WorldWideScience

Sample records for monterey ca 93943-5000

  1. 78 FR 45964 - Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Monterey Museum of Art, Monterey, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent To Repatriate Cultural Items: Monterey Museum of Art, Monterey, CA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Monterey Museum of Art, in... cultural items listed in this notice meet the definition of objects of cultural patrimony....

  2. 33 CFR 80.1134 - Monterey Harbor, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Monterey Harbor, CA. 80.1134 Section 80.1134 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1134 Monterey Harbor, CA. A line drawn...

  3. A Polynomial-Time Algorithm for Computing the Yolk in Fixed Dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-01

    1 Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000 10. Prof. Siriphong Lawphongpanich, Code OR- Lp ...Barrault 75634 PARIS C~dex 27. S. Barbera............................................................................1. Dept. d’Economica I Historia

  4. 76 FR 47237 - Notice of Realty Action: Direct Sale of Public Land in Monterey County, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-04

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Realty Action: Direct Sale of Public Land in Monterey County, CA... normal business hours. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The following public land is proposed for direct sale... appraised fair market value of $25,000. DATES: Written comments regarding the proposed sale must be...

  5. Marine debris in central California: quantifying type and abundance of beach litter in Monterey Bay, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosevelt, C; Los Huertos, M; Garza, C; Nevins, H M

    2013-06-15

    Monitoring beach litter is essential for reducing ecological threats towards humans and wildlife. In Monterey Bay, CA information on seasonal and spatial patterns is understudied. Central California's coastal managers require reliable information on debris abundance, distribution, and type, to support policy aimed at reducing litter. We developed a survey method that allowed for trained citizen scientists to quantify the types and abundance of beach litter. Sampling occurred from July 2009-June 2010. Litter abundance ranged from 0.03 to 17.1 items m(-2). Using a mixed model approach, we found season and location have the greatest effect on litter abundance. Styrofoam, the most numerically abundant item, made up 41% of the total amount of litter. Unexpected items included fertilizer pellets. The results of this study provide a baseline on the types and abundance of litter on the central coast and have directly supported policy banning Styrofoam take out containers from local municipalities.

  6. Intra-Operational Area Coordination: The Zone EOC Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited INTRA-OPERATIONAL...Kearnan, Jeffrey C. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...operational area (OA) emergency operations center (EOC) coordination model during catastrophic disasters. In addition, it establishes a clear need for a

  7. Analysis of SWO Fundamentals Exam Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited ANALYSIS OF SWO...ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING /MONITORING AGENCY...17 months following commissioning, the officer then reports to Surface Warfare Officer School (SWOS) for three weeks of Advanced Shiphandling and

  8. Application of the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean to Phytoplankton Ecology Studies in Monterey Bay, CA, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Ryan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a demonstrator for technologies for the next generation of ocean color sensors, the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO provides enhanced spatial and spectral resolution that is required to understand optically complex aquatic environments. In this study we apply HICO, along with satellite remote sensing and in situ observations, to studies of phytoplankton ecology in a dynamic coastal upwelling environment—Monterey Bay, CA, USA. From a spring 2011 study, we examine HICO-detected spatial patterns in phytoplankton optical properties along an environmental gradient defined by upwelling flow patterns and along a temporal gradient of upwelling intensification. From a fall 2011 study, we use HICO’s enhanced spatial and spectral resolution to distinguish a small-scale “red tide” bloom, and we examine bloom expansion and its supporting processes using other remote sensing and in situ data. From a spectacular HICO image of the Monterey Bay region acquired during fall of 2012, we present a suite of algorithm results for characterization of phytoplankton, and we examine the strengths, limitations, and distinctions of each algorithm in the context of the enhanced spatial and spectral resolution.

  9. Intraseasonal Relationships Between Tropical Heating and Extratropical Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-14

    intraseasonai behavoir is found to be well correlated with heating anomalies in specific parts of the global tropics. For each of these jet regions, we use...Defense Technical Information Center 2 Cameron Station Alexandria, VA 22304-6145 2. Library, Code 52 2 Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000 3

  10. Satellite Tasking via a Tablet Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING...actuated spacecraft, which then provides simulated images to mimic the data collection process. This imagery product is uploaded to the server for...22  Figure 7.  Screenshot of launch icon of the developed TAST application. ......................28

  11. An Open Architecture for Defense Virtual Environment Training Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-09-01

    Miller (USN) 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000 8...MASTER OF SCIENCE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE from the NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL September 2003 Authors: Stephen W. Matthews... Shiphandling Simulation Training by Marine Safety International ...........................................................................22 d) Air Traffic

  12. Efficient Calculation of Earth Penetrating Projectile Trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    CALCULATION OF EARTH PENETRATING PROJECTILE TRAJECTORIES by Daniel F . Youch September 2006 Thesis Advisor: Joshua Gordis... Daniel F . Youch 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000 8. PERFORMING...EFFICIENT CALCULATION OF EARTH PENETRATING PROJECTILE TRAJECTORIES Daniel F . Youch Lieutenant Commander, United States Navy B.S., Temple

  13. Video Teleconferencing Feasibility Study at the Naval Postgraduate School

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-01

    that would be able to provide assistance. Excellent sources are: 98 1. Tam Zeitvogel Telemanagement Resources International, Inc. 1138 Caballo Court San...Postgraduate School Attn: MAJ T.A. Schwendtner Monterey, CA 93943-5000 16. Tom Zeitvogel Telemanagement Resources International, Inc. 1138 Caballo Court San

  14. Evaluating the Addition of a Dinoflagellate Phytoplankton Functional Type Using Radiance Anomalies for Monterey Bay, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houskeeper, H. F.; Kudela, R. M.

    2016-12-01

    Ocean color sensors have enabled daily, global monitoring of phytoplankton productivity in the world's oceans. However, to observe key structures such as food webs, or to identify regime shifts of dominant species, tools capable of distinguishing between phytoplankton functional types using satellite remote sensing reflectance are necessary. One such tool developed by Alvain et al. (2005), PHYSAT, successfully linked four phytoplankton functional types to chlorophyll-normalized remote sensing spectra, or radiance anomalies, in case-1 waters. Yet this tool was unable to characterize dinoflagellates because of their ubiquitous background presence in the open ocean. We employ a radiance anomaly technique based on PHYSAT to target phytoplankton functional types in Monterey Bay, a region where dinoflagellate populations are larger and more variable than in open ocean waters, and thus where they may be viable targets for satellite remote sensing characterization. We compare with an existing Santa Cruz Wharf photo-pigment time series spanning from 2006 to the present to regionally ground-truth the method's predictions, and we assess its accuracy in characterizing dinoflagellates, a phytoplankton group that impacts the region's fish stocks and water quality. For example, an increase in dinoflagellate abundance beginning in 2005 led to declines in commercially important fish stocks that persisted throughout the following year. Certain species of dinoflagellates in Monterey Bay are also responsible for some of the harmful algal bloom events that negatively impact the shellfish industry. Moving toward better tools to characterize phytoplankton blooms is important for understanding ecosystem shifts, as well as protecting human health in the surrounding areas.

  15. Seasonal Dynamics of Particle-Associated Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea in Monterey Bay, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, D. R.; Tolar, B. B.; Francis, C.

    2016-12-01

    Within the past decade, significant research has shed light on key players within the nitrogen cycle. Ammonia-oxidizing Archaea (AOA) were discovered and found to be more abundant than ammonia-oxidizing Bacteria in marine systems, and therefore play a vital role in ammonia oxidation, the rate-limiting step in nitrification that converts NH3 to NO2-. Here we investigated seasonal dynamics of particle-associated (> 10 µm) AOA within Monterey Bay at Station M1 over a year-long sampling period from May 2015 to February 2016. We used quantitative PCR to amplify the archaeal amoA gene and collect data on the abundance of this gene at various depths (5-500 m). Our results indicate that particle-associated AOA are found throughout the upper water column in Monterey Bay, with archaeal amoA gene abundances ranging from 3.9 x 101 to 1.0 x 104 copies/L, with an average of 1.7 x 103 copies/L. Seasonal trends indicate that gene abundance is higher during the winter than in summer. We also quantified `shallow' versus `deep' ecotypes of water column AOA (WCA and WCB, respectively. These data will be compared to environmental data (temperature, salinity, chlorophyll a, etc.) collected during sampling. In comparison to the 0.2µm samples analyzed (mean = 2.2 x 107 copies/L; range = 2.4 x 104 to 1.1 x 108 copies/L), particle-associated archaeal amoA genes were on average 0.01% of the 0.2-10 µm size fraction. Although relatively small, the combined total abundance between the two size fractions may lead to additional correlations. Overall, particle-associated AOA may be important indicators of changing environmental conditions and provide seasonal context into abundance and distribution of these AOA. We also suggest that it may be a useful practice to analyze prefilters for AOA, as particle-associated AOA may contribute significantly to gene abundance estimates and possibly correlations with nitrification rates.

  16. Monterey Pop

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Der ästhetisch ambitionierte und kommerziell erfolgreiche Dylanfilm DONT LOOK BACK, den Pennebaker 1967 produziert hatte, machte die Produzenten des First International Monterey Pop Festivals auf den Dokumentaristen aus der Direct-Cinema-Gruppe um Robert Drew aufmerksam. Allerdings hatte er noch nie einen wirklichen Konzertfilm gemacht – in DONT LOOK BACK lag der thematische Schwerpunkt auf Dylan und nicht auf seiner Musik –, geschweige denn ein ganzes Festival verfilmt. In MONTEREY POP lässt...

  17. monterey_ca.grd

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NGDC builds and distributes high-resolution, coastal digital elevation models (DEMs) that integrate ocean bathymetry and land topography to support NOAA's mission to...

  18. Performance Analysis of Image Motion Analysis Algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-01

    Postgraduate School Monterey, California 93943-5000 4. Profesor J. B. Burl, Code EC/Bi 2 Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Naval...Postgraduate School Monterey, California 93943-5000 5. Profesor R. Cristi, Code EC/Cx Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Naval Postgraduate

  19. Development of Improved Design and 3D Printing Manufacture of Cross-Flow Fan Rotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    ROTOR 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Timothy J. Waterman 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey...CA 93943-5000 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING /MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) TDSI-National University...through Google Chrome -based software called Eiger. Eiger also contained the slicing and pathing algorithms for the printer. After the solid models

  20. Initial Investigation of a Novel Thermal Storage Concept as Part of a Renewable Energy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Handbook of Batteries , 3rd Edn., D. Linden and T.B. Reddy, Eds. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill Professional, 2002, pp. 23.1-23.88. [6] “Electropaedia...RENEWABLE ENERGY SYSTEM 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR( S ) Lindsay M. Olsen 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School...Monterey, CA 93943-5000 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING /MONITORING AGENCY NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) N/A 10

  1. Applying Psychosocial Theories of Terrorism to the Radicalization Process: A Mapping of De La Corte’s Seven Principles to Homegrown Radicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    S ) Alejandro Vargas, Jr. 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000 8. PERFORMING...ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING /MONITORING AGENCY NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) N/A 10. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY REPORT NUMBER 11...campuses and American cities in general. The only other option is for young Muslim men to explore denominational LGBT support groups, but cultural caps

  2. Analysis of Government Policies to Support Sustainable Domestic Defense Industries

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Companies in US and Their Sales Sales Number of Companies 41 products that reflect consumers’ tastes and preferences, and prices that reflect the...SUSTAINABLE DOMESTIC DEFENSE INDUSTRIES 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Roni Marzah and Budi Setiawan 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES...Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING /MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND

  3. German-American Security Relations within NATO and the UN

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAMES() AND ADDRES(ES) PERFORMING ORGANIATION Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000 9. SPONSORINGIMONITORING AGENCY NAME(S...Nations, in support of UNOSOM, a reinforced supply and transport battalion of up to 1,500 (later 1,700) personnel to perform "humanitarian tasks."𔃼...Ursachen, Typologie und Folgen fOr die GUS und die ubrige Welt," in Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik (ed.), Sonderforschungsvorhaben "Analysen

  4. Applying a System-of-Systems Engineering Perspective to Current and Future Army Acquisitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING /MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) N/A 10...TV-2 technical standards forecast UAV unmanned aerial vehicle UEWR Upgraded Early Warning Radar xvi THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK...Defense System is a true SoS because the Air Force’s Upgraded Early Warning Radar (UEWR) combined with a Patriot System provides unique capabilities

  5. Forecasting Workload for Defense Logistics Agency Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    methods” (Orchowsky, Kirchoff, Rider, & Kem, 1986, p. 7). An example of a simple technique is exponential smoothing. A 2006 summary by Gardner of all...AGENCY DISTRIBUTION 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Aaron W. Chonko, Padraic T. Heiliger, and Travis W. Rudge 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S...AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING /MONITORING

  6. Foreign Military Sales Trend Analysis: Impacts on the Future with Application to Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    Future with Application to Taiwan By: Kevin L. Moore, Chih-Haur Ho, Coleen A. Foust , and Aidas Kerutis June 2007... Foust and Aidas Kerutis 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000...TAIWAN Kevin L. Moore, Major, United States Army Chih-Haur Ho, Major, Republic of China Army Coleen A. Foust , Captain, United States Air Force

  7. Foreign Aid: Are We Increasing Stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER...government (USG) organization must do more with less. The Department of Defense (DOD) is compelled to conduct military operations across the globe with fewer...service members, and the Department of State (DOS) and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) are both being asked to conduct

  8. NPS TINYSCOPE Program Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    orbit and the rotation of the Earth and Moon . The planets will also perturb the orbits with Jupiter and Venus acting as the primary sources...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE NPS TINYSCOPE Program Management 6. AUTHOR( S ) Christopher Gordon Turner 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING /MONITORING

  9. A Non-Conventional Interdiction Strategy for the Global War on Terror

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    ADDRESS(ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S...AND ADDRESS(ES) N/A 10. SPONSORING/ MONITORING AGENCY REPORT NUMBER 11. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES The views expressed in this thesis are those of...a briefing to NPS students 8 May 2006. 171 Sean D. Naylor, “More Than Door- Kickers : Special Ops Forces Are Misused as Man-Hunters, Critics Say

  10. Analysis of Dead Time and Implementation of Smith Predictor Compensation in Tracking Servo Systems for Small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) N...A 10. SPONSORING/ MONITORING AGENCY REPORT NUMBER 11. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES The views expressed in this thesis are those of the author and do...own! You are beyond doubt an extraordinary woman and I am so lucky to have you as my wife – I love you Kickers ! I would also like to thank my

  11. A Simulation Tool for the Duties of Computer Specialist Non-Commissioned Officers on a Turkish Air Force Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    ES) Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 93943-5000 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND...ADDRESS(ES) N/A 10. SPONSORING/ MONITORING AGENCY REPORT NUMBER 11. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES The views expressed in this thesis are those of the...property change listener is “Simple Property Dumper .” This listener lists the state variable changes in the components that it is connected to by a

  12. Diagenetic Microcrystalline Opal Varieties from the Monterey Formation, CA: HRTEM Study of Structures and Phase Transformation Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Sherry L.; Wenk, H.-R.; DeVincenzi, Don (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Microcrystalline opal varieties form as intermediary precipitates during the diagenetic transformation of biogenically precipitated non-crystalline opal (opal-A) to microquartz. With regard to the Monterey Formation of California, X-ray powder diffraction studies have shown that a decrease in the primary d-spacing of opal-CT toward that of cristobalite occurs with increasing diagenesis. The initial timing of opal-CT/quartz formation and the value of the primary opal-CT d-spacing, are influenced by the sediment. lithology. Transmission electron microscopy methods (CTEM/HRTEM) were used to investigate the structure of the diagenetic phases and establish transformation mechanisms between the varieties of microcrystalline opals in charts and porcelanites from the Monterey Formation. HRTEM images revealed that the most common fibrous varieties of microcrystalline opals contain varying amounts of structural disorder. Finite lamellar units of cristobalite-and tridymite-type. layer sequences were found to be randomly stacked in a direction perpendicular to the fiber axis. Disordered and ordered fibers were found to have coprecipitated within the same radial fiber bundles that formed within the matrix of the Most siliceous samples. HRTEM images, which reveal that the fibers within radial and lepispheric fiber bundles branch non-crystallographically, support an earlier proposal that microspheres in chert grow via a spherulitic growth mechanism. A less common variety of opal-CT was found to be characterized by non-parallel (low-angle) stacking sequences that often contain twinned lamellae. Tabular-shaped crystals of orthorhombic tridymite (PO-2) were also identified in the porcelanite samples. A shift in the primary d-spacing of opal-CT has been interpreted as an indication of solid-state ordering g toward a predominantly cristobalite structure, (opal-C). Domains of opal-C were identified as topotactically-oriented overgrowths on discrete Sections of opal-CT fibers and as

  13. Sediment Dynamics and the Burial and Exhumation of Bedrock Reefs as Elucidated by High-resolution Repetitive Sonar Surveys: Northern Monterey Bay, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, C. D.; Fregoso, T. A.; Golden, N. E.; Finlayson, D. P.

    2011-12-01

    Two high-resolution bathymetric and acoustic backscatter sonar surveys were conducted along the energetic emergent inner shelf of northern Monterey Bay, CA, USA, in the fall of 2005 and the spring of 2006 to determine the impact of winter storm waves, beach erosion, and river floods on biologically-important bedrock reef habitats. The surveys extended from water depths of 4 m to 22 m and covered an area of 3.14 km2, of which 45.8% was bedrock, gravel, and coarse-grained sand and 54.2% was fine-grained sand. Our analysis of the bathymetric and acoustic backscatter data demonstrates that during the 6 months between surveys, 11.4% of the study area was buried by fine-grained sand while erosion exposed of bedrock or coarse-grained sand over 26.5% of the study area. The probability of burial decreased with increasing water depth and rugosity; the probability of exhumation increased with increasing seabed slope and rugosity. Much of the detected change was at the boundary between bedrock and unconsolidated sediment due to burial or exhumation of bedrock. In a number of cases, however, the change in seabed character was apparently due to fluctuations in sediment grain size, where scour exposed what appeared to be an underlying coarser-grained lag or fine-grained sand buried coarser-grained sand. These findings suggest that, in some places, (a) single acoustic surveys typically employed for geologic characterization and/or habitat mapping may not adequately characterize the geomorphology and sedimentologic nature of rocky, energetic inner shelves, and (b) burial and exhumation likely play a role in the life history of the numerous organisms that inhabit these reefs and thus information on the frequency and magnitude of such processes may better constrain our understanding of physical controls on benthic species' distribution patterns.

  14. Sediment dynamics and the burial and exhumation of bedrock reefs along an emergent coastline as elucidated by repetitive sonar surveys: Northern Monterey Bay, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, C.D.; Fregoso, T.A.; Golden, N.E.; Finlayson, D.P.

    2011-01-01

    Two high-resolution bathymetric and acoustic backscatter sonar surveys were conducted along the energetic emergent inner shelf of northern Monterey Bay, CA, USA, in the fall of 2005 and the spring of 2006 to determine the impact of winter storm waves, beach erosion, and river floods on biologically-important siliclastic bedrock reef habitats. The surveys extended from water depths of 4 m to 22 m and covered an area of 3.14 km2, 45.8% of which was bedrock, gravel, and coarse-grained sand and 54.2% was fine-grained sand. Our analyses of the bathymetric and acoustic backscatter data demonstrates that during the 6 months between surveys, 11.4% of the study area was buried by fine-grained sand while erosion resulted in the exposure of bedrock or coarse-grained sand over 26.5% of the study area. The probability of burial decreased with increasing water depth and rugosity; the probability of exhumation increased with increasing wave-induced near-bed shear stress, seabed slope and rugosity. Much of the detected change was at the boundary between bedrock and unconsolidated sediment due to sedimentation and erosion burying or exhuming bedrock, respectively. In a number of cases, however, the change in seabed character was apparently due to changes in sediment grain size when scour exposed what appeared to be an underlying coarser-grained lag or the burial of coarser-grained sand and gravel by fine-grained sand. These findings suggest that, in some places, (a) burial and exhumation of nearshore bedrock reefs along rocky, energetic inner shelves occurs over seasonal timescales and appears related to intrinsic factors such as seabed morphology and extrinsic factors such as wave forces, and (b) single acoustic surveys typically employed for geologic characterization and/or habitat mapping may not adequately characterize the geomorphologic and sedimentologic nature of these types of environments that typify most of the Pacific Ocean and up to 50% of the world's coastlines.

  15. Monterey MRWPCA Interceptor Pipeline 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Monterey Interceptor between Seaside Pump Station and Monterey Beach Resort is buried in the dunes, approximately 100 to 175 feet from the dune bluff. Between...

  16. Monterey MRWPCA Interceptor Pipeline 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Monterey Interceptor between Seaside Pump Station and Monterey Beach Resort is buried in the dunes, approximately 100 to 175 feet from the dune bluff. Between...

  17. Long-term, High Frequency, High Precision pH Measurements on the MBARI deep-water FOCE Experiment at the MARS Cabled Observatory in Monterey Bay, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltzer, E. T.; Maughan, T.; Barry, J. P.; Brewer, P. G.; Headley, K. L.; Herlien, R.; Kirkwood, W. J.; Matsumoto, G. I.; O'Reilly, T. C.; Salamy, K. A.; Scholfield, J.; Shane, F. F.; Walz, P. M.

    2012-12-01

    The MBARI deep-water FOCE experiment was deployed on the MARS cabled observatory in Monterey Bay on May 4th, 2011. It has been in continuous operation (excluding a few minor shore based power outages) ever since. During the fifteen months of deployment, we have been able to observe both the daily variation in pH in response to water mass movements associated with the semi-diurnal tides, internal waves and longer-term trends as a function of the seasonal variations in the water masses within the Monterey Bay Canyon. Our experimental site is located at 890 meters, just below the oxygen minimum for Monterey Bay, and we clearly see the anticipated inverse correlation between seawater temperature and pH. Daily variation in pH is on the order of 0.020-0.030 pH units with longer term trends adding an additional variation of similar magnitude. Instrumentation on this experiment included two CTDs with oxygen sensors (Sea-Bird 52). One CTD is mounted on the external FOCE framework to measure the background conditions, and one CTD is installed within the FOCE pH control area to monitor the experimentally manipulated conditions. In addition, 6 MBARI modified Sea-Bird 18 pH sensors were mounted on the FOCE apparatus. Four of these pH sensors monitored pH inside the experimental chamber and two monitored the external background seawater conditions. Although we originally intended to conduct several in situ CO2 enrichment experiments to study the impact of ocean acidification on the benthic biology and then recover the apparatus after one year, unanticipated changes in the ship schedule have left the FOCE experiment in place for nearly fifteen months at the time of this writing. Throughout this time period, all sensor data has been logged by the MBARI Shore-Side Data System (SSDS) resulting in the longest continuous record of high precision pH measurements in the intermediate water column. We present an analysis of the data obtained from this unique data set, and discuss our in

  18. Southern Monterey Bay Littoral Cell CRSMP CEMEX Mine Dredge Pond 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Location of the CEMEX mine dredge pond at Lapis Sand Plant, Marina, CA. Southern Monterey Bay has been the most intensively mined shoreline in the U.S. Sand mining...

  19. Southern Monterey Bay Littoral Cell CRSMP CEMEX Mine Dredge Pond 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Location of the CEMEX mine dredge pond at Lapis Sand Plant, Marina, CA. Southern Monterey Bay has been the most intensively mined shoreline in the U.S. Sand mining...

  20. Habitat--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  1. Contours--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. The raster data file is...

  2. Habitat--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  3. Contours--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. The raster data file is...

  4. Why Stochastic Modeling is Essential in Analyzing Interdicted Transportation Network Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-01

    Guro -Gu, Si-Heung 1 Dong, HanYang Apt. 5-1107 Seoul, Korea 11. CPT. Kim, Suk Hwan SMC 2318 Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, alifornia 93943-5000 12. Library 130-02 Korea Military Academy Gong-Reung Dong, 556-21 Seoul, Korea 61

  5. Contours--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. The raster data file is...

  6. Backscatter [5m]--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  7. Paleoshorelines--Offshore Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the paleoshorelines for the geologic and geomorphic map of Offshore Monterey, California. The vector data file is included in...

  8. Habitat--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor of the Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  9. Habitat--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor of the Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  10. Backscatter [5m]--Offshore Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  11. Contours--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. The raster data file is...

  12. Geology of the Monterey Bay region, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, H. Gary

    1977-01-01

    Geophysical data and sea floor samples collected from the continental shelf and slope between Ano Nuevo Point and Point Sur, California indicate that the Monterey Bay region has had a complex late Cenozoic tectonic history. Uplift and depression have produced a succession of regressive and transgressive sedimentary units, while contemporaneous right-slip along faults of the San Andreas system have offset major structural and lithologic elements. This deformation produced three regional and several local unconformities within upper Tertiary rocks and initiated development of a canyon system that today includes the Monterey, Ascension, Carmel, and other large submarine canyons. The Tertiary stratigraphy of the offshore Monterey Bay area is divided into two provinces by a major structural boundary, the north-trending Palo Colorado-San Gregorio fault zone. East of this zone in the offshore are four seismically distinct sequences that can be correlated with major sequences onshore. These sequences comprise (1) pre-Tertiary basement, and (2) middle Miocene, (3) upper Miocene to Pliocene, and (4) upper Pliocene to Holocene sedimentary intervals. Each of the latter three sequences is bounded by unconformities, as is its counterpart on land. Only Neogene sedimentary rocks are present offshore; Paleogene units, if originally present, have been removed completely by pre-middle Miocene erosion. An extensive erosional surface was cut during Zemorrian time into the late Mesozoic granitic basement rocks. Incised into this surface are the ancestral Monterey Canyon and an unnamed canyon. Marine sedimentary rocks of upper Miocene and Pliocene age overlie this unconformably and fill the unnamed canyon. Similar rocks also may have once filled Monterey Canyon. Near shore these strata are covered by terrestrial alluvial and eolian deposits, deltaic deposits, marine canyon fill, landslide and slump deposits, and unconsolidated sediments that range in age from upper Pliocene to Holocene

  13. Monterey Bay Aquarium Volunteer Guide Scheduling Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    wetlands/aviary 1 24 splash zone—rocky shore, coral reef kingdom 8 play your part 25 sandy seafloor 9 wetlands/aviary 2 26 octopus/deep reef 10...The mission of the Monterey Bay Aquarium is to inspire conservation of the oceans. It does this through education outreach, exhibits, research and... conservation , and by rehabilitating injured ocean wildlife. The Aquarium has a large and diverse staff that includes aquarists, scientific divers

  14. Can Vertical Migrations of Dinoflagellates Explain Observed Bioluminescence Patterns During an Upwelling Event in Monterey Bay, California?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-25

    transect (Figure 1). The REMUS transect began near Santa Cruz in the SA, ran out to the buoy Ml (Figure 1), and then returned back to shore. Inshore...Department, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo , California, USA. ’Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, California...University, San Luis Obispo , CA 93407, USA. M. J. Oliver, College of Earth, Ocean and Environment, University of Delaware, 700 Pilottown Rd., Lewes, DE 19958, USA. 10 of 10

  15. Performance of High-Reliability Space-Qualified Processors Implementing Software Defined Radios

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    SCHOOL Monterey, California 93943- 5000 Ronald A. Route Douglas A. Hensler President Provost The report entitled “Performance of High...exceptions to this generalization have emerged recently. The U.S. Government has been sponsoring the OPERA project through which the Boeing Corp. has...N N Data- collection sink tile 2 Compute , 0 1NkX k≤ < − 13 We used the system interfaces to the underlying tile-to-tile communications functions

  16. Faults--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is included in...

  17. Southern Monterey Bay Littoral Cell CRSMP Proposed Receiver Site 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Given the location of the critical areas of erosion and the need to avoid adverse impacts to local sensitive habitat, the Southern Monterey Bay Coastal RSM Plan...

  18. Faults--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is included in...

  19. Folds--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is included in...

  20. Southern Monterey Bay Littoral Cell CRSMP Sensitive Habitat 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — One of the most important functions of the southern Monterey Bay coastal system is its role as a habitat for a unique flora and fauna. The beaches are habitat for...

  1. Backscatter [7125]-- Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution Reson 7125 data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata describe...

  2. Backscatter [Swath]-- Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution SWATHPlus data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata describe...

  3. Isopachs--Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the isopachs for the Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California, region. The vector data file is included in...

  4. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  5. Folds--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  6. Faults--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is...

  7. Monterey Strategy Seminar: Day 1: Capabilities Based Planning.

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, James A; Pulsipher, Lashley; Zellen, Barry; Lavoy, Peter R.; Clary, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Monterey Strategy Seminar: Day 1: Capabilities Based Planning. Day 2: Dissuasion in the U.S. Defense Strategy. Day 3: Global Strike Warfare Naval Postgraduate School Center for Contemporary Conflict (CCC)

  8. Paleoshorelines--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the paleoshorelines for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is...

  9. Transgressive Contours--Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the transgressive contours for the Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California, region. The vector file is included in...

  10. Geology and geomorphology--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  11. Faults--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is...

  12. Folds--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Offshore Monterey map area, California. The vector data file is included...

  13. Sediment Thickness--Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the sediment-thickness map of the Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California, region. The raster data file is included in...

  14. Backscatter [8101]--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution Reson 8101 data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata...

  15. Monterey, California Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Monterey, California Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  16. Backscatter [Swath]-- Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution SWATHPlus data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata describe...

  17. BackscatterC [7125]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  18. Backscatter [7125]-- Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution Reson 7125 data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata describe...

  19. Isopachs--Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the isopachs for the Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California, region. The vector data file is included in...

  20. Transgressive Contours--Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the transgressive contours for the Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California, region. The vector file is included in...

  1. Sediment Thickness--Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the sediment-thickness map of the Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California, region. The raster data file is included in...

  2. Paleoshorelines--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the paleoshorelines for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is...

  3. Southern Monterey Bay Littoral Cell CRSMP Proposed Receiver Site 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — Given the location of the critical areas of erosion and the need to avoid adverse impacts to local sensitive habitat, the Southern Monterey Bay Coastal RSM Plan...

  4. BackscatterB [EM300]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  5. Faults--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is included...

  6. Southern Monterey Bay Littoral Cell CRSMP Critical Erosion Sites 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — PWA and Griggs (2004) defined three risk categories to Monterey Regional Water Pollution Control Agency (MRWPCA) facilities between Marina and Wharf II. These risk...

  7. Folds--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is included in...

  8. Backscatter [8101]--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents 2-m-resolution Reson 8101 data for the acoustic-backscatter map of the Offshore of Monterey map area, California. These metadata...

  9. BackscatterC [7125]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  10. BackscatterB [EM300]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  11. Battle of Midway Memorial Dinner, Monterey Bay Commandery, NOUS tickets

    OpenAIRE

    Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)

    2015-01-01

    Web page capture of tickets to the Battle of Midway Memorial Dinner through Eventbrite. The Monterey Bay Commandery of the Naval Order of the United States will host the 73 Battle of Midway Dining-Out on Saturday 6 June at the Naval Support Activity, Monterey, Herrmann Hall, Naval Postgraduate School. This black-tie event is open to the all active and retired service members, military faculty, and civilians. Guests holding confirmed reservations will have gate access the evenin...

  12. MONT95C - Bathymetry contours of the southern Monterey Bay area between Moss Landing and Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The bathymetric grids and derived contours are from data collected by the USGS with a multibeam (Simrad EM1000) sidescan sonar system in the southern Monterey Bay...

  13. MONT95C - Bathymetry contours of the southern Monterey Bay area between Moss Landing and Monterey, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The bathymetric grids and derived contours are from data collected by the USGS with a multibeam (Simrad EM1000) sidescan sonar system in the southern Monterey Bay...

  14. Anchovies to Whales: tracking vertebrate biodiversity in Monterey Bay by metabarcoding environmental DNA (eDNA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Closek, C. J.; Starks, H.; Walz, K.; Boehm, A. B.; Chavez, F.

    2016-12-01

    The oscillation between the dominance of Sardinops sagax (pacific sardine) and Engraulis mordax (northern anchovy) has been documented in the California Coastal Ecosystem for more than 100 years. These two species are strong drivers of trophic interactions in the region. As part of the Marine Biodiversity Observational Network (MBON) initiative, we used archived filtered seawater samples collected late-summer to mid-fall over a span of 8 years from Monterey Bay, CA to examine the change in marine vertebrate environmental DNA (eDNA). Water samples were collected from a nearshore location in Monterey Bay (C1) during the years of 2008-15. The water was then filtered, and the filter was archived at -80°C. DNA was extracted from the filters, and the 12S rRNA gene present in mitochondrial DNA was PCR amplification using primers designed to amplify 12s rRNA genes from marine vertebrates. The amplicons were subsequently sequenced with an Illumina MiSeq and the data processed using an analysis pipeline for sequence annotation. More than 20 fish genera were noted in the sequences from 2008-12, with Engraulis the dominant fish genus from 2013-15. Anchovy and Megaptera novaeangliae (humpback whale) were present in temporal patterns similar to those noted during visual observations where anchovy and humpback whale were more abundant during the years of 2013-2015 than the other years. This study demonstrates our ability to detect megafauna and fish species that are important to the Monterey Bay ecosystem from coastal water samples and determine community structural differences over time.

  15. Impact of Glider Data Assimilation on the Monterey Bay Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Assimilation on the Monterey Bay Model 6. AUTHOR(S) Igor Shulman, Clark Rowley, Stephanie Anderson, Sergio DeRada, John Kindle, Paul Martin, James...Impact of glider data assimilation on the Monterey Bay model Igor Shulman3*, Clark Rowley3, Stephanie Andersona, Sergio DeRadaa, John Kindlea, Paul ...support of the AOSN-II field campaign. Deep-Sea Research II, this issue |doi:10.1016/j.dsr2.2008 08.009). Kundu. P.K.. 1976. Ekman veering observed

  16. Bathymetry [5m]--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The raster data file is included in...

  17. Bathymetry [2m]--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The raster data file is included in...

  18. Hydrocarbon geochemistry of cold seeps in the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenson, T.D.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Hostettler, F.D.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Orange, D.L.; Martin, J.B.

    2002-01-01

    Samples from four geographically and tectonically discrete cold seeps named Clam Flat, Clamfield, Horseshoe Scarp South, and Tubeworm City, within the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary were analyzed for their hydrocarbon content. The sediment contains gaseous hydrocarbons and CO2, as well as high molecular weight aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons with various combinations of thermogenic and biogenic contributions from petroleum, marine, and terrigenous sources. Of particular interest is the cold seep site at Clamfield which is characterized by the presence of thermogenic hydrocarbons including oil that can likely be correlated with oil-saturated strata at Majors Creek near Davenport, CA, USA. At Clam Flat, the evidence for thermogenic hydrocarbons is equivocal. At Horseshoe Scarp South and Tubeworm City, hydrocarbon gases, mainly methane, are likely microbial in origin. These varied sources of hydrocarbon gases highlight the diverse chemical systems that appear at cold seep communities. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Proceedings of the Monterey Containment Symposium, Monterey, California, August 26-28, 1981. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, B.C. [comp.] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Jones, E.M. [comp.] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Keller, C.E. [comp.] [Field Command (DNA), Kirtland Air Force Base, NM (United States); Smith, C.W. [comp.] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1983-02-01

    Since the Atmospheric Test Ban Treaty was signed in 1963, the United States has conducted all nuclear weapons tests underground. To meet US treaty responsibilities and to ensure public safety, the containment community must prevent any release of radioactive gases to the atmosphere. In the past two decades we have gained considerable insight into the scientific and engineering requirements for complete containment, but the papers and discussions at the Monterey Symposium indicate that a great deal remains to be done. Among papers included here, those dealing with mature topics will serve as reviews and introductions for new workers in the field. Others, representing first looks at new areas, contain more speculative material. Active research topics include propagation of stress waves in rocks, formation and decay of residual hoop stresses around a cavity, hydrofracture out of a cavity, formation of chimneys, and geologic and geophysical investigations of the Nevada Test Site. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  20. ROV observation of fluid expulsion in Monterey Bay, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orange, D.L.; Barry, J.; Maher, N. [Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute., Pacific Grove, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    ROV dives in Monterey Bay have been used to examine the relationship of fluid flow to tectonic and stratigraphic conduits along an active transpressional continental margin. We used side-scan sonar to identify dive targets for the ROV, since anomalous reflectivity can be caused by the presence of biological {open_quote}cold seep{close_quotes} communities or authigenic carbonate. On a compressional ridge west of the San Gregorio Fault, cold seep clams are found along with extensive fields of authigenic carbonate in an elliptical region of anomalous reflectivity {approximately}400m in diameter. The reflectivity and fluid expulsion suggest that this feature is an active mud volcano. Analyses of push cores from the ridge site indicate high concentrations of both methane and sulfide and the presence of higher-order hydrocarbons. Many carbon isotopic ratios of the carbonate crusts indicate a methane carbon source; some values represent a mixture of methane carbon and normal marine carbon. Fluids charging the seeps west of the San Gregorio Fault may originate in tectonically-compacted sediments affected by residual Pacific-North America plate convergence, and may have an additional component of hydrocarbon charging from the underlying Monterey Formation. At the intersection of the Monterey Fault Zone and the Monterey Canyon a number of cold seeps occur in headless side canyons characterized by intense fracturing. This supports the hypothesis that submarine canyons act as hydrologic sinks for any overpressured fluid flowing toward the surface. On the San Gregorio Fault itself we have found in echelon ridges of carbonate. The fluids seeping out along fault zones may originate deep in the section and utilize the deformation-induced fracture permeability of the fault zone. Alternatively, aquifer-forcing from the uplifted Santa Cruz Mountains may provide a source of fluids venting along these fault zones (aquicludes?) and at seeps east of the fault zones.

  1. ROV observation of fluid expulsion in Monterey Bay, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orange, D.L.; Barry, J.; Maher, N. (Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute., Pacific Grove, CA (United States)) (and others)

    1996-01-01

    ROV dives in Monterey Bay have been used to examine the relationship of fluid flow to tectonic and stratigraphic conduits along an active transpressional continental margin. We used side-scan sonar to identify dive targets for the ROV, since anomalous reflectivity can be caused by the presence of biological [open quote]cold seep[close quotes] communities or authigenic carbonate. On a compressional ridge west of the San Gregorio Fault, cold seep clams are found along with extensive fields of authigenic carbonate in an elliptical region of anomalous reflectivity [approximately]400m in diameter. The reflectivity and fluid expulsion suggest that this feature is an active mud volcano. Analyses of push cores from the ridge site indicate high concentrations of both methane and sulfide and the presence of higher-order hydrocarbons. Many carbon isotopic ratios of the carbonate crusts indicate a methane carbon source; some values represent a mixture of methane carbon and normal marine carbon. Fluids charging the seeps west of the San Gregorio Fault may originate in tectonically-compacted sediments affected by residual Pacific-North America plate convergence, and may have an additional component of hydrocarbon charging from the underlying Monterey Formation. At the intersection of the Monterey Fault Zone and the Monterey Canyon a number of cold seeps occur in headless side canyons characterized by intense fracturing. This supports the hypothesis that submarine canyons act as hydrologic sinks for any overpressured fluid flowing toward the surface. On the San Gregorio Fault itself we have found in echelon ridges of carbonate. The fluids seeping out along fault zones may originate deep in the section and utilize the deformation-induced fracture permeability of the fault zone. Alternatively, aquifer-forcing from the uplifted Santa Cruz Mountains may provide a source of fluids venting along these fault zones (aquicludes ) and at seeps east of the fault zones.

  2. Cold seeps in Monterey Bay, California: Geochemistry of pore waters and relationship to benthic foraminiferal calcite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gieskes, Joris, E-mail: jgieskes@ucsd.edu [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, IOD-0208, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0208 (United States); Rathburn, Anthony E. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, IOD-0208, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0208 (United States)] [Indiana State University, Department of Earth and Environmental Systems, Terre Haute, IN 47809 (United States); Martin, Jonathan B. [University of Florida, Department of Geological Sciences, Gainesville, FL 32611-2120 (United States); Perez, M. Elena [Indiana State University, Department of Earth and Environmental Systems, Terre Haute, IN 47809 (United States)] [The Natural History Museum, Department of Palaeontology, Cromwell Road, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Mahn, Chris [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, IOD-0208, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0208 (United States); Bernhard, Joan M. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Geology and Geophysics Department, MS52, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States); Day, Shelley [University of Florida, Department of Geological Sciences, Gainesville, FL 32611-2120 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: > We describe the geochemistry of pore waters in the Clam Flats area of Monterey Bay. > The geochemical data are compared with the {delta}{sup 13}C chemistry of benthic foraminifera. > Living foraminifera indicate little effects of pore water low {delta}{sup 13}C (DIC) in the clam bed. > This phenomenon and its implications are discussed in detail. > Implications with regards to paleo-methane seepage are discussed. - Abstract: An extensive geochemical and biogeochemical examination of CH{sub 4} seeps in the Clam Flats area of Monterey Bay provides insight into the character of relationships between seep geochemistry and benthic foraminiferal geochemistry. The area is characterized by sulfide-rich fluids. Sulfide increases are associated with large increases in alkalinity, as well as small decreases in dissolved Ca and Mg. In addition, only small increases in NH{sub 4} are observed, but values of {delta}{sup 13}C of dissolved inorganic C are as low as -60 per mille at shallow depths (<3 cm). These observations indicate that all these processes are related to the bacterial oxidation of CH{sub 4}, which is transported upward by slow seepage of pore fluids. The geochemistry of the pore fluids should be relevant to the geochemistry of the carbonate tests of living and dead foraminifera. However, a profound disequilibrium of approximately an order of magnitude occurs between the {delta}{sup 13}C values of stained (cytoplasm-containing) foraminiferal carbonate and the C isotope values of ambient pore water dissolved inorganic C. Reasons are unclear for this isotopic disequilibrium, but have important implications for interpretations of foraminiferal carbonate as a paleoenvironmental proxy. Much fine scale work is needed to fully understand the relationships between the biogeochemistry of benthic foraminifera and the geochemistry of the pore waters where they live.

  3. THE RESPONSE OF MONTEREY BAY TO THE 2010 CHILEAN EARTHQUAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence C. Breaker

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The primary frequencies contained in the arrival sequence produced by the tsunami from the Chilean earthquake of 2010 in Monterey Bay were extracted to determine the seiche modes that were produced. Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA and Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition (EEMD were employed to extract the primary frequencies of interest. The wave train from the Chilean tsunami lasted for at least four days due to multipath arrivals that may not have included reflections from outside the bay but most likely did include secondary undulations, and energy trapping in the form of edge waves, inside the bay. The SSA decomposition resolved oscillations with periods of 52-57, 34-35, 26-27, and 21-22 minutes, all frequencies that have been predicted and/or observed in previous studies. The EEMD decomposition detected oscillations with periods of 50-55 and 21-22 minutes. Periods in the range of 50-57 minutes varied due to measurement uncertainties but almost certainly correspond to the first longitudinal mode of oscillation for Monterey Bay, periods of 34-35 minutes correspond to the first transverse mode of oscillation that assumes a nodal line across the entrance of the bay, a period of 26- 27 minutes, although previously observed, may not represent a fundamental oscillation, and a period of 21-22 minutes has been predicted and observed previously. A period of ~37 minutes, close to the period of 34-35 minutes, was generated by the Great Alaskan Earthquake of 1964 in Monterey Bay and most likely represents the same mode of oscillation. The tsunamis associated with the Great Alaskan Earthquake and the Chilean Earthquake both entered Monterey Bay but initially arrived outside the bay from opposite directions. Unlike the Great Alaskan Earthquake, however, which excited only one resonant mode inside the bay, the Chilean Earthquake excited several modes suggesting that the asymmetric shape of the entrance to Monterey Bay was an important factor and that the

  4. California State Waters Map Series—Offshore of Monterey, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Watt, Janet T.; Davenport, Clifton W.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Sliter, Ray W.; Maier, Katherine L.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2016-08-18

    IntroductionIn 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath bathymetry data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow subsurface geology.The Offshore of Monterey map area in central California is located on the Pacific Coast, about 120 km south of San Francisco. Incorporated cities in the map area include Seaside, Monterey, Marina, Pacific Grove, Carmel-by-the-Sea, and Sand City. The local economy receives significant resources from tourism, as well as from the Federal Government. Tourist attractions include the Monterey Bay Aquarium, Cannery Row, Fisherman’s Wharf, and the many golf courses near Pebble Beach, and the area serves as a gateway to the spectacular scenery and outdoor activities along the Big Sur coast to the south. Federal facilities include the Army’s Defense Language Institute, the Naval Postgraduate School, and the Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center (operated by the Navy). In 1994, Fort Ord army base, located between Seaside and Marina, was closed; much of former army base land now makes up the Fort Ord National Monument, managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as part of the National Landscape Conservation System. In addition, part of the old Fort Ord is now occupied by California State University, Monterey Bay.The offshore part of the map area lies entirely within the Monterey Bay National

  5. California State Waters Map Series—Offshore of Monterey, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Samuel Y.; Dartnell, Peter; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Golden, Nadine E.; Watt, Janet T.; Davenport, Clifton W.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Sliter, Ray W.; Maier, Katherine L.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Cochran, Susan A.

    2016-08-18

    IntroductionIn 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath bathymetry data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow subsurface geology.The Offshore of Monterey map area in central California is located on the Pacific Coast, about 120 km south of San Francisco. Incorporated cities in the map area include Seaside, Monterey, Marina, Pacific Grove, Carmel-by-the-Sea, and Sand City. The local economy receives significant resources from tourism, as well as from the Federal Government. Tourist attractions include the Monterey Bay Aquarium, Cannery Row, Fisherman’s Wharf, and the many golf courses near Pebble Beach, and the area serves as a gateway to the spectacular scenery and outdoor activities along the Big Sur coast to the south. Federal facilities include the Army’s Defense Language Institute, the Naval Postgraduate School, and the Fleet Numerical Meteorology and Oceanography Center (operated by the Navy). In 1994, Fort Ord army base, located between Seaside and Marina, was closed; much of former army base land now makes up the Fort Ord National Monument, managed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management as part of the National Landscape Conservation System. In addition, part of the old Fort Ord is now occupied by California State University, Monterey Bay.The offshore part of the map area lies entirely within the Monterey Bay National

  6. 15 CFR Appendix A to Subpart M of... - Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Coordinates A Appendix A to Subpart M of Part 922 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating...—Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Boundary Coordinates Point ID No. Latitude Longitude...

  7. Large wave-shaped bedforms in the axial channel of Monterey Submarine Canyon: Monterey Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paull, C. K.; Normark, W. R.; Ussler, W.; Caress, D. W.; Keaten, R.; Barry, J.; Xu, J.; Smith, D.; Covault, J. A.; Maier, K. L.

    2007-12-01

    Multibeam bathymetric data show that large wave-shaped bedforms exist on the seafloor within the axial channel of Monterey Submarine Canyon offshore northern California (Smith et al., 2006). These features have wavelengths up to 70 m, amplitudes up to 2 m, and distinct asymmetrical crests that are roughly perpendicular to the channel. Comparisons of repetitive multibeam surveys since 2004 shows that the bedforms are active features because their positions change between surveys. Three complementary studies are underway to understand the origin of these features: (1) Vibracoring - In June 2007, the ROV Ventana collected 18 vibracores up to 2 m in length along a 130-m transect in ~285 m water depth that spanned the crests of two and the flanks of three waves. Sediment in these cores is composed of one or more sequences of coarse gravel or multicolored clay-clasts that fine upward into sand. Sometimes individual gravel-clasts or clay-chips occur within sand. The internal stratigraphy of these waves shows they resemble classic gravity-flow deposits. (2) Sediment Movement - A pilot study was conducted to assess whether sediment within the canyon floor moves by traction from currents or mass transport. On February 8, 2007, three acoustic beacons were deployed in ~290 m water depth within the canyon axis using Ventana. The beacons were placed within recesses in 50-cm-high ~45 kg poured-concrete monuments. These boulder-sized monuments were buried leaving only the top of the beacon standing ~6 cm above the sediment surface. Thus, the monuments were largely entombed within the seafloor. We also placed 3 acoustic beacons mounted on trapezoidal frames at the edge of a terrace on the canyon's lower flank. On February 12th, we returned to the area and determined that all three monuments had moved ~150 m down canyon. Two trapezoidal frames were found on their sides entwined with each other 50 and 75 m down canyon from their deployment site. The third frame was never located. A

  8. Paleoceanographic and tectonic controls on deposition of the Monterey formation and related siliceous rocks in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    The timing of paleoceanographic and tectonic events that shaped the deposition of the Monterey Formation of California and related siliceous rocks has been determined by application of a refined biochronology. The base of the Monterey at 17.5 Ma coincides with rising global sea level and a switch in biogenous silica deposition from the Caribbean and low-latitude North Atlantic to the North Pacific. Major polar cooling, which began at 15 Ma, postdates the base of the Monterey by more than 2 Ma and cannot be invoked to cause the deposition of diatomaceous sediments occurring in the lowermost Monterey. Later polar cooling in the early late Miocene, however, apparently caused increased upwelling and deposition of purer diatomites in the upper Monterey. The top of the Monterey at about 6 Ma coincides with a major sea level drop and is commonly marked by an unconformity. Equivalent unconformities are widespread around the rim of the North Pacific and typically separate more pelagic sediments from overlying sediments with a greater terrigenous component. Above the Monterey, diatoms persist in California sediments to 4.5-4.0 m.y., where their decline coincides with increased deposition of diatoms in the Antarctic. Carbon isotope records in the Pacific and Indian Oceans record storage of 12C in the Monterey Formation and equivalent organic-rich sediments around the rim of the North Pacific. A +1.0??? excursion in ?? 13C beginning at 17.5 Ma coincides with rising sea level and probably reflects storage of organic material in Monterey-like marginal reservoirs. A reverse -1.0??? shift at 6.2 Ma closely approximates the top of the Monterey and may represent erosion of these marginal reservoirs and reintroduction of stored organic carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system. Initiation of transform faulting and extension in the California margin in the latest Oligocene and early Miocene caused the subsidence of basins which later received Monterey sediments. A major tectonic event

  9. Earthquake and bay: Response of Monterey Bay to the Loma Prieta Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwing, Franklin B.; Norton, Jerrold G.; Pilskaln, Cynthia H.

    The magnitude-7.1 Loma Prieta earthquake, which ruptured a segment of the San Andreas fault on October 17, 1989, and caused extensive damage over a large area of central California, also produced substantial motions in nearby Monterey Bay (Figure 1). Earthquake effects included a tsunami, or seismic sea wave, and subsequent surface water oscillations that were detected for about 24 hours following the main shock and widespread, substantial slumping of sediments on the Monterey Bay continental shelf and along the walls of Monterey Submarine Canyon.

  10. California State Waters Map Series—Monterey Canyon and vicinity, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartnell, Peter; Maier, Katherine L.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Golden, Nadine E.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Finlayson, David P.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Sliter, Ray W.; Greene, H. Gary; Davenport, Clifton W.; Endris, Charles A.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochran, Susan A.

    2016-06-10

    IntroductionIn 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath bathymetry data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow subsurface geology.The Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area lies within Monterey Bay in central California. Monterey Bay is one of the largest embayments along the west coast of the United States, spanning 36 km from its northern to southern tips (in Santa Cruz and Monterey, respectively) and 20 km along its central axis. Not only does it contain one of the broadest sections of continental shelf along California’s coast, it also contains Monterey Canyon, one of the largest and deepest submarine canyons in the world. Note that the California’s State Waters limit extends farther offshore between Santa Cruz and Monterey so that it encompasses all of Monterey Bay.The coastal area within the map area is lightly populated. The community of Moss Landing (population, 204) hosts the largest commercial fishing fleet in Monterey Bay in its harbor. The map area also includes parts of the cities of Marina (population, about 20,000) and Castroville (population, about 6,500). Fertile lowlands of the Salinas River and Pajaro River valleys largely occupy the inland part of the map area, and land use is primarily agricultural.The offshore part of the map area lies completely within the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. The

  11. Water level oscillations in Monterey Bay and Harbor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Park

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Seiches are normal modes of water bodies responding to geophysical forcings with potential to significantly impact ecology and maritime operations. Analysis of high-frequency (1 Hz water level data in Monterey, California, identifies harbor modes between 10 and 120 s that are attributed to specific geographic features. It is found that modal amplitude modulation arises from cross-modal interaction and that offshore wave energy is a primary driver of these modes. Synchronous coupling between modes is observed to significantly impact dynamic water levels. At lower frequencies with periods between 15 and 60 min, modes are independent of offshore wave energy, yet are continuously present. This is unexpected since seiches normally dissipate after cessation of the driving force, indicating an unknown forcing. Spectral and kinematic estimates of these low-frequency oscillations support the idea that a persistent anticyclonic mesoscale gyre adjacent to the bay is a potential mode driver, while discounting other sources.

  12. Water level oscillations in Monterey Bay and Harbor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Park

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Seiches are normal modes of water bodies responding to geophysical forcings with potential to significantly impact ecology and maritime operations. Analysis of high-frequency (1 Hz water level data in Monterey California identifies Harbor modes between 10 and 120 s that are attributed with specific geographic features. It found that modal amplitude modulation arises from cross-modal interaction and that offshore wave energy is a primary driver of these modes. Synchronous coupling between modes is observed to significantly impact dynamic water levels. At lower frequencies between 15 and 60 min modes are independent of offshore wave energy, yet are continuously present. This is unexpected since seiches normally dissipate after cessation of the driving force, indicating an unknown forcing. Spectral and kinematic estimates of these low frequency oscillations supports the idea that a persistent anticyclonic mesoscale gyre adjacent to the Bay is a potential mode driver, while discounting other sources.

  13. The monterey bay broadband ocean bottom seismic observatory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Uhrhammer

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available We report on the installation of a long-term buried ocean-floor broadband seismic station (MOBB in Monterey Bay, California (USA, 40km off-shore, at a water depth of 1000 m. The station was installed in April 2002 using a ship and ROV, in a collaborative effort between the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI and the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory (BSL. The station is located on the western side of the San Gregorio Fault, a major fault in the San Andreas plate boundary fault system. In addition to a 3-component CMG-1T seismometer package, the station comprises a current meter and Differential Pressure Gauge, both sampled at high-enough frequency (1 Hz to allow the study of relations between background noise on the seismometers and ocean waves and currents. The proximity of several land-based broadband seismic stations of the Berkeley Digital Seismic Network allows insightful comparisons of land/ocean background seismic noise at periods relevant to regional and teleseismic studies. The station is currently autonomous. Recording and battery packages are exchanged every 3 months during scheduled one day dives. Ultimately, this station will be linked to shore using continuous telemetry (cable and/or buoy and will contribute to the earthquake notification system in Northern California. We present examples of earthquake and noise data recorded during the first 6 months of operation of MOBB. Lessons learned from these and continued recordings will help understand the nature and character of background noise in regional off-shore environments and provide a reference for the installation of future off-shore temporary and permanent broadband seismic stations.

  14. Summer Internship Program at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, G. I.

    2009-12-01

    The Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute formally started the Internship Program in 1997. The program is open to undergraduate and graduate students and educators. The purpose of the Program is to provide an opportunity for talented students and teachers to come to MBARI for a certain period of time and to work on a research project under MBARI staff supervision. The interns are selected following a rigorous application procedure, merit review and, in some cases, an interview process. They are from around the world and represent a variety of different backgrounds, experience, and education. They all share a common desire to learn more about the marine environment and to work with MBARI staff. The mission of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute is to serve as a world center for advanced research and education in ocean science and technology. MBARI strives to achieve this mission through the development of better instruments, systems, and methods for scientific research in the deep ocean. MBARI emphasizes peer relationships between engineers and scientists as a basic principle of its operation. Teams at MBARI use cutting-edge technology to develop equipment, software, and research methods to meet the specific needs of deep-sea research. The focus of the MBARI internship is on the intern’s professional development—learning research techniques and improving communication and collaboration skills. Each intern has an MBARI mentor who will supervise a specific project. Interns will also serve as peer-mentors to other interns. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the history of the program as well as lessons learned. 2009 MBARI SUMMER INTERNS WITH PRESIDENT AND CEO MARCIA MCNUTT

  15. Monterey Strategy Seminar: Day 2: Dissuasion in the U.S. Defense Strategy.

    OpenAIRE

    Russell, James A; Pulsipher, Lashley; Zellen, Barry; Lavoy, Peter R.; Clary, Christopher

    2004-01-01

    Monterey Strategy Seminar: Day 1: Capabilities Based Planning. Day 2: Dissuasion in the U.S. Defense Strategy. Day 3: Global Strike Warfare Naval Postgraduate School Center for Contemporary Conflict (CCC)

  16. 75 FR 13468 - Disapproval of California State Implementation Plan Revisions, Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-22

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to disapprove a revision to the Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution Control... CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Intergovernmental relations, Nitrogen...

  17. Sediment core data from the northern flank of Monterey Canyon, offshore California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — he five files included in this U.S. Geological Survey data release are data from a set of sediment cores acquired from the continental slope, north of Monterey...

  18. Geology and geomorphology--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is included in...

  19. BackscatterA [USGS SWATH]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  20. BackscatterD [CSUMB Swath]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  1. Sediment core data from the northern flank of Monterey Canyon, offshore California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The five files included in this U.S. Geological Survey data release are data from a set of sediment cores acquired from the continental slope, north of Monterey...

  2. 76 FR 20324 - Availability of Seats for the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Advisory Council: Diving, Education (alternate), Research... professional affiliations; philosophy regarding the protection and management of marine resources; and possibly...'') chaired by the Research Representative, the Sanctuary Education Panel (``SEP'') chaired by the Education...

  3. Geology and geomorphology--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is included in...

  4. BackscatterD [CSUMB Swath]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  5. BackscatterA [USGS SWATH]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  6. Re-Engineering the Enrollment Management System at the Monterey Peninsula Unified School District (MPUSD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Terrace Manzanita La Mesa Highland Foothills Del Rey Woods King Middle Marina Vista Olson Marina Del Mar Crumpton Los Arboles Seaside High Ord Terrace...Le Mesa Larkin Manzanita Marina Del Mar Marina Vista Marshall Monte Vista Olson Ord Terrace Colton Fitch King Los Arboles Monterey High Seaside...196 183 583 583 King 163 163 228 553 552 Los Arboles 236 210 227 672 672 Total Middle 823 812 886 2521 2520 Monterey 417 362 375 317 1471 1474 Seaside

  7. Cost Analysis of a Transition to Green Vehicle Technology for Light Duty Fleet Vehicles in Public Works Department Naval Support Activity Monterey (PWD Monterey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    replacing ICEs with green technologies on the federal fleet level. The current leader in this research is the AVTA, a subcomponent of the Idaho...the market that may provide additional benefits. C. FOLLOW-ON RESEARCH Possibilities for future research are as follows: 1. Determine the...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT COST ANALYSIS OF A TRANSITION TO GREEN VEHICLE

  8. Views of the Sea Floor in Northern Monterey Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storlazzi, Curt D.; Golden, Nadine E.; Finlayson, David P.

    2008-01-01

    A sonar survey that produced unprecedented high-resolution images of the sea floor in northern Monterey Bay was conducted in 2005 and 2006. The survey, performed over 14 days by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), consisted of 172 tracklines and over 300 million soundings and covered an area of 12.2 km2 (4.7 mi2). The goals of this survey were to collect high-resolution bathymetry (depth to the sea floor) and acoustic backscatter data (amount of sound energy bounced back from the sea floor, which provides information on sea-floor hardness and texture) from the inner continental shelf. These data will provide a baseline for future change analyses, geologic mapping, sediment- and contaminant-transport studies, benthic-habitat delineation, and numerical modeling efforts. The survey shows that the inner shelf in this area is extremely varied in nature, encompassing flat sandy areas, faults, boulder fields, and complex bedrock ridges that support rich marine ecosystems. Furthermore, many of these complex bedrock ridges form the ?reefs? that result in a number of California?s classic surf breaks.

  9. 76 FR 1154 - Operating Industries, Inc., Superfund Site, Monterey Park, CA; Notice of Proposed CERCLA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-07

    ...., Beren Corporation, Beylik Drilling, Inc., Big Penny Car Wash General Partnership, Bimbo Bakeries USA... Metal Finishing Corp., dba Barron Anodizing, Cackle Fresh Egg Farms, Inc., Califone International, Inc...-interest to Lightolier, Inc., Geo Drilling Fluids, Inc., George O. Ladner, Jr., Trustee, Trepanier...

  10. Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Array Effects on Wave Current and Sediment Circulation: Monterey Bay CA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Jones, Craig; Magalen, Jason

    2014-09-01

    The goal s of this study were to develop tools to quantitatively characterize environments where wave energy converter ( WEC ) devices may be installed and to assess e ffects on hydrodynamics and lo cal sediment transport. A large hypothetical WEC array was investigated using wave, hydrodynamic, and sediment transport models and site - specific average and storm conditions as input. The results indicated that there were significant changes in sediment s izes adjacent to and in the lee of the WEC array due to reduced wave energy. The circulation in the lee of the array was also altered; more intense onshore currents were generated in the lee of the WECs . In general, the storm case and the average case show ed the same qualitative patterns suggesting that these trends would be maintained throughout the year. The framework developed here can be used to design more efficient arrays while minimizing impacts on nearshore environmen ts.

  11. 78 FR 5801 - Operating Industries, Inc. Superfund Site, Monterey Park, CA; Notice of Proposed CERCLA...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... Corradini Corporation, George J. Peckham, Jr., H.W. Hull & Sons, Inc., Hacienda Car Wash, Inc., Hiro's Transmission, Inc., International Paper Company, International Transportation Service, Inc., John Crane,...

  12. 76 FR 5201 - Notice of Realty Action: Competitive Sale of Public Lands in Monterey County, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-28

    ... qualifications, including citizenship or corporation or partnership, must accompany the sealed bid. A bid to..., sale procedures and conditions, appraisal, planning and environmental documents, and a mineral...

  13. Coast of California Storm and Tidal Waves Study. Geomorphology Framework Report Monterey Bay,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    oi 5-9 Composite stratIgraphic se-ction Of the northern part of Monterey Ila . east of the Palo Colorado-Sati Gregorio fault zone...exposujre oif thte Monterey, Paso Robles . and Aro- ina forinattoits are- ii’gltgibhe. P- rter and tithers (1979) also tletorinite that i-le tlites wi re the...Colorado-San Gregorio Fault Zone (fig. 5-t). The block extends from the Transverse Ranges to Cape Mendocino, a distance of approximately 800 km (Page, 1970

  14. California State Waters Map Series—Monterey Canyon and vicinity, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartnell, Peter; Maier, Katherine L.; Erdey, Mercedes D.; Dieter, Bryan E.; Golden, Nadine E.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Cochrane, Guy R.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Finlayson, David P.; Kvitek, Rikk G.; Sliter, Ray W.; Greene, H. Gary; Davenport, Clifton W.; Endris, Charles A.; Krigsman, Lisa M.; Dartnell, Peter; Cochran, Susan A.

    2016-06-10

    IntroductionIn 2007, the California Ocean Protection Council initiated the California Seafloor Mapping Program (CSMP), designed to create a comprehensive seafloor map of high-resolution bathymetry, marine benthic habitats, and geology within the 3-nautical-mile limit of California’s State Waters. The CSMP approach is to create highly detailed seafloor maps through collection, integration, interpretation, and visualization of swath bathymetry data, acoustic backscatter, seafloor video, seafloor photography, high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles, and bottom-sediment sampling data. The map products display seafloor morphology and character, identify potential marine benthic habitats, and illustrate both the surficial seafloor geology and shallow subsurface geology.The Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area lies within Monterey Bay in central California. Monterey Bay is one of the largest embayments along the west coast of the United States, spanning 36 km from its northern to southern tips (in Santa Cruz and Monterey, respectively) and 20 km along its central axis. Not only does it contain one of the broadest sections of continental shelf along California’s coast, it also contains Monterey Canyon, one of the largest and deepest submarine canyons in the world. Note that the California’s State Waters limit extends farther offshore between Santa Cruz and Monterey so that it encompasses all of Monterey Bay.The coastal area within the map area is lightly populated. The community of Moss Landing (population, 204) hosts the largest commercial fishing fleet in Monterey Bay in its harbor. The map area also includes parts of the cities of Marina (population, about 20,000) and Castroville (population, about 6,500). Fertile lowlands of the Salinas River and Pajaro River valleys largely occupy the inland part of the map area, and land use is primarily agricultural.The offshore part of the map area lies completely within the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary. The

  15. The evolving fresh market berry industry in Santa Cruz and Monterey counties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Tourte

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The fresh market berry industry in Santa Cruz and Monterey counties has contributed significantly to the agricultural vibrancy of the two counties and the state of California. Dramatic growth in strawberry, raspberry and blackberry production has been documented over the last 50 years, and most notably since the 1980s. Factors influencing this growth include innovations in agricultural practices and heightened consumer demand. Here, we review the historical context for the berry industry in Santa Cruz and Monterey counties. Organic production, production economics and challenges for the future are also discussed.

  16. Constraining pathways of microbial mediation for carbonate concretions of the Miocene Monterey Formation using carbonate-associated sulfate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyd, Sean J.; Berelson, William M.; Lyons, Timothy W.; Hammond, Douglas E.; Corsetti, Frank A.

    2012-02-01

    Carbonate concretions can form as a result of organic matter degradation within sediments. However, the ability to determine specific processes and timing relationships to particular concretions has remained elusive. Previously employed proxies (e.g., carbon and oxygen isotopes) cannot uniquely distinguish among diagenetic alkalinity sources generated by microbial oxidation of organic matter using oxygen, nitrate, metal oxides, and sulfate as electron acceptors, in addition to degradation by thermal decarboxylation. Here, we employ concentrations of carbonate-associated sulfate (CAS) and δ 34S CAS (along with more traditional approaches) to determine the specific nature of concretion authigenesis within the Miocene Monterey Formation. Integrated geochemical analyses reveal that at least three specific organo-diagenetic reaction pathways can be tied to concretion formation and that these reactions are largely sample-site specific. One calcitic concretion from the Phosphatic Shale Member at Naples Beach yields δ 34S CAS values near Miocene seawater sulfate (˜+22‰ VCDT), abundant CAS (ca. 1000 ppm), depleted δ 13C carb (˜-11‰ VPDB), and very low concentrations of Fe (ca. 700 ppm) and Mn (ca. 15 ppm)—characteristics most consistent with shallow formation in association with organic matter degradation by nitrate, iron-oxides and/or minor sulfate reduction. Cemented concretionary layers of the Phosphatic Shale Member at Shell Beach display elevated δ 34S CAS (up to ˜+37‰), CAS concentrations of ˜600 ppm, mildly depleted δ 13C carb (˜-6‰), moderate amounts of Mn (ca. 250 ppm), and relatively low Fe (ca. 1700 ppm), indicative of formation in sediments dominated by sulfate reduction. Finally, concretions within a siliceous host at Montaña de Oro and Naples Beach show minimal CAS concentrations, positive δ 13C values, and the highest concentrations of Fe (ca. 11,300 ppm) and Mn (ca. 440 ppm), consistent with formation in sediments experiencing

  17. Sand Wave Migrations Within Monterey Submarine Canyon, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, J.; Wong, F. L.

    2006-12-01

    Repeated high-resolution multi-beam surveys revealed the existence of a sand wave field along the axis of the Monterey submarine canyon between 20 and 300 m water depth. These sand waves range in wave length from 20 to 70 m and 2 to 5 m in height. Comparison of sequential multi-beam grid data (months apart) indicates that the sand waves apparently migrate upcanyon at some places while the same data clearly show that the sand waves migrate downcanyon at other locations. One hypothesis is that strong internal tidal flows, whose upcanyon component is intensified by the narrow canyon, are responsible for forming the sand wave field and for migrating the sand waves upcanyon. Another hypothesis is that the sand wave field is formed by creeping (analogous to the movement within glaciers), and in general they move in the downcanyon direction. A field experiment was conducted in 2005-06 to measure the driving forces (in hypothesis #1) that form and move the sand waves, and to collect the internal sedimentological structure within the sand waves that could reveal information on hypothesis #2. A mooring designed to measure near-floor velocity profiles, temperature, salinity, and sediment concentration in the water column was deployed for one year (June 2005 -July 2006) at 250 m water depth, slightly downcanyon of the sand wave field. In addition, a mapping survey was conducted in February, 2006 for collecting multi-beam and chirp profiles in the canyon head area of the sand wave field. Preliminary examination of the ADCP (downward looking) showed some very interesting features - the near- floor current dramatically changes with the spring-neap cycle of the surface tide. The time variation of the along-canyon current during neap tides - a sudden jump of upcanyon velocity before gradually tapering down, is typical of internal tides (internal bores). The time variation during spring tides when along canyon velocities reverse directions from upcanyon to downcanyon and gradually

  18. NOAA Office for Coastal Management Coastal Inundation Digital Elevation Model: San Francisco Bay/Monterey (CA) WFO - Santa Cruz and Monterey Counties

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This digital elevation model (DEM) is a part of a series of DEMs produced for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office for Coastal Management's Sea...

  19. THE RESPONSE OF MONTEREY BAY TO THE GREAT TOHOKU EARTHQUAKE OF 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Carroll

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The response of Monterey Bay to the Great Tohoku earthquake of 2011 is examined in this study. From a practical standpoint, although the resulting tsunami did not cause any damage to the open harbors at Monterey and Moss Landing, it caused extensive damage to boats and infrastructure in Santa Cruz Harbor, which is closed to surrounding waters. From a scientific standpoint, the observed and predicted amplitudes of the tsunami at 1 km from the source were 21.3 and 22.5 m based on the primary arrival from one DART bottom pressure recorder located 986 km ENE of the epicenter. The predicted and observed travel times for the tsunami to reach Monterey Bay agreed within 3%. The predicted and observed periods of the tsunami-generated wave before it entered the bay yielded periods that approached 2 hours. Once the tsunami entered Monterey Bay it was transformed into a seiche with a primary period of 36-37 minutes, corresponding to quarter-wave resonance within the bay. Finally, from a predictive standpoint, major tsunamis that enter the bay from the northwest, as in the present case, are the ones most likely to cause damage to Santa Cruz harbor.

  20. 77 FR 73322 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Direct final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is taking direct final action to approve revisions to the Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution... several different types of sources, ranging from fugitive dust to gas turbines. We are approving a local...

  1. 77 FR 73392 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution Control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-10

    ... Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: EPA is proposing to approve revisions to the Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution Control District... types of sources, ranging from fugitive dust to gas turbines. We are proposing to approve a local rule...

  2. Depth to Transition--Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the depth-to-transition map of the Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California, region. The raster data file is included in...

  3. 75 FR 37727 - Disapproval of California State Implementation Plan Revisions, Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    ... Air Pollution Control District AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: EPA is finalizing disapproval of a revision to the Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution Control... of Subjects in 40 CFR Part 52 Environmental protection, Air pollution control, Incorporation by...

  4. Oceanographic and Atmospheric Conditions on the Continental Shelf North of the Monterey Bay During August 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-17

    the Alan Robinson Special Issue Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans September 17, 2010 ____________________________ 1Monterey Bay...JPL/ROMS) [Schepetkin and McWilliams , 2004], and the Navy Coastal Ocean Model / Innovative Coastal-Ocean Observing Network (NCOM/ICON) model [Shulman

  5. BathymetryA Hillshade [2m]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The raster data file is included in...

  6. BathymetryB [5m]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The raster data file is included in...

  7. BathymetryA [2m]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The raster data file is included in...

  8. Monterey Institute Makes Language Fluency a Key Part of Its International Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Peter

    1992-01-01

    The Monterey Institute's International Studies curriculum is described in terms of its foreign language fluency requirements for business master's degree candidates and the school's use of language in international business negotiation training and other exercises involving foreign affairs. Illustrations reveal the school's success in educating…

  9. Depth to Transition--Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the depth-to-transition map of the Pigeon Point to South Monterey Bay, California, region. The raster data file is included in...

  10. BathymetryB Hillshade [5m]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The raster data file is included in...

  11. Sand Mining Impacts on Long-Term Dune Erosion in Southern Monterey Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    estimated to have condominium and hotel in Monterey, as well as 100 m extended 13 km seaward of the present day shoreline of rock rubble and a 200 in...OrthoBase software employed in the overlapping pair, but whose coordinates are unknown. stereo-photogrammetry calculated total horizontal rms The GCPs

  12. Bathymetry Hillshade [5m]--Offshore of Monterey Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Offshore of Monterey map area, California. The raster data file is included in...

  13. BathymetryA Hillshade [2m]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The raster data file is included in...

  14. BathymetryB [5m]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The raster data file is included in...

  15. BathymetryB Hillshade [5m]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The raster data file is included in...

  16. BathymetryA [2m]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The raster data file is included in...

  17. [Comment to “Response of Monterey Bay to the Loma Prieta Earthquake of October 17, 1989”] Montery Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwing, Franklin B.; Norton, Jerrold G.; Pilskaln, Cynthia H.

    Observations of liquefaction and slumping in Monterey Bay, Calif., described in “Response of Monterey Bay to the Loma Prieta Earthquake of October 17, 1989,” (Eos, February [6], 1990, p. 250), were based on the ongoing work of a team of scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, Moss Landing Marine Laboratories (MLML), Hopkins Marine Station, and Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), who are continuing to investigate the causes and effects of slumping and other processes that occurred in association with the earthquake.

  18. Paleoceanographic influences on compositional trends in the Monterey Formation, western Santa Barbara coastal area, California: Contrasts between banktop and distal slope settings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, N.R. (Univ. of Texas, Dallas, TX (United States). Program in Geosciences)

    1992-01-01

    The modern ocean-atmosphere system, consisting of cold polar regions, strong latitudinal temperature gradient, and strong thermocline, evolved as a consequence of Miocene paleoceanographic and paleoclimatic transitions, which were contemporaneous with deposition of the organic-rich Monterey Formation. Deep sea records show mid-Miocene enrichment shifts in C-13 (ca17.5 to ca13.5 Ma), lagged by C-18 (beginning around 15 Ma), suggesting that reverse greenhouse cooling led to intensified cryosphere development. Graphic correlation of Sr isotope and biostratigraphic data indicates that the South Ellwood section contains a more continuous record of organic accumulation. At Naples, highest organic contents are associated with the hardground-bearing carbonaceous marl member, which is condensed between strata bearing Luisian and Early Mohnian benthic foraminifera. Duration of the condensed interval is unresolved by biostratigraphy and Sr isotope estimates over a wide time range (7.5 to 15.7 Ma), but ages younger than 13 Ma are generally inferred for timing of maximum organic carbon accumulation. In contrast, richest organic facies at South Ellwood occur within a 300 to 400 foot interval containing Relizian and Luisian fauna, spanning the 18 to 13 Ma interval. Stable isotope data from the South Ellwood section document a trend of C-13 enrichment on the order of 1% which closely follows, but slightly lags, deposition of richest organic strata. Distinct enrichment in [delta]O-18 begins near the peak of maximum carbon enrichment, and continues into the upper siliceous facies. Thus, the Monterey Hypothesis is supported by the more basinal South Ellwood record, while rejected in the Naples Beach banktop record.

  19. Groundwater quality in the Monterey Bay and Salinas Valley groundwater basins, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    The Monterey-Salinas study unit is nearly 1,000 square miles and consists of the Santa Cruz Purisima Formation Highlands, Felton Area, Scotts Valley, Soquel Valley, West Santa Cruz Terrace, Salinas Valley, Pajaro Valley, and Carmel Valley groundwater basins (California Department of Water Resources, 2003; Kulongski and Belitz, 2011). These basins were grouped into four study areas based primarily on geography. Groundwater basins in the north were grouped into the Santa Cruz study area, and those to the south were grouped into the Monterey Bay, the Salinas Valley, and the Paso Robles study areas (Kulongoski and others, 2007). The study unit has warm, dry summers and cool, moist winters. Average annual rainfall ranges from 31 inches in Santa Cruz in the north to 13 inches in Paso Robles in the south. The study areas are drained by several rivers and their principal tributaries: the Salinas, Pajaro, and Carmel Rivers, and San Lorenzo Creek. The Salinas Valley is a large intermontane valley that extends southeastward from Monterey Bay to Paso Robles. It has been filled, up to a thickness of 2,000 feet, with Tertiary and Quaternary marine and terrestrial sediments that overlie granitic basement. The Miocene-age Monterey Formation and Pliocene- to Pleistocene-age Paso Robles Formation, and Pleistocene to Holocene-age alluvium contain freshwater used for supply. The primary aquifers in the study unit are defined as those parts of the aquifers corresponding to the perforated intervals of wells listed in the California Department of Public Health database. Public-supply wells are typically drilled to depths of 200 to 650 feet, consist of solid casing from the land surface to depths of about 175 to 500 feet, and are perforated below the solid casing. Water quality in the primary aquifers may differ from that in the shallower and deeper parts of the aquifer system. Groundwater movement is generally from the southern part of the Salinas Valley north towards the Monterey Bay

  20. A review of marine zones in the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Jennifer A.

    2001-01-01

    This report reviews marine zoning in the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (MBNMS). The 72 zoned areas in the MBNMS are of 13 different zone types. Each marine zone type has associated regulations that restrict or promote specific activities. For example, recreational activities such as boating, fishing, tidepooling, snorkeling, and SCUBA diving are limited in some zones. Scientific research is allowed at all sites, with appropriate permits, and is specifically promoted in a few sites...

  1. Monterey Peninsula Water Supply Project. Supplemental Draft Environmental Impact Report/Statement II. Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-02-01

    sanderlings, long-billed dowitchers, and I western, California and Heermann’s gulls. Brown pelicans, double-crested cormorants, and surf scooters are typical...sediment carried in suspension above the stream bed (see suspended load). Board: The Monterey Peninsula Water Management District’s seven-member Board...silt and fine sand, which is carried in suspension above the bottom of a stream by moving water, as contrasted with the bed load rolled along the

  2. Employing LIDAR and Rtk GPS to Evaluate a Small Beach Nourishment in Southern Monterey Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, A. G.; Smith, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    An increasing number of coastal communities are considering opportunistic beach nourishment as a coastal erosion mitigation method, particularly as erosion rates are quantified with increasing accuracy and consequences of sea level rise are realized. The southernmost region of Monterey Bay is eroding at rates of 0-0.8 m/year and small scale beach nourishment has been recommended as a possible mitigation technique. However, the absence of monitored pilot studies and calibrated models has prevented stakeholders from confidently predicting the lifetime or cost-benefit of the project. During the winter of 2012 - 2013, approximately 7,500 m3 of Monterey Harbor dredge material was used to nourish a section of beach identified as a critical erosion area. To determine whether this method is feasible as A long term mitigation strategy, we have collected topographic survey data of the nourishment area and control sites. Baseline beach profile data were collected using vessel based light detection and ranging (LIDAR) and real time kinematic (RTK) GPS prior to nourishment and periodically following completion of the nourishment project. Swell height and period were also monitored immediately offshore of the nourishment region. Morphologic change based on topographic survey data is combined with wave data to calibrate a beach morphology model to the Southern Monterey Bay region for use in future coastal erosion decisions as well as establish a nourishment evaluation method that could be applied to other critical erosion areas.

  3. Families of miocene monterey crude oil, seep, and tarball samples, coastal California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, K.E.; Hostettler, F.D.; Lorenson, T.D.; Rosenbauer, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Biomarker and stable carbon isotope ratios were used to infer the age, lithology, organic matter input, and depositional environment of the source rocks for 388 samples of produced crude oil, seep oil, and tarballs to better assess their origins and distributions in coastal California. These samples were used to construct a chemometric (multivariate statistical) decision tree to classify 288 additional samples. The results identify three tribes of 13C-rich oil samples inferred to originate from thermally mature equivalents of the clayey-siliceous, carbonaceous marl and lower calcareous-siliceous members of the Monterey Formation at Naples Beach near Santa Barbara. An attempt to correlate these families to rock extracts from these members in the nearby COST (continental offshore stratigraphic test) (OCS-Cal 78-164) well failed, at least in part because the rocks are thermally immature. Geochemical similarities among the oil tribes and their widespread distribution support the prograding margin model or the banktop-slope-basin model instead of the ridge-and-basin model for the deposition of the Monterey Formation. Tribe 1 contains four oil families having geochemical traits of clay-rich marine shale source rock deposited under suboxic conditions with substantial higher plant input. Tribe 2 contains four oil families with traits intermediate between tribes 1 and 3, except for abundant 28,30-bisnorhopane, indicating suboxic to anoxic marine marl source rock with hemipelagic input. Tribe 3 contains five oil families with traits of distal marine carbonate source rock deposited under anoxic conditions with pelagic but little or no higher plant input. Tribes 1 and 2 occur mainly south of Point Conception in paleogeographic settings where deep burial of the Monterey source rock favored petroleum generation from all three members or their equivalents. In this area, oil from the clayey-siliceous and carbonaceous marl members (tribes 1 and 2) may overwhelm that from the lower

  4. Currents, temperature, attenuation, and conductivity data collected during the Monterey Canyon Experiment from moorings deployed from platforms ROBERT GORDON SPROUL and NOAA Ship McARTHUR from 1993-08-03 to 1995-05-15 (NCEI Accession 0067570)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Monterey Canyon experiment studied the mechanisms that govern the circulation within and the transport of sediment and water through Monterey Submarine Canyon....

  5. Flow and Chemistry Pulsations, Monterey: Implications for Stress Transient Modulations of Hydrologic and Geochemical Systems in the Greater San Andreas Fault Zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K. M.; Fueri, E.; Hilton, D. R.

    2005-12-01

    Submarine fluid venting at continental shelf and slope regions has been recognized over the past ten years as an important, yet under-studied process in marine science. Seeps are now known to be a general feature of the hydrogeology of many tectonically active continental margins. The eastern Pacific margin is characterized by a variety of tectonic settings (i.e. convergent and strike-slip) where active venting of fluids and gases has been documented. Reports include vents off Alaska, Costa Rica, Monterey Bay, Eel River basin, and Heceta Bay, OR. Indications of seismic tremor, linked to hydrologic transience in the offshore regions of subduction zones have recently been published elsewhere (see Brown et al, EPSL 2005). We now address here the varying nature of submarine fluid discharges in a San Andreas strike-slip setting. A key element of the proposed work is the combined multidisciplinary measurement of fluid flow, seep temperatures, and dissolved noble gases and chemistry of the Monterey seep sites at Extrovert Cliff. The seeps are situated close to several active strike-slip faults including the Monterey and San Gregorio fault zones. Initial results of 2 week deployments in 2004 of flow meters at Extravert Cliff indicated high flow rates and elevated seep temperatures that vary by as much as a factor of 2 on diurnal time scales with subtle changes over longer periods (>2 weeks). There are also indicative chemical signals of deeply sourced fluids that vary widely with time that show the following signals: 1) Elevated abundances of both mantle derived Helium (3He) as well as 4He and 40Ar of radiogenic crustal relevant trace element components; 2) Altered fluid chemistry (including, Ca Mg, Li and B); 3) The fluid temperature, flow rates, and gas chemistry, in particular, vary with time. We have both long-term and sub-diurnal variations in flow and temperature as well as the 3He/4He ratios, helium concentration, CO2 concentration and d13C values perhaps influenced

  6. Biological marker distribution and significance in oils and rocks of the Monterey Formation, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curiale, Joseph A.; Cameron, Douglas; Davis, Dean V.

    1985-01-01

    The biological marker distributions of several oils, core extracts and solid bitumens of the Monterey Formation of California have been studied. Sterane, terpane and monoaromatic steroid hydrocarbons were analyzed in samples from the San Joaquin, Los Angeles, Ventura and Santa Maria Basins. The sterane patterns of both oils and extracts are characterized by (a) low relative concentrations of diasteranes, (b) low 20S/20R-5α,14α,17α-ethylcholestane ratios, (c) relatively high concentrations of cholestane ( vs. methyl- and ethylcholestane) isomers. San Joaquin Basin samples contain significant amounts of the 5β isomer, which is generally absent in samples from other basins. The carbon number distribution of 5α,14α,17α,20R steranes is similar for all oils, regardless of API gravity, depth or basin location, and is suggestive of open marine depositional conditions for the source material involved. 17α(H),l8α(H),21β(H)-28,30-Bisnorhopane is present in almost all samples. Certain San Joaquin Basin oils and extracts contain (a) a series of 25-nor hopanes, including 25,28,30-trisnorhopane, (b) a distinctive monoaromatic steroid hydrocarbon distribution, (c) an aliphatic hydrocarbon fraction devoid of n-paraffins. Biological marker characteristics suggest that the Monterey oils examined originated early in the maturational sequence, from elastics-poor source material. API gravities of the Monterey Formation oils examined vary monotonically with (a) bisnorhopane/hopane ratios, (b) aromatized/regular sterane ratios and (c) the concentration of monoaromatized steranes relative to terpanes and regular steranes. These oil gravity correlations exist regardless of sample depth or basin location.

  7. Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide During The Monterey Cooling Event Inferred From Fossil Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuerschner, W. M.

    2001-05-01

    The Middle Miocene is a period of transition from the late Early Miocene climatic optimum to the modern Late Neogene climate mode. Major changes in East Antarctic Ice Sheet volume, sea level, deep ocean circulation and global carbon cycle took place. In the marine record a marked d13C excursion between about 17.5 Ma and 13.5 Ma indicates enhanced biological productivity and burial of organic carbon, which in turn may have resulted into a drastic depletion in atmospheric CO2 concentration and finally into global cooling (Monterey hypothesis). Well preserved fossil laurel leaves (Laurus abchasica) were studied from several Early and Middle Miocene brown coal deposits in Germany and Czech Republic. Applying the inverse relationship between the number of pores (stomata) on leaves and the ambient CO2 concentration, stomatal frequency analysis reveals changes in paleoatmospheric CO2 during the Monterey cooling event. Preliminary results indicate a doubling of stomatal density and stomatal index during the middle Miocene. The increase coincides with the beginning of the δ 13C excursion at about 17.5 Ma in the marine record. Maximum values occur around 14 Ma but decline again around 12 Ma. The comparison with the response rates of the modern Laurus indicates a drawdown of about 100 - 200 ppmv as a first order approximation. During the middle Miocene climatic optimum atmospheric CO2 concentrations may have been significantly higher than during the post-Monterey period. In contrast to Middle Miocene CO2 reconstructions based on marine proxies the present data suggest, that massive oceanic C burial depleted the atmospheric C reservoir. This depletion may have resulted into the global cooling through a reversed greenhouse effect.

  8. Insights into Seasonal Variations in Phosphorus Concentrations and Cycling in Monterey Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, M.; Defforey, D.; Paytan, A.; Roberts, K.

    2014-12-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for life as it is a structural constituent in many cell components and a key player in cellular energy metabolism. Therefore, P availability can impact primary productivity. Here we quantify dissolved and particulate P compounds and trace P sources and cycling in Monterey Bay over the course of a year. This time series gives insights into monthly and seasonal variations in the surface water chemistry of this region. Preliminary characterization of seawater samples involves measuring total P and soluble reactive P (SRP) concentrations. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P NMR) is used to determine the chemical structure of organic phosphorus compounds present in surface seawater. The isotopic signature of phosphatic oxygen (δ18Op) is used as a proxy for studying P cycling and sources. Oxygen isotope ratios in phosphate are determined by continuous-flow isotope mass ratio spectrometry (CF-IRMS) following purification of dissolved P from seawater samples and precipitation as silver phosphate. We expect to observe seasonal changes in P concentrations, as well as differences in organic P composition and P sources. The chemical structure of organic P compounds will affect their bioavailability and thus the extent to which they can fuel primary productivity in Monterey Bay. δ18Op will reflect source signatures and provide information on turnover rates of P in surface waters. Results from this work will provide valuable insights into seasonal changes in P cycling in surface waters and have important implications for understanding primary productivity in the Monterey Bay ecosystem.

  9. Deployment of a Long-Term Broadband Seafloor Observatory in Monterey Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, P.; Neuhauser, D.; Stakes, D.; Romanowicz, B.; Ramirez, T.; Uhrhammer, R.

    2002-12-01

    MOBB (Monterey bay Ocean floor Broad Band project) is a collaborative project between the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) and the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory (BSL). Its goal is to install and operate a permanent seafloor broadband seismic station as a first step towards extending the on-shore broadband seismic network in northern California to the seaside of the North-America/Pacific plate boundary, providing better azimuthal coverage for regional earthquake and structure studies. The successful MOBB deployment took place 40km off shore at a water depth of 1000m during three dives on April 9-11, 2002. The seismometer was buried in a 60-cm deep caisson, which was later back filled with glass beads to stabilize the instrument. New tools, including a high-pressure water-jet excavator, were developed for the ROV Ventana to accomplish these tasks. The ocean-bottom MOBB station currently comprises a three-component seismometer package, a current-meter, and a recording and battery package. Data recovery dives, during which the recording and battery package will be exchanged, are planned every three months for the next three years. A differential pressure gauge (DPG) (Cox et al., 1984) will be deployed as part of the recording package during the next data recovery dive in September 2002. The station is currently recording data autonomously. Eventually, it will be linked to the planned (and recently funded) MARS (Monterey Accelerated Research System; rl {http://www.mbari.org/mars/}) cable and provide real-time, continuous seismic data to be merged with the rest of the northern California real-time seismic system. The data are archived at the NCEDC for on-line availability, as part of the Berkeley Digital Seismic Network (BDSN). This project follows the 1997 MOISE experiment, in which a three-component broadband system was deployed for a period of three months, 40km off shore in Monterey Bay. MOISE was a cooperative program sponsored by MBARI, UC

  10. Numerical Simulation of Recent Turbidity Currents in the Monterey Canyon System, Offshore California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimsund, S.; Xu, J.; Nemec, W.

    2007-12-01

    The method of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been used, in the form of a 3D numerical model (Flow- 3D®), to perform a full-scale simulation of turbidity currents measured in December 2002 by three moorings in the Soquel and Monterey canyons. The model was verified by simulation of laboratory flows, and was upscaled to the Monterey Canyon system on the basis of high-resolution bathymetric data and flow measurements. The measured velocity profiles were sufficient to assess the flow thickness, initial velocity and duration in the canyon head zone. A computational grid with a highest feasible resolution was used, and both bathymetry and hydrostatic pressure were accounted for. The volumetric sediment concentration and exact grain- size composition of the flows were unknown, and thus a range of values for the initial concentration and bed roughness were assumed and assessed on a trial-and-error basis. The simulations reveal the behavior of a turbidity current along its descent path, including its local hydraulic characteristics (the 3D field of velocity, sediment concentration, shear stress, strain rate, and dynamic viscosity, as well as the magnitude of velocity and turbulent shear). The results confirm that the velocity structure of turbidity current is highly sensitive to variation in seafloor topography. The December 17th flow in the Soquel Canyon appears to have lost capacity by dilution over a relatively short distance and shown significant velocity fluctuations, which is attributed to the rugged topography of the canyon floor. A major loss of momentum occurred when the flow plunged at high angle into the Monterey Canyon, crashing against its bend's southern wall. The December 20th flow in the Monterey Canyon, in contrast, developed a considerably longer body and strongly accelerated towards the canyon's sharp second bend before crashing against its western wall. The mooring data show a down-canyon decline of velocity and suggest gradual waning, but the

  11. Modeling and Field Study of Coupled Bio-Optical Physical Processes in the Monterey Bay Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, I.; Arnone, R.; Teague, W.; Chavez, F.; Schofield, O.; Moline, M.; Penta, B.; Ryan, J.; Gould, R.; Anderson, S.; Jolliff, J. K.; Book, J. W.; Derada, S.; Paduan, J. D.

    2008-12-01

    Scientists from government, academia and non-profit organizations participated in an interdisciplinary field program in the Monterey Bay from during May-June of 2008. The experiment was a collaboration between the NRL project "Bio-Optical Studies of Predictability and Assimilation for the Coastal Environment (BIOSPACE)", Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) project "Rapid Environmental Assessment Using an Integrated Coastal Ocean Observation-Modeling System (ESPRESSO)", the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), the NRL project "Unattended Sea-bed Power for In-water Operations", and the U.S. Geological Survey. Objectives of the NRL BIOSPACE and MURI ESPRESSO projects are centered around developing an understanding of coupled bio-optical and physical processes in the coastal zone and improvements of predictability of coastal ocean optical properties on time scales of 1-5 days. MBARI has long-term objectives of monitoring, studying and managing the Monterey Bay ecosystem dynamics and health. The goals for the 2008 field program were to create a synoptic view of the coupled bio- optical physical conditions in the Monterey Bay and to relate satellite observed properties to their subsurface structure. The program was focused on the so-called "upwelling shadow area"(northern part of the bay), where biological processes are enhanced as a result of the slower physical dynamics. The field program deployed a wide range of assets: gliders, AUVs, ScanFish (a ship-towed platform), SEPTR, etc. This deployment was supplemented with intensive station sampling from the R/V Point Sur and satellite ocean color imagery (MODIS, MERIS). The field program was supported by a real-time modeling effort consisting of a hierarchy of different resolution, nested, data assimilating, coupled bio-optical physical models. Development of a pair of cyclonic (in the bay) and anticyclonic (outside of the bay) eddies was observed and predicted by the model during an

  12. The influence of the San Gregorio fault on the morphology of Monterey Canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, C.M.G.; Ryan, William B. F.; Eittreim, S.; Donald, Reed

    1998-01-01

    A side-scan sonar survey was conducted of Monterey Canyon and the San Gregorio fault zone, off shore of Monterey Bay. The acoustic character and morphology of the sonar images, enhanced by SeaBeam bathymetry, show the path of the San Gregorio fault zone across the shelf, upper slope, and Monterey Canyon. High backscatter linear features a few kilometers long and 100 to 200 m wide delineate the sea-floor expression of the fault zone on the shelf. Previous studies have shown that brachiopod pavements and carbonate crusts are the source of the lineations backscatter. In Monterey Canyon, the fault zone occurs where the path of the canyon makes a sharp bend from WNW to SSW (1800 m). Here, the fault is marked by NW-SE-trending, high reflectivity lineations that cross the canyon floor between 1850 m and 1900 m. The lineations can be traced to ridges on the northwestern canyon wall where they have ~ 15 m of relief. Above the low-relief ridges, bowl-shaped features have been excavated on the canyon wall contributing to the widening of the canyon. We suggest that shear along the San Gregorio fault has led to the formation of the low-relief ridges near the canyon wall and that carbonate crusts, as along the shelf, may be the source of the high backscatter features on the canyon floor. The path of the fault zone across the upper slope is marked by elongated tributary canyons with high backscatter floors and 'U'-shaped cross-sectional profiles. Linear features and stepped scarps suggestive of recent crustal movement and mass-wasting, occur on the walls and floors of these canyons. Three magnitude-4 earthquakes have occurred within the last 30 years in the vicinity of the canyons that may have contributed to the observed features. As shown by others, motion along the fault zone has juxtaposed diverse lithologies that outcrop on the canyon walls. Gully morphology and the canyon's drainage patterns have been influenced by the substrate into which the gullies have formed.

  13. Franciscan-type rocks off Monterey Bay, California: Implications for western boundary of Salinian Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Henry T.; Nagel, David K.

    1981-07-01

    Serpentinites and spilitic basalts recovered at depths of 1000 m from Ascension Submarine Canyon northwest of Monterey Bay, California indicate that Franciscan basement is present immediately to the west of the San Gregorio Fault. This new information, together with published geological/geophysical data, support previous suggestions that the offshore western boundary of the Salinian block (Sur-Nacimiento Fault) has been tectonically truncated by the San Gregorio Fault and has been displaced by as much as 90 km to the northwest since the mid-late Miocene.

  14. Sedimentary processes of the lower Monterey Fan channel and channel-mouth lobe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaucke, I.; Masson, D.G.; Kenyon, Neil H.; Gardner, J.V.

    2004-01-01

    The distribution of deposits, sediment transport pathways and processes on the lower Monterey Fan channel and channel-mouth lobe (CML) are studied through the integration of GLORIA and TOBI sidescan sonar data with 7-kHz subbottom profiler records and sediment cores for ground-truthing. The lower Monterey channel is characterised by an up to 30-m-deep channel with poorly developed levees and alternating muddy and silty muddy overbank deposits. The channel is discontinuous, disappearing where gradients are less than about 1:350. Ground-truthing of the large CML shows that the entire CML is characterised by widespread deposits of generally fine sand, with coarser sand at the base of turbidites. Sand is particularly concentrated in finger-like areas of low-backscatter intensity and is interpreted as the result of non-turbulent sediment-gravity flows depositing metres thick massive, fine sand. TOBI sidescan sonar data reveal recent erosional features in the form of scours, secondary channels, large flow slides, and trains of blocks at the distal end of the CML. Erosion is probably related to increasing gradient as the CML approaches Murray Fracture zone and to differential loading of sandy submarine fan deposits onto pelagic clays. Reworking of older flow slides by sediment transport processes on the lobe produces trains of blocks that are several metres in diameter and aligned parallel to the flow direction. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Biological marker distribution in coexisting kerogen, bitumen and asphaltenes in Monterey Formation diatomite, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tannenbaum, E.; Ruth, E.; Huizinga, B.J.; Kaplan, I.R.

    1986-01-01

    Organic-rich (18.2%) Monterey Formation diatomite from California was studied. The organic matter consist of 94% bitumen and 6% kerogen. Biological markers from the bitumen and from pyrolysates of the coexisting asphaltenes and kerogen were analyzed in order to elucidate the relationship between the various fractions of the organic matter. While 17..cap alpha.. (H), 18..cap alpha.. (H), 21..cap alpha.. (H)-28,30-bisnorhopane was present in the bitumen and in the pyrolysate of the asphaltenes, it was not detected in the pyrolysates of the kerogen. A C/sub 40/-isoprenoid with head to head linkage, however, was present in pyrolysates of both kerogen and asphaltenes, but not in the bitumen from the diatomite. The maturation level of the bitumen, based on the extent of isomerization of steranes and hopanes, was that of a mature oil, whereas the pyrolysate from the kerogen showed a considerably lower maturation level. These relationships indicate that the bitumen may not be indigenous to the diatomite and that it is a mature oil that migrated into the rock. They consider the possibility, however, that some of the 28,30-bisnorhopane-rich Monterey Formation oils have not been generated through thermal degradation of kerogen, but have been expelled from the source rock at an early stage of diagenesis.

  16. Demonstration of surgical telerobotics and virtual telepresence by Internet + ISDN from Monterey (USA) to Milan (Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovetta, A; Sala, R; Bressanelli, M; Garavaldi, M E; Lorini, F; Pegoraro, R; Canina, M

    1998-01-01

    This paper deals with the connection which has been held on 8th July 1997 in collaboration with the JPL of the NASA, Pasadena, California, between the Eighth International Conference on the Advanced Robotics (ICAR '97) in course at Monterey, California and the Telerobotics Laboratory of Politecnico di Milano connected in a multipoint teleconference through the MCU of Rome with the Aula Magna of the same Politecnico and the Palace Business of the Giureconsulti of the Chamber of Commerce of Milan. The demonstration has allowed to telecontrol a scara robot of the Sankyo and an ABB robot, which have affected simulations of operations of biopsy to the prostate, to the liver and to the breast, a mechanical hand and a model of a car, disposed in a space destined to reproduce the Martian ground, from Monterey to Milan by means of the INTERNET+ISDN connection from. In fact the event has taken place four days after the landing on Mars happily successful of the spatial probe Pathfinder from which it has gone out the "Sojourner" robot, telecontrolled from the JPL of the NASA, which has begun to take photos of the Martian ground and also some of these images have been transmitted in the course of the connection.

  17. Prevalence of epidermal conditions in California coastal bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in Monterey Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldini, Daniela; Riggin, Jessica; Cecchetti, Arianna; Cotter, Mark P

    2010-11-01

    The prevalence of epidermal conditions in a small population of coastal bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in Monterey Bay was evaluated between 2006 and 2008. Five different skin condition categories were considered, including Pox-Like Lesions, Discoloration, Orange Film, Polygon Lesions, and Miscellaneous Markings. Of 147 adults and 42 calves photographically examined, at least 90 and 71%, respectively, were affected by at least one or multiple conditions. Pox-Like Lesions were the most prevalent, affecting 80% of the population, including adults and calves. This condition warrants the most urgent investigation being possibly indicative of the widespread presence of poxvirus or a similar pathogen in the population. In view of the high number of individuals affected, standard monitoring of the health status of Monterey Bay bottlenose dolphins is considered imperative. Discoloration was strongly associated with Pox-Like lesions. Orange Films were likely an epifaunal infestation caused by diatoms, which have been documented in other cetacean species. Polygon Lesions, a newly described category, could be the result of infestation by barnacles of the genus Cryptolepas. Miscellaneous Markings were variable in appearance and may not have the same causative factor. Although none of the proposed etiologies can be confirmed without appropriate clinical tests, recognizing common visible characteristics of the conditions could aid in preliminary comparisons across populations and individuals.

  18. Biological marker distribution in coexisting kerogen, bitumen and asphaltenes in Monterey Formation diatomite, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, E.; Ruth, E.; Huizinga, B. J.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1986-01-01

    Organic-rich (18.2%) Monterey Formation diatomite from California was studied. The organic matter consist of 94% bitumen and 6% kerogen. Biological markers from the bitumen and from pyrolysates of the coexisting asphaltenes and kerogen were analyzed in order to elucidate the relationship between the various fractions of the organic matter. While 17 alpha(H), 18 alpha(H), 21 alpha(H)-28,30-bisnorhopane was present in the bitumen and in the pryolysate of the asphaltenes, it was not detected in the pyrolysates of the kerogen. A C40-isoprenoid with "head to head" linkage, however, was present in pyrolysates of both kerogen and asphaltenes, but not in the bitumen from the diatomite. The maturation level of the bitumen, based on the extent of isomerization of steranes and hopanes, was that of a mature oil, whereas the pyrolysate from the kerogen showed a considerably lower maturation level. These relationships indicate that the bitumen may not be indigenous to the diatomite and that it is a mature oil that migrated into the rock. We consider the possibility, however, that some of the 28,30-bisnorhopane-rich Monterey Formation oils have not been generated through thermal degradation of kerogen, but have been expelled from the source rock at an early stage of diagenesis.

  19. Acoustic mapping of squid egg clusters and their bottom habitat in Monterey Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, Kenneth G.; Hanlon, Roger T.; Iampietro, Pat J.; Kvitek, Rikk G.

    2004-10-01

    Clusters of gelatinous egg capsules, known as mops or beds, of the market squid (Loligo opalescens) were mapped in a shallow-water, sandy habitat of Monterey Bay, California. The benthic egg clusters were imaged using an EdgeTech 272-TD dual-frequency sidescan sonar towed from R/V MACGINITIE, an 8-m-long survey vessel, with data recorded on a Triton Elics International Isis digital data acquisition system. Verification of target identity was accomplished independently by video photography from a remotely operated vehicle. The survey area included a 4-km stretch of sandy seafloor between Lover's Point and Cannery Row in Monterey at depths of 15-30 m. The study area had previously been mapped using the RESON SeaBat 8101 240-kHz multibeam sonar. Resulting high-resolution bathymetric data, with 1-m resolution, were used during the survey planning and execution. Squid egg clusters were clearly visible in the very-high-resolution, 400-kHz backscatter imagery, with pixel size 10-20 cm, recorded from the towed sidescan sonar. The concentration of egg clusters was greatest along a sloping feature believed to be a submarine fault. Egg mops with diameter as small as 0.5 m were distinguishable. [Support by Sea Grant is acknowledged.

  20. EXPLOITING REAL TIME DATA FROM THE MONTEREY OCEAN FLOOR BROADBAND OBSERVATORY (MOBB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowicz, B. A.; Taira, T.; Dolenc, D.; McGill, P. R.; Neuhauser, D. S.

    2009-12-01

    The Monterey Ocean Bottom Broadband (MOBB) observatory has been acquiring broadband seismic data and auxiliary channels (differential pressure and current meter) since its installation on the ocean floor in Monterey Bay, at 1000 m water depth and 40 km off-shore. Operating autonomously for almost 7 years, the system was successfully connected to the MARS cable (www.mbari.org/mars) on February 26th, 2009, via a 3.6 km extension cable from the MARS science node. The system works as designed and is currently streaming data from seismic, pressure, and water-current sensors to the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory, where it joins data from other broadband stations on land and is archived at the Northern California Earthquake Data Center. The availability of real-time MOBB broadband seismic data provides an opportunity for improving earthquake-monitoring capability in central California, particularly near the Santa Cruz Mountains segment of the San Andreas fault, and the San Gregorio fault. While buried in the mud, MOBB is affected by oceanic sources of noise, which are particularly strong in the infragravity wave band, and care must be taken to reduce this background noise in post-processing. We present examples of data analysis and illustrate how MOBB contributes to the determination of source parameters and regional structure.

  1. Biological marker distribution in coexisting kerogen, bitumen and asphaltenes in Monterey Formation diatomite, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannenbaum, E.; Ruth, E.; Huizinga, B. J.; Kaplan, I. R.

    1986-01-01

    Organic-rich (18.2%) Monterey Formation diatomite from California was studied. The organic matter consist of 94% bitumen and 6% kerogen. Biological markers from the bitumen and from pyrolysates of the coexisting asphaltenes and kerogen were analyzed in order to elucidate the relationship between the various fractions of the organic matter. While 17 alpha(H), 18 alpha(H), 21 alpha(H)-28,30-bisnorhopane was present in the bitumen and in the pryolysate of the asphaltenes, it was not detected in the pyrolysates of the kerogen. A C40-isoprenoid with "head to head" linkage, however, was present in pyrolysates of both kerogen and asphaltenes, but not in the bitumen from the diatomite. The maturation level of the bitumen, based on the extent of isomerization of steranes and hopanes, was that of a mature oil, whereas the pyrolysate from the kerogen showed a considerably lower maturation level. These relationships indicate that the bitumen may not be indigenous to the diatomite and that it is a mature oil that migrated into the rock. We consider the possibility, however, that some of the 28,30-bisnorhopane-rich Monterey Formation oils have not been generated through thermal degradation of kerogen, but have been expelled from the source rock at an early stage of diagenesis.

  2. Late Quaternary relative sea level in Southern California and Monterey Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Laura C.; Simms, Alexander R.

    2015-10-01

    Few records of late Quaternary relative sea level (RSL) are available for the Pacific coast of North America south of San Francisco Bay, a region where RSL data would be particularly useful for constraining vertical rates of tectonic motion. This paper provides the first regional, uplift-corrected late Quaternary RSL history for southern California derived from a compilation of 132 previously published and unpublished radiocarbon ages from nearshore, estuarine, and freshwater deposits in sediment cores from coastal southern California. We also provide a local, uplift-corrected RSL history for Monterey Bay, central California, generated from 48 radiocarbon ages from Elkhorn Slough and surrounding environments. Our resulting compilations show rapid sea-level rise from 15 ka which begins to decelerate to present mean sea level (PMSL) between 6 and 8 ka. Late Holocene (Bay in central California. Both rates of late Holocene RSL rise calculated are lower than recent RSL rates from southern California (˜1.61 ± 0.34 to 2.4 ± 1.04 mm a-1) and Monterey Bay (1.49 ± 0.95 mm a-1), derived from uplift-corrected, 20th century tide gauge data. This new RSL data fills geographical gaps in relative sea-level histories, as well as provides important datums for local tectonic processes.

  3. Assessment of undiscovered continuous oil and gas resources in the Monterey Formation, Los Angeles Basin Province, California, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Charpentier, Ronald R.; Klett, Timothy R.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Pitman, Janet K.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Hawkins, Sarah J.; Le, Phuong A.; Lillis, Paul G.; Marra, Kristen R.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.; Schenk, Christopher J.

    2016-07-08

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey assessed technically recoverable mean resources of 13 million barrels of oil, 22 billion cubic feet of gas, and 1 million barrels of natural gas liquids in the Monterey Formation of the Los Angeles Basin Province, California.

  4. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on the Nearshore Environment: A Month-Long Study in Monterey Bay CA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Magalen, Jason; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01

    A modified version of an indust ry standard wave modeling tool, SNL - SWAN, was used to perform model simulations for hourly initial wave conditio ns measured during the month of October 2009. The model was run with an array of 50 wave energy converters (WECs) and compared with model runs without WECs. Maximum changes in H s were found in the lee of the WEC array along the angles of incident wave dire ction and minimal changes were found along the western side of the model domain due to wave shadowing by land. The largest wave height reductions occurred during observed typhoon conditions and resulted in 14% decreases in H s along the Santa Cruz shoreline . Shoreline reductions in H s were 5% during s outh swell wave conditions and negligible during average monthly wave conditions.

  5. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: A Modeling Sensitivity Study in Monterey Bay CA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Grace Chang; Jason Magalen; Craig Jones

    2014-08-01

    A n indust ry standard wave modeling tool was utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters and wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deploym ent scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that b oth wave height and near - bottom orbital velocity we re subject to the largest pote ntial variations, each decreas ed in sensitivity as transmission coefficient increase d , as number and spacing of WEC devices decrease d , and as the deployment location move d offshore. Wave direction wa s affected consistently for all parameters and wave perio d was not affected (or negligibly affected) by varying model parameters or WEC configuration .

  6. Moments and Signal Processing: Proceedings of the Conference Held in Monterey, CA. on March 30-31 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-26

    tot,,•2y positivc (TP) if certain determinantal inequalities lh,11 ( Iailin 1938. ’p 11. 15). For instance, the functions exp(9x) and I(x < P) are TP...University of Pittsburgh Title: Probk ýility Calculations for Multivariate Pearson Families 1800-2000: " Social Hour," La Novia Terrace, Herrmann Hall 295

  7. 16TH Annual Review of Progress in Applied Computational Electromagnetics of the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA. Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Trueman C-130/Hercules HF Notch Antenna" David Gaudine 0940 "I-IF Towel-Bar Antenna Location Study Aboard an H3 Sikorsky Saad N. Tabet, Cart D. Myers...needed. For this reason an anatomically based model was obtained from Dr Om Gandhi of the University of Utah. This data is supported by programs, which...FRance, EDF-DER, Service IPN, D~partement SID, 1 Avenue du GCnrral-de-Gaulle, 92141 Clamart Cedex, May 1993. [8] C. M. Furse and 0. P. Gandhi

  8. Wave Energy Converter Effects on Wave Fields: Evaluation of SNL-SWAN and Sensitivity Studies in Monterey Bay CA.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Magalen, Jason; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01

    A modified version of an indust ry standard wave modeling tool was evaluated, optimized, and utilized to investigate model sensitivity to input parameters a nd wave energy converter ( WEC ) array deployment scenarios. Wave propagation was investigated d ownstream of the WECs to evaluate overall near - and far - field effects of WEC arrays. The sensitivity study illustrate d that wave direction and WEC device type we r e most sensitive to the variation in the model parameters examined in this study . Generally, the changes in wave height we re the primary alteration caused by the presence of a WEC array. Specifically, W EC device type and subsequently their size directly re sult ed in wave height variations; however, it is important to utilize ongoing laboratory studies and future field tests to determine the most appropriate power matrix values for a particular WEC device and configuration in order to improve modeling results .

  9. 75 FR 67620 - Temporary Security Zones; San Francisco Bay, Delta Ports, Monterey Bay and Humboldt Bay, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    ... cruise ship, tanker or HIV that is underway, anchored, or moored within the San Francisco Bay and Delta..., within 500 yards ahead, astern and extending 500 yards along either side of any cruise ship, tanker or..., astern and extending 500 yards along either side of any cruise ship, tanker or HIV that is...

  10. Analysis of a viral metagenomic library from 200 m depth in Monterey Bay, California constructed by direct shotgun cloning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preston Christina M

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viruses have a profound influence on both the ecology and evolution of marine plankton, but the genetic diversity of viral assemblages, particularly those in deeper ocean waters, remains poorly described. Here we report on the construction and analysis of a viral metagenome prepared from below the euphotic zone in a temperate, eutrophic bay of coastal California. Methods We purified viruses from approximately one cubic meter of seawater collected from 200m depth in Monterey Bay, CA. DNA was extracted from the virus fraction, sheared, and cloned with no prior amplification into a plasmid vector and propagated in E. coli to produce the MBv200m library. Random clones were sequenced by the Sanger method. Sequences were assembled then compared to sequences in GenBank and to other viral metagenomic libraries using BLAST analyses. Results Only 26% of the 881 sequences remaining after assembly had significant (E ≤ 0.001 BLAST hits to sequences in the GenBank nr database, with most being matches to bacteria (15% and viruses (8%. When BLAST analysis included environmental sequences, 74% of sequences in the MBv200m library had a significant match. Most of these hits (70% were to microbial metagenome sequences and only 0.7% were to sequences from viral metagenomes. Of the 121 sequences with a significant hit to a known virus, 94% matched bacteriophages (Families Podo-, Sipho-, and Myoviridae and 6% matched viruses of eukaryotes in the Family Phycodnaviridae (5 sequences or the Mimivirus (2 sequences. The largest percentages of hits to viral genes of known function were to those involved in DNA modification (25% or structural genes (17%. Based on reciprocal BLAST analyses, the MBv200m library appeared to be most similar to viral metagenomes from two other bays and least similar to a viral metagenome from the Arctic Ocean. Conclusions Direct cloning of DNA from diverse marine viruses was feasible and resulted in a distribution of virus

  11. MOBB: a permanent ocean floor broadband seismic observatory in Monterey Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhrhammer, R.; Romanowicz, B.; Stakes, D.; Neuhauser, D.; McGill, P.; Ramirez, T.

    2003-04-01

    The Monterey ocean bottom broadband station (MOBB) was installed on the seafloor in Monterey Bay, 40 km offshore, and at a depth of 1000m from the sea surface, on April 9-11, 2002. Its success capitalizes on the experience gained in the 1997 International MOISE experiment, conducted under similar conditions. The deployment took place during 3 dives on consecutive days and made use of MBARI's Point Lobos ship and ROV Ventana. The station is currently recording data autonomously. Eventually, it will be linked to the planned (and recently funded) MARS (Monterey Accelerated Research System; \\url {http://www.mbari.org/mars/}) cable and provide real-time, continuous seismic data to be merged with the rest of the northern California real-time seismic system. The data are archived at the NCEDC for on-line availability, as part of the Berkeley Digital Seismic Network (BDSN). The ocean-bottom MOBB station currently comprises a three-component seismometer package, a current-meter, a DPG, and recording and battery packages. The seismic package contains a low-power (2.2W), three-component CMG-1T broadband seismometer system, built by Guralp, Inc., with a three-component 24-bit digitizer, a leveling system, and a precision clock. The seismometer package is mounted on a cylindrical titanium pressure vessel 54cm in height and 41 cm in diameter, custom built by the MBARI team and outfitted for underwater connection. Data recovery dives, during which the recording and battery package will be exchanged are planned every three months for the next 3 years. Three such dives have already taken place, on 06/27/02, 09/20/02 and on 01/07/03. Due to a software problem, data were lost during the time period 07/01/02 and 09/20/02. Many regional and teleseismic earthquakes have been well recorded and the mass position signals indicate that the instruments have progressively settled. Preliminary analysis of data retrieved during the 2002 summer and winter dives will be presented. In particular

  12. CCN Properties of Organic Aerosol Collected Below and within Marine Stratocumulus Clouds near Monterey, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akua Asa-Awuku

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The composition of aerosol from cloud droplets differs from that below cloud. Its implications for the Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN activity are the focus of this study. Water-soluble organic matter from below cloud, and cloud droplet residuals off the coast of Monterey, California were collected; offline chemical composition, CCN activity and surface tension measurements coupled with Köhler Theory Analysis are used to infer the molar volume and surfactant characteristics of organics in both samples. Based on the surface tension depression of the samples, it is unlikely that the aerosol contains strong surfactants. The activation kinetics for all samples examined are consistent with rapid (NH42SO4 calibration aerosol. This is consistent with our current understanding of droplet kinetics for ambient CCN. However, the carbonaceous material in cloud drop residuals is far more hygroscopic than in sub-cloud aerosol, suggestive of the impact of cloud chemistry on the hygroscopic properties of organic matter.

  13. Prey and plastic ingestion of Pacific Northern Fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis rogersii) from Monterey Bay, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly-Greenan, Erica L; Harvey, James T; Nevins, Hannahrose M; Hester, Michelle M; Walker, William A

    2014-08-15

    Marine plastic pollution affects seabirds, including Pacific Northern Fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis rodgersii), that feed at the surface and mistake plastic for prey or incidentally ingest it. Direct and indirect health issues can result, including satiety and possibly leading to inefficient foraging. Our objective was to examine fulmar body condition, identify cephalopod diet to species, enumerate and weigh ingested plastic, and determine if prey number and size were correlated with ingested plastics in beach-cast fulmars wintering in Monterey Bay California (2003, n=178: 2007, n=185). Fulmars consumed mostly Gonatus pyros, G. onyx, and G. californiensis of similar size for both years. We found a significant negative correlation between pectoral muscle index and average size of cephalopod beaks per stomach; a significant increase in plastic categories between 2003 and 2007; and no significant correlation between number and mass of plastic compared with number and size of prey for either year.

  14. Orbitally paced phosphogenesis in Mediterranean shallow marine carbonates during the middle Miocene Monterey event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auer, Gerald; Hauzenberger, Christoph A.; Reuter, Markus; Piller, Werner E.

    2016-04-01

    During the Oligo-Miocene, major phases of phosphogenesis occurred in the Earth's oceans. However, most phosphate deposits represent condensed or allochthonous hemipelagic deposits, formed by complex physical and chemical enrichment processes, limiting their applicability for the study regarding the temporal pacing of Miocene phosphogenesis. The Oligo-Miocene Decontra section located on the Maiella Platform (central Apennines, Italy) is a widely continuous carbonate succession deposited in a mostly middle to outer neritic setting. Of particular interest are the well-winnowed grain to packstones of the middle Miocene Bryozoan Limestone, where occurrences of authigenic phosphate grains coincide with the prominent carbon isotope excursion of the Monterey event. This unique setting allows the analysis of orbital forcing on phosphogenesis, within a bio, chemo, and cyclostratigraphically constrained age-model. LA-ICP-MS analyses revealed a significant enrichment of uranium in the studied authigenic phosphates compared to the surrounding carbonates, allowing natural gamma-radiation (GR) to be used as a qualitative proxy for autochthonous phosphate content. Time series analyses indicate a strong 405 kyr eccentricity forcing of GR in the Bryozoan Limestone. These results link maxima in the GR record and thus phosphate content to orbitally paced increases in the burial of organic carbon, particularly during the carbon isotope maxima of the Monterey event. Thus, phosphogenesis during the middle Miocene in the Mediterranean was controlled by the 405 kyr eccentricity and its influence on large-scale paleoproductivity patterns. Rare earth element data were used as a tool to reconstruct the formation conditions of the investigated phosphates, indicating generally oxic formation conditions, which are consistent with microbially mediated phosphogenesis.

  15. NOSBATC - bathymetric contour data for the Monterey Bay region from Point Ano Nuevo to Point Sur, California based on NOAA/NOS data (UTM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains bathymetric data as contours for the the greater Monterey Bay area between Point Ano Nuevo to the north and Point Sur to the south. NOSBATC are...

  16. NOSBATC - bathymetric contour data for the Monterey Bay region from Point Ano Nuevo to Point Sur, California based on NOAA/NOS data (UTM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset contains bathymetric data as contours for the the greater Monterey Bay area between Point Ano Nuevo to the north and Point Sur to the south. NOSBATC are...

  17. High-Resolution Multibeam, Sidescan, and Subbottom Surveys in and Around Monterey Canyon Using the MBARI Mapping AUV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caress, D. W.; Thomas, H.; McEwen, R.; Henthorn, R.; Kirkwood, W. J.; Thompson, D.; Paull, C. K.; McGill, P.

    2005-12-01

    During 2004 and 2005, MBARI has conducted several high-resolution bathymetry, sidescan, and subbottom profiler surveys in and around Monterey Canyon, Monterey Bay, California. These surveys were conducted using the new MBARI Mapping Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV). This torpedo-shaped, 6000 m deep rated vehicle is equipped with a 200 kHz multibeam sonar, 110 kHz and 410 kHz chirp sidescan sonar, and a 2-16 kHz sweep subbottom profiler. The sonar package can also be mounted on ROV Ventana, allowing near-bottom bathymetric surveys of sites where extreme topography (e.g. the Monterey Canyon axis) preclude safe autonomous operation. The Mapping AUV is being used to monitor sediment transport through Monterey Canyon by conducting repeated high-resolution bathymetric surveys in the upper canyon. Upper Monterey Canyon is known to have frequent sediment transport events. Four sites have been selected with canyon axis depths of 300 m, 520 m, 1000 m, and 1400 m, respectively. Each survey nominally covers a 600 m by 600 m area with a 35 m line spacing and a 20 m altitude. We are achieving sub-meter lateral resolution and a vertical precision of 0.3 m. The combined bathymetry and backscatter successfully image fine scale channel features, including bedforms, small scarps and plunge pools, and undercutting of the inner canyon walls. All four sites have been surveyed at least once, and we will revisit these sites three times annually for the foreseeable future. We have also collected in excess of 170 km of subbottom profiles around and across the upper canyon. The subbottom profiler successfully images sediment structure to subsurface depths of as much as 50 m. These profiles demonstrate that the upper canyon walls are draped with sediment rather than exposing an erosional surface. Another Mapping AUV survey target is Smooth Ridge, located immediately north of Monterey Canyon and west of Soquel canyon. The upper reaches of Smooth Ridge are connected to the shelf across a

  18. Core descriptions, core photographs, physical property logs and surface textural data of sediment cores recovered from the continental shelf of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary during the research cruises M-1-95-MB, P-2-95-MB, and P-1-97-MB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzech, Kevin M.; Dahl, Wendy E.; Edwards, Brian D.

    2001-01-01

    In response to the 1992 creation of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (MBNMS), the United States Geological Survey (USGS) initiated a multiyear investigation of the Sanctuary continental margin. As part of the investigative effort, this report summarizes the shipboard procedures, subsequent laboratory analyses, and data results from three seafloor sampling cruises conducted on the continental shelf between Monterey peninsula, CA and San Francisco, CA. The cruises were conducted in 1995 aboard the NOAA Ship McArthur (M-1-95-MB) and in 1995 and 1997 aboard the R/V Point Sur (P-2-95-MB and P-1-97-MB). Scientists and representatives from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the California Department of Fish and Game (CDFG), the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC), and the San Jose State University Moss Landing Marine Laboratory (SJSU-MLML) supported the research effort. In this report we present sediment descriptions, sediment textural data, physical property logs, station metadata, and photographs of subcores from a total of three hundred and eighty four sample stations. At these sites either a box corer, MultiCore™r, grab sampler or a combination of these sampling devices were used to collect the sea floor sediments. The report is presented in an interactive web-based format with each mapped core station linked to the corresponding description and photo, and to a spreadsheet of surface texture and other sampling data.

  19. Water mass bio-optical properties in the Monterey Bay region: Fluorescence-based inference of shifts in phytoplankton photophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolliff, J. K.; Gould, R. W., Jr.; Penta, B.; Teague, W. J.; DeRada, S.; Chavez, F. P.; Arnone, R. A.

    2012-07-01

    A physical and bio-optical field survey of the Monterey Bay area was conducted during May-June 2008. The combined bio-optical and physical data may be summarized as a transition between two end-member states during the late spring to summer upwelling season: (1) the mesotrophic, nanoflagellate-dominated, low-salinity surface waters (chlorophyll-a ˜ 0.5-2 mg m-3; S 2 mg m-3; S > 33.8) of Monterey Bay and adjacent continental shelf areas. High-resolution and collocated spectrophotometric, fluorometric and CTD data obtained from a towed platform indicated low-salinity subarctic-origin surface waters intruded into Monterey Bay on 4 June. The dark in vivo fluorometry (IVF) phytoplankton response normalized to particle absorption at 676 nm (the apparent fluorescence efficiency, AFE) was nearly fourfold larger in this water mass type compared to higher salinity surface waters more typical of Monterey Bay. The collocated fluorescence and optical data were then used to estimate in situ irradiance values and determine apparent light saturation intensities (I'k) based on the remarkably consistent AFE water column inflection points. I'kvalues retrieved from the low-salinity surface waters were approximately half those obtained over the continental shelf. An analysis of concomitant HPLC data, in addition to historical data for the region, suggest these observed fluorescence trends may be indicative of taxon-specific variation in photophysiology. Specifically, the subarctic water mass-associated pelagic nanoflagellate group likely possesses a fundamentally different photosynthetic architecture than large diatoms prototypical of coastal upwelling regimes.

  20. COMPARING SEA LEVEL RESPONSE AT MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA FROM THE 1989 LOMA PRIETA EARTHQUAKE AND THE 1964 GREAT ALASKAN EARTHQUAKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. C. Breaker

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Two of the largest earthquakes to affect water levels in Monterey Bay in recent years were the Loma Prieta Earthquake (LPE of 1989 with a moment magnitude of 6.9, and the Great Alaskan Earthquake (GAE of 1964 with a moment magnitude of 9.2. In this study, we compare the sea level response of these events with a primary focus on their frequency content and how the bay affected it, itself. Singular Spectrum Analysis (SSA was employed to extract the primary frequencies associated with each event. It is not clear how or exactly where the tsunami associated with the LPE was generated, but it occurred inside the bay and most likely began to take on the characteristics of a seiche by the time it reached the tide gauge in Monterey Harbor. Results of the SSA decomposition revealed two primary periods of oscillation, 9-10 minutes, and 31-32 minutes. The first oscillation is in agreement with the range of periods for the expected natural oscillations of Monterey Harbor, and the second oscillation is consistent with a bay-wide oscillation or seiche mode. SSA decomposition of the GAE revealed several sequences of oscillations all with a period of approximately 37 minutes, which corresponds to the predicted, and previously observed, transverse mode of oscillation for Monterey Bay. In this case, it appears that this tsunami produced quarter-wave resonance within the bay consistent with its seiche-like response. Overall, the sea level responses to the LPE and GAE differed greatly, not only because of the large difference in their magnitudes but also because the driving force in one case occurred inside the bay (LPE, and in the second, outside the bay (GAE. As a result, different modes of oscillation were excited.

  1. Isotopic evidence for complex microbial ecosystems in the phosphate-rich interval of the Miocene Monterey Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiling, B. P.; Coleman, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    The middle Miocene Monterey Formation has long been debated as a crucial global sink for organic carbon that led to global cooling. We evaluate proxies for the microbial ecosystem to investigate organic carbon burial within the phosphate-rich interval of the Monterey Formation at Naples Beach, California by combining mineralogical evidence with δ34S analyses of carbonate associated sulfate (CAS). All δ34S are below Miocene seawater values (~22‰, VCDT) and range from +12.2‰ to +18.5‰. δ34SCAS Sulfate reducing bacteria then consume the excess, residual sulfate, generating free H2S in the absence of available iron. H2S diffuses upward towards the sediment-water interface (an oxic-suboxic mixing zone) where H2S is oxidized to 34S-depleted sulfate either aerobically or coupled to nitrate reduction, and lowers seawater pH. The high phosphate content and low carbonate content of this interval of the Monterey Formation supports a model of precipitation in lower pH waters. Assuming a -40‰ fractionation of δ34S due to microbial sulfate reduction, we estimate at least a 10%-20% contribution of sulfate from sulfide oxidation to marine porewater sulfate. These results suggest that the phosphate-rich interval of the Monterey Formation housed a complex suite of iron and sulfate reducing bacteria as well as sulfide oxidizing bacteria, suggesting that significant organic carbon was consumed during early diagenesis and may account for low organic carbon content described in previous studies.

  2. Marine neotectonic investigation of the San Gregorio Fault Zone on the northern flank of Monterey Canyon, offshore central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, K. L.; Paull, C. K.; Brothers, D. S.; McGann, M.; Caress, D. W.; Lundsten, E. M.; Anderson, K.; Gwiazda, R.

    2014-12-01

    The San Gregorio Fault Zone (SGFZ) is part of the North American-Pacific plate boundary and is thought to accommodate right-lateral offset up to 10 mm/yr. Because much of the SGFZ in Monterey Bay, central California, lies offshore in steep submarine canyon bathymetry, little is known of its recent activity. We provide initial direct evidence for faulting where the SGFZ has been interpreted based on canyon morphology to cross the northern flank of Monterey Canyon. High-resolution multibeam bathymetry and chirp subbottom profiles were acquired during 13 dives with the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute's (MBARI) Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) from 2009-2014 on the northern flank of Monterey Canyon, extending from the shelf edge ~15 km offshore Santa Cruz to ~1850 m water depth. Chirp profiles resolve layered sediments up to ~40 m subsurface in this region, and no fault scarps or seafloor lineaments are visible in the 1-m resolution multibeam bathymetry. At least one subsurface fault is identified within the SGFZ by offset reflections across a discrete, nearly vertical fault. However, this fault is only imaged where mass wasting has exhumed older strata to within ~25 m of the seafloor. Numerous slumps scars on the seafloor and packages of chaotic internal reflectivity in chirp profiles suggest that submarine landslide processes dominate the study area. To constrain the age of reflections offset by the fault, MBARI's Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) Doc Ricketts, sampled faces of slump scars where the offset reflections crop out using vibracores and horizontal push cores. Radiocarbon dating of foraminifera within these core samples is being used to constrain the last recorded movement on the fault. Application of AUV and ROV methods allows detailed neotectonic investigation of significant offshore structures, like the SGFZ, that contribute to hazard assessment.

  3. An Analysis of the Proposed Land Lease Agreement Between the Naval Postgraduate School and the City of Monterey, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-01

    of outgrants to the City of Monterey, in January 2001. The proposal covered three distinct areas of NPS and three different real estate agreements...the Navy and a local government, particularly, the exchange of Navy properties ( real estate ) and/or services for moneys and/or services. Stakeholder...and SWOT analysis are used as methodologies and tools to study the land lease process. The objective is to describe the public-public partnership

  4. Globalization, binational communities, and imported food risks: results of an outbreak investigation of lead poisoning in Monterey County, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handley, Margaret A; Hall, Celeste; Sanford, Eric; Diaz, Evie; Gonzalez-Mendez, Enrique; Drace, Kaitie; Wilson, Robert; Villalobos, Mario; Croughan, Mary

    2007-05-01

    Although the burden of lead poisoning has decreased across developed countries, it remains the most prevalent environmental poison worldwide. Our objective was to investigate the sources of an outbreak of lead poisoning in Monterey County, California. An investigation in 3 county health department clinics in Monterey County, California, was conducted between 2001 and 2003 to identify risk factors for elevated blood lead levels (> or = 10 microg/dL) among children and pregnant women. The prevalence of elevated blood lead levels was significantly higher in 1 of the 3 clinics (6% among screened children and 13% among prenatal patients). Risk factors included eating imported foods (relative risk [RR]=3.4; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.2, 9.5) and having originated from the Zimatlan area of Oaxaca, Mexico, compared with other areas of Oaxaca (RR=4.0; 95% CI=1.7, 9.5). Home-prepared dried grasshoppers (chapulines) sent from Oaxaca were found to contain significant amounts of lead. Consumption of foods imported from Oaxaca was identified as a risk factor for elevated blood lead levels in Monterey County, California. Lead-contaminated imported chapulines were identified as 1 source of lead poisoning, although other sources may also contribute to the observed findings. Food transport between binational communities presents a unique risk for the importation of environmental hazards [corrected

  5. Geochemistry of phosphatic-shales and associated authigenic minerals of the Miocene Monterey Formation: Implications for paragenetic evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, A.; Loyd, S. J.

    2016-12-01

    The Monterey Formation is a petroleum source and reservoir rock in California that was deposited in several basins during the tectonically-active Middle Miocene. The middle carbonaceous marl member of the Monterey Formation contains intervals of phosphatic-shales that are rhythmically cemented by dolomite as layers and concretions. Diagenetic minerals can form as the result of organic matter remineralization facilitated by microbes utilizing oxygen, nitrate, iron (III), sulfate and fermentation products as electron acceptors. Precipitation of phosphate and carbonate minerals tends to occur in suboxic-anoxic sediments, generally experiencing sulfate reduction, where degradation of organic matter yields alkalinity, sulfide and phosphate ions. Here, we present sulfur and carbon geochemical data in order to better characterize the conditions that led to the precipitation of phosphorous-rich minerals (e.g., carbonate-fluorapatite (CFA)) and dolomite that occur in close stratigraphic proximity. These data include concentration of CFA-associated sulfate, carbonate associated sulfate (CAS) and the respective δ°S values. The concentration of inorganic/organic carbon and associated δC values have been determined for CFA, dolomite and the host-shale, in order to further characterize the diagenetic environment of precipitation. These data indicate that authigenesis occurred in pore waters influenced by multiple microbial reactions, including respiration and methanogenesis reactions, and ultimately highlight the complexity of the Monterey diagenetic environment.

  6. Five Years of Data at the Monterey Ocean Bottom Broadband Seismic Station (MOBB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenc, D.; Romanowicz, B.; McGill, P.; Neuhauser, D.; Uhrhammer, R.

    2007-12-01

    We present an overview of the results obtained at MOBB in the past 5.5 years of its continuous operation. In particular we focus on the observations of the long-period ocean surface gravity waves (infragravity waves; 0.002 to 0.05 Hz) and different methods to remove the long-period background and signal-generated noise from the seismic observations. MOBB was installed 40 km offshore in the Monterey Bay at a water depth of 1000 m in April 2002 in collaboration between Berkeley Seismological Laboratory and Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI). It is located west of the San Gregorio Fault and represents the first step towards extending the onshore broadband seismic network in northern California westward of the Pacific-North America plate boundary. MOBB comprises a three- component broadband seismometer Guralp CMG-1T, sensitive over a wide frequency range, from 50 Hz to 2.8 mHz (360 s), a water current meter measuring current speed and direction, and a differential pressure gauge. At present, the station is autonomous and the data are on average retrieved every 4 months using MBARI's remotely operated vehicle Ventana. Work is under way to connect it to the MARS (Monterey Accelerated Research System) cable so that it will contribute continuous real time data to the northern California earthquake monitoring system. Lessons learned from the MOBB deployment as well as noise removal techniques that are specific to the ocean bottom installation will provide us reference for future installations of broadband seismic stations in the oceans. When compared to the quiet land stations, ocean bottom seismic station MOBB shows increased background noise in the band pass of interest for the study of regional and teleseismic signals. This is mainly due to deformation of the seafloor under the pressure forcing by infragravity waves. Also observed is additional signal- generated noise which is due to the reverberations in the shallow sedimentary layers as well as in the

  7. Linking Planktonic Larval Abundance to Internal Bores at the Head of the Monterey Submarine Canyon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, J.; Walter, R. K.; Steinbeck, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    Variability in the physical coastal environment can play an important role in determining the spatio-temporal variation in abundance of planktonic organisms. Combining planktonic larval abundance estimates over the course of a year with concurrent temperature and current data, this study provides empirical data linking a locally predominant internal tidal feature to patterns of biological abundance in the very nearshore environment at the head of Monterey Submarine Canyon. The physical observations indicate the presence of seasonally-variable semidiurnal internal bores that result in the pumping of cold (subthermocline) waters onto the adjacent shelf. Analysis of the larval abundance data indicates an assemblage shift from a relatively abundant shelf assemblage of larval fishes to a reduced abundance assemblage that is concurrent with the semidiurnal cold water intrusions driven by the tidal pumping. Results suggest that the tidal period pumping of subthermocline waters by internal bores dilutes or displaces shelf waters and their associated planktonic larval community. This could have important ecological implications at these scales and may also be of interest when siting industrial facilities that require seawater for cooling or desalination, as it would potentially reduce their impact on regional planktonic communities by diluting their rates of entrainment.

  8. Electrical Resistivity Imaging of Seawater Intrusion into the Monterey Bay Aquifer System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidlisecky, A; Moran, T; Hansen, B; Knight, R

    2016-03-01

    We use electrical resistivity tomography to obtain a 6.8-km electrical resistivity image to a depth of approximately 150 m.b.s.l. along the coast of Monterey Bay. The resulting image is used to determine the subsurface distribution of saltwater- and freshwater-saturated sediments and the geologic controls on fluid distributions in the region. Data acquisition took place over two field seasons in 2011 and 2012. To maximize our ability to image both vertical and horizontal variations in the subsurface, a combination of dipole-dipole, Wenner, Wenner-gamma, and gradient measurements were made, resulting in a large final dataset of approximately 139,000 data points. The resulting resistivity section extends to a depth of 150 m.b.s.l., and is used, in conjunction with the gamma logs from four coastal monitoring wells to identify four dominant lithologic units. From these data, we are able to infer the existence of a contiguous clay layer in the southern portion of our transect, which prevents downward migration of the saltwater observed in the upper 25 m of the subsurface to the underlying freshwater aquifer. The saltwater and brackish water in the northern portion of the transect introduce the potential for seawater intrusion into the hydraulically connected freshwater aquifer to the south, not just from the ocean, but also laterally from north to south.

  9. Resistivity imaging reveals complex pattern of saltwater intrusion along Monterey coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Meredith; Pidlisecky, Adam; Knight, Rosemary

    2017-08-01

    Electrical Resistivity Tomography data were acquired along 40 km of the Monterey Bay coast in central California. These data resulted in electrical resistivity images to depths of approximately 280 m.b.s.l., which were used to understand the distribution of freshwater and saltwater in the subsurface, and factors controlling this distribution. The resulting resistivity sections were interpreted in conjunction with existing data sets, including well logs, seismic reflection data, geologic reports, hydrologic reports, and land use maps from the region. Interpretation of these data shows a complex pattern of saltwater intrusion resulting from geology, pumping, and recharge. The resistivity profiles were used to identify geological flow conduits and barriers such as palaeo-channels and faults, localized saltwater intrusion from individual pumping wells, infiltration zones of surface fresh and brackish water, and regions showing improvements in water quality due to management actions. The use of ERT data for characterizing the subsurface in this region has led to an understanding of the spatial distribution of freshwater and saltwater at a level of detail unattainable with the previously deployed traditional well based salinity mapping and monitoring techniques alone. Significant spatial variability in the extent and geometry of intrusion observed in the acquired data highlights the importance of adopting continuous subsurface characterization methods such as this one.

  10. Moisture Adsorption and Thermodynamic Properties of California Grown Almonds (Varieties: Nonpareil and Monterey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zuo Taitano

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Moisture adsorption characteristics of California grown almonds (Nonpareil: pasteurized and unpasteurized almonds; Monterey: pasteurized, unpasteurized and blanched almonds were obtained using the gravimetric method over a range of water activities from 0.11 to 0.98 at 7-50ºC. The weights of almonds were measured until samples reached a constant weight. The relationship between equilibrium moisture content and water activity was established using the Guggenheim-Anderson-de Boer model. The diffusion coefficient of water in almond kernels was calculated based on Ficks second law. The monolayer moisture value of almonds ranged from 0.020 to 0.035 kg H2O kg-1 solids. The diffusion coefficient increased with temperature at a constant water activity, and decreased with water activity at a constant temperature. The thermodynamic properties (net isosteric heat, differential enthalpy and entropy were also determined. The net isosteric heat of adsorption decreased with the increasing moisture content, and the plot of differential enthalpy versus entropy satisfied the enthalpy-entropy compensation theory. The adsorption process of almond samples was enthalpy driven over the range of studied moisture contents.

  11. Biomonitoring of marine vertebrates in Monterey Bay using eDNA metabarcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andruszkiewicz, Elizabeth A; Starks, Hilary A; Chavez, Francisco P; Sassoubre, Lauren M; Block, Barbara A; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2017-01-01

    Molecular analysis of environmental DNA (eDNA) can be used to assess vertebrate biodiversity in aquatic systems, but limited work has applied eDNA technologies to marine waters. Further, there is limited understanding of the spatial distribution of vertebrate eDNA in marine waters. Here, we use an eDNA metabarcoding approach to target and amplify a hypervariable region of the mitochondrial 12S rRNA gene to characterize vertebrate communities at 10 oceanographic stations spanning 45 km within the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (MBNMS). In this study, we collected three biological replicates of small volume water samples (1 L) at 2 depths at each of the 10 stations. We amplified fish mitochondrial DNA using a universal primer set. We obtained 5,644,299 high quality Illumina sequence reads from the environmental samples. The sequence reads were annotated to the lowest taxonomic assignment using a bioinformatics pipeline. The eDNA survey identified, to the lowest taxonomic rank, 7 families, 3 subfamilies, 10 genera, and 72 species of vertebrates at the study sites. These 92 distinct taxa come from 33 unique marine vertebrate families. We observed significantly different vertebrate community composition between sampling depths (0 m and 20/40 m deep) across all stations and significantly different communities at stations located on the continental shelf (200 m bottom depth). All but 1 family identified using eDNA metabarcoding is known to occur in MBNMS. The study informs the implementation of eDNA metabarcoding for vertebrate biomonitoring.

  12. Effects of pruning in Monterey pine plantations affected by Fusarium circinatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bezos, D.; Lomba, J. M.; Martinez-Alvarez, P.; Fernandez, M.; Diez, J. J.

    2012-07-01

    Fusarium circinatum Nirenberg and O'Donnell (1998) is the causal agent of Pitch Canker Disease (PCD) in Pinus species, producing damage to the main trunk and lateral branches as well as causing branch dieback. The disease has been detected recently in northern Spain in Pinus spp. seedlings at nurseries and in Pinus radiata D. Don adult trees in plantations. Fusarium circinatum seems to require a wound to enter the tree, not only that as caused by insects but also that resulting from damage by humans, i.e. mechanical wounds. However, the effects of pruning on the infection process have yet to be studied. The aim of the present study was to know how the presence of mechanical damage caused by pruning affects PCD occurrence and severity in P. radiata plantations. Fifty P. radiata plots (pruned and unpruned) distributed throughout 16 sites affected by F. circinatum in the Cantabria region (northern Spain) were studied. Symptoms of PCD presence, such as dieback, oozing cankers and trunk deformation were evaluated in 25 trees per plot and related to pruning effect. A significant relationship between pruning and the number of cankers per tree was observed, concluding that wounds caused by pruning increase the chance of pathogen infection. Other trunk symptoms, such as the presence of resin outside the cankers, were also higher in pruned plots. These results should be taken into account for future management of Monterey Pine plantations. (Author) 36 refs.

  13. Regional Analysis of Stormwater Runoff for the Placement of Managed Aquifer Recharge Sites in Santa Cruz and Northern Monterey Counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, K. S.; Beganskas, S.; Fisher, A. T.

    2015-12-01

    We apply a USGS surface hydrology model, Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS), to analyze stormwater runoff in Santa Cruz and Northern Monterey Counties, CA with the goal of supplying managed aquifer recharge (MAR) sites. Under the combined threats of multiyear drought and excess drawdown, this region's aquifers face numerous sustainability challenges, including seawater intrusion, chronic overdraft, increased contamination, and subsidence. This study addresses the supply side of this resource issue by increasing our knowledge of the spatial and temporal dynamics of runoff that could provide water for MAR. Ensuring the effectiveness of MAR using stormwater requires a thorough understanding of runoff distribution and site-specific surface and subsurface aquifer conditions. In this study we use a geographic information system (GIS) and a 3-m digital elevation model (DEM) to divide the region's four primary watersheds into Hydrologic Response Units (HRUs), or topographic sub-basins, that serve as discretized input cells for PRMS. We then assign vegetation, soil, land use, slope, aspect, and other characteristics to these HRUs, from a variety of data sources, and analyze runoff spatially using PRMS under varying precipitation conditions. We are exploring methods of linking spatially continuous and high-temporal-resolution precipitation datasets to generate input precipitation catalogs, facilitating analyses of a variety of regimes. To gain an understanding of how surface hydrology has responded to land development, we will also modify our input data to represent pre-development conditions. Coupled with a concurrent MAR suitability analysis, our model results will help screen for locations of future MAR projects and will improve our understanding of how changes in land use and climate impact hydrologic runoff and aquifer recharge.

  14. Phosphorus cycling in the red tide incubator region of Monterey Bay in response to upwelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Rose Marie Mackey

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the cycling of phosphorus (P in the euphotic zone following upwelling in northeastern Monterey Bay (the Red Tide Incubator region of coastal California, with particular emphasis on how phytoplankton and bacteria mediate and respond to changes in P availability. In situ measurements of nutrient concentrations, phytoplankton community composition, and cell-specific alkaline phosphatase (AP activity (determined via enzyme labeled fluorescence assay were measured during 3 cruises. Upwelling led to a 10-fold increase in dissolved inorganic (DIP in surface waters, reaching ~0.5 mol L-1. This DIP was drawn down rapidly as upwelling relaxed over a period of 1 week. Relatively low ratios of nitrate to DIP uptake (~5:1 suggest that luxury P uptake was occurring as phytoplankton bloomed. Dissolved organic (DOP remained relatively constant (~0.3mol L-1 before and immediately following upwelling, but doubled as upwelling relaxed, likely due to phytoplankton excretion and release during grazing. This transition from a relatively high DIP:DOP ratio to lower DIP:DOP ratio was accompanied by a decline in the abundance of diatoms, which had low AP activity, toward localized, spatially-heterogeneous blooms of dinoflagellates in the genera Prorocentrum, Ceratium, Dinophysis, Alexandrium, and Scrippsiella that showed high AP activity regardless of ambient DIP levels. A nutrient addition incubation experiment showed that phytoplankton growth was primarily limited by nitrate, followed by DIP and then DOP, suggesting that P is a regulating, rather than limiting, nutrient in this region. AP activity was observed in bacteria associated with lysed cell debris and aggregates of particulate organic material, where it may serve to facilitate P regeneration, as well as affixed to the surfaces of intact phytoplankton cells, possibly indicative of close, beneficial phytoplankton-bacteria interactions.

  15. Imaging Saltwater Intrusion Along the Coast of Monterey Bay Using Long-Offset Electrical Resistivity Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, M.; Knight, R. J.; Pidlisecky, A.

    2016-12-01

    Coastal regions represent a complex dynamic interface where saltwater intrusion moves seawater landward and groundwater discharge moves freshwater seaward. These processes can have a dramatic impact on water quality, affecting both humans and coastal ecosystems. The ability to map the subsurface distribution of fresh and salt water is a critical step in predicting and managing water quality in coastal regions. This is commonly accomplished using wells, which are expensive and provide point information, which may fail to capture the spatial complexity in subsurface conditions. We present an alternate method for acquiring data, long-offset Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT), which is non-invasive, cost effective, and can address the problem of poor spatial sampling. This geophysical method can produce continuous profiles of subsurface electrical resistivity to a depth of 300 m, with spatial resolution on the order of tens of meters. Our research focuses on the Monterey Bay region, where sustained groundwater extraction over the past century has led to significant saltwater intrusion. ERT was acquired along 40 kilometers of the coast using the roll along method, allowing for continuous overlap in data acquisition. Electrodes were spaced every 22.2 m, with a total of 81 electrodes along the 1.8 km active cable length. The data show a complex distribution of fresh and salt water, influenced by geology, groundwater pumping, recharge, and land-use. While the inverted ERT resistivity profiles correspond well with existing data sets and geologic interpretations in the region, the spatial complexity revealed through the ERT data goes beyond what is known from traditional data sources alone. This leads us to conclude that this form of data can be extremely useful in informing and calibrating groundwater flow models, making targeted management decisions, and monitoring changes in subsurface salinities over time.

  16. Processing, mosaicking and management of the Monterey Bay digital sidescan-sonar images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, P.S.; Isbrecht, J.; Galanis, P.; Gabel, G.L.; Sides, S.C.; Soltesz, D.L.; Ross, S.L.; Velasco, M.G.

    2002-01-01

    Sidescan-sonar imaging systems with digital capabilities have now been available for approximately 20 years. In this paper we present several of the various digital image processing techniques developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and used to apply intensity/radiometric and geometric corrections, as well as enhance and digitally mosaic, sidescan-sonar images of the Monterey Bay region. New software run by a WWW server was designed and implemented to allow very large image data sets, such as the digital mosaic, to be easily viewed interactively, including the ability to roam throughout the digital mosaic at the web site in either compressed or full 1-m resolution. The processing is separated into the two different stages: preprocessing and information extraction. In the preprocessing stage, sensor-specific algorithms are applied to correct for both geometric and intensity/radiometric distortions introduced by the sensor. This is followed by digital mosaicking of the track-line strips into quadrangle format which can be used as input to either visual or digital image analysis and interpretation. An automatic seam removal procedure was used in combination with an interactive digital feathering/stenciling procedure to help minimize tone or seam matching problems between image strips from adjacent track-lines. The sidescan-sonar image processing package is part of the USGS Mini Image Processing System (MIPS) and has been designed to process data collected by any 'generic' digital sidescan-sonar imaging system. The USGS MIPS software, developed over the last 20 years as a public domain package, is available on the WWW at: http://terraweb.wr.usgs.gov/trs/software.html.

  17. Continuous and Episodic Modern Sediment Accumulation on Monterey Fan: Evidence from Ddt, 137Cs and Excess 210Pb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwiazda, R.; Paull, C. K.; Alexander, C. R.; Ussler, W.

    2012-12-01

    The mode and magnitude of fine-grained sediment accumulation on the Monterey Fan off the California central coast was investigated using pesticide concentrations and radioactive tracer profiles in sediment cores. DDT is a man-made pesticide that was used extensively in central California between 1945 and 1970. As such, its presence in marine sediments is a telltale sign of a modern sedimentation age. DDT and its metabolites, DDE and DDD, (collectively referred to as DDTr) were measured in fifty-five ~20cm-long sediment cores collected from the surface of the Monterey Fan up to 250 km to the south and 210 km to the west of the Monterey Canyon head, and in four transects across the Monterey Canyon channel at maximum water depths of 3160, 3380, 3580, and 3880 meters. Profiles of excess 210Pb (210Pbxs) and 137Cs were measured in 5 cores from the Fan to estimate recent sedimentation rates. Detectable levels of DDTr were observed in all but one of these cores, with DDTr concentrations characteristically highest at the surface and decreasing with depth. The area-normalized and depth-integrated DDTr content measured in all the cores in the Fan and in the deepest two channel transects was geographically fairly homogenous, with no statistical relationship between DDTr inventory and distance from the main channel crossing the Fan. The total sediment mass deposited on the Fan over the last 60 years, inferred from the total inventory of DDTr present in the area surveyed, is consistent with the amount of sediment delivered by the Salinas River over the same time period. 210Pbxs activities are fairly homogeneous within an uppermost layer of variable thickness (4.6-8cm) and decrease exponentially below it, but these exponential decreases are often interrupted by horizons with constant or increased 210Pbxs activity. Moreover, the coexistence of variable DDTr concentrations with homogeneous 210Pbxs activities in the top sediment indicates that the uniformity of 210Pbxs is not due

  18. The timing of sediment transport down Monterey Submarine Canyon, offshore California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Thomas; Paull, Charles K.; Ussler, William III; McGann, Mary; Buylaert, Jan-Pieter; Lundsten, Eve M

    2013-01-01

    While submarine canyons are the major conduits through which sediments are transported from the continents out into the deep sea, the time it takes for sediment to pass down through a submarine canyon system is poorly constrained. Here we report on the first study to couple optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages of quartz sand deposits and accelerator mass spectrometry 14C ages measured on benthic foraminifera to examine the timing of sediment transport through the axial channel of Monterey Submarine Canyon and Fan, offshore California. The OSL ages date the timing of sediment entry into the canyon head while the 14C ages of benthic foraminifera record the deposition of hemipelagic sediments that bound the sand horizons. We use both single-grain and small (∼2 mm area) single-aliquot regeneration approaches on vibracore samples from fining-upward sequences at various water depths to demonstrate relatively rapid, decadal-scale sand transport to at least 1.1 km depth and more variable decadal- to millennial-scale transport to a least 3.5 km depth on the fan. Significant differences between the time sand was last exposed at the canyon head (OSL age) and the timing of deposition of the sand (from 14C ages of benthic foraminifera in bracketing hemipelagic sediments) are interpreted as indicating that the sand does not pass through the entire canyon instantly in large individual events, but rather moves multiple times before emerging onto the fan. The increased spread in single-grain OSL dates with water depth provides evidence of mixing and temporary storage of sediment as it moves through the canyon system. The ages also indicate that the frequency of sediment transport events decreases with distance down the canyon channel system. The amalgamated sands near the canyon head yield OSL ages that are consistent with a sub-decadal recurrence frequency while the fining-upward sand sequences on the fan indicate that the channel is still experiencing events with a 150

  19. Breschini and Haversat, eds.: Analysis of South-Central California Shell Artifacts: Studies from Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Luis Obispo, and Santa Barbara Counties

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Richard E.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of South-Central Californian Shell Artifacts: Studies from Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Luis Obispo, and Santa Barbara Counties. Gary S. Breschmi and Trudy Haversat, eds. Salinas: Coyote Press Archives of California Prehistory No. 23, 1988, xiv + 105 pp., 21 figs., 28 tables, $8.70, (paper).

  20. 76 FR 28453 - Cesar Chavez Special Resource Study-Alameda, Fresno, Imperial, Kern, Los Angeles, Monterey...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    ... site for NPS Planning, Environment and Public Comment, and will be advertised in a newsletter which... National Park Service Cesar Chavez Special Resource Study--Alameda, Fresno, Imperial, Kern, Los Angeles..., Stanislaus, Tulare and Ventura Counties, CA, and Maricopa and Yuma Counties, AZ AGENCY: National Park...

  1. The elements of a consumer-based initiative in contributing to positive environmental change: Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemmerly, Jennifer Dianto; Macfarlane, Victoria

    2009-09-01

    Monterey Bay Aquarium launched the Seafood Watch program in 2000. The program's Seafood Watch pocket guide is a simple tool that visitors can use to identify seafood from environmentally responsible sources. Since its inception, more than 2 million pocket guides have been distributed to Monterey Bay Aquarium visitors and 20 million have been distributed through partnerships across the United States. Partner institutions such as aquariums, conservation organizations, and businesses also conduct outreach and are working to influence their local seafood purveyors. An evaluation conducted in 2003 and 2004 assessed the program's strategies for increasing awareness and shifting consumer buying habits as they relate to sustainable seafood, including use of the pocket guide. Visitors who picked up pocket guides were surveyed immediately after their aquarium visit, and again four months later. The evaluation found that most visitors continued to use the guides and had changed their seafood buying habits in several respects. Those interviewed also reported some barriers to using the guides. The elements that appear to be critical to the success of the strategy with respect to changing consumer purchasing habits include: a focused distribution approach; providing credible and specific information on problems and solutions to increase action-related knowledge; providing a trigger or prompt that is available at the time of purchase; and reducing barriers to action, at the point of action, by working with seafood purveyors and the broader sustainable seafood movement to increase knowledge and available options. In response to the evaluation, Seafood Watch has strengthened these elements and expanded to help meet the needs of the broader sustainable seafood movement. A process of strategic planning, evaluation, cooperation among partners, and adaptability to the movement's natural evolution has proven to be critical to the program's success in contributing to the development of a

  2. c180nc.m77t - MGD77 data file for Geophysical data from field activity C-1-80-NC in Monterey Bay, Northern California from 05/21/1980 to 05/22/1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with transit satellite navigation data was collected as part of field activity C-1-80-NC in Monterey Bay, Northern California from...

  3. Oceanographic data collected during the Davidson Seamount 2002 expedition on the RV Western Flyer, in the North Pacific Ocean, southwest of Monterey, California from May 17, 2002 - May 24, 2002 (NODC Accession 0072306)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This spring, scientists explored the first "undersea island" to be called a seamount. Davidson seamount, located 120 km Southwest of Monterey, California, is one of...

  4. c180nc.m77t - MGD77 data file for Geophysical data from field activity C-1-80-NC in Monterey Bay, Northern California from 05/21/1980 to 05/22/1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Single-beam bathymetry data along with transit satellite navigation data was collected as part of field activity C-1-80-NC in Monterey Bay, Northern California from...

  5. Generation of Department of Defense Architecture Framework (DODAF) Models Using the Monterey Phoenix Behavior Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING /MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center Pacific 53560 Hull Street San Diego ... Rivera 2009).The Rivera Group and NPS have executed a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) to share NPS source code and update... Diego , CA: International Council on Systems Engineering. Jackson, Daniel. 2012. Software Abstractions. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. Langford, Gary O

  6. Measurement of near-surface seismic compressional wave velocities using refraction tomography at a proposed construction site on the Presidio of Monterey, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Michael H.; Burton, Bethany L.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is determining the feasibility of constructing a new barracks building on the U.S. Army Presidio of Monterey in Monterey, California. Due to the presence of an endangered orchid in the proposed area, invasive techniques such as exploratory drill holes are prohibited. To aid in determining the feasibility, budget, and design of this building, a compressional-wave seismic refraction survey was proposed by the U.S. Geological Survey as an alternative means of investigating the depth to competent bedrock. Two sub-parallel profiles were acquired along an existing foot path and a fence line to minimize impacts on the endangered flora. The compressional-wave seismic refraction tomography data for both profiles indicate that no competent rock classified as non-rippable or marginally rippable exists within the top 30 feet beneath the ground surface.

  7. Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Cleanup Plan, Ford Ord, Monterey, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-25

    6 Oliver P. Bardin and 380.60 / Ada May Bardin 7 Benjamin Rush Bingaman 1,687.74 / 8 Margaret A. Jacks, et al 602.08 1 9 Luisa Guidotti, et al...2,036.39 1 10 Maria Antonia Field 563.19 1 11 Stephen Joseph Field 1,018.02 1 April 1944 Key: I = Undocumented o45.sj Fort Ord, California - 25 March 1994...40CA~rt. sall &"a dfts cltaned sip. not meeuml ulatory rc4ulmmew for l~amatblllty, reaclivity, crawoivity, or Toxicity far znhuImsow r Moastfasial sad

  8. Conference Proceedings: 14th Annual Review of Progress in Applied Computational Electromagnetics at the Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA, March 16-20, 1998. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-03-01

    iSH dl = ( "- 2- ..... ½., 1 +k m . ) + (s.am + b"-s , (I’m .. ½.o+± _½bs-4 , (19) = + ,k- , 339 /12 ൒ 7 dA nde centre 9 Figure 1: TLM cell with...on a vector propagating wave can be seen, e. g., by locally expanding the wave in terms of a generalized Wilcox expansion [24], [25] in terms of the...Lett. , vol. 8. no. 6, pp. 323-324. 1995. [251 C. H. Wilcox , "An expansion theorem for electromagnetic fields," Comm. Pure Appl. Math., vol. 9, pp.115

  9. The New Great Game: Chinese Views on Central Asia. Proceedings of the Central Asia Symposium held in Monterey, CA on August 7-11, 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-08-01

    030205_ce_forum01.pdf> 7. Shanghai group aims to keep U.S. in check, by Sergei Blagov, http://www. atimes.com . 8. Clifford Geertz , The Interpretation of... Geertz (1973) to describe the strategic implications of culture and 150 cultural interplay in a changing regional context and its implications for...as Geertz (1973) defines it, it is a set of symbolic systems that serves not only to define and identify the culture and social structures, but also

  10. NOAA Office for Coastal Management Coastal Inundation Digital Elevation Model: San Francisco Bay/Monterey (CA) WFO - Sonoma, Marin, Napa, and Solano Counties

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This digital elevation model (DEM) is a part of a series of DEMs produced for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office for Coastal Management's Sea...

  11. NOAA Office for Coastal Management Coastal Inundation Digital Elevation Model: San Francisco Bay/Monterey (CA) WFO - Contra Costa, San Francisco, Alameda, San Mateo, and Santa Clara Counties

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This digital elevation model (DEM) is a part of a series of DEMs produced for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office for Coastal Management's Sea...

  12. 16TH Annual Review of Progress in Applied Computational Electromagnetics at the Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA, March 20-24, 2000, Volume II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Masafumi Fujii**, Wolfgang J.R. Hoefer** *Dpto. Electricidad y Electr6nica. Univ. Valladolid 47011 Valladolid - SPAIN Tel: +34 983 423224 Fax: +34 983...Wolfgang J.R. Hoefer** *Dpto. Electricidad y Electr6nica. Univ. Valladolid 47011 Valladolid - SPAIN Tel: +34 983 423224 Fax: +34 983 423217 E-Mail

  13. Proceedings of the 7th Annual TARDEC Ground Vehicle Survivability Symposium, March 26-28, 1996, Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA Volume 1 - Unclassified Session Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-05-01

    Submitted J. Cardenas , U.S. Army TARDEC P-10 Ground Combat Vehicle Survivability Database Vol. 1 517 J. Olejar, C. Glausier, D. Brassard, K. Gantt, N. Funk... algebra . This change in methodology should go a long way toward alleviating the sampling problem that has been identi- fied in the IDA and SIRVICE studies

  14. Fusion calculations for 40Ca+40Ca, 48Ca+48Ca, 40Ca+48Ca and p+208Pb systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Zhang, Haifei; Bao, Xiaojun; Li, Junqing; Zhang, Hongfei

    2014-09-01

    The fusion cross sections of calcium isotopes and proton induced fusion have been calculated in terms of a coupled-channels formulation. Results indicated that there are big differences between the two fusion types. In the calculations of calcium isotopes fusion, the pair-transfer coupling has been applied in addition to the vibrational coupling, the combined effects showed that pair-transfer has played a significant role in the fusion process for the asymmetric 40Ca+48Ca system. The result of proton induced fusion for p+208Pb system successfully presents the fusion oscillation, which agrees with the experimental data rather well.

  15. Plankton in Monterey Bay: Optimization of optical sensor data from autonomous underwater vehicles with applications in plankton community composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyse, Diane E.

    Autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) equipped with oceanographic sensors demonstrate the capability to describe plankton communities in the marine environment. The vehicles collect data from the surface through the mixed layer for a variety of oceanographic parameters. The Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute operates the Dorado upper-water-column AUV. The Dorado AUV collects data for 32 size-classes, from 1.25 to 250 mum, using a laser in-situ scattering and transmissometry (LISST-100X) instrument. The objective of this study is to analyze data from AUVs and laboratory work to inform sampling methods with applications in targeting specific classes of plankton, particularly harmful algal bloom species. The results of this study show that specific combinations of LISST-100X size class channels can be combined to reconstruct fluorescence data. This project includes laboratory tests with monocultures of phytoplankton on both a backscattering sensor that detects chlorophyll at 695 nm and on the forward scattering LISST-100X sensor. The results show a linear relationship between backscattered chlorophyll concentration and cell density for four monocultures of phytoplankton. The forward scattering lab experiments show distinct organism signatures for three genera of phytoplankton tested as monocultures.

  16. Suspended particulate layers and internal waves over the southern Monterey Bay continental shelf: an important control on shelf mud belts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheriton, Olivia M.; McPhee-Shaw, Erika E.; Shaw, William J.; Stanton, Timothy P.; Bellingham, James G.; Storlazzi, Curt D.

    2014-01-01

    Physical and optical measurements taken over the mud belt on the southern continental shelf of Monterey Bay, California documented the frequent occurrence of suspended particulate matter features, the majority of which were detached from the seafloor, centered 9–33 m above the bed. In fall 2011, an automated profiling mooring and fixed instrumentation, including a thermistor chain and upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profiler, were deployed at 70 m depth for 5 weeks, and from 12 to 16 October a long-range autonomous underwater vehicle performed across-shelf transects. Individual SPM events were uncorrelated with local bed shear stress caused by surface waves and bottom currents. Nearly half of all observed SPM layers occurred during 1 week of the study, 9–16 October 2011, and were advected past the fixed profiling mooring by the onshore phase of semidiurnal internal tide bottom currents. At the start of the 9–16 October period, we observed intense near-bed vertical velocities capable of lifting particulates into the middle of the water column. This “updraft” event appears to have been associated with nonlinear adjustment of high-amplitude internal tides over the mid and outer shelf. These findings suggest that nonlinear internal tidal motions can erode material over the outer shelf and that, once suspended, this SPM can then be transported shoreward to the middle and shallow sections of the mud belt. This represents a fundamental broadening of our understanding of how shelf mud belts may be built up and sustained.

  17. Preliminary report on geology and ground water of the Pajaro Valley area, Santa Cruz and Monterey counties, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muir, K.S.

    1972-01-01

    The Pajaro Valley area, California, covering about 120 square miles, extends from the southern part of Santa Cruz County to several miles south of the county line into Monterey County. It borders the Pacific Ocean on the west and the Santa Cruz Mountains on the east. The city of Watsonville is the largest center of population. Deposits that range in age from Pliocene to Holocene make up the ground-water reservoir. These include, from oldest to youngest, the Purisima Formation, Aromas Red Sands of Allen (1946), terrace deposits, alluvium, and dune sand. These deposits underlie an area of about 80 square miles and have a maximum thickness of about 4,000 feet. The alluvium yields most of the water pumped from wells in the area. Pre-Pliocene rocks underlie and form the boundaries of the ground-water reservoir. These rocks contain ground water in fractures and in sandstone beds. However, they are not an important source of ground water. There is close continuity between the geology of the Pajaro Valley area and that of the Soquel-Aptos area, which is contiguous on the north. Ground water in the Pajaro Valley area is derived from three sources: (1) Precipitation within the Pajaro Valley area that reaches the ground-water body by direct infiltration or by seepage from streams, (2) seepage from the Pajaro River as it crosses the Pajaro Valley carrying runoff which originates upstream from the valley, and (3) precipitation in the Soquel-Aptos area that infiltrates and then moves southeastward at depth into the Pajaro Valley area. Ground water in most wells in the Pajaro Valley area occurs under confined (artesian) conditions; the only exception is ground water in the upper, near-surface part of the alluvium and that in the dune sand. It moves south from the north part of the area and southwest away from the San Andreas fault toward and out under Monterey Bay. In the south part of the area, ground-water movement is almost due west. The San Andreas fault probably is the only

  18. Quantifying the Impacts of Systemic Acquired Resistance to Pitch Canker on Monterey Pine Growth Rate and Hyperspectral Reflectance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J. Reynolds

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pitch canker, caused by Fusarium circinatum, is a disease affecting Monterey pine (Pinus radiata and many other pine species throughout the world. The impact of pitch canker on Pinus radiata may be limited by systemic acquired resistance (SAR, a phenomenon that elevates resistance to a pathogen after initial challenge by that pathogen or another microorganism. Allocation of resources to defense, as a consequence of SAR, is presumed to reduce resources available to support growth and reproduction, but specific fitness consequences associated with SAR in P. radiata have not been measured. To quantify impacts of SAR on growth rate, a 2 × 2 factorial experiment was established in which trees were either primed for SAR or unprimed, with half the trees in each of those two groups being inoculated with the pitch canker pathogen and the other half not inoculated. Priming for SAR was accomplished by inoculating one branch with F. circinatum and removing inoculated branches prior to subsequent challenge inoculations (= disease treatments. Disease treatments included three inoculations that were removed for measurement of lesion length, and three additional inoculations that remained on the tree as a representation of persistent disease. Control trees were mock inoculated with water. Main effects of priming and disease did not result in significant effects on growth rate. Based on hyperspectral canopy reflectance data, diseased trees were associated with higher difference vegetation index values and biomass. The absence of a negative impact on growth rate associated with SAR suggests that induction of resistance may have utility as a tool for management of pitch canker in plantations.

  19. The Ca(2+)/Calmodulin/CaMKK2 Axis: Nature's Metabolic CaMshaft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcelo, Kathrina L; Means, Anthony R; York, Brian

    2016-10-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) is an essential ligand that binds its primary intracellular receptor calmodulin (CaM) to trigger a variety of downstream processes and pathways. Central to the actions of Ca(2+)/CaM is the activation of a highly conserved Ca(2+)/CaM kinase (CaMK) cascade that amplifies Ca(2+) signals through a series of subsequent phosphorylation events. Proper regulation of Ca(2+) flux is necessary for whole-body metabolism and disruption of Ca(2+) homeostasis has been linked to various metabolic diseases. Here we provide a synthesis of recent advances that highlight the roles of the Ca(2+)/CaMK axis in key metabolic tissues. An appreciation of this information is critical to understanding the mechanisms by which Ca(2+)/CaM-dependent signaling contributes to metabolic homeostasis and disease.

  20. Annual Gaseous Electronics Conference (38th) Held at Monterey, California on 15-18 October 1985. Program and Abstracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-18

    U. of Bar, J. Bretagne , Internat’l Co U. de Paris-Sud, M. Bacal, Ecole Poly- technique, France TUESDAY AFTERNOON, 15 OCTOBER CA-11 ELECTRON...Chem. Phys., 73, 99 CA-10 Vibrational excitation in magnet" multicusp H2 discharges. C. GORSE, M. CAPITELLIP University of Bari, J. BRETAGNE ...il BRATES, N., DB-4 ESKIN, L.D., CB-8, CB-9 BRETAGNE , J., CA-1O BURROW, P.D., DA-3, DA-4 F C FALCONE, R., B-3 FERGUSON, E.E., EA-i CALEDONIA, G.E

  1. Structural characterization of the fracture systems in the porcelanites: Comparing data from the Monterey Formation in California USA and the Sap Bon Formation in Central Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanjanapayont, Pitsanupong; Aydin, Atilla; Wongseekaew, Kanitsorn; Maneelok, Wichanee

    2016-09-01

    The fractures in the porcelanites from the Monterey Formation in California USA and the Sap Bon Formation in Central Thailand were documented for a comparative study of their modes, distribution, and their relationship to other structures such as folds and bedding planes. Both formations consist in thinly bedded stiff units that are prone to folding, flexural slip, and cross-bedding brittle fracturing under compression. There are two assemblages in the porcelanites. The first assemblage includes commonly vertical high-angle opening mode fractures, left-lateral strike-slip faults, normal faults, and thrust faults. The second one is sub-horizontal fractures which are associated with folds, bedding slip, and thrusts faults in both Monterey and Sap Bon formations. The structural architectures of these rocks and the associated groups of structures are remarkably similar in terms of both opening and shearing modes and their relationships with the bedding due to their depositional architecture and the compressional tectonic regimes, in spite of the fact that the two locations are more than ten thousand kilometers apart and have very different ages of deformation.

  2. Across-shore variability in plankton layering and abundance associated with physical forcing in Monterey Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevadjian, J. C.; McManus, M. A.; Ryan, J.; Greer, A. T.; Cowen, R. K.; Woodson, C. B.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to further our understanding of the role of the coastal physical oceanographic environment as a dynamic and constantly evolving habitat for plankton. Over a 3-week period in the summer of 2010, an array of moorings were deployed and shipboard and autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) surveys were conducted to investigate the association between physical processes and plankton distributions over the Monterey Bay, California inner shelf. Acoustic backscatter, chlorophyll-a fluorescence, and high-resolution zooplankton imagery data collected during the shipboard surveys were used to map the distributions of phytoplankton and zooplankton; and profiles of temperature, salinity, oxygen, and nitrate from the AUV characterized the physical and chemical environment. A synthesis of underway and moored time series data provided insight into the histories of water masses in the area, and facilitated tracking of internal wave groups as they propagated towards shore. A near-bottom intrusion of recently-upwelled water was found to be strongly influenced by the diurnal tide, resulting in daily across-shelf excursions past the mooring array at the 20-m isobath. Behind the leading edge of the intrusion, the water column was highly stratified in temperature, salinity, oxygen, and nitrate; and thin layers of phytoplankton and zooplankton persisted at the upper boundary of the intrusion. In ambient waters shoreward of the intrusion, stratification was weak; copepod, appendicularian, and gelatinous zooplankton abundances were relatively low; and phytoplankton and acoustic backscatter were broadly distributed throughout the lower half of the water column. The arrival of two shoreward-propagating internal wave groups observed during the shipboard survey corresponded with disparate responses in plankton distribution. In the wake of the first wave group, phytoplankton and zooplankton layers thinned or converged; in the wake of the second wave group, an eight

  3. Variability of the internal tide on the southern Monterey Bay continental shelf and associated bottom boundary layer sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Kurt J.; Storlazzi, Curt D.; Cheriton, Olivia M.

    2016-06-01

    A 6-month deployment of instrumentation from April to October 2012 in 90 m water depth near the outer edge of the mid-shelf mud belt in southern Monterey Bay, California, reveals the importance regional upwelling on water column density structure, potentially accounting for the majority of the variability in internal tidal energy flux across the shelf. Observations consisted of time-series measurements of water-column currents, temperature and salinity, and near-bed currents and suspended matter. The internal tide accounted for 15-25% of the water-column current variance and the barotropic tide accounted for up to 35%. The subtidal flow showed remarkably little shear and was dominated by the 7-14 day band, which is associated with relaxations in the dominant equatorward winds typical of coastal California in the spring and summer. Upwelling and relaxation events resulted in strong near-bed flows and accounted for almost half of the current stress on the seafloor (not accounting for wave orbital velocities), and may have driven along-shelf geostrophic flow during steady state conditions. Several elevated suspended particulate matter (SPM) events occurred within 3 m of the bed and were generally associated with higher, long-period surface waves. However, these peaks in SPM did not coincide with the predicted resuspension events from the modeled combined wave-current shear stress, indicating that the observed SPM at our site was most likely resuspended elsewhere and advected along-isobath. Sediment flux was almost equal in magnitude in the alongshore and cross-shore directions. Instances of wave-current shear stress that exceeded the threshold of resuspension for the silty-clays common at these water depths only occurred when near-bed orbital velocities due to long-period surface waves coincided with vigorous near-bed currents associated with the internal tide or upwelling/relaxation events. Thus upwelling/relaxation dynamics are primarily responsible for variability

  4. Variability of the internal tide on the southern Monterey Bay continental shelf and associated bottom boundary layer sediment transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Kurt; Storlazzi, Curt; Cheriton, Olivia

    2016-01-01

    A 6-month deployment of instrumentation from April to October 2012 in 90 m water depth near the outer edge of the mid-shelf mud belt in southern Monterey Bay, California, reveals the importance regional upwelling on water column density structure, potentially accounting for the majority of the variability in internal tidal energy flux across the shelf. Observations consisted of time-series measurements of water-column currents, temperature and salinity, and near-bed currents and suspended matter. The internal tide accounted for 15–25% of the water-column current variance and the barotropic tide accounted for up to 35%. The subtidal flow showed remarkably little shear and was dominated by the 7–14 day band, which is associated with relaxations in the dominant equatorward winds typical of coastal California in the spring and summer. Upwelling and relaxation events resulted in strong near-bed flows and accounted for almost half of the current stress on the seafloor (not accounting for wave orbital velocities), and may have driven along-shelf geostrophic flow during steady state conditions. Several elevated suspended particulate matter (SPM) events occurred within 3 m of the bed and were generally associated with higher, long-period surface waves. However, these peaks in SPM did not coincide with the predicted resuspension events from the modeled combined wave–current shear stress, indicating that the observed SPM at our site was most likely resuspended elsewhere and advected along-isobath. Sediment flux was almost equal in magnitude in the alongshore and cross-shore directions. Instances of wave–current shear stress that exceeded the threshold of resuspension for the silty-clays common at these water depths only occurred when near-bed orbital velocities due to long-period surface waves coincided with vigorous near-bed currents associated with the internal tide or upwelling/relaxation events. Thus upwelling/relaxation dynamics are primarily responsible for

  5. Status and understanding of groundwater quality in the Monterey Bay and Salinas Valley Basins, 2005-California GAMA Priority Basin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Groundwater quality in the approximately 1,000 square mile (2,590 km2) Monterey Bay and Salinas Valley Basins (MS) study unit was investigated as part of the Priority Basin Project of the Groundwater Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) Program. The study unit is located in central California in Monterey, Santa Cruz, and San Luis Obispo Counties. The GAMA Priority Basin Project is being conducted by the California State Water Resources Control Board in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The GAMA MS study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of the quality of untreated (raw) groundwater in the primary aquifer systems (hereinafter referred to as primary aquifers). The assessment is based on water-quality and ancillary data collected in 2005 by the USGS from 97 wells and on water-quality data from the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) database. The primary aquifers were defined by the depth intervals of the wells listed in the CDPH database for the MS study unit. The quality of groundwater in the primary aquifers may be different from that in the shallower or deeper water-bearing zones; shallow groundwater may be more vulnerable to surficial contamination. The first component of this study, the status of the current quality of the groundwater resource, was assessed by using data from samples analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOC), pesticides, and naturally occurring inorganic constituents, such as major ions and trace elements. This status assessment is intended to characterize the quality of groundwater resources in the primary aquifers of the MS study unit, not the treated drinking water delivered to consumers by water purveyors. Relative-concentrations (sample concentration divided by the health- or aesthetic-based benchmark concentration) were used for evaluating groundwater quality for those constituents that have Federal and (or) California regulatory or

  6. 有关CA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ 什么是CA? CA(Certificaton Authority)是认证机构的国际通称,是指对数字证书的申请者发放、管理、取消数字证书的机构.CA的作用是检查证书持有者身份的合法性,并签发证书(在证书上签字),以防证书被伪造或篡改.

  7. Repeated 1-cm Resolution Topographic and 2.5-mm Resolution Photomosiac Surveys of Benthic Communities and Fine Scale Bedforms in Monterey Canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caress, D. W.; Hobson, B.; Thomas, H. J.; Henthorn, R.; Martin, E. J.; Bird, L.; Risi, M.; Troni, G.; Paull, C. K.; Rock, S.; Padial, J. A.; Hammond, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute has developed a low altitude, ROV-based seafloor mapping system that combines lidar laser ranging, multibeam sonar, and stereo photographic imagery. When operated at a 3-m altitude, this system maps seafloor topography with a 1-cm lateral resolution and simultaneously collects 2.5-mm resolution color photography. We have twice mapped an 80-m by 80-m area of a chemosynthetic clam community located at 2850-m depth in the Monterey Canyon axis. Both the topography and the photomosaics resolve changes in the clam community over a six-month interval. Many individual animals have moved, and tracks of those animals are visible in the lidar topography. No other changes in the seafloor at this site can be discerned. We have also performed single surveys of bedforms and scours at both 1850-m and 2850-m depths in Monterey Canyon. The highest resolution bathymetry data are collected using a 3DatDepth SL1 lidar laser scanner. This system has a 30° field of view and ranges continuously, achieving a 1 cm sounding spacing at a 3 m altitude and 0.3 m/s speed. Bathymetry data are also collected using a 400-kHz Reson 7125 multibeam sonar. This configuration produces 512 beams across a 135° wide swath; each beam has a 0.5° acrosstrack by 1.0° alongtrack angular width. At a 3-m altitude, the nadir beams have a 2.5 cm acrosstrack and 5 cm alongtrack footprint. Dual Prosilica GX1920 2.4 Mpixel color cameras provide color stereo photography of the seafloor. Illumination is provided by dual xenon strobes. The camera housings have been fitted with corrective optics achieving a 90° field of view with less than 1% distortion. At a 3-m altitude the raw image pixels have a 2.5 mm resolution. Position and attitude data are provided by a Kearfott SeaDevil Inertial Navigation System (INS) integrated with a 300 kHz Teledyne RD Instruments Doppler velocity log (DVL). A separate Paroscientific pressure sensor is mounted adjacent to the INS. The INS

  8. Topological organization of CA3-to-CA1 excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Yoshie; Ogawa, Koichi; Takahara, Yuji; Takasu, Keiko; Royer, Sebastien; Hasegawa, Minoru; Sakaguchi, Gaku; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2015-09-01

    The CA1-projecting axons of CA3 pyramidal cells, called Schaffer collaterals, constitute one of the major information flow routes in the hippocampal formation. Recent anatomical studies have revealed the non-random structural connectivity between CA3 and CA1, but little is known regarding the functional connectivity (i.e. how CA3 network activity is functionally transmitted downstream to the CA1 network). Using functional multi-neuron calcium imaging of rat hippocampal slices, we monitored the spatiotemporal patterns of spontaneous CA3 and CA1 burst activity under pharmacological GABAergic blockade. We found that spatially clustered CA3 activity patterns were transformed into layered CA1 activity sequences. Specifically, synchronized bursts initiated from multiple hot spots in CA3 ensembles, and CA1 neurons located deeper in the pyramidal cell layer were recruited during earlier phases of the burst events. The order of these sequential activations was maintained across the bursts, but the sequence velocity varied depending on the inter-burst intervals. Thus, CA3 axons innervate CA1 neurons in a highly topographical fashion.

  9. Biomarker CA125

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kargo, Anette Stolberg

    be detected months before symptoms arise and recurrence is visible on imaging. Therefore, biochemical detection of potential relapse by CA125 assessment can cause significant distress. A decision aid (DA) is a tool that provides information and describes advantages and disadvantages of a specific intervention...

  10. Monterey Bay Geoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    B.C. (Dragomir et al. 1982) It was from these early studies of the earth’s shape and size that the study of the earth’s gravity began. Galileo Galilei ...feel the earth’s gravitational acceleration but not the centrifugal acceleration. The traditional unit of gravity is the gal, from Galileo , 1 gal - 1

  11. Electrodeposition of Ca Metal in CaCl2-CaO Molten Salt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO; Jun-kang; WANG; Chang-shui; CAO; Long-hao; OUYANG; Ying-gen

    2013-01-01

    To realize the continuouscalciothermic reduction in molten salts,the electrodeposition behavior of Ca metal in CaCl2-CaO molten salt was investigated by cylic voltammetry.The cyclic voltammograms at the scan rate of 100 mV/s are shown in Fig.1.As is shown,the electrodeposition potential of Ca deviated from-1.66 V to-0.97 V after CaO was added to molten CaCl2 and the decomposition of CaO

  12. Investigation of late Pleistocene and Holocene activity in the San Gregorio fault zone on the continental slope north of Monterey Canyon, offshore central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Katherine L.; Paull, Charles K.; Brothers, Daniel; Caress, David W.; McGann, Mary; Lundsten, Eve M.; Anderson, Krystle; Gwiazda, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    We provide an extensive high‐resolution geophysical, sediment core, and radiocarbon dataset to address late Pleistocene and Holocene fault activity of the San Gregorio fault zone (SGFZ), offshore central California. The SGFZ occurs primarily offshore in the San Andreas fault system and has been accommodating dextral strike‐slip motion between the Pacific and North American plates since the mid‐Miocene. Our study focuses on the SGFZ where it has been mapped through the continental slope north of Monterey Canyon. From 2009 to 2015, the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute collected high‐resolution multibeam bathymetry and chirp sub‐bottom profiles using an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV). Targeted samples were collected using a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to provide radiocarbon age constraints. We integrate the high‐resolution geophysical data with radiocarbon dates to reveal Pleistocene seismic horizons vertically offset less than 5 m on nearly vertical faults. These faults are buried by continuous reflections deposited after ∼17.5  ka and likely following erosion during the last sea‐level lowstand ∼21  ka, bracketing the age of faulting to ∼32–21  ka. Clearly faulted horizons are only detected in a small area where mass wasting exhumed older strata to within ∼25  m of the seafloor. The lack of clearly faulted Holocene deposits and possible highly distributed faulting in the study area are consistent with previous interpretations that late Pleistocene and Holocene activity along the SGFZ may decrease to the south. This study illustrates the complexity of the SGFZ, offshore central California, and demonstrates the utility of very high‐resolution data from combined AUV (geophysical)–ROV (seabed sampling) surveys in offshore studies of fault activity.

  13. Sulfide capacities of CaO-CaF2-CaCl2 melts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, Simeon; Sakai, Toshihiko; Maeda, Masafumi

    1992-06-01

    The sulfide capacityC_{s^{2 - } } = ({text{pct S}}^{{text{2 - }}} )(p_{{text{O}}_{text{2}} } /p_{{text{S}}_{text{2}} } )^{1/2} ) of CaO-CaF2-CaCl2 slag was determined at temperatures from 1000 °C to 1300 °C by equilibrating molten slag, molten silver, and CO-CO2-Ar gas mixture. The sulfide capacity increases with replacing CaCl2 by CaF2 in slags of constant CaO contents. The sulfide capacity also increases with increasing temperature as well as with increasing CaO content at a constant ratio of CaF2/CaCl2 of unity. A linear relationship between the sulfide capacity and carbonate capacity in literature was observed on a logarithmic scale.

  14. Currents, temperature, conductivity, pressure, sigma-theta, and attenuation data from moorings deployed in Monterey Bay from platforms WILLIAM A. MCGAW, NOAA Ship McARTHUR, and POINT SUR from 1995-05-16 to 1998-08-17 (NCEI Accession 0067571)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary data were part of a large, multi-disciplinary experiment to characterize the Sanctuary's geologic environment. These data...

  15. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the THOMAS WASHINGTON in the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1991-05-31 to 1991-07-11 (NODC Accession 0115000)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115000 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from THOMAS WASHINGTON in the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary,...

  16. [Carbohydrate antigens CA 19-9, CA 242, CA 50 in liver diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, J; Jakubowska, D; Wiczkowski, A; Sprzaczkowska, K; Stechły, T; Zmudziński, W; Grzesik, P; Walas, R; Jarzab, B

    1998-01-01

    Serum concentrations of CA 19-9, CA 242, and CA 50 were determined in patients with hepatitis and liver cirrhosis without cholestasis. The study included 63 patients with chronic persistent hepatitis (group A), chronic active hepatitis (group B), and liver cirrhosis (group C). The control group (K) consisted of 82 patients with: peptic ulcer, colorectal polypi or diverticulosis of the colon. CA 19-9 level normal in the majority of patients with liver diseases, however, it was found to be increased in 4 (23%) of patients with liver cirrhosis. There was no statistically significant difference in the frequency of increased level of CA 19-9 between liver diseases and the control group. The rate of elevated serum level of CA 242 in patients with liver diseases and in control group was similar respectively 12%; 8.5%). The elevated CA 50 levels were most frequently found in patients with liver pathology (50% in liver cirrhosis and chronic active hepatitis; 36% in chronic persistent hepatitis). The elevation of CA 50 serum level occurs very often in liver diseases, even when they are going without cholestasis. Thus, the antigen is not useful for differentiating between benign and cancer diseases of gastrointestinal tract. Antigen CA 50 is to be taken into account only after exclusion of the pathology of liver, especially cirrhosis. Other investigated antigens: CA 19-9 and CA 242 are influenced by liver diseases to a minor and neglectable extent. Antigen CA 19-9 is the marker of choice in gastrointestinal cancers.

  17. Ground-Water Quality Data in the Monterey Bay and Salinas Valley Basins, California, 2005 - Results from the California GAMA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulongoski, Justin T.; Belitz, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    Ground-water quality in the approximately 1,000-square-mile Monterey Bay and Salinas Valley study unit was investigated from July through October 2005 as part of the California Ground-Water Ambient Monitoring and Assessment (GAMA) program. The study was designed to provide a spatially unbiased assessment of raw ground-water quality, as well as a statistically consistent basis for comparing water quality throughout California. Samples were collected from 94 public-supply wells and 3 monitoring wells in Monterey, Santa Cruz, and San Luis Obispo Counties. Ninety-one of the public-supply wells sampled were selected to provide a spatially distributed, randomized monitoring network for statistical representation of the study area. Six wells were sampled to evaluate changes in water chemistry: three wells along a ground-water flow path were sampled to evaluate lateral changes, and three wells at discrete depths from land surface were sampled to evaluate changes in water chemistry with depth from land surface. The ground-water samples were analyzed for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), pesticides, pesticide degradates, nutrients, major and minor ions, trace elements, radioactivity, microbial indicators, and dissolved noble gases (the last in collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory). Naturally occurring isotopes (tritium, carbon-14, helium-4, and the isotopic composition of oxygen and hydrogen) also were measured to help identify the source and age of the sampled ground water. In total, 270 constituents and water-quality indicators were investigated for this study. This study did not attempt to evaluate the quality of water delivered to consumers; after withdrawal from the ground, water typically is treated, disinfected, and (or) blended with other waters to maintain water quality. In addition, regulatory thresholds apply to treated water that is served to the consumer, not to raw ground water. In this study, only six constituents, alpha radioactivity, N

  18. 美国MARS海底观测网络中国节点试验%Test China Node on Monterey Accelerated Research System(MARS)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭晓彤; 冯正平; 李德平; 周怀阳; 吴邦春; 吕枫; 吴正伟; 杨灿军; 李培良; 李德俊; 金波

    2011-01-01

    MARS海底观测网络是国际深海海底观测网络组网设备的主要试验场所。2011年4月21日,由接驳盒子系统、海底化学环境监测子系统和海底动力环境监测子系统等海底观测网络组网设备组成的中国节点与美国MARS海底观测网络主节点成功接并,检测和考验了我国深海海底观测网络组网关键设备的主要性能,中国成为第三个在MARS网上进行大规模组网设备测试的国家。到目前为止,中国节点在MARS网上的运行稳定,正源源不断从美国蒙特利湾海底传回各种观测数据,表明我国深海海底观测网络组网关键技术已取得了重要突破,基本达到了实际应用水平。实时、高分辨率和海量的数据特征为开展海洋科学研究提供了宝贵的资料,显示了利用海底观测网络开展海洋科学研究的巨大优势。%Monterey Accelerated Research System(MARS) is a main test bed for the deep-sea observatory instruments in the world.On April 14 th,2011,a China node,which consists of a junction box,a chemical environment system and a dynamical environment system,was installed on MARS successfully by R/V Western Flyer,R/V Point Lobos and ROV Ventana for long-term test at the seafloor of Monterey Bay.China became the third country who tested her deep-sea observatory instruments on MARS on a large scale.Up to date,China node works well on MARS.The instruments of China node are sending data back from the seafloor of Monterey Bay.China node test on MARS shows that Chinese observatory technologies have had great progresses in the recent four years,which can be applied to the construction of the deep-sea observatory in China.Real-time data from China node will benefit marine research and show great advantages of deep-sea observatory.

  19. Sonoma County, CA, 2013 Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Sonoma County Vegetation Mapping and LiDAR Consortium retained WSI to provide lidar and Orthophoto data and derived products in Sonoma County, CA. A classified LAS...

  20. CA125 in ovarian cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duffy, M J; Bonfrer, J M; Kulpa, J

    2005-01-01

    value in the detection of early ovarian cancer. At present, therefore, CA125, either alone or in combination with other modalities, cannot be recommended for screening for ovarian cancer in asymptomatic women outside the context of a randomized controlled trial. Preoperative levels in postmenopausal...... women, however, may aid the differentiation of benign and malignant pelvic masses. Serial levels during chemotherapy for ovarian cancer are useful for assessing response to treatment. Although serial monitoring following initial chemotherapy can lead to the early detection of recurrent disease......CA125 is currently the most widely used tumor marker for ovarian epithelial cancer. The aim of this article is to provide guidelines for the routine clinical use of CA125 in patients with ovarian cancer. Due to lack of sensitivity for stage I disease and lack of specificity, CA125 is of little...

  1. Relationships between the distribution and stable isotopic composition of living benthic foraminifera and cold methane seep biogeochemistry in Monterey Bay, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathburn, Anthony E.; PéRez, M. Elena; Martin, Jonathan B.; Day, Shelley A.; Mahn, Chris; Gieskes, Joris; Ziebis, Wiebke; Williams, David; Bahls, Amanda

    2003-12-01

    As part of an ongoing effort to explore the use of foraminifera as a means to assess modern and ancient methane release, we compared ambient pore water chemistry with the distribution and stable isotopic composition of living (rose Bengal stained) foraminifera in MBARI ROV Ventana tube cores taken from modern seepage areas (about 1000 m water depth) in Monterey Bay, California. Benthic foraminiferal isotopic differences between sites clearly indicate that methane-influenced pore waters affect foraminiferal distributions and carbonate isotope geochemistry. Carbon isotope signatures of living benthic foraminifera did not conform to the very negative (-30 to -48‰), methane-influenced carbon isotope values of the pore waters they live in. Instead, the influence of methane seep pore waters was reflected in the greater range and carbon isotopic variability of living seep foraminifera compared with published δ13C values of foraminifera living in nonseep habitats. It is not clear what relative influences biological, ecological, and physical factors have on the carbon isotopic signatures observed in seep foraminifera. Substantial carbon isotope differences can exist between individuals of the same seep species. For instance, δ13C values of living Globobulimina pacifica varied by as much as 2.9‰ between seeps within 8 km of each other, whereas δ13C values of living Uvigerina peregrina varied by as much as 1.95‰ within the same seep. Provided there is no diagenetic alteration of the test carbonate, isotopic results of individual seep foraminifera support the hypothesis that foraminifera can be used to assess past and present methane seepage.

  2. Managing small-scale commercial fisheries for adaptive capacity: insights from dynamic social-ecological drivers of change in Monterey Bay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stacy E Aguilera

    Full Text Available Globally, small-scale fisheries are influenced by dynamic climate, governance, and market drivers, which present social and ecological challenges and opportunities. It is difficult to manage fisheries adaptively for fluctuating drivers, except to allow participants to shift effort among multiple fisheries. Adapting to changing conditions allows small-scale fishery participants to survive economic and environmental disturbances and benefit from optimal conditions. This study explores the relative influence of large-scale drivers on shifts in effort and outcomes among three closely linked fisheries in Monterey Bay since the Magnuson-Stevens Fisheries Conservation and Management Act of 1976. In this region, Pacific sardine (Sardinops sagax, northern anchovy (Engraulis mordax, and market squid (Loligo opalescens fisheries comprise a tightly linked system where shifting focus among fisheries is a key element to adaptive capacity and reduced social and ecological vulnerability. Using a cluster analysis of landings, we identify four modes from 1974 to 2012 that are dominated (i.e., a given species accounting for the plurality of landings by squid, sardine, anchovy, or lack any dominance, and seven points of transition among these periods. This approach enables us to determine which drivers are associated with each mode and each transition. Overall, we show that market and climate drivers are predominantly attributed to dominance transitions. Model selection of external drivers indicates that governance phases, reflected as perceived abundance, dictate long-term outcomes. Our findings suggest that globally, small-scale fishery managers should consider enabling shifts in effort among fisheries and retaining existing flexibility, as adaptive capacity is a critical determinant for social and ecological resilience.

  3. Managing small-scale commercial fisheries for adaptive capacity: insights from dynamic social-ecological drivers of change in Monterey Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Stacy E; Cole, Jennifer; Finkbeiner, Elena M; Le Cornu, Elodie; Ban, Natalie C; Carr, Mark H; Cinner, Joshua E; Crowder, Larry B; Gelcich, Stefan; Hicks, Christina C; Kittinger, John N; Martone, Rebecca; Malone, Daniel; Pomeroy, Carrie; Starr, Richard M; Seram, Sanah; Zuercher, Rachel; Broad, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Globally, small-scale fisheries are influenced by dynamic climate, governance, and market drivers, which present social and ecological challenges and opportunities. It is difficult to manage fisheries adaptively for fluctuating drivers, except to allow participants to shift effort among multiple fisheries. Adapting to changing conditions allows small-scale fishery participants to survive economic and environmental disturbances and benefit from optimal conditions. This study explores the relative influence of large-scale drivers on shifts in effort and outcomes among three closely linked fisheries in Monterey Bay since the Magnuson-Stevens Fisheries Conservation and Management Act of 1976. In this region, Pacific sardine (Sardinops sagax), northern anchovy (Engraulis mordax), and market squid (Loligo opalescens) fisheries comprise a tightly linked system where shifting focus among fisheries is a key element to adaptive capacity and reduced social and ecological vulnerability. Using a cluster analysis of landings, we identify four modes from 1974 to 2012 that are dominated (i.e., a given species accounting for the plurality of landings) by squid, sardine, anchovy, or lack any dominance, and seven points of transition among these periods. This approach enables us to determine which drivers are associated with each mode and each transition. Overall, we show that market and climate drivers are predominantly attributed to dominance transitions. Model selection of external drivers indicates that governance phases, reflected as perceived abundance, dictate long-term outcomes. Our findings suggest that globally, small-scale fishery managers should consider enabling shifts in effort among fisheries and retaining existing flexibility, as adaptive capacity is a critical determinant for social and ecological resilience.

  4. Cathodic behavior of molten CaCl2-CaO and CaCl2-NaCl-CaO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Lan; Wang, Wei; Li, Shi-Chao; Cao, Shan-Hui

    2010-12-01

    The cathodic behavior of molten CaCl2, CaCl2-CaO and equimolar CaCl2-NaCl-CaO was studied by cyclic voltammograms and constant potential polarization at temperatures of 1123 to 1173 K on molybdenum and titanium electrodes. The diffusion coefficient of Ca2+ (CaO) in molten CaCl2-CaO was calculated from the linear relationship between the square root of scan rate and the peak current density. The deposition potentials and the potential temperature coefficient of CaO in molten CaCl2-0.5mol%CaO and CaCl2-NaCl-0.5mol%CaO were also obtained from their cyclic voltammograms. The result shows that CaO is more easily reduced than CaCl2. The addition of NaCl in molten CaCl2-CaO induces the underpotential electrodeposition of CaO.

  5. The site of net absorption of Ca from the intestinal tract of growing pigs and effect of phytic acid, Ca level and Ca source on Ca digestibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Vega, J Caroline; Walk, Carrie L; Liu, Yanhong; Stein, Hans H

    2014-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to test the hypothesis that the standardised digestibility of Ca in calcium carbonate and Lithothamnium calcareum Ca is not different regardless of the level of dietary Ca, and that phytic acid affects the digestibility of Ca in these two ingredients to the same degree. The objectives were to determine where in the intestinal tract Ca absorption takes place and if there are measurable quantities of basal endogenous Ca fluxes in the stomach, small intestine or large intestine. Diets contained calcium carbonate or L. calcareum Ca as the sole source of Ca, 0% or 1% phytic acid and 0.4% or 0.8% Ca. A Ca-free diet was also formulated and used to measure endogenous fluxes and losses of Ca. Nine growing pigs (initial body weight 23.8 ± 1.3 kg) were cannulated in the duodenum and in the distal ileum, and faecal, ileal and duodenal samples were collected. Duodenal endogenous fluxes of Ca were greater (p phytic acid, but decreased (p phytic acid, but may be affected by dietary Ca level depending on the Ca source. Calcium from calcium carbonate is mostly absorbed before the duodenum, but Ca from L. calcareum Ca is mostly absorbed in the jejunum and ileum.

  6. CA on CD评析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周秀会

    2007-01-01

    结合作者使用 CA On CD 的经验和体会,全面而具体地分析了 CA on CD 的使用功能,明确了其优点及不足之处,同时,针对这些不足之处进行了探索和尝试,提出了利用检索技巧解决这些不足之处的方法。并结合实例详细说明。

  7. The diagnostic value of joint detection of serum CA19-9, CA125 and CA242 for cholangiocarcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Da-Peng; Han Lei; Liu Zhen-Xian; Yang He; Zhang Ying-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the diagnostic value of joint detection of serum CA19-9, CA125 and CA242 for cholangiocarcinoma.Methods:A total of 35 patients with cholangiocarcinoma who received surgical resection in our hospital were selected as malignant group, 30 patients with cholelithiasis who received surgical resection in our hospital during the same period were selected as benign group, serum samples were collected before surgery to determine CA19-9, CA125 and CA242 content, and cholangiocarcinoma tissue and normal bile duct tissue were collected after surgery to determine the content of proliferation and invasion molecules. Results:Serum CA19-9, CA125 and CA242 levels of malignant group were significantly higher than those of control group; PROX-1, Ki-67, Bcl-2, Bad, Gab1, LOXL2, TRPM7 and CXCL12 levels in cholangiocarcinoma tissue were higher than those in benign bile duct tissue, and E-cadherin level was lower than that in benign bile duct tissue; serum CA19-9, CA125 and CA242 levels were positively correlated with PROX-1, Ki-67, Bcl-2, Bad, Gab1, LOXL2, TRPM7 and CXCL12 levels, and negatively correlated with E-cadherin level.Conclusion:Joint detection of serum CA19-9, CA125 and CA242 can not only provide reference for the diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma, but can also provide basis for the evaluation of proliferation, invasion and other malignant biological behaviors.

  8. Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2005-09-29

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were

  9. Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2006-06-30

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were

  10. Use of Cutting-Edge Horizontal and Underbalanced Drilling Technologies and Subsurface Seismic Techniques to Explore, Drill and Produce Reservoired Oil and Gas from the Fractured Monterey Below 10,000 ft in the Santa Maria Basin of California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2005-09-29

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper curved sections were

  11. USE OF CUTTING-EDGE HORIZONTAL AND UNDERBALANCED DRILLING TECHNOLOGIES AND SUBSURFACE SEISMIC TECHNIQUES TO EXPLORE, DRILL AND PRODUCE RESERVOIRED OIL AND GAS FROM THE FRACTURED MONTEREY BELOW 10,000 FT IN THE SANTA MARIA BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2005-02-01

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area by Temblor Petroleum with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper

  12. USE OF CUTTING-EDGE HORIZONTAL AND UNDERBALANCED DRILLING TECHNOLOGIES AND SUBSURFACE SEISMIC TECHNIQUES TO EXPLORE, DRILL AND PRODUCE RESERVOIRED OIL AND GAS FROM THE FRACTURED MONTEREY BELOW 10,000 FT IN THE SANTA MARIA BASIN OF CALIFORNIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Witter; Robert Knoll; William Rehm; Thomas Williams

    2005-02-01

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate that oil and gas can be drilled and produced safely and economically from a fractured Monterey reservoir in the Santa Maria Basin of California by employing horizontal wellbores and underbalanced drilling technologies. Two vertical wells were previously drilled in this area by Temblor Petroleum with heavy mud and conventional completions; neither was commercially productive. A new well was drilled by the project team in 2004 with the objective of accessing an extended length of oil-bearing, high-resistivity Monterey shale via a horizontal wellbore, while implementing managed-pressure drilling (MPD) techniques to avoid formation damage. Initial project meetings were conducted in October 2003. The team confirmed that the demonstration well would be completed open-hole to minimize productivity impairment. Following an overview of the geologic setting and local field experience, critical aspects of the application were identified. At the pre-spud meeting in January 2004, the final well design was confirmed and the well programming/service company requirements assigned. Various design elements were reduced in scope due to significant budgetary constraints. Major alterations to the original plan included: (1) a VSP seismic survey was delayed to a later phase; (2) a new (larger) surface hole would be drilled rather than re-enter an existing well; (3) a 7-in. liner would be placed into the top of the Monterey target as quickly as possible to avoid problems with hole stability; (4) evaluation activities were reduced in scope; (5) geosteering observations for fracture access would be deduced from penetration rate, cuttings description and hydrocarbon in-flow; and (6) rather than use nitrogen, a novel air-injection MPD system was to be implemented. Drilling operations, delayed from the original schedule by capital constraints and lack of rig availability, were conducted from September 12 to November 11, 2004. The vertical and upper

  13. Short-term variability of 7Be atmospheric deposition and watershed response in a Pacific coastal stream, Monterey Bay, California, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaway, Christopher H; Storlazzi, Curt D; Draut, Amy E; Swarzenski, Peter W

    2013-06-01

    Beryllium-7 is a powerful and commonly used tracer for environmental processes such as watershed sediment provenance, soil erosion, fluvial and nearshore sediment cycling, and atmospheric fallout. However, few studies have quantified temporal or spatial variability of (7)Be accumulation from atmospheric fallout, and parameters that would better define the uses and limitations of this geochemical tracer. We investigated the abundance and variability of (7)Be in atmospheric deposition in both rain events and dry periods, and in stream surface-water samples collected over a ten-month interval at sites near northern Monterey Bay (37°N, 122°W) on the central California coast, a region characterized by a rainy winters, dry summers, and small mountainous streams with flashy hydrology. The range of (7)Be activity in rainwater samples from the main sampling site was 1.3-4.4 Bq L(-1), with a mean (±standard deviation) of 2.2 ± 0.9 Bq L(-1), and a volume-weighted average of 2.0 Bq L(-1). The range of wet atmospheric deposition was 18-188 Bq m(-2) per rain event, with a mean of 72 ± 53 Bq m(-2). Dry deposition fluxes of (7)Be ranged from less than 0.01 up to 0.45 Bq m(-2) d(-1), with an estimated dry season deposition of 7 Bq m(-2) month(-1). Annualized (7)Be atmospheric deposition was approximately 1900 Bq m(-2) yr(-1), with most deposition via rainwater (>95%) and little via dry deposition. Overall, these activities and deposition fluxes are similar to values found in other coastal locations with comparable latitude and Mediterranean-type climate. Particulate (7)Be values in the surface water of the San Lorenzo River in Santa Cruz, California, ranged from erosion in the watershed. There were too few particulate (7)Be data over the storm to accurately model a (7)Be load, but the results suggest enhanced watershed export of (7)Be from small, mountainous river systems compared to other watershed types.

  14. Isotopic Effects on Stereodynamics for Ca+HCI, Ca+DCI, and Ca+TClReactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-zhi Wang; Chuan-lu Yang; Jing-juan Liang; Jing Xiao; Qing-gang Zhang

    2011-01-01

    The vector correlations in Ca+HC1,Ca+DCI,and Ca+TCI reactions have been investigated by means of the quasi-classical trajectory calculations on PES constructed by means of multireference configuration interaction.The distributions of P(θr),P(Φr) and the PDDCSs of (2π/σ)(dσ00/dωt),(2π/σ)(dσ20/dωt),(2π/σ)(dσ22+/dωt),(2π/σ)(dσ21-/dωt) have been calculated based on the surface.The remarkable isotopic effects in the reactions are observed,and the mechanism which may be ascribed to different mass factors is discussed.

  15. Solar Ca II K Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertello, Luca; Pevtsov, Alexei A.; Tlatov, Andrey; Singh, Jagdev

    2016-07-01

    Some of the most important archives of past and current long-term solar synoptic observations in the resonance line of Ca II K are described here. These observations are very important for understanding the state of the solar magnetism on time scales up to several decades. The first observations of this kind began in 1904 at the Kodaikanal Observatory (India), followed by similar programs at different other locations. Regular full-disk Ca II K monitoring programs started in 1915 at the Mount Wilson Observatory (USA) and in 1917 at the National Solar Observatory of Japan. Beginning in 1919 and in 1926 regular observations were taken also at the Paris-Meudon Observatory (France) and at the "Donati solar tower telescope of the Arcetri Astrophysical Observatory in Italy, respectively. In 1926 the the Astronomical Observatory of the Coimbra University in Portugal started its own program of Ca II K observations. Although some of these programs have been terminated over the years, their data archives constitute a unique resource for studies of solar variability. In the early 1970s, the National Solar Observatory (NSO) at Sacramento Peak (USA) started a new program of daily Sun-as-a-star observations in the Ca II K line. Today the NSO is continuing these observations through its Synoptic Optical Long-term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) facility.

  16. EMRE Is a Matrix Ca(2+) Sensor that Governs Gatekeeping of the Mitochondrial Ca(2+) Uniporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vais, Horia; Mallilankaraman, Karthik; Mak, Don-On Daniel; Hoff, Henry; Payne, Riley; Tanis, Jessica E; Foskett, J Kevin

    2016-01-26

    The mitochondrial uniporter (MCU) is an ion channel that mediates Ca(2+) uptake into the matrix to regulate metabolism, cell death, and cytoplasmic Ca(2+) signaling. Matrix Ca(2+) concentration is similar to that in cytoplasm, despite an enormous driving force for entry, but the mechanisms that prevent mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload are unclear. Here, we show that MCU channel activity is governed by matrix Ca(2+) concentration through EMRE. Deletion or charge neutralization of its matrix-localized acidic C terminus abolishes matrix Ca(2+) inhibition of MCU Ca(2+) currents, resulting in MCU channel activation, enhanced mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, and constitutively elevated matrix Ca(2+) concentration. EMRE-dependent regulation of MCU channel activity requires intermembrane space-localized MICU1, MICU2, and cytoplasmic Ca(2+). Thus, mitochondria are protected from Ca(2+) depletion and Ca(2+) overload by a unique molecular complex that involves Ca(2+) sensors on both sides of the inner mitochondrial membrane, coupled through EMRE.

  17. KWU-werkersklasdramas in Afrikaans (ca. 1930 - ca. 1950

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Coetser

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available GWU working class theatre in Afrikaans (ca. 1930 - ca. 1950In 1984 Elsabé Brink drew attention to plays, prose and poetry written between 1930 and 1950 in Afrikaans by members of the Garment Workers’ Union (GWU. Scholars such as Stander and Willemse (1992, Van Niekerk (1996 and Van Wyk (1995, 1997 have also referred to GWU plays. Apart from these overviews, GWU plays as such have not yet received the attention they deserve. This article presents a revaluation, initially by providing an overview of their contents, followed by an examination of cultural, economic and political influences. It is argued that - retrospectively - the GWU plays reflected a unique cultural specificity from the framework established by Sitas (1986 for more contemporary working class theatre.

  18. Ca2+ dynamics in zebrafish morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Tsuruwaka

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracellular calcium ion (Ca2+ signaling is heavily involved in development, as illustrated by the use of a number of Ca2+ indicators. However, continuous Ca2+ patterns during morphogenesis have not yet been studied using fluorescence resonance energy transfer to track the Ca2+ sensor. In the present study, we monitored Ca2+ levels during zebrafish morphogenesis and differentiation with yellow cameleon, YC2.12. Our results show not only clear changes in Ca2+ levels but also continuous Ca2+ patterns at 24 hpf and later periods for the first time. Serial Ca2+dynamics during early pharyngula period (Prim-5-20; 24–33 hpf was successfully observed with cameleon, which have not reported anywhere yet. In fact, high Ca2+ level occurred concurrently with hindbrain development in segmentation and pharyngula periods. Ca2+ patterns in the late gastrula through segmentation periods which were obtained with cameleon, were similar to those obtained previously with other Ca2+sensor. Our results suggested that the use of various Ca2+ sensors may lead to novel findings in studies of Ca2+ dynamics. We hope that these results will prove valuable for further research in Ca2+ signaling.

  19. Ca2+-permeable and Ca2+-impermeable AMPA receptors coexist on horizontal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shi-Yong; Liang, Pei-Ji

    2005-02-28

    Fura-2 fluorescent calcium imaging was used for analyzing the subtype of AMPA receptors in freshly dissociated horizontal cells of carp retina. Exogenous application of AMPA induced an increase of intracellular concentration of free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in horizontal cells, while the [Ca2+]i increase was partly inhibited by nifedipine. The residual [Ca2+]i increase was completely eliminated by joro spider toxin-3, a blocker of Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors. On the other hand, the application of pentobarbital, which blocked Ca2+-impermeable AMPA receptors, could also partly inhibit the increase of [Ca2+]i, implying that the application of AMPA induced the activation of both Ca2+-permeable and Ca2+-impermeable AMPA receptors and the consequent activation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Taken together, these results suggested that Ca2+-permeable and Ca2+-impermeable AMPA receptors were coexpressed on horizontal cells.

  20. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve Horner

    2004-04-29

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the

  1. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve Horner

    2005-08-01

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the

  2. An Advanced Fracture Characterization and Well Path Navigation System for Effective Re-Development and Enhancement of Ultimate Recovery from the Complex Monterey Reservoir of South Ellwood Field, Offshore California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve Horner

    2006-01-31

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the

  3. AN ADVANCED FRACTURE CHARACTERIZATION AND WELL PATH NAVIGATION SYSTEM FOR EFFECTIVE RE-DEVELOPMENT AND ENHANCEMENT OF ULTIMATE RECOVERY FROM THE COMPLEX MONTEREY RESERVOIR OF SOUTH ELLWOOD FIELD, OFFSHORE CALIFORNIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steve Horner; Iraj Ershaghi

    2002-04-30

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to 8,700,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful redevelopment and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intends to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. State of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic and cross-well seismic, interference tests and production logs will be employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database will be used for construction of a novel geologic model of the fracture network. Development of an innovative fracture network reservoir simulator is proposed to monitor and manage the aquifer's role in pressure maintenance and water production. The new fracture simulation model will be used for both planning optimal paths for new wells and improving ultimate recovery. In the second phase of this project, the model will be used for the design of a pilot program for downhole water re-injection into the aquifer simultaneously with oil production. Downhole water separation units attached to electric submersible pumps will be used to minimize surface fluid handling thereby improving recoveries per well and field economics while maintaining aquifer support. In cooperation with the DOE, results of the field studies as well as the new models developed and the fracture database will be shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the

  4. An Advanced Fracture Characterization and Well Path Navigation System for Effective Re-Development and Enhancement of Ultimate Recovery from the Complex Monterey Reservoir of South Ellwood Field, Offshore California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horner, Steve; Ershaghi, Iraj

    2006-06-30

    Venoco Inc, intends to re-develop the Monterey Formation, a Class III basin reservoir, at South Ellwood Field, Offshore Santa Barbara, California. Well productivity in this field varies significantly. Cumulative Monterey production for individual wells has ranged from 260 STB to over 10,000,000 STB. Productivity is primarily affected by how well the well path connects with the local fracture system and the degree of aquifer support. Cumulative oil recovery to date is a small percentage of the original oil in place. To embark upon successful re-development and to optimize reservoir management, Venoco intended to investigate, map and characterize field fracture patterns and the reservoir conduit system. In the first phase of the project, state of the art borehole imaging technologies including FMI, dipole sonic, interference tests and production logs were employed to characterize fractures and micro faults. These data along with the existing database were used in the construction of a new geologic model of the fracture network. An innovative fracture network reservoir simulator was developed to better understand and manage the aquifer’s role in pressure maintenance and water production. In the second phase of this project, simulation models were used to plan the redevelopment of the field using high angle wells. Correct placement of the wells is critical to intersect the best-developed fracture zones and to avoid producing large volumes of water from the water leg. Particula r attention was paid to those areas of the field that have not been adequately developed with the existing producers. In cooperation with the DOE and the PTTC, the new data and the new fracture simulation model were shared with other operators. Numerous fields producing from the Monterey and analogous fractured reservoirs both onshore and offshore will benefit from the methodologies developed in this project. This report presents a summary of all technical work conducted during Budget Periods I

  5. Lattice Dynamics of fcc Ca

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stassis, C.; Zaretsky, J.; Misemer, D. K.;;

    1983-01-01

    to the propagation of elastic waves. The frequencies of the T1[ξξ0] branch for ξ between approximately 0.5 and 0.8 are slightly above the velocity-of-sound line determined from the low-frequency measurements. Since a similar effect has been observed in FCC Yb, it is natural to assume that the anomalous dispersion......A large single crystal of FCC Ca was grown and was used to study the lattice dynamics of this divalent metal by coherent inelastic neutron scattering. The phonon dispersion curves were measured, at room temperature, along the [ξ00], [ξξ0], [ξξξ], and [0ξ1] symmetry directions. The dispersion curves...... bear a striking resemblance to those of FCC Yb, which is also a divalent metal with an electronic band structure similar to that of Ca. In particular, the shear moduli c44 and (c11-c 12)/2 differ by a factor of 3.4, which implies that FCC Ca (like FCC Yb) is very anisotropic with regard...

  6. Continuously Tunable Ca2+ Regulation of RNA-Edited CaV1.3 Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hojjat Bazzazi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available CaV1.3 ion channels are dominant Ca2+ portals into pacemaking neurons, residing at the epicenter of brain rhythmicity and neurodegeneration. Negative Ca2+ feedback regulation of CaV1.3 channels (CDI is therefore critical for Ca2+ homeostasis. Intriguingly, nearly half the CaV1.3 transcripts in the brain are RNA edited to reduce CDI and influence oscillatory activity. It is then mechanistically remarkable that this editing occurs precisely within an IQ domain, whose interaction with Ca2+-bound calmodulin (Ca2+/CaM is believed to induce CDI. Here, we sought the mechanism underlying the altered CDI of edited channels. Unexpectedly, editing failed to attenuate Ca2+/CaM binding. Instead, editing weakened the prebinding of Ca2+-free CaM (apoCaM to channels, which proves essential for CDI. Thus, editing might render CDI continuously tunable by fluctuations in ambient CaM, a prominent effect we substantiate in substantia nigral neurons. This adjustability of Ca2+ regulation by CaM now looms as a key element of CNS Ca2+ homeostasis.

  7. Fine tuning of cytosolic Ca 2+ oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Ca 2+ oscillations, a widespread mode of cell signaling, were reported in non-excitable cells for the first time more than 25 years ago. Their fundamental mechanism, based on the periodic Ca 2+ exchange between the endoplasmic reticulum and the cytoplasm, has been well characterized. However, how the kinetics of cytosolic Ca 2+ changes are related to the extent of a physiological response remains poorly understood. Here, we review data suggesting that the downstream targets of Ca 2+ are controlled not only by the frequency of Ca 2+ oscillations but also by the detailed characteristics of the oscillations, such as their duration, shape, or baseline level. Involvement of non-endoplasmic reticulum Ca 2+ stores, mainly mitochondria and the extracellular medium, participates in this fine tuning of Ca 2+ oscillations. The main characteristics of the Ca 2+ exchange fluxes with these compartments are also reviewed. PMID:27630768

  8. [Effect of polycarbophil Ca on IBS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mine, Tetsuya

    2006-08-01

    In this chapter, I mentioned the effect of polycarbophil Ca on IBS. IBS is classified into 3 types; diarrhea type, constipation type and combined type. Polycarbophil Ca is effective for all types of IBS.

  9. Barnacle muscle: Ca2+, activation and mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, C C; Griffiths, P J; Lea, T J; Mulligan, I P; Palmer, R E; Simnett, S J

    1993-01-01

    In this review, aspects of the ways in which Ca2+ is transported and regulated within muscle cells have been considered, with particular reference to crustacean muscle fibres. The large size of these fibres permits easy access to the internal environment of the cell, allowing it to be altered by microinjection or microperfusion. At rest, Ca2+ is not in equilibrium across the cell membrane, it enters the cell down a steep electrochemical gradient. The free [Ca2+] at rest is maintained at a value close to 200 nM by a combination of internal buffering systems, mainly the SR, mitochondria, and the fixed and diffusible Ca(2+)-binding proteins, as well as by an energy-dependent extrusion system operating across the external cell membrane. This system relies upon the inward movement of Na+ down its own electrochemical gradient to provide the energy for the extrusion of Ca2+ ions. As a result of electrical excitation, voltage-sensitive channels for Ca2+ are activated and permit Ca2+ to enter the cell more rapidly than at rest. It has been possible to determine both the amount of Ca2+ entering by this step, and what part this externally derived Ca2+ plays in the development of force as well as in the free Ca2+ change. The latter can be determined directly by Ca(2+)-sensitive indicators introduced into the cell sarcoplasm. A combination of techniques, allowing both the total and free Ca2+ changes to be assessed during electrical excitation, has provided valuable information as to how muscle cells buffer their Ca2+ in order to regulate the extent of the change in the free Ca2+ concentration. The data indicate that the entering Ca2+ can only make a small direct contribution to the force developed by the cell. The implication here is that the major source of Ca2+ for contraction must be derived from the internal Ca2+ storage sites within the SR system, a view reinforced by caged Ca2+ methods. The ability to measure the free Ca2+ concentration changes within a single cell during

  10. CA-CA互操作研究%Research of CA-CA Interoperability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    沈士根; 叶培松; 陈宝明

    2005-01-01

    文章介绍了国际上CA-CA之间实现互操作的信任模式,然后根据中国目前的PKI实际情况,提出了以桥CA为全局模式,局部可采用严格层次信任模式来实现各CA之间的互操作.

  11. Altered network timing in the CA3-CA1 circuit of hippocampal slices from aged mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Kanak

    Full Text Available Network patterns are believed to provide unique temporal contexts for coordinating neuronal activity within and across different regions of the brain. Some of the characteristics of network patterns modeled in vitro are altered in the CA3 or CA1 subregions of hippocampal slices from aged mice. CA3-CA1 network interactions have not been examined previously. We used slices from aged and adult mice to model spontaneous sharp wave ripples and carbachol-induced gamma oscillations, and compared measures of CA3-CA1 network timing between age groups. Coherent sharp wave ripples and gamma oscillations were evident in the CA3-CA1 circuit in both age groups, but the relative timing of activity in CA1 stratum pyramidale was delayed in the aged. In another sample of aged slices, evoked Schaffer collateral responses were attenuated in CA3 (antidromic spike amplitude and CA1 (orthodromic field EPSP slope. However, the amplitude and timing of spontaneous sharp waves recorded in CA1 stratum radiatum were similar to adults. In both age groups unit activity recorded juxtacellularly from unidentified neurons in CA1 stratum pyramidale and stratum oriens was temporally modulated by CA3 ripples. However, aged neurons exhibited reduced spike probability during the early cycles of the CA3 ripple oscillation. These findings suggest that aging disrupts the coordination of patterned activity in the CA3-CA1 circuit.

  12. An inhibitory effect of extracellular Ca2+ on Ca2+-dependent exocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xiong

    Full Text Available AIM: Neurotransmitter release is elicited by an elevation of intracellular Ca(2+ concentration ([Ca(2+](i. The action potential triggers Ca(2+ influx through Ca(2+ channels which causes local changes of [Ca(2+](i for vesicle release. However, any direct role of extracellular Ca(2+ (besides Ca(2+ influx on Ca(2+-dependent exocytosis remains elusive. Here we set out to investigate this possibility on rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons and chromaffin cells, widely used models for studying vesicle exocytosis. RESULTS: Using photolysis of caged Ca(2+ and caffeine-induced release of stored Ca(2+, we found that extracellular Ca(2+ inhibited exocytosis following moderate [Ca(2+](i rises (2-3 µM. The IC(50 for extracellular Ca(2+ inhibition of exocytosis (ECIE was 1.38 mM and a physiological reduction (∼30% of extracellular Ca(2+ concentration ([Ca(2+](o significantly increased the evoked exocytosis. At the single vesicle level, quantal size and release frequency were also altered by physiological [Ca(2+](o. The calcimimetics Mg(2+, Cd(2+, G418, and neomycin all inhibited exocytosis. The extracellular Ca(2+-sensing receptor (CaSR was not involved because specific drugs and knockdown of CaSR in DRG neurons did not affect ECIE. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: As an extension of the classic Ca(2+ hypothesis of synaptic release, physiological levels of extracellular Ca(2+ play dual roles in evoked exocytosis by providing a source of Ca(2+ influx, and by directly regulating quantal size and release probability in neuronal cells.

  13. 46 CFR 7.130 - Point Conception, CA to Point Sur, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Point Conception, CA to Point Sur, CA. 7.130 Section 7.130 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PROCEDURES APPLICABLE TO THE PUBLIC BOUNDARY LINES Pacific Coast § 7.130 Point Conception, CA to Point Sur, CA. (a) A line drawn from...

  14. Testing coral paleothermometers (B/Ca, Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca, U/Ca andδ18O) under impacts of large riverine runoff

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Tianran; YU Kefu; ZHAO Jianxin; YAN Hongqiang; SONG Yinxian; FENG Yuexing; CHEN Tegu

    2015-01-01

    Sea surface temperature (SST) proxies including B/Ca, Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca, U/Ca andδ18O were analyzed in the skeleton of aPorites coral collected from the Zhujiang River (Pearl River) Estuary (ZRE). These geochemical proxies are influenced by river runoff and this area of the northern South China Sea is strongly affected by seasonal freshwater floods. We assessed the robustness of each SST proxy through comparison with the local instrumental SST. Coral Sr/Ca shows the highest correlation with SST variations (r2=0.59), suggesting Sr/Ca is the most robust SST proxy. In contrast, coralδ18O (r2=0.46), B/Ca (r2=0.43) and U/Ca (r2=0.41) ratios were only moderately correlated with SST variations, suggesting that they are disturbed by some other factors in addition to SST. The poor correlation (r2=0.27) between SST and Mg/Ca indicates that Mg/Ca in coral skeletons is not a simple function of SST variations. This may ultimately limit the use of Mg/Ca as a coral paleothermometer.

  15. Multiple Ca2+ sensors in secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, Alexander M; Groffen, Alexander J; Sørensen, Jakob Balslev;

    2011-01-01

    Regulated neurotransmitter secretion depends on Ca(2+) sensors, C2 domain proteins that associate with phospholipids and soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes to trigger release upon Ca(2+) binding. Ca(2+) sensors are thought to prevent spontaneous...... fusion at rest (clamping) and to promote fusion upon Ca(2+) activation. At least eight, often coexpressed, Ca(2+) sensors have been identified in mammals. Accumulating evidence suggests that multiple Ca(2+) sensors interact, rather than work autonomously, to produce the complex secretory response...... observed in neurons and secretory cells. In this review, we present several working models to describe how different sensors might be arranged to mediate synchronous, asynchronous and spontaneous neurotransmitter release. We discuss the scenario that different Ca(2+) sensors typically act on one shared...

  16. Autonomous CaMKII requires further stimulation by Ca2+/calmodulin for enhancing synaptic strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcomb, Kelsey; Buard, Isabelle; Coultrap, Steven J; Kulbe, Jacqueline R; O'Leary, Heather; Benke, Timothy A; Bayer, K Ulrich

    2014-08-01

    A hallmark feature of Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is generation of autonomous (Ca(2+)-independent) activity by T286 autophosphorylation. Biochemical studies have shown that "autonomous" CaMKII is ∼5-fold further stimulated by Ca(2+)/CaM, but demonstration of a physiological function for such regulation within cells has remained elusive. In this study, CaMKII-induced enhancement of synaptic strength in rat hippocampal neurons required both autonomous activity and further stimulation. Synaptic strength was decreased by CaMKIIα knockdown and rescued by reexpression, but not by mutants impaired for autonomy (T286A) or binding to NMDA-type glutamate receptor subunit 2B (GluN2B; formerly NR2B; I205K). Full rescue was seen with constitutively autonomous mutants (T286D), but only if they could be further stimulated (additional T305/306A mutation), and not with two other mutations that additionally impair Ca(2+)/CaM binding. Compared to rescue with wild-type CaMKII, the CaM-binding-impaired mutants even had reduced synaptic strength. One of these mutants (T305/306D) mimicked an inhibitory autophosphorylation of CaMKII, whereas the other one (Δstim) abolished CaM binding without introducing charged residues. Inhibitory T305/306 autophosphorylation also reduced GluN2B binding, but this effect was independent of reduced Ca(2+)/CaM binding and was not mimicked by T305/306D mutation. Thus, even autonomous CaMKII activity must be further stimulated by Ca(2+)/CaM for enhancement of synaptic strength.

  17. When is high-Ca+ microdomain required for mitochondrial Ca+ uptake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spät, A; Fülöp, L; Koncz, P; Szanda, G

    2009-01-01

    Ca(2+) release from IP(3)-sensitive stores in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) induced by Ca(2+)-mobilizing agonists generates high-Ca(2+) microdomains between ER vesicles and neighbouring mitochondria. Here we present a model that describes when such microdomains are required and when submicromolar [Ca(2+)] is sufficient for mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake rate in angiotensin II-stimulated H295R adrenocortical cells correlates with the proximity between ER vesicles and the mitochondrion, reflecting the uptake promoting effect of high-Ca(2+) peri-mitochondrial microdomains. Silencing or inhibition of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) or inhibition of the novel isoforms of protein kinase C enhances mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and abolishes the positive correlation between Ca(2+) uptake and ER-mitochondrion proximity. Inhibition of protein phosphatases attenuates mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and also abolishes its positive correlation with ER-mitochondrion proximity. We postulate that during IP(3)-induced Ca(2+) release, Ca(2+) uptake is confined to ER-close mitochondria, because of the simultaneous activation of the protein kinases. Attenuation of Ca(2+) uptake prevents Ca(2+) overload of mitochondria and thus protects the cell against apoptosis. On the other hand, all the mitochondria accumulate Ca(2+) at a non-inhibited rate during physiological Ca(2+) influx through the plasma membrane. Membrane potential is higher in ER-distant mitochondria, providing a bigger driving force for Ca(2+) uptake. Our model explains why comparable mitochondrial Ca(2+) signals are formed in response to K(+) and angiotensin II (equipotent in respect to global cytosolic Ca(2+) signals), although only the latter generates high-Ca(2+) microdomains.

  18. In Situ Ca2+ Titration in the Fluorometric Study of Intracellular Ca2+ Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Shane M.; Jackson, Meyer B.

    2014-01-01

    Imaging with Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent dye has provided a wealth of insight into the dynamics of cellular Ca2+ signaling. The spatiotemporal evolution of intracellular free Ca2+ observed in imaging experiments is shaped by binding and unbinding to cytoplasmic Ca2+ buffers, as well as the fluorescent indicator used for imaging. These factors must be taken into account in the interpretation of Ca2+ imaging data, and can be exploited to investigate endogenous Ca2+ buffer properties. Here we extended the use of Ca2+ fluorometry in the characterization of Ca2+ binding molecules within cells, building on a method of titration of intracellular Ca2+ binding sites in situ with measured amounts of Ca2+ entering through voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. We developed a systematic procedure for fitting fluorescence data acquired during a series of voltage steps to models with multiple Ca2+ binding sites. The method was tested on simulated data, and then applied to 2-photon fluorescence imaging data from rat posterior pituitary nerve terminals patch clamp-loaded with the Ca2+ indicator fluo-8. Focusing on data sets well described by a single endogenous Ca2+ buffer and dye, this method yielded estimates of the endogenous buffer concentration and Kd, the dye Kd, and the fraction of Ca2+ inaccessible cellular volume. The in situ Kd of fluo-8 thus obtained was indistinguishable from that measured in vitro. This method of calibrating Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent dyes in situ has significant advantages over previous methods. Our analysis of Ca2+ titration fluorometric data makes more effective use of the experimental data, and provides a rigorous treatment of multivariate errors and multiple Ca2+ binding species. This method offers a versatile approach to the study of endogenous Ca2+ binding molecules in their physiological milieu. PMID:25465896

  19. Involvement of Ca2+/CaM in the signal transduction of acetylcholine regulating stomatal movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    It has been known that the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) also exists in plants and is able to regulate the movement of stomata. In another aspect, Ca2+/CaM as the second messengers have a critical role of signal transduction in stomatal guard-cell. Here we showed that Ca2+/CaM were also involved in theACh regulated stomatal movement. In the medium containing Ca2+, the Ca2+ channel blockers (NIF and Ver) and CaM inhibitors (TFP and W7) could neutralize the ACh induced stomatal opening, however, they are ineffective in the medium containing K+. Those results indicated that Ca2+/CaM were involved in the signal transduction pathway of ACh regulating stomatal movement.

  20. Influence of NaCl-CaCl2 on Decomposing REPO4 with CaO

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The influence of NaCl-CaCl2 on thermal decomposition of REPO4 (RE: Ce, La, Nd, Th) with CaO was studied.The heat decomposing process of REPO4 was tested with TG-DTA experiments.The results showed that the decomposition temperature of REPO4 with CaO was reduced because of adding NaCl-CaCl2 mixture (NaCl:CaCl2=1:1).The influence of the addition of NaCl-CaCl2, roasting temperature and roasting time on decomposition ratio of REPO4 with CaO was studied.The results showed that the decomposition ratio of REPO4with CaO was 79% when the addition percentage of NaCl-CaCl2 was 10%, the roasting temperature was 750℃, and the roasting time was 1 h.

  1. Ca2+ cycling in heart cells from ground squirrels: adaptive strategies for intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Chen Li

    Full Text Available Heart tissues from hibernating mammals, such as ground squirrels, are able to endure hypothermia, hypoxia and other extreme insulting factors that are fatal for human and nonhibernating mammals. This study was designed to understand adaptive mechanisms involved in intracellular Ca(2+ homeostasis in cardiomyocytes from the mammalian hibernator, ground squirrel, compared to rat. Electrophysiological and confocal imaging experiments showed that the voltage-dependence of L-type Ca(2+ current (I(Ca was shifted to higher potentials in ventricular myocytes from ground squirrels vs. rats. The elevated threshold of I(Ca did not compromise the Ca(2+-induced Ca(2+ release, because a higher depolarization rate and a longer duration of action potential compensated the voltage shift of I(Ca. Both the caffeine-sensitive and caffeine-resistant components of cytosolic Ca(2+ removal were more rapid in ground squirrels. Ca(2+ sparks in ground squirrels exhibited larger amplitude/size and much lower frequency than in rats. Due to the high I(Ca threshold, low SR Ca(2+ leak and rapid cytosolic Ca(2+ clearance, heart cells from ground squirrels exhibited better capability in maintaining intracellular Ca(2+ homeostasis than those from rats and other nonhibernating mammals. These findings not only reveal adaptive mechanisms of hibernation, but also provide novel strategies against Ca(2+ overload-related heart diseases.

  2. γCaMKII shuttles Ca²⁺/CaM to the nucleus to trigger CREB phosphorylation and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Huan; Groth, Rachel D; Cohen, Samuel M; Emery, John F; Li, Boxing; Hoedt, Esthelle; Zhang, Guoan; Neubert, Thomas A; Tsien, Richard W

    2014-10-09

    Activity-dependent CREB phosphorylation and gene expression are critical for long-term neuronal plasticity. Local signaling at CaV1 channels triggers these events, but how information is relayed onward to the nucleus remains unclear. Here, we report a mechanism that mediates long-distance communication within cells: a shuttle that transports Ca(2+)/calmodulin from the surface membrane to the nucleus. We show that the shuttle protein is γCaMKII, its phosphorylation at Thr287 by βCaMKII protects the Ca(2+)/CaM signal, and CaN triggers its nuclear translocation. Both βCaMKII and CaN act in close proximity to CaV1 channels, supporting their dominance, whereas γCaMKII operates as a carrier, not as a kinase. Upon arrival within the nucleus, Ca(2+)/CaM activates CaMKK and its substrate CaMKIV, the CREB kinase. This mechanism resolves long-standing puzzles about CaM/CaMK-dependent signaling to the nucleus. The significance of the mechanism is emphasized by dysregulation of CaV1, γCaMKII, βCaMKII, and CaN in multiple neuropsychiatric disorders.

  3. Dissection of local Ca(2+) signals inside cytosol by ER-targeted Ca(2+) indicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwa, Fumihiro; Sakuragi, Shigeo; Kobayashi, Ayana; Takagi, Shin; Oda, Yoichi; Bannai, Hiroko; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2016-10-07

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) is a versatile intracellular second messenger that operates in various signaling pathways leading to multiple biological outputs. The diversity of spatiotemporal patterns of Ca(2+) signals, generated by the coordination of Ca(2+) influx from the extracellular space and Ca(2+) release from the intracellular Ca(2+) store the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), is considered to underlie the diversity of biological outputs caused by a single signaling molecule. However, such Ca(2+) signaling diversity has not been well described because of technical limitations. Here, we describe a new method to report Ca(2+) signals at subcellular resolution. We report that OER-GCaMP6f, a genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicator (GECI) targeted to the outer ER membrane, can monitor Ca(2+) release from the ER at higher spatiotemporal resolution than conventional GCaMP6f. OER-GCaMP6f was used for in vivo Ca(2+) imaging of C. elegans. We also found that the spontaneous Ca(2+) elevation in cultured astrocytes reported by OER-GCaMP6f showed a distinct spatiotemporal pattern from that monitored by plasma membrane-targeted GCaMP6f (Lck-GCaMP6f); less frequent Ca(2+) signal was detected by OER-GCaMP6f, in spite of the fact that Ca(2+) release from the ER plays important roles in astrocytes. These findings suggest that targeting of GECIs to the ER outer membrane enables sensitive detection of Ca(2+) release from the ER at subcellular resolution, avoiding the diffusion of GECI and Ca(2+). Our results indicate that Ca(2+) imaging with OER-GCaMP6f in combination with Lck-GCaMP6f can contribute to describing the diversity of Ca(2+) signals, by enabling dissection of Ca(2+) signals at subcellular resolution.

  4. Ca2+ uptake by the endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase in rat microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moccia, Francesco; Berra-Romani, Roberto; Baruffi, Silvana; Spaggiari, Santina; Signorelli, Silvia; Castelli, Loretta; Magistretti, Jacopo; Taglietti, Vanni; Tanzi, Franco

    2002-01-01

    In non-excitable cells, many agonists increase the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) by inducing an inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3))-mediated Ca(2+) release from the intracellular stores. Ca(2+) influx from the extracellular medium may then sustain the Ca(2+) signal. [Ca(2+)](i) recovers its resting level as a consequence of Ca(2+)-removing mechanisms, i.e. plasma-membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) pump, Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX) and sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) pump. In a study performed in pancreatic acinar cells, evidence has been provided suggesting that, during the decay phase of the agonist-evoked Ca(2+) transients, the Ca(2+) concentration within the intracellular stores remains essentially constant [Mogami, Tepikin and Petersen (1998) EMBO J. 17, 435-442]. It was therefore hypothesized that, in such a situation, intracellular Ca(2+) is not only picked up by the SERCA pump, but is also newly released through IP(3)-sensitive Ca(2+) channels, with the balance between these two processes being approximately null. The main aim of the present work was to test this hypothesis by a different experimental approach. Using cardiac microvascular endothelial cells, we found that inhibition of the SERCA pump has no effect on the time course of agonist-evoked Ca(2+) transients. This result was not due to a low capacity of the SERCA pump since, after agonist removal, this pump proved to be very powerful in clearing the excess of intracellular Ca(2+). We showed further that: (i) in order to avoid a rapid removal of Ca(2+) by the SERCA pump, continuous IP(3) production appears to be required throughout all of the decay phase of the Ca(2+) transient; and (ii) Ca(2+) picked up by the SERCA pump can be fully and immediately released by agonist application. All these results support the model of Mogami, Tepikin and Petersen [(1998) EMBO J. 17, 435-442]. Since the SERCA pump did not appear to be involved in shaping the decay phase of the

  5. Localized Calcineurin Confers Ca2+-Dependent Inactivation Upon Neuronal L-Type Ca2+ Channels

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Excitation-driven entry of Ca2+ through L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels controls gene expression in neurons and a variety of fundamental activities in other kinds of excitable cells. The probability of opening of CaV1.2 L-type channels is subject to pronounced enhancement by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), which is scaffolded to CaV1.2 channels by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). CaV1.2 channels also undergo negative autoregulation via Ca2+-dependent inactivation (CDI), which stro...

  6. Interlamellar CA1 network in the hippocampus

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Sunggu; Yang, Sungchil; Moreira, Thais; Hoffman, Gloria; Carlson, Greg C.; Bender, Kevin J.; Alger, Bradley E.; Tang, Cha-Min

    2014-01-01

    It has generally been thought that CA1 cells form only negligible connections with each other along the longitudinal axis of the hippocampus. But if CA1 cells were interconnected in an effective autoassociational network, this information would add a critical new dimension to our understanding of cellular processing within this structure. Here, we report the existence of a well-organized, longitudinally projecting synaptic network among CA1 pyramidal neurons. We further show that synapses of ...

  7. Glutamate excitotoxicity and Ca2+-regulation of respiration: Role of the Ca2+ activated mitochondrial transporters (CaMCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Carlos B; Llorente-Folch, Irene; Traba, Javier; Amigo, Ignacio; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Paloma; Contreras, Laura; Juaristi, Inés; Martinez-Valero, Paula; Pardo, Beatriz; Del Arco, Araceli; Satrustegui, Jorgina

    2016-08-01

    Glutamate elicits Ca(2+) signals and workloads that regulate neuronal fate both in physiological and pathological circumstances. Oxidative phosphorylation is required in order to respond to the metabolic challenge caused by glutamate. In response to physiological glutamate signals, cytosolic Ca(2+) activates respiration by stimulation of the NADH malate-aspartate shuttle through Ca(2+)-binding to the mitochondrial aspartate/glutamate carrier (Aralar/AGC1/Slc25a12), and by stimulation of adenine nucleotide uptake through Ca(2+) binding to the mitochondrial ATP-Mg/Pi carrier (SCaMC-3/Slc25a23). In addition, after Ca(2+) entry into the matrix through the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU), it activates mitochondrial dehydrogenases. In response to pathological glutamate stimulation during excitotoxicity, Ca(2+) overload, reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial dysfunction and delayed Ca(2+) deregulation (DCD) lead to neuronal death. Glutamate-induced respiratory stimulation is rapidly inactivated through a mechanism involving Poly (ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation, consumption of cytosolic NAD(+), a decrease in matrix ATP and restricted substrate supply. Glutamate-induced Ca(2+)-activation of SCaMC-3 imports adenine nucleotides into mitochondria, counteracting the depletion of matrix ATP and the impaired respiration, while Aralar-dependent lactate metabolism prevents substrate exhaustion. A second mechanism induced by excitotoxic glutamate is permeability transition pore (PTP) opening, which critically depends on ROS production and matrix Ca(2+) entry through the MCU. By increasing matrix content of adenine nucleotides, SCaMC-3 activity protects against glutamate-induced PTP opening and lowers matrix free Ca(2+), resulting in protracted appearance of DCD and protection against excitotoxicity in vitro and in vivo, while the lack of lactate protection during in vivo excitotoxicity explains increased vulnerability to kainite-induced toxicity in Aralar

  8. The initial 41Ca/40Ca ratios in two type A Ca-Al-rich inclusions: Implications for the origin of short-lived 41Ca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ming-Chang

    2017-03-01

    This paper reports new 41Ca-41K isotopic data for two Type A CAIs, NWA 3118 #1Nb (Compact Type A) and Vigarano 3138 F8 (Fluffy Type A), from reduced CV3 chondrites. The NWA CAI is found to have carried live 41Ca at the level of (4.6 ± 1.9) ×10-9 , consistent with the proposed Solar System initial 41Ca /40Ca = 4.2 ×10-9 by Liu et al. (2012a). On the other hand, the Vigarano CAI does not have resolvable radiogenic 41K excesses that can be attributed to the decay of 41Ca. Combined with the 26Al data that have been reported for these two CAIs, we infer that the 41Ca distribution was not homogeneous when 26Al was widespread at the canonical level of 26Al /27Al = 5.2 ×10-5 . Such a 41Ca heterogeneity can be understood under two astrophysical contexts: in situ charged particle irradiation by the protoSun in the solar nebula that had inherited some baseline 10Be abundance from the molecular cloud, and Solar System formation in a molecular cloud enriched in 26Al and 41Ca contaminated by massive star winds. That said, more high quality 41Ca data are still needed to better understand the origin of this radionuclide.

  9. Genetically encoded green fluorescent Ca2+ indicators with improved detectability for neuronal Ca2+ signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkura, Masamichi; Sasaki, Takuya; Sadakari, Junko; Gengyo-Ando, Keiko; Kagawa-Nagamura, Yuko; Kobayashi, Chiaki; Ikegaya, Yuji; Nakai, Junichi

    2012-01-01

    Imaging the activities of individual neurons with genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicators (GECIs) is a promising method for understanding neuronal network functions. Here, we report GECIs with improved neuronal Ca(2+) signal detectability, termed G-CaMP6 and G-CaMP8. Compared to a series of existing G-CaMPs, G-CaMP6 showed fairly high sensitivity and rapid kinetics, both of which are suitable properties for detecting subtle and fast neuronal activities. G-CaMP8 showed a greater signal (F(max)/F(min) = 38) than G-CaMP6 and demonstrated kinetics similar to those of G-CaMP6. Both GECIs could detect individual spikes from pyramidal neurons of cultured hippocampal slices or acute cortical slices with 100% detection rates, demonstrating their superior performance to existing GECIs. Because G-CaMP6 showed a higher sensitivity and brighter baseline fluorescence than G-CaMP8 in a cellular environment, we applied G-CaMP6 for Ca(2+) imaging of dendritic spines, the putative postsynaptic sites. By expressing a G-CaMP6-actin fusion protein for the spines in hippocampal CA3 pyramidal neurons and electrically stimulating the granule cells of the dentate gyrus, which innervate CA3 pyramidal neurons, we found that sub-threshold stimulation triggered small Ca(2+) responses in a limited number of spines with a low response rate in active spines, whereas supra-threshold stimulation triggered large fluorescence responses in virtually all of the spines with a 100% activity rate.

  10. Supralinear dendritic Ca(2+) signalling in young developing CA1 pyramidal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohle, Jörg; Bischofberger, Josef

    2014-11-15

    Although Ca(2+) is critically important in activity-dependent neuronal development, not much is known about the regulation of dendritic Ca(2+) signals in developing neurons. Here, we used ratiometric Ca(2+) imaging to investigate dendritic Ca(2+) signalling in rat hippocampal pyramidal cells during the first 1-4 weeks of postnatal development. We show that active dendritic backpropagation of Nav channel-dependent action potentials (APs) evoked already large dendritic Ca(2+) transients in animals aged 1 week with amplitudes of ∼150 nm, similar to the amplitudes of ∼160 nM seen in animals aged 4 weeks. Although the AP-evoked dendritic Ca(2+) load increased about four times during the first 4 weeks, the peak amplitude of free Ca(2+) concentration was balanced by a four-fold increase in Ca(2+) buffer capacity κs (∼70 vs. ∼280). Furthermore, Ca(2+) extrusion rates increased with postnatal development, leading to a slower decay time course (∼0.2 s vs. ∼0.1 s) and more effective temporal summation of Ca(2+) signals in young cells. Most importantly, during prolonged theta-burst stimulation dendritic Ca(2+) signals were up to three times larger in cells at 1 week than at 4 weeks of age and much larger than predicted by linear summation, which is attributable to an activity-dependent slow-down of Ca(2+) extrusion. As Ca(2+) influx is four-fold smaller in young cells, the larger Ca(2+) signals are generated using four times less ATP consumption. Taken together, the data suggest that active backpropagations regulate dendritic Ca(2+) signals during early postnatal development. Remarkably, during prolonged AP firing, Ca(2+) signals are several times larger in young than in mature cells as a result of activity-dependent regulation of Ca(2+) extrusion rates.

  11. Neural Signals Related to Outcome Evaluation Are Stronger in CA1 than CA3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Hyun; Huh, Namjung; Lee, Jong Won; Ghim, Jeong-Wook; Lee, Inah; Jung, Min W

    2017-01-01

    We have shown previously that CA1 conveys significant neural signals necessary to update value of the chosen target, namely chosen value and reward signals. To better understand hippocampal neural processes related to valuation, we compared chosen value- and reward-related neural activity between the CA3 and CA1 regions. Single units were recorded with tetrodes from the dorsal CA3 and CA1 regions of rats performing a dynamic foraging task, and chosen value- and reward-related neural activity was estimated using a reinforcement learning model and multiple regression analyses. Neural signals for chosen value and reward converged in both CA3 and CA1 when a trial outcome was revealed. However, these neural signals were stronger in CA1 than CA3. Consequently, neural signals for reward prediction error and updated chosen value were stronger in CA1 than CA3. Together with our previous finding that CA1 conveys stronger value signals than the subiculum, our results raise the possibility that CA1 might play a particularly important role among hippocampal subregions in evaluating experienced events.

  12. EMRE Is a Matrix Ca2+ Sensor that Governs Gatekeeping of the Mitochondrial Ca2+ Uniporter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horia Vais

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The mitochondrial uniporter (MCU is an ion channel that mediates Ca2+ uptake into the matrix to regulate metabolism, cell death, and cytoplasmic Ca2+ signaling. Matrix Ca2+ concentration is similar to that in cytoplasm, despite an enormous driving force for entry, but the mechanisms that prevent mitochondrial Ca2+ overload are unclear. Here, we show that MCU channel activity is governed by matrix Ca2+ concentration through EMRE. Deletion or charge neutralization of its matrix-localized acidic C terminus abolishes matrix Ca2+ inhibition of MCU Ca2+ currents, resulting in MCU channel activation, enhanced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, and constitutively elevated matrix Ca2+ concentration. EMRE-dependent regulation of MCU channel activity requires intermembrane space-localized MICU1, MICU2, and cytoplasmic Ca2+. Thus, mitochondria are protected from Ca2+ depletion and Ca2+ overload by a unique molecular complex that involves Ca2+ sensors on both sides of the inner mitochondrial membrane, coupled through EMRE.

  13. CaV1.1: The atypical prototypical voltage-gated Ca2+ channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannister, Roger A.; Beam, Kurt G.

    2012-01-01

    CaV1.1 is the prototype for the other nine known CaV channel isoforms, yet it has functional properties that make it truly atypical of this group. Specifically, CaV1.1 is expressed solely in skeletal muscle where it serves multiple purposes; it is the voltage sensor for excitation-contraction (EC) coupling and it is an L-type Ca2+ channel which contributes to a form of activity-dependent Ca2+ entry that has been termed Excitation-Coupled Ca2+ Entry (ECCE). The ability of CaV1.1 to serve as voltage-sensor for EC coupling appears to be unique amongst CaV channels, whereas the physiological role of its more conventional function as a Ca2+ channel has been a matter of uncertainty for nearly 50 years. In this chapter, we discuss how CaV1.1 supports EC coupling, the possible relevance of Ca2+ entry through CaV1.1 and how alterations of CaV1.1 function can have pathophysiological consequences. PMID:22982493

  14. Biphasic decay of the Ca transient results from increased sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca leak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankaranarayanan, Rajiv; Li, Yatong; Greensmith, David J.; Eisner, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Ca leak from the sarcoplasmic reticulum through the ryanodine receptor (RyR) reduces the amplitude of the Ca transient and slows its rate of decay.In the presence of β‐adrenergic stimulation, RyR‐mediated Ca leak produces a biphasic decay of the Ca transient with a fast early phase and a slow late phase.Two forms of Ca leak have been studied, Ca‐sensitising (induced by caffeine) and non‐sensitising (induced by ryanodine) and both induce biphasic decay of the Ca transient.Only Ca‐sensitising leak can be reversed by traditional RyR inhibitors such as tetracaine.Ca leak can also induce Ca waves. At low levels of leak, waves occur. As leak is increased, first biphasic decay and then slowed monophasic decay is seen. The level of leak has major effects on the shape of the Ca transient. Abstract In heart failure, a reduction in Ca transient amplitude and contractile dysfunction can by caused by Ca leak through the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca channel (ryanodine receptor, RyR) and/or decreased activity of the SR Ca ATPase (SERCA). We have characterised the effects of two forms of Ca leak (Ca‐sensitising and non‐sensitising) on calcium cycling and compared with those of SERCA inhibition. We measured [Ca2+]i with fluo‐3 in voltage‐clamped rat ventricular myocytes. Increasing SR leak with either caffeine (to sensitise the RyR to Ca activation) or ryanodine (non‐sensitising) had similar effects to SERCA inhibition: decreased systolic [Ca2+]i, increased diastolic [Ca2+]i and slowed decay. However, in the presence of isoproterenol, leak produced a biphasic decay of the Ca transient in the majority of cells while SERCA inhibition produced monophasic decay. Tetracaine reversed the effects of caffeine but not of ryanodine. When caffeine (1 mmol l−1) was added to a cell which displayed Ca waves, the wave frequency initially increased before waves disappeared and biphasic decay developed. Eventually (at higher caffeine concentrations), the

  15. Localized calcineurin confers Ca2+-dependent inactivation on neuronal L-type Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveria, Seth F; Dittmer, Philip J; Youn, Dong-ho; Dell'Acqua, Mark L; Sather, William A

    2012-10-31

    Excitation-driven entry of Ca(2+) through L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels controls gene expression in neurons and a variety of fundamental activities in other kinds of excitable cells. The probability of opening of Ca(V)1.2 L-type channels is subject to pronounced enhancement by cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), which is scaffolded to Ca(V)1.2 channels by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Ca(V)1.2 channels also undergo negative autoregulation via Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation (CDI), which strongly limits Ca(2+) entry. An abundance of evidence indicates that CDI relies upon binding of Ca(2+)/calmodulin (CaM) to an isoleucine-glutamine motif in the carboxy tail of Ca(V)1.2 L-type channels, a molecular mechanism seemingly unrelated to phosphorylation-mediated channel enhancement. But our work reveals, in cultured hippocampal neurons and a heterologous expression system, that the Ca(2+)/CaM-activated phosphatase calcineurin (CaN) is scaffolded to Ca(V)1.2 channels by the neuronal anchoring protein AKAP79/150, and that overexpression of an AKAP79/150 mutant incapable of binding CaN (ΔPIX; CaN-binding PXIXIT motif deleted) impedes CDI. Interventions that suppress CaN activity-mutation in its catalytic site, antagonism with cyclosporine A or FK506, or intracellular perfusion with a peptide mimicking the sequence of the phosphatase's autoinhibitory domain-interfere with normal CDI. In cultured hippocampal neurons from a ΔPIX knock-in mouse, CDI is absent. Results of experiments with the adenylyl cyclase stimulator forskolin and with the PKA inhibitor PKI suggest that Ca(2+)/CaM-activated CaN promotes CDI by reversing channel enhancement effectuated by kinases such as PKA. Hence, our investigation of AKAP79/150-anchored CaN reconciles the CaM-based model of CDI with an earlier, seemingly contradictory model based on dephosphorylation signaling.

  16. Health assessment of pine forest as affected by geothermal activities: Presence of Monterey pine aphid, Essigella californica (Essig (Homoptera: Aphidae associated with higher concentrations of boron on pine needles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Arturo Del Rio Mora

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies on assessments of the air pollution and deposition caused by geothermal fields on the forest health and presence of pests have been few documented to date. In the geothermal field "Los Humeros", located between the borders of the states of Puebla and Veracruz, Mexico was realized a forest health monitoring to know the assessment could have these emissions of sulphur (S and other two chemical elements measured by their concentrations on leaf tissues in the surrounding forests. For it were evaluated the forest healthy and pest insects registered at 20 stands of which were chosen completely at random 40 trees in total/site of the species Pinus montezumae and P. teocotein natural stands and plantations and picked up leaf tissue samples representatives per stand to determine the contents of sulphur (S, boron (B and arsenic (As representing each forest stand. The results of the study revealed that the presence of forest pests are not related to the proximity of the sites to emissions from stationary sources of emissions and moreover the amount of these 3 chemical substances monitored do not have none influence on the forest healthy sites condition, except for the Monterey pine aphid Essigella californica Essig, which seems to be directly associated with higher Boron content in the needles (mean=167.47±32.15, and peak 635.46 ppm and proximity of emission sources geothermal vents or where it is believed all these chemical elements are carried down by air currents to specific points and deposited in the stands. The general model obtained and with significance of R2=56.6 and P value 0.0033 for the presence of Monterey Pine aphid and the three main pollutants released from smoke plumes in geothermal systems is [D: Essigella]= -0.2088 + 1.880E-0.5 (A:SO4+ 0.002245 (B:B + 1.248 (C:As. The results suggest the use of aphid species as bioindicators of polluted sites.

  17. Isolation and characterization of higher metallofullerenes Ca@C92 and Ca@C94

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yuliang Che; Hua Yang; Hongxiao Jin; Chunxin Lu; Ziyang Liu

    2009-05-01

    We report for the first time isolation of Ca@C92 and Ca@C94 by multi-stage highperformance liquid chromatography technique without recycling equipment. It is notable that higher metallofullerenes containing alkaline earth metal ions could be isolated although their relative yields are extremely low. Ca@C92 and Ca@C94 are also confirmed by LD-TOF mass spectrometry and characterrized by UV-Vis-NIR absorption measurements.

  18. Ca(V)1 and Ca(V)2 channels engage distinct modes of Ca(2+) signaling to control CREB-dependent gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Damian G; Groth, Rachel D; Ma, Huan; Barrett, Curtis F; Owen, Scott F; Safa, Parsa; Tsien, Richard W

    2012-05-25

    Activity-dependent gene expression triggered by Ca(2+) entry into neurons is critical for learning and memory, but whether specific sources of Ca(2+) act distinctly or merely supply Ca(2+) to a common pool remains uncertain. Here, we report that both signaling modes coexist and pertain to Ca(V)1 and Ca(V)2 channels, respectively, coupling membrane depolarization to CREB phosphorylation and gene expression. Ca(V)1 channels are advantaged in their voltage-dependent gating and use nanodomain Ca(2+) to drive local CaMKII aggregation and trigger communication with the nucleus. In contrast, Ca(V)2 channels must elevate [Ca(2+)](i) microns away and promote CaMKII aggregation at Ca(V)1 channels. Consequently, Ca(V)2 channels are ~10-fold less effective in signaling to the nucleus than are Ca(V)1 channels for the same bulk [Ca(2+)](i) increase. Furthermore, Ca(V)2-mediated Ca(2+) rises are preferentially curbed by uptake into the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. This source-biased buffering limits the spatial spread of Ca(2+), further attenuating Ca(V)2-mediated gene expression.

  19. Ca(2+) signalling in the Golgi apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, Paola; Lissandron, Valentina; Capitanio, Paola; Pozzan, Tullio

    2011-08-01

    The Golgi apparatus plays a central role in lipid and protein post-translational modification and sorting. Morphologically the organelle is heterogeneous and it is possible to distinguish stacks of flat cysternae (cis- and medial Golgi), tubular-reticular networks and vesicles (trans-Golgi). These morphological differences parallel a distinct functionality with a selective distribution and complementary roles of the enzymes found in the different compartments. The Golgi apparatus has been also shown to be involved in Ca(2+) signalling: it is indeed endowed with Ca(2+) pumps, Ca(2+) release channels and Ca(2+) binding proteins and is thought to participate in determining the spatio-temporal complexity of the Ca(2+) signal within the cell, though this role is still poorly understood. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the organelle is heterogeneous in terms of Ca(2+) handling and selective reduction of Ca(2+) concentration, both in vitro and in a genetic human disease, within one of its sub-compartment results in alterations of protein trafficking within the secretory pathway and of the entire Golgi morphology. In this paper we review the available information on the Ca(2+) toolkit within the Golgi, its heterogeneous distribution in the organelle sub-compartments and discuss the implications of these characteristics for the physiopathology of the Golgi apparatus.

  20. 76 FR 19515 - California Disaster # CA-00170 Declaration of Economic Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-07

    ... determined to be adversely affected by the disaster: Primary Counties: Del Norte, Mendocino, San Luis Obispo, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Sonoma. Contiguous Counties: California: Alameda, Glenn, Humboldt, Kern, Kings, Lake, Marin, Merced, Monterey, Napa, San Benito, San Francisco, Santa Barbara,...

  1. LATS refining ladle slag modifying with CaO-CaF2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongming Wang; Guirong Li; Zhongming Ren; Bo Li; Xuejun Zhang; Guomin Shi

    2007-01-01

    To reduce the slag sticking onto the snorkel of the ladle during the ladle alloying treatment station (LATS) process, CaO-CaF2 (the mass ratio of CaO/CaF2 is 1:1) was employed as the modifier of the LATS refining ladle slag. The effect of CaO-CaF2 on the melting point, viscosity, and desulfurizing capability of the ladle slag was investigated. The melting point of the unmodified ladle slag is 1439°C. When adding 20wt% CaO-CaF2, the melting point is decreased to 1327°C. At 1500°C, the viscosity of the unmodified ladle slag is 6.5 Pa·s, which can be decreased lower than 2 Pa·s by adding more than 10wt% CaO-CaF2. The experimental results of desulfurization of the melts show that the desulfurizing power of the ladle slag can be enhanced by adding CaO-CaF2.

  2. By Regulating Mitochondrial Ca2+-Uptake UCP2 Modulates Intracellular Ca2+.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Jaroslaw Motloch

    Full Text Available The possible role of UCP2 in modulating mitochondrial Ca2+-uptake (mCa2+-uptake via the mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU is highly controversial.Thus, we analyzed mCa2+-uptake in isolated cardiac mitochondria, MCU single-channel activity in cardiac mitoplasts, dual Ca2+-transients from mitochondrial ((Ca2+m and intracellular compartment ((Ca2+c in the whole-cell configuration in cardiomyocytes of wild-type (WT and UCP2-/- mice.Isolated mitochondria showed a Ru360 sensitive mCa2+-uptake, which was significantly decreased in UCP2-/- (229.4±30.8 FU vs. 146.3±23.4 FU, P0.05 and transsarcolemmal Ca2+-influx was inhibited suggesting a possible compensatory mechanism. Additionally, we observed an inhibitory effect of ATP on mCa2+-uptake in WT mitoplasts and (Ca2+m of cardiomyocytes leading to an increase of (Ca2+c while no ATP dependent effect was observed in UCP2-/-.Our results indicate regulatory effects of UCP2 on mCa2+-uptake. Furthermore, we propose, that previously described inhibitory effects on MCU by ATP may be mediated via UCP2 resulting in changes of excitation contraction coupling.

  3. Ca-Dependent Folding of Human Calumenin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzorana, Marco; Hussain, Rohanah; Sorensen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Human calumenin (hCALU) is a six EF-hand protein belonging to the CREC family. As other members of the family, it is localized in the secretory pathway and regulates the activity of SERCA2a and of the ryanodine receptor in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We have studied the effects of Ca2+ binding to the protein and found it to attain a more compact structure upon ion binding. Circular Dichroism (CD) measurements suggest a major rearrangement of the protein secondary structure, which reversibly switches from disordered at low Ca2+ concentrations to predominantly alpha-helical when Ca2+ is added. SAXS experiments confirm the transition from an unfolded to a compact structure, which matches the structural prediction of a trilobal fold. Overall our experiments suggest that calumenin is a Ca2+ sensor, which folds into a compact structure, capable of interacting with its molecular partners, when Ca2+ concentration within the ER reaches the millimolar range. PMID:26991433

  4. Levels of CEA, CA153, CA199, CA724 and AFP in nipple discharge of breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Song; Mei, Yu; Wang, Yongmei; Zhu, Jiang; Zheng, Guixi; Ma, Rong

    2015-01-01

    The distinction between breast cancer and benign breast diseases with nipple discharge remains an important diagnostic challenge. The purpose of this study was to predict the potential usefulness of tumor markers in nipple discharge and to investigate the relationship of tumor markers and clinical characteristics with breast cancer.One hundred and eleven patients with nipple discharge received breast surgery from November 2013 to December 2014 were included in the study. We evaluated levels of five tumor markers (CEA, CA153, CA199, CA724 and AFP) prior to treatment. Patients were divided into two groups according to postoperative pathological results: 30 cases in breast cancer group and 81 cases in benign group. The relationships of clinical characteristics with breast cancer were investigated by multivariate analysis with a logistic regression model.It showed significant differences in levels of nipple discharge CEA (P AFP (P = 0.834) among two groups. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated complaint, age, menopause, abnormal palpable mass, CEA and CA153 were associated with breast cancer. In summary, measurements of CA199, CA724 and AFP in nipple discharge are not of great clinical value. Detecting CEA and CA153 in nipple dischargecould potentially be used for the early detection of breast cancer with in high-risk populations.

  5. SR-targeted CaMKII inhibition improves SR Ca2+ handling, but accelerates cardiac remodeling in mice overexpressing CaMKIIδC

    OpenAIRE

    Huke, Sabine; DeSantiago, Jaime; Kaetzel, Marcia A.; Mishra, Shikha; Brown, Joan H.; Dedman, John R.; Bers, Donald M.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac myocyte overexpression of CaMKIIδC leads to cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure (HF) possibly caused by altered myocyte Ca2+ handling. A central defect might be the marked CaMKII-induced increase in diastolic sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ leak which decreases SR Ca2+ load and Ca2+ transient amplitude. We hypothesized that inhibition of CaMKII near the SR membrane would decrease the leak, improve Ca2+ handling and prevent the development of contractile dysfunction and HF. To test ...

  6. Results of measuring internal Ca absorption and Ca kinetics with /sup 47/Ca in patients suffering from chronically recurrent urolithiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, L.; Esther, G.; Serfling, D.; Bast, R. (Rostock Univ. (German Democratic Republic). Radiologische Klinik)

    1983-07-01

    47 patients with chronically recurrent calcium lithiasis (with between 3 and over 100 stone episodes) and an average age of 43.2 years have been examined. The Ca absorption lay between 42.7% and 90.0% of the dose, the average was 59.3% with a standard deviation of +- 12.9. This is higher than in persons with healthy kidneys. The Ca absorption is significantly lower in patients with renal insufficiency. Studies on Ca kinetics revealed turnover rates and pool sizes within the normal range.

  7. Isospin effects in {sup 40,48}Ca+{sup 40,48}Ca collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henzl, V., E-mail: henzl@mit.ed [MSU-NSCL, 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing MI, 48824 (United States); Henzlova, D.; Kilburn, M. [MSU-NSCL, 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing MI, 48824 (United States); Verde, G. [INFN, Sezione di Catania. 64 Via S. Sofia, I-95123, Catania (Italy); Brown, D. [MSU-NSCL, 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing MI, 48824 (United States); Chbihi, A. [GANIL, CEA et IN2P3-CNRS, B.P. 5027, F-14076 Caen Cedex (France); Coupland, D. [MSU-NSCL, 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing MI, 48824 (United States); Elson, J. [Departments of Chemistry and Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Famiano, M. [Western Michigan University, 2229 Everett Tower, Kalamazoo, MI 49008-5252 (United States); Herlitzius, C. [MSU-NSCL, 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing MI, 48824 (United States); Hudan, S. [Indiana Univ. Cyclotron Facility, 2401 Milo B. Sampson Lane, Bloomington, IN 47405-4001 (United States); Lee, J.; Lukyanov, S.; Lynch, W.; Rogers, A.; Sanetullaev, A. [MSU-NSCL, 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing MI, 48824 (United States); Sobotka, L. [Departments of Chemistry and Physics, Washington University, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Souza, R.T. de [Indiana Univ. Cyclotron Facility, 2401 Milo B. Sampson Lane, Bloomington, IN 47405-4001 (United States); Sun, Z.Y.; Tsang, B. [MSU-NSCL, 1 Cyclotron, East Lansing MI, 48824 (United States)

    2010-03-01

    The isospin dependence of two proton correlations is studied in {sup 40}Ca+{sup 40}Ca and {sup 48}Ca+{sup 48}Ca collisions at E/A=80MeV. Measurements were performed with the HiRA detector array complemented by the 4pi Ball at NSCL. We observe a strong isospin dependence of the pp-correlation functions; however the emitting source radius extracted using the imaging technique yields no sensitivity to the isospin of the reaction system. We interpret this result as a consequence of smaller fraction of fast proton emission in the neutron rich {sup 48}Ca system.

  8. Toosendanin increases free-Ca2+ concentration in NG108-15 cells via L-type Ca2+ channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tong-hui XU; Jun DING; Yu-liang SHI

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To examine if toosendanin (TSN) affects intracellular free-Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in neuroblastomaxglioma hybrid cells (NG108-15 cells). METHODS: The [Ca2+]i was determined by laser-scanning confocal microscopic imaging technique in which Fluo-3 was used as Ca2+ indicator. RESULTS: TSN induced an increase in resting [Ca2+]i and in high K+-evoked Ca2+ transient in differentiated NG108-15 cells. The TSN-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was dose-dependent and disappeared in CdCl2-, nifedipine-containing or Ca2+-free solution, and appeared after washing out the Ca2+ channel blockers or adding Ca2+. CONCLUSION: TSN increased [Ca2+]i in differentiated NG108-15 cells. The [Ca2+]i enhancement was due to the influx of extracellular Ca2+ and related to L-type Ca2+ channels.

  9. A comparison of fluorescent Ca2+ indicators for imaging local Ca2+ signals in cultured cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Jeffrey T.; Parker, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Localized subcellular changes in Ca2+ serve as important cellular signaling elements, regulating processes as diverse as neuronal excitability and gene expression. Studies of cellular Ca2+ signaling have been greatly facilitated by the availability of fluorescent Ca2+ indicators. The respective merits of different indicators to monitor bulk changes in cellular Ca2+ levels have been widely evaluated, but a comprehensive comparison for their use in detecting and analyzing local, subcellular Ca2+ signals is lacking. Here, we evaluated several fluorescent Ca2+ indicators in the context of local Ca2+ signals (puffs) evoked by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) in cultured human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, using high-speed video-microscopy. Altogether, nine synthetic Ca2+ dyes (Fluo-4, Fluo-8, Fluo-8 high affinity, Fluo-8 low affinity, Oregon Green BAPTA-1, Cal-520, Rhod-4, Asante Calcium Red, and X-Rhod-1) and three genetically-encoded Ca2+-indicators (GCaMP6-slow, -medium and -fast variants) were tested; criteria include the magnitude, kinetics, signal-to-noise ratio and detection efficiency of local Ca2+ puffs. Among these, we conclude that Cal-520 is the optimal indicator for detecting and faithfully tracking local events; that Rhod-4 is the red-emitting indicator of choice; and that none of the GCaMP6 variants are well suited for imaging subcellular Ca2+ signals. PMID:26572560

  10. Behavior of CaO and Calcium in pure Magnesium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HA Seong-Ho; LEE Jin-Kyu; JO Hyung-Ho; JUNG Seung-Boo; KIM Shae K.

    2006-01-01

    Mg alloys exhibit a number of good properties such as low density, good castability and high specific strength.However, molten Mg and Mg alloys are ignited without the melt protective gases during melting and casting process due to their high reactivity.The purpose of this study is to investigate effects of Ca and CaO on pure Mg through microstructure observation, ignition test and phase analysis.With increasing Ca and CaO contents, the ignition resistance of Ca or CaO added pure Mg is increased and the grains are refined.As results of XRD and EDS, CaO is reduced to Ca in CaO added pure Mg.Mg2Ca phase is formed even in 0.1 wt.%CaO added pure Mg by reduction mechanism, while Mg2Ca phase is formed over 1.35 wt.% Ca added pure Mg.

  11. Ca2+ sparks and Ca2+ glows in superior cervical ganglion neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-jun YAO; Cai-hong WU; Jie LIU; Zhuan ZHOU; He-ping CHENG; Gang WANG; Kun-fu OU-YANG; Chao-liang WEI; Xian-hua WANG; Shi-rong WANG; Wei YAO; Hong-ping HUANG; Jian-hong LUO

    2006-01-01

    Aim: Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an integral component of neuronal Ca2+ signaling. The present study is to investigate properties of local Ca2+ release events in superior cervical ganglion (SCO) neurons. Methods: Primary cultured SCO neurons were prepared from neonatal rats (P3-P7). Low concentration of caffeine was used to induce Ca2+ release from the ER Ca2+ store, and intracellular Ca2+ was recorded by high-resolution line scan confocal imaging and the Ca2+ indicator Fluo-4. Results: Two populations of local Ca2+ release events with distinct temporal characteristics were evoked by 1.5 mmol/L caffeine near the surface membrane in the soma and the neurites of SCG neurons. Brief events similar to classic Ca2+ sparks lasted a few hundreds of milliseconds, whereas long-lasting events displayed duration up to tens of seconds. Typical somatic and neurite sparks were of 0.3- and 0.52-fold increase in local Fluo-4 fluorescence, respectively. Typical Ca2+ glows were brighter (△F/F0 approximately 0.6), but were highly confined in space. The half maximum of full duration of neurite sparks was much longer than those in the soma (685 vs 381 ms). Conclusion: Co-existence of Ca2+ sparks and Ca2+ glows in SCG neurons indicates distinctive local regulation of Ca2+ release kinetics. The local Ca2+ signals of variable, site-specific temporal length may bear important implications in encoding a "memory" of the trigger signal.

  12. Serum level of TSGF,CA242 and CA19-9 in pancreatic cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-Ting Jiang; Chang-Ping Wu; Hai-Feng Deng; Ming-Yang Lu; Jun Wu; Hong-Yu Zhang; Wen-Hui Sun; Mei Ji

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To establish a method to detect the expression of the tumor specific growth factor TSGF, CA242 and CA19-9 in serum and evaluate their value in diagnosis of pancreatic cancer.METHODS: ELISA and Biochemical colorimetric assay were used to detect the serum content of TSGF, CA242 and CA19-9 in 200 normal cases, 52 pancreatitis patients and 96 pancreatic cancer patients.RESULTS: The positive likelihood ratios of TSGF, CA242and CA19-9 were 5.4, 12.6 and 6.3, respectively, and their negative likelihood ratios were 0.10, 0.19 and 0.17,respectively. With single tumor marker diagnosed pancreatic cancer, the highest sensitivity and specificity of TSGF were 91.6% and 93.5%. In combined test with 3 markers, when all of them were positive, the sensitivity changed to 77.0%and the specificity and the positive predictive value were 100%. The levels of TSGF and CA242 were significantly higher in the patients with pancreatic cancer of head than those in the patients with pancreatic cancer of body, tail and whole pancreas, but the expression of CA19-9 had no correlation with the positions of the pancreatic cancer. The sensitivity of TSGF, CA242 and CA19-9 was increased with the progress in stages of pancreatic cancer. In stage I, the sensitivity of TSGF was markedly higher than CA242 and CA19-9.CONCLUSION: The combined use of TSGF, CA242 and CA19-9 expressions can elevate the specificity for pancreatic cancer diagnosis. And it shows that it plays an important role to differentiate positions and tissue typing. It is a forepart diagnosis for the pancreatic cancer by combination checking.There is very important correlation between the three markers and the pancreatic cancer.

  13. Study on Roasting Decomposition of Mixed Rare Earth Concentrate in CaO-NaCl-CaCl2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The decomposed process of bastnaesite, monazite and mixed rare earth concentrate in CaO-CaCl-CaCl2 was studied by means of TG-DTA method. The relationship among decomposition ratio, roasting temperature, and CaO-NaCl addition was studied by the quadratic regression orthogonal analysis, and then the regression equation was obtained. Through analysis, the optimum process conditions of mixed rare earth concentrate decomposed by CaO-CaCl-CaCl2 were obtained as follows: roasting temperature: 700 ℃, CaO addition: 15%, NaCl-CaCl2 addition: 10%, roasting time: 60 min, the decomposition ratio: 91.3%.

  14. Aging and CaMKII Alter Intracellular Ca2+ Transients and Heart Rhythm in Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santalla, Manuela; Valverde, Carlos A.; Harnichar, Ezequiel; Lacunza, Ezequiel; Aguilar-Fuentes, Javier; Mattiazzi, Alicia; Ferrero, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Aging is associated to disrupted contractility and rhythmicity, among other cardiovascular alterations. Drosophila melanogaster shows a pattern of aging similar to human beings and recapitulates the arrhythmogenic conditions found in the human heart. Moreover, the kinase CaMKII has been characterized as an important regulator of heart function and an arrhythmogenic molecule that participate in Ca2+ handling. Using a genetically engineered expressed Ca2+ indicator, we report changes in cardiac Ca2+ handling at two different ages. Aging prolonged relaxation, reduced spontaneous heart rate (HR) and increased the occurrence of arrhythmias, ectopic beats and asystoles. Alignment between Drosophila melanogaster and human CaMKII showed a high degree of conservation and indicates that relevant phosphorylation sites in humans are also present in the fruit fly. Inhibition of CaMKII by KN-93 (CaMKII-specific inhibitor), reduced HR without significant changes in other parameters. By contrast, overexpression of CaMKII increased HR and reduced arrhythmias. Moreover, it increased fluorescence amplitude, maximal rate of rise of fluorescence and reduced time to peak fluorescence. These results suggest that CaMKII in Drosophila melanogaster acts directly on heart function and that increasing CaMKII expression levels could be beneficial to improve contractility. PMID:25003749

  15. Prognostic significance of preoperative serum CA125, CA19-9 and CEA in gastric carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Chen, Xiao-Long; Zhao, Shen-Yu; Xu, Yu-Hui; Zhang, Wei-Han; Liu, Kai; Chen, Xin-Zu; Yang, Kun; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Zhi-Xin; Chen, Jia-Ping; Zhou, Zong-Guang; Hu, Jian-Kun

    2016-01-01

    The prognostic significance of preoperative serum CA125, CA19-9 and CEA in gastric carcinoma (GC) has been widely reported and is still under debate. Here, we evaluated the prognostic significance of preoperative serum CA125, CA19-9 and CEA in patients with GC. 1692 patients with GC who underwent gastrectomy were divided into the training (from January 2005 to December 2011, n = 1024) and the validation (from January 2012 to December 2013, n = 668) cohorts. Positive groups of CA125 (> 13.72 U/ml), CA19-9 (> 23.36 U/ml) and CEA (> 4.28 ng/ml) were significantly associated with more advanced clinicopathological traits and worse outcomes than that of negative groups (all P < 0.01). In Cox regression analysis, tumor size (P < 0.001, P = 0.005), pTNM stage (P < 0.001, P < 0.001) and CA125 (P = 0.026, P = 0.005) were independent prognostic factors both in two cohorts. Nomograms of these two cohorts based on the number of positive serum tumor markers (NPTM) were more accurate in prognostic prediction than TNM stage alone. Our findings suggested that elevated preoperative serum CA125, CA19-9 and CEA were associated with more advanced clinicopathological traits and less favorable outcomes. In addition, CA125 as an independent prognostic factor should be further investigated. Nomogram based on NPTM could accurately predict the prognosis of GC patients. PMID:27097114

  16. Regulated release of Ca2+ from respiring mitochondria by Ca2+/2H+ antiport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiskum, G; Lehninger, A L

    1979-07-25

    Simultaneous measurements of oxygen consumption and transmembrane transport of Ca2+, H+, and phosphate show that the efflux of Ca2+ from respiring tightly coupled rat liver mitochondria takes place by an electroneutral Ca2+/2H+ antiport process that is ruthenium red-insensitive and that is regulated by the oxidation-reduction state of the mitochondrial pyridine nucleotides. When mitochondrial pyridine nucleotides are kept in a reduced steady state, the efflux of Ca2+ is inhibited; when they are in an oxidized state, Ca2+ efflux is activated. These processes were demonstrated by allowing phosphate-depleted mitochondria respiring on succinate in the presence of rotenone to take up Ca2+ from the medium. Upon subsequent addition of ruthenium red to block Ca2+ transport via the electrophoretic influx pathway, and acetoacetate, to bring mitochondrial pyridine nucleotides into the oxidized state, Ca2+ efflux and H+ influx ensued. The observed H+ influx/Ca2+ efflux ratio was close to the value 2.0 predicted for the operation of an electrically neutral Ca2+/2H+ antiport process.

  17. Ischemic damage in hippocampal CA1 is dependent on glutamate release and intact innervation from CA3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benveniste, H; Jørgensen, M B; Sandberg, M

    1989-01-01

    The removal of glutamatergic afferents to CA1 by destruction of the CA3 region is known to protect CA1 pyramidal cells against 10 min of transient global ischemia. To investigate further the pathogenetic significance of glutamate, we measured the release of glutamate in intact and CA3-lesioned CA...

  18. EnviroAtlas - Fresno, CA - Block Groups

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset is the base layer for the Fresno, CA EnviroAtlas area. The block groups are from the US Census Bureau and are included/excluded based on...

  19. Role of Ca++ in Shoot Gravitropism. [avena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayle, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    A cornerstone in the argument that Ca(2+) levels may regulate growth is the finding the EGTA promotes straight growth. The usual explanation for these results is that Ca(2+) chelation from cell walls results in wall loosening and thus accelerated straight growth. The ability of frozen-thawed Avena coleoptile tissue (subjected to 15g tension) to extend in response to EGTA and Quin II was examined. The EGTA when applied in weakly buffered (i.e., 0.1mM) neutral solutions initiates rapid extension. When the buffer strength is increased, similar concentrations of EGTA produce no growth response. This implies when EGTA liberated protons are released upon Ca(2+) chelation they can either initiate acid growth (low buffer conditions) or if consumed (high buffer conditions) have no effect. Thus Ca(2+) chelation in itself apparently does not result in straight growth.

  20. CaMath user`s guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Ben-chin; Daly, B.

    1994-07-13

    CaMath is an external Mathematica package which can be loaded into Mathematica by a user. CaMath consists of a special set of channel access functions which provides the Mathematica users with easy and flexible access of channel information across the IOC networks. It also provides a complete set of process variable event monitoring functions. The available functions for CaMath, their functionality, and their syntax are described herein. This document also gives examples how a Mathematica user can interface to channel access devices. It is assumed that the user is already familiar with using Mathematica. Few examples of Mathematica module of using CaMath functions are also given in this document.

  1. CA Investment Casting Process of Complex Castings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    CA (Computer aided) investment casting technique used in superalloy castings of aerospace engine parts was presented. CA investment casting integrated computer application, RP (Rapid Prototyping) process, solidification simulation and investment casting process. It broke the bottle neck of making metal die. Solid model of complex parts were produced by UGII or other software, then translated into STL(Stereolithography) file, after RP process of SLS(Selective Laser Sintering), wax pattern used in investment ...

  2. YouthCaN 2001 / Sirje Janikson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Janikson, Sirje

    2001-01-01

    Aprillis 2001 toimus keskkonnateemaline õpilaskonverents YouthCaN 2001 Ameerika Loodusajaloo Muuseumis New Yorkìs. 35 seminarist ühe viis läbi Tartu Noorte Loodusmaja geoloogia ja keskkonnaringi esindus, tutvustati loodusmaja keskkonnaprojekte ja räägiti keskkonnaalaste veebilehtede koostamise kogemustest. YouthCaN (Youth Communicating and Networking) on rahvusvaheline noorte organisatsioon, mis vahendab kogemusi ja uusi ideid elukeskkonnast huvitatud noorte hulgas

  3. YouthCaN 2001 / Sirje Janikson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Janikson, Sirje

    2001-01-01

    Aprillis 2001 toimus keskkonnateemaline õpilaskonverents YouthCaN 2001 Ameerika Loodusajaloo Muuseumis New Yorkìs. 35 seminarist ühe viis läbi Tartu Noorte Loodusmaja geoloogia ja keskkonnaringi esindus, tutvustati loodusmaja keskkonnaprojekte ja räägiti keskkonnaalaste veebilehtede koostamise kogemustest. YouthCaN (Youth Communicating and Networking) on rahvusvaheline noorte organisatsioon, mis vahendab kogemusi ja uusi ideid elukeskkonnast huvitatud noorte hulgas

  4. Mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in skeletal muscle health and disease

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Jingsong; Yi, Jianxun

    2016-01-01

    Muscle uses Ca2+ as a messenger to control contraction and relies on ATP to maintain the intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. Mitochondria are the major sub-cellular organelle of ATP production. With a negative inner membrane potential, mitochondria take up Ca2+ from their surroundings, a process called mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. Under physiological conditions, Ca2+ uptake into mitochondria promotes ATP production. Excessive uptake causes mitochondrial Ca2+ overload, which activates downstream adverse responses leading to cell dysfunction. Moreover, mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake could shape spatio-temporal patterns of intracellular Ca2+ signaling. Malfunction of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake is implicated in muscle degeneration. Unlike non-excitable cells, mitochondria in muscle cells experience dramatic changes of intracellular Ca2+ levels. Besides the sudden elevation of Ca2+ level induced by action potentials, Ca2+ transients in muscle cells can be as short as a few milliseconds during a single twitch or as long as min...

  5. PIK3CA in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gieri eCathomas

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available PIK3CA, the catalytic subunit of PI3K, is mutated in many different tumours, including colorectal cancer. Mutations of PIK3CA have been reported in 10 – 20% of colorectal cancer, about 80% of mutations found in two hot spots in exon 9 and exon 20. In RAS wild-type colorectal cancers, PIK3CA mutations have been associated with a worse clinical outcome and with a negative prediction of a response to targeted therapy by anti-EGFR monoclonal antibodies. However, these findings have not been confirmed in all studies and subsequent more detailed analysis has revealed that these effects may be restricted to mutations in Exon 20. Finally, mutations in PIK3CA may be the long sought biomarker for successful adjuvant therapy with aspirin in patients with colorectal cancer. Therefore, PIK3CA mutations appear to be a promising predictive biomarker; however, further data are needed to conclusively define the impact of somatic mutations in the PIK3CA gene for the management of patients with colorectal cancer.

  6. X-Ray Data on Extraterrestrial CA Dialuminate (CaAl4O7)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, D.; Ross, C. R., II; Bischoff, A.

    1993-07-01

    After the first discovery of Ca-dialuminate (CaAl4O7) in Allende [1], in recent years this phase has been found in several carbonaceous chondrites. Ca- dialuminate is a major phase in Ca,Al-rich inclusions from ALH85085 (e.g., [2]) and a dominating phase in CAIs from Acfer 182 ([3,4]). X-ray data on Ca-dialuminate are known from synthetic (e.g., [5-8]; cell constants) and terrestrial CaAl4O7 ([9]; only d-spacings), but are not available from extraterrestrial Ca-dialuminate. We report here the results of the first X-ray study of extraterrestrial Ca- dialuminate. The data (Table 1) were obtained by microdiffraction using a Rigaku PSPC microdiffractometer at the Bayerisches Geoinstitut. Ni-filtered Cr radiation was used with a direct beam diameter of about 50 micrometers. This powder diffraction method allows in situ measurement of polycrystalline Ca- dialuminate in a thin section. The CaAl4O7-rich inclusion 022/9 described in [4], consisting of a ~200-micrometer-sized core of Ca-dialuminate surrounded by layers of melilite and Ca-pyroxene, was chosen for analysis. The polycrystalline core contains only a small number of tiny inclusions (especially perovskite) and is therefore an excellent candidate for an X-ray study. For determination of the d-spacings of Ca-dialuminate an external standard (Ag6Ge10P12) was used for detector calibration. A large number of reflections could be indexed based upon comparison with the X-ray pattern of synthetic CaAl4O7 available in the JCPDS compilation [7]. The comparison was simplified because of the high purity of CaAl4O7 in inclusion 022/9 [4], and suggests the same structure for synthetic and extraterrestrial Ca-dialuminate. For determination of lattice parameters (cell constants, cell volume) refinement calculations were made based on 14 reflections (Table 1). The data for extraterrestrial CaAl4O7 shown in Table 1 indicate a close similarity to those obtained for synthetic CaAl4O7. The cell constants a, b, and therefore the cell

  7. Ultrastructural and immunohistochemical localization of plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase 4 in Ca2+-transporting epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, R Todd; Beggs, Megan R; Zamani, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Plasma Membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase's (PMCA) participate in epithelial Ca(2+) transport and intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. The Pmca4 isoform is enriched in distal nephron isolates and decreased in mice lacking the epithelial Ca(2+) channel, Trpv5. We therefore hypothesized that Pmca4 plays a significant...... in distal nephron cells at both the basolateral membrane and intracellular perinuclear compartments, but not submembranous vesicles, suggesting rapid trafficking to the plasma membrane is unlikely to occur in vivo. Pmca4 expression was not altered by perturbations in Ca(2+) balance, pointing...... detected Pmca1 in lateral membranes of enterocytes. In kidney, Pmca4 showed broad localization to the distal nephron. In mouse, expression was most abundant in segments coexpressing the epithelial Ca(2+) channel, Trpv5. Significant, albeit lower expression, was also evident in the region encompassing...

  8. Sarcolemmal Ca(2+)-entry through L-type Ca(2+) channels controls the profile of Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) current in canine ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Balázs; Váczi, Krisztina; Hegyi, Bence; Gönczi, Mónika; Dienes, Beatrix; Kistamás, Kornél; Bányász, Tamás; Magyar, János; Baczkó, István; Varró, András; Seprényi, György; Csernoch, László; Nánási, Péter P; Szentandrássy, Norbert

    2016-08-01

    Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) current (ICl(Ca)) mediated by TMEM16A and/or Bestrophin-3 may contribute to cardiac arrhythmias. The true profile of ICl(Ca) during an actual ventricular action potential (AP), however, is poorly understood. We aimed to study the profile of ICl(Ca) systematically under physiological conditions (normal Ca(2+) cycling and AP voltage-clamp) as well as in conditions designed to change [Ca(2+)]i. The expression of TMEM16A and/or Bestrophin-3 in canine and human left ventricular myocytes was examined. The possible spatial distribution of these proteins and their co-localization with Cav1.2 was also studied. The profile of ICl(Ca), identified as a 9-anthracene carboxylic acid-sensitive current under AP voltage-clamp conditions, contained an early fast outward and a late inward component, overlapping early and terminal repolarizations, respectively. Both components were moderately reduced by ryanodine, while fully abolished by BAPTA, but not EGTA. [Ca(2+)]i was monitored using Fura-2-AM. Setting [Ca(2+)]i to the systolic level measured in the bulk cytoplasm (1.1μM) decreased ICl(Ca), while application of Bay K8644, isoproterenol, and faster stimulation rates increased the amplitude of ICl(Ca). Ca(2+)-entry through L-type Ca(2+) channels was essential for activation of ICl(Ca). TMEM16A and Bestrophin-3 showed strong co-localization with one another and also with Cav1.2 channels, when assessed using immunolabeling and confocal microscopy in both canine myocytes and human ventricular myocardium. Activation of ICl(Ca) in canine ventricular cells requires Ca(2+)-entry through neighboring L-type Ca(2+) channels and is only augmented by SR Ca(2+)-release. Substantial activation of ICl(Ca) requires high Ca(2+) concentration in the dyadic clefts which can be effectively buffered by BAPTA, but not EGTA.

  9. Endothelin-1 induces intracellular [Ca2+] increase via Ca2+ influx through the L-type Ca2+ channel, Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release and a pathway involving ETA receptors, PKC, PKA and AT1 receptors in cardiomyocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG QingHua; LI XingTing; ZHONG GuoGan; ZHANG WenJie; SUN ChengWen

    2009-01-01

    Using fura-2-acetoxymethyl eater (AM) fluorescence imaging and patch clamp techniques, we found that endothelin-1 (ET-1) significantly elevated the intracellular calcium level ([Ca2+]1) in a dose-dependent manner and activated the L-type Ca2+ channel in cardiomyocytes isolated from rats.The effect of ET-1 on [Ca2+]1 elevation was abolished in the presence of the ETA receptor blocker BQ123,but was not affected by the ETa receptor blocker BQ788. ET-1-induced an increase in [Ca2+]1, which was inhibited 46.7% by pretreatment with a high concentration of ryanodine (10 μmol/L), a blocker of the ryanodine receptor. The ET-1-induced [Ca2+]i increase was also inhibited by the inhibltors of protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C (PKC) and angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1 receptor). We found that ET-1 induced an enhancement of the amplitude of the whole cell L-type Ca2+ channel current and an Increase of open-state probability (NPo) of an L-type single Ca2+ channel. BQ123 completely blocked the ET-1-induced increase in calcium channel open-state probability. In this study we demonstrated that ET-1 regulates calcium overload through a series of mechanisms that include L-type Ca2+ channel activation and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR). ETa receptors, PKC, PKA and AT1 receptors may also contribute to this pathway.

  10. Endothelin-1 induces intracellular [Ca2+] increase via Ca2+ influx through the L-type Ca2+ channel, Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release and a pathway involving ETA receptors, PKC, PKA and AT1 receptors in cardiomyocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Using fura-2-acetoxymethyl ester (AM) fluorescence imaging and patch clamp techniques, we found that endothelin-1 (ET-1) significantly elevated the intracellular calcium level ([Ca2+]i) in a dose-dependent manner and activated the L-type Ca2+ channel in cardiomyocytes isolated from rats. The effect of ET-1 on [Ca2+]i elevation was abolished in the presence of the ETA receptor blocker BQ123, but was not affected by the ETB receptor blocker BQ788. ET-1-induced an increase in [Ca2+]i, which was inhibited 46.7% by pretreatment with a high concentration of ryanodine (10 μmol/L), a blocker of the ryanodine receptor. The ET-1-induced [Ca2+]i increase was also inhibited by the inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C (PKC) and angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1 receptor). We found that ET-1 induced an enhancement of the amplitude of the whole cell L-type Ca2+ channel current and an increase of open-state probability (NPo) of an L-type single Ca2+ channel. BQ123 completely blocked the ET-1-induced increase in calcium channel open-state probability. In this study we demonstrated that ET-1 regulates calcium overload through a series of mechanisms that include L-type Ca2+ channel activation and Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR). ETA receptors, PKC, PKA and AT1 receptors may also contribute to this pathway.

  11. Ca(2+-dependent regulation of the Ca(2+ concentration in the myometrium mitochondria. II. Ca(2+ effects on mitochondria membranes polarization and [Ca(2+](m

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. G. Babich

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It is known that Ca2+ accumulation in the mitochondria undergoes complex regulation by Ca2+ itself. But the mechanisms of such regulation are still discussed. In this paper we have shown that Ca ions directly or indirectly regulate the level of myometrium mitochondria membranes polarization. The additions of 100 µM Ca2+ were accompanied by depolarization of the mitochondria membranes. The following experiments were designed to study the impact of Ca2+ on the myometrium mitochondria [Ca2+]m. Isolated myometrium mitochondria were preincubated without or with 10 μM Са2+ followed by 100 μM Са2+ addition. Experiments were conducted in three mediums: without ATP and Mg2+ (0-medium, in the presence of 3 mM Mg2+ (Mg-medium and 3 mM Mg2+ + 3 mM ATP (Mg,ATP-medium. It was shown that the effects of 10 μM Са2+ addition were different in different mediums, namely in 0- and Mg-medium the [Ca2+]m values increased, whereas in Mg,ATP-medium statistically reliable changes were not registered. Preincubation of mitochondria with 10 μM Са2+ did not affect the [Ca2+]m value after the addition of 100 μM Са2+. The [Ca2+]m values after 100 μM Са2+ addition were the same in 0- and Mg,ATP-mediums and somewhat lower in Mg-medium. Preliminary incubation of mitochondria with 10 μM Са2+ in 0- and Mg-mediums reduced changes of Fluo 4 normalized fluorescence values that were induced by 100 μM Са2+ additions, but in Mg,ATP-medium such differences were not recorded. It is concluded that Са2+ exchange in myometrium mitochondria is regulated by the concentration of Ca ions as in the external medium, so in the matrix of mitochondria. The medium composition had a significant impact on the [Са2+]m values in the absence of exogenous cation. It is suggested that light increase of [Са2+]m before the addition of 100 μM Са2+ may have a positive effect on the functional activity of the mitochondria.

  12. Physical conditions in CaFe interstellar clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Gnacinski, P

    2007-01-01

    Interstellar clouds that exhibit strong Ca I and Fe I lines were called CaFe clouds. The ionisation equilibrium equations were used to model the column densities of Ca II, Ca I, K I, Na I, Fe I and Ti II in CaFe clouds. The chemical composition of CaFe clouds is that of the Solar System and no depletion of elements onto dust grains is seen. The CaFe clouds have high electron densities n=1 cm^-3 that leads to high column densities of neutral Ca and Fe.

  13. Physical conditions in CaFe interstellar clouds

    OpenAIRE

    Gnacinski, P.; Krogulec, M.

    2007-01-01

    Interstellar clouds that exhibit strong Ca I and Fe I lines were called CaFe clouds. The ionisation equilibrium equations were used to model the column densities of Ca II, Ca I, K I, Na I, Fe I and Ti II in CaFe clouds. The chemical composition of CaFe clouds is that of the Solar System and no depletion of elements onto dust grains is seen. The CaFe clouds have high electron densities n=1 cm^-3 that leads to high column densities of neutral Ca and Fe.

  14. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter MCU supports cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations, store-operated Ca2+ entry and Ca2+-dependent gene expression in response to receptor stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Samanta

    Full Text Available Ca2+ flux into mitochondria is an important regulator of cytoplasmic Ca2+ signals, energy production and cell death pathways. Ca2+ uptake can occur through the recently discovered mitochondrial uniporter channel (MCU but whether the MCU is involved in shaping Ca2+ signals and downstream responses to physiological levels of receptor stimulation is unknown. Here, we show that modest stimulation of leukotriene receptors with the pro-inflammatory signal LTC4 evokes a series of cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations that are rapidly and faithfully propagated into mitochondrial matrix. Knockdown of MCU or mitochondrial depolarisation, to reduce the driving force for Ca2+ entry into the matrix, prevents the mitochondrial Ca2+ rise and accelerates run down of the oscillations. The loss of cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations appeared to be a consequence of enhanced Ca2+-dependent inactivation of InsP3 receptors, which arose from the loss of mitochondrial Ca2+ buffering. Ca2+ dependent gene expression in response to leukotriene receptor activation was suppressed following knockdown of the MCU. In addition to buffering Ca2+ release, mitochondria also sequestrated Ca2+ entry through store-operated Ca2+ channels and this too was prevented following loss of MCU. MCU is therefore an important regulator of physiological pulses of cytoplasmic Ca2+.

  15. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter MCU supports cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations, store-operated Ca2+ entry and Ca2+-dependent gene expression in response to receptor stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Krishna; Douglas, Sophie; Parekh, Anant B

    2014-01-01

    Ca2+ flux into mitochondria is an important regulator of cytoplasmic Ca2+ signals, energy production and cell death pathways. Ca2+ uptake can occur through the recently discovered mitochondrial uniporter channel (MCU) but whether the MCU is involved in shaping Ca2+ signals and downstream responses to physiological levels of receptor stimulation is unknown. Here, we show that modest stimulation of leukotriene receptors with the pro-inflammatory signal LTC4 evokes a series of cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations that are rapidly and faithfully propagated into mitochondrial matrix. Knockdown of MCU or mitochondrial depolarisation, to reduce the driving force for Ca2+ entry into the matrix, prevents the mitochondrial Ca2+ rise and accelerates run down of the oscillations. The loss of cytoplasmic Ca2+ oscillations appeared to be a consequence of enhanced Ca2+-dependent inactivation of InsP3 receptors, which arose from the loss of mitochondrial Ca2+ buffering. Ca2+ dependent gene expression in response to leukotriene receptor activation was suppressed following knockdown of the MCU. In addition to buffering Ca2+ release, mitochondria also sequestrated Ca2+ entry through store-operated Ca2+ channels and this too was prevented following loss of MCU. MCU is therefore an important regulator of physiological pulses of cytoplasmic Ca2+.

  16. Relationship Between Ca2+-CaM and Ethylene-Induced PG Activity in Tomato Fruit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GU Cai-qin; XI Yu-fang; GUAN Jun-feng; LI Guang-min

    2003-01-01

    Polygalacturonase (PG) was studied during ripening and senescence of postharvest tomatofruit at pink stage at low and normal temperature. The results showed that the PG activity increased, thendecreased during ripening and senescence of tomato. Low temperature inhibited but ethylene enhanced PGactivity. Ethylene also enhanced caimodulin content, which was dependent on Ca2+ concentration in cell.When EGTA(Ca2+ chelator), verapamil (Vp) and LaCl3 (Ca2+ channel blockers), trifluoperazine and chloro-promaize (two CaM antagonisms) were used to treat tomato fruit at green mature stage with ethylene, theycould reverse ethylene-induced increase in PG activity, but Vp, chloropromaize (CPZ), trifluoperazine(TFP) could not directly influence PG activity, which indirectly indicated that influx of Ca2+ from the ex-tracellular space including the cell wall via the Ca2+ channel localized in plasma membrane and CaM were re-quired for ethylene-induced PG activity increase and that ethylene signal transduction may be related to Ca2+- CaM messenger system.

  17. Negative feedback from CaSR signaling to aquaporin-2 sensitizes vasopressin to extracellular Ca2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranieri, Marianna; Tamma, Grazia; Di Mise, Annarita; Russo, Annamaria; Centrone, Mariangela; Svelto, Maria; Calamita, Giuseppe; Valenti, Giovanna

    2015-07-01

    We previously described that high luminal Ca(2+) in the renal collecting duct attenuates short-term vasopressin-induced aquaporin-2 (AQP2) trafficking through activation of the Ca(2+)-sensing receptor (CaSR). Here, we evaluated AQP2 phosphorylation and permeability, in both renal HEK-293 cells and in the dissected inner medullary collecting duct, in response to specific activation of CaSR with NPS-R568. In CaSR-transfected cells, CaSR activation drastically reduced the basal levels of AQP2 phosphorylation at S256 (AQP2-pS256), thus having an opposite effect to vasopressin action. When forskolin stimulation was performed in the presence of NPS-R568, the increase in AQP2-pS256 and in the osmotic water permeability were prevented. In the freshly isolated inner mouse medullar collecting duct, stimulation with forskolin in the presence of NPS-R568 prevented the increase in AQP2-pS256 and osmotic water permeability. Our data demonstrate that the activation of CaSR in the collecting duct prevents the cAMP-dependent increase in AQP2-pS256 and water permeability, counteracting the short-term vasopressin response. By extension, our results suggest the attractive concept that CaSR expressed in distinct nephron segments exerts a negative feedback on hormones acting through cAMP, conferring high sensitivity of hormone to extracellular Ca(2+). © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  18. Heat and hyposmotic stimulation increase in [Ca2+]i by Ca2+ influx in rat synoviocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN WenWu; HU Fen; YANG WenXiu

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), which is marked by inflammatory synovitis, is a common, chronic autoimmune-disease, whose pathogenesis is complex and still unclear. In order to explore the effects of heat and hyposmotic stimuli on synoviocytes in rheumatoid arthritis, the changes of [Ca2+]i induced by heat, hyposmotic and 4α-PDD stimuli were observed in synoviocytes. [Ca2+]i elevation induced by heat ≥ 28℃, hyposmotic and 4α-PDD stimuli is found to be positively relative to increasing temperature, decreasing osmolality and rising concentration of 4α-PDD. Results show that there is reciprocity among these stimuli and desensitization, and that [Ca2+]i elevation depends on Ca2+ influx, but not necessarily links to Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel in synoviocytes. The above characteristics of Ca2+ influx are similar to those of TRPV4. A probable mechanism has been suggested that heat and hyposmotic stimulation might increase the level of [Ca2+]i by activating the TRPV4-like channel and Ca2+ influx in the synoviocytes.

  19. CaCl2-CaO熔盐中金属钙的电沉积行为研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭君康

    2014-01-01

    在900℃下,采用循环伏安法对CaCl2-CaO熔盐中金属钙的电沉积行为进行了研究.研究结果表明,在CaCl2熔盐中加入CaO后,熔盐中Ca2+的还原电位正移,且Ca2+的还原过程受扩散控制.

  20. Functional expression of Na-Ca exchanger clones measured with the fluorescent Ca(2+)-indicating dye fluo-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnetkamp, P P

    1996-01-01

    The process of Ca2+ homeostasis is of prime importance to all cells because of the ubiquitous role of cytoplasmic Ca2+ as an intracellular messenger and the cytotoxicity of sustained elevated cytosolic Ca2+ concentrations. Two classes of plasma membrane proteins are responsible for maintaining cytosolic free Ca2+ in the submicromolar range against a very large electrochemical Ca2+ gradient across the plasma membrane, the ATP-driven Ca2+ pump and Na-Ca exchangers. Two types of Na-Ca exchangers are known, the 3Na:1Ca exchangers found in heart, brain, kidney, and most other tissues and the 4Na:1Ca+ 1K exchanger found in retinal rod and cone photoreceptors. Functional expression of Na-Ca(/K) exchangers is most often measured as 45Ca uptake in Na(+)-loaded cells or as Na-Ca exchange currents with the giant excised patch technique. In this study, two functional assays used to detect expression of the bovine heart Na-Ca exchanger in CHO cells are described. Both assays are based on measurements of cytosolic free Ca2+ with the fluorescent Ca(2+)-indicating dye fluo-3 and should be equally applicable in the study of functional expression of both Na-Ca and Na-Ca/K exchanger clones.

  1. CaMKII inhibition targeted to the sarcoplasmic reticulum inhibits frequency dependent acceleration of relaxation and Ca2+ current facilitation

    OpenAIRE

    Picht, Eckard; DeSantiago, Jaime; Huke, Sabine; Kaetzel, Marcia A.; Dedman, John R.; Bers, Donald M.

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) in heart has been implicated in Ca2+ current (ICa) facilitation, enhanced sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release and frequency dependent acceleration of relaxation (FDAR) via enhanced SR Ca2+ uptake. However, questions remain about how CaMKII may work in these three processes. Here we tested the role of CaM-KII in these processes using transgenic mice (SR-AIP) that express four concatenated repeats of the CaMKII inhibitory peptide...

  2. Advanced reservoir characterization in the Antelope Shale to establish the viability of CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery in California`s Monterey Formation siliceous shales. Annual report, February 12, 1996--February 11, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toronyi, R.M.

    1997-12-01

    The Buena Vista Hills field is located about 25 miles southwest of Bakersfield, in Kern County, California, about two miles north of the city of Taft, and five miles south of the Elk Hills field. The Antelope Shale zone was discovered at the Buena Vista Hills field in 1952, and has since been under primary production. Little research was done to improve the completion techniques during the development phase in the 1950s, so most of the wells are completed with about 1000 ft of slotted liner. The proposed pilot consists of four existing producers on 20 acre spacing with a new 10 acre infill well drilled as the pilot CO{sub 2} injector. Most of the reservoir characterization of the first phase of the project will be performed using data collected in the pilot pattern wells. This is the first annual report of the project. It covers the period February 12, 1996 to February 11, 1997. During this period the Chevron Murvale 653Z-26B well was drilled in Section 26-T31S/R23E in the Buena Vista Hills field, Kern County, California. The Monterey Formation equivalent Brown and Antelope Shales were continuously cored, the zone was logged with several different kinds of wireline logs, and the well was cased to a total depth of 4907 ft. Core recovery was 99.5%. Core analyses that have been performed include Dean Stark porosity, permeability and fluid saturations, field wettability, anelastic strain recovery, spectral core gamma, profile permeametry, and photographic imaging. Wireline log analysis includes mineral-based error minimization (ELAN), NMR T2 processing, and dipole shear wave anisotropy. A shear wave vertical seismic profile was acquired after casing was set and processing is nearly complete.

  3. Advanced reservoir characterization in the Antelope Shale to establish the viability of CO{sub 2} enhanced oil recovery in California`s Monterey Formation siliceous shales. Annual report, February 12, 1996--February 11, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toronyi, R.M.

    1997-12-01

    The Buena Vista Hills field is located about 25 miles southwest of Bakersfield, in Kern County, California, about two miles north of the city of Taft, and five miles south of the Elk Hills field. The Antelope Shale zone was discovered at the Buena Vista Hills field in 1952, and has since been under primary production. Little research was done to improve the completion techniques during the development phase in the 1950s, so most of the wells are completed with about 1000 ft of slotted liner. The proposed pilot consists of four existing producers on 20 acre spacing with a new 10 acre infill well drilled as the pilot CO{sub 2} injector. Most of the reservoir characterization of the first phase of the project will be performed using data collected in the pilot pattern wells. This is the first annual report of the project. It covers the period February 12, 1996 to February 11, 1997. During this period the Chevron Murvale 653Z-26B well was drilled in Section 26-T31S/R23E in the Buena Vista Hills field, Kern County, California. The Monterey Formation equivalent Brown and Antelope Shales were continuously cored, the zone was logged with several different kinds of wireline logs, and the well was cased to a total depth of 4907 ft. Core recovery was 99.5%. Core analyses that have been performed include Dean Stark porosity, permeability and fluid saturations, field wettability, anelastic strain recovery, spectral core gamma, profile permeametry, and photographic imaging. Wireline log analysis includes mineral-based error minimization (ELAN), NMR T2 processing, and dipole shear wave anisotropy. A shear wave vertical seismic profile was acquired after casing was set and processing is nearly complete.

  4. Treatment of Ruptured Ovarian Endometrioma with Extremely High CA 125, Moderately High CA 19-9 and CA 15-3 Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzeyyen Duran

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this case report, a ruptured ovarian endometrioma with a very high CA-125 level, moderately elevated CA 19-9, and CA 15-3 levels is presented. A 20 years old patient, complaining from pelvic pain, 5 cm adnexial mass was detected on left side. Biochemical examination was revealed very high CA-125 value (2556IU/ml, moderately elevated CA 19-9 (134IU/ml, and CA 15-3 (65IU/ml values. Laparoscopy was done and a ruptured ovarian endometrioma of 5 cm was seen during operation. After the total excision of the cyst, tumor markers fell rapidly. Very high CA-125 value, moderately elevated CA19-9, and CA 15-3 values can be seen in cases with ruptured endometrioma. In young patients, endometrioma must be considered firstly and laparoscopy should be applied instead of more invasive methods unless there was any finding or strong suspicion about malignancy.

  5. A significant but rather mild contribution of T286 autophosphorylation to Ca2+/CaM-stimulated CaMKII activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J Coultrap

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Autophosphorylation of the Ca(2+/calmodulin (CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII at T286 generates partially Ca(2+/CaM-independent "autonomous" activity, which is thought to be required for long-term potentiation (LTP, a form of synaptic plasticity thought to underlie learning and memory. A requirement for T286 autophosphorylation also for efficient Ca(2+/CaM-stimulated CaMKII activity has been described, but remains controversial. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to determine the contribution of T286 autophosphorylation to Ca(2+/CaM-stimulated CaMKII activity, the activity of CaMKII wild type and its phosphorylation-incompetent T286A mutant was compared. As the absolute activity can vary between individual kinase preparations, the activity was measured in six different extracts for each kinase (expressed in HEK-293 cells. Consistent with measurements on purified kinase (from a baculovirus/Sf9 cell expression system, CaMKII T286A showed a mildly but significantly reduced rate of Ca(2+/CaM-stimulated phosphorylation for two different peptide substrates (to ~75-84% of wild type. Additional slower CaMKII autophosphorylation at T305/306 inhibits stimulation by Ca(2+/CaM, but occurs only minimally for CaMKII wild type during CaM-stimulated activity assays. Thus, we tested if the T286A mutant may show more extensive inhibitory autophosphorylation, which could explain its reduced stimulated activity. By contrast, inhibitory autophosphorylation was instead found to be even further reduced for the T286A mutant under our assay conditions. On a side note, the phospho-T305 antibody showed some basal background immuno-reactivity also with non-phosphorylated CaMKII, as indicated by T305/306A mutants. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results indicate that Ca(2+/CaM-stimulated CaMKII activity is mildly (~1.2-1.3fold further increased by additional T286 autophosphorylation, but that this autophosphorylation is not required for the major

  6. Control of ciliary motility by Ca sup 2+ : Integration of Ca sup 2+ -dependent functions and targets for Ca sup 2+ action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    To identify functions that regulate Ca{sup 2+}-induced ciliary reversal in Paramecium, mutants defective in terminating depolarization-induced backward swimming were selected. Six independent recessive mutations (k-shy) comprising two complementation groups, k-shyA and k-shyB, were identified. All mutants exhibited prolonged backward swimming in depolarizing solutions. Voltage clamp studies revealed that mutant Ca{sup 2+} current amplitudes were reduced, but could be restored to wild type levels by EGTA injection. The recovery of the mutant Ca{sup 2+} current from Ca{sup 2+}-dependent inactivation, and the decay of the Ca{sup 2+}-dependent K{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent Na{sup +} currents after depolarization were slow in k-shy compared to wild type. To identify protein targets of Ca{sup 2+} action, ciliary proteins that interact with calmodulin (CaM) were characterized. With a {sup 125}I-CaM blot assay, several CaM-binding proteins were identified including axonemal, soluble, and membrane-bound polypeptides. Competitive displacement studies with unlabeled Paramecium CaM, bovine CaM, and troponinC suggested that both protein types bind CaM with high affinity and specificity. To examine the presence of CaM-binding sites in intact axonemes, a filtration binding assay was developed.

  7. Diffusion of Ca and Mg in Calcite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cygan, R.T.; Fisler, D.K.

    1999-02-10

    The self-diffusion of Ca and the tracer diffusion of Mg in calcite have been experimentally measured using isotopic tracers of {sup 25}Mg and {sup 44}Ca. Natural single crystals of calcite were coated with a thermally-sputtered oxide thin film and then annealed in a CO{sub 2} gas at one atmosphere total pressure and temperatures from 550 to 800 C. Diffusion coefficient values were derived from the depth profiles obtained by ion microprobe analysis. The resultant activation energies for Mg tracer diffusion and Ca self-diffusion are respectively: E{sub a}(Mg) = 284 {+-} 74 kJ/mol and E{sub a}(Ca) = 271 {+-} 80 kJ/mol. For the temperature ranges in these experiments, the diffusion of Mg is faster than Ca. The results are generally consistent in magnitude with divalent cation diffusion rates obtained in previous studies and provide a means of interpreting the thermal histories of carbonate minerals, the mechanism of dolomitization, and other diffusion-controlled processes. The results indicate that cation diffusion in calcite is relatively slow and cations are the rate-limiting diffusing species for the deformation of calcite and carbonate rocks. Application of the calcite-dolomite geothermometer to metamorphic assemblages will be constrained by cation diffusion and cooling rates. The direct measurement of Mg tracer diffusion in calcite indicates that dolomitization is unlikely to be accomplished by Mg diffusion in the solid state but by a recrystallization process.

  8. Clinical significance of detecting CEA, CA199, AFP, HCG, CA153, CA125 in postoperative treatment of patients with ovarian cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue Pan; Zhen-Hua Du

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To explore the clinical significance of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), carbohydrate antigen 199 (CA199), a tire protein (AFP), human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG), carbohydrate antigen 153 (CA153) and carbohydrate antigen 125 (CA125) in the postoperative treatment of patients with ovarian cancer.Methods:210 cases of patients with ovarian cancer after initial treatment from January 2015 to December 2015, 232 cases of patients with ovarian benign tumor and 250 cases of healthy women were selected, CEA, CA199, AFP, HCG, CA153 and CA125 levels were detected, and the levels after chemotherapy in patients with ovarian carcinoma were detected.Results:CEA, CA199, AFP, HCG, CA153 and CA125 levels in patients with ovarian cancer were (12.37±7.43) ng/mL, (84.04±26.96) U/mL, (37.46±9.47) μg/L, (110.54±35.51) IU/L, (51.23±9.20) U/mL and (64.36±42.68) U/mL, respectively, which were significantly higher than that in normal controls and patients with benign ovarian lesions, and were considered to be statistically significant. Chemotherapy after two cycles, CEA, CA199, AFP, HCG, CA153 and CA125 levels in patients with ovarian cancer were significantly lower than that before chemotherapy, and were considered to be statistically different. Chemotherapy after four cycles, CEA, CA199, AFP, HCG, CA153 and CA125 levels in patients with ovarian cancer continue to decrease, and were significantly lower than that of chemotherapy after two cycles, and had statistical differences.Conclusion:CEA, CA199, AFP, HCG, CA153 and CA125 can be used as important indicators for monitoring the chemotherapy effects, early recurrence and metastasis of ovarian cancer.

  9. Sulfide capacity of CaO-CaF2-SiO2 slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susaki, Katsujiro; Maeda, Masafumi; Sano, Nobuo

    1990-02-01

    The sulfide capacity C S 2- = (pct S2-) · ( P O 2/ P S 2)1/2) of CaO-CaF2-SiO2 slags saturated with CaO, 3CaO · SiO2 or 2CaOSiO2 was determined at 1200 °C, 1250 °C, 1300 °C, and 1350 °C by equilibrating molten slag, molten silver, and CO-CO2 gas mixtures. Higher sulfide capacities were obtained for CaO-saturated slags. A drastic decrease was observed in those values when the ratio pct CaO/pct SiO2 is less than 2. The sulfur partition between carbon-saturated iron melts and presently investigated slags was calculated by using the sulfide capacities obtained and the activity coefficient of sulfur in carbon-saturated iron, which was also experimentally determined. For slags saturated with CaO, partitions of sulfur as high as 10,000 were obtained at 1300 °C and 1350 °C. Correlations between the sulfide capacity and other basicity indexes such as carbonate capacity and theoretical optical basicity were also discussed.

  10. Multifaceted plasma membrane Ca(2+) pumps: From structure to intracellular Ca(2+) handling and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padányi, Rita; Pászty, Katalin; Hegedűs, Luca; Varga, Karolina; Papp, Béla; Penniston, John T; Enyedi, Ágnes

    2016-06-01

    Plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPases (PMCAs) are intimately involved in the control of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration. They reduce Ca(2+) in the cytosol not only by direct ejection, but also by controlling the formation of inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate and decreasing Ca(2+) release from the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pool. In mammals four genes (PMCA1-4) are expressed, and alternative RNA splicing generates more than twenty variants. The variants differ in their regulatory characteristics. They localize into highly specialized membrane compartments and respond to the incoming Ca(2+) with distinct temporal resolution. The expression pattern of variants depends on cell type; a change in this pattern can result in perturbed Ca(2+) homeostasis and thus altered cell function. Indeed, PMCAs undergo remarkable changes in their expression pattern during tumorigenesis that might significantly contribute to the unbalanced Ca(2+) homeostasis of cancer cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Calcium and Cell Fate. Guest Editors: Jacques Haiech, Claus Heizmann, Joachim Krebs, Thierry Capiod and Olivier Mignen.

  11. Low-affinity Ca2+ indicators compared in measurements of skeletal muscle Ca2+ transients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingworth, Stephen; Gee, Kyle R; Baylor, Stephen M

    2009-10-07

    The low-affinity fluorescent Ca(2+) indicators OGB-5N, Fluo-5N, fura-5N, Rhod-5N, and Mag-fluo-4 were evaluated for their ability to accurately track the kinetics of the spatially averaged free Ca(2+) transient (Delta[Ca(2+)]) in skeletal muscle. Frog single fibers were injected with one of the above indicators and, usually, furaptra (previously shown to rapidly track Delta[Ca(2+)]). In response to an action potential, the full duration at half-maximum of the indicator's fluorescence change (DeltaF) was found to be larger with OGB-5N, Fluo-5N, fura-5N, and Rhod-5N than with furaptra; thus, these indicators do not track Delta[Ca(2+)] with kinetic fidelity. In contrast, the DeltaF time course of Mag-fluo-4 was identical to furaptra's; thus, Mag-fluo-4 also yields reliable kinetic information about Delta[Ca(2+)]. Mag-fluo-4's DeltaF has a larger signal/noise ratio than furaptra's (for similar indicator concentrations), and should thus be more useful for tracking Delta[Ca(2+)] in small cell volumes. However, because the resting fluorescence of Mag-fluo-4 probably arises largely from indicator that is bound with Mg(2+), the amplitude of the Mag-fluo-4 signal, and its calibration in Delta[Ca(2+)] units, is likely to be more sensitive to variations in [Mg(2+)] than furaptra's.

  12. Investigation of the 42Ca(n, γ)43Ca reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gruppelaar, H.; Kamp, A.M.F. op den; Spits, A.M.J.

    1969-01-01

    Gamma rays from thermal-neutron capture in enriched 42Ca were investigated with Ge(Li) detectors. Gamma-gamma coincidence measurements were performed with a Ge(Li)---NaI detector combination. A decay scheme of 43Ca has been constructed containing 42 of the 47 observed γ-lines. The excitation energie

  13. Synaptotagmin-7 is a principal Ca2+ sensor for Ca2+ -induced glucagon exocytosis in pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Wei, Shun-Hui; Hoang, Dong Nhut

    2009-01-01

    abolished Ca(2+)-triggered glucagon secretion. Moreover, single-cell capacitance measurements confirmed that pancreatic alpha-cells lacking synaptotagmin-7 exhibited little Ca(2+)-induced exocytosis, whereas all other physiological and morphological parameters of the alpha-cells were normal. Our data thus...

  14. (Meta)stable CaC{sub 2}; (Meta)stabiles CaC{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaser, J.; Dill, S.; Marzini, M.; Mayer, H.A.; Meyer, H.J. [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Anorganische Chemie

    2001-05-01

    One out of four modifications of CaC{sub 2} is the so-called metastable calcium carbide, CaC{sub 2}-III, which was synthesized as pure material. It forms by heating monoclinic CaC{sub 2}-II (C2/c) above 150 C and remains stable after cooling down to room temperature. The structure was refined from X-ray powder patterns (C2/m, Z = 4, a = 722.6(1) pm, b = 385.26(7) pm, c = 737.6(1) pm, {beta} = 107.345(2) ). After grinding CaC{sub 2}-III transforms back into CaC{sub 2}-II. Heating CaC{sub 2}-III induces a reversible phase transition into the cubic modification (CaC{sub 2}-IV) at 460 C. Differences between the three different structures of CaC{sub 2} I-III, being stable at ambient conditions are also shown by {sup 13}C-MAS-NMR measurements, especially the presence of two distinct types of carbon atoms in the structure of the title compound. (orig.)

  15. Differential NMDA receptor-dependent calcium loading and mitochondrial dysfunction in CA1 vs. CA3 hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanika, Ruslan I; Winters, Christine A; Pivovarova, Natalia B; Andrews, S Brian

    2010-02-01

    Hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons are selectively vulnerable to ischemia, while adjacent CA3 neurons are relatively resistant. Although glutamate receptor-mediated mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload and dysfunction is a major component of ischemia-induced neuronal death, no direct relationship between selective neuronal vulnerability and mitochondrial dysfunction has been demonstrated in intact brain preparations. Here, we show that in organotypic slice cultures NMDA induces much larger Ca(2+) elevations in vulnerable CA1 neurons than in resistant CA3. Consequently, CA1 mitochondria exhibit stronger calcium accumulation, more extensive swelling and damage, stronger depolarization of their membrane potential, and a significant increase in ROS generation. NMDA-induced Ca(2+) and ROS elevations were abolished in Ca(2+)-free medium or by NMDAR antagonists, but not by zinc chelation. We conclude that Ca(2)(+) overload-dependent mitochondrial dysfunction is a determining factor in the selective vulnerability of CA1 neurons.

  16. Atom Trap Trace Analysis of Ca Isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoekstra, S., E-mail: hoekstra@fhi-berlin.mgp.de [Fritz-Haber Institut der Max-Planck Gesellschaft (Germany); Mollema, A. K.; Morgenstern, R.; Willmann, L.; Wilschut, H. W.; Hoekstra, R. [Rijksuniversiteit Groningen, Atomic Physics, KVI (Netherlands)

    2005-04-15

    In our experiment we aim at the detection of the rarest, naturally occuring calcium isotope 41Ca by means of atom trap trace analysis. On basis of single-atom detection of 46Ca our present sensitivity for 41Ca is estimated to be 1 atom per hour at an abundance of 10-12. To reach a sensitivity at the level of natural abundance, which is 10-14, we need to reduce atomic beam losses. To achieve this, optical compression of the atomic beam is a promising option. We use Monte Carlo Simulations to demonstrate that optical compression of the atomic beam increases throughput of the atomic beam as well as isotope selectivity.

  17. Intercellular Ca2+ Waves: Mechanisms and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Intercellular calcium (Ca2+) waves (ICWs) represent the propagation of increases in intracellular Ca2+ through a syncytium of cells and appear to be a fundamental mechanism for coordinating multicellular responses. ICWs occur in a wide diversity of cells and have been extensively studied in vitro. More recent studies focus on ICWs in vivo. ICWs are triggered by a variety of stimuli and involve the release of Ca2+ from internal stores. The propagation of ICWs predominately involves cell communication with internal messengers moving via gap junctions or extracellular messengers mediating paracrine signaling. ICWs appear to be important in both normal physiology as well as pathophysiological processes in a variety of organs and tissues including brain, liver, retina, cochlea, and vascular tissue. We review here the mechanisms of initiation and propagation of ICWs, the key intra- and extracellular messengers (inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and ATP) mediating ICWs, and the proposed physiological functions of ICWs. PMID:22811430

  18. ASteCA - Automated Stellar Cluster Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Perren, Gabriel I; Piatti, Andrés E

    2014-01-01

    We present ASteCA (Automated Stellar Cluster Analysis), a suit of tools designed to fully automatize the standard tests applied on stellar clusters to determine their basic parameters. The set of functions included in the code make use of positional and photometric data to obtain precise and objective values for a given cluster's center coordinates, radius, luminosity function and integrated color magnitude, as well as characterizing through a statistical estimator its probability of being a true physical cluster rather than a random overdensity of field stars. ASteCA incorporates a Bayesian field star decontamination algorithm capable of assigning membership probabilities using photometric data alone. An isochrone fitting process based on the generation of synthetic clusters from theoretical isochrones and selection of the best fit through a genetic algorithm is also present, which allows ASteCA to provide accurate estimates for a cluster's metallicity, age, extinction and distance values along with its unce...

  19. Ca3Mn2O7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guiblin, Nicolas; Grebille, Dominique; Leligny, Henri; Martin, Christine

    2002-01-01

    The tricalcium dimanganese heptaoxide (Ca3Mn2O7) member of the Ruddlesden-Popper series Ca(n+1)Mn(n)O(3n+1), i.e. with n = 2, was previously reported with an I-centred tetragonal lattice [a(t) = 3.68 and c(t) = 19.57 A] by Fawcett, Sunstrom, Greenblatt, Croft & Ramanujachary [Chem. Mater. (1998), 10, 3643-3651]. It is now found to be orthorhombic, with an A-centred lattice [a = 5.2347 (6), b = 5.2421 (2) and c = 19.4177 (19) A]. The structure has been refined in space group A2(1)am using X-ray single-crystal diffraction data and assuming the existence of twin domains related by the (1-10) plane. A comparison with the basic perovskite structure CaMnO3 (n = infinity) is proposed.

  20. Calcium platinum aluminium, CaPtAl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Fon Abi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary X-ray study of CaPtAl has been reported previously by Hulliger [J. Alloys Compd (1993, 196, 225–228] based on X-ray powder diffraction data without structure refinement. With the present single-crystal X-ray study, we confirm the assignment of the TiNiSi type for CaPtAl, in a fully ordered inverse structure. All three atoms of the asymmetric unit have .m. site symmetry. The structure features a ∞3[AlPt] open framework with a fourfold coordination of Pt by Al atoms and vice versa. The Ca atoms are located in the large channels of the structure.

  1. Anoxia-induced elevation of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration depends on different Ca2+ sources in rice and wheat protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yemelyanov, Vladislav V; Shishova, Maria F; Chirkova, Tamara V; Lindberg, Sylvia M

    2011-08-01

    The anoxia-dependent elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, [Ca(2+)](cyt), was investigated in plants differing in tolerance to hypoxia. The [Ca(2+)](cyt) was measured by fluorescence microscopy in single protoplasts loaded with the calcium-fluoroprobe Fura 2-AM. Imposition of anoxia led to a fast (within 3 min) significant elevation of [Ca(2+)](cyt) in rice leaf protoplasts. A tenfold drop in the external Ca(2+) concentration (to 0.1 mM) resulted in considerable decrease of the [Ca(2+)](cyt) shift. Rice root protoplasts reacted upon anoxia with higher amplitude. Addition of plasma membrane (verapamil, La(3+) and EGTA) and intracellular membrane Ca(2+)-channel antagonists (Li(+), ruthenium red and cyclosporine A) reduced the anoxic Ca(2+)-accumulation in rice. Wheat protoplasts responded to anoxia by smaller changes of [Ca(2+)](cyt). In wheat leaf protoplasts, the amplitude of the Ca(2+)-shift little depended on the external level of Ca(2+). Wheat root protoplasts were characterized by a small shift of [Ca(2+)](cyt) under anoxia. Plasmalemma Ca(2+)-channel blockers had little effect on the elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) in wheat protoplasts. Intact rice seedlings absorbed Ca(2+) from the external medium under anoxic treatment. On the contrary, wheat seedlings were characterized by leakage of Ca(2+). Verapamil abolished the Ca(2+) influx in rice roots and Ca(2+) efflux from wheat roots. Anoxia-induced [Ca(2+)](cyt) elevation was high particularly in rice, a hypoxia-tolerant species. In conclusion, both external and internal Ca(2+) stores are important for anoxic [Ca(2+)](cyt) elevation in rice, whereas the hypoxia-intolerant wheat does not require external sources for [Ca(2+)](cyt) rise. Leaf and root protoplasts similarly responded to anoxia, independent of their organ origin.

  2. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in skeletal muscle health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jingsong; Dhakal, Kamal; Yi, Jianxun

    2016-08-01

    Muscle uses Ca(2+) as a messenger to control contraction and relies on ATP to maintain the intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. Mitochondria are the major sub-cellular organelle of ATP production. With a negative inner membrane potential, mitochondria take up Ca(2+) from their surroundings, a process called mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. Under physiological conditions, Ca(2+) uptake into mitochondria promotes ATP production. Excessive uptake causes mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload, which activates downstream adverse responses leading to cell dysfunction. Moreover, mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake could shape spatio-temporal patterns of intracellular Ca(2+) signaling. Malfunction of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake is implicated in muscle degeneration. Unlike non-excitable cells, mitochondria in muscle cells experience dramatic changes of intracellular Ca(2+) levels. Besides the sudden elevation of Ca(2+) level induced by action potentials, Ca(2+) transients in muscle cells can be as short as a few milliseconds during a single twitch or as long as minutes during tetanic contraction, which raises the question whether mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake is fast and big enough to shape intracellular Ca(2+) signaling during excitation-contraction coupling and creates technical challenges for quantification of the dynamic changes of Ca(2+) inside mitochondria. This review focuses on characterization of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake in skeletal muscle and its role in muscle physiology and diseases.

  3. Electrochemical formation of Mg-Li-Ca alloys by codeposition of Mg, Li and Ca from LiCl-KCl-MgCl2-CaCl2 melts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yong De; Zhang, Mi Lin; Xue, Yun; Han, Wei; Cao, Dian Xue; Jing, Xiao Yan; He, Li Yi; Yuan, Yi

    2009-08-07

    This work presents electrochemical formation of Mg-Li-Ca alloys via codeposition of Mg, Li and Ca on a molybdenum electrode in KCl-LiCl-MgCl(2)-CaCl(2) melts at 943 K. Cyclic voltammograms (CVs) showed that the underpotential deposition (UPD) of calcium on pre-deposited magnesium leads to the formation of a liquid Mg-Ca alloy, and the succeeding underpotential deposition of lithium on pre-deposited Mg-Ca alloy leads to the formation of a liquid Mg-Li-Ca solution. Chronopotentiometric measurements indicated that the codepositon of Mg, Li and Ca occurs at current densities more negative than -0.31 A cm(-2) in LiCl-KCl-MgCl(2) (5 wt%) melts containing 1 wt% CaCl(2). Chronoamperograms demonstrated that the onset potential for the codeposition of Mg, Li and Ca is -2.200 V, and the codeposition of Mg, Li and Ca is formed when the applied potentials are more negative than -2.200 V. X-Ray diffraction (XRD) indicated that Mg-Li-Ca alloys with different phases were formed via galvanostatic electrolysis. The microstructures of typical alpha and beta phases of Mg-Li-Ca alloys were characterized by optical microscope (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The analysis of energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) showed that the element Ca mainly distributes along grain boundary in Mg-Li-Ca alloys. The results of inductively coupled plasma analysis determined that the chemical compositions of Mg-Li-Ca alloys correspond with the phase structures of XRD patterns, and the lithium and calcium contents of Mg-Li-Ca alloys depend on the concentrations of MgCl(2) and CaCl(2).

  4. CA19-9antigenlevelscandistinguishbetween benignandmalignantpancreaticobiliarydisease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gareth Morris-Stiff; Mary Teli; Nicky Jardine; Malcolm CA Puntis

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: CA19-9 is a carbohydrate tumor-associated antigen which is frequently upregulated in pancreatobiliary neoplasia. However, it may also be elevated in patients with jaundice in the absence of a tumor due to biliary obstruction, and in other non-hepato-pancreatico-biliary conditions. This study aimed to evaluate whether CA19-9 levels could accurately differentiate between benign and malignant pancreatobiliary disease. METHODS: All patients referred to a single surgeon for investigation of pancreaticobiliary disease in 2003 in whom a ifrm diagnosis had been established were included. For malignant disease, a histological diagnosis was required but for benign disease a ifrm radiological diagnosis was deemed adequate. The patients were divided into 4 categories:pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PCa); cholangiocarcinoma (CCa); chronic pancreatitis (CP) and biliary calculous disease (Calc). Bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase levels corresponding to the point of assessment of CA19-9 were also noted. RESULTS:  Final diagnoses were made of pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PCa, n=73), cholangiocarcinoma (CCa, n=19), ampullary carcinoma (Amp, n=7), neuroendocrine carcinoma (Neu, n=4), duodenal carcinoma (Duo, n=3), chronic pancreatitis (CP, n=115), and biliary calculous disease (Calc, n=27). Median CA19-9 levels (U/ml) were:PCa, 653;CCa, 408;Duo, 403;Calc, 27;CP, 19;Neu, 10.5;Amp, 8 (reference range: 0-37). The CA19-9 levels were signiifcantly greater for malignant than for benign disease, could differentiate PCa from CCa/Duo, and were signiifcantly higher in unresectable than in resectable PCa. The sensitivity, speciifcity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for CA19-9 were 84.9%, 69.7%, 67.7%and 86.1%, respectively. A ROC analysis provided an area under the curve for CA19-9 of 0.871 (0.820-0.922), giving an optimal CA19-9 of 70.5 U/ml for differentiating benign from malignant pathology. Using this cut-off, the sensitivity was 82

  5. Novel regulatory aspects of the extracellular Ca2+-sensing receptor, CaR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccardi, Daniela; Finney, Brenda A; Wilkinson, William J; Kemp, Paul J

    2009-10-01

    The capacity to sense and adapt to changes in environmental cues is of paramount importance for every living organism. From yeast to man, cells must be able to match cellular activities to growth environment and nutrient availability. Key to this process is the development of membrane-bound systems that can detect modifications in the extracellular environment and to translate these into biological responses. Evidence gathered over the last 15 years has demonstrated that many of these cell surface "sensors" belong to the G protein-coupled receptor superfamily. Crucial to our understanding of nutrient sensing in mammalian species has been the identification of the extracellular Ca(2+)/cation-sensing receptor, CaR. CaR was the first ion-sensing molecule identified in man and genetic studies in humans have revealed the importance of the CaR in mineral ion metabolism. Latter, it has become apparent that the CaR also plays an important role outside the Ca(2+) homeostatic system, as an integrator of multiple environmental signals for the regulation of many vital cellular processes, from cell-to-cell communication to secretion and cell survival/cell death. Recently, novel aspects of receptor function reveal an unexpected role for the CaR in the regulation of growth and development in utero.

  6. Ca(2+)-activated chloride channel activity during Ca(2+) alternans in ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaporis, Giedrius; Blatter, Lothar A

    2016-11-01

    Cardiac alternans, defined beat-to-beat alternations in contraction, action potential (AP) morphology or cytosolic Ca transient (CaT) amplitude, is a high risk indicator for cardiac arrhythmias. We investigated mechanisms of cardiac alternans in single rabbit ventricular myocytes. CaTs were monitored simultaneously with membrane currents or APs recorded with the patch clamp technique. A strong correlation between beat-to-beat alternations of AP morphology and CaT alternans was observed. During CaT alternans application of voltage clamp protocols in form of pre-recorded APs revealed a prominent Ca(2+)-dependent membrane current consisting of a large outward component coinciding with AP phases 1 and 2, followed by an inward current during AP repolarization. Approximately 85% of the initial outward current was blocked by Cl(-) channel blocker DIDS or lowering external Cl(-) concentration identifying it as a Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) current (ICaCC). The data suggest that ICaCC plays a critical role in shaping beat-to-beat alternations in AP morphology during alternans.

  7. DA-6034 Induces [Ca(2+)]i Increase in Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Mi; Park, Soonhong; Ji, Hyewon; Kim, Tae-Im; Kim, Eung Kweon; Kang, Kyung Koo; Shin, Dong Min

    2014-04-01

    DA-6034, a eupatilin derivative of flavonoid, has shown potent effects on the protection of gastric mucosa and induced the increases in fluid and glycoprotein secretion in human and rat corneal and conjunctival cells, suggesting that it might be considered as a drug for the treatment of dry eye. However, whether DA-6034 induces Ca(2+) signaling and its underlying mechanism in epithelial cells are not known. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism for actions of DA-6034 in Ca(2+) signaling pathways of the epithelial cells (conjunctival and corneal cells) from human donor eyes and mouse salivary gland epithelial cells. DA-6034 activated Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) channels (CaCCs) and increased intracellular calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) in primary cultured human conjunctival cells. DA-6034 also increased [Ca(2+)]i in mouse salivary gland cells and human corneal epithelial cells. [Ca(2+)]i increase of DA-6034 was dependent on the Ca(2+) entry from extracellular and Ca(2+) release from internal Ca(2+) stores. Interestingly, these effects of DA-6034 were related to ryanodine receptors (RyRs) but not phospholipase C/inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) pathway and lysosomal Ca(2+) stores. These results suggest that DA-6034 induces Ca(2+) signaling via extracellular Ca(2+) entry and RyRs-sensitive Ca(2+) release from internal Ca(2+) stores in epithelial cells.

  8. 75 FR 8414 - California Disaster # CA-00150

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION California Disaster CA-00150 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of California dated...

  9. 76 FR 7622 - California Disaster #CA-00162

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION California Disaster CA-00162 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ] ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of California dated...

  10. 77 FR 61815 - California Disaster #CA-00190

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION California Disaster CA-00190 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of...

  11. 76 FR 38263 - California Disaster #CA-00172

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office Small Business Administration California Disaster CA-00172 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for...

  12. 75 FR 17792 - California Disaster # CA-00150

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION California Disaster CA-00150 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Administrative declaration of disaster for the State of...

  13. 76 FR 5856 - California Disaster #CA-00164

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION California Disaster CA-00164 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for...

  14. 75 FR 13144 - California Disaster #CA-00151

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION California Disaster CA-00151 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for...

  15. 76 FR 11307 - California Disaster #CA-00162

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION California Disaster CA-00162 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Amendment 1. SUMMARY: This is an amendment of the Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of...

  16. 75 FR 68848 - California Disaster #CA-00160

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-09

    ... [Federal Register Volume 75, Number 216 (Tuesday, November 9, 2010)] [Notices] [Pages 68848-68849] [FR Doc No: 2010-28201] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12370 and 12371] California Disaster CA-00160 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. [[Page 68849

  17. 76 FR 18614 - California Disaster #CA-00167

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION California Disaster CA-00167 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of California dated...

  18. 76 FR 80446 - California Disaster #CA-00182

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-23

    ... [Federal Register Volume 76, Number 247 (Friday, December 23, 2011)] [Notices] [Pages 80446-80447] [FR Doc No: 2011-32952] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12967 and 12968] California Disaster CA-00182 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is...

  19. 76 FR 24555 - California Disaster #CA-00171

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION California Disaster CA-00171 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of CALIFORNIA dated...

  20. 77 FR 58901 - California Disaster #CA-00190

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION California Disaster CA-00190 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of California dated...

  1. 75 FR 27846 - California Disaster # CA-00155

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-18

    ... [Federal Register Volume 75, Number 95 (Tuesday, May 18, 2010)] [Notices] [Page 27846] [FR Doc No: 2010-11746] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12166 and 12167] California Disaster CA-00155 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of...

  2. 75 FR 69733 - California Disaster #CA-00161

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-15

    ... [Federal Register Volume 75, Number 219 (Monday, November 15, 2010)] [Notices] [Page 69733] [FR Doc No: 2010-28587] SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION [Disaster Declaration 12373 and 12374] California Disaster CA-00161 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice...

  3. 75 FR 22872 - California Disaster # CA-00154

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION California Disaster CA-00154 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of California dated...

  4. Numerical model of Ca(OH)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, T.; Peelen, W.; Larbi, J.; Rooij, M. de; Polder, R.

    2010-01-01

    A mathematical model is being developed to describe a repair method in concrete, called cathodic protection (CP). The model is in principle also useful to describe electrodeposition in concrete, e.g. the process of re-precipitation of Ca(OH)2 invoked by an electrical current. In CP, the c

  5. 76 FR 20433 - California Disaster #CA-00169

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... ADMINISTRATION California Disaster CA-00169 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of California dated 04/05/2011. Incident: Center Fire. Incident Period: 03/18/2011 through 03/20/2011. Effective Date:...

  6. 78 FR 55771 - California Disaster #CA-00207

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... ADMINISTRATION California Disaster CA-00207 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of CALIFORNIA dated 08/26/2013. Incident: Silver Fire. Incident Period: 08/07/2013 through 08/14/2013. Effective Date:...

  7. 76 FR 62132 - California Disaster #CA-00176

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-06

    ... ADMINISTRATION California Disaster CA-00176 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of California dated 09/29/2011. Incident: Canyon Fire. Incident Period: 09/04/2011 through 09/11/2011. Effective Date:...

  8. 78 FR 60366 - California Disaster #CA-00212

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION California Disaster CA-00212 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of California dated 09/24/2013. Incident: Clover Fire Incident Period: 09/09/2013 through 09/15/2013. Effective Date:...

  9. 77 FR 1971 - California Disaster #CA-00183

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-12

    ... ADMINISTRATION California Disaster CA-00183 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of California dated 01/05/2012. Incident: 1502 Golden Gate Fire. Incident Period: 12/22/2011. Effective Date:...

  10. 78 FR 39821 - California Disaster #CA-00202

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... ADMINISTRATION California Disaster CA-00202 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of California dated 06/25/2013. Incident: Powerhouse Fire. Incident Period: 05/30/2013 through 06/11/2013. Effective Date:...

  11. 78 FR 77195 - California Disaster #CA-00214

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-20

    ... ADMINISTRATION California Disaster CA-00214 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a Notice of the Presidential declaration of a major disaster for Public Assistance Only for the State of California (FEMA- 4158-DR), dated 12/13/2013. Incident: Rim Fire. Incident Period:...

  12. 76 FR 16029 - CALIFORNIA Disaster #CA-00165

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-22

    ... ADMINISTRATION CALIFORNIA Disaster CA-00165 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of CALIFORNIA dated 03/16/2011. Incident: Garden Breeze Apartment Complex Fire. Incident Period: 02/20/2011. DATES:...

  13. 76 FR 79751 - California Disaster #CA-00181

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-22

    ... ADMINISTRATION California Disaster CA-00181 AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This is a notice of an Administrative declaration of a disaster for the State of California dated 12/14/2011. Incident: Sequoia Apartment Complex Fire. Incident Period: 11/18/2011. Effective Date:...

  14. Hippocampal CA1 Ripples as Inhibitory Transients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Malerba

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Memories are stored and consolidated as a result of a dialogue between the hippocampus and cortex during sleep. Neurons active during behavior reactivate in both structures during sleep, in conjunction with characteristic brain oscillations that may form the neural substrate of memory consolidation. In the hippocampus, replay occurs within sharp wave-ripples: short bouts of high-frequency activity in area CA1 caused by excitatory activation from area CA3. In this work, we develop a computational model of ripple generation, motivated by in vivo rat data showing that ripples have a broad frequency distribution, exponential inter-arrival times and yet highly non-variable durations. Our study predicts that ripples are not persistent oscillations but result from a transient network behavior, induced by input from CA3, in which the high frequency synchronous firing of perisomatic interneurons does not depend on the time scale of synaptic inhibition. We found that noise-induced loss of synchrony among CA1 interneurons dynamically constrains individual ripple duration. Our study proposes a novel mechanism of hippocampal ripple generation consistent with a broad range of experimental data, and highlights the role of noise in regulating the duration of input-driven oscillatory spiking in an inhibitory network.

  15. Hippocampal CA1 Ripples as Inhibitory Transients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malerba, Paola; Krishnan, Giri P; Fellous, Jean-Marc; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2016-04-01

    Memories are stored and consolidated as a result of a dialogue between the hippocampus and cortex during sleep. Neurons active during behavior reactivate in both structures during sleep, in conjunction with characteristic brain oscillations that may form the neural substrate of memory consolidation. In the hippocampus, replay occurs within sharp wave-ripples: short bouts of high-frequency activity in area CA1 caused by excitatory activation from area CA3. In this work, we develop a computational model of ripple generation, motivated by in vivo rat data showing that ripples have a broad frequency distribution, exponential inter-arrival times and yet highly non-variable durations. Our study predicts that ripples are not persistent oscillations but result from a transient network behavior, induced by input from CA3, in which the high frequency synchronous firing of perisomatic interneurons does not depend on the time scale of synaptic inhibition. We found that noise-induced loss of synchrony among CA1 interneurons dynamically constrains individual ripple duration. Our study proposes a novel mechanism of hippocampal ripple generation consistent with a broad range of experimental data, and highlights the role of noise in regulating the duration of input-driven oscillatory spiking in an inhibitory network.

  16. literacy.ca EXPRESS. April 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movement for Canadian Literacy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This issue of "literacy.ca EXPRESS" focuses on poverty. The articles included in this issue are: (1) Poverty Overview; (2) Tony's Story; (3) LAN (Learner Advisory Network) Member's Story (Dianne Smith); (4) Linking Adult Literacy to Poverty Reduction; (5) MCL (Movement for Canadian Literacy) Update; (6) Highlights from the LAN; (7) Good…

  17. Serum concentrations of the biomarkers CA125, CA15-3, CA72-4, tPSA and PAPP-A in natural and stimulated ovarian cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Stemp

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Ovarian stimulation reduced serum PAPP‐A levels, CA125 and CA15‐3 levels were generally unaffected by ovarian stimulation but displayed cyclical changes throughout both natural and stimulated cycles, whilst tPSA and CA72-4 were not affected by the stage of the cycle or ovarian stimulation.

  18. Cenozoic seawater Sr/Ca evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosdian, Sindia M.; Lear, Caroline H.; Tao, Kai; Grossman, Ethan L.; O'Dea, Aaron; Rosenthal, Yair

    2012-10-01

    Records of seawater chemistry help constrain temporal variations in geochemical processes that impact the global carbon cycle and climate through Earth's history. Here we reconstruct Cenozoic seawater Sr/Ca (Sr/Casw) using fossil Conus and turritellid gastropod Sr/Ca. Combined with an oxygen isotope paleotemperature record from the same samples, the gastropod record suggests that Sr/Caswwas slightly higher in the Eocene (˜11.4 ± 3 mmol/mol) than today (˜8.54 mmol/mol) and remained relatively stable from the mid- to late Cenozoic. We compare our gastropod Cenozoic Sr/Casw record with a published turritellid gastropod Sr/Casw record and other published biogenic (benthic foraminifera, fossil fish teeth) and inorganic precipitate (calcite veins) Sr/Caswrecords. Once the uncertainties with our gastropod-derived Sr/Casw are taken into account the Sr/Casw record agrees reasonably well with biogenic Sr/Caswrecords. Assuming a seawater [Ca] history derived from marine evaporite inclusions, all biogenic-based Sr/Casw reconstructions imply decreasing seawater [Sr] through the Cenozoic, whereas the calcite vein Sr/Casw reconstruction implies increasing [Sr] through the Cenozoic. We apply a simple geochemical model to examine the implications of divergence among these seawater [Sr] reconstructions and suggest that the interpretation and uncertainties associated with the gastropod and calcite vein proxies need to be revisited. Used in conjunction with records of carbonate depositional fluxes, our favored seawater Sr/Ca scenarios point to a significant increase in the proportion of aragonite versus calcite deposition in shelf sediments from the Middle Miocene, coincident with the proliferation of coral reefs. We propose that this occurred at least 10 million years after the seawater Mg/Ca threshold was passed, and was instead aided by declining levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide.

  19. Ca2+ signals regulate mitochondrial metabolism by stimulating CREB-mediated expression of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter gene MCU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmughapriya, Santhanam; Rajan, Sudarsan; Hoffman, Nicholas E; Zhang, Xueqian; Guo, Shuchi; Kolesar, Jill E; Hines, Kevin J; Ragheb, Jonathan; Jog, Neelakshi R; Caricchio, Roberto; Baba, Yoshihiro; Zhou, Yandong; Kaufman, Brett A; Cheung, Joseph Y; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Gill, Donald L; Madesh, Muniswamy

    2015-03-03

    Cytosolic Ca2+ signals, generated through the coordinated translocation of Ca2+ across the plasma membrane (PM) and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, mediate diverse cellular responses. Mitochondrial Ca2+ is important for mitochondrial function, and when cytosolic Ca2+ concentration becomes too high, mitochondria function as cellular Ca2+ sinks. By measuring mitochondrial Ca2+ currents, we found that mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake was reduced in chicken DT40 B lymphocytes lacking either the ER-localized inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP3R), which releases Ca2+ from the ER, or Orai1 or STIM1, components of the PM-localized Ca2+ -permeable channel complex that mediates store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) in response to depletion of ER Ca2+ stores. The abundance of MCU, the pore-forming subunit of the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter, was reduced in cells deficient in IP3R, STIM1, or Orai1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and promoter reporter analyses revealed that the Ca2+ -regulated transcription factor CREB (cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein) directly bound the MCU promoter and stimulated expression. Lymphocytes deficient in IP3R, STIM1, or Orai1 exhibited altered mitochondrial metabolism, indicating that Ca2+ released from the ER and SOCE-mediated signals modulates mitochondrial function. Thus, our results showed that a transcriptional regulatory circuit involving Ca2+ -dependent activation of CREB controls the Ca2+ uptake capability of mitochondria and hence regulates mitochondrial metabolism.

  20. Feedforward inhibition underlies the propagation of cholinergically induced gamma oscillations from hippocampal CA3 to CA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemankovics, Rita; Veres, Judit M; Oren, Iris; Hájos, Norbert

    2013-07-24

    Gamma frequency (30-80 Hz) oscillations are implicated in memory processing. Such rhythmic activity can be generated intrinsically in the CA3 region of the hippocampus from where it can propagate to the CA1 area. To uncover the synaptic mechanisms underlying the intrahippocampal spread of gamma oscillations, we recorded local field potentials, as well as action potentials and synaptic currents in anatomically identified CA1 and CA3 neurons during carbachol-induced gamma oscillations in mouse hippocampal slices. The firing of the vast majority of CA1 neurons and all CA3 neurons was phase-coupled to the oscillations recorded in the stratum pyramidale of the CA1 region. The predominant synaptic input to CA1 interneurons was excitatory, and their discharge followed the firing of CA3 pyramidal cells at a latency indicative of monosynaptic connections. Correlation analysis of the input-output characteristics of the neurons and local pharmacological block of inhibition both agree with a model in which glutamatergic CA3 input controls the firing of CA1 interneurons, with local pyramidal cell activity having a minimal role. The firing of phase-coupled CA1 pyramidal cells was controlled principally by their inhibitory inputs, which dominated over excitation. Our results indicate that the synchronous firing of CA3 pyramidal cells rhythmically recruits CA1 interneurons and that this feedforward inhibition generates the oscillatory activity in CA1. These findings identify distinct synaptic mechanisms underlying the generation of gamma frequency oscillations in neighboring hippocampal subregions.

  1. Ca2+-binding protein-1 facilitates and forms a postsynaptic complex with Cav1.2 (L-type) Ca2+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hong; Kim, Seong-Ah; Kirk, Elizabeth A; Tippens, Alyssa L; Sun, Hong; Haeseleer, Françoise; Lee, Amy

    2004-05-12

    Ca2+-binding protein-1 (CaBP1) is a Ca2+-binding protein that is closely related to calmodulin (CaM) and localized in somatodendritic regions of principal neurons throughout the brain, but how CaBP1 participates in postsynaptic Ca2+ signaling is not known. Here, we describe a novel role for CaBP1 in the regulation of Ca2+ influx through Ca(v)1.2 (L-type) Ca2+ channels. CaBP1 interacts directly with the alpha1 subunit of Ca(v)1.2 at sites that also bind CaM. CaBP1 binding to one of these sites, the IQ domain, is Ca2+ dependent and competitive with CaM binding. The physiological significance of this interaction is supported by the association of Ca(v)1.2 and CaBP1 in postsynaptic density fractions purified from rat brain. Moreover, in double-label immunofluorescence experiments, CaBP1 and Ca(v)1.2 colocalize in numerous cell bodies and dendrites of neurons, particularly in pyramidal cells in the CA3 region of the hippocampus and in the dorsal cortex. In electrophysiological recordings of cells transfected with Ca(v)1.2, CaBP1 greatly prolonged Ca2+ currents, prevented Ca2+-dependent inactivation, and caused Ca2+-dependent facilitation of currents evoked by step depolarizations and repetitive stimuli. These effects contrast with those of CaM, which promoted strong Ca2+-dependent inactivation of Ca(v)1.2 with these same voltage protocols. Our findings reveal how Ca2+-binding proteins, such as CaM and CaBP1, differentially adjust Ca2+ influx through Ca(v)1.2 channels, which may specify diverse modes of Ca2+ signaling in neurons.

  2. The alterations of Ca2+/calmodulin/CaMKII/CaV1.2 signaling in experimental models of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Dongyu; Guo, Feng; Zhu, Shu; Xu, Xiaoxue; Mao, Xiaoyuan; Cao, Yonggang; Lv, Xintong; Gao, Qinghua; Wang, Lei; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris; Hao, Liying; Cai, Jiqun

    2013-03-22

    The two critical forms of dementia are Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD). The alterations of Ca(2+)/calmodulin/CaMKII/CaV1.2 signaling in AD and VD have not been well elucidated. Here we have demonstrated changes in the levels of CaV1.2, calmodulin, p-CaMKII, p-CREB and BDNF proteins by Western blot analysis and the co-localization of p-CaMKII/CaV1.2 by double-labeling immunofluorescence in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice and VD gerbils. Additionally, expression of these proteins and intracellular calcium levels were examined in cultured neurons treated with Aβ1-42. The expression of CaV1.2 protein was increased in VD gerbils and in cultured neurons but decreased in APP/PS1 mice; the expression of calmodulin protein was increased in APP/PS1 mice and VD gerbils; levels of p-CaMKII, p-CREB and BDNF proteins were decreased in AD and VD models. The number of neurons in which p-CaMKII and CaV1.2 were co-localized, was decreased in the CA1 and CA3 regions in two models. Intracellular calcium was increased in the cultured neurons treated with Aβ1-42. Collectively, our results suggest that the alterations in CaV1.2, calmodulin, p-CaMKII, p-CREB and BDNF can be reflective of an involvement in the impairment in memory and cognition in AD and VD models.

  3. Ca2+ dialogue between acidic vesicles and ER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Anthony J

    2016-04-15

    Extracellular stimuli evoke the synthesis of intracellular second messengers, several of which couple to the release of Ca(2+)from Ca(2+)-storing organelles via activation of cognate organellar Ca(2+)-channel complexes. The archetype is the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and IP3receptor (IP3R) on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). A less understood, parallel Ca(2+)signalling cascade is that involving the messenger nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) that couples to Ca(2+)release from acidic Ca(2+)stores [e.g. endo-lysosomes, secretory vesicles, lysosome-related organelles (LROs)]. NAADP-induced Ca(2+)release absolutely requires organellar TPCs (two-pore channels). This review discusses how ER and acidic Ca(2+)stores physically and functionally interact to generate and shape global and local Ca(2+)signals, with particular emphasis on the two-way dialogue between these two organelles.

  4. Reduction of Ca2+-transporting systems in memory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigova, A A; Dedkova, E N; Zinchenko, V P; Litvinov, I S

    2000-01-01

    Antigen-specific B and T lymphocytes make up the material grounds of immune memory, their main functional distinction from the so-called "naive" cells is due to the rapid and enhanced response to the antigen-pathogen. An essential distinction between the memory and naive T cells is different sensitivity of these two subpopulations of T lymphocytes to Ca2+-ionophores. Comparative analysis of Ca2+ responses of the immune memory T lymphocytes and naive T cells of mouse CBA/J line to the addition of Ca2+-mobilizing agents concanavalin A, thapsigargin, and ionomycin was carried out. These compounds in concentrations increasing [Ca2+]i in naive cells had no effect on [Ca2+]i in memory cells. Thus, the Ca2+ entrance into memory cells was not activated by exhaustion of intracellular resources. Estimation of intracellular resources of Ca2+, mobilized by ionomycin and thapsigargin in Ca2+ free medium has shown the absence in memory T cells of the intracellular Ca2+ pool, which may be one of factors of their resistance to ionophores. Reduction of the system of Ca2+ influx into memory T cells was shown using the SH-reagent thimerosal. Memory T cells appear to be resistant to "Ca2+ -paradox." Their incubation with 0.5 mM EDTA in the presence or absence of Ca2+ -mobilizing compounds followed by addition of 2 mM CaCl2 did not result in induction of Ca2+ influx into these cells.

  5. Generation and behavior characterization of CaMKIIβ knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D Bachstetter

    Full Text Available The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII is abundant in the brain, where it makes important contributions to synaptic organization and homeostasis, including playing an essential role in synaptic plasticity and memory. Four genes encode isoforms of CaMKII (α, β, δ, γ, with CaMKIIα and CaMKIIβ highly expressed in the brain. Decades of molecular and cellular research, as well as the use of a large number of CaMKIIα mutant mouse lines, have provided insight into the pivotal roles of CaMKIIα in brain plasticity and cognition. However, less is known about the CaMKIIβ isoform. We report the development and extensive behavioral and phenotypic characterization of a CaMKIIβ knockout (KO mouse. The CaMKIIβ KO mouse was found to be smaller at weaning, with an altered body mass composition. The CaMKIIβ KO mouse showed ataxia, impaired forelimb grip strength, and deficits in the rotorod, balance beam and running wheel tasks. Interestingly, the CaMKIIβ KO mouse exhibited reduced anxiety in the elevated plus maze and open field tests. The CaMKIIβ KO mouse also showed cognitive impairment in the novel object recognition task. Our results provide a comprehensive behavioral characterization of mice deficient in the β isoform of CaMKII. The neurologic phenotypes and the construction of the genotype suggest the utility of this KO mouse strain for future studies of CaMKIIβ in brain structure, function and development.

  6. Precise half-life measurements for $^{38}$Ca and $^{39}$Ca

    CERN Document Server

    Blank, B; Demonchy, C-E; Borge, M J G; Matea, I; Munoz, F; Huikari, J; Dominguez-Reyes, R; Plaisir, C; Sturm, S; Canchel, G; Delahaye, P; Audirac, L; Fraile, L M; Serani, L; Lunney, D; Pedroza, J-L; Bey, A; Souin, J; Hui, Tran Trong; Delalee, F; Tengblad, O; Wenander, F

    2010-01-01

    The half-lives of Ca-38 and Ca-39 have been measured at ISOLDE of CERN. The REXTRAP facility was used to prepare ultra-clean samples of radioactive nuclei for precision decay spectroscopy. Ca-38 is one of the T-z = -1, 0(+). 0(+) beta-emitting nuclides used to determine the vector coupling constant of the weak interaction and the V-ud quark-mixing matrix element. The result obtained, T-1/2 = 443.8(19) ms, is four times more precise than the average of previous measurements. For Ca-39, a half-life of T-1/2 = 860.7(10) ms is obtained, a result in agreement with the average value from the literature.

  7. Fabrication aspects of PLA-CaP/PLGA-CaP composites for orthopedic applications: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Huan; Lawrence, Joseph G; Bhaduri, Sarit B

    2012-07-01

    For several decades, composites made of polylactic acid-calcium phosphates (PLA-CaP) and polylactic acid-co-glycolic acid-calcium phosphates (PLGA-CaP) have seen widespread uses in orthopedic applications. This paper reviews the fabrication aspects of these composites, following the ubiquitous materials science approach by studying "processing-structure-property" correlations. Various fabrication processes such as microencapsulation, phase separation, electrospinning, supercritical gas foaming, etc., are reviewed, with specific examples of their applications in fabricating these composites. The effect of the incorporation of CaP materials on the mechanical and biological performance of PLA/PLGA is addressed. In addition, this paper describes the state of the art on challenges and innovations concerning CaP dispersion, incorporation of biomolecules/stem cells and long-term degradation of the composites.

  8. Glutamate receptor activation in cultured cerebellar granule cells increases cytosolic free Ca2+ by mobilization of cellular Ca2+ and activation of Ca2+ influx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouchelouche, P; Belhage, B; Frandsen, A;

    1989-01-01

    The Ca2+ sensitive fluorescent probe, fura-2 has been used to monitor cytosolic free calcium levels in mature primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells during exposure to L-glutamate and other excitatory amino acids: quisqualate (QA) kainate (KA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA). Glutamate...... at micromolar concentrations produced a prompt and dose-related increase in the intracellular concentration of free Ca2+, ([Ca2+]i), whereas QA, KA and NMDA had no effect. This increase was also seen in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, suggesting that L-glutamate promotes mobilization of Ca2+ from...

  9. Prenatal morphine exposure reduces pyramidal neurons in CA1, CA2 and CA3 subfields of mice hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya Ghafari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:This study was carried out to evaluate the effect of maternal morphine exposure during gestational and lactation period on pyramidal neurons of hippocampus in 18 and 32 day mice offspring. Materials and Methods: Thirty female mice were randomly allocated into cases and controls. In case group, animals received morphinesulfate 10 mg/kg.body weight intraperitoneally during 7 days before mating, gestational period (GD 0-21, 18 and 32 days after delivery in the experimental groups. The control animals received an equivalent volume of normal saline. Cerebrum of six offsprings in each group was removed and stained with cresyl violet and a monoclonal antibody NeuN for immunohistochemical detection of surviving pyramidal neurons. Quantitative computer-assisted morphometric study was done on hippocampus. Results: The number of pyramidal neurons in CA1, CA2 and CA3 in treated groups was significantly reduced in postnatal day 18 and 32 (P18, P32 compared to control groups (P

  10. RNAi knockdown of PIK3CA preferentially inhibits invasion of mutant PIK3CA cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin-Ke Zhou; Sheng-Song Tang; Gao Yi; Min Hou; Jin-Hui Chen; Bo Yang; Ji-Fang Liu; Zhi-Min He

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To explore the effects of siRNA silencing of PIK3CA on proliferation, migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells and to investigate the underlying mechanisms.METHODS: The mutation of PIK3CA in exons 9 and 20 of gastric cancer cell lines HGC-27, SGC-7901, BGC-823, MGC-803 and MKN-45 was screened by poly-merase chain reaction (PCR) followed by sequencing. BGC-823 cells harboring no mutations in either of the exons, and HGC-27 cells containing PIK3CA mutations were employed in the current study. siRNA targeting PIK3CA was chemically synthesized and was transfect-ed into these two cell lines in vitro. mRNA and protein expression of PIK3CA were detected by real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. We also measured phosphorylation of a serine/threonine protein kinase (Akt) using Western blotting. The proliferation, migra-tion and invasion of these cells were examined sepa-rately by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltet-razolium bromide (MTT), wound healing and Transwell chambers assay.RESULTS: The siRNA directed against PIK3CA effec-tively led to inhibition of both endogenous mRNA and protein expression of PIK3CA, and thus significantly down-regulated phosphorylation of Akt (P < 0.05). Furthermore, simultaneous silencing of PIK3CA result-ed in an obvious reduction in tumor cell proliferation activity, migration and invasion potential (P < 0.01). Intriguing, mutant HGC-27 cells exhibited stronger invasion ability than that shown by wild-type BGC-823 cells. Knockdown of PIK3CA in mutant HGC-27 cells contributed to a reduction in cell invasion to a greater extent than in non-mutant BGC-823 cells.CONCLUSION: siRNA mediated targeting of PIK3CA may specifically knockdown the expression of PIK3CA in gastric cancer cells, providing a potential implication for therapy of gastric cancer.

  11. Progressive alterations of hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses in an animal model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Hui; An, Shu-Cheng; Ren, Wei; Ma, Xin-Ming

    2014-12-15

    Major depressive disorder is the most prevalent psychiatric condition, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this disorder are largely unknown, although multiple hypotheses have been proposed. The aim of this study was to characterize the progressive alteration of neuronal plasticity in the male rat hippocampus during depression induced by chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS), an established animal model of depression. The data in the hippocampus were collected on days 7, 14 and 21 after the onset of three-week CUMS. When analyzed on day 21, three-week CUMS induced typically depressive-like behaviors, impaired LTP induction, and decreased basal synaptic transmission at hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses recorded in vivo, which was accompanied by decreased density of dendritic spines in CA1 and CA3 pyramidal neurons. The levels of both Kalirin-7 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus were decreased at the same time. On day 14 (middle phase), some depressive-like behaviors were observed, which was accompanied by depressed basal synaptic transmission and enhanced LTP induction at the CA3-CA1 synapses. However, BDNF expression was decreased without alteration of Kalirin7 expression in comparison with no-stress control. Depressed basal synaptic transmission occurred in the middle phase of CUMS may contribute to decreased expression of BDNF. On day 7, depressive-like behaviors were not observed, and LTP induction, spine density, Kalirin-7 and BDNF expression were not altered by CUMS in comparison with no-stress control. These results showed that the functional changes at CA3-CA1synapses occurred earlier than the structural alteration during three-week CUMS as a strategy of neural adaptation, and rats required three weeks to develop depressive-like behaviors during CUMS. Our results suggest an important role of Kalirin-7 in CUMS-mediated alterations in spine density, synaptic function and overall depressive-like behaviors on day 21.

  12. The Reliability of Highly Elevated CA 19-9 Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. R. Osswald

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available CA 19-9 is used as a tumour marker of the upper gastrointestinal tract. However, extremely elevated CA 19-9 levels are found also in patients with benign diseases. Cholestasis was present in 97.1 % of patients with high elevated CA 19-9, independent of their primary disease. 50% of patients with non-malignant diseases and increased CA 19-9 levels showed liver cirrhosis, cholecystitis, pancreatitis and/or hepatitis. In 8.8% no explanation was found for the extremely high CA 19-9 level. The results provide evidence of different factors influencing the CA 19-9 level.

  13. Endo-lysosomal TRP mucolipin-1 channels trigger global ER Ca2+ release and Ca2+ influx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Bethan S.; Yates, Elizabeth; Grimm, Christian; Schapira, Anthony H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transient receptor potential (TRP) mucolipins (TRPMLs), encoded by the MCOLN genes, are patho-physiologically relevant endo-lysosomal ion channels crucial for membrane trafficking. Several lines of evidence suggest that TRPMLs mediate localised Ca2+ release but their role in Ca2+ signalling is not clear. Here, we show that activation of endogenous and recombinant TRPMLs with synthetic agonists evoked global Ca2+ signals in human cells. These signals were blocked by a dominant-negative TRPML1 construct and a TRPML antagonist. We further show that, despite a predominant lysosomal localisation, TRPML1 supports both Ca2+ release and Ca2+ entry. Ca2+ release required lysosomal and ER Ca2+ stores suggesting that TRPMLs, like other endo-lysosomal Ca2+ channels, are capable of ‘chatter’ with ER Ca2+ channels. Our data identify new modalities for TRPML1 action. PMID:27577094

  14. Honeybee locomotion is impaired by Am-CaV3 low voltage-activated Ca(2+) channel antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousset, M; Collet, C; Cens, T; Bastin, F; Raymond, V; Massou, I; Menard, C; Thibaud, J-B; Charreton, M; Vignes, M; Chahine, M; Sandoz, J C; Charnet, P

    2017-02-01

    Voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels are key transducers of cellular excitability and participate in several crucial physiological responses. In vertebrates, 10 Ca(2+) channel genes, grouped in 3 families (CaV1, CaV2 and CaV3), have been described and characterized. Insects possess only one member of each family. These genes have been isolated in a limited number of species and very few have been characterized although, in addition to their crucial role, they may represent a collateral target for neurotoxic insecticides. We have isolated the 3 genes coding for the 3 Ca(2+) channels expressed in Apis mellifera. This work provides the first detailed characterization of the honeybee T-type CaV3 Ca(2+) channel and demonstrates the low toxicity of inhibiting this channel. Comparing Ca(2+) currents recorded in bee neurons and myocytes with Ca(2+) currents recorded in Xenopus oocytes expressing the honeybee CaV3 gene suggests native expression in bee muscle cells only. High-voltage activated Ca(2+) channels could be recorded in the somata of different cultured bee neurons. These functional data were confirmed by in situ hybridization, immunolocalization and in vivo analysis of the effects of a CaV3 inhibitor. The biophysical and pharmacological characterization and the tissue distribution of CaV3 suggest a role in honeybee muscle function.

  15. The Structure of Ca2+ Sensor Case16 Reveals the Mechanism of Reaction to Low Ca2+ Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lydia A. Strukova

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the first crystal structure of a high-contrast genetically encoded circularly permuted green fluorescent protein (cpGFP-based Ca2+ sensor, Case16, in the presence of a low Ca2+ concentration. The structure reveals the positioning of the chromophore within Case16 at the first stage of the Ca2+-dependent response when only two out of four Ca2+-binding pockets of calmodulin (CaM are occupied with Ca2+ ions. In such a “half Ca2+-bound state”, Case16 is characterized by an incomplete interaction between its CaM-/M13-domains. We also report the crystal structure of the related Ca2+ sensor Case12 at saturating Ca2+ concentration. Based on this structure, we postulate that cpGFP-based Ca2+ sensors can form non-functional homodimers where the CaM-domain of one sensor molecule binds symmetrically to the M13-peptide of the partner sensor molecule. Case12 and Case16 behavior upon addition of high concentrations of free CaM or M13-peptide reveals that the latter effectively blocks the fluorescent response of the sensor. We speculate that the demonstrated intermolecular interaction with endogenous substrates and homodimerization can impede proper functioning of this type of Ca2+ sensors in living cells.

  16. Honeybee locomotion is impaired by Am-CaV3 low voltage-activated Ca2+ channel antagonist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousset, M.; Collet, C.; Cens, T.; Bastin, F.; Raymond, V.; Massou, I.; Menard, C.; Thibaud, J.-B.; Charreton, M.; Vignes, M.; Chahine, M.; Sandoz, J. C.; Charnet, P.

    2017-01-01

    Voltage‐gated Ca2+ channels are key transducers of cellular excitability and participate in several crucial physiological responses. In vertebrates, 10 Ca2+ channel genes, grouped in 3 families (CaV1, CaV2 and CaV3), have been described and characterized. Insects possess only one member of each family. These genes have been isolated in a limited number of species and very few have been characterized although, in addition to their crucial role, they may represent a collateral target for neurotoxic insecticides. We have isolated the 3 genes coding for the 3 Ca2+ channels expressed in Apis mellifera. This work provides the first detailed characterization of the honeybee T-type CaV3 Ca2+ channel and demonstrates the low toxicity of inhibiting this channel. Comparing Ca2+ currents recorded in bee neurons and myocytes with Ca2+ currents recorded in Xenopus oocytes expressing the honeybee CaV3 gene suggests native expression in bee muscle cells only. High‐voltage activated Ca2+ channels could be recorded in the somata of different cultured bee neurons. These functional data were confirmed by in situ hybridization, immunolocalization and in vivo analysis of the effects of a CaV3 inhibitor. The biophysical and pharmacological characterization and the tissue distribution of CaV3 suggest a role in honeybee muscle function. PMID:28145504

  17. Determination of the membrane topology of the small EF-hand Ca2+-sensing proteins CaBP7 and CaBP8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah V McCue

    Full Text Available The CaBPs represent a subfamily of small EF-hand containing calcium (Ca(2+-sensing proteins related to calmodulin that regulate key ion channels in the mammalian nervous system. In a recent bioinformatic analyses we determined that CaBP7 and CaBP8 form an evolutionarily distinct branch within the CaBPs (also known as the calneurons a finding that is consistent with earlier observations characterising a putative C-terminal transmembrane (TM spanning helix in each of these proteins which is essential for their sub-cellular targeting to the Golgi apparatus and constitutive secretory vesicles. The C-terminal position of the predicted TM-helix suggests that CaBP7 and CaBP8 could be processed in a manner analogous to tail-anchored integral membrane proteins which exhibit the ability to insert across membranes post-translationally. In this study we have investigated the topology of CaBP7 and CaBP8 within cellular membranes through a combination of trypsin protection and epitope accessibility analyses. Our results indicate that the TM-helices of CaBP7 and CaBP8 insert fully across membranes such that their extreme C-termini are luminal. The observed type-II membrane topology is consistent with processing of CaBP7 and CaBP8 as true tail-anchored proteins. This targeting mechanism is distinct from any other calmodulin related Ca(2+-sensor and conceivably underpins unique physiological functions of these proteins.

  18. Conversation Analysis (CA in Primary School Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Fajardo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Although CA deals with all kinds of talk produced in natural contexts, this study focuses its interest on the talk produced in some primary school classrooms. It attempts to develop the construct that CA should move significantly ahead to more practical grounds where its detailed and isolated description causes some effect in improving foreign language teaching, for example. It might be used, for instance, to promote professional development in Colombia. It plans to involve pre-service teachers initially and in-service ones later. The kind of interaction promoted by trainee teachers shows a very restricted possibility for young learners to use the language meaningfully in the classroom. Four stages are defined and suggested as a path to follow with pre-service teachers at Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia –UPTC– in the Foreign Language Programme - FLP.

  19. Neuronal Ca(2+) dyshomeostasis in Huntington disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomello, Marta; Oliveros, Juan C; Naranjo, Jose R; Carafoli, Ernesto

    2013-01-01

    The expansion of the N-terminal poly-glutamine tract of the huntingtin (Htt) protein is responsible for Huntington disease (HD). A large number of studies have explored the neuronal phenotype of HD, but the molecular aethiology of the disease is still very poorly understood. This has hampered the development of an appropriate therapeutical strategy to at least alleviate its symptoms. In this short review, we have focused our attention on the alteration of a specific cellular mechanism common to all HD models, either genetic or induced by treatment with 3-NPA, i.e. the cellular dyshomeostasis of Ca(2+). We have highlighted the direct and indirect (i.e. transcriptionally mediated) effects of mutated Htt on the maintenance of the intracellular Ca(2+) balance, the correct modulation of which is fundamental to cell survival and the disturbance of which plays a key role in the death of the cell.

  20. A Decision Framework for Enhancing Mobile Ad Hoc Network Stability and Security

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    dissertation committee members: Professor Gurminder Singh, Professor Kyle Lin, and Professor Ted Huffmire, always opened their doors to me and freely...Charleston, SC 16. Dr. Ted Huffmire Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 17. Dr. Cynthia Irvine Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 18. Dr...21. Tim Levin Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, CA 22. Dr. Karl Levitt National Science Foundation (NSF) Arlington, VA 157 23. Dr

  1. Arabidopsis transcriptional response to extracellular Ca2þ depletion involves a transient rise in cytosolic Ca

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Qi

    2015-01-01

    Ecological evidence indicates a worldwide trend of dramatical y decreased soil Ca2þ levels caused by increased acid deposition and massive timber harvesting. Little is known about the genetic and cel ular mechanism of plants’ responses to Ca2þ depletion. In this study, transcriptional profiling analysis helped identify multiple extracel ular Ca2þ ([Ca2þ]ext) depletion‐respon-sive genes in Arabidopsis thaliana L., many of which are involved in response to other environmental stresses. Interestingly, a group of genes encoding putative cytosolic Ca2þ ([Ca2þ]cyt) sensors were significantly upregulated, implying that [Ca2þ]cyt has a role in sensing [Ca2þ]ext depletion. Consistent with this observation, [Ca2þ]ext depletion stimulated a transient rise in [Ca2þ]cyt that was negatively influenced by [Kþ]ext, suggesting the involvement of a membrane potential‐sensitive component. The [Ca2þ]cyt response to [Ca2þ]ext depletion was significantly desensitized after the initial treatment, which is typical of a receptor‐mediated signaling event. The response was insensi-tive to an animal Ca2þ sensor antagonist, but was suppressed by neomycin, an inhibitor of phospholipase C. Gd3þ, an inhibitor of Ca2þ channels, suppressed the [Ca2þ]ext‐triggered rise in [Ca2þ]cyt and downstream changes in gene expression. Taken together, this study demonstrates that [Ca2þ]cyt plays an important role in the putative receptor‐mediated cel ular and transcriptional response to [Ca2þ]ext depletion of plant cel s.

  2. Apamin Boosting of Synaptic Potentials in CaV2.3 R-Type Ca2+ Channel Null Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kang; Kelley, Melissa H; Wu, Wendy W; Adelman, John P; Maylie, James

    2015-01-01

    SK2- and KV4.2-containing K+ channels modulate evoked synaptic potentials in CA1 pyramidal neurons. Each is coupled to a distinct Ca2+ source that provides Ca2+-dependent feedback regulation to limit AMPA receptor (AMPAR)- and NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated postsynaptic depolarization. SK2-containing channels are activated by Ca2+ entry through NMDARs, whereas KV4.2-containing channel availability is increased by Ca2+ entry through SNX-482 (SNX) sensitive CaV2.3 R-type Ca2+ channels. Recent studies have challenged the functional coupling between NMDARs and SK2-containing channels, suggesting that synaptic SK2-containing channels are instead activated by Ca2+ entry through R-type Ca2+ channels. Furthermore, SNX has been implicated to have off target affects, which would challenge the proposed coupling between R-type Ca2+ channels and KV4.2-containing K+ channels. To reconcile these conflicting results, we evaluated the effect of SK channel blocker apamin and R-type Ca2+ channel blocker SNX on evoked excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in CA1 pyramidal neurons from CaV2.3 null mice. The results show that in the absence of CaV2.3 channels, apamin application still boosted EPSPs. The boosting effect of CaV2.3 channel blockers on EPSPs observed in neurons from wild type mice was not observed in neurons from CaV2.3 null mice. These data are consistent with a model in which SK2-containing channels are functionally coupled to NMDARs and KV4.2-containing channels to CaV2.3 channels to provide negative feedback regulation of EPSPs in the spines of CA1 pyramidal neurons.

  3. Differential Ca2+ influx, KCa channel activity, and Ca2+ clearance distinguish Th1 and Th2 lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanger, C M; Neben, A L; Cahalan, M D

    2000-02-01

    In Th1 and Th2 lymphocytes, activation begins with identical stimuli but results in the production of different cytokines. The expression of some cytokine genes is differentially induced according to the amplitude and pattern of Ca2+ signaling. Using fura- 2 Ca2+ imaging of murine Th1 and Th2 clones, we observed that the Ca2+ rise elicited following store depletion with thapsigargin is significantly lower in Th2 cells than in Th1 cells. Maximal Ca2+ influx rates and whole-cell Ca2+ currents showed that both Th1 and Th2 cells express indistinguishable Ca2+-release-activated Ca2+ channels. Therefore, we investigated other mechanisms controlling the concentration of intracellular Ca2+, including K+ channels and Ca2+ clearance from the cytosol. Whole-cell recording demonstrated that there is no distinction in the amplitudes of voltage-gated K+ currents in the two cell types. Ca2+-activated K+ (KCa) currents, however, were significantly smaller in Th2 cells than in Th1 cells. Pharmacological equalization of Ca2+-activated K+ currents in the two cell types reduced but did not completely eliminate the difference between Th1 and Th2 Ca2+ responses, suggesting divergence in an additional Ca2+ regulatory mechanism. Therefore, we analyzed Ca2+ clearance from the cytosol of both cell types and found that Th2 cells extrude Ca2+ more quickly than Th1 cells. The combination of a faster Ca2+ clearance mechanism and smaller Ca2+-activated K+ currents in Th2 cells accounts for the lower Ca2+ response of Th2 cells compared with Th1 cells.

  4. The investigation on sulfation of modified Ca-based sorbent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hongwei Chen; Chunbo Wang; Yonghua Li; Zijie Wang [North China Electric Power University, Baoding (China). Department of Power Engineering

    2003-07-01

    The sulfation of a limestone modified by Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} was investigated in this paper, which aimed to find the causes of its enhanced sulfation capacity. It was shown in the experiment that although the sulfur capture capability of M-CaO (the CaO calcined from modified limestone) is in excess of that of N-CaO (the CaO calcined from original sample), the specific surface area and porosity of the former are much less than that of the latter and also the average pore radius of the former become bigger. Based on the solid-state ion diffusion theory, a new mechanism to explain M-CaO sulfation is suggested. More lattice defects are formed in M-CaO, which reduce the resistance of ion diffusion in the CaSO{sub 4} product layer, and increase the Ca-conversion. To verify this, XRD was applied to measure the crystal structures of CaO samples. It was found M-CaO has bigger lattice distortion than N-CaO. It means that M-CaO has more lattice defects. In the sulfation the lattice defects in M-CaO will go into the CaSO{sub 4} product layer and it is that accelerates the ion diffusivity and leads to the higher Ca-conversion than that of N-CaO. By scanning the element distribution in reacted M-CaO using SEM, how the lattice defects formed in the product layers was verified.

  5. CaMKII in sinoatrial node physiology and dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuejin eWu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The calcium and calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII is present in sinoatrial node (SAN pacemaker cells and is required for physiological fight or flight SAN beating rate responses. Inhibition of CaMKII in SAN does not affect baseline heart rate, but reduces heart rate increases in response to physiological stress. CaMKII senses intracellular calcium (Ca2+ changes, oxidation status and hyperglycemia to phosphorylate substrates that regulate Ca2+-sensitive proteins, such as L-type Ca2+ channels, phospholamban (PLN, and cardiac ryanodine receptors (RyR2. All of these substrates are involved in the SAN pacemaking mechanism. Excessive CaMKII activity, as occurs under pathological conditions such as heart failure, ischemia and diabetes, can promote intracellular Ca2+ overload and reactive oxygen species (ROS production. Oxidation of CaMKII (ox-CaMKII locks CaMKII into a constitutively active configuration that contributes to SAN cell apoptosis and fibrosis. This ox-CaMKII-mediated loss of functional SAN cells contributes to sinoatrial node dysfunction (SND and sudden death. Thus, CaMKII has emerged as a central regulator of physiological SAN responses and a key determinant of SND.

  6. de caña CAMECO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Suárez Ponciano

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available El aumento de la producción de caña en Cuba se ha vuelto más que un objetivo una necesidad, es por ello que se introducen nuevas máquinas que den respuesta a esta situación. Teniendo esto como premisa y considerando la importancia que el cultivo de la caña tiene para el país es que se ha escogido el Complejo Agroindustrial (CAI «Héctor Molina Riaño» por la influencia que tiene, en la provincia La Habana, en los resultados de este cultivo para analizar el producto de los medios que intervienen en la cosecha y transporte de la caña de azúcar, así como las condiciones de explotación en que se desarrollan, lo cual constituye el objetivo de este trabajo. Se desarrolló una base metodológica para el análisis de los resultados.

  7. Positive magnetoresistance in Ca-doped cobaltites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, S. M., E-mail: zhousm@ustc.edu.cn; Li, Y.; Guo, Y. Q.; Zhao, J. Y.; Shi, L., E-mail: shil@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-12-08

    Transport properties of polycrystalline La{sub 1−x}Ca{sub x}CoO{sub 3} (0.10 ≤ x ≤ 0.25) are systemically studied in this work. Three types of magnetoresistance (MR) effects are found in the Ca-doped cobaltites. Two negative MRs appear around high-temperature ferromagnetic transition and at low temperatures, which correspond to the conventional MR due to the field-induced suppression of spin-disorder scattering and the intergranular giant-MR due to spin-dependent transport between the ferromagnetic clusters, respectively. More interestingly, another exotic positive MR emerges at intermediate temperature region, which had not been previously reported in Sr- and Ba-doped cobaltites. It is found that this positive MR is associated with an abnormally magnetic transition and increases with the increase of x. For x = 0.25, the MR at low temperatures is dominated by the positive one, which is isotropic and nearly linear with the magnetic field. The possible origin of the positive MR in the Ca-doped cobaltites is discussed.

  8. Superconductivity in Ca-doped graphene laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J.; Su, Y.; Howard, C. A.; Kundys, D.; Grigorenko, A. N.; Guinea, F.; Geim, A. K.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Nair, R. R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite graphene’s long list of exceptional electronic properties and many theoretical predictions regarding the possibility of superconductivity in graphene, its direct and unambiguous experimental observation has not been achieved. We searched for superconductivity in weakly interacting, metal decorated graphene crystals assembled into so-called graphene laminates, consisting of well separated and electronically decoupled graphene crystallites. We report robust superconductivity in all Ca-doped graphene laminates. They become superconducting at temperatures (Tc) between ≈4 and ≈6 K, with Tc’s strongly dependent on the confinement of the Ca layer and the induced charge carrier concentration in graphene. We find that Ca is the only dopant that induces superconductivity in graphene laminates above 1.8 K among several dopants used in our experiments, such as potassium, caesium and lithium. By revealing the tunability of the superconducting response through doping and confinement of the metal layer, our work shows that achieving superconductivity in free-standing, metal decorated monolayer graphene is conditional on an optimum confinement of the metal layer and sufficient doping, thereby bringing its experimental realization within grasp. PMID:26979564

  9. Superconductivity in Ca-doped graphene laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J.; Su, Y.; Howard, C. A.; Kundys, D.; Grigorenko, A. N.; Guinea, F.; Geim, A. K.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Nair, R. R.

    2016-03-01

    Despite graphene’s long list of exceptional electronic properties and many theoretical predictions regarding the possibility of superconductivity in graphene, its direct and unambiguous experimental observation has not been achieved. We searched for superconductivity in weakly interacting, metal decorated graphene crystals assembled into so-called graphene laminates, consisting of well separated and electronically decoupled graphene crystallites. We report robust superconductivity in all Ca-doped graphene laminates. They become superconducting at temperatures (Tc) between ≈4 and ≈6 K, with Tc’s strongly dependent on the confinement of the Ca layer and the induced charge carrier concentration in graphene. We find that Ca is the only dopant that induces superconductivity in graphene laminates above 1.8 K among several dopants used in our experiments, such as potassium, caesium and lithium. By revealing the tunability of the superconducting response through doping and confinement of the metal layer, our work shows that achieving superconductivity in free-standing, metal decorated monolayer graphene is conditional on an optimum confinement of the metal layer and sufficient doping, thereby bringing its experimental realization within grasp.

  10. Superconductivity in Ca-doped graphene laminates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, J; Su, Y; Howard, C A; Kundys, D; Grigorenko, A N; Guinea, F; Geim, A K; Grigorieva, I V; Nair, R R

    2016-03-16

    Despite graphene's long list of exceptional electronic properties and many theoretical predictions regarding the possibility of superconductivity in graphene, its direct and unambiguous experimental observation has not been achieved. We searched for superconductivity in weakly interacting, metal decorated graphene crystals assembled into so-called graphene laminates, consisting of well separated and electronically decoupled graphene crystallites. We report robust superconductivity in all Ca-doped graphene laminates. They become superconducting at temperatures (Tc) between ≈4 and ≈6 K, with Tc's strongly dependent on the confinement of the Ca layer and the induced charge carrier concentration in graphene. We find that Ca is the only dopant that induces superconductivity in graphene laminates above 1.8 K among several dopants used in our experiments, such as potassium, caesium and lithium. By revealing the tunability of the superconducting response through doping and confinement of the metal layer, our work shows that achieving superconductivity in free-standing, metal decorated monolayer graphene is conditional on an optimum confinement of the metal layer and sufficient doping, thereby bringing its experimental realization within grasp.

  11. Ca2+ Signaling in Cerebellar Purkinje Neurons - EDITORIAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruol, Donna; Manto, Mario; Haines, Duane

    2012-01-01

    Tight regulation of calcium (Ca2+) dynamics is critical for all neurons. Ca2+ is a major mediator of cellular excitability, synaptic plasticity, regulation of transcription, amongst others. Recent years have seen major developments in terms of understanding the roles of Ca2+ signals in the cerebellar circuitry, especially for Purkinje neurons and granule cells. The unique morphology of Purkinje neurons serves as a platform to unravel the secrets of Ca2+ homeostasis in cerebellar microcircuits. This special issue covers recent advances in Ca2+ signaling and imaging, and highlights the importance of spatio-temporal compartmentalization underlying Ca2+ dynamics. Sorting out the pieces of the puzzle of homeostatic regulation of Ca2+ remains an instrumental step to start rational therapies of Ca2+ deregulation. PMID:22806980

  12. The emerging role of CaMKII in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-yang; Zhao, Ren; Zhe, Hong

    2015-05-20

    Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a multifunctional serine/threonine kinases best known for its critical role in learning and memory. Recent studies suggested that high levels of CaMKII also expressed in variety of malignant diseases. In this review, we focus on the structure and biology properties of CaMKII, including the role of CaMKII in the regulation of cancer progression and therapy response. We also describe the role of CaMKII in the diagnosis of different kinds of cancer and recent progress in the development of CaMKII inhibitors. These data establishes CaMKII as a novel target whose modulation presents new opportunities for cancer diagnosis and treatment.

  13. Is tissue CA125 expression in epithelial ovarian adenocarcinoma heterogenic?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparholt, Morten H; Høgdall, Claus K; Nedergaard, Lotte

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate if heterogeneity of tissue cancer antigen 125 (CA125) expression is present in epithelial serous adenocarcinomas. Furthermore, to investigate whether there is a correlation between levels of CA125 tissue expression, serum level of CA125, stage, and grade. A total of 10 patients...... diagnosed with serous ovarian adenocarcinomas were included. Preoperative blood samples were collected to determine serum CA125 levels. Tumor tissue from primary surgery was collected and processed for immunohistochemical analyses. CA125 was expressed in varying degrees in tumor tissues from all patients....... Mean tissue CA125 expression for each patient ranged from 36% to 98%. Intrapatient variations in tissue expression ranged from 10% to 90% point. No significant correlations between levels of CA125 tissue expression, serum level of CA125, stage, and grade were found. We found that the tissue expression...

  14. Pressure-induced structural transformation of CaC2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Huang, Xiaoli; Li, Da; Huang, Yanping; Bao, Kuo; Li, Fangfei; Wu, Gang; Liu, Bingbing; Cui, Tian

    2016-05-01

    The high pressure structural changes of calcium carbide CaC2 have been investigated with Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature. At ambient conditions, two forms of CaC2 co-exist. Above 4.9 GPa, monoclinic CaC2-ii diminished indicating the structural phase transition from CaC2-ii to CaC2-i. At about 7.0 GPa, both XRD patterns and Raman spectra confirmed that CaC2-i transforms into a metallic Cmcm structure which contains polymeric carbon chains. Along with the phase transition, the isolated C2 dumbbells are polymerized into zigzag chains resulting in a large volume collapse with 22.4%. Above 30.0 GPa, the XRD patterns of CaC2 become featureless and remain featureless upon decompression, suggesting an irreversible amorphization of CaC2.

  15. A study of the ground states of CaC2H+2,CaC2D+2 and CaC2H+4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The geometries, vibrational frequencies and bind energies are reported for the ground states of CaC2H+2, CaC2D+2 and CaC2H+4. CaC2H+2 and CaC2H+4 equilibrium geometries have C2v symmetry with the metal ion lying in the perpendicular bisector of the C-C bond. The ground state in both CaC2H+2 and CaC2H+4 molecules ia a 2A1 state and the binding in the ground state is mainly electrostatic. For both CaC2H+2 and CaC2H+4 the ligand is only slightly distorted from its free ligand structure, the C-C distance has hardly increased and there is only a very small bending of the H atom away from the Ca atom. This is consistent with the electrostatic nature of the bonding. Two different approaches-Hartree-Fock(HF) and density functional theory methods(DFT)-are used and basis sets here used is 6-311+G(3df,2p). The DFT results are in good agreement with experiments, namely, DFT methods provide the benefits that some more expensive ab initio methods can do, but at essentially HF cost. So it is important to include electron correlation for accurate results in this study.

  16. Phosphate Capacities of CaF2-MgO and CaF2-CaO-MgO Slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari, F.; Pickles, C. A.

    2015-02-01

    Previously published sulphide capacity data and thermodynamic arguments have been employed to calculate the phosphate capacities and the phosphorus partition ratios between a molten carbon saturated iron alloy and binary CaF2-MgO slags and also ternary CaF2 -CaO-MgO slags at 1450 °C. For the CaF2-MgO binary system, a linear relationship was found between the phosphate and the sulphide capacities as follows: log ? = 1.2 log Cs + 25.2. For the ternary CaF2-CaO-MgO system at 1450 °C, the logarithm of the calculated phosphate capacities ranged from 19.47 to 20.15. With the addition of CaO, the phosphate capacities initially increased, reached a maximum and then decreased slightly. The addition of MgO to the CaF2-CaO system resulted in a decrease in the phosphate capacity. The calculated phosphorus partition ratios increased slightly with increasing mole fraction of CaO in the ternary system.

  17. Serum concentrations of the biomarkers CA125, CA15-3, CA72-4, tPSA and PAPP-A in natural and stimulated ovarian cycles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Melissa Stemp; Peter Roberts; Allison McClements; Vincent Chapple; Jay Natalwala; Michael Black; Phillip Matson

    2014-01-01

    Objective:Biomarkers associated with cancer screening (CA125, CA15‐3, CA72‐4, total prostate specific antigen [tPSA]) and the monitoring of pregnancy (pregnancy associated plasma protein‐A [PAPP‐A]) were measured during natural and stimulated ovarian cycles in disease‐free non-pregnant women to determine if they could reflect normal events relating to ovulation and/or endometrial changes. Methods: A total of 73 blood samples (10 women) collected throughout the natural menstrual cycle, and 64 blood samples (11 women) taken during stimulated ovarian cycles, were analysed on the Roche Cobas e411 automated analyser. Results:Detectable levels of tPSA were measured in at least one point in the cycle in 6/10 of women in the natural cycle and 10/11 of women in stimulated cycles, and CA72-4 was detected in only 12/21 women tested. Concentrations of CA125, tPSA, CA15‐3 and CA72‐4 showed no significant difference between the natural and stimulated ovarian cycle groups. On average the mean PAPP‐A of the natural group was (2.41±0.58) mIU/L higher than the stimulated group (t=4.10, P< 0.001). CA125 and CA15‐3 results were both significantly influenced by the stage of the cycle (P<0.0001), whereas tPSA and PAPP‐A concentrations revealed no significant changes (P≥0.65). CA72‐4 was not affected by the stage of the cycle nor ovarian stimulation. Conclusion:Ovarian stimulation reduced serum PAPP‐A levels, CA125 and CA15‐3 levels were generally unaffected by ovarian stimulation but displayed cyclical changes throughout both natural and stimulated cycles, whilst tPSA and CA72-4 were not affected by the stage of the cycle or ovarian stimulation.

  18. Measurement of mitochondrial Ca2+ transport mediated by three transport proteins: VDAC1, the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, and the Ca2+ uniporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Hail, Danya; Palty, Raz; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda

    2014-02-01

    Ca(2+) is a ubiquitous cellular signal, with changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration not only stimulating a number of intercellular events but also triggering cell death pathways, including apoptosis. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and release play pivotal roles in cellular physiology by regulating intracellular Ca(2+) signaling, energy metabolism and cell death. Ca(2+) transport across the inner and outer mitochondrial membranes is mediated by several proteins, including channels, antiporters, and a uniporter. In this article, we present the background to several methods now established for assaying mitochondrial Ca(2+) transport activity across both mitochondrial membranes. The first of these is Ca(2+) transport mediated by the outer mitochondrial protein, the voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1 (VDAC1, also known as porin 1), both as a purified protein reconstituted into a planar lipid bilayer (PLB) or into liposomes and as a mitochondrial membrane-embedded protein. The second method involves isolated mitochondria for assaying the activity of an inner mitochondrial membrane transport protein, the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter (MCU) that transports Ca(2+) and is powered by the steep mitochondrial membrane potential. In the event of Ca(2+) overload, this leads to opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) and cell death. The third method describes how Na(+)-dependent mitochondrial Ca(2+) efflux mediated by mitochondrial NCLX, a member of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger superfamily, can be assayed in digitonin-permeabilized HEK-293 cells. The Ca(2+)-transport assays can be performed under various conditions and in combination with inhibitors, allowing detailed characterization of the transport activity of interest.

  19. MicroRNA-145 suppresses ROS-induced Ca{sup 2+} overload of cardiomyocytes by targeting CaMKIIδ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Min-Ji [Cardiovascular Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seongsanno, Seodamun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seongsanno, Seodamun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Jin-Kyung [College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women’s University, 52 HyoChangWon-Gil, Yongsan-ku, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Ham, Onju; Song, Byeong-Wook; Lee, Se-Yeon [Cardiovascular Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seongsanno, Seodamun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seongsanno, Seodamun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chang Yeon; Park, Jun-Hee [Department of Integrated Omics for Biomedical Sciences, Graduate School, Yonsei University, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodamun-gu, Seoul 120-759 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jiyun; Seo, Hyang-Hee [Cardiovascular Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seongsanno, Seodamun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seongsanno, Seodamun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eunhyun [Severance Integrative Research Institute for Cerebral and Cardiovascular Disease, Yonsei University Health System, 250 Seongsanno, Seodamun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Woo-min [Department of Animal Resource, Sahmyook University, Seoul 139-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Hye Jin [Cardiovascular Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 250 Seongsanno, Seodamun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hyun-Taek [College of Pharmacy, Sookmyung Women’s University, 52 HyoChangWon-Gil, Yongsan-ku, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •CaMKIIδ mediates H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced Ca{sup 2+} overload in cardiomyocytes. •miR-145 can inhibit Ca{sup 2+} overload. •A luciferase assay confirms that miR-145 functions as a CaMKIIδ-targeting miRNA. •Overexpression of miR-145 regulates CaMKIIδ-related genes and ameliorates apoptosis. -- Abstract: A change in intracellular free calcium (Ca{sup 2+}) is a common signaling mechanism of reperfusion-induced cardiomyocyte death. Calcium/calmodulin dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a critical regulator of Ca{sup 2+} signaling and mediates signaling pathways responsible for functions in the heart including hypertrophy, apoptosis, arrhythmia, and heart disease. MicroRNAs (miRNA) are involved in the regulation of cell response, including survival, proliferation, apoptosis, and development. However, the roles of miRNAs in Ca{sup 2+}-mediated apoptosis of cardiomyocytes are uncertain. Here, we determined the potential role of miRNA in the regulation of CaMKII dependent apoptosis and explored its underlying mechanism. To determine the potential roles of miRNAs in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-mediated Ca{sup 2+} overload, we selected and tested 6 putative miRNAs that targeted CaMKIIδ, and showed that miR-145 represses CaMKIIδ protein expression and Ca{sup 2+} overload. We confirmed CaMKIIδ as a direct downstream target of miR-145. Furthermore, miR-145 regulates Ca{sup 2+}-related signals and ameliorates apoptosis. This study demonstrates that miR-145 regulates reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced Ca{sup 2+} overload in cardiomyocytes. Thus, miR-145 affects ROS-mediated gene regulation and cellular injury responses.

  20. Application of Ca stable isotopes to long-term changes in the Ca cycle of a Northern Hardwood forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtz, A. C.; Takagi, K.; Bailey, S. W.; Bullen, T. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study (New Hampshire, USA) presents an unusual opportunity for the application of innovative isotope methods in forest biogeochemistry. Changes in biogeochemical cycling resulting from decades of acid deposition, subsequent reductions in acid deposition, and a series of experimental treatments (harvesting, Ca amendment) have been studied continuously for 60 years at this site. Importantly, researchers have archived soil, water, and vegetation samples for much of the site's history. Our work seeks to complement earlier mass balance studies of Ca cycling by measuring Ca isotope ratios on archived samples. In the first component of our study, we examined the Ca isotopic response to an experimental clearcut in the early 1980's. Earlier work showed that the clearcut promoted dramatic loss of Ca from the watershed, indicated by a 5-fold increase in streamwater Ca concentrations. The mechanism for this loss was unclear as no resolvable changes in soil Ca pools were observed. Our work shows that streamwater dissolved Ca becomes isotopically lighter as Ca concentrations increase. These data are best accounted for by an increase in Ca loss from the soil cation exchange complex. Soil exchangeable δ44Ca itself evolves towards lighter values in the years following the experimental harvest. We interpret this as replenishment of the soil exchange complex by release of isotopically light Ca from root biomass. In the second component of our study, we examine decadal-scale changes in streamwater and soil Ca in an un-manipulated biogeochemical reference watershed. Historical data from Hubbard Brook show that streamwater Ca concentrations began decreasing sharply in the early 1970's, attributed to decreased deposition of both acidity and Ca with the passage of the Clean Air Act. Preliminary data indicate no resolvable change in the average δ44Ca of streamwater, with variability mostly attributable to discharge (flowpath control). Preliminary data

  1. Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca variations in environmental and biological sources: A survey of marine and terrestrial systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, Stephanie; Clementz, Mark T.

    2012-10-01

    The relative concentrations of strontium to calcium (Sr/Ca) and barium to calcium (Ba/Ca) in mammalian bioapatite are common biogeochemical indicators for trophic level and/or dietary preferences in terrestrial foodwebs; however, similar research in marine foodwebs is lacking. This study combined environmental and biological Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca data from both terrestrial and marine settings from 62 published books, reports, and studies along with original data collected from 149 marine mammals (30 species) and 83 prey items (18 species) and found that variations in Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios of biological and environmental samples are appreciably different in terrestrial and marine systems. In terrestrial systems, environmental sources account for most of the variations in Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios. In contrast, environmental sources in marine systems (i.e., seawater) are comparatively invariant, meaning most of the variations in Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios originate from biological processes. Marine consumers, particularly non-mammalian and mammalian vertebrates, show evidence of biopurification of Ca relative to Sr and Ba, similar to what is observed in terrestrial systems; however, unlike terrestrial systems, variations in Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios of environmental sources are overprinted by bioaccumulation of Sr and Ba at the base of marine foodwebs. This demonstrates that in marine systems, spatial or temporal differences may have little to no effect on Sr/Ca and Ba/Ca ratios of marine vertebrates, making Sr/Ca, and to a lesser extent Ba/Ca, potentially useful global proxies for trophic level and dietary preferences of marine vertebrates.

  2. Reaction process of monazite and bastnaesite mixed rare earth minerals calcined by CaO-NaCl-CaCl2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The decomposition reactions of monazite and bastnaesite mixed rare earth minerals calcined by CaO-NaCl-CaCl2 were studied by means of TG-DTA and XRD. The results show that the process of the minerals decomposed by CaO involves two steps.The first step occurs in the temperature range of 425-540 ℃, and the main reactions are bastnaesite decomposition, i.e. REOF reacts with CaO to produce RE2O3 and CaF2, and Ce2O3 is oxidized to CeO2. During this step, CaCO3 is formed at about 500 ℃. The second step takes place in the temperature range of 610-700 ℃, and the reactions are monazite decomposition into RE2O3,Ca5F(PO4)3 and Ca3(PO4)2 by CaO and CaF2. In this process, the decomposition ability is improved because CaO from CaCO3decomposing has high chemical activity. In calcining process, the new formed Ca5F(PO4)3 restrains fluorine that can escape in form of gaseous compound. The decomposition ratio of the mixed rare earth minerals reaches 90.8% at 700 ℃.

  3. Modeling CaMKII-mediated regulation of L-type Ca2+ channels and ryanodine receptors in the heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph L Greenstein

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Excitation-contraction coupling (ECC in the cardiac myocyte is mediated by a number of highly integrated mechanisms of intracellular Ca2+ transport. Voltage- and Ca2+-dependent L-type Ca2+ channels (LCCs allow for Ca2+ entry into the myocyte, which then binds to nearby ryanodine receptors (RyRs and triggers Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in a process known as Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release. The highly coordinated Ca2+-mediated interaction between LCCs and RyRs is further regulated by the cardiac isoform of the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMKII. Because CaMKII targets and modulates the function of many ECC proteins, elucidation of its role in ECC and integrative cellular function is challenging and much insight has been gained through the use of detailed computational models. Multiscale models that can both reconstruct the detailed nature of local signaling events within the cardiac dyad and predict their functional consequences at the level of the whole cell have played an important role in advancing our understanding of CaMKII function in ECC. Here, we review experimentally based models of CaMKII function with a focus on LCC and RyR regulation, and the mechanistic insights that have been gained through their application.

  4. 血清CEA、CA-125、CA-153、CA-199、CA242联合检测对消化道肿瘤诊断的临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨德辉; 周力; 张永宏; 张澜林; 谭玉洁; 王焰; 秦雯

    2006-01-01

    目的:探讨血清CEA、CA-125、CA-153、CA-199、CA242联合检测对消化道肿瘤诊断的临床意义。方法:采用酶联免疫吸附法(ELISA法)检测130例恶性消化道肿瘤患者(食管癌32例、胃癌34例、胰腺癌30例、大肠癌34例)血清CEA、CA-125、CA-153、CA-199、CA242水平。结果:表明上述四种消化道肿瘤的血清CEA、CA-125、CA-153、CA-199、CA242与对照组比较结果统计学上均有显著性差异(P〈0.01)。除胰腺癌之外,其余3种消化道肿瘤五项肿瘤标记物联合检测的阳性率均显著高于单一标志物检测(P〈0.05),分别为食管癌62.5%、胃癌85.2%、大肠癌82.3%。结论:血清CEA、CA-125、CA-153、CA-199、CA242联合检测可以显著提高消化道恶性肿瘤诊断的敏感性。

  5. Mitochondrial free [Ca2+] levels and the permeability transition

    OpenAIRE

    Vay, Laura; Hernández-SanMiguel, Esther; Domínguez Lobatón, María Carmen; Moreno, Alfredo; Montero, Mayte; Álvarez, Javier

    2009-01-01

    Producción Científica Mitochondrial Ca2+ activates many processes, from mitochondrial metabolism to opening of the permeability transition pore (PTP) and apoptosis. However, there is considerable controversy regarding the free mitochondrial [Ca2+] ([Ca2+]M) levels that can be attained during cell activation or even in mitochondrial preparations. Studies using fluorescent dyes (rhod-2 or similar), have reported that phosphate precipitation precludes [Ca2+]M from increasing above...

  6. Oxidant stress promotes disease by activating CaMKII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark E

    2015-12-01

    CaMKII is activated by oxidation of methionine residues residing in the regulatory domain. Oxidized CaMKII (ox-CaMKII) is now thought to participate in cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases and cancer. This invited review summarizes current evidence for the role of ox-CaMKII in disease, considers critical knowledge gaps and suggests new areas for inquiry. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. T-type Ca(2+) channel modulation by otilonium bromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strege, Peter R; Sha, Lei; Beyder, Arthur; Bernard, Cheryl E; Perez-Reyes, Edward; Evangelista, Stefano; Gibbons, Simon J; Szurszewski, Joseph H; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2010-05-01

    Antispasmodics are used clinically to treat a variety of gastrointestinal disorders by inhibition of smooth muscle contraction. The main pathway for smooth muscle Ca(2+) entry is through L-type channels; however, there is increasing evidence that T-type Ca(2+) channels also play a role in regulating contractility. Otilonium bromide, an antispasmodic, has previously been shown to inhibit L-type Ca(2+) channels and colonic contractile activity. The objective of this study was to determine whether otilonium bromide also inhibits T-type Ca(2+) channels. Whole cell currents were recorded by patch-clamp technique from HEK293 cells transfected with cDNAs encoding the T-type Ca(2+) channels, Ca(V)3.1 (alpha1G), Ca(V)3.2 (alpha1H), or Ca(V)3.3 (alpha1I) alpha subunits. Extracellular solution was exchanged with otilonium bromide (10(-8) to 10(-5) M). Otilonium bromide reversibly blocked all T-type Ca(2+) channels with a significantly greater affinity for Ca(V)3.3 than Ca(V)3.1 or Ca(V)3.2. Additionally, the drug slowed inactivation in Ca(V)3.1 and Ca(V)3.3. Inhibition of T-type Ca(2+) channels may contribute to inhibition of contractility by otilonium bromide. This may represent a new mechanism of action for antispasmodics and may contribute to the observed increased clinical effectiveness of antispasmodics compared with selective L-type Ca(2+) channel blockers.

  8. T-type Ca2+ channel modulation by otilonium bromide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strege, Peter R.; Sha, Lei; Beyder, Arthur; Bernard, Cheryl E.; Perez-Reyes, Edward; Evangelista, Stefano; Gibbons, Simon J.; Szurszewski, Joseph H.

    2010-01-01

    Antispasmodics are used clinically to treat a variety of gastrointestinal disorders by inhibition of smooth muscle contraction. The main pathway for smooth muscle Ca2+ entry is through L-type channels; however, there is increasing evidence that T-type Ca2+ channels also play a role in regulating contractility. Otilonium bromide, an antispasmodic, has previously been shown to inhibit L-type Ca2+ channels and colonic contractile activity. The objective of this study was to determine whether otilonium bromide also inhibits T-type Ca2+ channels. Whole cell currents were recorded by patch-clamp technique from HEK293 cells transfected with cDNAs encoding the T-type Ca2+ channels, CaV3.1 (α1G), CaV3.2 (α1H), or CaV3.3 (α1I) alpha subunits. Extracellular solution was exchanged with otilonium bromide (10−8 to 10−5 M). Otilonium bromide reversibly blocked all T-type Ca2+ channels with a significantly greater affinity for CaV3.3 than CaV3.1 or CaV3.2. Additionally, the drug slowed inactivation in CaV3.1 and CaV3.3. Inhibition of T-type Ca2+ channels may contribute to inhibition of contractility by otilonium bromide. This may represent a new mechanism of action for antispasmodics and may contribute to the observed increased clinical effectiveness of antispasmodics compared with selective L-type Ca2+ channel blockers. PMID:20203058

  9. TRPV5, the gateway to Ca2+ homeostasis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mensenkamp, A.R.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Ca2+ homeostasis in the body is tightly controlled, and is a balance between absorption in the intestine, excretion via the urine, and exchange from bone. Recently, the epithelial Ca2+ channel (TRPV5) has been identified as the gene responsible for the Ca2+ influx in epithelial cells of the renal di

  10. 33 CFR 110.210 - San Diego Harbor, CA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Diego Harbor, CA. 110.210... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.210 San Diego Harbor, CA. (a) The anchorage grounds. (1... Commander, Naval Base, San Diego, CA. The administration of these anchorages is exercised by the...

  11. Serum tetranectin and CA125 in endometrial adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundstrøm, M S; Høgdall, C K; Nielsen, Anette Lynge;

    2000-01-01

    in relation to tumor grade, stage and cancer survival. RESULTS: The CA125 levels correlated significantly with tumor stage. Dichotomized according to a cut-off level of 35 U/ml, CA125 significantly correlated with cancer death. Multivariate regression analysis of cancer survival time showed that CA125 > 35 U/ml...

  12. TRPV5, the gateway to Ca2+ homeostasis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mensenkamp, A.R.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Ca2+ homeostasis in the body is tightly controlled, and is a balance between absorption in the intestine, excretion via the urine, and exchange from bone. Recently, the epithelial Ca2+ channel (TRPV5) has been identified as the gene responsible for the Ca2+ influx in epithelial cells of the renal

  13. Registration of CA0469C025C chickpea germplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chickpea (Cicer arientinum L.) germplasm CA0469C025C (Reg. No. XXX; PI XXX), was released by the USDA-ARS in 2010. CA0469C025C was released based on its improved yield and reaction to Ascochyta blight relative to the popular commercial cultivars ‘Dwelley’, ‘Sierra’, and ‘Sawyer’. CA0490C025C is deri...

  14. Distribution of Phosphorus between CaO-CaF2 Slag and Fe-C-P Melt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Qing-xiang; ZHOU Jian-jian; DU Xiao-jian

    2005-01-01

    The equilibrium distribution ratio of phosphorus between CaO-CaF2 molten slag and Fe-C-P melt at 1450 ℃ was measured. The phosphate capacity of slag and the activity coefficient of phosphorus oxide were calculated.

  15. The effect of CaF2 on thermodynamics of CaO-CaF2-SiO2(-MgO) slags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chul-Hwan; Jo, Sung-Koo; Kim, Seon-Hyo; Lee, Kwang-Ro; Kim, Jeong-Tae

    2004-02-01

    To address the role of CaF2 in the CaO-CaF2-SiO2(-MgO) slag system employed for the production of low-pressure rotor steels, the thermodynamic aspects of the slag were investigated by equilibrating it with liquid iron at 1873 K in CaO or MgO crucibles. Presaturation of slag with an oxide block piece of CaO or MgO in a Pt crucible and application of a carbon paste to the outside of an oxide crucible were designed to prevent crucible failure during the slag-metal experiments. The liquidus isotherm and phase boundary of the preceding slag system were investigated using the slag-metal equilibria. Also, the effect of CaF2 on the sulfide capacity and the activity coefficient of Fe t O were of particular interest in controlling the sulfur level and cleanliness of low-pressure rotor steels.

  16. Solid state interactions in the systems CaO(CaCO3-Fe2O3 and CuFe2O4-CaO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyanov B.S.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The solid state interactions in the systems CaO(CaCO3-Fe2O3 and CuFe2O4-CaO have been studied using X-ray diffraction analysis. The influence of the temperature on the ferrite formation process has been investigated in the range of 900-1200 oC and duration up to 360 min. It has been shown that a mixture of ferrites forms at 1000 oC and interaction of 240 min. The exchange reactions in the systems CuFe2O4-CaO and Cu0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4-CaO have been studied, too. It has been established that Ca2+ ions exchange Cu2+ and Zn2 partially and the solubility of copper and zinc in a 7 % sulfuric acid solution increases 10-15 times.

  17. Citrus bergamia Risso Elevates Intracellular Ca2+ in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells due to Release of Ca2+ from Primary Intracellular Stores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purum Kang

    2013-01-01

    , which was partially inhibited by a nonselective Ca2+ channel blocker La3+. In Ca2+-free extracellular solutions, BEO increased [Ca2+]i in a concentration-dependent manner, suggesting that BEO mobilizes intracellular Ca2+. BEO-induced [Ca2+]i increase was partially inhibited by a Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release inhibitor dantrolene, a phospholipase C inhibitor U73122, and an inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3-gated Ca2+ channel blocker, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borane (2-APB. BEO also increased [Ca2+]i in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone, an inhibitor of mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake. In addition, store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOC was potentiated by BEO. These results suggest that BEO mobilizes Ca2+ from primary intracellular stores via Ca2+-induced and IP3-mediated Ca2+ release and affect promotion of Ca2+ influx, likely via an SOC mechanism.

  18. Calbindin-D28K dynamically controls TRPV5-mediated Ca2+ transport.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambers, T.T.; Mahieu, F.; Oancea, E.; Hoofd, L.J.C.; Lange, F. de; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Voets, T.; Nilius, B.; Clapham, D.E.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    In Ca(2+)-transporting epithelia, calbindin-D(28K) (CaBP(28K)) facilitates Ca(2+) diffusion from the luminal Ca(2+) entry side of the cell to the basolateral side, where Ca(2+) is extruded into the extracellular compartment. Simultaneously, CaBP(28K) provides protection against toxic high Ca(2+) lev

  19. Calbindin-D28K dynamically controls TRPV5-mediated Ca2+ transport.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambers, T.T.; Mahieu, F.; Oancea, E.; Hoofd, L.J.C.; Lange, F. de; Mensenkamp, A.R.; Voets, T.; Nilius, B.; Clapham, D.E.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    In Ca(2+)-transporting epithelia, calbindin-D(28K) (CaBP(28K)) facilitates Ca(2+) diffusion from the luminal Ca(2+) entry side of the cell to the basolateral side, where Ca(2+) is extruded into the extracellular compartment. Simultaneously, CaBP(28K) provides protection against toxic high Ca(2+) lev

  20. Biological fractionation of stable Ca isotopes in Göttingen minipigs as a physiological model for Ca homeostasis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuser, Alexander; Eisenhauer, Anton; Scholz-Ahrens, Katharina E; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen

    2016-12-01

    In order to investigate fractionation of calcium (Ca) isotopes in vertebrates as a diagnostic tool to detect Ca metabolism dysfunction we analyzed the Ca isotopic composition (δ(44/40)Ca = [((44)Ca/(40)Ca)sample/((44)Ca/(40)Ca)reference]-1) of diet, faeces, blood, bones and urine from Göttingen minipigs, an animal model for human physiology. Samples of three groups were investigated: 1. control group (Con), 2. group with glucocorticosteroid induced osteoporosis (GIO) and 3. group with Ca and vitamin D deficiency induced osteomalacia (-CaD). In contrast to Con and GIO whose average δ(44/40)Cafaeces values (0.39 ± 0.13‰ and 0.28 ± 0.08‰, respectively) tend to be lower than their diet (0.47 ± 0.02‰), δ(44/40)Cafaeces of -CaD (-0.27 ± 0.21‰) was significantly lower than their δ(44/40)Cadiet (0.37 ± 0.03‰), but also lower than δ(44/40)Cafaeces of Con and GIO. We suggest that the low δ(44/40)Cafaeces of -CaD might be due to the contribution of isotopically light Ca from gastrointestinal fluids during gut passage. Assuming that this endogenous Ca source is a common physiologic feature, a fractionation during Ca absorption is also required for explaining δ(44/40)Cafaeces of Con and GIO. The δ(44/40)Caurine of all groups are high (>2.0‰) reflecting preferential renal reabsorption of light Ca isotopes. In Göttingen minipigs we found a Ca isotope fractionation between blood and bones (Δ(44/40)Cablood-bone) of 0.68 ± 0.15‰.

  1. Reorientable dipolar CuCa antisite and anomalous screening in CaCu3Ti4O12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delugas, Pietro; Alippi, Paola; Fiorentini, Vincenzo; Raineri, Vito

    2010-02-01

    Based on first-principles calculations, we show that the abundant CuCa antisite defect contributes sizably to dielectric screening in single-crystal CaCu3Ti4O12 . CuCa has a multi-minimum off-center equilibrium configuration, whereby it possesses a large and easily reorientable dipole moment. The low-temperature and frequency cut-off behavior of CuCa -induced response is consistent with experiment.

  2. Feedforward Inhibition Underlies the Propagation of Cholinergically Induced Gamma Oscillations from Hippocampal CA3 to CA1

    OpenAIRE

    Zemankovics, Rita; Veres, Judit M.; Oren, Iris; Hájos, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Gamma frequency (30–80 Hz) oscillations are implicated in memory processing. Such rhythmic activity can be generated intrinsically in the CA3 region of the hippocampus from where it can propagate to the CA1 area. To uncover the synaptic mechanisms underlying the intrahippocampal spread of gamma oscillations, we recorded local field potentials, as well as action potentials and synaptic currents in anatomically identified CA1 and CA3 neurons during carbachol-induced gamma oscillations in mouse ...

  3. An ID-like current that is downregulated by Ca2+ modulates information coding at CA3-CA3 synapses in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saviane, Chiara; Mohajerani, Majid H; Cherubini, Enrico

    2003-10-15

    Voltage-gated K+ channels localised on presynaptic nerve terminals control information coding by modulating presynaptic firing and synaptic efficacy in target neurones. We found that at CA3-CA3 connections in hippocampal slice cultures, a fast-activating, slowly inactivating K+ conductance similar to the so-called delay current (ID) is responsible for the delayed appearance of the first spike upon membrane depolarisation, for action potential repolarisation and for modulation of transmitter release. The ID-like current was downregulated by intracellular Ca2+, as indicated by the increased delay in the appearance of the first action potential following either the block of Ca2+ flux through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels with Cd2+ or replacement of the bathing solution with one devoid of Ca2+. In both cases, this effect was reversed by blocking this conductance with a low concentration of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, 10-50 muM). Application of 4-AP shortened the delay to the first spike generation, prevented the effect of Cd2+ and increased the spike duration. The earlier appearance of the first action potential was also observed in the presence of dendrotoxin-1 (100 nM). In voltage-clamp experiments larger currents were recorded in the absence of extracellular Ca2+, thus confirming the downregulation of the ID-like current by Ca2+ due to the positive shift of its inactivation. Spike broadening was associated with an enhancement of synaptic efficacy in target neurones, as assessed by the increase in EPSC amplitude and in the percentage of successes. Moreover, in the presence of 4-AP, EPSCs appeared with a longer latency and were more scattered. This conductance is therefore crucial for setting the timing and strength of synaptic transmission at CA3-CA3 connections. It is conceivable that switching off ID by increasing intracellular Ca2+ following activity-dependent processes may facilitate network synchronisation and crosstalk between CA3 pyramidal cells, leading to

  4. Chloroquine Inhibits Ca2+ Signaling in Murine CD4+ Thymocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Chao Xu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Bitter-tasting chloroquine can suppress T cell activation by inhibiting Ca2+ signaling. However, the mechanism of inhibition remains largely unclear. Methods: In this study, CD4+ T cells were isolated from the thymus, and the calcium content of CD4+ thymocytes was measured using fura-2 AM and a TILL imaging system. Pyrazole-3 (Pyr3, thapsigargin (TG, and caffeine were used to assess the effects of chloroquine on the intracellular Ca2+ content of CD4+ T cells. Results: In murine CD4+ thymocytes, chloroquine decreased the TG-triggered intracellular Ca2+ increase in a dose-dependent manner. In the absence of chloroquine under Ca2+-free conditions (0 mM Ca2+ and 0.5 mM EGTA, TG induced a transient Ca2+ increase. After restoration of the extracellular Ca2+ concentration to 2 mM, a dramatic Ca2+ increase occurred. This elevation was completely blocked by chloroquine and was markedly inhibited by Pyr3, a selective antagonist of transient receptor potential C3 (TRPC3 channel and stromal interaction molecule (STIM/Orai channel. Furthermore, the TG-induced transient Ca2+ increase under Ca2+-free conditions was eliminated in the presence of chloroquine. Chloroquine also blocked the dialyzed inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3-induced intracellular Ca2+ increase. However, chloroquine was not able to decrease the caffeine-induced Ca2+ increase. Conclusion: These data indicate that chloroquine inhibits the elevation of intracellular Ca2+ in thymic CD4+ T cells by inhibiting IP3 receptor-mediated Ca2+ release from intracellular stores and TRPC3 channel-mediated and/or STIM/Orai channel-mediated Ca2+ influx.

  5. The other side of cardiac Ca2+ signaling: transcriptional control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro eDomínguez-Rodríquez

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Ca2+ is probably the most versatile signal transduction element used by all cell types. In the heart, it is essential to activate cellular contraction in each heartbeat. Nevertheless Ca2+ is not only a key element in excitation-contraction coupling (EC coupling, but it is also a pivotal second messenger in cardiac signal transduction, being able to control processes such as excitability, metabolism, and transcriptional regulation. Regarding the latter, Ca2+ activates Ca2+-dependent transcription factors by a process called excitation-transcription coupling (ET coupling. ET coupling is an integrated process by which the common signaling pathways that regulate EC coupling activate transcription factors. Although ET coupling has been extensively studied in neurons and other cell types, less is known in cardiac muscle. Some hints have been found in studies on the development of cardiac hypertrophy, where two Ca2+-dependent enzymes are key actors: Ca2+/Calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII and phosphatase calcineurin, both of which are activated by the complex Ca2+/ /Calmodulin. The question now is how ET coupling occurs in cardiomyocytes, where intracellular Ca2+ is continuously oscillating. In this focused review, we will draw attention to location of Ca2+ signaling: intranuclear ([Ca2+]n or cytoplasmic ([Ca2+]c, and the specific ionic channels involved in the activation of cardiac ET coupling. Specifically, we will highlight the role of the 1,4,5 inositol triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs in the elevation of [Ca2+]n levels, which are important to locally activate CaMKII, and the role of transient receptor potential channels canonical (TRPCs in [Ca2+]c, needed to activate calcineurin.

  6. 拯救老兵CA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    威廉·麦克拉肯

    2011-01-01

    @@ 是的,CA Technologies(冠群电脑)还活着.这家由美籍华人王嘉廉创办的软件公司,曾经风光无限,甚至一度有比肩微软的可能.然而混乱的内部管理与频繁的决策失误,造成了公司业绩低迷,随即也引发了股东间的权力纷争.

  7. Superdeformed and Triaxial States in ^{42}Ca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadyńska-Klȩk, K; Napiorkowski, P J; Zielińska, M; Srebrny, J; Maj, A; Azaiez, F; Valiente Dobón, J J; Kicińska-Habior, M; Nowacki, F; Naïdja, H; Bounthong, B; Rodríguez, T R; de Angelis, G; Abraham, T; Anil Kumar, G; Bazzacco, D; Bellato, M; Bortolato, D; Bednarczyk, P; Benzoni, G; Berti, L; Birkenbach, B; Bruyneel, B; Brambilla, S; Camera, F; Chavas, J; Cederwall, B; Charles, L; Ciemała, M; Cocconi, P; Coleman-Smith, P; Colombo, A; Corsi, A; Crespi, F C L; Cullen, D M; Czermak, A; Désesquelles, P; Doherty, D T; Dulny, B; Eberth, J; Farnea, E; Fornal, B; Franchoo, S; Gadea, A; Giaz, A; Gottardo, A; Grave, X; Grȩbosz, J; Görgen, A; Gulmini, M; Habermann, T; Hess, H; Isocrate, R; Iwanicki, J; Jaworski, G; Judson, D S; Jungclaus, A; Karkour, N; Kmiecik, M; Karpiński, D; Kisieliński, M; Kondratyev, N; Korichi, A; Komorowska, M; Kowalczyk, M; Korten, W; Krzysiek, M; Lehaut, G; Leoni, S; Ljungvall, J; Lopez-Martens, A; Lunardi, S; Maron, G; Mazurek, K; Menegazzo, R; Mengoni, D; Merchán, E; Mȩczyński, W; Michelagnoli, C; Mierzejewski, J; Million, B; Myalski, S; Napoli, D R; Nicolini, R; Niikura, M; Obertelli, A; Özmen, S F; Palacz, M; Próchniak, L; Pullia, A; Quintana, B; Rampazzo, G; Recchia, F; Redon, N; Reiter, P; Rosso, D; Rusek, K; Sahin, E; Salsac, M-D; Söderström, P-A; Stefan, I; Stézowski, O; Styczeń, J; Theisen, Ch; Toniolo, N; Ur, C A; Vandone, V; Wadsworth, R; Wasilewska, B; Wiens, A; Wood, J L; Wrzosek-Lipska, K; Ziȩbliński, M

    2016-08-01

    Shape parameters of a weakly deformed ground-state band and highly deformed slightly triaxial sideband in ^{42}Ca were determined from E2 matrix elements measured in the first low-energy Coulomb excitation experiment performed with AGATA. The picture of two coexisting structures is well reproduced by new state-of-the-art large-scale shell model and beyond-mean-field calculations. Experimental evidence for superdeformation of the band built on 0_{2}^{+} has been obtained and the role of triaxiality in the A∼40 mass region is discussed. Furthermore, the potential of Coulomb excitation as a tool to study superdeformation has been demonstrated for the first time.

  8. Ca2+-Regulated Photoproteins: Effective Immunoassay Reporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila A. Frank

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Ca2+-regulated photoproteins of luminous marine coelenterates are of interest and a challenge for researchers as a unique bioluminescent system and as a promising analytical instrument for both in vivo and in vitro applications. The proteins are comprehensively studied as to biochemical properties, tertiary structures, bioluminescence mechanism, etc. This knowledge, along with available recombinant proteins serves the basis for development of unique bioluminescent detection systems that are “self-contained”, triggerable, fast, highly sensitive, and non-hazardous. In the paper, we focus on the use of photoproteins as reporters in binding assays based on immunological recognition element—bioluminescent immunoassay and hybridization immunoassay, their advantages and prospects.

  9. Mechanics of Old Faithful Geyser, Calistoga, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, M.L.; Manga, M.; Hurwitz, Shaul; Johnston, Malcolm J.; Karlstrom, L.; Wang, Chun-Yong

    2012-01-01

    In order to probe the subsurface dynamics associated with geyser eruptions, we measured ground deformation at Old Faithful Geyser of Calistoga, CA. We present a physical model in which recharge during the period preceding an eruption is driven by pressure differences relative to the aquifer supplying the geyser. The model predicts that pressure and ground deformation are characterized by an exponential function of time, consistent with our observations. The geyser's conduit is connected to a reservoir at a depth of at least 42 m, and pressure changes in the reservoir can produce the observed ground deformations through either a poroelastic or elastic mechanical model.

  10. Superdeformed and Triaxial States in 42Ca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadyńska-KlÈ©k, K.; Napiorkowski, P. J.; Zielińska, M.; Srebrny, J.; Maj, A.; Azaiez, F.; Valiente Dobón, J. J.; Kicińska-Habior, M.; Nowacki, F.; Naïdja, H.; Bounthong, B.; Rodríguez, T. R.; de Angelis, G.; Abraham, T.; Anil Kumar, G.; Bazzacco, D.; Bellato, M.; Bortolato, D.; Bednarczyk, P.; Benzoni, G.; Berti, L.; Birkenbach, B.; Bruyneel, B.; Brambilla, S.; Camera, F.; Chavas, J.; Cederwall, B.; Charles, L.; Ciemała, M.; Cocconi, P.; Coleman-Smith, P.; Colombo, A.; Corsi, A.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Cullen, D. M.; Czermak, A.; Désesquelles, P.; Doherty, D. T.; Dulny, B.; Eberth, J.; Farnea, E.; Fornal, B.; Franchoo, S.; Gadea, A.; Giaz, A.; Gottardo, A.; Grave, X.; GrÈ©bosz, J.; Görgen, A.; Gulmini, M.; Habermann, T.; Hess, H.; Isocrate, R.; Iwanicki, J.; Jaworski, G.; Judson, D. S.; Jungclaus, A.; Karkour, N.; Kmiecik, M.; Karpiński, D.; Kisieliński, M.; Kondratyev, N.; Korichi, A.; Komorowska, M.; Kowalczyk, M.; Korten, W.; Krzysiek, M.; Lehaut, G.; Leoni, S.; Ljungvall, J.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Lunardi, S.; Maron, G.; Mazurek, K.; Menegazzo, R.; Mengoni, D.; Merchán, E.; MÈ©czyński, W.; Michelagnoli, C.; Mierzejewski, J.; Million, B.; Myalski, S.; Napoli, D. R.; Nicolini, R.; Niikura, M.; Obertelli, A.; Özmen, S. F.; Palacz, M.; Próchniak, L.; Pullia, A.; Quintana, B.; Rampazzo, G.; Recchia, F.; Redon, N.; Reiter, P.; Rosso, D.; Rusek, K.; Sahin, E.; Salsac, M.-D.; Söderström, P.-A.; Stefan, I.; Stézowski, O.; Styczeń, J.; Theisen, Ch.; Toniolo, N.; Ur, C. A.; Vandone, V.; Wadsworth, R.; Wasilewska, B.; Wiens, A.; Wood, J. L.; Wrzosek-Lipska, K.; ZiÈ©bliński, M.

    2016-08-01

    Shape parameters of a weakly deformed ground-state band and highly deformed slightly triaxial sideband in 42Ca were determined from E 2 matrix elements measured in the first low-energy Coulomb excitation experiment performed with AGATA. The picture of two coexisting structures is well reproduced by new state-of-the-art large-scale shell model and beyond-mean-field calculations. Experimental evidence for superdeformation of the band built on 02+ has been obtained and the role of triaxiality in the A ˜40 mass region is discussed. Furthermore, the potential of Coulomb excitation as a tool to study superdeformation has been demonstrated for the first time.

  11. Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary Boundary (polygon)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Office of National Marine Sanctuaries manages a system of sanctuaries and other managed areas around the country. The legal boundaries of These sanctuaries are...

  12. Monterey, California Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  13. Monterey, California Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  14. The Role of Extracellular Ca2+Influx, Intracellular Ca2+ Release and Calmodulin in Mouse Egg Fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The effects of various Ca2+-modifying drugs on moue egg fertilization were studied. Ca2+ chelator, ethylen glycol-bis-(2-aminoethyl)-tetracetic acid (EGTA) ,and calmodulin (CaM) antagonist,trifluoperzaine (TFP) ,inhibited fertilization in a dose-dependent manner,whild Ca2+ channel bolcker,verapamil ,did not have any effect. When intracellular Ca2+ release was blocked by 8-(N, N-diethylamino) octy1-3,4,5-trimethoxy- benzonate (TMB-8) or the Ca2+ oscillations were inhibited by an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-AT- Pase,thapsigargin,the second polar body emission and pronuclear formation were significantly decreased. In contrast,inhibition of intracellular Ca2+ release via bolckage of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) production by neomycin or lithium did not affect fertilization. The results sugest that both extracellular influx,intracellu- lar Ca2+ release and CaM activation are required for normal fertilization. However ,extracellular influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channel and intracellular release induced by IP3 are not the only pathways for producing Ca2+ transients in moue eggs.

  15. The Role of Extracellular Ca2+ Influx,Intracellular Ca2+ Release and Calmodulin in Mouse Egg Fertilization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SunQing-yuan; TanJing-he; 等

    1999-01-01

    The effects of various Ca2+-modifying drugs on moue egg fertilization were studied.Ca2+ chelator,ethylen glycol-bis-(2-aminoethyl)-tetracetic acid(EGTA),and calmodulin(CaM) antagonist,trifluoperzaine (TFP),inhibited fertilization in a dose-dependent manner,whild Ca2+ channel bolcker,verspamil,did not have any effect.When intracellular Ca2+ release was blocked by 8-(N,N-diethylamino) octy 1-3,4,5-trimethoxy-benzonate(TME-8) or the Ca2+ oscillations were inhibited by an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-At-Pase,thapsigargin,the second polar body emission and pronuclear formation were significantly decreased.In contrast,inhibition of intracellular Ca2+ release via bolckage of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3) production by neomycin or lithium did not affect fertilization.The results sugest that both extracellular influx,intracellular Ca2+ release and CaM activation are required for mormal fertilization.However,extracellular influx through voltage-gated Ca2+ channel and intracellular release induced by IP3 and not the only pathways for producing Ca2+ transients in moue eggs.

  16. Differential contribution of cytoplasmic Ca2+ and Ca2+ influx to gamete fusion and egg activation in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, A F; Faure, J E; Dumas, C; Feijó, J A

    2001-12-01

    In multicellular organisms, gamete fusion triggers a set of events, collectively known as egg activation, that leads to the development of a new individual. Every species that has been studied shows at least one rise in cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]Cyt) after gamete fusion which is believed to be involved in activation. Yet the source and regulation of this Ca2+ signal and the way it is transduced inside the zygote are controversial. In higher plants, in vitro fertilization (IVF) has enabled the description of a rise in [Ca2+]Cyt (ref. 4) that is sufficient for activation, and of a Ca2+ influx that spreads as a wavefront from the fusion site The relationship between these two responses is unknown. Using a new combination of methods that simultaneously monitor the extracellular flux with a Ca2+-vibrating probe, and [Ca2+]Cyt by widefield imaging, we directly determined that the Ca2+ influx precedes the [Ca2+]Cyt elevation by 40-120 s. In addition, results from experiments using the Ca2+-channel inhibitor gadolinium (Gd3+) suggest that the Ca2+ influx may be necessary for sperm incorporation. We also present evidence for a putative sperm-dependent Gd3+-insensitive localized Ca2+ influx confined to the fusion point.

  17. Homer proteins in Ca²⁺ entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardin, Isaac; López, José J; Berna-Erro, Alejandro; Salido, Ginés M; Rosado, Juan A

    2013-06-01

    The Homer family of proteins consists of three adaptor proteins, Homer1, Homer2 and Homer3, each with various isoforms. Homer1 family presents an EVH1 domain, a coiled coil domain and two leucine zipper domains. Homer proteins regulate a number of Ca2+-handling proteins, including transient receptor potential channels and other Ca2+-permeable channels, ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors, shank scaffolding proteins or endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release channels. This review article focuses on the association of Homer 1 proteins with Ca2+-handling proteins and their role on intracellular Ca2+-homeostasis. Copyright © 2013 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Structural, electronics and optical properties of CaO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albuquerque, E L [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte 59072-970 Natal-RN (Brazil); Vasconcelos, M S [Departamento de Ciencias Exatas, Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica do Maranhao 65025-001 Sao Luis-MA (Brazil)], E-mail: eudenilson@dfte.ufrn.br

    2008-03-15

    The carrier effective masses of CaO in the cubic phase are estimated by ab initio calculations, which are used for the simulation of Si/CaO metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices by solving Schroedinger and Poisson equations self consistently. It is shown that higher switching speed, longer lifetimes, and higher endurance can be obtained replacing SiO{sub 2} by CaO as gate dielectric, suggesting promising biomedical applications for Si/CaO-based MOS devices due to the CaO bio-compatibility.

  19. Photolysis of caged compounds: studying Ca(2+) signaling and activation of Ca(2+)-dependent ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almassy, Janos; Yule, David I

    2013-01-01

    A wide variety of signaling molecules have been chemically modified by conjugation to a photolabile chromophore to render the substance temporarily biologically inert. Subsequent exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light can release the active moiety from the "caged" precursor in an experimentally controlled manner. This allows the concentration of active molecule to be precisely manipulated in both time and space. These techniques are particularly useful in experimental protocols designed to investigate the mechanisms underlying Ca(2+) signaling and the activation of Ca(2+)-dependent effectors.

  20. Effects of the removal of extracellular Ca2+ on [Ca2+]i responses to FCCP and acetate in carotid body glomus cells of adult rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, M

    1997-09-12

    The effects of the removal of extracellular Ca2+ on the responses of cytosolic concentrations of Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) to acidic stimuli, a protonophore carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone (FCCP) and an organic acid acetate, were examined in clusters of cultured carotid body glomus cells of adult rabbits using fura-2 microfluorometry. Application of FCCP (1 microM) induced an increase in [Ca2+]i (mean +/- S.E.M., 108 +/- 14%). After withdrawal of the protonophore the increased [Ca2+]i returned slowly to a resting level. The [Ca2+]i response was attenuated by an inorganic Ca2+ channel antagonist Ni2+ (2 mM) by 81 +/- 4%, and by an L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channel antagonist D600 (10 microM) by 53 +/- 13%. The removal of extracellular Ca2+ eliminated the [Ca2+]i response in 71% of the tested cells (n = 17), and depressed it by 68 +/- 6% in the rest. Recovery following stimulation with FCCP in the absence of Ca2+ reversibly produced a rapid and large rise in [Ca2+]i, referred to as a [Ca2+]i rise after Ca2+-free/FCCP. The magnitude of a [Ca2+]i rise after Ca2+-free/FCCP (285 +/- 28%, P < 0.05) was larger than that of an increase in [Ca2+]i induced by FCCP in the presence of Ca2+ and had a correlation with the intensity of the suppression of the [Ca2+]i response by Ca2+ removal. A [Ca2+]i rise after Ca2+-free/FCCP was inhibited mostly by D600. Similarly, recovery following exposure to acetate in the absence of Ca2+ caused a rise in [Ca2+]i, referred to as a [Ca2+]i rise after Ca2+-free/acetate which was sensitive to D600. The magnitude of the [Ca2+]i rise was larger than that of a change in [Ca2+]i caused by acetate in the presence of Ca2+. These results suggest that FCCP-induced increase in [Ca2+]i was, in most cells, due to Ca2+ influx via L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels and, in some cells, due to both Ca2+ influx and Ca2+ release from internal Ca2+ pool. The removal of extracellular Ca2+ might modify [Ca2+]i responses to acidic stimuli, causing [Ca2+]i