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Sample records for monte carlo-based technique

  1. Using a Monte-Carlo-based approach to evaluate the uncertainty on fringe projection technique

    CERN Document Server

    Molimard, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    A complete uncertainty analysis on a given fringe projection set-up has been performed using Monte-Carlo approach. In particular the calibration procedure is taken into account. Two applications are given: at a macroscopic scale, phase noise is predominant whilst at microscopic scale, both phase noise and calibration errors are important. Finally, uncertainty found at macroscopic scale is close to some experimental tests (~100 {\\mu}m).

  2. Quantitative Monte Carlo-based holmium-166 SPECT reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elschot, Mattijs; Smits, Maarten L. J.; Nijsen, Johannes F. W.; Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den; Jong, Hugo W. A. M. de [Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Viergever, Max A. [Image Sciences Institute, University Medical Center Utrecht, Heidelberglaan 100, 3584 CX Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Quantitative imaging of the radionuclide distribution is of increasing interest for microsphere radioembolization (RE) of liver malignancies, to aid treatment planning and dosimetry. For this purpose, holmium-166 ({sup 166}Ho) microspheres have been developed, which can be visualized with a gamma camera. The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate a new reconstruction method for quantitative {sup 166}Ho SPECT, including Monte Carlo-based modeling of photon contributions from the full energy spectrum.Methods: A fast Monte Carlo (MC) simulator was developed for simulation of {sup 166}Ho projection images and incorporated in a statistical reconstruction algorithm (SPECT-fMC). Photon scatter and attenuation for all photons sampled from the full {sup 166}Ho energy spectrum were modeled during reconstruction by Monte Carlo simulations. The energy- and distance-dependent collimator-detector response was modeled using precalculated convolution kernels. Phantom experiments were performed to quantitatively evaluate image contrast, image noise, count errors, and activity recovery coefficients (ARCs) of SPECT-fMC in comparison with those of an energy window-based method for correction of down-scattered high-energy photons (SPECT-DSW) and a previously presented hybrid method that combines MC simulation of photopeak scatter with energy window-based estimation of down-scattered high-energy contributions (SPECT-ppMC+DSW). Additionally, the impact of SPECT-fMC on whole-body recovered activities (A{sup est}) and estimated radiation absorbed doses was evaluated using clinical SPECT data of six {sup 166}Ho RE patients.Results: At the same noise level, SPECT-fMC images showed substantially higher contrast than SPECT-DSW and SPECT-ppMC+DSW in spheres ≥17 mm in diameter. The count error was reduced from 29% (SPECT-DSW) and 25% (SPECT-ppMC+DSW) to 12% (SPECT-fMC). ARCs in five spherical volumes of 1.96–106.21 ml were improved from 32%–63% (SPECT-DSW) and 50%–80

  3. GPU-Monte Carlo based fast IMRT plan optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongbao Li

    2014-03-01

    , Shi F, Jiang S, Jia X. GPU-Monte Carlo based fast IMRT plan optimization. Int J Cancer Ther Oncol 2014; 2(2:020244. DOI: 10.14319/ijcto.0202.44

  4. Development of a Monte-Carlo based method for calculating the effect of stationary fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pettersen, E. E.; Demazire, C.; Jareteg, K.

    2015-01-01

    that corresponds to the real part of the neutron balance, and one that corresponds to the imaginary part. The two equivalent problems are in nature similar to two subcritical systems driven by external neutron sources, and can thus be treated as such in a Monte Carlo framework. The definition of these two...... of light water reactor conditions in an infinite lattice of fuel pins surrounded by water. The test case highlights flux gradients that are steeper in the Monte Carlo-based transport solution than in the diffusion-based solution. Compared to other Monte Carlo-based methods earlier proposed for carrying out...

  5. MCHITS: Monte Carlo based Method for Hyperlink Induced Topic Search on Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoyan Jin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hyperlink Induced Topic Search (HITS is the most authoritative and most widely used personalized ranking algorithm on networks. The HITS algorithm ranks nodes on networks according to power iteration, and has high complexity of computation. This paper models the HITS algorithm with the Monte Carlo method, and proposes Monte Carlo based algorithms for the HITS computation. Theoretical analysis and experiments show that the Monte Carlo based approximate computing of the HITS ranking reduces computing resources a lot while keeping higher accuracy, and is significantly better than related works

  6. Monte Carlo based radial shield design of typical PWR reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gul, Anas; Khan, Rustam; Qureshi, M. Ayub; Azeem, Muhammad Waqar; Raza, S.A. [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Stummer, Thomas [Technische Univ. Wien (Austria). Atominst.

    2016-11-15

    Neutron and gamma flux and dose equivalent rate distribution are analysed in radial and shields of a typical PWR type reactor based on the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNP5. The ENDF/B-VI continuous energy cross-section library has been employed for the criticality and shielding analysis. The computed results are in good agreement with the reference results (maximum difference is less than 56 %). It implies that MCNP5 a good tool for accurate prediction of neutron and gamma flux and dose rates in radial shield around the core of PWR type reactors.

  7. A Monte Carlo-based model of gold nanoparticle radiosensitization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechtman, Eli Solomon

    The goal of radiotherapy is to operate within the therapeutic window - delivering doses of ionizing radiation to achieve locoregional tumour control, while minimizing normal tissue toxicity. A greater therapeutic ratio can be achieved by utilizing radiosensitizing agents designed to enhance the effects of radiation at the tumour. Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) represent a novel radiosensitizer with unique and attractive properties. AuNPs enhance local photon interactions, thereby converting photons into localized damaging electrons. Experimental reports of AuNP radiosensitization reveal this enhancement effect to be highly sensitive to irradiation source energy, cell line, and AuNP size, concentration and intracellular localization. This thesis explored the physics and some of the underlying mechanisms behind AuNP radiosensitization. A Monte Carlo simulation approach was developed to investigate the enhanced photoelectric absorption within AuNPs, and to characterize the escaping energy and range of the photoelectric products. Simulations revealed a 10 3 fold increase in the rate of photoelectric absorption using low-energy brachytherapy sources compared to megavolt sources. For low-energy sources, AuNPs released electrons with ranges of only a few microns in the surrounding tissue. For higher energy sources, longer ranged photoelectric products travelled orders of magnitude farther. A novel radiobiological model called the AuNP radiosensitization predictive (ARP) model was developed based on the unique nanoscale energy deposition pattern around AuNPs. The ARP model incorporated detailed Monte Carlo simulations with experimentally determined parameters to predict AuNP radiosensitization. This model compared well to in vitro experiments involving two cancer cell lines (PC-3 and SK-BR-3), two AuNP sizes (5 and 30 nm) and two source energies (100 and 300 kVp). The ARP model was then used to explore the effects of AuNP intracellular localization using 1.9 and 100 nm Au

  8. A Monte Carlo based spent fuel analysis safeguards strategy assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fensin, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menlove, Howard O [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sandoval, Nathan P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Safeguarding nuclear material involves the detection of diversions of significant quantities of nuclear materials, and the deterrence of such diversions by the risk of early detection. There are a variety of motivations for quantifying plutonium in spent fuel assemblies by means of nondestructive assay (NDA) including the following: strengthening the capabilities of the International Atomic Energy Agencies ability to safeguards nuclear facilities, shipper/receiver difference, input accountability at reprocessing facilities and burnup credit at repositories. Many NDA techniques exist for measuring signatures from spent fuel; however, no single NDA technique can, in isolation, quantify elemental plutonium and other actinides of interest in spent fuel. A study has been undertaken to determine the best integrated combination of cost effective techniques for quantifying plutonium mass in spent fuel for nuclear safeguards. A standardized assessment process was developed to compare the effective merits and faults of 12 different detection techniques in order to integrate a few techniques and to down-select among the techniques in preparation for experiments. The process involves generating a basis burnup/enrichment/cooling time dependent spent fuel assembly library, creating diversion scenarios, developing detector models and quantifying the capability of each NDA technique. Because hundreds of input and output files must be managed in the couplings of data transitions for the different facets of the assessment process, a graphical user interface (GUI) was development that automates the process. This GUI allows users to visually create diversion scenarios with varied replacement materials, and generate a MCNPX fixed source detector assessment input file. The end result of the assembly library assessment is to select a set of common source terms and diversion scenarios for quantifying the capability of each of the 12 NDA techniques. We present here the generalized

  9. Development and evaluation of Monte Carlo-based SPECT reconstruction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xiao, J.

    2009-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) is one of the most applied molecular imaging techniques to diagnose human diseases, e.g., of the heart, the brain or in oncology. For example, cardiac SPECT imaging plays a central role in diagnosing coronary heart diseases by providing clinicians w

  10. Monte Carlo techniques in radiation therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Verhaegen, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Modern cancer treatment relies on Monte Carlo simulations to help radiotherapists and clinical physicists better understand and compute radiation dose from imaging devices as well as exploit four-dimensional imaging data. With Monte Carlo-based treatment planning tools now available from commercial vendors, a complete transition to Monte Carlo-based dose calculation methods in radiotherapy could likely take place in the next decade. Monte Carlo Techniques in Radiation Therapy explores the use of Monte Carlo methods for modeling various features of internal and external radiation sources, including light ion beams. The book-the first of its kind-addresses applications of the Monte Carlo particle transport simulation technique in radiation therapy, mainly focusing on external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy. It presents the mathematical and technical aspects of the methods in particle transport simulations. The book also discusses the modeling of medical linacs and other irradiation devices; issues specific...

  11. Monte Carlo-based Noise Compensation in Coil Intensity Corrected Endorectal MRI

    CERN Document Server

    Lui, Dorothy; Haider, Masoom; Wong, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer found in males making early diagnosis important. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been useful in visualizing and localizing tumor candidates and with the use of endorectal coils (ERC), the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be improved. The coils introduce intensity inhomogeneities and the surface coil intensity correction built into MRI scanners is used to reduce these inhomogeneities. However, the correction typically performed at the MRI scanner level leads to noise amplification and noise level variations. Methods: In this study, we introduce a new Monte Carlo-based noise compensation approach for coil intensity corrected endorectal MRI which allows for effective noise compensation and preservation of details within the prostate. The approach accounts for the ERC SNR profile via a spatially-adaptive noise model for correcting non-stationary noise variations. Such a method is useful particularly for improving the image quality of coil i...

  12. New Monte Carlo-based method to evaluate fission fraction uncertainties for the reactor antineutrino experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, X. B.; Qiu, R. M.; Chen, Y. X.

    2017-02-01

    Uncertainties regarding fission fractions are essential in understanding antineutrino flux predictions in reactor antineutrino experiments. A new Monte Carlo-based method to evaluate the covariance coefficients between isotopes is proposed. The covariance coefficients are found to vary with reactor burnup and may change from positive to negative because of balance effects in fissioning. For example, between 235U and 239Pu, the covariance coefficient changes from 0.15 to -0.13. Using the equation relating fission fraction and atomic density, consistent uncertainties in the fission fraction and covariance matrix were obtained. The antineutrino flux uncertainty is 0.55%, which does not vary with reactor burnup. The new value is about 8.3% smaller.

  13. A Monte Carlo-based radiation safety assessment for astronauts in an environment with confined magnetic field shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Changran; Tang, Xiaobin; Gong, Chunhui; Guan, Fada; Johns, Jesse; Shu, Diyun; Chen, Da

    2015-12-01

    The active shielding technique has great potential for radiation protection in space exploration because it has the advantage of a significant mass saving compared with the passive shielding technique. This paper demonstrates a Monte Carlo-based approach to evaluating the shielding effectiveness of the active shielding technique using confined magnetic fields (CMFs). The International Commission on Radiological Protection reference anthropomorphic phantom, as well as the toroidal CMF, was modeled using the Monte Carlo toolkit Geant4. The penetrating primary particle fluence, organ-specific dose equivalent, and male effective dose were calculated for particles in galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) and solar particle events (SPEs). Results show that the SPE protons can be easily shielded against, even almost completely deflected, by the toroidal magnetic field. GCR particles can also be more effectively shielded against by increasing the magnetic field strength. Our results also show that the introduction of a structural Al wall in the CMF did not provide additional shielding for GCR; in fact it can weaken the total shielding effect of the CMF. This study demonstrated the feasibility of accurately determining the radiation field inside the environment and evaluating the organ dose equivalents for astronauts under active shielding using the CMF.

  14. A Monte-Carlo based model of the AX-PET demonstrator and its experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solevi, P; Oliver, J F; Gillam, J E; Bolle, E; Casella, C; Chesi, E; De Leo, R; Dissertori, G; Fanti, V; Heller, M; Lai, M; Lustermann, W; Nappi, E; Pauss, F; Rudge, A; Ruotsalainen, U; Schinzel, D; Schneider, T; Séguinot, J; Stapnes, S; Weilhammer, P; Tuna, U; Joram, C; Rafecas, M

    2013-08-21

    AX-PET is a novel PET detector based on axially oriented crystals and orthogonal wavelength shifter (WLS) strips, both individually read out by silicon photo-multipliers. Its design decouples sensitivity and spatial resolution, by reducing the parallax error due to the layered arrangement of the crystals. Additionally the granularity of AX-PET enhances the capability to track photons within the detector yielding a large fraction of inter-crystal scatter events. These events, if properly processed, can be included in the reconstruction stage further increasing the sensitivity. Its unique features require dedicated Monte-Carlo simulations, enabling the development of the device, interpreting data and allowing the development of reconstruction codes. At the same time the non-conventional design of AX-PET poses several challenges to the simulation and modeling tasks, mostly related to the light transport and distribution within the crystals and WLS strips, as well as the electronics readout. In this work we present a hybrid simulation tool based on an analytical model and a Monte-Carlo based description of the AX-PET demonstrator. It was extensively validated against experimental data, providing excellent agreement.

  15. Dosimetric validation of a commercial Monte Carlo based IMRT planning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grofsmid, Dennis; Dirkx, Maarten; Marijnissen, Hans; Woudstra, Evert; Heijmen, Ben

    2010-02-01

    Recently a commercial Monte Carlo based IMRT planning system (Monaco version 1.0.0) was released. In this study the dosimetric accuracy of this new planning system was validated. Absolute dose profiles, depth dose curves, and output factors calculated by Monaco were compared with measurements in a water phantom. Different static on-axis and off-axis fields were tested at various source-skin distances for 6, 10, and 18 MV photon beams. Four clinical IMRT plans were evaluated in a water phantom using a linear diode detector array and another six IMRT plans for different tumor sites in solid water using a 2D detector array. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the dose engine near tissue inhomogeneities absolute dose distributions were measured with Gafchromic EBT film in an inhomogeneous slab phantom. For an end-to-end test a four-field IMRT plan was applied to an anthropomorphic lung phantom with a simulated tumor peripherally located in the right lung. Gafchromic EBT film, placed in and around the tumor area, was used to evaluate the dose distribution. Generally, the measured and the calculated dose distributions agreed within 2% dose difference or 2 mm distance-to-agreement. But mainly at interfaces with bone, some larger dose differences could be observed. Based on the results of this study, the authors concluded that the dosimetric accuracy of Monaco is adequate for clinical introduction.

  16. A comprehensive revisit of the ρ meson with improved Monte-Carlo based QCD sum rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi-Nan; Zhang, Zhu-Feng; Steele, T. G.; Jin, Hong-Ying; Huang, Zhuo-Ran

    2017-07-01

    We improve the Monte-Carlo based QCD sum rules by introducing the rigorous Hölder-inequality-determined sum rule window and a Breit-Wigner type parametrization for the phenomenological spectral function. In this improved sum rule analysis methodology, the sum rule analysis window can be determined without any assumptions on OPE convergence or the QCD continuum. Therefore, an unbiased prediction can be obtained for the phenomenological parameters (the hadronic mass and width etc.). We test the new approach in the ρ meson channel with re-examination and inclusion of α s corrections to dimension-4 condensates in the OPE. We obtain results highly consistent with experimental values. We also discuss the possible extension of this method to some other channels. Supported by NSFC (11175153, 11205093, 11347020), Open Foundation of the Most Important Subjects of Zhejiang Province, and K. C. Wong Magna Fund in Ningbo University, TGS is Supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), Z. F. Zhang and Z. R. Huang are Grateful to the University of Saskatchewan for its Warm Hospitality

  17. An approach to using conventional brachytherapy software for clinical treatment planning of complex, Monte Carlo-based brachytherapy dose distributions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, Mark J.; Melhus, Christopher S.; Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts 02111 (United States); Radiation Oncology Department, Physics Section, ' ' La Fe' ' University Hospital, Avenida Campanar 21, E-46009 Valencia (Spain); Department of Atomic, Molecular, and Nuclear Physics, University of Valencia, C/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot, Spain and IFIC (University of Valencia-CSIC), C/Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    dosimetry parameter data {<=}0.1 cm was required, and the virtual brachytherapy source data set included over 5000 data points. On the other hand, the lack of consideration for applicator heterogeneity effect caused conventional dose overestimates exceeding an order of magnitude in regions of clinical interest. This approach is rationalized by the improved dose estimates. In conclusion, a new technique was developed to incorporate complex Monte Carlo-based brachytherapy dose distributions into conventional TPS. These results are generalizable to other brachytherapy source types and other TPS.

  18. Monte Carlo based treatment planning systems for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in Petten, The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nievaart, V. A.; Daquino, G. G.; Moss, R. L.

    2007-06-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a bimodal form of radiotherapy for the treatment of tumour lesions. Since the cancer cells in the treatment volume are targeted with 10B, a higher dose is given to these cancer cells due to the 10B(n,α)7Li reaction, in comparison with the surrounding healthy cells. In Petten (The Netherlands), at the High Flux Reactor, a specially tailored neutron beam has been designed and installed. Over 30 patients have been treated with BNCT in 2 clinical protocols: a phase I study for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme and a phase II study on the treatment of malignant melanoma. Furthermore, activities concerning the extra-corporal treatment of metastasis in the liver (from colorectal cancer) are in progress. The irradiation beam at the HFR contains both neutrons and gammas that, together with the complex geometries of both patient and beam set-up, demands for very detailed treatment planning calculations. A well designed Treatment Planning System (TPS) should obey the following general scheme: (1) a pre-processing phase (CT and/or MRI scans to create the geometric solid model, cross-section files for neutrons and/or gammas); (2) calculations (3D radiation transport, estimation of neutron and gamma fluences, macroscopic and microscopic dose); (3) post-processing phase (displaying of the results, iso-doses and -fluences). Treatment planning in BNCT is performed making use of Monte Carlo codes incorporated in a framework, which includes also the pre- and post-processing phases. In particular, the glioblastoma multiforme protocol used BNCT_rtpe, while the melanoma metastases protocol uses NCTPlan. In addition, an ad hoc Positron Emission Tomography (PET) based treatment planning system (BDTPS) has been implemented in order to integrate the real macroscopic boron distribution obtained from PET scanning. BDTPS is patented and uses MCNP as the calculation engine. The precision obtained by the Monte Carlo based TPSs exploited at Petten

  19. A Monte Carlo-based treatment-planning tool for ion beam therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Böhlen, T T; Dosanjh, M; Ferrari, A; Haberer, T; Parodi, K; Patera, V; Mairan, A

    2013-01-01

    Ion beam therapy, as an emerging radiation therapy modality, requires continuous efforts to develop and improve tools for patient treatment planning (TP) and research applications. Dose and fluence computation algorithms using the Monte Carlo (MC) technique have served for decades as reference tools for accurate dose computations for radiotherapy. In this work, a novel MC-based treatment-planning (MCTP) tool for ion beam therapy using the pencil beam scanning technique is presented. It allows single-field and simultaneous multiple-fields optimization for realistic patient treatment conditions and for dosimetric quality assurance for irradiation conditions at state-of-the-art ion beam therapy facilities. It employs iterative procedures that allow for the optimization of absorbed dose and relative biological effectiveness (RBE)-weighted dose using radiobiological input tables generated by external RBE models. Using a re-implementation of the local effect model (LEM), theMCTP tool is able to perform TP studies u...

  20. Monte Carlo based geometrical model for efficiency calculation of an n-type HPGe detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla Cabal, Fatima, E-mail: fpadilla@instec.c [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, ' Quinta de los Molinos' Ave. Salvador Allende, esq. Luaces, Plaza de la Revolucion, Ciudad de la Habana, CP 10400 (Cuba); Lopez-Pino, Neivy; Luis Bernal-Castillo, Jose; Martinez-Palenzuela, Yisel; Aguilar-Mena, Jimmy; D' Alessandro, Katia; Arbelo, Yuniesky; Corrales, Yasser; Diaz, Oscar [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, ' Quinta de los Molinos' Ave. Salvador Allende, esq. Luaces, Plaza de la Revolucion, Ciudad de la Habana, CP 10400 (Cuba)

    2010-12-15

    A procedure to optimize the geometrical model of an n-type detector is described. Sixteen lines from seven point sources ({sup 241}Am, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 22}Na, {sup 60}Co, {sup 57}Co, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 152}Eu) placed at three different source-to-detector distances (10, 20 and 30 cm) were used to calibrate a low-background gamma spectrometer between 26 and 1408 keV. Direct Monte Carlo techniques using the MCNPX 2.6 and GEANT 4 9.2 codes, and a semi-empirical procedure were performed to obtain theoretical efficiency curves. Since discrepancies were found between experimental and calculated data using the manufacturer parameters of the detector, a detail study of the crystal dimensions and the geometrical configuration is carried out. The relative deviation with experimental data decreases from a mean value of 18-4%, after the parameters were optimized.

  1. Monte Carlo based geometrical model for efficiency calculation of an n-type HPGe detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabal, Fatima Padilla; Lopez-Pino, Neivy; Bernal-Castillo, Jose Luis; Martinez-Palenzuela, Yisel; Aguilar-Mena, Jimmy; D'Alessandro, Katia; Arbelo, Yuniesky; Corrales, Yasser; Diaz, Oscar

    2010-12-01

    A procedure to optimize the geometrical model of an n-type detector is described. Sixteen lines from seven point sources ((241)Am, (133)Ba, (22)Na, (60)Co, (57)Co, (137)Cs and (152)Eu) placed at three different source-to-detector distances (10, 20 and 30 cm) were used to calibrate a low-background gamma spectrometer between 26 and 1408 keV. Direct Monte Carlo techniques using the MCNPX 2.6 and GEANT 4 9.2 codes, and a semi-empirical procedure were performed to obtain theoretical efficiency curves. Since discrepancies were found between experimental and calculated data using the manufacturer parameters of the detector, a detail study of the crystal dimensions and the geometrical configuration is carried out. The relative deviation with experimental data decreases from a mean value of 18-4%, after the parameters were optimized.

  2. SU-E-T-761: TOMOMC, A Monte Carlo-Based Planning VerificationTool for Helical Tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chibani, O; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Present a new Monte Carlo code (TOMOMC) to calculate 3D dose distributions for patients undergoing helical tomotherapy treatments. TOMOMC performs CT-based dose calculations using the actual dynamic variables of the machine (couch motion, gantry rotation, and MLC sequences). Methods: TOMOMC is based on the GEPTS (Gama Electron and Positron Transport System) general-purpose Monte Carlo system (Chibani and Li, Med. Phys. 29, 2002, 835). First, beam models for the Hi-Art Tomotherpy machine were developed for the different beam widths (1, 2.5 and 5 cm). The beam model accounts for the exact geometry and composition of the different components of the linac head (target, primary collimator, jaws and MLCs). The beams models were benchmarked by comparing calculated Pdds and lateral/transversal dose profiles with ionization chamber measurements in water. See figures 1–3. The MLC model was tuned in such a way that tongue and groove effect, inter-leaf and intra-leaf transmission are modeled correctly. See figure 4. Results: By simulating the exact patient anatomy and the actual treatment delivery conditions (couch motion, gantry rotation and MLC sinogram), TOMOMC is able to calculate the 3D patient dose distribution which is in principal more accurate than the one from the treatment planning system (TPS) since it relies on the Monte Carlo method (gold standard). Dose volume parameters based on the Monte Carlo dose distribution can also be compared to those produced by the TPS. Attached figures show isodose lines for a H&N patient calculated by TOMOMC (transverse and sagittal views). Analysis of differences between TOMOMC and TPS is an ongoing work for different anatomic sites. Conclusion: A new Monte Carlo code (TOMOMC) was developed for Tomotherapy patient-specific QA. The next step in this project is implementing GPU computing to speed up Monte Carlo simulation and make Monte Carlo-based treatment verification a practical solution.

  3. Iterative reconstruction using a Monte Carlo based system transfer matrix for dedicated breast positron emission tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Krishnendu; Straus, Kenneth J; Chen, Yu; Glick, Stephen J

    2014-08-28

    To maximize sensitivity, it is desirable that ring Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems dedicated for imaging the breast have a small bore. Unfortunately, due to parallax error this causes substantial degradation in spatial resolution for objects near the periphery of the breast. In this work, a framework for computing and incorporating an accurate system matrix into iterative reconstruction is presented in an effort to reduce spatial resolution degradation towards the periphery of the breast. The GATE Monte Carlo Simulation software was utilized to accurately model the system matrix for a breast PET system. A strategy for increasing the count statistics in the system matrix computation and for reducing the system element storage space was used by calculating only a subset of matrix elements and then estimating the rest of the elements by using the geometric symmetry of the cylindrical scanner. To implement this strategy, polar voxel basis functions were used to represent the object, resulting in a block-circulant system matrix. Simulation studies using a breast PET scanner model with ring geometry demonstrated improved contrast at 45% reduced noise level and 1.5 to 3 times resolution performance improvement when compared to MLEM reconstruction using a simple line-integral model. The GATE based system matrix reconstruction technique promises to improve resolution and noise performance and reduce image distortion at FOV periphery compared to line-integral based system matrix reconstruction.

  4. Iterative reconstruction using a Monte Carlo based system transfer matrix for dedicated breast positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, Krishnendu [Ohio Medical Physics Consulting, Dublin, Ohio 43017 (United States); Straus, Kenneth J.; Glick, Stephen J. [Department of Radiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts 01655 (United States); Chen, Yu. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Columbia University, New York, New York 10032 (United States)

    2014-08-28

    To maximize sensitivity, it is desirable that ring Positron Emission Tomography (PET) systems dedicated for imaging the breast have a small bore. Unfortunately, due to parallax error this causes substantial degradation in spatial resolution for objects near the periphery of the breast. In this work, a framework for computing and incorporating an accurate system matrix into iterative reconstruction is presented in an effort to reduce spatial resolution degradation towards the periphery of the breast. The GATE Monte Carlo Simulation software was utilized to accurately model the system matrix for a breast PET system. A strategy for increasing the count statistics in the system matrix computation and for reducing the system element storage space was used by calculating only a subset of matrix elements and then estimating the rest of the elements by using the geometric symmetry of the cylindrical scanner. To implement this strategy, polar voxel basis functions were used to represent the object, resulting in a block-circulant system matrix. Simulation studies using a breast PET scanner model with ring geometry demonstrated improved contrast at 45% reduced noise level and 1.5 to 3 times resolution performance improvement when compared to MLEM reconstruction using a simple line-integral model. The GATE based system matrix reconstruction technique promises to improve resolution and noise performance and reduce image distortion at FOV periphery compared to line-integral based system matrix reconstruction.

  5. Monte-Carlo based Uncertainty Analysis For CO2 Laser Microchanneling Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Shashi; Kumar, Nitish; Kumar, Subrata

    2016-09-01

    CO2 laser microchanneling has emerged as a potential technique for the fabrication of microfluidic devices on PMMA (Poly-methyl-meth-acrylate). PMMA directly vaporizes when subjected to high intensity focused CO2 laser beam. This process results in clean cut and acceptable surface finish on microchannel walls. Overall, CO2 laser microchanneling process is cost effective and easy to implement. While fabricating microchannels on PMMA using a CO2 laser, the maximum depth of the fabricated microchannel is the key feature. There are few analytical models available to predict the maximum depth of the microchannels and cut channel profile on PMMA substrate using a CO2 laser. These models depend upon the values of thermophysical properties of PMMA and laser beam parameters. There are a number of variants of transparent PMMA available in the market with different values of thermophysical properties. Therefore, for applying such analytical models, the values of these thermophysical properties are required to be known exactly. Although, the values of laser beam parameters are readily available, extensive experiments are required to be conducted to determine the value of thermophysical properties of PMMA. The unavailability of exact values of these property parameters restrict the proper control over the microchannel dimension for given power and scanning speed of the laser beam. In order to have dimensional control over the maximum depth of fabricated microchannels, it is necessary to have an idea of uncertainty associated with the predicted microchannel depth. In this research work, the uncertainty associated with the maximum depth dimension has been determined using Monte Carlo method (MCM). The propagation of uncertainty with different power and scanning speed has been predicted. The relative impact of each thermophysical property has been determined using sensitivity analysis.

  6. A Monte-Carlo based extension of the Meteor Orbit and Trajectory Software (MOTS) for computations of orbital elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albin, T.; Koschny, D.; Soja, R.; Srama, R.; Poppe, B.

    2016-01-01

    The Canary Islands Long-Baseline Observatory (CILBO) is a double station meteor camera system (Koschny et al., 2013; Koschny et al., 2014) that consists of 5 cameras. The two cameras considered in this report are ICC7 and ICC9, and are installed on Tenerife and La Palma. They point to the same atmospheric volume between both islands allowing stereoscopic observation of meteors. Since its installation in 2011 and the start of operation in 2012 CILBO has detected over 15000 simultaneously observed meteors. Koschny and Diaz (2002) developed the Meteor Orbit and Trajectory Software (MOTS) to compute the trajectory of such meteors. The software uses the astrometric data from the detection software MetRec (Molau, 1998) and determines the trajectory in geodetic coordinates. This work presents a Monte-Carlo based extension of the MOTS code to compute the orbital elements of simultaneously detected meteors by CILBO.

  7. Monte Carlo-based treatment planning system calculation engine for microbeam radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Rovira, I.; Sempau, J.; Prezado, Y. [Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain) and ID17 Biomedical Beamline, European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), 6 rue Jules Horowitz B.P. 220, F-38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Diagonal 647, Barcelona E-08028 (Spain); Laboratoire Imagerie et modelisation en neurobiologie et cancerologie, UMR8165, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Universites Paris 7 et Paris 11, Bat 440., 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, F-91406 Orsay Cedex (France)

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a synchrotron radiotherapy technique that explores the limits of the dose-volume effect. Preclinical studies have shown that MRT irradiations (arrays of 25-75-{mu}m-wide microbeams spaced by 200-400 {mu}m) are able to eradicate highly aggressive animal tumor models while healthy tissue is preserved. These promising results have provided the basis for the forthcoming clinical trials at the ID17 Biomedical Beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). The first step includes irradiation of pets (cats and dogs) as a milestone before treatment of human patients. Within this context, accurate dose calculations are required. The distinct features of both beam generation and irradiation geometry in MRT with respect to conventional techniques require the development of a specific MRT treatment planning system (TPS). In particular, a Monte Carlo (MC)-based calculation engine for the MRT TPS has been developed in this work. Experimental verification in heterogeneous phantoms and optimization of the computation time have also been performed. Methods: The penelope/penEasy MC code was used to compute dose distributions from a realistic beam source model. Experimental verification was carried out by means of radiochromic films placed within heterogeneous slab-phantoms. Once validation was completed, dose computations in a virtual model of a patient, reconstructed from computed tomography (CT) images, were performed. To this end, decoupling of the CT image voxel grid (a few cubic millimeter volume) to the dose bin grid, which has micrometer dimensions in the transversal direction of the microbeams, was performed. Optimization of the simulation parameters, the use of variance-reduction (VR) techniques, and other methods, such as the parallelization of the simulations, were applied in order to speed up the dose computation. Results: Good agreement between MC simulations and experimental results was achieved, even at

  8. Monte Carlo based calibration of scintillation detectors for laboratory and in situ gamma ray measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, E. R.; Limburg, J.; Koomans, R. L.; Tijs, M.

    2011-01-01

    The calibration of scintillation detectors for gamma radiation in a well characterized setup can be transferred to other geometries using Monte Carlo simulations to account for the differences between the calibration and the other geometry. In this study a calibration facility was used that is const

  9. Monte-Carlo based prediction of radiochromic film response for hadrontherapy dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frisson, T. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); CREATIS-LRMN, INSA, Batiment Blaise Pascal, 7 avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Centre Leon Berrard - 28 rue Laennec, F-69373 Lyon Cedex 08 (France)], E-mail: frisson@creatis.insa-lyon.fr; Zahra, N. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); IPNL - CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Universite Lyon 1, Batiment Paul Dirac, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Centre Leon Berrard - 28 rue Laennec, F-69373 Lyon Cedex 08 (France); Lautesse, P. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); IPNL - CNRS/IN2P3 UMR 5822, Universite Lyon 1, Batiment Paul Dirac, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Sarrut, D. [Universite de Lyon, F-69622 Lyon (France); CREATIS-LRMN, INSA, Batiment Blaise Pascal, 7 avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Centre Leon Berrard - 28 rue Laennec, F-69373 Lyon Cedex 08 (France)

    2009-07-21

    A model has been developed to calculate MD-55-V2 radiochromic film response to ion irradiation. This model is based on photon film response and film saturation by high local energy deposition computed by Monte-Carlo simulation. We have studied the response of the film to photon irradiation and we proposed a calculation method for hadron beams.

  10. Monte-Carlo based prediction of radiochromic film response for hadrontherapy dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisson, T.; Zahra, N.; Lautesse, P.; Sarrut, D.

    2009-07-01

    A model has been developed to calculate MD-55-V2 radiochromic film response to ion irradiation. This model is based on photon film response and film saturation by high local energy deposition computed by Monte-Carlo simulation. We have studied the response of the film to photon irradiation and we proposed a calculation method for hadron beams.

  11. Monte Carlo based calibration of scintillation detectors for laboratory and in situ gamma ray measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, E. R.; Limburg, J.; Koomans, R. L.; Tijs, M.

    The calibration of scintillation detectors for gamma radiation in a well characterized setup can be transferred to other geometries using Monte Carlo simulations to account for the differences between the calibration and the other geometry. In this study a calibration facility was used that is

  12. Uncertainties in Monte Carlo-based absorbed dose calculations for an experimental benchmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, F; Wulff, J; Kapsch, R-P; Zink, K

    2015-10-01

    There is a need to verify the accuracy of general purpose Monte Carlo codes like EGSnrc, which are commonly employed for investigations of dosimetric problems in radiation therapy. A number of experimental benchmarks have been published to compare calculated values of absorbed dose to experimentally determined values. However, there is a lack of absolute benchmarks, i.e. benchmarks without involved normalization which may cause some quantities to be cancelled. Therefore, at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt a benchmark experiment was performed, which aimed at the absolute verification of radiation transport calculations for dosimetry in radiation therapy. A thimble-type ionization chamber in a solid phantom was irradiated by high-energy bremsstrahlung and the mean absorbed dose in the sensitive volume was measured per incident electron of the target. The characteristics of the accelerator and experimental setup were precisely determined and the results of a corresponding Monte Carlo simulation with EGSnrc are presented within this study. For a meaningful comparison, an analysis of the uncertainty of the Monte Carlo simulation is necessary. In this study uncertainties with regard to the simulation geometry, the radiation source, transport options of the Monte Carlo code and specific interaction cross sections are investigated, applying the general methodology of the Guide to the expression of uncertainty in measurement. Besides studying the general influence of changes in transport options of the EGSnrc code, uncertainties are analyzed by estimating the sensitivity coefficients of various input quantities in a first step. Secondly, standard uncertainties are assigned to each quantity which are known from the experiment, e.g. uncertainties for geometric dimensions. Data for more fundamental quantities such as photon cross sections and the I-value of electron stopping powers are taken from literature. The significant uncertainty contributions are identified as

  13. Experimental validation of a rapid Monte Carlo based micro-CT simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colijn, A. P.; Zbijewski, W.; Sasov, A.; Beekman, F. J.

    2004-09-01

    We describe a newly developed, accelerated Monte Carlo simulator of a small animal micro-CT scanner. Transmission measurements using aluminium slabs are employed to estimate the spectrum of the x-ray source. The simulator incorporating this spectrum is validated with micro-CT scans of physical water phantoms of various diameters, some containing stainless steel and Teflon rods. Good agreement is found between simulated and real data: normalized error of simulated projections, as compared to the real ones, is typically smaller than 0.05. Also the reconstructions obtained from simulated and real data are found to be similar. Thereafter, effects of scatter are studied using a voxelized software phantom representing a rat body. It is shown that the scatter fraction can reach tens of per cents in specific areas of the body and therefore scatter can significantly affect quantitative accuracy in small animal CT imaging.

  14. Monte Carlo based dosimetry for neutron capture therapy of brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Lilia; Belgaid, Mohamed; Khelifi, Rachid

    2016-11-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a biologically targeted, radiation therapy for cancer which combines neutron irradiation with a tumor targeting agent labeled with a boron10 having a high thermal neutron capture cross section. The tumor area is subjected to the neutron irradiation. After a thermal neutron capture, the excited 11B nucleus fissions into an alpha particle and lithium recoil nucleus. The high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) emitted particles deposit their energy in a range of about 10μm, which is of the same order of cell diameter [1], at the same time other reactions due to neutron activation with body component are produced. In-phantom measurement of physical dose distribution is very important for BNCT planning validation. Determination of total absorbed dose requires complex calculations which were carried out using the Monte Carlo MCNP code [2].

  15. Monte Carlo based statistical power analysis for mediation models: methods and software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiyong

    2014-12-01

    The existing literature on statistical power analysis for mediation models often assumes data normality and is based on a less powerful Sobel test instead of the more powerful bootstrap test. This study proposes to estimate statistical power to detect mediation effects on the basis of the bootstrap method through Monte Carlo simulation. Nonnormal data with excessive skewness and kurtosis are allowed in the proposed method. A free R package called bmem is developed to conduct the power analysis discussed in this study. Four examples, including a simple mediation model, a multiple-mediator model with a latent mediator, a multiple-group mediation model, and a longitudinal mediation model, are provided to illustrate the proposed method.

  16. Monte Carlo based unit commitment procedures for the deregulated market environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granelli, G.P.; Marannino, P.; Montagna, M.; Zanellini, F. [Universita di Pavia, Pavia (Italy). Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica

    2006-12-15

    The unit commitment problem, originally conceived in the framework of short term operation of vertically integrated utilities, needs a thorough re-examination in the light of the ongoing transition towards the open electricity market environment. In this work the problem is re-formulated to adapt unit commitment to the viewpoint of a generation company (GENCO) which is no longer bound to satisfy its load, but is willing to maximize its profits. Moreover, with reference to the present day situation in many countries, the presence of a GENCO (the former monopolist) which is in the position of exerting the market power, requires a careful analysis to be carried out considering the different perspectives of a price taker and of the price maker GENCO. Unit commitment is thus shown to lead to a couple of distinct, yet slightly different problems. The unavoidable uncertainties in load profile and price behaviour over the time period of interest are also taken into account by means of a Monte Carlo simulation. Both the forecasted loads and prices are handled as random variables with a normal multivariate distribution. The correlation between the random input variables corresponding to successive hours of the day was considered by carrying out a statistical analysis of actual load and price data. The whole procedure was tested making use of reasonable approximations of the actual data of the thermal generation units available to come actual GENCOs operating in Italy. (author)

  17. Monte Carlo based water/medium stopping-power ratios for various ICRP and ICRU tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Varea, José M; Carrasco, Pablo; Panettieri, Vanessa; Brualla, Lorenzo

    2007-11-07

    Water/medium stopping-power ratios, s(w,m), have been calculated for several ICRP and ICRU tissues, namely adipose tissue, brain, cortical bone, liver, lung (deflated and inflated) and spongiosa. The considered clinical beams were 6 and 18 MV x-rays and the field size was 10 x 10 cm(2). Fluence distributions were scored at a depth of 10 cm using the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE. The collision stopping powers for the studied tissues were evaluated employing the formalism of ICRU Report 37 (1984 Stopping Powers for Electrons and Positrons (Bethesda, MD: ICRU)). The Bragg-Gray values of s(w,m) calculated with these ingredients range from about 0.98 (adipose tissue) to nearly 1.14 (cortical bone), displaying a rather small variation with beam quality. Excellent agreement, to within 0.1%, is found with stopping-power ratios reported by Siebers et al (2000a Phys. Med. Biol. 45 983-95) for cortical bone, inflated lung and spongiosa. In the case of cortical bone, s(w,m) changes approximately 2% when either ICRP or ICRU compositions are adopted, whereas the stopping-power ratios of lung, brain and adipose tissue are less sensitive to the selected composition. The mass density of lung also influences the calculated values of s(w,m), reducing them by around 1% (6 MV) and 2% (18 MV) when going from deflated to inflated lung.

  18. A class of Monte-Carlo-based statistical algorithms for efficient detection of repolarization alternans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iravanian, Shahriar; Kanu, Uche B; Christini, David J

    2012-07-01

    Cardiac repolarization alternans is an electrophysiologic condition identified by a beat-to-beat fluctuation in action potential waveform. It has been mechanistically linked to instances of T-wave alternans, a clinically defined ECG alternation in T-wave morphology, and associated with the onset of cardiac reentry and sudden cardiac death. Many alternans detection algorithms have been proposed in the past, but the majority have been designed specifically for use with T-wave alternans. Action potential duration (APD) signals obtained from experiments (especially those derived from optical mapping) possess unique characteristics, which requires the development and use of a more appropriate alternans detection method. In this paper, we present a new class of algorithms, based on the Monte Carlo method, for the detection and quantitative measurement of alternans. Specifically, we derive a set of algorithms (one an analytical and more efficient version of the other) and compare its performance with the standard spectral method and the generalized likelihood ratio test algorithm using synthetic APD sequences and optical mapping data obtained from an alternans control experiment. We demonstrate the benefits of the new algorithm in the presence of Gaussian and Laplacian noise and frame-shift errors. The proposed algorithms are well suited for experimental applications, and furthermore, have low complexity and are implementable using fixed-point arithmetic, enabling potential use with implantable cardiac devices.

  19. Markov chain Monte Carlo based analysis of post-translationally modified VDAC gating kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Shivendra G; Zhou, Yifan; Otto, Bradley J; Dash, Ranjan K; Kwok, Wai-Meng; Beard, Daniel A

    2014-01-01

    The voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC) is the main conduit for permeation of solutes (including nucleotides and metabolites) of up to 5 kDa across the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM). Recent studies suggest that VDAC activity is regulated via post-translational modifications (PTMs). Yet the nature and effect of these modifications is not understood. Herein, single channel currents of wild-type, nitrosated, and phosphorylated VDAC are analyzed using a generalized continuous-time Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. This developed method describes three distinct conducting states (open, half-open, and closed) of VDAC activity. Lipid bilayer experiments are also performed to record single VDAC activity under un-phosphorylated and phosphorylated conditions, and are analyzed using the developed stochastic search method. Experimental data show significant alteration in VDAC gating kinetics and conductance as a result of PTMs. The effect of PTMs on VDAC kinetics is captured in the parameters associated with the identified Markov model. Stationary distributions of the Markov model suggest that nitrosation of VDAC not only decreased its conductance but also significantly locked VDAC in a closed state. On the other hand, stationary distributions of the model associated with un-phosphorylated and phosphorylated VDAC suggest a reversal in channel conformation from relatively closed state to an open state. Model analyses of the nitrosated data suggest that faster reaction of nitric oxide with Cys-127 thiol group might be responsible for the biphasic effect of nitric oxide on basal VDAC conductance.

  20. Monte Carlo based verification of a beam model used in a treatment planning system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieslander, E.; Knöös, T.

    2008-02-01

    Modern treatment planning systems (TPSs) usually separate the dose modelling into a beam modelling phase, describing the beam exiting the accelerator, followed by a subsequent dose calculation in the patient. The aim of this work is to use the Monte Carlo code system EGSnrc to study the modelling of head scatter as well as the transmission through multi-leaf collimator (MLC) and diaphragms in the beam model used in a commercial TPS (MasterPlan, Nucletron B.V.). An Elekta Precise linear accelerator equipped with an MLC has been modelled in BEAMnrc, based on available information from the vendor regarding the material and geometry of the treatment head. The collimation in the MLC direction consists of leafs which are complemented with a backup diaphragm. The characteristics of the electron beam, i.e., energy and spot size, impinging on the target have been tuned to match measured data. Phase spaces from simulations of the treatment head are used to extract the scatter from, e.g., the flattening filter and the collimating structures. Similar data for the source models used in the TPS are extracted from the treatment planning system, thus a comprehensive analysis is possible. Simulations in a water phantom, with DOSXYZnrc, are also used to study the modelling of the MLC and the diaphragms by the TPS. The results from this study will be helpful to understand the limitations of the model in the TPS and provide knowledge for further improvements of the TPS source modelling.

  1. A Monte Carlo-based treatment planning tool for proton therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairani, A.; Böhlen, T. T.; Schiavi, A.; Tessonnier, T.; Molinelli, S.; Brons, S.; Battistoni, G.; Parodi, K.; Patera, V.

    2013-04-01

    In the field of radiotherapy, Monte Carlo (MC) particle transport calculations are recognized for their superior accuracy in predicting dose and fluence distributions in patient geometries compared to analytical algorithms which are generally used for treatment planning due to their shorter execution times. In this work, a newly developed MC-based treatment planning (MCTP) tool for proton therapy is proposed to support treatment planning studies and research applications. It allows for single-field and simultaneous multiple-field optimization in realistic treatment scenarios and is based on the MC code FLUKA. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE)-weighted dose is optimized either with the common approach using a constant RBE of 1.1 or using a variable RBE according to radiobiological input tables. A validated reimplementation of the local effect model was used in this work to generate radiobiological input tables. Examples of treatment plans in water phantoms and in patient-CT geometries together with an experimental dosimetric validation of the plans are presented for clinical treatment parameters as used at the Italian National Center for Oncological Hadron Therapy. To conclude, a versatile MCTP tool for proton therapy was developed and validated for realistic patient treatment scenarios against dosimetric measurements and commercial analytical TP calculations. It is aimed to be used in future for research and to support treatment planning at state-of-the-art ion beam therapy facilities.

  2. Quality assessment of Monte Carlo based system response matrices in PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabello, J.; Gillam, J.E. [Valencia Univ. (Spain). Inst. de Fisica Corpuscular; Rafecas, M. [Valencia Univ. (Spain). Inst. de Fisica Corpuscular; Valencia Univ. (Spain). Dept. de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    Iterative methods are currently accepted as the gold standard image reconstruction methods in nuclear medicine. The quality of the final reconstructed image greatly depends on how well physical processes are modelled in the System-Response- Matrix (SRM). The SRM can be obtained using experimental measurements, or calculated using Monte-Carlo (MC) or analytical methods. Nevertheless, independent on the method, the SRM is always contaminated by a certain level of error. MC based methods have recently gained popularity in calculation of the SRM due to the significant increase in computer power exhibited by regular commercial computers. MC methods can produce high accuracy results, but are subject to statistical noise, which affects the precision of the results. By increasing the number of annihilations simulated, the level of noise observed in the SRM decreases, at the additional cost of increased simulation time and increased file size necessary to store the SRM. The latter also has a negative impact on reconstruction time. A study on the noise of the SRM has been performed from a spatial point of view, identifying specific regions subject to higher levels of noise. This study will enable the calculation of SRM with different levels of statistics depending on the spatial location. A quantitative comparison of images, reconstructed using different SRM realizations, with similar and different levels of statistical quality, has been presented. (orig.)

  3. Monte Carlo based investigation of Berry phase for depth resolved characterization of biomedical scattering samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baba, Justin S [ORNL; John, Dwayne O [ORNL; Koju, Vijay [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The propagation of light in turbid media is an active area of research with relevance to numerous investigational fields, e.g., biomedical diagnostics and therapeutics. The statistical random-walk nature of photon propagation through turbid media is ideal for computational based modeling and simulation. Ready access to super computing resources provide a means for attaining brute force solutions to stochastic light-matter interactions entailing scattering by facilitating timely propagation of sufficient (>10million) photons while tracking characteristic parameters based on the incorporated physics of the problem. One such model that works well for isotropic but fails for anisotropic scatter, which is the case for many biomedical sample scattering problems, is the diffusion approximation. In this report, we address this by utilizing Berry phase (BP) evolution as a means for capturing anisotropic scattering characteristics of samples in the preceding depth where the diffusion approximation fails. We extend the polarization sensitive Monte Carlo method of Ramella-Roman, et al.,1 to include the computationally intensive tracking of photon trajectory in addition to polarization state at every scattering event. To speed-up the computations, which entail the appropriate rotations of reference frames, the code was parallelized using OpenMP. The results presented reveal that BP is strongly correlated to the photon penetration depth, thus potentiating the possibility of polarimetric depth resolved characterization of highly scattering samples, e.g., biological tissues.

  4. Monte Carlo-based revised values of dose rate constants at discrete photon energies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Palani Selvam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Absorbed dose rate to water at 0.2 cm and 1 cm due to a point isotropic photon source as a function of photon energy is calculated using the EDKnrc user-code of the EGSnrc Monte Carlo system. This code system utilized widely used XCOM photon cross-section dataset for the calculation of absorbed dose to water. Using the above dose rates, dose rate constants are calculated. Air-kerma strength S k needed for deriving dose rate constant is based on the mass-energy absorption coefficient compilations of Hubbell and Seltzer published in the year 1995. A comparison of absorbed dose rates in water at the above distances to the published values reflects the differences in photon cross-section dataset in the low-energy region (difference is up to 2% in dose rate values at 1 cm in the energy range 30-50 keV and up to 4% at 0.2 cm at 30 keV. A maximum difference of about 8% is observed in the dose rate value at 0.2 cm at 1.75 MeV when compared to the published value. S k calculations based on the compilation of Hubbell and Seltzer show a difference of up to 2.5% in the low-energy region (20-50 keV when compared to the published values. The deviations observed in the values of dose rate and S k affect the values of dose rate constants up to 3%.

  5. An exercise in model validation: Comparing univariate statistics and Monte Carlo-based multivariate statistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weathers, J.B. [Shock, Noise, and Vibration Group, Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding, P.O. Box 149, Pascagoula, MS 39568 (United States)], E-mail: James.Weathers@ngc.com; Luck, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mississippi State University, 210 Carpenter Engineering Building, P.O. Box ME, Mississippi State, MS 39762-5925 (United States)], E-mail: Luck@me.msstate.edu; Weathers, J.W. [Structural Analysis Group, Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding, P.O. Box 149, Pascagoula, MS 39568 (United States)], E-mail: Jeffrey.Weathers@ngc.com

    2009-11-15

    The complexity of mathematical models used by practicing engineers is increasing due to the growing availability of sophisticated mathematical modeling tools and ever-improving computational power. For this reason, the need to define a well-structured process for validating these models against experimental results has become a pressing issue in the engineering community. This validation process is partially characterized by the uncertainties associated with the modeling effort as well as the experimental results. The net impact of the uncertainties on the validation effort is assessed through the 'noise level of the validation procedure', which can be defined as an estimate of the 95% confidence uncertainty bounds for the comparison error between actual experimental results and model-based predictions of the same quantities of interest. Although general descriptions associated with the construction of the noise level using multivariate statistics exists in the literature, a detailed procedure outlining how to account for the systematic and random uncertainties is not available. In this paper, the methodology used to derive the covariance matrix associated with the multivariate normal pdf based on random and systematic uncertainties is examined, and a procedure used to estimate this covariance matrix using Monte Carlo analysis is presented. The covariance matrices are then used to construct approximate 95% confidence constant probability contours associated with comparison error results for a practical example. In addition, the example is used to show the drawbacks of using a first-order sensitivity analysis when nonlinear local sensitivity coefficients exist. Finally, the example is used to show the connection between the noise level of the validation exercise calculated using multivariate and univariate statistics.

  6. Monte Carlo based protocol for cell survival and tumour control probability in BNCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Sung-Joon

    1999-02-01

    A mathematical model to calculate the theoretical cell survival probability (nominally, the cell survival fraction) is developed to evaluate preclinical treatment conditions for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). A treatment condition is characterized by the neutron beam spectra, single or bilateral exposure, and the choice of boron carrier drug (boronophenylalanine (BPA) or boron sulfhydryl hydride (BSH)). The cell survival probability defined from Poisson statistics is expressed with the cell-killing yield, the (n, ) reaction density, and the tolerable neutron fluence. The radiation transport calculation from the neutron source to tumours is carried out using Monte Carlo methods: (i) reactor-based BNCT facility modelling to yield the neutron beam library at an irradiation port; (ii) dosimetry to limit the neutron fluence below a tolerance dose (10.5 Gy-Eq); (iii) calculation of the (n, ) reaction density in tumours. A shallow surface tumour could be effectively treated by single exposure producing an average cell survival probability of - for probable ranges of the cell-killing yield for the two drugs, while a deep tumour will require bilateral exposure to achieve comparable cell kills at depth. With very pure epithermal beams eliminating thermal, low epithermal and fast neutrons, the cell survival can be decreased by factors of 2-10 compared with the unmodified neutron spectrum. A dominant effect of cell-killing yield on tumour cell survival demonstrates the importance of choice of boron carrier drug. However, these calculations do not indicate an unambiguous preference for one drug, due to the large overlap of tumour cell survival in the probable ranges of the cell-killing yield for the two drugs. The cell survival value averaged over a bulky tumour volume is used to predict the overall BNCT therapeutic efficacy, using a simple model of tumour control probability (TCP).

  7. Effect of statistical fluctuation in Monte Carlo based photon beam dose calculation on gamma index evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Yan Jiang; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2013-03-21

    The γ-index test has been commonly adopted to quantify the degree of agreement between a reference dose distribution and an evaluation dose distribution. Monte Carlo (MC) simulation has been widely used for the radiotherapy dose calculation for both clinical and research purposes. The goal of this work is to investigate both theoretically and experimentally the impact of the MC statistical fluctuation on the γ-index test when the fluctuation exists in the reference, the evaluation, or both dose distributions. To the first order approximation, we theoretically demonstrated in a simplified model that the statistical fluctuation tends to overestimate γ-index values when existing in the reference dose distribution and underestimate γ-index values when existing in the evaluation dose distribution given the original γ-index is relatively large for the statistical fluctuation. Our numerical experiments using realistic clinical photon radiation therapy cases have shown that (1) when performing a γ-index test between an MC reference dose and a non-MC evaluation dose, the average γ-index is overestimated and the gamma passing rate decreases with the increase of the statistical noise level in the reference dose; (2) when performing a γ-index test between a non-MC reference dose and an MC evaluation dose, the average γ-index is underestimated when they are within the clinically relevant range and the gamma passing rate increases with the increase of the statistical noise level in the evaluation dose; (3) when performing a γ-index test between an MC reference dose and an MC evaluation dose, the gamma passing rate is overestimated due to the statistical noise in the evaluation dose and underestimated due to the statistical noise in the reference dose. We conclude that the γ-index test should be used with caution when comparing dose distributions computed with MC simulation.

  8. Monte Carlo based NMR simulations of open fractures in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukács, Tamás; Balázs, László

    2014-05-01

    According to the basic principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), a measurement's free induction decay curve has an exponential characteristic and its parameter is the transversal relaxation time, T2, given by the Bloch equations in rotating frame. In our simulations we are observing that particular case when the bulk's volume is neglectable to the whole system, the vertical movement is basically zero, hence the diffusion part of the T2 relation can be editted out. This small-apertured situations are common in sedimentary layers, and the smallness of the observed volume enable us to calculate with just the bulk relaxation and the surface relaxation. The simulation uses the Monte-Carlo method, so it is based on a random-walk generator which provides the brownian motions of the particles by uniformly distributed, pseudorandom generated numbers. An attached differential equation assures the bulk relaxation, the initial and the iterated conditions guarantee the simulation's replicability and enable having consistent estimations. We generate an initial geometry of a plain segment with known height, with given number of particles, the spatial distribution is set to equal to each simulation, and the surface-volume ratio remains at a constant value. It follows that to the given thickness of the open fracture, from the fitted curve's parameter, the surface relaxivity is determinable. The calculated T2 distribution curves are also indicating the inconstancy in the observed fracture situations. The effect of varying the height of the lamina at a constant diffusion coefficient also produces characteristic anomaly and for comparison we have run the simulation with the same initial volume, number of particles and conditions in spherical bulks, their profiles are clear and easily to understand. The surface relaxation enables us to estimate the interaction beetwen the materials of boundary with this two geometrically well-defined bulks, therefore the distribution takes as a

  9. Reconciliation between experimental and Monte Carlo-based simulation of the pore size distribution in mesoporous silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadvani, Jalil Khajepour; Falamaki, Cavus

    2008-07-23

    It is demonstrated for the first time that mesoporous PS structures obtained by the electrochemical etching of p(+)(100) oriented silicon wafers might assume the peculiarity of invariance of the first peak positions in their pore size distribution curves, albeit for current densities far from the electropolishing region and at constant electrolyte composition. A new Monte Carlo-based simulation model is presented that predicts reasonably the pore size distribution of the PS layers and the observed invariance of peak position with respect to changes in current density. The main highlight of the new model is the introduction of a 'light avalanche breakdown' process in a mathematical fashion. The model is also able to predict an absolute value of 4.23 Å for the smallest pore created experimentally. It is discussed that the latter value has an exact physical meaning: it corresponds with great accuracy to the width of a void created on the surface due to the exclusion of one Si atom.

  10. Reconciliation between experimental and Monte Carlo-based simulation of the pore size distribution in mesoporous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tadvani, Jalil Khajepour [Ceramics Department, Materials and Energy Research Center, PO Box 14155-4777, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Falamaki, Cavus [Chemical Engineering Department, Amirkabir University of Technology, Hafez Avenue, PO Box 15875-4413, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2008-07-23

    It is demonstrated for the first time that mesoporous PS structures obtained by the electrochemical etching of p{sup +}(100) oriented silicon wafers might assume the peculiarity of invariance of the first peak positions in their pore size distribution curves, albeit for current densities far from the electropolishing region and at constant electrolyte composition. A new Monte Carlo-based simulation model is presented that predicts reasonably the pore size distribution of the PS layers and the observed invariance of peak position with respect to changes in current density. The main highlight of the new model is the introduction of a 'light avalanche breakdown' process in a mathematical fashion. The model is also able to predict an absolute value of 4.23 A for the smallest pore created experimentally. It is discussed that the latter value has an exact physical meaning: it corresponds with great accuracy to the width of a void created on the surface due to the exclusion of one Si atom.

  11. Monte Carlo-based diode design for correction-less small field dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, P. H.; Crowe, S. B.; Kairn, T.; Knight, R. T.; Hill, B.; Kenny, J.; Langton, C. M.; Trapp, J. V.

    2013-07-01

    Due to their small collecting volume, diodes are commonly used in small field dosimetry. However, the relative sensitivity of a diode increases with decreasing small field size. Conversely, small air gaps have been shown to cause a significant decrease in the sensitivity of a detector as the field size is decreased. Therefore, this study uses Monte Carlo simulations to look at introducing air upstream to diodes such that they measure with a constant sensitivity across all field sizes in small field dosimetry. Varying thicknesses of air were introduced onto the upstream end of two commercial diodes (PTW 60016 photon diode and PTW 60017 electron diode), as well as a theoretical unenclosed silicon chip using field sizes as small as 5 mm × 5 mm. The metric \\frac{{D_{w,Q} }}{{D_{Det,Q} }} used in this study represents the ratio of the dose to a point of water to the dose to the diode active volume, for a particular field size and location. The optimal thickness of air required to provide a constant sensitivity across all small field sizes was found by plotting \\frac{{D_{w,Q} }}{{D_{Det,Q} }} as a function of introduced air gap size for various field sizes, and finding the intersection point of these plots. That is, the point at which \\frac{{D_{w,Q} }}{{D_{Det,Q} }} was constant for all field sizes was found. The optimal thickness of air was calculated to be 3.3, 1.15 and 0.10 mm for the photon diode, electron diode and unenclosed silicon chip, respectively. The variation in these results was due to the different design of each detector. When calculated with the new diode design incorporating the upstream air gap, k_{Q_{clin} ,Q_{msr} }^{f_{clin} ,f_{msr} } was equal to unity to within statistical uncertainty (0.5%) for all three diodes. Cross-axis profile measurements were also improved with the new detector design. The upstream air gap could be implanted on the commercial diodes via a cap consisting of the air cavity surrounded by water equivalent material. The

  12. Monte Carlo-based adaptive EPID dose kernel accounting for different field size responses of imagers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Song; Gardner, Joseph K; Gordon, John J; Li, Weidong; Clews, Luke; Greer, Peter B; Siebers, Jeffrey V

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study is to present an efficient method to generate imager-specific Monte Carlo (MC)-based dose kernels for amorphous silicon-based electronic portal image device dose prediction and determine the effective backscattering thicknesses for such imagers. EPID field size-dependent responses were measured for five matched Varian accelerators from three institutions with 6 MV beams at the source to detector distance (SDD) of 105 cm. For two imagers, measurements were made with and without the imager mounted on the robotic supporting arm. Monoenergetic energy deposition kernels with 0-2.5 cm of water backscattering thicknesses were simultaneously computed by MC to a high precision. For each imager, the backscattering thickness required to match measured field size responses was determined. The monoenergetic kernel method was validated by comparing measured and predicted field size responses at 150 cm SDD, 10 x 10 cm2 multileaf collimator (MLC) sliding window fields created with 5, 10, 20, and 50 mm gaps, and a head-and-neck (H&N) intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) patient field. Field size responses for the five different imagers deviated by up to 1.3%. When imagers were removed from the robotic arms, response deviations were reduced to 0.2%. All imager field size responses were captured by using between 1.0 and 1.6 cm backscatter. The predicted field size responses by the imager-specific kernels matched measurements for all involved imagers with the maximal deviation of 0.34%. The maximal deviation between the predicted and measured field size responses at 150 cm SDD is 0.39%. The maximal deviation between the predicted and measured MLC sliding window fields is 0.39%. For the patient field, gamma analysis yielded that 99.0% of the pixels have gamma < 1 by the 2%, 2 mm criteria with a 3% dose threshold. Tunable imager-specific kernels can be generated rapidly and accurately in a single MC simulation. The resultant kernels are imager position

  13. Monte Carlo-based multiphysics coupling analysis of x-ray pulsar telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liansheng; Deng, Loulou; Mei, Zhiwu; Zuo, Fuchang; Zhou, Hao

    2015-10-01

    X-ray pulsar telescope (XPT) is a complex optical payload, which involves optical, mechanical, electrical and thermal disciplines. The multiphysics coupling analysis (MCA) plays an important role in improving the in-orbit performance. However, the conventional MCA methods encounter two serious problems in dealing with the XTP. One is that both the energy and reflectivity information of X-ray can't be taken into consideration, which always misunderstands the essence of XPT. Another is that the coupling data can't be transferred automatically among different disciplines, leading to computational inefficiency and high design cost. Therefore, a new MCA method for XPT is proposed based on the Monte Carlo method and total reflective theory. The main idea, procedures and operational steps of the proposed method are addressed in detail. Firstly, it takes both the energy and reflectivity information of X-ray into consideration simultaneously. And formulate the thermal-structural coupling equation and multiphysics coupling analysis model based on the finite element method. Then, the thermalstructural coupling analysis under different working conditions has been implemented. Secondly, the mirror deformations are obtained using construction geometry function. Meanwhile, the polynomial function is adopted to fit the deformed mirror and meanwhile evaluate the fitting error. Thirdly, the focusing performance analysis of XPT can be evaluated by the RMS. Finally, a Wolter-I XPT is taken as an example to verify the proposed MCA method. The simulation results show that the thermal-structural coupling deformation is bigger than others, the vary law of deformation effect on the focusing performance has been obtained. The focusing performances of thermal-structural, thermal, structural deformations have degraded 30.01%, 14.35% and 7.85% respectively. The RMS of dispersion spot are 2.9143mm, 2.2038mm and 2.1311mm. As a result, the validity of the proposed method is verified through

  14. Assessment of parameter uncertainty in hydrological model using a Markov-Chain-Monte-Carlo-based multilevel-factorial-analysis method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junlong; Li, Yongping; Huang, Guohe; Chen, Xi; Bao, Anming

    2016-07-01

    Without a realistic assessment of parameter uncertainty, decision makers may encounter difficulties in accurately describing hydrologic processes and assessing relationships between model parameters and watershed characteristics. In this study, a Markov-Chain-Monte-Carlo-based multilevel-factorial-analysis (MCMC-MFA) method is developed, which can not only generate samples of parameters from a well constructed Markov chain and assess parameter uncertainties with straightforward Bayesian inference, but also investigate the individual and interactive effects of multiple parameters on model output through measuring the specific variations of hydrological responses. A case study is conducted for addressing parameter uncertainties in the Kaidu watershed of northwest China. Effects of multiple parameters and their interactions are quantitatively investigated using the MCMC-MFA with a three-level factorial experiment (totally 81 runs). A variance-based sensitivity analysis method is used to validate the results of parameters' effects. Results disclose that (i) soil conservation service runoff curve number for moisture condition II (CN2) and fraction of snow volume corresponding to 50% snow cover (SNO50COV) are the most significant factors to hydrological responses, implying that infiltration-excess overland flow and snow water equivalent represent important water input to the hydrological system of the Kaidu watershed; (ii) saturate hydraulic conductivity (SOL_K) and soil evaporation compensation factor (ESCO) have obvious effects on hydrological responses; this implies that the processes of percolation and evaporation would impact hydrological process in this watershed; (iii) the interactions of ESCO and SNO50COV as well as CN2 and SNO50COV have an obvious effect, implying that snow cover can impact the generation of runoff on land surface and the extraction of soil evaporative demand in lower soil layers. These findings can help enhance the hydrological model

  15. Monte Carlo-based interval transformation analysis for multi-criteria decision analysis of groundwater management strategies under uncertain naphthalene concentrations and health risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Lixia; He, Li; Lu, Hongwei; Chen, Yizhong

    2016-08-01

    A new Monte Carlo-based interval transformation analysis (MCITA) is used in this study for multi-criteria decision analysis (MCDA) of naphthalene-contaminated groundwater management strategies. The analysis can be conducted when input data such as total cost, contaminant concentration and health risk are represented as intervals. Compared to traditional MCDA methods, MCITA-MCDA has the advantages of (1) dealing with inexactness of input data represented as intervals, (2) mitigating computational time due to the introduction of Monte Carlo sampling method, (3) identifying the most desirable management strategies under data uncertainty. A real-world case study is employed to demonstrate the performance of this method. A set of inexact management alternatives are considered in each duration on the basis of four criteria. Results indicated that the most desirable management strategy lied in action 15 for the 5-year, action 8 for the 10-year, action 12 for the 15-year, and action 2 for the 20-year management.

  16. CARMEN: a system Monte Carlo based on linear programming from direct openings; CARMEN: Un sistema de planficiacion Monte Carlo basado en programacion lineal a partir de aberturas directas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ureba, A.; Pereira-Barbeiro, A. R.; Jimenez-Ortega, E.; Baeza, J. A.; Salguero, F. J.; Leal, A.

    2013-07-01

    The use of Monte Carlo (MC) has shown an improvement in the accuracy of the calculation of the dose compared to other analytics algorithms installed on the systems of business planning, especially in the case of non-standard situations typical of complex techniques such as IMRT and VMAT. Our treatment planning system called CARMEN, is based on the complete simulation, both the beam transport in the head of the accelerator and the patient, and simulation designed for efficient operation in terms of the accuracy of the estimate and the required computation times. (Author)

  17. Monte Carlo based approach to the LS–NaI 4πβ–γ anticoincidence extrapolation and uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, R

    2016-03-01

    The 4πβ–γ anticoincidence method is used for the primary standardization of β−, β+, electron capture (EC), α, and mixed-mode radionuclides. Efficiency extrapolation using one or more γ ray coincidence gates is typically carried out by a low-order polynomial fit. The approach presented here is to use a Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation of the detector system to analyze the efficiency extrapolation. New code was developed to account for detector resolution, direct γ ray interaction with the PMT, and implementation of experimental β-decay shape factors. The simulation was tuned to 57Co and 60Co data, then tested with 99mTc data, and used in measurements of 18F, 129I, and 124I. The analysis method described here offers a more realistic activity value and uncertainty than those indicated from a least-squares fit alone.

  18. Quantifying acoustic doppler current profiler discharge uncertainty: A Monte Carlo based tool for moving-boat measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, David S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a method using Monte Carlo simulations for assessing uncertainty of moving-boat acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) discharge measurements using a software tool known as QUant, which was developed for this purpose. Analysis was performed on 10 data sets from four Water Survey of Canada gauging stations in order to evaluate the relative contribution of a range of error sources to the total estimated uncertainty. The factors that differed among data sets included the fraction of unmeasured discharge relative to the total discharge, flow nonuniformity, and operator decisions about instrument programming and measurement cross section. As anticipated, it was found that the estimated uncertainty is dominated by uncertainty of the discharge in the unmeasured areas, highlighting the importance of appropriate selection of the site, the instrument, and the user inputs required to estimate the unmeasured discharge. The main contributor to uncertainty was invalid data, but spatial inhomogeneity in water velocity and bottom-track velocity also contributed, as did variation in the edge velocity, uncertainty in the edge distances, edge coefficients, and the top and bottom extrapolation methods. To a lesser extent, spatial inhomogeneity in the bottom depth also contributed to the total uncertainty, as did uncertainty in the ADCP draft at shallow sites. The estimated uncertainties from QUant can be used to assess the adequacy of standard operating procedures. They also provide quantitative feedback to the ADCP operators about the quality of their measurements, indicating which parameters are contributing most to uncertainty, and perhaps even highlighting ways in which uncertainty can be reduced. Additionally, QUant can be used to account for self-dependent error sources such as heading errors, which are a function of heading. The results demonstrate the importance of a Monte Carlo method tool such as QUant for quantifying random and bias errors when

  19. Monte Carlo-based subgrid parameterization of vertical velocity and stratiform cloud microphysics in ECHAM5.5-HAM2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tonttila

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available A new method for parameterizing the subgrid variations of vertical velocity and cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC is presented for general circulation models (GCMs. These parameterizations build on top of existing parameterizations that create stochastic subgrid cloud columns inside the GCM grid cells, which can be employed by the Monte Carlo independent column approximation approach for radiative transfer. The new model version adds a description for vertical velocity in individual subgrid columns, which can be used to compute cloud activation and the subgrid distribution of the number of cloud droplets explicitly. Autoconversion is also treated explicitly in the subcolumn space. This provides a consistent way of simulating the cloud radiative effects with two-moment cloud microphysical properties defined at subgrid scale. The primary impact of the new parameterizations is to decrease the CDNC over polluted continents, while over the oceans the impact is smaller. Moreover, the lower CDNC induces a stronger autoconversion of cloud water to rain. The strongest reduction in CDNC and cloud water content over the continental areas promotes weaker shortwave cloud radiative effects (SW CREs even after retuning the model. However, compared to the reference simulation, a slightly stronger SW CRE is seen e.g. over mid-latitude oceans, where CDNC remains similar to the reference simulation, and the in-cloud liquid water content is slightly increased after retuning the model.

  20. Optimisation of Simultaneous Tl-201/Tc-99m Dual Isotope Reconstruction with Monte-Carlo-Based Scatter Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuija Kangasmaa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous Tl-201/Tc-99m dual isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT is seriously hampered by down-scatter from Tc-99m into the Tl-201 energy window. This paper presents and optimises the ordered-subsets-expectation-maximisation-(OS-EM- based reconstruction algorithm, which corrects the down-scatter using an efficient Monte Carlo (MC simulator. The algorithm starts by first reconstructing the Tc-99m image with attenuation, collimator response, and MC-based scatter correction. The reconstructed Tc-99m image is then used as an input for an efficient MC-based down-scatter simulation of Tc-99m photons into the Tl-201 window. This down-scatter estimate is finally used in the Tl-201 reconstruction to correct the crosstalk between the two isotopes. The mathematical 4D NCAT phantom and physical cardiac phantoms were used to optimise the number of OS-EM iterations where the scatter estimate is updated and the number of MC simulated photons. The results showed that two scatter update iterations and 105 simulated photons are enough for the Tc-99m and Tl-201 reconstructions, whereas 106 simulated photons are needed to generate good quality down-scatter estimates. With these parameters, the entire Tl-201/Tc-99m dual isotope reconstruction can be accomplished in less than 3 minutes.

  1. Monte Carlo-based fluorescence molecular tomography reconstruction method accelerated by a cluster of graphic processing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Guotao; Gong, Hui; Deng, Yong; Fu, Jianwei; Luo, Qingming

    2011-02-01

    High-speed fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) reconstruction for 3-D heterogeneous media is still one of the most challenging problems in diffusive optical fluorescence imaging. In this paper, we propose a fast FMT reconstruction method that is based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulation and accelerated by a cluster of graphics processing units (GPUs). Based on the Message Passing Interface standard, we modified the MC code for fast FMT reconstruction, and different Green's functions representing the flux distribution in media are calculated simultaneously by different GPUs in the cluster. A load-balancing method was also developed to increase the computational efficiency. By applying the Fréchet derivative, a Jacobian matrix is formed to reconstruct the distribution of the fluorochromes using the calculated Green's functions. Phantom experiments have shown that only 10 min are required to get reconstruction results with a cluster of 6 GPUs, rather than 6 h with a cluster of multiple dual opteron CPU nodes. Because of the advantages of high accuracy and suitability for 3-D heterogeneity media with refractive-index-unmatched boundaries from the MC simulation, the GPU cluster-accelerated method provides a reliable approach to high-speed reconstruction for FMT imaging.

  2. Optimisation of simultaneous tl-201/tc-99m dual isotope reconstruction with monte-carlo-based scatter correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangasmaa, Tuija; Kuikka, Jyrki; Sohlberg, Antti

    2012-01-01

    Simultaneous Tl-201/Tc-99m dual isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT is seriously hampered by down-scatter from Tc-99m into the Tl-201 energy window. This paper presents and optimises the ordered-subsets-expectation-maximisation-(OS-EM-) based reconstruction algorithm, which corrects the down-scatter using an efficient Monte Carlo (MC) simulator. The algorithm starts by first reconstructing the Tc-99m image with attenuation, collimator response, and MC-based scatter correction. The reconstructed Tc-99m image is then used as an input for an efficient MC-based down-scatter simulation of Tc-99m photons into the Tl-201 window. This down-scatter estimate is finally used in the Tl-201 reconstruction to correct the crosstalk between the two isotopes. The mathematical 4D NCAT phantom and physical cardiac phantoms were used to optimise the number of OS-EM iterations where the scatter estimate is updated and the number of MC simulated photons. The results showed that two scatter update iterations and 10(5) simulated photons are enough for the Tc-99m and Tl-201 reconstructions, whereas 10(6) simulated photons are needed to generate good quality down-scatter estimates. With these parameters, the entire Tl-201/Tc-99m dual isotope reconstruction can be accomplished in less than 3 minutes.

  3. Fast and accurate Monte Carlo-based system response modeling for a digital whole-body PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiangyu; Li, Yanzhao; Yang, Lingli; Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Bo; Xiao, Peng; Xie, Qingguo

    2017-03-01

    Recently, we have developed a digital whole-body PET scanner based on multi-voltage threshold (MVT) digitizers. To mitigate the impact of resolution degrading factors, an accurate system response is calculated by Monte Carlo simulation, which is computationally expensive. To address the problem, here we improve the method of using symmetries by simulating an axial wedge region. This approach takes full advantage of intrinsic symmetries in the cylindrical PET system without significantly increasing the computation cost in the process of symmetries. A total of 4224 symmetries are exploited. It took 17 days to generate the system maxtrix on 160 cores of Xeon 2.5 GHz. Both simulation and experimental data are used to evaluate the accuracy of system response modeling. The simulation studies show the full-width-half-maximum of a line source being 2.1 mm and 3.8 mm at the center of FOV and 200 mm at the center of FOV. Experimental results show the 2.4 mm rods in the Derenzo phantom image, which can be well distinguished.

  4. Monte Carlo-based quantitative structure-activity relationship models for toxicity of organic chemicals to Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropova, Alla P; Toropov, Andrey A; Veselinović, Aleksandar M; Veselinović, Jovana B; Leszczynska, Danuta; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2016-11-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs) for toxicity of a large set of 758 organic compounds to Daphnia magna were built up. The simplified molecular input-line entry system (SMILES) was used to represent the molecular structure. The Correlation and Logic (CORAL) software was utilized as a tool to develop the QSAR models. These models are built up using the Monte Carlo method and according to the principle "QSAR is a random event" if one checks a group of random distributions in the visible training set and the invisible validation set. Three distributions of the data into the visible training, calibration, and invisible validation sets are examined. The predictive potentials (i.e., statistical characteristics for the invisible validation set of the best model) are as follows: n = 87, r(2)  = 0.8377, root mean square error = 0.564. The mechanistic interpretations and the domain of applicability of built models are suggested and discussed. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2691-2697. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  5. Prediction in the face of uncertainty: a Monte Carlo-based approach for systems biology of cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierling, Christoph; Kühn, Alexander; Hache, Hendrik; Daskalaki, Andriani; Maschke-Dutz, Elisabeth; Peycheva, Svetlana; Li, Jian; Herwig, Ralf; Lehrach, Hans

    2012-08-15

    Cancer is known to be a complex disease and its therapy is difficult. Much information is available on molecules and pathways involved in cancer onset and progression and this data provides a valuable resource for the development of predictive computer models that can help to identify new potential drug targets or to improve therapies. Modeling cancer treatment has to take into account many cellular pathways usually leading to the construction of large mathematical models. The development of such models is complicated by the fact that relevant parameters are either completely unknown, or can at best be measured under highly artificial conditions. Here we propose an approach for constructing predictive models of such complex biological networks in the absence of accurate knowledge on parameter values, and apply this strategy to predict the effects of perturbations induced by anti-cancer drug target inhibitions on an epidermal growth factor (EGF) signaling network. The strategy is based on a Monte Carlo approach, in which the kinetic parameters are repeatedly sampled from specific probability distributions and used for multiple parallel simulations. Simulation results from different forms of the model (e.g., a model that expresses a certain mutation or mutation pattern or the treatment by a certain drug or drug combination) can be compared with the unperturbed control model and used for the prediction of the perturbation effects. This framework opens the way to experiment with complex biological networks in the computer, likely to save costs in drug development and to improve patient therapy.

  6. Patient-specific Monte Carlo-based dose-kernel approach for inverse planning in afterloading brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amours, Michel; Pouliot, Jean; Dagnault, Anne; Verhaegen, Frank; Beaulieu, Luc

    2011-12-01

    Brachytherapy planning software relies on the Task Group report 43 dosimetry formalism. This formalism, based on a water approximation, neglects various heterogeneous materials present during treatment. Various studies have suggested that these heterogeneities should be taken into account to improve the treatment quality. The present study sought to demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating Monte Carlo (MC) dosimetry within an inverse planning algorithm to improve the dose conformity and increase the treatment quality. The method was based on precalculated dose kernels in full patient geometries, representing the dose distribution of a brachytherapy source at a single dwell position using MC simulations and the Geant4 toolkit. These dose kernels are used by the inverse planning by simulated annealing tool to produce a fast MC-based plan. A test was performed for an interstitial brachytherapy breast treatment using two different high-dose-rate brachytherapy sources: the microSelectron iridium-192 source and the electronic brachytherapy source Axxent operating at 50 kVp. A research version of the inverse planning by simulated annealing algorithm was combined with MC to provide a method to fully account for the heterogeneities in dose optimization, using the MC method. The effect of the water approximation was found to depend on photon energy, with greater dose attenuation for the lower energies of the Axxent source compared with iridium-192. For the latter, an underdosage of 5.1% for the dose received by 90% of the clinical target volume was found. A new method to optimize afterloading brachytherapy plans that uses MC dosimetric information was developed. Including computed tomography-based information in MC dosimetry in the inverse planning process was shown to take into account the full range of scatter and heterogeneity conditions. This led to significant dose differences compared with the Task Group report 43 approach for the Axxent source. Copyright © 2011

  7. Patient-Specific Monte Carlo-Based Dose-Kernel Approach for Inverse Planning in Afterloading Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D' Amours, Michel [Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de l' Universite Laval, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Department of Physics, Physics Engineering, and Optics, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada); Pouliot, Jean [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA (United States); Dagnault, Anne [Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de l' Universite Laval, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Verhaegen, Frank [Department of Radiation Oncology, Maastro Clinic, GROW Research Institute, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Department of Oncology, McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada); Beaulieu, Luc, E-mail: beaulieu@phy.ulaval.ca [Departement de Radio-Oncologie et Centre de Recherche en Cancerologie de l' Universite Laval, Hotel-Dieu de Quebec, Quebec, QC (Canada); Department of Physics, Physics Engineering, and Optics, Universite Laval, Quebec, QC (Canada)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: Brachytherapy planning software relies on the Task Group report 43 dosimetry formalism. This formalism, based on a water approximation, neglects various heterogeneous materials present during treatment. Various studies have suggested that these heterogeneities should be taken into account to improve the treatment quality. The present study sought to demonstrate the feasibility of incorporating Monte Carlo (MC) dosimetry within an inverse planning algorithm to improve the dose conformity and increase the treatment quality. Methods and Materials: The method was based on precalculated dose kernels in full patient geometries, representing the dose distribution of a brachytherapy source at a single dwell position using MC simulations and the Geant4 toolkit. These dose kernels are used by the inverse planning by simulated annealing tool to produce a fast MC-based plan. A test was performed for an interstitial brachytherapy breast treatment using two different high-dose-rate brachytherapy sources: the microSelectron iridium-192 source and the electronic brachytherapy source Axxent operating at 50 kVp. Results: A research version of the inverse planning by simulated annealing algorithm was combined with MC to provide a method to fully account for the heterogeneities in dose optimization, using the MC method. The effect of the water approximation was found to depend on photon energy, with greater dose attenuation for the lower energies of the Axxent source compared with iridium-192. For the latter, an underdosage of 5.1% for the dose received by 90% of the clinical target volume was found. Conclusion: A new method to optimize afterloading brachytherapy plans that uses MC dosimetric information was developed. Including computed tomography-based information in MC dosimetry in the inverse planning process was shown to take into account the full range of scatter and heterogeneity conditions. This led to significant dose differences compared with the Task Group report

  8. SU-E-T-175: Clinical Evaluations of Monte Carlo-Based Inverse Treatment Plan Optimization for Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Y; Li, Y; Tian, Z; Gu, X; Jiang, S; Jia, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Pencil-beam or superposition-convolution type dose calculation algorithms are routinely used in inverse plan optimization for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). However, due to their limited accuracy in some challenging cases, e.g. lung, the resulting dose may lose its optimality after being recomputed using an accurate algorithm, e.g. Monte Carlo (MC). It is the objective of this study to evaluate the feasibility and advantages of a new method to include MC in the treatment planning process. Methods: We developed a scheme to iteratively perform MC-based beamlet dose calculations and plan optimization. In the MC stage, a GPU-based dose engine was used and the particle number sampled from a beamlet was proportional to its optimized fluence from the previous step. We tested this scheme in four lung cancer IMRT cases. For each case, the original plan dose, plan dose re-computed by MC, and dose optimized by our scheme were obtained. Clinically relevant dosimetric quantities in these three plans were compared. Results: Although the original plan achieved a satisfactory PDV dose coverage, after re-computing doses using MC method, it was found that the PTV D95% were reduced by 4.60%–6.67%. After re-optimizing these cases with our scheme, the PTV coverage was improved to the same level as in the original plan, while the critical OAR coverages were maintained to clinically acceptable levels. Regarding the computation time, it took on average 144 sec per case using only one GPU card, including both MC-based beamlet dose calculation and treatment plan optimization. Conclusion: The achieved dosimetric gains and high computational efficiency indicate the feasibility and advantages of the proposed MC-based IMRT optimization method. Comprehensive validations in more patient cases are in progress.

  9. Two computational approaches for Monte Carlo based shutdown dose rate calculation with applications to the JET fusion machine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrizzi, L.; Batistoni, P.; Migliori, S. [Associazione EURATOM ENEA sulla Fusione, Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Chen, Y.; Fischer, U.; Pereslavtsev, P. [Association FZK-EURATOM Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany); Loughlin, M. [EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX (United Kingdom); Secco, A. [Nice Srl Via Serra 33 Camerano Casasco AT (Italy)

    2003-07-01

    In deuterium-deuterium (D-D) and deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion plasmas neutrons are produced causing activation of JET machine components. For safe operation and maintenance it is important to be able to predict the induced activation and the resulting shut down dose rates. This requires a suitable system of codes which is capable of simulating both the neutron induced material activation during operation and the decay gamma radiation transport after shut-down in the proper 3-D geometry. Two methodologies to calculate the dose rate in fusion devices have been developed recently and applied to fusion machines, both using the MCNP Monte Carlo code. FZK has developed a more classical approach, the rigorous 2-step (R2S) system in which MCNP is coupled to the FISPACT inventory code with an automated routing. ENEA, in collaboration with the ITER Team, has developed an alternative approach, the direct 1 step method (D1S). Neutron and decay gamma transport are handled in one single MCNP run, using an ad hoc cross section library. The intention was to tightly couple the neutron induced production of a radio-isotope and the emission of its decay gammas for an accurate spatial distribution and a reliable calculated statistical error. The two methods have been used by the two Associations to calculate the dose rate in five positions of JET machine, two inside the vacuum chamber and three outside, at cooling times between 1 second and 1 year after shutdown. The same MCNP model and irradiation conditions have been assumed. The exercise has been proposed and financed in the frame of the Fusion Technological Program of the JET machine. The scope is to supply the designers with the most reliable tool and data to calculate the dose rate on fusion machines. Results showed that there is a good agreement: the differences range between 5-35%. The next step to be considered in 2003 will be an exercise in which the comparison will be done with dose-rate data from JET taken during and

  10. Posture-specific phantoms representing female and male adults in Monte Carlo-based simulations for radiological protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassola, V. F.; Kramer, R.; Brayner, C.; Khoury, H. J.

    2010-08-01

    Does the posture of a patient have an effect on the organ and tissue absorbed doses caused by x-ray examinations? This study aims to find the answer to this question, based on Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of commonly performed x-ray examinations using adult phantoms modelled to represent humans in standing as well as in the supine posture. The recently published FASH (female adult mesh) and MASH (male adult mesh) phantoms have the standing posture. In a first step, both phantoms were updated with respect to their anatomy: glandular tissue was separated from adipose tissue in the breasts, visceral fat was separated from subcutaneous fat, cartilage was segmented in ears, nose and around the thyroid, and the mass of the right lung is now 15% greater than the left lung. The updated versions are called FASH2_sta and MASH2_sta (sta = standing). Taking into account the gravitational effects on organ position and fat distribution, supine versions of the FASH2 and the MASH2 phantoms have been developed in this study and called FASH2_sup and MASH2_sup. MC simulations of external whole-body exposure to monoenergetic photons and partial-body exposure to x-rays have been made with the standing and supine FASH2 and MASH2 phantoms. For external whole-body exposure for AP and PA projection with photon energies above 30 keV, the effective dose did not change by more than 5% when the posture changed from standing to supine or vice versa. Apart from that, the supine posture is quite rare in occupational radiation protection from whole-body exposure. However, in the x-ray diagnosis supine posture is frequently used for patients submitted to examinations. Changes of organ absorbed doses up to 60% were found for simulations of chest and abdomen radiographs if the posture changed from standing to supine or vice versa. A further increase of differences between posture-specific organ and tissue absorbed doses with increasing whole-body mass is to be expected.

  11. A hybrid phantom Monte Carlo-based method for historical reconstruction of organ doses in patients treated with cobalt-60 for Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroccia, Heather; Mendenhall, Nancy; Liu, Chihray; Hammer, Clifford; Culberson, Wesley; Thar, Tim; Mitchell, Tom; Li, Zuofeng; Bolch, Wesley

    2017-08-01

    Historical radiotherapy treatment plans lack 3D images sets required for estimating mean organ doses to patients. Alternatively, Monte Carlo-based models of radiotherapy devices coupled with whole-body computational phantoms can permit estimates of historical in-field and out-of-field organ doses as needed for studies associating radiation exposure and late tissue toxicities. In recreating historical patient treatments with 60Co based systems, the major components to be modeled include the source capsule, surrounding shielding layers, collimators (both fixed and adjustable), and trimmers as needed to vary field size. In this study, a computational model and experimental validation of the Theratron T-1000 are presented. Model validation is based upon in-field commissioning data collected at the University of Florida, published out-of-field data from the British Journal of Radiology (BJR) Supplement 25, and out-of-field measurements performed at the University of Wisconsin’s Accredited Dosimetry Calibration Laboratory (UWADCL). The computational model of the Theratron T-1000 agrees with central axis percentage depth dose data to within 2% for 6  ×  6 to 30  ×  30 cm2 fields. Out-of-field doses were found to vary between 0.6% to 2.4% of central axis dose at 10 cm from field edge and 0.42% to 0.97% of central axis dose at 20 cm from the field edge, all at 5 cm depth. Absolute and relative differences between computed and measured out-of-field doses varied between  ±2.5% and  ±100%, respectively, at distances up to 60 cm from the central axis. The source-term model was subsequently combined with patient-morphometry matched computational hybrid phantoms as a method for estimating in-field and out-of-field organ doses for patients treated for Hodgkin’s Lymphoma. By changing field size and position, and adding patient-specific field shaping blocks, more complex historical treatment set-ups can be to recreated, particularly those

  12. Experimental Component Characterization, Monte-Carlo-Based Image Generation and Source Reconstruction for the Neutron Imaging System of the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, C A; Moran, M J

    2007-08-21

    The Neutron Imaging System (NIS) is one of seven ignition target diagnostics under development for the National Ignition Facility. The NIS is required to record hot-spot (13-15 MeV) and downscattered (6-10 MeV) images with a resolution of 10 microns and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 10 at the 20% contour. The NIS is a valuable diagnostic since the downscattered neutrons reveal the spatial distribution of the cold fuel during an ignition attempt, providing important information in the case of a failed implosion. The present study explores the parameter space of several line-of-sight (LOS) configurations that could serve as the basis for the final design. Six commercially available organic scintillators were experimentally characterized for their light emission decay profile and neutron sensitivity. The samples showed a long lived decay component that makes direct recording of a downscattered image impossible. The two best candidates for the NIS detector material are: EJ232 (BC422) plastic fibers or capillaries filled with EJ399B. A Monte Carlo-based end-to-end model of the NIS was developed to study the imaging capabilities of several LOS configurations and verify that the recovered sources meet the design requirements. The model includes accurate neutron source distributions, aperture geometries (square pinhole, triangular wedge, mini-penumbral, annular and penumbral), their point spread functions, and a pixelated scintillator detector. The modeling results show that a useful downscattered image can be obtained by recording the primary peak and the downscattered images, and then subtracting a decayed version of the former from the latter. The difference images need to be deconvolved in order to obtain accurate source distributions. The images are processed using a frequency-space modified-regularization algorithm and low-pass filtering. The resolution and SNR of these sources are quantified by using two surrogate sources. The simulations show that all LOS

  13. Inversion of Schlumberger resistivity sounding data from the critically dynamic Koyna region using the Hybrid Monte Carlo-based neural network approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Maiti

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Koyna region is well-known for its triggered seismic activities since the hazardous earthquake of M=6.3 occurred around the Koyna reservoir on 10 December 1967. Understanding the shallow distribution of resistivity pattern in such a seismically critical area is vital for mapping faults, fractures and lineaments. However, deducing true resistivity distribution from the apparent resistivity data lacks precise information due to intrinsic non-linearity in the data structures. Here we present a new technique based on the Bayesian neural network (BNN theory using the concept of Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC/Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC simulation scheme. The new method is applied to invert one and two-dimensional Direct Current (DC vertical electrical sounding (VES data acquired around the Koyna region in India. Prior to apply the method on actual resistivity data, the new method was tested for simulating synthetic signal. In this approach the objective/cost function is optimized following the Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC/Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC sampling based algorithm and each trajectory was updated by approximating the Hamiltonian differential equations through a leapfrog discretization scheme. The stability of the new inversion technique was tested in presence of correlated red noise and uncertainty of the result was estimated using the BNN code. The estimated true resistivity distribution was compared with the results of singular value decomposition (SVD-based conventional resistivity inversion results. Comparative results based on the HMC-based Bayesian Neural Network are in good agreement with the existing model results, however in some cases, it also provides more detail and precise results, which appears to be justified with local geological and structural details. The new BNN approach based on HMC is faster and proved to be a promising inversion scheme to interpret complex and non-linear resistivity problems. The HMC-based BNN results

  14. Variance Reduction Techniques in Monte Carlo Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, Jack P.C.; Ridder, A.A.N.; Rubinstein, R.Y.

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods are simulation algorithms to estimate a numerical quantity in a statistical model of a real system. These algorithms are executed by computer programs. Variance reduction techniques (VRT) are needed, even though computer speed has been increasing dramatically, ever since the intr

  15. Variance Reduction Techniques in Monte Carlo Methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleijnen, Jack P.C.; Ridder, A.A.N.; Rubinstein, R.Y.

    2010-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods are simulation algorithms to estimate a numerical quantity in a statistical model of a real system. These algorithms are executed by computer programs. Variance reduction techniques (VRT) are needed, even though computer speed has been increasing dramatically, ever since the intr

  16. SU-E-T-632: Preliminary Study On Treating Nose Skin Using Energy and Intensity Modulated Electron Beams with Monte Carlo Based Dose Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, L; Eldib, A; Li, J; Price, R; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Uneven nose surfaces and air cavities underneath and the use of bolus present complexity and dose uncertainty when using a single electron energy beam to plan treatments of nose skin with a pencil beam-based planning system. This work demonstrates more accurate dose calculation and more optimal planning using energy and intensity modulated electron radiotherapy (MERT) delivered with a pMLC. Methods: An in-house developed Monte Carlo (MC)-based dose calculation/optimization planning system was employed for treatment planning. Phase space data (6, 9, 12 and 15 MeV) were used as an input source for MC dose calculations for the linac. To reduce the scatter-caused penumbra, a short SSD (61 cm) was used. Our previous work demonstrates good agreement in percentage depth dose and off-axis dose between calculations and film measurement for various field sizes. A MERT plan was generated for treating the nose skin using a patient geometry and a dose volume histogram (DVH) was obtained. The work also shows the comparison of 2D dose distributions between a clinically used conventional single electron energy plan and the MERT plan. Results: The MERT plan resulted in improved target dose coverage as compared to the conventional plan, which demonstrated a target dose deficit at the field edge. The conventional plan showed higher dose normal tissue irradiation underneath the nose skin while the MERT plan resulted in improved conformity and thus reduces normal tissue dose. Conclusion: This preliminary work illustrates that MC-based MERT planning is a promising technique in treating nose skin, not only providing more accurate dose calculation, but also offering an improved target dose coverage and conformity. In addition, this technique may eliminate the necessity of bolus, which often produces dose delivery uncertainty due to the air gaps that may exist between the bolus and skin.

  17. Dosimetric verification and clinical evaluation of a new commercially available Monte Carlo-based dose algorithm for application in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fragoso, Margarida; Wen Ning; Kumar, Sanath; Liu Dezhi; Ryu, Samuel; Movsas, Benjamin; Munther, Ajlouni; Chetty, Indrin J, E-mail: ichetty1@hfhs.or [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2010-08-21

    Modern cancer treatment techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), have greatly increased the demand for more accurate treatment planning (structure definition, dose calculation, etc) and dose delivery. The ability to use fast and accurate Monte Carlo (MC)-based dose calculations within a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) in the clinical setting is now becoming more of a reality. This study describes the dosimetric verification and initial clinical evaluation of a new commercial MC-based photon beam dose calculation algorithm, within the iPlan v.4.1 TPS (BrainLAB AG, Feldkirchen, Germany). Experimental verification of the MC photon beam model was performed with film and ionization chambers in water phantoms and in heterogeneous solid-water slabs containing bone and lung-equivalent materials for a 6 MV photon beam from a Novalis (BrainLAB) linear accelerator (linac) with a micro-multileaf collimator (m{sub 3} MLC). The agreement between calculated and measured dose distributions in the water phantom verification tests was, on average, within 2%/1 mm (high dose/high gradient) and was within {+-}4%/2 mm in the heterogeneous slab geometries. Example treatment plans in the lung show significant differences between the MC and one-dimensional pencil beam (PB) algorithms within iPlan, especially for small lesions in the lung, where electronic disequilibrium effects are emphasized. Other user-specific features in the iPlan system, such as options to select dose to water or dose to medium, and the mean variance level, have been investigated. Timing results for typical lung treatment plans show the total computation time (including that for processing and I/O) to be less than 10 min for 1-2% mean variance (running on a single PC with 8 Intel Xeon X5355 CPUs, 2.66 GHz). Overall, the iPlan MC algorithm is demonstrated to be an accurate and efficient dose algorithm, incorporating robust tools for MC

  18. Inverse modeling of cloud-aerosol interactions -- Part 2: Sensitivity tests on liquid phase clouds using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo based simulation approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Partridge, D.G.; Vrugt, J.A.; Tunved, P.; Ekman, A.M.L.; Struthers, H.; Sooroshian, A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to investigate cloud-aerosol interactions by coupling a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm to an adiabatic cloud parcel model. Despite the number of numerical cloud-aerosol sensitivity studies previously conducted few have used statistical analysis tools t

  19. Comparison of interatomic potentials of water via structure factors reconstructed from simulated partial radial distribution functions: a reverse Monte Carlo based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinczinger, Zsuzsanna; Jóvári, Pál; Pusztai, László

    2017-01-01

    Neutron- and x-ray weighted total structure factors of liquid water have been calculated on the basis of the intermolecular parts of partial radial distribution functions resulting from various computer simulations. The approach includes reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) modelling of these partials, using realistic flexible molecules, and the calculation of experimental diffraction data, including the intramolecular contributions, from the RMC particle configurations. The procedure has been applied to ten sets of intermolecular partial radial distribution functions obtained from various computer simulations, including one set from an ab initio molecular dynamics, of water. It is found that modern polarizable water potentials, such as SWM4-DP and BK3 are the most successful in reproducing measured diffraction data.

  20. Experimental validation of a Monte Carlo-based kV x-ray projection model for the Varian linac-mounted cone-beam CT imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazos, Dimitrios; Pokhrel, Damodar; Su, Zhong; Lu, Jun; Williamson, Jeffrey F.

    2008-03-01

    Fast and accurate modeling of cone-beam CT (CBCT) x-ray projection data can improve CBCT image quality either by linearizing projection data for each patient prior to image reconstruction (thereby mitigating detector blur/lag, spectral hardening, and scatter artifacts) or indirectly by supporting rigorous comparative simulation studies of competing image reconstruction and processing algorithms. In this study, we compare Monte Carlo-computed x-ray projections with projections experimentally acquired from our Varian Trilogy CBCT imaging system for phantoms of known design. Our recently developed Monte Carlo photon-transport code, PTRAN, was used to compute primary and scatter projections for cylindrical phantom of known diameter (NA model 76-410) with and without bow-tie filter and antiscatter grid for both full- and half-fan geometries. These simulations were based upon measured 120 kVp spectra, beam profiles, and flat-panel detector (4030CB) point-spread function. Compound Poisson- process noise was simulated based upon measured beam output. Computed projections were compared to flat- and dark-field corrected 4030CB images where scatter profiles were estimated by subtracting narrow axial-from full axial width 4030CB profiles. In agreement with the literature, the difference between simulated and measured projection data is of the order of 6-8%. The measurement of the scatter profiles is affected by the long tails of the detector PSF. Higher accuracy can be achieved mainly by improving the beam modeling and correcting the non linearities induced by the detector PSF.

  1. Monte Carlo-based investigations on the impact of removing the flattening filter on beam quality specifiers for photon beam dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czarnecki, Damian; Poppe, Björn; Zink, Klemens

    2017-06-01

    The impact of removing the flattening filter in clinical electron accelerators on the relationship between dosimetric quantities such as beam quality specifiers and the mean photon and electron energies of the photon radiation field was investigated by Monte Carlo simulations. The purpose of this work was to determine the uncertainties when using the well-known beam quality specifiers or energy-based beam specifiers as predictors of dosimetric photon field properties when removing the flattening filter. Monte Carlo simulations applying eight different linear accelerator head models with and without flattening filter were performed in order to generate realistic radiation sources and calculate field properties such as restricted mass collision stopping power ratios (L¯/ρ)airwater, mean photon and secondary electron energies. To study the impact of removing the flattening filter on the beam quality correction factors kQ , this factor for detailed ionization chamber models was calculated by Monte Carlo simulations. Stopping power ratios (L¯/ρ)airwater and kQ values for different ionization chambers as a function of TPR1020 and %dd(10)x were calculated. Moreover, mean photon energies in air and at the point of measurement in water as well as mean secondary electron energies at the point of measurement were calculated. The results revealed that removing the flattening filter led to a change within 0.3% in the relationship between %dd(10)x and (L¯/ρ)airwater, whereby the relationship between TPR1020 and (L¯/ρ)airwater changed up to 0.8% for high energy photon beams. However, TPR1020 was a good predictor of (L¯/ρ)airwater for both types of linear accelerator with energies mean photon energy below the linear accelerators head as well as at the point of measurement may not be suitable as a predictor of (L¯/ρ)airwater and kQ to merge the dosimetry of both linear accelerator types. It was possible to derive (L¯/ρ)airwater using the mean secondary electron energy

  2. Comparison of diffusion approximation and Monte Carlo based finite element models for simulating thermal responses to laser irradiation in discrete vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Verkruysse, Wim; Aguilar, Guillermo; Nelson, J Stuart

    2005-09-07

    Both diffusion approximation (DA) and Monte Carlo (MC) models have been used to simulate light distribution in multilayered human skin with or without discrete blood vessels. However, no detailed comparison of the light distribution, heat generation and induced thermal damage between these two models has been done for discrete vessels. Three models were constructed: (1) MC-based finite element method (FEM) model, referred to as MC-FEM; (2) DA-based FEM with simple scaling factors according to chromophore concentrations (SFCC) in the epidermis and vessels, referred to as DA-FEM-SFCC; and (3) DA-FEM with improved scaling factors (ISF) obtained by equalizing the total light energy depositions that are solved from the DA and MC models in the epidermis and vessels, respectively, referred to as DA-FEM-ISF. The results show that DA-FEM-SFCC underestimates the light energy deposition in the epidermis and vessels when compared to MC-FEM. The difference is nonlinearly dependent on wavelength, dermal blood volume fraction, vessel size and depth, etc. Thus, the temperature and damage profiles are also dramatically different. DA-FEM-ISF achieves much better results in calculating heat generation and induced thermal damage when compared to MC-FEM, and has the advantages of both calculation speed and accuracy. The disadvantage is that a multidimensional ISF table is needed for DA-FEM-ISF to be a practical modelling tool.

  3. Clinically applicable Monte Carlo-based biological dose optimization for the treatment of head and neck cancers with spot-scanning proton therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Tseung, H Wan Chan; Kreofsky, C R; Ma, D; Beltran, C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of fast Monte Carlo (MC) based inverse biological planning for the treatment of head and neck tumors in spot-scanning proton therapy. Methods: Recently, a fast and accurate Graphics Processor Unit (GPU)-based MC simulation of proton transport was developed and used as the dose calculation engine in a GPU-accelerated IMPT optimizer. Besides dose, the dose-averaged linear energy transfer (LETd) can be simultaneously scored, which makes biological dose (BD) optimization possible. To convert from LETd to BD, a linear relation was assumed. Using this novel optimizer, inverse biological planning was applied to 4 patients: 2 small and 1 large thyroid tumor targets, and 1 glioma case. To create these plans, constraints were placed to maintain the physical dose (PD) within 1.25 times the prescription while maximizing target BD. For comparison, conventional IMRT and IMPT plans were created for each case in Eclipse (Varian, Inc). The same critical structure PD constraints were use...

  4. Hydration structure in concentrated aqueous lithium chloride solutions: A reverse Monte Carlo based combination of molecular dynamics simulations and diffraction data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harsányi, I.; Pusztai, L.

    2012-11-01

    We report on a comparison of three interaction potential models of water (SPC/E, TIP4P-2005, and SWM4-DP) for describing the structure of concentrated aqueous lithium chloride solutions. Classical molecular dynamics simulations have been carried out and total scattering structure factors, calculated from the particle configurations, were compared with experimental diffraction data. Later, reverse Monte Carlo structural modelling was applied for refining molecular dynamics results, so that particle configurations consistent with neutron and X-ray diffraction data could be prepared that, at the same time, were as close as possible to the final stage of the molecular dynamics simulations. Partial radial distribution functions, first neighbors, and angular correlations were analysed further from the best fitting particle configurations. It was found that none of the water potential models describe the structure perfectly; overall, the SWM4-DP model seems to be the most promising. At the highest concentrations the SPC/E model appears to provide the best approximation of the water structure, whereas the TIP4P-2005 model proved to be the most successful for estimating the lithium-oxygen partial radial distribution function at each concentration.

  5. Inverse modelling of cloud-aerosol interactions – Part 2: Sensitivity tests on liquid phase clouds using a Markov chain Monte Carlo based simulation approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Partridge

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel approach to investigate cloud-aerosol interactions by coupling a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC algorithm to an adiabatic cloud parcel model. Despite the number of numerical cloud-aerosol sensitivity studies previously conducted few have used statistical analysis tools to investigate the global sensitivity of a cloud model to input aerosol physiochemical parameters. Using numerically generated cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC distributions (i.e. synthetic data as cloud observations, this inverse modelling framework is shown to successfully estimate the correct calibration parameters, and their underlying posterior probability distribution.

    The employed analysis method provides a new, integrative framework to evaluate the global sensitivity of the derived CDNC distribution to the input parameters describing the lognormal properties of the accumulation mode aerosol and the particle chemistry. To a large extent, results from prior studies are confirmed, but the present study also provides some additional insights. There is a transition in relative sensitivity from very clean marine Arctic conditions where the lognormal aerosol parameters representing the accumulation mode aerosol number concentration and mean radius and are found to be most important for determining the CDNC distribution to very polluted continental environments (aerosol concentration in the accumulation mode >1000 cm−3 where particle chemistry is more important than both number concentration and size of the accumulation mode.

    The competition and compensation between the cloud model input parameters illustrates that if the soluble mass fraction is reduced, the aerosol number concentration, geometric standard deviation and mean radius of the accumulation mode must increase in order to achieve the same CDNC distribution.

    This study demonstrates that inverse modelling provides a flexible, transparent and

  6. Evaluation of a commercial VMC++ Monte Carlo based treatment planning system for electron beams using EGSnrc/BEAMnrc simulations and measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edimo, P; Clermont, C; Kwato, M G; Vynckier, S

    2009-09-01

    In the present work, Monte Carlo (MC) models of electron beams (energies 4, 12 and 18MeV) from an Elekta SL25 medical linear accelerator were simulated using EGSnrc/BEAMnrc user code. The calculated dose distributions were benchmarked by comparison with measurements made in a water phantom for a wide range of open field sizes and insert combinations, at a single source-to-surface distance (SSD) of 100cm. These BEAMnrc models were used to evaluate the accuracy of a commercial MC dose calculation engine for electron beam treatment planning (Oncentra MasterPlan Treament Planning System (OMTPS) version 1.4, Nucletron) for two energies, 4 and 12MeV. Output factors were furthermore measured in the water phantom and compared to BEAMnrc and OMTPS. The overall agreement between predicted and measured output factors was comparable for both BEAMnrc and OMTPS, except for a few asymmetric and/or small insert cutouts, where larger deviations between measurements and the values predicted from BEAMnrc as well as OMTPS computations were recorded. However, in the heterogeneous phantom, differences between BEAMnrc and measurements ranged from 0.5 to 2.0% between two ribs and 0.6-1.0% below the ribs, whereas the range difference between OMTPS and measurements was the same (0.5-4.0%) in both areas. With respect to output factors, the overall agreement between BEAMnrc and measurements was usually within 1.0% whereas differences up to nearly 3.0% were observed for OMTPS. This paper focuses on a comparison for clinical cases, including the effects of electron beam attenuations in a heterogeneous phantom. It, therefore, complements previously reported data (only based on measurements) in one other paper on commissioning of the VMC++ dose calculation engine. These results demonstrate that the VMC++ algorithm is more robust in predicting dose distribution than Pencil beam based algorithms for the electron beams investigated.

  7. 基于蒙特卡罗模拟的可转换债券定价研究%Monte Carlo-based pricing of convertible bonds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵洋; 赵立臣

    2009-01-01

    The paper applied the least-square Monte Carlo method proposed by Longstaff,et al.to price convertible bond,so as to solve the problem of prcing the path-dependent clauses and American option features embeded in convertible bonds.Convertible bonds are complex hybrid securities being subject to equity risk,credit risk,and interest rate risk.In the established pricing model,the assumption of constant volatility is relaxed and the volatility is estimated with GARCH (1,1),according to TF model,the credit risk is represented with the credit risk spread,and the yield curve is estimsted with Nelson-Siegel method.By empirical research,it is found that the convertible bonds in China are underpriced by 2% to 3%.%使用Longstaff等提出的最小二乘蒙特卡罗方法为可转换债券定价,从而解决为可转换债券中路径依赖条款和美式期权进行定价的难题.可转换债券是复杂的结构化产品,同时受股价风险、信用风险和利率风险影响.在建立的定价模型中,股价过程放松波动率为常数的假设,用GARCH(1,1)模型估计波动率,信用风险根据TF模型用常数信用利差代表,收益率曲线用Nelson-Siegel方法估计.通过实证检验发现国内可转换债券市场存在低估,低估幅度在2%~3%之间.

  8. Quasi-Monte Carlo based global uncertainty and sensitivity analysis in modeling free product migration and recovery from petroleum-contaminated aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Li; Huang, Gordon; Lu, Hongwei; Wang, Shuo; Xu, Yi

    2012-06-15

    This paper presents a global uncertainty and sensitivity analysis (GUSA) framework based on global sensitivity analysis (GSA) and generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE) methods. Quasi-Monte Carlo (QMC) is employed by GUSA to obtain realizations of uncertain parameters, which are then input to the simulation model for analysis. Compared to GLUE, GUSA can not only evaluate global sensitivity and uncertainty of modeling parameter sets, but also quantify the uncertainty in modeling prediction sets. Moreover, GUSA's another advantage lies in alleviation of computational effort, since those globally-insensitive parameters can be identified and removed from the uncertain-parameter set. GUSA is applied to a practical petroleum-contaminated site in Canada to investigate free product migration and recovery processes under aquifer remediation operations. Results from global sensitivity analysis show that (1) initial free product thickness has the most significant impact on total recovery volume but least impact on residual free product thickness and recovery rate; (2) total recovery volume and recovery rate are sensitive to residual LNAPL phase saturations and soil porosity. Results from uncertainty predictions reveal that the residual thickness would remain high and almost unchanged after about half-year of skimmer-well scheme; the rather high residual thickness (0.73-1.56 m 20 years later) indicates that natural attenuation would not be suitable for the remediation. The largest total recovery volume would be from water pumping, followed by vacuum pumping, and then skimmer. The recovery rates of the three schemes would rapidly decrease after 2 years (less than 0.05 m(3)/day), thus short-term remediation is not suggested. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A virtual photon source model of an Elekta linear accelerator with integrated mini MLC for Monte Carlo based IMRT dose calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, M; Dohm, O; Alber, M

    2007-08-07

    A dedicated, efficient Monte Carlo (MC) accelerator head model for intensity modulated stereotactic radiosurgery treatment planning is needed to afford a highly accurate simulation of tiny IMRT fields. A virtual source model (VSM) of a mini multi-leaf collimator (MLC) (the Elekta Beam Modulator (EBM)) is presented, allowing efficient generation of particles even for small fields. The VSM of the EBM is based on a previously published virtual photon energy fluence model (VEF) (Fippel et al 2003 Med. Phys. 30 301) commissioned with large field measurements in air and in water. The original commissioning procedure of the VEF, based on large field measurements only, leads to inaccuracies for small fields. In order to improve the VSM, it was necessary to change the VEF model by developing (1) a method to determine the primary photon source diameter, relevant for output factor calculations, (2) a model of the influence of the flattening filter on the secondary photon spectrum and (3) a more realistic primary photon spectrum. The VSM model is used to generate the source phase space data above the mini-MLC. Later the particles are transmitted through the mini-MLC by a passive filter function which significantly speeds up the time of generation of the phase space data after the mini-MLC, used for calculation of the dose distribution in the patient. The improved VSM model was commissioned for 6 and 15 MV beams. The results of MC simulation are in very good agreement with measurements. Less than 2% of local difference between the MC simulation and the diamond detector measurement of the output factors in water was achieved. The X, Y and Z profiles measured in water with an ion chamber (V = 0.125 cm(3)) and a diamond detector were used to validate the models. An overall agreement of 2%/2 mm for high dose regions and 3%/2 mm in low dose regions between measurement and MC simulation for field sizes from 0.8 x 0.8 cm(2) to 16 x 21 cm(2) was achieved. An IMRT plan film verification

  10. Inverse modeling of cloud-aerosol interactions – Part 2: Sensitivity tests on liquid phase clouds using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo based simulation approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. G. Partridge

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel approach to investigate cloud-aerosol interactions by coupling a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC algorithm to a pseudo-adiabatic cloud parcel model. Despite the number of numerical cloud-aerosol sensitivity studies previously conducted few have used statistical analysis tools to investigate the sensitivity of a cloud model to input aerosol physiochemical parameters. Using synthetic data as observed values of cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC distribution, this inverse modelling framework is shown to successfully converge to the correct calibration parameters.

    The employed analysis method provides a new, integrative framework to evaluate the sensitivity of the derived CDNC distribution to the input parameters describing the lognormal properties of the accumulation mode and the particle chemistry. To a large extent, results from prior studies are confirmed, but the present study also provides some additional insightful findings. There is a clear transition from very clean marine Arctic conditions where the aerosol parameters representing the mean radius and geometric standard deviation of the accumulation mode are found to be most important for determining the CDNC distribution to very polluted continental environments (aerosol concentration in the accumulation mode >1000 cm−3 where particle chemistry is more important than both number concentration and size of the accumulation mode.

    The competition and compensation between the cloud model input parameters illustrate that if the soluble mass fraction is reduced, both the number of particles and geometric standard deviation must increase and the mean radius of the accumulation mode must increase in order to achieve the same CDNC distribution.

    For more polluted aerosol conditions, with a reduction in soluble mass fraction the parameter correlation becomes weaker and more non-linear over the range of possible solutions

  11. Reducing radiation dose to selected organs by selecting the tube start angle in MDCT helical scans: A Monte Carlo based study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Di; Zankl, Maria; DeMarco, John J.; Cagnon, Chris H.; Angel, Erin; Turner, Adam C.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States); German Research Center for Environmental Health (GmbH), Institute of Radiation Protection, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Ingolstaedter Landstrasse 1, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: Previous work has demonstrated that there are significant dose variations with a sinusoidal pattern on the peripheral of a CTDI 32 cm phantom or on the surface of an anthropomorphic phantom when helical CT scanning is performed, resulting in the creation of ''hot'' spots or ''cold'' spots. The purpose of this work was to perform preliminary investigations into the feasibility of exploiting these variations to reduce dose to selected radiosensitive organs solely by varying the tube start angle in CT scans. Methods: Radiation dose to several radiosensitive organs (including breasts, thyroid, uterus, gonads, and eye lenses) resulting from MDCT scans were estimated using Monte Carlo simulation methods on voxelized patient models, including GSF's Baby, Child, and Irene. Dose to fetus was also estimated using four pregnant female models based on CT images of the pregnant patients. Whole-body scans were simulated using 120 kVp, 300 mAs, both 28.8 and 40 mm nominal collimations, and pitch values of 1.5, 1.0, and 0.75 under a wide range of start angles (0 deg. - 340 deg. in 20 deg. increments). The relationship between tube start angle and organ dose was examined for each organ, and the potential dose reduction was calculated. Results: Some organs exhibit a strong dose variation, depending on the tube start angle. For small peripheral organs (e.g., the eye lenses of the Baby phantom at pitch 1.5 with 40 mm collimation), the minimum dose can be 41% lower than the maximum dose, depending on the tube start angle. In general, larger dose reductions occur for smaller peripheral organs in smaller patients when wider collimation is used. Pitch 1.5 and pitch 0.75 have different mechanisms of dose reduction. For pitch 1.5 scans, the dose is usually lowest when the tube start angle is such that the x-ray tube is posterior to the patient when it passes the longitudinal location of the organ. For pitch 0.75 scans, the dose is lowest

  12. SU-E-T-448: On the Perturbation Factor P-cav of the Markus Parallel Plate Ion Chambers in Clinical Electron Beams, Monte Carlo Based Reintegration of An Historical Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voigts-Rhetz, P von; Zink, K [Technische Hochschule Mittelhessen - University of Applied Sciences, Giessen, Hessen (Germany)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: All present dosimetry protocols recommend well-guarded parallel-plate ion chambers for electron dosimetry. For the guard-less Markus chamber an energy dependent fluence perturbation correction pcav is given. This perturbation correction was experimentally determined by van der Plaetsen by comparison of the read-out of a Markus and a NACP chamber, which was assumed to be “perturbation-free”. Aim of the present study is a Monte Carlo based reiteration of this experiment. Methods: Detailed models of four parallel-plate chambers (Roos, Markus, NACP and Advanced Markus) were designed using the Monte Carlo code EGSnrc and placed in a water phantom. For all chambers the dose to the active volume filled with low density water was calculated for 13 clinical electron spectra (E{sub 0}=6-21 MeV) at the depth of maximum and at the reference depth under reference conditions. In all cases the chamber's reference point was positioned at the depth of measurement. Moreover, the dose to water DW was calculated in a small water voxel positioned at the same depth. Results: The calculated dose ratio D{sub NACP}/D{sub Markus}, which according to van der Plaetsen reflects the fluence perturbation correction of the Markus chamber, deviates less from unity than the values given by van der Plaetsen's but exhibits a similar energy dependence. The same holds for the dose ratios of the other well guarded chambers. But, in comparison to water, the Markus chamber reveals the smallest overall perturbation correction which is nearly energy independent at both investigated depths. Conclusion: The simulations principally confirm the energy dependence of the dose ratio D{sub NACP}/D{sub Markus} as published by van der Plaetsen. But, as shown by our simulations of the ratio D{sub W}/D{sub Markus}, the conclusion drawn in all dosimetry protocols is questionable: in contrast to all well-guarded chambers the guard-less Markus chamber reveals the smallest overall perturbation

  13. Monte Carlo techniques for analyzing deep penetration problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramer, S.N.; Gonnord, J.; Hendricks, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    A review of current methods and difficulties in Monte Carlo deep-penetration calculations is presented. Statistical uncertainty is discussed, and recent adjoint optimization of splitting, Russian roulette, and exponential transformation biasing is reviewed. Other aspects of the random walk and estimation processes are covered, including the relatively new DXANG angular biasing technique. Specific items summarized are albedo scattering, Monte Carlo coupling techniques with discrete ordinates and other methods, adjoint solutions, and multi-group Monte Carlo. The topic of code-generated biasing parameters is presented, including the creation of adjoint importance functions from forward calculations. Finally, current and future work in the area of computer learning and artificial intelligence is discussed in connection with Monte Carlo applications. 29 refs.

  14. Gas discharges modeling by Monte Carlo technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Marija

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic assumption of the Townsend theory - that ions produce secondary electrons - is valid only in a very narrow range of the reduced electric field E/N. In accordance with the revised Townsend theory that was suggested by Phelps and Petrović, secondary electrons are produced in collisions of ions, fast neutrals, metastable atoms or photons with the cathode, or in gas phase ionizations by fast neutrals. In this paper we tried to build up a Monte Carlo code that can be used to calculate secondary electron yields for different types of particles. The obtained results are in good agreement with the analytical results of Phelps and. Petrović [Plasma Sourc. Sci. Technol. 8 (1999 R1].

  15. Monte Carlo Techniques for Nuclear Systems - Theory Lectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Forrest B. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Monte Carlo Methods, Codes, and Applications Group; Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Nuclear Engineering Dept.

    2016-11-29

    These are lecture notes for a Monte Carlo class given at the University of New Mexico. The following topics are covered: course information; nuclear eng. review & MC; random numbers and sampling; computational geometry; collision physics; tallies and statistics; eigenvalue calculations I; eigenvalue calculations II; eigenvalue calculations III; variance reduction; parallel Monte Carlo; parameter studies; fission matrix and higher eigenmodes; doppler broadening; Monte Carlo depletion; HTGR modeling; coupled MC and T/H calculations; fission energy deposition. Solving particle transport problems with the Monte Carlo method is simple - just simulate the particle behavior. The devil is in the details, however. These lectures provide a balanced approach to the theory and practice of Monte Carlo simulation codes. The first lectures provide an overview of Monte Carlo simulation methods, covering the transport equation, random sampling, computational geometry, collision physics, and statistics. The next lectures focus on the state-of-the-art in Monte Carlo criticality simulations, covering the theory of eigenvalue calculations, convergence analysis, dominance ratio calculations, bias in Keff and tallies, bias in uncertainties, a case study of a realistic calculation, and Wielandt acceleration techniques. The remaining lectures cover advanced topics, including HTGR modeling and stochastic geometry, temperature dependence, fission energy deposition, depletion calculations, parallel calculations, and parameter studies. This portion of the class focuses on using MCNP to perform criticality calculations for reactor physics and criticality safety applications. It is an intermediate level class, intended for those with at least some familiarity with MCNP. Class examples provide hands-on experience at running the code, plotting both geometry and results, and understanding the code output. The class includes lectures & hands-on computer use for a variety of Monte Carlo calculations

  16. A comparative study on the risk of second primary cancers in out-of-field organs associated with radiotherapy of localized prostate carcinoma using Monte Carlo-based accelerator and patient models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bednarz, Bryan; Athar, Basit; Xu, X. George [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02108 and Department of Mechanical Aerospace and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    Purpose: A physician's decision regarding an ideal treatment approach (i.e., radiation, surgery, and/or hormonal) for prostate carcinoma is traditionally based on a variety of metrics. One of these metrics is the risk of radiation-induced second primary cancer following radiation treatments. The aim of this study was to investigate the significance of second cancer risks in out-of-field organs from 3D-CRT and IMRT treatments of prostate carcinoma compared to baseline cancer risks in these organs. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were performed using a detailed medical linear accelerator model and an anatomically realistic adult male whole-body phantom. A four-field box treatment, a four-field box treatment plus a six-field boost, and a seven-field IMRT treatment were simulated. Using BEIR VII risk models, the age-dependent lifetime attributable risks to various organs outside the primary beam with a known predilection for cancer were calculated using organ-averaged equivalent doses. Results: The four-field box treatment had the lowest treatment-related second primary cancer risks to organs outside the primary beam ranging from 7.3x10{sup -9} to 2.54x10{sup -5}%/MU depending on the patients age at exposure and second primary cancer site. The risks to organs outside the primary beam from the four-field box and six-field boost and the seven-field IMRT were nearly equivalent. The risks from the four-field box and six-field boost ranged from 1.39x10{sup -8} to 1.80x10{sup -5}%/MU, and from the seven-field IMRT ranged from 1.60x10{sup -9} to 1.35x10{sup -5}%/MU. The second cancer risks in all organs considered from each plan were below the baseline risks. Conclusions: The treatment-related second cancer risks in organs outside the primary beam due to 3D-CRT and IMRT is small. New risk assessment techniques need to be investigated to address the concern of radiation-induced second cancers from prostate treatments, particularly focusing on risks to organs inside the

  17. A comparative study on the risk of second primary cancers in out-of-field organs associated with radiotherapy of localized prostate carcinoma using Monte Carlo-based accelerator and patient models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, Bryan; Athar, Basit; Xu, X. George

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: A physician’s decision regarding an ideal treatment approach (i.e., radiation, surgery, and∕or hormonal) for prostate carcinoma is traditionally based on a variety of metrics. One of these metrics is the risk of radiation-induced second primary cancer following radiation treatments. The aim of this study was to investigate the significance of second cancer risks in out-of-field organs from 3D-CRT and IMRT treatments of prostate carcinoma compared to baseline cancer risks in these organs. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were performed using a detailed medical linear accelerator model and an anatomically realistic adult male whole-body phantom. A four-field box treatment, a four-field box treatment plus a six-field boost, and a seven-field IMRT treatment were simulated. Using BEIR VII risk models, the age-dependent lifetime attributable risks to various organs outside the primary beam with a known predilection for cancer were calculated using organ-averaged equivalent doses. Results: The four-field box treatment had the lowest treatment-related second primary cancer risks to organs outside the primary beam ranging from 7.3×10−9 to 2.54×10−5%∕MU depending on the patients age at exposure and second primary cancer site. The risks to organs outside the primary beam from the four-field box and six-field boost and the seven-field IMRT were nearly equivalent. The risks from the four-field box and six-field boost ranged from 1.39×10−8 to 1.80×10−5%∕MU, and from the seven-field IMRT ranged from 1.60×10−9 to 1.35×10−5%∕MU. The second cancer risks in all organs considered from each plan were below the baseline risks. Conclusions: The treatment-related second cancer risks in organs outside the primary beam due to 3D-CRT and IMRT is small. New risk assessment techniques need to be investigated to address the concern of radiation-induced second cancers from prostate treatments, particularly focusing on risks to organs inside the primary beam

  18. Monte Carlo-based assessment of the trade-off between spatial resolution, field-of-view and scattered radiation in the variable resolution X-ray CT scanner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arabi, Hossein; Asl, Ali Reza Kamali; Ay, Mohammad Reza; Zaidi, Habib

    Objective: The purpose of this work is to evaluate the impact of optimization of magnification on performance parameters of the variable resolution X-ray (VRX) CT scanner. MethodsA realistic model based on an actual VRX CT scanner was implemented in the GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform. To

  19. Monte Carlo-based assessment of the trade-off between spatial resolution, field-of-view and scattered radiation in the variable resolution X-ray CT scanner

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arabi, Hossein; Asl, Ali Reza Kamali; Ay, Mohammad Reza; Zaidi, Habib

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this work is to evaluate the impact of optimization of magnification on performance parameters of the variable resolution X-ray (VRX) CT scanner. MethodsA realistic model based on an actual VRX CT scanner was implemented in the GATE Monte Carlo simulation platform. To evalu

  20. SU-E-T-561: Monte Carlo-Based Organ Dose Reconstruction Using Pre-Contoured Human Model for Hodgkins Lymphoma Patients Treated by Cobalt-60 External Beam Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, J; Pelletier, C [East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Lee, C [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Kim, J [University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Pyakuryal, A; Lee, C [National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Organ doses for the Hodgkin’s lymphoma patients treated with cobalt-60 radiation were estimated using an anthropomorphic model and Monte Carlo modeling. Methods: A cobalt-60 treatment unit modeled in the BEAMnrc Monte Carlo code was used to produce phase space data. The Monte Carlo simulation was verified with percent depth dose measurement in water at various field sizes. Radiation transport through the lung blocks were modeled by adjusting the weights of phase space data. We imported a precontoured adult female hybrid model and generated a treatment plan. The adjusted phase space data and the human model were imported to the XVMC Monte Carlo code for dose calculation. The organ mean doses were estimated and dose volume histograms were plotted. Results: The percent depth dose agreement between measurement and calculation in water phantom was within 2% for all field sizes. The mean organ doses of heart, left breast, right breast, and spleen for the selected case were 44.3, 24.1, 14.6 and 3.4 Gy, respectively with the midline prescription dose of 40.0 Gy. Conclusion: Organ doses were estimated for the patient group whose threedimensional images are not available. This development may open the door to more accurate dose reconstruction and estimates of uncertainties in secondary cancer risk for Hodgkin’s lymphoma patients. This work was partially supported by the intramural research program of the National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics.

  1. Stratified source-sampling techniques for Monte Carlo eigenvalue analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, A.

    1998-07-10

    In 1995, at a conference on criticality safety, a special session was devoted to the Monte Carlo ''Eigenvalue of the World'' problem. Argonne presented a paper, at that session, in which the anomalies originally observed in that problem were reproduced in a much simplified model-problem configuration, and removed by a version of stratified source-sampling. In this paper, stratified source-sampling techniques are generalized and applied to three different Eigenvalue of the World configurations which take into account real-world statistical noise sources not included in the model problem, but which differ in the amount of neutronic coupling among the constituents of each configuration. It is concluded that, in Monte Carlo eigenvalue analysis of loosely-coupled arrays, the use of stratified source-sampling reduces the probability of encountering an anomalous result over that if conventional source-sampling methods are used. However, this gain in reliability is substantially less than that observed in the model-problem results.

  2. Feasibility of Diagrammatic Monte-Carlo based on weak-coupling expansion in asymptotically free theories: case study of $O(N)$ sigma-model in the large-$N$ limit

    CERN Document Server

    Buividovich, P V

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the feasibility of applying Diagrammatic Monte-Carlo algorithms to the weak-coupling expansions of asymptotically free quantum field theories, taking the large-$N$ limit of the $O(N)$ sigma-model as the simplest example where exact results are available. We use stereographic mapping from the sphere to the real plane to set up the perturbation theory, which results in a small bare mass term proportional to the coupling $\\lambda$. Counting the powers of coupling associated with higher-order interaction vertices, we arrive at the double-series representation for the dynamically generated mass gap in powers of both $\\lambda$ and $\\log(\\lambda)$, which converges quite quickly to the exact non-perturbative answer. We also demonstrate that it is feasible to obtain the coefficients of these double series by a Monte-Carlo sampling in the space of Feynman diagrams. In particular, the sign problem of such sampling becomes milder at small $\\lambda$, that is, close to the continuum limit.

  3. A Monte Carlo simulation technique to determine the optimal portfolio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ghodrati

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available During the past few years, there have been several studies for portfolio management. One of the primary concerns on any stock market is to detect the risk associated with various assets. One of the recognized methods in order to measure, to forecast, and to manage the existing risk is associated with Value at Risk (VaR, which draws much attention by financial institutions in recent years. VaR is a method for recognizing and evaluating of risk, which uses the standard statistical techniques and the method has been used in other fields, increasingly. The present study has measured the value at risk of 26 companies from chemical industry in Tehran Stock Exchange over the period 2009-2011 using the simulation technique of Monte Carlo with 95% confidence level. The used variability in the present study has been the daily return resulted from the stock daily price change. Moreover, the weight of optimal investment has been determined using a hybrid model called Markowitz and Winker model in each determined stocks. The results showed that the maximum loss would not exceed from 1259432 Rials at 95% confidence level in future day.

  4. Application of adjoint Monte Carlo to accelerate simulations of mono-directional beams in treatment planning for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nievaart, V.A.; Legrady, D.; Moss, R.L.; Kloosterman, J.L.; Van der Hagen, T.H.; Van Dam, H.

    2007-01-01

    This paper deals with the application of the adjoint transport theory in order to optimize Monte Carlo based radiotherapy treatment planning. The technique is applied to Boron Neutron Capture Therapy where most often mixed beams of neutrons and gammas are involved. In normal forward Monte Carlo simu

  5. A Investigation of Radiotherapy Electron Beams Using Monte Carlo Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, George X.

    1995-01-01

    not be previously answered without the full simulation of a variety of medical accelerators. This study also demonstrates that the Monte Carlo technique is a powerful tool for the optimal design of accelerator treatment heads.

  6. GZP型60Co源剂量学参数的蒙特卡洛模拟%A Monte Carlo-based dosimetric study of the GZP 60Co source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王先良; 袁珂; 唐斌; 康盛伟; 黎杰; 肖明勇; 李晓兰; 李林涛; 王培

    2016-01-01

    目的 GZP型60Co源高剂量率后装机在临床中已有应用,模拟计算GZP型60Co源的剂量学参数.方法 使用EGSnrc蒙特卡洛软件模拟计算已知的BEBIG60Co源(Co0.A86)剂量学参数,与其结果进行对比,验证方法的可行性.对GZP型高剂量率后装机60Co源进行建模,用同样方法模拟计算GZP型60Co源剂量学参数.结果 对BEBIG 60Co源,结果与标准数据吻合很好,单位活度空气比释动能强度SK/A相差0.2%,剂量率常数∧相差1.0%,径向剂量函数gL(r)和各向异性函数F(r,θ)曲线吻合.计算得到的GZP型60Co源(1、2)号通道的SK/A和∧分别是3.011×10-7 cGycm2h-1Bq-1和1.118 cGyh-1U-1,GZP (3)号通道60Co源的SK/A和∧分别是3.002× 10-7 cGycm2h-1Bq-1和1.110 cGyh-1U-1,gL(r)、F(r,θ)和水模中单位空气比释动能强度的剂量率参照AAPM推荐列出.结论 研究结果可用于GZP型60Co源的计划系统中,也可以作为GZP型60Co源的质量控制.%Objective To simulate and calculate the dosimetric parameters of the GZP 60Co source that has been clinically used in high-dose-rate brachytherapy.Methods The EGSnrc Monte Carlo software was used to simulate and calculate the dosimetric parameters of a well known BEBIG 60Co source (Co0.A86).The results were compared with the actual parameters to verify the feasibility of this method.A Monte Carlo model of the GZP 60Co source for high-dose-rate brachytherapy was established to simulate and calculate its dosimetric parameters in the same way.Results For the BEBIG 60Co source,the resuhs were well accorded with the standard.The air-kerma strength per unit activity (SK/A) and dose rate constant (∧)deviated from the standard by 0.2% and 1.0%,respectively.The curves of the radial dose function gL(r) and the anisotropy function F (r,θ) fit well.For the GZP 60Co source,the SK/A and ∧values were calculated as 3.011 × 10-7 cGycm2h-1Bq-1 and 1.118 cGyh-1 U-1 in channel l&2 and 3.002× 10-7 cGycm2h-1 Bq-1 and 1.110 cGyh-1U

  7. A comparison of Monte Carlo dose calculation denoising techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Naqa, I.; Kawrakow, I.; Fippel, M.; Siebers, J. V.; Lindsay, P. E.; Wickerhauser, M. V.; Vicic, M.; Zakarian, K.; Kauffmann, N.; Deasy, J. O.

    2005-03-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that Monte Carlo (MC) denoising techniques can reduce MC radiotherapy dose computation time significantly by preferentially eliminating statistical fluctuations ('noise') through smoothing. In this study, we compare new and previously published approaches to MC denoising, including 3D wavelet threshold denoising with sub-band adaptive thresholding, content adaptive mean-median-hybrid (CAMH) filtering, locally adaptive Savitzky-Golay curve-fitting (LASG), anisotropic diffusion (AD) and an iterative reduction of noise (IRON) method formulated as an optimization problem. Several challenging phantom and computed-tomography-based MC dose distributions with varying levels of noise formed the test set. Denoising effectiveness was measured in three ways: by improvements in the mean-square-error (MSE) with respect to a reference (low noise) dose distribution; by the maximum difference from the reference distribution and by the 'Van Dyk' pass/fail criteria of either adequate agreement with the reference image in low-gradient regions (within 2% in our case) or, in high-gradient regions, a distance-to-agreement-within-2% of less than 2 mm. Results varied significantly based on the dose test case: greater reductions in MSE were observed for the relatively smoother phantom-based dose distribution (up to a factor of 16 for the LASG algorithm); smaller reductions were seen for an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) head and neck case (typically, factors of 2-4). Although several algorithms reduced statistical noise for all test geometries, the LASG method had the best MSE reduction for three of the four test geometries, and performed the best for the Van Dyk criteria. However, the wavelet thresholding method performed better for the head and neck IMRT geometry and also decreased the maximum error more effectively than LASG. In almost all cases, the evaluated methods provided acceleration of MC results towards statistically more accurate

  8. A comparison of Monte Carlo dose calculation denoising techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqa, I El [Washington University, St Louis, MO (United States); Kawrakow, I [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (Canada); Fippel, M [Univ Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany); Siebers, J V [Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA (United States); Lindsay, P E [Washington University, St Louis, MO (United States); Wickerhauser, M V [Washington University, St Louis, MO (United States); Vicic, M [Washington University, St Louis, MO (United States); Zakarian, K [Washington University, St Louis, MO (United States); Kauffmann, N [Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Deasy, J O [Washington University, St Louis, MO (United States)

    2005-03-07

    Recent studies have demonstrated that Monte Carlo (MC) denoising techniques can reduce MC radiotherapy dose computation time significantly by preferentially eliminating statistical fluctuations ('noise') through smoothing. In this study, we compare new and previously published approaches to MC denoising, including 3D wavelet threshold denoising with sub-band adaptive thresholding, content adaptive mean-median-hybrid (CAMH) filtering, locally adaptive Savitzky-Golay curve-fitting (LASG), anisotropic diffusion (AD) and an iterative reduction of noise (IRON) method formulated as an optimization problem. Several challenging phantom and computed-tomography-based MC dose distributions with varying levels of noise formed the test set. Denoising effectiveness was measured in three ways: by improvements in the mean-square-error (MSE) with respect to a reference (low noise) dose distribution; by the maximum difference from the reference distribution and by the 'Van Dyk' pass/fail criteria of either adequate agreement with the reference image in low-gradient regions (within 2% in our case) or, in high-gradient regions, a distance-to-agreement-within-2% of less than 2 mm. Results varied significantly based on the dose test case: greater reductions in MSE were observed for the relatively smoother phantom-based dose distribution (up to a factor of 16 for the LASG algorithm); smaller reductions were seen for an intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) head and neck case (typically, factors of 2-4). Although several algorithms reduced statistical noise for all test geometries, the LASG method had the best MSE reduction for three of the four test geometries, and performed the best for the Van Dyk criteria. However, the wavelet thresholding method performed better for the head and neck IMRT geometry and also decreased the maximum error more effectively than LASG. In almost all cases, the evaluated methods provided acceleration of MC results towards

  9. Automated importance generation and biasing techniques for Monte Carlo shielding techniques by the TRIPOLI-3 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Both, J.P.; Nimal, J.C.; Vergnaud, T. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Service d' Etudes des Reacteurs et de Mathematiques Appliquees)

    1990-01-01

    We discuss an automated biasing procedure for generating the parameters necessary to achieve efficient Monte Carlo biasing shielding calculations. The biasing techniques considered here are exponential transform and collision biasing deriving from the concept of the biased game based on the importance function. We use a simple model of the importance function with exponential attenuation as the distance to the detector increases. This importance function is generated on a three-dimensional mesh including geometry and with graph theory algorithms. This scheme is currently being implemented in the third version of the neutron and gamma ray transport code TRIPOLI-3. (author).

  10. Monte Carlo Based Toy Model for Fission Process

    CERN Document Server

    Kurniadi, R; Viridi, S

    2014-01-01

    Fission yield has been calculated notoriously by two calculations approach, macroscopic approach and microscopic approach. This work will proposes another calculation approach which the nucleus is treated as a toy model. The toy model of fission yield is a preliminary method that use random number as a backbone of the calculation. Because of nucleus as a toy model hence the fission process does not represent real fission process in nature completely. Fission event is modeled by one random number. The number is assumed as width of distribution probability of nucleon position in compound nuclei when fission process is started. The toy model is formed by Gaussian distribution of random number that randomizes distance like between particle and central point. The scission process is started by smashing compound nucleus central point into two parts that are left central and right central points. These three points have different Gaussian distribution parameters such as mean ({\\mu}CN, {\\mu}L, {\\mu}R), and standard d...

  11. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo Based Method for System Identification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaser, R E; Lee, C L; Nitao, J J; Hanley, W G

    2002-10-22

    This paper describes a novel methodology for the identification of mechanical systems and structures from vibration response measurements. It combines prior information, observational data and predictive finite element models to produce configurations and system parameter values that are most consistent with the available data and model. Bayesian inference and a Metropolis simulation algorithm form the basis for this approach. The resulting process enables the estimation of distributions of both individual parameters and system-wide states. Attractive features of this approach include its ability to: (1) provide quantitative measures of the uncertainty of a generated estimate; (2) function effectively when exposed to degraded conditions including: noisy data, incomplete data sets and model misspecification; (3) allow alternative estimates to be produced and compared, and (4) incrementally update initial estimates and analysis as more data becomes available. A series of test cases based on a simple fixed-free cantilever beam is presented. These results demonstrate that the algorithm is able to identify the system, based on the stiffness matrix, given applied force and resultant nodal displacements. Moreover, it effectively identifies locations on the beam where damage (represented by a change in elastic modulus) was specified.

  12. A Monte Carlo Based Analysis of Optimal Design Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    MATLAB’s fmincon or SolvOpt, developed by A. Kuntsevich and F. Kappel [18, 17], with four variations of the constraint implementation. We denote by (C1...Statistics, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., New York, NY, 1981. [17] F. Kappel and A. V. Kuntsevich , An implementation of Shor’s r-algorithm, Computational...Optimization and Applications, 15 (2000), 193–205. [18] A. Kuntsevich and F. Kappel, SolvOpt, retrieved December 2009, from http://www.kfunigraz.ac.at

  13. Hardware acceleration of Monte Carlo-based simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Echeverría Aramendi, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    During the last years there has been an enormous advance in FPGAs. Traditionally, FPGAs have been used mainly for prototyping as they offer significant advantages at a suitable low cost: flexibility and verification easiness. Their flexibility allows the implementation of different generations of a given application and provides space to designers to modify implementations until the very last moment, or even correct mistakes once the product has been released. Second, the verification of a de...

  14. 基于Monte Carlo法的光电跟踪测量系统精度分析和布站优化方法%A new Monte Carlo based measure error analysis and station position optimization method for photoelectrical tracking system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张振铎; 张彬

    2012-01-01

    提出一种基于Monte Carlo法的光电跟踪测量系统的分析方法,使用坐标变换方法对光电经纬仪建立了包含照准差、横轴差、竖轴差、传感器误差和编码器误差准确的Verilog-A模型,使用最坏情况法和Monte Carlo法分析了各种误差源对系统性能的影响.并对双站交汇的布站进行了优化,在考虑经纬仪本身误差源和站点位置误差的情况下,使用Monte Carlo法计算了针对特定弹道轨迹的最优布站选择.该方法对光电跟踪测量系统设计具有一定的指导作用.%A new measure error analytic method based on Monte Carlo is provided. The accurate Verilog-A model is established based on coordinate transformation, including collimate error, vertical axes error, horizontal axes error, sensor induced error and encoder induced error. The worst condition analysis and Monte Carlo analysis are used to calculate the effect of various error sources toward system characteristic. The station location design problem of double intercross measure for customizing ballistic trajectory is analyzed using Monte Carlo method, taking consideration of the theodolite induced error and station location error.

  15. Asteroid mass estimation using Markov-Chain Monte Carlo techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siltala, Lauri; Granvik, Mikael

    2016-10-01

    Estimates for asteroid masses are based on their gravitational perturbations on the orbits of other objects such as Mars, spacecraft, or other asteroids and/or their satellites. In the case of asteroid-asteroid perturbations, this leads to a 13-dimensional inverse problem where the aim is to derive the mass of the perturbing asteroid and six orbital elements for both the perturbing asteroid and the test asteroid using astrometric observations. We have developed and implemented three different mass estimation algorithms utilizing asteroid-asteroid perturbations into the OpenOrb asteroid-orbit-computation software: the very rough 'marching' approximation, in which the asteroid orbits are fixed at a given epoch, reducing the problem to a one-dimensional estimation of the mass, an implementation of the Nelder-Mead simplex method, and most significantly, a Markov-Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) approach. We will introduce each of these algorithms with particular focus on the MCMC algorithm, and present example results for both synthetic and real data. Our results agree with the published mass estimates, but suggest that the published uncertainties may be misleading as a consequence of using linearized mass-estimation methods. Finally, we discuss remaining challenges with the algorithms as well as future plans, particularly in connection with ESA's Gaia mission.

  16. Household water use and conservation models using Monte Carlo techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahill, R.; Lund, J. R.; DeOreo, B.; Medellín-Azuara, J.

    2013-10-01

    The increased availability of end use measurement studies allows for mechanistic and detailed approaches to estimating household water demand and conservation potential. This study simulates water use in a single-family residential neighborhood using end-water-use parameter probability distributions generated from Monte Carlo sampling. This model represents existing water use conditions in 2010 and is calibrated to 2006-2011 metered data. A two-stage mixed integer optimization model is then developed to estimate the least-cost combination of long- and short-term conservation actions for each household. This least-cost conservation model provides an estimate of the upper bound of reasonable conservation potential for varying pricing and rebate conditions. The models were adapted from previous work in Jordan and are applied to a neighborhood in San Ramon, California in the eastern San Francisco Bay Area. The existing conditions model produces seasonal use results very close to the metered data. The least-cost conservation model suggests clothes washer rebates are among most cost-effective rebate programs for indoor uses. Retrofit of faucets and toilets is also cost-effective and holds the highest potential for water savings from indoor uses. This mechanistic modeling approach can improve understanding of water demand and estimate cost-effectiveness of water conservation programs.

  17. The Utilization of the Monte Carlo Technique for Rational Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropova, Mariya A; Raška, Ivan; Toropov, Andrey A; Rašková, Mária

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative structure - activity relationships (QSARs) are built up for three endpoints (i) blood-brain barrier permeability; (ii) butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitory activity; and (iii) for biological effect of antibacterial drugs. The models are based on utilization of the Monte Carlo technique. The CORAL software available on the Internet has been utilized for the calculations. The principles of validation of models together with principles of selection of potential therapeutic agents are suggested. An original version of the definition for the domain of applicability as well as the mechanistic interpretation of model calculated with the Monte Carlo technique are described. Advantages and disadvantages of the utilized approach are discussed.

  18. Computer program uses Monte Carlo techniques for statistical system performance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohl, D. P.

    1967-01-01

    Computer program with Monte Carlo sampling techniques determines the effect of a component part of a unit upon the overall system performance. It utilizes the full statistics of the disturbances and misalignments of each component to provide unbiased results through simulated random sampling.

  19. Particle Markov Chain Monte Carlo Techniques of Unobserved Component Time Series Models Using Ox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nonejad, Nima

    This paper details Particle Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques for analysis of unobserved component time series models using several economic data sets. PMCMC combines the particle filter with the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm. Overall PMCMC provides a very compelling, computationally fast...

  20. Application of Monte Carlo Technique for Determining Maneuvering Loads from Statistical Information on Airplane Motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, Harold A.; Mayer, John P.; Huston, Wilber B.

    1961-01-01

    Results of a statistical analysis of horizontal-tail loads on a fighter airplane are presented. The data were obtained from a number of operational training missions with flight at altitudes up to about 50,000 feet and at Mach numbers up to 1.22. The analysis was performed to determine the feasibility of calculating horizontal-tail load from data on the flight conditions and airplane motions. In the analysis the calculated loads are compared with the measured loads for the different types of missions performed. The loads were calculated by two methods: a direct approach and a Monte Carlo technique. The procedures used and some of the problems associated with the data analysis are discussed. frequencies of occurrence of tail loads of given magnitudes are derived from statistical information on the flight quantities. In the direct method, a time history of tail load is calculated from time-history measurements of the flight quantities. The Monte Carlo method could be useful for extending loads information for design of prospective airplanes . For the Monte Carlo method, the The results indicate that the accuracy of loads, regardless of the method used for calculation, is largely dependent on the knowledge of the pertinent airplane aerodynamic characteristics and center-of-gravity location. In addition, reliable Monte Carlo results require an adequate sample of statistical data and a knowledge of the more important statistical dependencies between the various flight conditions and airplane motions.

  1. Application of variance reduction techniques in Monte Carlo simulation of clinical electron linear accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoubair, M.; El Bardouni, T.; El Gonnouni, L.; Boulaich, Y.; El Bakkari, B.; El Younoussi, C.

    2012-01-01

    Computation time constitutes an important and a problematic parameter in Monte Carlo simulations, which is inversely proportional to the statistical errors so there comes the idea to use the variance reduction techniques. These techniques play an important role in reducing uncertainties and improving the statistical results. Several variance reduction techniques have been developed. The most known are Transport cutoffs, Interaction forcing, Bremsstrahlung splitting and Russian roulette. Also, the use of a phase space seems to be appropriate to reduce enormously the computing time. In this work, we applied these techniques on a linear accelerator (LINAC) using the MCNPX computer Monte Carlo code. This code gives a rich palette of variance reduction techniques. In this study we investigated various cards related to the variance reduction techniques provided by MCNPX. The parameters found in this study are warranted to be used efficiently in MCNPX code. Final calculations are performed in two steps that are related by a phase space. Results show that, comparatively to direct simulations (without neither variance-reduction nor phase space), the adopted method allows an improvement in the simulation efficiency by a factor greater than 700.

  2. Analysis of Far-Field Radiation from Apertures Using Monte Carlo Integration Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Fakharian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available An integration technique based on the use of Monte Carlo Integration (MCI is proposed for the analysis of the electromagnetic radiation from apertures. The technique that can be applied to the calculation of the aperture antenna radiation patterns is the equivalence principle followed by physical optics, which can then be used to compute far-field antenna radiation patterns. However, this technique is often complex mathematically, because it requires integration over the closed surface. This paper presents an extremely simple formulation to calculate the far-fields from some types of aperture radiators by using MCI technique. The accuracy and effectiveness of this technique are demonstrated in three cases of radiation from the apertures and results are compared with the solutions using FE simulation and Gaussian quadrature rules.

  3. An efficient interpolation technique for jump proposals in reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farr, W M; Mandel, I; Stevens, D

    2015-06-01

    Selection among alternative theoretical models given an observed dataset is an important challenge in many areas of physics and astronomy. Reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) is an extremely powerful technique for performing Bayesian model selection, but it suffers from a fundamental difficulty and it requires jumps between model parameter spaces, but cannot efficiently explore both parameter spaces at once. Thus, a naive jump between parameter spaces is unlikely to be accepted in the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm and convergence is correspondingly slow. Here, we demonstrate an interpolation technique that uses samples from single-model MCMCs to propose intermodel jumps from an approximation to the single-model posterior of the target parameter space. The interpolation technique, based on a kD-tree data structure, is adaptive and efficient in modest dimensionality. We show that our technique leads to improved convergence over naive jumps in an RJMCMC, and compare it to other proposals in the literature to improve the convergence of RJMCMCs. We also demonstrate the use of the same interpolation technique as a way to construct efficient 'global' proposal distributions for single-model MCMCs without prior knowledge of the structure of the posterior distribution, and discuss improvements that permit the method to be used in higher dimensional spaces efficiently.

  4. Monte Carlo techniques for time-dependent radiative transfer in 3-D supernovae

    CERN Document Server

    Lucy, L B

    2004-01-01

    Monte Carlo techniques based on indivisible energy packets are described for computing light curves and spectra for 3-D supernovae. The radiative transfer is time-dependent and includes all effects of O(v/c). Monte Carlo quantization is achieved by discretizing the initial distribution of 56Ni into radioactive pellets. Each pellet decays with the emission of a single energy packet comprising gamma-ray photons representing one line from either the 56Ni or the 56Co decay spectrum. Subsequently, these energy packets propagate through the homologously-expanding ejecta with appropriate changes in the nature of their contained energy as they undergo Compton scatterings and pure absorptions. The 3-D code is tested by applying it to a spherically-symmetric SN in which the transfer of optical radiation is treated with a grey absorption coefficient. This 1-D problem is separately solved using Castor's co-moving frame moment equations. Satisfactory agreement is obtained. The Monte Carlo code is a platform onto which mor...

  5. New techniques in Monte Carlo simulation: experience with a prototype of generic programming application to Geant4 physics processes

    CERN Document Server

    Pia, Maria Grazia; Begalli, Marcia; Quintieri, Lina; Saracco, Paolo; Sudhakar, Manju; Weidenspointner, Georg; Zoglauer, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    An investigation is in progress to evaluate extensively and quantitatively the possible benefits and drawbacks of new programming paradigms in a Monte Carlo simulation environment, namely in the domain of physics modeling. The prototype design and extensive benchmarks, including a variety of rigorous quantitative metrics, are presented. The results of this research project allow the evaluation of new software techniques for their possible adoption in Monte Carlo simulation on objective, quantitative ground.

  6. Monte Carlo parametric studies of neutron interrogation with the Associated Particle Technique for cargo container inspections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deyglun, Clément; Carasco, Cédric; Pérot, Bertrand

    2014-06-01

    The detection of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) by neutron interrogation is extensively studied by Monte Carlo simulation at the Nuclear Measurement Laboratory of CEA Cadarache (French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission). The active inspection system is based on the Associated Particle Technique (APT). Fissions induced by tagged neutrons (i.e. correlated to an alpha particle in the DT neutron generator) in SNM produce high multiplicity coincidences which are detected with fast plastic scintillators. At least three particles are detected in a short time window following the alpha detection, whereas nonnuclear materials mainly produce single events, or pairs due to (n,2n) and (n,n'γ) reactions. To study the performances of an industrial cargo container inspection system, Monte Carlo simulations are performed with the MCNP-PoliMi transport code, which records for each neutron history the relevant information: reaction types, position and time of interactions, energy deposits, secondary particles, etc. The output files are post-processed with a specific tool developed with ROOT data analysis software. Particles not correlated with an alpha particle (random background), counting statistics, and time-energy resolutions of the data acquisition system are taken into account in the numerical model. Various matrix compositions, suspicious items, SNM shielding and positions inside the container, are simulated to assess the performances and limitations of an industrial system.

  7. Population synthesis of radio and gamma-ray millisecond pulsars using Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonthier, Peter L.; Koh, Yew-Meng; Kust Harding, Alice

    2016-04-01

    We present preliminary results of a new population synthesis of millisecond pulsars (MSP) from the Galactic disk using Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques to better understand the model parameter space. We include empirical radio and gamma-ray luminosity models that are dependent on the pulsar period and period derivative with freely varying exponents. The magnitudes of the model luminosities are adjusted to reproduce the number of MSPs detected by a group of thirteen radio surveys as well as the MSP birth rate in the Galaxy and the number of MSPs detected by Fermi. We explore various high-energy emission geometries like the slot gap, outer gap, two pole caustic and pair starved polar cap models. The parameters associated with the birth distributions for the mass accretion rate, magnetic field, and period distributions are well constrained. With the set of four free parameters, we employ Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations to explore the model parameter space. We present preliminary comparisons of the simulated and detected distributions of radio and gamma-ray pulsar characteristics. We estimate the contribution of MSPs to the diffuse gamma-ray background with a special focus on the Galactic Center.We express our gratitude for the generous support of the National Science Foundation (RUI: AST-1009731), Fermi Guest Investigator Program and the NASA Astrophysics Theory and Fundamental Program (NNX09AQ71G).

  8. An Efficient Interpolation Technique for Jump Proposals in Reversible-Jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Farr, Will M

    2011-01-01

    Selection among alternative theoretical models given an observed data set is an important challenge in many areas of physics and astronomy. Reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) is an extremely powerful technique for performing Bayesian model selection, but it suffers from a fundamental difficulty: it requires jumps between model parameter spaces, but cannot retain a memory of the favored locations in more than one parameter space at a time. Thus, a naive jump between parameter spaces is unlikely to be accepted in the MCMC algorithm and convergence is correspondingly slow. Here we demonstrate an interpolation technique that uses samples from single-model MCMCs to propose inter-model jumps from an approximation to the single-model posterior of the target parameter space. The interpolation technique, based on a kD-tree data structure, is adaptive and efficient in arbitrary dimensions. We show that our technique leads to dramatically improved convergence over naive jumps in an RJMCMC, and compare it ...

  9. The use of Monte Carlo technique to optimize the dose distribution in total skin irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poli, M.E.R. E-mail: esmeraldapoli@hotmail.com; Pereira, S.A.; Yoriyaz, H

    2001-06-01

    Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (mycosis fungoides) is an indolent disease with a low percentage of cure. Total skin irradiation using an electron beam has become an efficient treatment of mycosis fungoides with curative intention, with success in almost 40% of the patients. In this work, we propose the use of a Monte Carlo technique to simulate the dose distribution in the patients during total skin irradiation treatments. Use was made of MCNP-4B, a well known and established code used to simulate transport of electrons, photons and neutrons through matter, especially in the area of reactor physics, and also finding increasing utility in medical physics. The goal of our work is to simulate different angles between each beam with a fixed treatment distance in order to obtain a uniform dose distribution in the patient.

  10. Gating Techniques for Rao-Blackwellized Monte Carlo Data Association Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazhao Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the Rao-Blackwellized Monte Carlo data association (RBMCDA filter for multiple target tracking. The elliptical gating strategies are redesigned and incorporated into the framework of the RBMCDA filter. The obvious benefit is the reduction of the time cost because the data association procedure can be carried out with less validated measurements. In addition, the overlapped parts of the neighboring validation regions are divided into several separated subregions according to the possible origins of the validated measurements. In these subregions, the measurement uncertainties can be taken into account more reasonably than those of the simple elliptical gate. This would help to achieve higher tracking ability of the RBMCDA algorithm by a better association prior approximation. Simulation results are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed gating techniques.

  11. Visibility assessment : Monte Carlo characterization of temporal variability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laulainen, N.; Shannon, J.; Trexler, E. C., Jr.

    1997-12-12

    Current techniques for assessing the benefits of certain anthropogenic emission reductions are largely influenced by limitations in emissions data and atmospheric modeling capability and by the highly variant nature of meteorology. These data and modeling limitations are likely to continue for the foreseeable future, during which time important strategic decisions need to be made. Statistical atmospheric quality data and apportionment techniques are used in Monte-Carlo models to offset serious shortfalls in emissions, entrainment, topography, statistical meteorology data and atmospheric modeling. This paper describes the evolution of Department of Energy (DOE) Monte-Carlo based assessment models and the development of statistical inputs. A companion paper describes techniques which are used to develop the apportionment factors used in the assessment models.

  12. Expected-value techniques for Monte Carlo modeling of well logging problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, Scott W. [Claremont Research Institute of Applied Mathematical Sciences, School of Mathematics, Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, CA 91711 (United States); Maucec, Marko, E-mail: marko.maucec@halliburton.co [Claremont Research Institute of Applied Mathematical Sciences, School of Mathematics, Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, CA 91711 (United States); Spanier, Jerome [Claremont Research Institute of Applied Mathematical Sciences, School of Mathematics, Claremont Graduate University, Claremont, CA 91711 (United States); Badruzzaman, Ahmed; Chedester, Clint [ChevronTexaco Energy Technology Company, 6001 Bollinger Canyon Road, D-2208, San Ramon, CA 94583 (United States); Evans, Michael [Schlumberger, 110 Gillingham Lane, Sugar Land, TX 77478 (United States)

    2010-02-01

    This article describes research performed to develop an expected-value (EV) estimation capability for improving the efficiency of Monte Carlo simulations of oil well logging problems. The basic idea underlying EV estimation is that event-level interaction and transport probabilities are known and can be averaged exactly to produce unbiased estimators that properly account for potential future events in the simulation. Conventional surface-crossing and track-length based estimators do not provide any information unless a particle history actually reaches a detector region. Expected-value estimators, however, can extract information from particles that merely travel along a direction intercepting the detector region. This paper describes two expected-value estimators that have been developed for oil well logging simulations. The first estimates the volume-averaged scalar flux or reaction rate in a detector. The second estimates a weighted surface-averaged incident current that can be enfolded with a detector response function to estimate pulse-height spectra. Though EV estimation reduces variance at the event level, it does not guarantee reduced variance at the history level. However, our oil well logging tests indicate that the EV approach generally improves information content, enhances the efficiency of the transport simulation, and provides an efficient technique to obtain the fluxes, reaction rates, and pulse-height spectra in detectors, especially when applied in conjunction with weight-window variance reduction techniques.

  13. Monte Carlo simulation in proton computed tomography: a study of image reconstruction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inocente, Guilherme Franco; Stenico, Gabriela V.; Hormaza, Joel Mesa [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biociencias. Dept. de Fisica e Biofisica

    2012-07-01

    Full text: The radiation method is one of the most used for cancer treatment. In this context arises therapy with proton beams in front of conventional radiotherapy. It is known that with proton therapy there are more advantages to the patient treated when compared with more conventional methods. The dose distributed along the path, especially in healthy tissues - neighbor the tumor, is smaller and the accuracy of treatment is much better. To carry out the treatment, the patient undergoes a plan through images for visualization and location of the target volume. The main method for obtaining these images is computed tomography X-ray (XCT). For treatment with proton beam this imaging technique can to generate some uncertainties. The purpose of this project is to study the feasibility of reconstructing images generated from the irradiation with proton beams, thereby reducing some inaccuracies, as it will be the same type of radiation as treatment planning, and also to drastically reduce some errors location, since the planning can be done at the same place and just before where the patient is treated. This study aims to obtain a relationship between the intrinsic property of the interaction of photons and protons with matter. For this we use computational simulation based on Monte Carlo method with the code SRIM 2008 and MCNPX v.2.5.0, to reconstruct images using the technique used in conventional computed tomography. (author)

  14. Dynamical Models for NGC 6503 using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Puglielli, David; Courteau, Stéphane

    2010-01-01

    We use Bayesian statistics and Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques to construct dynamical models for the spiral galaxy NGC 6503. The constraints include surface brightness profiles which display a Freeman Type II structure; HI and ionized gas rotation curves; the stellar rotation, which is nearly coincident with the ionized gas curve; and the line of sight stellar dispersion, with a sigma-drop at the centre. The galaxy models consist of a Sersic bulge, an exponential disc with an optional inner truncation and a cosmologically motivated dark halo. The Bayesian/MCMC technique yields the joint posterior probability distribution function for the input parameters. We examine several interpretations of the data: the Type II surface brightness profile may be due to dust extinction, to an inner truncated disc or to a ring of bright stars; and we test separate fits to the gas and stellar rotation curves to determine if the gas traces the gravitational potential. We test each of these scenarios for bar stability...

  15. Kinetic Activation-Relaxation Technique and Self-Evolving Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo: Comparison of on-the-fly kinetic Monte Carlo algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Béland, Laurent K; Stoller, Roger; Xu, Haixuan

    2014-01-01

    We present a comparison of the kinetic Activation-Relaxation Technique (k-ART) and the Self-Evolving Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo (SEAKMC), two off-lattice, on-the-fly kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) techniques that were recently used to solve several materials science problems. We show that if the initial displacements are localized the dimer method and the Activation-Relaxation Technique \\emph{nouveau} provide similar performance. We also show that k-ART and SEAKMC, although based on different approximations, are in agreement with each other, as demonstrated by the examples of 50 vacancies in a 1950-atom Fe box and of interstitial loops in 16000-atom boxes. Generally speaking, k-ART's treatment of geometry and flickers is more flexible, e.g. it can handle amorphous systems, and rigorous than SEAKMC's, while the later's concept of active volumes permits a significant speedup of simulations for the systems under consideration and therefore allows investigations of processes requiring large systems that are not acc...

  16. Applying Squeezing Technique to Clayrocks: Lessons Learned from Experiments at Mont Terri Rock Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, A. M.; Sanchez-Ledesma, D. M.; Tournassat, C.; Melon, A.; Gaucher, E.; Astudillo, E.; Vinsot, A.

    2013-07-01

    Knowledge of the pore water chemistry in clay rock formations plays an important role in determining radionuclide migration in the context of nuclear waste disposal. Among the different in situ and ex-situ techniques for pore water sampling in clay sediments and soils, squeezing technique dates back 115 years. Although different studies have been performed about the reliability and representativeness of squeezed pore waters, more of them were achieved on high porosity, high water content and unconsolidated clay sediments. A very few of them tackled the analysis of squeezed pore water from low-porosity, low water content and highly consolidated clay rocks. In this work, a specially designed and fabricated one-dimensional compression cell two directional fluid flow was used to extract and analyse the pore water composition of Opalinus Clay core samples from Mont Terri (Switzerland). The reproducibility of the technique is good and no ionic ultrafiltration, chemical fractionation or anion exclusion was found in the range of pressures analysed: 70-200 MPa. Pore waters extracted in this range of pressures do not decrease in concentration, which would indicate a dilution of water by mixing of the free pore water and the outer layers of double layer water (Donnan water). A threshold (safety) squeezing pressure of 175 MPa was established for avoiding membrane effects (ion filtering, anion exclusion, etc.) from clay particles induced by increasing pressures. Besides, the pore waters extracted at these pressures are representative of the Opalinus Clay formation from a direct comparison against in situ collected borehole waters. (Author)

  17. Monte Carlo Simulation Of Emission Tomography And Other Medical Imaging Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Robert L

    2010-01-05

    An introduction to Monte Carlo simulation of emission tomography. This paper reviews the history and principles of Monte Carlo simulation, then applies these principles to emission tomography using the public domain simulation package SimSET (a Simulation System for Emission Tomography) as an example. Finally, the paper discusses how the methods are modified for X-ray computed tomography and radiotherapy simulations.

  18. Denoising of electron beam Monte Carlo dose distributions using digital filtering techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deasy, Joseph O.

    2000-07-01

    The Monte Carlo (MC) method has long been viewed as the ultimate dose distribution computational technique. The inherent stochastic dose fluctuations (i.e. noise), however, have several important disadvantages: noise will affect estimates of all the relevant dosimetric and radiobiological indices, and noise will degrade the resulting dose contour visualizations. We suggest the use of a post-processing denoising step to reduce statistical fluctuations and also improve dose contour visualization. We report the results of applying four different two-dimensional digital smoothing filters to two-dimensional dose images. The Integrated Tiger Series MC code was used to generate 10 MeV electron beam dose distributions at various depths in two different phantoms. The observed qualitative effects of filtering include: (a) the suppression of voxel-to-voxel (high-frequency) noise and (b) the resulting contour plots are visually more comprehensible. Drawbacks include, in some cases, slight blurring of penumbra near the surface and slight blurring of other very sharp real dosimetric features. Of the four digital filters considered here, one, a filter based on a local least-squares principle, appears to suppress noise with negligible degradation of real dosimetric features. We conclude that denoising of electron beam MC dose distributions is feasible and will yield improved dosimetric reliability and improved visualization of dose distributions.

  19. Denoising of electron beam Monte Carlo dose distributions using digital filtering techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deasy, Joseph O. [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, 510 So. Kingshighway Blvd, St Louis, MO 63110 (United States). E-mail: deasy at radonc.wustl.edu

    2000-07-01

    The Monte Carlo (MC) method has long been viewed as the ultimate dose distribution computational technique. The inherent stochastic dose fluctuations (i.e. noise), however, have several important disadvantages: noise will affect estimates of all the relevant dosimetric and radiobiological indices, and noise will degrade the resulting dose contour visualizations. We suggest the use of a post-processing denoising step to reduce statistical fluctuations and also improve dose contour visualization. We report the results of applying four different two-dimensional digital smoothing filters to two-dimensional dose images. The Integrated Tiger Series MC code was used to generate 10 MeV electron beam dose distributions at various depths in two different phantoms. The observed qualitative effects of filtering include: (a) the suppression of voxel-to-voxel (high-frequency) noise and (b) the resulting contour plots are visually more comprehensible. Drawbacks include, in some cases, slight blurring of penumbra near the surface and slight blurring of other very sharp real dosimetric features. Of the four digital filters considered here, one, a filter based on a local least-squares principle, appears to suppress noise with negligible degradation of real dosimetric features. We conclude that denoising of electron beam MC dose distributions is feasible and will yield improved dosimetric reliability and improved visualization of dose distributions. (author)

  20. Extended canonical Monte Carlo methods: Improving accuracy of microcanonical calculations using a reweighting technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez, L.; Castro-Palacio, J. C.

    2015-03-01

    Velazquez and Curilef [J. Stat. Mech. (2010) P02002, 10.1088/1742-5468/2010/02/P02002; J. Stat. Mech. (2010) P04026, 10.1088/1742-5468/2010/04/P04026] have proposed a methodology to extend Monte Carlo algorithms that are based on canonical ensemble. According to our previous study, their proposal allows us to overcome slow sampling problems in systems that undergo any type of temperature-driven phase transition. After a comprehensive review about ideas and connections of this framework, we discuss the application of a reweighting technique to improve the accuracy of microcanonical calculations, specifically, the well-known multihistograms method of Ferrenberg and Swendsen [Phys. Rev. Lett. 63, 1195 (1989), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.63.1195]. As an example of application, we reconsider the study of the four-state Potts model on the square lattice L ×L with periodic boundary conditions. This analysis allows us to detect the existence of a very small latent heat per site qL during the occurrence of temperature-driven phase transition of this model, whose size dependence seems to follow a power law qL(L ) ∝(1/L ) z with exponent z ≃0 .26 ±0 .02. Discussed is the compatibility of these results with the continuous character of temperature-driven phase transition when L →+∞ .

  1. Monte Carlo Simulation Of Emission Tomography And Other Medical Imaging Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Robert L.

    2010-01-01

    An introduction to Monte Carlo simulation of emission tomography. This paper reviews the history and principles of Monte Carlo simulation, then applies these principles to emission tomography using the public domain simulation package SimSET (a Simulation System for Emission Tomography) as an example. Finally, the paper discusses how the methods are modified for X-ray computed tomography and radiotherapy simulations. PMID:20733931

  2. Source of statistical noises in the Monte Carlo sampling techniques for coherently scattered photons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Wazir; Lee, Sang Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Detailed comparisons of the predictions of the Relativistic Form Factors (RFFs) and Modified Form Factors (MFFs) and their advantages and shortcomings in calculating elastic scattering cross sections can be found in the literature. However, the issues related to their implementation in the Monte Carlo (MC) sampling for coherently scattered photons is still under discussion. Secondly, the linear interpolation technique (LIT) is a popular method to draw the integrated values of squared RFFs/MFFs (i.e. A(Z, v(i)²)) over squared momentum transfer (v(i)² = v(1)²,......, v(59)²). In the current study, the role/issues of RFFs/MFFs and LIT in the MC sampling for the coherent scattering were analyzed. The results showed that the relative probability density curves sampled on the basis of MFFs are unable to reveal any extra scientific information as both the RFFs and MFFs produced the same MC sampled curves. Furthermore, no relationship was established between the multiple small peaks and irregular step shapes (i.e. statistical noise) in the PDFs and either RFFs or MFFs. In fact, the noise in the PDFs appeared due to the use of LIT. The density of the noise depends upon the interval length between two consecutive points in the input data table of A(Z, v(i)²) and has no scientific background. The probability density function curves became smoother as the interval lengths were decreased. In conclusion, these statistical noises can be efficiently removed by introducing more data points in the A(Z, v(i)²) data tables.

  3. Monte Carlo Modeling of Dual and Triple Photon Energy Absorptiometry Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Kamali-Asl

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Osteoporosis is a bone disease in which there is a reduction in the amount of bone mineral content leading to an increase in the risk of bone fractures. The affected individuals not only have to go through lots of pain and suffering but this disease also results in high economic costs to the society due to a large number of fractures.  A timely and accurate diagnosis of this disease makes it possible to start a treatment and thus preventing bone fractures as a result of osteoporosis. Radiographic methods are particularly well suited for in vivo determination of bone mineral density (BMD due to the relatively high x-ray absorption properties of bone mineral compared to other tissues. Materials and Methods: Monte Carlo simulation has been conducted to explore the possibilities of triple photon energy absorptiometry (TPA in the measurement of bone mineral content. The purpose of this technique is to correctly measure the bone mineral density in the presence of fatty and soft tissues. The same simulations have been done for a dual photon energy absorptiometry (DPA system and an extended DPA system. Results: Using DPA with three components improves the accuracy of the obtained result while the simulation results show that TPA system is not accurate enough to be considered as an adequate method for the measurement of bone mineral density. Discussion: The reason for the improvement in the accuracy is the consideration of fatty tissue in TPA method while having attenuation coefficient as a function of energy makes TPA an inadequate method. Conclusion: Using TPA method is not a perfect solution to overcome the problem of non uniformity in the distribution of fatty tissue.

  4. Monte Carlo Technique Used to Model the Degradation of Internal Spacecraft Surfaces by Atomic Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; Miller, Sharon K.

    2004-01-01

    Atomic oxygen is one of the predominant constituents of Earth's upper atmosphere. It is created by the photodissociation of molecular oxygen (O2) into single O atoms by ultraviolet radiation. It is chemically very reactive because a single O atom readily combines with another O atom or with other atoms or molecules that can form a stable oxide. The effects of atomic oxygen on the external surfaces of spacecraft in low Earth orbit can have dire consequences for spacecraft life, and this is a well-known and much studied problem. Much less information is known about the effects of atomic oxygen on the internal surfaces of spacecraft. This degradation can occur when openings in components of the spacecraft exterior exist that allow the entry of atomic oxygen into regions that may not have direct atomic oxygen attack but rather scattered attack. Openings can exist because of spacecraft venting, microwave cavities, and apertures for Earth viewing, Sun sensors, or star trackers. The effects of atomic oxygen erosion of polymers interior to an aperture on a spacecraft were simulated at the NASA Glenn Research Center by using Monte Carlo computational techniques. A two-dimensional model was used to provide quantitative indications of the attenuation of atomic oxygen flux as a function of the distance into a parallel-walled cavity. The model allows the atomic oxygen arrival direction, the Maxwell Boltzman temperature, and the ram energy to be varied along with the interaction parameters of the degree of recombination upon impact with polymer or nonreactive surfaces, the initial reaction probability, the reaction probability dependence upon energy and angle of attack, degree of specularity of scattering of reactive and nonreactive surfaces, and the degree of thermal accommodation upon impact with reactive and non-reactive surfaces to be varied to allow the model to produce atomic oxygen erosion geometries that replicate actual experimental results from space. The degree of

  5. Monte Carlo uncertainty analyses for integral beryllium experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, U; Tsige-Tamirat, H

    2000-01-01

    The novel Monte Carlo technique for calculating point detector sensitivities has been applied to two representative beryllium transmission experiments with the objective to investigate the sensitivity of important responses such as the neutron multiplication and to assess the related uncertainties due to the underlying cross-section data uncertainties. As an important result, it has been revealed that the neutron multiplication power of beryllium can be predicted with good accuracy using state-of-the-art nuclear data evaluations. Severe discrepancies do exist for the spectral neutron flux distribution that would transmit into significant uncertainties of the calculated neutron spectra and of the nuclear blanket performance in blanket design calculations. With regard to this, it is suggested to re-analyse the secondary energy and angle distribution data of beryllium by means of Monte Carlo based sensitivity and uncertainty calculations. Related code development work is underway.

  6. Monte Carlo analysis of a control technique for a tunable white lighting system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakrabarti, Maumita; Thorseth, Anders; Jepsen, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    A simulated colour control mechanism for a multi-coloured LED lighting system is presented. The system achieves adjustable and stable white light output and allows for system-to-system reproducibility after application of the control mechanism. The control unit works using a pre-calibrated lookup...... table for an experimentally realized system, with a calibrated tristimulus colour sensor. A Monte Carlo simulation is used to examine the system performance concerning the variation of luminous flux and chromaticity of the light output. The inputs to the Monte Carlo simulation, are variations of the LED...... peak wavelength, the LED rated luminous flux bin, the influence of the operating conditions, ambient temperature, driving current, and the spectral response of the colour sensor. The system performance is investigated by evaluating the outputs from the Monte Carlo simulation. The outputs show...

  7. Monte Carlo analysis of a control technique for a tunable white lighting system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakrabarti, Maumita; Thorseth, Anders; Jepsen, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    A simulated colour control mechanism for a multi-coloured LED lighting system is presented. The system achieves adjustable and stable white light output and allows for system-to-system reproducibility after application of the control mechanism. The control unit works using a pre-calibrated lookup...... table for an experimentally realized system, with a calibrated tristimulus colour sensor. A Monte Carlo simulation is used to examine the system performance concerning the variation of luminous flux and chromaticity of the light output. The inputs to the Monte Carlo simulation, are variations of the LED...... peak wavelength, the LED rated luminous flux bin, the influence of the operating conditions, ambient temperature, driving current, and the spectral response of the colour sensor. The system performance is investigated by evaluating the outputs from the Monte Carlo simulation. The outputs show...

  8. Validation of total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) technique dosimetry data by Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevelsky, Alexander; Borzov, Egor; Daniel, Shahar; Bar-Deroma, Rachel

    2016-07-08

    Total skin electron irradiation (TSEI) is a complex technique which requires many nonstandard measurements and dosimetric procedures. The purpose of this work was to validate measured dosimetry data by Monte Carlo (MC) simulations using EGSnrc-based codes (BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc). Our MC simulations consisted of two major steps. In the first step, the incident electron beam parameters (energy spectrum, FWHM, mean angular spread) were adjusted to match the measured data (PDD and profile) at SSD = 100 cm for an open field. In the second step, these parameters were used to calculate dose distributions at the treatment distance of 400 cm. MC simulations of dose distributions from single and dual fields at the treatment distance were performed in a water phantom. Dose distribution from the full treatment with six dual fields was simulated in a CT-based anthropomorphic phantom. MC calculations were compared to the available set of measurements used in clinical practice. For one direct field, MC calculated PDDs agreed within 3%/1 mm with the measurements, and lateral profiles agreed within 3% with the measured data. For the OF, the measured and calculated results were within 2% agreement. The optimal angle of 17° was confirmed for the dual field setup. Dose distribution from the full treatment with six dual fields was simulated in a CT-based anthropomorphic phantom. The MC-calculated multiplication factor (B12-factor), which relates the skin dose for the whole treatment to the dose from one calibration field, for setups with and without degrader was 2.9 and 2.8, respectively. The measured B12-factor was 2.8 for both setups. The difference between calculated and measured values was within 3.5%. It was found that a degrader provides more homogeneous dose distribution. The measured X-ray contamination for the full treatment was 0.4%; this is compared to the 0.5% X-ray contamination obtained with the MC calculation. Feasibility of MC simulation in an anthropomorphic phantom

  9. Verifying interpretive criteria for bioaerosol data using (bootstrap) Monte Carlo techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spicer, R Christopher; Gangloff, Harry

    2008-02-01

    A number of interpretive descriptors have been proposed for bioaerosol data due to the lack of health-based numerical standards, but very few have been verified as to their ability to describe a suspect indoor environment. Culturable and nonculturable (spore trap) sampling using the bootstrap version of Monte Carlo simulation (BMC) at several sites during 2003-2006 served as a source of indoor and outdoor data to test various criteria with regard to their variability in characterizing an indoor or outdoor environment. The purpose was to gain some insight for the reliability of some of the interpretive criteria in use as well as to demonstrate the utility of BMC methods as a generalized technique for validation of various interpretive criteria for bioaerosols. The ratio of nonphylloplane (NP) fungi (total of Aspergillus and Penicillium) to phylloplane (P) fungi (total of Cladosporium, Alternaria, and Epicoccum), or NP/P, is a descriptor that has been used to identify "dominance" of nonphylloplane fungi (NP/P > 1.0), assumed to be indicative of a problematic indoor environment. However, BMC analysis of spore trap and culturable bioaerosol data using the NP/P ratio identified frequent dominance by nonphylloplane fungi in outdoor air. Similarly, the NP/P descriptor indicated dominance of nonphylloplane fungi in buildings with visible mold growth and/or known water intrusion with a frequency often in the range of 0.5 Fixed numerical criteria for spore trap data of 900 and 1300 spores/m(3) for total spores and 750 Aspergillus/Penicillium spores/m(3) exhibited similar variability, as did ratios of nonphylloplane to total fungi, phylloplane to total fungi, and indoor/outdoor ratios for total fungal spores. Analysis of bioaerosol data by BMC indicates that numerical levels or descriptors based on dominance of certain fungi are unreliable as criteria for characterizing a given environment. The utility of BMC analysis lies in its generalized application to test mathematically

  10. Implementation of variance-reduction techniques for Monte Carlo nuclear logging calculations with neutron sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maucec, M

    2005-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations for nuclear logging applications are considered to be highly demanding transport problems. In this paper, the implementation of weight-window variance reduction schemes in a 'manual' fashion to improve the efficiency of calculations for a neutron logging tool is presented. Th

  11. Using Monte Carlo Techniques to Demonstrate the Meaning and Implications of Multicollinearity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Timothy S.; Berry, Kelly E.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents an in-class Monte Carlo demonstration, designed to demonstrate to students the implications of multicollinearity in a multiple regression study. In the demonstration, students already familiar with multiple regression concepts are presented with a scenario in which the "true" relationship between the response and predictor…

  12. Novel imaging and quality assurance techniques for ion beam therapy a Monte Carlo study

    CERN Document Server

    Rinaldi, I; Jäkel, O; Mairani, A; Parodi, K

    2010-01-01

    Ion beams exhibit a finite and well defined range in matter together with an “inverted” depth-dose profile, the so-called Bragg peak. These favourable physical properties may enable superior tumour-dose conformality for high precision radiation therapy. On the other hand, they introduce the issue of sensitivity to range uncertainties in ion beam therapy. Although these uncertainties are typically taken into account when planning the treatment, correct delivery of the intended ion beam range has to be assured to prevent undesired underdosage of the tumour or overdosage of critical structures outside the target volume. Therefore, it is necessary to define dedicated Quality Assurance procedures to enable in-vivo range verification before or during therapeutic irradiation. For these purposes, Monte Carlo transport codes are very useful tools to support the development of novel imaging modalities for ion beam therapy. In the present work, we present calculations performed with the FLUKA Monte Carlo code and pr...

  13. Fast patient-specific Monte Carlo brachytherapy dose calculations via the correlated sampling variance reduction technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampson, Andrew; Le Yi; Williamson, Jeffrey F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate potential of correlated sampling Monte Carlo (CMC) simulation to improve the calculation efficiency for permanent seed brachytherapy (PSB) implants without loss of accuracy. Methods: CMC was implemented within an in-house MC code family (PTRAN) and used to compute 3D dose distributions for two patient cases: a clinical PSB postimplant prostate CT imaging study and a simulated post lumpectomy breast PSB implant planned on a screening dedicated breast cone-beam CT patient exam. CMC tallies the dose difference, {Delta}D, between highly correlated histories in homogeneous and heterogeneous geometries. The heterogeneous geometry histories were derived from photon collisions sampled in a geometrically identical but purely homogeneous medium geometry, by altering their particle weights to correct for bias. The prostate case consisted of 78 Model-6711 {sup 125}I seeds. The breast case consisted of 87 Model-200 {sup 103}Pd seeds embedded around a simulated lumpectomy cavity. Systematic and random errors in CMC were unfolded using low-uncertainty uncorrelated MC (UMC) as the benchmark. CMC efficiency gains, relative to UMC, were computed for all voxels, and the mean was classified in regions that received minimum doses greater than 20%, 50%, and 90% of D{sub 90}, as well as for various anatomical regions. Results: Systematic errors in CMC relative to UMC were less than 0.6% for 99% of the voxels and 0.04% for 100% of the voxels for the prostate and breast cases, respectively. For a 1 x 1 x 1 mm{sup 3} dose grid, efficiency gains were realized in all structures with 38.1- and 59.8-fold average gains within the prostate and breast clinical target volumes (CTVs), respectively. Greater than 99% of the voxels within the prostate and breast CTVs experienced an efficiency gain. Additionally, it was shown that efficiency losses were confined to low dose regions while the largest gains were located where little difference exists between the homogeneous and

  14. Reverse Monte Carlo studies of CeO2 using neutron and synchrotron radiation techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Adam H.; Marchbank, Huw R.; Hyde, Timothy I.; Playford, Helen Y.; Tucker, Matthew G.; Sankar, Gopinathan

    2017-03-01

    A reverse Monte Carlo analysis method was employed to extract the structure of CeO2 from Neutron total scattering (comprising both neutron diffraction (ND) and pair-distribution functions (PDF) and Ce L3- and K-edge EXAFS data. Here it is shown that there is a noticeable difference between using short ranged x-ray absorption spectroscopy data and using medium-long range PDF and ND data in regards to the disorder of the cerium atoms. This illustrates the importance of considering multiple length scales and radiation sources.

  15. Development of advanced geometric models and acceleration techniques for Monte Carlo simulation in Medical Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Badal Soler, Andreu

    2008-01-01

    Els programes de simulació Monte Carlo de caràcter general s'utilitzen actualment en una gran varietat d'aplicacions.Tot i això, els models geomètrics implementats en la majoria de programes imposen certes limitacions a la forma dels objectes que es poden definir. Aquests models no són adequats per descriure les superfícies arbitràries que es troben en estructures anatòmiques o en certs aparells mèdics i, conseqüentment, algunes aplicacions que requereixen l'ús de models geomètrics molt detal...

  16. Phenomenology of Large Extra Dimensions Models at Hadrons Colliders using Monte Carlo Techniques (Spin-2 Graviton)

    CERN Document Server

    Bakhet, Nady; Hussein, Tarek

    2015-01-01

    Large Extra Dimensions Models have been proposed to remove the hierarchy problem and give an explanation why the gravity is so much weaker than the other three forces. In this work, we present an analysis of Monte Carlo data events for new physics signatures of spin-2 Graviton in context of ADD model with total dimensions $D=4+\\delta,$ $\\delta = 1,2,3,4,5,6 $ where $ \\delta $ is the extra special dimension, this model involves missing momentum $P_{T}^{miss}$ in association with jet in the final state via the process $pp(\\bar{p}) \\rightarrow G+jet$, Also, we present an analysis in context of the RS model with 5-dimensions via the process $pp(\\bar{p}) \\rightarrow G+jet$, $G \\rightarrow e^{+}e^{-}$ with final state $e^{+}e^{-}+jet$. We used Monte Carlo event generator Pythia8 to produce efficient signal selection rules at the Large Hadron Collider with $\\sqrt{s}$=14TeV and at the Tevatron $\\sqrt{s}$=1.96TeV .

  17. Investigation of physical vapor deposition techniques of conformal shell coating for core/shell structures by Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cansizoglu, H., E-mail: hxis@ualr.edu; Yurukcu, M.; Cansizoglu, M.F.; Karabacak, T.

    2015-05-29

    Vertically aligned core/shell nanowire (nanorod) arrays are favorable candidates in many nano-scale devices such as solar cells, detectors, and integrated circuits. The quality of the shell coating around nanowire arrays is as crucial as the quality of the nanowires in device applications. For this reason, we worked on different physical vapor deposition (PVD) techniques and conducted Monte Carlo simulations to estimate the best deposition technique for a conformal shell coating. Our results show that a small angle (≤ 45°) between incoming flux of particles and the substrate surface normal is necessary for PVD techniques with a directional incoming flux (e.g. thermal or e-beam evaporation) for a reasonable conformal coating. On the other hand, PVD techniques with an angular flux distribution (e.g. sputtering) can provide a fairly conformal shell coating around nanowire arrays without a need of small angle deposition. We also studied the shape effect of the arrays on the conformality of the coating and discovered that arrays of the tapered-top nanorods and the pyramids can be coated with a more conformal and thicker coating compared to the coating on the arrays of flat-top nanowires due to their larger openings in between structures. Our results indicate that conventional PVD techniques, which offer low cost and large scale thin film fabrication, can be utilized for highly conformal and uniform shell coating formation in core/shell nanowire device applications. - Highlights: • We examined the shell coating growth in core/shell nanostructures. • We investigated the effect of physical vapor deposition method on the conformality of the shell. • We used Monte Carlo simulations to simulate the shell growth on nanowire templates. • Angular atomic flux (i.e., sputtering at high pressure) leads to conformal and uniform coatings. • A small angle (< 45°) to the directional flux needs to be introduced for conformal coatings.

  18. An automated Monte-Carlo based method for the calculation of cascade summing factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, M. J.; Britton, R.; Davies, A. V.; McLarty, J. L.; Goodwin, M.

    2016-10-01

    A versatile method has been developed to calculate cascade summing factors for use in quantitative gamma-spectrometry analysis procedures. The proposed method is based solely on Evaluated Nuclear Structure Data File (ENSDF) nuclear data, an X-ray energy library, and accurate efficiency characterisations for single detector counting geometries. The algorithm, which accounts for γ-γ, γ-X, γ-511 and γ-e- coincidences, can be applied to any design of gamma spectrometer and can be expanded to incorporate any number of nuclides. Efficiency characterisations can be derived from measured or mathematically modelled functions, and can accommodate both point and volumetric source types. The calculated results are shown to be consistent with an industry standard gamma-spectrometry software package. Additional benefits including calculation of cascade summing factors for all gamma and X-ray emissions, not just the major emission lines, are also highlighted.

  19. Monte Carlo based performance assessment of different animal PET architectures using pixellated CZT detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visvikis, D. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F-29609 Brest (France)]. E-mail: Visvikis.Dimitris@univ-brest.fr; Lefevre, T. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F-29609 Brest (France); Lamare, F. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F-29609 Brest (France); Kontaxakis, G. [ETSI Telecomunicacion Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, s/n 28040, Madrid (Spain); Santos, A. [ETSI Telecomunicacion Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, s/n 28040, Madrid (Spain); Darambara, D. [Department of Physics, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-20

    The majority of present position emission tomography (PET) animal systems are based on the coupling of high-density scintillators and light detectors. A disadvantage of these detector configurations is the compromise between image resolution, sensitivity and energy resolution. In addition, current combined imaging devices are based on simply placing back-to-back and in axial alignment different apparatus without any significant level of software or hardware integration. The use of semiconductor CdZnTe (CZT) detectors is a promising alternative to scintillators for gamma-ray imaging systems. At the same time CZT detectors have the potential properties necessary for the construction of a truly integrated imaging device (PET/SPECT/CT). The aims of this study was to assess the performance of different small animal PET scanner architectures based on CZT pixellated detectors and compare their performance with that of state of the art existing PET animal scanners. Different scanner architectures were modelled using GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission). Particular scanner design characteristics included an overall cylindrical scanner format of 8 and 24 cm in axial and transaxial field of view, respectively, and a temporal coincidence window of 8 ns. Different individual detector modules were investigated, considering pixel pitch down to 0.625 mm and detector thickness from 1 to 5 mm. Modified NEMA NU2-2001 protocols were used in order to simulate performance based on mouse, rat and monkey imaging conditions. These protocols allowed us to directly compare the performance of the proposed geometries with the latest generation of current small animal systems. Results attained demonstrate the potential for higher NECR with CZT based scanners in comparison to scintillator based animal systems.

  20. Fast online Monte Carlo-based IMRT planning for the MRI linear accelerator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bol, G.H.; Hissoiny, S.; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.

    2012-01-01

    The MRI accelerator, a combination of a 6 MV linear accelerator with a 1.5 T MRI, facilitates continuous patient anatomy updates regarding translations, rotations and deformations of targets and organs at risk. Accounting for these demands high speed, online intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) r

  1. Monte-Carlo-based studies of a polarized positron source for International Linear Collider (ILC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollan, Ralph; Laihem, Karim; Schälicke, Andreas

    2006-04-01

    The full exploitation of the physics potential of an International Linear Collider (ILC) requires the development of a polarized positron beam. New concepts of polarized positron sources are based on the development of circularly polarized photon sources. The polarized photons create electron-positron pairs in a thin target and transfer their polarization state to the outgoing leptons. To achieve a high level of positron polarization the understanding of the production mechanisms in the target is crucial. Therefore, a general framework for the simulation of polarized processes with GEANT4 is under development. In this contribution the current status of the project and its application to a study of the positron production process for the ILC is presented.

  2. Monte Carlo based studies of a polarized positron source for international linear collider (ILC).

    OpenAIRE

    Schälicke, A.; Dollan, R.; Laihem, K.

    2006-01-01

    The full exploitation of the physics potential of an International Linear Collider (ILC) requires the development of a polarized positron beam. New concepts of polarized positron sources are based on the development of circularly polarized photon sources. The polarized photons create electron-positron pairs in a thin target and transfer their polarization state to the outgoing leptons. To achieve a high level of positron polarization the understanding of the production mechanisms in the targe...

  3. Validation and simulation of a regulated survey system through Monte Carlo techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asier Lacasta Soto

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Channel flow covers long distances and obeys to variable temporal behaviour. It is usually regulated by hydraulic elements as lateralgates to provide a correct of water supply. The dynamics of this kind of flow is governed by a partial differential equations systemnamed shallow water model. They have to be complemented with a simplified formulation for the gates. All the set of equations forma non-linear system that can only be solved numerically. Here, an explicit upwind numerical scheme in finite volumes able to solveall type of flow regimes is used. Hydraulic structures (lateral gates formulation introduces parameters with some uncertainty. Hence,these parameters will be calibrated with a Monte Carlo algorithm obtaining associated coefficients to each gate. Then, they will bechecked, using real cases provided by the monitorizing equipment of the Pina de Ebro channel located in Zaragoza.

  4. Complexation between a macromolecule and an amphiphile by Monte Carlo technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharibi, Hussein; Behjatmanesh-Ardakani, Reza; Hashemianzadeh, Majid; Mousavi-Khoshdel, Morteza

    2006-07-13

    Using a simple modified version of Larson's model, we studied the complexation between a macromolecule and an amphiphile in a dilute range of concentrations. The main characteristic of amphiphile molecules, that is, the hydrophobicity of the tails and hydrophilicity of the heads, is used to model the self-assembling process. Contrary to the molecular thermodynamics approaches, no prior shape was considered for the aggregates and the system was allowed to choose the most stable structure. For true ensemble averaging, without any synthetic results, configurational bias Monte Carlo and reptation moves are used to produce a Markov chain of configurations. From the results, it is found that the macromolecule causes the clusters of surfactants to be formed at a concentration much lower than the critical micelle concentration. Furthermore, the shape of the clusters tends to be more spherical, which is in line with theory and experiments. From the results, it is learned how a polymer can change the behavior of an amphiphilic molecule. All of the results are in good qualitative agreement with experimental and molecular thermodynamics results. Furthermore, the model predicts network formation between bound clusters at high concentrations of the surfactant.

  5. Monte Carlo comparisons of the top quark mass measurement techniques using kinematic constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Geonmo; Kim, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jason Sang Hun; Park, Inkyu

    2016-12-01

    A Monte Carlo study to compare the sensitivities of the top-quark mass-reconstruction methods using the b-quark decay as a kinematic constraint was performed. The top quark is reconstructed from its decay products, the W boson and the b-quark, and its mass can be obtained by using the 4-vector sum of their final states. However, missing neutrinos and the poor jet energy resolution makes the mass measurement biased and imprecise, always requiring further calibration, and dominates the systematic uncertainties. Several new ideas to increase the mass resolution by using the kinematic constraints of the b quark decays using a charm quark meson were suggested and performed to overcome such systematic limits. In this study, we compare three methods, one using J/ ψ, another using D 0, and the other using D* meson, by extracting their sensitivities to the top-quark mass, as well as their statistical advantages. This study is intended to set a priority in the real data analyses using a new data set from abundant tbar t production in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Run 2.

  6. ANALYSIS OF MONTE CARLO SIMULATION SAMPLING TECHNIQUES ON SMALL SIGNAL STABILITY OF WIND GENERATOR- CONNECTED POWER SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TEMITOPE RAPHAEL AYODELE

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo simulation using Simple Random Sampling (SRS technique is popularly known for its ability to handle complex uncertainty problems. However, to produce a reasonable result, it requires huge sample size. This makes it to be computationally expensive, time consuming and unfit for online power system applications. In this article, the performance of Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS technique is explored and compared with SRS in term of accuracy, robustness and speed for small signal stability application in a wind generator-connected power system. The analysis is performed using probabilistic techniques via eigenvalue analysis on two standard networks (Single Machine Infinite Bus and IEEE 16–machine 68 bus test system. The accuracy of the two sampling techniques is determined by comparing their different sample sizes with the IDEAL (conventional. The robustness is determined based on a significant variance reduction when the experiment is repeated 100 times with different sample sizes using the two sampling techniques in turn. Some of the results show that sample sizes generated from LHS for small signal stability application produces the same result as that of the IDEAL values starting from 100 sample size. This shows that about 100 sample size of random variable generated using LHS method is good enough to produce reasonable results for practical purpose in small signal stability application. It is also revealed that LHS has the least variance when the experiment is repeated 100 times compared to SRS techniques. This signifies the robustness of LHS over that of SRS techniques. 100 sample size of LHS produces the same result as that of the conventional method consisting of 50000 sample size. The reduced sample size required by LHS gives it computational speed advantage (about six times over the conventional method.

  7. Diagrammatic Monte Carlo approach for diagrammatic extensions of dynamical mean-field theory -- convergence analysis of the dual fermion technique

    CERN Document Server

    Gukelberger, Jan; Hafermann, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    The dual-fermion approach provides a formally exact prescription for calculating properties of a correlated electron system in terms of a diagrammatic expansion around dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT). It can address the full range of interactions, the lowest order theory is asymptotically exact in both the weak- and strong-coupling limits, and the technique naturally incorporates long-range correlations beyond the reach of current cluster extensions to DMFT. Most practical implementations, however, neglect higher-order interaction vertices beyond two-particle scattering in the dual effective action and further truncate the diagrammatic expansion in the two-particle scattering vertex to a leading-order or ladder-type approximation. In this work we compute the dual-fermion expansion for the Hubbard model including all diagram topologies with two-particle interactions to high orders by means of a stochastic diagrammatic Monte Carlo algorithm. We use benchmarking against numerically exact Diagrammatic Determin...

  8. Depth-of-interaction estimates in pixelated scintillator sensors using Monte Carlo techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Diksha; Sze, Christina; Bhandari, Harish; Nagarkar, Vivek; Badano, Aldo

    2017-01-01

    Image quality in thick scintillator detectors can be improved by minimizing parallax errors through depth-of-interaction (DOI) estimation. A novel sensor for low-energy single photon imaging having a thick, transparent, crystalline pixelated micro-columnar CsI:Tl scintillator structure has been described, with possible future application in small-animal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging when using thicker structures under development. In order to understand the fundamental limits of this new structure, we introduce cartesianDETECT2, an open-source optical transport package that uses Monte Carlo methods to obtain estimates of DOI for improving spatial resolution of nuclear imaging applications. Optical photon paths are calculated as a function of varying simulation parameters such as columnar surface roughness, bulk, and top-surface absorption. We use scanning electron microscope images to estimate appropriate surface roughness coefficients. Simulation results are analyzed to model and establish patterns between DOI and photon scattering. The effect of varying starting locations of optical photons on the spatial response is studied. Bulk and top-surface absorption fractions were varied to investigate their effect on spatial response as a function of DOI. We investigated the accuracy of our DOI estimation model for a particular screen with various training and testing sets, and for all cases the percent error between the estimated and actual DOI over the majority of the detector thickness was ±5% with a maximum error of up to ±10% at deeper DOIs. In addition, we found that cartesianDETECT2 is computationally five times more efficient than MANTIS. Findings indicate that DOI estimates can be extracted from a double-Gaussian model of the detector response. We observed that our model predicts DOI in pixelated scintillator detectors reasonably well.

  9. Evaluation of a commercial electron treatment planning system based on Monte Carlo techniques (eMC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemler, Peter; Besserer, Jürgen; Schneider, Uwe; Neuenschwander, Hans

    2006-01-01

    A commercial electron beam treatment planning system on the basis of a Monte Carlo algorithm (Varian Eclipse, eMC V7.2.35) was evaluated. Measured dose distributions were used for comparison with dose distributions predicted by eMC calculations. Tests were carried out for various applicators and field sizes, irregular shaped cut outs and an inhomogeneity phantom for energies between 6 Me V and 22 MeV Monitor units were calculated for all applicator/energy combinations and field sizes down to 3 cm diameter and source-to-surface distances of 100 cm and 110 cm. A mass-density-to-Hounsfield-Units calibration was performed to compare dose distributions calculated with a default and an individual calibration. The relationship between calculation parameters of the eMC and the resulting dose distribution was studied in detail. Finally, the algorithm was also applied to a clinical case (boost treatment of the breast) to reveal possible problems in the implementation. For standard geometries there was a good agreement between measurements and calculations, except for profiles for low energies (6 MeV) and high energies (18 Me V 22 MeV), in which cases the algorithm overestimated the dose off-axis in the high-dose region. For energies of 12 MeV and higher there were oscillations in the plateau region of the corresponding depth dose curves calculated with a grid size of 1 mm. With irregular cut outs, an overestimation of the dose was observed for small slits and low energies (4% for 6 MeV), as well as for asymmetric cases and extended source-to-surface distances (12% for SSD = 120 cm). While all monitor unit calculations for SSD = 100 cm were within 3% compared to measure-ments, there were large deviations for small cut outs and source-to-surface distances larger than 100 cm (7%for a 3 cm diameter cut-out and a source-to-surface distance of 10 cm).

  10. Multiple-Event Location Using the Markov-Chain Monte Carlo Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, S C; Johannesson, G; Hanley, W

    2005-07-13

    The goal of next-generation seismic location is to ascertain a consistent set of event locations and travel-time corrections through simultaneous analysis of all relevant data. Towards that end, we are developing a new multiple-event location algorithm that utilizes the Markov-Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method for solving large, non-linear event inverse problems. Unlike most inverse methods, the MCMC approach produces a suite of solutions, each of which is consistent with seismic and other observations, as well as prior estimates of data and model uncertainties. In the MCMC multiple-event locator (MCMCloc), the model uncertainties consist of prior estimates on the accuracy of each input event location, travel-time prediction uncertainties, phase measurement uncertainties, and assessments of phase identification. The prior uncertainty estimates include correlations between travel-time predictions, correlations between measurement errors, and the probability of misidentifying one phase for another (or bogus picks). The implementation of prior constraints on location accuracy allows the direct utilization of ground-truth events in the location algorithm. This is a significant improvement over most other multiple-event locators (GMEL is an exception), for which location accuracy is achieved through post-processing comparisons with ground-truth information. Like the double-difference algorithm, the implementation of a correlation structure for travel-time predictions allows MCMCloc to operate over arbitrarily large geographic areas. MCMCloc can accommodate non-Gaussian and multi-modal pick distributions, which can enhance application to poorly recorded events. Further, MCMCloc allows for ambiguous determination of phase assignments, and the solution includes the probability that phases are properly assigned. The probabilities that phase assignments are correct are propagated to the estimates of all other model parameters. Posteriori estimates of event locations, path

  11. Observation and modeling of biological colloids with neutron scattering techniques and Monte Carlo simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Heijkamp, L.F.

    2011-01-01

    In this study non-invasive neutron scattering techniques are used on soft condensed matter, probing colloidal length scales. Neutrons penetrate deeply into matter and have a different interaction with hydrogen and deuterium, allowing for tunable contrast using light and heavy water as solvents. The

  12. Observation and modeling of biological colloids with neutron scattering techniques and Monte Carlo simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Heijkamp, L.F.

    2011-01-01

    In this study non-invasive neutron scattering techniques are used on soft condensed matter, probing colloidal length scales. Neutrons penetrate deeply into matter and have a different interaction with hydrogen and deuterium, allowing for tunable contrast using light and heavy water as solvents. The

  13. Assessment of fusion facility dose rate map using mesh adaptivity enhancements of hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibrahim, Ahmad M., E-mail: ibrahimam@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Wilson, Paul P. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Sawan, Mohamed E., E-mail: sawan@engr.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Mosher, Scott W.; Peplow, Douglas E.; Grove, Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: •Calculate the prompt dose rate everywhere throughout the entire fusion energy facility. •Utilize FW-CADIS to accurately perform difficult neutronics calculations for fusion energy systems. •Develop three mesh adaptivity algorithms to enhance FW-CADIS efficiency in fusion-neutronics calculations. -- Abstract: Three mesh adaptivity algorithms were developed to facilitate and expedite the use of the CADIS and FW-CADIS hybrid Monte Carlo/deterministic techniques in accurate full-scale neutronics simulations of fusion energy systems with immense sizes and complicated geometries. First, a macromaterial approach enhances the fidelity of the deterministic models without changing the mesh. Second, a deterministic mesh refinement algorithm generates meshes that capture as much geometric detail as possible without exceeding a specified maximum number of mesh elements. Finally, a weight window coarsening algorithm decouples the weight window mesh and energy bins from the mesh and energy group structure of the deterministic calculations in order to remove the memory constraint of the weight window map from the deterministic mesh resolution. The three algorithms were used to enhance an FW-CADIS calculation of the prompt dose rate throughout the ITER experimental facility and resulted in a 23.3% increase in the number of mesh tally elements in which the dose rates were calculated in a 10-day Monte Carlo calculation. Additionally, because of the significant increase in the efficiency of FW-CADIS simulations, the three algorithms enabled this difficult calculation to be accurately solved on a regular computer cluster, eliminating the need for a world-class super computer.

  14. Monte Carlo simulation of X-ray imaging and spectroscopy experiments using quadric geometry and variance reduction techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golosio, Bruno; Schoonjans, Tom; Brunetti, Antonio; Oliva, Piernicola; Masala, Giovanni Luca

    2014-03-01

    The simulation of X-ray imaging experiments is often performed using deterministic codes, which can be relatively fast and easy to use. However, such codes are generally not suitable for the simulation of even slightly more complex experimental conditions, involving, for instance, first-order or higher-order scattering, X-ray fluorescence emissions, or more complex geometries, particularly for experiments that combine spatial resolution with spectral information. In such cases, simulations are often performed using codes based on the Monte Carlo method. In a simple Monte Carlo approach, the interaction position of an X-ray photon and the state of the photon after an interaction are obtained simply according to the theoretical probability distributions. This approach may be quite inefficient because the final channels of interest may include only a limited region of space or photons produced by a rare interaction, e.g., fluorescent emission from elements with very low concentrations. In the field of X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy, this problem has been solved by combining the Monte Carlo method with variance reduction techniques, which can reduce the computation time by several orders of magnitude. In this work, we present a C++ code for the general simulation of X-ray imaging and spectroscopy experiments, based on the application of the Monte Carlo method in combination with variance reduction techniques, with a description of sample geometry based on quadric surfaces. We describe the benefits of the object-oriented approach in terms of code maintenance, the flexibility of the program for the simulation of different experimental conditions and the possibility of easily adding new modules. Sample applications in the fields of X-ray imaging and X-ray spectroscopy are discussed. Catalogue identifier: AERO_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AERO_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland

  15. Monte Carlo techniques for the study of cancer patients fractionation in head and neck treated with radiotherapy; Tecnicas de Monte Carlo para el estudio del fraccionamiento en pacientes de cancer de cabeza y cuello tratados con radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco Herrera, M. A.; Jimenez Dominguez, M.; Perucha Ortega, M.; Herrador Cordoba, M.

    2011-07-01

    The dose fractionation than the standard head and neck cancer in some situations involve a significant increase of local control and overall survival. There is clinical evidence of these results in case of hyperfractionated treatments, although the choice of optimal fractionation generally is not obtained from the results of any model, in this study has provided the tumor control probability (TCP) for various subdivisions modified (hypo fractionated and hyperfractionated) using Monte Carlo simulation techniques.

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of ripple filters designed for proton and carbon ion beams in hadrontherapy with active scanning technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourhaleb, F; Givehchi, N; Iliescu, S; Rosa, A La; Pecka, A; Peroni, C [Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale, Universita' di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, Torino 10125 (Italy); Attili, A; Cirio, R; Marchetto, F; Donetti, M; Garella, M A; Giordanengo, S; Pardo, J [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, Torino 10125 (Italy); Cirrone, P [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Via S.Sofia 62, Catania 95125 (Italy)], E-mail: bourhaleb@to.infn.it

    2008-02-01

    Proton and carbon ion beams have a very sharp Bragg peak. For proton beams of energies smaller than 100 MeV, fitting with a gaussian the region of the maximum of the Bragg peak, the sigma along the beam direction is smaller than 1 mm, while for carbon ion beams, the sigma derived with the same technique is smaller than 1 mm for energies up to 360 MeV. In order to use low energy proton and carbon ion beams in hadrontherapy and to achieve an acceptable homogeneity of the spread out Bragg peak (SOBP) either the peak positions along the beam have to be quite close to each other or the longitudinal peak shape needs to be broaden at least few millimeters by means of a properly designed ripple filter. With a synchrotron accelerator in conjunction with active scanning techniques the use of a ripple filter is necessary to reduce the numbers of energy switches necessary to obtain a smooth SOBP, leading also to shorter overall irradiation times. We studied the impact of the design of the ripple filter on the dose uniformity in the SOBP region by means of Monte Carlo simulations, implemented using the package Geant4. We simulated the beam delivery line supporting both proton and carbon ion beams using different energies of the beams. We compared the effect of different kind of ripple filters and their advantages.

  17. Near-infrared optical properties of ex vivo human skin and subcutaneous tissues measured using the Monte Carlo inversion technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, C. Rebecca; Kohl, Matthias; Essenpreis, Matthias; Cope, Mark

    1998-09-01

    The absorption and transport scattering coefficients of caucasian and negroid dermis, subdermal fat and muscle have been measured for all wavelengths between 620 and 1000 nm. Samples of tissue 2 mm thick were measured ex vivo to determine their reflectance and transmittance. A Monte Carlo model of the measurement system and light transport in tissue was then used to recover the optical coefficients. The sample reflectance and transmittance were measured using a single integrating sphere `comparison' method. This has the advantage over conventional double-sphere techniques in that no corrections are required for sphere properties, and so measurements sufficiently accurate to recover the absorption coefficient reliably could be made. The optical properties of caucasian dermis were found to be approximately twice those of the underlying fat layer. At 633 nm, the mean optical properties over 12 samples were and for absorption coefficient and and for transport scattering coefficient for caucasian dermis and the underlying fat layer respectively. The transport scattering coefficient for all biological samples showed a monotonic decrease with increasing wavelength. The method was calibrated using solid tissue phantoms and by comparison with a temporally resolved technique.

  18. Photon detection efficiency of laboratory-based x-ray phase contrast imaging techniques for mammography: a Monte Carlo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saghamanesh, S.; Aghamiri, S. M.; Kamali-Asl, A.; Yashiro, W.

    2017-09-01

    An important challenge in real-world biomedical applications of x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) techniques is the efficient use of the photon flux generated by an incoherent and polychromatic x-ray source. This efficiency can directly influence dose and exposure time and ideally should not affect the superior contrast and sensitivity of XPCI. In this paper, we present a quantitative evaluation of the photon detection efficiency of two laboratory-based XPCI methods, grating interferometry (GI) and coded-aperture (CA). We adopt a Monte Carlo approach to simulate existing prototypes of those systems, tailored for mammography applications. Our simulations were validated by means of a simple experiment performed on a CA XPCI system. Our results show that the fraction of detected photons in the standard energy range of mammography are about 1.4% and 10% for the GI and CA techniques, respectively. The simulations indicate that the design of the optical components plays an important role in the higher efficiency of CA compared to the GI method. It is shown that the use of lower absorbing materials as the substrates for GI gratings can improve its flux efficiency by up to four times. Along similar lines, we also show that an optimized and compact configuration of GI could lead to a 3.5 times higher fraction of detected counts compared to a standard and non-optimised GI implementation.

  19. Comparative evaluation of scatter correction techniques in 3D positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Zaidi, H

    2000-01-01

    Much research and development has been concentrated on the scatter compensation required for quantitative 3D PET. Increasingly sophisticated scatter correction procedures are under investigation, particularly those based on accurate scatter models, and iterative reconstruction-based scatter compensation approaches. The main difference among the correction methods is the way in which the scatter component in the selected energy window is estimated. Monte Carlo methods give further insight and might in themselves offer a possible correction procedure. Methods: Five scatter correction methods are compared in this paper where applicable. The dual-energy window (DEW) technique, the convolution-subtraction (CVS) method, two variants of the Monte Carlo-based scatter correction technique (MCBSC1 and MCBSC2) and our newly developed statistical reconstruction-based scatter correction (SRBSC) method. These scatter correction techniques are evaluated using Monte Carlo simulation studies, experimental phantom measurements...

  20. Investigation of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} using Monte Carlo and the cluster expansion technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Christian D.R.; Gruhn, Thomas; Felser, Claudia [Institute of Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry, Johannes Gutenberg-University, Mainz (Germany); Windeln, Johannes [IBM Germany, Mgr. Technology Center ISC EMEA, Mainz (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    CIGS based solar cells are among the most promising thin-film techniques for cheap, yet efficient modules. They have been investigated for many years, but the full potential of CIGS cells has not yet been exhausted and many effects are not understood. For instance, the band gap of the absorber material Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} varies with Ga content. The question why solar cells with high Ga content have low efficiencies, despite the fact that the band gap should have the optimum value, is still unanswered. We are using Monte Carlo simulations in combination with a cluster expansion to investigate the homogeneity of the In-Ga distribution as a possible cause of the low efficiency of cells with high Ga content. The cluster expansion is created by a fit to ab initio electronic structure energies. The results we found are crucial for the processing of solar cells, shed light on structural properties and give hints on how to significantly improve solar cell performance. Above the transition temperature from the separated to the mixed phase, we observe different sizes of the In and Ga domains for a given temperature. The In domains in the Ga-rich compound are smaller and less abundant than the Ga domains in the In-rich compound. This translates into the Ga-rich material being less homogeneous.

  1. Monte Carlo Simulation of Alloy Design Techniques: Fracture and Welding Studied Using the BFS Method for Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozzolo, Guillermo H.; Good, Brian; Noebe, Ronald D.; Honecy, Frank; Abel, Phillip

    1999-01-01

    Large-scale simulations of dynamic processes at the atomic level have developed into one of the main areas of work in computational materials science. Until recently, severe computational restrictions, as well as the lack of accurate methods for calculating the energetics, resulted in slower growth in the area than that required by current alloy design programs. The Computational Materials Group at the NASA Lewis Research Center is devoted to the development of powerful, accurate, economical tools to aid in alloy design. These include the BFS (Bozzolo, Ferrante, and Smith) method for alloys (ref. 1) and the development of dedicated software for large-scale simulations based on Monte Carlo- Metropolis numerical techniques, as well as state-of-the-art visualization methods. Our previous effort linking theoretical and computational modeling resulted in the successful prediction of the microstructure of a five-element intermetallic alloy, in excellent agreement with experimental results (refs. 2 and 3). This effort also produced a complete description of the role of alloying additions in intermetallic binary, ternary, and higher order alloys (ref. 4).

  2. The Cycles of Snow Cover in Pyrenees Mountain and Mont Lebanon Analyzed Using the Global Modeling Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapeau, L.; Mangiarotti, S.; Le Jean, F.; Gascoin, S.; Jarlan, L.

    2014-12-01

    The global modeling technique provides a way to obtain ordinary differential equations from single time series1. This technique, initiated in the 1990s, could be applied successfully to numerous theoretic and experimental systems. More recently it could be applied to environmental systems2,3. Here this technique is applied to seasonal snow cover area in the Pyrenees mountain (Europe) and Mont Lebanon (Mediterranean region). The snowpack evolution is complex because it results from combination of processes driven by physiography (elevation, slope, land cover...) and meteorological variables (precipitation, temperature, wind speed...), which are highly heterogeneous in such regions. Satellite observations in visible bands offer a powerful tool to monitor snow cover areas at global scale, with large resolutions range. Although this observable does not directly inform about snow water equivalent, its dynamical behavior strongly relies on it. Therefore, snow cover area is likely to be a good proxy of the global dynamics and global modeling technique a well adapted approach. The MOD10A2 product (500m) generated from MODIS by the NASA is used after a pretreatment is applied to minimize clouds effect. The global modeling technique is then applied using two packages4,5. The analysis is performed with two time series for the whole period (2000-2012) and year by year. Low-dimensional chaotic models are obtained in many cases. Such models provide a strong argument for chaos since involving the two necessary conditions in a synthetic way: determinism and strong sensitivity to initial conditions. The models comparison suggests important non-stationnarities at interannual scale which prevent from detecting long term changes. 1: Letellier et al 2009. Frequently asked questions about global modeling, Chaos, 19, 023103. 2: Maquet et al 2007. Global models from the Canadian lynx cycles as a direct evidence for chaos in real ecosystems. J. of Mathematical Biology, 55 (1), 21-39 3

  3. Calculation of fracta dimension of fractured rock mass by monte-carlo  analogy technique%采用Monte-Carlo模拟技术计算 裂隙岩体的分维数

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柴军瑞

    2000-01-01

    采用结构面现场测量及统计分析建立岩体结构的概率模型,进而采用Monte-Carlo模拟技术生成岩体裂隙网络模型,由生成的岩体裂隙网络模型计算岩体裂隙分布的分维数;并给出了工程应用实例。%The probability model of rock mass structure and the fracture network model of rock mass are established by means of the field measurement and statistic analysis and the Monte-Carlo analogy technique. The fractal dimension of the fracture distribution of rock mass is obtained by the fracture network. An engineering example is also given in this paper.

  4. Geometrical and Monte Carlo projectors in 3D PET reconstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Aguiar, Pablo; Rafecas López, Magdalena; Ortuno, Juan Enrique; Kontaxakis, George; Santos, Andrés; Pavía, Javier; Ros, Domènec

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: In the present work, the authors compare geometrical and Monte Carlo projectors in detail. The geometrical projectors considered were the conventional geometrical Siddon ray-tracer (S-RT) and the orthogonal distance-based ray-tracer (OD-RT), based on computing the orthogonal distance from the center of image voxel to the line-of-response. A comparison of these geometrical projectors was performed using different point spread function (PSF) models. The Monte Carlo-based method under c...

  5. A Markov chain Monte Carlo technique for identification of combinations of allelic variants underlying complex diseases in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favorov, Alexander V; Andreewski, Timophey V; Sudomoina, Marina A; Favorova, Olga O; Parmigiani, Giovanni; Ochs, Michael F

    2005-12-01

    In recent years, the number of studies focusing on the genetic basis of common disorders with a complex mode of inheritance, in which multiple genes of small effect are involved, has been steadily increasing. An improved methodology to identify the cumulative contribution of several polymorphous genes would accelerate our understanding of their importance in disease susceptibility and our ability to develop new treatments. A critical bottleneck is the inability of standard statistical approaches, developed for relatively modest predictor sets, to achieve power in the face of the enormous growth in our knowledge of genomics. The inability is due to the combinatorial complexity arising in searches for multiple interacting genes. Similar "curse of dimensionality" problems have arisen in other fields, and Bayesian statistical approaches coupled to Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques have led to significant improvements in understanding. We present here an algorithm, APSampler, for the exploration of potential combinations of allelic variations positively or negatively associated with a disease or with a phenotype. The algorithm relies on the rank comparison of phenotype for individuals with and without specific patterns (i.e., combinations of allelic variants) isolated in genetic backgrounds matched for the remaining significant patterns. It constructs a Markov chain to sample only potentially significant variants, minimizing the potential of large data sets to overwhelm the search. We tested APSampler on a simulated data set and on a case-control MS (multiple sclerosis) study for ethnic Russians. For the simulated data, the algorithm identified all the phenotype-associated allele combinations coded into the data and, for the MS data, it replicated the previously known findings.

  6. Monte Carlo Simulation of X-rays Multiple Refractive Scattering from Fine Structure Objects imaged with the DEI Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Khromova, A N; Arfelli, F; Menk, R H; Besch, H J; Plothow-Besch, H; 10.1109/NSSMIC.2004.1466758

    2010-01-01

    In this work we present a novel 3D Monte Carlo photon transport program for simulation of multiple refractive scattering based on the refractive properties of X-rays in highly scattering media, like lung tissue. Multiple scattering reduces not only the quality of the image, but contains also information on the internal structure of the object. This information can be exploited utilizing image modalities such as Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI). To study the effect of multiple scattering a Monte Carlo program was developed that simulates multiple refractive scattering of X-ray photons on monodisperse PMMA (poly-methyl-methacrylate) microspheres representing alveoli in lung tissue. Eventually, the results of the Monte Carlo program were compared to the measurements taken at the SYRMEP beamline at Elettra (Trieste, Italy) on special phantoms showing a good agreement between both data.

  7. Determination of output factor for 6 MV small photon beam: comparison between Monte Carlo simulation technique and microDiamond detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krongkietlearts, K.; Tangboonduangjit, P.; Paisangittisakul, N.

    2016-03-01

    In order to improve the life's quality for a cancer patient, the radiation techniques are constantly evolving. Especially, the two modern techniques which are intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) are quite promising. They comprise of many small beam sizes (beamlets) with various intensities to achieve the intended radiation dose to the tumor and minimal dose to the nearby normal tissue. The study investigates whether the microDiamond detector (PTW manufacturer), a synthetic single crystal diamond detector, is suitable for small field output factor measurement. The results were compared with those measured by the stereotactic field detector (SFD) and the Monte Carlo simulation (EGSnrc/BEAMnrc/DOSXYZ). The calibration of Monte Carlo simulation was done using the percentage depth dose and dose profile measured by the photon field detector (PFD) of the 10×10 cm2 field size with 100 cm SSD. Comparison of the values obtained from the calculations and measurements are consistent, no more than 1% difference. The output factors obtained from the microDiamond detector have been compared with those of SFD and Monte Carlo simulation, the results demonstrate the percentage difference of less than 2%.

  8. Monte Carlo scatter correction for SPECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zemei

    The goal of this dissertation is to present a quantitatively accurate and computationally fast scatter correction method that is robust and easily accessible for routine applications in SPECT imaging. A Monte Carlo based scatter estimation method is investigated and developed further. The Monte Carlo simulation program SIMIND (Simulating Medical Imaging Nuclear Detectors), was specifically developed to simulate clinical SPECT systems. The SIMIND scatter estimation (SSE) method was developed further using a multithreading technique to distribute the scatter estimation task across multiple threads running concurrently on multi-core CPU's to accelerate the scatter estimation process. An analytical collimator that ensures less noise was used during SSE. The research includes the addition to SIMIND of charge transport modeling in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. Phenomena associated with radiation-induced charge transport including charge trapping, charge diffusion, charge sharing between neighboring detector pixels, as well as uncertainties in the detection process are addressed. Experimental measurements and simulation studies were designed for scintillation crystal based SPECT and CZT based SPECT systems to verify and evaluate the expanded SSE method. Jaszczak Deluxe and Anthropomorphic Torso Phantoms (Data Spectrum Corporation, Hillsborough, NC, USA) were used for experimental measurements and digital versions of the same phantoms employed during simulations to mimic experimental acquisitions. This study design enabled easy comparison of experimental and simulated data. The results have consistently shown that the SSE method performed similarly or better than the triple energy window (TEW) and effective scatter source estimation (ESSE) methods for experiments on all the clinical SPECT systems. The SSE method is proven to be a viable method for scatter estimation for routine clinical use.

  9. Accurate Ab initio calculation of ionization potentials of the first-row transition metals with the configuration-interaction quantum Monte Carlo technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Robert E; Booth, George H; Alavi, Ali

    2015-01-23

    Accurate ionization potentials of the first-row transition-metal atoms are obtained via the initiator full configuration quantum Monte Carlo technique, performing a stochastic integration of the electronic Schrödinger equation in exponentially large Hilbert spaces, with a mean absolute error of 0.13  kcal/mol (5 meV). This accuracy requires correlation of the 3p semicore electrons and in some cases the 3s manifold, along with extrapolation of the correlation energies to the complete-basis-set limit, and provides a new theoretical benchmark for the ionization potentials of these systems.

  10. Use of a Monte Carlo technique to complete a fragmented set of H2S emission rates from a wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauberger, Günther; Piringer, Martin; Baumann-Stanzer, Kathrin; Knauder, Werner; Petz, Erwin

    2013-12-15

    The impact of ambient concentrations in the vicinity of a plant can only be assessed if the emission rate is known. In this study, based on measurements of ambient H2S concentrations and meteorological parameters, the a priori unknown emission rates of a tannery wastewater treatment plant are calculated by an inverse dispersion technique. The calculations are determined using the Gaussian Austrian regulatory dispersion model. Following this method, emission data can be obtained, though only for a measurement station that is positioned such that the wind direction at the measurement station is leeward of the plant. Using the inverse transform sampling, which is a Monte Carlo technique, the dataset can also be completed for those wind directions for which no ambient concentration measurements are available. For the model validation, the measured ambient concentrations are compared with the calculated ambient concentrations obtained from the synthetic emission data of the Monte Carlo model. The cumulative frequency distribution of this new dataset agrees well with the empirical data. This inverse transform sampling method is thus a useful supplement for calculating emission rates using the inverse dispersion technique.

  11. MORSE Monte Carlo code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramer, S.N.

    1984-01-01

    The MORSE code is a large general-use multigroup Monte Carlo code system. Although no claims can be made regarding its superiority in either theoretical details or Monte Carlo techniques, MORSE has been, since its inception at ORNL in the late 1960s, the most widely used Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The principal reason for this popularity is that MORSE is relatively easy to use, independent of any installation or distribution center, and it can be easily customized to fit almost any specific need. Features of the MORSE code are described.

  12. Invited review article: physics and Monte Carlo techniques as relevant to cryogenic, phonon, and ionization readout of Cryogenic Dark Matter Search radiation detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leman, Steven W

    2012-09-01

    This review discusses detector physics and Monte Carlo techniques for cryogenic, radiation detectors that utilize combined phonon and ionization readout. A general review of cryogenic phonon and charge transport is provided along with specific details of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search detector instrumentation. In particular, this review covers quasidiffusive phonon transport, which includes phonon focusing, anharmonic decay, and isotope scattering. The interaction of phonons in the detector surface is discussed along with the downconversion of phonons in superconducting films. The charge transport physics include a mass tensor which results from the crystal band structure and is modeled with a Herring-Vogt transformation. Charge scattering processes involve the creation of Neganov-Luke phonons. Transition-edge-sensor (TES) simulations include a full electric circuit description and all thermal processes including Joule heating, cooling to the substrate, and thermal diffusion within the TES, the latter of which is necessary to model normal-superconducting phase separation. Relevant numerical constants are provided for these physical processes in germanium, silicon, aluminum, and tungsten. Random number sampling methods including inverse cumulative distribution function (CDF) and rejection techniques are reviewed. To improve the efficiency of charge transport modeling, an additional second order inverse CDF method is developed here along with an efficient barycentric coordinate sampling method of electric fields. Results are provided in a manner that is convenient for use in Monte Carlo and references are provided for validation of these models.

  13. Invited Review Article: Physics and Monte Carlo techniques as relevant to cryogenic, phonon, and ionization readout of Cryogenic Dark Matter Search radiation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leman, Steven W. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2012-09-15

    This review discusses detector physics and Monte Carlo techniques for cryogenic, radiation detectors that utilize combined phonon and ionization readout. A general review of cryogenic phonon and charge transport is provided along with specific details of the Cryogenic Dark Matter Search detector instrumentation. In particular, this review covers quasidiffusive phonon transport, which includes phonon focusing, anharmonic decay, and isotope scattering. The interaction of phonons in the detector surface is discussed along with the downconversion of phonons in superconducting films. The charge transport physics include a mass tensor which results from the crystal band structure and is modeled with a Herring-Vogt transformation. Charge scattering processes involve the creation of Neganov-Luke phonons. Transition-edge-sensor (TES) simulations include a full electric circuit description and all thermal processes including Joule heating, cooling to the substrate, and thermal diffusion within the TES, the latter of which is necessary to model normal-superconducting phase separation. Relevant numerical constants are provided for these physical processes in germanium, silicon, aluminum, and tungsten. Random number sampling methods including inverse cumulative distribution function (CDF) and rejection techniques are reviewed. To improve the efficiency of charge transport modeling, an additional second order inverse CDF method is developed here along with an efficient barycentric coordinate sampling method of electric fields. Results are provided in a manner that is convenient for use in Monte Carlo and references are provided for validation of these models.

  14. Determination of low-energy structures of a small RNA hairpin using Monte Carlo–based techniques

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sudhanshu Shanker; Pradipta Bandyopadhyay

    2012-07-01

    The energy landscape of RNA is known to be extremely rugged, and hence finding low-energy structures starting from a random structure is a challenging task for any optimization algorithm. In the current work, we have investigated the ability of one Monte Carlo–based optimization algorithm, Temperature Basin Paving, to explore the energy landscape of a small RNA T-loop hairpin. In this method, the history of the simulation is used to increase the probability of states less visited in the simulation. It has been found that using both energy and end-to-end distance as the biasing parameters in the simulation, the partially folded structure of the hairpin starting from random structures could be obtained.

  15. The kinetic activation-relaxation technique: an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm with on-the-fly event search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousseau, Nomand

    2012-02-01

    While kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm has been proposed almost 40 years ago, its application in materials science has been mostly limited to lattice-based motion due to the difficulties associated with identifying new events and building usable catalogs when atoms moved into off-lattice position. Here, I present the kinetic activation-relaxation technique (kinetic ART) is an off-lattice, self-learning kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm with on-the-fly event search [1]. It combines ART nouveau [2], a very efficient unbiased open-ended activated method for finding transition states, with a topological classification [3] that allows a discrete cataloguing of local environments in complex systems, including disordered materials. In kinetic ART, local topologies are first identified for all atoms in a system. ART nouveau event searches are then launched for new topologies, building an extensive catalog of barriers and events. Next, all low energy events are fully reconstructed and relaxed, allowing to take complete account of elastic effects in the system's kinetics. Using standard kinetic Monte Carlo, the clock is brought forward and an event is then selected and applied before a new search for topologies is launched. In addition to presenting the various elements of the algorithm, I will discuss three recent applications to ion-bombarded silicon, defect diffusion in Fe and structural relaxation in amorphous silicon.[4pt] This work was done in collaboration with Laurent Karim B'eland, Peter Brommer, Fedwa El-Mellouhi, Jean-Francois Joly and Laurent Lewis.[4pt] [1] F. El-Mellouhi, N. Mousseau and L.J. Lewis, Phys. Rev. B. 78, 153202 (2008); L.K. B'eland et al., Phys. Rev. E 84, 046704 (2011).[2] G.T. Barkema and N. Mousseau, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 4358 (1996); E. Machado-Charry et al., J. Chem Phys. 135, 034102, (2011).[3] B.D. McKay, Congressus Numerantium 30, 45 (1981).

  16. Monte Carlo-Based Dose Calculation in Postprostatectomy Image-Guided Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley Rankine

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Step-and-shoot (S&S intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT using the XiO treatment planning system (TPS has been routinely used for patients receiving postprostatectomy radiotherapy (PPRT. After installing the Monaco, a pilot study was undertaken with five patients to compare XiO with Monaco (V2.03 TPS for PPRT with respect to plan quality for S&S as well as volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT. Monaco S&S showed higher mean clinical target volume (CTV coverage (99.85% than both XiO S&S (97.98%, P = 0.04 and Monaco VMAT (99.44, P = 0.02. Rectal V60Gy volumes were lower for Monaco S&S compared to XiO (46.36% versus 58.06%, P = 0.001 and Monaco VMAT (46.36% versus 54.66%, P = 0.02. Rectal V60Gy volume was lowest for Monaco S&S and superior to XiO (mean 19.89% versus 31.25%, P = 0.02. Rectal V60Gy volumes were lower for Monaco VMAT compared to XiO (21.09% versus 31.25%, P = 0.02. Other organ-at-risk (OAR parameters were comparable between TPSs. Compared to XiO S&S, Monaco S&S plans had fewer segments (78.6 versus 116.8 segments, P = 0.02, lower total monitor units (MU (677.6 MU versus 770.7 MU, P = 0.01, and shorter beam-on times (5.7 min versus 7.6 min, P = 0.03. This pilot study suggests that Monaco S&S improves CTV coverage, OAR doses, and planning and treatment times for PPRT.

  17. A Reliability Evaluation Method for Military Logistics Nodes with Monte Carlo Technique%基于Monte Carlo的军事物流结点可靠性评估方法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    甘明; 林志翔; 王丰; 芮迎春

    2014-01-01

    Military logistics nodes are basic elements of military logistics network. Reliability evaluation of nodes that takes uncertain factors into account is more objective due to the fact that battlefield environment is changing all the time and reliability of nodes is always affected by lots of uncertain factors. This paper presents a systematic reliability evaluation technique using a series of reliability indices, sets up a reliability evaluation model that takes uncertain factors of military logistics nodes into account, and works out a solution algorithm based on Monte Carlo technique. This paper also analyzes those factors which impact reliability of nodes, on the basis of which, some measures are presented to improve reliability of military logistics nodes. Case studies on some certain campaign-level logistics network indicate that the proposed method is feasible and accuracy.%军事物流网络结点是构成军事物流网络的基本要素。战场环境瞬息万变,结点的可靠性往往受许多不确定因素的影响,计及不确定因素的评估方法可以更客观、真实地评估结点的可靠性。基于此,提出了刻画物流结点可靠性的评估指标体系,建立了计及不确定因素的军事物流结点可靠性评估模型,给出了Monte Carlo求解算法。对影响结点可靠性的因素进行了分析,在此基础上提出了改善军事物流结点可靠性的措施。以某战役级军事物流网络为例进行算例分析,验证了该方法的可行性和正确性。

  18. Principled Variance Reduction Techniques for Real Time Patient-Specific Monte Carlo Applications within Brachytherapy and Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Andrew Joseph

    This dissertation describes the application of two principled variance reduction strategies to increase the efficiency for two applications within medical physics. The first, called correlated Monte Carlo (CMC) applies to patient-specific, permanent-seed brachytherapy (PSB) dose calculations. The second, called adjoint-biased forward Monte Carlo (ABFMC), is used to compute cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scatter projections. CMC was applied for two PSB cases: a clinical post-implant prostate, and a breast with a simulated lumpectomy cavity. CMC computes the dose difference, DeltaD, between the highly correlated dose computing homogeneous and heterogeneous geometries. The particle transport in the heterogeneous geometry assumed a purely homogeneous environment, and altered particle weights accounted for bias. Average gains of 37 to 60 are reported from using CMC, relative to un-correlated Monte Carlo (UMC) calculations, for the prostate and breast CTV's, respectively. To further increase the efficiency up to 1500 fold above UMC, an approximation called interpolated correlated Monte Carlo (ICMC) was applied. ICMC computes DeltaD using CMC on a low-resolution (LR) spatial grid followed by interpolation to a high-resolution (HR) voxel grid followed. The interpolated, HR DeltaD is then summed with a HR, pre-computed, homogeneous dose map. ICMC computes an approximate, but accurate, HR heterogeneous dose distribution from LR MC calculations achieving an average 2% standard deviation within the prostate and breast CTV's in 1.1 sec and 0.39 sec, respectively. Accuracy for 80% of the voxels using ICMC is within 3% for anatomically realistic geometries. Second, for CBCT scatter projections, ABFMC was implemented via weight windowing using a solution to the adjoint Boltzmann transport equation computed either via the discrete ordinates method (DOM), or a MC implemented forward-adjoint importance generator (FAIG). ABFMC, implemented via DOM or FAIG, was tested for a

  19. Numerical simulation of super-short pulsed discharge in helium with particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Feng; Zhang Li-Li; Wang De-Zhen

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports that a simulation of glow discharge in pure helium gas at the pressure of 1.333×103 Pa under a high-voltage nanosecond pulse is performed by using a one-dimensional particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collisions (PIC-MCC) model. Numerical modelling results show that the cathode sheath is much thicker than that of anode during the pulse discharge, and that there exists the phenomenon of field reversal at relative high pressures near the end of the pulse, which results from the cumulative positive charges due to their finite mobility during the cathode sheath expansion. Moreover, electron energy distribution function (EEDF) and ion energy distribution function (IEDF) have been also observed. In the early stage of the pulse, a large amount of electrons can be accelerated above the ionization threshold energy. However, in the second half of the pulse, as the field in bulk plasma decreases and thereafter the reverse field forms due to the excessive charges in cathode sheath, although the plasma density grows, the high energy part of EEDF decreases. It concludes that the large volume non-equilibrium plasmas can be obtained with high-voltage nanosecond pulse discharges.

  20. Synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy: dosimetry by Fricke gel and Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudou, Caroline; Biston, Marie-Claude; Corde, Stéphanie; Adam, Jean-François; Ferrero, Claudio; Estève, François; Elleaume, Hélène

    2004-11-21

    Synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy (SSR) consists in loading the tumour with a high atomic number element (Z), and exposing it to monochromatic x-rays from a synchrotron source (50-100 keV), in stereotactic conditions. The dose distribution results from both the stereotactic monochromatic x-ray irradiation and the presence of the high Z element. The purpose of this preliminary study was to evaluate the two-dimensional dose distribution resulting solely from the irradiation geometry, using Monte Carlo simulations and a Fricke gel dosimeter. The verification of a Monte Carlo-based dosimetry was first assessed by depth dose measurements in a water tank. We thereafter used a Fricke dosimeter to compare Monte Carlo simulations with dose measurements. The Fricke dosimeter is a solution containing ferrous ions which are oxidized to ferric ions under ionizing radiation, proportionally to the absorbed dose. A cylindrical phantom filled with Fricke gel was irradiated in stereotactic conditions over several slices with a continuous beam (beam section = 0.1 x 1 cm2). The phantom and calibration vessels were then imaged by nuclear magnetic resonance. The measured doses were fairly consistent with those predicted by Monte Carlo simulations. However, the measured maximum absolute dose was 10% underestimated regarding calculation. The loss of information in the higher region of dose is explained by the diffusion of ferric ions. Monte Carlo simulation is the most accurate tool for dosimetry including complex geometries made of heterogeneous materials. Although the technique requires improvements, gel dosimetry remains an essential tool for the experimental verification of dose distribution in SSR with millimetre precision.

  1. Monte-Carlo scatter correction for cone-beam computed tomography with limited scan field-of-view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Matthias; Sattel, Timo; Hohmann, Steffen; Wiegert, Jens

    2008-03-01

    In flat detector cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), scattered radiation is a major source of image degradation, making accurate a posteriori scatter correction inevitable. A potential solution to this problem is provided by computerized scatter correction based on Monte-Carlo simulations. Using this technique, the detected distributions of X-ray scatter are estimated for various viewing directions using Monte-Carlo simulations of an intermediate reconstruction. However, as a major drawback, for standard CBCT geometries and with standard size flat detectors such as mounted on interventional C-arms, the scan field of view is too small to accommodate the human body without lateral truncations, and thus this technique cannot be readily applied. In this work, we present a novel method for constructing a model of the object in a laterally and possibly also axially extended field of view, which enables meaningful application of Monte-Carlo based scatter correction even in case of heavy truncations. Evaluation is based on simulations of a clinical CT data set of a human abdomen, which strongly exceeds the field of view of the simulated C-arm based CBCT imaging geometry. By using the proposed methodology, almost complete removal of scatter-caused inhomogeneities is demonstrated in reconstructed images.

  2. Dose enhancement in gold nanoparticle-aided radiotherapy for the therapeutic photon beams using Monte Carlo technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Ramesh Kakade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gold nanoparticle (GNP-aided radiation therapy (RT is useful to make the tumor more sensitive to radiation damage because of the enhancement in the dose inside the tumor region. Polymer gel dosimeter (PGD can be a good choice for the physical measurement of dose enhancement produced by GNP inside the gel. Materials and Methods: The present study uses EGSnrc Monte Carlo code to estimate dose enhancement factor (DEF due to the introduction of GNPs inside the PGD at different concentrations (7 and 18 mg Au/g of gel when irradiated by therapeutic X-rays of energy 100 kVp, 150 kVp, 6 MV, and 15 MV. The simulation was also carried out to quantify the dose enhancement in PAGAT gel and tumor for 100 kVp X-rays. Results: For 100 kVp X-rays, average DEF of 1.86 and 2.91 is observed in the PAGAT gel dosimeter with 7 and 18 mg Au/g of gel, respectively. Average DEF of 1.69 and 2.61 is recorded for 150 kVp X-rays with 7 and 18 mg Au/g of gel, respectively. No clinically meaningful DEF was observed for 6 and 15 MV photon beams. Furthermore, the dose enhancement within the PAGAT gel dosimeter and tumor closely matches with each other. Conclusion: The polymer gel dosimetry can be a suitable method of dose estimation and verification for clinical implementation of GNP-aided RT. GNP-aided RT has the potential of delivering high localized tumoricidal dose with significant sparing of normal structures when the treatment is delivered with low energy X-rays.

  3. Dose enhancement in gold nanoparticle-aided radiotherapy for the therapeutic photon beams using Monte Carlo technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakade, Nitin Ramesh; Sharma, Sunil Dutt

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle (GNP)-aided radiation therapy (RT) is useful to make the tumor more sensitive to radiation damage because of the enhancement in the dose inside the tumor region. Polymer gel dosimeter (PGD) can be a good choice for the physical measurement of dose enhancement produced by GNP inside the gel. The present study uses EGSnrc Monte Carlo code to estimate dose enhancement factor (DEF) due to the introduction of GNPs inside the PGD at different concentrations (7 and 18 mg Au/g of gel) when irradiated by therapeutic X-rays of energy 100 kVp, 150 kVp, 6 MV, and 15 MV. The simulation was also carried out to quantify the dose enhancement in PAGAT gel and tumor for 100 kVp X-rays. For 100 kVp X-rays, average DEF of 1.86 and 2.91 is observed in the PAGAT gel dosimeter with 7 and 18 mg Au/g of gel, respectively. Average DEF of 1.69 and 2.61 is recorded for 150 kVp X-rays with 7 and 18 mg Au/g of gel, respectively. No clinically meaningful DEF was observed for 6 and 15 MV photon beams. Furthermore, the dose enhancement within the PAGAT gel dosimeter and tumor closely matches with each other. The polymer gel dosimetry can be a suitable method of dose estimation and verification for clinical implementation of GNP-aided RT. GNP-aided RT has the potential of delivering high localized tumoricidal dose with significant sparing of normal structures when the treatment is delivered with low energy X-rays.

  4. In Silico Generation of Peptides by Replica Exchange Monte Carlo: Docking-Based Optimization of Maltose-Binding-Protein Ligands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Russo

    Full Text Available Short peptides can be designed in silico and synthesized through automated techniques, making them advantageous and versatile protein binders. A number of docking-based algorithms allow for a computational screening of peptides as binders. Here we developed ex-novo peptides targeting the maltose site of the Maltose Binding Protein, the prototypical system for the study of protein ligand recognition. We used a Monte Carlo based protocol, to computationally evolve a set of octapeptides starting from a polialanine sequence. We screened in silico the candidate peptides and characterized their binding abilities by surface plasmon resonance, fluorescence and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry assays. These experiments showed the designed binders to recognize their target with micromolar affinity. We finally discuss the obtained results in the light of further improvement in the ex-novo optimization of peptide based binders.

  5. Ant colony method to control variance reduction techniques in the Monte Carlo simulation of clinical electron linear accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Pareja, S. [Servicio de Radiofisica Hospitalaria, Hospital Regional Universitario ' Carlos Haya' , Avda. Carlos Haya, s/n, E-29010 Malaga (Spain)], E-mail: garciapareja@gmail.com; Vilches, M. [Servicio de Fisica y Proteccion Radiologica, Hospital Regional Universitario ' Virgen de las Nieves' , Avda. de las Fuerzas Armadas, 2, E-18014 Granada (Spain); Lallena, A.M. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Granada, E-18071 Granada (Spain)

    2007-09-21

    The ant colony method is used to control the application of variance reduction techniques to the simulation of clinical electron linear accelerators of use in cancer therapy. In particular, splitting and Russian roulette, two standard variance reduction methods, are considered. The approach can be applied to any accelerator in a straightforward way and permits, in addition, to investigate the 'hot' regions of the accelerator, an information which is basic to develop a source model for this therapy tool.

  6. Geomatics techniques applied to time series of aerial images for multitemporal geomorphological analysis of the Miage Glacier (Mont Blanc).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, Luigi; Carletti, Roberto; Giardino, Marco; Mortara, Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    The Miage glacier is the major one in the Italian side of the Mont Blanc Massif, the third by area and the first by longitudinal extent among Italian glaciers. It is a typical debris covered glacier, since the end of the L.I.A. The debris coverage reduces ablation, allowing a relative stability of the glacier terminus, which is characterized by a wide and articulated moraine apparatus. For its conservative landforms, the Miage Glacier has a great importance for the analysis of the geomorphological response to recent climatic changes. Thanks to an organized existing archive of multitemporal aerial images (1935 to present) a photogrammetric approach has been applied to detect recent geomorphological changes in the Miage glacial basin. The research team provided: a) to digitize all the available images (still in analogic form) through photogrammetric scanners (very low image distortions devices) taking care of correctly defining the resolution of the acquisition compared to the scale mapping images are suitable for; b) to import digitized images into an appropriate digital photogrammetry software environment; c) to manage images in order, where possible, to carried out the stereo models orientation necessary for 3D navigation and plotting of critical geometric features of the glacier. Recognized geometric feature, referring to different periods, can be transferred to vector layers and imported in a GIS for further comparisons and investigations; d) to produce multi-temporal Digital Elevation Models for glacier volume changes; e) to perform orthoprojection of such images to obtain multitemporal orthoimages useful for areal an planar terrain evaluation and thematic analysis; f) to evaluate both planimetric positioning and height determination accuracies reachable through the photogrammetric process. Users have to known reliability of the measures they can do over such products. This can drive them to define the applicable field of this approach and this can help them to

  7. A Monte Carlo template-based analysis for very high definition imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes as applied to the VERITAS telescope array

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2015-01-01

    We present a sophisticated likelihood reconstruction algorithm for shower-image analysis of imaging Cherenkov telescopes. The reconstruction algorithm is based on the comparison of the camera pixel amplitudes with the predictions from a Monte Carlo based model. Shower parameters are determined by a maximisation of a likelihood function. Maximisation of the likelihood as a function of shower fit parameters is performed using a numerical non-linear optimisation technique. A related reconstruction technique has already been developed by the CAT and the H.E.S.S. experiments, and provides a more precise direction and energy reconstruction of the photon induced shower compared to the second moment of the camera image analysis. Examples are shown of the performance of the analysis on simulated gamma-ray data from the VERITAS array.

  8. Calculation of extrapolation curves in the 4π(LS)β-γ coincidence technique with the Monte Carlo code Geant4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobin, C; Thiam, C; Bouchard, J

    2016-03-01

    At LNE-LNHB, a liquid scintillation (LS) detection setup designed for Triple to Double Coincidence Ratio (TDCR) measurements is also used in the β-channel of a 4π(LS)β-γ coincidence system. This LS counter based on 3 photomultipliers was first modeled using the Monte Carlo code Geant4 to enable the simulation of optical photons produced by scintillation and Cerenkov effects. This stochastic modeling was especially designed for the calculation of double and triple coincidences between photomultipliers in TDCR measurements. In the present paper, this TDCR-Geant4 model is extended to 4π(LS)β-γ coincidence counting to enable the simulation of the efficiency-extrapolation technique by the addition of a γ-channel. This simulation tool aims at the prediction of systematic biases in activity determination due to eventual non-linearity of efficiency-extrapolation curves. First results are described in the case of the standardization (59)Fe. The variation of the γ-efficiency in the β-channel due to the Cerenkov emission is investigated in the case of the activity measurements of (54)Mn. The problem of the non-linearity between β-efficiencies is featured in the case of the efficiency tracing technique for the activity measurements of (14)C using (60)Co as a tracer.

  9. The dynamical activation-relaxation technique (DART): an on-the-fly kinetic Monte-Carlo algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Mellouhi, Fadwa; Cote, Michel; Lewis, Laurent J.; Mousseau, Normand

    2008-03-01

    We present DART, the dynamical activation-relaxation technique, that combines the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau) with a non-lattice KMC method that allows the on-the-fly identification of barriers and the full treatment of lattice deformations. Most KMC schemes rely on the use of a fixed list of events and barriers, which are drawn with the proper weight during the simulation. While this works well for a number of problems (such as metal-on-metal growth), it cannot be used for processes where the events may change with time. DART overcomes this limitation. ART nouveau has been used extensively for the study of activated mechanisms in different materials within both an empirical and an ab-initio description of the systems. In the DART implementation, KMC moves are based on a catalog of events constructed on-the-fly using ART. After each KMC move, this catalog is updated so as to take into account new environments that may appear. A topological description of the structure of the system at each moment allows the method to identify rapidly these new environments and to move forward efficiently. In this talk, we will describe the method and present the case of interstitial diffusion in Si. Our results are compared with previous molecular-dynamics and on-lattice KMC simulations.

  10. Monte Carlo methods for electromagnetics

    CERN Document Server

    Sadiku, Matthew NO

    2009-01-01

    Until now, novices had to painstakingly dig through the literature to discover how to use Monte Carlo techniques for solving electromagnetic problems. Written by one of the foremost researchers in the field, Monte Carlo Methods for Electromagnetics provides a solid understanding of these methods and their applications in electromagnetic computation. Including much of his own work, the author brings together essential information from several different publications.Using a simple, clear writing style, the author begins with a historical background and review of electromagnetic theory. After addressing probability and statistics, he introduces the finite difference method as well as the fixed and floating random walk Monte Carlo methods. The text then applies the Exodus method to Laplace's and Poisson's equations and presents Monte Carlo techniques for handing Neumann problems. It also deals with whole field computation using the Markov chain, applies Monte Carlo methods to time-varying diffusion problems, and ...

  11. 基于Monte-Carlo统计技术的堤防设计参数指标选值方法研究%Research on the Method for Selecting Design Parameters of Dyke Based on Monte-Carlo Statistic Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李金都; 周志芳; 宋汉周; 张发明; 周益民

    2005-01-01

    本文通过工程实例,就应用Monte-Carlo统计技术进行岩土工程参数指标选值问题开展了研究.研究结果表明,运用Monte-Carlo统计技术,可以达到合理选择岩土的物理力学参数的目的,避免人为降低设计参数、增大工程处理投资的问题.

  12. Application of Monte Carlo techniques to optimization of high-energy beam transport in a stochastic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, R. V.; Dieudonne, J. E.; Filippas, T. A.

    1971-01-01

    An algorithm employing a modified sequential random perturbation, or creeping random search, was applied to the problem of optimizing the parameters of a high-energy beam transport system. The stochastic solution of the mathematical model for first-order magnetic-field expansion allows the inclusion of state-variable constraints, and the inclusion of parameter constraints allowed by the method of algorithm application eliminates the possibility of infeasible solutions. The mathematical model and the algorithm were programmed for a real-time simulation facility; thus, two important features are provided to the beam designer: (1) a strong degree of man-machine communication (even to the extent of bypassing the algorithm and applying analog-matching techniques), and (2) extensive graphics for displaying information concerning both algorithm operation and transport-system behavior. Chromatic aberration was also included in the mathematical model and in the optimization process. Results presented show this method as yielding better solutions (in terms of resolutions) to the particular problem than those of a standard analog program as well as demonstrating flexibility, in terms of elements, constraints, and chromatic aberration, allowed by user interaction with both the algorithm and the stochastic model. Example of slit usage and a limited comparison of predicted results and actual results obtained with a 600 MeV cyclotron are given.

  13. Determination of the detective quantum efficiency of gamma camera systems: a Monte Carlo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Ida; Starck, Sven-Ake; Båth, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was to investigate the validity of using the Monte Carlo technique for determining the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of a gamma camera system and to use this technique in investigating the DQE behaviour of a gamma camera system and its dependency on a number of relevant parameters. The Monte Carlo-based software SIMIND, simulating a complete gamma camera system, was used in the present study. The modulation transfer function (MTF) of the system was determined from simulated images of a point source of (99m)Tc, positioned at different depths in a water phantom. Simulations were performed using different collimators and energy windows. The MTF of the system was combined with the photon yield and the sensitivity, obtained from the simulations, to form the frequency-dependent DQE of the system. As figure-of-merit (FOM), the integral of the 2D DQE was used. The simulated DQE curves agreed well with published data. As expected, there was a strong dependency of the shape and magnitude of the DQE curve on the collimator, energy window and imaging position. The highest FOM was obtained for a lower energy threshold of 127 keV for objects close to the detector and 131 keV for objects deeper in the phantom, supporting an asymmetric window setting to reduce scatter. The Monte Carlo software SIMIND can be used to determine the DQE of a gamma camera system from a simulated point source alone. The optimal DQE results in the present study were obtained for parameter settings close to the clinically used settings.

  14. Accurate study of FosPeg® distribution in a mouse model using fluorescence imaging technique and fluorescence white monte carlo simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Haiyan; Liu, Haichun; Svenmarker, Pontus

    2010-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging is used for quantitative in vivo assessment of drug concentration. Light attenuation in tissue is compensated for through Monte-Carlo simulations. The intrinsic fluorescence intensity, directly proportional to the drug concentration, could be obtained....

  15. SU-E-I-42: Normalized Embryo/fetus Doses for Fluoroscopically Guided Pacemaker Implantation Procedures Calculated Using a Monte Carlo Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damilakis, J; Stratakis, J; Solomou, G [University of Crete, Heraklion (Greece)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is well known that pacemaker implantation is sometimes needed in pregnant patients with symptomatic bradycardia. To our knowledge, there is no reported experience regarding radiation doses to the unborn child resulting from fluoroscopy during pacemaker implantation. The purpose of the current study was to develop a method for estimating embryo/fetus dose from fluoroscopically guided pacemaker implantation procedures performed on pregnant patients during all trimesters of gestation. Methods: The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport code was employed in this study. Three mathematical anthropomorphic phantoms representing the average pregnant patient at the first, second and third trimesters of gestation were generated using Bodybuilder software (White Rock science, White Rock, NM). The normalized embryo/fetus dose from the posteroanterior (PA), the 30° left-anterior oblique (LAO) and the 30° right-anterior oblique (RAO) projections were calculated for a wide range of kVp (50–120 kVp) and total filtration values (2.5–9.0 mm Al). Results: The results consist of radiation doses normalized to a) entrance skin dose (ESD) and b) dose area product (DAP) so that the dose to the unborn child from any fluoroscopic technique and x-ray device used can be calculated. ESD normalized doses ranged from 0.008 (PA, first trimester) to 2.519 μGy/mGy (RAO, third trimester). DAP normalized doses ranged from 0.051 (PA, first trimester) to 12.852 μGy/Gycm2 (RAO, third trimester). Conclusion: Embryo/fetus doses from fluoroscopically guided pacemaker implantation procedures performed on pregnant patients during all stages of gestation can be estimated using the method developed in this study. This study was supported by the Greek Ministry of Education and Religious Affairs, General Secretariat for Research and Technology, Operational Program ‘Education and Lifelong Learning’, ARISTIA (Research project: CONCERT)

  16. Boring and excavation technologies for Opalinus clay in the rock laboratories at Mont Terri; Techniques de forages et d'excavations dans les argiles à Opalinus, laboratoire souterrain du Mont Terri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bossart, P.; Nussbaum, Ch. [Swiss Federal Office of Topography swisstopo, Wabern (Switzerland); Burrus, F. [Groupe Grands Travaux GGT, Porrentruy (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    This comprehensive article discusses the work done since 1996 at the rock laboratories at Mont Terri in the Swiss Jura Mountains. The work being done by fifteen international partners on the characterisation of the Opalinus clay with regard to its geological, hydro-geological, geochemical and geotechnical characteristics is reported on. Various methods of drilling are described that are able to preserve any tectonic crevices in the rock. Drilling under special conditions, including the use of nitrogen and argon atmospheres to prevent bacterial contamination, is looked at, as are the methods used in tunnelling without having to use water.

  17. 基于人工神经网络和Monte-Carlo法的混凝土配合比优化设计研究%Optimization of concrete mixture on the basis of artificial neural network and Monte-Carlo techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘国华; 陈斌; 汪树玉; 郑志强; 何国余

    2003-01-01

    结合BP人工神经网络和Monte-Carlo随机试验法,建立混凝土配合比的直接优化设计模型,并开发出实用软件.该设计过程包括:(1)首先建立配合比试验样本数据库,然后根据不同混凝土的设计要求,检索该数据库并动态建立网络模型;(2)以混凝土原材料和制作工艺作为输入单元,混凝土最终性能指标作为输出单元,训练、测试BP神经网络,并检验其可靠性;(3)以建立的BP神经网络模型和其它配合比限制条件作为约束条件,混凝土单位成本作为优化目标建立Monte-Carlo直接优化模型,设计出混凝土初步配合比;(4)按对上述设计出的配合比进行试拌、调整,得到实际可使用配合比.

  18. MCMC Particle Filter Using New Data Association Technique with Viterbi Filtered Gate Method for Multi-Target Tracking in Heavy Clutter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. M.Saad

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Improving data association technique in dense clutter environment for multi-target tracking used in Markov chain Monte Carlo based particle filter (MCMC-PF are discussed in this paper. A new method named Viterbi filtered gate Markov chain Monte Carlo VFG-MCMC is introduced to avoid track swap and to overcome the issue of loosing track to highly maneuvering targets in the presence of more background clutter and false signals. An adaptive search based on Viterbi algorithm is then used to detect the valid filtered data point in each target gate. The detected valid point for each target is applied to the estimation algorithm of MCMC-PF during calculating the sampling weights. This proposed method makes the MCMC interacts only with the valid target that is candidate from the filtered gate and no more calculations are considered for invalid targets. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness and better performance when compared to conventional algorithm MCMC-PF.

  19. Dairy goat kids fed liquid diets in substitution of goat milk and slaughtered at different ages: an economic viability analysis using Monte Carlo techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knupp, L S; Veloso, C M; Marcondes, M I; Silveira, T S; Silva, A L; Souza, N O; Knupp, S N R; Cannas, A

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the economic viability of producing dairy goat kids fed liquid diets in alternative of goat milk and slaughtered at two different ages. Forty-eight male newborn Saanen and Alpine kids were selected and allocated to four groups using a completely randomized factorial design: goat milk (GM), cow milk (CM), commercial milk replacer (CMR) and fermented cow colostrum (FC). Each group was then divided into two groups: slaughter at 60 and 90 days of age. The animals received Tifton hay and concentrate ad libitum. The values of total costs of liquid and solid feed plus labor, income and average gross margin were calculated. The data were then analyzed using the Monte Carlo techniques with the @Risk 5.5 software, with 1000 iterations of the variables being studied through the model. The kids fed GM and CMR generated negative profitability values when slaughtered at 60 days (US$ -16.4 and US$ -2.17, respectively) and also at 90 days (US$ -30.8 and US$ -0.18, respectively). The risk analysis showed that there is a 98% probability that profitability would be negative when GM is used. In this regard, CM and FC presented low risk when the kids were slaughtered at 60 days (8.5% and 21.2%, respectively) and an even lower risk when animals were slaughtered at 90 days (5.2% and 3.8%, respectively). The kids fed CM and slaughtered at 90 days presented the highest average gross income (US$ 67.88) and also average gross margin (US$ 18.43/animal). For the 60-day rearing regime to be economically viable, the CMR cost should not exceed 11.47% of the animal-selling price. This implies that the replacer cannot cost more than US$ 0.39 and 0.43/kg for the 60- and 90-day feeding regimes, respectively. The sensitivity analysis showed that the variables with the greatest impact on the final model's results were animal selling price, liquid diet cost, final weight at slaughter and labor. In conclusion, the production of male dairy goat kids can be economically

  20. Quasi-monte carlo simulation and variance reduction techniques substantially reduce computational requirements of patient-level simulation models: An application to a discrete event simulation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treur, M.; Postma, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Patient-level simulation models provide increased flexibility to overcome the limitations of cohort-based approaches in health-economic analysis. However, computational requirements of reaching convergence is a notorious barrier. The objective was to assess the impact of using quasi-mont

  1. Ultrasound modulated light blood flow measurement using intensity autocorrelation function: a Monte-Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsalach, A.; Metzger, Y.; Breskin, I.; Zeitak, R.; Shechter, R.

    2014-03-01

    Development of techniques for continuous measurement of regional blood flow, and in particular cerebral blood flow (CBF), is essential for monitoring critical care patients. Recently, a novel technique, based on ultrasound modulation of light was developed for non-invasive, continuous CBF monitoring (termed ultrasound-tagged light (UTL or UT-NIRS)), and shown to correlate with readings of 133 Xe SPECT1 and laser Doppler2. Coherent light is introduced into the tissue concurrently with an Ultrasound (US) field. Displacement of scattering centers within the sampled volume induced by Brownian motion, blood flow and the US field affects the photons' temporal correlation. Hence, the temporal fluctuations of the obtained speckle pattern provide dynamic information about the blood flow. We developed a comprehensive simulation, combining the effects of Brownian motion, US and flow on the obtained speckle pattern. Photons trajectories within the tissue are generated using a Monte-Carlo based model. Then, the temporal changes in the optical path due to displacement of scattering centers are determined, and the corresponding interference pattern over time is derived. Finally, the light intensity autocorrelation function of a single speckle is calculated, from which the tissue decorrelation time is determined. The simulation's results are compared with in-vitro experiments, using a digital correlator, demonstrating decorrelation time prediction within the 95% confidence interval. This model may assist in the development of optical based methods for blood flow measurements and particularly, in methods using the acousto-optic effect.

  2. Evaluation of the material assignment method used by a Monte Carlo treatment planning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isambert, A; Brualla, L; Lefkopoulos, D

    2009-12-01

    An evaluation of the conversion process from Hounsfield units (HU) to material composition in computerised tomography (CT) images, employed by the Monte Carlo based treatment planning system ISOgray (DOSIsoft), is presented. A boundary in the HU for the material conversion between "air" and "lung" materials was determined based on a study using 22 patients. The dosimetric consequence of the new boundary was quantitatively evaluated for a lung patient plan.

  3. Analysis of the radiation shielding of the bunker of a 230MeV proton cyclotron therapy facility; comparison of analytical and Monte Carlo techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunil, C

    2016-04-01

    The neutron ambient dose equivalent outside the radiation shield of a proton therapy cyclotron vault is estimated using the unshielded dose equivalent rates and the attenuation lengths obtained from the literature and by simulations carried out with the FLUKA Monte Carlo radiation transport code. The source terms derived from the literature and that obtained from the FLUKA calculations differ by a factor of 2-3, while the attenuation lengths obtained from the literature differ by 20-40%. The instantaneous dose equivalent rates outside the shield differ by a few orders of magnitude, not only in comparison with the Monte Carlo simulation results, but also with the results obtained by line of sight attenuation calculations with the different parameters obtained from the literature. The attenuation of neutrons caused by the presence of bulk iron, such as magnet yokes is expected to reduce the dose equivalent by as much as a couple of orders of magnitude outside the shield walls.

  4. Fast sequential Monte Carlo methods for counting and optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinstein, Reuven Y; Vaisman, Radislav

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive account of the theory and application of Monte Carlo methods Based on years of research in efficient Monte Carlo methods for estimation of rare-event probabilities, counting problems, and combinatorial optimization, Fast Sequential Monte Carlo Methods for Counting and Optimization is a complete illustration of fast sequential Monte Carlo techniques. The book provides an accessible overview of current work in the field of Monte Carlo methods, specifically sequential Monte Carlo techniques, for solving abstract counting and optimization problems. Written by authorities in the

  5. Ground States of the Lithium Atom and its Ions up to Z = 10 in the Presence of Magnetic Field using Variational Monte Carlo Technique

    CERN Document Server

    Doma, S B; Farag, A M; El-Gammal, F N

    2016-01-01

    The variational Monte Carlo method is applied to investigate the ground state energy of the lithium atom and its ions up to Z=10 in the presence of an external magnetic field regime. Our calculations are based on using three forms of compact and accurate trial wave functions, which were put forward in calculating energies in the absence of magnetic field. The obtained results are in good agreement with the most recent accurate values and also with the exact values.

  6. Characteristics of miniature electronic brachytherapy x-ray sources based on TG-43U1 formalism using Monte Carlo simulation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safigholi, Habib; Faghihi, Reza; Jashni, Somaye Karimi; Meigooni, Ali S. [Faculty of Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Fars, 73481-13111, Persepolis (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Research Center, Shiraz University, 71936-16548, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, 71348-14336, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Radiation therapy, Comprehensive Cancer Center of Nevada, 3730 South Eastern Avenue, Las Vegas, Nevada 89169 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: The goal of this study is to determine a method for Monte Carlo (MC) characterization of the miniature electronic brachytherapy x-ray sources (MEBXS) and to set dosimetric parameters according to TG-43U1 formalism. TG-43U1 parameters were used to get optimal designs of MEBXS. Parameters that affect the dose distribution such as anode shapes, target thickness, target angles, and electron beam source characteristics were evaluated. Optimized MEBXS designs were obtained and used to determine radial dose functions and 2D anisotropy functions in the electron energy range of 25-80 keV. Methods: Tungsten anode material was considered in two different geometries, hemispherical and conical-hemisphere. These configurations were analyzed by the 4C MC code with several different optimization techniques. The first optimization compared target thickness layers versus electron energy. These optimized thicknesses were compared with published results by Ihsan et al.[Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B 264, 371-377 (2007)]. The second optimization evaluated electron source characteristics by changing the cathode shapes and electron energies. Electron sources studied included; (1) point sources, (2) uniform cylinders, and (3) nonuniform cylindrical shell geometries. The third optimization was used to assess the apex angle of the conical-hemisphere target. The goal of these optimizations was to produce 2D-dose anisotropy functions closer to unity. An overall optimized MEBXS was developed from this analysis. The results obtained from this model were compared to known characteristics of HDR {sup 125}I, LDR {sup 103}Pd, and Xoft Axxent electronic brachytherapy source (XAEBS) [Med. Phys. 33, 4020-4032 (2006)]. Results: The optimized anode thicknesses as a function of electron energy is fitted by the linear equation Y ({mu}m) = 0.0459X (keV)-0.7342. The optimized electron source geometry is obtained for a disk-shaped parallel beam (uniform cylinder) with 0.9 mm radius. The TG-43

  7. Testing river surveying techniques in tidal environments: example from an actively meandering channel surveyed with TLS (Mont Saint-Michel bay, France)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, J.; Lague, D.

    2013-12-01

    Tidal channel developed in mega-tidal salt marsh offer a unique set of characteristics to study the interaction between hydraulics, riparian vegetation and sedimentation using Terrestrial Laser Scanner (TLS). The recession of water allows a nearly complete survey of the channel that is otherwise impossible in rivers. Moreover, the predictability of tide amplitude allows to target surveys large events. Finally, the hydro-sedimentary processes and peak flow velocities in excess of 2 m/s in mega-tidal estuaries (e.g. Mont Saint Michel (MSM) bay) allow to explore conditions that are similar to river during flood conditions. This has motivated a 3 years study of a sinuous tidal channel located on the fringe of the marsh with the aim to understand its dynamics at daily to annual scales. We have acquired 36 high resolution topographic surveys with TLS, whose 13 daily surveys were acquired during annual largest tides. A local reference network of targets is used to yield a high registration accuracy with uncertainty varying between 1.5 mm and 3.4 mm. We use the CANUPO algorithm for classifying riparian vegetation and ground in 3D data, and use the point cloud comparison algorithm M3C2 to resolve 3D topographic changes down to 5 mm. ADCP, ADV and a turbidimeter were installed to constrain flow velocities and suspended sediment concentration (SSC). Our analysis is focused on three active compartments: (1) the inner bar on which riparian pioneer vegetation is developing and where sedimentation reaches up to 5 cm/tide; (2) the actively eroding outer bank which exhibits local retreat rates up to 2 m/tide; (3) the channel itself for which we document fluctuations of up to 0.2 m in elevation at daily to monthly timescales. We find that High Water Level (HWL) is a good predictor of the mean rate of evolution of these compartments with different empirical relationships. Spatially averaged sedimentation on the inner bend tends to increase linearly with HWL and is increased by a

  8. Application de la methode des sous-groupes au calcul Monte-Carlo multigroupe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicolas

    effects of the scattering reaction consistent with the subgroup method. In this study, we generalize the Discrete Angle Technique, already proposed for homogeneous, multigroup cross sections, to isotopic cross sections on the form of probability tables. In this technique, the angular density is discretized into probability tables. Similarly to the cross-section case, a moment approach is used to compute the probability tables for the scattering cosine. (4) The introduction of a leakage model based on the B1 fundamental mode approximation. Unlike deterministic lattice packages, most Monte Carlo-based lattice physics codes do not include leakage models. However the generation of homogenized and condensed group constants (cross sections, diffusion coefficients) require the critical flux. This project has involved the development of a program into the DRAGON framework, written in Fortran 2003 and wrapped with a driver in C, the GANLIB 5. Choosing Fortran 2003 has permitted the use of some modern features, such as the definition of objects and methods, data encapsulation and polymorphism. The validation of the proposed code has been performed by comparison with other numerical methods: (1) The continuous-energy Monte Carlo method of the SERPENT code. (2) The Collision Probability (CP) method and the discrete ordinates (SN) method of the DRAGON lattice code. (3) The multigroup Monte Carlo code MORET, coupled with the DRAGON code. Benchmarks used in this work are representative of some industrial configurations encountered in reactor and criticality-safety calculations: (1)Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) cells and assemblies. (2) Canada-Deuterium Uranium Reactors (CANDU-6) clusters. (3) Critical experiments from the ICSBEP handbook (International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Program).

  9. The Specific Bias in Dynamic Monte Carlo Simulations of Nuclear Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Toshihisa; Endo, Hiroshi; Ishizu, Tomoko; Tatewaki, Isao

    2014-06-01

    During the development of Monte-Carlo-based dynamic code system, we have encountered two major Monte-Carlo-specific problems. One is the break down due to "false super-criticality" which is caused by an accidentally large eigenvalue due to statistical error in spite of the fact that the reactor is actually not. The other problem, which is the main topic in this paper, is that the statistical error in power level using the reactivity calculated with Monte Carlo code is not symmetric about its mean but always positively biased. This signifies that the bias is accumulated as the calculation proceeds and consequently results in over-estimation of the final power level. It should be noted that the bias will not eliminated by refining time step as long as the variance is not zero. A preliminary investigation on this matter using the one-group-precursor point kinetic equations was made and it was concluded that the bias in power level is approximately proportional to the product of variance in Monte Carlo calculation and elapsed time. This conclusion was verified with some numerical experiments. This outcome is important in quantifying the required precision of the Monte-Carlo-based reactivity calculations.

  10. Calculation of photon pulse height distribution using deterministic and Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhavan, Azadeh; Vosoughi, Naser

    2015-12-01

    Radiation transport techniques which are used in radiation detection systems comprise one of two categories namely probabilistic and deterministic. However, probabilistic methods are typically used in pulse height distribution simulation by recreating the behavior of each individual particle, the deterministic approach, which approximates the macroscopic behavior of particles by solution of Boltzmann transport equation, is being developed because of its potential advantages in computational efficiency for complex radiation detection problems. In current work linear transport equation is solved using two methods including collided components of the scalar flux algorithm which is applied by iterating on the scattering source and ANISN deterministic computer code. This approach is presented in one dimension with anisotropic scattering orders up to P8 and angular quadrature orders up to S16. Also, multi-group gamma cross-section library required for this numerical transport simulation is generated in a discrete appropriate form. Finally, photon pulse height distributions are indirectly calculated by deterministic methods that approvingly compare with those from Monte Carlo based codes namely MCNPX and FLUKA.

  11. Dosimetric study of prostate brachytherapy using techniques of Monte-Carlo simulation, experimental measurements and comparison with a treatment plan; Estudo dosimetrico de braquiterapia da prostata utilizando tecnicas de simulacao de Monte-Carlo, medidas experimentais, e comparacao com um procedimento de plano de tratamento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teles, Pedro; Barros, Silvia; Vaz, Pedro; Goncalves, Isabel [Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, Sacavem (Portugal). Instituto Superior Tecnico; Cardoso, Simone [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Facure, Alessandro [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rosa, Luiz da; Santos, Maira [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pereira Junior, Pedro Paulo [Dosimetrika (Brazil); Zankl, Maria [German Research Centre for Environmental Health, Munchen (Germany). Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen

    2013-10-01

    Prostate Brachytherapy is a radiotherapy technique, which consists in inserting a number of radioactive seeds (containing, usually, the following radionuclides {sup 125} l, {sup 241}Am or {sup 103}Pd ) surrounding or in the vicinity of, prostate tumor tissue . The main objective of this technique is to maximize the radiation dose to the tumor and minimize it in other tissues and organs healthy, in order to reduce its morbidity. The absorbed dose distribution in the prostate, using this technique is usually non-homogeneous and time dependent. Various parameters such as the type of seed, the attenuation interactions between them, their geometrical arrangement within the prostate, the actual geometry of the seeds,and further swelling of the prostate gland after implantation greatly influence the course of absorbed dose in the prostate and surrounding areas. Quantification of these parameters is therefore extremely important for dose optimization and improvement of their plans conventional treatment, which in many cases not fully take into account. The Monte Carlo techniques allow to study these parameters quickly and effectively. In this work, we use the program MCNPX and generic voxel phantom (GOLEM) where simulated different geometric arrangements of seeds containing {sup 125}I, Amersham Health model of type 6711 in prostates of different sizes, in order to try to quantify some of the parameters. The computational model was validated using a phantom prostate cubic RW3 type , consisting of tissue equivalent, and thermoluminescent dosimeters. Finally, to have a term of comparison with a treatment real plan it was simulate a treatment plan used in a hospital of Rio de Janeiro, with exactly the same parameters, and our computational model. The results obtained in our study seem to indicate that the parameters described above may be a source of uncertainty in the correct evaluation of the dose required for actual treatment plans. The use of Monte Carlo techniques can

  12. Using adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system technique for crosstalk correction in simultaneous {sup 99m}Tc/{sup 201}Tl SPECT imaging: A Monte Carlo simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidary, Saeed, E-mail: saeedheidary@aut.ac.ir; Setayeshi, Saeed, E-mail: setayesh@aut.ac.ir

    2015-01-11

    This work presents a simulation based study by Monte Carlo which uses two adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS) for cross talk compensation of simultaneous {sup 99m}Tc/{sup 201}Tl dual-radioisotope SPECT imaging. We have compared two neuro-fuzzy systems based on fuzzy c-means (FCM) and subtractive (SUB) clustering. Our approach incorporates eight energy-windows image acquisition from 28 keV to 156 keV and two main photo peaks of {sup 201}Tl (77±10% keV) and {sup 99m}Tc (140±10% keV). The Geant4 application in emission tomography (GATE) is used as a Monte Carlo simulator for three cylindrical and a NURBS Based Cardiac Torso (NCAT) phantom study. Three separate acquisitions including two single-isotopes and one dual isotope were performed in this study. Cross talk and scatter corrected projections are reconstructed by an iterative ordered subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) algorithm which models the non-uniform attenuation in the projection/back-projection. ANFIS-FCM/SUB structures are tuned to create three to sixteen fuzzy rules for modeling the photon cross-talk of the two radioisotopes. Applying seven to nine fuzzy rules leads to a total improvement of the contrast and the bias comparatively. It is found that there is an out performance for the ANFIS-FCM due to its acceleration and accurate results.

  13. Radiative transfer equation for predicting light propagation in biological media: comparison of a modified finite volume method, the Monte Carlo technique, and an exact analytical solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asllanaj, Fatmir; Contassot-Vivier, Sylvain; Liemert, André; Kienle, Alwin

    2014-01-01

    We examine the accuracy of a modified finite volume method compared to analytical and Monte Carlo solutions for solving the radiative transfer equation. The model is used for predicting light propagation within a two-dimensional absorbing and highly forward-scattering medium such as biological tissue subjected to a collimated light beam. Numerical simulations for the spatially resolved reflectance and transmittance are presented considering refractive index mismatch with Fresnel reflection at the interface, homogeneous and two-layered media. Time-dependent as well as steady-state cases are considered. In the steady state, it is found that the modified finite volume method is in good agreement with the other two methods. The relative differences between the solutions are found to decrease with spatial mesh refinement applied for the modified finite volume method obtaining method is used for the time semi-discretization of the radiative transfer equation. An agreement among the modified finite volume method, Runge-Kutta method, and Monte Carlo solutions are shown, but with relative differences higher than in the steady state.

  14. Proton Upset Monte Carlo Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Patrick M.; Kouba, Coy K.; Foster, Charles C.

    2009-01-01

    The Proton Upset Monte Carlo Simulation (PROPSET) program calculates the frequency of on-orbit upsets in computer chips (for given orbits such as Low Earth Orbit, Lunar Orbit, and the like) from proton bombardment based on the results of heavy ion testing alone. The software simulates the bombardment of modern microelectronic components (computer chips) with high-energy (.200 MeV) protons. The nuclear interaction of the proton with the silicon of the chip is modeled and nuclear fragments from this interaction are tracked using Monte Carlo techniques to produce statistically accurate predictions.

  15. Europium Structural Effect on a Borosilicate Glass of Nuclear Interest: Combining Experimental Techniques with Reverse Monte Carlo Modelling to Investigate Short to Medium Range Order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouty, O.; Delaye, J. M.; Peuget, S.; Charpentier, T.

    In-depth understanding of the effects of actinides in borosilicate glass matrices used for nuclear waste disposal is of great importance for nuclear spent fuel reprocessing cycle and fission products immobilization. This work carried out on ternary simplified glasses (Si, B, Na) doped respectively with 1 mol. % and 3.85 mol. % europium, presents a comprehensive study on the behaviour of trivalent europium taken as a surrogate of trivalent actinides. Neutron scattering, Wide Angle X- ray Scattering, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Raman Spectroscopy and Reverse Monte Carlo simulations were performed. For both glasses, it was found that europium coordination number was around 6 ± 0.2, revealing an octahedral spatial configuration. Europium species accommodates in both silicate and borate site distributions but preferentially in the silicate network. Europium induces a IVB/IIIB ratio decrease and a silicate network polymerization according to NMR 29Si chemical shift and Raman spectra evolution.

  16. Estimation of low energy neutron flux ($E_n\\leq15$ MeV) in India-based Neutrino Observatory cavern using Monte Carlo techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Dokania, N; Mathimalar, S; Garai, A; Nanal, V; Pillay, R G; Bhushan, K G

    2015-01-01

    The neutron flux at low energy ($E_n\\leq15$ MeV) resulting from the radioactivity of the rock in the underground cavern of the India-based Neutrino Observatory is estimated using Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulations. The neutron production rate due to the spontaneous fission of U, Th and ($\\alpha, n$) interactions in the rock is determined employing the actual rock composition. It has been demonstrated that the total flux is equivalent to a finite size cylindrical rock ($D=L=140$ cm) element. The energy integrated neutron flux thus obtained at the center of the underground tunnel is 2.76 (0.47) $\\times 10^{-6}\\rm~n ~cm^{-2}~s^{-1}$. The estimated neutron flux is of the same order ($\\sim10^{-6}\\rm~n ~cm^{-2}~s^{-1}$)~as measured in other underground laboratories.

  17. Development of new source diagnostic methods and variance reduction techniques for Monte Carlo eigenvalue problems with a focus on high dominance ratio problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenner, Michael T.

    Obtaining the solution to the linear Boltzmann equation is often is often a daunting task. The time-independent form is an equation of six independent variables which cannot be solved analytically in all but some special problems. Instead, numerical approaches have been devised. This work focuses on improving Monte Carlo methods for its solution in eigenvalue form. First, a statistical method of stationarity detection called the KPSS test adapted as a Monte Carlo eigenvalue source convergence test. The KPSS test analyzes the source center of mass series which was chosen since it should be indicative of overall source behavior, and is physically easy to understand. A source center of mass plot alone serves as a good visual source convergence diagnostic. The KPSS test and three different information theoretic diagnostics were implemented into the well known KENOV.a code inside of the SCALE (version 5) code package from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and compared through analysis of a simple problem and several difficult source convergence benchmarks. Results showed that the KPSS test can add to the overall confidence by identifying more problematic simulations than without its usage. Not only this, the source center of mass information on hand visually aids in the understanding of the problem physics. The second major focus of this dissertation concerned variance reduction methodologies for Monte Carlo eigenvalue problems. The CADIS methodology, based on importance sampling, was adapted to the eigenvalue problems. It was shown that the straight adaption of importance sampling can provide a significant variance reduction in determination of keff (in cases studied up to 30%?). A modified version of this methodology was developed which utilizes independent deterministic importance simulations. In this new methodology, each particle is simulated multiple times, once to every other discretized source region utilizing the importance for that region only. Since each particle

  18. Moisture content prediction in poultry litter using artificial intelligence techniques and Monte Carlo simulation to determine the economic yield from energy use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico-Contreras, José Octavio; Aguilar-Lasserre, Alberto Alfonso; Méndez-Contreras, Juan Manuel; López-Andrés, Jhony Josué; Cid-Chama, Gabriela

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the economic return of poultry litter combustion in boilers to produce bioenergy (thermal and electrical), as this biomass has a high-energy potential due to its component elements, using fuzzy logic to predict moisture and identify the high-impact variables. This is carried out using a proposed 7-stage methodology, which includes a statistical analysis of agricultural systems and practices to identify activities contributing to moisture in poultry litter (for example, broiler chicken management, number of air extractors, and avian population density), and thereby reduce moisture to increase the yield of the combustion process. Estimates of poultry litter production and heating value are made based on 4 different moisture content percentages (scenarios of 25%, 30%, 35%, and 40%), and then a risk analysis is proposed using the Monte Carlo simulation to select the best investment alternative and to estimate the environmental impact for greenhouse gas mitigation. The results show that dry poultry litter (25%) is slightly better for combustion, generating 3.20% more energy. Reducing moisture from 40% to 25% involves considerable economic investment due to the purchase of equipment to reduce moisture; thus, when calculating financial indicators, the 40% scenario is the most attractive, as it is the current scenario. Thus, this methodology proposes a technology approach based on the use of advanced tools to predict moisture and representation of the system (Monte Carlo simulation), where the variability and uncertainty of the system are accurately represented. Therefore, this methodology is considered generic for any bioenergy generation system and not just for the poultry sector, whether it uses combustion or another type of technology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Monte Carlo simulation of a compact microbeam radiotherapy system based on carbon nanotube field emission technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Eric C; Chang, Sha X

    2012-08-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is an experimental radiotherapy technique that has shown potent antitumor effects with minimal damage to normal tissue in animal studies. This unique form of radiation is currently only produced in a few large synchrotron accelerator research facilities in the world. To promote widespread translational research on this promising treatment technology we have proposed and are in the initial development stages of a compact MRT system that is based on carbon nanotube field emission x-ray technology. We report on a Monte Carlo based feasibility study of the compact MRT system design. Monte Carlo calculations were performed using EGSnrc-based codes. The proposed small animal research MRT device design includes carbon nanotube cathodes shaped to match the corresponding MRT collimator apertures, a common reflection anode with filter, and a MRT collimator. Each collimator aperture is sized to deliver a beam width ranging from 30 to 200 μm at 18.6 cm source-to-axis distance. Design parameters studied with Monte Carlo include electron energy, cathode design, anode angle, filtration, and collimator design. Calculations were performed for single and multibeam configurations. Increasing the energy from 100 kVp to 160 kVp increased the photon fluence through the collimator by a factor of 1.7. Both energies produced a largely uniform fluence along the long dimension of the microbeam, with 5% decreases in intensity near the edges. The isocentric dose rate for 160 kVp was calculated to be 700 Gy∕min∕A in the center of a 3 cm diameter target. Scatter contributions resulting from collimator size were found to produce only small (<7%) changes in the dose rate for field widths greater than 50 μm. Dose vs depth was weakly dependent on filtration material. The peak-to-valley ratio varied from 10 to 100 as the separation between adjacent microbeams varies from 150 to 1000 μm. Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that the proposed compact MRT system

  20. Lattice gauge theories and Monte Carlo simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Rebbi, Claudio

    1983-01-01

    This volume is the most up-to-date review on Lattice Gauge Theories and Monte Carlo Simulations. It consists of two parts. Part one is an introductory lecture on the lattice gauge theories in general, Monte Carlo techniques and on the results to date. Part two consists of important original papers in this field. These selected reprints involve the following: Lattice Gauge Theories, General Formalism and Expansion Techniques, Monte Carlo Simulations. Phase Structures, Observables in Pure Gauge Theories, Systems with Bosonic Matter Fields, Simulation of Systems with Fermions.

  1. Monte Carlo radiation transport in external beam radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Çeçen, Yiğit

    2013-01-01

    The use of Monte Carlo in radiation transport is an effective way to predict absorbed dose distributions. Monte Carlo modeling has contributed to a better understanding of photon and electron transport by radiotherapy physicists. The aim of this review is to introduce Monte Carlo as a powerful radiation transport tool. In this review, photon and electron transport algorithms for Monte Carlo techniques are investigated and a clinical linear accelerator model is studied for external beam radiot...

  2. Extended Ensemble Monte Carlo

    OpenAIRE

    Iba, Yukito

    2000-01-01

    ``Extended Ensemble Monte Carlo''is a generic term that indicates a set of algorithms which are now popular in a variety of fields in physics and statistical information processing. Exchange Monte Carlo (Metropolis-Coupled Chain, Parallel Tempering), Simulated Tempering (Expanded Ensemble Monte Carlo), and Multicanonical Monte Carlo (Adaptive Umbrella Sampling) are typical members of this family. Here we give a cross-disciplinary survey of these algorithms with special emphasis on the great f...

  3. Quantum Monte Carlo approaches for correlated systems

    CERN Document Server

    Becca, Federico

    2017-01-01

    Over the past several decades, computational approaches to studying strongly-interacting systems have become increasingly varied and sophisticated. This book provides a comprehensive introduction to state-of-the-art quantum Monte Carlo techniques relevant for applications in correlated systems. Providing a clear overview of variational wave functions, and featuring a detailed presentation of stochastic samplings including Markov chains and Langevin dynamics, which are developed into a discussion of Monte Carlo methods. The variational technique is described, from foundations to a detailed description of its algorithms. Further topics discussed include optimisation techniques, real-time dynamics and projection methods, including Green's function, reptation and auxiliary-field Monte Carlo, from basic definitions to advanced algorithms for efficient codes, and the book concludes with recent developments on the continuum space. Quantum Monte Carlo Approaches for Correlated Systems provides an extensive reference ...

  4. Monte Carlo-based Spencer-Attix and Bragg-Gray tissue-to-air stopping power ratios for ISO beta sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvam, T Palani; Vandana, S; Bakshi, A K; Babu, D A R

    2016-02-01

    Spencer-Attix (SA) and Bragg-Gray (BG) mass-collision-stopping-power ratios of tissue-to-air are calculated using a modified version of EGSnrc-based SPRRZnrc user-code for the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) beta sources such as (147)Pm, (85)Kr, (90)Sr/(90)Y and (106)Ru/(106)Rh. The ratios are calculated at 5 and 70 µm depths along the central axis of the unit density ICRU-4-element tissue phantom as a function of air-cavity lengths of the extrapolation chamber l = 0.025-0.25 cm. The study shows that the BG values are independent of l and agree well with the ISO-reported values for the above sources. The overall variation in the SA values is ∼0.3% for all the investigated sources, when l is varied from 0.025 to 0.25 cm. As energy of the beta increases the SA stopping-power ratio for a given cavity length decreases. For example, SA values of (147)Pm are higher by ∼2% when compared with the corresponding values of (106)Ru/(106)Rh source. SA stopping-power ratios are higher than the BG stopping-power ratios and the degree of variation depends on type of source and the value of l. For example, the difference is up to 0.7 % at l = 0.025 cm for the (90)Sr/(90)Y source. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. New Product Development in an Emerging Economy: Analysing the Role of Supplier Involvement Practices by Using Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanagi Kanapathy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The research question is whether the positive relationship found between supplier involvement practices and new product development performances in developed economies also holds in emerging economies. The role of supplier involvement practices in new product development performance is yet to be substantially investigated in the emerging economies (other than China. This premise was examined by distributing a survey instrument (Jayaram’s (2008 published survey instrument that has been utilised in developed economies to Malaysian manufacturing companies. To gauge the relationship between the supplier involvement practices and new product development (NPD project performance of 146 companies, structural equation modelling was adopted. Our findings prove that supplier involvement practices have a significant positive impact on NPD project performance in an emerging economy with respect to quality objectives, design objectives, cost objectives, and “time-to-market” objectives. Further analysis using the Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm, yielding a more credible and feasible differentiation, confirmed these results (even in the case of an emerging economy and indicated that these practices have a 28% impact on variance of NPD project performance. This considerable effect implies that supplier involvement is a must have, although further research is needed to identify the contingencies for its practices.

  6. Dosimetry of a cone beam CT device for oral and maxillofacial radiology using Monte Carlo techniques and ICRP adult reference computational phantoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morant, J J; Salvadó, M; Hernández-Girón, I; Casanovas, R; Ortega, R; Calzado, A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to calculate organ and effective doses for a range of available protocols in a particular cone beam CT (CBCT) scanner dedicated to dentistry and to derive effective dose conversion factors. Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate organ and effective doses using the International Commission on Radiological Protection voxel adult male and female reference phantoms (AM and AF) in an i-CAT CBCT. Nine different fields of view (FOVs) were simulated considering full- and half-rotation modes, and also a high-resolution acquisition for a particular protocol. Dose-area product (DAP) was measured. Dose to organs varied for the different FOVs, usually being higher in the AF phantom. For 360°, effective doses were in the range of 25-66 μSv, and 46 μSv for full head. Higher contributions to the effective dose corresponded to the remainder (31%; 27-36 range), salivary glands (23%; 20-29%), thyroid (13%; 8-17%), red bone marrow (10%; 9-11%) and oesophagus (7%; 4-10%). The high-resolution protocol doubled the standard resolution doses. DAP values were between 181 mGy cm(2) and 556 mGy cm(2) for 360°. For 180° protocols, dose to organs, effective dose and DAP were approximately 40% lower. A conversion factor (DAP to effective dose) of 0.130 ± 0.006 μSv mGy(-1) cm(-2) was derived for all the protocols, excluding full head. A wide variation in dose to eye lens and thyroid was found when shifting the FOV in the AF phantom. Organ and effective doses varied according to field size, acquisition angle and positioning of the beam relative to radiosensitive organs. Good positive correlation between calculated effective dose and measured DAP was found.

  7. Amorphous silicon EPID calibration for dosimetric applications: comparison of a method based on Monte Carlo prediction of response with existing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parent, L [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Fielding, A L [School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane (Australia); Dance, D R [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Seco, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Francis Burr Proton Therapy Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston (United States); Evans, P M [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom)

    2007-07-21

    For EPID dosimetry, the calibration should ensure that all pixels have a similar response to a given irradiation. A calibration method (MC), using an analytical fit of a Monte Carlo simulated flood field EPID image to correct for the flood field image pixel intensity shape, was proposed. It was compared with the standard flood field calibration (FF), with the use of a water slab placed in the beam to flatten the flood field (WS) and with a multiple field calibration where the EPID was irradiated with a fixed 10 x 10 field for 16 different positions (MF). The EPID was used in its normal configuration (clinical setup) and with an additional 3 mm copper slab (modified setup). Beam asymmetry measured with a diode array was taken into account in MC and WS methods. For both setups, the MC method provided pixel sensitivity values within 3% of those obtained with the MF and WS methods (mean difference <1%, standard deviation <2%). The difference of pixel sensitivity between MC and FF methods was up to 12.2% (clinical setup) and 11.8% (modified setup). MC calibration provided images of open fields (5 x 5 to 20 x 20 cm{sup 2}) and IMRT fields to within 3% of that obtained with WS and MF calibrations while differences with images calibrated with the FF method for fields larger than 10 x 10 cm{sup 2} were up to 8%. MC, WS and MF methods all provided a major improvement on the FF method. Advantages and drawbacks of each method were reviewed.

  8. Dosimetry of a cone beam CT device for oral and maxillofacial radiology using Monte Carlo techniques and ICRP adult reference computational phantoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morant, JJ; Salvadó, M; Hernández-Girón, I; Casanovas, R; Ortega, R; Calzado, A

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to calculate organ and effective doses for a range of available protocols in a particular cone beam CT (CBCT) scanner dedicated to dentistry and to derive effective dose conversion factors. Methods: Monte Carlo simulations were used to calculate organ and effective doses using the International Commission on Radiological Protection voxel adult male and female reference phantoms (AM and AF) in an i-CAT CBCT. Nine different fields of view (FOVs) were simulated considering full- and half-rotation modes, and also a high-resolution acquisition for a particular protocol. Dose–area product (DAP) was measured. Results: Dose to organs varied for the different FOVs, usually being higher in the AF phantom. For 360°, effective doses were in the range of 25–66 μSv, and 46 μSv for full head. Higher contributions to the effective dose corresponded to the remainder (31%; 27–36 range), salivary glands (23%; 20–29%), thyroid (13%; 8–17%), red bone marrow (10%; 9–11%) and oesophagus (7%; 4–10%). The high-resolution protocol doubled the standard resolution doses. DAP values were between 181 mGy cm2 and 556 mGy cm2 for 360°. For 180° protocols, dose to organs, effective dose and DAP were approximately 40% lower. A conversion factor (DAP to effective dose) of 0.130 ± 0.006 μSv mGy−1 cm−2 was derived for all the protocols, excluding full head. A wide variation in dose to eye lens and thyroid was found when shifting the FOV in the AF phantom. Conclusions: Organ and effective doses varied according to field size, acquisition angle and positioning of the beam relative to radiosensitive organs. Good positive correlation between calculated effective dose and measured DAP was found. PMID:22933532

  9. Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo for frequency-dependent radiative transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Densmore, Jeffrey D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kelly, Thompson G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Urbatish, Todd J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-11-17

    Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations. In this paper, we develop an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo. With a frequency-dependent test problem, we confirm the increased efficiency of our new DDMC technique.

  10. Study on the response of thermoluminescent dosemeters to synchrotron radiation: experimental method and Monte Carlo calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, A K; Chatterjee, S; Palani Selvam, T; Dhabekar, B S

    2010-07-01

    In the present study, the energy dependence of response of some popular thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLDs) have been investigated such as LiF:Mg,Ti, LiF:Mg,Cu,P and CaSO(4):Dy to synchrotron radiation in the energy range of 10-34 keV. The study utilised experimental, Monte Carlo and analytical methods. The Monte Carlo calculations were based on the EGSnrc and FLUKA codes. The calculated energy response of all the TLDs using the EGSnrc and FLUKA codes shows excellent agreement with each other. The analytically calculated response shows good agreement with the Monte Carlo calculated response in the low-energy region. In the case of CaSO(4):Dy, the Monte Carlo-calculated energy response is smaller by a factor of 3 at all energies in comparison with the experimental response when polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) (75 % by wt) is included in the Monte Carlo calculations. When PTFE is ignored in the Monte Carlo calculations, the difference between the calculated and experimental response decreases (both responses are comparable >25 keV). For the LiF-based TLDs, the Monte Carlo-based response shows reasonable agreement with the experimental response.

  11. Self-consistent kinetic lattice Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsfield, A.; Dunham, S.; Fujitani, Hideaki

    1999-07-01

    The authors present a brief description of a formalism for modeling point defect diffusion in crystalline systems using a Monte Carlo technique. The main approximations required to construct a practical scheme are briefly discussed, with special emphasis on the proper treatment of charged dopants and defects. This is followed by tight binding calculations of the diffusion barrier heights for charged vacancies. Finally, an application of the kinetic lattice Monte Carlo method to vacancy diffusion is presented.

  12. Monte Carlo fundamentals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, F.B.; Sutton, T.M.

    1996-02-01

    This report is composed of the lecture notes from the first half of a 32-hour graduate-level course on Monte Carlo methods offered at KAPL. These notes, prepared by two of the principle developers of KAPL`s RACER Monte Carlo code, cover the fundamental theory, concepts, and practices for Monte Carlo analysis. In particular, a thorough grounding in the basic fundamentals of Monte Carlo methods is presented, including random number generation, random sampling, the Monte Carlo approach to solving transport problems, computational geometry, collision physics, tallies, and eigenvalue calculations. Furthermore, modern computational algorithms for vector and parallel approaches to Monte Carlo calculations are covered in detail, including fundamental parallel and vector concepts, the event-based algorithm, master/slave schemes, parallel scaling laws, and portability issues.

  13. Monte Carlo methods

    OpenAIRE

    Bardenet, R.

    2012-01-01

    ISBN:978-2-7598-1032-1; International audience; Bayesian inference often requires integrating some function with respect to a posterior distribution. Monte Carlo methods are sampling algorithms that allow to compute these integrals numerically when they are not analytically tractable. We review here the basic principles and the most common Monte Carlo algorithms, among which rejection sampling, importance sampling and Monte Carlo Markov chain (MCMC) methods. We give intuition on the theoretic...

  14. Exploring Monte Carlo methods

    CERN Document Server

    Dunn, William L

    2012-01-01

    Exploring Monte Carlo Methods is a basic text that describes the numerical methods that have come to be known as "Monte Carlo." The book treats the subject generically through the first eight chapters and, thus, should be of use to anyone who wants to learn to use Monte Carlo. The next two chapters focus on applications in nuclear engineering, which are illustrative of uses in other fields. Five appendices are included, which provide useful information on probability distributions, general-purpose Monte Carlo codes for radiation transport, and other matters. The famous "Buffon's needle proble

  15. Development of a space radiation Monte Carlo computer simulation based on the FLUKA and ROOT codes

    CERN Document Server

    Pinsky, L; Ferrari, A; Sala, P; Carminati, F; Brun, R

    2001-01-01

    This NASA funded project is proceeding to develop a Monte Carlo-based computer simulation of the radiation environment in space. With actual funding only initially in place at the end of May 2000, the study is still in the early stage of development. The general tasks have been identified and personnel have been selected. The code to be assembled will be based upon two major existing software packages. The radiation transport simulation will be accomplished by updating the FLUKA Monte Carlo program, and the user interface will employ the ROOT software being developed at CERN. The end-product will be a Monte Carlo-based code which will complement the existing analytic codes such as BRYNTRN/HZETRN presently used by NASA to evaluate the effects of radiation shielding in space. The planned code will possess the ability to evaluate the radiation environment for spacecraft and habitats in Earth orbit, in interplanetary space, on the lunar surface, or on a planetary surface such as Mars. Furthermore, it will be usef...

  16. Improved version of the PHOBOS Glauber Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Loizides, C; Steinberg, P

    2014-01-01

    Glauber models are used to calculate geometric quantities in the initial state of heavy ion collisions, such as impact parameter, number of participating nucleons and initial eccentricity. Experimental heavy-ion collaboration, in particular at RHIC and LHC, use Glauber Model calculations for various geometric observables. In this document, we describe the assumptions inherent to the approach, and provide an updated implementation (v2) of the Monte Carlo based Glauber Model calculation, which originally was used by the PHOBOS collaboration. The main improvement w.r.t. the earlier version (arXiv:0805.4411) are the inclusion of tritium, Helium-3, and Uranium, as well as the treatment of deformed nuclei and Glauber-Gribov fluctuations of the proton in p+A collisions. A users' guide (updated to reflect changes in v2) is provided for running various calculations.

  17. Coupled carrier-phonon nonequilibrium dynamics in terahertz quantum cascade lasers: a Monte Carlo analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iotti, Rita C.; Rossi, Fausto

    2013-07-01

    The operation of state-of-the-art optoelectronic quantum devices may be significantly affected by the presence of a nonequilibrium quasiparticle population to which the carrier subsystem is unavoidably coupled. This situation is particularly evident in new-generation semiconductor-heterostructure-based quantum emitters, operating both in the mid-infrared as well as in the terahertz (THz) region of the electromagnetic spectrum. In this paper, we present a Monte Carlo-based global kinetic approach, suitable for the investigation of a combined carrier-phonon nonequilibrium dynamics in realistic devices, and discuss its application with a prototypical resonant-phonon THz emitting quantum cascade laser design.

  18. Simulation and the Monte Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinstein, Reuven Y

    2016-01-01

    Simulation and the Monte Carlo Method, Third Edition reflects the latest developments in the field and presents a fully updated and comprehensive account of the major topics that have emerged in Monte Carlo simulation since the publication of the classic First Edition over more than a quarter of a century ago. While maintaining its accessible and intuitive approach, this revised edition features a wealth of up-to-date information that facilitates a deeper understanding of problem solving across a wide array of subject areas, such as engineering, statistics, computer science, mathematics, and the physical and life sciences. The book begins with a modernized introduction that addresses the basic concepts of probability, Markov processes, and convex optimization. Subsequent chapters discuss the dramatic changes that have occurred in the field of the Monte Carlo method, with coverage of many modern topics including: Markov Chain Monte Carlo, variance reduction techniques such as the transform likelihood ratio...

  19. Monte Carlo simulations for plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, M.; Murakami, S.; Nakajima, N.; Wang, W.X. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    Plasma behaviours are very complicated and the analyses are generally difficult. However, when the collisional processes play an important role in the plasma behaviour, the Monte Carlo method is often employed as a useful tool. For examples, in neutral particle injection heating (NBI heating), electron or ion cyclotron heating, and alpha heating, Coulomb collisions slow down high energetic particles and pitch angle scatter them. These processes are often studied by the Monte Carlo technique and good agreements can be obtained with the experimental results. Recently, Monte Carlo Method has been developed to study fast particle transports associated with heating and generating the radial electric field. Further it is applied to investigating the neoclassical transport in the plasma with steep gradients of density and temperatures which is beyong the conventional neoclassical theory. In this report, we briefly summarize the researches done by the present authors utilizing the Monte Carlo method. (author)

  20. Monte Carlo methods for particle transport

    CERN Document Server

    Haghighat, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method has become the de facto standard in radiation transport. Although powerful, if not understood and used appropriately, the method can give misleading results. Monte Carlo Methods for Particle Transport teaches appropriate use of the Monte Carlo method, explaining the method's fundamental concepts as well as its limitations. Concise yet comprehensive, this well-organized text: * Introduces the particle importance equation and its use for variance reduction * Describes general and particle-transport-specific variance reduction techniques * Presents particle transport eigenvalue issues and methodologies to address these issues * Explores advanced formulations based on the author's research activities * Discusses parallel processing concepts and factors affecting parallel performance Featuring illustrative examples, mathematical derivations, computer algorithms, and homework problems, Monte Carlo Methods for Particle Transport provides nuclear engineers and scientists with a practical guide ...

  1. Smart detectors for Monte Carlo radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Baes, Maarten

    2008-01-01

    Many optimization techniques have been invented to reduce the noise that is inherent in Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations. As the typical detectors used in Monte Carlo simulations do not take into account all the information contained in the impacting photon packages, there is still room to optimize this detection process and the corresponding estimate of the surface brightness distributions. We want to investigate how all the information contained in the distribution of impacting photon packages can be optimally used to decrease the noise in the surface brightness distributions and hence to increase the efficiency of Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations. We demonstrate that the estimate of the surface brightness distribution in a Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulation is similar to the estimate of the density distribution in an SPH simulation. Based on this similarity, a recipe is constructed for smart detectors that take full advantage of the exact location of the impact of the photon pack...

  2. State-of-the-art Monte Carlo 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soran, P.D.

    1988-06-28

    Particle transport calculations in highly dimensional and physically complex geometries, such as detector calibration, radiation shielding, space reactors, and oil-well logging, generally require Monte Carlo transport techniques. Monte Carlo particle transport can be performed on a variety of computers ranging from APOLLOs to VAXs. Some of the hardware and software developments, which now permit Monte Carlo methods to be routinely used, are reviewed in this paper. The development of inexpensive, large, fast computer memory, coupled with fast central processing units, permits Monte Carlo calculations to be performed on workstations, minicomputers, and supercomputers. The Monte Carlo renaissance is further aided by innovations in computer architecture and software development. Advances in vectorization and parallelization architecture have resulted in the development of new algorithms which have greatly reduced processing times. Finally, the renewed interest in Monte Carlo has spawned new variance reduction techniques which are being implemented in large computer codes. 45 refs.

  3. MCOR - Monte Carlo depletion code for reference LWR calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puente Espel, Federico, E-mail: fup104@psu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University (United States); Tippayakul, Chanatip, E-mail: cut110@psu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University (United States); Ivanov, Kostadin, E-mail: kni1@psu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University (United States); Misu, Stefan, E-mail: Stefan.Misu@areva.com [AREVA, AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Research highlights: > Introduction of a reference Monte Carlo based depletion code with extended capabilities. > Verification and validation results for MCOR. > Utilization of MCOR for benchmarking deterministic lattice physics (spectral) codes. - Abstract: The MCOR (MCnp-kORigen) code system is a Monte Carlo based depletion system for reference fuel assembly and core calculations. The MCOR code is designed as an interfacing code that provides depletion capability to the LANL Monte Carlo code by coupling two codes: MCNP5 with the AREVA NP depletion code, KORIGEN. The physical quality of both codes is unchanged. The MCOR code system has been maintained and continuously enhanced since it was initially developed and validated. The verification of the coupling was made by evaluating the MCOR code against similar sophisticated code systems like MONTEBURNS, OCTOPUS and TRIPOLI-PEPIN. After its validation, the MCOR code has been further improved with important features. The MCOR code presents several valuable capabilities such as: (a) a predictor-corrector depletion algorithm, (b) utilization of KORIGEN as the depletion module, (c) individual depletion calculation of each burnup zone (no burnup zone grouping is required, which is particularly important for the modeling of gadolinium rings), and (d) on-line burnup cross-section generation by the Monte Carlo calculation for 88 isotopes and usage of the KORIGEN libraries for PWR and BWR typical spectra for the remaining isotopes. Besides the just mentioned capabilities, the MCOR code newest enhancements focus on the possibility of executing the MCNP5 calculation in sequential or parallel mode, a user-friendly automatic re-start capability, a modification of the burnup step size evaluation, and a post-processor and test-matrix, just to name the most important. The article describes the capabilities of the MCOR code system; from its design and development to its latest improvements and further ameliorations. Additionally

  4. Quantitative elemental determination of the particulate matter in the atmosphere of Pachuca city and the Real del Monte village, Hidalgo by means of PIXE technique; Determinacion elemental cuantitativa de la materia particulada en la atmosfera de la ciudad de Pachuca y el poblado de Real del Monte, Hidalgo, mediante la tecnica PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guasso G, C.L. [ITT, 50000 Toluca (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    All the pollutants that are generated so much of anthropogenic activities as natural cause effects to the health, and of course its increase the atmospheric pollution. Today in day for the great advance of the technology other pollutants are even generated but noxious to the human being's health, such it is the case of the particles, which are also called particulate matter airborne (MPA). This has motivated, to establish control measures leaning in collection strategies and certified analysis techniques, accurate and reliable. In the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) they have been carried out studies on particulate matter airborne. In 1991 it was installed, calibrated and validated the nuclear technique of atomic origin based on proton beams known as PIXE. The characterization of the (MPA) it is carried out applying this technique and the collection by means of Dichotomous collectors (SFU). The thesis work that is presented next, includes the topic of the atmospheric pollution by particulate matter airborne (MPA) in a mining region, inside the Hidalgo State. The study was carried out during the 1998 winter season, only embracing the whole month of March in alternate days giving a total of 112 samples. Two sites that are highly active in the mining were studied, these are: the Real del Monte town and the Hidalgo state capital: Pachuca. Four samples per day were collected beginning to the 7:00 am--7:00 pm (daytime period) and concluding to the 7:00 pm -7:00 am (nocturne period). The characterization of its elementary content is carried out using the X-ray emission induced by particles technique (PIXE) that is a nuclear technique able to analyze 23 chemical elements beginning from the Al to the Pb, it requires of a very small sample quantity, it is very sensitive and it is not destructive. This characterization one carries out so much for fraction PM{sub 2.5} (fine) like as PM{sub 10} (thick) in both sites, also it was analyzed the temporary

  5. Shell model the Monte Carlo way

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ormand, W.E.

    1995-03-01

    The formalism for the auxiliary-field Monte Carlo approach to the nuclear shell model is presented. The method is based on a linearization of the two-body part of the Hamiltonian in an imaginary-time propagator using the Hubbard-Stratonovich transformation. The foundation of the method, as applied to the nuclear many-body problem, is discussed. Topics presented in detail include: (1) the density-density formulation of the method, (2) computation of the overlaps, (3) the sign of the Monte Carlo weight function, (4) techniques for performing Monte Carlo sampling, and (5) the reconstruction of response functions from an imaginary-time auto-correlation function using MaxEnt techniques. Results obtained using schematic interactions, which have no sign problem, are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the method, while an extrapolation method for realistic Hamiltonians is presented. In addition, applications at finite temperature are outlined.

  6. Quantum Monte Carlo simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yazhen

    2011-01-01

    Contemporary scientific studies often rely on the understanding of complex quantum systems via computer simulation. This paper initiates the statistical study of quantum simulation and proposes a Monte Carlo method for estimating analytically intractable quantities. We derive the bias and variance for the proposed Monte Carlo quantum simulation estimator and establish the asymptotic theory for the estimator. The theory is used to design a computational scheme for minimizing the mean square er...

  7. Monte Carlo transition probabilities

    OpenAIRE

    Lucy, L. B.

    2001-01-01

    Transition probabilities governing the interaction of energy packets and matter are derived that allow Monte Carlo NLTE transfer codes to be constructed without simplifying the treatment of line formation. These probabilities are such that the Monte Carlo calculation asymptotically recovers the local emissivity of a gas in statistical equilibrium. Numerical experiments with one-point statistical equilibrium problems for Fe II and Hydrogen confirm this asymptotic behaviour. In addition, the re...

  8. Analysis of hysteretic spin transition and size effect in 3D spin crossover compounds investigated by Monte Carlo Entropic sampling technique in the framework of the Ising-type model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chiruta, Daniel; Linares, J; Dahoo, Pierre-Richard; Dimian, Mihai

    2015-01-01

    .... In this contribution we solve the corresponding Hamiltonian for a three-dimensional SCO system taking into account short-range and long-range interaction using a biased Monte Carlo entropic sampling...

  9. Intrinsic fluorescence of protein in turbid media using empirical relation based on Monte Carlo lookup table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Gnanatheepam; Udayakumar, Kanniyappan; Aruna, Prakasarao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2017-03-01

    Fluorescence of Protein has been widely used in diagnostic oncology for characterizing cellular metabolism. However, the intensity of fluorescence emission is affected due to the absorbers and scatterers in tissue, which may lead to error in estimating exact protein content in tissue. Extraction of intrinsic fluorescence from measured fluorescence has been achieved by different methods. Among them, Monte Carlo based method yields the highest accuracy for extracting intrinsic fluorescence. In this work, we have attempted to generate a lookup table for Monte Carlo simulation of fluorescence emission by protein. Furthermore, we fitted the generated lookup table using an empirical relation. The empirical relation between measured and intrinsic fluorescence is validated using tissue phantom experiments. The proposed relation can be used for estimating intrinsic fluorescence of protein for real-time diagnostic applications and thereby improving the clinical interpretation of fluorescence spectroscopic data.

  10. A parallel systematic-Monte Carlo algorithm for exploring conformational space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Vera, Roberto; Mazola, Yuliet; Musacchio, Alexis

    2012-01-01

    Computational algorithms to explore the conformational space of small molecules are complex and computer demand field in chemoinformatics. In this paper a hybrid algorithm to explore the conformational space of organic molecules is presented. This hybrid algorithm is based in a systematic search approach combined with a Monte Carlo based method in order to obtain an ensemble of low-energy conformations simulating the flexibility of small chemical compounds. The Monte Carlo method uses the Metropolis criterion to accept or reject a conformation through an in-house implementation of the MMFF94s force field to calculate the conformational energy. The parallel design of this algorithm, based on the message passing interface (MPI) paradigm, was implemented. The results showed a performance increase in the terms of speed and efficiency.

  11. An Introduction to Monte Carlo Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raeside, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews the principles of Monte Carlo calculation and random number generation in an attempt to introduce the direct and the rejection method of sampling techniques as well as the variance-reduction procedures. Indicates that the increasing availability of computers makes it possible for a wider audience to learn about these powerful methods. (CC)

  12. Accuracy of Monte Carlo simulations compared to in-vivo MDCT dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bostani, Maryam, E-mail: mbostani@mednet.ucla.edu; McMillan, Kyle; Cagnon, Chris H.; McNitt-Gray, Michael F. [Departments of Biomedical Physics and Radiology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States); Mueller, Jonathon W. [United States Air Force, Keesler Air Force Base, Biloxi, Mississippi 39534 (United States); Cody, Dianna D. [University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); DeMarco, John J. [Departments of Biomedical Physics and Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 (United States)

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy of a Monte Carlo simulation-based method for estimating radiation dose from multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) by comparing simulated doses in ten patients to in-vivo dose measurements. Methods: MD Anderson Cancer Center Institutional Review Board approved the acquisition of in-vivo rectal dose measurements in a pilot study of ten patients undergoing virtual colonoscopy. The dose measurements were obtained by affixing TLD capsules to the inner lumen of rectal catheters. Voxelized patient models were generated from the MDCT images of the ten patients, and the dose to the TLD for all exposures was estimated using Monte Carlo based simulations. The Monte Carlo simulation results were compared to the in-vivo dose measurements to determine accuracy. Results: The calculated mean percent difference between TLD measurements and Monte Carlo simulations was −4.9% with standard deviation of 8.7% and a range of −22.7% to 5.7%. Conclusions: The results of this study demonstrate very good agreement between simulated and measured doses in-vivo. Taken together with previous validation efforts, this work demonstrates that the Monte Carlo simulation methods can provide accurate estimates of radiation dose in patients undergoing CT examinations.

  13. Monte carlo simulations of organic photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Chris; Greenham, Neil C

    2014-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are a valuable tool to model the generation, separation, and collection of charges in organic photovoltaics where charges move by hopping in a complex nanostructure and Coulomb interactions between charge carriers are important. We review the Monte Carlo techniques that have been applied to this problem, and describe the results of simulations of the various recombination processes that limit device performance. We show how these processes are influenced by the local physical and energetic structure of the material, providing information that is useful for design of efficient photovoltaic systems.

  14. The Virtual Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Hrivnacova, I; Berejnov, V V; Brun, R; Carminati, F; Fassò, A; Futo, E; Gheata, A; Caballero, I G; Morsch, Andreas

    2003-01-01

    The concept of Virtual Monte Carlo (VMC) has been developed by the ALICE Software Project to allow different Monte Carlo simulation programs to run without changing the user code, such as the geometry definition, the detector response simulation or input and output formats. Recently, the VMC classes have been integrated into the ROOT framework, and the other relevant packages have been separated from the AliRoot framework and can be used individually by any other HEP project. The general concept of the VMC and its set of base classes provided in ROOT will be presented. Existing implementations for Geant3, Geant4 and FLUKA and simple examples of usage will be described.

  15. SMCTC: Sequential Monte Carlo in C++

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M. Johansen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Sequential Monte Carlo methods are a very general class of Monte Carlo methodsfor sampling from sequences of distributions. Simple examples of these algorithms areused very widely in the tracking and signal processing literature. Recent developmentsillustrate that these techniques have much more general applicability, and can be appliedvery eectively to statistical inference problems. Unfortunately, these methods are oftenperceived as being computationally expensive and dicult to implement. This articleseeks to address both of these problems.A C++ template class library for the ecient and convenient implementation of verygeneral Sequential Monte Carlo algorithms is presented. Two example applications areprovided: a simple particle lter for illustrative purposes and a state-of-the-art algorithmfor rare event estimation.

  16. Quantum speedup of Monte Carlo methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanaro, Ashley

    2015-09-08

    Monte Carlo methods use random sampling to estimate numerical quantities which are hard to compute deterministically. One important example is the use in statistical physics of rapidly mixing Markov chains to approximately compute partition functions. In this work, we describe a quantum algorithm which can accelerate Monte Carlo methods in a very general setting. The algorithm estimates the expected output value of an arbitrary randomized or quantum subroutine with bounded variance, achieving a near-quadratic speedup over the best possible classical algorithm. Combining the algorithm with the use of quantum walks gives a quantum speedup of the fastest known classical algorithms with rigorous performance bounds for computing partition functions, which use multiple-stage Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques. The quantum algorithm can also be used to estimate the total variation distance between probability distributions efficiently.

  17. Monte Carlo strategies in scientific computing

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jun S

    2008-01-01

    This paperback edition is a reprint of the 2001 Springer edition This book provides a self-contained and up-to-date treatment of the Monte Carlo method and develops a common framework under which various Monte Carlo techniques can be "standardized" and compared Given the interdisciplinary nature of the topics and a moderate prerequisite for the reader, this book should be of interest to a broad audience of quantitative researchers such as computational biologists, computer scientists, econometricians, engineers, probabilists, and statisticians It can also be used as the textbook for a graduate-level course on Monte Carlo methods Many problems discussed in the alter chapters can be potential thesis topics for masters’ or PhD students in statistics or computer science departments Jun Liu is Professor of Statistics at Harvard University, with a courtesy Professor appointment at Harvard Biostatistics Department Professor Liu was the recipient of the 2002 COPSS Presidents' Award, the most prestigious one for sta...

  18. Cloud-based Monte Carlo modelling of BSSRDF for the rendering of human skin appearance (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronin, Alexander; Rushmeier, Holly E.; Meglinski, Igor; Bykov, Alexander V.

    2016-03-01

    We present a new Monte Carlo based approach for the modelling of Bidirectional Scattering-Surface Reflectance Distribution Function (BSSRDF) for accurate rendering of human skin appearance. The variations of both skin tissues structure and the major chromophores are taken into account correspondingly to the different ethnic and age groups. The computational solution utilizes HTML5, accelerated by the graphics processing units (GPUs), and therefore is convenient for the practical use at the most of modern computer-based devices and operating systems. The results of imitation of human skin reflectance spectra, corresponding skin colours and examples of 3D faces rendering are presented and compared with the results of phantom studies.

  19. Quantum Monte Carlo using a Stochastic Poisson Solver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, D; Martin, R M; Kalos, M H

    2005-05-06

    Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) is an extremely powerful method to treat many-body systems. Usually quantum Monte Carlo has been applied in cases where the interaction potential has a simple analytic form, like the 1/r Coulomb potential. However, in a complicated environment as in a semiconductor heterostructure, the evaluation of the interaction itself becomes a non-trivial problem. Obtaining the potential from any grid-based finite-difference method, for every walker and every step is unfeasible. We demonstrate an alternative approach of solving the Poisson equation by a classical Monte Carlo within the overall quantum Monte Carlo scheme. We have developed a modified ''Walk On Spheres'' algorithm using Green's function techniques, which can efficiently account for the interaction energy of walker configurations, typical of quantum Monte Carlo algorithms. This stochastically obtained potential can be easily incorporated within popular quantum Monte Carlo techniques like variational Monte Carlo (VMC) or diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC). We demonstrate the validity of this method by studying a simple problem, the polarization of a helium atom in the electric field of an infinite capacitor.

  20. Monte Carlo solution of the volume-integral equation of electromagnetic scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltoniemi, J.; Muinonen, K.

    2014-07-01

    regular quadratures. Because of the oscillating singularity of the Green's function, the quadrature must match exactly the canceling patterns of the integrand, and any improper quadrature leads to large errors. Monte Carlo based integration appears thus a very bad choice, but we take the challenge, and formulate the integration applying a three-finger rule to catch the singularity. Our other selections are the least-squares technique and plane-wave basis, though both can be freely and easily changed. The singularity is treated fully numerically, and the radius ρ is assumed so small that the correction terms do not contribute. Any other choice only worsens the accuracy, without a significant gain in speed. As with any other technique, we can solve small spheres of size xrefractive indices. In speed, this technique does not compete with faster techniques such as ADDA, but in some random cases the accuracy can be even better (probably due to sub-optimal singularity formula in ADDA -- applying numerical integration also there could probably make ADDA winner in all the cases). We continue towards more complicated cases and multiple scattering to see, if some further improvements can be made.

  1. Using Supervised Learning to Improve Monte Carlo Integral Estimation

    CERN Document Server

    Tracey, Brendan; Alonso, Juan J

    2011-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) techniques are often used to estimate integrals of a multivariate function using randomly generated samples of the function. In light of the increasing interest in uncertainty quantification and robust design applications in aerospace engineering, the calculation of expected values of such functions (e.g. performance measures) becomes important. However, MC techniques often suffer from high variance and slow convergence as the number of samples increases. In this paper we present Stacked Monte Carlo (StackMC), a new method for post-processing an existing set of MC samples to improve the associated integral estimate. StackMC is based on the supervised learning techniques of fitting functions and cross validation. It should reduce the variance of any type of Monte Carlo integral estimate (simple sampling, importance sampling, quasi-Monte Carlo, MCMC, etc.) without adding bias. We report on an extensive set of experiments confirming that the StackMC estimate of an integral is more accurate than ...

  2. Monte Carlo Option Princing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Maya

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available El método Monte Carlo se aplica a varios casos de valoración de opciones financieras. El método genera una buena aproximación al comparar su precisión con la de otros métodos numéricos. La estimación que produce la versión Cruda de Monte Carlo puede ser aún más exacta si se recurre a metodologías de reducción de la varianza entre las cuales se sugieren la variable antitética y de la variable de control. Sin embargo, dichas metodologías requieren un esfuerzo computacional mayor por lo cual las mismas deben ser evaluadas en términos no sólo de su precisión sino también de su eficiencia.

  3. Monte Carlo and nonlinearities

    CERN Document Server

    Dauchet, Jérémi; Blanco, Stéphane; Caliot, Cyril; Charon, Julien; Coustet, Christophe; Hafi, Mouna El; Eymet, Vincent; Farges, Olivier; Forest, Vincent; Fournier, Richard; Galtier, Mathieu; Gautrais, Jacques; Khuong, Anaïs; Pelissier, Lionel; Piaud, Benjamin; Roger, Maxime; Terrée, Guillaume; Weitz, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is widely used to numerically predict systems behaviour. However, its powerful incremental design assumes a strong premise which has severely limited application so far: the estimation process must combine linearly over dimensions. Here we show that this premise can be alleviated by projecting nonlinearities on a polynomial basis and increasing the configuration-space dimension. Considering phytoplankton growth in light-limited environments, radiative transfer in planetary atmospheres, electromagnetic scattering by particles and concentrated-solar-power-plant productions, we prove the real world usability of this advance on four test-cases that were so far regarded as impracticable by Monte Carlo approaches. We also illustrate an outstanding feature of our method when applied to sharp problems with interacting particles: handling rare events is now straightforward. Overall, our extension preserves the features that made the method popular: addressing nonlinearities does not compromise o...

  4. Fundamentals of Monte Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wollaber, Allan Benton [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-16

    This is a powerpoint presentation which serves as lecture material for the Parallel Computing summer school. It goes over the fundamentals of the Monte Carlo calculation method. The material is presented according to the following outline: Introduction (background, a simple example: estimating π), Why does this even work? (The Law of Large Numbers, The Central Limit Theorem), How to sample (inverse transform sampling, rejection), and An example from particle transport.

  5. Hybrid Monte Carlo with Chaotic Mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Kadakia, Nirag

    2016-01-01

    We propose a hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) technique applicable to high-dimensional multivariate normal distributions that effectively samples along chaotic trajectories. The method is predicated on the freedom of choice of the HMC momentum distribution, and due to its mixing properties, exhibits sample-to-sample autocorrelations that decay far faster than those in the traditional hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm. We test the methods on distributions of varying correlation structure, finding that the proposed technique produces superior covariance estimates, is less reliant on step-size tuning, and can even function with sparse or no momentum re-sampling. The method presented here is promising for more general distributions, such as those that arise in Bayesian learning of artificial neural networks and in the state and parameter estimation of dynamical systems.

  6. Composite biasing in Monte Carlo radiative transfer

    CERN Document Server

    Baes, Maarten; Lunttila, Tuomas; Bianchi, Simone; Camps, Peter; Juvela, Mika; Kuiper, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Biasing or importance sampling is a powerful technique in Monte Carlo radiative transfer, and can be applied in different forms to increase the accuracy and efficiency of simulations. One of the drawbacks of the use of biasing is the potential introduction of large weight factors. We discuss a general strategy, composite biasing, to suppress the appearance of large weight factors. We use this composite biasing approach for two different problems faced by current state-of-the-art Monte Carlo radiative transfer codes: the generation of photon packages from multiple components, and the penetration of radiation through high optical depth barriers. In both cases, the implementation of the relevant algorithms is trivial and does not interfere with any other optimisation techniques. Through simple test models, we demonstrate the general applicability, accuracy and efficiency of the composite biasing approach. In particular, for the penetration of high optical depths, the gain in efficiency is spectacular for the spe...

  7. 基于连续能量蒙特卡罗方法的均匀化群常数计算%Continuous energy Monte Carlo method based homogenization multi-group constants calculation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李满仓; 王侃; 姚栋

    2012-01-01

    两步法反应堆物理计算流程中,组件均匀化群常数显著影响堆芯计算精度.相比确定论方法,连续能量蒙特卡罗方法均匀化精确描述各种几何构型栅格,避免繁琐共振自屏计算,保留更多连续能量信息,不仅产生的群常数更精确,而且普适性也更强.作为实现连续能量蒙特卡罗组件均匀化的第一步,本文应用径迹长度方法统计计算一般群截面和群常数,提出并使用散射事件方法获得不能直接应用确定论方法计算群间散射截面和高阶勒让德系数,应用P1截面计算扩散系数.为还原两步法计算流程中组件在堆芯的临界状态,本文应用BN理论对均匀化群常数进行泄漏修正.在4种类型组件和简化压水堆堆芯上数值验证蒙特卡罗均匀化群常数.验证结果表明:连续能量蒙特卡罗方法组件均匀化群常数具有良好几何适应性,显著提高堆芯计算精度.%The efficiency of the standard two-step reactor physics calculation relies on the accuracy of multi-group constants from the assembly-level homogenization process. In contrast to the traditional deterministic methods, generating the homogenization cross sections via Monte Carlo method overcomes the difficulties in geometry and treats energy in continuum, thus provides more accuracy parameters. Besides, the same code and data bank can be used for a wide range of applications, resulting in the versatility using Monte Carlo codes for homogenization. As the first stage to realize Monte Carlo based lattice homogenization, the track length scheme is used as the foundation of cross section generation, which is straight forward. The scattering matrix and Legendre components, however, require special techniques. The Scattering Event method was proposed to solve the problem. There are no continuous energy counterparts in the Monte Carlo calculation for neutron diffusion coefficients. P1 cross sections were used to calculate the diffusion

  8. The Monte Carlo method the method of statistical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Shreider, YuA

    1966-01-01

    The Monte Carlo Method: The Method of Statistical Trials is a systematic account of the fundamental concepts and techniques of the Monte Carlo method, together with its range of applications. Some of these applications include the computation of definite integrals, neutron physics, and in the investigation of servicing processes. This volume is comprised of seven chapters and begins with an overview of the basic features of the Monte Carlo method and typical examples of its application to simple problems in computational mathematics. The next chapter examines the computation of multi-dimensio

  9. Guideline of Monte Carlo calculation. Neutron/gamma ray transport simulation by Monte Carlo method

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    This report condenses basic theories and advanced applications of neutron/gamma ray transport calculations in many fields of nuclear energy research. Chapters 1 through 5 treat historical progress of Monte Carlo methods, general issues of variance reduction technique, cross section libraries used in continuous energy Monte Carlo codes. In chapter 6, the following issues are discussed: fusion benchmark experiments, design of ITER, experiment analyses of fast critical assembly, core analyses of JMTR, simulation of pulsed neutron experiment, core analyses of HTTR, duct streaming calculations, bulk shielding calculations, neutron/gamma ray transport calculations of the Hiroshima atomic bomb. Chapters 8 and 9 treat function enhancements of MCNP and MVP codes, and a parallel processing of Monte Carlo calculation, respectively. An important references are attached at the end of this report.

  10. Radiative Equilibrium and Temperature Correction in Monte Carlo Radiation Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Bjorkman, J. E.; Wood, Kenneth

    2001-01-01

    We describe a general radiative equilibrium and temperature correction procedure for use in Monte Carlo radiation transfer codes with sources of temperature-independent opacity, such as astrophysical dust. The technique utilizes the fact that Monte Carlo simulations track individual photon packets, so we may easily determine where their energy is absorbed. When a packet is absorbed, it heats a particular cell within the envelope, raising its temperature. To enforce radiative equilibrium, the ...

  11. Successful combination of the stochastic linearization and Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elishakoff, I.; Colombi, P.

    1993-01-01

    A combination of a stochastic linearization and Monte Carlo techniques is presented for the first time in literature. A system with separable nonlinear damping and nonlinear restoring force is considered. The proposed combination of the energy-wise linearization with the Monte Carlo method yields an error under 5 percent, which corresponds to the error reduction associated with the conventional stochastic linearization by a factor of 4.6.

  12. Multiscale Monte Carlo equilibration: pure Yang-Mills theory

    CERN Document Server

    Endres, Michael G; Detmold, William; Orginos, Kostas; Pochinsky, Andrew V

    2015-01-01

    We present a multiscale thermalization algorithm for lattice gauge theory, which enables efficient parallel generation of uncorrelated gauge field configurations. The algorithm combines standard Monte Carlo techniques with ideas drawn from real space renormalization group and multigrid methods. We demonstrate the viability of the algorithm for pure Yang-Mills gauge theory for both heat bath and hybrid Monte Carlo evolution, and show that it ameliorates the problem of topological freezing up to controllable lattice spacing artifacts.

  13. Monte Carlo method for solving a parabolic problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Yi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a numerical method based on random sampling for a parabolic problem. This method combines use of the Crank-Nicolson method and Monte Carlo method. In the numerical algorithm, we first discretize governing equations by Crank-Nicolson method, and obtain a large sparse system of linear algebraic equations, then use Monte Carlo method to solve the linear algebraic equations. To illustrate the usefulness of this technique, we apply it to some test problems.

  14. Monts Jura Jazz Festival

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    The 5th edition of the "Monts Jura Jazz Festival" will take place at the Esplanade du Lac in Divonne-les-Bains, France on September 21 and 22. This festival organized by the CERN Jazz Club and supported by the CERN Staff Association is becoming a major musical event in the Geneva region. International Jazz artists like Didier Lockwood and David Reinhardt are part of this year outstanding program. Full program and e-tickets are available on the festival website. Don't miss this great festival!

  15. Monts Jura Jazz Festival

    CERN Multimedia

    Jazz Club

    2012-01-01

    The 5th edition of the "Monts Jura Jazz Festival" that will take place on September 21st and 22nd 2012 at the Esplanade du Lac in Divonne-les-Bains. This festival is organized by the "CERN Jazz Club" with the support of the "CERN Staff Association". This festival is a major musical event in the French/Swiss area and proposes a world class program with jazz artists such as D.Lockwood and D.Reinhardt. More information on http://www.jurajazz.com.

  16. LMC: Logarithmantic Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantz, Adam B.

    2017-06-01

    LMC is a Markov Chain Monte Carlo engine in Python that implements adaptive Metropolis-Hastings and slice sampling, as well as the affine-invariant method of Goodman & Weare, in a flexible framework. It can be used for simple problems, but the main use case is problems where expensive likelihood evaluations are provided by less flexible third-party software, which benefit from parallelization across many nodes at the sampling level. The parallel/adaptive methods use communication through MPI, or alternatively by writing/reading files, and mostly follow the approaches pioneered by CosmoMC (ascl:1106.025).

  17. Fission source sampling in coupled Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, Boerge; Dufek, Jan [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Div. of Nuclear Research Technology

    2017-05-15

    We study fission source sampling methods suitable for the iterative way of solving coupled Monte Carlo neutronics problems. Specifically, we address the question as to how the initial Monte Carlo fission source should be optimally sampled at the beginning of each iteration step. We compare numerically two approaches of sampling the initial fission source; the tested techniques are derived from well-known methods for iterating the neutron flux in coupled simulations. The first technique samples the initial fission source using the source from the previous iteration step, while the other technique uses a combination of all previous steps for this purpose. We observe that the previous-step approach performs the best.

  18. Development of CT scanner models for patient organ dose calculations using Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jianwei

    There is a serious and growing concern about the CT dose delivered by diagnostic CT examinations or image-guided radiation therapy imaging procedures. To better understand and to accurately quantify radiation dose due to CT imaging, Monte Carlo based CT scanner models are needed. This dissertation describes the development, validation, and application of detailed CT scanner models including a GE LightSpeed 16 MDCT scanner and two image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) cone beam CT (CBCT) scanners, kV CBCT and MV CBCT. The modeling process considered the energy spectrum, beam geometry and movement, and bowtie filter (BTF). The methodology of validating the scanner models using reported CTDI values was also developed and implemented. Finally, the organ doses to different patients undergoing CT scan were obtained by integrating the CT scanner models with anatomically-realistic patient phantoms. The tube current modulation (TCM) technique was also investigated for dose reduction. It was found that for RPI-AM, thyroid, kidneys and thymus received largest dose of 13.05, 11.41 and 11.56 mGy/100 mAs from chest scan, abdomen-pelvis scan and CAP scan, respectively using 120 kVp protocols. For RPI-AF, thymus, small intestine and kidneys received largest dose of 10.28, 12.08 and 11.35 mGy/100 mAs from chest scan, abdomen-pelvis scan and CAP scan, respectively using 120 kVp protocols. The dose to the fetus of the 3 month pregnant patient phantom was 0.13 mGy/100 mAs and 0.57 mGy/100 mAs from the chest and kidney scan, respectively. For the chest scan of the 6 month patient phantom and the 9 month patient phantom, the fetal doses were 0.21 mGy/100 mAs and 0.26 mGy/100 mAs, respectively. For MDCT with TCM schemas, the fetal dose can be reduced with 14%-25%. To demonstrate the applicability of the method proposed in this dissertation for modeling the CT scanner, additional MDCT scanner was modeled and validated by using the measured CTDI values. These results demonstrated that the

  19. Improving PWR core simulations by Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis and Bayesian inference

    CERN Document Server

    Castro, Emilio; Buss, Oliver; Garcia-Herranz, Nuria; Hoefer, Axel; Porsch, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    A Monte Carlo-based Bayesian inference model is applied to the prediction of reactor operation parameters of a PWR nuclear power plant. In this non-perturbative framework, high-dimensional covariance information describing the uncertainty of microscopic nuclear data is combined with measured reactor operation data in order to provide statistically sound, well founded uncertainty estimates of integral parameters, such as the boron letdown curve and the burnup-dependent reactor power distribution. The performance of this methodology is assessed in a blind test approach, where we use measurements of a given reactor cycle to improve the prediction of the subsequent cycle. As it turns out, the resulting improvement of the prediction quality is impressive. In particular, the prediction uncertainty of the boron letdown curve, which is of utmost importance for the planning of the reactor cycle length, can be reduced by one order of magnitude by including the boron concentration measurement information of the previous...

  20. Multilevel sequential Monte-Carlo samplers

    KAUST Repository

    Jasra, Ajay

    2016-01-05

    Multilevel Monte-Carlo methods provide a powerful computational technique for reducing the computational cost of estimating expectations for a given computational effort. They are particularly relevant for computational problems when approximate distributions are determined via a resolution parameter h, with h=0 giving the theoretical exact distribution (e.g. SDEs or inverse problems with PDEs). The method provides a benefit by coupling samples from successive resolutions, and estimating differences of successive expectations. We develop a methodology that brings Sequential Monte-Carlo (SMC) algorithms within the framework of the Multilevel idea, as SMC provides a natural set-up for coupling samples over different resolutions. We prove that the new algorithm indeed preserves the benefits of the multilevel principle, even if samples at all resolutions are now correlated.

  1. Monte Carlo simulations on SIMD computer architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burmester, C.P.; Gronsky, R. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Wille, L.T. [Florida Atlantic Univ., Boca Raton, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-03-01

    Algorithmic considerations regarding the implementation of various materials science applications of the Monte Carlo technique to single instruction multiple data (SMM) computer architectures are presented. In particular, implementation of the Ising model with nearest, next nearest, and long range screened Coulomb interactions on the SIMD architecture MasPar MP-1 (DEC mpp-12000) series of massively parallel computers is demonstrated. Methods of code development which optimize processor array use and minimize inter-processor communication are presented including lattice partitioning and the use of processor array spanning tree structures for data reduction. Both geometric and algorithmic parallel approaches are utilized. Benchmarks in terms of Monte Carlo updates per second for the MasPar architecture are presented and compared to values reported in the literature from comparable studies on other architectures.

  2. Calibration of a gamma spectrometer for natural radioactivity measurement. Experimental measurements and Monte Carlo modelling; Etalonnage d'un spectrometre gamma en vue de la mesure de la radioactivite naturelle. Mesures experimentales et modelisation par techniques de Monte-Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtine, Fabien [Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire, Universite Blaise Pascal - CNRS/IN2P3, 63000 Aubiere Cedex (France)

    2007-03-15

    The thesis proceeded in the context of dating by thermoluminescence. This method requires laboratory measurements of the natural radioactivity. For that purpose, we have been using a germanium spectrometer. To refine the calibration of this one, we modelled it by using a Monte-Carlo computer code: Geant4. We developed a geometrical model which takes into account the presence of inactive zones and zones of poor charge-collection within the germanium crystal. The parameters of the model were adjusted by comparison with experimental results obtained with a source of {sup 137}Cs. It appeared that the form of the inactive zones is less simple than is presented in the specialized literature. This model was widened to the case of a more complex source, with cascade effect and angular correlations between photons: the {sup 60}Co. Lastly, applied to extended sources, it gave correct results and allowed us to validate the simulation of matrix effect. (author)

  3. MCMini: Monte Carlo on GPGPU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcus, Ryan C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-25

    MCMini is a proof of concept that demonstrates the possibility for Monte Carlo neutron transport using OpenCL with a focus on performance. This implementation, written in C, shows that tracing particles and calculating reactions on a 3D mesh can be done in a highly scalable fashion. These results demonstrate a potential path forward for MCNP or other Monte Carlo codes.

  4. Bayesian Optimal Experimental Design Using Multilevel Monte Carlo

    KAUST Repository

    Issaid, Chaouki Ben

    2015-01-07

    Experimental design is very important since experiments are often resource-exhaustive and time-consuming. We carry out experimental design in the Bayesian framework. To measure the amount of information, which can be extracted from the data in an experiment, we use the expected information gain as the utility function, which specifically is the expected logarithmic ratio between the posterior and prior distributions. Optimizing this utility function enables us to design experiments that yield the most informative data for our purpose. One of the major difficulties in evaluating the expected information gain is that the integral is nested and can be high dimensional. We propose using Multilevel Monte Carlo techniques to accelerate the computation of the nested high dimensional integral. The advantages are twofold. First, the Multilevel Monte Carlo can significantly reduce the cost of the nested integral for a given tolerance, by using an optimal sample distribution among different sample averages of the inner integrals. Second, the Multilevel Monte Carlo method imposes less assumptions, such as the concentration of measures, required by Laplace method. We test our Multilevel Monte Carlo technique using a numerical example on the design of sensor deployment for a Darcy flow problem governed by one dimensional Laplace equation. We also compare the performance of the Multilevel Monte Carlo, Laplace approximation and direct double loop Monte Carlo.

  5. Monte-Carlo simulation-based statistical modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, John

    2017-01-01

    This book brings together expert researchers engaged in Monte-Carlo simulation-based statistical modeling, offering them a forum to present and discuss recent issues in methodological development as well as public health applications. It is divided into three parts, with the first providing an overview of Monte-Carlo techniques, the second focusing on missing data Monte-Carlo methods, and the third addressing Bayesian and general statistical modeling using Monte-Carlo simulations. The data and computer programs used here will also be made publicly available, allowing readers to replicate the model development and data analysis presented in each chapter, and to readily apply them in their own research. Featuring highly topical content, the book has the potential to impact model development and data analyses across a wide spectrum of fields, and to spark further research in this direction.

  6. EXTENDED MONTE CARLO LOCALIZATION ALGORITHM FOR MOBILE SENSOR NETWORKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A real-world localization system for wireless sensor networks that adapts for mobility and irregular radio propagation model is considered.The traditional range-based techniques and recent range-free localization schemes are not welt competent for localization in mobile sensor networks,while the probabilistic approach of Bayesian filtering with particle-based density representations provides a comprehensive solution to such localization problem.Monte Carlo localization is a Bayesian filtering method that approximates the mobile node’S location by a set of weighted particles.In this paper,an enhanced Monte Carlo localization algorithm-Extended Monte Carlo Localization (Ext-MCL) is suitable for the practical wireless network environment where the radio propagation model is irregular.Simulation results show the proposal gets better localization accuracy and higher localizable node number than previously proposed Monte Carlo localization schemes not only for ideal radio model,but also for irregular one.

  7. Metropolis Methods for Quantum Monte Carlo Simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Ceperley, D. M.

    2003-01-01

    Since its first description fifty years ago, the Metropolis Monte Carlo method has been used in a variety of different ways for the simulation of continuum quantum many-body systems. This paper will consider some of the generalizations of the Metropolis algorithm employed in quantum Monte Carlo: Variational Monte Carlo, dynamical methods for projector monte carlo ({\\it i.e.} diffusion Monte Carlo with rejection), multilevel sampling in path integral Monte Carlo, the sampling of permutations, ...

  8. Utilising Monte Carlo Simulation for the Valuation of Mining Concessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosli Said

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Valuation involves the analyses of various input data to produce an estimated value. Since each input is itself often an estimate, there is an element of uncertainty in the input. This leads to uncertainty in the resultant output value. It is argued that a valuation must also convey information on the uncertainty, so as to be more meaningful and informative to the user. The Monte Carlo simulation technique can generate the information on uncertainty and is therefore potentially useful to valuation. This paper reports on the investigation that has been conducted to apply Monte Carlo simulation technique in mineral valuation, more specifically, in the valuation of a quarry concession.

  9. Modified Monte Carlo techniques by rotating slip segments for searching general critical slip surface(Ⅰ): random angle of rotation%基于滑面段旋转的Monte Carlo搜索技术及改进(Ⅰ):转角大小随机

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鲁渝; 张建民

    2006-01-01

    对Abdallah I.Husein等人提出的Monte Carlo搜索技术进行了改进:(1)增加了若干条几何合理性条件;(2)增加了防止节点重合的机制;(3)通过确定滑面段旋转角的上、下限,使其能够适用于上凸型滑面;(4)增加了节点数调整机制,以使搜索到的临界滑面更光滑.算例分析表明,改进后的算法不但保持了原方法的优点,而且更实用,临界滑面的自动搜索变得更为可靠与稳定,并将此算法纳入到自主研发的ZSlope边坡稳定分析软件中.

  10. Lectures on Monte Carlo methods

    CERN Document Server

    Madras, Neal

    2001-01-01

    Monte Carlo methods form an experimental branch of mathematics that employs simulations driven by random number generators. These methods are often used when others fail, since they are much less sensitive to the "curse of dimensionality", which plagues deterministic methods in problems with a large number of variables. Monte Carlo methods are used in many fields: mathematics, statistics, physics, chemistry, finance, computer science, and biology, for instance. This book is an introduction to Monte Carlo methods for anyone who would like to use these methods to study various kinds of mathemati

  11. High-Throughput Computation and the Applicability of Monte Carlo Integration in Fatigue Load Estimation of Floating Offshore Wind Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graf, Peter A.; Stewart, Gordon; Lackner, Matthew; Dykes, Katherine; Veers, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Long-term fatigue loads for floating offshore wind turbines are hard to estimate because they require the evaluation of the integral of a highly nonlinear function over a wide variety of wind and wave conditions. Current design standards involve scanning over a uniform rectangular grid of metocean inputs (e.g., wind speed and direction and wave height and period), which becomes intractable in high dimensions as the number of required evaluations grows exponentially with dimension. Monte Carlo integration offers a potentially efficient alternative because it has theoretical convergence proportional to the inverse of the square root of the number of samples, which is independent of dimension. In this paper, we first report on the integration of the aeroelastic code FAST into NREL's systems engineering tool, WISDEM, and the development of a high-throughput pipeline capable of sampling from arbitrary distributions, running FAST on a large scale, and postprocessing the results into estimates of fatigue loads. Second, we use this tool to run a variety of studies aimed at comparing grid-based and Monte Carlo-based approaches with calculating long-term fatigue loads. We observe that for more than a few dimensions, the Monte Carlo approach can represent a large improvement in computational efficiency, but that as nonlinearity increases, the effectiveness of Monte Carlo is correspondingly reduced. The present work sets the stage for future research focusing on using advanced statistical methods for analysis of wind turbine fatigue as well as extreme loads.

  12. An Introduction to Monte Carlo Simulation of Statistical physics Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Murthy, K. P. N.

    2001-01-01

    A brief introduction to the technique of Monte Carlo simulations in statistical physics is presented. The topics covered include statistical ensembles random and pseudo random numbers, random sampling techniques, importance sampling, Markov chain, Metropolis algorithm, continuous phase transition, statistical errors from correlated and uncorrelated data, finite size scaling, n-fold way, critical slowing down, blocking technique,percolation, cluster algorithms, cluster counting, histogram tech...

  13. Discrete range clustering using Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterji, G. B.; Sridhar, B.

    1993-01-01

    For automatic obstacle avoidance guidance during rotorcraft low altitude flight, a reliable model of the nearby environment is needed. Such a model may be constructed by applying surface fitting techniques to the dense range map obtained by active sensing using radars. However, for covertness, passive sensing techniques using electro-optic sensors are desirable. As opposed to the dense range map obtained via active sensing, passive sensing algorithms produce reliable range at sparse locations, and therefore, surface fitting techniques to fill the gaps in the range measurement are not directly applicable. Both for automatic guidance and as a display for aiding the pilot, these discrete ranges need to be grouped into sets which correspond to objects in the nearby environment. The focus of this paper is on using Monte Carlo methods for clustering range points into meaningful groups. One of the aims of the paper is to explore whether simulated annealing methods offer significant advantage over the basic Monte Carlo method for this class of problems. We compare three different approaches and present application results of these algorithms to a laboratory image sequence and a helicopter flight sequence.

  14. Implications of Monte Carlo Statistical Errors in Criticality Safety Assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pevey, Ronald E.

    2005-09-15

    Most criticality safety calculations are performed using Monte Carlo techniques because of Monte Carlo's ability to handle complex three-dimensional geometries. For Monte Carlo calculations, the more histories sampled, the lower the standard deviation of the resulting estimates. The common intuition is, therefore, that the more histories, the better; as a result, analysts tend to run Monte Carlo analyses as long as possible (or at least to a minimum acceptable uncertainty). For Monte Carlo criticality safety analyses, however, the optimization situation is complicated by the fact that procedures usually require that an extra margin of safety be added because of the statistical uncertainty of the Monte Carlo calculations. This additional safety margin affects the impact of the choice of the calculational standard deviation, both on production and on safety. This paper shows that, under the assumptions of normally distributed benchmarking calculational errors and exact compliance with the upper subcritical limit (USL), the standard deviation that optimizes production is zero, but there is a non-zero value of the calculational standard deviation that minimizes the risk of inadvertently labeling a supercritical configuration as subcritical. Furthermore, this value is shown to be a simple function of the typical benchmarking step outcomes--the bias, the standard deviation of the bias, the upper subcritical limit, and the number of standard deviations added to calculated k-effectives before comparison to the USL.

  15. Calibration and Monte Carlo modelling of neutron long counters

    CERN Document Server

    Tagziria, H

    2000-01-01

    The Monte Carlo technique has become a very powerful tool in radiation transport as full advantage is taken of enhanced cross-section data, more powerful computers and statistical techniques, together with better characterisation of neutron and photon source spectra. At the National Physical Laboratory, calculations using the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP-4B have been combined with accurate measurements to characterise two long counters routinely used to standardise monoenergetic neutron fields. New and more accurate response function curves have been produced for both long counters. A novel approach using Monte Carlo methods has been developed, validated and used to model the response function of the counters and determine more accurately their effective centres, which have always been difficult to establish experimentally. Calculations and measurements agree well, especially for the De Pangher long counter for which details of the design and constructional material are well known. The sensitivit...

  16. Monte Carlo integration on GPU

    OpenAIRE

    Kanzaki, J.

    2010-01-01

    We use a graphics processing unit (GPU) for fast computations of Monte Carlo integrations. Two widely used Monte Carlo integration programs, VEGAS and BASES, are parallelized on GPU. By using $W^{+}$ plus multi-gluon production processes at LHC, we test integrated cross sections and execution time for programs in FORTRAN and C on CPU and those on GPU. Integrated results agree with each other within statistical errors. Execution time of programs on GPU run about 50 times faster than those in C...

  17. Influence of using high kV and low m As techniques in the dose of patients submitted to X ray thorax examinations; Influencia do uso de tecnicas de alto kV e baixo mAs na dose em pacientes submetidos a exames de raios X de torax

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Paulo Marcio Campos de, E-mail: pmco@cdtn.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear. Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias e Tecnicas Nucleares; Squair, Peterson Lima; Lacerda, Marco Aurelio de Sousa; Silva, Teogenes Augusto da, E-mail: pls@cdtn.b, E-mail: masl@cdtn.b, E-mail: silvata@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Dosimetric studies of patients subject to radiodiagnostic have got a special attention in Brazil although they are not required by the Brazilian legislation. However, in several Brazilian clinics there have been observed the use of techniques with lower peak voltage and higher electric charges values in spite the European Commission recommends the high voltages with low electric charge values in order to reduce the patient dose. This work compares three methodologies for evaluating the organ absorbed doses in patients undergoing chest x-rays at two techniques (80 k Vp and 10 m As; 120 k Vp and 2 m As): the PCXMC and CALDose{sub X} Monte Carlo based software and experimental measurements with T L dosimeters in a anthropomorphic phantom. The experimental measurements showed the technique with high voltage was dose reduced by approximately 60% in the entrance skin in relation to low voltage technique and the software showed similar dose reduction, shows the importance of adopting techniques which have high voltage values and low electrical charges, unlike usually found on chest x-rays in some hospitals and clinics in Brazil. (author)

  18. A zero-variance based scheme for Monte Carlo criticality simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christoforou, S.

    2010-01-01

    The ability of the Monte Carlo method to solve particle transport problems by simulating the particle behaviour makes it a very useful technique in nuclear reactor physics. However, the statistical nature of Monte Carlo implies that there will always be a variance associated with the estimate obtain

  19. Diagnostic and solutions for the odors problems in the waste water treatment plants in Monte Orgegia (Alicante) with olphactometry techniques; Diagnostico y soluciones a los problemas de olores en la E.D.A.R. de Monte Orgegia (Alicante) mediante tecnicas de olfatometria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valor Herencia, I.; Cortada, C. [Labaqua, S.A., Alicante (Spain); Uribarri, E.; Suarez, C. [Haskoning, S.a., Madrid (Spain)

    1996-10-01

    The problem of odor nuisances affects our society more and more each day. There are many activities that generate bad odors, such as wastewater treatment plants, municipal waste treatment plants, industries, etc. These problems are difficult to solve as the solutions must be based on the knowledge of odor origin and intensity. Olfactometry techniques establish a relation between the origin of odors (generation and emission) and the nuisance caused in the surroundings (inmision). In this paper, a recent study for the identification of odor problems and the proposed of the solutions in a wastewater treatment plant in Alicante (Spain) using the olfactometry techniques is shown.

  20. Monte Carlo simulations of nanoscale Ne+ ion beam sputtering: investigating the influence of surface effects, interstitial formation, and the nanostructural evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahady, Kyle; Tan, Shida; Greenzweig, Yuval; Livengood, Richard; Raveh, Amir; Rack, Philip

    2017-01-01

    We present an updated version of our Monte-Carlo based code for the simulation of ion beam sputtering. This code simulates the interaction of energetic ions with a target, and tracks the cumulative damage, enabling it to simulate the dynamic evolution of nanostructures as material is removed. The updated code described in this paper is significantly faster, permitting the inclusion of new features, namely routines to handle interstitial atoms, and to reduce the surface energy as the structure would otherwise develop energetically unfavorable surface porosity. We validate our code against the popular Monte-Carlo code SRIM-TRIM, and study the development of nanostructures from Ne+ ion beam milling in a copper target.

  1. Quantum Monte Carlo diagonalization method as a variational calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizusaki, Takahiro; Otsuka, Takaharu [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Honma, Michio

    1997-05-01

    A stochastic method for performing large-scale shell model calculations is presented, which utilizes the auxiliary field Monte Carlo technique and diagonalization method. This method overcomes the limitation of the conventional shell model diagonalization and can extremely widen the feasibility of shell model calculations with realistic interactions for spectroscopic study of nuclear structure. (author)

  2. Monte-carlo calculations for some problems of quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novoselov, A. A., E-mail: novoselov@goa.bog.msu.ru; Pavlovsky, O. V.; Ulybyshev, M. V. [Moscow State University (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-15

    The Monte-Carlo technique for the calculations of functional integral in two one-dimensional quantum-mechanical problems had been applied. The energies of the bound states in some potential wells were obtained using this method. Also some peculiarities in the calculation of the kinetic energy in the ground state had been studied.

  3. Exploring Mass Perception with Markov Chain Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Andrew L.; Ross, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    Several previous studies have examined the ability to judge the relative mass of objects in idealized collisions. With a newly developed technique of psychological Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling (A. N. Sanborn & T. L. Griffiths, 2008), this work explores participants; perceptions of different collision mass ratios. The results reveal…

  4. Exploring Mass Perception with Markov Chain Monte Carlo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Andrew L.; Ross, Michael G.

    2009-01-01

    Several previous studies have examined the ability to judge the relative mass of objects in idealized collisions. With a newly developed technique of psychological Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling (A. N. Sanborn & T. L. Griffiths, 2008), this work explores participants; perceptions of different collision mass ratios. The results reveal…

  5. Multilevel sequential Monte Carlo samplers

    KAUST Repository

    Beskos, Alexandros

    2016-08-29

    In this article we consider the approximation of expectations w.r.t. probability distributions associated to the solution of partial differential equations (PDEs); this scenario appears routinely in Bayesian inverse problems. In practice, one often has to solve the associated PDE numerically, using, for instance finite element methods which depend on the step-size level . hL. In addition, the expectation cannot be computed analytically and one often resorts to Monte Carlo methods. In the context of this problem, it is known that the introduction of the multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method can reduce the amount of computational effort to estimate expectations, for a given level of error. This is achieved via a telescoping identity associated to a Monte Carlo approximation of a sequence of probability distributions with discretization levels . ∞>h0>h1⋯>hL. In many practical problems of interest, one cannot achieve an i.i.d. sampling of the associated sequence and a sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) version of the MLMC method is introduced to deal with this problem. It is shown that under appropriate assumptions, the attractive property of a reduction of the amount of computational effort to estimate expectations, for a given level of error, can be maintained within the SMC context. That is, relative to exact sampling and Monte Carlo for the distribution at the finest level . hL. The approach is numerically illustrated on a Bayesian inverse problem. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

  6. Monte Carlo Treatment Planning for Molecular Targeted Radiotherapy within the MINERVA System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, J; Siantar, C H; Wessol, D E; Wemple, C A; Nigg, D; Cogliati, J; Daly, T; Descalle, M; Flickinger, T; Pletcher, D; DeNardo, G

    2004-09-22

    The aim of this project is to extend accurate and patient-specific treatment planning to new treatment modalities, such as molecular targeted radiation therapy, incorporating previously crafted and proven Monte Carlo and deterministic computation methods. A flexible software environment is being created that allows planning radiation treatment for these new modalities and combining different forms of radiation treatment with consideration of biological effects. The system uses common input interfaces, medical image sets for definition of patient geometry, and dose reporting protocols. Previously, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Montana State University (MSU), and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) had accrued experience in the development and application of Monte Carlo-based, three-dimensional, computational dosimetry and treatment planning tools for radiotherapy in several specialized areas. In particular, INEEL and MSU have developed computational dosimetry systems for neutron radiotherapy and neutron capture therapy, while LLNL has developed the PEREGRINE computational system for external beam photon-electron therapy. Building on that experience, the INEEL and MSU are developing the MINERVA (Modality Inclusive Environment for Radiotherapeutic Variable Analysis) software system as a general framework for computational dosimetry and treatment planning for a variety of emerging forms of radiotherapy. In collaboration with this development, LLNL has extended its PEREGRINE code to accommodate internal sources for molecular targeted radiotherapy (MTR), and has interfaced it with the plug-in architecture of MINERVA. Results from the extended PEREGRINE code have been compared to published data from other codes, and found to be in general agreement (EGS4 - 2%, MCNP - 10%)(Descalle et al. 2003). The code is currently being benchmarked against experimental data. The interpatient variability of the drug pharmacokinetics in MTR

  7. Monte Carlo treatment planning for molecular targeted radiotherapy within the MINERVA system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, Joerg [University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Siantar, Christine Hartmann [University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Wessol, Daniel E [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3885 (United States); Wemple, Charles A [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3885 (United States); Nigg, David [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, PO Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415-3885 (United States); Cogliati, Josh [Department of Computer Science, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States); Daly, Tom [University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Descalle, Marie-Anne [University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Flickinger, Terry [University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Pletcher, David [University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); DeNardo, Gerald [University of California Davis, School of Medicine, Sacramento, CA 95817 (United States)

    2005-03-07

    The aim of this project is to extend accurate and patient-specific treatment planning to new treatment modalities, such as molecular targeted radiation therapy, incorporating previously crafted and proven Monte Carlo and deterministic computation methods. A flexible software environment is being created that allows planning radiation treatment for these new modalities and combining different forms of radiation treatment with consideration of biological effects. The system uses common input interfaces, medical image sets for definition of patient geometry and dose reporting protocols. Previously, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Montana State University (MSU) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) had accrued experience in the development and application of Monte Carlo based, three-dimensional, computational dosimetry and treatment planning tools for radiotherapy in several specialized areas. In particular, INEEL and MSU have developed computational dosimetry systems for neutron radiotherapy and neutron capture therapy, while LLNL has developed the PEREGRINE computational system for external beam photon-electron therapy. Building on that experience, the INEEL and MSU are developing the MINERVA (modality inclusive environment for radiotherapeutic variable analysis) software system as a general framework for computational dosimetry and treatment planning for a variety of emerging forms of radiotherapy. In collaboration with this development, LLNL has extended its PEREGRINE code to accommodate internal sources for molecular targeted radiotherapy (MTR), and has interfaced it with the plugin architecture of MINERVA. Results from the extended PEREGRINE code have been compared to published data from other codes, and found to be in general agreement (EGS4-2%, MCNP-10%) (Descalle et al 2003 Cancer Biother. Radiopharm. 18 71-9). The code is currently being benchmarked against experimental data. The interpatient variability of the

  8. Monte Carlo simulation as a tool to predict blasting fragmentation based on the Kuz Ram model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Mario A.; Ficarazzo, Francesco

    2006-04-01

    Rock fragmentation is considered the most important aspect of production blasting because of its direct effects on the costs of drilling and blasting and on the economics of the subsequent operations of loading, hauling and crushing. Over the past three decades, significant progress has been made in the development of new technologies for blasting applications. These technologies include increasingly sophisticated computer models for blast design and blast performance prediction. Rock fragmentation depends on many variables such as rock mass properties, site geology, in situ fracturing and blasting parameters and as such has no complete theoretical solution for its prediction. However, empirical models for the estimation of size distribution of rock fragments have been developed. In this study, a blast fragmentation Monte Carlo-based simulator, based on the Kuz-Ram fragmentation model, has been developed to predict the entire fragmentation size distribution, taking into account intact and joints rock properties, the type and properties of explosives and the drilling pattern. Results produced by this simulator were quite favorable when compared with real fragmentation data obtained from a blast quarry. It is anticipated that the use of Monte Carlo simulation will increase our understanding of the effects of rock mass and explosive properties on the rock fragmentation by blasting, as well as increase our confidence in these empirical models. This understanding will translate into improvements in blasting operations, its corresponding costs and the overall economics of open pit mines and rock quarries.

  9. A Monte Carlo model for 3D grain evolution during welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Theron M.; Mitchell, John A.; Tikare, Veena

    2017-09-01

    Welding is one of the most wide-spread processes used in metal joining. However, there are currently no open-source software implementations for the simulation of microstructural evolution during a weld pass. Here we describe a Potts Monte Carlo based model implemented in the SPPARKS kinetic Monte Carlo computational framework. The model simulates melting, solidification and solid-state microstructural evolution of material in the fusion and heat-affected zones of a weld. The model does not simulate thermal behavior, but rather utilizes user input parameters to specify weld pool and heat-affect zone properties. Weld pool shapes are specified by Bézier curves, which allow for the specification of a wide range of pool shapes. Pool shapes can range from narrow and deep to wide and shallow representing different fluid flow conditions within the pool. Surrounding temperature gradients are calculated with the aide of a closest point projection algorithm. The model also allows simulation of pulsed power welding through time-dependent variation of the weld pool size. Example simulation results and comparisons with laboratory weld observations demonstrate microstructural variation with weld speed, pool shape, and pulsed-power.

  10. Monte Carlo simulation of electrons in dense gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tattersall, Wade; Boyle, Greg; Cocks, Daniel; Buckman, Stephen; White, Ron

    2014-10-01

    We implement a Monte-Carlo simulation modelling the transport of electrons and positrons in dense gases and liquids, by using a dynamic structure factor that allows us to construct structure-modified effective cross sections. These account for the coherent effects caused by interactions with the relatively dense medium. The dynamic structure factor also allows us to model thermal gases in the same manner, without needing to directly sample the velocities of the neutral particles. We present the results of a series of Monte Carlo simulations that verify and apply this new technique, and make comparisons with macroscopic predictions and Boltzmann equation solutions. Financial support of the Australian Research Council.

  11. SKIRT: the design of a suite of input models for Monte Carlo radiative transfer simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Baes, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is the most popular technique to perform radiative transfer simulations in a general 3D geometry. The algorithms behind and acceleration techniques for Monte Carlo radiative transfer are discussed extensively in the literature, and many different Monte Carlo codes are publicly available. On the contrary, the design of a suite of components that can be used for the distribution of sources and sinks in radiative transfer codes has received very little attention. The availability of such models, with different degrees of complexity, has many benefits. For example, they can serve as toy models to test new physical ingredients, or as parameterised models for inverse radiative transfer fitting. For 3D Monte Carlo codes, this requires algorithms to efficiently generate random positions from 3D density distributions. We describe the design of a flexible suite of components for the Monte Carlo radiative transfer code SKIRT. The design is based on a combination of basic building blocks (which can...

  12. Equilibrium Statistics: Monte Carlo Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, Martin

    Monte Carlo methods use random numbers, or ‘random’ sequences, to sample from a known shape of a distribution, or to extract distribution by other means. and, in the context of this book, to (i) generate representative equilibrated samples prior being subjected to external fields, or (ii) evaluate high-dimensional integrals. Recipes for both topics, and some more general methods, are summarized in this chapter. It is important to realize, that Monte Carlo should be as artificial as possible to be efficient and elegant. Advanced Monte Carlo ‘moves’, required to optimize the speed of algorithms for a particular problem at hand, are outside the scope of this brief introduction. One particular modern example is the wavelet-accelerated MC sampling of polymer chains [406].

  13. On a full Monte Carlo approach to quantum mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellier, J. M.; Dimov, I.

    2016-12-01

    The Monte Carlo approach to numerical problems has shown to be remarkably efficient in performing very large computational tasks since it is an embarrassingly parallel technique. Additionally, Monte Carlo methods are well known to keep performance and accuracy with the increase of dimensionality of a given problem, a rather counterintuitive peculiarity not shared by any known deterministic method. Motivated by these very peculiar and desirable computational features, in this work we depict a full Monte Carlo approach to the problem of simulating single- and many-body quantum systems by means of signed particles. In particular we introduce a stochastic technique, based on the strategy known as importance sampling, for the computation of the Wigner kernel which, so far, has represented the main bottleneck of this method (it is equivalent to the calculation of a multi-dimensional integral, a problem in which complexity is known to grow exponentially with the dimensions of the problem). The introduction of this stochastic technique for the kernel is twofold: firstly it reduces the complexity of a quantum many-body simulation from non-linear to linear, secondly it introduces an embarassingly parallel approach to this very demanding problem. To conclude, we perform concise but indicative numerical experiments which clearly illustrate how a full Monte Carlo approach to many-body quantum systems is not only possible but also advantageous. This paves the way towards practical time-dependent, first-principle simulations of relatively large quantum systems by means of affordable computational resources.

  14. Physics study of microbeam radiation therapy with PSI-version of Monte Carlo code GEANT as a new computational tool

    CERN Document Server

    Stepanek, J; Laissue, J A; Lyubimova, N; Di Michiel, F; Slatkin, D N

    2000-01-01

    Microbeam radiation therapy (MRT) is a currently experimental method of radiotherapy which is mediated by an array of parallel microbeams of synchrotron-wiggler-generated X-rays. Suitably selected, nominally supralethal doses of X-rays delivered to parallel microslices of tumor-bearing tissues in rats can be either palliative or curative while causing little or no serious damage to contiguous normal tissues. Although the pathogenesis of MRT-mediated tumor regression is not understood, as in all radiotherapy such understanding will be based ultimately on our understanding of the relationships among the following three factors: (1) microdosimetry, (2) damage to normal tissues, and (3) therapeutic efficacy. Although physical microdosimetry is feasible, published information on MRT microdosimetry to date is computational. This report describes Monte Carlo-based computational MRT microdosimetry using photon and/or electron scattering and photoionization cross-section data in the 1 e V through 100 GeV range distrib...

  15. Monte Carlo Hamiltonian: Linear Potentials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Xiang-Qian; LIU Jin-Jiang; HUANG Chun-Qing; JIANG Jun-Qin; Helmut KROGER

    2002-01-01

    We further study the validity of the Monte Carlo Hamiltonian method. The advantage of the method,in comparison with the standard Monte Carlo Lagrangian approach, is its capability to study the excited states. Weconsider two quantum mechanical models: a symmetric one V(x) = |x|/2; and an asymmetric one V(x) = ∞, forx < 0 and V(x) = x, for x ≥ 0. The results for the spectrum, wave functions and thermodynamical observables are inagreement with the analytical or Runge-Kutta calculations.

  16. Vectorizing and macrotasking Monte Carlo neutral particle algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heifetz, D.B.

    1987-04-01

    Monte Carlo algorithms for computing neutral particle transport in plasmas have been vectorized and macrotasked. The techniques used are directly applicable to Monte Carlo calculations of neutron and photon transport, and Monte Carlo integration schemes in general. A highly vectorized code was achieved by calculating test flight trajectories in loops over arrays of flight data, isolating the conditional branches to as few a number of loops as possible. A number of solutions are discussed to the problem of gaps appearing in the arrays due to completed flights, which impede vectorization. A simple and effective implementation of macrotasking is achieved by dividing the calculation of the test flight profile among several processors. A tree of random numbers is used to ensure reproducible results. The additional memory required for each task may preclude using a larger number of tasks. In future machines, the limit of macrotasking may be possible, with each test flight, and split test flight, being a separate task.

  17. Development of ray tracing visualization program by Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Kenji; Otani, Takayuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    1997-09-01

    Ray tracing algorithm is a powerful method to synthesize three dimensional computer graphics. In conventional ray tracing algorithms, a view point is used as a starting point of ray tracing, from which the rays are tracked up to the light sources through center points of pixels on the view screen to calculate the intensities of the pixels. This manner, however, makes it difficult to define the configuration of light source as well as to strictly simulate the reflections of the rays. To resolve these problems, we have developed a new ray tracing means which traces rays from a light source, not from a view point, with use of Monte Carlo method which is widely applied in nuclear fields. Moreover, we adopt the variance reduction techniques to the program with use of the specialized machine (Monte-4) for particle transport Monte Carlo so that the computational time could be successfully reduced. (author)

  18. Development of ray tracing visualization program by Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higuchi, Kenji; Otani, Takayuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokyo (Japan); Hasegawa, Yukihiro

    1997-09-01

    Ray tracing algorithm is a powerful method to synthesize three dimensional computer graphics. In conventional ray tracing algorithms, a view point is used as a starting point of ray tracing, from which the rays are tracked up to the light sources through center points of pixels on the view screen to calculate the intensities of the pixels. This manner, however, makes it difficult to define the configuration of light source as well as to strictly simulate the reflections of the rays. To resolve these problems, we have developed a new ray tracing means which traces rays from a light source, not from a view point, with use of Monte Carlo method which is widely applied in nuclear fields. Moreover, we adopt the variance reduction techniques to the program with use of the specialized machine (Monte-4) for particle transport Monte Carlo so that the computational time could be successfully reduced. (author)

  19. Experimental and Monte Carlo evaluation of Eclipse treatment planning system for effects on dose distribution of the hip prostheses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Çatlı, Serap, E-mail: serapcatli@hotmail.com [Gazi University, Faculty of Sciences, 06500 Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey); Tanır, Güneş [Gazi University, Faculty of Sciences, 06500 Teknikokullar, Ankara (Turkey)

    2013-10-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of titanium, titanium alloy, and stainless steel hip prostheses on dose distribution based on the Monte Carlo simulation method, as well as the accuracy of the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) at 6 and 18 MV photon energies. In the present study the pencil beam convolution (PBC) method implemented in the Eclipse TPS was compared to the Monte Carlo method and ionization chamber measurements. The present findings show that if high-Z material is used in prosthesis, large dose changes can occur due to scattering. The variance in dose observed in the present study was dependent on material type, density, and atomic number, as well as photon energy; as photon energy increased back scattering decreased. The dose perturbation effect of hip prostheses was significant and could not be predicted accurately by the PBC method for hip prostheses. The findings show that for accurate dose calculation the Monte Carlo-based TPS should be used in patients with hip prostheses.

  20. Experimental and Monte Carlo evaluation of Eclipse treatment planning system for effects on dose distribution of the hip prostheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlı, Serap; Tanır, Güneş

    2013-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of titanium, titanium alloy, and stainless steel hip prostheses on dose distribution based on the Monte Carlo simulation method, as well as the accuracy of the Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS) at 6 and 18MV photon energies. In the present study the pencil beam convolution (PBC) method implemented in the Eclipse TPS was compared to the Monte Carlo method and ionization chamber measurements. The present findings show that if high-Z material is used in prosthesis, large dose changes can occur due to scattering. The variance in dose observed in the present study was dependent on material type, density, and atomic number, as well as photon energy; as photon energy increased back scattering decreased. The dose perturbation effect of hip prostheses was significant and could not be predicted accurately by the PBC method for hip prostheses. The findings show that for accurate dose calculation the Monte Carlo-based TPS should be used in patients with hip prostheses.

  1. Analysis of neutron flux distribution using the Monte Carlo method for the feasibility study of the Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis technique at the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerra, Bruno T.; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: brunoteixeiraguerra@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (DEN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departmento de Energia Nuclear; Soares, Alexandre L.; Menezes, Maria Angela B.C., E-mail: menezes@cdtn.br, E-mail: asleal@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The IPR-R1 is a reactor type TRIGA, Mark-I model, manufactured by the General Atomic Company and installed at Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN), Brazilian Commission for Nuclear Energy (CNEN), in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. It is a light water moderated and cooled, graphite-reflected, open-pool type research reactor and operates at 100 kW. It presents low power, low pressure, for application in research, training and radioisotopes production. The fuel is an alloy of zirconium hydride and uranium enriched at 20% in {sup 235}U. The implementation of the PGNAA (Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis) using this research reactor will significantly increase in number of chemical elements analysed and the kind of matrices. A project is underway in order to implement this technique at CDTN. The objective of this study was to contribute in feasibility analysis of implementing this technique. For this purpose, MCNP is being used. Some variance reduction tools in the methodology, that has been already developed, was introduced for calculating of the neutron flux in the neutron extractor inclined. The objective was to reduce the code error and thereby increasing the reliability of the results. With the implementation of the variance reduction tools, the results of the thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes presented a significant improvement in both calculations. (author)

  2. Monte Carlo Particle Lists: MCPL

    CERN Document Server

    Kittelmann, Thomas; Knudsen, Erik B; Willendrup, Peter; Cai, Xiao Xiao; Kanaki, Kalliopi

    2016-01-01

    A binary format with lists of particle state information, for interchanging particles between various Monte Carlo simulation applications, is presented. Portable C code for file manipulation is made available to the scientific community, along with converters and plugins for several popular simulation packages.

  3. Novel Quantum Monte Carlo Approaches for Quantum Liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubenstein, Brenda M.

    Quantum Monte Carlo methods are a powerful suite of techniques for solving the quantum many-body problem. By using random numbers to stochastically sample quantum properties, QMC methods are capable of studying low-temperature quantum systems well beyond the reach of conventional deterministic techniques. QMC techniques have likewise been indispensible tools for augmenting our current knowledge of superfluidity and superconductivity. In this thesis, I present two new quantum Monte Carlo techniques, the Monte Carlo Power Method and Bose-Fermi Auxiliary-Field Quantum Monte Carlo, and apply previously developed Path Integral Monte Carlo methods to explore two new phases of quantum hard spheres and hydrogen. I lay the foundation for a subsequent description of my research by first reviewing the physics of quantum liquids in Chapter One and the mathematics behind Quantum Monte Carlo algorithms in Chapter Two. I then discuss the Monte Carlo Power Method, a stochastic way of computing the first several extremal eigenvalues of a matrix too memory-intensive to be stored and therefore diagonalized. As an illustration of the technique, I demonstrate how it can be used to determine the second eigenvalues of the transition matrices of several popular Monte Carlo algorithms. This information may be used to quantify how rapidly a Monte Carlo algorithm is converging to the equilibrium probability distribution it is sampling. I next present the Bose-Fermi Auxiliary-Field Quantum Monte Carlo algorithm. This algorithm generalizes the well-known Auxiliary-Field Quantum Monte Carlo algorithm for fermions to bosons and Bose-Fermi mixtures. Despite some shortcomings, the Bose-Fermi Auxiliary-Field Quantum Monte Carlo algorithm represents the first exact technique capable of studying Bose-Fermi mixtures of any size in any dimension. In Chapter Six, I describe a new Constant Stress Path Integral Monte Carlo algorithm for the study of quantum mechanical systems under high pressures. While

  4. Multi-Index Monte Carlo (MIMC)

    KAUST Repository

    Haji Ali, Abdul Lateef

    2015-01-07

    We propose and analyze a novel Multi-Index Monte Carlo (MIMC) method for weak approximation of stochastic models that are described in terms of differential equations either driven by random measures or with random coefficients. The MIMC method is both a stochastic version of the combination technique introduced by Zenger, Griebel and collaborators and an extension of the Multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method first described by Heinrich and Giles. Inspired by Giles’s seminal work, instead of using first-order differences as in MLMC, we use in MIMC high-order mixed differences to reduce the variance of the hierarchical differences dramatically. Under standard assumptions on the convergence rates of the weak error, variance and work per sample, the optimal index set turns out to be of Total Degree (TD) type. When using such sets, MIMC yields new and improved complexity results, which are natural generalizations of Giles’s MLMC analysis, and which increase the domain of problem parameters for which we achieve the optimal convergence.

  5. Multi-Index Monte Carlo (MIMC)

    KAUST Repository

    Haji Ali, Abdul Lateef

    2016-01-06

    We propose and analyze a novel Multi-Index Monte Carlo (MIMC) method for weak approximation of stochastic models that are described in terms of differential equations either driven by random measures or with random coefficients. The MIMC method is both a stochastic version of the combination technique introduced by Zenger, Griebel and collaborators and an extension of the Multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) method first described by Heinrich and Giles. Inspired by Giles s seminal work, instead of using first-order differences as in MLMC, we use in MIMC high-order mixed differences to reduce the variance of the hierarchical differences dramatically. Under standard assumptions on the convergence rates of the weak error, variance and work per sample, the optimal index set turns out to be of Total Degree (TD) type. When using such sets, MIMC yields new and improved complexity results, which are natural generalizations of Giles s MLMC analysis, and which increase the domain of problem parameters for which we achieve the optimal convergence, O(TOL-2).

  6. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Neutron Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Carlson, J; Ravenhall, D G

    2003-01-01

    Uniform neutron matter is approximated by a cubic box containing a finite number of neutrons, with periodic boundary conditions. We report variational and Green's function Monte Carlo calculations of the ground state of fourteen neutrons in a periodic box using the Argonne $\\vep $ two-nucleon interaction at densities up to one and half times the nuclear matter density. The effects of the finite box size are estimated using variational wave functions together with cluster expansion and chain summation techniques. They are small at subnuclear densities. We discuss the expansion of the energy of low-density neutron gas in powers of its Fermi momentum. This expansion is strongly modified by the large nn scattering length, and does not begin with the Fermi-gas kinetic energy as assumed in both Skyrme and relativistic mean field theories. The leading term of neutron gas energy is ~ half the Fermi-gas kinetic energy. The quantum Monte Carlo results are also used to calibrate the accuracy of variational calculations ...

  7. Monte Carlo methods for pricing financial options

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N Bolia; S Juneja

    2005-04-01

    Pricing financial options is amongst the most important and challenging problems in the modern financial industry. Except in the simplest cases, the prices of options do not have a simple closed form solution and efficient computational methods are needed to determine them. Monte Carlo methods have increasingly become a popular computational tool to price complex financial options, especially when the underlying space of assets has a large dimensionality, as the performance of other numerical methods typically suffer from the ‘curse of dimensionality’. However, even Monte-Carlo techniques can be quite slow as the problem-size increases, motivating research in variance reduction techniques to increase the efficiency of the simulations. In this paper, we review some of the popular variance reduction techniques and their application to pricing options. We particularly focus on the recent Monte-Carlo techniques proposed to tackle the difficult problem of pricing American options. These include: regression-based methods, random tree methods and stochastic mesh methods. Further, we show how importance sampling, a popular variance reduction technique, may be combined with these methods to enhance their effectiveness. We also briefly review the evolving options market in India.

  8. Applications of Monte Carlo Methods in Calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Sheldon P.; Gordon, Florence S.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the application of probabilistic ideas, especially Monte Carlo simulation, to calculus. Describes some applications using the Monte Carlo method: Riemann sums; maximizing and minimizing a function; mean value theorems; and testing conjectures. (YP)

  9. Use of Monte Carlo simulations in the assessment of calibration strategies-Part I: an introduction to Monte Carlo mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, John

    2013-04-01

    An introduction to the use of the mathematical technique of Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate least squares regression calibration is described. Monte Carlo techniques involve the repeated sampling of data from a population that may be derived from real (experimental) data, but is more conveniently generated by a computer using a model of the analytical system and a randomization process to produce a large database. Datasets are selected from this population and fed into the calibration algorithms under test, thus providing a facile way of producing a sufficiently large number of assessments of the algorithm to enable a statically valid appraisal of the calibration process to be made. This communication provides a description of the technique that forms the basis of the results presented in Parts II and III of this series, which follow in this issue, and also highlights the issues arising from the use of small data populations in bioanalysis.

  10. Haplotype association analyses in resources of mixed structure using Monte Carlo testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Alun

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomewide association studies have resulted in a great many genomic regions that are likely to harbor disease genes. Thorough interrogation of these specific regions is the logical next step, including regional haplotype studies to identify risk haplotypes upon which the underlying critical variants lie. Pedigrees ascertained for disease can be powerful for genetic analysis due to the cases being enriched for genetic disease. Here we present a Monte Carlo based method to perform haplotype association analysis. Our method, hapMC, allows for the analysis of full-length and sub-haplotypes, including imputation of missing data, in resources of nuclear families, general pedigrees, case-control data or mixtures thereof. Both traditional association statistics and transmission/disequilibrium statistics can be performed. The method includes a phasing algorithm that can be used in large pedigrees and optional use of pseudocontrols. Results Our new phasing algorithm substantially outperformed the standard expectation-maximization algorithm that is ignorant of pedigree structure, and hence is preferable for resources that include pedigree structure. Through simulation we show that our Monte Carlo procedure maintains the correct type 1 error rates for all resource types. Power comparisons suggest that transmission-disequilibrium statistics are superior for performing association in resources of only nuclear families. For mixed structure resources, however, the newly implemented pseudocontrol approach appears to be the best choice. Results also indicated the value of large high-risk pedigrees for association analysis, which, in the simulations considered, were comparable in power to case-control resources of the same sample size. Conclusions We propose hapMC as a valuable new tool to perform haplotype association analyses, particularly for resources of mixed structure. The availability of meta-association and haplotype-mining modules in

  11. Exact Dynamics via Poisson Process: a unifying Monte Carlo paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubernatis, James

    2014-03-01

    A common computational task is solving a set of ordinary differential equations (o.d.e.'s). A little known theorem says that the solution of any set of o.d.e.'s is exactly solved by the expectation value over a set of arbitary Poisson processes of a particular function of the elements of the matrix that defines the o.d.e.'s. The theorem thus provides a new starting point to develop real and imaginary-time continous-time solvers for quantum Monte Carlo algorithms, and several simple observations enable various quantum Monte Carlo techniques and variance reduction methods to transfer to a new context. I will state the theorem, note a transformation to a very simple computational scheme, and illustrate the use of some techniques from the directed-loop algorithm in context of the wavefunction Monte Carlo method that is used to solve the Lindblad master equation for the dynamics of open quantum systems. I will end by noting that as the theorem does not depend on the source of the o.d.e.'s coming from quantum mechanics, it also enables the transfer of continuous-time methods from quantum Monte Carlo to the simulation of various classical equations of motion heretofore only solved deterministically.

  12. (U) Introduction to Monte Carlo Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hungerford, Aimee L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-20

    Monte Carlo methods are very valuable for representing solutions to particle transport problems. Here we describe a “cook book” approach to handling the terms in a transport equation using Monte Carlo methods. Focus is on the mechanics of a numerical Monte Carlo code, rather than the mathematical foundations of the method.

  13. EDITORIAL: Special section: Selected papers from the Third European Workshop on Monte Carlo Treatment Planning (MCTP2012) Special section: Selected papers from the Third European Workshop on Monte Carlo Treatment Planning (MCTP2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spezi, Emiliano; Leal, Antonio

    2013-04-01

    code, the authors report that software has been designed in a way that it should be independent of the type of MC code, provided that simulation meets a number of operational criteria. We wish to thank Elekta/CMS Inc., the University of Seville, the Junta of Andalusia and the European Regional Development Fund for their financial support. We would like also to acknowledge the members of EWG-MCTP for their help in peer-reviewing all the abstracts, and all the invited speakers who kindly agreed to deliver keynote presentations in their area of expertise. A final word of thanks to our colleagues who worked on the reviewing process of the papers selected for this special section and to the IOP Publishing staff who made it possible. MCTP2012 was accredited by the European Federation of Organisations for Medical Physics as a CPD event for medical physicists. Emiliano Spezi and Antonio Leal Guest Editors References Chakarova R, Müntzing K, Krantz M, E Hedin E and Hertzman S 2013 Monte Carlo optimization of total body irradiation in a phantom and patient geometry Phys. Med. Biol. 58 2461-69 Czarnecki D and Zink K 2013 Monte Carlo calculated correction factors for diodes and ion chambers in small photon fields Phys. Med. Biol. 58 2431-44 Mairani A, Böhlen T T, Schiavi A, Tessonnier T, Molinelli S, Brons S, Battistoni G, Parodi K and Patera V 2013 A Monte Carlo-based treatment planning tool for proton therapy Phys. Med. Biol. 58 2471-90 Marcatili S, Pettinato C, Daniels S, Lewis G, Edwards P, Fanti S and Spezi E 2013 Development and validation of RAYDOSE: a Geant4 based application for molecular radiotherapy Phys. Med. Biol. 58 2491-508 Miras H, Jiménez R, Miras C and Gomà C 2013 CloudMC: A cloud computing application for Monte Carlo simulation Phys. Med. Biol. 58 N125-33 Reynaert N 2007 First European Workshop on Monte Carlo Treatment Planning J. Phys.: Conf. Ser. 74 011001 Seuntjens J, Beaulieu L, El Naqa I and Després P 2012 Special section: Selected papers from the

  14. On nonlinear Markov chain Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Andrieu, Christophe; Doucet, Arnaud; Del Moral, Pierre; 10.3150/10-BEJ307

    2011-01-01

    Let $\\mathscr{P}(E)$ be the space of probability measures on a measurable space $(E,\\mathcal{E})$. In this paper we introduce a class of nonlinear Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods for simulating from a probability measure $\\pi\\in\\mathscr{P}(E)$. Nonlinear Markov kernels (see [Feynman--Kac Formulae: Genealogical and Interacting Particle Systems with Applications (2004) Springer]) $K:\\mathscr{P}(E)\\times E\\rightarrow\\mathscr{P}(E)$ can be constructed to, in some sense, improve over MCMC methods. However, such nonlinear kernels cannot be simulated exactly, so approximations of the nonlinear kernels are constructed using auxiliary or potentially self-interacting chains. Several nonlinear kernels are presented and it is demonstrated that, under some conditions, the associated approximations exhibit a strong law of large numbers; our proof technique is via the Poisson equation and Foster--Lyapunov conditions. We investigate the performance of our approximations with some simulations.

  15. Commensurabilities between ETNOs: a Monte Carlo survey

    CERN Document Server

    Marcos, C de la Fuente

    2016-01-01

    Many asteroids in the main and trans-Neptunian belts are trapped in mean motion resonances with Jupiter and Neptune, respectively. As a side effect, they experience accidental commensurabilities among themselves. These commensurabilities define characteristic patterns that can be used to trace the source of the observed resonant behaviour. Here, we explore systematically the existence of commensurabilities between the known ETNOs using their heliocentric and barycentric semimajor axes, their uncertainties, and Monte Carlo techniques. We find that the commensurability patterns present in the known ETNO population resemble those found in the main and trans-Neptunian belts. Although based on small number statistics, such patterns can only be properly explained if most, if not all, of the known ETNOs are subjected to the resonant gravitational perturbations of yet undetected trans-Plutonian planets. We show explicitly that some of the statistically significant commensurabilities are compatible with the Planet Nin...

  16. Helminthiases in Montes Claros. Preliminary survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Girard Kaminsky

    1976-04-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary survey was conducted for the presence of helminths in the city of Montes Claros, M. G., Brazil. Three groups of persons were examined by the direct smear, Kato thick film and MIFC techniques; one group by direct smear and Kato only. General findings were: a high prevalence of hookworm, followed by ascariasis, S. mansoni, S. stercoralis and very light infections with T. trichiurá. E. vermicularis and H. nana were ranking parasites at an orphanage, with some hookworm and S. mansoni infections as well. At a pig slaughter house, the dominant parasites were hookworm and S. mansoni. Pig cysticercosis was an incidental finding worth mentioning for the health hazard it represents for humans as well as an economic loss. From the comparative results between the Kato and the MIF the former proved itself again as a more sensitive and reliable concentration method for helminth eggs, of low cost and easy performance.

  17. Accurate barrier heights using diffusion Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Krongchon, Kittithat; Wagner, Lucas K

    2016-01-01

    Fixed node diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) has been performed on a test set of forward and reverse barrier heights for 19 non-hydrogen-transfer reactions, and the nodal error has been assessed. The DMC results are robust to changes in the nodal surface, as assessed by using different mean-field techniques to generate single determinant wave functions. Using these single determinant nodal surfaces, DMC results in errors of 1.5(5) kcal/mol on barrier heights. Using the large data set of DMC energies, we attempted to find good descriptors of the fixed node error. It does not correlate with a number of descriptors including change in density, but does correlate with the gap between the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied orbital energies in the mean-field calculation.

  18. Uma abordagem simplificada do método Monte Carlo Quântico: da solução de integrais ao problema da distribuição eletrônica A simplified approach to the Quantum Monte Carlo method: from the solution of integrals to the electronic distribution problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Fernando Delfino Angelotti

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an introductory and general discussion on the quantum Monte Carlo methods, some fundamental algorithms, concepts and applicability. In order to introduce the quantum Monte Carlo method, preliminary concepts associated with Monte Carlo techniques are discussed.

  19. Accelerated GPU based SPECT Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Marie-Paule; Bert, Julien; Benoit, Didier; Bardiès, Manuel; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2016-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) modelling is widely used in the field of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) as it is a reliable technique to simulate very high quality scans. This technique provides very accurate modelling of the radiation transport and particle interactions in a heterogeneous medium. Various MC codes exist for nuclear medicine imaging simulations. Recently, new strategies exploiting the computing capabilities of graphical processing units (GPU) have been proposed. This work aims at evaluating the accuracy of such GPU implementation strategies in comparison to standard MC codes in the context of SPECT imaging. GATE was considered the reference MC toolkit and used to evaluate the performance of newly developed GPU Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation (GGEMS) modules for SPECT imaging. Radioisotopes with different photon energies were used with these various CPU and GPU Geant4-based MC codes in order to assess the best strategy for each configuration. Three different isotopes were considered: 99m Tc, 111In and 131I, using a low energy high resolution (LEHR) collimator, a medium energy general purpose (MEGP) collimator and a high energy general purpose (HEGP) collimator respectively. Point source, uniform source, cylindrical phantom and anthropomorphic phantom acquisitions were simulated using a model of the GE infinia II 3/8" gamma camera. Both simulation platforms yielded a similar system sensitivity and image statistical quality for the various combinations. The overall acceleration factor between GATE and GGEMS platform derived from the same cylindrical phantom acquisition was between 18 and 27 for the different radioisotopes. Besides, a full MC simulation using an anthropomorphic phantom showed the full potential of the GGEMS platform, with a resulting acceleration factor up to 71. The good agreement with reference codes and the acceleration factors obtained support the use of GPU implementation strategies for improving computational efficiency

  20. Accelerated GPU based SPECT Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Marie-Paule; Bert, Julien; Benoit, Didier; Bardiès, Manuel; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2016-06-07

    Monte Carlo (MC) modelling is widely used in the field of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) as it is a reliable technique to simulate very high quality scans. This technique provides very accurate modelling of the radiation transport and particle interactions in a heterogeneous medium. Various MC codes exist for nuclear medicine imaging simulations. Recently, new strategies exploiting the computing capabilities of graphical processing units (GPU) have been proposed. This work aims at evaluating the accuracy of such GPU implementation strategies in comparison to standard MC codes in the context of SPECT imaging. GATE was considered the reference MC toolkit and used to evaluate the performance of newly developed GPU Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation (GGEMS) modules for SPECT imaging. Radioisotopes with different photon energies were used with these various CPU and GPU Geant4-based MC codes in order to assess the best strategy for each configuration. Three different isotopes were considered: (99m) Tc, (111)In and (131)I, using a low energy high resolution (LEHR) collimator, a medium energy general purpose (MEGP) collimator and a high energy general purpose (HEGP) collimator respectively. Point source, uniform source, cylindrical phantom and anthropomorphic phantom acquisitions were simulated using a model of the GE infinia II 3/8" gamma camera. Both simulation platforms yielded a similar system sensitivity and image statistical quality for the various combinations. The overall acceleration factor between GATE and GGEMS platform derived from the same cylindrical phantom acquisition was between 18 and 27 for the different radioisotopes. Besides, a full MC simulation using an anthropomorphic phantom showed the full potential of the GGEMS platform, with a resulting acceleration factor up to 71. The good agreement with reference codes and the acceleration factors obtained support the use of GPU implementation strategies for improving computational

  1. Theoretical study of transition state structure and reaction enthalpy of the F + H2-->HF + H reaction by a diffusion quantum Monte Carlo approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shih-I

    2005-05-15

    Ab initio calculations of transition state structure and reaction enthalpy of the F + H2-->HF + H reaction has been carried out by the fixed-node diffusion quantum Monte Carlo method in this study. The Monte Carlo sampling is based on the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck random walks guided by a trial wave function constructed from the floating spherical Gaussian orbitals and spherical Gaussian geminals. The Monte Carlo calculated barrier height of 1.09(16) kcal/mol is consistent with the experimental values, 0.86(10)/1.18(10) kcal/mol, and the calculated value from the multireference-type coupled-cluster (MRCC) calculation with the aug-cc-pVQZ(F)/cc-pVQZ(H) basis set, 1.11 kcal/mol. The Monte Carlo-based calculation also gives a similar value of the reaction enthalpy, -32.00(4) kcal/mol, compared with the experimental value, -32.06(17) kcal/mol, and the calculated value from a MRCC/aug-cc-pVQZ(F)/cc-pVQZ(H) calculation, -31.94 kcal/mol. This study clearly indicates a further application of the random-walk-based approach in the field of quantum chemical calculation.

  2. Monte Carlo modelling of positron transport in real world applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marjanović, S.; Banković, A.; Šuvakov, M.; Petrović, Z. Lj

    2014-05-01

    Due to the unstable nature of positrons and their short lifetime, it is difficult to obtain high positron particle densities. This is why the Monte Carlo simulation technique, as a swarm method, is very suitable for modelling most of the current positron applications involving gaseous and liquid media. The ongoing work on the measurements of cross-sections for positron interactions with atoms and molecules and swarm calculations for positrons in gasses led to the establishment of good cross-section sets for positron interaction with gasses commonly used in real-world applications. Using the standard Monte Carlo technique and codes that can follow both low- (down to thermal energy) and high- (up to keV) energy particles, we are able to model different systems directly applicable to existing experimental setups and techniques. This paper reviews the results on modelling Surko-type positron buffer gas traps, application of the rotating wall technique and simulation of positron tracks in water vapor as a substitute for human tissue, and pinpoints the challenges in and advantages of applying Monte Carlo simulations to these systems.

  3. The Monte Carlo Simulation Method for System Reliability and Risk Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Zio, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is one of the best tools for performing realistic analysis of complex systems as it allows most of the limiting assumptions on system behavior to be relaxed. The Monte Carlo Simulation Method for System Reliability and Risk Analysis comprehensively illustrates the Monte Carlo simulation method and its application to reliability and system engineering. Readers are given a sound understanding of the fundamentals of Monte Carlo sampling and simulation and its application for realistic system modeling.   Whilst many of the topics rely on a high-level understanding of calculus, probability and statistics, simple academic examples will be provided in support to the explanation of the theoretical foundations to facilitate comprehension of the subject matter. Case studies will be introduced to provide the practical value of the most advanced techniques.   This detailed approach makes The Monte Carlo Simulation Method for System Reliability and Risk Analysis a key reference for senior undergra...

  4. Density matrix quantum Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Blunt, N S; Spencer, J S; Foulkes, W M C

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a quantum Monte Carlo method capable of sampling the full density matrix of a many-particle system, thus granting access to arbitrary reduced density matrices and allowing expectation values of complicated non-local operators to be evaluated easily. The direct sampling of the density matrix also raises the possibility of calculating previously inaccessible entanglement measures. The algorithm closely resembles the recently introduced full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo method, but works all the way from infinite to zero temperature. We explain the theory underlying the method, describe the algorithm, and introduce an importance-sampling procedure to improve the stochastic efficiency. To demonstrate the potential of our approach, the energy and staggered magnetization of the isotropic antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on small lattices and the concurrence of one-dimensional spin rings are compared to exact or well-established results. Finally, the nature of the sign problem...

  5. Efficient kinetic Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Tim P.

    2008-02-01

    This paper concerns kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) algorithms that have a single-event execution time independent of the system size. Two methods are presented—one that combines the use of inverted-list data structures with rejection Monte Carlo and a second that combines inverted lists with the Marsaglia-Norman-Cannon algorithm. The resulting algorithms apply to models with rates that are determined by the local environment but are otherwise arbitrary, time-dependent and spatially heterogeneous. While especially useful for crystal growth simulation, the algorithms are presented from the point of view that KMC is the numerical task of simulating a single realization of a Markov process, allowing application to a broad range of areas where heterogeneous random walks are the dominate simulation cost.

  6. Adaptive Multilevel Monte Carlo Simulation

    KAUST Repository

    Hoel, H

    2011-08-23

    This work generalizes a multilevel forward Euler Monte Carlo method introduced in Michael B. Giles. (Michael Giles. Oper. Res. 56(3):607–617, 2008.) for the approximation of expected values depending on the solution to an Itô stochastic differential equation. The work (Michael Giles. Oper. Res. 56(3):607– 617, 2008.) proposed and analyzed a forward Euler multilevelMonte Carlo method based on a hierarchy of uniform time discretizations and control variates to reduce the computational effort required by a standard, single level, Forward Euler Monte Carlo method. This work introduces an adaptive hierarchy of non uniform time discretizations, generated by an adaptive algorithmintroduced in (AnnaDzougoutov et al. Raùl Tempone. Adaptive Monte Carlo algorithms for stopped diffusion. In Multiscale methods in science and engineering, volume 44 of Lect. Notes Comput. Sci. Eng., pages 59–88. Springer, Berlin, 2005; Kyoung-Sook Moon et al. Stoch. Anal. Appl. 23(3):511–558, 2005; Kyoung-Sook Moon et al. An adaptive algorithm for ordinary, stochastic and partial differential equations. In Recent advances in adaptive computation, volume 383 of Contemp. Math., pages 325–343. Amer. Math. Soc., Providence, RI, 2005.). This form of the adaptive algorithm generates stochastic, path dependent, time steps and is based on a posteriori error expansions first developed in (Anders Szepessy et al. Comm. Pure Appl. Math. 54(10):1169– 1214, 2001). Our numerical results for a stopped diffusion problem, exhibit savings in the computational cost to achieve an accuracy of ϑ(TOL),from(TOL−3), from using a single level version of the adaptive algorithm to ϑ(((TOL−1)log(TOL))2).

  7. Global sensitivity analysis of computer-aided molecular design problem for the development of novel working fluids for power cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frutiger, Jerome; Abildskov, Jens; Sin, Gürkan

    2016-01-01

    study involving the design of a working fluid for an Organic Ranking Cycle (ORC) design for power generation. Morris Screening is found to be favorable over Monte Carlo based standard regression. Monte Carlo based standard regression cannot be applied, because the current model cannot be sufficiently......This study compares two methods for global sensitivity analysis as a new approach for the identification and ranking of target properties in molecular design problems: A modified Morris Screening technique and Monte Carlo based standard regression. The two methodologies are highlighted in a case...

  8. Monte Carlo Application in the 125I Dosimetric Parameters Simulation%Monte Carlo在125I剂量参数模拟中的应用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屈喜梅; 王丽琴; 刘忠超; 崔松野

    2013-01-01

    The 125Ⅰ seed brachytherapy source has been widely employed in the cancer treatment, and Monte Carlo simulation technique can accurately calculate the target dose distribution of 125Ⅰ seed source, which can realize better treatment effect.Here describes the Monte Carlo simulation in 1 radiotherapy applications,3 kinds of Monte Carlo codes( MCNP,EGS,DPM )used in radiotherapy and the method of simulation calculation of the dose parameters, which is very significant for accurately determining the therapeutic dose in clinical radiotherapy.%125I粒子源近距离放射治疗在肿瘤治疗中已经广泛应用,Monte Carlo模拟技术能准确地计算出125I粒子源靶区的剂量分布,使治疗效果更好.该文主要介绍Monte Carlo在放射治疗中常用的三种代码(MCNP、EGS、DPM)及用Monte Carlo进行剂量参数模拟计算的方法,表明Monte Carlo模拟计算应用在临床的125I放射治疗中对于如何准确确定治疗剂量具有重要意义.

  9. On adaptive resampling strategies for sequential Monte Carlo methods

    OpenAIRE

    Del Moral, Pierre; Doucet, Arnaud; Jasra, Ajay

    2012-01-01

    Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) methods are a class of techniques to sample approximately from any sequence of probability distributions using a combination of importance sampling and resampling steps. This paper is concerned with the convergence analysis of a class of SMC methods where the times at which resampling occurs are computed online using criteria such as the effective sample size. This is a popular approach amongst practitioners but there are very few convergence results available for...

  10. Assessing Excel VBA Suitability for Monte Carlo Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation includes a wide range of stochastic techniques used to quantitatively evaluate the behavior of complex systems or processes. Microsoft Excel spreadsheets with Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) software is, arguably, the most commonly employed general purpose tool for MC simulation. Despite the popularity of the Excel in many industries and educational institutions, it has been repeatedly criticized for its flaws and often described as questionable, if not complet...

  11. McSCIA: application of the equivalence theorem in a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model for spherical shell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spada, F.M.; Krol, M.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/078760410; Stammes, P.

    2006-01-01

    A new multiple-scattering Monte Carlo 3-D radiative transfer model named McSCIA (Monte Carlo for SCIAmachy) is presented. The backward technique is used to efficiently simulate narrow field of view instruments. The McSCIA algorithm has been formulated as a function of the Earth’s radius, and can

  12. McSCIA: application of the equivalence theorem in a Monte Carlo radiative transfer model for spherical shell atmospheres

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spada, F.; Krol, M.C.; Stammes, P.

    2006-01-01

    A new multiple-scatteringMonte Carlo 3-D radiative transfer model named McSCIA (Monte Carlo for SCIA-machy) is presented. The backward technique is used to efficiently simulate narrow field of view instruments. The McSCIA algorithm has been formulated as a function of the Earth's radius, and can

  13. Hybrid Monte Carlo with Fat Link Fermion Actions

    CERN Document Server

    Kamleh, W; Williams, A G; Kamleh, Waseem; Leinweber, Derek B.; Williams, Anthony G.

    2004-01-01

    The use of APE smearing or other blocking techniques in lattice fermion actions can provide many advantages. There are many variants of these fat link actions in lattice QCD currently, such as FLIC fermions. The FLIC fermion formalism makes use of the APE blocking technique in combination with a projection of the blocked links back into the special unitary group. This reunitarisation is often performed using an iterative maximisation of a gauge invariant measure. This technique is not differentiable with respect to the gauge field and thus prevents the use of standard Hybrid Monte Carlo simulation algorithms. The use of an alternative projection technique circumvents this difficulty and allows the simulation of dynamical fat link fermions with standard HMC and its variants. The necessary equations of motion for FLIC fermions are derived, and some initial simulation results are presented. The technique is more general however, and is straightforwardly applicable to other smearing techniques or fat link actions...

  14. Monte Carlo methods for multidimensional integration for European option pricing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, V.; Dimov, I. T.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we illustrate examples of highly accurate Monte Carlo and quasi-Monte Carlo methods for multiple integrals related to the evaluation of European style options. The idea is that the value of the option is formulated in terms of the expectation of some random variable; then the average of independent samples of this random variable is used to estimate the value of the option. First we obtain an integral representation for the value of the option using the risk neutral valuation formula. Then with an appropriations change of the constants we obtain a multidimensional integral over the unit hypercube of the corresponding dimensionality. Then we compare a specific type of lattice rules over one of the best low discrepancy sequence of Sobol for numerical integration. Quasi-Monte Carlo methods are compared with Adaptive and Crude Monte Carlo techniques for solving the problem. The four approaches are completely different thus it is a question of interest to know which one of them outperforms the other for evaluation multidimensional integrals in finance. Some of the advantages and disadvantages of the developed algorithms are discussed.

  15. Monte Carlo: in the beginning and some great expectations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metropolis, N.

    1985-01-01

    The central theme will be on the historical setting and origins of the Monte Carlo Method. The scene was post-war Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. There was an inevitability about the Monte Carlo Event: the ENIAC had recently enjoyed its meteoric rise (on a classified Los Alamos problem); Stan Ulam had returned to Los Alamos; John von Neumann was a frequent visitor. Techniques, algorithms, and applications developed rapidly at Los Alamos. Soon, the fascination of the Method reached wider horizons. The first paper was submitted for publication in the spring of 1949. In the summer of 1949, the first open conference was held at the University of California at Los Angeles. Of some interst perhaps is an account of Fermi's earlier, independent application in neutron moderation studies while at the University of Rome. The quantum leap expected with the advent of massively parallel processors will provide stimuli for very ambitious applications of the Monte Carlo Method in disciplines ranging from field theories to cosmology, including more realistic models in the neurosciences. A structure of multi-instruction sets for parallel processing is ideally suited for the Monte Carlo approach. One may even hope for a modest hardening of the soft sciences.

  16. Monte Carlo approach to turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dueben, P.; Homeier, D.; Muenster, G. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Jansen, K. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Mesterhazy, D. [Humboldt Univ., Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik

    2009-11-15

    The behavior of the one-dimensional random-force-driven Burgers equation is investigated in the path integral formalism on a discrete space-time lattice. We show that by means of Monte Carlo methods one may evaluate observables, such as structure functions, as ensemble averages over different field realizations. The regularization of shock solutions to the zero-viscosity limit (Hopf-equation) eventually leads to constraints on lattice parameters required for the stability of the simulations. Insight into the formation of localized structures (shocks) and their dynamics is obtained. (orig.)

  17. The Monte Carlo technique as a tool to predict LOAEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veselinović, Jovana B; Veselinović, Aleksandar M; Toropova, Alla P; Toropov, Andrey A

    2016-06-30

    Quantitative structure - activity relationships (QSARs) for the Lowest Observed Adverse Effect Level (LOAEL) for a large set of organic compounds (n = 341) are suggested. The molecular structures of these compounds are represented by Simplified Molecular Input-Line Entry Systems (SMILES). A criteria for the estimation quality of split into the "visible" training set (used for developing a model) and "invisible" external validation set is suggested. The correlation between the above criterion and the predictive potential of developed QSAR model (root-mean-square error for "invisible" validation set) has been detected. One-variable models are built up for several different splits into the "visible" training set and "invisible" validation set. The statistical quality of these models is quite good. Mechanistic interpretation and the domain of applicability for these models are defined according to probabilistic point of view. The methodology for defining applicability domain in QSAR modeling with SMILES notation based optimal descriptors is presented. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Approaching Chemical Accuracy with Quantum Monte Carlo

    OpenAIRE

    Petruzielo, Frank R.; Toulouse, Julien; Umrigar, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    International audience; A quantum Monte Carlo study of the atomization energies for the G2 set of molecules is presented. Basis size dependence of diffusion Monte Carlo atomization energies is studied with a single determinant Slater-Jastrow trial wavefunction formed from Hartree-Fock orbitals. With the largest basis set, the mean absolute deviation from experimental atomization energies for the G2 set is 3.0 kcal/mol. Optimizing the orbitals within variational Monte Carlo improves the agreem...

  19. Mean field simulation for Monte Carlo integration

    CERN Document Server

    Del Moral, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    In the last three decades, there has been a dramatic increase in the use of interacting particle methods as a powerful tool in real-world applications of Monte Carlo simulation in computational physics, population biology, computer sciences, and statistical machine learning. Ideally suited to parallel and distributed computation, these advanced particle algorithms include nonlinear interacting jump diffusions; quantum, diffusion, and resampled Monte Carlo methods; Feynman-Kac particle models; genetic and evolutionary algorithms; sequential Monte Carlo methods; adaptive and interacting Marko

  20. pyNSMC: A Python Module for Null-Space Monte Carlo Uncertainty Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, J.; Brakefield, L. K.

    2015-12-01

    The null-space monte carlo technique is a non-linear uncertainty analyses technique that is well-suited to high-dimensional inverse problems. While the technique is powerful, the existing workflow for completing null-space monte carlo is cumbersome, requiring the use of multiple commandline utilities, several sets of intermediate files and even a text editor. pyNSMC is an open-source python module that automates the workflow of null-space monte carlo uncertainty analyses. The module is fully compatible with the PEST and PEST++ software suites and leverages existing functionality of pyEMU, a python framework for linear-based uncertainty analyses. pyNSMC greatly simplifies the existing workflow for null-space monte carlo by taking advantage of object oriented design facilities in python. The core of pyNSMC is the ensemble class, which draws and stores realized random vectors and also provides functionality for exporting and visualizing results. By relieving users of the tedium associated with file handling and command line utility execution, pyNSMC instead focuses the user on the important steps and assumptions of null-space monte carlo analysis. Furthermore, pyNSMC facilitates learning through flow charts and results visualization, which are available at many points in the algorithm. The ease-of-use of the pyNSMC workflow is compared to the existing workflow for null-space monte carlo for a synthetic groundwater model with hundreds of estimable parameters.

  1. A unified Monte Carlo interpretation of particle simulations and applications to nonneutral plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydemir, A.Y.

    1993-09-01

    Using a ``Monte Carlo interpretation`` a particle simulations, a general description of low-noise techniques is developed in terms well-known Monte Carlo variance reduction methods. Some of these techniques then are applied to linear and nonlinear studies of pure electron plasmas in cylindrical geometry, with emphasis on the generation and nonlinear evolution of electron vortices. Long-lived l = 1 and l and l = 2 vortices, and others produced by unstable diocotron modes in hollow profiles, are studies. It is shown that low-noise techniques make it possible to follow the linear evolution and saturation of even the very weakly unstable resonant diocotron modes.

  2. Monte Carlo Treatment Planning for Advanced Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronholm, Rickard

    and validation of a Monte Carlo model of a medical linear accelerator (i), converting a CT scan of a patient to a Monte Carlo compliant phantom (ii) and translating the treatment plan parameters (including beam energy, angles of incidence, collimator settings etc) to a Monte Carlo input file (iii). A protocol...... previous algorithms since it uses delineations of structures in order to include and/or exclude certain media in various anatomical regions. This method has the potential to reduce anatomically irrelevant media assignment. In house MATLAB scripts translating the treatment plan parameters to Monte Carlo...

  3. 1-D EQUILIBRIUM DISCRETE DIFFUSION MONTE CARLO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. EVANS; ET AL

    2000-08-01

    We present a new hybrid Monte Carlo method for 1-D equilibrium diffusion problems in which the radiation field coexists with matter in local thermodynamic equilibrium. This method, the Equilibrium Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (EqDDMC) method, combines Monte Carlo particles with spatially discrete diffusion solutions. We verify the EqDDMC method with computational results from three slab problems. The EqDDMC method represents an incremental step toward applying this hybrid methodology to non-equilibrium diffusion, where it could be simultaneously coupled to Monte Carlo transport.

  4. On adaptive resampling strategies for sequential Monte Carlo methods

    CERN Document Server

    Del Moral, Pierre; Jasra, Ajay; 10.3150/10-BEJ335

    2012-01-01

    Sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) methods are a class of techniques to sample approximately from any sequence of probability distributions using a combination of importance sampling and resampling steps. This paper is concerned with the convergence analysis of a class of SMC methods where the times at which resampling occurs are computed online using criteria such as the effective sample size. This is a popular approach amongst practitioners but there are very few convergence results available for these methods. By combining semigroup techniques with an original coupling argument, we obtain functional central limit theorems and uniform exponential concentration estimates for these algorithms.

  5. Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm with fat link fermion actions

    CERN Document Server

    Kamleh, Waseem; Williams, Anthony G; 10.1103/PhysRevD.70.014502

    2004-01-01

    The use of APE smearing or other blocking techniques in lattice fermion actions can provide many advantages. There are many variants of these fat link actions in lattice QCD currently, such as flat link irrelevant clover (FLIC) fermions. The FLIC fermion formalism makes use of the APE blocking technique in combination with a projection of the blocked links back into the special unitary group. This reunitarization is often performed using an iterative maximization of a gauge invariant measure. This technique is not differentiable with respect to the gauge field and thus prevents the use of standard Hybrid Monte Carlo simulation algorithms. The use of an alternative projection technique circumvents this difficulty and allows the simulation of dynamical fat link fermions with standard HMC and its variants. The necessary equations of motion for FLIC fermions are derived, and some initial simulation results are presented. The technique is more general however, and is straightforwardly applicable to other smearing ...

  6. Aqueous Alteration at a Delta in Eastern Libya Montes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Tirsch, Daniela; Tornabene, Livio L.; Seelos, Frank P.; Erkeling, Gino; Hiesinger, Harald; Jaumann, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Libya Montes hosts ancient Noachian basalt altered by hydrothermal action from the Isidis impact, olivine- and pyroxene-bearing lavas from the Syrtis volcanic outflows, multiple craters that have excavated these geologic units, and numerous Hesperian-Amazonian-aged fluvial features that carved channels across the surface and may have transported material downward towards Isidis. Mineralogical analyses of a delta region in Eastern Libya Montes using recently available MTR3 CRISM images have revealed the presence of carbonate in additional to Al-, Fe-, and Mg-bearing phyllosilicates. We are investigating the origins of these aqueous components through stratigraphical and morphological analyses. We hypothesize that the carbonate and Fe/Mg-phyllosilicates are alteration products of the ancient basalt and that the Al-smectite formed as a result of the delta and more recent lacustrine or fluvial processes. The Al-smectite spectral features are most consistent with beidellite, which forms at elevated temperatures compared to montmorillonite. We seek to determine if the beidellite likely formed in warm delta waters or if it may have formed via burial diagenesis and was then excavated by the delta. Newly developed CRISM parameters are being utilized for analysis of the MTR3 versions of CRISM images FRT0000B0CB and FRT0001E2F2 in the fan and delta region of eastern Libya Montes. The MTR3 images feature joined short-wavelength and long-wavelength images and improved spectral signals through new atmospheric separation and noise removal techniques. This enables better detection of spectral signatures from small outcrops of aqueous components. We have placed these new CRISM mineral maps over HRSC stereo images to evaluate the stratigraphy of the aqueous components in relation to the ancient basalt and Syrtis lavas as in previous analyses of the central Libya Montes region. Coordinated CRISM-HiRISE views are expected to provide insights into the morphologies of the aqueous units

  7. Direct aperture optimization for IMRT using Monte Carlo generated beamlets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Alanah M; Bush, Karl; Milette, Marie-Pierre; Popescu, I Antoniu; Otto, Karl; Duzenli, Cheryl

    2006-10-01

    This work introduces an EGSnrc-based Monte Carlo (MC) beamlet does distribution matrix into a direct aperture optimization (DAO) algorithm for IMRT inverse planning. The technique is referred to as Monte Carlo-direct aperture optimization (MC-DAO). The goal is to assess if the combination of accurate Monte Carlo tissue inhomogeneity modeling and DAO inverse planning will improve the dose accuracy and treatment efficiency for treatment planning. Several authors have shown that the presence of small fields and/or inhomogeneous materials in IMRT treatment fields can cause dose calculation errors for algorithms that are unable to accurately model electronic disequilibrium. This issue may also affect the IMRT optimization process because the dose calculation algorithm may not properly model difficult geometries such as targets close to low-density regions (lung, air etc.). A clinical linear accelerator head is simulated using BEAMnrc (NRC, Canada). A novel in-house algorithm subdivides the resulting phase space into 2.5 X 5.0 mm2 beamlets. Each beamlet is projected onto a patient-specific phantom. The beamlet dose contribution to each voxel in a structure-of-interest is calculated using DOSXYZnrc. The multileaf collimator (MLC) leaf positions are linked to the location of the beamlet does distributions. The MLC shapes are optimized using direct aperture optimization (DAO). A final Monte Carlo calculation with MLC modeling is used to compute the final dose distribution. Monte Carlo simulation can generate accurate beamlet dose distributions for traditionally difficult-to-calculate geometries, particularly for small fields crossing regions of tissue inhomogeneity. The introduction of DAO results in an additional improvement by increasing the treatment delivery efficiency. For the examples presented in this paper the reduction in the total number of monitor units to deliver is approximately 33% compared to fluence-based optimization methods.

  8. Global Monte Carlo Simulation with High Order Polynomial Expansions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William R. Martin; James Paul Holloway; Kaushik Banerjee; Jesse Cheatham; Jeremy Conlin

    2007-12-13

    The functional expansion technique (FET) was recently developed for Monte Carlo simulation. The basic idea of the FET is to expand a Monte Carlo tally in terms of a high order expansion, the coefficients of which can be estimated via the usual random walk process in a conventional Monte Carlo code. If the expansion basis is chosen carefully, the lowest order coefficient is simply the conventional histogram tally, corresponding to a flat mode. This research project studied the applicability of using the FET to estimate the fission source, from which fission sites can be sampled for the next generation. The idea is that individual fission sites contribute to expansion modes that may span the geometry being considered, possibly increasing the communication across a loosely coupled system and thereby improving convergence over the conventional fission bank approach used in most production Monte Carlo codes. The project examined a number of basis functions, including global Legendre polynomials as well as “local” piecewise polynomials such as finite element hat functions and higher order versions. The global FET showed an improvement in convergence over the conventional fission bank approach. The local FET methods showed some advantages versus global polynomials in handling geometries with discontinuous material properties. The conventional finite element hat functions had the disadvantage that the expansion coefficients could not be estimated directly but had to be obtained by solving a linear system whose matrix elements were estimated. An alternative fission matrix-based response matrix algorithm was formulated. Studies were made of two alternative applications of the FET, one based on the kernel density estimator and one based on Arnoldi’s method of minimized iterations. Preliminary results for both methods indicate improvements in fission source convergence. These developments indicate that the FET has promise for speeding up Monte Carlo fission source

  9. Machine learning techniques in optical communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibar, Darko; Piels, Molly; Jones, Rasmus Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Machine learning techniques relevant for nonlinearity mitigation, carrier recovery, and nanoscale device characterization are reviewed and employed. Markov Chain Monte Carlo in combination with Bayesian filtering is employed within the nonlinear state-space framework and demonstrated for parameter...

  10. Error in Monte Carlo, quasi-error in Quasi-Monte Carlo

    OpenAIRE

    Kleiss, R. H. P.; Lazopoulos, A.

    2006-01-01

    While the Quasi-Monte Carlo method of numerical integration achieves smaller integration error than standard Monte Carlo, its use in particle physics phenomenology has been hindered by the abscence of a reliable way to estimate that error. The standard Monte Carlo error estimator relies on the assumption that the points are generated independently of each other and, therefore, fails to account for the error improvement advertised by the Quasi-Monte Carlo method. We advocate the construction o...

  11. Uncertainties in s-process nucleosynthesis in massive stars determined by Monte Carlo variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura (西村信哉), N.; Hirschi, R.; Rauscher, T.; Murphy, A. St. J.; Cescutti, G.

    2017-08-01

    The s-process in massive stars produces the weak component of the s-process (nuclei up to A ∼ 90), in amounts that match solar abundances. For heavier isotopes, such as barium, production through neutron capture is significantly enhanced in very metal-poor stars with fast rotation. However, detailed theoretical predictions for the resulting final s-process abundances have important uncertainties caused both by the underlying uncertainties in the nuclear physics (principally neutron-capture reaction and β-decay rates) as well as by the stellar evolution modelling. In this work, we investigated the impact of nuclear-physics uncertainties relevant to the s-process in massive stars. Using a Monte Carlo based approach, we performed extensive nuclear reaction network calculations that include newly evaluated upper and lower limits for the individual temperature-dependent reaction rates. We found that most of the uncertainty in the final abundances is caused by uncertainties in the neutron-capture rates, while β-decay rate uncertainties affect only a few nuclei near s-process branchings. The s-process in rotating metal-poor stars shows quantitatively different uncertainties and key reactions, although the qualitative characteristics are similar. We confirmed that our results do not significantly change at different metallicities for fast rotating massive stars in the very low metallicity regime. We highlight which of the identified key reactions are realistic candidates for improved measurement by future experiments.

  12. Development of Monte Carlo Methods for Investigating Migration of Radionuclides in Contaminated Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avrorin, E. N.; Tsvetokhin, A. G.; Xenofontov, A. I.; Kourbatova, E. I.; Regens, J. L.

    2002-02-26

    This paper presents the results of an ongoing research and development project conducted by Russian institutions in Moscow and Snezhinsk, supported by the International Science and Technology Center (ISTC), in collaboration with the University of Oklahoma. The joint study focuses on developing and applying analytical tools to effectively characterize contaminant transport and assess risks associated with migration of radionuclides and heavy metals in the water column and sediments of large reservoirs or lakes. The analysis focuses on the development and evaluation of theoretical-computational models that describe the distribution of radioactive wastewater within a reservoir and characterize the associated radiation field as well as estimate doses received from radiation exposure. The analysis focuses on the development and evaluation of Monte Carlo-based, theoretical-computational methods that are applied to increase the precision of results and to reduce computing time for estimating the characteristics the radiation field emitted from the contaminated wastewater layer. The calculated migration of radionuclides is used to estimate distributions of radiation doses that could be received by an exposed population based on exposure to radionuclides from specified volumes of discrete aqueous sources. The calculated dose distributions can be used to support near-term and long-term decisions about priorities for environmental remediation and stewardship.

  13. Monte Carlo simulation of the kinetic effects on GaAs/GaAs(001) MBE growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ageev, Oleg A.; Solodovnik, Maxim S.; Balakirev, Sergey V.; Mikhaylin, Ilya A.; Eremenko, Mikhail M.

    2017-01-01

    The molecular beam epitaxial growth of GaAs on the GaAs(001)-(2×4) surface is investigated using a kinetic Monte Carlo-based method. The developed algorithm permits to focus on the kinetic effects in a wide range of growth conditions and enables considerable computational speedup. The simulation results show that the growth rate has a dramatic influence upon both the island morphology and Ga surface diffusion length. The average island size reduces with increasing growth rate while the island density increases with increasing growth rate as well as As4/Ga beam equivalent pressure ratio. As the growth rate increases, the island density becomes weaker dependent upon the As4/Ga pressure ratio and approaches to a saturation value. We also discuss three characteristics of Ga surface diffusion, namely a diffusion length of a Ga adatom deposited first, an average diffusion length, and an island spacing as an average distance between islands. The calculations show that the As4/Ga pressure ratio dependences of these characteristics obey the same law, but with different coefficients. An increase of the As4/Ga pressure ratio leads to a decrease in both the diffusion length and island spacing. However, its influence becomes stronger with increasing growth rate for the first Ga adatom diffusion length and weaker for the average diffusion length and for the island spacing.

  14. Monte Carlo simulations to advance characterisation of landmines by pulsed fast/thermal neutron analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maucec, M.; Rigollet, C.

    2004-01-01

    The performance of a detection system based on the pulsed fast/thermal neutron analysis technique was assessed using Monte Carlo simulations. The aim was to develop and implement simulation methods, to support and advance the data analysis techniques of the characteristic gamma-ray spectra, potentia

  15. Monte Carlo Simulation as a Research Management Tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, L. J.

    1986-06-01

    Monte Carlo simulation provides a research manager with a performance monitoring tool to supplement the standard schedule- and resource-based tools such as the Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT) and Critical Path Method (CPM). The value of the Monte Carlo simulation in a research environment is that it 1) provides a method for ranking competing processes, 2) couples technical improvements to the process economics, and 3) provides a mechanism to determine the value of research dollars. In this paper the Monte Carlo simulation approach is developed and applied to the evaluation of three competing processes for converting lignocellulosic biomass to ethanol. The technique is shown to be useful for ranking the processes and illustrating the importance of the timeframe of the analysis on the decision process. The results show that acid hydrolysis processes have higher potential for near-term application (2-5 years), while the enzymatic hydrolysis approach has an equal chance to be competitive in the long term (beyond 10 years).

  16. Modelling of scintillator based flat-panel detectors with Monte-Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reims, N.; Sukowski, F.; Uhlmann, N.

    2011-01-01

    Scintillator based flat panel detectors are state of the art in the field of industrial X-ray imaging applications. Choosing the proper system and setup parameters for the vast range of different applications can be a time consuming task, especially when developing new detector systems. Since the system behaviour cannot always be foreseen easily, Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations are keys to gain further knowledge of system components and their behaviour for different imaging conditions. In this work we used two Monte-Carlo based models to examine an indirect converting flat panel detector, specifically the Hamamatsu C9312SK. We focused on the signal generation in the scintillation layer and its influence on the spatial resolution of the whole system. The models differ significantly in their level of complexity. The first model gives a global description of the detector based on different parameters characterizing the spatial resolution. With relatively small effort a simulation model can be developed which equates the real detector regarding signal transfer. The second model allows a more detailed insight of the system. It is based on the well established cascade theory, i.e. describing the detector as a cascade of elemental gain and scattering stages, which represent the built in components and their signal transfer behaviour. In comparison to the first model the influence of single components especially the important light spread behaviour in the scintillator can be analysed in a more differentiated way. Although the implementation of the second model is more time consuming both models have in common that a relatively small amount of system manufacturer parameters are needed. The results of both models were in good agreement with the measured parameters of the real system.

  17. Quantum Monte Carlo study of the protonated water dimer

    CERN Document Server

    Dagrada, Mario; Saitta, Antonino M; Sorella, Sandro; Mauri, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    We report an extensive theoretical study of the protonated water dimer (Zundel ion) by means of the highly correlated variational Monte Carlo and lattice regularized Monte Carlo approaches. This system represents the simplest model for proton transfer (PT) and a correct description of its properties is essential in order to understand the PT mechanism in more complex acqueous systems. Our Jastrow correlated AGP wave function ensures an accurate treatment of electron correlations. Exploiting the advantages of contracting the primitive basis set over atomic hybrid orbitals, we are able to limit dramatically the number of variational parameters with a systematic control on the numerical precision, crucial in order to simulate larger systems. We investigate energetics and geometrical properties of the Zundel ion as a function of the oxygen-oxygen distance, taken as reaction coordinate. In both cases, our QMC results are found in excellent agreement with coupled cluster CCSD(T) technique, the quantum chemistry "go...

  18. Monte Carlo Methods for Bridging the Timescale Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilding, Nigel; Landau, David P.

    We identify the origin, and elucidate the character of the extended time-scales that plague computer simulation studies of first and second order phase transitions. A brief survey is provided of a number of new and existing techniques that attempt to circumvent these problems. Attention is then focused on two novel methods with which we have particular experience: “Wang-Landau sampling” and Phase Switch Monte Carlo. Detailed case studies are made of the application of the Wang-Landau approach to calculate the density of states of the 2D Ising model and the Edwards-Anderson spin glass. The principles and operation of Phase Switch Monte Carlo are described and its utility in tackling ‘difficult’ first order phase transitions is illustrated via a case study of hard-sphere freezing. We conclude with a brief overview of promising new methods for the improvement of deterministic, spin dynamics simulations.

  19. Accelerated Monte Carlo simulations with restricted Boltzmann machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Li; Wang, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Despite their exceptional flexibility and popularity, Monte Carlo methods often suffer from slow mixing times for challenging statistical physics problems. We present a general strategy to overcome this difficulty by adopting ideas and techniques from the machine learning community. We fit the unnormalized probability of the physical model to a feed-forward neural network and reinterpret the architecture as a restricted Boltzmann machine. Then, exploiting its feature detection ability, we utilize the restricted Boltzmann machine to propose efficient Monte Carlo updates to speed up the simulation of the original physical system. We implement these ideas for the Falicov-Kimball model and demonstrate an improved acceptance ratio and autocorrelation time near the phase transition point.

  20. Accelerate Monte Carlo Simulations with Restricted Boltzmann Machines

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Li

    2016-01-01

    Despite their exceptional flexibility and popularity, the Monte Carlo methods often suffer from slow mixing times for challenging statistical physics problems. We present a general strategy to overcome this difficulty by adopting ideas and techniques from the machine learning community. We fit the unnormalized probability of the physical model to a feedforward neural network and reinterpret the architecture as a restricted Boltzmann machine. Then, exploiting its feature detection ability, we utilize the restricted Boltzmann machine for efficient Monte Carlo updates and to speed up the simulation of the original physical system. We implement these ideas for the Falicov-Kimball model and demonstrate improved acceptance ratio and autocorrelation time near the phase transition point.

  1. Langevin Monte Carlo filtering for target tracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iglesias Garcia, Fernando; Bocquel, Melanie; Driessen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    This paper introduces the Langevin Monte Carlo Filter (LMCF), a particle filter with a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm which draws proposals by simulating Hamiltonian dynamics. This approach is well suited to non-linear filtering problems in high dimensional state spaces where the bootstrap filte

  2. An introduction to Monte Carlo methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, J. -C.; Barkema, G. T.

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are methods for simulating statistical systems. The aim is to generate a representative ensemble of configurations to access thermodynamical quantities without the need to solve the system analytically or to perform an exact enumeration. The main principles of Monte Carlo sim

  3. An introduction to Monte Carlo methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walter, J. -C.; Barkema, G. T.

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations are methods for simulating statistical systems. The aim is to generate a representative ensemble of configurations to access thermodynamical quantities without the need to solve the system analytically or to perform an exact enumeration. The main principles of Monte Carlo sim

  4. Challenges of Monte Carlo Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Alex Roberts [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-10

    These are slides from a presentation for Parallel Summer School at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Solving discretized partial differential equations (PDEs) of interest can require a large number of computations. We can identify concurrency to allow parallel solution of discrete PDEs. Simulated particles histories can be used to solve the Boltzmann transport equation. Particle histories are independent in neutral particle transport, making them amenable to parallel computation. Physical parameters and method type determine the data dependencies of particle histories. Data requirements shape parallel algorithms for Monte Carlo. Then, Parallel Computational Physics and Parallel Monte Carlo are discussed and, finally, the results are given. The mesh passing method greatly simplifies the IMC implementation and allows simple load-balancing. Using MPI windows and passive, one-sided RMA further simplifies the implementation by removing target synchronization. The author is very interested in implementations of PGAS that may allow further optimization for one-sided, read-only memory access (e.g. Open SHMEM). The MPICH_RMA_OVER_DMAPP option and library is required to make one-sided messaging scale on Trinitite - Moonlight scales poorly. Interconnect specific libraries or functions are likely necessary to ensure performance. BRANSON has been used to directly compare the current standard method to a proposed method on idealized problems. The mesh passing algorithm performs well on problems that are designed to show the scalability of the particle passing method. BRANSON can now run load-imbalanced, dynamic problems. Potential avenues of improvement in the mesh passing algorithm will be implemented and explored. A suite of test problems that stress DD methods will elucidate a possible path forward for production codes.

  5. The MC21 Monte Carlo Transport Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutton TM, Donovan TJ, Trumbull TH, Dobreff PS, Caro E, Griesheimer DP, Tyburski LJ, Carpenter DC, Joo H

    2007-01-09

    MC21 is a new Monte Carlo neutron and photon transport code currently under joint development at the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory and the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory. MC21 is the Monte Carlo transport kernel of the broader Common Monte Carlo Design Tool (CMCDT), which is also currently under development. The vision for CMCDT is to provide an automated, computer-aided modeling and post-processing environment integrated with a Monte Carlo solver that is optimized for reactor analysis. CMCDT represents a strategy to push the Monte Carlo method beyond its traditional role as a benchmarking tool or ''tool of last resort'' and into a dominant design role. This paper describes various aspects of the code, including the neutron physics and nuclear data treatments, the geometry representation, and the tally and depletion capabilities.

  6. Fermion-dimer scattering using an impurity lattice Monte Carlo approach and the adiabatic projection method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhatisari, Serdar; Lee, Dean

    2014-12-01

    We present lattice Monte Carlo calculations of fermion-dimer scattering in the limit of zero-range interactions using the adiabatic projection method. The adiabatic projection method uses a set of initial cluster states and Euclidean time projection to give a systematically improvable description of the low-lying scattering cluster states in a finite volume. We use Lüscher's finite-volume relations to determine the s -wave, p -wave, and d -wave phase shifts. For comparison, we also compute exact lattice results using Lanczos iteration and continuum results using the Skorniakov-Ter-Martirosian equation. For our Monte Carlo calculations we use a new lattice algorithm called impurity lattice Monte Carlo. This algorithm can be viewed as a hybrid technique which incorporates elements of both worldline and auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. Fermion-Dimer Scattering using Impurity Lattice Monte Carlo and the Adiabatic Projection Method

    CERN Document Server

    Elhatisari, Serdar

    2014-01-01

    We present lattice Monte Carlo calculations of fermion-dimer scattering in the limit of zero-range interactions using the adiabatic projection method. The adiabatic projection method uses a set of initial cluster states and Euclidean time projection to give a systematically improvable description of the low-lying scattering cluster states in a finite volume. We use L\\"uscher's finite-volume relations to determine the $s$-wave, $p$-wave, and $d$-wave phase shifts. For comparison, we also compute exact lattice results using Lanczos iteration and continuum results using the Skorniakov-Ter-Martirosian equation. For our Monte Carlo calculations we use a new lattice algorithm called impurity lattice Monte Carlo. This algorithm can be viewed as a hybrid technique which incorporates elements of both worldline and auxiliary-field Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. Monte Carlo simulations for heavy ion dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geithner, O.

    2006-07-26

    Water-to-air stopping power ratio (s{sub w,air}) calculations for the ionization chamber dosimetry of clinically relevant ion beams with initial energies from 50 to 450 MeV/u have been performed using the Monte Carlo technique. To simulate the transport of a particle in water the computer code SHIELD-HIT v2 was used which is a substantially modified version of its predecessor SHIELD-HIT v1. The code was partially rewritten, replacing formerly used single precision variables with double precision variables. The lowest particle transport specific energy was decreased from 1 MeV/u down to 10 keV/u by modifying the Bethe- Bloch formula, thus widening its range for medical dosimetry applications. Optional MSTAR and ICRU-73 stopping power data were included. The fragmentation model was verified using all available experimental data and some parameters were adjusted. The present code version shows excellent agreement with experimental data. Additional to the calculations of stopping power ratios, s{sub w,air}, the influence of fragments and I-values on s{sub w,air} for carbon ion beams was investigated. The value of s{sub w,air} deviates as much as 2.3% at the Bragg peak from the recommended by TRS-398 constant value of 1.130 for an energy of 50 MeV/u. (orig.)

  9. Parallel Monte Carlo Simulation of Aerosol Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Zhou

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A highly efficient Monte Carlo (MC algorithm is developed for the numerical simulation of aerosol dynamics, that is, nucleation, surface growth, and coagulation. Nucleation and surface growth are handled with deterministic means, while coagulation is simulated with a stochastic method (Marcus-Lushnikov stochastic process. Operator splitting techniques are used to synthesize the deterministic and stochastic parts in the algorithm. The algorithm is parallelized using the Message Passing Interface (MPI. The parallel computing efficiency is investigated through numerical examples. Near 60% parallel efficiency is achieved for the maximum testing case with 3.7 million MC particles running on 93 parallel computing nodes. The algorithm is verified through simulating various testing cases and comparing the simulation results with available analytical and/or other numerical solutions. Generally, it is found that only small number (hundreds or thousands of MC particles is necessary to accurately predict the aerosol particle number density, volume fraction, and so forth, that is, low order moments of the Particle Size Distribution (PSD function. Accurately predicting the high order moments of the PSD needs to dramatically increase the number of MC particles.

  10. Commensurabilities between ETNOs: a Monte Carlo survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Fuente Marcos, C.; de la Fuente Marcos, R.

    2016-07-01

    Many asteroids in the main and trans-Neptunian belts are trapped in mean motion resonances with Jupiter and Neptune, respectively. As a side effect, they experience accidental commensurabilities among themselves. These commensurabilities define characteristic patterns that can be used to trace the source of the observed resonant behaviour. Here, we explore systematically the existence of commensurabilities between the known ETNOs using their heliocentric and barycentric semimajor axes, their uncertainties, and Monte Carlo techniques. We find that the commensurability patterns present in the known ETNO population resemble those found in the main and trans-Neptunian belts. Although based on small number statistics, such patterns can only be properly explained if most, if not all, of the known ETNOs are subjected to the resonant gravitational perturbations of yet undetected trans-Plutonian planets. We show explicitly that some of the statistically significant commensurabilities are compatible with the Planet Nine hypothesis; in particular, a number of objects may be trapped in the 5:3 and 3:1 mean motion resonances with a putative Planet Nine with semimajor axis ˜700 au.

  11. Parallel Monte Carlo simulation of aerosol dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, K.

    2014-01-01

    A highly efficient Monte Carlo (MC) algorithm is developed for the numerical simulation of aerosol dynamics, that is, nucleation, surface growth, and coagulation. Nucleation and surface growth are handled with deterministic means, while coagulation is simulated with a stochastic method (Marcus-Lushnikov stochastic process). Operator splitting techniques are used to synthesize the deterministic and stochastic parts in the algorithm. The algorithm is parallelized using the Message Passing Interface (MPI). The parallel computing efficiency is investigated through numerical examples. Near 60% parallel efficiency is achieved for the maximum testing case with 3.7 million MC particles running on 93 parallel computing nodes. The algorithm is verified through simulating various testing cases and comparing the simulation results with available analytical and/or other numerical solutions. Generally, it is found that only small number (hundreds or thousands) of MC particles is necessary to accurately predict the aerosol particle number density, volume fraction, and so forth, that is, low order moments of the Particle Size Distribution (PSD) function. Accurately predicting the high order moments of the PSD needs to dramatically increase the number of MC particles. 2014 Kun Zhou et al.

  12. Helminthiases in Montes Claros. Preliminary survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Girard Kaminsky

    1976-04-01

    Full Text Available A preliminary survey was conducted for the presence of helminths in the city of Montes Claros, M. G., Brazil. Three groups of persons were examined by the direct smear, Kato thick film and MIFC techniques; one group by direct smear and Kato only. General findings were: a high prevalence of hookworm, followed by ascariasis, S. mansoni, S. stercoralis and very light infections with T. trichiurá. E. vermicularis and H. nana were ranking parasites at an orphanage, with some hookworm and S. mansoni infections as well. At a pig slaughter house, the dominant parasites were hookworm and S. mansoni. Pig cysticercosis was an incidental finding worth mentioning for the health hazard it represents for humans as well as an economic loss. From the comparative results between the Kato and the MIF the former proved itself again as a more sensitive and reliable concentration method for helminth eggs, of low cost and easy performance.Um estudo preliminar sobre helmintos foi feito na cidade de Montes Claros, MG, Brasil. Três grupos de pessoas foram examinados pelos métodos direto, de Kato e do MIF e um grupo pelos métodos direto e Kato exclusivamente. Encontrou-se uma alta prevalência de necatorose, seguindo-se ascaríase, S. mansoni, S. stercoralis, e infecções leves pelo T. trichiura. E. vermicularis e H. nana foram osparasitos mais prevalentes num orfanato, com alguns casos de infecção pelo Necator e S. mansoni. Cisticercose dos suinos foi achado incidental e é importante ser mencionada devido ao perigo que representa no plano da Saúde Pública, bem como pela perda econômica que produz. Discutiu-se brevemente a importância do solo na transmissão dos helmintos num clima quente e seco. Da comparação dos métodos de Kato e MIF, o primeiro demonstrou ser o método mais sensível para ovos de helmintos, de baixo custo e fácil preparo.

  13. Spike Inference from Calcium Imaging using Sequential Monte Carlo Methods

    OpenAIRE

    NeuroData; Paninski, L

    2015-01-01

    Vogelstein JT, Paninski L. Spike Inference from Calcium Imaging using Sequential Monte Carlo Methods. Statistical and Applied Mathematical Sciences Institute (SAMSI) Program on Sequential Monte Carlo Methods, 2008

  14. Backscattered radiation into a transmission ionization chamber: measurement and Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizumi, Maíra T; Yoriyaz, Hélio; Caldas, Linda V E

    2010-01-01

    Backscattered radiation (BSR) from field-defining collimators can affect the response of a monitor chamber in X-radiation fields. This contribution must be considered since this kind of chamber is used to monitor the equipment response. In this work, the dependence of a transmission ionization chamber response on the aperture diameter of the collimators was studied experimentally and using a Monte Carlo (MC) technique. According to the results, the BSR increases the chamber response of over 4.0% in the case of a totally closed collimator and 50 kV energy beam, using both techniques. The results from Monte Carlo simulation confirm the validity of the simulated geometry.

  15. Use of Monte Carlo methods in environmental risk assessments at the INEL: Applications and issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, G.; Van Horn, R.

    1996-06-01

    The EPA is increasingly considering the use of probabilistic risk assessment techniques as an alternative or refinement of the current point estimate of risk. This report provides an overview of the probabilistic technique called Monte Carlo Analysis. Advantages and disadvantages of implementing a Monte Carlo analysis over a point estimate analysis for environmental risk assessment are discussed. The general methodology is provided along with an example of its implementation. A phased approach to risk analysis that allows iterative refinement of the risk estimates is recommended for use at the INEL.

  16. Monte Carlo approaches to light nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, J.

    1990-01-01

    Significant progress has been made recently in the application of Monte Carlo methods to the study of light nuclei. We review new Green's function Monte Carlo results for the alpha particle, Variational Monte Carlo studies of {sup 16}O, and methods for low-energy scattering and transitions. Through these calculations, a coherent picture of the structure and electromagnetic properties of light nuclei has arisen. In particular, we examine the effect of the three-nucleon interaction and the importance of exchange currents in a variety of experimentally measured properties, including form factors and capture cross sections. 29 refs., 7 figs.

  17. Monte carlo simulation for soot dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Kun

    2012-01-01

    A new Monte Carlo method termed Comb-like frame Monte Carlo is developed to simulate the soot dynamics. Detailed stochastic error analysis is provided. Comb-like frame Monte Carlo is coupled with the gas phase solver Chemkin II to simulate soot formation in a 1-D premixed burner stabilized flame. The simulated soot number density, volume fraction, and particle size distribution all agree well with the measurement available in literature. The origin of the bimodal distribution of particle size distribution is revealed with quantitative proof.

  18. Quantum Monte Carlo for minimum energy structures

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, Lucas K

    2010-01-01

    We present an efficient method to find minimum energy structures using energy estimates from accurate quantum Monte Carlo calculations. This method involves a stochastic process formed from the stochastic energy estimates from Monte Carlo that can be averaged to find precise structural minima while using inexpensive calculations with moderate statistical uncertainty. We demonstrate the applicability of the algorithm by minimizing the energy of the H2O-OH- complex and showing that the structural minima from quantum Monte Carlo calculations affect the qualitative behavior of the potential energy surface substantially.

  19. Fast quantum Monte Carlo on a GPU

    CERN Document Server

    Lutsyshyn, Y

    2013-01-01

    We present a scheme for the parallelization of quantum Monte Carlo on graphical processing units, focusing on bosonic systems and variational Monte Carlo. We use asynchronous execution schemes with shared memory persistence, and obtain an excellent acceleration. Comparing with single core execution, GPU-accelerated code runs over x100 faster. The CUDA code is provided along with the package that is necessary to execute variational Monte Carlo for a system representing liquid helium-4. The program was benchmarked on several models of Nvidia GPU, including Fermi GTX560 and M2090, and the latest Kepler architecture K20 GPU. Kepler-specific optimization is discussed.

  20. MCNP{trademark} Monte Carlo: A precis of MCNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, K.J.

    1996-06-01

    MCNP{trademark} is a general purpose three-dimensional time-dependent neutron, photon, and electron transport code. It is highly portable and user-oriented, and backed by stringent software quality assurance practices and extensive experimental benchmarks. The cross section database is based upon the best evaluations available. MCNP incorporates state-of-the-art analog and adaptive Monte Carlo techniques. The code is documented in a 600 page manual which is augmented by numerous Los Alamos technical reports which detail various aspects of the code. MCNP represents over a megahour of development and refinement over the past 50 years and an ongoing commitment to excellence.

  1. Monte-Carlo Simulation on Neutron Instruments at CARR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The design of high resolution neutron powder diffractometer(HRPD) and two cold neutron guides(CNGs) to be built at China advanced research reactor(CARR) are studied by Monte-Carlo simulation technique.The HRPD instrument is desiged to have a minimum resolution of 0.2% and neutron fluence rate of greater than 106 cm-2 ·s-1 at sample position. The resolution curves, neutron fluence rate and effective neutron beam size at sample position are given. Differences in resolutions and intensity between the

  2. Monte Carlo estimation of the number of tatami tilings

    CERN Document Server

    Kimura, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the way Japanese tatami mats are placed on the floor, we consider domino tilings with a constraint and estimate the number of such tilings of plane regions. We map the system onto a monomer-dimer model with a novel local interaction on the dual lattice. We use a variant of the Hamiltonian replica exchange Monte Carlo method and the multi-parameter reweighting technique to study the model. The properties of the quantity are studied beyond exact enumeration and combinatorial method. The logarithm of the number of the tilings is linear in the boundary length of the region for all the regions studied.

  3. More about Zener drag studies with Monte Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Prinzio, Carlos L.; Druetta, Esteban; Nasello, Olga Beatriz

    2013-03-01

    Grain growth (GG) processes in the presence of second-phase and stationary particles have been widely studied but the results found are inconsistent. We present new GG simulations in two- and three-dimensional (2D and 3D) polycrystalline samples with second phase stationary particles, using the Monte Carlo technique. Simulations using values of particle concentration greater than 15% and particle radii different from 1 or 3 are performed, thus covering a range of particle radii and concentrations not previously studied. It is shown that only the results for 3D samples follow Zener's law.

  4. 11th International Conference on Monte Carlo and Quasi-Monte Carlo Methods in Scientific Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Nuyens, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the refereed proceedings of the Eleventh International Conference on Monte Carlo and Quasi-Monte Carlo Methods in Scientific Computing that was held at the University of Leuven (Belgium) in April 2014. These biennial conferences are major events for Monte Carlo and quasi-Monte Carlo researchers. The proceedings include articles based on invited lectures as well as carefully selected contributed papers on all theoretical aspects and applications of Monte Carlo and quasi-Monte Carlo methods. Offering information on the latest developments in these very active areas, this book is an excellent reference resource for theoreticians and practitioners interested in solving high-dimensional computational problems, arising, in particular, in finance, statistics and computer graphics.

  5. Aasta film - joonisfilm "Mont Blanc" / Verni Leivak

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Leivak, Verni, 1966-

    2002-01-01

    Eesti Filmiajakirjanike Ühing andis aasta 2001 parima filmi tiitli Priit Tenderi joonisfilmile "Mont Blanc" : Eesti Joonisfilm 2001.Ka filmikriitikute eelistused kinodes ja televisioonis 2001. aastal näidatud filmide osas

  6. Avariide kiuste Monte Carlosse / Aare Arula

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Arula, Aare

    2007-01-01

    Vt. ka Tehnika dlja Vsehh nr. 3, lk. 26-27. 26. jaanuaril 1937 Tallinnast Monte Carlo tähesõidule startinud Karl Siitanit ja tema meeskonda ootasid ees seiklused, mis oleksid neile peaaegu elu maksnud

  7. Avariide kiuste Monte Carlosse / Aare Arula

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Arula, Aare

    2007-01-01

    Vt. ka Tehnika dlja Vsehh nr. 3, lk. 26-27. 26. jaanuaril 1937 Tallinnast Monte Carlo tähesõidule startinud Karl Siitanit ja tema meeskonda ootasid ees seiklused, mis oleksid neile peaaegu elu maksnud

  8. Predator trapping on Monte Vista NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This letter is summarizing the status of predator trapping on Monte Vista National Wildlife refuge in light of the referendum passes in the State of Colorado banning...

  9. Quantum Monte Carlo Calculations of Light Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Pieper, Steven C

    2007-01-01

    During the last 15 years, there has been much progress in defining the nuclear Hamiltonian and applying quantum Monte Carlo methods to the calculation of light nuclei. I describe both aspects of this work and some recent results.

  10. Improved Monte Carlo Renormalization Group Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, R.; Wilson, K. G.; Umrigar, C.

    1985-01-01

    An extensive program to analyze critical systems using an Improved Monte Carlo Renormalization Group Method (IMCRG) being undertaken at LANL and Cornell is described. Here we first briefly review the method and then list some of the topics being investigated.

  11. Monte Vista NWR Water Use Report- 1964

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes water use at Monte Vista NWR for 1964. The document includes summaries of 1964 water use, 1965 water program recommendations, and proposed...

  12. Pheasant hunting on the Monte Vista NWR

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This letter to the Alamosa/Monte Vista NWR Refuge Manager discusses the need to alter management of pheasants in the area to halt the continued decline in population...

  13. Aasta film - joonisfilm "Mont Blanc" / Verni Leivak

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Leivak, Verni, 1966-

    2002-01-01

    Eesti Filmiajakirjanike Ühing andis aasta 2001 parima filmi tiitli Priit Tenderi joonisfilmile "Mont Blanc" : Eesti Joonisfilm 2001.Ka filmikriitikute eelistused kinodes ja televisioonis 2001. aastal näidatud filmide osas

  14. LCG Monte-Carlo Data Base

    CERN Document Server

    Bartalini, P.; Kryukov, A.; Selyuzhenkov, Ilya V.; Sherstnev, A.; Vologdin, A.

    2004-01-01

    We present the Monte-Carlo events Data Base (MCDB) project and its development plans. MCDB facilitates communication between authors of Monte-Carlo generators and experimental users. It also provides a convenient book-keeping and an easy access to generator level samples. The first release of MCDB is now operational for the CMS collaboration. In this paper we review the main ideas behind MCDB and discuss future plans to develop this Data Base further within the CERN LCG framework.

  15. Monte Carlo Algorithms for Linear Problems

    OpenAIRE

    DIMOV, Ivan

    2000-01-01

    MSC Subject Classification: 65C05, 65U05. Monte Carlo methods are a powerful tool in many fields of mathematics, physics and engineering. It is known, that these methods give statistical estimates for the functional of the solution by performing random sampling of a certain chance variable whose mathematical expectation is the desired functional. Monte Carlo methods are methods for solving problems using random variables. In the book [16] edited by Yu. A. Shreider one can find the followin...

  16. The Feynman Path Goes Monte Carlo

    OpenAIRE

    Sauer, Tilman

    2001-01-01

    Path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) simulations have become an important tool for the investigation of the statistical mechanics of quantum systems. I discuss some of the history of applying the Monte Carlo method to non-relativistic quantum systems in path-integral representation. The principle feasibility of the method was well established by the early eighties, a number of algorithmic improvements have been introduced in the last two decades.

  17. Monte Carlo Hamiltonian:Inverse Potential

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Xiang-Qian; CHENG Xiao-Ni; Helmut KR(O)GER

    2004-01-01

    The Monte Carlo Hamiltonian method developed recently allows to investigate the ground state and low-lying excited states of a quantum system,using Monte Carlo(MC)algorithm with importance sampling.However,conventional MC algorithm has some difficulties when applied to inverse potentials.We propose to use effective potential and extrapolation method to solve the problem.We present examples from the hydrogen system.

  18. Error in Monte Carlo, quasi-error in Quasi-Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Kleiss, R H

    2006-01-01

    While the Quasi-Monte Carlo method of numerical integration achieves smaller integration error than standard Monte Carlo, its use in particle physics phenomenology has been hindered by the abscence of a reliable way to estimate that error. The standard Monte Carlo error estimator relies on the assumption that the points are generated independently of each other and, therefore, fails to account for the error improvement advertised by the Quasi-Monte Carlo method. We advocate the construction of an estimator of stochastic nature, based on the ensemble of pointsets with a particular discrepancy value. We investigate the consequences of this choice and give some first empirical results on the suggested estimators.

  19. Coherent Scattering Imaging Monte Carlo Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Laila Abdulgalil Rafik

    Conventional mammography has poor contrast between healthy and cancerous tissues due to the small difference in attenuation properties. Coherent scatter potentially provides more information because interference of coherently scattered radiation depends on the average intermolecular spacing, and can be used to characterize tissue types. However, typical coherent scatter analysis techniques are not compatible with rapid low dose screening techniques. Coherent scatter slot scan imaging is a novel imaging technique which provides new information with higher contrast. In this work a simulation of coherent scatter was performed for slot scan imaging to assess its performance and provide system optimization. In coherent scatter imaging, the coherent scatter is exploited using a conventional slot scan mammography system with anti-scatter grids tilted at the characteristic angle of cancerous tissues. A Monte Carlo simulation was used to simulate the coherent scatter imaging. System optimization was performed across several parameters, including source voltage, tilt angle, grid distances, grid ratio, and shielding geometry. The contrast increased as the grid tilt angle increased beyond the characteristic angle for the modeled carcinoma. A grid tilt angle of 16 degrees yielded the highest contrast and signal to noise ratio (SNR). Also, contrast increased as the source voltage increased. Increasing grid ratio improved contrast at the expense of decreasing SNR. A grid ratio of 10:1 was sufficient to give a good contrast without reducing the intensity to a noise level. The optimal source to sample distance was determined to be such that the source should be located at the focal distance of the grid. A carcinoma lump of 0.5x0.5x0.5 cm3 in size was detectable which is reasonable considering the high noise due to the usage of relatively small number of incident photons for computational reasons. A further study is needed to study the effect of breast density and breast thickness

  20. Non-analogue Monte Carlo method, application to neutron simulation; Methode de Monte Carlo non analogue, application a la simulation des neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morillon, B.

    1996-12-31

    With most of the traditional and contemporary techniques, it is still impossible to solve the transport equation if one takes into account a fully detailed geometry and if one studies precisely the interactions between particles and matters. Only the Monte Carlo method offers such a possibility. However with significant attenuation, the natural simulation remains inefficient: it becomes necessary to use biasing techniques where the solution of the adjoint transport equation is essential. The Monte Carlo code Tripoli has been using such techniques successfully for a long time with different approximate adjoint solutions: these methods require from the user to find out some parameters. If this parameters are not optimal or nearly optimal, the biases simulations may bring about small figures of merit. This paper presents a description of the most important biasing techniques of the Monte Carlo code Tripoli ; then we show how to calculate the importance function for general geometry with multigroup cases. We present a completely automatic biasing technique where the parameters of the biased simulation are deduced from the solution of the adjoint transport equation calculated by collision probabilities. In this study we shall estimate the importance function through collision probabilities method and we shall evaluate its possibilities thanks to a Monte Carlo calculation. We compare different biased simulations with the importance function calculated by collision probabilities for one-group and multigroup problems. We have run simulations with new biasing method for one-group transport problems with isotropic shocks and for multigroup problems with anisotropic shocks. The results show that for the one-group and homogeneous geometry transport problems the method is quite optimal without splitting and russian roulette technique but for the multigroup and heterogeneous X-Y geometry ones the figures of merit are higher if we add splitting and russian roulette technique.

  1. Computing Critical Values of Exact Tests by Incorporating Monte Carlo Simulations Combined with Statistical Tables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vexler, Albert; Kim, Young Min; Yu, Jihnhee; Lazar, Nicole A; Hutson, Aland

    2014-12-01

    Various exact tests for statistical inference are available for powerful and accurate decision rules provided that corresponding critical values are tabulated or evaluated via Monte Carlo methods. This article introduces a novel hybrid method for computing p-values of exact tests by combining Monte Carlo simulations and statistical tables generated a priori. To use the data from Monte Carlo generations and tabulated critical values jointly, we employ kernel density estimation within Bayesian-type procedures. The p-values are linked to the posterior means of quantiles. In this framework, we present relevant information from the Monte Carlo experiments via likelihood-type functions, whereas tabulated critical values are used to reflect prior distributions. The local maximum likelihood technique is employed to compute functional forms of prior distributions from statistical tables. Empirical likelihood functions are proposed to replace parametric likelihood functions within the structure of the posterior mean calculations to provide a Bayesian-type procedure with a distribution-free set of assumptions. We derive the asymptotic properties of the proposed nonparametric posterior means of quantiles process. Using the theoretical propositions, we calculate the minimum number of needed Monte Carlo resamples for desired level of accuracy on the basis of distances between actual data characteristics (e.g. sample sizes) and characteristics of data used to present corresponding critical values in a table. The proposed approach makes practical applications of exact tests simple and rapid. Implementations of the proposed technique are easily carried out via the recently developed STATA and R statistical packages.

  2. Monte Carlo EM加速算法%Acceleration of Monte Carlo EM Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗季

    2008-01-01

    EM算法是近年来常用的求后验众数的估计的一种数据增广算法,但由于求出其E步中积分的显示表达式有时很困难,甚至不可能,限制了其应用的广泛性.而Monte Carlo EM算法很好地解决了这个问题,将EM算法中E步的积分用Monte Carlo模拟来有效实现,使其适用性大大增强.但无论是EM算法,还是Monte Carlo EM算法,其收敛速度都是线性的,被缺损信息的倒数所控制,当缺损数据的比例很高时,收敛速度就非常缓慢.而Newton-Raphson算法在后验众数的附近具有二次收敛速率.本文提出Monte Carlo EM加速算法,将Monte Carlo EM算法与Newton-Raphson算法结合,既使得EM算法中的E步用Monte Carlo模拟得以实现,又证明了该算法在后验众数附近具有二次收敛速度.从而使其保留了Monte Carlo EM算法的优点,并改进了Monte Carlo EM算法的收敛速度.本文通过数值例子,将Monte Carlo EM加速算法的结果与EM算法、Monte Carlo EM算法的结果进行比较,进一步说明了Monte Carlo EM加速算法的优良性.

  3. Lattice gas models and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of epitaxial growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biehl, Michael; Voigt, A

    2005-01-01

    A brief introduction is given to Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations of epitaxial crystal growth. Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) serves as the prototype example for growth far from equilibrium. However, many of the aspects discussed here would carry over to other techniques as well. A variety of app

  4. TRIPOLI: a general Monte Carlo code, present state and future prospects. [Neutron and gamma ray transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimal, J.C.; Vergnaud, T. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France))

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the most important features of the Monte Carlo code TRIPOLI-2. This code solves the Boltzmann equation in three-dimensional geometries for coupled neutron and gamma rays problems. A particular emphasis is devoted to the biasing techniques, which are very important for deep penetration. Future developments in TRIPOLI are described in the conclusion. (author).

  5. Comparison of the Monte Carlo adjoint-weighted and differential operator perturbation methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiedrowski, Brian C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Forrest B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    Two perturbation theory methodologies are implemented for k-eigenvalue calculations in the continuous-energy Monte Carlo code, MCNP6. A comparison of the accuracy of these techniques, the differential operator and adjoint-weighted methods, is performed numerically and analytically. Typically, the adjoint-weighted method shows better performance over a larger range; however, there are exceptions.

  6. Monte Carlo Wave Packet Theory of Dissociative Double Ionization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Henriette Astrup; Madsen, Lars Bojer; Mølmer, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear dynamics in strong-field double ionization processes is predicted using a stochastic Monte Carlo wave packet technique. Using input from electronic structure calculations and strong-field electron dynamics the description allows for field-dressed dynamics within a given molecule as well...

  7. Speed-up of Monte Carlo simulations by sampling of rejected states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frenkel, D.

    2004-01-01

    The Markov chain Monte Carlo method is an important tool to estimate the average properties of systems with a very large number of accessible states. This technique is used extensively in fields ranging from physics to genetics and economics. The rejection of trial configurations is a central

  8. The information-based complexity of approximation problem by adaptive Monte Carlo methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we study the complexity of information of approximation problem on the multivariate Sobolev space with bounded mixed derivative MWpr,α(Td), 1 < p < ∞, in the norm of Lq(Td), 1 < q < ∞, by adaptive Monte Carlo methods. Applying the discretization technique and some properties of pseudo-s-scale, we determine the exact asymptotic orders of this problem.

  9. Generic Form of Bayesian Monte Carlo For Models With Partial Monotonicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajabalinejad, M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a generic method for the safety assessments of models with partial monotonicity. For this purpose, a Bayesian interpolation method is developed and implemented in the Monte Carlo process. integrated approach is the generalization of the recently developed techniques used in safet

  10. Generic form of Bayesian Monte Carlo for models with partial monotonicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rajabalinejad, M.; Spitas, C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a generic method for the safety assessments of models with partial monotonicity. For this purpose, a Bayesian interpolation method is developed and implemented in the Monte Carlo process. integrated approach is the generalization of the recently developed techniques used in safet

  11. Monte Carlo direct view factor and generalized radiative heat transfer programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Williams, J. L.; Scates, J. H.

    1969-01-01

    Computer programs find the direct view factor from one surface segment to another using the Monte carlo technique, and the radioactive-transfer coefficients between surface segments. An advantage of the programs is the great generality of problems treatable and rapidity of solution from problem conception to receipt of results.

  12. Lattice gas models and kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of epitaxial growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biehl, Michael; Voigt, A

    2005-01-01

    A brief introduction is given to Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulations of epitaxial crystal growth. Molecular Beam Epitaxy (MBE) serves as the prototype example for growth far from equilibrium. However, many of the aspects discussed here would carry over to other techniques as well. A variety of app

  13. Pore-scale uncertainty quantification with multilevel Monte Carlo

    KAUST Repository

    Icardi, Matteo

    2014-01-06

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of pore-scale transport processes in porous media have recently gained large popularity. However the geometrical details of the pore structures can be known only in a very low number of samples and the detailed flow computations can be carried out only on a limited number of cases. The explicit introduction of randomness in the geometry and in other setup parameters can be crucial for the optimization of pore-scale investigations for random homogenization. Since there are no generic ways to parametrize the randomness in the porescale structures, Monte Carlo techniques are the most accessible to compute statistics. We propose a multilevel Monte Carlo (MLMC) technique to reduce the computational cost of estimating quantities of interest within a prescribed accuracy constraint. Random samples of pore geometries with a hierarchy of geometrical complexities and grid refinements, are synthetically generated and used to propagate the uncertainties in the flow simulations and compute statistics of macro-scale effective parameters.

  14. Monte Carlo Criticality Methods and Analysis Capabilities in SCALE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goluoglu, Sedat [ORNL; Petrie Jr, Lester M [ORNL; Dunn, Michael E [ORNL; Hollenbach, Daniel F [ORNL; Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the Monte Carlo codes KENO V.a and KENO-VI in SCALE that are primarily used to calculate multiplication factors and flux distributions of fissile systems. Both codes allow explicit geometric representation of the target systems and are used internationally for safety analyses involving fissile materials. KENO V.a has limiting geometric rules such as no intersections and no rotations. These limitations make KENO V.a execute very efficiently and run very fast. On the other hand, KENO-VI allows very complex geometric modeling. Both KENO codes can utilize either continuous-energy or multigroup cross-section data and have been thoroughly verified and validated with ENDF libraries through ENDF/B-VII.0, which has been first distributed with SCALE 6. Development of the Monte Carlo solution technique and solution methodology as applied in both KENO codes is explained in this paper. Available options and proper application of the options and techniques are also discussed. Finally, performance of the codes is demonstrated using published benchmark problems.

  15. Approaching Chemical Accuracy with Quantum Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Petruzielo, F R; Umrigar, C J

    2012-01-01

    A quantum Monte Carlo study of the atomization energies for the G2 set of molecules is presented. Basis size dependence of diffusion Monte Carlo atomization energies is studied with a single determinant Slater-Jastrow trial wavefunction formed from Hartree-Fock orbitals. With the largest basis set, the mean absolute deviation from experimental atomization energies for the G2 set is 3.0 kcal/mol. Optimizing the orbitals within variational Monte Carlo improves the agreement between diffusion Monte Carlo and experiment, reducing the mean absolute deviation to 2.1 kcal/mol. Moving beyond a single determinant Slater-Jastrow trial wavefunction, diffusion Monte Carlo with a small complete active space Slater-Jastrow trial wavefunction results in near chemical accuracy. In this case, the mean absolute deviation from experimental atomization energies is 1.2 kcal/mol. It is shown from calculations on systems containing phosphorus that the accuracy can be further improved by employing a larger active space.

  16. A Monte Carlo Method for Calculating Initiation Probability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenman, G M; Procassini, R J; Clouse, C J

    2007-03-05

    A Monte Carlo method for calculating the probability of initiating a self-sustaining neutron chain reaction has been developed. In contrast to deterministic codes which solve a non-linear, adjoint form of the Boltzmann equation to calculate initiation probability, this new method solves the forward (standard) form of the equation using a modified source calculation technique. Results from this new method are compared with results obtained from several deterministic codes for a suite of historical test problems. The level of agreement between these code predictions is quite good, considering the use of different numerical techniques and nuclear data. A set of modifications to the historical test problems has also been developed which reduces the impact of neutron source ambiguities on the calculated probabilities.

  17. Sensitivity analysis for oblique incidence reflectometry using Monte Carlo simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamran, Faisal; Andersen, Peter E.

    2015-01-01

    Oblique incidence reflectometry has developed into an effective, noncontact, and noninvasive measurement technology for the quantification of both the reduced scattering and absorption coefficients of a sample. The optical properties are deduced by analyzing only the shape of the reflectance...... profiles. This article presents a sensitivity analysis of the technique in turbid media. Monte Carlo simulations are used to investigate the technique and its potential to distinguish the small changes between different levels of scattering. We present various regions of the dynamic range of optical...... properties in which system demands vary to be able to detect subtle changes in the structure of the medium, translated as measured optical properties. Effects of variation in anisotropy are discussed and results presented. Finally, experimental data of milk products with different fat content are considered...

  18. Penalized Splines for Smooth Representation of High-dimensional Monte Carlo Datasets

    CERN Document Server

    Whitehorn, Nathan; Lafebre, Sven

    2013-01-01

    Detector response to a high-energy physics process is often estimated by Monte Carlo simulation. For purposes of data analysis, the results of this simulation are typically stored in large multi-dimensional histograms, which can quickly become both too large to easily store and manipulate and numerically problematic due to unfilled bins or interpolation artifacts. We describe here an application of the penalized spline technique to efficiently compute B-spline representations of such tables and discuss aspects of the resulting B-spline fits that simplify many common tasks in handling tabulated Monte Carlo data in high-energy physics analysis, in particular their use in maximum-likelihood fitting.

  19. A Monte Carlo Synthetic-Acceleration Method for Solving the Thermal Radiation Diffusion Equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Thomas M [ORNL; Mosher, Scott W [ORNL; Slattery, Stuart [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel synthetic-acceleration based Monte Carlo method for solving the equilibrium thermal radiation diusion equation in three dimensions. The algorithm performance is compared against traditional solution techniques using a Marshak benchmark problem and a more complex multiple material problem. Our results show that not only can our Monte Carlo method be an eective solver for sparse matrix systems, but also that it performs competitively with deterministic methods including preconditioned Conjugate Gradient while producing numerically identical results. We also discuss various aspects of preconditioning the method and its general applicability to broader classes of problems.

  20. A Monte Carlo synthetic-acceleration method for solving the thermal radiation diffusion equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Thomas M., E-mail: evanstm@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Mosher, Scott W., E-mail: moshersw@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Slattery, Stuart R., E-mail: sslattery@wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin–Madison, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53716 (United States); Hamilton, Steven P., E-mail: hamiltonsp@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    We present a novel synthetic-acceleration-based Monte Carlo method for solving the equilibrium thermal radiation diffusion equation in three spatial dimensions. The algorithm performance is compared against traditional solution techniques using a Marshak benchmark problem and a more complex multiple material problem. Our results show that our Monte Carlo method is an effective solver for sparse matrix systems. For solutions converged to the same tolerance, it performs competitively with deterministic methods including preconditioned conjugate gradient and GMRES. We also discuss various aspects of preconditioning the method and its general applicability to broader classes of problems.

  1. B-splines smoothed rejection sampling method and its applications in quasi-Monte Carlo integration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷桂媛

    2002-01-01

    The rejection sampling method is one of the most popular methods used in Monte Carlo methods. It turns out that the standard rejection method is closely related to the problem of quasi-Monte Carlo integration of characteristic functions, whose accuracy may be lost due to the discontinuity of the characteristic functions. We proposed a B-splines smoothed rejection sampling method, which smoothed the characteristic function by B-splines smoothing technique without changing the integral quantity. Numerical experiments showed that the convergence rate of nearly O(N-1) is regained by using the B-splines smoothed rejection method in importance sampling.

  2. B-splines smoothed rejection sampling method and its applications in quasi-Monte Carlo integration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷桂媛

    2002-01-01

    The rejection sampling method is one of the most popular methods used in Monte Carlo methods. It turns out that the standard rejection method is closely related to the problem of quasi-Monte Carlo integration of characteristic functions, whose accuracy may be lost due to the discontinuity of the characteristic functions. We proposed a B-splines smoothed rejection sampling method, which smoothed the characteristic function by B-splines smoothing technique without changing the integral quantity. Numerical experiments showed that the convergence rate of nearly O( N-1 ) is regained by using the B-splines smoothed rejection method in importance sampling.

  3. Determination of scatter fractions of some materials by experimental studies and Monte Carlo calculations

    CERN Document Server

    Meric, N; Bor, D

    1999-01-01

    Scatter fractions have been determined experimentally for lucite, polyethylene, polypropylene, aluminium and copper of varying thicknesses using a polyenergetic broad X-ray beam of 67 kVp. Simulation of the experiment has been carried out by the Monte Carlo technique under the same input conditions. Comparison of the measured and predicted data with each other and with the previously reported values has been given. The Monte Carlo calculations have also been carried out for water, bakelite and bone to examine the dependence of scatter fraction on the density of the scatterer.

  4. Calculation Aspects of the European Rebalanced Basket Option using Monte Carlo Methods: Valuation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CJ van der Merwe

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Extra premiums can be charged to a client to guarantee a minimum payout of a contract on a portfolio that gets rebalanced on a regular basis back to fixed proportions. The valuation of this premium can be changed to that of the pricing of a European put option with underlying rebalanced portfolio. This article finds the most efficient estimators for the value of this path-dependant multi-asset put option using different Monte Carlo methods. With the help of a refined method, computing time of the value decreased significantly. Furthermore, Variance Reduction Techniques and Quasi-Monte Carlo methods delivered more accurate and faster converging estimates as well.

  5. Stochastic simulation and Monte-Carlo methods; Simulation stochastique et methodes de Monte-Carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, C. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France); Talay, D. [Institut National de Recherche en Informatique et en Automatique (INRIA), 78 - Le Chesnay (France); Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France)

    2011-07-01

    This book presents some numerical probabilistic methods of simulation with their convergence speed. It combines mathematical precision and numerical developments, each proposed method belonging to a precise theoretical context developed in a rigorous and self-sufficient manner. After some recalls about the big numbers law and the basics of probabilistic simulation, the authors introduce the martingales and their main properties. Then, they develop a chapter on non-asymptotic estimations of Monte-Carlo method errors. This chapter gives a recall of the central limit theorem and precises its convergence speed. It introduces the Log-Sobolev and concentration inequalities, about which the study has greatly developed during the last years. This chapter ends with some variance reduction techniques. In order to demonstrate in a rigorous way the simulation results of stochastic processes, the authors introduce the basic notions of probabilities and of stochastic calculus, in particular the essential basics of Ito calculus, adapted to each numerical method proposed. They successively study the construction and important properties of the Poisson process, of the jump and deterministic Markov processes (linked to transport equations), and of the solutions of stochastic differential equations. Numerical methods are then developed and the convergence speed results of algorithms are rigorously demonstrated. In passing, the authors describe the probabilistic interpretation basics of the parabolic partial derivative equations. Non-trivial applications to real applied problems are also developed. (J.S.)

  6. CT-Based Brachytherapy Treatment Planning using Monte Carlo Simulation Aided by an Interface Software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Moslemi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In brachytherapy, radioactive sources are placed close to the tumor, therefore, small changes in their positions can cause large changes in the dose distribution. This emphasizes the need for computerized treatment planning. The usual method for treatment planning of cervix brachytherapy uses conventional radiographs in the Manchester system. Nowadays, because of their advantages in locating the source positions and the surrounding tissues, CT and MRI images are replacing conventional radiographs. In this study, we used CT images in Monte Carlo based dose calculation for brachytherapy treatment planning, using an interface software to create the geometry file required in the MCNP code. The aim of using the interface software is to facilitate and speed up the geometry set-up for simulations based on the patient’s anatomy. This paper examines the feasibility of this method in cervix brachytherapy and assesses its accuracy and speed. Material and Methods: For dosimetric measurements regarding the treatment plan, a pelvic phantom was made from polyethylene in which the treatment applicators could be placed. For simulations using CT images, the phantom was scanned at 120 kVp. Using an interface software written in MATLAB, the CT images were converted into MCNP input file and the simulation was then performed. Results: Using the interface software, preparation time for the simulations of the applicator and surrounding structures was approximately 3 minutes; the corresponding time needed in the conventional MCNP geometry entry being approximately 1 hour. The discrepancy in the simulated and measured doses to point A was 1.7% of the prescribed dose.  The corresponding dose differences between the two methods in rectum and bladder were 3.0% and 3.7% of the prescribed dose, respectively. Comparing the results of simulation using the interface software with those of simulation using the standard MCNP geometry entry showed a less than 1

  7. A Monte Carlo Method for Making the SDSS u-Band Magnitude More Accurate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jiayin; Du, Cuihua; Zuo, Wenbo; Jing, Yingjie; Wu, Zhenyu; Ma, Jun; Zhou, Xu

    2016-10-01

    We develop a new Monte Carlo-based method to convert the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) u-band magnitude to the south Galactic Cap of the u-band Sky Survey (SCUSS) u-band magnitude. Due to the increased accuracy of SCUSS u-band measurements, the converted u-band magnitude becomes more accurate compared with the original SDSS u-band magnitude, in particular at the faint end. The average u-magnitude error (for both SDSS and SCUSS) of numerous main-sequence stars with 0.2\\lt g-r\\lt 0.8 increases as the g-band magnitude becomes fainter. When g = 19.5, the average magnitude error of the SDSS u is 0.11. When g = 20.5, the average SDSS u error rises to 0.22. However, at this magnitude, the average magnitude error of the SCUSS u is just half as much as that of the SDSS u. The SDSS u-band magnitudes of main-sequence stars with 0.2\\lt g-r\\lt 0.8 and 18.5\\lt g\\lt 20.5 are converted, therefore the maximum average error of the converted u-band magnitudes is 0.11. The potential application of this conversion is to derive a more accurate photometric metallicity calibration from SDSS observations, especially for the more distant stars. Thus, we can explore stellar metallicity distributions either in the Galactic halo or some stream stars.

  8. MONTE CARLO ANALYSIS FOR PREDICTION OF NOISE FROM A CONSTRUCTION SITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaiton Haron

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The large number of operations involving noisy machinery associated with construction site activities result in considerable variation in the noise levels experienced at receiver locations. This paper suggests an approach to predict noise levels generated from a site by using a Monte Carlo approach. This approach enables the determination of details regarding the statistical uncertainties associated with noise level predictions or temporal distributions. This technique could provide the basis for a generalised prediction technique and a simple noise management tool.

  9. Random Numbers and Monte Carlo Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Philipp O. J.

    Many-body problems often involve the calculation of integrals of very high dimension which cannot be treated by standard methods. For the calculation of thermodynamic averages Monte Carlo methods are very useful which sample the integration volume at randomly chosen points. After summarizing some basic statistics, we discuss algorithms for the generation of pseudo-random numbers with given probability distribution which are essential for all Monte Carlo methods. We show how the efficiency of Monte Carlo integration can be improved by sampling preferentially the important configurations. Finally the famous Metropolis algorithm is applied to classical many-particle systems. Computer experiments visualize the central limit theorem and apply the Metropolis method to the traveling salesman problem.

  10. Quantum Monte Carlo with variable spins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melton, Cody A; Bennett, M Chandler; Mitas, Lubos

    2016-06-28

    We investigate the inclusion of variable spins in electronic structure quantum Monte Carlo, with a focus on diffusion Monte Carlo with Hamiltonians that include spin-orbit interactions. Following our previous introduction of fixed-phase spin-orbit diffusion Monte Carlo, we thoroughly discuss the details of the method and elaborate upon its technicalities. We present a proof for an upper-bound property for complex nonlocal operators, which allows for the implementation of T-moves to ensure the variational property. We discuss the time step biases associated with our particular choice of spin representation. Applications of the method are also presented for atomic and molecular systems. We calculate the binding energies and geometry of the PbH and Sn2 molecules, as well as the electron affinities of the 6p row elements in close agreement with experiments.

  11. A brief introduction to Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonate, P L

    2001-01-01

    Simulation affects our life every day through our interactions with the automobile, airline and entertainment industries, just to name a few. The use of simulation in drug development is relatively new, but its use is increasing in relation to the speed at which modern computers run. One well known example of simulation in drug development is molecular modelling. Another use of simulation that is being seen recently in drug development is Monte Carlo simulation of clinical trials. Monte Carlo simulation differs from traditional simulation in that the model parameters are treated as stochastic or random variables, rather than as fixed values. The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief introduction to Monte Carlo simulation methods.

  12. Quantum Monte Carlo with Variable Spins

    CERN Document Server

    Melton, Cody A; Mitas, Lubos

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the inclusion of variable spins in electronic structure quantum Monte Carlo, with a focus on diffusion Monte Carlo with Hamiltonians that include spin-orbit interactions. Following our previous introduction of fixed-phase spin-orbit diffusion Monte Carlo (FPSODMC), we thoroughly discuss the details of the method and elaborate upon its technicalities. We present a proof for an upper-bound property for complex nonlocal operators, which allows for the implementation of T-moves to ensure the variational property. We discuss the time step biases associated with our particular choice of spin representation. Applications of the method are also presented for atomic and molecular systems. We calculate the binding energies and geometry of the PbH and Sn$_2$ molecules, as well as the electron affinities of the 6$p$ row elements in close agreement with experiments.

  13. CosmoPMC: Cosmology Population Monte Carlo

    CERN Document Server

    Kilbinger, Martin; Cappe, Olivier; Cardoso, Jean-Francois; Fort, Gersende; Prunet, Simon; Robert, Christian P; Wraith, Darren

    2011-01-01

    We present the public release of the Bayesian sampling algorithm for cosmology, CosmoPMC (Cosmology Population Monte Carlo). CosmoPMC explores the parameter space of various cosmological probes, and also provides a robust estimate of the Bayesian evidence. CosmoPMC is based on an adaptive importance sampling method called Population Monte Carlo (PMC). Various cosmology likelihood modules are implemented, and new modules can be added easily. The importance-sampling algorithm is written in C, and fully parallelised using the Message Passing Interface (MPI). Due to very little overhead, the wall-clock time required for sampling scales approximately with the number of CPUs. The CosmoPMC package contains post-processing and plotting programs, and in addition a Monte-Carlo Markov chain (MCMC) algorithm. The sampling engine is implemented in the library pmclib, and can be used independently. The software is available for download at http://www.cosmopmc.info.

  14. Adiabatic optimization versus diffusion Monte Carlo methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarret, Michael; Jordan, Stephen P.; Lackey, Brad

    2016-10-01

    Most experimental and theoretical studies of adiabatic optimization use stoquastic Hamiltonians, whose ground states are expressible using only real nonnegative amplitudes. This raises a question as to whether classical Monte Carlo methods can simulate stoquastic adiabatic algorithms with polynomial overhead. Here we analyze diffusion Monte Carlo algorithms. We argue that, based on differences between L1 and L2 normalized states, these algorithms suffer from certain obstructions preventing them from efficiently simulating stoquastic adiabatic evolution in generality. In practice however, we obtain good performance by introducing a method that we call Substochastic Monte Carlo. In fact, our simulations are good classical optimization algorithms in their own right, competitive with the best previously known heuristic solvers for MAX-k -SAT at k =2 ,3 ,4 .

  15. Self-learning Monte Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junwei; Qi, Yang; Meng, Zi Yang; Fu, Liang

    2017-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulation is an unbiased numerical tool for studying classical and quantum many-body systems. One of its bottlenecks is the lack of a general and efficient update algorithm for large size systems close to the phase transition, for which local updates perform badly. In this Rapid Communication, we propose a general-purpose Monte Carlo method, dubbed self-learning Monte Carlo (SLMC), in which an efficient update algorithm is first learned from the training data generated in trial simulations and then used to speed up the actual simulation. We demonstrate the efficiency of SLMC in a spin model at the phase transition point, achieving a 10-20 times speedup.

  16. Evaluation of the interindividual human variation in bioactivation of methyleugenol using physiologically based kinetic modeling and Monte Carlo simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Subeihi, Ala' A.A., E-mail: subeihi@yahoo.com [Division of Toxicology, Wageningen University, Tuinlaan 5, 6703 HE Wageningen (Netherlands); BEN-HAYYAN-Aqaba International Laboratories, Aqaba Special Economic Zone Authority (ASEZA), P. O. Box 2565, Aqaba 77110 (Jordan); Alhusainy, Wasma; Kiwamoto, Reiko; Spenkelink, Bert [Division of Toxicology, Wageningen University, Tuinlaan 5, 6703 HE Wageningen (Netherlands); Bladeren, Peter J. van [Division of Toxicology, Wageningen University, Tuinlaan 5, 6703 HE Wageningen (Netherlands); Nestec S.A., Avenue Nestlé 55, 1800 Vevey (Switzerland); Rietjens, Ivonne M.C.M.; Punt, Ans [Division of Toxicology, Wageningen University, Tuinlaan 5, 6703 HE Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2015-03-01

    The present study aims at predicting the level of formation of the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of methyleugenol, 1′-sulfooxymethyleugenol, in the human population by taking variability in key bioactivation and detoxification reactions into account using Monte Carlo simulations. Depending on the metabolic route, variation was simulated based on kinetic constants obtained from incubations with a range of individual human liver fractions or by combining kinetic constants obtained for specific isoenzymes with literature reported human variation in the activity of these enzymes. The results of the study indicate that formation of 1′-sulfooxymethyleugenol is predominantly affected by variation in i) P450 1A2-catalyzed bioactivation of methyleugenol to 1′-hydroxymethyleugenol, ii) P450 2B6-catalyzed epoxidation of methyleugenol, iii) the apparent kinetic constants for oxidation of 1′-hydroxymethyleugenol, and iv) the apparent kinetic constants for sulfation of 1′-hydroxymethyleugenol. Based on the Monte Carlo simulations a so-called chemical-specific adjustment factor (CSAF) for intraspecies variation could be derived by dividing different percentiles by the 50th percentile of the predicted population distribution for 1′-sulfooxymethyleugenol formation. The obtained CSAF value at the 90th percentile was 3.2, indicating that the default uncertainty factor of 3.16 for human variability in kinetics may adequately cover the variation within 90% of the population. Covering 99% of the population requires a larger uncertainty factor of 6.4. In conclusion, the results showed that adequate predictions on interindividual human variation can be made with Monte Carlo-based PBK modeling. For methyleugenol this variation was observed to be in line with the default variation generally assumed in risk assessment. - Highlights: • Interindividual human differences in methyleugenol bioactivation were simulated. • This was done using in vitro incubations, PBK modeling

  17. Parallel Markov chain Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Ruichao; Orkoulas, G

    2007-06-07

    With strict detailed balance, parallel Monte Carlo simulation through domain decomposition cannot be validated with conventional Markov chain theory, which describes an intrinsically serial stochastic process. In this work, the parallel version of Markov chain theory and its role in accelerating Monte Carlo simulations via cluster computing is explored. It is shown that sequential updating is the key to improving efficiency in parallel simulations through domain decomposition. A parallel scheme is proposed to reduce interprocessor communication or synchronization, which slows down parallel simulation with increasing number of processors. Parallel simulation results for the two-dimensional lattice gas model show substantial reduction of simulation time for systems of moderate and large size.

  18. Monte Carlo Hamiltonian:Linear Potentials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUOXiang-Qian; HelmutKROEGER; 等

    2002-01-01

    We further study the validity of the Monte Carlo Hamiltonian method .The advantage of the method,in comparison with the standard Monte Carlo Lagrangian approach,is its capability to study the excited states.We consider two quantum mechanical models:a symmetric one V(x)=/x/2;and an asymmetric one V(x)==∞,for x<0 and V(x)=2,for x≥0.The results for the spectrum,wave functions and thermodynamical observables are in agreement with the analytical or Runge-Kutta calculations.

  19. Monte Carlo dose distributions for radiosurgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perucha, M.; Leal, A.; Rincon, M.; Carrasco, E. [Sevilla Univ. (Spain). Dept. Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica; Sanchez-Doblado, F. [Sevilla Univ. (Spain). Dept. Fisiologia Medica y Biofisica]|[Hospital Univ. Virgen Macarena, Sevilla (Spain). Servicio de Oncologia Radioterapica; Nunez, L. [Clinica Puerta de Hierro, Madrid (Spain). Servicio de Radiofisica; Arrans, R.; Sanchez-Calzado, J.A.; Errazquin, L. [Hospital Univ. Virgen Macarena, Sevilla (Spain). Servicio de Oncologia Radioterapica; Sanchez-Nieto, B. [Royal Marsden NHS Trust (United Kingdom). Joint Dept. of Physics]|[Inst. of Cancer Research, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2001-07-01

    The precision of Radiosurgery Treatment planning systems is limited by the approximations of their algorithms and by their dosimetrical input data. This fact is especially important in small fields. However, the Monte Carlo methods is an accurate alternative as it considers every aspect of particle transport. In this work an acoustic neurinoma is studied by comparing the dose distribution of both a planning system and Monte Carlo. Relative shifts have been measured and furthermore, Dose-Volume Histograms have been calculated for target and adjacent organs at risk. (orig.)

  20. Monte Carlo simulation of neutron scattering instruments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeger, P.A.

    1995-12-31

    A library of Monte Carlo subroutines has been developed for the purpose of design of neutron scattering instruments. Using small-angle scattering as an example, the philosophy and structure of the library are described and the programs are used to compare instruments at continuous wave (CW) and long-pulse spallation source (LPSS) neutron facilities. The Monte Carlo results give a count-rate gain of a factor between 2 and 4 using time-of-flight analysis. This is comparable to scaling arguments based on the ratio of wavelength bandwidth to resolution width.

  1. The Rational Hybrid Monte Carlo Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, M A

    2006-01-01

    The past few years have seen considerable progress in algorithmic development for the generation of gauge fields including the effects of dynamical fermions. The Rational Hybrid Monte Carlo (RHMC) algorithm, where Hybrid Monte Carlo is performed using a rational approximation in place the usual inverse quark matrix kernel is one of these developments. This algorithm has been found to be extremely beneficial in many areas of lattice QCD (chiral fermions, finite temperature, Wilson fermions etc.). We review the algorithm and some of these benefits, and we compare against other recent algorithm developements. We conclude with an update of the Berlin wall plot comparing costs of all popular fermion formulations.

  2. The Rational Hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Michael

    2006-12-01

    The past few years have seen considerable progress in algorithmic development for the generation of gauge fields including the effects of dynamical fermions. The Rational Hybrid Monte Carlo (RHMC) algorithm, where Hybrid Monte Carlo is performed using a rational approximation in place the usual inverse quark matrix kernel is one of these developments. This algorithm has been found to be extremely beneficial in many areas of lattice QCD (chiral fermions, finite temperature, Wilson fermions etc.). We review the algorithm and some of these benefits, and we compare against other recent algorithm developements. We conclude with an update of the Berlin wall plot comparing costs of all popular fermion formulations.

  3. Monte Carlo Radiation Hydrodynamics: Methods, Tests and Application to Supernova Type Ia Ejecta

    CERN Document Server

    Noebauer, U M; Kromer, M; Röpke, F K; Hillebrandt, W

    2012-01-01

    In astrophysical systems, radiation-matter interactions are important in transferring energy and momentum between the radiation field and the surrounding material. This coupling often makes it necessary to consider the role of radiation when modelling the dynamics of astrophysical fluids. During the last few years, there have been rapid developments in the use of Monte Carlo methods for numerical radiative transfer simulations. Here, we present an approach to radiation hydrodynamics that is based on coupling Monte Carlo radiative transfer techniques with finite-volume hydrodynamical methods in an operator-split manner. In particular, we adopt an indivisible packet formalism to discretize the radiation field into an ensemble of Monte Carlo packets and employ volume-based estimators to reconstruct the radiation field characteristics. In this paper the numerical tools of this method are presented and their accuracy is verified in a series of test calculations. Finally, as a practical example, we use our approach...

  4. Annealing evolutionary stochastic approximation Monte Carlo for global optimization

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Faming

    2010-04-08

    In this paper, we propose a new algorithm, the so-called annealing evolutionary stochastic approximation Monte Carlo (AESAMC) algorithm as a general optimization technique, and study its convergence. AESAMC possesses a self-adjusting mechanism, whose target distribution can be adapted at each iteration according to the current samples. Thus, AESAMC falls into the class of adaptive Monte Carlo methods. This mechanism also makes AESAMC less trapped by local energy minima than nonadaptive MCMC algorithms. Under mild conditions, we show that AESAMC can converge weakly toward a neighboring set of global minima in the space of energy. AESAMC is tested on multiple optimization problems. The numerical results indicate that AESAMC can potentially outperform simulated annealing, the genetic algorithm, annealing stochastic approximation Monte Carlo, and some other metaheuristics in function optimization. © 2010 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  5. Radiation Transport for Explosive Outflows: A Multigroup Hybrid Monte Carlo Method

    CERN Document Server

    Wollaeger, Ryan T; Graziani, Carlo; Couch, Sean M; Jordan, George C; Lamb, Donald Q; Moses, Gregory A

    2013-01-01

    We explore the application of Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) to radiation transport in strong fluid outflows with structured opacity. The IMC method of Fleck & Cummings is a stochastic computational technique for nonlinear radiation transport. IMC is partially implicit in time and may suffer in efficiency when tracking Monte Carlo particles through optically thick materials. The DDMC method of Densmore accelerates an IMC computation where the domain is diffusive. Recently, Abdikamalov extended IMC and DDMC to multigroup, velocity-dependent neutrino transport with the intent of modeling neutrino dynamics in core-collapse supernovae. Densmore has also formulated a multifrequency extension to the originally grey DDMC method. In this article we rigorously formulate IMC and DDMC over a high-velocity Lagrangian grid for possible application to photon transport in the post-explosion phase of Type Ia supernovae. The method described is suitable for a large variety of non-mono...

  6. Monte-Carlo fluid approaches to detached plasmas in non-axisymmetric divertor configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Y.; Frerichs, H.; Kobayashi, M.; Reiter, D.

    2017-03-01

    Fluid transport modeling in three-dimensional boundaries of toroidal confinement devices is reviewed with the emphasis on a Monte-Carlo approach to simulate detached plasmas. The loss of axisymmetry in such configurations presents a major challenge for numerical implementation of the standard fluid model widely applied to fusion experimental devices. A large-scale effort has been made to address this problem under complementary aspects including different magnetic topologies and numerical techniques. In this paper, we give a brief review of the different strategies pioneered and the challenges involved. A more detailed description is provided for the Monte-Carlo code—EMC3-Eirene, where the physics model and the basic idea behind the applied Monte-Carlo method are presented. The focus is put on its applications to detachment studies for stellarators and tokamaks. Here, major achievements and difficulties encountered are described. Model limitations and further development plans are discussed.

  7. MCNP-REN a Monte Carlo tool for neutron detector design

    CERN Document Server

    Abhold, M E

    2002-01-01

    The development of neutron detectors makes extensive use of the predictions of detector response through the use of Monte Carlo techniques in conjunction with the point reactor model. Unfortunately, the point reactor model fails to accurately predict detector response in common applications. For this reason, the general Monte Carlo code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP), was modified to simulate the pulse streams that would be generated by a neutron detector and normally analyzed by a shift register. This modified code, MCNP-Random Exponentially Distributed Neutron Source (MCNP-REN), along with the Time Analysis Program, predicts neutron detector response without using the point reactor model, making it unnecessary for the user to decide whether or not the assumptions of the point model are met for their application. MCNP-REN is capable of simulating standard neutron coincidence counting as well as neutron multiplicity counting. Measurements of mixed oxide fresh fuel w...

  8. Quantum Monte Carlo: Faster, More Reliable, And More Accurate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Amos Gerald

    2010-06-01

    combination of Generalized Valence Bond wavefunctions, improved correlation functions, and stabilized weighting techniques for calculations run on graphics cards, represents a new way for using Quantum Monte Carlo to study arbitrarily sized molecules.

  9. Application of Photon Transport Monte Carlo Module with GPU-based Parallel System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Chang Je [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shon, Heejeong [Golden Eng. Co. LTD, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Donghak [CoCo Link Inc., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    In general, it takes lots of computing time to get reliable results in Monte Carlo simulations especially in deep penetration problems with a thick shielding medium. To mitigate such a weakness of Monte Carlo methods, lots of variance reduction algorithms are proposed including geometry splitting and Russian roulette, weight windows, exponential transform, and forced collision, etc. Simultaneously, advanced computing hardware systems such as GPU(Graphics Processing Units)-based parallel machines are used to get a better performance of the Monte Carlo simulation. The GPU is much easier to access and to manage when comparing a CPU cluster system. It also becomes less expensive these days due to enhanced computer technology. There, lots of engineering areas adapt GPU-bases massive parallel computation technique. based photon transport Monte Carlo method. It provides almost 30 times speedup without any optimization and it is expected almost 200 times with fully supported GPU system. It is expected that GPU system with advanced parallelization algorithm will contribute successfully for development of the Monte Carlo module which requires quick and accurate simulations.

  10. Monte Carlo methods in AB initio quantum chemistry quantum Monte Carlo for molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Lester, William A; Reynolds, PJ

    1994-01-01

    This book presents the basic theory and application of the Monte Carlo method to the electronic structure of atoms and molecules. It assumes no previous knowledge of the subject, only a knowledge of molecular quantum mechanics at the first-year graduate level. A working knowledge of traditional ab initio quantum chemistry is helpful, but not essential.Some distinguishing features of this book are: Clear exposition of the basic theory at a level to facilitate independent study. Discussion of the various versions of the theory: diffusion Monte Carlo, Green's function Monte Carlo, and release n

  11. Use of Monte Carlo Methods in brachytherapy; Uso del metodo de Monte Carlo en braquiterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granero Cabanero, D.

    2015-07-01

    The Monte Carlo method has become a fundamental tool for brachytherapy dosimetry mainly because no difficulties associated with experimental dosimetry. In brachytherapy the main handicap of experimental dosimetry is the high dose gradient near the present sources making small uncertainties in the positioning of the detectors lead to large uncertainties in the dose. This presentation will review mainly the procedure for calculating dose distributions around a fountain using the Monte Carlo method showing the difficulties inherent in these calculations. In addition we will briefly review other applications of the method of Monte Carlo in brachytherapy dosimetry, as its use in advanced calculation algorithms, calculating barriers or obtaining dose applicators around. (Author)

  12. On the use of stochastic approximation Monte Carlo for Monte Carlo integration

    KAUST Repository

    Liang, Faming

    2009-03-01

    The stochastic approximation Monte Carlo (SAMC) algorithm has recently been proposed as a dynamic optimization algorithm in the literature. In this paper, we show in theory that the samples generated by SAMC can be used for Monte Carlo integration via a dynamically weighted estimator by calling some results from the literature of nonhomogeneous Markov chains. Our numerical results indicate that SAMC can yield significant savings over conventional Monte Carlo algorithms, such as the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm, for the problems for which the energy landscape is rugged. © 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A comparison of Monte Carlo generators

    CERN Document Server

    Golan, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    A comparison of GENIE, NEUT, NUANCE, and NuWro Monte Carlo neutrino event generators is presented using a set of four observables: protons multiplicity, total visible energy, most energetic proton momentum, and $\\pi^+$ two-dimensional energy vs cosine distribution.

  14. Monte Carlo Tools for Jet Quenching

    OpenAIRE

    Zapp, Korinna

    2011-01-01

    A thorough understanding of jet quenching on the basis of multi-particle final states and jet observables requires new theoretical tools. This talk summarises the status and propects of the theoretical description of jet quenching in terms of Monte Carlo generators.

  15. Scalable Domain Decomposed Monte Carlo Particle Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Matthew Joseph [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2013-12-05

    In this dissertation, we present the parallel algorithms necessary to run domain decomposed Monte Carlo particle transport on large numbers of processors (millions of processors). Previous algorithms were not scalable, and the parallel overhead became more computationally costly than the numerical simulation.

  16. Monte Carlo methods beyond detailed balance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schram, Raoul D.; Barkema, Gerard T.

    2015-01-01

    Monte Carlo algorithms are nearly always based on the concept of detailed balance and ergodicity. In this paper we focus on algorithms that do not satisfy detailed balance. We introduce a general method for designing non-detailed balance algorithms, starting from a conventional algorithm satisfying

  17. An analysis of Monte Carlo tree search

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    James, S

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Monte Carlo Tree Search (MCTS) is a family of directed search algorithms that has gained widespread attention in recent years. Despite the vast amount of research into MCTS, the effect of modifications on the algorithm, as well as the manner...

  18. Monte Carlo Simulation of Counting Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Philip M.

    A computer program to perform a Monte Carlo simulation of counting experiments was written. The program was based on a mathematical derivation which started with counts in a time interval. The time interval was subdivided to form a binomial distribution with no two counts in the same subinterval. Then the number of subintervals was extended to…

  19. Quantum Monte Carlo of ThO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shuming; Mitas, Lubos

    2012-02-01

    Thorium dioxide solid is a unique optical and heat-resistant actinide material with large gap and cohesion. It is a diamagnet, unlike a number of other similar actinide oxides. We investigate the electronic structure of ThO2 using Density Functional Theory (DFT) and quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods. We adopt Stuttgart RLC and RSC effective core potentials (pseudopotentials) for the Th atom. In the DFT calculations, some of the properties are verified in all-electron calculations using the FLAPW techniques. Using the fixed-node diffusion Monte Carlo we calculate the ground state and several excited states from which we estimate the cohesion and the band gap. Simulation cells of several sizes are used to estimate/reduce the finite size effects. We compare the QMC results with recent DFT calculations with several types of functionals which include hybrids such as PBE0 and HSE. Insights from QMC calculations give us understanding of the correlations beyond the DFT approaches and pave the way for accurate electronic structure calculations of other actinide materials.

  20. On the time scale associated with Monte Carlo simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Kristof M; Neyts, Erik C

    2014-11-28

    Uniform-acceptance force-bias Monte Carlo (fbMC) methods have been shown to be a powerful technique to access longer timescales in atomistic simulations allowing, for example, phase transitions and growth. Recently, a new fbMC method, the time-stamped force-bias Monte Carlo (tfMC) method, was derived with inclusion of an estimated effective timescale; this timescale, however, does not seem able to explain some of the successes the method. In this contribution, we therefore explicitly quantify the effective timescale tfMC is able to access for a variety of systems, namely a simple single-particle, one-dimensional model system, the Lennard-Jones liquid, an adatom on the Cu(100) surface, a silicon crystal with point defects and a highly defected graphene sheet, in order to gain new insights into the mechanisms by which tfMC operates. It is found that considerable boosts, up to three orders of magnitude compared to molecular dynamics, can be achieved for solid state systems by lowering of the apparent activation barrier of occurring processes, while not requiring any system-specific input or modifications of the method. We furthermore address the pitfalls of using the method as a replacement or complement of molecular dynamics simulations, its ability to explicitly describe correct dynamics and reaction mechanisms, and the association of timescales to MC simulations in general.