allowed for trained citizen scientists to quantify the types and abundance of beach litter. Sampling occurred from July 2009-June 2010. Litter abundance ranged from 0.03 to 17.1 items m(-2). Using a mixed model approach, we found season and location have the greatest effect on litter abundance. Styrofoam, the most numerically abundant item, made up 41% of the total amount of litter. Unexpected items included fertilizer pellets. The results of this study provide a baseline on the types and abundance of litter on the central coast and have directly supported policy banning Styrofoam take out containers from local municipalities.

  5. Application of the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean to Phytoplankton Ecology Studies in Monterey Bay, CA, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a demonstrator for technologies for the next generation of ocean color sensors, the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO provides enhanced spatial and spectral resolution that is required to understand optically complex aquatic environments. In this study we apply HICO, along with satellite remote sensing and in situ observations, to studies of phytoplankton ecology in a dynamic coastal upwelling environment—Monterey Bay, CA, USA. From a spring 2011 study, we examine HICO-detected spatial patterns in phytoplankton optical properties along an environmental gradient defined by upwelling flow patterns and along a temporal gradient of upwelling intensification. From a fall 2011 study, we use HICO’s enhanced spatial and spectral resolution to distinguish a small-scale “red tide” bloom, and we examine bloom expansion and its supporting processes using other remote sensing and in situ data. From a spectacular HICO image of the Monterey Bay region acquired during fall of 2012, we present a suite of algorithm results for characterization of phytoplankton, and we examine the strengths, limitations, and distinctions of each algorithm in the context of the enhanced spatial and spectral resolution.

  6. Evaluating the Addition of a Dinoflagellate Phytoplankton Functional Type Using Radiance Anomalies for Monterey Bay, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houskeeper, H. F.; Kudela, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    Ocean color sensors have enabled daily, global monitoring of phytoplankton productivity in the world's oceans. However, to observe key structures such as food webs, or to identify regime shifts of dominant species, tools capable of distinguishing between phytoplankton functional types using satellite remote sensing reflectance are necessary. One such tool developed by Alvain et al. (2005), PHYSAT, successfully linked four phytoplankton functional types to chlorophyll-normalized remote sensing spectra, or radiance anomalies, in case-1 waters. Yet this tool was unable to characterize dinoflagellates because of their ubiquitous background presence in the open ocean. We employ a radiance anomaly technique based on PHYSAT to target phytoplankton functional types in Monterey Bay, a region where dinoflagellate populations are larger and more variable than in open ocean waters, and thus where they may be viable targets for satellite remote sensing characterization. We compare with an existing Santa Cruz Wharf photo-pigment time series spanning from 2006 to the present to regionally ground-truth the method's predictions, and we assess its accuracy in characterizing dinoflagellates, a phytoplankton group that impacts the region's fish stocks and water quality. For example, an increase in dinoflagellate abundance beginning in 2005 led to declines in commercially important fish stocks that persisted throughout the following year. Certain species of dinoflagellates in Monterey Bay are also responsible for some of the harmful algal bloom events that negatively impact the shellfish industry. Moving toward better tools to characterize phytoplankton blooms is important for understanding ecosystem shifts, as well as protecting human health in the surrounding areas.

  7. Seasonal Dynamics of Particle-Associated Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea in Monterey Bay, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, D. R.; Tolar, B. B.; Francis, C.

    2016-12-01

    Within the past decade, significant research has shed light on key players within the nitrogen cycle. Ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) were discovered and found to be more abundant than ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria in marine systems, and therefore play a vital role in ammonia oxidation, the rate-limiting step in nitrification that converts NH3 to NO2-. Here we investigated seasonal dynamics of particle-associated (> 10 µm) AOA within Monterey Bay at Station M1 over a year-long sampling period from May 2015 to February 2016. We used quantitative PCR to amplify the archaeal amoA gene and collect data on the abundance of this gene at various depths (5-500 m). Our results indicate that particle-associated AOA are found throughout the upper water column in Monterey Bay, with archaeal amoA gene abundances ranging from 3.9 x 101 to 1.0 x 104 copies/L, with an average of 1.7 x 103 copies/L. Seasonal trends indicate that gene abundance is higher during the winter than in summer. We also quantified `shallow' versus `deep' ecotypes of water column AOA (WCA and WCB, respectively. These data will be compared to environmental data (temperature, salinity, chlorophyll a, etc.) collected during sampling. In comparison to the 0.2µm samples analyzed (mean = 2.2 x 107 copies/L; range = 2.4 x 104 to 1.1 x 108 copies/L), particle-associated archaeal amoA genes were on average 0.01% of the 0.2-10 µm size fraction. Although relatively small, the combined total abundance between the two size fractions may lead to additional correlations. Overall, particle-associated AOA may be important indicators of changing environmental conditions and provide seasonal context into abundance and distribution of these AOA. We also suggest that it may be a useful practice to analyze prefilters for AOA, as particle-associated AOA may contribute significantly to gene abundance estimates and possibly correlations with nitrification rates.

  8. Monterey Pop

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Der ästhetisch ambitionierte und kommerziell erfolgreiche Dylanfilm DONT LOOK BACK, den Pennebaker 1967 produziert hatte, machte die Produzenten des First International Monterey Pop Festivals auf den Dokumentaristen aus der Direct-Cinema-Gruppe um Robert Drew aufmerksam. Allerdings hatte er noch nie einen wirklichen Konzertfilm gemacht – in DONT LOOK BACK lag der thematische Schwerpunkt auf Dylan und nicht auf seiner Musik –, geschweige denn ein ganzes Festival verfilmt. In MONTEREY POP lässt...

  9. monterey_ca.grd

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NGDC builds and distributes high-resolution, coastal digital elevation models (DEMs) that integrate ocean bathymetry and land topography to support NOAA's mission to...

  10. Diagenetic Microcrystalline Opal Varieties from the Monterey Formation, CA: HRTEM Study of Structures and Phase Transformation Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Sherry L.; Wenk, H.-R.; DeVincenzi, Don (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Microcrystalline opal varieties form as intermediary precipitates during the diagenetic transformation of biogenically precipitated non-crystalline opal (opal-A) to microquartz. With regard to the Monterey Formation of California, X-ray powder diffraction studies have shown that a decrease in the primary d-spacing of opal-CT toward that of cristobalite occurs with increasing diagenesis. The initial timing of opal-CT/quartz formation and the value of the primary opal-CT d-spacing, are influenced by the sediment. lithology. Transmission electron microscopy methods (CTEM/HRTEM) were used to investigate the structure of the diagenetic phases and establish transformation mechanisms between the varieties of microcrystalline opals in charts and porcelanites from the Monterey Formation. HRTEM images revealed that the most common fibrous varieties of microcrystalline opals contain varying amounts of structural disorder. Finite lamellar units of cristobalite-and tridymite-type. layer sequences were found to be randomly stacked in a direction perpendicular to the fiber axis. Disordered and ordered fibers were found to have coprecipitated within the same radial fiber bundles that formed within the matrix of the Most siliceous samples. HRTEM images, which reveal that the fibers within radial and lepispheric fiber bundles branch non-crystallographically, support an earlier proposal that microspheres in chert grow via a spherulitic growth mechanism. A less common variety of opal-CT was found to be characterized by non-parallel (low-angle) stacking sequences that often contain twinned lamellae. Tabular-shaped crystals of orthorhombic tridymite (PO-2) were also identified in the porcelanite samples. A shift in the primary d-spacing of opal-CT has been interpreted as an indication of solid-state ordering g toward a predominantly cristobalite structure, (opal-C). Domains of opal-C were identified as topotactically-oriented overgrowths on discrete Sections of opal-CT fibers and as

  11. Sediment Dynamics and the Burial and Exhumation of Bedrock Reefs as Elucidated by High-resolution Repetitive Sonar Surveys: Northern Monterey Bay, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, C. D.; Fregoso, T. A.; Golden, N. E.; Finlayson, D. P.

    2011-12-01

    Two high-resolution bathymetric and acoustic backscatter sonar surveys were conducted along the energetic emergent inner shelf of northern Monterey Bay, CA, USA, in the fall of 2005 and the spring of 2006 to determine the impact of winter storm waves, beach erosion, and river floods on biologically-important bedrock reef habitats. The surveys extended from water depths of 4 m to 22 m and covered an area of 3.14 km2, of which 45.8% was bedrock, gravel, and coarse-grained sand and 54.2% was fine-grained sand. Our analysis of the bathymetric and acoustic backscatter data demonstrates that during the 6 months between surveys, 11.4% of the study area was buried by fine-grained sand while erosion exposed of bedrock or coarse-grained sand over 26.5% of the study area. The probability of burial decreased with increasing water depth and rugosity; the probability of exhumation increased with increasing seabed slope and rugosity. Much of the detected change was at the boundary between bedrock and unconsolidated sediment due to burial or exhumation of bedrock. In a number of cases, however, the change in seabed character was apparently due to fluctuations in sediment grain size, where scour exposed what appeared to be an underlying coarser-grained lag or fine-grained sand buried coarser-grained sand. These findings suggest that, in some places, (a) single acoustic surveys typically employed for geologic characterization and/or habitat mapping may not adequately characterize the geomorphology and sedimentologic nature of rocky, energetic inner shelves, and (b) burial and exhumation likely play a role in the life history of the numerous organisms that inhabit these reefs and thus information on the frequency and magnitude of such processes may better constrain our understanding of physical controls on benthic species' distribution patterns.

  12. Sediment dynamics and the burial and exhumation of bedrock reefs along an emergent coastline as elucidated by repetitive sonar surveys: Northern Monterey Bay, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, C.D.; Fregoso, T.A.; Golden, N.E.; Finlayson, D.P.

    2011-01-01

    Two high-resolution bathymetric and acoustic backscatter sonar surveys were conducted along the energetic emergent inner shelf of northern Monterey Bay, CA, USA, in the fall of 2005 and the spring of 2006 to determine the impact of winter storm waves, beach erosion, and river floods on biologically-important siliclastic bedrock reef habitats. The surveys extended from water depths of 4 m to 22 m and covered an area of 3.14 km2, 45.8% of which was bedrock, gravel, and coarse-grained sand and 54.2% was fine-grained sand. Our analyses of the bathymetric and acoustic backscatter data demonstrates that during the 6 months between surveys, 11.4% of the study area was buried by fine-grained sand while erosion resulted in the exposure of bedrock or coarse-grained sand over 26.5% of the study area. The probability of burial decreased with increasing water depth and rugosity; the probability of exhumation increased with increasing wave-induced near-bed shear stress, seabed slope and rugosity. Much of the detected change was at the boundary between bedrock and unconsolidated sediment due to sedimentation and erosion burying or exhuming bedrock, respectively. In a number of cases, however, the change in seabed character was apparently due to changes in sediment grain size when scour exposed what appeared to be an underlying coarser-grained lag or the burial of coarser-grained sand and gravel by fine-grained sand. These findings suggest that, in some places, (a) burial and exhumation of nearshore bedrock reefs along rocky, energetic inner shelves occurs over seasonal timescales and appears related to intrinsic factors such as seabed morphology and extrinsic factors such as wave forces, and (b) single acoustic surveys typically employed for geologic characterization and/or habitat mapping may not adequately characterize the geomorphologic and sedimentologic nature of these types of environments that typify most of the Pacific Ocean and up to 50% of the world's coastlines.

  13. Monterey MRWPCA Interceptor Pipeline 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Monterey Interceptor between Seaside Pump Station and Monterey Beach Resort is buried in the dunes, approximately 100 to 175 feet from the dune bluff. Between...

  14. Monterey MRWPCA Interceptor Pipeline 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Monterey Interceptor between Seaside Pump Station and Monterey Beach Resort is buried in the dunes, approximately 100 to 175 feet from the dune bluff. Between...

  15. Long-term, High Frequency, High Precision pH Measurements on the MBARI deep-water FOCE Experiment at the MARS Cabled Observatory in Monterey Bay, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, E. T.; Maughan, T.; Barry, J. P.; Brewer, P. G.; Headley, K. L.; Herlien, R.; Kirkwood, W. J.; Matsumoto, G. I.; O'Reilly, T. C.; Salamy, K. A.; Scholfield, J.; Shane, F. F.; Walz, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    The MBARI deep-water FOCE experiment was deployed on the MARS cabled observatory in Monterey Bay on May 4th, 2011. It has been in continuous operation (excluding a few minor shore based power outages) ever since. During the fifteen months of deployment, we have been able to observe both the daily variation in pH in response to water mass movements associated with the semi-diurnal tides, internal waves and longer-term trends as a function of the seasonal variations in the water masses within the Monterey Bay Canyon. Our experimental site is located at 890 meters, just below the oxygen minimum for Monterey Bay, and we clearly see the anticipated inverse correlation between seawater temperature and pH. Daily variation in pH is on the order of 0.020-0.030 pH units with longer term trends adding an additional variation of similar magnitude. Instrumentation on this experiment included two CTDs with oxygen sensors (Sea-Bird 52). One CTD is mounted on the external FOCE framework to measure the background conditions, and one CTD is installed within the FOCE pH control area to monitor the experimentally manipulated conditions. In addition, 6 MBARI modified Sea-Bird 18 pH sensors were mounted on the FOCE apparatus. Four of these pH sensors monitored pH inside the experimental chamber and two monitored the external background seawater conditions. Although we originally intended to conduct several in situ CO2 enrichment experiments to study the impact of ocean acidification on the benthic biology and then recover the apparatus after one year, unanticipated changes in the ship schedule have left the FOCE experiment in place for nearly fifteen months at the time of this writing. Throughout this time period, all sensor data has been logged by the MBARI Shore-Side Data System (SSDS) resulting in the longest continuous record of high precision pH measurements in the intermediate water column. We present an analysis of the data obtained from this unique data set, and discuss our in

  16. Southern Monterey Bay Littoral Cell CRSMP CEMEX Mine Dredge Pond 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Location of the CEMEX mine dredge pond at Lapis Sand Plant, Marina, CA. Southern Monterey Bay has been the most intensively mined shoreline in the U.S. Sand mining...

  17. Southern Monterey Bay Littoral Cell CRSMP CEMEX Mine Dredge Pond 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Location of the CEMEX mine dredge pond at Lapis Sand Plant, Marina, CA. Southern Monterey Bay has been the most intensively mined shoreline in the U.S. Sand mining...

  18. Habitat--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  19. Contours--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. The raster data file is...

  20. Habitat--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  1. Contours--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. The raster data file is...

  2. Open Campus: Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    pathways for highly trained graduates of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) academic programs, and help academic institutions...international relationships. An example is the ARL West campus in Playa Vista , CA, where staff members are recruited from Southern California to work on...engineering and mathematics (STEM) disciplines relevant to ARL science and technology programs. Under EPAs, visiting students and professors

  3. Contours--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. The raster data file is...

  4. Backscatter [5m]--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  5. Paleoshorelines--Offshore Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the paleoshorelines for the geologic and geomorphic map of Offshore Monterey, California. The vector data file is included in...

  6. Habitat--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor of the Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  7. Habitat--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor of the Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  8. Backscatter [5m]--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  9. Contours--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. The raster data file is...

  10. Empowering Entrepreneurship through Improving Campus Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgitte Woge

    2014-01-01

    Inventors an Innovators Alliance) konferencen i San Jose CA, den 21. – 23. Marts 2014 med posterpræsentationen“Empowering Entrepreneurship through Improving Campus Life......Inventors an Innovators Alliance) konferencen i San Jose CA, den 21. – 23. Marts 2014 med posterpræsentationen“Empowering Entrepreneurship through Improving Campus Life...

  11. Polarized Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Susan Resneck

    1991-01-01

    On college campuses, the climate is polarized because of intolerance and discrimination, censorship, factionalism, and anger among students and faculty. As a result, the campus is in danger of becoming dominated by political issues and discouraging the exchange of ideas characteristic of a true liberal arts education. (MSE)

  12. Geology of the Monterey Bay region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, H. Gary

    1977-01-01

    Geophysical data and sea floor samples collected from the continental shelf and slope between Ano Nuevo Point and Point Sur, California indicate that the Monterey Bay region has had a complex late Cenozoic tectonic history. Uplift and depression have produced a succession of regressive and transgressive sedimentary units, while contemporaneous right-slip along faults of the San Andreas system have offset major structural and lithologic elements. This deformation produced three regional and several local unconformities within upper Tertiary rocks and initiated development of a canyon system that today includes the Monterey, Ascension, Carmel, and other large submarine canyons. The Tertiary stratigraphy of the offshore Monterey Bay area is divided into two provinces by a major structural boundary, the north-trending Palo Colorado-San Gregorio fault zone. East of this zone in the offshore are four seismically distinct sequences that can be correlated with major sequences onshore. These sequences comprise (1) pre-Tertiary basement, and (2) middle Miocene, (3) upper Miocene to Pliocene, and (4) upper Pliocene to Holocene sedimentary intervals. Each of the latter three sequences is bounded by unconformities, as is its counterpart on land. Only Neogene sedimentary rocks are present offshore; Paleogene units, if originally present, have been removed completely by pre-middle Miocene erosion. An extensive erosional surface was cut during Zemorrian time into the late Mesozoic granitic basement rocks. Incised into this surface are the ancestral Monterey Canyon and an unnamed canyon. Marine sedimentary rocks of upper Miocene and Pliocene age overlie this unconformably and fill the unnamed canyon. Similar rocks also may have once filled Monterey Canyon. Near shore these strata are covered by terrestrial alluvial and eolian deposits, deltaic deposits, marine canyon fill, landslide and slump deposits, and unconsolidated sediments that range in age from upper Pliocene to Holocene

  13. Campus Politics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays,many college students show great enthusiasm in participating intocampus political activities,such as running for heads of the Students Union or the as sociations.Campus politics is an important part of college life.

  14. Monterey Bay Aquarium Volunteer Guide Scheduling Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    wetlands/aviary 1 24 splash zone—rocky shore, coral reef kingdom 8 play your part 25 sandy seafloor 9 wetlands/aviary 2 26 octopus/deep reef 10...The mission of the Monterey Bay Aquarium is to inspire conservation of the oceans. It does this through education outreach, exhibits, research and... conservation , and by rehabilitating injured ocean wildlife. The Aquarium has a large and diverse staff that includes aquarists, scientific divers

  15. Can Vertical Migrations of Dinoflagellates Explain Observed Bioluminescence Patterns During an Upwelling Event in Monterey Bay, California?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    transect (Figure 1). The REMUS transect began near Santa Cruz in the SA, ran out to the buoy Ml (Figure 1), and then returned back to shore. Inshore...Department, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo , California, USA. ’Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, California...University, San Luis Obispo , CA 93407, USA. M. J. Oliver, College of Earth, Ocean and Environment, University of Delaware, 700 Pilottown Rd., Lewes, DE 19958, USA. 10 of 10

  16. Faults--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is included in...

  17. Southern Monterey Bay Littoral Cell CRSMP Proposed Receiver Site 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Given the location of the critical areas of erosion and the need to avoid adverse impacts to local sensitive habitat, the Southern Monterey Bay Coastal RSM Plan...

  18. Faults--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is included in...

  19. Folds--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is included in...

  20. Southern Monterey Bay Littoral Cell CRSMP Sensitive Habitat 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — One of the most important functions of the southern Monterey Bay coastal system is its role as a habitat for a unique flora and fauna. The beaches are habitat for...

  1. Backscatter [7125]-- Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution Reson 7125 data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata describe...

  2. Backscatter [Swath]-- Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution SWATHPlus data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata describe...

  3. Isopachs--Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the isopachs for the Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California, region. The vector data file is included in...

  4. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  5. Folds--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  6. Faults--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is...

  7. Monterey Strategy Seminar: Day 1: Capabilities Based Planning.

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, James A; Pulsipher, Lashley; Zellen, Barry; Lavoy, Peter R.; Clary, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Monterey Strategy Seminar: Day 1: Capabilities Based Planning. Day 2: Dissuasion in the U.S. Defense Strategy. Day 3: Global Strike Warfare Naval Postgraduate School Center for Contemporary Conflict (CCC)

  8. Paleoshorelines--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the paleoshorelines for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is...

  9. Transgressive Contours--Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the transgressive contours for the Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California, region. The vector file is included in...

  10. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  11. Faults--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is...

  12. Folds--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  13. Sediment Thickness--Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the sediment-thickness map of the Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California, region. The raster data file is included in...

  14. Backscatter [8101]--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution Reson 8101 data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata...

  15. Monterey, California Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Monterey, California Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  16. Backscatter [Swath]-- Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution SWATHPlus data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata describe...

  17. BackscatterC [7125]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  18. Backscatter [7125]-- Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution Reson 7125 data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata describe...

  19. Isopachs--Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the isopachs for the Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California, region. The vector data file is included in...

  20. Transgressive Contours--Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the transgressive contours for the Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California, region. The vector file is included in...

  1. Sediment Thickness--Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the sediment-thickness map of the Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California, region. The raster data file is included in...

  2. Paleoshorelines--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the paleoshorelines for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is...

  3. Southern Monterey Bay Littoral Cell CRSMP Proposed Receiver Site 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Given the location of the critical areas of erosion and the need to avoid adverse impacts to local sensitive habitat, the Southern Monterey Bay Coastal RSM Plan...

  4. BackscatterB [EM300]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  5. Faults--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is included...

  6. Southern Monterey Bay Littoral Cell CRSMP Critical Erosion Sites 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — PWA and Griggs (2004) defined three risk categories to Monterey Regional Water Pollution Control Agency (MRWPCA) facilities between Marina and Wharf II. These risk...

  7. Folds--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is included in...

  8. Backscatter [8101]--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution Reson 8101 data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata...

  9. BackscatterC [7125]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  10. BackscatterB [EM300]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  11. Battle of Midway Memorial Dinner, Monterey Bay Commandery, NOUS tickets

    OpenAIRE

    Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)

    2015-01-01

    Web page capture of tickets to the Battle of Midway Memorial Dinner through Eventbrite. The Monterey Bay Commandery of the Naval Order of the United States will host the 73 Battle of Midway Dining-Out on Saturday 6 June at the Naval Support Activity, Monterey, Herrmann Hall, Naval Postgraduate School. This black-tie event is open to the all active and retired service members, military faculty, and civilians. Guests holding confirmed reservations will have gate access the evenin...

  12. MONT95C - Bathymetry contours of the southern Monterey Bay area between Moss Landing and Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The bathymetric grids and derived contours are from data collected by the USGS with a multibeam (Simrad EM1000) sidescan sonar system in the southern Monterey Bay...

  13. MONT95C - Bathymetry contours of the southern Monterey Bay area between Moss Landing and Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The bathymetric grids and derived contours are from data collected by the USGS with a multibeam (Simrad EM1000) sidescan sonar system in the southern Monterey Bay...

  14. Anchovies to Whales: tracking vertebrate biodiversity in Monterey Bay by metabarcoding environmental DNA (eDNA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closek, C. J.; Starks, H.; Walz, K.; Boehm, A. B.; Chavez, F.

    2016-12-01

    The oscillation between the dominance of Sardinops sagax (pacific sardine) and Engraulis mordax (northern anchovy) has been documented in the California Coastal Ecosystem for more than 100 years. These two species are strong drivers of trophic interactions in the region. As part of the Marine Biodiversity Observational Network (MBON) initiative, we used archived filtered seawater samples collected late-summer to mid-fall over a span of 8 years from Monterey Bay, CA to examine the change in marine vertebrate environmental DNA (eDNA). Water samples were collected from a nearshore location in Monterey Bay (C1) during the years of 2008-15. The water was then filtered, and the filter was archived at -80°C. DNA was extracted from the filters, and the 12S rRNA gene present in mitochondrial DNA was PCR amplification using primers designed to amplify 12s rRNA genes from marine vertebrates. The amplicons were subsequently sequenced with an Illumina MiSeq and the data processed using an analysis pipeline for sequence annotation. More than 20 fish genera were noted in the sequences from 2008-12, with Engraulis the dominant fish genus from 2013-15. Anchovy and Megaptera novaeangliae (humpback whale) were present in temporal patterns similar to those noted during visual observations where anchovy and humpback whale were more abundant during the years of 2013-2015 than the other years. This study demonstrates our ability to detect megafauna and fish species that are important to the Monterey Bay ecosystem from coastal water samples and determine community structural differences over time.

  15. SmartCampusAAU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rene; Thomsen, Bent; Thomsen, Lone Leth

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes SmartCampusAAU - an open, extendable platform that supports the easy creation of indoor location based systems. SmartCampusAAU offers an app and backend that can be used to enable indoor positioning and navigation in any building. The SmartCampusAAU app is available on all ma...... major mobile platforms (Android, iPhone and Windows Phone) and supports both device- and infrastructure-based positioning. SmartCampusAAU also offers a publicly available OData backend that allows researchers to share radio map and location tracking data.......This paper describes SmartCampusAAU - an open, extendable platform that supports the easy creation of indoor location based systems. SmartCampusAAU offers an app and backend that can be used to enable indoor positioning and navigation in any building. The SmartCampusAAU app is available on all...

  16. Impact of Glider Data Assimilation on the Monterey Bay Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Assimilation on the Monterey Bay Model 6. AUTHOR(S) Igor Shulman, Clark Rowley, Stephanie Anderson, Sergio DeRada, John Kindle, Paul Martin, James...Impact of glider data assimilation on the Monterey Bay model Igor Shulman3*, Clark Rowley3, Stephanie Andersona, Sergio DeRadaa, John Kindlea, Paul ...support of the AOSN-II field campaign. Deep-Sea Research II, this issue |doi:10.1016/j.dsr2.2008 08.009). Kundu. P.K.. 1976. Ekman veering observed

  17. Virtual Campus Hub technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vercoulen, Frank; Badger, Merete; Monaco, Lucio;

    This deliverable briefly describes which technological components have been delivered for the Virtual Campus Hub and how they can be used. A detailed discussion of the technical details of the components, how they were realized and how they fit the VCH concept can be found in deliverables D5.......4. Virtual Campus Hub Technology Evaluation Report and D6.7 The Virtual Campus Hub Concept....

  18. Bathymetry [5m]--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The raster data file is included in...

  19. Bathymetry [2m]--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The raster data file is included in...

  20. SmartCampusAAU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rene; Thomsen, Bent; Thomsen, Lone Leth

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes SmartCampusAAU - an open, extendable platform that supports the easy creation of indoor location based systems. SmartCampusAAU offers an app and backend that can be used to enable indoor positioning and navigation in any building. The SmartCampusAAU app is available on all ma...... major mobile platforms (Android, iPhone and Windows Phone) and supports both device- and infrastructure-based positioning. SmartCampusAAU also offers a publicly available OData backend that allows researchers to share radio map and location tracking data....

  1. Hydrocarbon geochemistry of cold seeps in the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenson, T.D.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Hostettler, F.D.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Orange, D.L.; Martin, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    Samples from four geographically and tectonically discrete cold seeps named Clam Flat, Clamfield, Horseshoe Scarp South, and Tubeworm City, within the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary were analyzed for their hydrocarbon content. The sediment contains gaseous hydrocarbons and CO2, as well as high molecular weight aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons with various combinations of thermogenic and biogenic contributions from petroleum, marine, and terrigenous sources. Of particular interest is the cold seep site at Clamfield which is characterized by the presence of thermogenic hydrocarbons including oil that can likely be correlated with oil-saturated strata at Majors Creek near Davenport, CA, USA. At Clam Flat, the evidence for thermogenic hydrocarbons is equivocal. At Horseshoe Scarp South and Tubeworm City, hydrocarbon gases, mainly methane, are likely microbial in origin. These varied sources of hydrocarbon gases highlight the diverse chemical systems that appear at cold seep communities. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. 2010 Campus Sustainability Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    With this review of campus sustainability efforts in 2010, the editors aim to give readers--those who are often immersed in the day-to-day particulars of sustainability efforts--the same chance to take a step back and take a broader look at where they stand with sustainability in higher education. This inaugural 2010 Campus Sustainability Review…

  3. 2010 Campus Sustainability Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, 2011

    2011-01-01

    With this review of campus sustainability efforts in 2010, the editors aim to give readers--those who are often immersed in the day-to-day particulars of sustainability efforts--the same chance to take a step back and take a broader look at where they stand with sustainability in higher education. This inaugural 2010 Campus Sustainability Review…

  4. Proceedings of the Monterey Containment Symposium, Monterey, California, August 26-28, 1981. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, B.C. [comp.] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Jones, E.M. [comp.] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Keller, C.E. [comp.] [Field Command (DNA), Kirtland Air Force Base, NM (United States); Smith, C.W. [comp.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1983-02-01

    Since the Atmospheric Test Ban Treaty was signed in 1963, the United States has conducted all nuclear weapons tests underground. To meet US treaty responsibilities and to ensure public safety, the containment community must prevent any release of radioactive gases to the atmosphere. In the past two decades we have gained considerable insight into the scientific and engineering requirements for complete containment, but the papers and discussions at the Monterey Symposium indicate that a great deal remains to be done. Among papers included here, those dealing with mature topics will serve as reviews and introductions for new workers in the field. Others, representing first looks at new areas, contain more speculative material. Active research topics include propagation of stress waves in rocks, formation and decay of residual hoop stresses around a cavity, hydrofracture out of a cavity, formation of chimneys, and geologic and geophysical investigations of the Nevada Test Site. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  5. Web Interactive Campus Map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marylene S. Eder

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Interactive campus map is a web based application that can be accessed through a web browser. With the Google Map Application Programming Interface availability of the overlay function has been taken advantage to create custom map functionalities. Collection of building points were gathered for routing and to create polygons which serves as a representation of each building. The previous campus map provides a static visual representation of the campus. It uses legends building name and its corresponding building number in providing information. Due to its limited capabilities it became a realization to the researchers to create an interactive campus map.Storing data about the building room and staff information and university events and campus guide are among the primary features that this study has to offer. Interactive Web-based Campus Information System is intended in providing a Campus Information System.It is open to constant updates user-friendly for both trained and untrained users and capable of responding to all needs of users and carrying out analyses. Based on the data gathered through questionnaires researchers analyzed the results of the test survey and proved that the system is user friendly deliver information to users and the important features that the students expect.

  6. ROV observation of fluid expulsion in Monterey Bay, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orange, D.L.; Barry, J.; Maher, N. [Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute., Pacific Grove, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    ROV dives in Monterey Bay have been used to examine the relationship of fluid flow to tectonic and stratigraphic conduits along an active transpressional continental margin. We used side-scan sonar to identify dive targets for the ROV, since anomalous reflectivity can be caused by the presence of biological {open_quote}cold seep{close_quotes} communities or authigenic carbonate. On a compressional ridge west of the San Gregorio Fault, cold seep clams are found along with extensive fields of authigenic carbonate in an elliptical region of anomalous reflectivity {approximately}400m in diameter. The reflectivity and fluid expulsion suggest that this feature is an active mud volcano. Analyses of push cores from the ridge site indicate high concentrations of both methane and sulfide and the presence of higher-order hydrocarbons. Many carbon isotopic ratios of the carbonate crusts indicate a methane carbon source; some values represent a mixture of methane carbon and normal marine carbon. Fluids charging the seeps west of the San Gregorio Fault may originate in tectonically-compacted sediments affected by residual Pacific-North America plate convergence, and may have an additional component of hydrocarbon charging from the underlying Monterey Formation. At the intersection of the Monterey Fault Zone and the Monterey Canyon a number of cold seeps occur in headless side canyons characterized by intense fracturing. This supports the hypothesis that submarine canyons act as hydrologic sinks for any overpressured fluid flowing toward the surface. On the San Gregorio Fault itself we have found in echelon ridges of carbonate. The fluids seeping out along fault zones may originate deep in the section and utilize the deformation-induced fracture permeability of the fault zone. Alternatively, aquifer-forcing from the uplifted Santa Cruz Mountains may provide a source of fluids venting along these fault zones (aquicludes?) and at seeps east of the fault zones.

  7. ROV observation of fluid expulsion in Monterey Bay, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orange, D.L.; Barry, J.; Maher, N. (Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute., Pacific Grove, CA (United States)) (and others)

    1996-01-01

    ROV dives in Monterey Bay have been used to examine the relationship of fluid flow to tectonic and stratigraphic conduits along an active transpressional continental margin. We used side-scan sonar to identify dive targets for the ROV, since anomalous reflectivity can be caused by the presence of biological [open quote]cold seep[close quotes] communities or authigenic carbonate. On a compressional ridge west of the San Gregorio Fault, cold seep clams are found along with extensive fields of authigenic carbonate in an elliptical region of anomalous reflectivity [approximately]400m in diameter. The reflectivity and fluid expulsion suggest that this feature is an active mud volcano. Analyses of push cores from the ridge site indicate high concentrations of both methane and sulfide and the presence of higher-order hydrocarbons. Many carbon isotopic ratios of the carbonate crusts indicate a methane carbon source; some values represent a mixture of methane carbon and normal marine carbon. Fluids charging the seeps west of the San Gregorio Fault may originate in tectonically-compacted sediments affected by residual Pacific-North America plate convergence, and may have an additional component of hydrocarbon charging from the underlying Monterey Formation. At the intersection of the Monterey Fault Zone and the Monterey Canyon a number of cold seeps occur in headless side canyons characterized by intense fracturing. This supports the hypothesis that submarine canyons act as hydrologic sinks for any overpressured fluid flowing toward the surface. On the San Gregorio Fault itself we have found in echelon ridges of carbonate. The fluids seeping out along fault zones may originate deep in the section and utilize the deformation-induced fracture permeability of the fault zone. Alternatively, aquifer-forcing from the uplifted Santa Cruz Mountains may provide a source of fluids venting along these fault zones (aquicludes ) and at seeps east of the fault zones.

  8. Cold seeps in Monterey Bay, California: Geochemistry of pore waters and relationship to benthic foraminiferal calcite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieskes, Joris, E-mail: jgieskes@ucsd.edu [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, IOD-0208, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0208 (United States); Rathburn, Anthony E. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, IOD-0208, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0208 (United States)] [Indiana State University, Department of Earth and Environmental Systems, Terre Haute, IN 47809 (United States); Martin, Jonathan B. [University of Florida, Department of Geological Sciences, Gainesville, FL 32611-2120 (United States); Perez, M. Elena [Indiana State University, Department of Earth and Environmental Systems, Terre Haute, IN 47809 (United States)] [The Natural History Museum, Department of Palaeontology, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Mahn, Chris [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, IOD-0208, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0208 (United States); Bernhard, Joan M. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Geology and Geophysics Department, MS52, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Day, Shelley [University of Florida, Department of Geological Sciences, Gainesville, FL 32611-2120 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: > We describe the geochemistry of pore waters in the Clam Flats area of Monterey Bay. > The geochemical data are compared with the {delta}{sup 13}C chemistry of benthic foraminifera. > Living foraminifera indicate little effects of pore water low {delta}{sup 13}C (DIC) in the clam bed. > This phenomenon and its implications are discussed in detail. > Implications with regards to paleo-methane seepage are discussed. - Abstract: An extensive geochemical and biogeochemical examination of CH{sub 4} seeps in the Clam Flats area of Monterey Bay provides insight into the character of relationships between seep geochemistry and benthic foraminiferal geochemistry. The area is characterized by sulfide-rich fluids. Sulfide increases are associated with large increases in alkalinity, as well as small decreases in dissolved Ca and Mg. In addition, only small increases in NH{sub 4} are observed, but values of {delta}{sup 13}C of dissolved inorganic C are as low as -60 per mille at shallow depths (<3 cm). These observations indicate that all these processes are related to the bacterial oxidation of CH{sub 4}, which is transported upward by slow seepage of pore fluids. The geochemistry of the pore fluids should be relevant to the geochemistry of the carbonate tests of living and dead foraminifera. However, a profound disequilibrium of approximately an order of magnitude occurs between the {delta}{sup 13}C values of stained (cytoplasm-containing) foraminiferal carbonate and the C isotope values of ambient pore water dissolved inorganic C. Reasons are unclear for this isotopic disequilibrium, but have important implications for interpretations of foraminiferal carbonate as a paleoenvironmental proxy. Much fine scale work is needed to fully understand the relationships between the biogeochemistry of benthic foraminifera and the geochemistry of the pore waters where they live.

  9. Campus Card Tricks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickes, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Examines the development of an innovative student identification card system that includes off-campus banking and credit card functions. Finding solutions to bank objections, credit card company rule problems, and software difficulties are discussed. (GR)

  10. THE RESPONSE OF MONTEREY BAY TO THE 2010 CHILEAN EARTHQUAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence C. Breaker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary frequencies contained in the arrival sequence produced by the tsunami from the Chilean earthquake of 2010 in Monterey Bay were extracted to determine the seiche modes that were produced. Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA and Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD were employed to extract the primary frequencies of interest. The wave train from the Chilean tsunami lasted for at least four days due to multipath arrivals that may not have included reflections from outside the bay but most likely did include secondary undulations, and energy trapping in the form of edge waves, inside the bay. The SSA decomposition resolved oscillations with periods of 52-57, 34-35, 26-27, and 21-22 minutes, all frequencies that have been predicted and/or observed in previous studies. The EEMD decomposition detected oscillations with periods of 50-55 and 21-22 minutes. Periods in the range of 50-57 minutes varied due to measurement uncertainties but almost certainly correspond to the first longitudinal mode of oscillation for Monterey Bay, periods of 34-35 minutes correspond to the first transverse mode of oscillation that assumes a nodal line across the entrance of the bay, a period of 26- 27 minutes, although previously observed, may not represent a fundamental oscillation, and a period of 21-22 minutes has been predicted and observed previously. A period of ~37 minutes, close to the period of 34-35 minutes, was generated by the Great Alaskan Earthquake of 1964 in Monterey Bay and most likely represents the same mode of oscillation. The tsunamis associated with the Great Alaskan Earthquake and the Chilean Earthquake both entered Monterey Bay but initially arrived outside the bay from opposite directions. Unlike the Great Alaskan Earthquake, however, which excited only one resonant mode inside the bay, the Chilean Earthquake excited several modes suggesting that the asymmetric shape of the entrance to Monterey Bay was an important factor and that the

  11. OnCampus: a mobile platform towards a smart campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xin; Kong, Xiangjie; Zhang, Fulin; Chen, Zhen; Kang, Jialiang

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of researchers and practitioners are working to develop smart cities. Considerable attention has been paid to the college campus as it is an important component of smart cities. Consequently, the question of how to construct a smart campus has become a topical one. Here, we propose a scheme that can facilitate the construction of a smart and friendly campus. We primarily focus on three aspects of smart campuses. These are: the formation of social circles based on interests mining, the provision of educational guidance based on emotion analysis of information posted on a platform, and development of a secondary trading platform aimed at optimizing the allocation of campus resources. Based on these objectives, we designed and implemented a mobile platform called OnCampus as the first step towards the development of a smart campus that has been introduced in some colleges. We found that OnCampus could successfully accomplish the three above mentioned functions of a smart campus.

  12. California State Waters Map Series—Offshore of Monterey, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Watt, Janet T.; Davenport, Clifton W.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Sliter, Ray W.; Maier, Katherine L.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2016-08-18

    IntroductionIn 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath bathymetry data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow subsurface geology.The Offshore of Monterey map area in central California is located on the Pacific Coast, about 120 km south of San Francisco. Incorporated cities in the map area include Seaside, Monterey, Marina, Pacific Grove, Carmel-by-the-Sea, and Sand City. The local economy receives significant resources from tourism, as well as from the Federal Government. Tourist attractions include the Monterey Bay Aquarium, Cannery Row, Fisherman’s Wharf, and the many golf courses near Pebble Beach, and the area serves as a gateway to the spectacular scenery and outdoor activities along the Big Sur coast to the south. Federal facilities include the Army’s Defense Language Institute, the Naval Postgraduate School, and the Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center (operated by the Navy). In 1994, Fort Ord army base, located between Seaside and Marina, was closed; much of former army base land now makes up the Fort Ord National Monument, managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as part of the National Landscape Conservation System. In addition, part of the old Fort Ord is now occupied by California State University, Monterey Bay.The offshore part of the map area lies entirely within the Monterey Bay National

  13. California State Waters Map Series—Offshore of Monterey, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Watt, Janet T.; Davenport, Clifton W.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Sliter, Ray W.; Maier, Katherine L.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2016-08-18

    IntroductionIn 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath bathymetry data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow subsurface geology.The Offshore of Monterey map area in central California is located on the Pacific Coast, about 120 km south of San Francisco. Incorporated cities in the map area include Seaside, Monterey, Marina, Pacific Grove, Carmel-by-the-Sea, and Sand City. The local economy receives significant resources from tourism, as well as from the Federal Government. Tourist attractions include the Monterey Bay Aquarium, Cannery Row, Fisherman’s Wharf, and the many golf courses near Pebble Beach, and the area serves as a gateway to the spectacular scenery and outdoor activities along the Big Sur coast to the south. Federal facilities include the Army’s Defense Language Institute, the Naval Postgraduate School, and the Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center (operated by the Navy). In 1994, Fort Ord army base, located between Seaside and Marina, was closed; much of former army base land now makes up the Fort Ord National Monument, managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as part of the National Landscape Conservation System. In addition, part of the old Fort Ord is now occupied by California State University, Monterey Bay.The offshore part of the map area lies entirely within the Monterey Bay National

  14. 15 CFR Appendix A to Subpart M of... - Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Coordinates A Appendix A to Subpart M of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating...—Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Coordinates Point ID No. Latitude Longitude...

  15. Dual Campus High School

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen P. Mombourquette

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available September 2010 witnessed the opening of the first complete dual campus high school in Alberta. Catholic Central High School, which had been in existence since 1967 in one building, now offered courses to students on two campuses. The “dual campus” philosophy was adopted so as to ensure maximum program flexibility for students. The philosophy, however, was destined to affect student engagement and staff efficacy as the change in organizational structure, campus locations, and course availability was dramatic. Changing school organizational structure also had the potential of affecting student achievement. A mixed-methods study utilizing engagement surveys, efficacy scales, and interviews with students and teachers was used to ascertain the degree of impact. The results of the study showed that minimal impact occurred to levels of student engagement, minor negative impact to staff efficacy, and a slight increase to student achievement results.

  16. Large wave-shaped bedforms in the axial channel of Monterey Submarine Canyon: Monterey Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paull, C. K.; Normark, W. R.; Ussler, W.; Caress, D. W.; Keaten, R.; Barry, J.; Xu, J.; Smith, D.; Covault, J. A.; Maier, K. L.

    2007-12-01

    Multibeam bathymetric data show that large wave-shaped bedforms exist on the seafloor within the axial channel of Monterey Submarine Canyon offshore northern California (Smith et al., 2006). These features have wavelengths up to 70 m, amplitudes up to 2 m, and distinct asymmetrical crests that are roughly perpendicular to the channel. Comparisons of repetitive multibeam surveys since 2004 shows that the bedforms are active features because their positions change between surveys. Three complementary studies are underway to understand the origin of these features: (1) Vibracoring - In June 2007, the ROV Ventana collected 18 vibracores up to 2 m in length along a 130-m transect in ~285 m water depth that spanned the crests of two and the flanks of three waves. Sediment in these cores is composed of one or more sequences of coarse gravel or multicolored clay-clasts that fine upward into sand. Sometimes individual gravel-clasts or clay-chips occur within sand. The internal stratigraphy of these waves shows they resemble classic gravity-flow deposits. (2) Sediment Movement - A pilot study was conducted to assess whether sediment within the canyon floor moves by traction from currents or mass transport. On February 8, 2007, three acoustic beacons were deployed in ~290 m water depth within the canyon axis using Ventana. The beacons were placed within recesses in 50-cm-high ~45 kg poured-concrete monuments. These boulder-sized monuments were buried leaving only the top of the beacon standing ~6 cm above the sediment surface. Thus, the monuments were largely entombed within the seafloor. We also placed 3 acoustic beacons mounted on trapezoidal frames at the edge of a terrace on the canyon's lower flank. On February 12th, we returned to the area and determined that all three monuments had moved ~150 m down canyon. Two trapezoidal frames were found on their sides entwined with each other 50 and 75 m down canyon from their deployment site. The third frame was never located. A

  17. Paleoceanographic and tectonic controls on deposition of the Monterey formation and related siliceous rocks in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The timing of paleoceanographic and tectonic events that shaped the deposition of the Monterey Formation of California and related siliceous rocks has been determined by application of a refined biochronology. The base of the Monterey at 17.5 Ma coincides with rising global sea level and a switch in biogenous silica deposition from the Caribbean and low-latitude North Atlantic to the North Pacific. Major polar cooling, which began at 15 Ma, postdates the base of the Monterey by more than 2 Ma and cannot be invoked to cause the deposition of diatomaceous sediments occurring in the lowermost Monterey. Later polar cooling in the early late Miocene, however, apparently caused increased upwelling and deposition of purer diatomites in the upper Monterey. The top of the Monterey at about 6 Ma coincides with a major sea level drop and is commonly marked by an unconformity. Equivalent unconformities are widespread around the rim of the North Pacific and typically separate more pelagic sediments from overlying sediments with a greater terrigenous component. Above the Monterey, diatoms persist in California sediments to 4.5-4.0 m.y., where their decline coincides with increased deposition of diatoms in the Antarctic. Carbon isotope records in the Pacific and Indian Oceans record storage of 12C in the Monterey Formation and equivalent organic-rich sediments around the rim of the North Pacific. A +1.0??? excursion in ?? 13C beginning at 17.5 Ma coincides with rising sea level and probably reflects storage of organic material in Monterey-like marginal reservoirs. A reverse -1.0??? shift at 6.2 Ma closely approximates the top of the Monterey and may represent erosion of these marginal reservoirs and reintroduction of stored organic carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system. Initiation of transform faulting and extension in the California margin in the latest Oligocene and early Miocene caused the subsidence of basins which later received Monterey sediments. A major tectonic event

  18. From Campus to Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloyd, Marion G.

    1980-01-01

    College students of the 1980s are working within the democratic system rather than against it. Congressmen, impressed by the seriousness and skill of today's college students, have invited them to testify on issues. College students are merging their campus organizations to provide broader support and influence. (Author)

  19. Recycling the Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Milton

    1978-01-01

    Renovation and conversion of many old buildings at Davidson (North Carolina) College over the past fifteen years have saved millions of dollars and preserved the neoclassical architecture of the campus. The Davidson shop crews' repair and remodeling projects are described and illustrated by several photographs. (MF)

  20. PNNL Campus Master Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosey, Whitney LC

    2012-09-07

    The Plan is used as a guide for PNNL in making facility and infrastructure decisions essential to supporting the PNNL vision: to establish a modern, collaborative, flexible, and sustainable campus while optimizing the efficiency of operations in support of courageous discovery and innovation.

  1. Sustainable Campus Housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimm, Jon

    2001-01-01

    Discusses how incorporating energy-efficient features into residence halls can save money and make students' campus experience more enjoyable. Use of heat-recovery systems, low-impact lighting, and natural daylighting are explored as are ideas to consider for future residence hall construction projects or renovations. (GR)

  2. Virtual Campus Tours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrell, Andrea

    1999-01-01

    College campus "tours" offered online have evolved to include 360-degree views, live video, animation, talking tour guides, interactive maps with photographic links, and detailed information about buildings, departments, and programs. Proponents feel they should enhance, not replace, real tours. The synergy between the virtual tour and…

  3. Revisiting Campuses with Newman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Edward Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    This article builds on an essay the author published twenty years ago in "Current Issues in Catholic Higher Education" that examined the viability of John Henry Newman's "Idea of a University" against Catholic campus life and the just-released "Ex corde Ecclesiae". The current essay briefly notes those earlier key…

  4. Earthquake and bay: Response of Monterey Bay to the Loma Prieta Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwing, Franklin B.; Norton, Jerrold G.; Pilskaln, Cynthia H.

    The magnitude-7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake, which ruptured a segment of the San Andreas fault on October 17, 1989, and caused extensive damage over a large area of central California, also produced substantial motions in nearby Monterey Bay (Figure 1). Earthquake effects included a tsunami, or seismic sea wave, and subsequent surface water oscillations that were detected for about 24 hours following the main shock and widespread, substantial slumping of sediments on the Monterey Bay continental shelf and along the walls of Monterey Submarine Canyon.

  5. California State Waters Map Series—Monterey Canyon and vicinity, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartnell, Peter; Maier, Katherine L.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Golden, Nadine E.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Finlayson, David P.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Sliter, Ray W.; Greene, H. Gary; Davenport, Clifton W.; Endris, Charles A.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochran, Susan A.

    2016-06-10

    IntroductionIn 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath bathymetry data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow subsurface geology.The Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area lies within Monterey Bay in central California. Monterey Bay is one of the largest embayments along the west coast of the United States, spanning 36 km from its northern to southern tips (in Santa Cruz and Monterey, respectively) and 20 km along its central axis. Not only does it contain one of the broadest sections of continental shelf along California’s coast, it also contains Monterey Canyon, one of the largest and deepest submarine canyons in the world. Note that the California’s State Waters limit extends farther offshore between Santa Cruz and Monterey so that it encompasses all of Monterey Bay.The coastal area within the map area is lightly populated. The community of Moss Landing (population, 204) hosts the largest commercial fishing fleet in Monterey Bay in its harbor. The map area also includes parts of the cities of Marina (population, about 20,000) and Castroville (population, about 6,500). Fertile lowlands of the Salinas River and Pajaro River valleys largely occupy the inland part of the map area, and land use is primarily agricultural.The offshore part of the map area lies completely within the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. The

  6. Water level oscillations in Monterey Bay and Harbor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Park

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Seiches are normal modes of water bodies responding to geophysical forcings with potential to significantly impact ecology and maritime operations. Analysis of high-frequency (1 Hz water level data in Monterey, California, identifies harbor modes between 10 and 120 s that are attributed to specific geographic features. It is found that modal amplitude modulation arises from cross-modal interaction and that offshore wave energy is a primary driver of these modes. Synchronous coupling between modes is observed to significantly impact dynamic water levels. At lower frequencies with periods between 15 and 60 min, modes are independent of offshore wave energy, yet are continuously present. This is unexpected since seiches normally dissipate after cessation of the driving force, indicating an unknown forcing. Spectral and kinematic estimates of these low-frequency oscillations support the idea that a persistent anticyclonic mesoscale gyre adjacent to the bay is a potential mode driver, while discounting other sources.

  7. Water level oscillations in Monterey Bay and Harbor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Park

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Seiches are normal modes of water bodies responding to geophysical forcings with potential to significantly impact ecology and maritime operations. Analysis of high-frequency (1 Hz water level data in Monterey California identifies Harbor modes between 10 and 120 s that are attributed with specific geographic features. It found that modal amplitude modulation arises from cross-modal interaction and that offshore wave energy is a primary driver of these modes. Synchronous coupling between modes is observed to significantly impact dynamic water levels. At lower frequencies between 15 and 60 min modes are independent of offshore wave energy, yet are continuously present. This is unexpected since seiches normally dissipate after cessation of the driving force, indicating an unknown forcing. Spectral and kinematic estimates of these low frequency oscillations supports the idea that a persistent anticyclonic mesoscale gyre adjacent to the Bay is a potential mode driver, while discounting other sources.

  8. Power quality on campus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copper Development Association

    2011-05-15

    The Maria Stata Center on the campus of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is home to the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems (LIDS) and the Department of Linguistics and Philosophy. Computers and networks are everywhere on campus and the electrical infrastructure, mainly made of copper, ensures the highest level of power quality. The copper-based grounding system helps stabilize the wiring system and several K-rated transformers help accommodate harmonic currents and improve energy efficiency. Separation from sensitive and non-sensitive branch circuits helps to shield sensitive equipment from electrical noise, and the installation of transient voltage surge suppression equipment assures maximum protection from voltage surges. .

  9. The monterey bay broadband ocean bottom seismic observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Uhrhammer

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We report on the installation of a long-term buried ocean-floor broadband seismic station (MOBB in Monterey Bay, California (USA, 40km off-shore, at a water depth of 1000 m. The station was installed in April 2002 using a ship and ROV, in a collaborative effort between the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI and the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory (BSL. The station is located on the western side of the San Gregorio Fault, a major fault in the San Andreas plate boundary fault system. In addition to a 3-component CMG-1T seismometer package, the station comprises a current meter and Differential Pressure Gauge, both sampled at high-enough frequency (1 Hz to allow the study of relations between background noise on the seismometers and ocean waves and currents. The proximity of several land-based broadband seismic stations of the Berkeley Digital Seismic Network allows insightful comparisons of land/ocean background seismic noise at periods relevant to regional and teleseismic studies. The station is currently autonomous. Recording and battery packages are exchanged every 3 months during scheduled one day dives. Ultimately, this station will be linked to shore using continuous telemetry (cable and/or buoy and will contribute to the earthquake notification system in Northern California. We present examples of earthquake and noise data recorded during the first 6 months of operation of MOBB. Lessons learned from these and continued recordings will help understand the nature and character of background noise in regional off-shore environments and provide a reference for the installation of future off-shore temporary and permanent broadband seismic stations.

  10. Summer Internship Program at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, G. I.

    2009-12-01

    The Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute formally started the Internship Program in 1997. The program is open to undergraduate and graduate students and educators. The purpose of the Program is to provide an opportunity for talented students and teachers to come to MBARI for a certain period of time and to work on a research project under MBARI staff supervision. The interns are selected following a rigorous application procedure, merit review and, in some cases, an interview process. They are from around the world and represent a variety of different backgrounds, experience, and education. They all share a common desire to learn more about the marine environment and to work with MBARI staff. The mission of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute is to serve as a world center for advanced research and education in ocean science and technology. MBARI strives to achieve this mission through the development of better instruments, systems, and methods for scientific research in the deep ocean. MBARI emphasizes peer relationships between engineers and scientists as a basic principle of its operation. Teams at MBARI use cutting-edge technology to develop equipment, software, and research methods to meet the specific needs of deep-sea research. The focus of the MBARI internship is on the intern’s professional development—learning research techniques and improving communication and collaboration skills. Each intern has an MBARI mentor who will supervise a specific project. Interns will also serve as peer-mentors to other interns. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the history of the program as well as lessons learned. 2009 MBARI SUMMER INTERNS WITH PRESIDENT AND CEO MARCIA MCNUTT

  11. Mobile Phone on Campus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周成

    2005-01-01

    Communication revolution has brought a great convenience to modem society and people. Especially, the occurrence of mobile phone, in away, has changed the world where we live. Maybe the mobile phone was a luxury for only a decade ago. Now, it is no exaggeration4 to say that the difference between the parts and the present is as vast as that between earth and heaven. With no exception6, campus students also fall into the category called “cell-phone school”.

  12. Monterey Strategy Seminar: Day 2: Dissuasion in the U.S. Defense Strategy.

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, James A; Pulsipher, Lashley; Zellen, Barry; Lavoy, Peter R.; Clary, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Monterey Strategy Seminar: Day 1: Capabilities Based Planning. Day 2: Dissuasion in the U.S. Defense Strategy. Day 3: Global Strike Warfare Naval Postgraduate School Center for Contemporary Conflict (CCC)

  13. 75 FR 13468 - Disapproval of California State Implementation Plan Revisions, Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to disapprove a revision to the Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution Control... CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Intergovernmental relations, Nitrogen...

  14. Sediment core data from the northern flank of Monterey Canyon, offshore California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — he five files included in this U.S. Geological Survey data release are data from a set of sediment cores acquired from the continental slope, north of Monterey...

  15. Geology and geomorphology--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is included in...

  16. BackscatterA [USGS SWATH]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  17. BackscatterD [CSUMB Swath]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  18. Sediment core data from the northern flank of Monterey Canyon, offshore California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The five files included in this U.S. Geological Survey data release are data from a set of sediment cores acquired from the continental slope, north of Monterey...

  19. 76 FR 20324 - Availability of Seats for the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Diving, Education (alternate), Research... professional affiliations; philosophy regarding the protection and management of marine resources; and possibly...'') chaired by the Research Representative, the Sanctuary Education Panel (``SEP'') chaired by the Education...

  20. Geology and geomorphology--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is included in...

  1. BackscatterD [CSUMB Swath]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  2. BackscatterA [USGS SWATH]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  3. Re-Engineering the Enrollment Management System at the Monterey Peninsula Unified School District (MPUSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Terrace Manzanita La Mesa Highland Foothills Del Rey Woods King Middle Marina Vista Olson Marina Del Mar Crumpton Los Arboles Seaside High Ord Terrace...Le Mesa Larkin Manzanita Marina Del Mar Marina Vista Marshall Monte Vista Olson Ord Terrace Colton Fitch King Los Arboles Monterey High Seaside...196 183 583 583 King 163 163 228 553 552 Los Arboles 236 210 227 672 672 Total Middle 823 812 886 2521 2520 Monterey 417 362 375 317 1471 1474 Seaside

  4. Profiling Campus Administration: A Demographic Survey of Campus Police Chiefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linebach, Jared A.; Kovacsiss, Lea M.; Tesch, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    Campus law enforcement faces unique challenges, as there are different societal expectations compared to municipal law enforcement. Municipal law enforcement models typically focus on traditionally reactive law and order, while campus law enforcement models typically focus on proactive responses to crime and its deterrence. Stressors experienced…

  5. Blended Learning on Campus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilesen, Simon; Nielsen, Jørgen Lerche

    2004-01-01

    On the basis of a large-scale project implementing information and communication technology at Roskilde University, Denmark, this paper discusses ways of introducing technology-based blended learning in academic life. We examine some examples of use of systems for computer-mediated collabora......-tive learning and work in Danish Open University education as well as in courses on campus. We further suggest some possi-bilities for using technology in innovative ways, arguing that innovation is to be found, not in isolated instantiations of sys-tems, but in the form of a deliberate integration of all...... relevant ICT-features as a whole into the learning environment....

  6. Campus Security under the Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    A university president's worst nightmare can take any number of forms. The lone shooter run amok on campus. The freight-train sound of a tornado bearing down on a dormitory. A river cresting its banks, about to flood a college town. From robberies and assaults to fires and chemical spills, the list goes on and on. Campus security and safety…

  7. Building Your Image on Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keever, Sue

    1998-01-01

    Offers advice to recruiters working on college campuses on how they can create a positive image with students and career services personnel. States that a good recruiting organization knows its customers, creates programs with the customer in mind, chooses its recruiting team well, and fosters strong relationships with campus partners. (MKA)

  8. Campus network security model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong-ku; Song, Li-ren

    2011-12-01

    Campus network security is growing importance, Design a very effective defense hacker attacks, viruses, data theft, and internal defense system, is the focus of the study in this paper. This paper compared the firewall; IDS based on the integrated, then design of a campus network security model, and detail the specific implementation principle.

  9. THE SYRACUSE CAMPUS SCHOOL PLAN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    BARRY, FRANKLYN S.

    THE CAMPUS SCHOOL PLAN FOR AN EDUCATIONAL PARK IN SYRACUSE, NEW YORK, WAS CONCEIVED WHEN THE BOARD OF EDUCATION WAS FACED WITH THE NEED TO REPLACE EIGHT OUTMODED ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS. THE PARK WOULD BE BUILT ON A SITE ON THE PERIPHERY OF THE CITY, TO WHICH STUDENTS WOULD BE TRANSPORTED BY BUS. THE FIRST CAMPUS WOULD ESTABLISH FOUR PAIRS OF…

  10. PLANNING THE CAMPUS BY COMPUTER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MATTOX, ROBERT F.

    PROBLEMS OF CAMPUS PLANNING ARE DISCUSSED IN TERMS OF COMPUTER ANALYSIS OF SCHEDULED AND NONSCHEDULED ACTIVITIES. ESTIMATION OF SPACE NEEDS FOR SCHEDULED CAMPUS ACTIVITIES INCLUDES--(1) TOTAL ENROLLMENT, (2) DISTRIBUTION OF MAJORS, (3) DISTRIBUTION OF CLASS TIME TO DEPARTMENTS, (4) DEPARTMENT LOADS, (5) DISTRIBUTION TO LECTURE LAB, (6)…

  11. Campus Technology Innovators Awards 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Meg; Raths, David

    2010-01-01

    Each year in judging the Campus Technology Innovators awards, the authors have the privilege of reading through hundreds of fascinating examples of technology innovation on campus. Nominated projects cover the gamut of technology areas, from assessment and advising to wireless and web 2.0. This article presents 11 innovator award winners of this…

  12. Cost Analysis of a Transition to Green Vehicle Technology for Light Duty Fleet Vehicles in Public Works Department Naval Support Activity Monterey (PWD Monterey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    replacing ICEs with green technologies on the federal fleet level. The current leader in this research is the AVTA, a subcomponent of the Idaho...the market that may provide additional benefits. C. FOLLOW-ON RESEARCH Possibilities for future research are as follows: 1. Determine the...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT COST ANALYSIS OF A TRANSITION TO GREEN VEHICLE

  13. Views of the Sea Floor in Northern Monterey Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Golden, Nadine E.; Finlayson, David P.

    2008-01-01

    A sonar survey that produced unprecedented high-resolution images of the sea floor in northern Monterey Bay was conducted in 2005 and 2006. The survey, performed over 14 days by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), consisted of 172 tracklines and over 300 million soundings and covered an area of 12.2 km2 (4.7 mi2). The goals of this survey were to collect high-resolution bathymetry (depth to the sea floor) and acoustic backscatter data (amount of sound energy bounced back from the sea floor, which provides information on sea-floor hardness and texture) from the inner continental shelf. These data will provide a baseline for future change analyses, geologic mapping, sediment- and contaminant-transport studies, benthic-habitat delineation, and numerical modeling efforts. The survey shows that the inner shelf in this area is extremely varied in nature, encompassing flat sandy areas, faults, boulder fields, and complex bedrock ridges that support rich marine ecosystems. Furthermore, many of these complex bedrock ridges form the ?reefs? that result in a number of California?s classic surf breaks.

  14. 76 FR 1154 - Operating Industries, Inc., Superfund Site, Monterey Park, CA; Notice of Proposed CERCLA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-07

    ...., Beren Corporation, Beylik Drilling, Inc., Big Penny Car Wash General Partnership, Bimbo Bakeries USA... Metal Finishing Corp., dba Barron Anodizing, Cackle Fresh Egg Farms, Inc., Califone International, Inc...-interest to Lightolier, Inc., Geo Drilling Fluids, Inc., George O. Ladner, Jr., Trustee, Trepanier...

  15. Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Array Effects on Wave Current and Sediment Circulation: Monterey Bay CA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Jones, Craig; Magalen, Jason

    2014-09-01

    The goal s of this study were to develop tools to quantitatively characterize environments where wave energy converter ( WEC ) devices may be installed and to assess e ffects on hydrodynamics and lo cal sediment transport. A large hypothetical WEC array was investigated using wave, hydrodynamic, and sediment transport models and site - specific average and storm conditions as input. The results indicated that there were significant changes in sediment s izes adjacent to and in the lee of the WEC array due to reduced wave energy. The circulation in the lee of the array was also altered; more intense onshore currents were generated in the lee of the WECs . In general, the storm case and the average case show ed the same qualitative patterns suggesting that these trends would be maintained throughout the year. The framework developed here can be used to design more efficient arrays while minimizing impacts on nearshore environmen ts.

  16. 78 FR 5801 - Operating Industries, Inc. Superfund Site, Monterey Park, CA; Notice of Proposed CERCLA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... Corradini Corporation, George J. Peckham, Jr., H.W. Hull & Sons, Inc., Hacienda Car Wash, Inc., Hiro's Transmission, Inc., International Paper Company, International Transportation Service, Inc., John Crane,...

  17. 76 FR 5201 - Notice of Realty Action: Competitive Sale of Public Lands in Monterey County, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    ... qualifications, including citizenship or corporation or partnership, must accompany the sealed bid. A bid to..., sale procedures and conditions, appraisal, planning and environmental documents, and a mineral...

  18. Campus Capability Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Arsenlis, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bailey, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bergman, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brase, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brenner, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Camara, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Carlton, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cheng, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chrzanowski, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Colson, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); East, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Farrell, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ferranti, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gursahani, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hansen, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Helms, L. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hernandez, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jeffries, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Larson, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lu, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNabb, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mercer, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Skeate, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sueksdorf, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zucca, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Le, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ancria, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Scott, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Leininger, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gagliardi, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gash, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bronson, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Chung, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hobson, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meeker, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sanchez, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zagar, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Quivey, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sommer, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Atherton, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-06-06

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Campus Capability Plan for 2018-2028. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is one of three national laboratories that are part of the National Nuclear Security Administration. LLNL provides critical expertise to strengthen U.S. security through development and application of world-class science and technology that: Ensures the safety, reliability, and performance of the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile; Promotes international nuclear safety and nonproliferation; Reduces global danger from weapons of mass destruction; Supports U.S. leadership in science and technology. Essential to the execution and continued advancement of these mission areas are responsive infrastructure capabilities. This report showcases each LLNL capability area and describes the mission, science, and technology efforts enabled by LLNL infrastructure, as well as future infrastructure plans.

  19. The Virtual Campus Hub Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badger, Merete; Prag, Sidsel-Marie Winther; Monaco, Lucio

    of Technology in Sweden, Politecnico di Torino in Italy, and Eindhoven University of Technology in the Netherlands. The project is partially funded by the European Commission under the 7th Framework Programme (project no. RI-283746). This report describes the final concept of Virtual Campus Hub. It gives...... an overview of the project achievements and recommends best practices for the use of the Virtual Campus Hub elements: a series of applications for online teaching and collaboration which are connected to a technical platform, the Virtual Campus Hub portal, using the European research infrastructure Géant/eduGAIN....

  20. IN UNIVERSITY OF BENIN CAMPUS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MCA patients were grouped under rider, passenger and pedestrian. Results: MCA ... Conclusion: Passengers and pedestrians who are the ultimate users of the motorcycle transport system in the campus showed lesser ... Information from.

  1. Using Campus Data for Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, John A., Jr.; Glover, Robert H.

    1988-01-01

    Many operational and some tactical information needs can be well supported with current information technology and campus-based data, but information support for many tactical and most strategic decisions may be aided by interinstitutional collaboration. (Author/MSE)

  2. Coast of California Storm and Tidal Waves Study. Geomorphology Framework Report Monterey Bay,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    oi 5-9 Composite stratIgraphic se-ction Of the northern part of Monterey Ila . east of the Palo Colorado-Sati Gregorio fault zone...exposujre oif thte Monterey, Paso Robles . and Aro- ina forinattoits are- ii’gltgibhe. P- rter and tithers (1979) also tletorinite that i-le tlites wi re the...Colorado-San Gregorio Fault Zone (fig. 5-t). The block extends from the Transverse Ranges to Cape Mendocino, a distance of approximately 800 km (Page, 1970

  3. California State Waters Map Series—Monterey Canyon and vicinity, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartnell, Peter; Maier, Katherine L.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Golden, Nadine E.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Finlayson, David P.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Sliter, Ray W.; Greene, H. Gary; Davenport, Clifton W.; Endris, Charles A.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochran, Susan A.

    2016-06-10

    IntroductionIn 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath bathymetry data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow subsurface geology.The Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area lies within Monterey Bay in central California. Monterey Bay is one of the largest embayments along the west coast of the United States, spanning 36 km from its northern to southern tips (in Santa Cruz and Monterey, respectively) and 20 km along its central axis. Not only does it contain one of the broadest sections of continental shelf along California’s coast, it also contains Monterey Canyon, one of the largest and deepest submarine canyons in the world. Note that the California’s State Waters limit extends farther offshore between Santa Cruz and Monterey so that it encompasses all of Monterey Bay.The coastal area within the map area is lightly populated. The community of Moss Landing (population, 204) hosts the largest commercial fishing fleet in Monterey Bay in its harbor. The map area also includes parts of the cities of Marina (population, about 20,000) and Castroville (population, about 6,500). Fertile lowlands of the Salinas River and Pajaro River valleys largely occupy the inland part of the map area, and land use is primarily agricultural.The offshore part of the map area lies completely within the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. The

  4. The evolving fresh market berry industry in Santa Cruz and Monterey counties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Tourte

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The fresh market berry industry in Santa Cruz and Monterey counties has contributed significantly to the agricultural vibrancy of the two counties and the state of California. Dramatic growth in strawberry, raspberry and blackberry production has been documented over the last 50 years, and most notably since the 1980s. Factors influencing this growth include innovations in agricultural practices and heightened consumer demand. Here, we review the historical context for the berry industry in Santa Cruz and Monterey counties. Organic production, production economics and challenges for the future are also discussed.

  5. Constraining pathways of microbial mediation for carbonate concretions of the Miocene Monterey Formation using carbonate-associated sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, Sean J.; Berelson, William M.; Lyons, Timothy W.; Hammond, Douglas E.; Corsetti, Frank A.

    2012-02-01

    Carbonate concretions can form as a result of organic matter degradation within sediments. However, the ability to determine specific processes and timing relationships to particular concretions has remained elusive. Previously employed proxies (e.g., carbon and oxygen isotopes) cannot uniquely distinguish among diagenetic alkalinity sources generated by microbial oxidation of organic matter using oxygen, nitrate, metal oxides, and sulfate as electron acceptors, in addition to degradation by thermal decarboxylation. Here, we employ concentrations of carbonate-associated sulfate (CAS) and δ 34S CAS (along with more traditional approaches) to determine the specific nature of concretion authigenesis within the Miocene Monterey Formation. Integrated geochemical analyses reveal that at least three specific organo-diagenetic reaction pathways can be tied to concretion formation and that these reactions are largely sample-site specific. One calcitic concretion from the Phosphatic Shale Member at Naples Beach yields δ 34S CAS values near Miocene seawater sulfate (˜+22‰ VCDT), abundant CAS (ca. 1000 ppm), depleted δ 13C carb (˜-11‰ VPDB), and very low concentrations of Fe (ca. 700 ppm) and Mn (ca. 15 ppm)—characteristics most consistent with shallow formation in association with organic matter degradation by nitrate, iron-oxides and/or minor sulfate reduction. Cemented concretionary layers of the Phosphatic Shale Member at Shell Beach display elevated δ 34S CAS (up to ˜+37‰), CAS concentrations of ˜600 ppm, mildly depleted δ 13C carb (˜-6‰), moderate amounts of Mn (ca. 250 ppm), and relatively low Fe (ca. 1700 ppm), indicative of formation in sediments dominated by sulfate reduction. Finally, concretions within a siliceous host at Montaña de Oro and Naples Beach show minimal CAS concentrations, positive δ 13C values, and the highest concentrations of Fe (ca. 11,300 ppm) and Mn (ca. 440 ppm), consistent with formation in sediments experiencing

  6. Sand Wave Migrations Within Monterey Submarine Canyon, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Wong, F. L.

    2006-12-01

    Repeated high-resolution multi-beam surveys revealed the existence of a sand wave field along the axis of the Monterey submarine canyon between 20 and 300 m water depth. These sand waves range in wave length from 20 to 70 m and 2 to 5 m in height. Comparison of sequential multi-beam grid data (months apart) indicates that the sand waves apparently migrate upcanyon at some places while the same data clearly show that the sand waves migrate downcanyon at other locations. One hypothesis is that strong internal tidal flows, whose upcanyon component is intensified by the narrow canyon, are responsible for forming the sand wave field and for migrating the sand waves upcanyon. Another hypothesis is that the sand wave field is formed by creeping (analogous to the movement within glaciers), and in general they move in the downcanyon direction. A field experiment was conducted in 2005-06 to measure the driving forces (in hypothesis #1) that form and move the sand waves, and to collect the internal sedimentological structure within the sand waves that could reveal information on hypothesis #2. A mooring designed to measure near-floor velocity profiles, temperature, salinity, and sediment concentration in the water column was deployed for one year (June 2005 -July 2006) at 250 m water depth, slightly downcanyon of the sand wave field. In addition, a mapping survey was conducted in February, 2006 for collecting multi-beam and chirp profiles in the canyon head area of the sand wave field. Preliminary examination of the ADCP (downward looking) showed some very interesting features - the near- floor current dramatically changes with the spring-neap cycle of the surface tide. The time variation of the along-canyon current during neap tides - a sudden jump of upcanyon velocity before gradually tapering down, is typical of internal tides (internal bores). The time variation during spring tides when along canyon velocities reverse directions from upcanyon to downcanyon and gradually

  7. NOAA Office for Coastal Management Coastal Inundation Digital Elevation Model: San Francisco Bay/Monterey (CA) WFO - Santa Cruz and Monterey Counties

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This digital elevation model (DEM) is a part of a series of DEMs produced for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office for Coastal Management's Sea...

  8. THE RESPONSE OF MONTEREY BAY TO THE GREAT TOHOKU EARTHQUAKE OF 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Carroll

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of Monterey Bay to the Great Tohoku earthquake of 2011 is examined in this study. From a practical standpoint, although the resulting tsunami did not cause any damage to the open harbors at Monterey and Moss Landing, it caused extensive damage to boats and infrastructure in Santa Cruz Harbor, which is closed to surrounding waters. From a scientific standpoint, the observed and predicted amplitudes of the tsunami at 1 km from the source were 21.3 and 22.5 m based on the primary arrival from one DART bottom pressure recorder located 986 km ENE of the epicenter. The predicted and observed travel times for the tsunami to reach Monterey Bay agreed within 3%. The predicted and observed periods of the tsunami-generated wave before it entered the bay yielded periods that approached 2 hours. Once the tsunami entered Monterey Bay it was transformed into a seiche with a primary period of 36-37 minutes, corresponding to quarter-wave resonance within the bay. Finally, from a predictive standpoint, major tsunamis that enter the bay from the northwest, as in the present case, are the ones most likely to cause damage to Santa Cruz harbor.

  9. 77 FR 73322 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is taking direct final action to approve revisions to the Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution... several different types of sources, ranging from fugitive dust to gas turbines. We are approving a local...

  10. 77 FR 73392 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution Control District... types of sources, ranging from fugitive dust to gas turbines. We are proposing to approve a local rule...

  11. Depth to Transition--Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the depth-to-transition map of the Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California, region. The raster data file is included in...

  12. 75 FR 37727 - Disapproval of California State Implementation Plan Revisions, Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing disapproval of a revision to the Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution Control... of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by...

  13. Oceanographic and Atmospheric Conditions on the Continental Shelf North of the Monterey Bay During August 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    the Alan Robinson Special Issue Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans September 17, 2010 ____________________________ 1Monterey Bay...JPL/ROMS) [Schepetkin and McWilliams , 2004], and the Navy Coastal Ocean Model / Innovative Coastal-Ocean Observing Network (NCOM/ICON) model [Shulman

  14. BathymetryA Hillshade [2m]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The raster data file is included in...

  15. BathymetryB [5m]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The raster data file is included in...

  16. BathymetryA [2m]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The raster data file is included in...

  17. Monterey Institute Makes Language Fluency a Key Part of Its International Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Peter

    1992-01-01

    The Monterey Institute's International Studies curriculum is described in terms of its foreign language fluency requirements for business master's degree candidates and the school's use of language in international business negotiation training and other exercises involving foreign affairs. Illustrations reveal the school's success in educating…

  18. Depth to Transition--Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the depth-to-transition map of the Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California, region. The raster data file is included in...

  19. BathymetryB Hillshade [5m]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The raster data file is included in...

  20. Sand Mining Impacts on Long-Term Dune Erosion in Southern Monterey Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    estimated to have condominium and hotel in Monterey, as well as 100 m extended 13 km seaward of the present day shoreline of rock rubble and a 200 in...OrthoBase software employed in the overlapping pair, but whose coordinates are unknown. stereo-photogrammetry calculated total horizontal rms The GCPs

  1. Bathymetry Hillshade [5m]--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The raster data file is included in...

  2. BathymetryA Hillshade [2m]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The raster data file is included in...

  3. BathymetryB [5m]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The raster data file is included in...

  4. BathymetryB Hillshade [5m]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The raster data file is included in...

  5. BathymetryA [2m]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The raster data file is included in...

  6. Electronic Cigarettes on Hospital Campuses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Meernik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Smoke and tobacco-free policies on hospital campuses have become more prevalent across the U.S. and Europe, de-normalizing smoking and reducing secondhand smoke exposure on hospital grounds. Concerns about the increasing use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes and the impact of such use on smoke and tobacco-free policies have arisen, but to date, no systematic data describes e-cigarette policies on hospital campuses. The study surveyed all hospitals in North Carolina (n = 121 to assess what proportion of hospitals have developed e-cigarette policies, how policies have been implemented and communicated, and what motivators and barriers have influenced the development of e-cigarette regulations. Seventy-five hospitals (62% completed the survey. Over 80% of hospitals reported the existence of a policy regulating the use of e-cigarettes on campus and roughly half of the hospitals without a current e-cigarette policy are likely to develop one within the next year. Most e-cigarette policies have been incorporated into existing tobacco-free policies with few reported barriers, though effective communication of e-cigarette policies is lacking. The majority of hospitals strongly agree that e-cigarette use on campus should be prohibited for staff, patients, and visitors. Widespread incorporation of e-cigarette policies into existing hospital smoke and tobacco-free campus policies is feasible but needs communication to staff, patients, and visitors.

  7. Electronic Cigarettes on Hospital Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meernik, Clare; Baker, Hannah M; Paci, Karina; Fischer-Brown, Isaiah; Dunlap, Daniel; Goldstein, Adam O

    2015-12-29

    Smoke and tobacco-free policies on hospital campuses have become more prevalent across the U.S. and Europe, de-normalizing smoking and reducing secondhand smoke exposure on hospital grounds. Concerns about the increasing use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and the impact of such use on smoke and tobacco-free policies have arisen, but to date, no systematic data describes e-cigarette policies on hospital campuses. The study surveyed all hospitals in North Carolina (n = 121) to assess what proportion of hospitals have developed e-cigarette policies, how policies have been implemented and communicated, and what motivators and barriers have influenced the development of e-cigarette regulations. Seventy-five hospitals (62%) completed the survey. Over 80% of hospitals reported the existence of a policy regulating the use of e-cigarettes on campus and roughly half of the hospitals without a current e-cigarette policy are likely to develop one within the next year. Most e-cigarette policies have been incorporated into existing tobacco-free policies with few reported barriers, though effective communication of e-cigarette policies is lacking. The majority of hospitals strongly agree that e-cigarette use on campus should be prohibited for staff, patients, and visitors. Widespread incorporation of e-cigarette policies into existing hospital smoke and tobacco-free campus policies is feasible but needs communication to staff, patients, and visitors.

  8. On University Campus Landscape Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李锋; 祁素萍

    2014-01-01

    In a few years, with the progress of China's society, material needs and spiritual needs are in the corresponding en-hancement. All needs and requirements of society for talents are in the unceasing increase and improvement, and certainly will need to increase the country's national education. Our country put forward the strategy of developing the country through sci-ence and education, and the university education is the center of it. So our country on the one hand, through expanding enroll-ment rate, let more people to accept higher education;On the other hand, through increasing the investment of the infrastructure construction in colleges and universities, the campus can satisfy the need of more features. Along with the progress of market economy and urban modernization, the campus development level has become an important symbol in measuring the progress of a city, a regional economic and cultural development. It is also the origin to transport all kinds of advanced talents for urban. The construction of university campus is gradually developed in such an environment, striving to reflect new period, new era universi-ty campus's new look and new attitude. Trying to develop the campus to which has its own characteristic humanities landscape and put the characteristic of open and humanistic, functional and artistic quality, ecological and sustainable in organic combina-tion of unity, advancing with The Times.

  9. 'We Are at This Campus, There Is Nothing in This Campus …': Socio-Spatial Analysis of a University Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aglargöz, Ozan

    2017-01-01

    This article provides a socio-spatial analysis of a higher education institution operating within a multi-campus system at a location other than the flagship campus. Based on this case study of a technical school, the meanings attached to the university campus are analyzed through semi-structured interviews and official documents. The study…

  10. [Comment to “Response of Monterey Bay to the Loma Prieta Earthquake of October 17, 1989”] Montery Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwing, Franklin B.; Norton, Jerrold G.; Pilskaln, Cynthia H.

    Observations of liquefaction and slumping in Monterey Bay, Calif., described in “Response of Monterey Bay to the Loma Prieta Earthquake of October 17, 1989,” (Eos, February [6], 1990, p. 250), were based on the ongoing work of a team of scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories (MLML), Hopkins Marine Station, and Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), who are continuing to investigate the causes and effects of slumping and other processes that occurred in association with the earthquake.

  11. Sustainable Campus Dining: How Campuses Are Targeting Sustainability and Engagement through Dining Services Initiatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Celeste

    2013-01-01

    Sustainable food and dining is a popular topic on college and university campuses. Popular areas of focus include equipment upgrades in the kitchen, installation of campus or community gardens, and streamlining existing campus recycling operations, such as by converting campus vehicles to run on used vegetable oil from the dining hall. Research…

  12. Paleoceanographic influences on compositional trends in the Monterey Formation, western Santa Barbara coastal area, California: Contrasts between banktop and distal slope settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, N.R. (Univ. of Texas, Dallas, TX (United States). Program in Geosciences)

    1992-01-01

    The modern ocean-atmosphere system, consisting of cold polar regions, strong latitudinal temperature gradient, and strong thermocline, evolved as a consequence of Miocene paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic transitions, which were contemporaneous with deposition of the organic-rich Monterey Formation. Deep sea records show mid-Miocene enrichment shifts in C-13 (ca17.5 to ca13.5 Ma), lagged by C-18 (beginning around 15 Ma), suggesting that reverse greenhouse cooling led to intensified cryosphere development. Graphic correlation of Sr isotope and biostratigraphic data indicates that the South Ellwood section contains a more continuous record of organic accumulation. At Naples, highest organic contents are associated with the hardground-bearing carbonaceous marl member, which is condensed between strata bearing Luisian and Early Mohnian benthic foraminifera. Duration of the condensed interval is unresolved by biostratigraphy and Sr isotope estimates over a wide time range (7.5 to 15.7 Ma), but ages younger than 13 Ma are generally inferred for timing of maximum organic carbon accumulation. In contrast, richest organic facies at South Ellwood occur within a 300 to 400 foot interval containing Relizian and Luisian fauna, spanning the 18 to 13 Ma interval. Stable isotope data from the South Ellwood section document a trend of C-13 enrichment on the order of 1% which closely follows, but slightly lags, deposition of richest organic strata. Distinct enrichment in [delta]O-18 begins near the peak of maximum carbon enrichment, and continues into the upper siliceous facies. Thus, the Monterey Hypothesis is supported by the more basinal South Ellwood record, while rejected in the Naples Beach banktop record.

  13. Campus fiber optic enterprise networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Richard A.

    1991-02-01

    The proliferation of departmental LANs in campus environments has driven network technology to the point where construction of token ring fiber-optic backbone systems is now a cost-effective alternative. This article will discuss several successful real life case history applications of token ring fiber in a campus setting each with unique distance and load factor requirements. It is hoped that these examples will aid in the understanding planning and implementation of similar installations. It will also attempt to provide important information on the emerging Fiber Distributed Data Interface (FDDI) standard.

  14. Will Your Campus Diversity Initiative Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingle, Grant

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author gives suggestions on how to make campus diversity initiative work. The author suggests making sure that the following conditions apply to a campus initiative before getting involved: (1) The communications about the initiative, on and off campus, are comparable to those for a capital campaign; (2) The initiative has an…

  15. Sustainable Retrofitting of Nordic University Campuses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Robert; Nenonen, Suvi; Nielsen, Susanne Balslev

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to identify the state-of-art of Nordic campus development and identify how campus areas can be retrofitted by addition of new technologies, features, functions and services. The leading research question is: how to develop Nordic resilient campus management...

  16. Academic Culture and Campus Culture of Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xi; Tian, Xianghong

    2012-01-01

    Academic culture of universities mainly consists of academic outlooks, academic spirits, academic ethics and academic environments. Campus culture in a university is characterized by individuality, academic feature, opening, leading, variety and creativity. The academic culture enhances the construction of campus culture. The campus culture…

  17. Energy Sustainability and the Green Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Walter

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the importance of campus energy sustainability, explaining that both demand- and supply-side strategies are required. Suggests that on the demand side, an aggressive campus energy conservation program can reduce campus energy consumption by 30 percent or more. Asserts that addressing the supply side of the energy equation means shifting…

  18. Coming Soon: The Cashless Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peskin, Carole Ann; McDemmond, Marie

    1994-01-01

    Increasing use of credit on college campuses raises important policy questions and planning needs. Credit and debit card use varies, and most institutions are studying, experimenting, and inventing uses. Although use of credit improves cash flow, streamlines payments and services, and increases income, there are also costs to the institution. (MSE)

  19. The Stewardship of Campus Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audrain, Calvert W.

    2011-01-01

    Even as technology and globalization are changing the way one lives and views the world, colleges and universities have become increasingly interested in preserving historic campus buildings and sites. Heritage has become more important to students, faculty, and staff, as well as to alumni, who have often been its prime supporters. This article…

  20. Problem Gambling on College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComb, Jennifer L.; Hanson, William E.

    2009-01-01

    The vast majority of college students gamble, with some doing so problematically. This article discusses gambling and problem gambling among college students, framing it as an emerging health issue on college campuses nationwide. Given that 4 out of 5 college students admit to gambling, and that approximately 8% gamble problematically, it is…

  1. Coming Soon: The Cashless Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peskin, Carole Ann; McDemmond, Marie

    1994-01-01

    Increasing use of credit on college campuses raises important policy questions and planning needs. Credit and debit card use varies, and most institutions are studying, experimenting, and inventing uses. Although use of credit improves cash flow, streamlines payments and services, and increases income, there are also costs to the institution. (MSE)

  2. About Women on Campus, 1996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Bernice Resnick, Ed.

    1996-01-01

    This quarterly newsletter provides information about the programs, issues, and concerns of women students, faculty, and administrators in higher education. Each of these four issues (comprising 1 year's worth) presents brief summaries of news items or reports in regularly appearing sections covering campus news, the workplace, sexual harassment,…

  3. University Satellite Campus Management Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Doug; Stott, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Among the 60 or so university satellite campuses in Australia are many that are probably failing to meet the high expectations of their universities and the communities they were designed to serve. While in some cases this may be due to the demand driven system, it may also be attributable in part to the ways in which they are managed. The…

  4. Groundwater quality in the Monterey Bay and Salinas Valley groundwater basins, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Monterey-Salinas study unit is nearly 1,000 square miles and consists of the Santa Cruz Purisima Formation Highlands, Felton Area, Scotts Valley, Soquel Valley, West Santa Cruz Terrace, Salinas Valley, Pajaro Valley, and Carmel Valley groundwater basins (California Department of Water Resources, 2003; Kulongski and Belitz, 2011). These basins were grouped into four study areas based primarily on geography. Groundwater basins in the north were grouped into the Santa Cruz study area, and those to the south were grouped into the Monterey Bay, the Salinas Valley, and the Paso Robles study areas (Kulongoski and others, 2007). The study unit has warm, dry summers and cool, moist winters. Average annual rainfall ranges from 31 inches in Santa Cruz in the north to 13 inches in Paso Robles in the south. The study areas are drained by several rivers and their principal tributaries: the Salinas, Pajaro, and Carmel Rivers, and San Lorenzo Creek. The Salinas Valley is a large intermontane valley that extends southeastward from Monterey Bay to Paso Robles. It has been filled, up to a thickness of 2,000 feet, with Tertiary and Quaternary marine and terrestrial sediments that overlie granitic basement. The Miocene-age Monterey Formation and Pliocene- to Pleistocene-age Paso Robles Formation, and Pleistocene to Holocene-age alluvium contain freshwater used for supply. The primary aquifers in the study unit are defined as those parts of the aquifers corresponding to the perforated intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health database. Public-supply wells are typically drilled to depths of 200 to 650 feet, consist of solid casing from the land surface to depths of about 175 to 500 feet, and are perforated below the solid casing. Water quality in the primary aquifers may differ from that in the shallower and deeper parts of the aquifer system. Groundwater movement is generally from the southern part of the Salinas Valley north towards the Monterey Bay

  5. A review of marine zones in the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Jennifer A.

    2001-01-01

    This report reviews marine zoning in the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (MBNMS). The 72 zoned areas in the MBNMS are of 13 different zone types. Each marine zone type has associated regulations that restrict or promote specific activities. For example, recreational activities such as boating, fishing, tidepooling, snorkeling, and SCUBA diving are limited in some zones. Scientific research is allowed at all sites, with appropriate permits, and is specifically promoted in a few sites...

  6. Monterey Peninsula Water Supply Project. Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Report/Statement II. Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-02-01

    sanderlings, long-billed dowitchers, and I western, California and Heermann’s gulls. Brown pelicans, double-crested cormorants, and surf scooters are typical...sediment carried in suspension above the stream bed (see suspended load). Board: The Monterey Peninsula Water Management District’s seven-member Board...silt and fine sand, which is carried in suspension above the bottom of a stream by moving water, as contrasted with the bed load rolled along the

  7. Employing LIDAR and Rtk GPS to Evaluate a Small Beach Nourishment in Southern Monterey Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, A. G.; Smith, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    An increasing number of coastal communities are considering opportunistic beach nourishment as a coastal erosion mitigation method, particularly as erosion rates are quantified with increasing accuracy and consequences of sea level rise are realized. The southernmost region of Monterey Bay is eroding at rates of 0-0.8 m/year and small scale beach nourishment has been recommended as a possible mitigation technique. However, the absence of monitored pilot studies and calibrated models has prevented stakeholders from confidently predicting the lifetime or cost-benefit of the project. During the winter of 2012 - 2013, approximately 7,500 m3 of Monterey Harbor dredge material was used to nourish a section of beach identified as a critical erosion area. To determine whether this method is feasible as A long term mitigation strategy, we have collected topographic survey data of the nourishment area and control sites. Baseline beach profile data were collected using vessel based light detection and ranging (LIDAR) and real time kinematic (RTK) GPS prior to nourishment and periodically following completion of the nourishment project. Swell height and period were also monitored immediately offshore of the nourishment region. Morphologic change based on topographic survey data is combined with wave data to calibrate a beach morphology model to the Southern Monterey Bay region for use in future coastal erosion decisions as well as establish a nourishment evaluation method that could be applied to other critical erosion areas.

  8. The first CERN Spring Campus

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2014-01-01

    From 14 to 16 April, the first edition of the CERN Spring Campus took place in Spain. Taking place over three intensive days, this event brought experts from CERN together at the University of Oviedo, where they met the engineers and scientists of the future in a programme of scientific and technological dissemination and cultural exchange.   The young participants of the first CERN Spring Campus and their instructors show their enthusiasm after the intensive three-day course. “This three-day school focuses on preparing young engineers for the job market, with a particular emphasis on computing,” explains Derek Mathieson, Advanced Information Systems Group Leader in the GS Department and Head of the CERN Spring Campus organising committee. “We organised talks on entrepreneurship and IT, as well as on job interviews and CV writing. It was also an important opportunity for the participants to meet CERN computing engineers to find out what it is like to work in I...

  9. Families of miocene monterey crude oil, seep, and tarball samples, coastal California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, K.E.; Hostettler, F.D.; Lorenson, T.D.; Rosenbauer, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Biomarker and stable carbon isotope ratios were used to infer the age, lithology, organic matter input, and depositional environment of the source rocks for 388 samples of produced crude oil, seep oil, and tarballs to better assess their origins and distributions in coastal California. These samples were used to construct a chemometric (multivariate statistical) decision tree to classify 288 additional samples. The results identify three tribes of 13C-rich oil samples inferred to originate from thermally mature equivalents of the clayey-siliceous, carbonaceous marl and lower calcareous-siliceous members of the Monterey Formation at Naples Beach near Santa Barbara. An attempt to correlate these families to rock extracts from these members in the nearby COST (continental offshore stratigraphic test) (OCS-Cal 78-164) well failed, at least in part because the rocks are thermally immature. Geochemical similarities among the oil tribes and their widespread distribution support the prograding margin model or the banktop-slope-basin model instead of the ridge-and-basin model for the deposition of the Monterey Formation. Tribe 1 contains four oil families having geochemical traits of clay-rich marine shale source rock deposited under suboxic conditions with substantial higher plant input. Tribe 2 contains four oil families with traits intermediate between tribes 1 and 3, except for abundant 28,30-bisnorhopane, indicating suboxic to anoxic marine marl source rock with hemipelagic input. Tribe 3 contains five oil families with traits of distal marine carbonate source rock deposited under anoxic conditions with pelagic but little or no higher plant input. Tribes 1 and 2 occur mainly south of Point Conception in paleogeographic settings where deep burial of the Monterey source rock favored petroleum generation from all three members or their equivalents. In this area, oil from the clayey-siliceous and carbonaceous marl members (tribes 1 and 2) may overwhelm that from the lower

  10. Perceptions of campus climate by sexual minorities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetreault, Patricia A; Fette, Ryan; Meidlinger, Peter C; Hope, Debra

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has indicated that students who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) often have negative experiences on university campuses due to their sexual orientation or gender identity. Direct and indirect experiences contribute to an overall perception of the campus climate. This study used an online survey to assess students' perceptions of campus climate, their experiences confronting bias, support of family members and friends, and whether they had considered leaving campus. Multiple regression analysis indicated that perceptions of poorer campus climate were predicted by greater unfair treatment by instructors, more impact from anti-lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer (LGBTQ) bias on friends' and families' emotional support, and having hidden one's LGBT identity from other students. Cluster analyses revealed four groups of participants distinguished by openness about their sexual orientation and negative experiences, with one group appearing to be at risk for poor retention. Results are discussed in terms of the needs of LGBTQ students on campus.

  11. Conversations about Sexuality on a Public University Campus: Perspectives from Campus Ministry Students and Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Charis R.; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M.; Messias, DeAnne K. Hilfinger; Friedman, Daniela B.; Robillard, Alyssa G.

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about university campus religious organisations' influence on students' sexuality-related attitudes and behaviours. This study sought to better understand sexuality-related communication within the context of campus ministries by exploring students' and campus ministry leaders' conversational experiences at a public university in…

  12. Conversations about Sexuality on a Public University Campus: Perspectives from Campus Ministry Students and Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Charis R.; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M.; Messias, DeAnne K. Hilfinger; Friedman, Daniela B.; Robillard, Alyssa G.

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about university campus religious organisations' influence on students' sexuality-related attitudes and behaviours. This study sought to better understand sexuality-related communication within the context of campus ministries by exploring students' and campus ministry leaders' conversational experiences at a public university in…

  13. Currents, temperature, attenuation, and conductivity data collected during the Monterey Canyon Experiment from moorings deployed from platforms ROBERT GORDON SPROUL and NOAA Ship McARTHUR from 1993-08-03 to 1995-05-15 (NCEI Accession 0067570)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Monterey Canyon experiment studied the mechanisms that govern the circulation within and the transport of sediment and water through Monterey Submarine Canyon....

  14. Flow and Chemistry Pulsations, Monterey: Implications for Stress Transient Modulations of Hydrologic and Geochemical Systems in the Greater San Andreas Fault Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K. M.; Fueri, E.; Hilton, D. R.

    2005-12-01

    Submarine fluid venting at continental shelf and slope regions has been recognized over the past ten years as an important, yet under-studied process in marine science. Seeps are now known to be a general feature of the hydrogeology of many tectonically active continental margins. The eastern Pacific margin is characterized by a variety of tectonic settings (i.e. convergent and strike-slip) where active venting of fluids and gases has been documented. Reports include vents off Alaska, Costa Rica, Monterey Bay, Eel River basin, and Heceta Bay, OR. Indications of seismic tremor, linked to hydrologic transience in the offshore regions of subduction zones have recently been published elsewhere (see Brown et al, EPSL 2005). We now address here the varying nature of submarine fluid discharges in a San Andreas strike-slip setting. A key element of the proposed work is the combined multidisciplinary measurement of fluid flow, seep temperatures, and dissolved noble gases and chemistry of the Monterey seep sites at Extrovert Cliff. The seeps are situated close to several active strike-slip faults including the Monterey and San Gregorio fault zones. Initial results of 2 week deployments in 2004 of flow meters at Extravert Cliff indicated high flow rates and elevated seep temperatures that vary by as much as a factor of 2 on diurnal time scales with subtle changes over longer periods (>2 weeks). There are also indicative chemical signals of deeply sourced fluids that vary widely with time that show the following signals: 1) Elevated abundances of both mantle derived Helium (3He) as well as 4He and 40Ar of radiogenic crustal relevant trace element components; 2) Altered fluid chemistry (including, Ca Mg, Li and B); 3) The fluid temperature, flow rates, and gas chemistry, in particular, vary with time. We have both long-term and sub-diurnal variations in flow and temperature as well as the 3He/4He ratios, helium concentration, CO2 concentration and d13C values perhaps influenced

  15. Virtual Campus Hub technical evaluation report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vercoulen, Frank; Badger, Merete; Monaco, Lucio;

    This report describes and discusses the technical achievements of the Virtual Campus Hub project and formulates a brief agenda for the future.......This report describes and discusses the technical achievements of the Virtual Campus Hub project and formulates a brief agenda for the future....

  16. Campus Stalking: Theoretical Implications and Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Joel H.; Cooper, Dianne L.

    2011-01-01

    The problem of campus stalking requires uniting several departments to develop a response plan reflective of the comprehensive nature of campus stalking. This article highlights how research on stalking, stalking theories, and related environmental theories support the formation of a cross-functional team to develop a multifaceted response to this…

  17. Campuses See Rising Demand for Housing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Eric

    2008-01-01

    The numbers looked strange. In early March, the University of Missouri had received many more campus-housing contracts than it expected. Each year many upperclassmen cancel their agreements after finding an off-campus rental, leaving enough spaces for incoming students. But on March 17, the first day freshmen could select their rooms online, there…

  18. Report on Extended Campus Library Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickler, Sally Ann; And Others

    This report presents the results of a study of the Extended Campus Library Services program at Western Kentucky University (WKU), which was conducted by a committee appointed by the Director of University Libraries. A description of the program's goals and objectives is followed by a review of the extended campus programs in relation to similar…

  19. A Rubric for Campus Heritage Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Charles A.; Fixler, David N.; Kelly, Sarah D.

    2011-01-01

    This article is inspired by recent observations, events, and publications, as well as by a general and rising concern for and appreciation of the culture of American historical heritage as manifested on college and university campuses. Among the influences and inspirations for this article are Richard P. Dober's (2005) "Campus Heritage"…

  20. Should Tourists Be Banned From Campuses?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Xiamen University,one of the leading universities in China,began to ban tour groups from entering its campus on June 1.The notice of the university said that except for certain dining halls,most of the school's cafeterias will not receive tourists or accept cash.However,individual tourists are still allowed to enter the campus after registration.

  1. Suicide and Its Prevention on College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyes, Lee

    2012-01-01

    Suicide is a significant issue facing higher education institutions. Many campuses are involved in a variety of procedures, programs, and initiatives that seek to reduce or prevent suicide and the impact of suicide-related behavior. This article offers examples of campus prevention efforts, important resources on suicide prevention for college…

  2. Campus Stalking: Theoretical Implications and Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Joel H.; Cooper, Dianne L.

    2011-01-01

    The problem of campus stalking requires uniting several departments to develop a response plan reflective of the comprehensive nature of campus stalking. This article highlights how research on stalking, stalking theories, and related environmental theories support the formation of a cross-functional team to develop a multifaceted response to this…

  3. The CIC Historic Campus Architecture Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Richard H.

    2011-01-01

    America's private colleges and universities include most of the oldest institutions of higher education in the country, and their evolving physical campuses say much about American education. In recent years, the study of campus history, preservation, and adaptive reuse has received increasing attention by many sectors of the educational…

  4. Making Technology Work for Campus Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floreno, Jeff; Keil, Brad

    2010-01-01

    The challenges associated with securing schools from both on- and off-campus threats create constant pressure for law enforcement, campus security professionals, and administrators. And while security technology choices are plentiful, many colleges and universities are operating with limited dollars and information needed to select and integrate…

  5. Green connector design for conservation campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prihanto, Teguh

    2017-03-01

    Universitas Negeri Semarang (UNNES) as a green campus of conservation must be comfortable, safe and fit for the users. As the growth of several new campus buildings, the need for integration means building green connectors adjacent buildings. The design is in line with their internal transportation policies that encourage the academic community to walk in the campus area. This effort is also to make the walk as a cultural activity, not merely implement policies campus only. So that the future is expected to create a built environment conservation campus humane, environmentally friendly and an inspiration for the region around the campus environment in an effort to better environmental management. The connector provided is considered still can not fully meet the eligibility aspect and comfort. Based on the extent of the problem can be formulated green connector design of the building to meet the comfort of pedestrians on campus. This study has the objective to: (1) assess the development potential point green connectors; (2) develop alternative design green connectors. Alternative green connector design that is more convenient to replace the connector campus that are currently lacking to provide comfort for pedestrians.

  6. Solicitation on Campus: Free Speech or Commercialization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Annette

    1986-01-01

    The issue of whether the First Amendments right to freedom of speech applies to commercial vendors on campuses as it does to nonprofit solicitation is addressed and guidelines provided. Banning commercial solicitation from residence halls, but allowing it on a limited basis in campus centers is recommended. (Author/ABB)

  7. The Mixed Political Blessing of Campus Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breen, Sheryl D.

    2010-01-01

    The rise of sustainability rhetoric, curriculum, infrastructure, and marketing on college campuses is a mixed blessing. On the one hand, college presidents are pledging to eliminate their campuses' global warming emissions; colleges and universities are building wind turbines, composters, and green buildings; and sustainability coordinators are…

  8. Biological marker distribution and significance in oils and rocks of the Monterey Formation, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiale, Joseph A.; Cameron, Douglas; Davis, Dean V.

    1985-01-01

    The biological marker distributions of several oils, core extracts and solid bitumens of the Monterey Formation of California have been studied. Sterane, terpane and monoaromatic steroid hydrocarbons were analyzed in samples from the San Joaquin, Los Angeles, Ventura and Santa Maria Basins. The sterane patterns of both oils and extracts are characterized by (a) low relative concentrations of diasteranes, (b) low 20S/20R-5α,14α,17α-ethylcholestane ratios, (c) relatively high concentrations of cholestane ( vs. methyl- and ethylcholestane) isomers. San Joaquin Basin samples contain significant amounts of the 5β isomer, which is generally absent in samples from other basins. The carbon number distribution of 5α,14α,17α,20R steranes is similar for all oils, regardless of API gravity, depth or basin location, and is suggestive of open marine depositional conditions for the source material involved. 17α(H),l8α(H),21β(H)-28,30-Bisnorhopane is present in almost all samples. Certain San Joaquin Basin oils and extracts contain (a) a series of 25-nor hopanes, including 25,28,30-trisnorhopane, (b) a distinctive monoaromatic steroid hydrocarbon distribution, (c) an aliphatic hydrocarbon fraction devoid of n-paraffins. Biological marker characteristics suggest that the Monterey oils examined originated early in the maturational sequence, from elastics-poor source material. API gravities of the Monterey Formation oils examined vary monotonically with (a) bisnorhopane/hopane ratios, (b) aromatized/regular sterane ratios and (c) the concentration of monoaromatized steranes relative to terpanes and regular steranes. These oil gravity correlations exist regardless of sample depth or basin location.

  9. Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide During The Monterey Cooling Event Inferred From Fossil Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuerschner, W. M.

    2001-05-01

    The Middle Miocene is a period of transition from the late Early Miocene climatic optimum to the modern Late Neogene climate mode. Major changes in East Antarctic Ice Sheet volume, sea level, deep ocean circulation and global carbon cycle took place. In the marine record a marked d13C excursion between about 17.5 Ma and 13.5 Ma indicates enhanced biological productivity and burial of organic carbon, which in turn may have resulted into a drastic depletion in atmospheric CO2 concentration and finally into global cooling (Monterey hypothesis). Well preserved fossil laurel leaves (Laurus abchasica) were studied from several Early and Middle Miocene brown coal deposits in Germany and Czech Republic. Applying the inverse relationship between the number of pores (stomata) on leaves and the ambient CO2 concentration, stomatal frequency analysis reveals changes in paleoatmospheric CO2 during the Monterey cooling event. Preliminary results indicate a doubling of stomatal density and stomatal index during the middle Miocene. The increase coincides with the beginning of the δ 13C excursion at about 17.5 Ma in the marine record. Maximum values occur around 14 Ma but decline again around 12 Ma. The comparison with the response rates of the modern Laurus indicates a drawdown of about 100 - 200 ppmv as a first order approximation. During the middle Miocene climatic optimum atmospheric CO2 concentrations may have been significantly higher than during the post-Monterey period. In contrast to Middle Miocene CO2 reconstructions based on marine proxies the present data suggest, that massive oceanic C burial depleted the atmospheric C reservoir. This depletion may have resulted into the global cooling through a reversed greenhouse effect.

  10. Insights into Seasonal Variations in Phosphorus Concentrations and Cycling in Monterey Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, M.; Defforey, D.; Paytan, A.; Roberts, K.

    2014-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for life as it is a structural constituent in many cell components and a key player in cellular energy metabolism. Therefore, P availability can impact primary productivity. Here we quantify dissolved and particulate P compounds and trace P sources and cycling in Monterey Bay over the course of a year. This time series gives insights into monthly and seasonal variations in the surface water chemistry of this region. Preliminary characterization of seawater samples involves measuring total P and soluble reactive P (SRP) concentrations. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P NMR) is used to determine the chemical structure of organic phosphorus compounds present in surface seawater. The isotopic signature of phosphatic oxygen (δ18Op) is used as a proxy for studying P cycling and sources. Oxygen isotope ratios in phosphate are determined by continuous-flow isotope mass ratio spectrometry (CF-IRMS) following purification of dissolved P from seawater samples and precipitation as silver phosphate. We expect to observe seasonal changes in P concentrations, as well as differences in organic P composition and P sources. The chemical structure of organic P compounds will affect their bioavailability and thus the extent to which they can fuel primary productivity in Monterey Bay. δ18Op will reflect source signatures and provide information on turnover rates of P in surface waters. Results from this work will provide valuable insights into seasonal changes in P cycling in surface waters and have important implications for understanding primary productivity in the Monterey Bay ecosystem.

  11. Deployment of a Long-Term Broadband Seafloor Observatory in Monterey Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, P.; Neuhauser, D.; Stakes, D.; Romanowicz, B.; Ramirez, T.; Uhrhammer, R.

    2002-12-01

    MOBB (Monterey bay Ocean floor Broad Band project) is a collaborative project between the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) and the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory (BSL). Its goal is to install and operate a permanent seafloor broadband seismic station as a first step towards extending the on-shore broadband seismic network in northern California to the seaside of the North-America/Pacific plate boundary, providing better azimuthal coverage for regional earthquake and structure studies. The successful MOBB deployment took place 40km off shore at a water depth of 1000m during three dives on April 9-11, 2002. The seismometer was buried in a 60-cm deep caisson, which was later back filled with glass beads to stabilize the instrument. New tools, including a high-pressure water-jet excavator, were developed for the ROV Ventana to accomplish these tasks. The ocean-bottom MOBB station currently comprises a three-component seismometer package, a current-meter, and a recording and battery package. Data recovery dives, during which the recording and battery package will be exchanged, are planned every three months for the next three years. A differential pressure gauge (DPG) (Cox et al., 1984) will be deployed as part of the recording package during the next data recovery dive in September 2002. The station is currently recording data autonomously. Eventually, it will be linked to the planned (and recently funded) MARS (Monterey Accelerated Research System; rl {http://www.mbari.org/mars/}) cable and provide real-time, continuous seismic data to be merged with the rest of the northern California real-time seismic system. The data are archived at the NCEDC for on-line availability, as part of the Berkeley Digital Seismic Network (BDSN). This project follows the 1997 MOISE experiment, in which a three-component broadband system was deployed for a period of three months, 40km off shore in Monterey Bay. MOISE was a cooperative program sponsored by MBARI, UC

  12. Numerical Simulation of Recent Turbidity Currents in the Monterey Canyon System, Offshore California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimsund, S.; Xu, J.; Nemec, W.

    2007-12-01

    The method of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been used, in the form of a 3D numerical model (Flow- 3D®), to perform a full-scale simulation of turbidity currents measured in December 2002 by three moorings in the Soquel and Monterey canyons. The model was verified by simulation of laboratory flows, and was upscaled to the Monterey Canyon system on the basis of high-resolution bathymetric data and flow measurements. The measured velocity profiles were sufficient to assess the flow thickness, initial velocity and duration in the canyon head zone. A computational grid with a highest feasible resolution was used, and both bathymetry and hydrostatic pressure were accounted for. The volumetric sediment concentration and exact grain- size composition of the flows were unknown, and thus a range of values for the initial concentration and bed roughness were assumed and assessed on a trial-and-error basis. The simulations reveal the behavior of a turbidity current along its descent path, including its local hydraulic characteristics (the 3D field of velocity, sediment concentration, shear stress, strain rate, and dynamic viscosity, as well as the magnitude of velocity and turbulent shear). The results confirm that the velocity structure of turbidity current is highly sensitive to variation in seafloor topography. The December 17th flow in the Soquel Canyon appears to have lost capacity by dilution over a relatively short distance and shown significant velocity fluctuations, which is attributed to the rugged topography of the canyon floor. A major loss of momentum occurred when the flow plunged at high angle into the Monterey Canyon, crashing against its bend's southern wall. The December 20th flow in the Monterey Canyon, in contrast, developed a considerably longer body and strongly accelerated towards the canyon's sharp second bend before crashing against its western wall. The mooring data show a down-canyon decline of velocity and suggest gradual waning, but the

  13. Modeling and Field Study of Coupled Bio-Optical Physical Processes in the Monterey Bay Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, I.; Arnone, R.; Teague, W.; Chavez, F.; Schofield, O.; Moline, M.; Penta, B.; Ryan, J.; Gould, R.; Anderson, S.; Jolliff, J. K.; Book, J. W.; Derada, S.; Paduan, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    Scientists from government, academia and non-profit organizations participated in an interdisciplinary field program in the Monterey Bay from during May-June of 2008. The experiment was a collaboration between the NRL project "Bio-Optical Studies of Predictability and Assimilation for the Coastal Environment (BIOSPACE)", Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) project "Rapid Environmental Assessment Using an Integrated Coastal Ocean Observation-Modeling System (ESPRESSO)", the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), the NRL project "Unattended Sea-bed Power for In-water Operations", and the U.S. Geological Survey. Objectives of the NRL BIOSPACE and MURI ESPRESSO projects are centered around developing an understanding of coupled bio-optical and physical processes in the coastal zone and improvements of predictability of coastal ocean optical properties on time scales of 1-5 days. MBARI has long-term objectives of monitoring, studying and managing the Monterey Bay ecosystem dynamics and health. The goals for the 2008 field program were to create a synoptic view of the coupled bio- optical physical conditions in the Monterey Bay and to relate satellite observed properties to their subsurface structure. The program was focused on the so-called "upwelling shadow area"(northern part of the bay), where biological processes are enhanced as a result of the slower physical dynamics. The field program deployed a wide range of assets: gliders, AUVs, ScanFish (a ship-towed platform), SEPTR, etc. This deployment was supplemented with intensive station sampling from the R/V Point Sur and satellite ocean color imagery (MODIS, MERIS). The field program was supported by a real-time modeling effort consisting of a hierarchy of different resolution, nested, data assimilating, coupled bio-optical physical models. Development of a pair of cyclonic (in the bay) and anticyclonic (outside of the bay) eddies was observed and predicted by the model during an

  14. The influence of the San Gregorio fault on the morphology of Monterey Canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, C.M.G.; Ryan, William B. F.; Eittreim, S.; Donald, Reed

    1998-01-01

    A side-scan sonar survey was conducted of Monterey Canyon and the San Gregorio fault zone, off shore of Monterey Bay. The acoustic character and morphology of the sonar images, enhanced by SeaBeam bathymetry, show the path of the San Gregorio fault zone across the shelf, upper slope, and Monterey Canyon. High backscatter linear features a few kilometers long and 100 to 200 m wide delineate the sea-floor expression of the fault zone on the shelf. Previous studies have shown that brachiopod pavements and carbonate crusts are the source of the lineations backscatter. In Monterey Canyon, the fault zone occurs where the path of the canyon makes a sharp bend from WNW to SSW (1800 m). Here, the fault is marked by NW-SE-trending, high reflectivity lineations that cross the canyon floor between 1850 m and 1900 m. The lineations can be traced to ridges on the northwestern canyon wall where they have ~ 15 m of relief. Above the low-relief ridges, bowl-shaped features have been excavated on the canyon wall contributing to the widening of the canyon. We suggest that shear along the San Gregorio fault has led to the formation of the low-relief ridges near the canyon wall and that carbonate crusts, as along the shelf, may be the source of the high backscatter features on the canyon floor. The path of the fault zone across the upper slope is marked by elongated tributary canyons with high backscatter floors and 'U'-shaped cross-sectional profiles. Linear features and stepped scarps suggestive of recent crustal movement and mass-wasting, occur on the walls and floors of these canyons. Three magnitude-4 earthquakes have occurred within the last 30 years in the vicinity of the canyons that may have contributed to the observed features. As shown by others, motion along the fault zone has juxtaposed diverse lithologies that outcrop on the canyon walls. Gully morphology and the canyon's drainage patterns have been influenced by the substrate into which the gullies have formed.

  15. Franciscan-type rocks off Monterey Bay, California: Implications for western boundary of Salinian Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Henry T.; Nagel, David K.

    1981-07-01

    Serpentinites and spilitic basalts recovered at depths of 1000 m from Ascension Submarine Canyon northwest of Monterey Bay, California indicate that Franciscan basement is present immediately to the west of the San Gregorio Fault. This new information, together with published geological/geophysical data, support previous suggestions that the offshore western boundary of the Salinian block (Sur-Nacimiento Fault) has been tectonically truncated by the San Gregorio Fault and has been displaced by as much as 90 km to the northwest since the mid-late Miocene.

  16. Collaborative procurement for developing a sustainable campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nifa, Faizatul Akmar Abdul; Rahim, Syukran Abdul; Rani, Wan Nurul Mardiah Wan Mohd; Ismail, Mohd. Noorizhar

    2016-08-01

    It is particularly challenging to achieve sustainability in campus universities, where a high volume of users and activities has made it more imperative to promote green buildings that reduce energy and water consumption while having a minimal carbon footprint. At present, the frameworks for sustainable campus have seldom focused on the project procurement method which would improve construction team integration in developing the physical aspect of campus development. Therefore, in response to that challenge, this paper investigates how the delivery team, responsible for the design and construction of a project, can be integrated to work together more efficiently and more using the collaborative procurement method known as partnering. This paper reports part of a previous research and sets the base for ongoing research on the critical factors in partnering for sustainable campus development. The outcome or result of this study will meet and support the requirement for construction, maintenance, and operation process for universities towards sustainable building/campus in the future.

  17. Sedimentary processes of the lower Monterey Fan channel and channel-mouth lobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaucke, I.; Masson, D.G.; Kenyon, Neil H.; Gardner, J.V.

    2004-01-01

    The distribution of deposits, sediment transport pathways and processes on the lower Monterey Fan channel and channel-mouth lobe (CML) are studied through the integration of GLORIA and TOBI sidescan sonar data with 7-kHz subbottom profiler records and sediment cores for ground-truthing. The lower Monterey channel is characterised by an up to 30-m-deep channel with poorly developed levees and alternating muddy and silty muddy overbank deposits. The channel is discontinuous, disappearing where gradients are less than about 1:350. Ground-truthing of the large CML shows that the entire CML is characterised by widespread deposits of generally fine sand, with coarser sand at the base of turbidites. Sand is particularly concentrated in finger-like areas of low-backscatter intensity and is interpreted as the result of non-turbulent sediment-gravity flows depositing metres thick massive, fine sand. TOBI sidescan sonar data reveal recent erosional features in the form of scours, secondary channels, large flow slides, and trains of blocks at the distal end of the CML. Erosion is probably related to increasing gradient as the CML approaches Murray Fracture zone and to differential loading of sandy submarine fan deposits onto pelagic clays. Reworking of older flow slides by sediment transport processes on the lobe produces trains of blocks that are several metres in diameter and aligned parallel to the flow direction. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Biological marker distribution in coexisting kerogen, bitumen and asphaltenes in Monterey Formation diatomite, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tannenbaum, E.; Ruth, E.; Huizinga, B.J.; Kaplan, I.R.

    1986-01-01

    Organic-rich (18.2%) Monterey Formation diatomite from California was studied. The organic matter consist of 94% bitumen and 6% kerogen. Biological markers from the bitumen and from pyrolysates of the coexisting asphaltenes and kerogen were analyzed in order to elucidate the relationship between the various fractions of the organic matter. While 17..cap alpha.. (H), 18..cap alpha.. (H), 21..cap alpha.. (H)-28,30-bisnorhopane was present in the bitumen and in the pyrolysate of the asphaltenes, it was not detected in the pyrolysates of the kerogen. A C/sub 40/-isoprenoid with head to head linkage, however, was present in pyrolysates of both kerogen and asphaltenes, but not in the bitumen from the diatomite. The maturation level of the bitumen, based on the extent of isomerization of steranes and hopanes, was that of a mature oil, whereas the pyrolysate from the kerogen showed a considerably lower maturation level. These relationships indicate that the bitumen may not be indigenous to the diatomite and that it is a mature oil that migrated into the rock. They consider the possibility, however, that some of the 28,30-bisnorhopane-rich Monterey Formation oils have not been generated through thermal degradation of kerogen, but have been expelled from the source rock at an early stage of diagenesis.

  19. Demonstration of surgical telerobotics and virtual telepresence by Internet + ISDN from Monterey (USA) to Milan (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovetta, A; Sala, R; Bressanelli, M; Garavaldi, M E; Lorini, F; Pegoraro, R; Canina, M

    1998-01-01

    This paper deals with the connection which has been held on 8th July 1997 in collaboration with the JPL of the NASA, Pasadena, California, between the Eighth International Conference on the Advanced Robotics (ICAR '97) in course at Monterey, California and the Telerobotics Laboratory of Politecnico di Milano connected in a multipoint teleconference through the MCU of Rome with the Aula Magna of the same Politecnico and the Palace Business of the Giureconsulti of the Chamber of Commerce of Milan. The demonstration has allowed to telecontrol a scara robot of the Sankyo and an ABB robot, which have affected simulations of operations of biopsy to the prostate, to the liver and to the breast, a mechanical hand and a model of a car, disposed in a space destined to reproduce the Martian ground, from Monterey to Milan by means of the INTERNET+ISDN connection from. In fact the event has taken place four days after the landing on Mars happily successful of the spatial probe Pathfinder from which it has gone out the "Sojourner" robot, telecontrolled from the JPL of the NASA, which has begun to take photos of the Martian ground and also some of these images have been transmitted in the course of the connection.

  20. Prevalence of epidermal conditions in California coastal bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in Monterey Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldini, Daniela; Riggin, Jessica; Cecchetti, Arianna; Cotter, Mark P

    2010-11-01

    The prevalence of epidermal conditions in a small population of coastal bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in Monterey Bay was evaluated between 2006 and 2008. Five different skin condition categories were considered, including Pox-Like Lesions, Discoloration, Orange Film, Polygon Lesions, and Miscellaneous Markings. Of 147 adults and 42 calves photographically examined, at least 90 and 71%, respectively, were affected by at least one or multiple conditions. Pox-Like Lesions were the most prevalent, affecting 80% of the population, including adults and calves. This condition warrants the most urgent investigation being possibly indicative of the widespread presence of poxvirus or a similar pathogen in the population. In view of the high number of individuals affected, standard monitoring of the health status of Monterey Bay bottlenose dolphins is considered imperative. Discoloration was strongly associated with Pox-Like lesions. Orange Films were likely an epifaunal infestation caused by diatoms, which have been documented in other cetacean species. Polygon Lesions, a newly described category, could be the result of infestation by barnacles of the genus Cryptolepas. Miscellaneous Markings were variable in appearance and may not have the same causative factor. Although none of the proposed etiologies can be confirmed without appropriate clinical tests, recognizing common visible characteristics of the conditions could aid in preliminary comparisons across populations and individuals.

  1. Biological marker distribution in coexisting kerogen, bitumen and asphaltenes in Monterey Formation diatomite, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, E.; Ruth, E.; Huizinga, B. J.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1986-01-01

    Organic-rich (18.2%) Monterey Formation diatomite from California was studied. The organic matter consist of 94% bitumen and 6% kerogen. Biological markers from the bitumen and from pyrolysates of the coexisting asphaltenes and kerogen were analyzed in order to elucidate the relationship between the various fractions of the organic matter. While 17 alpha(H), 18 alpha(H), 21 alpha(H)-28,30-bisnorhopane was present in the bitumen and in the pryolysate of the asphaltenes, it was not detected in the pyrolysates of the kerogen. A C40-isoprenoid with "head to head" linkage, however, was present in pyrolysates of both kerogen and asphaltenes, but not in the bitumen from the diatomite. The maturation level of the bitumen, based on the extent of isomerization of steranes and hopanes, was that of a mature oil, whereas the pyrolysate from the kerogen showed a considerably lower maturation level. These relationships indicate that the bitumen may not be indigenous to the diatomite and that it is a mature oil that migrated into the rock. We consider the possibility, however, that some of the 28,30-bisnorhopane-rich Monterey Formation oils have not been generated through thermal degradation of kerogen, but have been expelled from the source rock at an early stage of diagenesis.

  2. Acoustic mapping of squid egg clusters and their bottom habitat in Monterey Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Kenneth G.; Hanlon, Roger T.; Iampietro, Pat J.; Kvitek, Rikk G.

    2004-10-01

    Clusters of gelatinous egg capsules, known as mops or beds, of the market squid (Loligo opalescens) were mapped in a shallow-water, sandy habitat of Monterey Bay, California. The benthic egg clusters were imaged using an EdgeTech 272-TD dual-frequency sidescan sonar towed from R/V MACGINITIE, an 8-m-long survey vessel, with data recorded on a Triton Elics International Isis digital data acquisition system. Verification of target identity was accomplished independently by video photography from a remotely operated vehicle. The survey area included a 4-km stretch of sandy seafloor between Lover's Point and Cannery Row in Monterey at depths of 15-30 m. The study area had previously been mapped using the RESON SeaBat 8101 240-kHz multibeam sonar. Resulting high-resolution bathymetric data, with 1-m resolution, were used during the survey planning and execution. Squid egg clusters were clearly visible in the very-high-resolution, 400-kHz backscatter imagery, with pixel size 10-20 cm, recorded from the towed sidescan sonar. The concentration of egg clusters was greatest along a sloping feature believed to be a submarine fault. Egg mops with diameter as small as 0.5 m were distinguishable. [Support by Sea Grant is acknowledged.

  3. EXPLOITING REAL TIME DATA FROM THE MONTEREY OCEAN FLOOR BROADBAND OBSERVATORY (MOBB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowicz, B. A.; Taira, T.; Dolenc, D.; McGill, P. R.; Neuhauser, D. S.

    2009-12-01

    The Monterey Ocean Bottom Broadband (MOBB) observatory has been acquiring broadband seismic data and auxiliary channels (differential pressure and current meter) since its installation on the ocean floor in Monterey Bay, at 1000 m water depth and 40 km off-shore. Operating autonomously for almost 7 years, the system was successfully connected to the MARS cable (www.mbari.org/mars) on February 26th, 2009, via a 3.6 km extension cable from the MARS science node. The system works as designed and is currently streaming data from seismic, pressure, and water-current sensors to the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory, where it joins data from other broadband stations on land and is archived at the Northern California Earthquake Data Center. The availability of real-time MOBB broadband seismic data provides an opportunity for improving earthquake-monitoring capability in central California, particularly near the Santa Cruz Mountains segment of the San Andreas fault, and the San Gregorio fault. While buried in the mud, MOBB is affected by oceanic sources of noise, which are particularly strong in the infragravity wave band, and care must be taken to reduce this background noise in post-processing. We present examples of data analysis and illustrate how MOBB contributes to the determination of source parameters and regional structure.

  4. Biological marker distribution in coexisting kerogen, bitumen and asphaltenes in Monterey Formation diatomite, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, E.; Ruth, E.; Huizinga, B. J.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1986-01-01

    Organic-rich (18.2%) Monterey Formation diatomite from California was studied. The organic matter consist of 94% bitumen and 6% kerogen. Biological markers from the bitumen and from pyrolysates of the coexisting asphaltenes and kerogen were analyzed in order to elucidate the relationship between the various fractions of the organic matter. While 17 alpha(H), 18 alpha(H), 21 alpha(H)-28,30-bisnorhopane was present in the bitumen and in the pryolysate of the asphaltenes, it was not detected in the pyrolysates of the kerogen. A C40-isoprenoid with "head to head" linkage, however, was present in pyrolysates of both kerogen and asphaltenes, but not in the bitumen from the diatomite. The maturation level of the bitumen, based on the extent of isomerization of steranes and hopanes, was that of a mature oil, whereas the pyrolysate from the kerogen showed a considerably lower maturation level. These relationships indicate that the bitumen may not be indigenous to the diatomite and that it is a mature oil that migrated into the rock. We consider the possibility, however, that some of the 28,30-bisnorhopane-rich Monterey Formation oils have not been generated through thermal degradation of kerogen, but have been expelled from the source rock at an early stage of diagenesis.

  5. Late Quaternary relative sea level in Southern California and Monterey Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Laura C.; Simms, Alexander R.

    2015-10-01

    Few records of late Quaternary relative sea level (RSL) are available for the Pacific coast of North America south of San Francisco Bay, a region where RSL data would be particularly useful for constraining vertical rates of tectonic motion. This paper provides the first regional, uplift-corrected late Quaternary RSL history for southern California derived from a compilation of 132 previously published and unpublished radiocarbon ages from nearshore, estuarine, and freshwater deposits in sediment cores from coastal southern California. We also provide a local, uplift-corrected RSL history for Monterey Bay, central California, generated from 48 radiocarbon ages from Elkhorn Slough and surrounding environments. Our resulting compilations show rapid sea-level rise from 15 ka which begins to decelerate to present mean sea level (PMSL) between 6 and 8 ka. Late Holocene (Bay in central California. Both rates of late Holocene RSL rise calculated are lower than recent RSL rates from southern California (˜1.61 ± 0.34 to 2.4 ± 1.04 mm a-1) and Monterey Bay (1.49 ± 0.95 mm a-1), derived from uplift-corrected, 20th century tide gauge data. This new RSL data fills geographical gaps in relative sea-level histories, as well as provides important datums for local tectonic processes.

  6. Academic citizenship beyond the campus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Rikke Toft; Bengtsen, Søren Smedegaard

    2016-01-01

    -imagine the possibilities of the university to integrate with people and society through dialogue and placeful-ness. Accordingly, supporting academic citizenship entails designing for the placeful university – a university that invites and promotes openness, dialogue, democracy, mutual integration, care and joint......hrough combining theories of space and place with works on institutional being, virtues and modes of becoming, this article develops and promotes academic citizenship as the formation of dwelling, being and becoming on the placeful university beyond the campus. We argue that this is a prerequisite...... for the integration of the university in society and society in the university. We discuss the need for a concept of the placeful university to capture academic belonging in the nexus between university and society. As such, the conceptualisation of the placeful university provides an opportunity to re...

  7. Assessment of undiscovered continuous oil and gas resources in the Monterey Formation, Los Angeles Basin Province, California, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, Timothy R.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Pitman, Janet K.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Hawkins, Sarah J.; Le, Phuong A.; Lillis, Paul G.; Marra, Kristen R.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2016-07-08

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey assessed technically recoverable mean resources of 13 million barrels of oil, 22 billion cubic feet of gas, and 1 million barrels of natural gas liquids in the Monterey Formation of the Los Angeles Basin Province, California.

  8. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on the Nearshore Environment: A Month-Long Study in Monterey Bay CA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Magalen, Jason; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01

    A modified version of an indust ry standard wave modeling tool, SNL - SWAN, was used to perform model simulations for hourly initial wave conditio ns measured during the month of October 2009. The model was run with an array of 50 wave energy converters (WECs) and compared with model runs without WECs. Maximum changes in H s were found in the lee of the WEC array along the angles of incident wave dire ction and minimal changes were found along the western side of the model domain due to wave shadowing by land. The largest wave height reductions occurred during observed typhoon conditions and resulted in 14% decreases in H s along the Santa Cruz shoreline . Shoreline reductions in H s were 5% during s outh swell wave conditions and negligible during average monthly wave conditions.

  9. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: A Modeling Sensitivity Study in Monterey Bay CA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Grace Chang; Jason Magalen; Craig Jones

    2014-08-01

    A n indust ry standard wave modeling tool was utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters and wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deploym ent scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that b oth wave height and near - bottom orbital velocity we re subject to the largest pote ntial variations, each decreas ed in sensitivity as transmission coefficient increase d , as number and spacing of WEC devices decrease d , and as the deployment location move d offshore. Wave direction wa s affected consistently for all parameters and wave perio d was not affected (or negligibly affected) by varying model parameters or WEC configuration .

  10. Moments and Signal Processing: Proceedings of the Conference Held in Monterey, CA. on March 30-31 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-26

    tot,,•2y positivc (TP) if certain determinantal inequalities lh,11 ( Iailin 1938. ’p 11. 15). For instance, the functions exp(9x) and I(x < P) are TP...University of Pittsburgh Title: Probk ýility Calculations for Multivariate Pearson Families 1800-2000: " Social Hour," La Novia Terrace, Herrmann Hall 295

  11. 16TH Annual Review of Progress in Applied Computational Electromagnetics of the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA. Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Trueman C-130/Hercules HF Notch Antenna" David Gaudine 0940 "I-IF Towel-Bar Antenna Location Study Aboard an H3 Sikorsky Saad N. Tabet, Cart D. Myers...needed. For this reason an anatomically based model was obtained from Dr Om Gandhi of the University of Utah. This data is supported by programs, which...FRance, EDF-DER, Service IPN, D~partement SID, 1 Avenue du GCnrral-de-Gaulle, 92141 Clamart Cedex, May 1993. [8] C. M. Furse and 0. P. Gandhi

  12. Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: Evaluation of SNL-SWAN and Sensitivity Studies in Monterey Bay CA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Magalen, Jason; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01

    A modified version of an indust ry standard wave modeling tool was evaluated, optimized, and utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters a nd wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deployment scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that wave direction and WEC device type we r e most sensitive to the variation in the model parameters examined in this study . Generally, the changes in wave height we re the primary alteration caused by the presence of a WEC array. Specifically, W EC device type and subsequently their size directly re sult ed in wave height variations; however, it is important to utilize ongoing laboratory studies and future field tests to determine the most appropriate power matrix values for a particular WEC device and configuration in order to improve modeling results .

  13. 75 FR 67620 - Temporary Security Zones; San Francisco Bay, Delta Ports, Monterey Bay and Humboldt Bay, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    ... cruise ship, tanker or HIV that is underway, anchored, or moored within the San Francisco Bay and Delta..., within 500 yards ahead, astern and extending 500 yards along either side of any cruise ship, tanker or..., astern and extending 500 yards along either side of any cruise ship, tanker or HIV that is...

  14. CDC STATE System Tobacco Legislation - Smokefree Campus

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1995-2016. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. Legislation – Smokefree Campuses....

  15. CDC STATE System Tobacco Legislation - Smokefree Campus

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1995-2017. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. Legislation – Smokefree Campuses. The...

  16. CDC STATE System Tobacco Legislation - Smokefree Campus

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 1995-2016. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). State Tobacco Activities Tracking and Evaluation (STATE) System. Legislation – Smokefree Campuses. The...

  17. Dairy Campus in Leeuwarden krijgt vorm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koning, de C.J.A.M.; Rotgers, G.

    2011-01-01

    Dairy Campus begint vorm te krijgen. Nog niet in gemetselde bouwstenen, maar in projecten en op papier. Sinds maart 2011 heeft dit nieuwe melkvee-innovatiecentrum van Wageningen Universiteit en Research Center een manager: Kees de Koning.

  18. VetSuccess on Campus (VSOC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The VSOC program provides a VA Vocational Rehabilitation Counselor (VRC) to each VSOC school. These VRCs are called VetSuccess on Campus (VSOC) Counselors. A VA Vet...

  19. Analysis of a viral metagenomic library from 200 m depth in Monterey Bay, California constructed by direct shotgun cloning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preston Christina M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viruses have a profound influence on both the ecology and evolution of marine plankton, but the genetic diversity of viral assemblages, particularly those in deeper ocean waters, remains poorly described. Here we report on the construction and analysis of a viral metagenome prepared from below the euphotic zone in a temperate, eutrophic bay of coastal California. Methods We purified viruses from approximately one cubic meter of seawater collected from 200m depth in Monterey Bay, CA. DNA was extracted from the virus fraction, sheared, and cloned with no prior amplification into a plasmid vector and propagated in E. coli to produce the MBv200m library. Random clones were sequenced by the Sanger method. Sequences were assembled then compared to sequences in GenBank and to other viral metagenomic libraries using BLAST analyses. Results Only 26% of the 881 sequences remaining after assembly had significant (E ≤ 0.001 BLAST hits to sequences in the GenBank nr database, with most being matches to bacteria (15% and viruses (8%. When BLAST analysis included environmental sequences, 74% of sequences in the MBv200m library had a significant match. Most of these hits (70% were to microbial metagenome sequences and only 0.7% were to sequences from viral metagenomes. Of the 121 sequences with a significant hit to a known virus, 94% matched bacteriophages (Families Podo-, Sipho-, and Myoviridae and 6% matched viruses of eukaryotes in the Family Phycodnaviridae (5 sequences or the Mimivirus (2 sequences. The largest percentages of hits to viral genes of known function were to those involved in DNA modification (25% or structural genes (17%. Based on reciprocal BLAST analyses, the MBv200m library appeared to be most similar to viral metagenomes from two other bays and least similar to a viral metagenome from the Arctic Ocean. Conclusions Direct cloning of DNA from diverse marine viruses was feasible and resulted in a distribution of virus

  20. MOBB: a permanent ocean floor broadband seismic observatory in Monterey Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrhammer, R.; Romanowicz, B.; Stakes, D.; Neuhauser, D.; McGill, P.; Ramirez, T.

    2003-04-01

    The Monterey ocean bottom broadband station (MOBB) was installed on the seafloor in Monterey Bay, 40 km offshore, and at a depth of 1000m from the sea surface, on April 9-11, 2002. Its success capitalizes on the experience gained in the 1997 International MOISE experiment, conducted under similar conditions. The deployment took place during 3 dives on consecutive days and made use of MBARI's Point Lobos ship and ROV Ventana. The station is currently recording data autonomously. Eventually, it will be linked to the planned (and recently funded) MARS (Monterey Accelerated Research System; \\url {http://www.mbari.org/mars/}) cable and provide real-time, continuous seismic data to be merged with the rest of the northern California real-time seismic system. The data are archived at the NCEDC for on-line availability, as part of the Berkeley Digital Seismic Network (BDSN). The ocean-bottom MOBB station currently comprises a three-component seismometer package, a current-meter, a DPG, and recording and battery packages. The seismic package contains a low-power (2.2W), three-component CMG-1T broadband seismometer system, built by Guralp, Inc., with a three-component 24-bit digitizer, a leveling system, and a precision clock. The seismometer package is mounted on a cylindrical titanium pressure vessel 54cm in height and 41 cm in diameter, custom built by the MBARI team and outfitted for underwater connection. Data recovery dives, during which the recording and battery package will be exchanged are planned every three months for the next 3 years. Three such dives have already taken place, on 06/27/02, 09/20/02 and on 01/07/03. Due to a software problem, data were lost during the time period 07/01/02 and 09/20/02. Many regional and teleseismic earthquakes have been well recorded and the mass position signals indicate that the instruments have progressively settled. Preliminary analysis of data retrieved during the 2002 summer and winter dives will be presented. In particular

  1. Regional medical campuses: a new classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheifetz, Craig E; McOwen, Katherine S; Gagne, Pierre; Wong, Jennifer L

    2014-08-01

    There is burgeoning belief that regional medical campuses (RMCs) are a significant part of the narrative about medical education and the health care workforce in the United States and Canada. Although RMCs are not new, in the recent years of medical education enrollment expansion, they have seen their numbers increase. Class expansion explains the rapid growth of RMCs in the past 10 years, but it does not adequately describe their function. Often, RMCs have missions that differ from their main campus, especially in the areas of rural and community medicine. The absence of an easy-to-use classification system has led to a lack of current research about RMCs as evidenced by the small number of articles in the current literature. The authors describe the process of the Group on Regional Medical Campuses used to develop attributes of a campus separate from the main campus that constitute a "classification" of a campus as an RMC. The system is broken into four models-basic science, clinical, longitudinal, and combined-and is linked to Liaison Committee on Medical Education standards. It is applicable to all schools and can be applied by any medical school dean or medical education researcher. The classification system paves the way for stakeholders to agree on a denominator of RMCs and conduct future research about their impact on medical education.

  2. CCN Properties of Organic Aerosol Collected Below and within Marine Stratocumulus Clouds near Monterey, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akua Asa-Awuku

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The composition of aerosol from cloud droplets differs from that below cloud. Its implications for the Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN activity are the focus of this study. Water-soluble organic matter from below cloud, and cloud droplet residuals off the coast of Monterey, California were collected; offline chemical composition, CCN activity and surface tension measurements coupled with Köhler Theory Analysis are used to infer the molar volume and surfactant characteristics of organics in both samples. Based on the surface tension depression of the samples, it is unlikely that the aerosol contains strong surfactants. The activation kinetics for all samples examined are consistent with rapid (NH42SO4 calibration aerosol. This is consistent with our current understanding of droplet kinetics for ambient CCN. However, the carbonaceous material in cloud drop residuals is far more hygroscopic than in sub-cloud aerosol, suggestive of the impact of cloud chemistry on the hygroscopic properties of organic matter.

  3. Prey and plastic ingestion of Pacific Northern Fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis rogersii) from Monterey Bay, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly-Greenan, Erica L; Harvey, James T; Nevins, Hannahrose M; Hester, Michelle M; Walker, William A

    2014-08-15

    Marine plastic pollution affects seabirds, including Pacific Northern Fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis rodgersii), that feed at the surface and mistake plastic for prey or incidentally ingest it. Direct and indirect health issues can result, including satiety and possibly leading to inefficient foraging. Our objective was to examine fulmar body condition, identify cephalopod diet to species, enumerate and weigh ingested plastic, and determine if prey number and size were correlated with ingested plastics in beach-cast fulmars wintering in Monterey Bay California (2003, n=178: 2007, n=185). Fulmars consumed mostly Gonatus pyros, G. onyx, and G. californiensis of similar size for both years. We found a significant negative correlation between pectoral muscle index and average size of cephalopod beaks per stomach; a significant increase in plastic categories between 2003 and 2007; and no significant correlation between number and mass of plastic compared with number and size of prey for either year.

  4. Orbitally paced phosphogenesis in Mediterranean shallow marine carbonates during the middle Miocene Monterey event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Gerald; Hauzenberger, Christoph A.; Reuter, Markus; Piller, Werner E.

    2016-04-01

    During the Oligo-Miocene, major phases of phosphogenesis occurred in the Earth's oceans. However, most phosphate deposits represent condensed or allochthonous hemipelagic deposits, formed by complex physical and chemical enrichment processes, limiting their applicability for the study regarding the temporal pacing of Miocene phosphogenesis. The Oligo-Miocene Decontra section located on the Maiella Platform (central Apennines, Italy) is a widely continuous carbonate succession deposited in a mostly middle to outer neritic setting. Of particular interest are the well-winnowed grain to packstones of the middle Miocene Bryozoan Limestone, where occurrences of authigenic phosphate grains coincide with the prominent carbon isotope excursion of the Monterey event. This unique setting allows the analysis of orbital forcing on phosphogenesis, within a bio, chemo, and cyclostratigraphically constrained age-model. LA-ICP-MS analyses revealed a significant enrichment of uranium in the studied authigenic phosphates compared to the surrounding carbonates, allowing natural gamma-radiation (GR) to be used as a qualitative proxy for autochthonous phosphate content. Time series analyses indicate a strong 405 kyr eccentricity forcing of GR in the Bryozoan Limestone. These results link maxima in the GR record and thus phosphate content to orbitally paced increases in the burial of organic carbon, particularly during the carbon isotope maxima of the Monterey event. Thus, phosphogenesis during the middle Miocene in the Mediterranean was controlled by the 405 kyr eccentricity and its influence on large-scale paleoproductivity patterns. Rare earth element data were used as a tool to reconstruct the formation conditions of the investigated phosphates, indicating generally oxic formation conditions, which are consistent with microbially mediated phosphogenesis.

  5. Wireless Campus LBS - Building campus-wide Location Based Services bases on WiFi technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Köbben, Barend; Bunningen, van Arthur H.; Muthukrishnan, Kavitha; Stefanakis, Emmanuel

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a project that has just started at the University of Twente (UT) in cooperation with the International Institute for Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation (ITC) to provide Location Based Services (LBS) for the UT campus. This LBS will run on the existing Wireless Campus

  6. The Impact of the Structure, Function, and Resources of the Campus Security Office on Campus Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Patricia Anne

    2012-01-01

    The topic of this dissertation is college and university safety. This national quantitative study utilized resource dependency theory to examine relationships between the incidence of reported campus crimes and the structure, function, and resources of campus security offices. This study uncovered a difference in reported total crime rates,…

  7. NOSBATC - bathymetric contour data for the Monterey Bay region from Point Ano Nuevo to Point Sur, California based on NOAA/NOS data (UTM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains bathymetric data as contours for the the greater Monterey Bay area between Point Ano Nuevo to the north and Point Sur to the south. NOSBATC are...

  8. NOSBATC - bathymetric contour data for the Monterey Bay region from Point Ano Nuevo to Point Sur, California based on NOAA/NOS data (UTM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains bathymetric data as contours for the the greater Monterey Bay area between Point Ano Nuevo to the north and Point Sur to the south. NOSBATC are...

  9. High-Resolution Multibeam, Sidescan, and Subbottom Surveys in and Around Monterey Canyon Using the MBARI Mapping AUV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caress, D. W.; Thomas, H.; McEwen, R.; Henthorn, R.; Kirkwood, W. J.; Thompson, D.; Paull, C. K.; McGill, P.

    2005-12-01

    During 2004 and 2005, MBARI has conducted several high-resolution bathymetry, sidescan, and subbottom profiler surveys in and around Monterey Canyon, Monterey Bay, California. These surveys were conducted using the new MBARI Mapping Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV). This torpedo-shaped, 6000 m deep rated vehicle is equipped with a 200 kHz multibeam sonar, 110 kHz and 410 kHz chirp sidescan sonar, and a 2-16 kHz sweep subbottom profiler. The sonar package can also be mounted on ROV Ventana, allowing near-bottom bathymetric surveys of sites where extreme topography (e.g. the Monterey Canyon axis) preclude safe autonomous operation. The Mapping AUV is being used to monitor sediment transport through Monterey Canyon by conducting repeated high-resolution bathymetric surveys in the upper canyon. Upper Monterey Canyon is known to have frequent sediment transport events. Four sites have been selected with canyon axis depths of 300 m, 520 m, 1000 m, and 1400 m, respectively. Each survey nominally covers a 600 m by 600 m area with a 35 m line spacing and a 20 m altitude. We are achieving sub-meter lateral resolution and a vertical precision of 0.3 m. The combined bathymetry and backscatter successfully image fine scale channel features, including bedforms, small scarps and plunge pools, and undercutting of the inner canyon walls. All four sites have been surveyed at least once, and we will revisit these sites three times annually for the foreseeable future. We have also collected in excess of 170 km of subbottom profiles around and across the upper canyon. The subbottom profiler successfully images sediment structure to subsurface depths of as much as 50 m. These profiles demonstrate that the upper canyon walls are draped with sediment rather than exposing an erosional surface. Another Mapping AUV survey target is Smooth Ridge, located immediately north of Monterey Canyon and west of Soquel canyon. The upper reaches of Smooth Ridge are connected to the shelf across a

  10. The Future of the Campus: Architecture and Master Planning Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, Jonathan; Roberts, Paul; Taylor, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The article discusses current and likely future trends within the architecture and master planning of university campuses. It argues that higher education administrators must maximise the value of the campus to create physical environments that enhance the student experience.

  11. The Future of the Campus: Architecture and Master Planning Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, Jonathan; Roberts, Paul; Taylor, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    The article discusses current and likely future trends within the architecture and master planning of university campuses. It argues that higher education administrators must maximise the value of the campus to create physical environments that enhance the student experience.

  12. Professional Organizations for Pharmacy Students on Satellite Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Mollie Ashe; McLaughlin, Jacqueline; Shepherd, Greene; Williams, Charlene; Zeeman, Jackie; Joyner, Pamela

    2016-06-25

    Objective. To evaluate the structure and impact of student organizations on pharmacy school satellite campuses. Methods. Primary administrators from satellite campuses received a 20-question electronic survey. Quantitative data analysis was conducted on survey responses. Results. The most common student organizations on satellite campuses were the American Pharmacists Association (APhA) (93.1%), American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) (89.7%), Christian Pharmacists Fellowship International (CPFI) (60.0%), state organizations (51.7%), and local organizations (58.6%). Perceived benefits of satellite campus organizations included opportunities for professional development, student engagement, and service. Barriers to success included small enrollment, communication between campuses, finances, and travel. Conclusion. Student organizations were an important component of the educational experience on pharmacy satellite campuses and allowed students to develop professionally and engage with communities. Challenges included campus size, distance between campuses, and communication.

  13. Does the Degree of Campus "Wiredness" Matter?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouping Hu

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Responses to the College Student Experience Questionnaire 4th Edition from 18,844 students at 71 colleges and universities were analyzed to determine if the presence of computing and information technology influenced the frequency of use of various forms of technology and other educational resources and the exposure to good educational practices. Undergraduates attending "more wired" campuses as determined by the 1998 and 1999 Yahoo! Most Wired Campus survey more frequently used computing and information technology and reported higher levels of engagement in good educational practices than their counterparts at less wired institutions. Non-traditional students benefited less than traditional students, but both women and men students benefited comparably from campus "wiredness."

  14. Campus sustainable food projects: critique and engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlett, Peggy F

    2011-01-01

    Campus sustainable food projects recently have expanded rapidly. A review of four components - purchasing goals, academic programs, direct marketing, and experiential learning - shows both intent and capacity to contribute to transformational change toward an alternative food system. The published rationales for campus projects and specific purchasing guidelines join curricular and cocurricular activities to evaluate, disseminate, and legitimize environmental, economic, social justice, and health concerns about conventional food. Emerging new metrics of food service practices mark a potential shift from rhetoric to market clout, and experiential learning builds new coalitions and can reshape relations with food and place. Campus projects are relatively new and their resilience is not assured, but leading projects have had regional, state, and national impact. The emergence of sustainability rankings in higher education and contract-based compliance around purchasing goals suggests that if support continues, higher education's leadership can extend to the broader agrifood system.

  15. Design Process of a Campus Plan: A Case Study of Duzce University Konuralp Campus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgur Yerli

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Humanity have always felt the need to alter the environment they inhabit. In our modern era, this desire continues to exhibit itself in more urban landscapes. As a microcosm of the cityscape, university campuses contribute many cultural and economic advantages to the urban population. Moreover they bring under control to the urban growth and generally provides open and green spaces to the city. In this paper, Düzce University Konuralp Campus, located north of the Düzce City, was considered as our study area. Here we describe the Konuralp campus design which was developed in "Duzce University Konuralp Campus Development Plan Urban Design Competition". The method of the study consist of three steps. Some analyses like location, topography (ecological wind corridors and the meeting point of the valleys, spatial zoning, design axes and circulation were performed at the first step. In the second step it has been tried to specify how to apply the steps for designing kind of these campus projects. The concept of the design was created and constructed for the project. In the last step the design was visualized with 3D aplications and presented here. The aim of the study is how to design a campus which is sustainable and accessible. Consequently, the campus design was realized which had some design principles based on pedestrian priority. Educational buildings were separated from social buildings, sports center and cultural centers by using a-pedestrian walkways. In the middle of the working area campus square was designed which contains some land uses such as ceremony area, student center, amphitheatre and library. Finally a sustainable and accessible campus design was developed for Duzce University.

  16. Core descriptions, core photographs, physical property logs and surface textural data of sediment cores recovered from the continental shelf of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary during the research cruises M-1-95-MB, P-2-95-MB, and P-1-97-MB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzech, Kevin M.; Dahl, Wendy E.; Edwards, Brian D.

    2001-01-01

    In response to the 1992 creation of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (MBNMS), the United States Geological Survey (USGS) initiated a multiyear investigation of the Sanctuary continental margin. As part of the investigative effort, this report summarizes the shipboard procedures, subsequent laboratory analyses, and data results from three seafloor sampling cruises conducted on the continental shelf between Monterey peninsula, CA and San Francisco, CA. The cruises were conducted in 1995 aboard the NOAA Ship McArthur (M-1-95-MB) and in 1995 and 1997 aboard the R/V Point Sur (P-2-95-MB and P-1-97-MB). Scientists and representatives from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG), the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC), and the San Jose State University Moss Landing Marine Laboratory (SJSU-MLML) supported the research effort. In this report we present sediment descriptions, sediment textural data, physical property logs, station metadata, and photographs of subcores from a total of three hundred and eighty four sample stations. At these sites either a box corer, MultiCore™r, grab sampler or a combination of these sampling devices were used to collect the sea floor sediments. The report is presented in an interactive web-based format with each mapped core station linked to the corresponding description and photo, and to a spreadsheet of surface texture and other sampling data.

  17. Water mass bio-optical properties in the Monterey Bay region: Fluorescence-based inference of shifts in phytoplankton photophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolliff, J. K.; Gould, R. W., Jr.; Penta, B.; Teague, W. J.; DeRada, S.; Chavez, F. P.; Arnone, R. A.

    2012-07-01

    A physical and bio-optical field survey of the Monterey Bay area was conducted during May-June 2008. The combined bio-optical and physical data may be summarized as a transition between two end-member states during the late spring to summer upwelling season: (1) the mesotrophic, nanoflagellate-dominated, low-salinity surface waters (chlorophyll-a ˜ 0.5-2 mg m-3; S 2 mg m-3; S > 33.8) of Monterey Bay and adjacent continental shelf areas. High-resolution and collocated spectrophotometric, fluorometric and CTD data obtained from a towed platform indicated low-salinity subarctic-origin surface waters intruded into Monterey Bay on 4 June. The dark in vivo fluorometry (IVF) phytoplankton response normalized to particle absorption at 676 nm (the apparent fluorescence efficiency, AFE) was nearly fourfold larger in this water mass type compared to higher salinity surface waters more typical of Monterey Bay. The collocated fluorescence and optical data were then used to estimate in situ irradiance values and determine apparent light saturation intensities (I'k) based on the remarkably consistent AFE water column inflection points. I'kvalues retrieved from the low-salinity surface waters were approximately half those obtained over the continental shelf. An analysis of concomitant HPLC data, in addition to historical data for the region, suggest these observed fluorescence trends may be indicative of taxon-specific variation in photophysiology. Specifically, the subarctic water mass-associated pelagic nanoflagellate group likely possesses a fundamentally different photosynthetic architecture than large diatoms prototypical of coastal upwelling regimes.

  18. COMPARING SEA LEVEL RESPONSE AT MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA FROM THE 1989 LOMA PRIETA EARTHQUAKE AND THE 1964 GREAT ALASKAN EARTHQUAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. C. Breaker

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Two of the largest earthquakes to affect water levels in Monterey Bay in recent years were the Loma Prieta Earthquake (LPE of 1989 with a moment magnitude of 6.9, and the Great Alaskan Earthquake (GAE of 1964 with a moment magnitude of 9.2. In this study, we compare the sea level response of these events with a primary focus on their frequency content and how the bay affected it, itself. Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA was employed to extract the primary frequencies associated with each event. It is not clear how or exactly where the tsunami associated with the LPE was generated, but it occurred inside the bay and most likely began to take on the characteristics of a seiche by the time it reached the tide gauge in Monterey Harbor. Results of the SSA decomposition revealed two primary periods of oscillation, 9-10 minutes, and 31-32 minutes. The first oscillation is in agreement with the range of periods for the expected natural oscillations of Monterey Harbor, and the second oscillation is consistent with a bay-wide oscillation or seiche mode. SSA decomposition of the GAE revealed several sequences of oscillations all with a period of approximately 37 minutes, which corresponds to the predicted, and previously observed, transverse mode of oscillation for Monterey Bay. In this case, it appears that this tsunami produced quarter-wave resonance within the bay consistent with its seiche-like response. Overall, the sea level responses to the LPE and GAE differed greatly, not only because of the large difference in their magnitudes but also because the driving force in one case occurred inside the bay (LPE, and in the second, outside the bay (GAE. As a result, different modes of oscillation were excited.

  19. Isotopic evidence for complex microbial ecosystems in the phosphate-rich interval of the Miocene Monterey Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiling, B. P.; Coleman, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    The middle Miocene Monterey Formation has long been debated as a crucial global sink for organic carbon that led to global cooling. We evaluate proxies for the microbial ecosystem to investigate organic carbon burial within the phosphate-rich interval of the Monterey Formation at Naples Beach, California by combining mineralogical evidence with δ34S analyses of carbonate associated sulfate (CAS). All δ34S are below Miocene seawater values (~22‰, VCDT) and range from +12.2‰ to +18.5‰. δ34SCAS Sulfate reducing bacteria then consume the excess, residual sulfate, generating free H2S in the absence of available iron. H2S diffuses upward towards the sediment-water interface (an oxic-suboxic mixing zone) where H2S is oxidized to 34S-depleted sulfate either aerobically or coupled to nitrate reduction, and lowers seawater pH. The high phosphate content and low carbonate content of this interval of the Monterey Formation supports a model of precipitation in lower pH waters. Assuming a -40‰ fractionation of δ34S due to microbial sulfate reduction, we estimate at least a 10%-20% contribution of sulfate from sulfide oxidation to marine porewater sulfate. These results suggest that the phosphate-rich interval of the Monterey Formation housed a complex suite of iron and sulfate reducing bacteria as well as sulfide oxidizing bacteria, suggesting that significant organic carbon was consumed during early diagenesis and may account for low organic carbon content described in previous studies.

  20. Marine neotectonic investigation of the San Gregorio Fault Zone on the northern flank of Monterey Canyon, offshore central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, K. L.; Paull, C. K.; Brothers, D. S.; McGann, M.; Caress, D. W.; Lundsten, E. M.; Anderson, K.; Gwiazda, R.

    2014-12-01

    The San Gregorio Fault Zone (SGFZ) is part of the North American-Pacific plate boundary and is thought to accommodate right-lateral offset up to 10 mm/yr. Because much of the SGFZ in Monterey Bay, central California, lies offshore in steep submarine canyon bathymetry, little is known of its recent activity. We provide initial direct evidence for faulting where the SGFZ has been interpreted based on canyon morphology to cross the northern flank of Monterey Canyon. High-resolution multibeam bathymetry and chirp subbottom profiles were acquired during 13 dives with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute's (MBARI) Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) from 2009-2014 on the northern flank of Monterey Canyon, extending from the shelf edge ~15 km offshore Santa Cruz to ~1850 m water depth. Chirp profiles resolve layered sediments up to ~40 m subsurface in this region, and no fault scarps or seafloor lineaments are visible in the 1-m resolution multibeam bathymetry. At least one subsurface fault is identified within the SGFZ by offset reflections across a discrete, nearly vertical fault. However, this fault is only imaged where mass wasting has exhumed older strata to within ~25 m of the seafloor. Numerous slumps scars on the seafloor and packages of chaotic internal reflectivity in chirp profiles suggest that submarine landslide processes dominate the study area. To constrain the age of reflections offset by the fault, MBARI's Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) Doc Ricketts, sampled faces of slump scars where the offset reflections crop out using vibracores and horizontal push cores. Radiocarbon dating of foraminifera within these core samples is being used to constrain the last recorded movement on the fault. Application of AUV and ROV methods allows detailed neotectonic investigation of significant offshore structures, like the SGFZ, that contribute to hazard assessment.

  1. An Analysis of the Proposed Land Lease Agreement Between the Naval Postgraduate School and the City of Monterey, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-01

    of outgrants to the City of Monterey, in January 2001. The proposal covered three distinct areas of NPS and three different real estate agreements...the Navy and a local government, particularly, the exchange of Navy properties ( real estate ) and/or services for moneys and/or services. Stakeholder...and SWOT analysis are used as methodologies and tools to study the land lease process. The objective is to describe the public-public partnership

  2. Integrated Renewable Energy and Campus Sustainability Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uthoff, Jay [Luther College, Decorah, IA (United States); Jensen, Jon [Luther College, Decorah, IA (United States); Bailey, Andrew [Luther College, Decorah, IA (United States)

    2013-09-25

    Renewable energy, energy conservation, and other sustainability initiatives have long been a central focus of Luther College. The DOE funded Integrated Renewable Energy and Campus Sustainability Initiative project has helped accelerate the College’s progress toward carbon neutrality. DOE funds, in conjunction with institutional matching funds, were used to fund energy conservation projects, a renewable energy project, and an energy and waste education program aimed at all campus constituents. The energy and waste education program provides Luther students with ideas about sustainability and conservation guidelines that they carry with them into their future communities.

  3. Globalization, binational communities, and imported food risks: results of an outbreak investigation of lead poisoning in Monterey County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Margaret A; Hall, Celeste; Sanford, Eric; Diaz, Evie; Gonzalez-Mendez, Enrique; Drace, Kaitie; Wilson, Robert; Villalobos, Mario; Croughan, Mary

    2007-05-01

    Although the burden of lead poisoning has decreased across developed countries, it remains the most prevalent environmental poison worldwide. Our objective was to investigate the sources of an outbreak of lead poisoning in Monterey County, California. An investigation in 3 county health department clinics in Monterey County, California, was conducted between 2001 and 2003 to identify risk factors for elevated blood lead levels (> or = 10 microg/dL) among children and pregnant women. The prevalence of elevated blood lead levels was significantly higher in 1 of the 3 clinics (6% among screened children and 13% among prenatal patients). Risk factors included eating imported foods (relative risk [RR]=3.4; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.2, 9.5) and having originated from the Zimatlan area of Oaxaca, Mexico, compared with other areas of Oaxaca (RR=4.0; 95% CI=1.7, 9.5). Home-prepared dried grasshoppers (chapulines) sent from Oaxaca were found to contain significant amounts of lead. Consumption of foods imported from Oaxaca was identified as a risk factor for elevated blood lead levels in Monterey County, California. Lead-contaminated imported chapulines were identified as 1 source of lead poisoning, although other sources may also contribute to the observed findings. Food transport between binational communities presents a unique risk for the importation of environmental hazards [corrected

  4. Geochemistry of phosphatic-shales and associated authigenic minerals of the Miocene Monterey Formation: Implications for paragenetic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, A.; Loyd, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Monterey Formation is a petroleum source and reservoir rock in California that was deposited in several basins during the tectonically-active Middle Miocene. The middle carbonaceous marl member of the Monterey Formation contains intervals of phosphatic-shales that are rhythmically cemented by dolomite as layers and concretions. Diagenetic minerals can form as the result of organic matter remineralization facilitated by microbes utilizing oxygen, nitrate, iron (III), sulfate and fermentation products as electron acceptors. Precipitation of phosphate and carbonate minerals tends to occur in suboxic-anoxic sediments, generally experiencing sulfate reduction, where degradation of organic matter yields alkalinity, sulfide and phosphate ions. Here, we present sulfur and carbon geochemical data in order to better characterize the conditions that led to the precipitation of phosphorous-rich minerals (e.g., carbonate-fluorapatite (CFA)) and dolomite that occur in close stratigraphic proximity. These data include concentration of CFA-associated sulfate, carbonate associated sulfate (CAS) and the respective δ°S values. The concentration of inorganic/organic carbon and associated δC values have been determined for CFA, dolomite and the host-shale, in order to further characterize the diagenetic environment of precipitation. These data indicate that authigenesis occurred in pore waters influenced by multiple microbial reactions, including respiration and methanogenesis reactions, and ultimately highlight the complexity of the Monterey diagenetic environment.

  5. Five Years of Data at the Monterey Ocean Bottom Broadband Seismic Station (MOBB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, D.; Romanowicz, B.; McGill, P.; Neuhauser, D.; Uhrhammer, R.

    2007-12-01

    We present an overview of the results obtained at MOBB in the past 5.5 years of its continuous operation. In particular we focus on the observations of the long-period ocean surface gravity waves (infragravity waves; 0.002 to 0.05 Hz) and different methods to remove the long-period background and signal-generated noise from the seismic observations. MOBB was installed 40 km offshore in the Monterey Bay at a water depth of 1000 m in April 2002 in collaboration between Berkeley Seismological Laboratory and Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI). It is located west of the San Gregorio Fault and represents the first step towards extending the onshore broadband seismic network in northern California westward of the Pacific-North America plate boundary. MOBB comprises a three- component broadband seismometer Guralp CMG-1T, sensitive over a wide frequency range, from 50 Hz to 2.8 mHz (360 s), a water current meter measuring current speed and direction, and a differential pressure gauge. At present, the station is autonomous and the data are on average retrieved every 4 months using MBARI's remotely operated vehicle Ventana. Work is under way to connect it to the MARS (Monterey Accelerated Research System) cable so that it will contribute continuous real time data to the northern California earthquake monitoring system. Lessons learned from the MOBB deployment as well as noise removal techniques that are specific to the ocean bottom installation will provide us reference for future installations of broadband seismic stations in the oceans. When compared to the quiet land stations, ocean bottom seismic station MOBB shows increased background noise in the band pass of interest for the study of regional and teleseismic signals. This is mainly due to deformation of the seafloor under the pressure forcing by infragravity waves. Also observed is additional signal- generated noise which is due to the reverberations in the shallow sedimentary layers as well as in the

  6. Measuring Sexual Violence on Campus: Climate Surveys and Vulnerable Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heer, Brooke; Jones, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Since the 2014 "Not Alone" report on campus sexual assault, the use of climate surveys to measure sexual violence on campuses across the United States has increased considerably. The current study utilizes a quasi meta-analysis approach to examine the utility of general campus climate surveys, which include a measure of sexual violence,…

  7. Software Engineering Infrastructure in a Large Virtual Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristobal, Jesus; Merino, Jorge; Navarro, Antonio; Peralta, Miguel; Roldan, Yolanda; Silveira, Rosa Maria

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The design, construction and deployment of a large virtual campus are a complex issue. Present virtual campuses are made of several software applications that complement e-learning platforms. In order to develop and maintain such virtual campuses, a complex software engineering infrastructure is needed. This paper aims to analyse the…

  8. Implementation and application of ACL in campus network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shiyong; Li, Zhao; Li, Biqing

    2017-03-01

    In this paper, it firstly introduces the related knowledge of access control list (ACL) technology, hardware requirements and software configuration. Then it discusses the topological structure of campus network from the perspective of campus network planning as well as demonstrates the application of ACL technology in campus network combined with examples.

  9. Gang Activity on Campus: A Crisis Response Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Mahauganee; Meaney, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    This case study challenges readers to consider a contemporary issue for campus threat assessment and emergency preparedness: gang presence on college campuses. A body of research examining the presence of gangs and gang activity on college campuses has developed, revealing that gangs pose a viable threat for institutions of higher education. The…

  10. Software Engineering Infrastructure in a Large Virtual Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristobal, Jesus; Merino, Jorge; Navarro, Antonio; Peralta, Miguel; Roldan, Yolanda; Silveira, Rosa Maria

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The design, construction and deployment of a large virtual campus are a complex issue. Present virtual campuses are made of several software applications that complement e-learning platforms. In order to develop and maintain such virtual campuses, a complex software engineering infrastructure is needed. This paper aims to analyse the…

  11. A Virtual Campus Based on Human Factor Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuting; Kang, Houliang

    2014-01-01

    Three Dimensional or 3D virtual reality has become increasingly popular in many areas, especially in building a digital campus. This paper introduces a virtual campus, which is based on a 3D model of The Tourism and Culture College of Yunnan University (TCYU). Production of the virtual campus was aided by Human Factor and Ergonomics (HF&E), an…

  12. A New Campus Police Agency: A Florida Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parfitt, Rick

    2012-01-01

    Campus policing is a geographically focused police practice and the epitome of community oriented policing. Campus law enforcement agencies deal not only with a racially, ethnically, and culturally diverse population, they also deal with populations that change dramatically every year. While some campuses are enclaves unto themselves, many are…

  13. A Virtual Campus Based on Human Factor Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuting; Kang, Houliang

    2014-01-01

    Three Dimensional or 3D virtual reality has become increasingly popular in many areas, especially in building a digital campus. This paper introduces a virtual campus, which is based on a 3D model of The Tourism and Culture College of Yunnan University (TCYU). Production of the virtual campus was aided by Human Factor and Ergonomics (HF&E), an…

  14. A Geospatial Mixed Methods Approach to Assessing Campus Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hites, Lisle S.; Fifolt, Matthew; Beck, Heidi; Su, Wei; Kerbawy, Shatomi; Wakelee, Jessica; Nassel, Ariann

    2013-01-01

    Background: While there is no panacea for alleviating campus safety concerns, safety experts agree that one of the key components to an effective campus security plan is monitoring the environment. Despite previous attempts to measure campus safety, quantifying perceptions of fear, safety, and risk remains a challenging issue. Since perceptions of…

  15. Understanding the Law Enforcement Officer's Role in the Campus Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhyne, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    Campus police forces operate under a difficult mandate of competing and conflicting goals. Officers are charged with protecting institutions whose basic mission is to provide a peaceful, open campus setting that encourages freedom of movement and expression. Campuses are generally unguarded and open to the general public and their buildings,…

  16. Campus Information Network Hardware System Design%Campus Information Network Hardware System Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘正勇

    2011-01-01

    The emphasis of constructing and developing the campus information network is how to design and optimize the network hardware system. This paper mainly studies the network system structure design, the server system structure design and the network export

  17. Needed: A Fresh Perspective on Campus Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Anthony; Males, Mike

    2017-01-01

    That campuses suffer unacceptable levels of violence is undisputable; they are part of a larger American society in which family, community, and institutional violence far exceed levels found in comparable Western nations. And yet, amid the finger-pointing and scapegoating of students as violent, we note a critical lack of evidence-based analysis,…

  18. Uus ja uhke campus valmib aastaks 2010

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Tallinna Tehnikaülikooli haldusdirektor Henn Karits tutvustab ülikooli lähimate aastate ehitusplaane - peamaja rekonstrueerimist, majandus- ja humanitaarteaduskondade hoone ning raamatukogu uue hoone ehitamist. Uus campus sisaldab endas ka maa-aluse parkla, spordikompleksi, üliõpilasühiselamud

  19. A Comprehensive Model for Campus Death Postvention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, David X.; Ginsberg, Marc H.

    1996-01-01

    Describes an ecomap and time-event flowchart for monitoring postvention following a death on a college campus. Argues that poor coordination of postvention efforts can result in delays, duplication of efforts, errors, risk of liability, and public relations problems. Provides diagrams of an ecomap and of a time-event schedule. (RJM)

  20. For Members Only: Feminism on Campus Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agness, Karin L.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of contemporary feminism in the classroom and on campus is widespread, and student clubs, women's centers, and women's studies departments often exclude women who hold traditional views. In this article, the author takes a look at how this influence evolved and describes the very successful actions she took as a student to challenge…

  1. For Members Only: Feminism on Campus Today

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agness, Karin L.

    2010-01-01

    The influence of contemporary feminism in the classroom and on campus is widespread, and student clubs, women's centers, and women's studies departments often exclude women who hold traditional views. In this article, the author takes a look at how this influence evolved and describes the very successful actions she took as a student to challenge…

  2. New Campus Crime Prevention Resources Available

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campus Law Enforcement Journal, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The Campus Crime Prevention Committee has compiled a list of university and college crime prevention agencies and resources, which includes contact information, links to agency crime prevention web pages, and a list of resources they offer (i.e., brochures, guides, PowerPoint programs, videos, etc.) as well as a spreadsheet showing organizations…

  3. Campus Response to a Student Gunman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmussen, Kelly J.; Creswell, John W.

    1995-01-01

    A qualitative case analysis describes campus reaction to an incident in which a student attempted to fire a gun at his classmates. Data were collected through interviews with informants, observations, documents, and audiovisual materials. From the case emerged themes of denial, fear, concern for safety, long-term psychological effects, and need…

  4. Campus Environmental Audits: The UCLA Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, April A.; Gottlieb, Robert

    1992-01-01

    The nation's first comprehensive analysis of a university's environmental impact, at the University of California at Los Angeles, has become a blueprint for prompting environmental change on campuses nationwide. The study documented conditions in the workplace, wastes and hazards, air quality, water and energy use, and procurement practices.…

  5. Policing Alcohol and Related Crimes on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Andrea N.

    2013-01-01

    Research shows that college students drink alcohol frequently and heavily. This can compromise their health and well-being. Student drinking is also tied to crime. While prior work explores the nature and extent of crimes involving alcohol on campus, to date no study has examined how police handle these incidents or crime generally. This study…

  6. Guns on Campus: A Chilling Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mash, Kenneth M.

    2013-01-01

    The author of this article observes that, while much has been written on the overall topic of safety with regard to allowing guns on college campuses, little has been said about how allowing the possession of deadly weapons can create a "chilling effect" on academic discussions. This article considers how some universities have…

  7. A Reaction to Mazoue's Deconstructed Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrock, Sharon A.

    2012-01-01

    Mazoue's ("J Comput High Educ," 2012) article, "The Deconstructed Campus," is examined from the perspective of instructional design practice. Concerns center on: the knowledge base of precision instruction; the differential effectiveness of teaching procedural as opposed to declarative knowledge; the reliance on assessment of online learning; and…

  8. Eco-Friendly Campuses as Teaching Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Stephen J.; Kearns, Thomas D.

    2008-01-01

    Sustainable design projects offer academic communities the opportunity to make the design and operations of their campuses part of the larger lessons of social and environmental responsibility that are integral parts of higher education. In no place is that demonstrated more clearly than in New England, with its long commitment to environmental…

  9. Historical Analysis of College Campus Interracial Dating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firmin, Michael W.; Firebaugh, Stephanie

    2008-01-01

    Interracial dating on American campuses has had a relatively stormy past. Until the past three decades or so, it was outlawed in some states. Southern institutions, in particular, such as the infamous Bob Jones University have made this issue divisive even among their own constituencies. Age and generation seem to be cogent factors with younger…

  10. Infusing JUST Design in Campus Recreation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staeger-Wilson, Katheryne; Sampson, Douglas H.

    2012-01-01

    This practice brief highlights the collaborative work among a disability resource professional, a university architect, and students with disabilities to create a campus recreation center with universal design features. This partnership serves to illustrate that building to minimum compliance standards does not necessarily remove barriers to…

  11. Adaptively Ubiquitous Learning in Campus Math Path

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Shu-Chuan; Kuo, Bor-Chen; Liu, Yu-Lung

    2012-01-01

    The purposes of this study are to develop and evaluate the instructional model and learning system which integrate ubiquitous learning, computerized adaptive diagnostic testing system and campus math path learning. The researcher first creates a ubiquitous learning environment which is called "adaptive U-learning math path system". This…

  12. Leadership Development on a Diverse Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riutta, Satu; Teodorescu, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    While leadership development is considered an important goal of education on many campuses, very little is known about how leadership skills develop in a diverse environment, which most colleges will be in the future. We compare causes for Socially Responsible Leadership (SRL) at the end of college students' first year in one diverse liberal…

  13. Gay Rights on Campus, circa 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Elizabeth P.; Ford, Charles H.

    2011-01-01

    The environment for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) students, staff, and faculty on college campuses has certainly improved over the last generation, but recent dramatic episodes confirm the continuing need for vigilance and reform. Students remain the constituency most vulnerable to the effects of entrenched bigotry: the harassment…

  14. Operations Course Icebreaker: Campus Club Cupcakes Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Brent; Southin, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Campus Club Cupcakes is an in-class "introduction to operations management" experiential learning exercise which can be used within minutes of starting the course. After reading the one-page mini case, students are encouraged to meet each other and collaborate to determine if making and selling cupcakes to fellow business students would…

  15. Uus ja uhke campus valmib aastaks 2010

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Tallinna Tehnikaülikooli haldusdirektor Henn Karits tutvustab ülikooli lähimate aastate ehitusplaane - peamaja rekonstrueerimist, majandus- ja humanitaarteaduskondade hoone ning raamatukogu uue hoone ehitamist. Uus campus sisaldab endas ka maa-aluse parkla, spordikompleksi, üliõpilasühiselamud

  16. Guns on Campus: A Chilling Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mash, Kenneth M.

    2013-01-01

    The author of this article observes that, while much has been written on the overall topic of safety with regard to allowing guns on college campuses, little has been said about how allowing the possession of deadly weapons can create a "chilling effect" on academic discussions. This article considers how some universities have…

  17. Nerf Guns Strike a Nerve on Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    Killing zombies on campus just isn't as much fun as it used to be. Students at Bowling Green State University once carried Nerf guns for a week each semester, shooting the zombies before the creatures could tag them. Participants were seen by most bystanders as nerdy but harmless kids who liked role-playing. These days, bright plastic Nerf guns…

  18. Transportation Sustainability on a University Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, David H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to show the present level of sustainable transportation, mainly walking and bicycling, on a large campus in the US Midwest and then analyzes some of the opportunities and impediments in increasing the modal share. Design/methodology/approach: Three types of analysis are used. First, current level of walking and bicycling…

  19. Hate Speech on Campus: A Practical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    Looks at arguments concerning hate speech and speech codes on college campuses, arguing that speech codes are likely to be of limited value in achieving civil rights objectives, and that there are alternatives less harmful to civil liberties and more successful in promoting civil rights. Identifies specific goals, and considers how restriction of…

  20. Operations Course Icebreaker: Campus Club Cupcakes Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, Brent; Southin, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Campus Club Cupcakes is an in-class "introduction to operations management" experiential learning exercise which can be used within minutes of starting the course. After reading the one-page mini case, students are encouraged to meet each other and collaborate to determine if making and selling cupcakes to fellow business students would…

  1. Campus Police Benefit by Automating Training Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Bob

    2008-01-01

    Making sure law enforcement officers are current with their professional training has always been a top priority of police departments whether they must protect a city or a college campus. However, as training has expanded with many new certification categories, tracking all of these for each officer has grown more complex. This has prompted many…

  2. Improving Service Management in Campus IT Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Stewart H. C.; Chan, Yuk-Hee

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims at presenting the benefits from implementing IT service management (ITSM) in an organization for managing campus-wide IT operations. In order to improve the fault correlation from business perspectives, we proposed a framework to automate network and system alerts with respect to its business service impact for proactive…

  3. Sustainable Campus: Engaging the Community in Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Too, Linda; Bajracharya, Bhishna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify the major factors necessary for engaging university campus community in sustainability. While general awareness in sustainability issues has improved in recent years through mass media coverage, this knowledge is not always translated into actual sustainable practice. Studies have indicated that…

  4. Mapping Academic Library Contributions to Campus Internationalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Steven W.; Kutner, Laurie; Cooper, Liz

    2015-01-01

    This study surveyed academic libraries across the United States to establish baseline data on their contributions to campus internationalization. Supplementing data from the American Council on Education (ACE) on internationalization of higher education, this research measured the level of international activities taking place in academic…

  5. Sustainable Campus: Engaging the Community in Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Too, Linda; Bajracharya, Bhishna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify the major factors necessary for engaging university campus community in sustainability. While general awareness in sustainability issues has improved in recent years through mass media coverage, this knowledge is not always translated into actual sustainable practice. Studies have indicated that…

  6. Rethinking Partnerships on a Decentralized Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufault, Katie H.

    2017-01-01

    Decentralization is an effective approach for structuring campus learning and success centers. McShane & Von Glinow (2007) describe decentralization as "an organizational model where decision authority and power are dispersed among units rather than held by a single small group of administrators" (p. 237). A decentralized structure…

  7. Savoy/TMA Public Education Campus Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    21st Century School Fund, 2006

    2006-01-01

    The Savoy/TMA Public Education Campus encompasses the 3.5 acres that includes the Savoy Elementary School and the former Nichols Avenue School, now the fully modernized Thurgood Marshall Academy Public Charter High School (TMA) and a recreation center sponsored by the Department of Parks and Recreation. As a part of public initiatives to better…

  8. Building Partnerships with College Campuses: Community Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiderman, Sally; Furco, Andrew; Zapf, Jennifer; Goss, Megan

    The information that forms the basis of this brochure was drawn from a summit of community organization representatives who have worked in partnerships with institutions of higher education. The brochure highlights three issues community partners believe must be fully addressed if community/campus partnerships are to be successful and mutually…

  9. Facilitating College Readiness through Campus Life Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    In a program called "College Immersion," middle grades students spend up to one week on a local college campus, attending specially designed college classes and experiencing collegiate activities. This research study reports on findings related to two different college-middle school partnerships involved in a College Immersion program.…

  10. Design and Implementation of Campus Application APP Based on Android

    Science.gov (United States)

    dongxu, Zhu; yabin, liu; xian lei, PI; weixiang, Zhou; meng, Huang

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, "Internet + campus" as the entrance of the Android technology based on the application of campus design and implementation of Application program. Based on GIS(Geographic Information System) spatial database, GIS spatial analysis technology, Java development technology and Android development technology, this system server adopts the Model View Controller architectue to realize the efficient use of campus information and provide real-time information of all kinds of learning and life for campus student at the same time. "Fingertips on the Institute of Disaster Prevention Science and Technology" release for the campus students of all grades of life, learning, entertainment provides a convenient.

  11. Linking Planktonic Larval Abundance to Internal Bores at the Head of the Monterey Submarine Canyon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, J.; Walter, R. K.; Steinbeck, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Variability in the physical coastal environment can play an important role in determining the spatio-temporal variation in abundance of planktonic organisms. Combining planktonic larval abundance estimates over the course of a year with concurrent temperature and current data, this study provides empirical data linking a locally predominant internal tidal feature to patterns of biological abundance in the very nearshore environment at the head of Monterey Submarine Canyon. The physical observations indicate the presence of seasonally-variable semidiurnal internal bores that result in the pumping of cold (subthermocline) waters onto the adjacent shelf. Analysis of the larval abundance data indicates an assemblage shift from a relatively abundant shelf assemblage of larval fishes to a reduced abundance assemblage that is concurrent with the semidiurnal cold water intrusions driven by the tidal pumping. Results suggest that the tidal period pumping of subthermocline waters by internal bores dilutes or displaces shelf waters and their associated planktonic larval community. This could have important ecological implications at these scales and may also be of interest when siting industrial facilities that require seawater for cooling or desalination, as it would potentially reduce their impact on regional planktonic communities by diluting their rates of entrainment.

  12. Electrical Resistivity Imaging of Seawater Intrusion into the Monterey Bay Aquifer System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidlisecky, A; Moran, T; Hansen, B; Knight, R

    2016-03-01

    We use electrical resistivity tomography to obtain a 6.8-km electrical resistivity image to a depth of approximately 150 m.b.s.l. along the coast of Monterey Bay. The resulting image is used to determine the subsurface distribution of saltwater- and freshwater-saturated sediments and the geologic controls on fluid distributions in the region. Data acquisition took place over two field seasons in 2011 and 2012. To maximize our ability to image both vertical and horizontal variations in the subsurface, a combination of dipole-dipole, Wenner, Wenner-gamma, and gradient measurements were made, resulting in a large final dataset of approximately 139,000 data points. The resulting resistivity section extends to a depth of 150 m.b.s.l., and is used, in conjunction with the gamma logs from four coastal monitoring wells to identify four dominant lithologic units. From these data, we are able to infer the existence of a contiguous clay layer in the southern portion of our transect, which prevents downward migration of the saltwater observed in the upper 25 m of the subsurface to the underlying freshwater aquifer. The saltwater and brackish water in the northern portion of the transect introduce the potential for seawater intrusion into the hydraulically connected freshwater aquifer to the south, not just from the ocean, but also laterally from north to south.

  13. Resistivity imaging reveals complex pattern of saltwater intrusion along Monterey coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Meredith; Pidlisecky, Adam; Knight, Rosemary

    2017-08-01

    Electrical Resistivity Tomography data were acquired along 40 km of the Monterey Bay coast in central California. These data resulted in electrical resistivity images to depths of approximately 280 m.b.s.l., which were used to understand the distribution of freshwater and saltwater in the subsurface, and factors controlling this distribution. The resulting resistivity sections were interpreted in conjunction with existing data sets, including well logs, seismic reflection data, geologic reports, hydrologic reports, and land use maps from the region. Interpretation of these data shows a complex pattern of saltwater intrusion resulting from geology, pumping, and recharge. The resistivity profiles were used to identify geological flow conduits and barriers such as palaeo-channels and faults, localized saltwater intrusion from individual pumping wells, infiltration zones of surface fresh and brackish water, and regions showing improvements in water quality due to management actions. The use of ERT data for characterizing the subsurface in this region has led to an understanding of the spatial distribution of freshwater and saltwater at a level of detail unattainable with the previously deployed traditional well based salinity mapping and monitoring techniques alone. Significant spatial variability in the extent and geometry of intrusion observed in the acquired data highlights the importance of adopting continuous subsurface characterization methods such as this one.

  14. Moisture Adsorption and Thermodynamic Properties of California Grown Almonds (Varieties: Nonpareil and Monterey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zuo Taitano

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Moisture adsorption characteristics of California grown almonds (Nonpareil: pasteurized and unpasteurized almonds; Monterey: pasteurized, unpasteurized and blanched almonds were obtained using the gravimetric method over a range of water activities from 0.11 to 0.98 at 7-50ºC. The weights of almonds were measured until samples reached a constant weight. The relationship between equilibrium moisture content and water activity was established using the Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer model. The diffusion coefficient of water in almond kernels was calculated based on Ficks second law. The monolayer moisture value of almonds ranged from 0.020 to 0.035 kg H2O kg-1 solids. The diffusion coefficient increased with temperature at a constant water activity, and decreased with water activity at a constant temperature. The thermodynamic properties (net isosteric heat, differential enthalpy and entropy were also determined. The net isosteric heat of adsorption decreased with the increasing moisture content, and the plot of differential enthalpy versus entropy satisfied the enthalpy-entropy compensation theory. The adsorption process of almond samples was enthalpy driven over the range of studied moisture contents.

  15. Biomonitoring of marine vertebrates in Monterey Bay using eDNA metabarcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andruszkiewicz, Elizabeth A; Starks, Hilary A; Chavez, Francisco P; Sassoubre, Lauren M; Block, Barbara A; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2017-01-01

    Molecular analysis of environmental DNA (eDNA) can be used to assess vertebrate biodiversity in aquatic systems, but limited work has applied eDNA technologies to marine waters. Further, there is limited understanding of the spatial distribution of vertebrate eDNA in marine waters. Here, we use an eDNA metabarcoding approach to target and amplify a hypervariable region of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene to characterize vertebrate communities at 10 oceanographic stations spanning 45 km within the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (MBNMS). In this study, we collected three biological replicates of small volume water samples (1 L) at 2 depths at each of the 10 stations. We amplified fish mitochondrial DNA using a universal primer set. We obtained 5,644,299 high quality Illumina sequence reads from the environmental samples. The sequence reads were annotated to the lowest taxonomic assignment using a bioinformatics pipeline. The eDNA survey identified, to the lowest taxonomic rank, 7 families, 3 subfamilies, 10 genera, and 72 species of vertebrates at the study sites. These 92 distinct taxa come from 33 unique marine vertebrate families. We observed significantly different vertebrate community composition between sampling depths (0 m and 20/40 m deep) across all stations and significantly different communities at stations located on the continental shelf (200 m bottom depth). All but 1 family identified using eDNA metabarcoding is known to occur in MBNMS. The study informs the implementation of eDNA metabarcoding for vertebrate biomonitoring.

  16. Effects of pruning in Monterey pine plantations affected by Fusarium circinatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezos, D.; Lomba, J. M.; Martinez-Alvarez, P.; Fernandez, M.; Diez, J. J.

    2012-07-01

    Fusarium circinatum Nirenberg and O'Donnell (1998) is the causal agent of Pitch Canker Disease (PCD) in Pinus species, producing damage to the main trunk and lateral branches as well as causing branch dieback. The disease has been detected recently in northern Spain in Pinus spp. seedlings at nurseries and in Pinus radiata D. Don adult trees in plantations. Fusarium circinatum seems to require a wound to enter the tree, not only that as caused by insects but also that resulting from damage by humans, i.e. mechanical wounds. However, the effects of pruning on the infection process have yet to be studied. The aim of the present study was to know how the presence of mechanical damage caused by pruning affects PCD occurrence and severity in P. radiata plantations. Fifty P. radiata plots (pruned and unpruned) distributed throughout 16 sites affected by F. circinatum in the Cantabria region (northern Spain) were studied. Symptoms of PCD presence, such as dieback, oozing cankers and trunk deformation were evaluated in 25 trees per plot and related to pruning effect. A significant relationship between pruning and the number of cankers per tree was observed, concluding that wounds caused by pruning increase the chance of pathogen infection. Other trunk symptoms, such as the presence of resin outside the cankers, were also higher in pruned plots. These results should be taken into account for future management of Monterey Pine plantations. (Author) 36 refs.

  17. Regional Analysis of Stormwater Runoff for the Placement of Managed Aquifer Recharge Sites in Santa Cruz and Northern Monterey Counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, K. S.; Beganskas, S.; Fisher, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    We apply a USGS surface hydrology model, Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS), to analyze stormwater runoff in Santa Cruz and Northern Monterey Counties, CA with the goal of supplying managed aquifer recharge (MAR) sites. Under the combined threats of multiyear drought and excess drawdown, this region's aquifers face numerous sustainability challenges, including seawater intrusion, chronic overdraft, increased contamination, and subsidence. This study addresses the supply side of this resource issue by increasing our knowledge of the spatial and temporal dynamics of runoff that could provide water for MAR. Ensuring the effectiveness of MAR using stormwater requires a thorough understanding of runoff distribution and site-specific surface and subsurface aquifer conditions. In this study we use a geographic information system (GIS) and a 3-m digital elevation model (DEM) to divide the region's four primary watersheds into Hydrologic Response Units (HRUs), or topographic sub-basins, that serve as discretized input cells for PRMS. We then assign vegetation, soil, land use, slope, aspect, and other characteristics to these HRUs, from a variety of data sources, and analyze runoff spatially using PRMS under varying precipitation conditions. We are exploring methods of linking spatially continuous and high-temporal-resolution precipitation datasets to generate input precipitation catalogs, facilitating analyses of a variety of regimes. To gain an understanding of how surface hydrology has responded to land development, we will also modify our input data to represent pre-development conditions. Coupled with a concurrent MAR suitability analysis, our model results will help screen for locations of future MAR projects and will improve our understanding of how changes in land use and climate impact hydrologic runoff and aquifer recharge.

  18. Self-Concepts and Values Among Hispanic and Mainstream Navy Recruits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-02-01

    Zinn , M. Chicano... Howard Prince - - Naval Postgraduate School Head, Department of Behavior ATTN: Dr. James Arima, Code 54-Aa Science and Leadership Monterey, CA 93940 U.S...Oregon, West Campus Eugene, OR 97403 Dr. Howard M. Weiss Dept. of Psychological Sciences Purdue University West Lafayette, IN 47907 Dr. Philip G. Zimbardo Department of Psychology Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305 IO ..... .,,-

  19. Phosphorus cycling in the red tide incubator region of Monterey Bay in response to upwelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Rose Marie Mackey

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the cycling of phosphorus (P in the euphotic zone following upwelling in northeastern Monterey Bay (the Red Tide Incubator region of coastal California, with particular emphasis on how phytoplankton and bacteria mediate and respond to changes in P availability. In situ measurements of nutrient concentrations, phytoplankton community composition, and cell-specific alkaline phosphatase (AP activity (determined via enzyme labeled fluorescence assay were measured during 3 cruises. Upwelling led to a 10-fold increase in dissolved inorganic (DIP in surface waters, reaching ~0.5 mol L-1. This DIP was drawn down rapidly as upwelling relaxed over a period of 1 week. Relatively low ratios of nitrate to DIP uptake (~5:1 suggest that luxury P uptake was occurring as phytoplankton bloomed. Dissolved organic (DOP remained relatively constant (~0.3mol L-1 before and immediately following upwelling, but doubled as upwelling relaxed, likely due to phytoplankton excretion and release during grazing. This transition from a relatively high DIP:DOP ratio to lower DIP:DOP ratio was accompanied by a decline in the abundance of diatoms, which had low AP activity, toward localized, spatially-heterogeneous blooms of dinoflagellates in the genera Prorocentrum, Ceratium, Dinophysis, Alexandrium, and Scrippsiella that showed high AP activity regardless of ambient DIP levels. A nutrient addition incubation experiment showed that phytoplankton growth was primarily limited by nitrate, followed by DIP and then DOP, suggesting that P is a regulating, rather than limiting, nutrient in this region. AP activity was observed in bacteria associated with lysed cell debris and aggregates of particulate organic material, where it may serve to facilitate P regeneration, as well as affixed to the surfaces of intact phytoplankton cells, possibly indicative of close, beneficial phytoplankton-bacteria interactions.

  20. Imaging Saltwater Intrusion Along the Coast of Monterey Bay Using Long-Offset Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, M.; Knight, R. J.; Pidlisecky, A.

    2016-12-01

    Coastal regions represent a complex dynamic interface where saltwater intrusion moves seawater landward and groundwater discharge moves freshwater seaward. These processes can have a dramatic impact on water quality, affecting both humans and coastal ecosystems. The ability to map the subsurface distribution of fresh and salt water is a critical step in predicting and managing water quality in coastal regions. This is commonly accomplished using wells, which are expensive and provide point information, which may fail to capture the spatial complexity in subsurface conditions. We present an alternate method for acquiring data, long-offset Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), which is non-invasive, cost effective, and can address the problem of poor spatial sampling. This geophysical method can produce continuous profiles of subsurface electrical resistivity to a depth of 300 m, with spatial resolution on the order of tens of meters. Our research focuses on the Monterey Bay region, where sustained groundwater extraction over the past century has led to significant saltwater intrusion. ERT was acquired along 40 kilometers of the coast using the roll along method, allowing for continuous overlap in data acquisition. Electrodes were spaced every 22.2 m, with a total of 81 electrodes along the 1.8 km active cable length. The data show a complex distribution of fresh and salt water, influenced by geology, groundwater pumping, recharge, and land-use. While the inverted ERT resistivity profiles correspond well with existing data sets and geologic interpretations in the region, the spatial complexity revealed through the ERT data goes beyond what is known from traditional data sources alone. This leads us to conclude that this form of data can be extremely useful in informing and calibrating groundwater flow models, making targeted management decisions, and monitoring changes in subsurface salinities over time.

  1. Processing, mosaicking and management of the Monterey Bay digital sidescan-sonar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, P.S.; Isbrecht, J.; Galanis, P.; Gabel, G.L.; Sides, S.C.; Soltesz, D.L.; Ross, S.L.; Velasco, M.G.

    2002-01-01

    Sidescan-sonar imaging systems with digital capabilities have now been available for approximately 20 years. In this paper we present several of the various digital image processing techniques developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and used to apply intensity/radiometric and geometric corrections, as well as enhance and digitally mosaic, sidescan-sonar images of the Monterey Bay region. New software run by a WWW server was designed and implemented to allow very large image data sets, such as the digital mosaic, to be easily viewed interactively, including the ability to roam throughout the digital mosaic at the web site in either compressed or full 1-m resolution. The processing is separated into the two different stages: preprocessing and information extraction. In the preprocessing stage, sensor-specific algorithms are applied to correct for both geometric and intensity/radiometric distortions introduced by the sensor. This is followed by digital mosaicking of the track-line strips into quadrangle format which can be used as input to either visual or digital image analysis and interpretation. An automatic seam removal procedure was used in combination with an interactive digital feathering/stenciling procedure to help minimize tone or seam matching problems between image strips from adjacent track-lines. The sidescan-sonar image processing package is part of the USGS Mini Image Processing System (MIPS) and has been designed to process data collected by any 'generic' digital sidescan-sonar imaging system. The USGS MIPS software, developed over the last 20 years as a public domain package, is available on the WWW at: http://terraweb.wr.usgs.gov/trs/software.html.

  2. Alcohol Regulation and Violence on College Campuses

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Grossman; Sara Markowitz

    1999-01-01

    This study focuses on the effects of variations in alcoholic beverage prices among states of the United States on violence on college campuses. The principal hypothesis tested is that the incidence of violence is negatively related to the price of alcohol. This hypothesis is derived from two well established relationships: the positive relationship between alcohol and violence and the negative relationship between the use of alcohol and its price. The data employed in the study are the 1989, ...

  3. Substance abuse on the college campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rimsza, Mary Ellen; Moses, Karen S

    2005-02-01

    Substance abuse is a major health and behavioral concern in college students. Alcohol and marijuana are the most commonly abused drugs on college campuses. Others include tobacco, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, gamma-hydroxybutyrate, flunitrazepam (Rohypnol), lysergic acid, ketamine, methamphetamine, phencyclidine, cocaine, and psilocybin mushrooms. This article reviews the use of these drugs by college students. Substance use is a major contributing factor in poor academic performance and failure to successfully complete a college education.

  4. Keeping our Campuses and Communities Safe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Goodman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the events of September 11, 2001, the U.S. population has a heightened awareness that tragedies can and do strike ordinary people without warning. The same can be said for the unfortunate abundance of campus shootings, where the next "9/11" occurred in 2007 on the campus of Virginia Tech. And yet, subsequent investigations into these horrific events often reveal that clues existed that might have pointed to the eventual violent outcome. It is unquestionable that to dramatically improve the safety and security of our cities we must rely upon the millions of eyes of our fellow citizens to unearth these clues as they pursue their daily activities. But ordinary citizens on the street are often reluctant to get involved and lackthe tools to overcome their reticence to report suspicious activity. In this article, we examine several indicators of campus and community violence, as well as a novel technology to facilitate communication of potential threats to safety before they become a reality.

  5. A New Campus Built on Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, Ari [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Mercado, Andrea [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Regnier, Cindy [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-08-01

    The University of California (UC), Merced partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop and implement solutions to reduce energy consumption by as part of DOE’s Commercial Buildings Partnerships (CBP) Program. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) provided technical expertise in support of this DOE program. This case study reports on the process and outcome of this project including the achieved savings from design improvements for the campus. The intent of the project was to retrofit the Science & Engineering (S&E) building and the central plant at UC Merced to achieve up to 30% energy reduction. The anticipated savings from these retrofits represented about 17% of whole-campus energy use. If achieved, the savings contribution from the CBP project would have brought overall campus performance to 56% of the 1999 UC/CSU benchmark performance for their portfolio of buildings. However, the final design that moved forward as part of the CBP program only included the retrofit measures for the S&E building.

  6. Federal Campuses Handbook for Net Zero Energy, Water, and Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-08-14

    In 2015, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) defined a zero energy campus as "an energy-efficient campus where, on a source energy basis, the actual annual delivered energy is less than or equal to the on-site renewable exported energy." This handbook is focused on applying the EERE definition of zero energy campuses to federal sector campuses. However, it is not intended to replace, substitute, or modify any statutory or regulatory requirements and mandates.

  7. What Should Stay Put? Campus Landscape Planning for the Long Term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahres, Mike Van

    2000-01-01

    Discusses campus landscape long-term planning and design decision making during campus alterations and upgrades. Those campus landscape elements that tend to remain in place and planning for their continued existence are discussed. (GR)

  8. Continuous and Episodic Modern Sediment Accumulation on Monterey Fan: Evidence from Ddt, 137Cs and Excess 210Pb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwiazda, R.; Paull, C. K.; Alexander, C. R.; Ussler, W.

    2012-12-01

    The mode and magnitude of fine-grained sediment accumulation on the Monterey Fan off the California central coast was investigated using pesticide concentrations and radioactive tracer profiles in sediment cores. DDT is a man-made pesticide that was used extensively in central California between 1945 and 1970. As such, its presence in marine sediments is a telltale sign of a modern sedimentation age. DDT and its metabolites, DDE and DDD, (collectively referred to as DDTr) were measured in fifty-five ~20cm-long sediment cores collected from the surface of the Monterey Fan up to 250 km to the south and 210 km to the west of the Monterey Canyon head, and in four transects across the Monterey Canyon channel at maximum water depths of 3160, 3380, 3580, and 3880 meters. Profiles of excess 210Pb (210Pbxs) and 137Cs were measured in 5 cores from the Fan to estimate recent sedimentation rates. Detectable levels of DDTr were observed in all but one of these cores, with DDTr concentrations characteristically highest at the surface and decreasing with depth. The area-normalized and depth-integrated DDTr content measured in all the cores in the Fan and in the deepest two channel transects was geographically fairly homogenous, with no statistical relationship between DDTr inventory and distance from the main channel crossing the Fan. The total sediment mass deposited on the Fan over the last 60 years, inferred from the total inventory of DDTr present in the area surveyed, is consistent with the amount of sediment delivered by the Salinas River over the same time period. 210Pbxs activities are fairly homogeneous within an uppermost layer of variable thickness (4.6-8cm) and decrease exponentially below it, but these exponential decreases are often interrupted by horizons with constant or increased 210Pbxs activity. Moreover, the coexistence of variable DDTr concentrations with homogeneous 210Pbxs activities in the top sediment indicates that the uniformity of 210Pbxs is not due

  9. The timing of sediment transport down Monterey Submarine Canyon, offshore California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Thomas; Paull, Charles K.; Ussler, William III; McGann, Mary; Buylaert, Jan-Pieter; Lundsten, Eve M

    2013-01-01

    While submarine canyons are the major conduits through which sediments are transported from the continents out into the deep sea, the time it takes for sediment to pass down through a submarine canyon system is poorly constrained. Here we report on the first study to couple optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages of quartz sand deposits and accelerator mass spectrometry 14C ages measured on benthic foraminifera to examine the timing of sediment transport through the axial channel of Monterey Submarine Canyon and Fan, offshore California. The OSL ages date the timing of sediment entry into the canyon head while the 14C ages of benthic foraminifera record the deposition of hemipelagic sediments that bound the sand horizons. We use both single-grain and small (∼2 mm area) single-aliquot regeneration approaches on vibracore samples from fining-upward sequences at various water depths to demonstrate relatively rapid, decadal-scale sand transport to at least 1.1 km depth and more variable decadal- to millennial-scale transport to a least 3.5 km depth on the fan. Significant differences between the time sand was last exposed at the canyon head (OSL age) and the timing of deposition of the sand (from 14C ages of benthic foraminifera in bracketing hemipelagic sediments) are interpreted as indicating that the sand does not pass through the entire canyon instantly in large individual events, but rather moves multiple times before emerging onto the fan. The increased spread in single-grain OSL dates with water depth provides evidence of mixing and temporary storage of sediment as it moves through the canyon system. The ages also indicate that the frequency of sediment transport events decreases with distance down the canyon channel system. The amalgamated sands near the canyon head yield OSL ages that are consistent with a sub-decadal recurrence frequency while the fining-upward sand sequences on the fan indicate that the channel is still experiencing events with a 150

  10. FIRE's Guide to Free Speech on Campus. Second Edition. FIRE's Guides to Student Rights on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverglate, Harvey A.; French, David; Lukianoff, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Since its first publication in 2005, the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) has distributed more than 138,000 print and online copies of its "Guide to Free Speech on Campus." In that time, FIRE's commitment to advocating on behalf of the essential rights discussed in the pages that follow has remained unwavering;…

  11. The campus in the twentieth century: The urban campus in Chicago from 1890 to 1965

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Giliberti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available After the Civil War, when socio political reorganisation was urgently needed, American universities contributed to the process of re establishing the internal equilibrium of power within the nation. Thus an attempt was made to reinforce the political parties and develop regions as politically discrete territorial entities that were relatively manageable. In the twentieth century the effect of this policy of local centralisation at the regional level, in conjunction with the opportunity offered by the need to develop more effective city governance, was translated into the awareness that a major contribution of academia to politics is to help re establish the parameters of governability for the entire country. With the goal of documenting and exploring some key relations between campus plans and city planning in Chicago, this paper illustrates a number of campus plans and planning strategies in which “the city” can be thought of as a metonym for the entire society. Nexuses between campus and city planning can be revealed from the creation of the campus of the University of Chicago in 1890 to the first half of the 1960s.

  12. Seeding Entrepreneurship across Campus: Early Implementation Experiences of the Kauffman Campuses Initiative. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsey, Lara; Rosenberg, Linda; Kim, Benita

    2006-01-01

    Although entrepreneurship has long been considered a fundamental aspect of American society, its development as an academic field in U.S. colleges and universities is relatively recent and on-campus entrepreneurship programs have been most commonly found in business schools. Because entrepreneurs and innovative ideas can arise from within any…

  13. THERMAL ADAPTATION, CAMPUS GREENING AND OUTDOOR USE IN LAUTECH CAMPUS, OGBOMOSO, NIGERIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Adeniran ADEDEJI

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The interwoven relationship between the use of indoors and outdoors in the tropics as means of thermal adaptation has long been recognized. In the case of outdoors, this is achieved by green intervention of shading trees as adaptive mechanisms through behavioural thermoregulation. Unfortunately, the indoor academic spaces of LAUTECH campus was not provided with necessary outdoor academic learning environment in the general site planning of the campus for use at peak indoor thermal dissatisfaction period considering the tropical climatic setting of the university. The students’ departmental and faculty associations tried to provide parks for themselves as alternatives which on casual observation are of substandard quality and poorly maintained because of lack of institutional coordination and low funding. This study examined the quality and use of these parks for thermal comfort through behavioral adjustment from subjective field evidence with the goal of improvement. To achieve this, twelve parks were selected within the campus. Questionnaires containing use and quality variables were administered randomly upon 160 users of these parks. The data obtained was subjected to descriptive statistical analysis. Results show that the quality of the parks, weather condition, period of the day, and personal psychological reasons of users has great influence on the use of the parks. The study concludes with policy recommendations on improvement of the quality of the parks and the campus outdoors and greenery in general.

  14. Transactive Campus Energy Systems: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katipamula, Srinivas; Corbin, Charles D.; Haack, Jereme N.; Hao, He; Kim, Woohyun; Hostick, Donna J.; Akyol, Bora A.; Allwardt, Craig H.; Carpenter, Brandon J.; Huang, Sen; Liu, Guopeng; Lutes, Robert G.; Makhmalbaf, Atefe; Mendon, Vrushali V.; Ngo, Hung; Somasundaram, Sriram; Underhill, Ronald M.; Zhao, Mingjie

    2017-09-26

    Transactive energy refers to the combination of economic and control techniques to improve grid reliability and efficiency. The fundamental purpose of transactive energy management is to seamlessly coordinate the operation of large numbers of new intelligent assets—such as distributed solar, energy storage and responsive building loads—to provide the flexibility needed to operate the power grid reliably and at minimum cost, particularly one filled with intermittent renewable generation such as the Pacific Northwest. It addresses the key challenge of providing smooth, stable, and predictable “control” of these assets, despite the fact that most are neither owned nor directly controlled by the power grid. The Clean Energy and Transactive Campus (CETC) work described in this report was done as part of a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and the Washington State Department of Commerce (Commerce) through the Clean Energy Fund (CEF). The project team consisted of PNNL, the University of Washington (UW) and Washington State University (WSU), to connect the PNNL, UW, and WSU campuses to form a multi-campus testbed for transaction-based energy management—transactive—solutions. Building on the foundational transactive system established by the Pacific Northwest Smart Grid Demonstration (PNWSGD), the purpose of the project was to construct the testbed as both a regional flexibility resource and as a platform for research and development (R&D) on buildings/grid integration and information-based energy efficiency. This report provides a summary of the various tasks performed under the CRADA.

  15. Black Hills State University Underground Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Brianna J; Thomas, Keenan J; Oliver-Mallory, Kelsey C; Lesko, Kevin T; Schnee, Richard W; Henning, Reyco; MacLellan, Ryan F; Guerra, Marcelo B B; Busch, Matthew; Christofferson, Cabot-Ann D; Wilkerson, J F; Xu, Wenqin; Mei, Dongming

    2017-08-01

    The Black Hills State University Underground Campus (BHUC) houses a low background counting facility on the 4850' level of the Sanford Underground Research Facility. There are currently four ultra-low background, high-purity germanium detectors installed in the BHUC and it is anticipated four more detectors will be installed within a year. In total, the BHUC will be able to accommodate up to twelve detectors with space inside a class 1000 cleanroom, an automated liquid nitrogen fill system, on-site personnel assistance and other required utilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Eco-movilidad en el Campus universitario

    OpenAIRE

    Jané Ribera, Eduard

    2013-01-01

    El objetivo del proyecto es concebir y analizar la creación de un toldo, localizado en el aparcamiento universitario del Campus Sud de la UPC, compuesto por lonas fotovoltaicas tensadas y estructuras relativamente no complejas. El toldo alimenta energéticamente a una red interna de motocicletas eléctricas que circulan en la zona universitaria disponible para los usuarios de las facultades de la zona. Este proyecto se clasifica en cuatro partes: un análisis de la gestión de la construcción ...

  17. Assessing LGBTQ campus climate and creating change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yost, Megan R; Gilmore, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    We report the findings of a climate study of a liberal arts college in Pennsylvania. This climate assessment was comprehensive in content (heterosexual and cisgender individuals' attitudes, and LGBTQ individuals' experiences), participants (faculty, staff, and students), and methodology (qualitative and quantitative). We found low levels of sexual prejudice and generally positive perceptions of the campus, but positive attitudes were more strongly endorsed by heterosexual and cisgender than LGBTQ participants. We consider the impact of these perceptions on LGBTQ students' co-curricular involvement and discuss the institutional changes that are underway as a result of our study.

  18. Breschini and Haversat, eds.: Analysis of South-Central California Shell Artifacts: Studies from Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Luis Obispo, and Santa Barbara Counties

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of South-Central Californian Shell Artifacts: Studies from Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Luis Obispo, and Santa Barbara Counties. Gary S. Breschmi and Trudy Haversat, eds. Salinas: Coyote Press Archives of California Prehistory No. 23, 1988, xiv + 105 pp., 21 figs., 28 tables, $8.70, (paper).

  19. Censorship of Off-Campus Publications Violates First Amendment Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Julian

    1989-01-01

    Reviews Burch v. Barker, in which the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that school administrators' prior review of an alternative or off-campus publication, destined for distribution on the school campus, is in violation of the First Amendment. (MS)

  20. Miami-Dade Community College: Applications at the Wolfson Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padron, Eduardo J.; Levitt, Ted

    1995-01-01

    Reviews the Miami-Dade Community College (MDCC) general education program, focusing on the program's specific applications at MDCC's Wolfson Campus. Indicates that general education at the Campus involves education in environmental issues, social studies, humanities, multicultural awareness, the cultivation of individual responsibility, and…

  1. The Public Health Approach to Campus Suicide Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jodoin, Elizabeth C.; Robertson, Jason

    2013-01-01

    The perception that college students are coming to campus with more severe psychological concerns than in the past has been empirically supported on college campuses (Benton and others, 2003). Approximately 20 percent of all adolescents have a diagnosable mental health disorder (Kessler and others, 2005), many of which then continue on to college…

  2. Defining Campus Violence: A Phenomenological Analysis of Community Stakeholder Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Matthew J.; Caldwell, Rebecca J.; Goldman, Emily Grey

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to derive an empirically based understanding of campus violence. Grounded in a communication paradigm offered by sociolinguistic scholars, we adopted a phenomenological approach for conducting and analyzing 23 interviews from campus community stakeholders, including students, staff, faculty, administrators, and…

  3. The Role of Institutional Culture in Campus Master Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Raymond Chip, III

    2012-01-01

    Campuses of higher education are physical artifacts of the institutions' culture. No matter the institutional type, geographic location, or population it serves, "the campus is a visible, physical manifestation and indicator of organizational life" (D. Martin, 2006, p. iii). Artifacts serving as symbols of the institution's…

  4. Breaking the Silence Surrounding Mental Health on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roper, Larry D.

    2013-01-01

    Mentally ill students are able to participate in higher education at unprecedented rates. While colleges and universities have been responsive to the therapeutic needs, we have failed to successfully create supportive campus climates. Campus leaders are challenged to demonstrate ethical leadership that breaks the silence and confronts the stigma…

  5. Application of Campus Instructional Support: Two Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss-Ehlers, Caroline S.; Pasquerella, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate how instructional support is a critical tool to promote the use of technology in research and teaching. A Campus-Wide Collaborative Model of Technological Instructional Support (CCMTIS) is presented that incorporates: integration of technology across campus; technical assistance; allocation of…

  6. Assessing the Campus's Ethical Climate: A Multidimensional Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banning, James H.

    1997-01-01

    Develops a general framework and matrix for assessing ethical behavior from a campus perspective and illustrates how visual anthropology can be used to implement the matrix. Claims that indices, such as photographs on bulletin boards, architecture, graffiti, and other environmental elements, can portray a campus's ethical climate. (RJM)

  7. The Impact of Honors on the Campus Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Larry

    2015-01-01

    The development of an honors program at Rogers State University a decade ago brought about significant positive changes to the campus, where more than three-quarters of the students are the first in their families to attend college. Throughout the years, these young scholars have elevated academic discourse across campus and delivered an impact…

  8. Should College Campuses become Tobacco Free without an Enforcement Plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fennell, Reginald

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco-free campuses are a great public health initiative. "Healthy People 2020" and "Healthy Campus 2020" address tobacco use and young adults including college students. Sources indicate that of the more than 6,000 colleges and universities in the United States, less than 800 are either smoke free or tobacco free. An increasing number of…

  9. Invoking the Spiritual in Campus Life and Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Judy L.; Dantley, Michael E.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the implications of the spirituality in the workplace movement for leadership and campus life in colleges and universities. Describes how student affairs leadership, informed by spiritual intelligence, can create campus environments that support and enhance the sense of wholeness, connection, and community for students, faculty, and…

  10. College Student Perceptions on Campus Alcohol Policies and Consumption Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Brenda L.; Roberts, Katherine J.; Donnelly, Joseph W.; Rutledge, Imani N.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental strategies for colleges and universities to reduce alcohol consumption among their students include the development and enforcement of campus alcohol policies. This study examines students' knowledge and attitudes toward campus alcohol policies and how they relate to alcohol consumption and alcohol social norms. A sample of 422…

  11. Why Students Choose the Branch Campus of a Large University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Jeff; Howell, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Fonseca and Bird (2007) ask an intriguing question that relates to university branch campuses: "What happened to all the people who thought online learning would drive traditional education out of the market? Just when "click" is supposed to be replacing "brick," branch campuses are proliferating around the country."…

  12. Recreational Use of Ritalin on College Campuses. Infofacts/Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapner, Daniel Ari

    2008-01-01

    Although alcohol is the most abused drug on college campuses, Ritalin has also attracted much concern in recent years. This "Infofacts/Resources" describes Ritalin use on college campuses, outlines possible effects of its abuse, and recommends policies for institutions of higher education. (Contains 7 online resources.)

  13. Motivational Signage Increases Physical Activity on a College Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, M. Allison; Torok, Donald

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The authors evaluated whether motivational signage influenced rates of stair use relative to elevator use on a college campus. Participants: In March and April 2004, the authors observed students, faculty, staff, and any visitors accessing a college campus building. Methods: During Phase I, the authors monitored ascending stair and…

  14. The Relationship between Social Capital and Weapon Possession on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messer, Rachel H.; Bradley, Kristopher I.; Calvi, Jessica L.; Kennison, Shelia M.

    2012-01-01

    The present research focused on the problem of how college officials might be able to predict weapon possession on college campuses. We hypothesized that measures of social capital (i.e., trust and participation in society) may be useful in identifying individuals who are likely to possess weapons on campuses. Prior research has shown that those…

  15. Modern Architecture and the U.S. Campus Heritage Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buono, Jon

    2011-01-01

    The history of an educational institution is maintained both in its traditions--the customs and practices of the school--and in its physical dimension--the buildings, landscapes, and other cultural resources that define its "campus." In the past 15 years, the memorialization of the American college and university campus--whether in…

  16. Essential Ingredients to Working with Campus Protests and Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Dustin

    2012-01-01

    Recent months have provided many campus law enforcement and security administrators with an added challenge in providing for the safety and welfare of their campus communities. The "Occupy Wall Street" (OWS) movement, which began on September 17, 2011 in New York City, was numerous protests against economic inequality, record rates of…

  17. The Full and True Value of Campus Heritage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elefante, Carl

    2011-01-01

    To gain a full and true understanding of the value of campus heritage requires shifting perspective. On many campuses, heritage resources are perceived to have no relevance whatsoever to the challenges of sustainability. This results largely from a profound misconception about what may constitute a sustainable future and what steps may be needed…

  18. Campus Architecture: Building in the Groves of Academe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dober, Richard P.

    This book describes, defines, and documents campus architectural designs, covering all aspects of campus building and landscape planning in light of today's new challenges--from the updating and revitalization of the existing architectural heritage to the kinds of innovative new buildings required to meet today's and tomorrow's academic needs. The…

  19. Chinese-English Code-switching in Campus Advertisements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨真真

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to analyze Chinese-English code-switching in campus advertisements by the linguistic adaptation theory. Through the interpretation of the specific examples, the communicative goals are achieved by adaptation of linguistic reality, social convention and psychological motivations. Code-switching has significant pragmatic value in campus advertisements and makes the communication efficient.

  20. Essential Ingredients to Working with Campus Protests and Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Dustin

    2012-01-01

    Recent months have provided many campus law enforcement and security administrators with an added challenge in providing for the safety and welfare of their campus communities. The "Occupy Wall Street" (OWS) movement, which began on September 17, 2011 in New York City, was numerous protests against economic inequality, record rates of…

  1. Defining Campus Violence: A Phenomenological Analysis of Community Stakeholder Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Matthew J.; Caldwell, Rebecca J.; Goldman, Emily Grey

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to derive an empirically based understanding of campus violence. Grounded in a communication paradigm offered by sociolinguistic scholars, we adopted a phenomenological approach for conducting and analyzing 23 interviews from campus community stakeholders, including students, staff, faculty, administrators, and…

  2. The Police Response to Mental Illness on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Gary J.; Shtull, Penny R.

    2012-01-01

    Campus police officers are often among the initial contacts for behavioral incidents involving people with mental illness. Their training and access to resources influence decisions to direct the individual to support services and/or through campus disciplinary processes and/or the criminal justice system. Over the past decade, there has been an…

  3. Anti-Stigma Programs: Stigma in Campus Police Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafacz, Jennifer D.

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that the most effective way to combat mental illness stigma is to focus on power groups who have a direct impact on the lives of persons with serious mental illness. With the increase of violence and need for mental health services on college campuses, campus police officers are seen as an important power group for persons…

  4. Teaching Undergraduate Business Management Courses on Campus and in Prisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudin, Joel P.

    1998-01-01

    In a comparison of performance in a business management course by on-campus and incarcerated students (the latter taught via interactive television), prisoners outperformed both U.S. and international on-campus students. Results may support the argument that elimination of Pell Grants for prisoners was shortsighted. (SK)

  5. Reference Services for Off-Campus Students and Faculty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, Barbara; Power, Colleen

    1994-01-01

    Discussion of off-campus library services focuses on a literature review of surveys on reference services to off-campus users that investigated the philosophy of service, student demographics, the reference environment, materials provision, theory versus practice, reference assessment and guidelines, local library partnerships, and future trends.…

  6. Assessing the Campus's Ethical Climate: A Multidimensional Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banning, James H.

    1997-01-01

    Develops a general framework and matrix for assessing ethical behavior from a campus perspective and illustrates how visual anthropology can be used to implement the matrix. Claims that indices, such as photographs on bulletin boards, architecture, graffiti, and other environmental elements, can portray a campus's ethical climate. (RJM)

  7. Understanding and Advancing Campus Sustainability Using a Systems Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, Stephen M.; Stuart, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: University campuses behave as complex systems, and sustainability in higher education is best seen as an emergent quality that arises from interactions both within an institution and between the institution and the environmental and social contexts in which it operates. A framework for strategically prioritizing campus sustainability work…

  8. Campus Sustainability Initiatives and Performance: Do They Correlate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to test the hypothesis that there are correlations between campus sustainability initiatives and environmental performance, as measured by resource consumption and waste generation performance metrics. Institutions of higher education would like to imply that their campus sustainability initiatives are good…

  9. Development, Validity, and Reliability of the Campus Residential Experience Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriram, Rishi; Scales, Laine; Shushok, Frank, Jr.

    2017-01-01

    The importance of living on campus is well established, but extant research that examines administrator perceptions of what comprises the best educational experience for students living on campus is generally unavailable. This study reports the development of a psychometric instrument designed to uncover underlying paradigms and attitudes of…

  10. A New Campus of Vienna University of Economics and Business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsyredar Dagdanova

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the issues of building of modern university campuses through the example of a new campus of Vienna University of Economics and Business – a successful project that facilitates the improvement of education quality and provides conditions for harmonious development of the individual.

  11. Virtual Campus in the Context of an Educational Virtual City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fominykh, Mikhail; Prasolova-Forland, Ekaterina; Morozov, Mikhail; Gerasimov, Alexey

    2011-01-01

    This paper is focused on virtual campuses, i.e. virtual worlds representing real educational institutions that are based on the metaphor of a university and provide users with different learning tools. More specifically, the idea of integrating a virtual campus into the context of a virtual city is suggested. Such a virtual city, where students…

  12. AASHE Digest 2009. A Review of Campus Sustainability News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Andrea, Comp.; Sweeney, Seann, Comp.

    2010-01-01

    This paper includes over 1,250 stories that catalog a broadening and deepening commitment to campus sustainability by colleges and universities in the U.S. and Canada. The 380-page report categorizes stories from nearly 600 higher education institutions into 24 chapters, spanning education and research, campus operations, and administration and…

  13. AASHE Digest 2008. A Review of Campus Sustainability News

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Andrea, Comp.; Dautremont-Smith, Julian, Comp.

    2009-01-01

    This publication includes over 1,350 stories that illustrate the continued expansion of sustainability practices into every sector of campus. Initiatives from nearly 700 institutions are organized into 28 chapters, spanning education and research, campus operations, and administration and finance. In addition, the publication contains over 90 new…

  14. Embedding Marketing in International Campus Development: Lessons from UK Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Vicky

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides recommendations for embedding a market- and marketing-informed approach within the development process for a new international campus. It includes a brief outline of the current global profile of international campuses (as one form of transnational education) before highlighting the role of marketing at key stages of campus…

  15. Anti-Stigma Programs: Stigma in Campus Police Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafacz, Jennifer D.

    2012-01-01

    It has been proposed that the most effective way to combat mental illness stigma is to focus on power groups who have a direct impact on the lives of persons with serious mental illness. With the increase of violence and need for mental health services on college campuses, campus police officers are seen as an important power group for persons…

  16. Institutional Identity and Organizational Structure in Multi-Campus Universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengerink, Harold A.

    2001-01-01

    Explores the structure of universities with multiple campuses but no independent central administrative system. Discusses the hybrid missions of branch campuses, which are asked to serve both the overall university and local constituent communities. Explains that these multiple missions may conflict and thus require intentional organizational…

  17. College Student Perceptions on Campus Alcohol Policies and Consumption Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Brenda L.; Roberts, Katherine J.; Donnelly, Joseph W.; Rutledge, Imani N.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental strategies for colleges and universities to reduce alcohol consumption among their students include the development and enforcement of campus alcohol policies. This study examines students' knowledge and attitudes toward campus alcohol policies and how they relate to alcohol consumption and alcohol social norms. A sample of 422…

  18. Campus Architecture: Building in the Groves of Academe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dober, Richard P.

    This book describes, defines, and documents campus architectural designs, covering all aspects of campus building and landscape planning in light of today's new challenges--from the updating and revitalization of the existing architectural heritage to the kinds of innovative new buildings required to meet today's and tomorrow's academic needs. The…

  19. Modern Architecture and the U.S. Campus Heritage Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buono, Jon

    2011-01-01

    The history of an educational institution is maintained both in its traditions--the customs and practices of the school--and in its physical dimension--the buildings, landscapes, and other cultural resources that define its "campus." In the past 15 years, the memorialization of the American college and university campus--whether in…

  20. Study of Smart Campus Development Using Internet of Things Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widya Sari, Marti; Wahyu Ciptadi, Prahenusa; Hafid Hardyanto, R.

    2017-04-01

    This paper describes the development of smart campus using Internet of Things (IoT) technology. Through smart campus, it is possible that a campus is connected via online by the outside entity, so that the teaching approach based on technology can be conducted in real time. This research was conducted in smart education, smart parking and smart room. Observation and literature studies were applied as the research method with the related theme for the sake of system design of smart campus. The result of this research is the design of smart campus system that includes smart education development, smart parking and smart room with the sake of Universitas PGRI Yogyakarta as the case study.

  1. Campus Recreation Worldwide: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashem Kozechian

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The percentage of adults who engage in regular leisure time physical activity is decreasing, causing an increase in risk for several health issues. Research indicates that the more physically active individuals are in their leisure time as adolescents and young adults, the more likely they are to remain active throughout the lifespan. The number of individuals entering the college or university setting has continued to increase over the past decade. Institutions of higher education are supporting the construction and management of large recreational facilities on-campuses for college students to use for leisure time physical activity behaviors. Many administrators are aware of the benefits of participation in leisure time physical activity among college students including: higher grades, less stress, better adjustment and higher persistence to graduation. Given the increase in popularity of comprehensive campus recreation programs and facilities, there is a need for theory based research to bridge the gap in assessing participation and developing intervention and educational materials to increase participation.

  2. Project campus and maternal and child clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Aldemar Gómez Sierra

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to illustrate the activities of the process of cooperation between the University of Pavia , Italy and the Juan de Castellanos de Tunja University Foundation . The first involved the signing of an agreement in April 2012, related to the formulation of hypotheses to project the new University Campus and some preliminary ideas for the construction of a Mother and Child University Hospital , level IV , hinged to the campus ; projects then emerged from anthropological reflections on creating spaces provided to address structural elements in a culture in this case to: create, teach , learn and apply science with other knowledge and related health and disease. This experience , still ongoing , is part of the main aims of cooperation , which is an opportunity for scientific research and methodological experimentation and innovation , both in terms of architectural solutions and technical control of the project. In fact , it appears that any architectural project in territorial contexts (climate, soil, subsoil and culture , environmental, social and diverse climate , requires a study and knowledge of the resources and potential of the place where you go to work, to enrich and value the traditions and local identities and transformations stays mixed . Through this activity , it was possible to gather and exchange processes experiment applied between experts from different disciplines and thesis students , thus consolidating an interesting interplay of scientific competition between two universities , which enriches professional , academic and social heritage.

  3. Focus on the Part-Timer; Arbitration on a Non-Unionized Campus; Campus Negotiators--A Critical Comment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenstein, Aaron, Ed.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Job concerns and characteristics of part-time faculty and interests concerning union representation, arbitration on a nonunionized campus and a view of campus negotiators are addressed in this newsletter issue. The issue of protection of part-timers by their union is examined, and adjunct faculty are categorized as follows: the semi-retired, those…

  4. Conveying Campus Sexual Misconduct Policy Information to College and University Students: Results from a 7-Campus Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, S. J.; Edwards, K. M.; Banyard, V. L.; Stapleton, J. G.; Demers, J. M.; Moynihan, M. M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy of different methods (ie, in-class policy reading; in-class policy reading and discussion; no reading or discussion) to deliver campus sexual misconduct policy information to students on 7 campuses. Participants: A total of 1,195 participants at 7 colleges and universities participated in the study from August to…

  5. 76 FR 28453 - Cesar Chavez Special Resource Study-Alameda, Fresno, Imperial, Kern, Los Angeles, Monterey...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    ... site for NPS Planning, Environment and Public Comment, and will be advertised in a newsletter which... National Park Service Cesar Chavez Special Resource Study--Alameda, Fresno, Imperial, Kern, Los Angeles..., Stanislaus, Tulare and Ventura Counties, CA, and Maricopa and Yuma Counties, AZ AGENCY: National Park...

  6. Metal contamination in campus dust of Xi'an, China: A study based on multivariate statistics and spatial distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hao [School of Tourism and Environment, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Lu, Xinwei, E-mail: luxinwei@snnu.edu.cn [School of Tourism and Environment, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Li, Loretta Y., E-mail: lli@civil.ubc.ca [Department of Civil Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver V6T 1Z4 (Canada); Gao, Tianning; Chang, Yuyu [School of Tourism and Environment, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China)

    2014-06-01

    The concentrations of As, Ba, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, Pb, V and Zn in campus dust from kindergartens, elementary schools, middle schools and universities of Xi'an, China were determined by X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Correlation coefficient analysis, principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA) were used to analyze the data and to identify possible sources of these metals in the dust. The spatial distributions of metals in urban dust of Xi'an were analyzed based on the metal concentrations in campus dusts using the geostatistics method. The results indicate that dust samples from campuses have elevated metal concentrations, especially for Pb, Zn, Co, Cu, Cr and Ba, with the mean values of 7.1, 5.6, 3.7, 2.9, 2.5 and 1.9 times the background values for Shaanxi soil, respectively. The enrichment factor results indicate that Mn, Ni, V, As and Ba in the campus dust were deficiently to minimally enriched, mainly affected by nature and partly by anthropogenic sources, while Co, Cr, Cu, Pb and Zn in the campus dust and especially Pb and Zn were mostly affected by human activities. As and Cu, Mn and Ni, Ba and V, and Pb and Zn had similar distribution patterns. The southwest high-tech industrial area and south commercial and residential areas have relatively high levels of most metals. Three main sources were identified based on correlation coefficient analysis, PCA, CA, as well as spatial distribution characteristics. As, Ni, Cu, Mn, Pb, Zn and Cr have mixed sources — nature, traffic, as well as fossil fuel combustion and weathering of materials. Ba and V are mainly derived from nature, but partly also from industrial emissions, as well as construction sources, while Co principally originates from construction. - Highlights: • Metal content in dust from schools was determined by XRF. • Spatial distribution of metals in urban dust was focused on campus samples. • Multivariate statistic and spatial distribution were used to identify metal

  7. MONITORING OF RADIOACTIVITY AT DNURT CAMPUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. F. Dolina

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The research paper aims to determine radioactive contamination on the territory of campus of Dnipropetrovsk National University of Railway Transport named after Academician V. Lazaryan (DNURT. Methodology. The dosimeters measured the radioactive contamination in different places (points of DNURT campus, focusing on public places. The centres of measurements became dormitories, monuments, stops, main entrances of the new and the old buildings, classrooms, basements, a swimming pool, boiler room and others. Findings. The conducted radiation monitoring for the first time in the history of the University discovered the source of radioactive contamination on DNURT territory and campus. The highest radiation background is observed on three points, namely: the pedestal of the monument, the monument to students-soldiers, the main entrance of the new building (columns. This can be explained by granite materials, which the pedestals and the stairs are made of. Originality. The largest contribution to the total value of annual effective dose of human exposure is made by ionizing radiation sources (IRS of building materials (65 - 70%. The radioactivity level of building materials is determined by the content of natural radionuclides that are included in uranium-radium and thorium decay series (18 and 12 radionuclides as well as potassium-40. Radioactivity of building materials is evaluated by the content of dominant radionuclides radium-226, thorium-232 and potassium-40. Their dominant role is explained by the fact that these long-lived high-energy - emitters are the products of decay of radium-226 in uranium series of and radium-224 in thorium series, exposing radioactive gases (radon-222 and radon-220. Radioactive gases are accumulated in the basements of educational buildings; their decay is accompanied by 100% alpha radiation, which is the most dangerous. Practical value. It is necessary to set radioactivity signs near the objects with high

  8. Campus e città. Il progetto Mastercampus / Campus and City. The Mastercampus Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Quintelli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available La componente universitaria, strategicamente indispensabile nello sviluppo di un’economia della conoscenza, rappresenta una risorsa determinante per la struttura e il paesaggio della città dove la ricerca è alla base di ogni laboratorio produttivo caratterizzato dall’innovazione, in cui la tipologia del campus universitario diventa strumento poleogenetico necessariamente complementare al contesto della città e alla realtà territoriale preesistente. / The university component is strategically indispensable in the development of a knowledge economy, one where research is the basis of every production lab characterized by innovation, where the university campus type becomes a poleogenetic tool, of necessity complementary to the city context and pre-existing local circumstances

  9. The elements of a consumer-based initiative in contributing to positive environmental change: Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmerly, Jennifer Dianto; Macfarlane, Victoria

    2009-09-01

    Monterey Bay Aquarium launched the Seafood Watch program in 2000. The program's Seafood Watch pocket guide is a simple tool that visitors can use to identify seafood from environmentally responsible sources. Since its inception, more than 2 million pocket guides have been distributed to Monterey Bay Aquarium visitors and 20 million have been distributed through partnerships across the United States. Partner institutions such as aquariums, conservation organizations, and businesses also conduct outreach and are working to influence their local seafood purveyors. An evaluation conducted in 2003 and 2004 assessed the program's strategies for increasing awareness and shifting consumer buying habits as they relate to sustainable seafood, including use of the pocket guide. Visitors who picked up pocket guides were surveyed immediately after their aquarium visit, and again four months later. The evaluation found that most visitors continued to use the guides and had changed their seafood buying habits in several respects. Those interviewed also reported some barriers to using the guides. The elements that appear to be critical to the success of the strategy with respect to changing consumer purchasing habits include: a focused distribution approach; providing credible and specific information on problems and solutions to increase action-related knowledge; providing a trigger or prompt that is available at the time of purchase; and reducing barriers to action, at the point of action, by working with seafood purveyors and the broader sustainable seafood movement to increase knowledge and available options. In response to the evaluation, Seafood Watch has strengthened these elements and expanded to help meet the needs of the broader sustainable seafood movement. A process of strategic planning, evaluation, cooperation among partners, and adaptability to the movement's natural evolution has proven to be critical to the program's success in contributing to the development of a

  10. Seeding Entrepreneurship Across Campus Early Implementation Experiences of the Kauffman Campuses Initiative

    OpenAIRE

    Lara Hulsey; Linda Rosenberg; Benita Kim

    2006-01-01

    Entrepreneurship has long been a fundamental aspect of American society, serving as an important contributor to economic growth. However, only recently has entrepreneurship begun to develop as an academic field in U.S. colleges and universities. The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation launched the Kauffman Campuses Initiative in eight U.S. universities to encourage campuswide expansion of entrepreneurship programs and activities. This report provides a cross-site analysis of implementation exper...

  11. Assessing the Feasibility of International Branch Campuses: Factors Universities Consider when Establishing Campuses Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    locations in urban areas close to air and rail transportation. Three administrators with IBCs located over an hour from international airports noted that...countries. Research by Lane (2011), specifically in Malaysia and Dubai, suggests that IBCs typically serve at least one of the three purposes...described by Levy. The University of Nottingham’s campus in Malaysia , for instance, arguably offers a new pedagogical approach and opportunities that are

  12. Creating an Energy Intelligent Campus: Data Integration Challenges and Solutions at a Large Research Campus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cutler, Dylan; Frank, Stephen; Slovensky, Michelle; Sheppy, Michael; Petersen, Anya

    2016-08-26

    Rich, well-organized building performance and energy consumption data enable a host of analytic capabilities for building owners and operators, from basic energy benchmarking to detailed fault detection and system optimization. Unfortunately, data integration for building control systems is challenging and costly in any setting. Large portfolios of buildings--campuses, cities, and corporate portfolios--experience these integration challenges most acutely. These large portfolios often have a wide array of control systems, including multiple vendors and nonstandard communication protocols. They typically have complex information technology (IT) networks and cybersecurity requirements and may integrate distributed energy resources into their infrastructure. Although the challenges are significant, the integration of control system data has the potential to provide proportionally greater value for these organizations through portfolio-scale analytics, comprehensive demand management, and asset performance visibility. As a large research campus, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) experiences significant data integration challenges. To meet them, NREL has developed an architecture for effective data collection, integration, and analysis, providing a comprehensive view of data integration based on functional layers. The architecture is being evaluated on the NREL campus through deployment of three pilot implementations.

  13. State University of New York Controls Over Telephone Systems at Selected Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Office of the Comptroller, Albany.

    The State University of New York (SUNY) consists of 29 State-operated campuses. Campuses of the SUNY system each operate and manage their own telephone systems. Campuses may own or lease their own telephone system called a private branch exchange (PBX). A PBX makes a campus a miniature telephone company with the ability to add and delete telephone…

  14. A Multi-Component Model for HIV/AIDS Prevention Education on the College Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaran, Gopal; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Describes an approach to building a multidimensional HIV/AIDS prevention education model for college campuses based on surveys of students' and faculty members' knowledge and attitudes about HIV/AIDS. The model emphasizes education, campus health services, campus environment, counseling and support services, and campus community coalitions. (SM)

  15. c180nc.m77t - MGD77 data file for Geophysical data from field activity C-1-80-NC in Monterey Bay, Northern California from 05/21/1980 to 05/22/1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with transit satellite navigation data was collected as part of field activity C-1-80-NC in Monterey Bay, Northern California from...

  16. Oceanographic data collected during the Davidson Seamount 2002 expedition on the RV Western Flyer, in the North Pacific Ocean, southwest of Monterey, California from May 17, 2002 - May 24, 2002 (NODC Accession 0072306)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This spring, scientists explored the first "undersea island" to be called a seamount. Davidson seamount, located 120 km Southwest of Monterey, California, is one of...

  17. c180nc.m77t - MGD77 data file for Geophysical data from field activity C-1-80-NC in Monterey Bay, Northern California from 05/21/1980 to 05/22/1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with transit satellite navigation data was collected as part of field activity C-1-80-NC in Monterey Bay, Northern California from...

  18. Campus Access Control System RFID Based

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. SANTHOSH S

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Radio frequency identification (RFID technology has helped many organizations to reduce cost. Nevertheless, there are challenges and issues associated with RFID adoption. The most common internal challenge for many organizations is justifying the investment and modification of processes. The focus of this project is to show the business value of RFID technology and its applications. The important issue is the security level of the whole campus because it needs to be carefully differentiated. Dormitories and special research laboratories should benefit from higher levels of security than any other campuses. The key to the problem is represented by the new Radio Frequency Identification (RFID which can support contactless cards with memory. The most important feature of the proposed system is the updating of access permission level at any time for the user based on the availability of that user. The data transfer from the reader to the database was done using wireless communication (RF communication. To achieve this here RF transmitter and the RF receiver is used. The data which is read by the reader is sent to the microcontroller. Then from the controller we can transfer the data to the database by using the UART module (serial communication which is inbuilt in the microcontroller through RF transmitter. RF receiver of the same frequency at the receiver end receives and then stores the data in the database. RF transmitter and Receiver – frequency for transmitting and receiving the data depends on the user as per the requirement for the application and it is based on the range of distance. For the data encoding and decoding process HCS-101 protocol is used.

  19. Comparative Study on Sino-US Campus Culture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏二梅

    2015-01-01

    Cultural communication is playing an increasingly important role in the communication between between China and the United States,which not only promotes the communication and cooperation between the two countries,but provides experience and reference for the development of campus culture and education.We should find the root causes,draw lessons from the essences of American campus culture based on our excellent traditional culture,create campus culture with our own national characteristics to train comprehensive high-quality talents and develop the education system of our country.

  20. From the Digital Campus to Smart Campus%从数字化校园到智慧校园

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任斌

    2012-01-01

      At present, the construction of smart campus and exploration in many nationwide famous universities were all carried on, the smart campus is a traditional concept of wisdom campus on development, this paper introduces the digital campus to smart campus from the developed progress, and emphatically introduces the characteristics of smart campus, and points out some problems existed in the construction process of smart campus.%  目前,全国很多知名高校都在进行智慧校园的建设和探索,智慧校园是对传统智慧校园概念的发展,本文介绍了从数字化校园到智慧校园的发展历程,着重介绍了智慧校园的特点,指出了在智慧校园建设过程中存在的一些问题。

  1. Academic and social integration on campus among sexual minority students: the impacts of psychological and experiential campus climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodford, Michael R; Kulick, Alex

    2015-03-01

    A heterosexist campus climate can increase risk for mental health problems for sexual minority students; however, the relationship between campus climate for sexual minorities and academic outcomes remains understudied. Using a sample of sexual minority respondents extracted from a campus climate survey conducted at a large university in the Midwest, we examine relationships between multiple dimensions of psychological and experiential campus climate for sexual minorities with academic integration (academic disengagement, grade-point average [GPA]) and social integration (institutional satisfaction, acceptance on campus). We also investigate the protective role of engagement with informal academic and peer-group systems. Findings suggest campus climate affects sexual minority students' integration. In multivariate analyses, perceptions of whether lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) people could be open about their sexual identity was positively associated with acceptance on campus; personal heterosexist harassment was positively associated with academic disengagement and negatively with GPA. Students' informal academic integration (instructor relations) and informal social integration (LGB friends) demonstrated influential main effects but did not moderate any of the climate-outcome relationships. Researchers should further explore the relationships between climate and academic outcomes among sexual minority students, both collectively and among specific sub-groups, and address the role of other protective factors.

  2. Green Campus initiative and its impacts on quality of life of stakeholders in Green and Non-Green Campus universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiyarattanachai, Ronnachai; Hollmann, Nicholas M

    2016-01-01

    In 2010, Universitas Indonesia (UI) developed the UI GreenMetric World University Ranking for universities to share information about their sustainability practices. This ranking system was well aligned with the basis of Sustainability for Higher Education. The scoring system can also be used as a guideline for universities to achieve sustainability in their campuses. Since its first launch, more universities around the world have increasingly participated in the ranking system including many universities in Thailand. This study compared perception of stakeholders in Green Campus and Non-Green Campus universities in Thailand regarding stakeholders' satisfaction on sustainability practices and perceived quality of life at their campuses. The results showed that stakeholders at the studied Green Campus University were more satisfied and had significantly better perceived quality of life compared to stakeholders from the studied Non-Green Campus university. The results suggested that universities should adopt the criteria set in the UI GreenMetric World University Ranking to achieve better sustainability in their campuses and improve quality of life of their stakeholders.

  3. Generation of Department of Defense Architecture Framework (DODAF) Models Using the Monterey Phoenix Behavior Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING /MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific 53560 Hull Street San Diego ... Rivera 2009).The Rivera Group and NPS have executed a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) to share NPS source code and update... Diego , CA: International Council on Systems Engineering. Jackson, Daniel. 2012. Software Abstractions. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. Langford, Gary O

  4. A Comparative Analysis of the Academic Performance of Distance and On-campus Learners

    OpenAIRE

    MAGAGULA, C. M.; NGWENYA, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined (i) the profile of the distance and on-campus learners, (ii) the academic performance of distance and on-campus learners, (iii) the advantages and disadvantages of learning through distance education and on-campus education, and (iv) how the disadvantages of learning through distance education could be reduced. The study found that the majority of distance and on-campus learners were female, single, and unemployed. Most off-campus learners were more than 20 years old, whil...

  5. Soil management and conservation in the Prince of Songkla University, Surat Thani Campus, Surat Thani Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choengthong, S.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this study were to analyze soil properties and to find out a suitable soil conservation method for soil management in Surat Thani campus,Prince of Songkla University.Land in the area was dividedinto plots depending on different land use. Soil samples were collected from each plot and were analyzed for soil properties. The results from soil analysis revealed that soils in Surat Thani campus had pH between 4.53- 7.62. The quantitative levels of soil total N, available P and exchangeable K were low. Also the quantitative levels of Ca, Mg and S were low. Moreover, the quantitative levels of organic matter were low between 4.6-9.9gkg-1. There was no salty effect as the electrical conductivities (EC were low between 6.8 - 26.4 μS/cm. Furthermore, the cation exchange capacities (CEC were low, between 1.65 - 2.78 cmolckg-1 . In conclusion, soil inSurat Thani campus, Prince of Songkla University, had soil nutrients lower than those needed for plant growth and development. Therefore, there is a need for application of fertilizer to obtain good plant growth.Soil conservation experiment was done by studying soil loss from a control plot (no cover crop compared with the ones growing Peuraria phaseoloides , Wedelia trilobata and Vetiveria zizanioides. The results revealed that Peuraria phaseoloides was suitable to grow as cover crop for controlling soil erosion.Peurariacould reduce soil loss up to 87% compared to those with bare soil. Wedelia trilobata(Creeping daisy and Vetiveria zizanioides could reduce soil loss about 55% and 30 % respectively. In order to reduce soilleaching that can be as high as 38 kg from an area of only 8 m2, soil protection method by growing Peuraria phaseoloides, or Weddelia trilobata on sloping and bare land are highly recommended.

  6. Campus Activism in the 21st Century: A Historical Framing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadhurst, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    This chapter frames campus activism by introducing the historical movements that have been important for higher education since the 18th century to the present and exploring the connections and shared characteristics among these various movements.

  7. A Mathematical Sciences Program at an Upper-Division Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetz, Frank J.

    1978-01-01

    The conception, objectives, contents, and limitations of a degree program in the mathematical sciences at Pennsylvania State University, Capitol Campus, are discussed. Career goals that may be pursued include: managerial, science, education, actuarial, and computer. (MP)

  8. AnimaCampuse lipukiri soovitab: "Kehtesta oma reeglid" / Liina Luhats

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Luhats, Liina

    2011-01-01

    15.-19. nov.-ni Tallinnas paralleelselt animafilmide festivaliga toimuvat AnimaCampust tutvustab programmijuht Heilika Pikkov. AnimaCampuse avalike loengute kava. 19. nov.-l toimuvast koomiksipäevast

  9. Are You Ready To Discuss IT Outsourcing on Your Campus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCord, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Explores why the idea of outsourcing campus information technology (IT) services rouses opinions and passions best handled by informed dialogue. Discusses how to conduct this dialog, including common myths about outsourcing and useful lessons. (EV)

  10. A MODEL FOR HIGHER EDUCATION CAMPUS HEALTH SERVICES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-17

    Mar 17, 2010 ... nurses who are employed at a higher education campus' health service to render a healthcare ..... effectively perform roles and tasks expected of him or her in .... all times by those with whom the individual comes into contact.

  11. A Mathematical Sciences Program at an Upper-Division Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetz, Frank J.

    1978-01-01

    The conception, objectives, contents, and limitations of a degree program in the mathematical sciences at Pennsylvania State University, Capitol Campus, are discussed. Career goals that may be pursued include: managerial, science, education, actuarial, and computer. (MP)

  12. Spiders of Kerala Agricultural University Campus, Thrissur, Kerala, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. K. Adarsh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A total of 86 species of spiders belonging to 56 genera of 20 families have been recorded from the Kerala Agricultural University (KAU campus, Thrissur, Kerala, southern India.  This represents 5.1% of the total spiders’ species and 33.33% of the total families of spiders recorded in India.  The dominant spider family at KAU campus is Araneidae with 18 species of nine genera. Salticidae is represented by 14 species of 13 genera.  Out of 252 endemic spiders of India, 16 have been reported from KAU campus.  Guild structure analysis shows spiders belonging to seven types of feeding guilds present in KAU campus.  Orb-web builders are the dominant feeding guild accounting for 34%, followed by stalkers (22%, ground runners (20%, ambushers (8%, scattered line weavers (8%, foliage runners (7% and sheet-web builders (1%. 

  13. A MODEL FOR HIGHER EDUCATION CAMPUS HEALTH SERVICES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-03-17

    Mar 17, 2010 ... nurses who are employed at a higher education campus' health service to render a healthcare ..... extremely diverse in terms of gender, age, religion, culture, .... the environment, with relative freedom from pain, disability,.

  14. Development of an integrated campus security alerting system ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development of an integrated campus security alerting system. ... Nigerian Journal of Technology ... (IP) cameras and micro-switches for monitoring security situations thereby providing an immediate alerting signal to the security personnel.

  15. Creating a Campus Identity in an Urban Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, Janet

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design of Coe College in Iowa, the University of Chicago, and the University of California's Washington, DC campus to illustrate the successful development of a physical identity by urban institutions. (EV)

  16. Design And Development Of Three Wheeled Campus Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharad Patel

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available In todays world infrastructure of College and Industries are becoming large so if one has to travel or visit from one place to another he has to walk long distance and sometimes it becomes very hasty and inconvenient. Sometimes after too many traveling in campus it causes strain and pain in body. So to travel these distances two-wheeled or three wheeled electric scooter like Segway PT Irrway were introduced. But these scooters are very costly such as they starts from amp8377 50000. Another problem with those vehicle is that they are difficult to handle when we drive first time. So in alternate to this product we developed whole newly designed product and this is Reliable Ecofriendly Compact vehicle for campus. Its utilities are college campus Airports Industries Recreational Parks Sanctuaries Museums Palaces Villas etc. So Our research is on design and development of three-wheel campus vehicle and also its multipurpose utility among the society.

  17. Mike O’Callaghan Federal Medical Center Campus Environmental Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Center Campus Final EA Departments to the basement, outpatient clinics and medical center diagnostics to the first floor, surgical services to the...Center Campus Final EA 3.8.1 Vegetation The Integrated Natural Resource Management Plan (INRMP) describes the desert scrub creosote bush/white bursage...domestic geese and ducks. The areas with the most diverse wildlife are those containing native desert scrub vegetation, mostly located in clear

  18. Assessment of a University Campus Food Environment, California, 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Tseng, Marilyn; DeGreef, Kelsey; Fishler, Madison; Gipson, Rachel; Koyano, Kelly; Neill, Dawn B.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction University campuses offer an opportunity to study the extent to which modifying the food environment influences eating, but in-depth characterizations of campus food environments are needed to identify potential targets for intervention. The objective of this project was to describe the availability, accessibility, and quality of healthful food choices in dining venues and food stores at or near a public, 4-year university in California. Methods Trained assessors used the Nutriti...

  19. Employer Branding; influencing student perception by campus management activities

    OpenAIRE

    Strnad, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The target of this thesis was to define the concept of employer branding and its relation to campus management, the activities companies do in order to attract students and promote themselves as quality employers. The theoretical research captures the marketing essence of branding and further develops it into the employer branding framework. Further research focussed on possible campus management activities. In the practical part the popularity and effectiveness of the activities were tested ...

  20. Decentralised energy solutions: The CSIR energy autonomous campus

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carter-Brown, Clinton

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Reduce Consumption : 20% reduction through energy efficiency (30 GWh) 24GWh) per year Load Management : Through Demand Response (DR) measures including Electric Vehicles Supply PV: All CSIR rooftops, 1-2 ground-mounted plants Total of 8 MWp 13 GWh... analysis, Site selection, Environmental Impact Assessment, etc Demand side management: Campus energy audit & street light energy audit Storage: Technology selection process, procurement of electric vehicles for the campus 27 Over 1 MW of Solar PV...

  1. Measurement of near-surface seismic compressional wave velocities using refraction tomography at a proposed construction site on the Presidio of Monterey, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Michael H.; Burton, Bethany L.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is determining the feasibility of constructing a new barracks building on the U.S. Army Presidio of Monterey in Monterey, California. Due to the presence of an endangered orchid in the proposed area, invasive techniques such as exploratory drill holes are prohibited. To aid in determining the feasibility, budget, and design of this building, a compressional-wave seismic refraction survey was proposed by the U.S. Geological Survey as an alternative means of investigating the depth to competent bedrock. Two sub-parallel profiles were acquired along an existing foot path and a fence line to minimize impacts on the endangered flora. The compressional-wave seismic refraction tomography data for both profiles indicate that no competent rock classified as non-rippable or marginally rippable exists within the top 30 feet beneath the ground surface.

  2. Development of Networked Virtual Experiment System Based on Virtual Campus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian-tai Guo

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available China’s higher education has been going through a period of rapid expansion in undergraduate population,and this means a much heavier demand on teaching resources such as laboratories, experiments, teaching staff,etc., which cannot possibly be made available all of a sudden.To deal with this situation, we found virtual reality (VR technology very helpful. Virtual reality (VR has found many applications in education; and the resources of virtual education such as virtual campus, virtual laboratory etc. are used more and more widely, especially in the field of higher education. But so far virtual campus was mainly regarded as a means of image exhibition, and virtual laboratories were no more than 2D display of experimental processes and equipments. To make better use of these resources, this paper puts forward the concept of networked virtual experiment systems based on virtual campus by combining the virtual laboratory and virtual campus with the technique of LAN (Local area network, and establishes its theoretical model. Finally, a networked virtual experiment system based on virtual campus is developed using VRML and 3DSMAX. Networked virtual experiment system based on virtual campus has a promising future for various applications in higher education.

  3. Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Cleanup Plan, Ford Ord, Monterey, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-25

    6 Oliver P. Bardin and 380.60 / Ada May Bardin 7 Benjamin Rush Bingaman 1,687.74 / 8 Margaret A. Jacks, et al 602.08 1 9 Luisa Guidotti, et al...2,036.39 1 10 Maria Antonia Field 563.19 1 11 Stephen Joseph Field 1,018.02 1 April 1944 Key: I = Undocumented o45.sj Fort Ord, California - 25 March 1994...40CA~rt. sall &"a dfts cltaned sip. not meeuml ulatory rc4ulmmew for l~amatblllty, reaclivity, crawoivity, or Toxicity far znhuImsow r Moastfasial sad

  4. Conference Proceedings: 14th Annual Review of Progress in Applied Computational Electromagnetics at the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA, March 16-20, 1998. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-01

    iSH dl = ( "- 2- ..... ½., 1 +k m . ) + (s.am + b"-s , (I’m .. ½.o+± _½bs-4 , (19) = + ,k- , 339 /12 ൒ 7 dA nde centre 9 Figure 1: TLM cell with...on a vector propagating wave can be seen, e. g., by locally expanding the wave in terms of a generalized Wilcox expansion [24], [25] in terms of the...Lett. , vol. 8. no. 6, pp. 323-324. 1995. [251 C. H. Wilcox , "An expansion theorem for electromagnetic fields," Comm. Pure Appl. Math., vol. 9, pp.115

  5. The New Great Game: Chinese Views on Central Asia. Proceedings of the Central Asia Symposium held in Monterey, CA on August 7-11, 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    030205_ce_forum01.pdf> 7. Shanghai group aims to keep U.S. in check, by Sergei Blagov, http://www. atimes.com . 8. Clifford Geertz , The Interpretation of... Geertz (1973) to describe the strategic implications of culture and 150 cultural interplay in a changing regional context and its implications for...as Geertz (1973) defines it, it is a set of symbolic systems that serves not only to define and identify the culture and social structures, but also

  6. NOAA Office for Coastal Management Coastal Inundation Digital Elevation Model: San Francisco Bay/Monterey (CA) WFO - Sonoma, Marin, Napa, and Solano Counties

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This digital elevation model (DEM) is a part of a series of DEMs produced for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office for Coastal Management's Sea...

  7. NOAA Office for Coastal Management Coastal Inundation Digital Elevation Model: San Francisco Bay/Monterey (CA) WFO - Contra Costa, San Francisco, Alameda, San Mateo, and Santa Clara Counties

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This digital elevation model (DEM) is a part of a series of DEMs produced for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office for Coastal Management's Sea...

  8. 16TH Annual Review of Progress in Applied Computational Electromagnetics at the Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA, March 20-24, 2000, Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Masafumi Fujii**, Wolfgang J.R. Hoefer** *Dpto. Electricidad y Electr6nica. Univ. Valladolid 47011 Valladolid - SPAIN Tel: +34 983 423224 Fax: +34 983...Wolfgang J.R. Hoefer** *Dpto. Electricidad y Electr6nica. Univ. Valladolid 47011 Valladolid - SPAIN Tel: +34 983 423224 Fax: +34 983 423217 E-Mail

  9. Proceedings of the 7th Annual TARDEC Ground Vehicle Survivability Symposium, March 26-28, 1996, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA Volume 1 - Unclassified Session Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Submitted J. Cardenas , U.S. Army TARDEC P-10 Ground Combat Vehicle Survivability Database Vol. 1 517 J. Olejar, C. Glausier, D. Brassard, K. Gantt, N. Funk... algebra . This change in methodology should go a long way toward alleviating the sampling problem that has been identi- fied in the IDA and SIRVICE studies

  10. Ambient Intelligence: The MyCampus Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-07-01

    aspects of privacy in Ambient Intelligence environments (e.g. [Ack04,Hon04, HS04 ,KFJ03, Lan02, LHJ+03, KFJ03]), to the best of our knowledge, the...CA, 2004. [ HS04 ] U. Hengartner, and P, Steenkiste. Implementing access control to people location information. In 9th ACM Symposium on Access

  11. A MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF CAMPUS INFORMATION SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. STALIN KUMAR

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An H-magic labeling in a H-decomposable graph G is a bijection f : V (G ∪ E(G → {1, 2, ..., p + q} such that for every copy H in the decomposition, \\sum\\limits_{v∈V (H}{f(v}+\\sum\\limits_{e∈E(H}{ f(e} is constant. f is said to be H-V -super magic if f(V (G = {1, 2, ..., p}. Suppose that V (G = U(G ∪ W(G with |U(G| = m and |W(G| = n. Then f is said to be H-V -super-strong magic labeling if f(U(G = {1, 2, ..., m} and f(W(G = {m + 1, m + 2, ...,(m + n = p}. A graph that admits a H-V -super-strong magic labeling is called a H-V -super-strong magic decomposable graph. In this paper, we pay our attention to provide a mathematical modeling of campus information system.

  12. Automatic Campus Network Management using GPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayakumar.S

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Organization Network is the place where large number of attacks is happening. The attackers are using different methodologies to capture the information from the end user without the knowledge of the end-user. This paper introduces the concepts of Campus Management and Emergency log by using Medium Access Control (MAC and Global Positioning System (GPS. By using the IP address of an attacker, the MAC address can be found and the attackers machine can be blocked access with the help of firewall. Using the GPS we can be able to navigate the attackers position with the help of the position log. The log keeps updating for each and every 10 seconds. The attacker can be identified as if he used his own system or victim (3rd party system. An emergency response log has been created to record each emergency incident response process. The role of the log is more important with an increasing accumulation of information with the log; Network Engineer/Administrator can determine the type of inevitable emergency incidents grouped into evitable events, in order to improve the system reliability of emergency response.

  13. Fusion calculations for 40Ca+40Ca, 48Ca+48Ca, 40Ca+48Ca and p+208Pb systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Zhang, Haifei; Bao, Xiaojun; Li, Junqing; Zhang, Hongfei

    2014-09-01

    The fusion cross sections of calcium isotopes and proton induced fusion have been calculated in terms of a coupled-channels formulation. Results indicated that there are big differences between the two fusion types. In the calculations of calcium isotopes fusion, the pair-transfer coupling has been applied in addition to the vibrational coupling, the combined effects showed that pair-transfer has played a significant role in the fusion process for the asymmetric 40Ca+48Ca system. The result of proton induced fusion for p+208Pb system successfully presents the fusion oscillation, which agrees with the experimental data rather well.

  14. Plankton in Monterey Bay: Optimization of optical sensor data from autonomous underwater vehicles with applications in plankton community composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse, Diane E.

    Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) equipped with oceanographic sensors demonstrate the capability to describe plankton communities in the marine environment. The vehicles collect data from the surface through the mixed layer for a variety of oceanographic parameters. The Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute operates the Dorado upper-water-column AUV. The Dorado AUV collects data for 32 size-classes, from 1.25 to 250 mum, using a laser in-situ scattering and transmissometry (LISST-100X) instrument. The objective of this study is to analyze data from AUVs and laboratory work to inform sampling methods with applications in targeting specific classes of plankton, particularly harmful algal bloom species. The results of this study show that specific combinations of LISST-100X size class channels can be combined to reconstruct fluorescence data. This project includes laboratory tests with monocultures of phytoplankton on both a backscattering sensor that detects chlorophyll at 695 nm and on the forward scattering LISST-100X sensor. The results show a linear relationship between backscattered chlorophyll concentration and cell density for four monocultures of phytoplankton. The forward scattering lab experiments show distinct organism signatures for three genera of phytoplankton tested as monocultures.

  15. Suspended particulate layers and internal waves over the southern Monterey Bay continental shelf: an important control on shelf mud belts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheriton, Olivia M.; McPhee-Shaw, Erika E.; Shaw, William J.; Stanton, Timothy P.; Bellingham, James G.; Storlazzi, Curt D.

    2014-01-01

    Physical and optical measurements taken over the mud belt on the southern continental shelf of Monterey Bay, California documented the frequent occurrence of suspended particulate matter features, the majority of which were detached from the seafloor, centered 9–33 m above the bed. In fall 2011, an automated profiling mooring and fixed instrumentation, including a thermistor chain and upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profiler, were deployed at 70 m depth for 5 weeks, and from 12 to 16 October a long-range autonomous underwater vehicle performed across-shelf transects. Individual SPM events were uncorrelated with local bed shear stress caused by surface waves and bottom currents. Nearly half of all observed SPM layers occurred during 1 week of the study, 9–16 October 2011, and were advected past the fixed profiling mooring by the onshore phase of semidiurnal internal tide bottom currents. At the start of the 9–16 October period, we observed intense near-bed vertical velocities capable of lifting particulates into the middle of the water column. This “updraft” event appears to have been associated with nonlinear adjustment of high-amplitude internal tides over the mid and outer shelf. These findings suggest that nonlinear internal tidal motions can erode material over the outer shelf and that, once suspended, this SPM can then be transported shoreward to the middle and shallow sections of the mud belt. This represents a fundamental broadening of our understanding of how shelf mud belts may be built up and sustained.

  16. 3D Visualization Development of SIUE Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellutla, Shravya

    Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has progressed from the traditional map-making to the modern technology where the information can be created, edited, managed and analyzed. Like any other models, maps are simplified representations of real world. Hence visualization plays an essential role in the applications of GIS. The use of sophisticated visualization tools and methods, especially three dimensional (3D) modeling, has been rising considerably due to the advancement of technology. There are currently many off-the-shelf technologies available in the market to build 3D GIS models. One of the objectives of this research was to examine the available ArcGIS and its extensions for 3D modeling and visualization and use them to depict a real world scenario. Furthermore, with the advent of the web, a platform for accessing and sharing spatial information on the Internet, it is possible to generate interactive online maps. Integrating Internet capacity with GIS functionality redefines the process of sharing and processing the spatial information. Enabling a 3D map online requires off-the-shelf GIS software, 3D model builders, web server, web applications and client server technologies. Such environments are either complicated or expensive because of the amount of hardware and software involved. Therefore, the second objective of this research was to investigate and develop simpler yet cost-effective 3D modeling approach that uses available ArcGIS suite products and the free 3D computer graphics software for designing 3D world scenes. Both ArcGIS Explorer and ArcGIS Online will be used to demonstrate the way of sharing and distributing 3D geographic information on the Internet. A case study of the development of 3D campus for the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville is demonstrated.

  17. Web Content Analysis On Sustainable Campus Operation (SCO Initiatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razman Ruzaimah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyse the current practices implemented in global universities for achieving sustainability throughout campus operations. This study adopted a web content analysis method where 30 international green universities’ websites have been thoroughly examined to identify common initiatives implemented to achieve sustainability through campus operations. The findings are ranked based on the implementation of these initiatives by participating universities. From the websites reviewed, as much as 31 initiatives have been identified as common initiatives frequently implemented by green universities to achieve sustainability in campus operations. It was found that the common initiatives frequently implemented by most of the universities include ‘Provide bin with clearly marked signs to increase the number of recycling items’, and ‘Generate electricity on campus by establishing power generation plants’ with 87% and 83% respectively. This paper fills the gap by presenting the investigation of sustainability initiatives from some of the major green universities internationally. It is suggested that higher education institutions, particularly Malaysian universities, initiate or manage their implementation of sustainable campus operation (SCO initiatives based on the findings of this research.

  18. Starry Campus: Reducing Light Pollution at Smith College

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenon, Alexandria

    2017-01-01

    This is the start of a program to teach Smith College students about the dangers posed by light pollution and inspire them to help make Smith a better dark sky area. This will focus both on general astronomy education to catch their interest and speciic light pollution information as well. My advisor is creating an initiative for dark skies education and preservation on college campuses, with this as the pilot program. College students can help both on campus and off when they will be able to take what they learn to inform their decisions about lighting when they move out on their own. The ultimate goal is to convince Smith College to make the changes it needs to reduce its light pollution as well as to motivate its students to learn more about astronomy and light pollution. I am developing an education and outreach program using venues such as house teas, lectures, and meetings to teach other students, the staff, and faculty about the issue. I am also working with existing clubs and organizations on campus such as the Green Team, the landscape studies department, and the Center for the Environment, Ecological Design, and Sustainability. This will help to develop campus lighting standards. These lighting standards will be proposed to the college, as there are no current standards in place for lighting around campus.

  19. True Green and Sustainable University Campuses? Toward a Clusters Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Sonetti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Campus greening is often the first step universities take towards sustainability. However, the diffusion of sustainability reporting methodologies and rankings is still at an early stage, and is biased in mainly measuring energy efficiency indicators while omitting basic features enabling meaningful comparisons among centers or addressing social (users aspects related to long term sustainability transitions. This paper aims to introduce a critical perspective on sustainability university frameworks through: (i a review of current Campus Sustainability Assessments (CSAs; (ii performing and comparing the results obtained from the application of two internationally recognized CSAs (namely, Green Metric and ISCN to two case studies (the Politecnico di Torino, in Italy, and the Hokkaido University, In Japan and, finally, (iii proposing a new CSA approach that encompasses clusters of homogeneous campus typologies for meaningful comparisons and university rankings. The proposed clusters regard universities’ morphological structures (campuses nested within city centers versus outside of a city compact ones, climatic zones and functions. At the micro scale, the paper introduces the need for indicators beyond measuring pure energy efficiency, but which are attentive to local and societal constraints and provide long-term tracking of outcomes. This, better than a sheer record of sustainability priority actions, can help in building homogenous university case studies to find similar and scalable success strategies and practices, and also in self-monitoring progress toward achieving truly sustainable university campuses.

  20. Student Engineers and Engineer Identity: Campus Engineer Identities as Figured World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonso, Karen L.

    2006-09-01

    The research reported here contributes to understanding how student engineers on an engineering campus in the US mid-continent not only talked about the kinds of people recognized as engineers on campus, but also juxtaposes their talk about "campus engineer identities" with two students' ways of presenting themselves as engineers through engineering project teamwork to argue that campus engineer identities framed on-campus interpretations of actions, and ultimately that identity production was a complicated process through which campus engineer identities (cultural knowledge learned on campus) provided a lens of meaning through which to "recognize" (or not) performances of engineer selves as engineers. This research adds to conversations about identity in practice, especially identity production in science education, by suggesting the importance of cultural forms for belonging, especially at an obdurate site of science practice like the campus studied.

  1. Towards the development of a new model for best practice and knowledge construction in virtual campuses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cartelli, Antonio; Connolly, Thomas; Magalhaes, Hugo; Stansfield, Mark; Jimoyiannis, Athanassios; Maillet, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    .... The paper outlines a tentative model of issues underpinning best practice in virtual campuses derived from an initial literature-based investigation of existing virtual campus initiatives within the European Union...

  2. Enhancing college students’ global awareness through campus Toastmasters clubs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu, Tsu-Chia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to investigate the effects of the 20 college campus Toastmasters clubs all over Taiwan, towards the enhancement of its student members’ global awareness. Within the concept of cooperative learning, promotion of global views by means of sharing various cultural concepts within the conducted Toastmasters meeting program, group works such as structured interaction and communication activities, and individual speaking activities, while not worrying about their grammatical errors are used as strategies. Using the qualitative research paradigm in terms of focus group and individual interviews, the current study gathers college student members’ global viewpoints along with their insightful observations in order to understand the implications of such cooperative strategies. Results indicates that co-curricular programs in existing campus activities, such as Campus Toastmasters clubs, is capable of developing the students’ global viewpoints and/or was able to help diminish their culture shock within a competitive diversely membered higher education milieu.

  3. The use of local data in ESRI Virtual Campus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staunstrup, Jan Kloster; Hedegaard, Torben

    1998-01-01

    alternated by hands-on sessions. However, with the ESRI Virtual Campus new possibilities have emerged. A ‘localized extension’ to the Virtual Campus is now being developed in our department in cooperation with the ESRI team. The idea is to make exercises available, based on local data, as a part...... make the training more rewarding for the individuals involved. We would like to present our results so far, to the European ESRI user community, together with some work still in progress. We believe, that our experience, and our work together with the very kind and cooperative Virtual Campus...... development team, may be beneficial to many others users in Europe. A further perspective could even be the development of an ‘EU Virtual Campus’ based on common European data sets. Such data would be much more relevant and comprehensible for the users in Europe than American data....

  4. Business Planning for a Campus-Wide Biobank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarling, Tamsin E; Lasser, Frances; Carter, Candace; Matzke, Lise A M; Dhugga, Gurm; Arora, Nidhi; Dee, Simon; LeBlanc, Jodi; Babinsky, Sindy; O'Donoghue, Sheila; Cheah, Stefanie; Watson, Peter; Vercauteren, Suzanne M

    2017-02-01

    Biobanks are resources that facilitate research. Many biobanks exist around the world, but most tend to focus on a specific disease or research area. BC Children's Hospital and BC Women's Hospital are located on the same campus (Oak Street Campus) in Vancouver, BC, Canada. A campus-wide biobank has been established on the site of these two hospitals to collect specimens and annotated data from children or women seeking medical care at either of the hospitals. Such an initiative requires careful planning and consideration of many factors such as buy in and support of key stakeholders, governance, financial planning, and optimizing specimen collection. We developed a business plan to account for the many aspects associated with integrating the "BC Children's Hospital BioBank." This document describes the approach our business plan took for the implementation of our biobank and the progress, including deviations from the business plan. We also provide a perspective on the current status with a focus on sustainability.

  5. Trends in Student Radicalization across University Campuses in Afghanistan

    OpenAIRE

    Zaman, Robert; Mohammadi, Abdul Ahad

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to examine the trends in student radicalization across eight university campuses\\ud in Afghanistan. We conclude from our survey of student and staff views and an analysis of the\\ud character of protests across campuses that the extent of student radicalization varies. In\\ud particular, we come to three noteworthy findings. First, most university students are more\\ud concerned over prospects of post-graduation follow-on careers than ideological ambition.\\ud Second, while we fin...

  6. Comparing Perceptions of Campus Crime Severity among Community College and Public Four-Year University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, Loren M.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years violent crimes on several university campuses have been highlighted by mass media, drawing national attention to the issue of campus crime. Not all college campuses, however, experience the same level of crime. While community colleges serve roughly half of all undergraduates in the U.S., statistically these public institutions…

  7. Design and Implementation of Multi-Campus, Modular Master Classes in Biochemical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuyts, Niek; Bruneel, Dorine; Meyers, Myriam; Van Hoof, Etienne; De Vos, Leander; Langie, Greet; Rediers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The Master of Science in engineering technology: biochemical engineering is organised in KU Leuven at four geographically dispersed campuses. To sustain the Master's programmes at all campuses, it is clear that a unique education profile at each campus is crucial. In addition, a rationalisation is required by increased cooperation, increased…

  8. Design and Implementation of Multi-Campus, Modular Master Classes in Biochemical Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuyts, Niek; Bruneel, Dorine; Meyers, Myriam; Van Hoof, Etienne; De Vos, Leander; Langie, Greet; Rediers, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The Master of Science in engineering technology: biochemical engineering is organised in KU Leuven at four geographically dispersed campuses. To sustain the Master's programmes at all campuses, it is clear that a unique education profile at each campus is crucial. In addition, a rationalisation is required by increased cooperation, increased…

  9. Demographic and Academic Trends in Drinking Patterns and Alcohol-Related Problems on Dry College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Dexter M.; Johnson, Mark B.; Voas, Robert B.; Turrisi, Robert

    2006-01-01

    Restricting alcohol consumption on campus is a measure often used by college administrators to prevent alcohol abuse and-alcohol-related problems. The effect of dry campus policies on alcohol consumption and alcohol-related problems, however, remains poorly understood. This report will compare characteristics of two dry campuses with descriptions…

  10. Preliminary report on geology and ground water of the Pajaro Valley area, Santa Cruz and Monterey counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, K.S.

    1972-01-01

    The Pajaro Valley area, California, covering about 120 square miles, extends from the southern part of Santa Cruz County to several miles south of the county line into Monterey County. It borders the Pacific Ocean on the west and the Santa Cruz Mountains on the east. The city of Watsonville is the largest center of population. Deposits that range in age from Pliocene to Holocene make up the ground-water reservoir. These include, from oldest to youngest, the Purisima Formation, Aromas Red Sands of Allen (1946), terrace deposits, alluvium, and dune sand. These deposits underlie an area of about 80 square miles and have a maximum thickness of about 4,000 feet. The alluvium yields most of the water pumped from wells in the area. Pre-Pliocene rocks underlie and form the boundaries of the ground-water reservoir. These rocks contain ground water in fractures and in sandstone beds. However, they are not an important source of ground water. There is close continuity between the geology of the Pajaro Valley area and that of the Soquel-Aptos area, which is contiguous on the north. Ground water in the Pajaro Valley area is derived from three sources: (1) Precipitation within the Pajaro Valley area that reaches the ground-water body by direct infiltration or by seepage from streams, (2) seepage from the Pajaro River as it crosses the Pajaro Valley carrying runoff which originates upstream from the valley, and (3) precipitation in the Soquel-Aptos area that infiltrates and then moves southeastward at depth into the Pajaro Valley area. Ground water in most wells in the Pajaro Valley area occurs under confined (artesian) conditions; the only exception is ground water in the upper, near-surface part of the alluvium and that in the dune sand. It moves south from the north part of the area and southwest away from the San Andreas fault toward and out under Monterey Bay. In the south part of the area, ground-water movement is almost due west. The San Andreas fault probably is the only

  11. Quantifying the Impacts of Systemic Acquired Resistance to Pitch Canker on Monterey Pine Growth Rate and Hyperspectral Reflectance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J. Reynolds

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pitch canker, caused by Fusarium circinatum, is a disease affecting Monterey pine (Pinus radiata and many other pine species throughout the world. The impact of pitch canker on Pinus radiata may be limited by systemic acquired resistance (SAR, a phenomenon that elevates resistance to a pathogen after initial challenge by that pathogen or another microorganism. Allocation of resources to defense, as a consequence of SAR, is presumed to reduce resources available to support growth and reproduction, but specific fitness consequences associated with SAR in P. radiata have not been measured. To quantify impacts of SAR on growth rate, a 2 × 2 factorial experiment was established in which trees were either primed for SAR or unprimed, with half the trees in each of those two groups being inoculated with the pitch canker pathogen and the other half not inoculated. Priming for SAR was accomplished by inoculating one branch with F. circinatum and removing inoculated branches prior to subsequent challenge inoculations (= disease treatments. Disease treatments included three inoculations that were removed for measurement of lesion length, and three additional inoculations that remained on the tree as a representation of persistent disease. Control trees were mock inoculated with water. Main effects of priming and disease did not result in significant effects on growth rate. Based on hyperspectral canopy reflectance data, diseased trees were associated with higher difference vegetation index values and biomass. The absence of a negative impact on growth rate associated with SAR suggests that induction of resistance may have utility as a tool for management of pitch canker in plantations.

  12. The Ca(2+)/Calmodulin/CaMKK2 Axis: Nature's Metabolic CaMshaft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelo, Kathrina L; Means, Anthony R; York, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) is an essential ligand that binds its primary intracellular receptor calmodulin (CaM) to trigger a variety of downstream processes and pathways. Central to the actions of Ca(2+)/CaM is the activation of a highly conserved Ca(2+)/CaM kinase (CaMK) cascade that amplifies Ca(2+) signals through a series of subsequent phosphorylation events. Proper regulation of Ca(2+) flux is necessary for whole-body metabolism and disruption of Ca(2+) homeostasis has been linked to various metabolic diseases. Here we provide a synthesis of recent advances that highlight the roles of the Ca(2+)/CaMK axis in key metabolic tissues. An appreciation of this information is critical to understanding the mechanisms by which Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent signaling contributes to metabolic homeostasis and disease.

  13. A New Technique for Mitigating Risk on US College Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephanie; White, Rebecca J.; Hertz, Giles

    2008-01-01

    High-profile criminal acts continue to plague United States (US) college campuses despite recent efforts to implement more aggressive risk mitigation practices, such as criminal background checks. Despite these efforts, incidents such as the most recent shootings at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University continue to demonstrate that,…

  14. Innovation & Collaboration Are Keys to Campus Water Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler-Carter, Ruth E.

    2013-01-01

    Water, water everywhere--managing and conserving water resources is a major factor at campuses worldwide. Doing so is a challenge, since water is one of the most-used and ubiquitous resources in any environment. Water is often taken for granted and not measured by the people who use it the most, yet it might have the greatest potential for helping…

  15. Colleges Wade into Survival Training for Campus Shootings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Eric

    2008-01-01

    This month a company in Spokane, Washington, plans to release "Shots Fired on Campus," an instructional DVD with strategies for preventing and surviving a gun rampage. About 50 colleges have ordered the video, and its creators expect to sell several hundred more this fall. Since the massacre at Virginia Tech last year, colleges everywhere have…

  16. Coaching Students to Academic Success and Engagement on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Claire; Gahagan, Jimmie

    2010-01-01

    Academic coaching can be a crucial step in helping students transition to college. Coaches work with students to be strategic in establishing and achieving their academic goals as well as becoming engaged on campus. At the University of South Carolina, academic coaching is defined as a one-on-one interaction with a student focusing on strengths,…

  17. Operational Considerations for Opening a Branch Campus Abroad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Lawrence M.; Lammey, Robert W.

    2011-01-01

    Universities have been attracted to the creation of international branch campuses (IBCs) for many reasons, including cultural immersion of students and faculty and global brand recognition for a university seeking to enhance its reputation and strengthen its academic standards. This chapter provides specific advice for how IBCs can negotiate entry…

  18. Colleges Wade into Survival Training for Campus Shootings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Eric

    2008-01-01

    This month a company in Spokane, Washington, plans to release "Shots Fired on Campus," an instructional DVD with strategies for preventing and surviving a gun rampage. About 50 colleges have ordered the video, and its creators expect to sell several hundred more this fall. Since the massacre at Virginia Tech last year, colleges everywhere have…

  19. STARS[R] Spring 2012 Quarterly Review: Framing Campus Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanski, Monika

    2012-01-01

    The Spring 2012 SQR: "Framing Campus Sustainability," features stories that frame the evolving concept of sustainability in higher education. Included in this issue are a snapshot of ratings-to-date, a focus on credits within the Operations (OP) category, and insights into how institutions are defining and interpreting the evolving concepts of…

  20. The Troubled Student and Campus Violence: Connecting Academic "Silos"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Elizabeth

    2008-01-01

    Six months after the carnage at Virginia Tech last year, the author relates that she studied the steps colleges have since taken to try to prevent suicide and homicide on campus. Here, she discusses some of the observations she gathered from her study. She describes that some faculty members are indifferent, oblivious, or even nasty to their…

  1. Frequency and Correlates of Campus Crime: Missouri Public Postsecondary Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seunghee

    2012-01-01

    Data from 34 public postsecondary institutions in Missouri showed liquor- and drug-related offenses and burglary as the most frequent campus crimes. Four-year institutions, institutions with a greater number of students, full-time students, younger students, out-of-state students, and a larger percentage of program completion were positively…

  2. Campus-Based Policy Institute Poised to Reinvent New England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodbury, Robert L.

    1996-01-01

    Campus-based public policy institutes with local, state, and regional orientations may play a profound role in shaping New England's future by addressing a variety of issues, including achieving quality in public schools, access to health care and other social services, job creation, environmental protection and creation of livable communities,…

  3. The Practice of Campus-Based Threat Assessment: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Jeffrey W.; Nolan, Jeffrey J.; Deisinger, Eugene R. D.

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an overview of threat assessment and management as implemented on campuses of higher education. Standards of practice and state calls for implementation are cited. An overview of some of the basic principles for threat assessment and management implementation is accompanied by examples of how they are utilized. Pitfalls…

  4. Digital Devices Invade Campus, and Networks Feel the Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    New, Jake

    2013-01-01

    Inside campus libraries and dormitory rooms, thousands of students connect to the Internet not only to study with online systems like Blackboard but also to watch movies and TV shows on Netflix. Computers, smartphones, wireless printers, tablets, iPods, Xboxes, handheld gaming systems, e-readers, smart TVs, Blu-ray players--students now bring an…

  5. Sustainable Education Campus in Spain: Nature and Architecture for Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Sotelo, Pablo Campos

    2008-01-01

    The quality of education is intimately linked to its architecture. Any urbanistic/architectural project must stem from an in-depth study of the area's characteristics, taken in the broad geographical, climatic, cultural, functional and ideological sense. The site should provide the conceptual energy from which a campus draws life. This requirement…

  6. Faculty Activity Analysis in the Universidad Tecnica Del Estado Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadima, Oscar

    An analysis of academic activities of college faculty at the eight campuses of Chile's Universidad Tecnica del Estado was conducted. Activities were grouped into seven categories: direct teaching, indirect teaching, research, community services, faculty development, academic administration, and other activities. Following the narrative…

  7. Library Outreach: Introducing Campus Childcare Providers to the Academic Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Melissa Maxwell; Thornton, Elaine

    2013-01-01

    This case study describes a library outreach effort to university staff members employed by the campus child care center. Authors planned an instructional session to introduce child care staff members to library resources, focusing on the curriculum collection as a source of supplemental materials for classrooms. Surveys were administered before…

  8. Enhancing NTIS Database Access at a Multi-Campus University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkling, Thomas W.; Jordan, Kelly

    1997-01-01

    The Pennsylvania State University Libraries and the National Technical Information Service (NTIS) collaborated to bring the entire NTIS bibliographic database online on the University-wide information system and make it available for searching at all 21 Pennsylvania State campuses. This article also reviews the level of database and technical…

  9. Strategies for Implementing a Tobacco-Free Campus Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Tavis J.; Reindl, Diana M.; Whewell, Aubrey T.

    2011-01-01

    This report examines the rationale for creating a tobacco-free campus to utilize in passing antitobacco policies, and recommendations for overcoming barriers. As with any type of advocacy effort, a variety of impediments exist, including lack of administrative and staff support, absence of student involvement, and sparse resources. A variety of…

  10. Campus Partner Collections: Expanding the Boundaries of the Library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elguindi, Anne C.; Kelshian, Robert; Sandler, Alayne Mundt

    2011-01-01

    At most colleges and universities, there are a number of small, nonlibrary collections across campus, such as those found in student centers or academic departments. Historically, at American University, partnership with these collections was done through absorbing them into the main library collection. Recently, however, the Library has seen…

  11. Campus Community Policing: It All Started with Us...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Gary J.; March, Noel C.

    2008-01-01

    The first police in the United States to embrace the kind of community-focused policing that "modern" law enforcement embraces, and which was extolled by Sir Robert Peel in 1826, were the New Haven, Connecticut police officers hired by Yale University in 1894 to patrol and keep order on campus. Why did Yale not simply rely on the New…

  12. Digital Devices Invade Campus, and Networks Feel the Strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    New, Jake

    2013-01-01

    Inside campus libraries and dormitory rooms, thousands of students connect to the Internet not only to study with online systems like Blackboard but also to watch movies and TV shows on Netflix. Computers, smartphones, wireless printers, tablets, iPods, Xboxes, handheld gaming systems, e-readers, smart TVs, Blu-ray players--students now bring an…

  13. A Harassing Climate? Sexual Harassment and Campus Racial Climate Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundy-Wagner, Valerie; Winkle-Wagner, Rachelle

    2013-01-01

    In this conceptual paper, the authors discuss how research about sexual harassment and campus racial climates for undergraduate students is relegated to separate silos. Drawing on intersectionality and critical race feminist frameworks, the authors juxtapose these strands of research with attention to ethnicity/race and gender, highlighting how…

  14. Innovation & Collaboration Are Keys to Campus Water Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler-Carter, Ruth E.

    2013-01-01

    Water, water everywhere--managing and conserving water resources is a major factor at campuses worldwide. Doing so is a challenge, since water is one of the most-used and ubiquitous resources in any environment. Water is often taken for granted and not measured by the people who use it the most, yet it might have the greatest potential for helping…

  15. Campus Computing Looks Ahead: Tracking the Digital Puck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Kenneth C.

    2002-01-01

    Examines data from the 2002 Campus Computing Survey to determine trends in information technology in higher education and future possibilities. Discusses Web portals; electronic commerce capabilities, including use of credit cards; budget challenges, including budget cuts; and mobile technology and wireless networks. (LRW)

  16. Virtual Mobility in Higher Education. The UNED Campus Net Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguado, Teresa; Monge, Fernando; Del Olmo, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    We present the UNED Virtual Mobility Campus Net Program, implemented since 2012 in collaboration with European and Latin American universities. Program's objectives, participating institutions, procedures, and evaluation are exposed. Virtual mobility is understood as a meaningful strategy for intercultural learning by studying an undergraduate or…

  17. Internationalizing a Campus: From Colonial to Modern Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Pamela L.; Barber, James P.; Holly, Neal; Brush, Kim; Bohon, Leslie; Green, Madeleine F.

    2013-01-01

    In the March-April 2013 issue of "Change," Patti McGill Peterson and Robin Matross Helms described the disheartening status of internationalization on American college campuses. Despite internationalization being touted as a strategic goal in higher education, over the past 15 years little has changed at most colleges. Student learning…

  18. The Campus Laboratory School: Phoenix or Dodo Bird.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGeoch, Dorothy M.

    The development of the campus laboratory school is traced from its origins in Europe in the seventeenth century and in the United States normal school schools of the 1820's. These schools served for practice, as models of the desired teaching methods and provided opportunities for student teaching. Even before 1900 the function of the schools was…

  19. A Model of Ethnoviolence and Public Policy on College Campuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tryman, Mfanya D.

    1992-01-01

    Examines a model and provides possible causal explanations for the increasing number of acts of racial violence, the rise of racism on college campuses, and the attendant implications for public policy. Causes for increased racial violence are complex and can be outlined in the Holistic Model of Ethnoviolence. (JB)

  20. International Students' Enhanced Academic Performance: Effects of Campus Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banjong, Delphine N.

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates international students' challenges, such as financial, English proficiency, loneliness/homesickness in the United States. In addition, it assesses how these students coped with such difficulties by making use of resources on campus, such as an international center, writing center, counseling center, and the student…

  1. Ready, Fire, Aim: The College Campus Gun Fight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birnbaum, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The question of whether guns should be permitted on college and university campuses in the United States reflects the tension between two competing perspectives. America has both a robust gun culture and an equally robust (if less well known) gun-control culture. The gun culture is as American as apple pie: There may be as many as 300 million…

  2. Guns on Campus: A Current Debate. E-Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Center for Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Violence Prevention, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Almost all U.S. college campuses ban concealed weapons. But in the aftermath of the tragic shooting deaths at Virginia Tech in 2007, the debate on whether guns should be permitted at colleges and universities has intensified. Dozens of states have considered proposals to lift bans on concealed weapons at colleges and universities, but so far none…

  3. Rural Teacher's Perceptions of Safety on Texas High School Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Ronald J., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative phenomenological research study used narrative inquiry to explore the perceptions of safety of rural Texas high school teachers as it related to a campus intruder or active shooter. The investigator utilized Creswell's (2012) six steps in analyzing and interpreting the qualitative data. The results of the study showed that…

  4. A Sustainability Initiative to Quantify Carbon Sequestration by Campus Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Helen M.

    2012-01-01

    Over 3,900 trees on a university campus were inventoried by an instructor-led team of geography undergraduates in order to quantify the carbon sequestration associated with biomass growth. The setting of the project is described, together with its logistics, methodology, outcomes, and benefits. This hands-on project provided a team of students…

  5. Understanding How Institutional Leadership Affects Civic Engagement on University Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Prairie Leigh

    2011-01-01

    Higher education in America has a long tradition of civic engagement education. Although there is theoretical and rhetorical support, many institutions still struggle with implementing effective civic engagement on their campuses. The aim of this study was to provide an understanding of factors that contribute to successful civic engagement,…

  6. Campus Partnerships Improve Impact Documentation of Nutrition Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Partnerships with other campus college units can provide ways of improving Extension's impact documentation. Nutrition programs have relied upon knowledge gained and people's self report of behavior change. Partnering with the College of Nursing, student nurses provided blood screenings during the pre and 6 month follow-up of a pilot heart risk…

  7. Emotional Support Animals, Service Animals, and Pets on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Bergen, C. W.

    2015-01-01

    For decades, universities have been accommodating physically disabled students who require guide dogs and other types of service animals. Within the past several years, however, mentally disabled students have increasingly petitioned colleges with no-pet policies to permit them to bring their animals on campus because they need a companion or…

  8. A Perspective on the Future of Branch Campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Branch campuses can thrive in the extremely competitive environment of higher education, because of their commitment to access and their relatively low cost of operation. Success, however, depends on understanding the preferences of adult learners and other place bound students. With targeted programs, focused services, careful financial…

  9. Campus Sustainability: Climate Change, Transport and Paper Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Alison; Giurco, Damien

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to detail the design of a campus climate change strategy, transport strategy and paper reduction strategy at the University of Technology, Sydney (Australia). Design/methodology/approach: The approach to strategy development used desktop research and staff/student consultation to inform the development of objectives,…

  10. The Causal Effect of Campus Residency on College Student Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schudde, Lauren T.

    2011-01-01

    Despite theoretical evidence positing a positive relationship between campus residency and collegiate outcomes, prior research has not established a causal link. Utilizing propensity score matching and national longitudinal data, this study investigates whether living in university-owned housing impacts retention. The results suggest that the…

  11. Organizing a Campus Seminar on Careers in Entertainment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walt Disney Productions, Anaheim, CA.

    Developed by Walt Disney Productions as part of a project granted by the Career Education Program of the Office of Education, this handbook is designed to help college and university fine arts departments in planning and carrying out an on-campus seminar on careers in entertainment. Sections include Why Hold a Seminar on Careers in Entertainment?,…

  12. Measles: Current Status and Outbreak Control on Campus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amler, Robert W.; Orenstein, Walter A.

    1984-01-01

    The current effort to eliminate measles in the United States has caused record low levels of the disease. This strategy must continue to be applied in order to break the transmission of measles on college campuses through high immunization levels, promotion of rapid reporting of cases, and quick responses to outbreaks. (Author/DF)

  13. Marketing Your Campus Events to the Community at Large.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreider, Jim

    1997-01-01

    Provides advice on marketing campus events to the local community at large, using the experiences of the programming board at Eastern Oregon State University. Focuses on the development of a marketing team, interviews with community organizations and the media, a market survey snapshot, marketing strategies for various local media, and examples of…

  14. STARS Quarterly Review. Summer 2012: Innovations in Campus Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanski, Monika

    2012-01-01

    The Summer 2012 SQR: "Innovations in Campus Sustainability," explores the critical linkages between education, innovation, and sustainability. This issue highlights new and ground-breaking practices within the Innovation (IN) category of STARS, focusing on the unique solutions within higher education that positively impact current and future…

  15. STARS: A Campus-Wide Integrated Continuous Planning Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about Sustainability Tracking, Assessment and Rating System or "STARS," a tool currently available that aims to help a campus answer the "how" and "how hard" questions. Created by AASHE (the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education), STARS presents guidelines and suggestions (based on…

  16. Campus Social Climate Correlates of Environmental Type Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Daniel W.; Junco, Reynol; Irvin, Summer D.

    2004-01-01

    To address the ability of the Salter Environment Type Assessment (SETA) to measure different kinds of campus environments, data from three studies of the SETA with the Work Environment Scale, Group Environment Scale, and University Residence Environment Scale were reexamined (n = 534). Relationship dimension scales were very consistent with…

  17. ATM Technology Adoption in U.S. Campus Networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Engui; Perry, John F.; Anderson, Larry S.; Brook, R. Dan; Hare, R. Dwight; Moore, Arnold J.; Xu, Xiaohe

    This study examined the relationships between ATM (asynchronous transfer mode) adoption in universities and four organizational variables: university size, type, finances, and information processing maturity. Another purpose of the study was to identify the current status of ATM adoption in campus networking. Subjects were university domain LAN…

  18. Campus Information Systems for Students: Classification in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobarsi, Josep; Bernardo, Merce; Coenders, Germa

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: First, this article seeks to establish a conceptual model for campus information systems for students, in order to make their comparison possible for strategic management purposes. Second, it seeks to test this conceptual model in a fieldwork on Spanish higher education institutions, in order to relate information systems characteristics…

  19. Money Worries Keep Students Going to Campus Food Banks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Timothy

    2012-01-01

    Hunger on campus is part of a lingering national problem that grew after the financial crisis that began in late 2007. In an unforgiving economy, many students across the country struggle not only to pay tuition but also to buy food. Colleges and nonprofit groups have noticed, and more are reacting. Food pantries are cropping up on two-year and…

  20. A Diversity Doctor’s Best Lessons from the Campus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathy-Anne Jordan

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Review of the book: “Taking on Diversity: How We Can Move from Anxiety to Respect—A Diversity Doctor’s Best Lessons from the Campus.” By Rupert W. Nacoste. Amherst, NY: Prometheus Books, 2015. ISBN: 978-1-63388026-9