WorldWideScience

Sample records for montane meadow grasses

  1. Meadow-grass gall midge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Monrad

    The area with meadow-grass (Poa pratensis, L.) grown for seed production in Den-mark is a significant proportion of the entire seed production. The meadow-grass gall midge (Mayetiola schoberi, Barnes 1958) is of considerable economic importance since powerful attacks can reduce the yield...... drastically. It overwinters as larvae in a puparium, in the soil, and begins to hatch on average in late April, but the time is de-pending on the temperature. Emergence of the meadow-grass gall midge in spring takes place over a 2-3 week period. Beginning of emergence of the meadow-grass gall midge takes...... maximum. Therefore, the spraying frequency could be lowered signifi-cantly and in many cases lowered to only one insecticide application in meadow-grass every year....

  2. Meadow Fescue: The Forgotten Grass

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 1990, we found an unknown grass growing on a farm in southwestern Wisconsin. We have identified this grass as meadow fescue, popular in the late 19th century and early 20th century before tall fescue was imported into the USA. The grass was established throughout the Charles Opitz farm by harve...

  3. Watershed-scale modeling of streamflow change in incised montane meadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essaid, Hedeff I.; Hill, Barry R.

    2014-01-01

    Land use practices have caused stream channel incision and water table decline in many montane meadows of the Western United States. Incision changes the magnitude and timing of streamflow in water supply source watersheds, a concern to resource managers and downstream water users. The hydrology of montane meadows under natural and incised conditions was investigated using watershed simulation for a range of hydrologic conditions. The results illustrate the interdependence between: watershed and meadow hydrology; bedrock and meadow aquifers; and surface and groundwater flow through the meadow for the modeled scenarios. During the wet season, stream incision resulted in less overland flow and interflow and more meadow recharge causing a net decrease in streamflow and increase in groundwater storage relative to natural meadow conditions. During the dry season, incision resulted in less meadow evapotranspiration and more groundwater discharge to the stream causing a net increase in streamflow and a decrease in groundwater storage relative to natural meadow conditions. In general, for a given meadow setting, the magnitude of change in summer streamflow and long-term change in watershed groundwater storage due to incision will depend on the combined effect of: reduced evapotranspiration in the eroded meadow; induced groundwater recharge; replenishment of dry season groundwater storage depletion in meadow and bedrock aquifers by precipitation during wet years; and groundwater storage depletion that is not replenished by precipitation during wet years.

  4. Montane meadows and hydrologic connections between forests and streams in the Sierra Nevada, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, R. G.; Conklin, M. H.

    2013-12-01

    Montane meadows of the Sierra Nevada often serve as the interface between up-gradient forested area and down-gradient streamflow. We investigated the roles that meadow groundwater and evapotranspiration play in the greater catchment water cycle using a water-column data from monitoring wells and piezometers in two meadows for water years 2008-2012. Analyses include mass balance and modeling using 1-D HYDRUS. Though spatially heterogeneous, groundwater fluxes contribute to evapotranspiration (ETg) across the meadows, and are constrained by surface-water discharge. Near the meadow center groundwater discharges occur for the duration of the snow-free season, ET¬g is relatively low. At the meadow edge the groundwater flux changes from discharge to recharge when the growing season begins; also ETg increases, and major-ion concentrations in groundwater are more dilute than those near the meadow center. When groundwater is discharged throughout the meadow during snowmelt, the stream-water ion content more closely resembles water sampled from wells at the meadow edge. These trends change as the summer season progresses--groundwater is no longer discharged at the meadow edge and the stream water ion concentration matches the groundwater sampled from the center of the meadow. Slug tests performed in the monitoring wells indicate a saturated hydraulic conductivity (Kh) of meadow substrates between 10-5 and 10-6 m s-1. The upper end of this range reflects substrate with large sand fractions, while lower values reflect finer-grained or higher-organic-content substrate. Applying the higher Kh values to groundwater gradients during snowmelt results in groundwater discharge rates greater than streamflow measured at the meadow outlet. This suggests that the peat layer at the meadow surface, with significantly lower Kh values, retards groundwater discharge from the meadow during snowmelt. ETg signals in wells at the meadow edge and in wells installed just outside of the meadow

  5. Detecting Montane Meadows in the Tahoe National Forest Using LiDAR and ASTER Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, A.; Blesius, L.; Davis, J. D.

    2016-12-01

    In the Sierra Nevada mountains, meadows provide numerous hydraulic and ecosystem functions such as flood attenuation, groundwater storage, and wildlife habitat. However, many meadows have been degraded from historical land use such as water diversion, grazing, and logging. Land managers have altered management strategies for restoration purposes, but there is a lack of comprehensive data on meadow locations. Previous attempts to inventory Sierra Nevada meadows have included several remote sensing techniques including heads up digitizing and pixel based image analysis, but this has been challenging due to geographic variability, seasonal changes, and meadow health. I present a remote sensing method using multiple return LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) and ASTER imagery to detect montane meadows in a subset of the Tahoe National Forest. The project used LiDAR data to create a digital terrain model and digital surface model. From these models, I derived canopy height, surface slope, and watercourse for the entire study area. Literature queries returned known values for canopy height and surface slope characteristic of montane meadows. These values were used to select for possible meadows within the study area. To filter out noise, only contiguous areas greater than one acre that satisfied the queries were used. Finally, 15-meter ASTER imagery was used to de-select for areas such as dirt patches or gravel bars that might have satisfied the previous queries and meadow criteria. When using high resolution aerial imagery to assess model accuracy, preliminary results show user accuracy of greater than 80%. Further validation is still needed to improve the accuracy of modeled meadow delineation. This method allows for meadows to be inventoried without discriminating based on geographic variability, seasonal changes, or meadow health.

  6. Characterizing the Source Water for Montane Meadows to Assess Resiliency under Changing Hydroclimatic Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarnell, S. M.; Peek, R.; Bell, A.; Weixelman, D.; Viers, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Ecologically and hydrologically functioning montane meadows provide a variety of ecosystem services and create biological hotspots in high-elevation landscapes. They serve as wetlands that filter water, attenuate floods, sequester carbon, sustain downstream flows, and provide high productivity habitat in typically lower productivity mountain regions. Their importance to watershed quality and health is well recognized, and restoration of meadows is a high priority for resource management agencies and non-governmental organizations. Yet many meadow restoration projects have limited outcomes or fail to achieve the desired effects due to a lack of understanding the underlying hydrological and geomorphic processes inherent to meadows that contribute to their resiliency. Few studies exist on how meadows are sustained through time despite various land use impacts or how the origin of water supplying the meadow (snowmelt-dominated versus regional groundwater-dominated) may influence meadow conditions. Furthermore, as climate conditions continue to change, questions remain regarding which meadows will be most resistant to and resilient from climate warming and thus have the highest potential for successful and sustainable restoration of meadow processes. We discuss these concepts and present two methods for assessing the regional and local contributions of source water to meadows as an indicator of resiliency. On a broad scale, comparisons of satellite imagery using metrics such as normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) for regions with meadows may be useful to detect inter-annual and seasonal variations in meadow wetness and thus indicate meadow sites with larger groundwater sources that are more resilient over time. Locally, use of a hydrogeomorphic typing key that relates water source, geomorphic position, groundwater table elevation, and plant species composition may be useful to detect local groundwater sources that provide greater consistency of conditions and

  7. Hillslope and stream connections to water tables in montane meadows of the southern Sierra Nevada, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conklin, M. H.; Lucas, R. G.

    2011-12-01

    Montane meadows are often areas of groundwater discharge. In this study we characterized the groundwater - surface water interactions of two meadow systems and their connectivity to the surrounding catchment . We analyzed groundwater elevation data in 24 wells in two meadows located in the southern Sierra Nevada. Well transects extended from the meadow centers near the stream, to the meadow edged, and into the adjacent forest-where wells were drilled into the weathered granite saprock layer. Water samples were collected from the monitoring wells and from streams associated with the meadow systems and analyzed for major ions and stable water isotopes. Ground water elevations in the monitoring wells were used to calculate daily evapotranspiration (ET) values. These values show that locations on the meadow slopes and near the meadow edges are losing water to the atmosphere at near potential evapotranspiration rates during the height of the growing season. ET signals from wells near the meadow streams are muted, likely due to the vegetation utilizing the available surface water at these locations. Wells installed in the saprock layer, outside of the meadow boundaries, show diurnal fluctuations in sync with fluctuations observed at the meadow edge. This trend persists after the meadow vegetation senesces, indicating that groundwater elevations in the meadow, especially near the meadow edge, are significantly influenced by the adjacent hillslope saprock layer and forest ET. Geochemical sampling results indicate that the meadow streams are predominantly fed by snowmelt in the spring and early summer, moving toward more influence from base flow in the late summer and early fall. Results from the geochemical analysis established the connections of the hillslope to the meadow water tables and of the meadow subsurface waters to the down-gradient streams. Our results indicate that the these meadows are directly connected to the shallow sub-surface processes in the up gradient

  8. Modeling the gopher-meadow eco-geomorphic system on montane hillslopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchell, E. W.; Doak, D. F.; Anderson, R. S.

    2013-12-01

    On montane hillslopes of Colorado's Front Range, the transport of soil by gophers can dominate the modern geomorphic system in meadows. Qualitative observations reveal that gophers prefer to forage in meadows over forests, that seedling roots are consumed by gophers, and that trees commonly occupy the rocky crests of hills overlooking open meadow hillslopes. This motivates a numerical model of gopher-mediated transport of soil and the long-term evolution of the coupled ecological-geomorphic system through quantitative observations from a manipulative experiment on meadow-centered plots in the Boulder Creek CZO in the Colorado Front Range montane forest. The ecological and geomorphic processes in the coupled system we wish to model must include: seedling establishment and damage, gopher tunneling geometries and resulting mound generation, mound material transport driven by rain and hail and by ungulate trampling, vegetative lock-down of mound material, and resulting changes in the soil depth and rockiness of the landscape. We must therefore have algorithms to capture the feedback mechanisms between gopher activity and the growth and potential death of trees, the casting of seeds and their likelihood of germination, and the spatial distribution of plants. The ecological component interacts with the soils/critical zone layer through feedbacks that include the dependence of gopher activity on root density, depth, and size, undergrowth availability, and the dependence of the rate of change of soil thickness on gradients in gopher-mediated transport. Results of a preliminary cellular automaton model which captures the essence of these geomorphic-ecological feedbacks can readily address the role of gophers in limiting the encroachment of trees into meadow patches. The bioturbation of the meadows, and the downslope transport of soil within them, is much more efficient than that in the forest, which sees little to no gopher activity. These geomorphic transport hotspots will

  9. Plant species distribution in relation to water-table depth and soil redox potential in montane riparian meadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathleen A. Dwire; J. Boone Kauffman; John E. Baham

    2006-01-01

    The distribution of riparian plant species is largely driven by hydrologic and soil variables, and riparian plant communities frequently occur in relatively distinct zones along streamside elevational and soil textural gradients. In two montane meadows in northeast Oregon, USA, we examined plant species distribution in three riparian plant communities¡ªdefined as wet,...

  10. Groundwater-surface water interactions in montane meadows of the Sierra Nevada, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, R. G.; Conklin, M. H.

    2012-12-01

    center data indicate groundwater discharge for the entirety of the summer growing season—long after the adjacent forest soils have dried out. Analysis of the geochemical data show that major ion concentrations vary little within the individual wells but vary from the edge of the meadow to the center. Stream water samples show surface flow is dominated by snow melt in the spring and is influenced more by subsurface flow as the growing season progresses. Groundwater discharges into the center of the meadows, long after the soils the adjacent Forests have dried out. This is consistent with the results from our geochemical analysis that suggests the surface water leaving the meadow systems is more influenced by subsurface flow later in the summer. Consistent groundwater discharge, with little variation in the geochemical profile of the groundwater, suggests a shallow groundwater source that is not being fully utilized by the adjacent forest landscape. These montane meadow systems provide a window for investigating groundwater surface water interactions in the catchments of the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory.

  11. Comparative study on CO2 emissions from different types of alpine meadows during grass exuberance period

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUQiwu; CAOGuangmin; WUQin; LIDong; WANGYuesi

    2004-01-01

    Potentilla fruticosa scrub, Kobresia humilis meadow and Kobresia tibetica meadow are widely distributed on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. During the grass exuberance period from 3 July to 4 September, based on close chamber-GC method, a study on CO2 emissions from different treatments was conducted in these meadows at Haibei research station, CAS. Results indicated that mean CO2 emission rates from various treatments were 672.09±152.37 mgm-2h-1 for FC (grass treatment); 425.41±191.99 mgm-2h-1 for FJ (grass exclusion treatment); 280.36±174.83 mgm-2h-1 for FL (grass and roots exclusion treatment); 838.95±237.02 mgm-2h-1 for GG (scrub+grass treatment); 528.48±205.67 mgm-2h-1 for GC (grass treatment); 268.97±99.72 mgm-2h-1 for GL (grass and roots exclusion treatment); and 659.20±94.83 mgm-2h-1 for LC (grass treatment), respectively (FC, FJ, FL, GG, GC, GL, LC were the Chinese abbreviation for various treatments). Furthermore, Kobresia humilis meadow, Potentilla fruticosa scrub meadow and Kobresia tibetica meadow differed greatly in average CO2 emission rate of soil-plant system, in the order of GG>FC>LC>GC. Moreover, in Kobresia hurnilis meadow,heterotrophic and autotrophic respiration accounted for 42% and 58% of the total respiration of soil-plant system respectively, whereas, in Potentilla fruticosa scrub meadow, heterotrophic and autotrophic respiration accounted for 32% and 68% of total system respiration from GG; 49% and 51% from GC. In addition, root respiration from Kobresia humilis meadow approximated 145 mgCO2m-2h-1,contributed 34% to soil respiration. During the experiment period, Kobresia humilis meadow and Potentilla fruticosa scrub meadow had a net carbon fixation of 111.11 gm-2 and 243.89 gm-2 respectively. Results also showed that soil temperature was the main factor which influenced CO2 emission from alpine meadow ecosystem, significant correlations were found between soil temperature at 5 cm depth and CO2 emission from GG, GC, FC and FJ treatments

  12. The energy balance of utilising meadow grass in Danish biogas production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Ane Katharina Paarup; Raju, Chitra Sangaraju; Kucheryavskiy, Sergey V.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the energy balance of utilising nature conservation biomass from meadow habitats in Danish biogas production. Utilisation of nature conservation grass in biogas production in Denmark represents an interesting perspective for enhancing nature conservation of the open...... grassland habitats, while introducing an alternative to the use of intensively cultivated energy crops as co-substrates in manure based biogas plants. The energy balance of utilising nature conservation grass was investigated by using: data collected from previous investigations on the productivity...... of meadow areas, different relevant geo-datasets, spatial analyses, and various statistical analyses. The results show that values for the energy return on energy invested (EROEI) ranging from 1.7 to 3.3 can be obtained when utilising meadow grasses in local biogas production. The total national net energy...

  13. Determining the effects of cattle grazing treatments on Yosemite toads (Anaxyrus [=Bufo] canorus in montane meadows.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan K McIlroy

    Full Text Available Amphibians are experiencing a precipitous global decline, and population stability on public lands with multiple uses is a key concern for managers. In the Sierra Nevada Mountains (California, USA, managers have specifically identified livestock grazing as an activity that may negatively affect Yosemite toads due to the potential overlap of grazing with toad habitat. Grazing exclusion from Yosemite toad breeding and rearing areas and/or entire meadows have been proposed as possible management actions to alleviate the possible impact of cattle on this species. The primary objective of this study was to determine if different fencing treatments affect Yosemite toad populations. We specifically examined the effect of three fencing treatments on Yosemite toad breeding pool occupancy, tadpoles, and young of the year (YOY. Our hypothesis was that over the course of treatment implementation (2006 through 2010, Yosemite toad breeding pool occupancy and early life stage densities would increase within two fencing treatments relative to actively grazed meadows due to beneficial changes to habitat quality in the absence of grazing. Our results did not support our hypothesis, and showed no benefit to Yosemite toad presence or early life stages in fenced or partially fenced meadows compared to standard USDA Forest Service grazing levels. We found substantial Yosemite toad variation by both meadow and year. This variation was influenced by meadow wetness, with water table depth significant in both the tadpole and YOY models.

  14. Hydroclimatic alteration increases vulnerability of montane meadows in the Sierra Nevada, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viers, J. H.; Peek, R.; Purdy, S. E.; Emmons, J. D.; Yarnell, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    Meadow ecosystems of the Sierra Nevada (California, USA) have been maintained by the interplay of biotic and abiotic forces, where hydrological functions bridge aquatic and terrestrial realms. Meadows are not only key habitat for fishes, amphibians, birds, and mammals alike, but also provide enumerable ecosystem services to humans, not limited to regulating services (eg, water filtration), provisioning services (eg, grazing), and aesthetics. Using hydroclimatic models and spatial distribution models of indicator species, a range wide assessment was conducted to assess and synthesize the vulnerability of meadow ecosystems to hydroclimatic alteration, a result of regional climate change. Atmospheric warming is expected to result in a greater fraction of total precipitation falling as winter rain (rather than snow) and earlier snowmelt. These predicted changes will likely cause more precipitation-driven runoff in winter and reduced snowmelt runoff in spring, leading to reduced annual runoff and a general shift in runoff timing to earlier in the year. These profound effects have consequences for hydrological cycling and meadow functioning, though such changes will not occur steadily through time or uniformly across the range, and each individual meadow will respond as a function of its composition and land use history. Most vulnerable is groundwater recharge, a fundamental component of meadow hydrology. As a result of shortened snow melt period and absence of diel snowmelt fluxes that would otherwise gradually refill meadow aquifers, recharge is expected to decline due to less infiltration. Diminished water tables will likely stress hydric and mesic vegetation, promoting more xeric conditions. Coupled with greater magnitude stream flows, these conditions promote channel incision and ultimate state shift to non-meadow conditions. The biological effects of hydroclimatic alteration, such as lower mean annual flow and earlier timing, will result in an overall decrease in

  15. Complex interactions between a legume and two grasses in a subalpine meadow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marty, Charles; Pornon, André; Escaravage, Nathalie; Winterton, Peter; Lamaze, Thierry

    2009-10-01

    Interactions between plants are a complex combination of positive and negative interactions, with the net outcome depending on environmental contexts. The more frequent association of Trifolium alpinum (legume) with Festuca eskia than with Nardus stricta (grasses) in many Pyrenean subalpine meadows suggests a differential ability to use nitrogen (N) derived from N(2) fixation. In the field, we investigated the interactions between the legume and grasses and, in the glasshouse, the transfer of (15)N from the legume to the grasses. In one grass-Trifolium mixture, the legume had a strong positive effect on the biomass and N content of the grass as compared to pure grass stands. When both grasses grew together with the legume, only Festuca benefited from the presence of Trifolium but, surprisingly, the benefit decreased with increasing Trifolium abundance. Leaf labeling experiments with (15)N-NH(4)(+) revealed a higher transfer of (15)N from Trifolium to Festuca than to Nardus, suggesting a more direct N pathway between the two species. This more direct pathway could prevent Nardus from benefiting from the legume N in the three-species mixtures. Thus, the positive interactions between N-fixers and nonfixers appear to be largely species-specific and to depend strongly on the species in the plant assemblage.

  16. Pyrenean meadows in Natura 2000 network: grass production and plant biodiversity conservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón Reiné

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In semi-natural mountain meadows, yield and forage quality must be reconciled with plant biodiversity conservation. This study was performed to analyze the relationships between these three parameters. To quantify plant biodiversity and pastoral value (PV, phytosociological inventories were performed in 104 semi-natural meadows in the Central Spanish Pyrenees included in the Natura 2000 network. Forage yields were calculated and forage samples were analyzed for relative feed value (RFV. We identified two main types of meadows: (i those that had “more intensive management,” relatively close to farm buildings, with little or no slope, dominated by grasses, with low plant biodiversity, high PV and yield, but low forage quality and (ii those that had “less intensive management,” distant from farm buildings, on slopes, richer in “other forbs”, with high plant biodiversity and forage quality, but low PV and yield. Conservation policies should emphasize less intensive management practices to maintain plant diversity in the semi-natural meadows in the Pyrenees. The widespread view that “other forbs” have low nutritional value should be revised in future research. These species often are undervalued by the PV method, because their nutritional quality, digestibility and intake are poorly understood.

  17. Pyrenean meadows in Natura 2000 network: grass production and plant biodiversity conservation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reine, R.; Barrantes, O.; Chocarro, C.; Juarez, A.; Broca, A.; Maestro, M.; Ferrer, C.

    2014-06-01

    In semi-natural mountain meadows, yield and forage quality must be reconciled with plant biodiversity conservation. This study was performed to analyze the relationships between these three parameters. To quantify plant biodiversity and pastoral value (PV), phyto sociological inventories were performed in 104 semi-natural meadows in the Central Spanish Pyrenees included in the Natura 2000 network. Forage yields were calculated and forage samples were analyzed for relative feed value (RFV). We identified two main types of meadows: (i) those that had more intensive management, relatively close to farm buildings, with little or no slope, dominated by grasses, with low plant biodiversity, high PV and yield, but low forage quality and (ii) those that had less intensive management, distant from farm buildings, on slopes, richer in other forbs, with high plant biodiversity and forage quality, but low PV and yield. Conservation policies should emphasize less intensive management practices to maintain plant diversity in the semi-natural meadows in the Pyrenees. The widespread view that other forbs have low nutritional value should be revised in future research. These species often are undervalued by the PV method, because their nutritional quality, digestibility and intake are poorly understood. (Author)

  18. Transformer species in the flora of the Starobilsk grass-meadow steppe (Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kucher Oksana O.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of an investigation of alien species that change the character, condition, form or nature of ecosystems over large areas (transformer species in the flora of the Starobilsk grass-meadow steppe are presented. The check-list of alien plants includes over 386 species of vascular plants, of which 28 are invasive and 6 are transformer species. In this study, the data on the first records of alien species, their distribution history, ecology, occurrence in different plant communities and degree of naturalization were compiled. The distribution maps of transformer species are provided.

  19. Biogas production from ensiled meadow grass; effect of mechanical pretreatments and rapid determination of substrate biodegradability via physicochemical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsapekos, P; Kougias, P G; Angelidaki, I

    2015-04-01

    As the biogas sector is rapidly expanding, there is an increasing need in finding new alternative feedstock to biogas plants. Meadow grass can be a suitable co-substrate and if ensiled it can be supplied to biogas plants continuously throughout the year. Nevertheless, this substrate is quite recalcitrant and therefore efficient pretreatment is needed to permit easy access of microbes to the degradable components. In this study, different mechanical pretreatment methods were applied on ensiled meadow grass to investigate their effect on biomass biodegradability. All the tested pretreatments increased the methane productivity and the increase ranged from 8% to 25%. The best mechanical pretreatment was the usage of two coarse mesh grating plates. Additionally, simple analytical methods were conducted to investigate the possibility of rapidly determining the methane yield of meadow grass. Among the methods, electrical conductivity test showed the most promising calibration statistics (R(2)=0.68).

  20. Using sensitive montane amphibian species as indicators of hydroclimatic change in meadow ecosystems of the Sierra Nevada, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peek, R.; Viers, J.; Yarnell, S. M.

    2012-12-01

    Climate change can affect sensitive species and ecosystems in many ways, yet sparse data and the inability to apply various climate models at functional spatial scales often prevents relevant research from being utilized in conservation management plans. Climate change has been linked to declines and disturbances in a multitude of species and habitats, and in California, one of the greatest climatic concerns is the predicted reduction in mountain snowpack and associated snowmelt. These decreases in natural storage of water as snow in mountain regions can affect the timing and variability of critical snowmelt runoff periods—important seasonal signals that species in montane ecosystems have evolved life history strategies around—leading to greater intra-annual variability and diminished summer and fall stream flows. Although many species distribution models exist, few provide ways to integrate continually updated and revised Global Climate Models (GCMs), hydrologic data unique to a watershed, and ecological responses that can be incorporated into conservation strategies. This study documents a novel and applicable method of combining boosted regression tree (BRT) modeling and species distributions with hydroclimatic data as a potential management tool for conservation. Boosted regression trees are suitable for ecological distribution modeling because they can reduce both bias and variance, as well as handle sharp discontinuities common in sparsely sampled species or large study areas. This approach was used to quantify the effects of hydroclimatic changes on the distribution of key riparian-associated amphibian species in montane meadow habitats in the Sierra Nevada at the sub-watershed level. Based on modeling using current species range maps in conjunction with three climate scenarios (near, mid, and far), extreme range contractions were observed for all sensitive species (southern long-toed salamander, mountain yellow-legged frog, Yosemite toad) by the year

  1. Effects of experimentally reduced snowpack and passive warming on montane meadow plant phenology and floral resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, J.A.; Debinski, D.M.; Caragea, P.C.; Germino, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Climate change can have a broad range of effects on ecosystems and organisms, and early responses may include shifts in vegetation phenology and productivity that may not coincide with the energetics and forage timing of higher trophic levels. We evaluated phenology, annual height growth, and foliar frost responses of forbs to a factorial experiment of snow removal (SR) and warming in a high-elevation meadow over two years in the Rocky Mountains, United States. Species included arrowleaf balsamroot (Balsamorhiza sagittata, early-season emergence and flowering) and buckwheat (Eriogonum umbellatum, semi-woody and late-season flowering), key forbs for pollinator and nectar-using animal communities that are widely distributed and locally abundant in western North America. Snow removal exerted stronger effects than did warming, and advanced phenology differently for each species. Specifically, SR advanced green-up by a few days for B. sagittata to >2 wk in E. umbellatum, and led to 5- to 11-d advances in flowering of B. sagittata in one year and advances in bud break in 3 of 4 species/yr combinations. Snow removal increased height of E. umbellatum appreciably (~5 cm added to ~22.8 cm in control), but led to substantial increases in frost damage to flowers of B. sagittata. Whereas warming had no effects on E. umbellatum, it increased heights of B. sagittata by >6 cm (compared to 30.7 cm in control plots) and moreover led to appreciable reductions in frost damage to flowers. These data suggest that timing of snowmelt, which is highly variable from year to year but is advancing in recent decades, has a greater impact on these critical phenological, growth, and floral survival traits and floral/nectar resources than warming per se, although warming mitigated early effects of SR on frost kill of flowers. Given the short growing season of these species, the shifts could cause uncoupling in nectar availability and timing of foraging.

  2. Biogas production from ensiled meadow grass; effect of mechanical pretreatments and rapid determination of substrate biodegradability via physicochemical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsapekos, Panagiotis; Kougias, Panagiotis; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    As the biogas sector is rapidly expanding, there is an increasing need in finding new alternative feedstock to biogas plants. Meadow grass can be a suitable co-substrate and if ensiled it can be supplied to biogas plants continuously throughout the year. Nevertheless, this substrate is quite reca...

  3. Anaerobic Mono- and Co-digestion of Mechanically Pretreated Meadow Grass for Biogas Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsapekos, Panagiotis; Kougias, Panagiotis; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    silage. The methane productivity from pretreated meadow grass silage, harvested at fall (late cut), was further examined in a co-digestion process with three different types of livestock manure (mink, poultry, and cattle). The silage was co-digested with manure in five different manure/silage mixing...... ratios in terms of organic matter. The results showed that the optimum silage concentration in the co-digestion mixture with manure, for the highest methane yield, was strongly dependent upon the chemical composition of the manure. More specifically, the ammonia concentration of manure and the C/N ratio...... of the co-digestion mixture were found to be the key parameters for an improved biomethanation process....

  4. Gopher eskers, mounds, and stonelines: Evidence of the annual to centennial impacts of gophers in the montane meadows of Colorado's Front Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchell, E. W.; Lombardi, E. M.; Marquez, J. A.; Doak, D. F.; Anderson, R. S.

    2014-12-01

    Within the critical zone on montane hillslopes of Colorado's Front Range, qualitative observations suggest that gophers not only dominate the modern meadow geomorphic rates, but are involved in a geomorphic-ecological feedback system that governs meadow migration on decadal-millennial time scales. Our observations suggest that gopher intensity and location is pertinent to forest/meadow (FM) dynamics. Field mapping of gopher activity as the snow melts in the spring revealed that subnivean tubes ("eskers") are tightly clustered at the FM boundary while mounds generated over the remainder of the summer are concentrated strictly in the meadows. This suggests that gophers spend the winter months at the FM interface and spend the warmer seasons within the meadows. We hypothesize that variations in snow depth drive this spatial-temporal pattern of gopher activity; deeper snow near the FM boundary provides greater insulation, as near-surface ground temperatures in the wind-scoured meadow centers are colder. This motivates our initiation of monitoring and modeling of near-surface temperature across a FM pair. Numerical modeling supports qualitative observations that the following geomorphic-ecological processes are active: seedling establishment and damage, gopher tunneling and resulting mound generation, mound material transport driven by ungulate trampling, vegetative lock-down of mound material, and resulting changes in the soil depth of the landscape. This year's observations suggest that we must add to this mix the annual cycle of the gopher activity. Finally, probing and soil pits within the meadows reveal that on longer timescales gopher activity leads to the development of a well-mixed upper soil layer that is sharply bounded below by high concentrations of large stones ("stone lines") within the glacial till substrate of the hillslopes. The mean diameter of mound surface grains is half that of clasts comprising the stone lines. This motivates documentation of soil

  5. Invasive species in the flora of the Starobilsk grass-meadow steppe (Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kucher Oksana O.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The results of an investigation of the invasive species in the flora of the Starobilsk grass-meadow steppe are presented. Check-list of alien plant has over 386 species of vascular plants of which 28 species are invasive. We have identified 6 transformer species from the invasive plants. We aggregate data on the entry, distribution history, ecology, occurrence in different plant communities, degree of their naturalization and the habitats where they occur. The leading families of invasive species are: Asteraceae. The basis for this group is presented by origin from the North America and the Mediterranean. With respect to the time of immigration, most of them are kenophytes. By the method of introduction, ksenophytes are dominated; according to the degree of naturalization epoecophytes and agriophytes dominate in this group. With regard to the characteristics of life forms, half of invasive species are terophytes. The vast majority of plants are heliophytes and xeromesophytes. Most species are found in biotopes group I: Cultivated agricultural biotopes; least of all species found in biotopes group F: Biotopes dominated by chamephytes and nanophanerophytes. Only 3 species found in biotopes group F: Biotopes dominated by chamephytesand nanophanerophytes. The maps of distribution of 28 invasive species are provided. Most of the species marked dispersed in more than 30 squares.

  6. Cattail invasion of sedge/grass meadows in Lake Ontario: Photointerpretation analysis of sixteen wetlands over five decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, D.A.; Kowalski, K.P.; Hoare, H.L.; Carlson, M.L.; Morgan, H.N.

    2008-01-01

    Photointerpretation studies were conducted to evaluate vegetation changes in wetlands of Lake Ontario and the upper St. Lawrence River associated with regulation of water levels since about 1960. The studies used photographs from 16 sites (four each from drowned river mouth, barrier beach, open embayment, and protected embayment wetlands) and spanned a period from the 1950s to 2001 at roughly decadal intervals. Meadow marsh was the most prominent vegetation type in most wetlands in the late 1950s when water levels had declined following high lake levels in the early 1950s. Meadow marsh increased at some sites in the mid-1960s in response to low lake levels and decreased at all sites in the late 1970s following a period of high lake levels. Typha increased at nearly all sites, except wave-exposed open embayments, in the 1970s. Meadow marsh continued to decrease and Typha to increase at most sites during sustained higher lake levels through the 1980s, 1990s, and into 2001. Most vegetation changes could be correlated with lake-level changes and with life-history strategies and physiological tolerances to water depth of prominent taxa. Analyses of GIS coverages demonstrated that much of the Typha invasion was landward into meadow marsh, largely by Typha x glauca. Lesser expansion toward open water included both T. x glauca and T. angustifolia. Although many models focus on the seed bank as a key component of vegetative change in wetlands, our results suggest that canopy-dominating, moisture-requiring Typha was able to invade meadow marsh at higher elevations because sustained higher lake levels allowed it to survive and overtake sedges and grasses that can tolerate periods of drier soil conditions.

  7. Post-harvest treatments in smooth-stalked meadow grass (Poa pratensis L.) - effect on carbohydrates and tiller development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    . The present investigation was initiated to investigate the effect of post-harvest treatments on dry matter production in autumn, carbohydrate content, the number of reproductive tillers and seed yield in a turf-type cultivar ‘Conni' of smooth-stalked meadow grass. The results show that post-harvest treatments...

  8. Research Analysis of Vermicompost Influence on Bioaccumulation of Heavy Metals in Common Meadow-Grass (Poa pratensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domas Laurinaitis

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The more intensive growth of agricultural crops adding mineral fertilizers, environmental pollution make the soil degraded: reduce the fertility of soil, increase the concentration of heavy metals. Especially dangerous is a common, synergistic effect of heavy metals. Vermicompost optimizes pH, texture and organic material content – the soil indicators, which are the major contributors to migration of heavy metals in the soil and to the plants from it. In the article there is an investigation of vermicompost influence on bioaccumulation of heavy metals in common meadow-grass. After experimental research it is determined that immobilization of heavy metals was the best in soil-vermicompost substrate, prepared in a ratio 1:2. The cadmium (Cd concentrations were lowest and the difference of HM content determined between roots and shoots was the most in biomass grown up in that mixture. In the underground part of plant the concentration equal to 11.10 mg/kg and in the part of above ground – 1.05 mg/kg. The situation of lead (Pb and copper (Cu is analogous. This is the optimal ratio of mixture preparation.

  9. Silage preparation and fermentation quality of natural grasses treated with lactic acid bacteria and cellulase in meadow steppe and typical steppe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Meiling; Ge, Gentu; Liu, Tingyu; Jia, Yushan; Cai, Yimin

    2016-09-27

    Silage preparation and fermentation quality of natural grasses in meadow steppe (MS) and typical steppe (TS) were studied. MS and TS contained thirty-three and nine species of natural grasses, respectively. Stipa Baicalensis in MS and Stipa grandi in TS were the dominant grasses with the highest dry matter (DM) yield. The crude protein (CP), neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and water-soluble carbohydrate (WSC) of the mixed natural grasses in both steppes were 8.02 to 9.03, 66.75 to 69.47 and 2.02 to 2.20% on a DM basis, respectively. The small-scale silages and round bale silages of mixed natural grasses in both steppes were prepared using the commercial lactic acid bacteria (LAB) inoculants Chikuso-1 (CH, Lactobacillus plantarum) and cellulase enzyme (AC, Acremonium cellulase) as additives. All silages treated with LAB and cellulase were well preserved with lower pH, butyric acid and ammonia-N content, and higher lactic acid and CP content than those of control in four kinds of silages. Compared with CH- or AC-treated silages, the CH+AC-treated silages had higher lactic acid content. The results confirmed that combination with LAB and cellulase may result in beneficial effects by improving the natural grass silage fermentation in both grasslands.

  10. Biological availability of (238)U, (234)U and (226)Ra for wild berries and meadow grasses in natural ecosystems of Belarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolik, G A; Ovsiannikova, S V; Voinikava, K V; Ivanova, T G; Papenia, M V

    2014-01-01

    This work is devoted to investigation of behavior of (234)U, (238)U and (226)Ra by determining the soil to plant transfer under different natural conditions such as forest or swamped areas and meadow lands with different soil types. The paper summarizes the data on investigation of uranium and radium uptake by wild berries and natural meadow grasses in the typical conditions of Belarus. Parameters characterizing the biological availability of (234)U, (238)U and (226)Ra for bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus), lingonberry (Vaccinium viti-idaea), blueberry (Vaccinium iliginosum) and cranberry (Vaccinium oxycoccus palustris) as well as for widely occurring mixed meadow vegetation, which belongs to the sedge-grass or grass-sedge associations and forbs, have been established. In the sites under investigation, the deposition levels of (238+239+240)Pu were less than 0.37 kBq m(-2) and (137)Cs deposition ranged between less than 0.37 and 37 kBq m(-2). It was found that activity concentrations of radionuclides in berries varied in the ranges of 0.037-0.11 for (234)U, 0.036-0.10 for (238)U and 0.11-0.43 Bq kg(-1) for (226)Ra, but in the mixed meadow grasses they were 0.32-4.4, 0.24-3.9 and 0.14-6.9 Bq kg(-1) accordingly. The (234)U/(238)U activity ratios were 1.02 ± 0.01 for wild berries, 1.20 ± 0.09 for underground meadow grasses and 1.02 ± 0.02 for proper soils. The concentration ratios (CRs, dry weight basis) of (234)U and (238)U for mixed meadow grasses were 0.036-0.42 and 0.041-0.46 respectively. The correspondent geometric means (GM) were 0.13 and 0.15 with geometric standard deviations (GSD) of 2.4. The CRs of (226)Ra for meadow grasses were 0.031-1.0 with GM 0.20 and GSD 2.6. The CRs of (234)U, (238)U and (226)Ra for wild berries ranged within 0.0018-0.008 (GM is 0.0034, GSD is 1.8), 0.0018-0.008 (GM is 0.0035, GSD is 1.8) and 0.005-0.033 (GM is 0.016, GSD is 2.1) accordingly. The highest CR values of uranium for mixed meadow grasses were found in the

  11. SEMI-NATURAL MEADOWS AND O THER TRADITIONAL RURAL BIOTOPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. JUTILA

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In the middle of 19th century the area of meadows was at its largest in Finland, about 1.6 million hectares. Thereafter the meadow area has decreased dramatically. Finnish Environment Institute has led the inventory of traditional rural or agricultural biotopes in Finland since 1992. Until now the results have been published only in the regions of Satakunta, North Ostrobothnia and North Karelia. In Satakunta 280 sites of valuable traditional rural biotopes (1160 hectares were found and most of them were grazed by cattle. Of these 39% (457 ha were meadows including shore meadows. All meadows with the exception of shore meadows were very small (< 2 ha. Other traditional rural biotopes were wooded pastures (258 ha, grazed forests (183 ha and some others (79 ha. The meadows were classified according to the physiognomic and floristic determinants. Nutrient-poor rocky meadows, nutrient-poor dry short herb meadows, dry grass meadows, dry grassherb meadows, scrub meadows and humid or moist meadows were rare in Satakunta. Mesophilous meadows were divided to short herb meadows, grass meadows and tall herb meadows and they covered altogether 96 ha (8% in Satakunta. Grazed lake and river shore meadows covered about 110 ha (9,5% and were quite often dominated by short sedges and grasses. Studied seashore meadows covered 188 ha, making 16 % of all valuable traditional rural biotopes in Satakunta. There were three very large seashore meadows in the Pori region. In the traditional rural biotopes of Satakunta 14 nationally threatened species were found.

  12. SEMI-NATURAL MEADOWS AND O THER TRADITIONAL RURAL BIOTOPES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. JUTILA

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available In the middle of 19th century the area of meadows was at its largest in Finland, about 1.6 million hectares. Thereafter the meadow area has decreased dramatically. Finnish Environment Institute has led the inventory of traditional rural or agricultural biotopes in Finland since 1992. Until now the results have been published only in the regions of Satakunta, North Ostrobothnia and North Karelia. In Satakunta 280 sites of valuable traditional rural biotopes (1160 hectares were found and most of them were grazed by cattle. Of these 39% (457 ha were meadows including shore meadows. All meadows with the exception of shore meadows were very small (< 2 ha. Other traditional rural biotopes were wooded pastures (258 ha, grazed forests (183 ha and some others (79 ha. The meadows were classified according to the physiognomic and floristic determinants. Nutrient-poor rocky meadows, nutrient-poor dry short herb meadows, dry grass meadows, dry grassherb meadows, scrub meadows and humid or moist meadows were rare in Satakunta. Mesophilous meadows were divided to short herb meadows, grass meadows and tall herb meadows and they covered altogether 96 ha (8% in Satakunta. Grazed lake and river shore meadows covered about 110 ha (9,5% and were quite often dominated by short sedges and grasses. Studied seashore meadows covered 188 ha, making 16 % of all valuable traditional rural biotopes in Satakunta. There were three very large seashore meadows in the Pori region. In the traditional rural biotopes of Satakunta 14 nationally threatened species were found.

  13. Differential meadows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Bergstra; A. Ponse

    2008-01-01

    A meadow is a zero totalised field (0^{-1}=0), and a cancellation meadow is a meadow without proper zero divisors. In this paper we consider differential meadows, i.e., meadows equipped with differentiation operators. We give an equational axiomatization of these operators and thus obtain a finite b

  14. Soil- and plant-based countermeasures to reduce {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr uptake by grasses in natural meadows: the REDUP project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal, M. E-mail: miquel.vidal@apolo.qui.ub.es; Camps, M.; Grebenshikova, N.; Sanzharova, N.; Ivanov, Y.; Vandecasteele, C.; Shand, C.; Rigol, A.; Firsakova, S.; Fesenko, S.; Levchuk, S.; Cheshire, M.; Sauras, T.; Rauret, G

    2001-07-01

    The effectiveness of a set of soil- and plant-based countermeasures to reduce {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr transfer to plants was tested in natural meadows in the area affected by Chernobyl fallout. Countermeasures comprised the use of agricultural practices (disking+ploughing, liming and NPK fertilisation), addition of soil amendments and reseeding with a selection of grass species. Disking+ploughing was the most effective treatment, whereas the K fertiliser doses applied were insufficient to produce a significant increase in K concentration in soil solution. The application of some agricultural practices was economically justifiable for scenarios with a high initial transfer, such as {sup 137}Cs-contaminated organic soils. The use of soil amendments did not lead to a further decrease in transfer. Laboratory experiments demonstrated that this was because of their low radionuclide sorption properties. Finally, experiments examining the effect of plant species on radionuclide transfer showed that both transfer and biomass can depend on the plant species indicating that those with high radionuclide root uptake should be avoided when reseeding after ploughing.

  15. Registration of Arsenal meadow bromegrass

    Science.gov (United States)

    The United States Department of Agriculture (ARS) announces the release of the cultivar 'Arsenal' meadow bromegrass [Bromus biebersteinii Roem. & Schult. (excluded)] for use on semiarid rangelands and non-irrigated pastures as a rapid establishing forage grass with early spring growth, good fall nut...

  16. Plant species dominance shifts across erosion edge-meadow transects in the Swiss Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, Corinne; Körner, Christian; Hiltbrunner, Erika

    2013-03-01

    While exerting no obvious function under "average" environmental conditions, the presence of certain plant specialists becomes crucial in the event of a complete failure of a community due to severe disturbance such as landslides. Plants capable of growing at erosion edges may act as potential edge-engineers by coping with unstable ground and stabilizing the soil with their roots. We hypothesized that life conditions at erosion edges select for a particular set of specialists or species with specific traits, the identification of which was the aim of the study. Across 17 small-scale transects (0.40 × 1.60 m) from intact meadows to landslide edges (Ursern Valley, Swiss Alps, c. 1,600 m a.s.l.), we quantified plant species abundance by the point intercept method and characterized growth conditions based on Landolt's indicator values, leaf δ(13)C, and volumetric soil moisture in the uppermost soil layers. We observed a clear change of plant species composition and relative abundance from the meadow to the edge, presumably induced by the 25 % lower soil moisture and microclimatic exposure. Species richness at the edge was two-thirds of that in the meadow, but was positively correlated with species richness of the adjacent meadow. Species with "edge-preference" had either (1) rolled or festucoid leaves like Festuca spp., Avenella flexuosa and Nardus stricta, or (2) small, scleromorphic leaves like Vaccinium vitis-idaea, Calluna vulgaris and Thymus ssp. Graminoids with rolled/festucoid leaves were found to be the most dominant edge-specialists. The grass Festuca valesiaca s.l. emerged as the most dominant plant species at the edge, having an 11-times higher cover at the edge than in the meadow. In this montane grassland, a single species contributes to the stabilization of erosion edges and may be regarded as a potential keystone species for slope stability and regeneration after landslides even its role has not so far been established.

  17. Post-harvest treatments in smooth-stalked meadow grass (Poa pratensis L.) - effect on carbohydrates and tiller development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    Temperate grass species require a period of short days/low temperature to respond to flower induction stimuli. The same environmental conditions stimulate the increase in carbohydrate concentration in aboveground biomass and the accumulation of reserve carbohydrates in the basal plant parts...

  18. [Ash Meadows Purchase Proposal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A proposal sent to the Richard King Mellon Foundation for a loan to fund the purchase of Ash Meadows by the Nature Conservancy. Ash Meadows, set outside of Las Vegas...

  19. Continuous 1985–2012 Landsat Monitoring to Assess Fire Effects on Meadows in Yosemite National Park, California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher E. Soulard

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available To assess how montane meadow vegetation recovered after a wildfire that occurred in Yosemite National Park, CA in 1996, Google Earth Engine image processing was applied to leverage the entire Landsat Thematic Mapper archive from 1985 to 2012. Vegetation greenness (normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI was summarized every 16 days across the 28-year Landsat time series for 26 meadows. Disturbance event detection was hindered by the subtle influence of low-severity fire on meadow vegetation. A hard break (August 1996 was identified corresponding to the Ackerson Fire, and monthly composites were used to compare NDVI values and NDVI trends within burned and unburned meadows before, immediately after, and continuously for more than a decade following the fire date. Results indicate that NDVI values were significantly lower at 95% confidence level for burned meadows following the fire date, yet not significantly lower at 95% confidence level in the unburned meadows. Burned meadows continued to exhibit lower monthly NDVI in the dormant season through 2012. Over the entire monitoring period, the negative-trending, dormant season NDVI slopes in the burned meadows were also significantly lower than unburned meadows at 90% confidence level. Lower than average NDVI values and slopes in the dormant season compared to unburned meadows, coupled with photographic evidence, strongly suggest that evergreen vegetation was removed from the periphery of some meadows after the fire. These analyses provide insight into how satellite imagery can be used to monitor low-severity fire effects on meadow vegetation.

  20. Continuous 1985-2012 Landsat monitoring to assess fire effects on meadows in Yosemite National Park, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulard, Christopher E.; Albano, Christine M.; Villarreal, Miguel; Walker, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    To assess how montane meadow vegetation recovered after a wildfire that occurred in Yosemite National Park, CA in 1996, Google Earth Engine image processing was applied to leverage the entire Landsat Thematic Mapper archive from 1985 to 2012. Vegetation greenness (normalized difference vegetation index [NDVI]) was summarized every 16 days across the 28-year Landsat time series for 26 meadows. Disturbance event detection was hindered by the subtle influence of low-severity fire on meadow vegetation. A hard break (August 1996) was identified corresponding to the Ackerson Fire, and monthly composites were used to compare NDVI values and NDVI trends within burned and unburned meadows before, immediately after, and continuously for more than a decade following the fire date. Results indicate that NDVI values were significantly lower at 95% confidence level for burned meadows following the fire date, yet not significantly lower at 95% confidence level in the unburned meadows. Burned meadows continued to exhibit lower monthly NDVI in the dormant season through 2012. Over the entire monitoring period, the negative-trending, dormant season NDVI slopes in the burned meadows were also significantly lower than unburned meadows at 90% confidence level. Lower than average NDVI values and slopes in the dormant season compared to unburned meadows, coupled with photographic evidence, strongly suggest that evergreen vegetation was removed from the periphery of some meadows after the fire. These analyses provide insight into how satellite imagery can be used to monitor low-severity fire effects on meadow vegetation.

  1. Effects of Overseeding Grass on Aboveground Biomass of Different Economic Group in Maqu Alpine Desertified Meadow Pasture%补播禾草对玛曲高寒沙化草地各经济类群地上生物量的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈子萱; 田福平; 武高林; 牛俊义

    2011-01-01

    The effects of overseeding on aboveground biomass of different economic group in Maqu alpine desertified meadow were studied from 2006 to 2007. The results showed that overseeding grass can increase vegetation height and coverage. Aboveground biomass of sedges decreased and grasses biomass increased in 2006. In 2007 aboveground biomass of all economic groups increased and grasses biomass increased significantly, which accounted for about 50% of the total aboveground biomass. Grasses and legumes in mixed sowing grassland of Festuca sinensis, Poa pratensis and Elymus natans (ZCP) were higher by 34. 56% and 96. 37% than control respectively, which was a better overseeding treatment for Maqu alpine desertified grassland. It showed that overseeding was the effective management measure for alpine desertified meadow, which had positive effect on increasing vegetation height, coverage and aboveground biomass.%为研究补播禾草对玛曲高寒沙化草地各经济类群地上生物量的影响,于2006年和2007年在甘肃玛曲高寒沙化草地进行了禾草补播试验.结果表明:补播禾草可增加高寒沙化草地草群高度和植被盖度.补播当年,莎草类地上生物量降低,禾草类地上生物量增加.补播第二年,各经济类群地上生物量都增加,禾草类的地上生物量增加最多,占到总生物量的50%左右.其中,中华羊茅(Festuca sinensis)、草地早熟禾(Poa pratensis)和垂穗披碱草(Elymus natans)混播的处理,禾草类和豆科类比对照分别高出34.56%和96.37%,是玛曲高寒沙化草地较好补播处理.补播作为改良天然草场的有效措施,对增加草群高度、覆盖度和提高草地地上生物量具有积极作用.

  2. Meadow based Fraction Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Bergstra, Jan A.

    2015-01-01

    In the context of an involutive meadow a precise definition of fractions is formulated and on that basis formal definitions of various classes of fractions are given. The definitions follow the fractions as terms paradigm. That paradigm is compared with two competing paradigms for storytelling on fractions: fractions as values and fractions as pairs.

  3. Effects of tourism and topography on vegetation diversity in the subalpine meadows of the Dongling Mountains of Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Tun; Xiang, ChunLing; Li, Min

    2012-02-01

    Subalpine meadows in the Dongling Mountains (located at E115º26'-115º40', N40º00'-40º05') of Beijing, China are important for tourism and the provision of ecosystem services. However, because of poor management serious degradation has occurred on these subalpine meadows. The aim of this paper is to present a quantitative analysis of effects of tourism disturbance and topography on the status and diversity of montane meadow communities and to provide direction for improved management. Sixty quadrats of 2 × 2 m(2) along 10 transects were set up to collect data on site characteristics and vegetation status. The relationships between community composition and structure, species diversity, and tourism disturbance and topographic variables were analyzed by multivariate methods (TWINSPAN and CCA). The results showed that eight meadow communities were identified by TWINSPAN. Most of them were seriously degraded. The first CCA axis identified an elevation and tourism disturbance intensity gradient, which illustrated that tourism disturbance and elevation were most important factors influencing meadow types, composition and structure. Some resistant species and response species to tourism disturbance were identified and can be used as indicator species of tourism disturbance. Species richness, heterogeneity and evenness were closely related to tourism disturbance and elevation. It is concluded that tourism disturbance must be controlled to enable grassland rehabilitation to occur in the meadows. Measures of effective management of the meadows were discussed.

  4. Studies on Fast Remediation of Soda Meadow Alkaline Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Lianren; SUN Yankun; LI Dawei

    2010-01-01

    Researches on models of remediation quickly in soda meadow alkaline soil, and dynamic variation of water-salt in saline soil of Zhaozhou County were studied systematically from 2001 to 2006. Realize the vegetation cover of those years through the artificial planting, mixed seeding lymc grass (Elymus dahuricus Turcz) and melilot in the mode of rotary tillage and deep loosening in lower and medium saline soils. The results showed that there was remarkable relationship between net evaporation (difference of precipitation and evaporation) and total salt content in the soil. The net evaporation could be used as a new method to forecast the dynamics variation of salt to ensure the pasture optimum sowing time. Realize the autumnal vegetation cover of those years through direct planting on the bourgeon layer of soda meadow alkaline soil, on the other hand, the covered pasture made the function of restraining salt and alkaline content to realize the biology reverse succession quickly. Forage seeds were seeded directly on the seeding bed of soda alkaline meadow at the end of July. In fall of the same year, a certain amount of biomass was obtained. The model, which has remarkable economical efficiency and use widely, represented the innovative model for the fast vegetation restoration on the soda alkaline meadow soil.

  5. AshMeadowsNaucorid_CH

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These data identify the areas where final critical habitat for the Ash Meadows Naucorid (Ambrysus amargosus) occur. "Nevada, Nye County. Point of Rocks Springs and...

  6. AshMeadowsNaucorid_CH

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These data identify the areas where final critical habitat for the Ash Meadows Naucorid (Ambrysus amargosus) occur. "Nevada, Nye County. Point of Rocks Springs and...

  7. [Effects of nitrogen and phosphorous fertilization on community structure and productivity of degraded alpine meadows in northern Tibet, China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Ning; Shi, Pei-li; Niu, Ben; Jiang, Jing; Song, Ming-hua; Zhang, Xian-zhou; He, Yong-tao

    2014-12-01

    Abstract: Fertilization is an effective management measure for recovery of degraded grasslands. To better understand the effects of fertilization on community structure and productivity of lightly and severely degraded alpine meadows, we conducted a fertilization experiment in northern Tibet since 2008. The treatments were addition of nitrogen (N) alone (50 kg N x hm(-2) x a(-1), LN; 100 kg N x hm(-2) x a(-1), HN) or addition of both phosphorus (P) and N (50 kg N x hm(-2) x a(-1) +50 kg P x hm(-2) x a(-1), LN+P; 100 kg N x hm(-2) x a(-1) +50 kg P x hm(-2) x a(-1), HN+P) in each of the two types of degraded alpine meadows. N addition alone significantly affected plant community coverage or productivity in neither the slightly nor the severely degraded alpine meadow, while addition of both N and P significantly increased plant community coverage, aboveground and below- ground biomass of the alpine meadows. This suggested that productivity of this alpine meadow is co-limited by N and P. HN and HN+P significantly decreased species richness and evenness in the lightly degraded grassland, indicating that HN was not beneficial for the lightly degraded grassland to maintain species diversity and community stability. N addition significantly reduced the root to shoot ratio in the severely degraded meadow. In the lightly degraded meadow, N addition alone, especially with a high amount (HN) , enhanced the importance values (IV) and biomass of grasses, while fertilization with both N and P increased those of sedges. In the severely degraded meadow, fertilization had little effect on IV of grasses or sedges, but improved biomass of forbs. The results suggested that LN+P could be employed in recovery of lightly degraded alpine meadows, but other management measures such as fencing and reseeding may be needed for recovery of severely degraded alpine meadows.

  8. Genetic compatibility determines endophyte-grass combinations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kari Saikkonen

    Full Text Available Even highly mutually beneficial microbial-plant interactions, such as mycorrhizal- and rhizobial-plant exchanges, involve selfishness, cheating and power-struggles between the partners, which depending on prevailing selective pressures, lead to a continuum of interactions from antagonistic to mutualistic. Using manipulated grass-endophyte combinations in a five year common garden experiment, we show that grass genotypes and genetic mismatches constrain genetic combinations between the vertically (via host seeds transmitted endophytes and the out-crossing host, thereby reducing infections in established grass populations. Infections were lost in both grass tillers and seedlings in F(1 and F(2 generations, respectively. Experimental plants were collected as seeds from two different environments, i.e., meadows and nearby riverbanks. Endophyte-related benefits to the host included an increased number of inflorescences, but only in meadow plants and not until the last growing season of the experiment. Our results illustrate the importance of genetic host specificity and trans-generational maternal effects on the genetic structure of a host population, which act as destabilizing forces in endophyte-grass symbioses. We propose that (1 genetic mismatches may act as a buffering mechanism against highly competitive endophyte-grass genotype combinations threatening the biodiversity of grassland communities and (2 these mismatches should be acknowledged, particularly in breeding programmes aimed at harnessing systemic and heritable endophytes to improve the agriculturally valuable characteristics of cultivars.

  9. Effects of habitat management treatments on plant community composition and biomass in a Montane wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, J.E.; Keough, J.R.; Pyle, W.H.

    2007-01-01

    Grazing and burning are commonly applied practices that can impact the diversity and biomass of wetland plant communities. We evaluated the vegetative response of wetlands and adjacent upland grasslands to four treatment regimes (continuous idle, fall prescribed burning followed by idle, annual fall cattle grazing, and rotation of summer grazing and idle) commonly used by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Our study area was Grays Lake, a large, montane wetland in southeastern Idaho that is bordered by extensive wet meadows. We identified seven plant cover types, representing the transition from dry meadow to deep wetland habitats: mixed deep marsh, spikerush slough, Baltic rush (Juncus balticus), moist meadow, alkali, mesic meadow, and dry meadow. We compared changes in community composition and total aboveground biomass of each plant cover type between 1998, when all units had been idled for three years, and 1999 (1 yr post-treatment) and 2000 (2 yr post-treatment). Analysis using non-metric multidimensional scaling indicated that compositional changes varied among cover types, treatments, and years following treatment. Treatment-related changes in community composition were greatest in mixed deep marsh, Baltic rush, and mesic meadow. In mixed deep marsh and Baltic rush, grazing and associated trampling contributed to changes in the plant community toward more open water and aquatic species and lower dominance of Baltic rush; grazing and trampling also seemed to contribute to increased cover in mesic meadow. Changing hydrological conditions, from multiple years of high water to increasing drought, was an important factor influencing community composition and may have interacted with management treatments. Biomass differed among treatments and between years within cover types. In the wettest cover types, fall burning and grazing rotation treatments had greater negative impact on biomass than the idle treatment, but in drier cover types, summer grazing stimulated

  10. Simulating land-cover change in Montane mainland southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jefferson; Vogler, John B; Sen, Omer L; Giambelluca, Thomas W; Ziegler, Alan D

    2012-05-01

    We used the conversion of land use and its effects (CLUE-s) model to simulate scenarios of land-cover change in Montane mainland southeast Asia (MMSEA), a region in the midst of transformation due to rapid intensification of agriculture and expansion of regional trade markets. Simulated changes affected approximately 10 % of the MMSEA landscape between 2001 and 2025 and 16 % between 2001 and 2050. Roughly 9 % of the current vegetation, which consists of native species of trees, shrubs, and grasses, is projected to be replaced by tree plantations, tea, and other evergreen shrubs during the 50 years period. Importantly, 4 % of this transition is expected to be due to the expansion of rubber (Hevea brasiliensis), a tree plantation crop that may have important implications for local-to-regional scale hydrology because of its potentially high water consumption in the dry season.

  11. Root lifespans of four grass species from habitats differing in nutrient availability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krift, van der T.A.J.; Berendse, F.

    2002-01-01

    1. In grass species that occur in pastures or hay meadows, life spans of roots determine much of the carbon and nutrient loss from the plant in addition to the amounts that are lost by mowing or grazing. We hypothesized that grass species from nutrient-poor habitats had longer root life spans and co

  12. Effects of environment and grazing disturbance on tree establishment in meadows of the central Cascade Range, Oregon, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, E.A.; Halpern, C.B. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Coll. of Forest Resources

    1998-04-01

    Within the last century there has been widespread establishment of trees in mountain meadows of the Pacific Northwest. We reconstructed patterns of tree invasion at 17 meadow sites in the central Cascade Range of Oregon, USA - sites representing diverse physical environments and vegetation types and experiencing different histories of recent anthropogenic disturbance (sheep grazing). Spatial distributions and age structures of invasive tree populations were analysed with respect to climatic records and grazing history. Patterns of establishment varied considerably among meadows, reflecting strong differences in environment and grazing history. In montane hydric meadows, tree establishment was spatially clumped beneath large old trees and on elevated microsites; however the timing of invasion differed between sites with stable versus fluctuating water tables. In upland mesic/dry montane meadows, timing of invasion corresponded with cessation of sheep grazing (early 1940s) and the onset of wetter summers (mid 1940s). In the subalpine zone, climate and aspect interacted to produce contrasting histories of invasion on north- and south-faced slopes. Establishment on north-facing slopes, concentrated in heath-shrub communities, coincided with regional warming (1920-1945) when snowpacks were lighter and melted earlier. Recruitment of trees onto south-facing slopes occurred later, when conditions were wetter (1945-1985). In many environments, the spatial distribution of recruitment suggests that once trees have established, autogenic factors become increasingly important as individual trees or groups of trees alter the physical or biotic conditions that once inhibited establishment. Knowledge of the factors that influence invasion, and of their varying importance across gradients in environment and vegetation, is critical to predicting future changes in these dynamic systems 74 refs, 12 figs, 2 figs

  13. Tree diversity in sub-montane and lower montane primary rain forests in Central Sulawesi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Culmsee, H.; Pitopang, R.

    2009-01-01

    The tree diversity of sub-montane and lower montane primary forests is studied in plot-based inventories on two sites in Lore Lindu National Park, Central Sulawesi. Out of 166 species in total, 50 % are new records for Sulawesi (19 %) or the Central Sulawesi province (31 %). Species richness

  14. Montane wetland water chemistry, Uinta Mountains, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severson, K. S.; Matyjasik, M.; Ford, R. L.; Hernandez, M. W.; Welsh, S. B.; Summers, S.; Bartholomew, L. M.

    2009-12-01

    This study attempts to determine the relationship between surface and groundwater chemistry and wetland characteristics within the Reader Lakes watershed, Uinta Mountains. The dominant rock type in the study area is quartz sandstone of the Hades Pass formation, Unita Mountain Group (Middle Proterozoic). Minor amounts of interbedded arkose and illite-bearing shale are also present. Water chemistry data have been collected from more than one hundred locations during the 2008 and 2009 summer seasons. The Reader Creek watershed is approximately 9.8 km long and about 3.5 km wide in the central portion of the basin. Direct precipitation is the primary source of groundwater recharge and the area is typically covered by snow from November until May. Four distinct wetland complexes, designated as the upper, middle, lower and the sloping fen, constitute the major wetland environments in the study area. The chemistry of the melt water from the high-elevation snowfield is affected by weathering of incorporated atmospheric dust and surface rocks. Total dissolved solids in both years were between 7 and 9 mg/L. Major anions include HCO3 (averaging 4.0 mg/L), SO4 (1.3 mg/L), NO3 (0.9 mg/L), Cl (0.8 mg/L), F (0.07 mg/L), PO4 (0.03 mg/L), and Br(0.015 mg/L). Major cations include Na (1.1 mg/L), Ca (1.0 mg/L), K (0.28 mg/L), and Mg (0.15 mg/L). Groundwater concentrations in the lower meadow, as measured in piezomters, are distinctly different, with the following maximum concentrations of anions: HCO3 (36.7 mg/L), SO4 (5.0 mg/L), Cl (3.4 mg/L), NO3 (0.9 mg/L), PO4 (0.28 mg/L), F (0.23 mg/L), Br (0.12 mg/L), and cations: Ca (22 mg/L), Na (4.6 mg/L), Mg (3.4 mg/L), and K (1.8 mg/L)- with a maximum value of 83 mg/L for total dissolved solids. Waters in Reader Creek, the main trunk channel, are typically sodium-potassium and sodium -potassium bicarbonate, with some calcium-bicarbonate, mostly in the middle part of the watershed. Groundwater from springs is sodium-potassium in the upper

  15. Seed production of two meadow fescue cultivars differing in growth habit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. MÄKELÄ

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis Huds. is grown widely in the Nordic countries in forage grass mixtures. Locally adapted cultivars are preferred for establishment of mixed swards. Meadow fescue seed yield is determined by seed weight, the number of panicle bearing tillers, size of panicles and the number of fertile florets. We aimed to determine the differences in components of seed yield in two different meadow fescue cultivars differing in forage quality; Kalevi, released in 1979, and Fure, released in 1999. Biomass accumulation was monitored, numbers of fertile and sterile florets, and seeds were counted, and the forage quality was analysed. Seed quality was also analysed. Fure was leafier and accumulated more vegetative biomass than Kalevi. Kalevi had significantly more panicles than Fure, although Fure compensated for the lower number of panicles with increased panicle size. There were no differences in number of sterile and aborted florets between cultivars. Based on the results it seems that these two meadow fescue cultivars have a completely different strategy in seed production even though the final seed yield was not markedly different. It is apparent that meadow fescues have good ability to compensate among the components of seed yield. Long-term field experiments should be conducted to investigate the interactions between plant stand ecology, seed production and cultivation technology.;

  16. Grasses – a potential sustainable resource for biocrude production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grigoras, Ionela; Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup; Toor, Saqib Sohail

    This study aims to map the spatial distribution of different types of grasses available in Denmark using a GIS (Geographical Information System) based approach and to supplement these with biofuel potential maps based on HtL conversion. Biomass yields (t/ha) and biofuel energy equivalent (GJ....../ha) are mapped as function of the type of grassland area (permanent, roadside, grass sown in crop rotation systems) using 2012 databases made available by Jordbrugs Analyser Portal and Danmarks Miljøportal. Grasses have become a promising lignocellulosic biomass for biofuels production due to the low cost factor......-crude yield and a high quality of the bio-crude using grasses as feedstock a series of experiments with meadow grass have been carried out in a batch reactor. Biomass input and liquefaction products are characterized using proximate analysis, elemental analysis, heating values, FTIR, GC/MS. Data is subject...

  17. Changes in plant biomass and species composition of alpine Kobresia meadows along altitudinal gradient on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Alpine Kobresia meadows are major vegetation types on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. There is growing concern over their relationships among biodiversity, productivity and environments. Despite the im-portance of species composition, species richness, the type of different growth forms, and plant bio-mass structure for Kobresia meadow ecosystems, few studies have been focused on the relationship between biomass and environmental gradient in the Kobresia meadow plant communities, particularly in relation to soil moisture and edaphic gradients. We measured the plant species composition, her-baceous litter, aboveground and belowground biomass in three Kobresia meadow plant communities in Haibei Alpine Meadow Ecosystem Research Station from 2001 to 2004. Community differences in plant species composition were reflected in biomass distribution. The total biomass showed a de-crease from 13196.96±719.69 g/m2 in the sedge-dominated K. tibetica swamp to 2869.58±147.52 g/m2 in the forb and sedge dominated K. pygmaea meadow, and to 2153.08±141.95 g/m2 in the forbs and grasses dominated K. humilis along with the increase of altitude. The vertical distribution of below-ground biomass is distinct in the three meadow communities, and the belowground biomass at the depth of 0-10 cm in K. tibetica swamp meadow was significantly higher than that in K. humilis and K. pygmaea meadows (P<0.01). The herbaceous litter in K. tibetica swamp was significantly higher than those in K. pygnaeca and K. humilis meadows. The effects of plant litter are enhanced when ground water and soil moisture levels are raised. The relative importance of litter and vegetation may vary with soil water availability. In the K. tibetica swamp, total biomass was negatively correlated to species richness (P<0.05); aboveground biomass was positively correlated to soil organic matter, soil moisture, and plant cover (P<0.05); belowground biomass was positively correlated with soil moisture (P<0.05). However, in the K

  18. Changes in plant biomass and species composition of alpine Kobresia meadows along altitudinal gradient on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Alpine Kobresia meadows are major vegetation types on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. There is growing concern over their relationships among biodiversity, productivity and environments. Despite the importance of species composition, species richness, the type of different growth forms, and plant biomass structure for Kobresia meadow ecosystems, few studies have been focused on the relationship between biomass and environmental gradient in the Kobresia meadow plant communities, particularly in relation to soil moisture and edaphic gradients. We measured the plant species composition, herbaceous litter, aboveground and belowground biomass in three Kobresia meadow plant communities in Haibei Alpine Meadow Ecosystem Research Station from 2001 to 2004. Community differences in plant species composition were reflected in biomass distribution. The total biomass showed a decrease from 13196.96±719.69 g/m2 in the sedge-dominated K. tibetica swamp to 2869.58±147.52 g/m2 in the forb and sedge dominated K. pygmaea meadow, and to 2153.08±141.95 g/m2 in the forbs and grasses dominated K. humilis along with the increase of altitude. The vertical distribution of belowground biomass is distinct in the three meadow communities, and the belowground biomass at the depth of 0-10 cm in K. tibetica swamp meadow was significantly higher than that in K. humilis and K. pygmaea meadows (P<0.01). The herbaceous litter in K. tibetica swamp was significantly higher than those in K. pygnaeca and K. humilis meadows. The effects of plant litter are enhanced when ground water and soil moisture levels are raised. The relative importance of litter and vegetation may vary with soil water availability. In the K. tibetica swamp, total biomass was negatively correlated to species richness (P<0.05); aboveground biomass was positively correlated to soil organic matter, soil moisture, and plant cover (P<0.05); belowground biomass was positively correlated with soil moisture (P<0.05). However, in

  19. Vegetation pattern related tc grazing pressure in alpine meadows of Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S K; Rai, J P N

    2004-07-01

    The present study aims to analyze the interaction of prevailing biotic pressure on plant species diversity in Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve (NDBR) which lies in northern part of Uttaranchal hills between 79 degrees 40'E to 80 degrees 05'E longitude and 30 degrees 17' N to 30 degrees 41'N latitude and covers an area of 2236.7 km2. A total of 75 species has been found which included the herbaceous plants viz., grasses, sedges and forbs. Generally, the plants have a short life span of 3-4 months. However, few species persist throughout the growth period i.e. May-October. Phytosociological study performed in plots of varying slope and grazing pressure intensity revealed that the dominant grasses were Danthonia cachemyriana and Poa annua and dominant forbs were Trachydium roylei and Geum elatum in all the plots. Grasses were abundant on west facing slopes while forbs preferred the even topography of east facing meadows. The grasses and sedges together had optimum density during July and August. In general, short lived species exhibited more diversity for one or two months whilst the long lived species exhibited optimum diversity althrough the snow free period. The species diversity is maximum (100%) in moderately grazed bughiyals i.e. Pacchu and minimum in intensively grazed bughiyals i.e. Martoli. The species distribution among the plots was 60-90% contagious and 11.2-38.0% randomirrespective of grazing pressure, thus highlighting the significance of grazing pressure in management of alpine meadows.

  20. Montane conifer fuel dynamics, Yosemite National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wagtendonk, J.W.; Moore, P.E.

    1997-01-01

    Litter and woody fuel accumulation rates over 7 years for 7 montane Sierra Nevada conifer species, including giant sequoia, ponderosa pine, sugar pine, Jeffrey pine, incense-cedar and white fir. Data are from four sites per size class per species with four size classes each. Nonspatial, georeferenced.

  1. AshMeadowsSpeckledDace_CH

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These data identify the areas where final critical habitat for the Ash Meadows Amargosa pupfish (Cyprinodon nevadensis mionectes) occur. "Nevada, Nye County: Each of...

  2. AshMeadowsAmargosaPupfish_CH

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These data identify the areas where final critical habitat for the Ash Meadows Amargosa pupfish (Cyprinodon nevadensis mionectes) occur. "Nevada, Nye County: Each of...

  3. AshMeadowsSpeckledDace_CH

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These data identify the areas where final critical habitat for the Ash Meadows Amargosa pupfish (Cyprinodon nevadensis mionectes) occur. "Nevada, Nye County: Each of...

  4. AshMeadowsAmargosaPupfish_CH

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — These data identify the areas where final critical habitat for the Ash Meadows Amargosa pupfish (Cyprinodon nevadensis mionectes) occur. "Nevada, Nye County: Each of...

  5. Designing hybrid grass genomes to control runoff generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, C.; Binley, A.; Humphreys, M.; King, I. P.; O'Donovan, S.; Papadopoulos, A.; Turner, L. B.; Watts, C.; Whalley, W. R.; Haygarth, P.

    2010-12-01

    Sustainable management of water in landscapes requires balancing demands of agricultural production whilst moderating downstream effects like flooding. Pasture comprises 69% of global agricultural areas and is essential for producing food and fibre alongside environmental goods and services. Thus there is a need to breed forage grasses that deliver multiple benefits through increased levels of productivity whilst moderating fluxes of water. Here we show that a novel grass hybrid that combines the entire genomes of perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne - the grass of choice for Europe’s forage agriculture) and meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis) has a significant role in flood prevention. Field plot experiments established differences in runoff generation with the hybrid cultivar reducing runoff by 50% compared to perennial ryegrass cultivar, and by 35% compared to a meadow fescue cultivar (34 events over two years, replicated randomized-block design, statistically significant differences). This important research outcome was the result of a project that combined plant genetics, soil physics and plot scale hydrology to identify novel grass genotypes that can reduce runoff from grassland systems. Through a coordinated series of experiments examining effects from the gene to plot scale, we have identified that the rapid growth and then turnover of roots in the L. perenne x F. pratensis hybrid is likely to be a key mechanism in reducing runoff generation. More broadly this is an exciting first step to realizing the potential to design grass genomes to achieve both food production, and to deliver flood control, a key ecosystem service.

  6. Biogas potential in Grasses from Wetlands; Biogaspotential hos vaatmarksgraes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Marvin

    2009-12-15

    The purpose of this study has been to survey wetlands that are suitable for mowing and to analyze the biogas potential in the harvested grasses. A preformed investigation showed that there are suitable wetlands, which can be harvestable, namely those mowed formerly in traditional haymaking. The practice of traditional haymaking is dying out in Sweden today but there are several good reasons why it should to be reconsidered. Nature- and cultural values are obvious, also the unutilized energy in the grass. The suitable types of wetland that were specifically studied were the productive wetlands; meadow marshes and wet meadows. These wetlands are represented in the Swedish meadow- and pasture inventory database; (TUVA) and the Swedish national wetland inventory (VMI). Going through the databases showed that they largely complement each other. A geographical mapping was also carried out of wetlands in relation to areas of interest for the future establishment of biogas plants, so called 'hotspots'. The geographical survey shows that there is ample amount of grass from wetlands within a 30-kilometer radius that can supplement the plants main substrate, manure. The map layer Swedish Ground Cover Data (SMD) together with GIS software was used to analyze the extent of overgrowth for the older VMI objects in Uppsala County, with the result that half of the VMI objects are no longer of interest. They have become either woodland and bogs, or reed beds. There is very little information on wetland-grasses and methane production. Instead, a theory was evaluated regarding the possibility of transforming nutritional values for grass and sedges into biogas potentials. It was shown that this method does not capture the total biogas potential, but offers a minimum value that can be considered rather reliable. The energy transformation showed that late harvested grasses from wetlands has a biogas potential about 0,21 Nm3 methane/ (kg, DM) which is about 60 % of the biogas

  7. Grass Lignocellulose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akin, Danny E.

    Grass lignocelluloses are limited in bioconversion by aromatic constituents, which include both lignins and phenolic acids esters. Histochemistry, ultraviolet absorption microspectrophotometry, and response to microorganisms and specific enzymes have been used to determine the significance of aromatics toward recalcitrance. Coniferyl lignin appears to be the most effective limitation to biodegradation, existing in xylem cells of vascular tissues; cell walls with syringyl lignin, for example, leaf sclerenchyma, are less recalcitrant. Esterified phenolic acids, i.e., ferulic and p-coumaric acids, often constitute a major chemical limitation in nonlignified cell walls to biodegradation in grasses, especially warm-season species. Methods to improve biodegradability through modification of aromatics include: plant breeding, use of lignin-degrading white-rot fungi, and addition of esterases. Plant breeding for new cultivars has been especially effective for nutritionally improved forages, for example, bermudagrasses. In laboratory studies, selective white-rot fungi that lack cellulases delignified the lignocellulosic materials and improved fermentation of residual carbohydrates. Phenolic acid esterases released p-coumaric and ferulic acids for potential coproducts, improved the available sugars for fermentation, and improved biodegradation. The separation and removal of the aromatic components for coproducts, while enhancing the availability of sugars for bioconversion, could improve the economics of bioconversion.

  8. Seagrass meadows in a globally changing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Richard K F; van Keulen, Mike; Coles, Rob G

    2014-06-30

    Seagrass meadows are valuable ecosystem service providers that are now being lost globally at an unprecedented rate, with water quality and other localised stressors putting their future viability in doubt. It is therefore critical that we learn more about the interactions between seagrass meadows and future environmental change in the anthropocene. This needs to be with particular reference to the consequences of poor water quality on ecosystem resilience and the effects of change on trophic interactions within the food web. Understanding and predicting the response of seagrass meadows to future environmental change requires an understanding of the natural long-term drivers of change and how these are currently influenced by anthropogenic stress. Conservation management of coastal and marine ecosystems now and in the future requires increased knowledge of how seagrass meadows respond to environmental change, and how they can be managed to be resilient to these changes. Finding solutions to such issues also requires recognising people as part of the social-ecological system. This special issue aims to further enhance this knowledge by bringing together global expertise across this field. The special issues considers issues such as ecosystem service delivery of seagrass meadows, the drivers of long-term seagrass change and the socio-economic consequences of environmental change to seagrass.

  9. Atlantis FLEX (BAY 22010 H – a new herbicide in cereals with efficacy against grasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerlen, Dirk

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Atlantis FLEX (Mesosulfuron-methyl; Propoxycarbazone-sodium; Mefenpyr-diethyl is a new cereal herbicide to control blackgrass (Alopecurus myosuroides, ryegrass (Lolium spec., brome grass (Bromus spec., wild oat (Avena fatua, loose silky-bentgrass (Apera spica-venti L, annual meadow-grass (Poa annua L. and dicot weeds. Atlantis FLEX can be used in winter wheat, winter triticale, winter rye, winter durum wheat and spelt. The publication is based on efficacy trials from two years of spring application with Atlantis FLEX. It will be shown, that Atlantis FLEX generates a good to excellent efficacy against grass-weeds.

  10. Netherlands grass monitoring network

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stienezen, M.W.J.; Remmelink, G.J.; |Weiden, van der T.; Tjoonk, L.; Nolles, J.E.; Voskamp-Harkema, W.; Pol, van den A.

    2016-01-01

    To support on farm grazing management in the Netheralnds a grass monitoring was established in 2014. The aim of the network is to share and publish data on grass quality, grass growth and soil temperature in different regions of the Netherlands to serve as a benchmark. Grass quality, sward height

  11. English Water Meadows: historic relics or focus for environmental management and inter-disciplinary research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Hadrian

    2015-04-01

    Irrigated water meadows are found across Europe, from southern Scandinavia to Spain and in the Alpine regions and Italy. While the practice of engineering 'floated' meadow land for deliberate irrigation on hillsides and floodplains is widespread and ancient, since about 1600 AD the practice was widely adopted on floodplains in southern England where they improved the timing and productivity of grazing land and produced hay crops. They also became a part of English consciousness through art and literature. To some, water meadows are a relic of an agrarian past, to others they are the object of a range of foci for conservation, education, sustainable grass production, community engagement and recent research suggests water returned from meadow irrigation is beneficial to river water quality. Historically floodplain 'bedwork' water meadows grew from, and were integral in, the farming system of 'Wessex' involving sheep which produced dung for arable land and later supporting dairy and beef production, as well as hay. Where systems remain, this is largely due to the whim of individuals, the outcome of agri-environmental schemes. Water meadows may be managed by public, voluntary or private sector bodies. What is needed is a fresh look at how land owners, or communities, might micro-target them for heritage, habitat and grassland management. There are therefore interesting questions concerning their future: Who might invest in their restoration and maintenance? How might they be integrated into commercial farming? Are they of sufficient interest to restore en masse to become (once more) a major feature of the English chalk stream valleys? Do they provide a way into academic and public perception, combining environmental science, history, cultural heritage and environmental management? How might restoration and management become vehicles for public engagement? While each of these questions represents a major topic for discussion, this paper is an attempt to consolidate

  12. Edificio de viviendas. Lake Meadows Chicago

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skidmore - Owings y Merrill, Arquitectos

    1958-09-01

    Full Text Available "Lake Meadows" es una amplia parcela, de cuatrocientos mil metros cuadrados, situada en las afueras de Chicago, con vistas dominantes sobre el lago Michigan. En tan bello emplazamiento se ha construido uno de los más atractivos conjuntos residenciales norteamericanos.

  13. The ecology of the seagrass meadows of the west coast of Florida: A community profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zieman, J.C.; Zieman, R.T. (Virginia Univ., Charlottesville, VA (USA). Dept. of Environmental Sciences)

    1989-09-01

    This report summarizes information on the ecology of seagrass meadows on the west coast of Florida, from south of Tampa Bay to Pensacola. This area contains more than 3500 ha of seagrass beds, dominated by three species, Thalasia testudinum (turtle grass), Syringodium filiforme (manatee grass), and Halodule wrightii (shoal grass). Beds occur both on the shallow, zero-energy Continental Shelf and in inshore bays and estuaries. Species ecology, distribution, biomass, and productivity of these dominant seagrass species are discussed. Seagrass beds support a very diverse and abundant algal flora and fauna, and these organisms, and seagrass detritus form the base of a productive food chain. Seagrass beds are important nursery areas providing both cover and food, for a number of commercial and sports fishery species. Along the west Florida coast, estuarine grass beds are noticeably more stressed and impacted by human activities than the more pristine nearshore beds. Urban development and dredging and filling are the major threates to seagrass beds in this region. 500 refs., 28 figs., 14 tabs.

  14. The effect of the shape of gaps on microenvironmental conditions and seedling recruitment in Molinietum caeruleae meadows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinga Kostrakiewicz-Gierałt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Cessation of the management of semi-natural habitats such as grasslands and meadows contributes to secondary succession and encroachment of native and alien tall-growing perennials, large tussock grasses, shrubs, and trees. Thus, the formation of gaps in the plant canopy and litter, enabling seedling recruitment, appears to be a very effective method for the restoration of several plant communities. The main objective of the research was to assess the effect of the shape of openings on microenvironmental conditions and seedling recruitment in Molinietum caeruleae patches in various habitat conditions. In all study patches, circular and linear openings, comparable in area, were randomly created through the removal of plant canopy and litter layer. The circular gaps presented greater light availability and lower soil humidity than linear openings, while soil temperature within differently shaped openings was similar. Regardless of differences in microenvironmental conditions, the total number of seedlings in differently shaped gaps did not vary considerably. Three plant categories were found: (i those recruited mostly in circular openings, (ii those recruited mostly in linear gaps, (iii those colonizing circular and linear gaps similarly. The colonizers of circular gaps represented various synecological groups (ruderal, grasslands and meadows, young tree communities and diverse life forms (therophytes, hemicryptophytes, chamaephytes, phanerophytes, while the colonizers of linear gaps were meadow and grassland hemicryptophytes. The formation of linear openings contributes to increases in the abundance of meadow taxa, while the creation of circular openings may have a negative effect, contributing to the promotion of the secondary succession process.

  15. Soil microbial population and enzyme activity related to grazing pressure in alpine meadows of Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjeeva K; Rai, J P N

    2004-01-01

    The present study aims to analyze the interaction of prevailing biotic pressure on soil environment with emphasis on its physicochemical and microbiological characteristics determining soil fertility status and thus supporting plant and animal biodiversity in Nanda Devi Biosphere Reserve (NDBR) which is located in northern part of Uttaranchal hills between 79 degrees 40'E to 80 degrees 05'E longitude and 30 degrees 17'N to 30 degrees 41'E latitude. The experimental results revealed that the physico-chemical characteristics (viz., moisture, pH, EC, C, N, P, K, CEC) of soil were maximum in moderately grazed meadow and minimum in intensively grazed meadow. Soil microbial analysis measured in terms of total viable count (TVC) exhibited grazing sensitivity trend being maximum population of bacteria > fungi > actinomycetes. The soil microbial population was positively correlated with soil respiration, dehydrogenase activity, acid phosphatase and microbial biomass, which exhibited uneven trend with grazing pressure. Soil from moderately grazed meadow showed highest microbial count and enzyme activities, whilst intensively grazed meadow showed lowest microbial count and enzyme activities. This depicts the beneficial role of prescribed grazing up to limited extent in management of soil fertility, which might have supported luxuriant growth of a variety of grasses.

  16. Variation in phenology of hibernation and reproduction in the endangered New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer K. Frey

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hibernation is a key life history feature that can impact many other crucial aspects of a species’ biology, such as its survival and reproduction. I examined the timing of hibernation and reproduction in the federally endangered New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus, which occurs across a broad range of latitudes and elevations in the American Southwest. Data from museum specimens and field studies supported predictions for later emergence and shorter active intervals in montane populations relative to lower elevation valley populations. A low-elevation population located at Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge (BANWR in the Rio Grande valley was most similar to other subspecies of Z. hudsonius: the first emergence date was in mid-May and there was an active interval of 162 days. In montane populations of Z. h. luteus, the date of first emergence was delayed until mid-June and the active interval was reduced to ca 124–135 days, similar to some populations of the western jumping mouse (Z. princeps. Last date of immergence into hibernation occurred at about the same time in all populations (mid to late October. In montane populations pregnant females are known from July to late August and evidence suggests that they have a single litter per year. At BANWR two peaks in reproduction were expected based on similarity of active season to Z. h. preblei. However, only one peak was clearly evident, possibly due to later first reproduction and possible torpor during late summer. At BANWR pregnant females are known from June and July. Due to the short activity season and geographic variation in phenology of key life history events of Z. h. luteus, recommendations are made for the appropriate timing for surveys for this endangered species.

  17. Variation in phenology of hibernation and reproduction in the endangered New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Jennifer K

    2015-01-01

    Hibernation is a key life history feature that can impact many other crucial aspects of a species' biology, such as its survival and reproduction. I examined the timing of hibernation and reproduction in the federally endangered New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus), which occurs across a broad range of latitudes and elevations in the American Southwest. Data from museum specimens and field studies supported predictions for later emergence and shorter active intervals in montane populations relative to lower elevation valley populations. A low-elevation population located at Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Refuge (BANWR) in the Rio Grande valley was most similar to other subspecies of Z. hudsonius: the first emergence date was in mid-May and there was an active interval of 162 days. In montane populations of Z. h. luteus, the date of first emergence was delayed until mid-June and the active interval was reduced to ca 124-135 days, similar to some populations of the western jumping mouse (Z. princeps). Last date of immergence into hibernation occurred at about the same time in all populations (mid to late October). In montane populations pregnant females are known from July to late August and evidence suggests that they have a single litter per year. At BANWR two peaks in reproduction were expected based on similarity of active season to Z. h. preblei. However, only one peak was clearly evident, possibly due to later first reproduction and possible torpor during late summer. At BANWR pregnant females are known from June and July. Due to the short activity season and geographic variation in phenology of key life history events of Z. h. luteus, recommendations are made for the appropriate timing for surveys for this endangered species.

  18. Foraminifera and the ecology of sea grass communities since the late Cretaceous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Malcolm; Smart, Christopher; Jagt, John

    2016-04-01

    Sea grasses are marine angiosperms (plants) that, in the late Cretaceous, migrated from the land into shallow-water marine environments. They represent a distinct, but fragile, marine habitat and sea grass meadows are often regarded as biodiversity hot-spots with a range of species (including fish, sea horses and cuttlefish) using them as nurseries for their young. Foraminifera are often found associated with sea grass meadows, with the associated taxa reflecting both the environment and palaeolatitude. In the tropics and sub-tropics, miliolid foraminifera dominate (e.g., Peneroplis spp.) as do large discoidal taxa such as Marginopora and Calcarina. In temperate to cool latitudes the assemblage changes to one dominated by smaller benthic taxa, including Elphidium spp. One taxon, Elphidium crispum, is geotropic and is often found - in the summer months - to crowd the fronds of the sea grass. In the Gulpen and Maastricht formations of the Maastricht area (The Netherlands and Belgium) sea grass fossils (both fronds and rhizomes) have been recorded in association with assemblages of both larger and smaller benthic foraminifera (Hart et al., 2016). Some of the large discoidal forms (e.g., Omphalocyclus and Orbitoides/Lepidorbitoides) and the distinctive Siderolites are associated with these sea grass fossils and are suggestive of the modern sea grass communities of sub-tropical areas. While earlier records were of relatively isolated sea grasses, in September/October 2015 surfaces with abundant sea grasses were found that are suggestive of complete 'meadows'. Preservation of some silicified rhizomes indicates that silicification must have been very rapid, before any degradation or compaction of the delicate tissues. The presence of sea grass fossils and their associated benthic foraminifera is indicative of a clear, shallow-water seaway, with a maximum depth of 15-20 m. The reported variations in sea level during the latest Cretaceous cannot, therefore, have been very

  19. Restore McComas Meadows; Meadow Creek Watershed, 2005-2006 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McRoberts, Heidi (Nez Perce Tribe, Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Lapwai, ID)

    2006-07-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe Department of Fisheries Resource Management, Watershed Division approaches watershed restoration with a ridge-top to ridge-top approach. Watershed restoration projects within the Meadow Creek watershed are coordinated and cost shared with the Nez Perce National Forest. The Nez Perce Tribe began watershed restoration projects within the Meadow Creek watershed of the South Fork Clearwater River in 1996. Progress has been made in restoring the watershed by excluding cattle from critical riparian areas through fencing, planting trees in riparian areas within the meadow and its tributaries, prioritizing culverts for replacement to accommodate fish passage, and decommissioning roads to reduce sediment input. During this contract period work was completed on two culvert replacement projects; Doe Creek and a tributary to Meadow Creek. Additionally construction was also completed for the ditch restoration project within McComas Meadows. Monitoring for project effectiveness and trends in watershed conditions was also completed. Road decommissioning monitoring, as well as stream temperature, sediment, and discharge were completed.

  20. Relations between Carbon Dioxide Fluxes and Environmental Factors of Kobresia humilis Meadows and Potentilla fruticosa Meadows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Liang; XU Shixiao; LI Yingnian; TANG Yanbong; ZHAO Xinquan; GU Song; DU Mingyuan; YU Guirui

    2007-01-01

    Carbon dioxide fluxes of Kobresia humilis and Potentillafruticosa shrub meadows,two typical ecosystems in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau,were measured by eddy covariance technology and the data collected in August 2003 were employed to analyze the relations between carbon dioxide fluxes and environmental factors of the ecosystems.August is the time when the two ecosystems reach their peak leaf area indexes and stay stable,and also the period when the net carbon absorptions of Kobresia humilis and Potentilla photo flux densities (PPFD),the carbon dioxide-uptake rate of the Kobresia humilis meadow is higher than that of the Potentilla fruticosa shrub meadow;where the PPFD are rates of the two ecosystems declined as air temperature increased,but the carbon dioxide uptake rate of the Kobresia humilis meadow decreased more quickly (-0.086) than that of the Potentilla fruticosa shrub meadow (-0.016).Soil moistures exert influence on the soil respirations and this varies with the vegetation type.The daily carbon dioxide absorptions of the ecosystems increase with increased diurnal temperature differences and higher diurnal temperature differences result in higher carbon dioxide exchanges.There exists a negative correlation between the vegetation albedos and the carbon dioxide fluxes.

  1. Preliminary analysis of productivity of fruiting fungi on Strzeleckie meadows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Sadowska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Analysis demonstrated that the fresh ahd dry weight as well as the ash content of fungal fruit bodies collected on a forest-surrounded unmown meadow (Stellario-Deschampsietum Freitag 1957 and Caricetum elatae W.Koch 1926 were lower than the same values for a plot of exploited mown meadow and higher than on an exploited unmown meadow (Arrhenatheretum medioeuropaeum (Br.-Bl. Oberd. 1952.

  2. Stability of alpine meadow ecosystem on the Qinghai- Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Huakun; ZHOU Li; ZHAO Xinquan; LIU Wei; LI Yingnian; GU Song; ZHOU Xinmin

    2006-01-01

    The meadow ecosystem on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau is considered to be sensitive to climate change. An understanding of the alpine meadow ecosystem is therefore important for predicting the response of ecosystems to climate change. In this study, we use the coefficients of variation (Cv) and stability (E) obtained from the Haibei Alpine Meadow Ecosystem Research Station to characterize the ecosystem stability. The results suggest that the net primary production of the alpine meadow ecosystem was more stable (Cv = 13.18%) than annual precipitation (Cv = 16.55%) and annual mean air temperature (Cv = 28.82%). The net primary production was insensitive to either the precipitation (E = 0.0782) or air temperature (E = 0.1113). In summary, the alpine meadow ecosystem on the Qinghai- Tibetan Plateau is much stable. Comparison of alpine meadow ecosystem stability with other five natural grassland ecosystems in Israel and southern African indicates that the alpine meadow ecosystem on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau is the most stable ecosystem. The alpine meadow ecosystem with relatively simple structure has high stability, which indicates that community stability is not only correlated with biodiversity and community complicity but also with environmental stability. An average oscillation cycles of 3―4 years existed in annual precipitation, annual mean air temperature, net primary production and the population size of consumers at the Haibei natural ecosystem. The high stability of the alpine meadow ecosystem may be resulting also from the adaptation of the ecosystem to the alpine environment.

  3. Responses of community-level plant-insect interactions to climate warming in a meadow steppe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hui; Zou, Xuehui; Wang, Deli; Wan, Shiqiang; Wang, Ling; Guo, Jixun

    2015-12-21

    Climate warming may disrupt trophic interactions, consequently influencing ecosystem functioning. Most studies have concentrated on the temperature-effects on plant-insect interactions at individual and population levels, with a particular emphasis on changes in phenology and distribution. Nevertheless, the available evidence from the community level is limited. A 3-year field manipulative experiment was performed to test potential responses of plant and insect communities, and plant-insect interactions, to elevated temperature in a meadow steppe. Warming increased the biomass of plant community and forbs, and decreased grass biomass, indicating a shift from grass-dominant to grass-forb mixed plant community. Reduced abundance of the insect community under warming, particularly the herbivorous insects, was attributed to lower abundance of Euchorthippus unicolor and a Cicadellidae species resulting from lower food availability and higher defensive herbivory. Lower herbivore abundance caused lower predator species richness because of reduced prey resources and contributed to an overall decrease in insect species richness. Interestingly, warming enhanced the positive relationship between insect and plant species richness, implying that the strength of the plant-insect interactions was altered by warming. Our results suggest that alterations to plant-insect interactions at a community level under climate warming in grasslands may be more important and complex than previously thought.

  4. Responses of community-level plant-insect interactions to climate warming in a meadow steppe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hui; Zou, Xuehui; Wang, Deli; Wan, Shiqiang; Wang, Ling; Guo, Jixun

    2015-01-01

    Climate warming may disrupt trophic interactions, consequently influencing ecosystem functioning. Most studies have concentrated on the temperature-effects on plant-insect interactions at individual and population levels, with a particular emphasis on changes in phenology and distribution. Nevertheless, the available evidence from the community level is limited. A 3-year field manipulative experiment was performed to test potential responses of plant and insect communities, and plant-insect interactions, to elevated temperature in a meadow steppe. Warming increased the biomass of plant community and forbs, and decreased grass biomass, indicating a shift from grass-dominant to grass-forb mixed plant community. Reduced abundance of the insect community under warming, particularly the herbivorous insects, was attributed to lower abundance of Euchorthippus unicolor and a Cicadellidae species resulting from lower food availability and higher defensive herbivory. Lower herbivore abundance caused lower predator species richness because of reduced prey resources and contributed to an overall decrease in insect species richness. Interestingly, warming enhanced the positive relationship between insect and plant species richness, implying that the strength of the plant-insect interactions was altered by warming. Our results suggest that alterations to plant-insect interactions at a community level under climate warming in grasslands may be more important and complex than previously thought. PMID:26686758

  5. Quantifying Volume of Groundwater in High Elevation Meadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciruzzi, D.; Lowry, C.

    2013-12-01

    Assessing the current and future water needs of high elevation meadows is dependent on quantifying the volume of groundwater stored within the meadow sediment. As groundwater dependent ecosystems, these meadows rely on their ability to capture and store water in order to support ecologic function and base flow to streams. Previous research of these meadows simplified storage by assuming a homogenous reservoir of constant thickness. These previous storage models were able to close the water mass balance, but it is unclear if these assumptions will be successful under future anthropogenic impacts, such as increased air temperature resulting in dryer and longer growing seasons. Applying a geophysical approach, ground-penetrating radar was used at Tuolumne Meadows, CA to qualitatively and quantitatively identify the controls on volume of groundwater storage. From the geophysical results, a three-dimensional model of Tuolumne Meadows was created, which identified meadow thickness and bedrock geometry. This physical model was used in a suite of numerical models simulating high elevation meadows in order to quantify volume of groundwater stored with temporal and spatial variability. Modeling efforts tested both wet and dry water years in order to quantify the variability in the volume of groundwater storage for a range of aquifer properties. Each model was evaluated based on the seasonal depth to water in order to evaluate a particular scenario's ability to support ecological function and base flow. Depending on the simulated meadows ability or inability to support its ecosystem, each representative meadow was categorized as successful or unsuccessful. Restoration techniques to increase active storage volume were suggested at unsuccessful meadows.

  6. Atlantis Star – a new herbicide in cereals with efficacy against grasses and dicots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerlen, Dirk

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Atlantis Star (mesosulfuron-methyl; iodosulfuron-methyl-sodium; thiencarbazone-methyl; mefenpyr-diethyl is a new cereal herbicide to control blackgrass (Alopecurus myosuroides; sensitive and high infestation, brome grass (Bromus spec., ryegrass (Lolium spec., wild oat (Avena fatua, loose silky-bentgrass (Apera spica-venti L., annual meadow-grass (Poa annua L. and dicot weeds. Atlantis Star can be used in winter wheat, winter triticale, winter rye, winter durum wheat and spelt. The publication is based on efficacy trials from two years of spring application with Atlantis Star.

  7. Meadow contraction and extinction debt in meadow plants and moths in the Western Cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows in the western Cascades have contracted and fragmented by approximately 50% in the past 60 years. These habitats occupy only about 5% of the landscape of the western Cascades but are important for the preservation of biodiversity and rare species. This habitat loss and ...

  8. In situ spectral reflectance studies of tidal wetland grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, D. S.; Klemas, V.

    1981-01-01

    Field measurements of wetland spectral canopy reflectance in the Landsat-MSS wavebands were correlated with biotic factors. The highest single band correlations were observed between visible (MSS Band 4: 0.5 to 0.6 micron and Band 5: 0.6 to 0.7 micron) canopy reflectance and the percentage, by weight, of live (green) vegetation in the canopies of Spartina alterniflora (salt marsh cordgrass), Spartina patens (salt meadow grass), and Distichlis spicata (spike grass). Infrared canopy reflectance displayed significant but weaker dependence on canopy parameters such as live and total biomass and canopy height. The Band 7 (0.8 to 1.1 microns)/Band 5 (0.6 to 0.7 micron) reflectance ratio was found to be highly correlated with green biomass for S. alterniflora. Highest spectral separability between the 'low marsh' S. alterniflora and the 'high marsh' Salt Hay (S. patens and D. spicata) communities in Delaware occurs during December.

  9. Cosc's Head (Onobrychis viciifolia Scop. Site Properties on Mountain and Lowland Meadows and Their Agricultural Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ivanek

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available In the Kalnik piedmont region parallel researches of cock ' s head Onobrychis viciifolia Scop. site soil properties and lawn botanical composition were performed on 2 locations in mountain association Bromo-Plantaginetum mediae and 6 locations in lowland meadow in association Arrhenatheretum elatioris. Some physical and chemical soil properties on each location were determined at the soil depths 0-15, 18-22 and 25-30 cm with usual methods. Botanical composition of lawn was determined by the method Klapp et al. modified by Šoštarić-Pisačić and Kovačević. It was determined that Cock's head sites in association Arrhenatheretum elatioris give significantly higher hay yields than Cock's head sites in association Bromo-Plantaginetum mediae. Hay quality in both associations is good. On the researched locations soil property differences among locations were determined. Correlations and regressions between single soil properties and Cock's head percentage in botanical composition of meadow associations were determined, with the help of computer. From correlations and regressions it is visible that with increase of soil supply with physiological active phosphorus, with decrease of clay soil particles < 0.002 mm and with increase of soil particles 2 - 0.2 mm increases percentage of Cock's head (Onobrychis viciifolia in botanical composition of meadow associations. On the same sites correlation between soil reaction (pH and soil supply with physiological active magnesium (Mg, and manganese (Mn respectively were determined. Plain Cock's head (Onobrychis viciifolia Scop. sites in associations Arrhenatheretum elatioris on the alluvial carbonate ground can provide convenient conditions for all arable plants in particular for clovers-grasses mixtures based on Cock s head (Onobrychis sativa or alfalfa (Medicago sativa.

  10. Posidonia oceanica L. (Delile) Meadow from Messioua

    OpenAIRE

    Sammari, Ch.; Hattour, A.; Komatsu, T; Zarrouk, S; Ben Mustapha, K.; El Abed, A.

    2002-01-01

    In order to study the benthic ecology of the “Messioua banc” (30 NM east off Zarzis, Southern Tunisia), a traditional Tunisian sponge fishing ground, four marine campaigns were conducted with the R/V “Hannibal” from October 2000 to August 2001. The objectives of three of these campaigns were field validation, focusing on the sampling of the Posidonia oceanica meadow and of the sponge population. However the goal of the fourth one, with the use of a multi-beam sonar SEABAT 9001 (Reson Co.), wa...

  11. Transcriptome sequencing identifies novel persistent viruses in herbicide resistant wild-grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbadin, Federico; Glover, Rachel; Stafford, Rebecca; Rozado-Aguirre, Zuriñe; Boonham, Neil; Adams, Ian; Mumford, Rick; Edwards, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Herbicide resistance in wild grasses is widespread in the UK, with non-target site resistance (NTSR) to multiple chemistries being particularly problematic in weed control. As a complex trait, NTSR is driven by complex evolutionary pressures and the growing awareness of the role of the phytobiome in plant abiotic stress tolerance, led us to sequence the transcriptomes of herbicide resistant and susceptible populations of black-grass and annual rye-grass for the presence of endophytes. Black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides; Am) populations, displaying no overt disease symptoms, contained three previously undescribed viruses belonging to the Partititiviridae (AMPV1 and AMPV2) and Rhabdoviridae (AMVV1) families. These infections were widespread in UK black-grass populations and evidence was obtained for similar viruses being present in annual rye grass (Lolium rigidum), perennial rye-grass (Lolium perenne) and meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis). In black-grass, while no direct causative link was established linking viral infection to herbicide resistance, transcriptome sequencing showed a high incidence of infection in the NTSR Peldon population. The widespread infection of these weeds by little characterised and persistent viruses and their potential evolutionary role in enhancing plant stress tolerance mechanisms including NTSR warrants further investigation. PMID:28165016

  12. Transcriptome sequencing identifies novel persistent viruses in herbicide resistant wild-grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbadin, Federico; Glover, Rachel; Stafford, Rebecca; Rozado-Aguirre, Zuriñe; Boonham, Neil; Adams, Ian; Mumford, Rick; Edwards, Robert

    2017-02-06

    Herbicide resistance in wild grasses is widespread in the UK, with non-target site resistance (NTSR) to multiple chemistries being particularly problematic in weed control. As a complex trait, NTSR is driven by complex evolutionary pressures and the growing awareness of the role of the phytobiome in plant abiotic stress tolerance, led us to sequence the transcriptomes of herbicide resistant and susceptible populations of black-grass and annual rye-grass for the presence of endophytes. Black-grass (Alopecurus myosuroides; Am) populations, displaying no overt disease symptoms, contained three previously undescribed viruses belonging to the Partititiviridae (AMPV1 and AMPV2) and Rhabdoviridae (AMVV1) families. These infections were widespread in UK black-grass populations and evidence was obtained for similar viruses being present in annual rye grass (Lolium rigidum), perennial rye-grass (Lolium perenne) and meadow fescue (Festuca pratensis). In black-grass, while no direct causative link was established linking viral infection to herbicide resistance, transcriptome sequencing showed a high incidence of infection in the NTSR Peldon population. The widespread infection of these weeds by little characterised and persistent viruses and their potential evolutionary role in enhancing plant stress tolerance mechanisms including NTSR warrants further investigation.

  13. Division by zero in non-involutive meadows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergstra, J.A.; Middelburg, C.A.

    2015-01-01

    Meadows have been proposed as alternatives for fields with a purely equational axiomatization. At the basis of meadows lies the decision to make the multiplicative inverse operation total by imposing that the multiplicative inverse of zero is zero. Thus, the multiplicative inverse operation of a mea

  14. Taxonomic and functional ecology of montane ants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Rhys Bishop

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Why is biological diversity distributed in the way that it is? This question has been central to ecology and biogeography for centuries and is of great importance for pure and applied reasons. I use a functional trait view of ecology to complement standard sampling protocols to better understand the distribution and structure of ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae diversity across mountains. I use a long-term dataset of ant diversity and abundance, combined with a recently collected morphological trait dataset to examine how the alpha and beta diversity of ants responds to changes in temperature along an extensive elevational gradient in southern Africa. In addition, I link morphological thermoregulatory traits to each other and to the environment with a new database of ant elevational abundances from across the globe. Finally, I analyse how physiological thermal tolerances vary and constrain foraging patterns in montane ants. I find that temperature is a strong driver of both alpha and beta diversity patterns. In addition, morphological traits such as colour and body size are found to have a significant relationship to ambient temperatures. This relationship also implies that the relative abundances of different ant species change depending on their thermoregulatory traits (colour and body size and the surrounding thermal environment. Furthermore, the critical thermal minimum (CTmin of the ant species investigated and the lowest environmental temperatures are found to be key in constraining foraging activity patterns. The data presented here strengthen and link existing ideas about how thermoregulation can influence ecological communities and also suggests important ways in which diversity patterns may change in the future.

  15. Bacterial diversity of siliciclastic sediments in a Thalassia testudinum meadow and the implications for Lucinisca nassula chemosymbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green-García, Angela M.; Engel, Annette Summers

    2012-10-01

    Despite the ecological and economic importance of Thalassia testudinum (turtle grass) meadows along the Caribbean and Gulf of Mexico coasts, and recognition that microbial activities are critical to plant growth and health, the bacterial diversity of these habitats has been poorly studied. Based on comparative analyses of 16S rRNA gene sequences from sediments in a T. testudinum meadow, 25 major taxonomic groups (excluding candidate divisions) were retrieved, including Alpha- Delta-, and Gamma-proteobacteria, Chloroflexi, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria, Spirochaetes, and Firmicutes. The distribution of bacterial groups was linked to a strongly hypoxic and sulfidic redox gradient. The diversity is potentially novel because phylogenetic affinities of sediment sequences compared to contextually annotated environmental clones from different habitats or to cultured representatives indicated approximately 41% were more closely related to each other than to sequences retrieved from these other habitats. Of all the relationships, very few (2.4%) were to cultured organisms, but 27% were to environmental clones retrieved from shallow marine shelf and coastal sediments or from mangroves, estuarine, or wetland sediments. Rare sequences were closely related to endosymbiont groups of Lucinisca nassula (Lucinidea: Bivalvia) hosts collected from the same meadow, which may indicate that the sediment is a potential reservoir for free-living symbionts. This study provides insight into the ecological and evolutionary relationships of the Thalassia-lucinid-bacteria system in tropical to sub-tropical regions.

  16. Pests in ornamental grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornamental perennial grasses are becoming increasingly popular in the landscape due to their beauty and ease of care. Although few pest problems are encountered in ornamental grasses, they are not immune to insects and disease. Two lined spittlebugs (Prosapia bicincta) can cause damage to ornament...

  17. Herbicidal Control of Grasses

    OpenAIRE

    Om Prakash; Srinivasan Ramanujam

    1980-01-01

    Necessity of the herbicidal application for controlling undesirable grasses, by the Defence Services, Military farms and Inter Service Organisations is highlighted. Control of grasses by herbicidal chemicals, registered under the Insecticides Act 1968 in this country, is reviewed apart from a mention of non-chemical methods.

  18. Modelling grass digestibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groot, J.C.J.

    1999-01-01

    Grass digestibility is determined by the rate of plant development, mass of plant organs (leaf blades, leaf sheaths and stem internodes) and composition of organs. The development of an integrating model for grass digestibility necessitates the quantification of developmental characteristics of plan

  19. Nine thousand years of upper montane soil/vegetation dynamics from the summit of Caratuva Peak, Southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Maurício B.; Pereira, Nuno Veríssimo; Behling, Hermann; Curcio, Gustavo R.; Roderjan, Carlos V.

    2014-12-01

    Biodiversity loss, climate change, and increased freshwater consumption are some of the main environmental problems on Earth. Mountain ecosystems can reduce these threats by providing several positive influences, such as the maintenance of biodiversity, water regulation, and carbon storage, amongst others. The knowledge of the history of these environments and their response to climate change is very important for management, conservation, and environmental monitoring programs. The genesis of the soil organic matter of the current upper montane vegetation remains unclear and seems to be quite variable depending on location. Some upper montane sites in the very extensive coastal Sea Mountain Range present considerable organic matter from the late Pleistocene and other from only the Holocene. Our study was carried out on three soil profiles (two cores in grassland and one in forest) on the Caratuva Peak of the Serra do Ibitiraquire (a sub-range of Sea Mountain Range - Serra do Mar) in Southern Brazil. The δ13C isotopic analyses of organic matter in soil horizons were conducted to detect whether C3 or C4 plants dominated the past communities. Complementarily, we performed a pollen analysis and 14C dating of the humin fraction to obtain the age of the studied horizons. Except for a short and probably drier period (between 6000 and 4500 cal yr BP), C3 plants, including ombrophilous grasses and trees, have dominated the highlands of the Caratuva Peak (Pico Caratuva), as well as the other uppermost summits of the Serra do Ibitiraquire, since around 9000 cal yr BP. The Caratuva region represents a landscape of high altitude grasslands (campos de altitude altomontanos or campos altomontanos) and upper montane rain/cloud forests with soils that most likely contain some organic matter from the late Pleistocene, as has been reported in Southern and Southeastern Brazil for other sites. However, our results indicate that the studied deposits (near the summit) are from the early

  20. Historical Meadow Dynamics in Southwest British Columbia: a Multidisciplinary Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Lepofsky

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent encroachment of woody species threatening many western North American meadows has been attributed to diverse factors. We used a suite of methods in Chittenden Meadow, southwestern British Columbia, Canada, to identify the human, ecological, and physical factors responsible for its historical dynamics and current encroachment by woody vegetation. We evaluated three hypotheses about the origin and processes maintaining the meadow: the meadow is (1 of recent human origin; (2 of ancient human origin, maintained by aboriginal burning; and (3 of ancient non-human origin, not maintained by aboriginal burning. Our data supported the idea that the meadow had ancient non-human origins and its recent history and current status have resulted from complex interactions among landform, climate, and fire. Soil properties (both horizonation and charcoal content indicate that the meadow is of ancient, non-human origin. Tree ages in the meadow and surrounding forest indicate that encroachment is recent, not related to a variety of recent human activities, and is probably a result of increasing spring temperature and decreasing spring snow depth. Although ethnographic surveys and historical documents revealed indigenous use of the general area over millennia, including the use of fire as a management tool, we found little direct evidence of indigenous use of the meadow. However, there was no proxy record of fire frequency in the meadow that we could have used to determine the role of fire in maintaining the meadow in the past, or the role of humans in igniting those fires. Thus, the historical role of humans in the maintenance of the meadow by prescribed fire remains indeterminate. Based on these conclusions, we combined hypotheses (2 and (3 into an a posteriori hypothesis that reflects changing interactions among people, fire, and climate over time. Without management intervention, we expect that tree encroachment will continue. Several general lessons

  1. Montane and cloud forest specialists among neotropical Xylaria species

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Jean Lodge; Thomas L& #230; ss& #248; e; M. Catherine Aime; Terry W. Henkel; M. Catherine Aime; Terry W. Henkel

    2008-01-01

    We compared recored of neotropical Xylaria species among Belize, Ecuador, the Guianas, Mexico, Puerto Rico and Venezuela to determine if there were neotropical taxa consistently found only in cloud forest or high montane forests that might be endangered by climate change.

  2. Evaluation of management practices in wetland meadows at Grays Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Idaho, 1997-2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, J.E.; Pyle, W.H.; Keough, J.R.; Johnson, D.H.

    2002-01-01

    experimental units, the most common were American coot, sandhill crane, Canada goose, American avocet, mallard, and cinnamon teal. Daily survival rates (DSRs) of dabbling duck nests (all species pooled) were negatively affected by fall grazing. We detected no effects of treatments on DSRs of Canada geese or sandhill crane nests. DSRs for sandhill crane nests were higher in 1998 than in 1999 or 2000 and were slightly higher than that in 1997. DSRs for coot nests were affected by both year and treatment; within-treatment differences among years were extensive, In 1998, when all units were idled, DSRs for coot nests were higher in units assigned to idle treatment than those assigned to fall-grazed or rotation treatment. DSRs for coot nests did not differ among treatment blocks in 1997 (all units idled) or 1999 (first year after treatments). We speculate that compaction of residual vegetation by snowpack reduced any differences between idle and treated units and thus lessened the value of idle habitat for most nesting birds. Nesting densities and nest success rates of Canada geese, dabbling ducks, and sandhill cranes were lower those that reported from Steel's (1952) study in 1949-1950, but differences in habitats and areas searched relative to our study make comparisons difficult. Nest success rates of sandhill cranes also were lower than those reported by Drewien (1973). Declines in nest success probably are related to changes in predator community. We captured 5 species of small mammals (meadow vole, montane vole, deer mouse, vagrant shrew, and ermine). Populations of meadow and montane voles irrupted in 1998 then crashed in spring 1999; the most marked changes were in montane vole numbers. Capture rates of ermine and observation rates for striped skunks and raptors suggested a numerical response (higher recruitment) by these predators to higher prey abundance and possibly distributional shifts (movement into areas of more abundant microtines). We did not detect differences

  3. Projecting the Hydrologic Impacts of Climate Change on Montane Wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Se-Yeun; Ryan, Maureen E; Hamlet, Alan F; Palen, Wendy J; Lawler, Joshua J; Halabisky, Meghan

    2015-01-01

    Wetlands are globally important ecosystems that provide critical services for natural communities and human society. Montane wetland ecosystems are expected to be among the most sensitive to changing climate, as their persistence depends on factors directly influenced by climate (e.g. precipitation, snowpack, evaporation). Despite their importance and climate sensitivity, wetlands tend to be understudied due to a lack of tools and data relative to what is available for other ecosystem types. Here, we develop and demonstrate a new method for projecting climate-induced hydrologic changes in montane wetlands. Using observed wetland water levels and soil moisture simulated by the physically based Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) hydrologic model, we developed site-specific regression models relating soil moisture to observed wetland water levels to simulate the hydrologic behavior of four types of montane wetlands (ephemeral, intermediate, perennial, permanent wetlands) in the U. S. Pacific Northwest. The hybrid models captured observed wetland dynamics in many cases, though were less robust in others. We then used these models to a) hindcast historical wetland behavior in response to observed climate variability (1916-2010 or later) and classify wetland types, and b) project the impacts of climate change on montane wetlands using global climate model scenarios for the 2040s and 2080s (A1B emissions scenario). These future projections show that climate-induced changes to key driving variables (reduced snowpack, higher evapotranspiration, extended summer drought) will result in earlier and faster drawdown in Pacific Northwest montane wetlands, leading to systematic reductions in water levels, shortened wetland hydroperiods, and increased probability of drying. Intermediate hydroperiod wetlands are projected to experience the greatest changes. For the 2080s scenario, widespread conversion of intermediate wetlands to fast-drying ephemeral wetlands will likely reduce

  4. Microhabitat differences impact phylogeographic concordance of codistributed species: genomic evidence in montane sedges (Carex L.) from the Rocky Mountains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massatti, Rob; Knowles, L Lacey

    2014-10-01

    By selecting codistributed, closely related montane sedges from the Rocky Mountains that are similar in virtually all respects but one-their microhabitat affinities-we test predictions about how patterns of genetic variation are expected to differ between Carex nova, an inhabitant of wetlands, and Carex chalciolepis, an inhabitant of drier meadows, slopes, and ridges. Although contemporary populations of the taxa are similarly isolated, the distribution of glacial moraines suggests that their past population connectedness would have differed. Sampling of codistributed population pairs from different mountain ranges combined with the resolution provided by over 24,000 single nucleotide polymorphism loci supports microhabitat-mediated differences in the sedges' patterns of genetic variation that are consistent with their predicted differences in the degree of isolation of ancestral source populations. Our results highlight how microhabitat preferences may interact with glaciations to produce fundamental differences in the past distributions of presently codistributed species. We discuss the implications of these findings for generalizing the impacts of climate-induced distributional shifts for communities, as well as for the prospects of gaining insights about species-specific deterministic processes, not just deterministic community-level responses, from comparative phylogeographic study.

  5. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative Report : January - Decemeber 1974

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Great Meadows NWR and satellite refuges outlines refuge accomplishments during the 1974 calendar year. The report begins by...

  6. Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1969 : Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1969 calendar year. The report begins by...

  7. Narrative Report : Fiscal Year 1975 : Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Great Meadows NWR and satellite refuges outlines refuge accomplishments during the 1975 fiscal year. The report begins by...

  8. Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge : A plan for the future

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The management plan is to maintain Ash Meadows Refuge as a natural ecosystem. To accomplish this, the area will be restored as much as possible to conditions which...

  9. Crane Meadows National Wildlife Refuge: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Crane Meadows NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and...

  10. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge: Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Great Meadows NWR for the next 15 years. This plan outlines the Refuge vision and...

  11. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Monthly Narrative: February 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments February 1993. The report begins with a summary of the...

  12. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Monthly Narrative: March 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during March 1993. The report begins with a summary of the...

  13. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Monthly Narrative: August 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during August 1993. The report begins with a summary of the...

  14. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Monthly Narrative: January 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during January 1993. The report begins with a summary of the...

  15. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Monthly Narrative: April 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during April 1993. The report begins with a summary of the...

  16. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Monthly Narrative: June 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during June 1993. The report begins with a summary of the...

  17. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Monthly Narrative: September 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during September 1993. The report begins with a summary of...

  18. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Monthly Narrative: July 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during July 1993. The report begins with a summary of the...

  19. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Cpmplex: Monthly Narrative February

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This monthly narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Complex outlines Refuge accomplishments during February 1998. The report begins with a...

  20. Experimental infection of meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) with sheep scrapie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, CM; Schneider, Jay R.; Pedersen, Janice C.; Heisey, Dennis M.; Johnson, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) are permissive to chronic wasting disease (CWD) infection, but their susceptibility to other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) is poorly characterized. In this initial study, we intracerebrally challenged 6 meadow voles with 2 isolates of sheep scrapie. Three meadow voles acquired a TSE after the scrapie challenge and an extended incubation period. The glycoform profile of proteinase K-resistant prion protein (PrP(res)) in scrapie-sick voles remained similar to the sheep inocula, but differed from that of voles clinically affected by CWD. Vacuolization patterns and disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) deposition were generally similar in all scrapie-affected voles, except in the hippocampus, where PrP(Sc) staining varied markedly among the animals. Our results demonstrate that meadow voles can acquire a TSE after intracerebral scrapie challenge and that this species could therefore prove useful for characterizing scrapie isolates.

  1. Experimental infection of meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) with sheep scrapie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Christina M; Schneider, Jay R; Pedersen, Joel A; Heisey, Dennis M; Johnson, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) are permissive to chronic wasting disease (CWD) infection, but their susceptibility to other transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) is poorly characterized. In this initial study, we intracerebrally challenged 6 meadow voles with 2 isolates of sheep scrapie. Three meadow voles acquired a TSE after the scrapie challenge and an extended incubation period. The glycoform profile of proteinase K-resistant prion protein (PrP(res)) in scrapie-sick voles remained similar to the sheep inocula, but differed from that of voles clinically affected by CWD. Vacuolization patterns and disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) deposition were generally similar in all scrapie-affected voles, except in the hippocampus, where PrP(Sc) staining varied markedly among the animals. Our results demonstrate that meadow voles can acquire a TSE after intracerebral scrapie challenge and that this species could therefore prove useful for characterizing scrapie isolates.

  2. Narrative Report : Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge : May - August 1959

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1959. The report begins by summarizing...

  3. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Complex: Monthly Narrative January

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This monthly narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Complex outlines Refuge accomplishments during January 1998. The report begins with a...

  4. The Trail Inventory of Ash Meadows NWR [Cycle 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  5. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative Report : May - August 1963

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1963. The report begins by summarizing...

  6. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative Report : May - August 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from May through August of 1962. The report begins by summarizing...

  7. Narrative Report : Calendar Year 1968 : Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1968 calendar year. The report begins by...

  8. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (Sudbury Division) [Land Status Map

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial...

  9. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Monthly Narrative: May 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during May 1993. The report begins with a summary of the...

  10. Ash Meadows Pupfish Preserve: A proposal from The Nature Conservancy

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The Ash Meadows region of southwest Nevada has evolved since the last period of glaciation into a unique alkali desert ecosystem. The remnant springs, pools and...

  11. BIOGEOGRAPHICAL IMPLICATIONS OF SOME PLANT SPECIES FROM A TROPICAL MONTANE RAIN FOREST IN SOUTHERN YUNNAN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Hua

    2004-01-01

    A pristine montane rain forest was recently discovered from Mengsong of Xishuangbanna in the southern Yunnan.It attracts botanists that many primitive plant taxa across various life forms were co-existed in the montane rain forest.In order to know the biogeography of the montane rain forest,distribution patterns of some species of biogeographical importance from the montane forest were enumerated and their biogeographical implications were discussed with geological explanation.It was concluded that the montane rain forest in the southern Yunnan has strong affinity to montane rain forests in Sumatra or Southeast Asia in broad sense.It was tentatively suggested that Sumatra could be once connected to Myanmar and drifted away due to northward movement of continental Asia by bumping of India plate.

  12. Key biogeochemical factors affecting soil carbon storage in Posidonia meadows

    KAUST Repository

    Serrano, Oscar

    2016-08-15

    Biotic and abiotic factors influence the accumulation of organic carbon (C-org) in seagrass ecosystems. We surveyed Posidonia sinuosa meadows growing in different water depths to assess the variability in the sources, stocks and accumulation rates of Corg. We show that over the last 500 years, P. sinuosa meadows closer to the upper limit of distribution (at 2-4 m depth) accumulated 3- to 4-fold higher C-org stocks (averaging 6.3 kg C-org m(-2) at 3- to 4-fold higher rates (12.8 gC(org) m(-2) yr(-1) ) compared to meadows closer to the deep limits of distribution (at 6-8 m depth; 1.8 kg C-org m(-2) and 3.6 g C-org m(-2) yr(-1) . In shallower meadows, C-org stocks were mostly derived from seagrass detritus (88% in average) compared to meadows closer to the deep limit of distribution (45% on average). In addition, soil accumulation rates and fine-grained sediment content (< 0.125 mm) in shallower meadows (2.0 mm yr(-1) and 9 %, respectively) were approximately 2-fold higher than in deeper meadows (1.2 mm yr(-1) and 5 %, respectively). The C-org stocks and accumulation rates accumulated over the last 500 years in bare sediments (0.6 kg C-org m(-2) and 1.2 g C-org m(-2) yr(-1)were 3- to 11-fold lower than in P. sinuosa meadows, while fine-grained sediment content (1 %) and seagrass detritus contribution to the Corg pool (20 %) were 8- and 3-fold lower than in Posidonia meadows, respectively. The patterns found support the hypothesis that Corg storage in seagrass soils is influenced by interactions of biological (e.g., meadow productivity, cover and density), chemical (e.g., recalcitrance of Corg stocks) and physical (e.g., hydrodynamic energy and soil accumulation rates) factors within the meadow. We conclude that there is a need to improve global estimates of seagrass carbon storage accounting for biogeochemical factors driving variability within habitats.

  13. Unveiling the Hidden Bat Diversity of a Neotropical Montane Forest

    OpenAIRE

    Chaverri, Gloriana; Garin, Inazio; Alberdi, Antton; Jimenez, Lide; Castillo-Salazar, Cristian; Aihartza, Joxerra

    2016-01-01

    Mountain environments, characterized by high levels of endemism, are at risk of experiencing significant biodiversity loss due to current trends in global warming. While many acknowledge their importance and vulnerability, these ecosystems still remain poorly studied, particularly for taxa that are difficult to sample such as bats. Aiming to estimate the amount of cryptic diversity among bats of a Neotropical montane cloud forest in Talamanca Range—south-east Central America—, we performed a ...

  14. Birds, Montane forest, State of Rio de Janeiro, Southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foster, A.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Field surveys in montane Atlantic forest of Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil, provided a list of 82 bird species in four sitesvisited. Our protocol relied on standardized use of mist nets and observations. The birds recorded include 40 Atlanticforest endemics, three globally and two nationally Vulnerable species, and two regionally Endangered species. Data onspecies elevation are included and discussed. This work enhances baseline knowledge of these species to assist futurestudies in these poorly understood, but biologically important areas.

  15. Photosynthetic activity buffers ocean acidification in seagrass meadows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. E. Hendriks

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Macrophytes growing in shallow coastal zones characterized by intense metabolic activity have the capacity to modify pH within their canopy and beyond. We observed diel pH ranges is in shallow (5–12 m seagrass (Posidonia oceanica meadows from 0.06 pH units in September to 0.24 units in June. The carbonate system (pH, DIC, and aragonite saturation state (ΩAr and O2 within the meadows displayed strong diel variability driven by primary productivity, and changes in chemistry were related to structural parameters of the meadow, in particular, the leaf surface area available for photosynthesis (LAI. LAI was positively correlated to mean and max pHNBS and max ΩAr. Oxygen production positively influenced the range and maximum pHNBS and the range of ΩAr. In June, vertical mixing (as Turbulent Kinetic Energy influenced ΩAr, while in September there was no effect of hydrodynamics on the carbonate system within the canopy. ΩAr was positively correlated with the calcium carbonate load of the leaves, demonstrating a direct link between structural parameters, ΩAr and carbonate deposition. There was a direct relationship between ΩAr, influenced directly by meadow LAI, and CaCO3 content of the leaves. Therefore, calcifying organisms, e.g. epiphytes with carbonate skeletons, might benefit from the modification of the carbonate system by the meadow. The meadow might be capable of providing refugia for calcifiers by increasing pH and ΩAr through metabolic activity. There is, however, concern for the ability of seagrasses to provide this refugia function in the future. The predicted decline of seagrass meadows may alter the scope for alteration of pH within a seagrass meadow and in the water column above the meadow, particularly if shoot density and biomass decline, both strongly linked to LAI. Organisms associated with seagrass communities may therefore suffer from the loss of pH buffering capacity in degraded meadows.

  16. Nitrogen fixation in Red Sea seagrass meadows

    KAUST Repository

    Abdallah, Malak

    2017-05-01

    Seagrasses are key coastal ecosystems, providing many ecosystem services. Seagrasses increase biodiversity as they provide habitat for a large set of organisms. In addition, their structure provides hiding places to avoid predation. Seagrasses can grow in shallow marine coastal areas, but several factors regulate their growth and distribution. Seagrasses can uptake different kinds of organic and inorganic nutrients through their leaves and roots. Nitrogen and phosphorous are the most important nutrients for seagrass growth. Biological nitrogen fixation is the conversion of atmospheric nitrogen into ammonia by diazotrophic bacteria. This process provides a significant source of nitrogen for seagrass growth. The nitrogen fixation is controlled by the nif genes which are found in diazotrophs. The main goal of the project is to measure nitrogen fixation rates on seagrass sediments, in order to compare among various seagrass species from the Red Sea. Moreover, we will compare the fixing rates of the Vegetated areas with the bare sediments. This project will help to ascertain the role of nitrogen fixing bacteria in the development of seagrass meadows.

  17. Silicon, endophytes and secondary metabolites as grass defenses against mammalian herbivores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otso eHuitu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Grasses have been considered to primarily employ tolerance in lieu of defense in mitigating damage caused by herbivory. Yet a number of mechanisms have been identified in grasses, which may deter feeding by grazers. These include enhanced silicon uptake, hosting of toxin-producing endophytic fungi and induction of secondary metabolites. While these mechanisms have been individually studied, their synergistic responses to grazing, as well as their effects on grazers, are poorly known. A field experiment was carried out in 5 × 5 m outdoor enclosures to quantify phytochemical changes of either endophyte-infected (E+ or endophyte-free (E- meadow fescue (Schedonorus pratensis in response to medium intensity (corresponding with densities of ca. 1200 voles / ha for 5 weeks during 3 months or heavy intensity (ca. 1200 voles / ha for 8 weeks during 3 months grazing by a mammalian herbivore, the field vole (Microtus agrestis. A laboratory experiment was then conducted to evaluate the effects of endophyte infection status and grazing history of the grass diet on vole performance. As predicted, grazing increased foliar silicon content, by up to 13 %. Grazing also increased foliar levels of phosphorous and several phenolic compounds, most notably those of the flavonols isorhamnetin-diglycoside and rhamnetin derivative. Silicon concentrations were consistently circa 16 % higher in E+ grasses than in E-grasses, at all levels of grazing. Similarly, concentrations of chlorogenic acid derivative were found to be consistently higher in E+ than in E- grasses. Female voles maintained on heavily grazed grasses suffered higher mortality rates in the laboratory than female voles fed ungrazed grass, regardless of endophyte infection status. Our results conclusively demonstrate that, in addition to tolerance, grasses employ multi-tiered, effective defenses against mammalian grazers.

  18. Use of Grasses and Mixtures of Grasses for Energy Purposes

    OpenAIRE

    David Andert; Jan Frydrych; Ilona Gerndtová

    2012-01-01

    As levels of agricultural productivity increase, there is also an increase in land area not utilized for food production. This area can be used for growing energy crops, including grasses. When land is set aside for grassing, or when the potential of perennial grasses is not utilized due to reductions in cattle herds, there is also an increased amount of grass that can be utilized for energy purposes. Experiments were carried out on the principle of single-stage anaerobic digestion within the...

  19. Impact of mooring activities on carbon stocks in seagrass meadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, O.; Ruhon, R.; Lavery, P. S.; Kendrick, G. A.; Hickey, S.; Masqué, P.; Arias-Ortiz, A.; Steven, A.; Duarte, C. M.

    2016-03-01

    Boating activities are one of the causes that threaten seagrass meadows and the ecosystem services they provide. Mechanical destruction of seagrass habitats may also trigger the erosion of sedimentary organic carbon (Corg) stocks, which may contribute to increasing atmospheric CO2. This study presents the first estimates of loss of Corg stocks in seagrass meadows due to mooring activities in Rottnest Island, Western Australia. Sediment cores were sampled from seagrass meadows and from bare but previously vegetated sediments underneath moorings. The Corg stores have been compromised by the mooring deployment from 1930s onwards, which involved both the erosion of existing sedimentary Corg stores and the lack of further accumulation of Corg. On average, undisturbed meadows had accumulated ~6.4 Kg Corg m-2 in the upper 50 cm-thick deposits at a rate of 34 g Corg m-2 yr-1. The comparison of Corg stores between meadows and mooring scars allows us to estimate a loss of 4.8 kg Corg m-2 in the 50 cm-thick deposits accumulated over ca. 200 yr as a result of mooring deployments. These results provide key data for the implementation of Corg storage credit offset policies to avoid the conversion of seagrass ecosystems and contribute to their preservation.

  20. Impact of mooring activities on carbon stocks in seagrass meadows

    KAUST Repository

    Serrano, O.

    2016-03-16

    Boating activities are one of the causes that threaten seagrass meadows and the ecosystem services they provide. Mechanical destruction of seagrass habitats may also trigger the erosion of sedimentary organic carbon (Corg) stocks, which may contribute to increasing atmospheric CO2. This study presents the first estimates of loss of Corg stocks in seagrass meadows due to mooring activities in Rottnest Island, Western Australia. Sediment cores were sampled from seagrass meadows and from bare but previously vegetated sediments underneath moorings. The Corg stores have been compromised by the mooring deployment from 1930s onwards, which involved both the erosion of existing sedimentary Corg stores and the lack of further accumulation of Corg. On average, undisturbed meadows had accumulated ~6.4 Kg Corg m−2 in the upper 50 cm-thick deposits at a rate of 34 g Corg m−2 yr−1. The comparison of Corg stores between meadows and mooring scars allows us to estimate a loss of 4.8 kg Corg m−2 in the 50 cm-thick deposits accumulated over ca. 200 yr as a result of mooring deployments. These results provide key data for the implementation of Corg storage credit offset policies to avoid the conversion of seagrass ecosystems and contribute to their preservation.

  1. Impact of mooring activities on carbon stocks in seagrass meadows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, O; Ruhon, R; Lavery, P S; Kendrick, G A; Hickey, S; Masqué, P; Arias-Ortiz, A; Steven, A; Duarte, C M

    2016-03-16

    Boating activities are one of the causes that threaten seagrass meadows and the ecosystem services they provide. Mechanical destruction of seagrass habitats may also trigger the erosion of sedimentary organic carbon (Corg) stocks, which may contribute to increasing atmospheric CO2. This study presents the first estimates of loss of Corg stocks in seagrass meadows due to mooring activities in Rottnest Island, Western Australia. Sediment cores were sampled from seagrass meadows and from bare but previously vegetated sediments underneath moorings. The Corg stores have been compromised by the mooring deployment from 1930s onwards, which involved both the erosion of existing sedimentary Corg stores and the lack of further accumulation of Corg. On average, undisturbed meadows had accumulated ~6.4 Kg Corg m(-2) in the upper 50 cm-thick deposits at a rate of 34 g Corg m(-2) yr(-1). The comparison of Corg stores between meadows and mooring scars allows us to estimate a loss of 4.8 kg Corg m(-2) in the 50 cm-thick deposits accumulated over ca. 200 yr as a result of mooring deployments. These results provide key data for the implementation of Corg storage credit offset policies to avoid the conversion of seagrass ecosystems and contribute to their preservation.

  2. GUI development for GRASS GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Landa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses GUI development for GRASS GIS. Sophisticated native GUI for GRASS is one of the key points (besides the new 2D/3D raster library, vector architecture improvements, etc. for the future development of GRASS. In 2006 the GRASS development team decided to start working on the new generation of GUI instead of improving the current GUI based on Tcl/Tk.

  3. Subalpine meadow plant communities in Yosemite and Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks, 2011-2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This publication presents data collected within meadows from samples used to assess meadow plant community responses to recreational pack stock as part of a USGS...

  4. MINERAL HORIZONS, ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS AND CIRCULAR SHAPES IN THE GRASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentino Straser

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The occasional appearance of circular shapes in meadows and farmland located on slopes usually affected by gravitational phenomena, offered an occasion for verifying the possible relation between the position of the circles in the grass, the gravitational movement of the slope affecting its mineral horizons and the variations of electric and static magnetic fields close to the circular shapes and in the surrounding area. The stress caused by the “creeping” movement in the uderlying ground turned out to be in direct relation with the variation in the electric and magnetic fields caused by piezoelectric and piezomagnetic minerals such as quartz. The onset of the electromagnetic process involves the conversion of electric energy on the surface into an area of spherical shape which is linked with a different growth of herbaceous species compared to the surrounding vegetation.

  5. Community characteristics of tropical montane evergreen forest and tropical montane dwarf forest in Bawangling National Nature Reserve on Hainan Island, South China

    OpenAIRE

    Wenxing Long; Runguo Zang; Yi Ding

    2011-01-01

    Both tropical montane evergreen forest (TMEF) and tropical montane dwarf forest (TMDF) are typical tropical cloud forests on Hainan Island. To compare community structure and species diversity be-tween these two forest types, we established eight and ten plots (each with 2,500 m2 in area) in TMEF and TMDF, respectively, in Bawangling National Nature Reserve on Hainan Island, South China. We investigated each individual plant with diameter at breast height (DBH) ≥1 cm including trees, shrubs a...

  6. [Responses of plant functional traits and soil factors to slope aspect in alpine meadow of South Gansu, Northwest China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min-Xi, Liu; Jian-Zu, Ma

    2012-12-01

    This paper studied the plant functional traits, soil factors, and their relationships at different slope aspects in the alpine meadow of South Gansu. On the sunny slope, grasses were the dominant functional groups; while on the shady slope, forbs and shrubs dominated. The plant community biomass was significantly higher on shady slope than on sunny slope, while the leaf N/P ratio was in adverse. The leaf phosphorus content, specific leaf area, and plant average height at different slope aspects were in the order of shady slope > partial shady slope > sunny slope, whereas the leaf nitrogen content on different slopes had less difference. The survival strategies of the vegetations on sunny and shady slopes had great changes, reflecting in the differences in the plant leaf traits and dominant functional groups. Soil temperature was in the order of sunny slope > partial shady slope > shady slope, while soil water content was in the order of shady slope > partial shady slope > sunny slope. Soil total phosphorus content increased from the sunny slope to the shady slope, while the other soil nutrients contents showed the sequence of shady slope > sunny slope > partial shady slope. The specific leaf area and plant average height were significantly positively correlated to the soil organic carbon, total phosphorous, and water contents, and significantly negatively correlated to soil pH. Soil water content and soil pH co-affected the distribution patterns of plant functional traits and soil nutrients at different slope aspects of alpine meadow.

  7. RELATIONSHIPS OF MEADOW VEGETATION TO GROUNDWATER DEPTH: EFFECTS OF PRECIPITATION VARIABILITY AND STREAM INCISION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The composition of riparian meadow vegetation is controlled by access to groundwater. Depth to groundwater is controlled by meadow architecture and water source, and changes in either meadow architecture or water source through stream incision or changes in annual precipitation c...

  8. Export from Seagrass Meadows Contributes to Marine Carbon Sequestration

    KAUST Repository

    Duarte, Carlos M.

    2017-01-17

    Seagrasses export a substantial portion of their primary production, both in particulate and dissolved organic form, but the fate of this export production remains unaccounted for in terms of seagrass carbon sequestration. Here we review available evidence on the fate of seagrass carbon export to conclude that this represents a significant contribution to carbon sequestration, both in sediments outside seagrass meadows and in the deep sea. The evidence presented implies that the contribution of seagrass meadows to carbon sequestration has been underestimated by only including carbon burial within seagrass sediments.

  9. A rare case of grass flow induced by the M8.4 Arequipa earthquake, June 2001, in the Altiplano of Northern Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, José A.; Clavero, Jorge E.

    2005-09-01

    On June 23, 2001, an M8.4 earthquake that originated in southern Peru triggered the partial collapse of the Chislluma bofedal (water meadows) in the Altiplano (high-altitude plateau) of northern Chile. The seismic waves evidently produced the liquefaction of the bofedal and caused its partial collapse generating a flow. The flow deposit was mainly made of long-fiber grass and water, with minor amounts of clastic material. It traveled more than 14 km downstream at a peak velocity of 50 km/h. It destroyed the water meadows and killed more than 20 llamas. Slurry flows caused by meadow liquefaction are a previously unrecognized seismic-induced geological hazard for high-altitude plateau areas such as the Altiplano.

  10. Salt Profile Distributions of Meadow Wetland in Yinchuan Plain%银川平原草甸湿地盐土及其盐分分布特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏贵菊; 何彤慧; 于骥; 吴春燕; 赵永全

    2016-01-01

    This paper studied the salt profile distribution of meadow wetland in Yinchuan plain based on field observation and analysis in laboratory. According to topsoil salt content soil in the study area was divided into five grades (Ⅰ,Ⅱ,Ⅲ,Ⅳ,Ⅴ) with different vegetation types, mainly salt herb meadows and salt small shrub meadow in theⅠ, salt meadow and grassy meadow inⅡ, rhizome grass meadow inⅢ,Ⅳ, forb meadow and low humidity meadow inⅤ. Total salt accumulated in meadow topsoils. Total salt decreased sharply with the increase of soil depth within 0 – 30 cm depth but slowly with 30 – 70 cm depth. Except HCO3–, other salt ions accumulated obviously in topsoils, Na+, K+, Cl– in different salinization grades shared the same trends with total salt, i.e.Ⅰ>Ⅱ>Ⅲ>Ⅳ >Ⅴ. Meadow wetland plants accumulated salt, mainly were NaCl and NaHCO3, while mainly were NaCl, NaHCO3 and Na2CO3 in soil.%通过野外观测和室内分析,研究银川平原草甸湿地盐土及其盐分的分布特征,根据土壤表层全盐含量将研究区土壤划分为5个等级,分别为Ⅰ、Ⅱ、Ⅲ、Ⅳ、Ⅴ,不同土壤等级的植被类型不同,在土壤Ⅰ中主要分布盐生草本草甸和盐生小灌木草甸,在土壤Ⅱ中主要分布盐生草甸和丛生禾草草甸,在Ⅲ、Ⅳ中主要分布根茎禾草草甸,在Ⅴ中主要分布杂类草草甸和一些低湿草甸;研究区草甸土壤全盐含量在垂直方向上表现出明显的表聚现象,在0~30 cm土层,随着土壤深度的增加,土壤全盐含量急剧下降,在30~70 cm土壤全盐含量的下降则较为平缓;各盐分离子除了HCO3–以外,其余各离子均表现出明显的表聚现象,但在不同的土壤等级中,只有Na+、K+、Cl–和土壤全盐的表现一致,均为Ⅰ>Ⅱ>Ⅲ>Ⅳ>Ⅴ。草甸湿地植物体中也有一定的盐分累积,在植物体中,主要盐分为NaCl、NaHCO3;在土壤中主要盐分为NaCl、NaHCO3、Na2CO3。

  11. Cossack Star – a new herbicide in cereals with efficacy against grasses and dicots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerlen, Dirk

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cossack Star (mesosulfuron-methyl; iodosulfuron-methyl-sodium; thiencarbazone-methyl; mefenpyr-diethyl is a new cereal herbicide to control blackgrass (Alopecurus myosuroides, ryegrass (Lolium spec., wild oat (Avena fatua, loose silky-bentgrass (Apera spica-venti L., annual meadow-grass (Poa annua L. and dicot weeds. Cossack Star can be used in winter wheat, winter triticale, winter rye, winter durum wheat and spelt. The publication is based on efficacy trials from two years of spring application with Cossack Star.

  12. Echo Meadows Project Winter Artificial Recharge.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziari, Fred

    2002-12-19

    This report discusses the findings of the Echo Meadows Project (BPA Project 2001-015-00). The main purpose of this project is to artificially recharge an alluvial aquifer, WITH water from Umatilla River during the winter high flow period. In turn, this recharged aquifer will discharge an increased flow of cool groundwater back to the river, thereby improving Umatilla River water quality and temperature. A considerable side benefit is that the Umatilla River should improve as a habitat for migration, spanning, and rearing of anadromous and resident fish. The scope of this project is to provide critical baseline information about the Echo Meadows and the associated reach of the Umatilla River. Key elements of information that has been gathered include: (1) Annual and seasonal groundwater levels in the aquifer with an emphasis on the irrigation season, (2) Groundwater hydraulic properties, particularly hydraulic conductivity and specific yield, and (3) Groundwater and Umatilla River water quality including temperature, nutrients and other indicator parameters. One of the major purposes of this data gathering was to develop input to a groundwater model of the area. The purpose of the model is to estimate our ability to recharge this aquifer using water that is only available outside of the irrigation season (December through the end of February) and to estimate the timing of groundwater return flow back to the river. We have found through the data collection and modeling efforts that this reach of the river had historically returned as much as 45 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water to the Umatilla River during the summer and early fall. However, this return flow was reduced to as low as 10 cfs primarily due to reduced quantities of irrigation application, gain in irrigation efficiencies and increased groundwater pumping. Our modeling indicated that it is possible to restore these critical return flows using applied water outside of the irrigation season. We further

  13. Echo Meadows Project Winter Artificial Recharge.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziari, Fred

    2002-12-19

    This report discusses the findings of the Echo Meadows Project (BPA Project 2001-015-00). The main purpose of this project is to artificially recharge an alluvial aquifer, WITH water from Umatilla River during the winter high flow period. In turn, this recharged aquifer will discharge an increased flow of cool groundwater back to the river, thereby improving Umatilla River water quality and temperature. A considerable side benefit is that the Umatilla River should improve as a habitat for migration, spanning, and rearing of anadromous and resident fish. The scope of this project is to provide critical baseline information about the Echo Meadows and the associated reach of the Umatilla River. Key elements of information that has been gathered include: (1) Annual and seasonal groundwater levels in the aquifer with an emphasis on the irrigation season, (2) Groundwater hydraulic properties, particularly hydraulic conductivity and specific yield, and (3) Groundwater and Umatilla River water quality including temperature, nutrients and other indicator parameters. One of the major purposes of this data gathering was to develop input to a groundwater model of the area. The purpose of the model is to estimate our ability to recharge this aquifer using water that is only available outside of the irrigation season (December through the end of February) and to estimate the timing of groundwater return flow back to the river. We have found through the data collection and modeling efforts that this reach of the river had historically returned as much as 45 cubic feet per second (cfs) of water to the Umatilla River during the summer and early fall. However, this return flow was reduced to as low as 10 cfs primarily due to reduced quantities of irrigation application, gain in irrigation efficiencies and increased groundwater pumping. Our modeling indicated that it is possible to restore these critical return flows using applied water outside of the irrigation season. We further

  14. Fungal-mediated multitrophic interactions--do grass endophytes in diet protect voles from predators?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Saari

    Full Text Available Plant-associated micro-organisms such as mycotoxin-producing endophytes commonly have direct negative effects on herbivores. These effects may be carried over to natural enemies of the herbivores, but this has been rarely explored. We examined how feeding on Neotyphodium endophyte infected (E+ and endophyte free (E- meadow ryegrass (Scherodonus pratensis affects body mass, population size and mobility of sibling voles (Microtus levis, and whether the diet mediates the vulnerability of voles to least weasel (Mustela nivalis nivalis predation. Because least weasels are known to be olfactory hunters, we also examined whether they are able to distinguish olfactory cues of voles fed on E+ and E- diets. Neither body mass of voles nor population size differed between diets. However, contrary to our prediction, least weasels preyed more often on voles fed with E- grass than on voles fed with E+ grass. The mobility of voles fed on E+ grass was reduced compared to voles fed on E- grass, but this effect was unrelated to risk of predation. Least weasels appeared unable to distinguish between excrement odours of voles between the two treatments. Our results suggest that consumption of endophytic grass is not directly deleterious to sibling voles. What's more, consumption of endophytes appears to be advantageous to voles by reducing risk of mammalian predation. Our study is thus the first to demonstrate an effect of plant-associated microbial symbionts on herbivore-predator interactions in vertebrate communities.

  15. Fungal-mediated multitrophic interactions--do grass endophytes in diet protect voles from predators?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saari, Susanna; Sundell, Janne; Huitu, Otso; Helander, Marjo; Ketoja, Elise; Ylönen, Hannu; Saikkonen, Kari

    2010-03-24

    Plant-associated micro-organisms such as mycotoxin-producing endophytes commonly have direct negative effects on herbivores. These effects may be carried over to natural enemies of the herbivores, but this has been rarely explored. We examined how feeding on Neotyphodium endophyte infected (E+) and endophyte free (E-) meadow ryegrass (Scherodonus pratensis) affects body mass, population size and mobility of sibling voles (Microtus levis), and whether the diet mediates the vulnerability of voles to least weasel (Mustela nivalis nivalis) predation. Because least weasels are known to be olfactory hunters, we also examined whether they are able to distinguish olfactory cues of voles fed on E+ and E- diets. Neither body mass of voles nor population size differed between diets. However, contrary to our prediction, least weasels preyed more often on voles fed with E- grass than on voles fed with E+ grass. The mobility of voles fed on E+ grass was reduced compared to voles fed on E- grass, but this effect was unrelated to risk of predation. Least weasels appeared unable to distinguish between excrement odours of voles between the two treatments. Our results suggest that consumption of endophytic grass is not directly deleterious to sibling voles. What's more, consumption of endophytes appears to be advantageous to voles by reducing risk of mammalian predation. Our study is thus the first to demonstrate an effect of plant-associated microbial symbionts on herbivore-predator interactions in vertebrate communities.

  16. Structure and floristic similarities of upper montane forests in Serra Fina mountain range, southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Dias Meireles

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The upper montane forests in the southern and southeastern regions of Brazil have an unusual and discontinuous geographic distribution at the top of the Atlantic coastal mountain ranges. To describe the floristic composition and structure of the Atlantic Forest near its upper altitudinal limit in southeastern Brazil, 30 plots with 10 × 10 m were installed in three forest sites between 2,200 and 2,300 m.a.s.l. at Serra Fina. The floristic composition and phytosociological structure of this forest were compared with other montane and upper montane forests. In total, 704 individuals were included, belonging to 24 species, 15 families, and 19 genera. Myrsinaceae, Myrtaceae, Symplocaceae, and Cunoniaceae were the most important families, and Myrsine gardneriana, Myrceugenia alpigena, Weinmannia humilis, and Symplocos corymboclados were the most important species. The three forest sites revealed differences in the abundance of species, density, canopy height, and number of stems per individual. The upper montane forests showed structural similarities, such as lower richness, diversity, and effective number of species, and they tended to have higher total densities and total dominance per hectare to montane forests. The most important species in these upper montane forests belong to Austral-Antartic genera or neotropical and pantropical genera that are typical of montane areas. The high number of species shared by these forests suggests past connections between the vegetation in southern Brazilian high-altitude areas.

  17. Attacking invasive grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Jon E.

    2015-01-01

    In grasslands fire may play a role in the plant invasion process, both by creating disturbances that potentially favour non-native invasions and as a possible tool for controlling alien invasions. Havill et al. (Applied Vegetation Science, 18, 2015, this issue) determine how native and non-native species respond to different fire regimes as a first step in understanding the potential control of invasive grasses.

  18. Unveiling the Hidden Bat Diversity of a Neotropical Montane Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaverri, Gloriana; Garin, Inazio; Alberdi, Antton; Jimenez, Lide; Castillo-Salazar, Cristian; Aihartza, Joxerra

    2016-01-01

    Mountain environments, characterized by high levels of endemism, are at risk of experiencing significant biodiversity loss due to current trends in global warming. While many acknowledge their importance and vulnerability, these ecosystems still remain poorly studied, particularly for taxa that are difficult to sample such as bats. Aiming to estimate the amount of cryptic diversity among bats of a Neotropical montane cloud forest in Talamanca Range—south-east Central America—, we performed a 15-night sampling campaign, which resulted in 90 captured bats belonging to 8 species. We sequenced their mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) and screened their inter- and intraspecific genetic variation. Phylogenetic relations with conspecifics and closely related species from other geographic regions were established using Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian inference methods, as well as median-joining haplotype networks. Mitochondrial lineages highly divergent from hitherto characterized populations (> 9% COI dissimilarity) were found in Myotis oxyotus and Hylonycteris underwoodi. Sturnira burtonlimi and M. keaysi also showed distinct mitochondrial structure with sibling species and/or populations. These results suggest that mountains in the region hold a high degree of endemicity potential that has previously been ignored in bats. They also warn of the high extinction risk montane bats may be facing due to climatic change, particularly in isolated mountain systems like Talamanca Range. PMID:27706168

  19. Nutrient supply in undrained and drained Calthion meadows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duren, IC; Pegtel, DM; Aerts, BA; Inberg, JA

    1997-01-01

    Plant species-rich Calthion meadows on mesotrophic fen pear soil extensively cut for hay are among the endangered semi-natural vegetation types in northwestern Europe. They are often badly affected by lowering the groundwater table (drainage) and fertilization. In a comparative study of an undrained

  20. COENOLOGICAL STATUS OF THE IRIS MEADOWS IN HUNGARY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. SALAMON-ALBERT

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Species composition and vegetation structure by association and local diagnostic, constant and dominant species of Iridetum sibiricae was analysed from Hungary adjusting to the evaluation of European vegetation. Classification, ordination and statistical analyses was carried out to characterize and make distinction to some other wet meadow vegetation types. In the association habitat and management dependent subunits were formed.

  1. Riparian Meadow Response to Modern Conservation Grazing Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oles, Kristin M.; Weixelman, Dave A.; Lile, David F.; Tate, Kenneth W.; Snell, Laura K.; Roche, Leslie M.

    2017-09-01

    Riparian meadows occupy a small proportion of the public lands in the western United States but they provide numerous ecosystem services, including the production of high-quality forage for livestock grazing. Modern conservation management strategies (e.g., reductions in livestock stocking rates and adoption of new riparian grazing standards) have been implemented to better balance riparian conservation and livestock production objectives on publicly managed lands. We examined potential relationships between long-term changes in plant community, livestock grazing pressure and environmental conditions at two spatial scales in meadows grazed under conservation management strategies. Changes in plant community were not associated with either livestock stocking rate or precipitation at the grazing allotment (i.e., administrative) scale. Alternatively, both grazing pressure and precipitation had significant, albeit modest, associations with changes in plant community at the meadow (i.e., ecological site) scale. These results suggest that reductions in stocking rate have improved the balance between riparian conservation and livestock production goals. However, associations between elevation, site wetness, precipitation, and changes in plant community suggest that changing climate conditions (e.g., reduced snowpack and changes in timing of snowmelt) could trigger shifts in plant communities, potentially impacting both conservation and agricultural services (e.g., livestock and forage production). Therefore, adaptive, site-specific management strategies are required to meet grazing pressure limits and safeguard ecosystem services within individual meadows, especially under more variable climate conditions.

  2. Nitrogen Critical Loads for an Alpine Meadow Ecosystem on the Tibetan Plateau

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Ning; Shi, Peili; Song, Minghua; Zhang, Xianzhou; Jiang, Jing; Chai, Xi

    2016-03-01

    Increasing atmospheric nitrogen (N) deposition has the potential to alter plant diversity and thus the function and stability of terrestrial ecosystems. N-limited alpine ecosystems are expected to be particularly susceptible to increasing N deposition. However, little is known about the critical loads and saturation thresholds of ecosystem responses to increasing N deposition on the Tibetan Plateau, despite its importance to ecosystem management. To evaluate the N critical loads and N saturation thresholds in an alpine ecosystem, in 2010, we treated an alpine meadow with five levels of N addition (0, 10, 20, 40, and 80 kg N ha-1 year-1) and characterized plant and soil responses. The results showed that plant species richness and diversity index did not statistically vary with N addition treatments, but they both changed with years. N addition affected plant cover and aboveground productivity, especially for grasses, and soil chemical features. The N critical loads and saturation thresholds, in terms of plant cover and biomass change at the community level, were 8.8-12.7 and 50 kg N ha-1 year-1 (including the ambient N deposition rate), respectively. However, pronounced changes in soil inorganic N and net N mineralization occurred under the 20 and 40 kg N ha-1 year-1 treatments. Our results indicate that plant community cover and biomass are more sensitive than soil to increasing N inputs. The plant community composition in alpine ecosystems on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau may change under increasing N deposition in the future.

  3. Seagrass meadows as a globally significant carbonate reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazarrasa, I.; Marbà, N.; Lovelock, C. E.; Serrano, O.; Lavery, P. S.; Fourqurean, J. W.; Kennedy, H.; Mateo, M. A.; Krause-Jensen, D.; Steven, A. D. L.; Duarte, C. M.

    2015-08-01

    There has been growing interest in quantifying the capacity of seagrass ecosystems to act as carbon sinks as a natural way of offsetting anthropogenic carbon emissions to the atmosphere. However, most of the efforts have focused on the particulate organic carbon (POC) stocks and accumulation rates and ignored the particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) fraction, despite important carbonate pools associated with calcifying organisms inhabiting the meadows, such as epiphytes and benthic invertebrates, and despite the relevance that carbonate precipitation and dissolution processes have in the global carbon cycle. This study offers the first assessment of the global PIC stocks in seagrass sediments using a synthesis of published and unpublished data on sediment carbonate concentration from 403 vegetated and 34 adjacent un-vegetated sites. PIC stocks in the top 1 m of sediment ranged between 3 and 1660 Mg PIC ha-1, with an average of 654 ± 24 Mg PIC ha-1, exceeding those of POC reported in previous studies by about a factor of 5. Sedimentary carbonate stocks varied across seagrass communities, with meadows dominated by Halodule, Thalassia or Cymodocea supporting the highest PIC stocks, and tended to decrease polewards at a rate of -8 ± 2 Mg PIC ha-1 per degree of latitude (general linear model, GLM; p seagrass meadows, the mean PIC accumulation rate in seagrass sediments is found to be 126.3 ± 31.05 g PIC m-2 yr-1. Based on the global extent of seagrass meadows (177 000 to 600 000 km2), these ecosystems globally store between 11 and 39 Pg of PIC in the top metre of sediment and accumulate between 22 and 75 Tg PIC yr-1, representing a significant contribution to the carbonate dynamics of coastal areas. Despite the fact that these high rates of carbonate accumulation imply CO2 emissions from precipitation, seagrass meadows are still strong CO2 sinks as demonstrated by the comparison of carbon (PIC and POC) stocks between vegetated and adjacent un-vegetated sediments.

  4. Blue carbon stocks in Baltic Sea eelgrass (Zostera marina) meadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhr, Maria Emilia; Boström, Christoffer; Canal-Vergés, Paula; Holmer, Marianne

    2016-11-01

    Although seagrasses cover only a minor fraction of the ocean seafloor, their carbon sink capacity accounts for nearly one-fifth of the total oceanic carbon burial and thus play a critical structural and functional role in many coastal ecosystems. We sampled 10 eelgrass (Zostera marina) meadows in Finland and 10 in Denmark to explore seagrass carbon stocks (Corg stock) and carbon accumulation rates (Corg accumulation) in the Baltic Sea area. The study sites represent a gradient from sheltered to exposed locations in both regions to reflect expected minimum and maximum stocks and accumulation. The Corg stock integrated over the top 25 cm of the sediment averaged 627 g C m-2 in Finland, while in Denmark the average Corg stock was over 6 times higher (4324 g C m-2). A conservative estimate of the total organic carbon pool in the regions ranged between 6.98 and 44.9 t C ha-1. Our results suggest that the Finnish eelgrass meadows are minor carbon sinks compared to the Danish meadows, and that majority of the Corg produced in the Finnish meadows is exported. Our analysis further showed that > 40 % of the variation in the Corg stocks was explained by sediment characteristics, i.e. dry density, porosity and silt content. In addition, our analysis show that the root : shoot ratio of Z. marina explained > 12 % and the contribution of Z. marina detritus to the sediment surface Corg pool explained > 10 % of the variation in the Corg stocks. The mean monetary value for the present carbon storage and carbon sink capacity of eelgrass meadows in Finland and Denmark, were 281 and 1809 EUR ha-1, respectively. For a more comprehensive picture of seagrass carbon storage capacity, we conclude that future blue carbon studies should, in a more integrative way, investigate the interactions between sediment biogeochemistry, seascape structure, plant species architecture and the hydrodynamic regime.

  5. Seagrass meadows as a globally significant carbonate reservoir

    KAUST Repository

    Mazarrasa, I.

    2015-03-06

    There has been a growing interest in quantifying the capacity of seagrass ecosystems to act as carbon sinks as a natural way of offsetting anthropogenic carbon emissions to the atmosphere. However, most of the efforts have focused on the organic carbon (POC) stocks and accumulation rates and ignored the inorganic carbon (PIC) fraction, despite important carbonate pools associated with calcifying organisms inhabiting the meadows, such as epiphytes and benthic invertebrates, and despite the relevance that carbonate precipitation and dissolution processes have in the global carbon cycle. This study offers the first assessment of the global PIC stocks in seagrass sediments using a synthesis of published and unpublished data on sediment carbonate concentration from 402 vegetated and 34 adjacent un-vegetated sites. PIC stocks in the top 1 m sediments ranged between 3 and 1660 Mg PIC ha-1, with an average of 654 ± 24 Mg PIC ha-1, exceeding about 5 fold those of POC reported in previous studies. Sedimentary carbonate stocks varied across seagrass communities, with meadows dominated by Halodule, Thalassia or Cymodocea supporting the highest PIC stocks, and tended to decrease polewards at a rate of -8 ± 2 Mg PIC ha-1 degree-1 of latitude (GLM, p < 0.0003). Using PIC concentration and estimates of sediment accretion in seagrass meadows, mean PIC accumulation rates in seagrass sediments is 126.3 ± 0.7 g PIC m-2 y-1. Based on the global extent of seagrass meadows (177 000 to 600 000 km2), these ecosystems globally store between 11 and 39 Pg of PIC in the top meter of sediment and accumulate between 22 and 76 Tg PIC y-1, representing a significant contribution to the carbonate dynamics of coastal areas. Despite that these high rates of carbonate accumulation imply CO2 emissions from precipitation, seagrass meadows are still strong CO2 sinks as demonstrates the comparison of carbon (POC and POC) stocks between vegetated and adjacent un-vegetated sediments.

  6. Reciprocal Vegetation-Flow Feedbacks Driving Early-Stage Landscape Evolution in a Restored Wet Meadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, L.; Merritts, D. J.; Walter, R. C.; Watts, D.

    2013-12-01

    Just as taxonomic classification has improved understanding in biology, ecogeomorphologists would benefit from a functional classification of biota based on the biophysical feedbacks that they engage in. Early stages of landscape development following disturbance provide a unique opportunity to delineate and understand these feedback processes, as the diversity in functional morphotypes (a.k.a. 'ecomorphs,' to expand on a concept from terrestrial ecology) is high and the potential for self-organization of landscape pattern strong. We used the opportunity of a stream restoration that reset its floodplain to 'initial conditions' to perform a suite of biophysical measurements designed to delineate the classes of feedback that influence landscape evolution in distinct ways. The Big Spring Run restoration (Lancaster, PA), completed in November 2011, involved removal of 15,000 t of legacy sediment from the valley bottom to expose a Holocene hydric layer and reestablish wet meadow hydrology and biota. By performing repeat biogeomorphic surveys within a study grid, we tested the hypothesis that distinct ecomorphs determine the persistence and location of channel and microtopographic features. The qualitatively distinct patch types surveyed included carpet-forming mat vegetation, tussock-forming vegetation, sparsely vegetated mudflats, benthic algal mats, mixed herbaceous communities, grasses, and clonal emergent vegetation. Within each sampling location, changes in vegetation community architecture, grain size distribution, critical shear stress for sediment entrainment, and topography were monitored over time, and flow resistance was measured. An overbank flow event that completely filled the floodplain provided an additional opportunity to measure vegetation-flow-sediment interactions. Once emergent vegetation was bent over by flow, vegetation had a negligible influence on flow velocity--in contrast to most other wetlands--but continued to shelter the bed from sediment

  7. Effects of tropical montane forest disturbance on epiphytic macrolichens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benitez, Angel [Instituto de Ecologia, Herbario HUTPL, Universidad Tecnica Particular de Loja, San Cayetano s/n, Loja (Ecuador); Prieto, Maria, E-mail: maria.prieto@urjc.es [Area de Biodiversidad y Conservacion, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Mostoles, E-28933, Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez, Yadira [Instituto de Ecologia, Herbario HUTPL, Universidad Tecnica Particular de Loja, San Cayetano s/n, Loja (Ecuador); Aragon, Gregorio [Area de Biodiversidad y Conservacion, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, Mostoles, E-28933, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-12-15

    The high diversity of epiphytes typical of undisturbed montane tropical forests has been negatively affected by continuous deforestation and forest conversion to secondary vegetation. Macrolichens are an important component of these epiphytes. Because their physiology is strongly coupled to humidity and solar radiation, we hypothesized that microclimatic changes derived from forest clearing and logging can affect the diversity of these poikilohydric organisms. In southern Ecuador, we examined three types of forests according to a disturbance gradient (primary forests, secondary forests, and monospecific forests of Alnus acuminata) for the presence/absence and coverage of epiphytic macrolichens that we identified on 240 trees. We found that total richness tended to decrease when the range of the disturbance increased. The impoverishment was particularly drastic for 'shade-adapted lichens', while the richness of 'heliophytic lichens' increased in the drier conditions of secondary growth. Epiphytic composition also differed significantly among the three types of forests, and the similarity decreased when the range of the disturbance was greater. We concluded that a span of 40 years of recovery by secondary vegetation was not enough to regenerate the diversity of epiphytic macrolichens that was lost due to forest disturbances. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tropical montane forest disturbance drastically reduced macrolichen diversity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Species loss was most severe for the 'shade-adapted lichens' because high radiation is harmful to them. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In secondary forests lichen diversity of native forests was not regenerated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The protection of remnants of primary tropical forest might help to preserve a diverse community of epiphytic macrolichens.

  8. Dominance hierarchies, diversity and species richness of vascular plants in an alpine meadow: contrasting short and medium term responses to simulated global change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha M. Alatalo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We studied the impact of simulated global change on a high alpine meadow plant community. Specifically, we examined whether short-term (5 years responses are good predictors for medium-term (7 years changes in the system by applying a factorial warming and nutrient manipulation to 20 plots in Latnjajaure, subarctic Sweden. Seven years of experimental warming and nutrient enhancement caused dramatic shifts in dominance hierarchies in response to the nutrient and the combined warming and nutrient enhancement treatments. Dominance hierarchies in the meadow moved from a community being dominated by cushion plants, deciduous, and evergreen shrubs to a community being dominated by grasses, sedges, and forbs. Short-term responses were shown to be inconsistent in their ability to predict medium-term responses for most functional groups, however, grasses showed a consistent and very substantial increase in response to nutrient addition over the seven years. The non-linear responses over time point out the importance of longer-term studies with repeated measurements to be able to better predict future changes. Forecasted changes to temperature and nutrient availability have implications for trophic interactions, and may ultimately influence the access to and palatability of the forage for grazers. Depending on what anthropogenic change will be most pronounced in the future (increase in nutrient deposits, warming, or a combination of them both, different shifts in community dominance hierarchies may occur. Generally, this study supports the productivity–diversity relationship found across arctic habitats, with community diversity peaking in mid-productivity systems and degrading as nutrient availability increases further. This is likely due the increasing competition in plant–plant interactions and the shifting dominance structure with grasses taking over the experimental plots, suggesting that global change could have high costs to biodiversity in the

  9. Ornamental Landscape Grasses. Slide Script.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still, Steven M.; Adams, Denise W.

    This slide script to accompany the slide series, Ornamental Landscape Grasses, contains photographs of the 167 slides and accompanying narrative text intended for use in the study and identification of commercially important ornamental grasses and grasslike plants. Narrative text is provided for slides of 62 different perennial and annual species…

  10. Identification of some Malaysian grasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henrard, J.Th.

    1935-01-01

    When BUSE gave an enumeration of the grasses collected by JUNGHUHN in Java and Sumatra, he mentioned under Paspalum a species, described by RETZIUS in the year 1781 as Paspalum hirsutum. BUSE identified a grass from Sumatra as being the species of RETZIUS, on account of the description, having certa

  11. Natural radionuclides in meadow and pasture land in the Nordic countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosen, K.; Gutierrez Villanueva, J.-L.; Sundell-Bergman, S. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) (Sweden)] [and others

    2012-06-15

    The amount of natural radionuclides in the environment differs between the Nordic countries as shown by previous investigations and also by this study. Agricultural areas of high natural background are predominantly found in Sweden, Southern Finland and Norway while low background areas are typical for Iceland and Denmark. Thus, this study offers possibilities for studying behaviour of natural radionuclides under different conditions such as the influence of different soil types as well as the husbandry. Furthermore the areas also enable studying environmental behaviour of radium and other natural radionuclides under seemingly steady state conditions. However, migration and accumulation of natural radionuclides in cultivated soil is complex involving various processes. Thus, a long term goal of this study was to identify the implications of some of these processes by determining the soil to plant transfer for pasture land under the different conditions that prevail in the Nordic countries. The potential health hazards due to chronic ingestion of low concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides are fairly unknown but the results of this study may provide valuable background information for assessing these radiation risks. The aim of this project has been to gain knowledge on the status of natural radionuclides in meadow and pasture land and in grassland plants in different Nordic countries and on the transfer of these radionuclides from soil/water to man via the milk/food chain (soil- meadow/pasture grass -cow-milk). Limited data are available on the mobility and the transfer of naturally occurring radionuclides in the ecosystems of the agricultural land. In addition, information concerning the concentrations in meat and dairy products is of interest for assessing exposures of humans to natural radionuclides. Soil characteristics are known to have significant impact on the mobility and uptake of natural radionuclides. Therefore, the uptake in relation to

  12. [Relationships between horqin meadow NDVI and meteorological factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Cui-ping; Guan, De-xin; Wang, An-zhi; Jin, Chang-jie; Wu, Jia-bing; Wang, Ji-jun; Ni, Pan; Yuan, Feng-hui

    2009-01-01

    Based on the 2000-2006 MODIS 8-day composite NDVI and day-by-day meteorological data, the seasonal and inter-annual variations of Horqin meadow NDVI as well as the relationships between the NDVI and relevant meteorological factors were studied. The results showed that as for the seasonal variation, Horqin meadow NDVI was more related to water vapor pressure than to precipitation. Cumulated temperature and cumulated precipitation together affected the inter-annual turning-green period significantly, and the precipitation in growth season (June and July), compared with that in whole year, had more obvious effects on the annual maximal NDVI. The analysis of time lag effect indicated that water vapor pressure had a persistent (about 12 days) prominent effect on the NDVI. The time lag effect of mean air temperature was 11-15 days, and the cumulated dual effect of the temperature and precipitation was 36-52 days.

  13. Seagrass meadows as a globally significant carbonate reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    I. Mazarrasa; N. Marbà; Lovelock, C.E.; SERRANO, O; P. S. Lavery; J. W. Fourqurean; H. Kennedy; Mateo, M.A.; D. Krause-Jensen; A. D. L. Steven; Duarte, C. M.

    2015-01-01

    There has been a growing interest in quantifying the capacity of seagrass ecosystems to act as carbon sinks as a natural way of offsetting anthropogenic carbon emissions to the atmosphere. However, most of the efforts have focused on the organic carbon (POC) stocks and accumulation rates and ignored the inorganic carbon (PIC) fraction, despite important carbonate pools associated with calcifying organisms inhabiting the meadows, such as epiphytes and benthic invertebrates, and...

  14. Seagrass meadows as a globally significant carbonate reservoir

    OpenAIRE

    I. Mazarrasa; N. Marbà; Lovelock, C.E.; SERRANO, O; P. S. Lavery; J. W. Fourqurean; H. Kennedy; Mateo, M.A.; D. Krause-Jensen; A. D. L. Steven; Duarte, C. M.

    2015-01-01

    There has been growing interest in quantifying the capacity of seagrass ecosystems to act as carbon sinks as a natural way of offsetting anthropogenic carbon emissions to the atmosphere. However, most of the efforts have focused on the particulate organic carbon (POC) stocks and accumulation rates and ignored the particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) fraction, despite important carbonate pools associated with calcifying organisms inhabiting the meadows, such as epiphytes and be...

  15. Seagrass meadows as a globally significant carbonate reservoir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Mazarrasa

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There has been a growing interest in quantifying the capacity of seagrass ecosystems to act as carbon sinks as a natural way of offsetting anthropogenic carbon emissions to the atmosphere. However, most of the efforts have focused on the organic carbon (POC stocks and accumulation rates and ignored the inorganic carbon (PIC fraction, despite important carbonate pools associated with calcifying organisms inhabiting the meadows, such as epiphytes and benthic invertebrates, and despite the relevance that carbonate precipitation and dissolution processes have in the global carbon cycle. This study offers the first assessment of the global PIC stocks in seagrass sediments using a synthesis of published and unpublished data on sediment carbonate concentration from 402 vegetated and 34 adjacent un-vegetated sites. PIC stocks in the top 1 m sediments ranged between 3 and 1660 Mg PIC ha-1, with an average of 654 ± 24 Mg PIC ha-1, exceeding about 5 fold those of POC reported in previous studies. Sedimentary carbonate stocks varied across seagrass communities, with meadows dominated by Halodule, Thalassia or Cymodocea supporting the highest PIC stocks, and tended to decrease polewards at a rate of -8 ± 2 Mg PIC ha-1 degree-1 of latitude (GLM, p -2 y-1. Based on the global extent of seagrass meadows (177 000 to 600 000 km2, these ecosystems globally store between 11 and 39 Pg of PIC in the top meter of sediment and accumulate between 22 and 76 Tg PIC y-1, representing a significant contribution to the carbonate dynamics of coastal areas. Despite that these high rates of carbonate accumulation imply CO2 emissions from precipitation, seagrass meadows are still strong CO2 sinks as demonstrates the comparison of carbon (POC and POC stocks between vegetated and adjacent un-vegetated sediments.

  16. Extending juvenility in grasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaeppler, Shawn; de Leon Gatti, Natalia; Foerster, Jillian

    2017-04-11

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for modulating the juvenile to adult developmental growth transition in plants, such as grasses (e.g. maize). In particular, the invention provides methods for enhancing agronomic properties in plants by modulating expression of GRMZM2G362718, GRMZM2G096016, or homologs thereof. Modulation of expression of one or more additional genes which affect juvenile to adult developmental growth transition such as Glossy15 or Cg1, in conjunction with such modulation of expression is also contemplated. Nucleic acid constructs for down-regulation of GRMZM2G362718 and/or GRMZM2G096016 are also contemplated, as are transgenic plants and products produced there from, that demonstrate altered, such as extended juvenile growth, and display associated phenotypes such as enhanced yield, improved digestibility, and increased disease resistance. Plants described herein may be used, for example, as improved forage or feed crops or in biofuel production.

  17. An integral projection model with YY-males and application to evaluating grass carp control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Richard A.; Eager, Eric A.; Brey, Marybeth; Hansen, Michael J.; Kocovsky, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Invasive fish species disrupt ecosystems and cause economic damage. Several methods have been discussed to control populations of invasive fish including the release of YY-males. YY-males are fish that have 2 male chromosomes compared to a XY-male. When YY-males mate, they only produce male (XY) offspring. This decreases the female proportion of the population and can, in theory, eradicate local populations by biasing the sex-ratio. YY-males have been used as a population control tool for brook trout in montane streams and lakes in Idaho, USA. The YY-male control method has been discussed for grass carp in Lake Erie, North America. We developed and presented an integral projection model for grass carp to model the use of YY-males as a control method for populations in this lake. Using only the YY-male control method, we found that high levels of YY-males would need to be release annually to control the species. Specifically, these levels were the same order of magnitude as the baseline adult population (e.g., 1000 YY-males needed to be released annual for 20 years to control a baseline adult population of 2500 grass carp). These levels may not be reasonable or obtainable for fisheries managers given the impacts of YY-males on aquatic vegetation and other constraints of natural resource management.

  18. Seagrass meadows as a globally significant carbonate reservoir

    KAUST Repository

    Mazarrasa, I.

    2015-08-24

    There has been growing interest in quantifying the capacity of seagrass ecosystems to act as carbon sinks as a natural way of offsetting anthropogenic carbon emissions to the atmosphere. However, most of the efforts have focused on the particulate organic carbon (POC) stocks and accumulation rates and ignored the particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) fraction, despite important carbonate pools associated with calcifying organisms inhabiting the meadows, such as epiphytes and benthic invertebrates, and despite the relevance that carbonate precipitation and dissolution processes have in the global carbon cycle. This study offers the first assessment of the global PIC stocks in seagrass sediments using a synthesis of published and unpublished data on sediment carbonate concentration from 403 vegetated and 34 adjacent un-vegetated sites. PIC stocks in the top 1 m of sediment ranged between 3 and 1660 Mg PIC ha−1, with an average of 654 ± 24 Mg PIC ha−1, exceeding those of POC reported in previous studies by about a factor of 5. Sedimentary carbonate stocks varied across seagrass communities, with meadows dominated by Halodule, Thalassia or Cymodocea supporting the highest PIC stocks, and tended to decrease polewards at a rate of −8 ± 2 Mg PIC ha−1 per degree of latitude (general linear model, GLM; p < 0.0003). Using PIC concentrations and estimates of sediment accretion in seagrass meadows, the mean PIC accumulation rate in seagrass sediments is found to be 126.3 ± 31.05 g PIC m−2 yr−1. Based on the global extent of seagrass meadows (177 000 to 600 000 km2), these ecosystems globally store between 11 and 39 Pg of PIC in the top metre of sediment and accumulate between 22 and 75 Tg PIC yr−1, representing a significant contribution to the carbonate dynamics of coastal areas. Despite the fact that these high rates of carbonate accumulation imply CO2

  19. WHEAT GRASS HEALTH BENEFITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akula Annapurna

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nutraceutical is a food or food product that provides health and medical benefits, including the preventionand treatment of disease. Nutraceuticals are the products typically claim to prevent chronic diseases, improve health,delay the aging process, and increase life expectancy.Let us know something about one such nutraceutical.Wheatgrass is a commonly found herb in India contains enzymes like protease, cytrochrome, amylase, lipase,transhydrogenase and SOD (super oxide dismutase. Besides these enzymes, it also contains all the essential aminoacids especially alanine, asparatic acid, glutamic acid, arginine and serine, which are helpful in providing good amountof protein in body which builds and repair tissues. Wheatgrass contains chlorophyll and flavonoids in good amount.It also contains vitamins like vitamin A, vitamin C, and vitamin E and minerals like iron, calcium and magnesium.Chlorophyll has been shown to build red blood cells quickly,cures anemia, normalise blood pressure by dilating theblood vessels. Chlorophyll has been shown to produce an unfavourable environment for bacterial growth in the bodyand therefore effective in increasing the body's resistance to illness. Probably the most important benefit ofwheatgrass is, it is a cancer fighting agent. Many people strongly believe that the benefits of wheatgrass on cancerare real and that consuming wheat grass can help in the treatment and even in the prevention of cancer. Wheatgrassproduces an immunization effect against many dietary carcinogens..Additional benefits of wheatgrass are bettercomplexion and a healthy glow. The slowing of graying hair is also a benefit believed to come from wheatgrass. Wecan grow wheat grass in small cups, pots and trays very conveniently in our homes, so that we will have fresh juiceand powder with minimum cost.

  20. Carbon balance of a subarctic meadow under 3 r{ C warming - unravelling respiration}

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvennoinen, Hanna; Bárcena, Téresa G.; Moni, Christophe; Szychowski, Marcin; Rajewicz, Paulina; Höglind, Mats; Rasse, Daniel P.

    2016-04-01

    Boreal and arctic terrestrial ecosystems are central to the climate change debate, as the warming is expected to be disproportionate as compared to world averages. Northern areas contain large terrestrial carbon (C) stocks further increasing the interest in the C cycle's fate in changing climate. In 2013, we started an ecosystem warming experiment at a meadow in Eastern Finnmark, NE Norway. The meadow was on a clay soil and its vegetation was common meadow grasses and clover. Typical local agronomy was applied. The study site featured ten 4m-wide hexagonal plots, five control and five actively warmed plots in randomized complete block design. Each of the warmed plots was continuously maintained 3 ° C above its associated control plot with infrared heaters controlled by canopy thermal sensors. In 2014-2015, we measured net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and respiration twice per week during growth seasons from preinstalled collars of each site with dynamic, temperature-controlled chambers combined to an infrared analyzer. Despite warming-induced differences in yield, species composition and root biomass, neither the NEE nor the respiration responded to the warming, all sites remaining equal sinks for C. Following this observation, we carried out an additional experiment in 2015 where we aimed at partitioning the total CO2 flux to microbial and plant respiration as well as at recording the growth season variation of those parameters in situ. Here, we used an approach based on natural abundances of 13C. The δ13C signature of both autotrophic plant respiration and heterotrophic microbial respiration were obtained in targeted incubations (Snell et al. 2014). Then, the δ13C -signature of the total soil respiration was determined in the field by Keeling approach with dynamic dark chambers combined to CRDS. Proportions of autotrophic and heterotrophic components in total soil respiration were then derived based on 13C mixing model. Incubations were repeated at early, mid and

  1. Ecohydrological controls over water budgets in floodplain meadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Paul J.; Verhoef, Anne; Macdonald, David M. J.; Gardner, Cate M.; Punalekar, Suvarna M.; Tatarenko, Irina; Gowing, David

    2013-04-01

    Floodplain meadows are important ecosystems, characterised by high plant species richness including rare species. Fine-scale partitioning along soil hydrological gradients allows many species to co-exist. Concerns exist that even modest changes to soil hydrological regime as a result of changes in management or climate may endanger floodplain meadows communities. As such, understanding the interaction between biological and physical controls over floodplain meadow water budgets is important to understanding their likely vulnerability or resilience. Floodplain meadow plant communities are highly heterogeneous, leading to patchy landscapes with distinct vegetation. However, it is unclear whether this patchiness in plant distribution is likely to translate into heterogeneous soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) rates of water and heat, or whether floodplain meadows can reasonably be treated as internally homogeneous in physical terms despite this patchy vegetation. We used a SVAT model, the Soil-Water-Atmosphere-Plants (SWAP) model by J.C. van Dam and co-workers, to explore the controls over the partitioning of water budgets in floodplain meadows. We conducted our research at Yarnton Mead on the River Thames in Oxfordshire, one of the UK's best remaining examples of a floodplain meadow, and which is still managed and farmed in a low-intensity mixed-use manner. We used soil and plant data from our site to parameterise SWAP; we drove the model using in-situ half-hourly meteorological data. We analysed the model's sensitivity to a range of soil and plant parameters - informed by our measurements - in order to assess the effects of different plant communities on SVAT fluxes. We used a novel method to simulate water-table dynamics at the site; the simulated water tables provide a lower boundary condition for SWAP's hydrological submodel. We adjusted the water-table model's parameters so as to represent areas of the mead with contrasting topography, and so different

  2. Grass fungal endophytes and uses thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craven, Kelly

    2015-03-10

    The invention provides isolated fungal endophytes and synthetic combinations thereof with host grass plants. Methods for inoculating grass plant with the endophytes, for propagating the grass-endophyte combinations, and for producing feeds and biofuels from grass-endophyte combinations are also provided.

  3. 玛曲草地垂穗披碱草物候变化及影响因子%The Impact Factors and the Phenological Variation of Elymus nutans in Maqu Meadow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王建兵; 汪治桂

    2011-01-01

    通过对1985-2005年玛曲草地垂穗披碱草(Elymus nutans)物候变化及其影响因子分析,发现玛曲草地垂穗披碱草返青期略有推迟的趋势,推迟趋势为1.6 d/10 a,而抽穗、开花、种子成熟、黄枯等物候期均呈提前趋势,特别是抽穗、开花、种子成熟期明显提前,提前趋势分别为4.9 d/10 a,8.0d/10a,13.9 d/10 a.影响玛曲草地垂穗披碱草返青期推迟的主要因子是秋季降水量减少,夏季气温升高是导致玛曲草地垂穗披碱草抽穗、开花、种子成熟期提前的主要原因,秋季暖干化趋势是导致黄枯期提前的主要原因.%Maqu county is located in the southwest of Gansu Province, on the northeast of the Qinghai-Xizang Plateau. Maqu meadow is the core region of the important water source supply area of the Huanghe River, having unique significance in the water and eco-environmental security of the Huanghe River basin. A lot of remarkable results in the variation of Maqu meadow are achieved from the perspective of climate and eco-environment, but phenological variation of the pasture grass in Maqu meadow isnts paid enough attention. Based on the growing data of Elymus nutans (1985-2005) at the agricultural meteorological station of Maqu (102°05'E, 34°00'N, sea-level elevation 3471.4 m) and the simultaneous observation meteorological factors(such as temperature, precipitation, sunshine duration, etc)at the same place, the relationship between the Elymus nutans phenological variation and the meteorological factors is studied, providing reference for the research on eco-environment variation of Maqu meadow.In recent 20 years, the Elymus nutans recovery date of Maqu meadow shows a delaying trend with the tendency ratio of 1.6 d/10 a, but the date of ear, bloom, maturate and withered show obvious advancing trends with the tendency ratios of 4. 9 d/10 a, 8. 0 d/10 a, 13. 9 d/10 a and 1. 3 d/10 a. The reducing of autumnal precipitation is main impact factor to delaying

  4. Nevada Department of Wildlife Native Fish and Amphibians Field Trip Report: To estimate the population sizes of Ash Meadows Amargosa pupfish and Ash Meadows speckled dace and also to monitor exotic removal efforts.

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Fish population monitoring has been ongoing since the 1980s at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. This year we conducted surveys on the Ash Meadows Amargosa...

  5. Nevada Department of Wildlife Native Fish and Amphibians Field Trip Report: To estimate the population sizes of Ash Meadows Amargosa pupfish and Ash Meadows speckled dace and also to monitor exotic species removal efforts

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Fish population monitoring has been ongoing since the 1980s at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. This year we conducted surveys on the Ash Meadows Amargosa...

  6. Photo series for quantifying forest fuels in Mexico: montane subtropical forests of the Sierra Madre del Sur and temperate forests and montane shrubland of the northern Sierra Madre Oriental

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge E. Morfin-Rios; Ernesto Alvarado-Celestino; Enrique J. Jardel-Pelaez; Robert E. Vihnanek; David K. Wright; Jose M. Michel-Fuentes; Clinton S. Wright; Roger D. Ottmar; David V. Sandberg; Andres Najera-Diaz

    2008-01-01

    Single wide-angle and stereo photographs display a range of forest ecosystems conditions and fuel loadings in montane subtropical forests of the Sierra Madre del Sur and temperate forests and montane shrubland of the northern Sierra Madre Oriental of Mexico. Each group of photographs includes inventory information summarizing overstory vegetation composition and...

  7. Breeding for Grass Seed Yield

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boelt, Birte; Studer, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    Seed yield is a trait of major interest for many fodder and amenity grass species and has received increasing attention since seed multiplication is economically relevant for novel grass cultivars to compete in the commercial market. Although seed yield is a complex trait and affected...... by agricultural practices as well as environmental factors, traits related to seed production reveal considerable genetic variation, prerequisite for improvement by direct or indirect selection. This chapter first reports on the biological and physiological basics of the grass reproduction system, then highlights...... important aspects and components affecting the seed yield potential and the agronomic and environmental aspects affecting the utilization and realization of the seed yield potential. Finally, it discusses the potential of plant breeding to sustainably improve total seed yield in fodder and amenity grasses....

  8. Grass and weed killer poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002838.htm Grass and weed killer poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Many weed killers contain dangerous chemicals that are harmful if ...

  9. Endophyte isolate and host grass effects on Chaetocnema pulicaria (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Olivier J P; Gwinn, Kimberly D; Pless, Charles D; Popay, Alison J

    2011-04-01

    Endophytic fungi belonging to the genus Neotyphodium, confer resistance to infected host grasses against insect pests. The effect of host species, and endophtye species and strain, on feeding and survival of the corn flea beetle, Chaetocnema pulicaria Melsheimer (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) was investigated. The grass-endophyte associations included natural and artificially derived associations producing varying arrays of common endophyte-related alkaloids or alkaloid groups, peramine, lolitrem B, ergovaline, and the lolines. Preference and nonpreference tests showed that C. pulicaria feeding and survival were reduced by infection of tall fescue with the wild-type strain of N. coenophialum, the likely mechanism being antixenosis rather than antibiosis. In the preference tests, endophyte and host species effects were observed. Of the 10 different Neotyphodium strains tested in artificially derived tall fescue associations, eight strongly deterred feeding by C. pulicaria, whereas the remaining two strains had little or no effect on feeding. Infection of tall fescue with another fungal symbiont, p-endophyte, had no effect. Perennial ryegrass, Lolium perenne L., infected with six strains of endophyte, was moderately resistant to C. pulicaria compared with endophyte-free grass, but four additional strains were relatively inactive. Six Neotyphodium-meadow fescue, Festuca pratensis Huds., associations, including the wild-type N. uncinatum-meadow fescue combination, were resistant, whereas three associations were not effective. Loline alkaloids seemed to play a role in antixenosis to C. pulicaria. Effects not attributable to the lolines or any other of the alkaloids examined also were observed. This phenomenon also has been reported in tests with other insects, and indicates the presence of additional insect-active factors.

  10. Groundwater Surface Trends at Van Norden Meadow, California, from Ground Penetrating Radar Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadrick, N. I.; Blacic, T. M.; Yarnell, S. M.

    2014-12-01

    Van Norden meadow in the Donner Summit area west of Lake Tahoe is one of the largest sub-alpine meadows in the Sierra Nevada mountain range. As natural water retention basins, meadows attenuate floods, improve water quality and support vegetation that stabilizes stream banks and promotes high biodiversity. Like most meadows in the Sierras however, over-grazing, road-building, and development has resulted in localized stream incision, degradation, and partial conversion from wet to dry conditions in Van Norden. Additionally, a small dam at the base of the meadow has partially flooded the lower meadow creating reservoir conditions. Privately owned since the late 1800s, Van Norden was recently purchased by a local land trust to prevent further development and return the area to public ownership. Restoration of the natural meadow conditions will involve notching the dam in 2016 to reduce currently impounded water volumes from 250 to less than 50 acre-feet. To monitor the effects of notching the dam on the upstream meadow conditions, better understanding of the surface and groundwater hydrology both pre- and post-restoration is required. We surveyed the meadow in summer 2014 with ground penetrating radar (GPR) to map the groundwater surface prior to restoration activities using a 270MHz antenna to obtain a suite of longitudinal and transverse transects. Groundwater level within the meadow was assessed using both piezometer readings and sweeps of the GPR antenna. Seventeen piezometers were added this year to the 13 already in place to monitor temporal changes in the groundwater surface, while the GPR profiles provided information about lateral variations. Our results provide an estimate of the groundwater depth variations across the upper portion of the meadow before notching. We plan to return in 2015 to collect GPR profiles during wetter conditions, which will provide a more complete assessment of the pre-notching groundwater hydrology.

  11. Net primary productivity of subalpine meadows in Yosemite National Park in relation to climate variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Peggy E.; Van Wagtendonk, Jan W.; Yee, Julie L.; McClaran, Mitchel P.; Cole, David N.; McDougald, Neil K.; Brooks, Matthew L.

    2013-01-01

    Subalpine meadows are some of the most ecologically important components of mountain landscapes, and primary productivity is important to the maintenance of meadow functions. Understanding how changes in primary productivity are associated with variability in moisture and temperature will become increasingly important with current and anticipated changes in climate. Our objective was to describe patterns and variability in aboveground live vascular plant biomass in relation to climatic factors. We harvested aboveground biomass at peak growth from four 64-m2 plots each in xeric, mesic, and hydric meadows annually from 1994 to 2000. Data from nearby weather stations provided independent variables of spring snow water content, snow-free date, and thawing degree days for a cumulative index of available energy. We assembled these climatic variables into a set of mixed effects analysis of covariance models to evaluate their relationships with annual aboveground net primary productivity (ANPP), and we used an information theoretic approach to compare the quality of fit among candidate models. ANPP in the xeric meadow was negatively related to snow water content and thawing degree days and in the mesic meadow was negatively related to snow water content. Relationships between ANPP and these 2 covariates in the hydric meadow were not significant. Increasing snow water content may limit ANPP in these meadows if anaerobic conditions delay microbial activity and nutrient availability. Increased thawing degree days may limit ANPP in xeric meadows by prematurely depleting soil moisture. Large within-year variation of ANPP in the hydric meadow limited sensitivity to the climatic variables. These relationships suggest that, under projected warmer and drier conditions, ANPP will increase in mesic meadows but remain unchanged in xeric meadows because declines associated with increased temperatures would offset the increases from decreased snow water content.

  12. Cattle grazing and conservation of a meadow-dependent amphibian species in the Sierra Nevada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie M Roche

    Full Text Available World-wide population declines have sharpened concern for amphibian conservation on working landscapes. Across the Sierra Nevada's national forest lands, where almost half of native amphibian species are considered at risk, permitted livestock grazing is a notably controversial agricultural activity. Cattle (Bos taurus grazing is thought to degrade the quality, and thus reduce occupancy, of meadow breeding habitat for amphibian species of concern such as the endemic Yosemite toad (Anaxyrus [ = Bufo] canorus. However, there is currently little quantitative information correlating cattle grazing intensity, meadow breeding habitat quality, and toad use of meadow habitat. We surveyed biotic and abiotic factors influencing cattle utilization and toad occupancy across 24 Sierra Nevada meadows to establish these correlations and inform conservation planning efforts. We utilized both traditional regression models and Bayesian structural equation modeling to investigate potential drivers of meadow habitat use by cattle and Yosemite toads. Cattle use was negatively related to meadow wetness, while toad occupancy was positively related. In mid and late season (mid July-mid September grazing periods, cattle selected for higher forage quality diets associated with vegetation in relatively drier meadows, whereas toads were more prevalent in wetter meadows. Because cattle and toads largely occupied divergent zones along the moisture gradient, the potential for indirect or direct negative effects is likely minimized via a partitioning of the meadow habitat. During the early season, when habitat use overlap was highest, overall low grazing levels resulted in no detectable impacts on toad occupancy. Bayesian structural equation analyses supported the hypothesis that meadow hydrology influenced toad meadow occupancy, while cattle grazing intensity did not. These findings suggest cattle production and amphibian conservation can be compatible goals within this

  13. Genetic structure of colline and montane populations of an endangered plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, Tiphaine; Matthies, Diethart; Muller, Serge; Colling, Guy

    2016-08-12

    Due to land-use intensification, lowland and colline populations of many plants of nutrient-poor grasslands have been strongly fragmented in the last decades, with potentially negative consequences for their genetic diversity and persistence. Populations in mountains might represent a genetic reservoir for grassland plants, because they have been less affected by land-use changes. We studied the genetic structure and diversity of colline and montane Vosges populations of the threatened perennial plant Arnica montana in western central Europe using AFLP markers. Our results indicate that in contrast to our expectation even strongly fragmented colline populations of A. montana have conserved a considerable amount of genetic diversity. However, mean seed mass increased with the proportion of polymorphic loci, suggesting inbreeding effects in low diversity populations. At a similar small geographical scale there was a clear IBD pattern for the montane Vosges but not for the colline populations. However, there was a strong IBD-pattern for the colline populations at a large geographical scale suggesting that this pattern is a legacy of historical gene flow, as most of the colline populations are today strongly isolated from each other. Genetic differentiation between colline and montane Vosges populations was strong. Moreover, results of a genome scan study indicated differences in loci under selection, suggesting that plants from montane Vosges populations might be maladapted to conditions at colline sites. Our results suggest caution in using material from montane populations of rare plants for the reinforcement of small genetically depauperate lowland populations.

  14. Genetic structure of colline and montane populations of an endangered plant species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurice, Tiphaine; Matthies, Diethart; Muller, Serge; Colling, Guy

    2016-01-01

    Due to land-use intensification, lowland and colline populations of many plants of nutrient-poor grasslands have been strongly fragmented in the last decades, with potentially negative consequences for their genetic diversity and persistence. Populations in mountains might represent a genetic reservoir for grassland plants, because they have been less affected by land-use changes. We studied the genetic structure and diversity of colline and montane Vosges populations of the threatened perennial plant Arnica montana in western central Europe using AFLP markers. Our results indicate that in contrast to our expectation even strongly fragmented colline populations of A. montana have conserved a considerable amount of genetic diversity. However, mean seed mass increased with the proportion of polymorphic loci, suggesting inbreeding effects in low diversity populations. At a similar small geographical scale, there was a clear IBD pattern for the montane Vosges but not for the colline populations. However, there was a strong IBD-pattern for the colline populations at a large geographical scale suggesting that this pattern is a legacy of historical gene flow, as most of the colline populations are today strongly isolated from each other. Genetic differentiation between colline and montane Vosges populations was strong. Moreover, results of a genome scan study indicated differences in loci under selection, suggesting that plants from montane Vosges populations might be maladapted to conditions at colline sites. Our results suggest caution in using material from montane populations of rare plants for the reinforcement of small genetically depauperate lowland populations. PMID:27519913

  15. Chimpanzee seed dispersal in a montane forest fragment in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chancellor, Rebecca L; Rundus, Aaron S; Nyandwi, Sylvain

    2017-03-01

    Primate seed dispersal plays an important role in forest regeneration. It may be particularly important to anthropogenically disturbed habitats such as forest fragments. However, few studies have examined primate seed dispersal in these types of environments. Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) are frugivorous and large-bodied, and are therefore able to disperse both large and small seeds, making them an important seed dispersal species. We examined chimpanzee seed dispersal in Gishwati forest, a 14 km(2) montane rainforest fragment in Rwanda. We systematically collected ≤24-hr-old fecal samples and counted the number of seeds of each fruit species. We also recorded observations of seeds found in wadges. We found that chimpanzees dispersed at least 18 fruit species in 14 families in their feces. Ninety-five percent of feces had seeds, the most common of which were Ficus spp., Myrianthus holstii, and Maesa lanceolata. We estimated that the Gishwati chimpanzee community with a density of 1.7 individuals per km(2) dispersed an average of 592 (>2 mm) seeds km(-2)  day(-1) . We also found that chimpanzees dispersed the seeds of at least two fruit species, Ficus spp. and Chrysophyllum gorungosanum, in their wadges. In addition, 17% of the tree species recorded in our vegetation plots were chimpanzee-dispersed. This study emphasizes the importance of chimpanzees as large seed dispersers in regenerating forest fragments.

  16. Effects of tropical montane forest disturbance on epiphytic macrolichens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, Angel; Prieto, María; González, Yadira; Aragón, Gregorio

    2012-12-15

    The high diversity of epiphytes typical of undisturbed montane tropical forests has been negatively affected by continuous deforestation and forest conversion to secondary vegetation. Macrolichens are an important component of these epiphytes. Because their physiology is strongly coupled to humidity and solar radiation, we hypothesized that microclimatic changes derived from forest clearing and logging can affect the diversity of these poikilohydric organisms. In southern Ecuador, we examined three types of forests according to a disturbance gradient (primary forests, secondary forests, and monospecific forests of Alnus acuminata) for the presence/absence and coverage of epiphytic macrolichens that we identified on 240 trees. We found that total richness tended to decrease when the range of the disturbance increased. The impoverishment was particularly drastic for "shade-adapted lichens", while the richness of "heliophytic lichens" increased in the drier conditions of secondary growth. Epiphytic composition also differed significantly among the three types of forests, and the similarity decreased when the range of the disturbance was greater. We concluded that a span of 40 years of recovery by secondary vegetation was not enough to regenerate the diversity of epiphytic macrolichens that was lost due to forest disturbances. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Scientific Opinion on the re-evaluation of montan acid esters (E 912 as a food additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS was asked to deliver a scientific opinion re-evaluating the safety of montan acid esters (E 912 when used as a food additive. Montan acids are extracted from oxidised montan wax and esterified with ethylene glycol, 1,3-butanediol or triols, to form montan acid esters. Montan acid esters are authorised only for the surface treatment of fresh fruits. No data, specifically for montan acid esters, on toxicokinetics and reproductive and developmental toxicity were available. The available data on short-term and subchronic toxicity, genotoxicity and chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity were limited. Important deficiencies in the available studies on chronic toxicity and carcinogenicity were noticed. The data requested in the 1990s (i.e. chromosomal aberration in vitro, reproduction and teratogenicity studies, material characteristics, impurities, presence of PAHs were not submitted. Furthermore no data were submitted following an EFSA public call for data in 2012. The Panel identified some summary data in the European Chemicals Agency database (ECHA on registered substances that might have been relevant for the assessment of montan acid esters but the original study reports were not made available to EFSA. Based on these limitations in the toxicological database the Panel concluded that montan acid esters as a food additive could not be evaluated.

  18. Effects of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization on soil carbon fractions in alpine meadows on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jin Hua; Yang, Yu Jie; Li, Bo Wen; Li, Wen Jin; Wang, Gang; Knops, Johannes M H

    2014-01-01

    In grassland ecosystems, N and P fertilization often increase plant productivity, but there is no concensus if fertilization affects soil C fractions. We tested effects of N, P and N+P fertilization at 5, 10, 15 g m-2 yr-1 (N5, N10, N15, P5, P10, P15, N5P5, N10P10, and N15P15) compared to unfertilized control on soil C, soil microbial biomass and functional diversity at the 0-20 cm and 20-40 cm depth in an alpine meadow after 5 years of continuous fertilization. Fertilization increased total aboveground biomass of community and grass but decreased legume and forb biomass compared to no fertilization. All fertilization treatments decreased the C:N ratios of legumes and roots compared to control, however fertilization at rates of 5 and 15 g m-2 yr-1 decreased the C:N ratios of the grasses. Compared to the control, soil microbial biomass C increased in N5, N10, P5, and P10 in 0-20 cm, and increased in N10 and P5 while decreased in other treatments in 20-40 cm. Most of the fertilization treatments decreased the respiratory quotient (qCO2) in 0-20 cm but increased qCO2 in 20-40 cm. Fertilization increased soil microbial functional diversity (except N15) but decreased cumulative C mineralization (except in N15 in 0-20 cm and N5 in 20-40 cm). Soil organic C (SOC) decreased in P5 and P15 in 0-20 cm and for most of the fertilization treatments (except N15P15) in 20-40 cm. Overall, these results suggested that soils will not be a C sink (except N15P15). Nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization may lower the SOC pool by altering the plant biomass composition, especially the C:N ratios of different plant functional groups, and modifying C substrate utilization patterns of soil microbial communities. The N+P fertilization at 15 g m-2 yr-1 may be used in increasing plant aboveground biomass and soil C accumulation under these meadows.

  19. Turbulent mixing and fluid transport within Florida Bay seagrass meadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jennifer C. R.; Reidenbach, Matthew A.

    2017-10-01

    Seagrasses serve an important function in the ecology of Florida Bay, providing critical nursery habitat and a food source for a variety of organisms. They also create significant benthic structure that induces drag, altering local hydrodynamics that can influence mixing and nutrient dynamics. Thalassia testudinum seagrass meadows were investigated to determine how shoot density and morphometrics alter local wave conditions, the generation of turbulence, and fluid exchange above and within the canopy. Sparsely vegetated and densely vegetated meadows were monitored, with shoot densities of 259 ± 26 and 484 ± 78 shoots m-2, respectively. The temporal and spatial structure of velocity and turbulence were measured using acoustic Doppler velocimeters and an in situ particle image velocimetry (PIV) system positioned both above and within the seagrass canopy. The retention of fluid within the canopy was determined by examining e-folding times calculated from the concentration curves of dye plumes released within the seagrass canopy. Results show that a shear layer with an inflection point develops at the top of the seagrass canopy, which generates instabilities that impart turbulence into the seagrass meadow. Compared to the overlying water column, turbulence was enhanced within the sparse canopy due to flow interaction with the seagrass blades, but reduced within the dense canopy. Wave generated oscillatory motion penetrated deeper into the canopy than unidirectional currents, enhancing fluid exchange. Both shoot density and the relative magnitude of wave- versus current-driven flow conditions were found to be important controls on turbulent exchange of water masses across the canopy-water interface.

  20. Blue carbon stocks in Baltic Sea eelgrass (Zostera marina) meadows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohr, Maria Emilia; Bostrom, Christoffer; Canal-Vergés, Paula;

    2016-01-01

    Although seagrasses cover only a minor fraction of the ocean seafloor, their carbon sink capacity accounts for nearly one-fifth of the total oceanic carbon burial and thus play a critical structural and functional role in many coastal ecosystems. We sampled 10 eelgrass (Zostera marina) meadows...... density, porosity and silt content. In addition, our analysis show that the root : shoot ratio of Z. marina explained >12% and the contribution of Z. marina detritus to the sediment surface C-org pool explained >10% of the variation in the C-org stocks. The mean monetary value for the present carbon...

  1. Sustainable Management of Seagrass Meadows: the GEOSS AIP-6 Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Mattia; Pastres, Roberto; Zucchetta, Matteo; Venier, Chiara; Roncella, Roberto; Bigagli, Lorenzo; Mangin, Antoine; Amine Taji, Mohamed; Gonzalo Malvarez, Gonzalo; Nativi, Stefano

    2014-05-01

    Seagrass meadows (marine angiosperm plants) occupy less than 0.2% of the global ocean surface, annually store about 10-18% of the so-called "Blue Carbon", i.e. the Carbon stored in coastal vegetated areas. Recent literature estimates that the flux to the long-term carbon sink in seagrasses represents 10-20% of seagrasses global average production. Such figures can be translated into economic benefits, taking into account that a ton of carbon dioxide in Europe is paid at around 15 € in the carbon market. This means that the organic carbon retained in seagrass sediments in the Mediterranean is worth 138 - 1128 billion €, which represents 6-23 € per square meter. This is 9-35 times more than one square meter of tropical forest soil (0.66 € per square meter), or 5-17 times when considering both the above and the belowground compartments in tropical forests. According the most conservative estimations, about 10% of the Mediterranean meadows have been lost during the last century. To estimate seagrass meadows distribution, a Species Distribution Model (SDM) can be used. SDM is a tool that is used to evaluate the potential distribution of a given species (e.g. Posidonia oceanica for seagrass) on the basis of the features (bio-chemical-physical parameters) of the studied environment. In the framework of the GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems) initiative, the FP7 project MEDINA developed a showcase as part of the GEOSS Architecture Interoperability Pilot - phase 6 (AIP-6). The showcase aims at providing a tool for the sustainable management of seagrass meadows along the Mediterranean coastline by integrating the SDM with available GEOSS resources. This way, the required input data can be searched, accessed and ingested into the model leveraging the brokering framework of the GEOSS Common Infrastructure (GCI). This framework is comprised of a set of middle-ware components (Brokers) that are in charge of implementing the needed interoperability

  2. Meadow soil microbiocoenosis under influence of railway transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. Bobryk

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available A case study of the microbial coenosis status of the soil of meadow ecosystem at different distances from the railway track was carried out in the urbansettlement Velykyi Bereznyi in the Transcarpathian Region. The increasing technogenic pollution causes changes in the complex of microbiological indices, brings about qualitative and quantitative changes in the functioning of microbial cenosis of the soil. That has a negative impact on its potential fertility, and raises phytotoxic levels in soils. The results show that soils phytotoxic hyperactivity of ecosystems along the mainline correlates with the quantity of actinomycetes, coliforms, oligonitrophilc and cryptogamous microorgamisms.

  3. SYNSYSTEMATIQUE DES PRAIRIES DE FRANCE (SYNSYSTEMATIC OF THE MEADOWS OF FRANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.M. GEHU

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The synsystematic diagram of the meadows of France proposed in this work enumerates the main associations and the prairial superior unities of France giving them their great synecological features. The majority of these communities of meadows are usable in cutting or in pasture. They are grouped in the three following classes: Arrhenatheretea elatioris, Molinio-Juncetea and Agrostietea stoloniferae.

  4. Restoration of wooded meadows - a comparative analysis along a chronosequence on Oland (Sweden)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mitlacher, K; Poschlod, P; Rosen, E; Bakker, JP

    2002-01-01

    Wooded meadows on the Baltic Island of Oland result from traditional agricultural management over centuries, which has led to a species-rich vegetation with high species diversity. Today. nearly all of these meadows have been abandoned and became rapidly overgrown by deciduous shrub and tree species

  5. Ten Years of Change in Sierran Stringer Meadows: An Evaluation of Range Condition Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara H. Allen

    1989-01-01

    Grazed Sierra Nevada stringer meadow systems were sampled on Blodgett Forest Research Station in northern California between 1977 and 1987 to determine cattle use, and to examine changes in production and species composition over time. Utilization of meadow species averaged 61 percent over the 10 years, but use increased to more than 80 percent utilization after 1985....

  6. Experiments on the restoration of species-rich meadows in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendse, F.; Oomes, M.J.M.; Altena, H.J.; Elberse, W.Th.

    1992-01-01

    Three long-term experiments were carried out in meadows that were mown twice a year on three different soils: heavy clay, sand and clay-on-peat. The experiment on heavy clay studied the effect of an increase in nutrient supply on dry matter production and species diversity in a species-rich meadow.

  7. Divergent Impacts of Two Cattle Types on Vegetation in Coastal Meadows: Implications for Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurila, Marika; Huuskonen, Arto; Pesonen, Maiju; Kaseva, Janne; Joki-Tokola, Erkki; Hyvärinen, Marko

    2015-11-01

    The proportion of beef cattle in relation to the total number of cattle has increased in Europe, which has led to a higher contribution of beef cattle in the management of semi-natural grasslands. Changes in vegetation caused by this change in grazers are virtually unexplored so far. In the present study, the impacts of beef and dairy cattle on vegetation structure and composition were compared on Bothnian Bay coastal meadows. Vegetation parameters were measured in seven beef cattle, six dairy heifer pastures, and in six unmanaged meadows. Compared to unmanaged meadows, vegetation in grazed meadows was significantly lower in height and more frequently colonized by low-growth species. As expected, vegetation grazed by beef cattle was more open than that on dairy heifer pastures where litter cover and proportion of bare ground were in the same level as in the unmanaged meadows. However, the observed differences may have in part arisen from the higher cattle densities in coastal meadows grazed by beef cattle than by dairy heifers. The frequencies of different species groups and the species richness values of vegetation did not differ between the coastal meadows grazed by the two cattle types. One reason for this may be the relatively short management history of the studied pastures. The potential differences in grazing impacts of the two cattle types on vegetation structure can be utilized in the management of coastal meadows for species with divergent habitat requirements.

  8. DISTRIBUTION AND QUALITY OF SEAGRASS MEADOWS IN THE PENSACOLA BAY SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract for oral presentation: Seagrass meadows have 22 ecological benefits and have an estimated value of $20,500 per acre in Florida. Seagrass meadows support a variety of marine life that includes macroalgae (148 species), epiphytes (1 13 species), macroinvertebrates (230 spe...

  9. Comparative Study Of Alluvial Cnidion-Type Meadows In The Lower Danube River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider-Binder Erika

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Alluvial Cnidion-type meadows (Habitat type 6440 of the Habitats Directive, mostly characteristic for the lower courses of large rivers in continental climate conditions of Europe are presented from the Lower Danube upstream the municipality of Giurgiu (river-km 510-524. The ecological requirements of the characteristic species, as well as their sensitivity to human-induced changes that derive from regular flooding, drainage, intensification of use and/or abandonment, are highlighted; these changes frequently lead to a decrease of biodiversity of the Cnidion-type meadows or to their total loss The studied meadows are compared with similar alluvial meadows from other sites of the lower Danube River basin. Finally, the strong interlocking of Cnidion type meadows with those of the Agropyro-Rumicion, Molinion and Deschampsion caespitosae alliances are discussed.

  10. Macroscopic Thermal Energy Balance on Montane Valley Aquifers and Groundwater Recharge Source Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trask, J. C.; Fogg, G. E.

    2010-12-01

    Several recent publications have highlighted the need to improve definition of groundwater flow patterns in montane regions, presenting case studies with several field investigative approaches. Determination of the depth of upland bedrock groundwater circulation and identification of valley aquifer recharge sources in montane areas is needed for improved characterization of montane groundwater flow patterns and for aquifer source protection planning. In most upland bedrock regions, wells and boreholes are scarce, adding to the challenges inherent to investigating groundwater flow in fractured rock systems. Approaches using natural environmental tracers have previously been shown to be effective in quantifying subsurface recharge into valley aquifers from groundwater flow within adjoining mountain-front and mountain-block areas. Thermal tracing of montane groundwater flow is easy and inexpensive relative to other environmental tracer and geophysical techniques, and can complement other approaches (e.g. Manning and Solomon, 2005). We present a heat flow tracer approach to identification of montane valley aquifer recharge sources. A novel application of a macroscopic thermal energy balance is introduced and used in recharge source analysis for two mountain-front bounding basin-fill aquifers located in the Sierra Nevada, USA. We show that robust upper and lower bounds on total heat flow and sources of recharge into montane valley aquifers may be determined without numerical modeling by using a macroscopic thermal energy balance. Several factors tend to enhance focusing of geothermal conductive heat flow from depth toward montane valley margins. Analytic bracketing techniques, applicable to domains with irregular boundary geometry and non-uniform thermal boundary conditions, are used together with thermal data to obtain quantitative bounds on conductive heat flow across aquifer domain boundaries. Thermal data required include: (i) a rough estimate of regional geothermal

  11. Drivers of methane uptake by montane forest soils in the Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sam; Diem, Torsten; Huaraca Quispe, Lidia; Cahuana, Adan; Meir, Patrick; Teh, Yit

    2016-04-01

    The exchange of methane between the soils of humid tropical forests and the atmosphere is relatively poorly documented. This is particularly true of montane settings where variations between uptake and emission of atmospheric methane have been observed. Whilst most of these ecosystems appear to function as net sinks for atmospheric methane, some act as considerable sources. In regions like the Andes, humid montane forests are extensive and a better understanding of the magnitude and controls on soil-atmosphere methane exchange is required. We report methane fluxes from upper montane cloud forest (2811 - 2962 m asl), lower montane cloud forest (1532 - 1786 m asl), and premontane forest (1070 - 1088 m asl) soils in south-eastern Peru. Between 1000 and 3000 m asl, mean annual air temperature and total annual precipitation decrease from 24 ° C and 5000 mm to 12 ° C and 1700 mm. The study region experiences a pronounced wet season between October and April. Monthly measurements of soil-atmosphere gas exchange, soil moisture, soil temperature, soil oxygen concentration, available ammonium and available nitrate were made from February 2011 in the upper and lower montane cloud forests and July 2011 in the premontane forest to June 2013. These soils acted as sinks for atmospheric methane with mean net fluxes for wet and dry season, respectively, of -2.1 (0.2) and -1.5 (0.1) mg CH4 m-2 d-1 in the upper montane forest; -1.5 (0.2) and -1.4 (0.1) mg CH4 m-2 d-1in the lower montane forest; and -0.3 (0.2) and -0.2 (0.2) mg CH4 m-2 d-1 in the premontane forest. Spatial variations among forest types were related to available nitrate and water-filled pore space suggesting that nitrate inhibition of oxidation or constraints on the diffusional supply of methane to methanotrophic communities may be important controls on methane cycling in these soils. Seasonality in methane exchange, with weaker uptake related to increased water-filled pore space and soil temperature during the wet

  12. Artificial Warming of Arctic Meadow under Pollution Stress: Experimental design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moni, Christophe; Silvennoinen, Hanna; Fjelldal, Erling; Brenden, Marius; Kimball, Bruce; Rasse, Daniel

    2014-05-01

    Boreal and arctic terrestrial ecosystems are central to the climate change debate, notably because future warming is expected to be disproportionate as compared to world averages. Likewise, greenhouse gas (GHG) release from terrestrial ecosystems exposed to climate warming is expected to be the largest in the arctic. Artic agriculture, in the form of cultivated grasslands, is a unique and economically relevant feature of Northern Norway (e.g. Finnmark Province). In Eastern Finnmark, these agro-ecosystems are under the additional stressor of heavy metal and sulfur pollution generated by metal smelters of NW Russia. Warming and its interaction with heavy metal dynamics will influence meadow productivity, species composition and GHG emissions, as mediated by responses of soil microbial communities. Adaptation and mitigation measurements will be needed. Biochar application, which immobilizes heavy metal, is a promising adaptation method to promote positive growth response in arctic meadows exposed to a warming climate. In the MeadoWarm project we conduct an ecosystem warming experiment combined to biochar adaptation treatments in the heavy-metal polluted meadows of Eastern Finnmark. In summary, the general objective of this study is twofold: 1) to determine the response of arctic agricultural ecosystems under environmental stress to increased temperatures, both in terms of plant growth, soil organisms and GHG emissions, and 2) to determine if biochar application can serve as a positive adaptation (plant growth) and mitigation (GHG emission) strategy for these ecosystems under warming conditions. Here, we present the experimental site and the designed open-field warming facility. The selected site is an arctic meadow located at the Svanhovd Research station less than 10km west from the Russian mining city of Nikel. A splitplot design with 5 replicates for each treatment is used to test the effect of biochar amendment and a 3oC warming on the Arctic meadow. Ten circular

  13. Factors influencing stream baseflow transit times in tropical montane watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Villers, Lyssette E.; Geissert, Daniel R.; Holwerda, Friso; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    2016-04-01

    Stream water mean transit time (MTT) is a fundamental hydrologic parameter that integrates the distribution of sources, flow paths, and storages present in catchments. However, in the tropics little MTT work has been carried out, despite its usefulness for providing important information on watershed functioning at different spatial scales in (largely) ungauged basins. In particular, very few studies have quantified stream MTTs or have related these to catchment characteristics in tropical montane regions. Here we examined topographic, land use/cover and soil hydraulic controls on baseflow transit times for nested catchments (0.1-34 km2) within a humid mountainous region, underlain by volcanic soil (Andisols) in central Veracruz (eastern Mexico). We used a 2-year record of bi-weekly isotopic composition of precipitation and stream baseflow data to estimate MTT. Land use/cover and topographic parameters (catchment area and form, drainage density, slope gradient and length) were derived from geographic information system (GIS) analysis. Soil water retention characteristics, and depth and permeability of the soil-bedrock interface were obtained from intensive field measurements and laboratory analysis. Results showed that baseflow MTTs ranged between 1.2 and 2.7 years across the 12 study catchments. Overall, MTTs across scales were mainly controlled by catchment slope and the permeability observed at the soil-bedrock interface. In association with topography, catchment form and the depth to the soil-bedrock interface were also identified as important features influencing baseflow MTTs. The greatest differences in MTTs were found both within groups of small (0.1-1.5 km2) and large (14-34 km2) catchments. Interestingly, the longest stream MTTs were found in the headwater cloud forest catchments.

  14. Net ecosystem CO2 exchange and controlling factors in a steppe——Kobresia meadow on the Tibetan Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    <正>Knowledge of seasonal variation of net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE) and its biotic and abiotic controllers will further our understanding of carbon cycling process, mechanism and large-scale modelling. Eddy covariance technique was used to measure NEE, biotic and abiotic factors for nearly 3 years in the hinterland alpine steppe--Korbresia meadow grassland on the Tibetan Plateau, the present highest fluxnet station in the world. The main objectives are to investigate dynamics of NEE and its components and to determine the major controlling factors. Maximum carbon assimilation took place in August and maximum carbon loss occurred in November. In June, rainfall amount due to monsoon climate played a great role in grass greening and consequently influenced interannual variation of ecosystem carbon gain. From July through September, monthly NEE presented net carbon assimilation. In other months, ecosystem exhibited carbon loss. In growing season, daytime NEE was mainly controlled by photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). In addition, leaf area index (LAI) interacted with PAR and together modulated NEE rates. Ecosystem respiration was controlled mainly by soil temperature and simultaneously by soil moisture. Q10 was negatively correlated with soil temperature but positively correlated with soil moisture. Large daily range of air temperature is not necessary to enhance carbon gain. Standard respiration rate at referenced 10℃(R10) was positively correlated with soil moisture, soil temperature, LAI and aboveground biomass. Rainfall patterns in growing season markedly influenced soil moisture and therefore soil moisture controlled seasonal change of ecosystem respiration. Pulse rainfall in the beginning and at the end of growing season induced great ecosystem respiration and consequently a great amount of carbon was lost. Short growing season and relative low temperature restrained alpine grass vegetation development. The results suggested that LAI be usually in

  15. Effect of fire disaster on production and vegetation community of sub-alpine meadow in Qinghai-Tibet Plateau%冬季火烧对青藏高原亚高山草甸草地地上生产力和植物群落的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵忠; 赵燕; 荣良燕

    2016-01-01

    以2010年1月21日发生于青藏高原亚高山草甸草地火灾的过火草地为对象,通过对比2010年生长季火烧与未火烧草地生产力及植物群落的变化,发现火烧后第1年草地生产力有不同程度提高,以高寒灌丛草甸线叶嵩草+发草+苔草草地增产影响最大(P grassland,We found that the meadow production increased in the first years after burning,in prarticular on the meadow with Kobresia capillifolia + Deschampsia caespitosa + Carex sp (P <0.05).The fire had no influence in the plant community composition,however,the yeild of sedge (Cyperaceae )as the dominant species signfi-cantly increased (P <0.05),which meaned that burning stimulated the growth of rhizome sedge.The yield of grass (Poaceae)decreased significantly after burning (P < 0.05 ),indicating that burning retarded the grass' growth in length.Burning also affected the meadow plants during its growing season.The re-greening date was 15-25 days ahead of time in the early spring.

  16. Grass Roots War on Poverty

    OpenAIRE

    Amsden, Alice H

    2012-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa’s failure to slay the dragon of poverty is due to a logical flaw in its policies: the remedies to reduce poverty don’t address the causes. Poverty is caused by unemployment, owing to a scarcity of jobs that pay above bare subsistence, but grass-roots poverty alleviation measures are exclusively designed to make job-seekers more capable although no jobs are available. The ‘appropriate’ technologies of the grass roots movement that dominates anti-poverty policies are ...

  17. THE EFFECT OF CATTLE LIQUID MANURE FERTILIZATION ON THE SOIL MITES (ACARI OF PERMANENT MEADOW IN POLAND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RADOMIR GRACZYK

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different doses of cattle liquid manure, with or without the VIT-TRA agent, on the mites of permanent meadow, with species analysis of oribatid mites (Acari, Oribatida was investigated. Samples were taken from 13 plots, fertilized with cattle liquid manure in doses 40, 60 and 80 m3· ha-1 and VIT-TRA agent. The dose 40 m3· ha-1 increased the abundance of mites, comparing to the control plot, while doses 60 and 80 m3· ha-1 decreased it. The fungicidal agent, with medium and high dose of fertilizer, signifi cantly decreased the density of Oribatida, Gamasida and Actinedida in relation to small dose of fertilizer with this agent. The mites reacted in a similar way to the bactericidal agent, but acting of virocidal agent was indistinct. The Oribatida dominated among the mites, while the Actinedida and Gamasida were less abundant. Among the Oribatida the most abundant were: Parachipteria bella, Liebstadia humerata, Achipteria coleoptrata and Scheloribates laevigatus. The Oribatida preferred the lower part of grasses, and their density distinctly decreased with the soil depth.

  18. Persistent impacts of trace metals from mining on floodplain grass communities along Soda Butte Creek, Yellowstone National Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoughton, J.A.; Marcus, W.A.

    2000-03-01

    In Yellowstone National Park, tailings and associated trace metals from past mining have been deposited along 28 km of Soda Butte Creek by large flood events. This study documents grass species diversity, density, and biomass; trace metal concentrations in soils; and soil pH, salinity, and clay content in four selected floodplain meadows contaminated by these tailings. Trace metal levels frequently exceed acceptable concentrations for agricultural soils at sampling points within the meadows. pH levels within flood-deposited tailings are strongly to moderately acid, while pH levels outside of tailings deposits are neutral. The data analysis: (1) shows that metals and acidity associated with tailings affect plant biomass, density, and diversity; (2) documents that the vegetation/metal and vegetation/pH associations are more of a threshold than a linear relationship; and (3) suggests that other factors may be involved in structuring the community. Vegetation diversity, density, and biomass decrease at threshold levels of trace metal concentrations and soil pH in all four meadows. CuSum plots of diversity in relation to trace metal levels show a decrease in mean diversity at 315 ppm copper, 22 ppm arsenic, 4.2% iron, 65 ppm lead, and 170 ppm zinc. Densities of Phleum pratense and Poa pratensis were significantly lower (P {le} 0.001) on plots with more than 250 ppm copper. Above-ground biomass of Phleum pratense was also significantly lower on plots with copper levels above 250 ppm. Decreased mean grass density was found on plots with pH < 6.4, but the only statistically significant difference was for Juncus balticus, which had increased density on plots with pH < 6.4. In contrast to the clear impacts of trace metals and pH on vegetation, other site characteristics did not alter measured vegetation characteristics.

  19. Influences of previous wildfires on change, resistance, and resilience to reburning in a montane southwestern landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan D. Coop; Lisa Holsinger; Sarah McClernan; Sean A. Parks

    2015-01-01

    Land use legacies and climate have altered fire regimes across montane forests of much of the southwestern US (Allen and others 2002), and several recent wildfires have been extremely large and severe (Dennison and others 2014). Large openings resulting from high-severity fire in former ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and mixed conifer forests may be persistent given...

  20. A new species of Gulella (Pulmonata: Streptaxidae) from montane forest in the Ndoto Mountains, Kenya

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rowson, B.; Seddon, M.B.; Tattersfield, P.

    2009-01-01

    Gulella mkuu spec. nov. is described from montane forest in the isolated Ndoto Mountains of northern Kenya. Although exceptionally large for the genus, shell, genitalia and radula features suggest it is more closely related to the "G. sellae-ugandensis" complex than to other very large East African

  1. Modification of global precipitation data for enhanced hydrologic modeling of tropical montane watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauch, Michael; Kumar, Rohini; Eisner, Stephanie; Mulligan, Mark; Reinhardt, Julia; Samaniego, Luis; Santini, William; Vetter, Tobias; Friesen, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Global gridded precipitation is an essential driving input for hydrologic models to simulate runoff dynamics in large river basins. However, the data often fail to adequately represent precipitation variability in mountainous regions due to orographic effects and sparse and highly uncertain gauge data. Water balance simulations in tropical montane regions covered by cloud forests are especially challenging because of the additional water input from cloud water interception. The ISI-MIP2 hydrologic model ensemble encountered these problems for Andean sub-basins of the Upper Amazon Basin, where all models significantly underestimated observed runoff. In this paper, we propose simple yet plausible ways to adjust global precipitation data provided by WFDEI, the WATCH Forcing Data methodology applied to ERA-Interim reanalysis, for tropical montane watersheds. The modifications were based on plausible reasoning and freely available tropics-wide data: (i) a high-resolution climatology of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and (ii) the percentage of tropical montane cloud forest cover. Using the modified precipitation data, runoff predictions significantly improved for all hydrologic models considered. The precipitation adjustment methods presented here have the potential to enhance other global precipitation products for hydrologic model applications in the Upper Amazon Basin as well as in other tropical montane watersheds.

  2. Fagus dominance in Chinese montane forests: natural regeneration of Fagus lucida and Fagus hayatae var. pashanica.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, K.F.

    1995-01-01

    Fagus species are important components of certain mesic temperate forests in the Northern Hemisphere. Of eleven Fagus species distinguished, five are found in China. Chinese beeches are restricted to the mountains of southern China. In the montane zones of the northern subtropics beeches (Fagus engl

  3. Successional dynamics and restoration implications of a montane coniferous forest in the central Appalachians, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas M. Schuler; Rachel J. Collins

    2002-01-01

    Central Appalachian montane red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) communities have been greatly reduced in extent and functional quality over the past century. This community decline has put several plant and animal species, such as the endangered Virginia northern flying squirrel (Glaucomys sabrinus fuscus Shaw), at risk from habitat...

  4. Elevational Distribution of Adult Trees and Seedlings in a Tropical Montane Transect, Southwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyang Song

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Montane habitats are characterized by high variation of environmental factors within small geographic ranges, which offers opportunities to explore how forest assemblages respond to changes in environmental conditions. Understanding the distributional transition of adult trees and seedlings will provide insight into the fate of forest biodiversity in response to future climate change. We investigated the elevational distribution of 156 species of adult trees and 152 species of seedlings in a tropical montane forest in Xishuangbanna, southwest China. Adult trees and seedlings were surveyed within 5 replicate plots established at each of 4 elevational bands (800, 1000, 1200, and 1400 m above sea level. We found that species richness of both adult trees and seedlings changed with elevation, showing a notable decline in diversity values from 1000 to 1200 m. Tree species composition also demonstrated distinct differences between 1000 and 1200 m, marking the division between tropical seasonal rain forest (800 and 1000 m and tropical montane evergreen broad-leaved forest (1200 and 1400 m. The results suggested that soil moisture and temperature regimes were associated with elevational distribution of tree species in this region. We also observed that seedlings from certain species found at high elevations were also distributed in low-elevation zones, but no seedlings of species from low elevations were distributed in high-elevation zones. The increase in temperature and droughts predicted for this region may result in the contraction of tropical seasonal rain forest at lower elevations and a downhill shift of higher tropical montane tree species.

  5. Perrenial Grasses for Sustainable European Protein Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Uffe; Lærke, Poul Erik

    2016-01-01

    production into grass production. Grasses and legumes have higher contents of protein with better quality (high lysine and methionine contents) than grain and seed crops. Thus, substituting imported soya bean protein with protein extracted from perennial grasses is an interesting option....

  6. Traffic-related trace element accumulation in roadside soils and wild grasses in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guanxing; Yan, Xuedong; Zhang, Fan; Zeng, Chen; Gao, Dan

    2013-12-30

    This research examines traffic-source trace elements accumulations and distributions in roadside soils and wild grasses in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. A total of 100 soil samples and 100 grass samples including Achnatherum splendens, Anaphalis nepalensis, Artemisia sphaerocephala, Carex moorcroftii, Iris lacteal, Kobresia myosuroides, Oreosolen wattii, Oxytropis ochrocephala and Stellera chamaejasme were collected at 100 sites from different road segments. The contents of metals and metalloids, including Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Cr, Co, Ni and As, in the soil and grass samples were analyzed using ICP-MS. The total mean concentrations of the eight trace elements in soils are Cu (22.84 mg/kg), Zn (100.56 mg/kg), Cd (0.28 mg/kg), Pb (28.75 mg/kg), Cr (36.82 mg/kg), Co (10.24 mg/kg), Ni (32.44 mg/kg) and As (21.43 mg/kg), while in grasses are Cu (9.85 mg/kg), Zn (31.47 mg/kg), Cd (0.05 mg/kg), Pb (2.06 mg/kg), Cr (14.16 mg/kg), Co (0.55 mg/kg), Ni (4.03 mg/kg) and As (1.33 mg/kg). The metal and metalloid concentrations in the nine grass species were all below the critical values of hyperaccumulators. The mean values and Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) results indicate that: (1) the concentrations of the trace elements in the soils are higher than those in the grasses, (2) the concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb in the soils decrease as the roadside distance increases, (3) the concentrations of trace elements in the grasses are the highest at 10 m from the road edge, (4) the higher the traffic volume, the higher the concentrations of the trace elements in the roadside soils and grasses, and (5) when the land cover is meadow, the lower the sand content in the soil, the lower the trace element concentrations. With a trace element's bioavailability represented by its transfer factor (TF) from the soil to the grass, the TFs of the eight trace elements are not in the same orders for different grass species.

  7. Traffic-Related Trace Element Accumulation in Roadside Soils and Wild Grasses in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanxing Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This research examines traffic-source trace elements accumulations and distributions in roadside soils and wild grasses in the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau. A total of 100 soil samples and 100 grass samples including Achnatherum splendens, Anaphalis nepalensis, Artemisia sphaerocephala, Carex moorcroftii, Iris lacteal, Kobresia myosuroides, Oreosolen wattii, Oxytropis ochrocephala and Stellera chamaejasme were collected at 100 sites from different road segments. The contents of metals and metalloids, including Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb, Cr, Co, Ni and As, in the soil and grass samples were analyzed using ICP-MS. The total mean concentrations of the eight trace elements in soils are Cu (22.84 mg/kg, Zn (100.56 mg/kg, Cd (0.28 mg/kg, Pb (28.75 mg/kg, Cr (36.82 mg/kg, Co (10.24 mg/kg, Ni (32.44 mg/kg and As (21.43 mg/kg, while in grasses are Cu (9.85 mg/kg, Zn (31.47 mg/kg, Cd (0.05 mg/kg, Pb (2.06 mg/kg, Cr (14.16 mg/kg, Co (0.55 mg/kg, Ni (4.03 mg/kg and As (1.33 mg/kg. The metal and metalloid concentrations in the nine grass species were all below the critical values of hyperaccumulators. The mean values and Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA results indicate that: (1 the concentrations of the trace elements in the soils are higher than those in the grasses, (2 the concentrations of Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb in the soils decrease as the roadside distance increases, (3 the concentrations of trace elements in the grasses are the highest at 10 m from the road edge, (4 the higher the traffic volume, the higher the concentrations of the trace elements in the roadside soils and grasses, and (5 when the land cover is meadow, the lower the sand content in the soil, the lower the trace element concentrations. With a trace element's bioavailability represented by its transfer factor (TF from the soil to the grass, the TFs of the eight trace elements are not in the same orders for different grass species.

  8. Green economy: un'occasione per le aree montane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Sapone

    2013-06-01

    di rivitalizzare le aree montane. Il presente contributo rappresenta un avanzamento di studio sui temi che hanno interessato la costruzione di una rete di ecovillaggi approfondendo problematiche relative all'economia locale, al paesaggio e, più in generale, alla sostenibilità ambientale. Normal 0 14 false false false IT ZH-TW X-NONE

  9. Grass pollen allergens globally: the contribution of subtropical grasses to burden of allergic respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, J M

    2014-06-01

    Grass pollens of the temperate (Pooideae) subfamily and subtropical subfamilies of grasses are major aeroallergen sources worldwide. The subtropical Chloridoideae (e.g. Cynodon dactylon; Bermuda grass) and Panicoideae (e.g. Paspalum notatum; Bahia grass) species are abundant in parts of Africa, India, Asia, Australia and the Americas, where a large and increasing proportion of the world's population abide. These grasses are phylogenetically and ecologically distinct from temperate grasses. With the advent of global warming, it is conceivable that the geographic distribution of subtropical grasses and the contribution of their pollen to the burden of allergic rhinitis and asthma will increase. This review aims to provide a comprehensive synthesis of the current global knowledge of (i) regional variation in allergic sensitivity to subtropical grass pollens, (ii) molecular allergenic components of subtropical grass pollens and (iii) allergic responses to subtropical grass pollen allergens in relevant populations. Patients from subtropical regions of the world show higher allergic sensitivity to grass pollens of Chloridoideae and Panicoideae grasses, than to temperate grass pollens. The group 1 allergens are amongst the allergen components of subtropical grass pollens, but the group 5 allergens, by which temperate grass pollen extracts are standardized for allergen content, appear to be absent from both subfamilies of subtropical grasses. Whilst there are shared allergenic components and antigenic determinants, there are additional clinically relevant subfamily-specific differences, at T- and B-cell levels, between pollen allergens of subtropical and temperate grasses. Differential immune recognition of subtropical grass pollens is likely to impact upon the efficacy of allergen immunotherapy of patients who are primarily sensitized to subtropical grass pollens. The literature reviewed herein highlights the clinical need to standardize allergen preparations for both

  10. Impacts of climate and management on water balance and nitrogen leaching from montane grassland soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jin; Gasche, Rainer; Wang, Na; Lu, Haiyan; Butterbach-Bahl, Klaus; Kiese, Ralf

    2017-04-01

    The impacts of climate and management on the water balance and nutrient leaching of montane grasslands have rarely been investigated, though such ecosystems may represent a major source for ground and surface water nitrates. In this study nitrogen (nitrate, ammonium, dissolved organic nitrogen) and dissolved organic carbon leaching as well as water balance components (precipitation, evapotranspiration, and groundwater recharge) were quantified (2012-2014) by means of replicated (N=3 per site/ treatment) measurements of weighable grassland lysimeters (1 m2 area, 1.2 m soil depth) at three sites (E860: 860 m a.s.l., E770: 770 m a.s.l. and E600: 600 m a.s.l.) in the pre-alpine region of S-Germany. Two grassland management strategies were investigated: a) intensive management with 5 cuts per year and cattle slurry application rates of 280 kg N ha-1 yr-1, and b) extensive management with 3 cuts per year and cattle slurry application rates of 56 kg N ha-1 yr-1. Our results show that at E600, the site with highest air temperature (8.6 °C) and lowest precipitation (981.9 mm), evapotranspiration losses were 100.7 mm higher as at the E860 site, i.e. the site with lowest mean annual air temperature (6.5 °C) and highest precipitation (1359.3 mm). On the other hand groundwater recharge was substantial lower at E600 (-440.9 mm) as compared to E860. Compared to climate, impacts of grassland management on water balance components were negligible. However, intensive management significantly increased mean total nitrogen leaching rates across sites as compared to extensive management from 2.6 kg N ha-1 year-1 (range: 0.5-6.0 kg N ha-1 year-1) to 4.8 kg N ha-1 year-1 (range: 0.9-12.9 kg N ha-1 year-1). N leaching losses were dominated by nitrate (64.7 %) and equally less by ammonium (14.6 %) and DON (20.7 %). The rather low rates of N leaching (0.8 - 6.9 % of total applied N) suggest a highly efficient nitrogen uptake by plants as measured by plant total N content at harvest

  11. Food supply depends on seagrass meadows in the coral triangle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Richard K. F.; Hinder, Stephanie L.; Bodger, Owen G.; Cullen-Unsworth, Leanne C.

    2014-09-01

    The tropical seascape provides food and livelihoods to hundreds of millions of people, but the support of key habitats to this supply remains ill appreciated. For fisheries and conservation management actions to help promote resilient ecosystems, sustainable livelihoods, and food supply, knowledge is required about the habitats that help support fisheries productivity and the consequences of this for food security. This paper provides an interdisciplinary case study from the coral triangle of how seagrass meadows provide support for fisheries and local food security. We apply a triangulated approach that utilizes ecological, fisheries and market data combined with over 250 household interviews. Our research demonstrates that seagrass associated fauna in a coral triangle marine protected area support local food supply contributing at least 50% of the fish based food. This formed between 54% and 99% of daily protein intake in the area. Fishery catch was found to significantly vary with respect to village (p type significantly influenced this proportion (<0.05). Limited sustainability of fishery practices (high juvenile catch and a 51% decline in CPUE for the biggest fishery) and poor habitat management mean the security of this food supply has the potential to be undermined in the long-term. Findings of this study have implications for the management and assessment of fisheries throughout the tropical seascape. Our study provides an exemplar for why natural resource management should move beyond biodiversity and consider how conservation and local food security are interlinked processes that are not mutually exclusive. Seagrass meadows are under sustained threat worldwide, this study provides evidence of the need to conserve these not just to protect biodiversity but to protect food security.

  12. Three Grasses New to Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    SCHOLZ, Hildemar

    2014-01-01

    Studies on herbarium material of grasses recently collected in Turkey revealed the existence of three taxa hitherto not reported from this country: Bromus tomentellus Boiss. subsp. nivalis (Bornm.) H. Scholz & Byfield, subsp. et stat. nov., Microstegium vimineum (Trin.) A. Camus as a probably introduced plant, and Poa asiae-minoris H. Scholz & Byfield, sp. nova, described here as a species new to science.

  13. Three Grasses New to Turkey

    OpenAIRE

    SCHOLZ, Hildemar

    2000-01-01

    Studies on herbarium material of grasses recently collected in Turkey revealed the existence of three taxa hitherto not reported from this country: Bromus tomentellus Boiss. subsp. nivalis (Bornm.) H. Scholz & Byfield, subsp. et stat. nov., Microstegium vimineum (Trin.) A. Camus as a probably introduced plant, and Poa asiae-minoris H. Scholz & Byfield, sp. nova, described here as a species new to science.

  14. Mechanical pretreatment at harvesting increases the bioenergy output from marginal land grasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsapekos, Panagiotis; Kougias, Panagiotis; Egelund, H.

    2017-01-01

    , a Disc-mower, an Excoriator and a Chopper were used to define the most appropriate machinery in order to improve the energy output per hectare for full-scale biogas plants. Among the harvesters, Excoriator, a novel simultaneous harvest and mechanical treatment, was found to significantly increase...... the methane yield of meadow grass by 20% compared to a classical Disc-mower. The positive effect was also validated by three kinetic model equations. The modified Gompertz model was the most capable of determining the kinetics of anaerobic digestion process, pointing out also the superiority of Excoriator...... enhance the bioenergy output of a full-scale biogas plant in a range of 12%-23%. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  15. Drivers of atmospheric methane uptake by montane forest soils in the southern Peruvian Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sam P.; Diem, Torsten; Huaraca Quispe, Lidia P.; Cahuana, Adan J.; Reay, Dave S.; Meir, Patrick; Arn Teh, Yit

    2016-07-01

    The soils of tropical montane forests can act as sources or sinks of atmospheric methane (CH4). Understanding this activity is important in regional atmospheric CH4 budgets given that these ecosystems account for substantial portions of the landscape in mountainous areas like the Andes. We investigated the drivers of net CH4 fluxes from premontane, lower and upper montane forests, experiencing a seasonal climate, in south-eastern Peru. Between February 2011 and June 2013, these soils all functioned as net sinks for atmospheric CH4. Mean (standard error) net CH4 fluxes for the dry and wet season were -1.6 (0.1) and -1.1 (0.1) mg CH4-C m-2 d-1 in the upper montane forest, -1.1 (0.1) and -1.0 (0.1) mg CH4-C m-2 d-1 in the lower montane forest, and -0.2 (0.1) and -0.1 (0.1) mg CH4-C m-2 d-1 in the premontane forest. Seasonality in CH4 exchange varied among forest types with increased dry season CH4 uptake only apparent in the upper montane forest. Variation across these forests was best explained by available nitrate and water-filled pore space indicating that nitrate inhibition of oxidation or diffusional constraints imposed by changes in water-filled pore space on methanotrophic communities may represent important controls on soil-atmosphere CH4 exchange. Net CH4 flux was inversely related to elevation; a pattern that differs to that observed in Ecuador, the only other extant study site of soil-atmosphere CH4 exchange in the tropical Andes. This may result from differences in rainfall patterns between the regions, suggesting that attention should be paid to the role of rainfall and soil moisture dynamics in modulating CH4 uptake by the organic-rich soils typical of high-elevation tropical forests.

  16. Effects of feeding grass or red clover silage cut at two maturity stages in dairy cows. 1. Nitrogen metabolism and supply of amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhatalo, A; Kuoppala, K; Ahvenjärvi, S; Rinne, M

    2009-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of plant species (red clover vs. timothy-meadow fescue) and forage maturity at primary harvest (early vs. late cut silage) on rumen fermentation, nutrient digestion, and nitrogen metabolism including omasal canal AA flow and plasma AA concentration in lactating cows. Five dairy cows equipped with rumen cannulas were used in a study designed as a 5 x 5 Latin square with 21-d periods. The diets consisted of early-cut and late-cut grass and red clover silage, respectively, and a mixture of late-cut grass and early-cut red clover silages given ad libitum with 9 kg/d of a standard concentrate. Grass silage dry matter intake tended to decrease but that of red clover silages tended to increase with advancing maturity. Milk yields were unchanged among treatments, milk protein and fat concentrations being lower for red clover than for grass silage diets. Rumen fluid pH was unchanged but volatile fatty acid and ammonia concentrations were higher for red clover than for grass silage diets. Intake of N, and omasal canal flows of total nonammonia N (NAN), microbial NAN, and dietary NAN were higher for red clover than for grass silage diets but were not affected by forage maturity. However, microbial NAN flow and amount of N excreted in the feces decreased with advancing maturity for grass diets but increased for red clover diets. Apparent ruminal N degradability of the diets was unchanged, but true ruminal N degradability decreased and efficiency of microbial synthesis increased with red clover diets compared with grass silage diets. Omasal canal flows of AA, except those for Met and Cys, were on average 20% higher for red clover than grass silage diets. Omasal canal digesta concentrations of Leu, Phe, branched-chain, and essential AA were higher but those of Met lower for red clover than for grass silage diets. Plasma AA concentrations, except for His (unchanged) and Met (lower), were higher for red clover than for grass diets. However, none

  17. UV induced visual cues in grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baby, Sabulal; Johnson, Anil John; Govindan, Balaji; Lukose, Sujith; Gopakumar, Bhaskaran; Koshy, Konnath Chacko

    2013-01-01

    Grasses are traditionally considered as wind pollinated, however, field observations confirmed frequent insect visits to grass flowers, suggesting insect pollination. Fruit and seed predators inflict heavy losses to cereals and millets during their growth, maturation and storage. The actual factors guiding insects and predators to grass flowers, fruits and seeds are not clear. Here, we report attractive blue fluorescence emissions on grass floral parts such as glumes, lemma, palea, lodicules, staminal filaments, pollens and fruits in ultraviolet (UV) 366 nm, whereas the stigmatic portions were not blue, but red fluorescent. We characterized the blue fluorescent constituent in grass reproductive structures as ferulic acid (FA). Fluorescence spectra of blue-emitting grass floral, seed extracts and isolated FA on excitation at 366 nm showed their emissions at 420–460 nm. We propose these FA-based blue fluorescence emissions in grass reproductive structures as visual cues that attract pollinators, predators and even pests towards them. PMID:24061408

  18. Wet Meadow Plant Associations, Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, Harney County, Oregon

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes vegetation data collected in July 2012 and July 2013 in wet meadow habitats on the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. It incorporates portions...

  19. HYDROLOGY OF CENTRAL GREAT BASIN MEADOW ECOSYSTEMS – EFFECTS OF STREAM INCISION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riparian wet meadow complexes in the mountains of the central Great Basin are scarce, ecologically important systems that are threatened by stream incision. Our interdisciplinary group has investigated 1) the interrelationships of geomorphology, hydrology, and vegetation; and 2) ...

  20. Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge and Carlton Pond Waterfowl Production Area outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1990...

  1. Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Carlton Pond Waterfowl Production Area, Benton Unit, and Unity Unit outlines Refuge...

  2. Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1989 calendar year. The report begins by summarizing...

  3. Species status assessment report New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The New Mexico meadow jumping mouse (Zapus hudsonius luteus) (jumping mouse) lives in dense riparian herbaceous vegetation along streams from southern Colorado to...

  4. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1988

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1988 calendar year. The report begins with a...

  5. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1992 calendar year. The report begins with a...

  6. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Complex: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1989

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Complex outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1989 calendar year. The report begins with...

  7. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1991 calendar year. The report begins with a...

  8. Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge and the Owl Moutain Partnership riparian/meadow management demonstration project

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Arapaho National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) and the Owl Mountain Partnership (OMP) are implementing a 5-year riparian/meadow management demonstration project. The...

  9. Sediment toxicity of Long Meadow Lake Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Long Meadow Lake on the Minnesota Valley National Wildlife Refuge - an important waterfowl production area - serves as a major urban stormwater receptor in the...

  10. Annual narrative report: Calendar year 2000: Supawna Meadows National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Supawna Meadows NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2000 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of the year's...

  11. Supawna Meadows National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Supawna Meadows NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1996 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of the year's...

  12. Supawna Meadows National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1998

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Supawna Meadows NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1998 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of the year's...

  13. Annual narrative report: Calendar year 2001: Supawna Meadows National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Supawna Meadows NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 2001 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of the year's...

  14. Supawna Meadows National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Supawna Meadows NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1995 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of the year's...

  15. Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 4 of 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  16. Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 1 of 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  17. Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 2 of 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  18. Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge [Land Status Map: Sheet 3 of 4

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This map was produced by the Division of Realty to depict landownership at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. It was generated from rectified aerial photography,...

  19. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge Monthly Narrative: September-December 1993

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the months of September through December 1993. The...

  20. Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Sunkhaze Meadows NWR, Carlton Pond Waterfowl Production Area, Benton Unit, and Unity Unit outlines Refuge accomplishments during the...

  1. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrrative Report : Calendar Year 1985

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1985 calendar year. The report begins with a...

  2. Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Carlton Pond National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Fiscal year 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Sunhaze Meadows NWR and Carlton Pond WPA outlines activities and accomplishments during the 2001 fiscal year. The report begins with...

  3. Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge and Carlton Pond Waterfowl Production Area: Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) was written to guide management on Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge and Carlton Pond Waterfowl Production Area...

  4. Bird Nesting Effort in Wet Meadows at Baca National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In the summers of 2013, 2015, and 2016, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service staff conducted research to determine nesting effort of avian species in the wet meadow...

  5. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrrative Report : Calendar Year 1987

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1987 calendar year. The report begins with a...

  6. Outreach Plan : Crane Meadows National Wildlife Refuge : Special Deer & Turkey Hunting Opportunities

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is a plan for special deer and turkey hunting opportunities at Crane Meadows NWR. Goals, strategies, messages, and key dates relevant to this plan are outlined.

  7. The Trail Inventory of Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge [Cycle 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The purpose of this report is to create a baseline inventory of all non-motorized trails on Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. Trails in this inventory are...

  8. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge : Narrative Report : September to December 1960

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments from September to December 1960. The report begins by summarizing...

  9. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1990 calendar year. The report begins with a...

  10. Archaeological and paleoenvironmental investigations in the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This is an archeological and paleoenvironmental study of Ash Meadows NWR. Archaeological and paleoenvironmental studies were conducted by the Quaternary Sciences...

  11. Supawna Meadows National Wildlife Refuge annual narrative report calendar year 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Supawna Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1997 calendar year. The report begins with a...

  12. Assessment of Cokeville Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Wyoming for creosote contamination of wetlands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Semi-permeable devices (SPMDs) were deployed in wetlands along a railroad right-of-way at the Cokeville Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Wyoming to...

  13. Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Sunkhaze Meadows NWR, Carlton Pond Waterfowl Production Area, Benton Unit, and Unity Unit outlines Refuge accomplishments during the...

  14. Contaminant survey of Sunkhaze Stream and Baker Brook: Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 1993 a screening-level contaminant survey of the Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge was conducted by the Maine Field Office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife...

  15. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrrative Report : Calendar Year 1984

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1984 calendar year. The report begins with a...

  16. Malheur NWR: Initial Survey Instructions for Wet Meadow Landbird Point Count

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We will monitor birds tied to wet meadow habitat in Unit 12. This data will be linked with plant community composition data to gain understanding shifting population...

  17. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrrative Report : Calendar Year 1983

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1983 calendar year. The report begins with a...

  18. Seagrass meadows globally as a coupled social-ecological system: implications for human wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen-Unsworth, Leanne C; Nordlund, Lina Mtwana; Paddock, Jessica; Baker, Susan; McKenzie, Len J; Unsworth, Richard K F

    2014-06-30

    Seagrass ecosystems are diminishing worldwide and repeated studies confirm a lack of appreciation for the value of these systems. In order to highlight their value we provide the first discussion of seagrass meadows as a coupled social-ecological system on a global scale. We consider the impact of a declining resource on people, including those for whom seagrass meadows are utilised for income generation and a source of food security through fisheries support. Case studies from across the globe are used to demonstrate the intricate relationship between seagrass meadows and people that highlight the multi-functional role of seagrasses in human wellbeing. While each case underscores unique issues, these examples simultaneously reveal social-ecological coupling that transcends cultural and geographical boundaries. We conclude that understanding seagrass meadows as a coupled social-ecological system is crucial in carving pathways for social and ecological resilience in light of current patterns of local to global environmental change.

  19. Vegetation Classification, Inventory, and Ecological Integrity Assessment of the Wet Meadow Habitats: Malheur National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The objectives of this biotic inventory contribute greatly to the construction of a solid foundation for wet meadow management on the Refuge and the wildlife that it...

  20. Supawna Meadows National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Supawna Meadows NWR outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1991 calendar year. The report begins with a summary of the year's...

  1. Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: Calendar year 1992

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Sunkhaze Meadows NWR, Carlton Pond Waterfowl Production Area, Benton Unit, and Unity Unit outlines Refuge accomplishments during the...

  2. An Evaluation of Ecosystem Restoration Options for Cokeville Meadows National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This Evaluation of Ecosystem Restoration and Management Options covers the hydrogeomorphic analysis (HGM) for Cokeville Meadows National Wildlife Refuge. This three...

  3. Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge : Annual Narrrative Report : Calendar Year 1982

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Great Meadows National Wildlife Refuge outlines Refuge accomplishments during the 1982 calendar year. The report begins with a...

  4. Epichloë endophytes alter inducible indirect defences in host grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Blande, James D; Gundel, Pedro E; Helander, Marjo; Saikkonen, Kari

    2014-01-01

    Epichloë endophytes are common symbionts living asymptomatically in pooid grasses and may provide chemical defences against herbivorous insects. While the mechanisms underlying these fungal defences have been well studied, it remains unknown whether endophyte presence affects the host's own defences. We addressed this issue by examining variation in the impact of Epichloë on constitutive and herbivore-induced emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC), a well-known indirect plant defence, between two grass species, Schedonorus phoenix (ex. Festuca arundinacea; tall fescue) and Festuca pratensis (meadow fescue). We found that feeding by a generalist aphid species, Rhopalosiphum padi, induced VOC emissions by uninfected plants of both grass species but to varying extents, while mechanical wounding failed to do so in both species after one day of damage. Interestingly, regardless of damage treatment, Epichloë uncinata-infected F. pratensis emitted significantly lower quantities of VOCs than their uninfected counterparts. In contrast, Epichloë coenophiala-infected S. phoenix did not differ from their uninfected counterparts in constitutive VOC emissions but tended to increase VOC emissions under intense aphid feeding. A multivariate analysis showed that endophyte status imposed stronger differences in VOC profiles of F. pratensis than damage treatment, while the reverse was true for S. phoenix. Additionally, both endophytes inhibited R. padi population growth as measured by aphid dry biomass, with the inhibition appearing greater in E. uncinata-infected F. pratensis. Our results suggest, not only that Epichloë endophytes may play important roles in mediating host VOC responses to herbivory, but also that the magnitude and direction of such responses may vary with the identity of the Epichloë-grass symbiosis. Whether Epichloë-mediated host VOC responses will eventually translate into effects on higher trophic levels merits future investigation.

  5. Epichloë Endophytes Alter Inducible Indirect Defences in Host Grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Blande, James D.; Gundel, Pedro E.; Helander, Marjo; Saikkonen, Kari

    2014-01-01

    Epichloë endophytes are common symbionts living asymptomatically in pooid grasses and may provide chemical defences against herbivorous insects. While the mechanisms underlying these fungal defences have been well studied, it remains unknown whether endophyte presence affects the host's own defences. We addressed this issue by examining variation in the impact of Epichloë on constitutive and herbivore-induced emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC), a well-known indirect plant defence, between two grass species, Schedonorus phoenix (ex. Festuca arundinacea; tall fescue) and Festuca pratensis (meadow fescue). We found that feeding by a generalist aphid species, Rhopalosiphum padi, induced VOC emissions by uninfected plants of both grass species but to varying extents, while mechanical wounding failed to do so in both species after one day of damage. Interestingly, regardless of damage treatment, Epichloë uncinata-infected F. pratensis emitted significantly lower quantities of VOCs than their uninfected counterparts. In contrast, Epichloë coenophiala-infected S. phoenix did not differ from their uninfected counterparts in constitutive VOC emissions but tended to increase VOC emissions under intense aphid feeding. A multivariate analysis showed that endophyte status imposed stronger differences in VOC profiles of F. pratensis than damage treatment, while the reverse was true for S. phoenix. Additionally, both endophytes inhibited R. padi population growth as measured by aphid dry biomass, with the inhibition appearing greater in E. uncinata-infected F. pratensis. Our results suggest, not only that Epichloë endophytes may play important roles in mediating host VOC responses to herbivory, but also that the magnitude and direction of such responses may vary with the identity of the Epichloë–grass symbiosis. Whether Epichloë-mediated host VOC responses will eventually translate into effects on higher trophic levels merits future investigation. PMID:24978701

  6. Food for Pollinators: Quantifying the Nectar and Pollen Resources of Urban Flower Meadows

    OpenAIRE

    Hicks, D.M.; Ouvrard, P.; Baldock, K.C.R.; Baude, M.; Goddard, M. A.; Kunin, W.E.; Mitschunas, N.; Memmott, J; Morse, H; Nikolitsi, M; Osgathorpe, L.M.; Potts, S. G.; Robertson, K. M.; Scott, A.V.; Sinclair, F.

    2016-01-01

    Planted meadows are increasingly used to improve the biodiversity and aesthetic amenity value of urban areas. Although many ‘pollinator-friendly’ seed mixes are available, the floral resources these provide to flower-visiting insects, and how these change through time, are largely unknown. Such data are necessary to compare the resources provided by alternative meadow seed mixes to each other and to other flowering habitats. We used quantitative surveys of over 2 million flowers to estimate t...

  7. Modelling reference conditions for the upper limit of Posidonia oceanica meadows: a morphodynamic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacchi, Matteo; Misson, Gloria; Montefalcone, Monica; Archetti, Renata; Nike Bianchi, Carlo; Ferrari, Marco

    2014-05-01

    The upper portion of the meadows of the protected Mediterranean seagrass Posidonia oceanica occurs in the region of the seafloor mostly affected by surf-related effects. Evaluation of its status is part of monitoring programs, but proper conclusions are difficult to draw due to the lack of definite reference conditions. Comparing the position of the meadow upper limit with the beach morphodynamics (i.e. the distinctive type of beach produced by topography and wave climate) provided evidence that the natural landwards extension of meadows can be predicted. Here we present an innovative predictive cartographic approach able to identify the seafloor portion where the meadow upper limit should naturally lies (i.e. its reference conditions). The conceptual framework of this model is based on 3 essential components: i) Definition of the breaking depth geometry: the breaking limit represents the major constrain for the landward meadow development. We modelled the breaking limit (1 year return time) using the software Mike 21 sw. ii) Definition of the morphodynamic domain of the beach using the surf scaling index ɛ; iii) Definition of the P. oceanica upper limit geometry. We coupled detailed aerial photo with thematic bionomic cartography. In GIS environment, we modelled the seafloor extent where the meadow should naturally lies according to the breaking limit position and the morphodynamic domain of the beach. Then, we added the GIS layer with the meadow upper limit geometry. Therefore, the final output shows, on the same map, both the reference condition and the actual location of the upper limit. It make possible to assess the status of the landward extent of a given P. oceanica meadow and quantify any suspected or observed regression caused by anthropic factors. The model was elaborated and validated along the Ligurian coastline (NW Mediteraanean) and was positively tested in other Mediterranean areas.

  8. Habitat use of a multispecific seagrass meadow by green turtles Chelonia mydas at Mayotte Island

    OpenAIRE

    Ballorain, Katia; Ciccione, Stephane; Bourjea, Jerome; Grizel, Henri; Enstipp, Manfred; Georges, Jean-Yves

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the habitat use in green turtles exploiting a 13-ha multispecific seagrass meadow at Mayotte Island, south-western Indian Ocean. A phytoecological survey shows the occurrence of eight seagrass species, dominated by Halodule uninervis and Syringodium isoetifolium, distributed according to four distinct seagrass communities along the depth gradient. Direct underwater censuses show that green turtles occurred all over the meadow. Yet when community relative surface area was taken...

  9. Remote influence of off-shore fish farm waste on Mediterranean seagrass (Posidonia oceanica) meadows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, J M; Marco-Méndez, C; Sánchez-Lizaso, J L

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was estimating the remote influence of waste dispersed from a large off-shore fish farm complex (6197 ton year(-1)) on the near-shore Posidonia oceanica meadow (26-27 m deep) located at a distance of 3 km. Measurements of isotopic nitrogen content in epiphytes and seagrass leaf tissues, epiphyte biomass, shoot size, herbivory pressure, shoot density and seagrass meadow cover, performed in this meadow (FA area) were compared with those obtained in an undisturbed control meadow (CA area) to evaluate: (1) the remote influence of waste and (2) the impact of such influence on seagrass condition. In addition, delta(15)N measurements in particulate organic matter of natural and anthropogenic origin were used in a single-isotope mixing model to elucidate the relative contributions of these sources to the isotopic N signal measured in epiphytes and leaf tissues. Total tissue N content was similar between meadow areas, but delta(15)N signatures were significantly higher in the FA area than in the CA area both in epiphytes and seagrass leaf tissues. Results from the mixing model, together with available information on local currents and previous studies, support the conclusion that the dispersion of farm wastes over large areas (spanning kilometres) are responsible for the elevated delta(15)N signatures found in the FA meadow area. Despite this, no changes in meadow structure were detected and only some changes at the level of seagrass community (epiphytes abundances and herbivores activity) could be interpreted at the light of nutrient-induced effects in the FA area. Results from this study indicate that concentrating aquaculture facilities in off-shore areas is a strategy not totally exempt of environmental risk on near-shore sensitive habitats such as seagrass meadows.

  10. Mangroves as a major source of soil carbon storage in adjacent seagrass meadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guangcheng; Azkab, Muhammad Husni; Chmura, Gail L.; Chen, Shunyang; Sastrosuwondo, Pramudji; Ma, Zhiyuan; Dharmawan, I. Wayan Eka; Yin, Xijie; Chen, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Mangrove forests have the potential to export carbon to adjacent ecosystems but whether mangrove-derived organic carbon (OC) would enhance the soil OC storage in seagrass meadows adjacent to mangroves is unclear. In this study we examine the potential for the contribution of mangrove OC to seagrass soils on the coast of North Sulawesi, Indonesia. We found that seagrass meadows adjacent to mangroves had significantly higher soil OC concentrations, soil OC with lower δ 13C, and lower bulk density than those at the non-mangrove adjacent meadows. Soil OC storage to 30 cm depth ranged from 3.21 to 6.82 kg C m−2, and was also significantly higher at the mangrove adjacent meadows than those non-adjacent meadows. δ13C analyses revealed that mangrove OC contributed 34 to 83% to soil OC at the mangrove adjacent meadows. The δ13C value of seagrass plants was also different between the seagrasses adjacent to mangroves and those which were not, with lower values measured at the seagrasses adjacent to mangroves. Moreover, we found significant spatial variation in both soil OC concentration and storage, with values decreasing toward sea, and the contribution of mangrove-derived carbon also reduced with distance from the forest. PMID:28186151

  11. Ecosystem responses to warming-induced plant species loss and increased nitrogen availability in a Rocky Mountain subalpine meadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Molly Elizabeth

    Climate change is predicted to be an important driver of future biodiversity changes, especially in mountainous environments. Climate warming-induced plant species loss is likely to be non-random and based on species-specific susceptibility to rising temperatures. Experimental warming results from a subalpine meadow in Colorado suggest that warming adversely affects shallow-rooted forb species in this ecosystem. To examine the ecological consequences of losing this warming-sensitive species group, I experimentally removed all shallow-rooted forb species from otherwise intact subalpine meadow plots. Since experimental warming also resulted in increased soil nitrogen availability, I crossed the removal treatment with a nitrogen addition treatment to determine whether the loss of shallow-rooted forbs altered the community's response to a perturbation in nitrogen availability. After three years of experimental species removal, tap-rooted forbs and grasses were able to fully compensate for the loss of shallow-rooted forbs with increased biomass production. Moreover, the remaining plant community yielded a larger biomass response to nitrogen addition when shallow-rooted forbs were removed, possibly because removal led to increased soil moisture. The loss of shallow-rooted forbs and addition of nitrogen did not have strong effects on nitrogen cycling beyond increases in the amount of nitrate moving down through the soil profile. Uptake of nitrogen into plant tissue was also not affected by either the shallow-rooted forb removal or nitrogen addition treatments, suggesting that nitrogen may not have been the most limiting resource during the experiment. I found that spatial heterogeneity generally had a greater influence on soil microbial community composition than any of the experimental treatments. I conclude that the warming-induced loss of shallow-rooted forbs did not affect biomass production, nitrogen cycling, or soil microbial community composition, but did increase

  12. Soil microclimate monitoring in forested and meadow sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyerova, Katerina; Safanda, Jan

    2016-04-01

    It is well known fact that forest microclimate differs from open area microclimate (Geiger 1965). Less attention is paid to soil temperatures and their long-term monitoring. To evaluate and compare these two environments from the soil microclimate point of view, Institute of Geophysics in Prague monitors soil and air temperatures in Bedřichov in the Jizerské Hory Mountains (Czech Republic). The soil temperatures are measured in three depths (20, 50 and 100 cm) in forest (700 m a. s. l.) and meadow (750 m a. s. l.). Air temperatures are measured at 2m height both in forest and meadow. Nowadays, we have more than three years long time series. The most of studies and experiments described in literature are short-term ones (in order of days or weeks). However, from short-term experiments the seasonal behaviour and trends can be hardly identified and conclusions on soil temperature reaction to climatic extremes such as heat waves, drought or freeze cannot be done with confidence. These drawbacks of the short-term experiments are discussed in literature (eg. Morecroft et al. 1998; Renaud et al. 2011). At the same, with progression of the global warming, the expected increasing frequency of climatic extremes will affect the future form of forest vegetation (Von Arx et al. 2012). The soil and air temperature series, both from the forest and meadow sites, are evaluated and interpreted with respect to long term temperature characteristics and seasonal trends. The emphasis is given on the soil temperature responses to extreme climatic situations. We examine variability between the localities and depths and spatial and temporal changes in this variability. This long-term monitoring allows us to better understand and examine the behaviour of the soil temperature in extreme weather situations. Therefore, we hope to contribute to better prediction of future reactions of this specific environments to the climate change. Literature Geiger, R., 1965. The climate near the ground

  13. SOD FORM OF PERENNIAL GRASSES

    OpenAIRE

    Belyuchenko I. S.

    2014-01-01

    The article considers the peculiarities of turf and sod, specificity of formation of kidneys for regeneration, types of shoots, vegetative mobility and specificity of growth in certain conditions, turf grasses are divided into loosely-and tightly-turf characterized, by specific features of environmental, biological characteristics; forming turf from generative rosettes, elongated and shortened vegetative, side ground shoots, differing specificity of morphological, biochemical and fitocoenotic...

  14. Groundwater flow and storage within an alpine meadow-talus complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. McClymont

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The different types of geological deposits and rock formations found in alpine watersheds play key roles in regulating the rate and timing of runoff to mountain rivers. Talus and alpine meadows are dominant features in these areas, but scant data exist for their capacity to store and transmit groundwater. To gain further understanding of these processes, we have undertaken a combined geophysical and hydrological study of a small (2100 m2 alpine meadow and surrounding talus within the Lake O'Hara watershed in the Canadian Rockies. Several intersecting ground-penetrating radar (GPR and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT profiles and a seismic refraction profile were acquired to map the thickness of the talus and to image the topography of the bedrock basin that underlies the meadow. From analysis of the GPR and seismic profiles, we estimate that the talus deposits are relatively thin (<6 m. Combined interpretations from the GPR and ERT data show that the fine-grained sediment comprising the meadow basin has a total volume of ca. 3300 m3 and has a maximum thickness of ca. 4 m. Annual snow surveys and stream gauging reveal that the total input volume of snowmelt and rainfall to the meadow basin is several times larger than its groundwater storage capacity, giving rise to low total-dissolved species concentrations (14–21 mg/L within the meadow groundwater. Observations from four piezometers established on the meadow show that the water table fluctuates rapidly in response to spring snowmelt and precipitation events but otherwise maintains a relatively stable depth of 0.3–0.4 m below the meadow surface during summer months. A slug test performed on one of the piezometers indicated that the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the shallow meadow sediments is 2.5×10−7 m/s. We suggest that a bedrock saddle imaged underneath the southern end of the meadow forms a natural constriction to subsurface flow out of the

  15. Groundwater flow and storage within an alpine meadow-talus complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. F. McClymont

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The different types of geological deposits and rock formations found in alpine watersheds play key roles in regulating the rate and timing of runoff to mountain rivers. Talus and alpine meadows are dominant features in these areas, but scant data exist for their capacity to store and transmit groundwater. To gain further understanding of these processes, we have undertaken a combined geophysical and hydrological study of a small (2100 m2 alpine meadow and surrounding talus within the Lake O'Hara watershed in the Canadian Rockies. Several intersecting ground-penetrating radar (GPR and electrical resistivity tomography (ERT profiles and a seismic refraction profile were acquired to map the thickness of the talus and to image the topography of the bedrock basin that lies under the meadow. From analysis of the GPR and seismic profiles, we estimate that the talus deposits are relatively thin (<6 m. Combined interpretations from the GPR and ERT data show that the fine-grained sediment, that the meadow basin is comprised of, has a total volume of ca. 3300 m3 and has a maximum thickness of ca. 4 m. Annual snow surveys and stream gauging reveal that the total input volume of snowmelt and rainfall to the meadow basin is several times larger than its groundwater storage capacity, giving rise to low total-dissolved species concentrations (14–21 mg/L within the meadow groundwater. Observations from four piezometers established on the meadow show that the water table fluctuates rapidly in response to spring snowmelt and precipitation events but otherwise maintains a relatively stable depth of 0.3–0.4 m below the meadow surface during summer months. A slug test performed on one of the piezometers indicated that the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the shallow meadow sediments is 2.5×10−7 m/s. We suggest that a bedrock saddle imaged underneath the southern end of the meadow forms a natural constriction to subsurface

  16. A multi-scale evaluation of pack stock effects on subalpine meadow plant communities in the Sierra Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Steven R.; Berlow, Eric L.; Ostoja, Steven M.; Brooks, Matthew L.; Génin, Alexandre; Matchett, John R.; Hart, Stephen C.

    2017-01-01

    We evaluated the influence of pack stock (i.e., horse and mule) use on meadow plant communities in Sequoia and Yosemite National Parks in the Sierra Nevada of California. Meadows were sampled to account for inherent variability across multiple scales by: 1) controlling for among-meadow variability by using remotely sensed hydro-climatic and geospatial data to pair stock use meadows with similar non-stock (reference) sites, 2) accounting for within-meadow variation in the local hydrology using in-situ soil moisture readings, and 3) incorporating variation in stock use intensity by sampling across the entire available gradient of pack stock use. Increased cover of bare ground was detected only within “dry” meadow areas at the two most heavily used pack stock meadows (maximum animals per night per hectare). There was no difference in plant community composition for any level of soil moisture or pack stock use. Increased local-scale spatial variability in plant community composition (species dispersion) was detected in “wet” meadow areas at the two most heavily used meadows. These results suggest that at the meadow scale, plant communities are generally resistant to the contemporary levels of recreational pack stock use. However, finer-scale within-meadow responses such as increased bare ground or spatial variability in the plant community can be a function of local-scale hydrological conditions. Wilderness managers can improve monitoring of disturbance in Sierra Nevada meadows by adopting multiple plant community indices while simultaneously considering local moisture regimes.

  17. Symbiotic grasses: A review of basic biology of forage grass fungal endophytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    The fungal endophytes associated with grasses are the fundamental reason for the basic successes of several pasture grasses, notable tall fescues, and perennial ryegrass. Tall fescue and perennial ryegrass fungal endophytes, Neotyphodium coenophialum and N. lolii, respectively, and their relatives ...

  18. Nutritional value of cabbage and kikuyu grass as food for grass carp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nutritional value of cabbage and kikuyu grass as food for grass carp,. Ctenopharyngodon idella Val. ... the Transkei, farming is the main economic activity. (Anon, 1980). .... Eds. Varshney, C.K. & Rzoska, J., The Hague, W. Junk.,. 315 pp.

  19. Patterns and drivers of scattered tree loss in agricultural landscapes: orchard meadows in Germany (1968-2009).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plieninger, Tobias; Levers, Christian; Mantel, Martin; Costa, Augusta; Schaich, Harald; Kuemmerle, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Scattered trees support high levels of farmland biodiversity and ecosystem services in agricultural landscapes, but they are threatened by agricultural intensification, urbanization, and land abandonment. This study aimed to map and quantify the decline of orchard meadows (scattered fruit trees of high nature conservation value) for a region in Southwestern Germany for the 1968 2009 period and to identify the driving forces of this decline. We derived orchard meadow loss from 1968 and 2009 aerial images and used a boosted regression trees modelling framework to assess the relative importance of 18 environmental, demographic, and socio-economic variables to test five alternative hypothesis explaining orchard meadow loss. We found that orchard meadow loss occurred in flatter areas, in areas where smaller plot sizes and fragmented orchard meadows prevailed, and in areas near settlements and infrastructure. The analysis did not confirm that orchard meadow loss was higher in areas where agricultural intensification was stronger and in areas of lower implementation levels of conservation policies. Our results demonstrated that the influential drivers of orchard meadow loss were those that reduce economic profitability and increase opportunity costs for orchards, providing incentives for converting orchard meadows to other, more profitable land uses. These insights could be taken up by local- and regional-level conservation policies to identify the sites of persistent orchard meadows in agricultural landscapes that would be prioritized in conservation efforts.

  20. Soil organic carbon and nitrogen content of density fractions and effect of meadow degradation to soil carbon and nitrogen of fractions in alpine Kobresia meadow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This research was conducted on the non-disturbed native alpine Kobresia meadow(YF) and the severely degraded meadow(SDL) of Dari County of Qinghai Province.By a density fractionation approach,each soil sample was divided into two fractions:light fraction(LF) and heavy fraction(HF).The obtained fractions were analyzed for organic carbon(OC) and nitrogen(N) concentrations.The results showed:(1) the OC concentration in HF and LF was 3.84% and 28.63% respectively while the nitrogen concentration in HF and LF was 0.362% and 1.192% respectively in 0-10 cm depth.C:N ratio was 10.6 in HF and 23.8 in LF respectively.(2) As far as the ratio of OC in given fraction to that in gross sample was concerned,dominance of OC in HF was obvious in the whole soil profile.OC in HF increased from 78.95% to 90.33%,while OC in LF decreased from 21.05% to 9.68% with depths.(3) Soil total OC amounted to 47.47 in YF while 17.63 g.kg-1 in SDL,in which the OC content in HF decreased from 37.31 to 16.01 g.kg-1 while OC content in LF decreased from 10.01 to 1.62 g.kg-1.In other words,results of OC and N content show meadow degradation led to the loss of 57% OC in HF and 84% OC in LF from originally native ecosystem on alpine meadow.In addition,meadow degradation led to the loss of 43% N in HF and 79% N in LF from originally native ecosystem on alpine meadow.(4) The main reason for loss of C and N in LF during meadow degradation was not attributed to the decrease of OC and N concentration in LF and LF,but to the decrease in LF dry weight.Loss of N was far lower than loss of C in HF.This may suggest that there is difference in protection mode of C and N in HF.

  1. Multiple grass mixes as opposed to single grasses for allergen immunotherapy in allergic rhinitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangl, K; Niederberger, V; Valenta, R

    2013-11-01

    Grass pollen allergy affects approximately 40% of allergic patients. Subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy (SCIT) is the only allergen-specific and disease-modifying treatment available. Currently available therapeutic vaccines for the treatment of grass pollen allergy are based on natural grass pollen extracts which are either made from pollen of one cross-reactive grass species or from several related grass species. Clinical studies have shown that SCIT performed with timothy grass pollen extract is effective for the treatment of grass pollen allergy. Moreover, it has been demonstrated that recombinant timothy grass pollen allergens contain the majority of relevant epitopes and can be used for SCIT in clinical trials. However, recent in vitro studies have suggested that mixes consisting of allergen extracts from several related grass species may have advantages for SCIT over single allergen extracts. Here, we review current knowledge regarding the disease-relevant allergens in grass pollen allergy, available clinical studies comparing SCIT with allergen extracts from timothy grass or from mixes of several related grass species of the Pooideae subfamily, in vitro cross-reactivity studies performed with natural allergen extracts and recombinant allergens and SCIT studies performed with recombinant timothy grass pollen allergens. In vitro and clinical studies performed with natural allergen extracts reveal no relevant advantages of using multiple grass mixes as opposed to single grass pollen extracts. Several studies analysing the molecular composition of natural allergen extracts and the molecular profile of patients' immune responses after SCIT with allergen extracts indicate that the major limitation for the production of a high quality grass pollen vaccine resides in intrinsic features of natural allergen extracts which can only be overcome with recombinant allergen-based technologies.

  2. Species turnover in tropical montane forest avifauna links to climatic correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Feng Tsai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined avifauna richness and composition in Taiwan’s tropical montane forests, and compared to historical records dated 22 years ago. A richness attrition of 44 species caused a discrepancy of 30.2%, and an estimated yearly turnover of 2.2%. More resident species that were narrower or lower in elevation distribution, insectivores/omnivores, small to medium-sized, forest/open-field dwelling, and canopy/ground foragers, vanished; whereas piscivores, carnivores, riparian- and shrub-dwellers, ground and mid-layer foragers, and migrants suffered by higher proportions. Occurrence frequencies of persistent species remained constant but varied among ecological groups, indicating an increased homogeneity for smaller-sized insectivores/omnivores dwelling in the forest canopy, shrub, or understory. While the overall annual temperature slightly increased, a relatively stable mean temperature was replaced by an ascending trend from the mid-1990s until 2002, followed by a cooling down. Mean maximum temperatures increased but minimums decreased gradually over years, resulting in increasing temperature differences up to over 16 °C. This accompanied an increase of extreme typhoons affecting Taiwan or directly striking these montane forests during the last decade. These results, given no direct human disturbances were noted, suggest a link between the species turnover and recent climate change, and convey warning signs of conservation concerns for tropical montane assemblages.

  3. A MCDM Analysis of the Roşia Montană Gold Mining Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Mihai

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The need and estimated utility for a structured analysis of the Roşia Montană gold exploitation project have been palpable in the Romanian public sphere during the last 15 years and there is a vast amount of conflicting information and opinions on the benefits and risks involved. This article provides a comprehensive decision analysis of the Roşia Montană project. Over 100 documents from the past years have been gathered regarding the Roşia Montană mining project, which cover the main official, formal and less formal documents covering the case and produced by a wide range of stakeholders. These were then analyzed while designing a multi-criteria tree including the relevant perspectives under which the most commonly discussed four alternatives were analyzed. The result of this can be translated into a valuable recommendation for the mining company and for the political decision-makers. If these stakeholders want the continuation of the project and its acceptance by civil society, the key challenge is to increase the transparency of the process and improve the credibility and legal aspects; if these aspects cannot be met, the decision-makers need to pay attention to the alternatives available for a sustainable development in the area.

  4. Two pulses of diversification across the Isthmus of Tehuantepec in a montane Mexican bird fauna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, B R; Klicka, J

    2010-09-07

    Understanding the evolutionary history of the species in a particular region provides insights into how that fauna was formed. Of particular interest to biogeographers is examining the impact a geographical barrier had in generating temporal genetic diversity among codistributed species. We examined the impact a major New World barrier, the Isthmus of Tehuantepec (IT) in southern Mexico, had on a regional bird fauna. Specifically, genetic data from 10 montane-forest bird taxa were analysed using approximate Bayesian computation (ABC) to test the hypothesis of simultaneous intraspecific diversification at the IT. Because effective population size (N(e)) has the greatest impact on coalescent times, thereby affecting tests of divergence among codistributed taxa, we chose priors for both current and ancestral N(e) using empirical estimates of theta. The ABC method detected two discrete diversification events. Subsequent analysis with the number of diversification events constrained to two suggests that four taxa diverged in an older event, with the remaining six diverging more recently. Application of a range of mutation rates from 2.0 to 5.0% Myr(-1) places both events within the Pleistocene or Late Pliocene, suggesting that fluctuations in montane habitat induced by climate cycles and a late Pliocene seaway may have fractured this montane bird fauna. The results presented here suggest this avian fauna responded in a relatively concerted fashion over the last several million years.

  5. Ground flora, small mammal and bird species diversity in miscanthus (Miscanthusxgiganteus) and reed canary-grass (Phalaris arundinacea) fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semere, T.; Slater, F.M. [Cardiff University, School of Biosciences, Llysdinam Field Centre, Newbridge-on-Wye, Llandrindod Wells, Powys LD1 6NB (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-15

    Wildlife monitoring of two miscanthus and two reed canary-grass fields in Herefordshire, England was carried out in 2002, 2003 and 2004 to investigate the ecological impact of perennial biomass grass crops on ground flora, small mammals and birds. Quadrats were used to record percentage ground vegetation cover within and around the periphery of each crop. Small mammals were sampled by live trapping using Longworth traps. The common bird census technique was used to monitor populations of birds. Miscanthus fields were richer in weed vegetation than reed canary-grass or arable fields. Bird use of the biomass crop fields varied depending on species. There were considerably more open-ground bird species such as skylarks (Alauda arvensis), lapwings (Vanellus vanellus) and meadow pipits (Anthus pratensis) within miscanthus than within reed canary-grass fields. There was no particular crop-type preference by the small mammal species, but rather a preference for good ground cover and little land disturbance, which was provided by both biomass crops. Ground flora, small mammals and most of the bird species (except open-ground birds) were found more abundantly within field margins and boundaries than in crop fields indicating the importance of retaining field structure when planting biomass crops. The miscanthus work relates entirely to young crops, which may be representative of part of the national crop if large areas are cultivated for rhizomes. The findings from the current project indicate that perennial biomass grass crops can provide substantially improved habitat for many forms of native wildlife, due to the low intensity of the agricultural management system and the untreated headlands. (author)

  6. Comparative genetics in the grasses

    OpenAIRE

    Gale, Michael D.; Devos, Katrien M.

    1998-01-01

    Genetic mapping of wheat, maize, and rice and other grass species with common DNA probes has revealed remarkable conservation of gene content and gene order over the 60 million years of radiation of Poaceae. The linear organization of genes in some nine different genomes differing in basic chromosome number from 5 to 12 and nuclear DNA amount from 400 to 6,000 Mb, can be described in terms of only 25 “rice linkage blocks.” The extent to which this intergenomic coli...

  7. Effect of individual grass species and grass species mixtures on soil quality as related to root biomass and grass yield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eekeren, van N.J.M.; Bos, M.; Wit, de J.; Keidel, H.; Bloem, J.

    2010-01-01

    For the purpose of feeding value, drought resistance and nitrogen utilization, other grasses (e.g. Festuca arundinacea and Dactylis glomerata) than the currently widely used perennial rye grass (Lolium perenne) are introduced in dairy farming, either as a monoculture or in a mixture. To study the ef

  8. The estimation of some wild flowers seed material from the natural-valuable meadow habitats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janicka Maria

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The restoration of the species composition of the meadow habitats is often linked to the introduction of the typical species’ seeds. The effectiveness of that treatment requires getting the acquired detailed knowledge of the germination biology of peculiar species. Eight typical plant species of four non-forest habitats of the river valleys, representing the following types: Cnidion dubii (6440, Molinion (6410, Arrhenatherion (6510 and Festuco-Brometea (6210 were investigated. The diasporas were collected in the years 2014–2015 on the meadows of PLH 140016 protection area near Mniszew (Kozienice county, Mazovian voivodeship. The ability of seeds’ germination in the laboratory conditions was studied. It was stated that Cnidion and Molinion meadows’ species require pre-chilling to break the seeds’ dormancy, while the Arrhenatherion meadows and xerotermophilous swards do not require such treatment. The Allium angulosum, Plantago lanceolata, Achillea millefolium and Eryngium planum were characterized by high vigour and germination capability as well as the low share of dead seeds. The extremely drought in 2015 caused the decreasing in germination capability and increasing in the dead seeds’ share. The preliminary studies, presented in this paper, show that Cnidion and Molinion meadows may be most difficult to restore because of the necessity of breaking the seeds’ dormancy and higher sensitiveness for the unfavourable weather conditions during the seed ripening stage. The studies have practical significance for the works connected with the floristic diversity’ increasing of threatened communities and the restoration of the destroyed meadow habitats.

  9. Towards Detection of Cutting in Hay Meadows by Using of NDVI and EVI Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Halabuk

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The main requirement for preserving European hay meadows in good condition is through prerequisite cut management. However, monitoring these practices on a larger scale is very difficult. Our study analyses the use of MODIS vegetation indices products, namely EVI and NDVI, to discriminate cut and uncut meadows in Slovakia. We tested the added value of simple transformations of raw data series (seasonal statistics, first difference series, compared EVI and NDVI, and analyzed optimal periods, the number of scenes and the effect of smoothing on classification performance. The first difference series transformation saw substantial improvement in classification results. The best case NDVI series classification yielded overall accuracy of 85% with balanced rates of producer’s and user’s accuracies for both classes. EVI yielded slightly lower values, though not significantly different, although user accuracy of cut meadows achieved only 67%. Optimal periods for discriminating cut and uncut meadows lay between 16 May and 4 August, meaning only seven consecutive images are enough to accurately detect cutting in hay meadows. More importantly, the 16-day compositing period seemed to be enough for detection of cutting, which would be the time span that might be hopefully achieved by upcoming on-board HR sensors (e.g., Sentinel-2.

  10. Wet meadow ecosystems contribute the majority of overwinter soil respiration from snow-scoured alpine tundra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, John F.; Blanken, Peter D.; Williams, Mark W.

    2016-04-01

    We measured soil respiration across a soil moisture gradient ranging from dry to wet snow-scoured alpine tundra soils throughout three winters and two summers. In the absence of snow accumulation, soil moisture variability was principally determined by the combination of mesotopographical hydrological focusing and shallow subsurface permeability, which resulted in a patchwork of comingled ecosystem types along a single alpine ridge. To constrain the subsequent carbon cycling variability, we compared three measures of effective diffusivity and three methods to calculate gradient method soil respiration from four typical vegetation communities. Overwinter soil respiration was primarily restricted to wet meadow locations, and a conservative estimate of the rate of overwinter soil respiration from snow-scoured wet meadow tundra was 69-90% of the maximum carbon dioxide (CO2) respired by seasonally snow-covered soils within this same catchment. This was attributed to higher overwinter soil temperatures at wet meadow locations relative to fellfield, dry meadow, and moist meadow communities, which supported liquid water and heterotrophic respiration throughout the winter. These results were corroborated by eddy covariance-based measurements that demonstrated an average of 272 g C m-2 overwinter carbon loss during the study period. As a result, we updated a conceptual model of soil respiration versus snow cover to express the potential for soil respiration variability from snow-scoured alpine tundra.

  11. Seasonal Change of Loline Alkaloids in Endophyte-lnfected Meadow Fescue

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TONG De-wen; WANG Jin-yi; Brain Patchett; Ravi Gooneratne

    2006-01-01

    Lolines are a group of saturated pyrrolizidine alkaloids that possess broad bioactivity against a wide array of herbivorous insects. However, they do not exhibit toxicity to ruminants such as cattle and sheep. In order to study the direct and potential physiological effects on ruminants and the mechanism of insecticide/insectifuge, the distribution of loline alkaloids in endophyte-infected meadow fescue and the seasonal change of the distribution were analyzed. The crowns,roots and leaves of endophyte-infected meadow fescue at its four different growth periods, i.e., spring, summer, early autumn and late autumn, in New Zealand were colleted. After powdering, organic solvent extraction and purification by column chromatography, all loline alkaloid samples were analyzed by capillary gas chromatography with 4-phenylmorpholine (PM) as an internal standard. The analytic results showed that the loline contents in the roots, crowns and leaves of endophyte-infected meadow fescue vary with seasons. Even within the same season, the distribution of lolines in endophyte-infected meadow fescue varies. During summer, lolines mainly existed in the leaves and roots, but in early autumn, they are produced in the crowns. It was concluded that, lolines were mainly produced in the leaves and roots of endophyte-infected meadow fescue. In gas chromatographic analysis, N-formylloline, the major component of loline alkaloid in the plant, was employed to assay the alkaloids.

  12. Carbon monoxide exchange and partitioning of a managed mountain meadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerle, Albin; Kitz, Florian; Spielmann, Felix; Gerdel, Katharina; Wohlfahrt, Georg

    2016-04-01

    With an average mole fraction of 100 ppb carbon monoxide (CO) plays a critical role in atmospheric chemistry and thus has an indirect global warming potential. While sources/sinks of CO on land at least partially cancel out each other, the magnitude of CO sources and sinks is highly uncertain. Even if direct CO fluxes from/to land ecosystems are very much likely clearly lower in magnitude compared to anthropogenic emissions, biomass burning, emissions from chemical precursors and the OH sink, it may be premature to neglect any direct contributions of land ecosystems to the CO budget. In addition, changes in global climate and resulting changes in global productivity may require re-evaluating older data and assumptions. One major reason for the large uncertainty is a general scarcity of empirical data. An additional factor contributing to the uncertainty is the lack of ecosystem-scale CO exchange measurements, i.e. CO flux data that encompass all sources and sinks within an ecosystem. Here we present data on continuous eddy covariance measurements of CO-fluxes above a managed mountain grassland in combination with soil chamber flux measurements, within- and above-canopy concentration profiles and an inverse Lagrangian analysis to disentangle sinks and sources of CO. Results show the grassland ecosystem to be a net source for CO during daytime, with increasing flux rates at higher solar radiation. At night, if at all, the meadow is a slight sink for CO. The same holds true regarding the soil flux measurements. Additionally, a two-month rainout experiment revealed hardly any differences in CO soil fluxes between rainout- and control-plots unless extremely dry conditions were reached.

  13. Testing for thresholds of ecosystem collapse in seagrass meadows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, Sean D; Fernandes, Milena; Burnell, Owen W; Doubleday, Zoë A; Griffin, Kingsley J; Irving, Andrew D; Leung, Jonathan Y S; Owen, Samuel; Russell, Bayden D; Falkenberg, Laura J

    2017-10-01

    Although the public desire for healthy environments is clear-cut, the science and management of ecosystem health has not been as simple. Ecological systems can be dynamic and can shift abruptly from one ecosystem state to another. Such unpredictable shifts result when ecological thresholds are crossed; that is, small cumulative increases in an environmental stressor drive a much greater change than could be predicted from linear effects, suggesting an unforeseen tipping point is crossed. In coastal waters, broad-scale seagrass loss often occurs as a sudden event associated with human-driven nutrient enrichment (eutrophication). We tested whether the response of seagrass ecosystems to coastal nutrient enrichment is subject to a threshold effect. We exposed seagrass plots to different levels of nutrient enrichment (dissolved inorganic nitrogen) for 10 months and measured net production. Seagrass response exhibited a threshold pattern when nutrient enrichment exceeded moderate levels: there was an abrupt and large shift from positive to negative net leaf production (from approximately 0.04 leaf production to 0.02 leaf loss per day). Epiphyte load also increased as nutrient enrichment increased, which may have driven the shift in leaf production. Inadvertently crossing such thresholds, as can occur through ineffective management of land-derived inputs such as wastewater and stormwater runoff along urbanized coasts, may account for the widely observed sudden loss of seagrass meadows. Identification of tipping points may improve not only adaptive-management monitoring that seeks to avoid threshold effects, but also restoration approaches in systems that have crossed them. © 2017 Society for Conservation Biology.

  14. [Diurnal and seasonal variations of energy balance over Horqin meadow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui-dong; Guan, De-Xin; Yuan, Feng-Hui; Ren, Yan; Wang, An-Zhi; Jin, Chang-Jie; Wu, Jia-Bing

    2014-01-01

    Based on the measurements of eddy flux and micrometeorological factors, this paper analyzed the diurnal and seasonal variations of energy balance over Horqin meadow. The results showed that annual energy balance ratio (EBR) of the eddy covariance system was 0.77, and EBR was biggest in growing season, middle in bare soil period and smallest in snow-covered period. Diurnal variations of energy components all presented bell-shaped curves. The peak of net radiation appeared around 12:00 and peaks of other components slightly lagged. Seasonal variation of net radiation presented a single-peak curve, and the annual average was 5.71 MJ x m(-2) x d(-1). Seasonal variation of latent heat flux was similar to that of net radiation, and the annual average was 2.84 MJ x m(-2) x d(-1). Seasonal variation of sensible heat flux presented a double-peak curve, and the peaks appeared in April and September, respectively. Annual averaged sensible heat flux was 1.87 MJ x m(-2) x d(-1). Maximum soil heat flux (3.47 MJ x m(-2) x d(-1)) appeared in April, and the soil heat flux became negative after September. Annual budget ratios of energy components presented a decreasing order of latent heat flux, sensible heat flux and soil heat flux, which accounted for 49.8%, 35.8% and 3.1% of net radiation, respectively. Seasonal variation of Bowen ratio (beta) presented a 'U' shape, and the annual average was 1.61. beta was small (0.18) and relatively stable in growing season, while it was large (2.39) and fluctuated severely in non-growing season.

  15. Thematic trip: "Save Roşia MontanÄă"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eugenia, Marcu

    2015-04-01

    The name Roşia Montană, situated in Transylvania, became well known after a Romanian-Canadian company, Roşia Montană Gold Company (RMGC), obtained the concession license on exploitation for gold and silver minerals in the Roşia Montană area. The project consists of opening the largest surface gold mines in Europe using cyanide, which will include four open pits and a processing plant for gold and silver in The Roşia Valley and a tailings facility with an area of 367 hectares in the Corna Valley. One of the main fears is related to a possible ecological accident like the one in Baia Mare in 2000, when a tailing facility dam break led to cyanide pollution of Tisa and Danube rivers that resulted in the death of 1,200 tons of fish and contamination of water resources for 2 million people. This thematic trip is important for the scientific preparation of students and an opportunity to educate them in the spirit of environmental protection. The training and education of students will require assimilation and understanding, actively and consciously, using the knowledge acquired during the compulsory curriculum and training skills. REASON: The continuous degradation of the environment is a major crisis due to human intervention in nature, and the proposed Roşia Montană mining project will continue this trend. The company proposes to extract gold from mines by using the gold separation technique using cyanide, a process that involves destroying a total area of 16 km² which includes 5 mountains, 7 churches, 11 cemeteries and the ruins of Alburnus Maior Citadel, as well as creating pollution that would last for hundreds of years. The extraction of gold from low-grade ores using cyanide processes was estimated to result in a worldwide emission of 45,300 tons of hydrogen cyanide. Environmental education for a healthy life has children as target group, because they are the trustees and beneficiaries of tomorrow's natural resources and can influence the attitudes of

  16. INTEGRATING GEOPHYSICS, GEOLOGY, AND HYDROLOGY TO DETERMINE BEDROCK GEOMETRY CONTROLS ON THE ORIGIN OF ISOLATED MEADOW COMPLEXES WITHIN THE CENTRAL GREAT BASIN, NEVADA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riparian meadow complexes found in mountain ranges of the Central Great Basin physiographic region (western United States) are of interest to researchers as they contain significant biodiversity relative to the surrounding basin areas. These meadow complexes are currently degradi...

  17. A Walk in the "Tall, Tall Grass"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaatz, Kathryn

    2008-01-01

    This inquiry-based lesson was inspired by Denise Fleming's book entitled, "In the Tall, Tall Grass" (1991). The author used the book and a real study of prairie grasses to teach kindergartners how to make careful observations and record what they see. In addition, they learn how to "draw as scientists." Here the author describes her class's yearly…

  18. Complete Genome of Bacillus subtilis Myophage Grass

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Stanton Y.; Colquhoun, Jennifer M.; Perl, Abbey L.; Chamakura, Karthik R.; Kuty Everett, Gabriel F.

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis is a ubiquitous Gram-positive model organism. Here, we describe the complete genome of B. subtilus myophage Grass. Aside from genes encoding core proteins pertinent to the life cycle of the phage, Grass has several interesting features, including an FtsK/SpoIIIE protein.

  19. Tree-grass interactions in savannas

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scholes, RJ

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available portions of the soil profile being used by tree roots occurs whether or not grasses are present. Conversely, grasses were capable of limiting water recharge of deeper soils on the fine-textured site, thus reducing Acacia growth. Stuart-Hill et al (164...

  20. Nutrient removal by grasses irrigated with wastewater and nitrogen balance for reed canarygrass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geber, U.

    2000-04-01

    To develop complementary wastewater treatment systems that increase nutrient reduction and recycling, an experiment was conducted to evaluate the efficiency of three grass species as catch crops for N, P, and K at Aurahammar wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in the southern part of Sweden. Another objective was also to assess soil accumulation of N, P, and K and the risk of N leaching by drainage. Three grasses--reed canarygrass (Phalaris arundinacea L.), meadow foxtail (Alopecurus pratensis L.), and smooth bromegrass (Bromus inermis Leyss.)--were irrigated with a mixture of treated effluent and supernatant at two levels of intensity [optimum level (equal to evapotranspiration) and over-optimal level] and at two nutrient levels, approximately 150 and 300 kg N ha{sup {minus}1}. There were small differences in dry matter (DM) yield between grass species and no difference in N removal among species. The amount of N removed in harvested biomass to N applied was 0.58 in 1995 and 0.63 in 1996. The amount of N removed increased with increased nutrient load. Applied amounts of P were the same as P in harvested biomass. All species removed K amounts several times greater than applied amounts. Increased nutrient load increased overall K removal. The low amount of mineral N and especially NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N in the soil profile in autumn samplings indicate the risk for leaching is small. Soil water NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} contents were also low, <2.5 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N L{sup {minus}1} during the growing season, with a mean value of <1 mg NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-N L{sup {minus}1}.

  1. SQ grass sublingual allergy immunotherapy tablet for disease-modifying treatment of grass pollen allergic rhinoconjunctivitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Ronald; Roberts, Graham; de Blic, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Allergy immunotherapy is a treatment option for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (ARC). It is unique compared with pharmacotherapy in that it modifies the immunologic pathways that elicit an allergic response. The SQ Timothy grass sublingual immunotherapy (SLIT) tablet is approved in North...... America and throughout Europe for the treatment of adults and children (≥5 years old) with grass pollen-induced ARC. OBJECTIVE: The clinical evidence for the use of SQ grass SLIT-tablet as a disease-modifying treatment for grass pollen ARC is discussed in this review. METHODS: The review included...... the suitability of SQ grass SLIT-tablet for patients with clinically relevant symptoms to multiple Pooideae grass species, single-season efficacy, safety, adherence, coseasonal initiation, and cost-effectiveness. The data from the long-term SQ grass SLIT-tablet clinical trial that evaluated a clinical effect 2...

  2. Dugong dugon feeding in tropical Australian seagrass meadows: implications for conservation planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha J. Tol

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Dugongs (Dugong dugon are listed as vulnerable to extinction due to rapid population reductions caused in part by loss of seagrass feeding meadows. Understanding dugong feeding behaviour in tropical Australia, where the majority of dugongs live, will assist conservation strategies. We examined whether feeding patterns in intertidal seagrass meadows in tropical north-eastern Australia were related to seagrass biomass, species composition and/or nitrogen content. The total biomass of each seagrass species removed by feeding dugongs was measured and compared to its relative availability. Nitrogen concentrations were also determined for each seagrass species present at the sites. Dugongs consumed seagrass species in proportion to their availability, with biomass being the primary determining factor. Species composition and/or nitrogen content influenced consumption to a lesser degree. Conservation plans focused on protecting high biomass intertidal seagrass meadows are likely to be most effective at ensuring the survival of dugong in tropical north-eastern Australia.

  3. Holocene dune formation at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Area, Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Nicholas; Mahan, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    Small isolated dune fields in the northern Mojave Desert are important centers of biodiversity and archaeological occupation sites. Currently dunes at Ash Meadows, Nevada, are stabilized by vegetation and are experiencing erosion of their upwind margins, indicating a negative sediment budget. New OSL ages from dunes at Ash Meadows indicate continuous eolian accumulation from 1.5 to 0.8 ka, with further accumulation around 0.2 ka. Prior studies (e.g., Mehringer and Warren, 1976) indicate periods of dune accumulation prior to 3.3 ka; 1.9–1 ka; and after 0.9 ka. These periods of eolian accumulation are largely synchronous with those identified elsewhere in the Mojave Desert. The composition of the Ash Meadows dunes indicates their derivation from regional fluvial sources, most likely during periods when axial washes were active as a result of enhanced winter precipitation.

  4. Expositions of the Botanic Garden of Petrozavodsk State University: "Рagan Meadow"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eglacheva Arina

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available "Pagan Meadow" - one of the business cards of Botanic Garden of PSU filled deep sense of creation and originality. Pyramidal junipers were rescued and brought to the mining sites shungit in 1999. The unique expedition was attended by students and graduate students of the Ecology-Biological Faculty. Stone maze and seids appeared in 2011 as a result of the competition landscape projects "Northern motives." Despite the initial dissociation of the two projects lined up a complete picture of the veneration of wood and stone in the history of Karelia. Consideration "Pagan Meadow" by studying upland meadows with a treelike junipers and diversity of the maze of boulders lets discuss the issues of ecology and geology.

  5. Impact of the brine from a desalination plant on a shallow seagrass ( Posidonia oceanica) meadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gacia, Esperança; Invers, Olga; Manzanera, Marta; Ballesteros, Enric; Romero, Javier

    2007-05-01

    Although seawater desalination has increased significantly over recent decades, little attention has been paid to the impact of the main by-product (hypersaline water: brine) on ecosystems. In the Mediterranean, potentially the most affected ecosystems are meadows of the endemic seagrass Posidonia oceanica. We studied the effect of brine on a shallow P. oceanica meadow exposed to reverse osmosis brine discharge for more than 6 years. P. oceanica proved to be very sensitive to both eutrophication and high salinities derived from the brine discharge. Affected plants showed high epiphyte load and nitrogen content in the leaves, high frequencies of necrosis marks, low total non-structural carbohydrates and low glutamine synthetase activity, compared to control plants. However, there was no indication of extensive decline of the affected meadow. This is probably due to its very shallow situation, which results in high incident radiation as well as fast dilution and dispersion of the brine plume.

  6. Dugong dugon feeding in tropical Australian seagrass meadows: implications for conservation planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tol, Samantha J; Coles, Rob G; Congdon, Bradley C

    2016-01-01

    Dugongs (Dugong dugon) are listed as vulnerable to extinction due to rapid population reductions caused in part by loss of seagrass feeding meadows. Understanding dugong feeding behaviour in tropical Australia, where the majority of dugongs live, will assist conservation strategies. We examined whether feeding patterns in intertidal seagrass meadows in tropical north-eastern Australia were related to seagrass biomass, species composition and/or nitrogen content. The total biomass of each seagrass species removed by feeding dugongs was measured and compared to its relative availability. Nitrogen concentrations were also determined for each seagrass species present at the sites. Dugongs consumed seagrass species in proportion to their availability, with biomass being the primary determining factor. Species composition and/or nitrogen content influenced consumption to a lesser degree. Conservation plans focused on protecting high biomass intertidal seagrass meadows are likely to be most effective at ensuring the survival of dugong in tropical north-eastern Australia.

  7. 75 FR 26747 - Meadow Lake Wind Farm III LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ...-1176-000] Meadow Lake Wind Farm III LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing... above-referenced proceeding of Meadow Lake Wind Farm III LLC's application for market-based rate... clicking on the appropriate link in the above list. They are also available for review in the Commission's...

  8. 75 FR 26747 - Meadow Lake Wind Farm IV LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-12

    ...] Meadow Lake Wind Farm IV LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request...-referenced proceeding of Meadow Lake Wind Farm IV LLC's application for market-based rate authority, with an... proceeding are accessible in the Commission's eLibrary system by clicking on the appropriate link in the...

  9. RESEARCH REGARDING THE MELLIFEROUS CHARACTHERISTICS OF LABIATES FROM XEROPHILE MEADOWS FROM DANUBE VALLEY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NICOLETA ION

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The xerophile meadows in the Danube Valley are dry meadows, located at a great distance from the Danube and with underground waters at greater depth. Their floral composition is characterized by a small number of species pertaining to both mezoxerophiles and to xerophiles, yet the highest percentage is covered by xerophile species, which are characterized by their small foliage surface, the very narrow and tough limb, and acute porosity etc.In the floral composition of these species, the graminaceae species are best represented, followed by leguminous and lamiaceae, known in beekeeping as good honey plants. Thus, the researches carried out have shown that Lamiaceae species have a good participation, with variation limits raging from 15% to 50-60%. Leguminous species are represented less on xerophile meadows than in hidrophile meadows. Among these we mention: Lotus corniculatus L., Trifolium repens L. si Medicago lupulina L., all these species being known in beekeeping as good honey plants. Among gramineae species the most representatives are: Lolium perene L. and Poa pratensis L., yet with no melliferous value. Likewise, the group of „various” plants varied a lot as participation in the structure of the vegetal cover of xerophile meadows, depending on the place of research, all these species having no melliferous value. The current paper describes the results o biometric and melliferous researches carried out over the period 2003- 2005 on 5 plant species pertaining to the Lamiaceae family, namely: Salvia nemerosa L. – sage; Salvia pratensis L. – meadow sage; Marrubium vulgare L. – horehound;Lamium purpureum L. – purple deatnettle;Lamium amplexicaule L. – henbit deadnettle.

  10. A comparison between energy transfer and atmospheric turbulent exchanges over alpine meadow and banana plantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhangwei; Ma, Yaoming; Wen, Zhiping; Ma, Weiqiang

    2016-04-01

    Banana plantation and alpine meadow ecosystems in southern China and the Tibetan Plateau are unique in the underlying surfaces they exhibit. In this study, we used eddy covariance and a micrometeorological tower to examine the characteristics of land surface energy exchanges over a banana plantation in southern China and an alpine meadow in the Tibetan Plateau from May 2010 to August 2012. The results showed that the diurnal and seasonal variations in upward shortwave radiation flux and surface soil heat flux were larger over the alpine meadow than over the banana plantation surface. Dominant energy partitioning varied with season. Latent heat flux was the main consumer of net radiation flux in the growing season, whereas sensible heat flux was the main consumer during other periods. The Monin-Obukhov similarity theory was employed for comparative purposes, using sonic anemometer observations of flow over the surfaces of banana plantations in the humid southern China monsoon region and the semi-arid areas of the TP, and was found to be applicable. Over banana plantation and alpine meadow areas, the average surface albedo and surface aerodynamic roughness lengths under neutral atmospheric conditions were ~0.128 and 0.47m, and ~0.223 and 0.01m, respectively. During the measuring period, the mean annual bulk transfer coefficients for momentum and sensible heat were 1.47×10-2 and 7.13×10-3, and 2.91×10-3 and 1.96×10-3, for banana plantation and alpine meadow areas, respectively. This is the first time in Asia that long-term open field measurements have been taken with the specific aim of making comparisons between banana plantation and alpine meadow surfaces.

  11. Evaluating mountain meadow groundwater response to Pinyon-Juniper and temperature in a great basin watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Rosemary W.H.; Huntington, Justin L.; Snyder, Keirith A.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Morton, Charles; Stringham, Tamzen K.

    2017-01-01

    This research highlights development and application of an integrated hydrologic model (GSFLOW) to a semiarid, snow-dominated watershed in the Great Basin to evaluate Pinyon-Juniper (PJ) and temperature controls on mountain meadow shallow groundwater. The work used Google Earth Engine Landsat satellite and gridded climate archives for model evaluation. Model simulations across three decades indicated that the watershed operates on a threshold response to precipitation (P) >400 mm/y to produce a positive yield (P-ET; 9%) resulting in stream discharge and a rebound in meadow groundwater levels during these wetter years. Observed and simulated meadow groundwater response to large P correlates with above average predicted soil moisture and with a normalized difference vegetation index threshold value >0.3. A return to assumed pre-expansion PJ conditions or an increase in temperature to mid-21st century shifts yielded by only ±1% during the multi-decade simulation period; but changes of approximately ±4% occurred during wet years. Changes in annual yield were largely dampened by the spatial and temporal redistribution of evapotranspiration across the watershed: Yet the influence of this redistribution and vegetation structural controls on snowmelt altered recharge to control water table depth in the meadow. Even a small-scale removal of PJ (0.5 km2) proximal to the meadow will promote a stable, shallow groundwater system resilient to droughts, while modest increases in temperature will produce a meadow susceptible to declining water levels and a community structure likely to move toward dry and degraded conditions.

  12. Savonarola at the stake: the rise and fall of Roy Meadow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Robert

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the role of prominent paediatrician Professor Sir Roy Meadow in the controversy surrounding the diagnosis of Munchausen Syndrome by Proxy (MSBP) in mothers accused of murdering their children. The MSBP saga is a further chapter of an era of moral panic that started several decades ago with repressed memory therapy, satanic ritual abuse and multiple personalities. The fall of medieval sage Savonarola is an apt analogy for the fate of Roy Meadow. The history of medicine is rife with figures who become their own authority and rule by force of personality.

  13. Projected range contractions of European protected oceanic montane plant communities: focus on climate change impacts is essential for their future conservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rory L Hodd

    Full Text Available Global climate is rapidly changing and while many studies have investigated the potential impacts of this on the distribution of montane plant species and communities, few have focused on those with oceanic montane affinities. In Europe, highly sensitive bryophyte species reach their optimum occurrence, highest diversity and abundance in the north-west hyperoceanic regions, while a number of montane vascular plant species occur here at the edge of their range. This study evaluates the potential impact of climate change on the distribution of these species and assesses the implications for EU Habitats Directive-protected oceanic montane plant communities. We applied an ensemble of species distribution modelling techniques, using atlas data of 30 vascular plant and bryophyte species, to calculate range changes under projected future climate change. The future effectiveness of the protected area network to conserve these species was evaluated using gap analysis. We found that the majority of these montane species are projected to lose suitable climate space, primarily at lower altitudes, or that areas of suitable climate will principally shift northwards. In particular, rare oceanic montane bryophytes have poor dispersal capacity and are likely to be especially vulnerable to contractions in their current climate space. Significantly different projected range change responses were found between 1 oceanic montane bryophytes and vascular plants; 2 species belonging to different montane plant communities; 3 species categorised according to different biomes and eastern limit classifications. The inclusion of topographical variables in addition to climate, significantly improved the statistical and spatial performance of models. The current protected area network is projected to become less effective, especially for specialised arctic-montane species, posing a challenge to conserving oceanic montane plant communities. Conservation management plans need

  14. Bioenergy production from roadside grass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Ane Katharina Paarup; Ehimen, Ehiazesebhor Augustine; Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2014-01-01

    .5–3.0% of the present national energy production based on biogas. The estimated values for the energy return on invested energy (EROEI) was found to range from 2.17 to 2.88. The measured contents of heavy metals in the roadside vegetation was seen not to exceed the legislative levels for what can be applied......This paper presents a study of the feasibility of utilising roadside vegetation for biogas production in Denmark. The potential biomass yield, methane yields, and the energy balances of using roadside grass for biogas production was investigated based on spatial analysis. The results show...... that the potential annual yield of biomass obtainable from roadside verges varies widely depending on the local conditions. The net energy gain (NEG) from harvest, collection, transport, storage and digestion of roadside vegetation was estimated to range from 60,126–121,476 GJ, corresponding to 1...

  15. Topographic and Bioclimatic Determinants of the Occurrence of Forest and Grassland in Tropical Montane Forest-Grassland Mosaics of the Western Ghats, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arundhati; Nagendra, Harini; Anand, Madhur; Bunyan, Milind

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this analysis was to identify topographic and bioclimatic factors that predict occurrence of forest and grassland patches within tropical montane forest-grassland mosaics. We further investigated whether interactions between topography and bioclimate are important in determining vegetation pattern, and assessed the role of spatial scale in determining the relative importance of specific topographic features. Finally, we assessed the role of elevation in determining the relative importance of diverse explanatory factors. The study area consists of the central and southern regions of the Western Ghats of Southern India, a global biodiversity hotspot. Random forests were used to assess prediction accuracy and predictor importance. Conditional inference classification trees were used to interpret predictor effects and examine potential interactions between predictors. GLMs were used to confirm predictor importance and assess the strength of interaction terms. Overall, topographic and bioclimatic predictors classified vegetation pattern with approximately 70% accuracy. Prediction accuracy was higher for grassland than forest, and for mosaics at higher elevations. Elevation was the most important predictor, with mosaics above 2000 m dominated largely by grassland. Relative topographic position measured at a local scale (within a 300 m neighbourhood) was another important predictor of vegetation pattern. In high elevation mosaics, northness and concave land surface curvature were important predictors of forest occurrence. Important bioclimatic predictors were: dry quarter precipitation, annual temperature range and the interaction between the two. The results indicate complex interactions between topography and bioclimate and among topographic variables. Elevation and topography have a strong influence on vegetation pattern in these mosaics. There were marked regional differences in the roles of various topographic and bioclimatic predictors across the

  16. Topographic and Bioclimatic Determinants of the Occurrence of Forest and Grassland in Tropical Montane Forest-Grassland Mosaics of the Western Ghats, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arundhati Das

    Full Text Available The objective of this analysis was to identify topographic and bioclimatic factors that predict occurrence of forest and grassland patches within tropical montane forest-grassland mosaics. We further investigated whether interactions between topography and bioclimate are important in determining vegetation pattern, and assessed the role of spatial scale in determining the relative importance of specific topographic features. Finally, we assessed the role of elevation in determining the relative importance of diverse explanatory factors. The study area consists of the central and southern regions of the Western Ghats of Southern India, a global biodiversity hotspot. Random forests were used to assess prediction accuracy and predictor importance. Conditional inference classification trees were used to interpret predictor effects and examine potential interactions between predictors. GLMs were used to confirm predictor importance and assess the strength of interaction terms. Overall, topographic and bioclimatic predictors classified vegetation pattern with approximately 70% accuracy. Prediction accuracy was higher for grassland than forest, and for mosaics at higher elevations. Elevation was the most important predictor, with mosaics above 2000 m dominated largely by grassland. Relative topographic position measured at a local scale (within a 300 m neighbourhood was another important predictor of vegetation pattern. In high elevation mosaics, northness and concave land surface curvature were important predictors of forest occurrence. Important bioclimatic predictors were: dry quarter precipitation, annual temperature range and the interaction between the two. The results indicate complex interactions between topography and bioclimate and among topographic variables. Elevation and topography have a strong influence on vegetation pattern in these mosaics. There were marked regional differences in the roles of various topographic and bioclimatic

  17. 天祝高寒草甸土壤容重与孔隙度时空变化研究%Study on spatial-temporal changes of soil bulk density and soil porosity of alpine meadow in Tianzhu

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    路远; 张万祥; 孙榕江; 常根柱

    2009-01-01

    The soil physical poperties of 4 types of alpine meadow (Kobresia capillifoli,sedge+grass,grass+forb,Polygonum viviparum) in Tianzhu was studied. The results showed that there was no fixed variation pattern in soil bulk density and soil porosity among different types,while the variation regulation of the soil spatial structure was clear. The soil bulk density increased and soil porosity decreased along with the soil depth. The soil bulk density of semi-artificial pasture was smaller than other three plots.%选取天祝高寒草甸线叶嵩草草地(Kobresia capillifolia pasture)、莎草-禾草草地(sedge-grass pasture)、禾草-杂类草草地(grass-forb semi-artificial pasture)及珠芽蓼草地(Polygonum viviparum pasture)4块样地的土壤为研究对象,通过对其土壤的物理性状取样分析,结果表明:土壤容重与孔隙度随时间无确定的变化规律;土壤空间结构变化规律明显,均表现出土壤容重随土层深度增加而逐渐增大,土壤孔隙度随土层深度增加而逐渐减小的规律.并且禾草-杂类草半人工草地的土壤容重小于其他3个样地,说明其表层土壤孔隙度增大,通气透水性好.

  18. Alkaloid toxins in endophyte-infected grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, R G; Petroski, R J

    1992-01-01

    Grasses infected with clavicipitaceous fungi have been associated with a variety of diseases including classical ergotism in humans and animals, fescue foot and summer syndrome in cattle, and rye-grass staggers in sheep. During the last decade it has been recognized that many of these fungal infections are endophytic; a fungal endophyte is a fungus that grows entirely within the host plant. Inspection of field collections and herbarium specimens has revealed that such infections are widespread in grasses. The chemistry associated with these grass-fungal interactions has proved to be interesting and complex, as each grass-fungal pair results in a unique "fingerprint" of various alkaloids, of which some are highly toxic to herbivores. In many cases the presence of an endophyte appears to benefit the plant by increasing drought resistance, or by increasing resistance to attack by insects, thus improving the overall survivability of the grass. This review will focus on alkaloids that have been reported in endophyte-infected grasses.

  19. Evolution of Grasses and Grassland Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strömberg, Caroline A. E.

    2011-05-01

    The evolution and subsequent ecological expansion of grasses (Poaceae) since the Late Cretaceous have resulted in the establishment of one of Earth's dominant biomes, the temperate and tropical grasslands, at the expense of forests. In the past decades, several new approaches have been applied to the fossil record of grasses to elucidate the patterns and processes of this ecosystem transformation. The data indicate that the development of grassland ecosystems on most continents was a multistage process involving the Paleogene appearance of (C3 and C4) open-habitat grasses, the mid-late Cenozoic spread of C3 grass-dominated habitats, and, finally, the Late Neogene expansion of C4 grasses at tropical-subtropical latitudes. The evolution of herbivores adapted to grasslands did not necessarily coincide with the spread of open-habitat grasses. In addition, the timing of these evolutionary and ecological events varied between regions. Consequently, region-by-region investigations using both direct (plant fossils) and indirect (e.g., stable carbon isotopes, faunas) evidence are required for a full understanding of the tempo and mode of grass and grassland evolution.

  20. Leaf litter decomposition rates increase with rising mean annual temperature in Hawaiian tropical montane wet forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori D. Bothwell

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Decomposing litter in forest ecosystems supplies nutrients to plants, carbon to heterotrophic soil microorganisms and is a large source of CO2 to the atmosphere. Despite its essential role in carbon and nutrient cycling, the temperature sensitivity of leaf litter decay in tropical forest ecosystems remains poorly resolved, especially in tropical montane wet forests where the warming trend may be amplified compared to tropical wet forests at lower elevations. We quantified leaf litter decomposition rates along a highly constrained 5.2 °C mean annual temperature (MAT gradient in tropical montane wet forests on the Island of Hawaii. Dominant vegetation, substrate type and age, soil moisture, and disturbance history are all nearly constant across this gradient, allowing us to isolate the effect of rising MAT on leaf litter decomposition and nutrient release. Leaf litter decomposition rates were a positive linear function of MAT, causing the residence time of leaf litter on the forest floor to decline by ∼31 days for each 1 °C increase in MAT. Our estimate of the Q10 temperature coefficient for leaf litter decomposition was 2.17, within the commonly reported range for heterotrophic organic matter decomposition (1.5–2.5 across a broad range of ecosystems. The percentage of leaf litter nitrogen (N remaining after six months declined linearly with increasing MAT from ∼88% of initial N at the coolest site to ∼74% at the warmest site. The lack of net N immobilization during all three litter collection periods at all MAT plots indicates that N was not limiting to leaf litter decomposition, regardless of temperature. These results suggest that leaf litter decay in tropical montane wet forests may be more sensitive to rising MAT than in tropical lowland wet forests, and that increased rates of N release from decomposing litter could delay or prevent progressive N limitation to net primary productivity with climate warming.

  1. Facilitating adaptation in montane plants to changing precipitation along an elevation gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Steve; Leopold, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Montane plant communities throughout the world have responded to changes in precipitation and temperature regimes by shifting ranges upward in elevation. Continued warmer, drier climate conditions have been documented and are projected to increase in high-elevation areas in Hawai‘i, consistent with climate change effects reported in other environments throughout the world. Organisms that cannot disperse or adapt biologically to projected climate scenarios in situ may decrease in distributional range and abundance over time. Restoration efforts will need to accommodate future climate change and account for the interactive effects of existing invasive species to ensure long-term persistence. As part of a larger, ongoing restoration effort, we hypothesized that plants from a lower-elevation forest ecotype would have higher rates of survival and growth compared to high-elevation forest conspecifics when grown in common plots along an elevation gradient. We monitored climate conditions at planting sites to identify whether temperature or rainfall influenced survival and growth after 20 weeks. We found that origin significantly affected survival in only one of three native montane species, Dodonaea viscosa. Contrary to our hypothesis, 75.2% of seedlings from high-elevation origin survived in comparison to 58.7% of seedlings from low elevation across the entire elevation gradient. Origin also influenced survival in linearized mixed models that controlled for temperature, precipitation, and elevation in D. viscosa and Chenopodium oahuense. Only C. oahuense seedlings had similar predictors of growth and survival. There were no common patterns of growth or survival between species, indicating that responses to changing precipitation and emperature regimes varied between montane plant species. Results also suggest that locally sourced seed is important to ensure highest survival at restoration sites. Further experimentation on larger spatial and temporal scales is necessary

  2. Effects of mist acidity and ambient ozone removal on montane red spruce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vann, D.R. [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Biology; Strimbeck, D.R.; Johnson, A.H. [Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States). Dept. of Geology

    1995-10-01

    The effects of acidic mists and ozone on several biochemical and growth parameters in mature montane red spruce were examined. Branch-size environmental chambers were used to introduce mists of controlled composition and to protect selected branches from ambient ozone and acidic mists. Mists of distilled water increased the end-of-season pigment concentration and shoot length of enclosed branches relative to ambient or artificial mists. Needle and twig weights and starch concentrations were not significantly altered by the acidic mist treatments. Removal of ambient ozone had no apparent effect on the variables measured. 8 figs., 2 tabs., 39 refs.

  3. Army ant raid attendance and bivouac checking behavior by Neotropical montane forest birds

    OpenAIRE

    O'Donnell, Sean; Kumar, Anjali; Logan, Corina J.

    2010-01-01

    This is the final version of the article. It first appeared from Wilson Ornithological Society via http://dx.doi.org/10.1676/09-156.1 We quantified resident and migrant bird attendance at army ant swarm raids (n  =  48) in a neotropical montane forest. All observations were during seasons when Nearctic migrant birds are present. Bird species differed in army ant raid-attending behavior. Resident bird species attended 2 to 54% of raids, while migrants attended at lower maximum frequencies (...

  4. Tropical land-cover change alters biogeochemical inputs to ecosystems in a Mexican montane landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponette-González, A G; Weathers, K C; Curran, L M

    2010-10-01

    In tropical regions, the effects of land-cover change on nutrient and pollutant inputs to ecosystems remain poorly documented and may be pronounced, especially in montane areas exposed to elevated atmospheric deposition. We examined atmospheric deposition and canopy interactions of sulfate-sulfur (SO4(2-)-S), chloride (Cl-), and nitrate-nitrogen (NO(3-)-N) in three extensive tropical montane land-cover types: clearings, forest, and coffee agroforest. Bulk and fog deposition to clearings was measured as well as throughfall (water that falls through plant canopies) ion fluxes in seven forest and five coffee sites. Sampling was conducted from 2005 to 2008 across two regions in the Sierra Madre Oriental, Veracruz, Mexico. Annual throughfall fluxes to forest and coffee sites ranged over 6-27 kg SO4(2-)-S/ha, 12-69 kg Cl-/ha, and 2-6 kg NO(3-)-N/ha. Sulfate-S in forest and coffee throughfall was higher or similar to bulk S deposition measured in clearings. Throughfall Cl- inputs, however, were consistently higher than Cl- amounts deposited to cleared areas, with net Cl- fluxes enhanced in evergreen coffee relative to semi-deciduous forest plots. Compared to bulk nitrate-N deposition, forest and coffee canopies retained 1-4 kg NO(3-)-N/ha annually, reducing NO(3-)-N inputs to soils. Overall, throughfall fluxes were similar to values reported for Neotropical sites influenced by anthropogenic emissions, while bulk S and N deposition were nine- and eightfold greater, respectively, than background wet deposition rates for remote tropical areas. Our results demonstrate that land-cover type significantly alters the magnitude and spatial distribution of atmospheric inputs to tropical ecosystems, primarily through canopy-induced changes in fog and dry deposition. However, we found that land cover interacts with topography and climate in significant ways to produce spatially heterogeneous patterns of anion fluxes, and that these factors can converge to create deposition hotspots

  5. La Casa Roura de Domènech i Montaner a Canet de Mar (1892)

    OpenAIRE

    Borrell Mas, Jordi

    2010-01-01

    La Casa Roura o ca la Bianga de Canet de Mar va ser construïda i projectada per l’arquitecte Lluís Domènech i Montaner durant els anys 1889 i 1892 per encàrrec de la seva cunyada Francesca Roura i el seu marit Jacint de Capmany. Aquells van ser els primers anys del nou moviment cultural i arquitectònic anomenat Modernisme que s’estava desenvolupant a Catalunya. Paral•lelament, arreu d’Europa també s’hi estaven produint diferents moviments com l’Art Noveau, la Sezession, el Jugendstil o l’Styl...

  6. Grass Biomethane for Agriculture and Energy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Korres, N.E.; Thamsiriroj, T.; Smith, B.

    2011-01-01

    have advanced the role of grassland as a renewable source of energy in grass biomethane production with various environmental and socio-economic benefits. It is underlined that the essential question whether the gaseous biofuel meets the EU sustainability criteria of 60% greenhouse gas emission savings...... by 2020 can be met since savings up to 89.4% under various scenarios can be achieved. Grass biomethane production compared to other liquid biofuels either when these are produced by indigenous of imported feedstocks is very promising. Grass biomethane, given the mature and well known technology...

  7. Grasses and Grasslike Plants of Utah, A Field Guide

    OpenAIRE

    Pratt, Mindy

    2011-01-01

    This guide is meant to serve as a help in identifying many of the grasses and grass-like plants common to the rangelands, forests, and farmlands of Utah. It is not an exhaustive guide to the plants contained herein, nor is it a comprehensive summary of all the grasses and grass-like plants in Utah.

  8. Genome sequence analysis of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon: insights into grass genome evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulman, Al

    2009-08-09

    Three subfamilies of grasses, the Erhardtoideae (rice), the Panicoideae (maize, sorghum, sugar cane and millet), and the Pooideae (wheat, barley and cool season forage grasses) provide the basis of human nutrition and are poised to become major sources of renewable energy. Here we describe the complete genome sequence of the wild grass Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), the first member of the Pooideae subfamily to be completely sequenced. Comparison of the Brachypodium, rice and sorghum genomes reveals a precise sequence- based history of genome evolution across a broad diversity of the grass family and identifies nested insertions of whole chromosomes into centromeric regions as a predominant mechanism driving chromosome evolution in the grasses. The relatively compact genome of Brachypodium is maintained by a balance of retroelement replication and loss. The complete genome sequence of Brachypodium, coupled to its exceptional promise as a model system for grass research, will support the development of new energy and food crops

  9. Mapping of seagrass meadows from the Lakshadweep Islands (India), using aerial photographs

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jagtap, T.G.; Inamdar, S.N.

    Seagrass meadows from the Lakshadweep Islands were mapped with the help of black and white aerial photographs. A maximum of 40 ha seagrass cover was estimated in the lagoon of Minicoy, followEd. by Kavaratti (43 ha.). The total seagrass cover from...

  10. Methods of limiting willow shrub re-growth after initial removal on fen meadows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klimkowska, Agata; Dzierza, Paulina; Kotowski, Wiktor; Brzezinska, Kamila

    2010-01-01

    Shrub removal is commonly used for management and restoration of species-rich fen meadows. A common problem after initial shrub cutting of willow is a vigorous re-sprouting and quick re-growth. In this paper we test experimentally what is an effective management option, limiting the re-growth of wil

  11. Evaluating mountain meadow groundwater response to pinyon-juniper and temperature in a great basin watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Expansion of deeply-rooted Pinyon-Juniper (PJ) has altered water partitioning and reduced water availability to discharging meadows. Research highlights the development and application of GSFLOW to a semi-arid, snow-dominated watershed in the Great Basin to evaluate PJ and temperature controls on mo...

  12. [Microbial community structure of the alpine meadow under different grazing styles in Naqu prefecture of Tibet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Lei; Liu, Ying-hui; Li, Yue; Ouyang, Sheng-nan

    2015-08-01

    To clarify the effects of grazing styles on the soil microbial community in the alpine meadow, we explored the changes of soil microbial community structure in the alpine meadow located in Naqu district of Tibet Autonomous Region by analyzing the soil chemical properties and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs). The results showed that the contents of soil total organic carbon, total phosphate and nitrate nitrogen under the different grazing styles followed the trend of 7-year rest grazing > free grazing > grazing prohibition. Except for the ratio of fungal PLFAs/bacterial PLFAs, total PLFAs, the bacterial PLFAs, the fungal PLFAs, the gram negative bacterial and the gram positive bacterial PLFAs over the different grazing types were in the order of 7-year rest grazing > 5-year grazing prohibition > 7-year and 9-year grazing prohibition. The principal component analysis (PCA) presented that the first principal component (PC1 = 74.6%) was mainly composed of monounsaturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids and branched fatty acids, and the second principal component (PC2 = 13.2%) was mainly composed of saturated fatty acids and some monounsaturated fatty acids. Total PLFAs content was significantly positively correlated with microbial biomass carbon content. Compared with grazing prohibition, fallow grazing was best for the alpine meadow in Naqu district, and free grazing with light intensity was good for the alpine meadow.

  13. Restoration potential of sedge meadows in hand-cultivated soybean fields in northeastern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guodong; Middleton, Beth; Jiang, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Sedge meadows can be difficult to restore from farmed fields if key structural dominants are missing from propagule banks. In hand-cultivated soybean fields in northeastern China, we asked if tussock-forming Carex and other wetland species were present as seed or asexual propagules. In the Sanjiang Plain, China, we compared the seed banks, vegetative propagules (below-ground) and standing vegetation of natural and restored sedge meadows, and hand-cultivated soybean fields in drained and flooded conditions. We found that important wetland species survived cultivation as seeds for some time (e.g. Calamogrostis angustifolia and Potamogeton crispus) and as field weeds (e.g. C. angustifolia and Phragmites australis). Key structural species were missing in these fields, for example, Carex meyeriana. We also observed that sedge meadows restored without planting or seeding lacked tussock-forming sedges. The structure of the seed bank was related to experimental water regime, and field environments of tussock height, thatch depth, and presence of burning as based on Nonmetric Multidimensional Scaling analysis. To re-establish the structure imposed by tussock sedges, specific technologies might be developed to encourage the development of tussocks in restored sedge meadows.

  14. Screening level contaminant survey of the Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The 9,337-acre Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge is located in the Town of Milford, Maine. Along the refuge’s southern boundary is the former Town of Milford...

  15. 75 FR 39037 - Crane Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Morrison County, MN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Crane Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Morrison County, MN AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability: Draft comprehensive conservation plan and...

  16. 75 FR 63505 - Crane Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Morrison County, MN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Crane Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Morrison County, MN AGENCY: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability: Final Comprehensive...

  17. The effects of drainage on groundwater quality and plant species distribution in stream valley meadows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grootjans, A.P.; Diggelen, R. van; Wassen, M.J.; Wiersinga, W.A.

    1988-01-01

    Conditions in fen meadows in Dutch stream valleys are influenced by both deep (Ca2+-rich) and shallow (Ca2+-poor) groundwater flows. The distribution patterns of phreatophytic (groundwater-influenced) plant species showed distinct relationships with the distribution of different groundwater types.

  18. Methods of limiting willow shrub re-growth after initial removal on fen meadows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klimkowska, Agata; Dzierza, Paulina; Kotowski, Wiktor; Brzezinska, Kamila

    2010-01-01

    Shrub removal is commonly used for management and restoration of species-rich fen meadows. A common problem after initial shrub cutting of willow is a vigorous re-sprouting and quick re-growth. In this paper we test experimentally what is an effective management option, limiting the re-growth of wil

  19. Grade 9 Astronomy Study: Interests of Boys and Girls Studying Astronomy at Fletcher's Meadow Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstovic, Mirjan; Brown, Laura; Chacko, Merin; Trinh, Brenda

    2008-01-01

    In this report, we discuss the interests of Grade 9 boys and girls studying astronomy at Fletcher's Meadow Secondary School in Brampton, Ontario. A total of 152 Grade 9 academic students were asked to rate their interest levels in various astronomy topics on a scale of 0-3, where 0 represented no interest and 3 represented a high level of…

  20. Let it flow: how does an underlying current affect wave propagation over a natural seagrass meadow?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, M.; Gillis, L.G.

    2015-01-01

    Temperate seagrass beds can be found within intertidal and tidal areas of variable hydrodynamic forcing. To investigate the interaction between hydrodynamics and seagrass plants, Zostera noltii meadows were exposed to a range of combinations of waves and flow in a flume. Velocity profiles were obtai

  1. Seed dispersal in agricultural habitats and the restoration of species-rich meadows.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dorp, van D.

    1996-01-01

    The restoration of species-rich meadows on former agricultural land in the Netherlands has a high priority, because these ecosystems have been disappearing rapidly due to eutrophication and acidification and falling water tables. In order to be able to restore such ecosystems on wet nutrient-poor so

  2. Short-term effect of beach replenishment on a shallow Posidonia oceanica meadow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Correa, José M; Fernández-Torquemada, Yolanda; Sánchez-Lizaso, José Luis

    2009-09-01

    Putative perturbations on a Posidonia oceanica meadow produced by recent artificial beach nourishment were evaluated in relation to four undisturbed meadows. Temporal variations of putative impacted location vs. control locations of environmental (light availability and sediment features), plant (associated epiphytes, silt-clay fraction attached to epiphytes, herbivore attack, non-structural carbohydrate reserves) and structural parameters (cover and density) of meadows were tested by asymmetrical analysis of variance beyond BACI (Before/After, Control/Impact). Additionally, two asymmetrical analyses of variance were used to test for differences in vegetative growth of horizontal rhizomes (leaf production, horizontal rhizome growth, biomass production and net secondary rhizome recruitment) before and after beach replenishment. Environmental effects induced by dumping works were only detected in connection with a higher silt-clay deposition rate. This increase was consistent with the increase of silt-clay cover attached to epiphytes. As a consequence of silt-clay smothering, a decrease of filter feeding epiphytes, starch reserves, shoot surface and shoot biomass was observed. The sensitivity of plants to sediment inputs, leads us to recommend avoidance of dumping or sediment movement in the vicinity of P. oceanica meadows.

  3. Fen-meadow succession in relation to spatial and temporal differences in hydrological and soil conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, van der D.; Sykora, K.V.

    2006-01-01

    Question: In fen meadows with Junco-Molinion plant communities, falling groundwater levels may not lead to a boosted above-ground biomass production if limitation of nutrients persists. Instead, depending on drainage intensity and microtopography, acidification may trigger a shift into drier and mor

  4. Grade 9 Astronomy Study: Interests of Boys and Girls Studying Astronomy at Fletcher's Meadow Secondary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstovic, Mirjan; Brown, Laura; Chacko, Merin; Trinh, Brenda

    2008-01-01

    In this report, we discuss the interests of Grade 9 boys and girls studying astronomy at Fletcher's Meadow Secondary School in Brampton, Ontario. A total of 152 Grade 9 academic students were asked to rate their interest levels in various astronomy topics on a scale of 0-3, where 0 represented no interest and 3 represented a high level of…

  5. Analysis of rhizobacterial communities in perennial Graminaceae from polluted water meadow soil, and screening of metal-resistant, potentially plant growth-promoting bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Amico, Elena; Cavalca, Lucia; Andreoni, Vincenza

    2005-04-01

    This study investigates the impact of long-term heavy metal contamination on the culturable, heterotrophic, functional and genetic diversity of rhizobacterial communities of perennial grasses in water meadow soil. The culturable heterotrophic diversity was investigated by colony appearance on solid LB medium. Genetic diversity was measured as bands in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) obtained directly from rhizosphere soil and rhizoplane DNA extracts, and from the corresponding culturable communities. In the two rhizospheric fractions the DGGE profiles of the direct DNA extracts were similar and stable among replicates, whereas in the enriched cultures the profiles of the fractions differed, but among the replicates they were similar. One hundred isolates were collected into 33 different operational taxonomic units by use of amplified internal transcribed spacers and into 19 heavy metal-resistant phenotypes. The phylogenetic position of strains belonging to 18 operational taxonomic units, representing more than 80% of the isolates, was determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Several heavy metal-resistant strains were isolated from rhizoplane. Finally, metal-resistant rhizobacteria were tested for plant growth-promoting characteristics; some were found to contain 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase and/or to produce indole acetic acid and siderophores. Two strains resistant to cadmium and zinc, Pseudomonas tolaasii RP23 and Pseudomonas fluorescens RS9, had all three plant growth-promoting characteristics. Our findings suggest that bacteria can respond to soil metal contamination, and the described methodological approach appears promising for targeting potential plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria.

  6. Processes affecting the spatial distribution of seagrass meadow sedimentary material on Yao Yai Island, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quak, Michelle S. Y.; Ziegler, Alan D.; Benner, Shawn G.; Evans, Sam; Todd, Peter A.; Gillis, Lucy G.; Vongtanaboon, Sukanya; Jachowski, Nick; Bouma, Tjeerd J.

    2016-12-01

    Many islands throughout SE Asia are experiencing rapid development and land-cover conversion that potentially threaten sensitive coastal ecosystems, such as seagrasses, through increased loading of sediment and nutrients originating from disturbed catchments draining to the sea. To evaluate this threat for one such island in Southern Thailand (Yao Yai), we perform sediment source tracing via end-member mixing analysis using stable isotopes δ13C and δ15N in organic matter to explore sediment loading in a seagrass meadow. The analysis indicates that sedimentary material in the meadow originates mostly from ocean-associated sources (∼62% from seagrass detritus, seston, and ocean sediments). Terrestrial material comprises ∼19% of the organic material found in the seagrass meadow, with another 20% originating from an adjacent mangrove forest. Approximately one-fourth of the seagrass meadow material (24%) is detritus that has been (re)deposited internally. The high contribution of terrestrial-derived organic matter deposited near the river mouth demonstrates that substantial quantities of sediment are being transferred from upslope erosion sources into the seagrass meadow. However, only a small amount of this material is deposited throughout the entire bay because much of the terrestrial- and mangrove-derived sediment is transferred to the open ocean via channels that are periodically dredged to allow boat access to two small inland harbours. This positive affect of dredging has not received very much attention in existing literature. River water flowing to the channels during falling tide delivers sediment to these efficient pathways, where much of it bypasses the seagrass meadow at periods of time when sediment deposition would normally be the greatest. There is growing concern that ongoing land-cover changes and planned urbanization related to tourism and agriculture on the island may boost sediment/nutrients above a critical threshold, beyond that revealed in

  7. Food for Pollinators: Quantifying the Nectar and Pollen Resources of Urban Flower Meadows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Damien M; Ouvrard, Pierre; Baldock, Katherine C R; Baude, Mathilde; Goddard, Mark A; Kunin, William E; Mitschunas, Nadine; Memmott, Jane; Morse, Helen; Nikolitsi, Maria; Osgathorpe, Lynne M; Potts, Simon G; Robertson, Kirsty M; Scott, Anna V; Sinclair, Frazer; Westbury, Duncan B; Stone, Graham N

    2016-01-01

    Planted meadows are increasingly used to improve the biodiversity and aesthetic amenity value of urban areas. Although many 'pollinator-friendly' seed mixes are available, the floral resources these provide to flower-visiting insects, and how these change through time, are largely unknown. Such data are necessary to compare the resources provided by alternative meadow seed mixes to each other and to other flowering habitats. We used quantitative surveys of over 2 million flowers to estimate the nectar and pollen resources offered by two exemplar commercial seed mixes (one annual, one perennial) and associated weeds grown as 300m2 meadows across four UK cities, sampled at six time points between May and September 2013. Nectar sugar and pollen rewards per flower varied widely across 65 species surveyed, with native British weed species (including dandelion, Taraxacum agg.) contributing the top five nectar producers and two of the top ten pollen producers. Seed mix species yielding the highest rewards per flower included Leontodon hispidus, Centaurea cyanus and C. nigra for nectar, and Papaver rhoeas, Eschscholzia californica and Malva moschata for pollen. Perennial meadows produced up to 20x more nectar and up to 6x more pollen than annual meadows, which in turn produced far more than amenity grassland controls. Perennial meadows produced resources earlier in the year than annual meadows, but both seed mixes delivered very low resource levels early in the year and these were provided almost entirely by native weeds. Pollen volume per flower is well predicted statistically by floral morphology, and nectar sugar mass and pollen volume per unit area are correlated with flower counts, raising the possibility that resource levels can be estimated for species or habitats where they cannot be measured directly. Our approach does not incorporate resource quality information (for example, pollen protein or essential amino acid content), but can easily do so when suitable data

  8. Food for Pollinators: Quantifying the Nectar and Pollen Resources of Urban Flower Meadows.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damien M Hicks

    Full Text Available Planted meadows are increasingly used to improve the biodiversity and aesthetic amenity value of urban areas. Although many 'pollinator-friendly' seed mixes are available, the floral resources these provide to flower-visiting insects, and how these change through time, are largely unknown. Such data are necessary to compare the resources provided by alternative meadow seed mixes to each other and to other flowering habitats. We used quantitative surveys of over 2 million flowers to estimate the nectar and pollen resources offered by two exemplar commercial seed mixes (one annual, one perennial and associated weeds grown as 300m2 meadows across four UK cities, sampled at six time points between May and September 2013. Nectar sugar and pollen rewards per flower varied widely across 65 species surveyed, with native British weed species (including dandelion, Taraxacum agg. contributing the top five nectar producers and two of the top ten pollen producers. Seed mix species yielding the highest rewards per flower included Leontodon hispidus, Centaurea cyanus and C. nigra for nectar, and Papaver rhoeas, Eschscholzia californica and Malva moschata for pollen. Perennial meadows produced up to 20x more nectar and up to 6x more pollen than annual meadows, which in turn produced far more than amenity grassland controls. Perennial meadows produced resources earlier in the year than annual meadows, but both seed mixes delivered very low resource levels early in the year and these were provided almost entirely by native weeds. Pollen volume per flower is well predicted statistically by floral morphology, and nectar sugar mass and pollen volume per unit area are correlated with flower counts, raising the possibility that resource levels can be estimated for species or habitats where they cannot be measured directly. Our approach does not incorporate resource quality information (for example, pollen protein or essential amino acid content, but can easily do so

  9. Cattle grazing and its long-term effects on sedge meadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Beth

    2004-01-01

    Most people think that wetlands are temporary, that they fill in by natural processes, and eventually become dry land. Some of these outdated ideas have come from the way that this subject has been covered in introductory textbooks in schools (Gibson, 1996). From these texts, we learned incorrectly that over time a lake fills with sediment or organic matter to become a wetland, which dries out to support shrubs and trees, and eventually it is no longer a wetland (Middleton, 1999; Middleton and others, 2004). These old ideas of how vegetation changes (succession) are no longer accepted. Wetland succession should be thought of as a cycle, with natural disturbance driving the changes, depending on the needs of the species. Succession is not something that changes a wetland into something that is not a wetland (Egler, 1978; van der Valk, 1981; Middleton and others, 1991; Klinger, 1996; Middleton, 1999).As an example of how disturbance changes wetlands, I have studied sedge meadows that have become invaded by shrubs after cattle (Bos sp.) have grazed them, in the Lodi Marsh State Natural Area, Wisconsin. Cattle disturbances allowed shrubs to invade sedge meadows, but the cattle also grazed on the shrubs, which kept them small. After the cows were removed, the plant species changed in the sedge meadow from the original sedges (fig. 1), to sedges mixed with growing small shrubs, and eventually to tall shrubs with very small amounts of sedge, called “shrub carr” (Middleton, 2002a). Even though there has been a succession of plant types, the meadows, which began as wetlands, have remained wetlands. The settlers originally found the sedge meadows to be open “sedge” lands and not shrubby. The settlers cut the sedges by hand to feed the cattle. Whitetailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), though probably not bison (Bison bison), grazed these sedge meadows (Middleton 2002a).Subsequent studies have explored methods to control invasive shrubs to restore the biodiversity of

  10. Karl Konrad Grass jumalainimeste uurijana / Alar Laats

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Laats, Alar

    2006-01-01

    Karl Konrad Grass oli 19. sajandil Dorpati keiserliku ülikooli usuteaduskonna Uue Testamendi õppejõud, kes tegeles hobi korras idakristluse (vene sektid) uurimisega. Tema peateoseks on uurimus "Die russischen Sekten". Ettekanne konverentsil 15.-16. aprill 2005. a.

  11. Grasses for energy production: hydrological guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, R.L.

    2003-07-01

    This report provides hydrological guidelines for growers, land and water resource managers, environmental groups and other parties interested in utilising grasses for energy production. The aim of the report is to help interested parties decide if a location is suitable for planting energy grasses by considering whether potential hydrological impacts will have an adverse effect on crop productivity and yield. The guidelines consider: the water use of energy grasses compared with other crops; the factors governing water use; the water requirements for a productive crop; and the likely impacts on the availability and quantity of water. The report points out that there are still gaps in our knowledge of the processes controlling the water use and growth of energy grasses and notes that, in some situations, there will be considerable uncertainty in predictions of water use and the magnitude of the associated hydrological impacts.

  12. Imaging spectroscopy for characterisation of grass swards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schut, A.G.T.

    2003-01-01

    Keywords: Imaging spectroscopy, imaging spectrometry, remote sensing, reflection, reflectance, grass sward, white clover, recognition, characterisation, ground cover, growth monitoring, stress detection, heterogeneity quantificationThe potential of imaging spectroscopy as a tool for characterisation

  13. Karl Konrad Grass jumalainimeste uurijana / Alar Laats

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Laats, Alar

    2006-01-01

    Karl Konrad Grass oli 19. sajandil Dorpati keiserliku ülikooli usuteaduskonna Uue Testamendi õppejõud, kes tegeles hobi korras idakristluse (vene sektid) uurimisega. Tema peateoseks on uurimus "Die russischen Sekten". Ettekanne konverentsil 15.-16. aprill 2005. a.

  14. (Kangaroo grass) at various growth stages

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-04-06

    Apr 6, 2009 ... Key words: Kangaroo grass, biomass, dry matter, rangeland, growth stages. INTRODUCTION ... Soil organic matter, soil porosity and nutrient ... as soil moisture approaches field capacity (Nolan, 1994). Because Kangaroo ...

  15. Pampas Grass - Orange Co. [ds351

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This dataset provides the known distribution of pampas grass (Cortaderia selloana) in southern Orange County. The surveys were conducted from May to June, 2007 and...

  16. Seasonality in vegetation biometrics and its effects on sediment characteristics and meiofauna in Baltic seagrass meadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowska, Emilia; Włodarska-Kowalczuk, Maria; Kotwicki, Lech; Balazy, Piotr; Kuliński, Karol

    2014-02-01

    Seagrass meadows can act as ecosystem engineers, i.e., organisms that modify the availability of resources to other organisms. However, their possible positive impacts depend on the characteristics of the vegetation, and these can vary strongly seasonally. This study assesses seasonal variability in macrophyte taxonomic composition and seagrass biometrics in the temperate Baltic Sea eelgrass meadows. We hypothesize that the anticipated strong seasonality in vegetation cover induces parallel seasonal changes in seagrass engineering effects as indicated by changes in sediment characteristics and meiozoobenthic abundance, composition and diversity. Macrophytes, sediments, and fauna were sampled at two locations in the Puck Bay from vegetated bottoms and bare sands five times in one year. Zostera marina vegetation occurred throughout the year and showed strong seasonality with the highest values of shoot density, leaf length, and biomass in July (202.3 ± 30.0 95% CI shoots m-2) and the lowest in March (55.4 ± 15.0 shoots m-2). POC was significantly higher in vegetated sands, and these effects were evident throughout the study period regardless of variability in macrophyte vegetation. The density and diversity of meiofauna did not differ between the seagrass beds and bare sands even in summer months when vegetation was best developed. The lack of an effect of the seagrass meadows on the meiofauna can be explained by the relatively low shoot density and biomass of the studied seagrass meadows and/or higher macrobenthic predation on the vegetated bottom compared to bare sands. However, both the canopies of macrophytes and the effects of the vegetation on benthic systems could increase substantially over the course of the gradual, natural restoration of the seagrass meadows.

  17. Soil organic carbon storage and soil CO2 flux in the alpine meadow ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    High-resolution sampling,measurements of organic carbon contents and 14C signatures of selected four soil profiles in the Haibei Station situated on the northeast Tibetan Plateau,and application of 14C tracing technology were conducted in an attempt to investigate the turnover times of soil organic car-bon and the soil-CO2 flux in the alpine meadow ecosystem. The results show that the organic carbon stored in the soils varies from 22.12×104 kg C hm-2 to 30.75×104 kg C hm-2 in the alpine meadow eco-systems,with an average of 26.86×104 kg C hm-2. Turnover times of organic carbon pools increase with depth from 45 a to 73 a in the surface soil horizon to hundreds of years or millennia or even longer at the deep soil horizons in the alpine meadow ecosystems. The soil-CO2 flux ranges from 103.24 g C m-2 a-1 to 254.93 gC m-2 a-1,with an average of 191.23 g C m-2 a-1. The CO2 efflux produced from microbial decomposition of organic matter varies from 73.3 g C m-2 a-1 to 181 g C m-2 a-1. More than 30% of total soil organic carbon resides in the active carbon pool and 72.8%―81.23% of total CO2 emitted from or-ganic matter decomposition results from the topsoil horizon (from 0 cm to 10 cm) for the Kobresia meadow. Responding to global warming,the storage,volume of flow and fate of the soil organic carbon in the alpine meadow ecosystem of the Tibetan Plateau will be changed,which needs further research.

  18. Influence of land cover changes on the physical and chemical properties of alpine meadow soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Taking the alpine cold meadow grassland in the southeastern part of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau as an example, this research deals with the characteristics of alpine meadow soil property changes, including soil nutrients, soil physical properties and soil moisture content under different land coverage conditions. With the degradation of grassland vegetation and the decline of vegetation coverage, soil compactness reduces, gravel content increases and bulk density increases. The originally dense root-system layer is gradually denuded, making the soil coarse and gravel. The change of the organic matter contents with the vegetation coverage change in the surface soil layer (0-20 cm) has shown an obvious cubic polynomial curve process. The organic matter contents increase rapidly when land coverage is above 60%, contrarily decreases on a large scale when land coverage is below 30%. Between 30%-60% of land coverage the organic matter contents remain stable. The total N and organic matter contents in soil have shown quite similar change regularity. Following this the mathematic equations are derived to describe such change processes. Moisture content in soil changes sharply with the vegetation coverage change. Soil moisture content change with the vegetation coverage change has shown a quadratic parabola process. Results have shown that organic matter content and the total N content of the alpine meadow soil decrease by 14890 kg/hm2 and 5505 kg/hm2 respectively as the vegetation coverage reduces from 90% to less than 30%. The heavy changes of soil physical and chemical properties with grassland degradation have made the recovery of alpine meadow ecological system impossible. The protection of alpine meadow vegetation is of vital importance to the maintenance of the regional soil environment and the regional ecological system.

  19. Soil organic carbon storage and soil CO2 flux in the alpine meadow ecosystem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Zhen; SHEN ChengDe; GAO QuanZhou; SUN YanMin; YI WeiXi; LI YingNian

    2007-01-01

    High-resolution sampling, measurements of organic carbon contents and 14C signatures of selected four soil profiles in the Haibei Station situated on the northeast Tibetan Plateau, and application of 14C tracing technology were conducted in an attempt to investigate the turnover times of soil organic carbon and the soil-CO2 flux in the alpine meadow ecosystem. The results show that the organic carbon stored in the soils varies from 22.12(104 kg C hm-2 to 30.75(104 kg C hm-2 in the alpine meadow ecosystems, with an average of 26.86(104 kg C hm-2. Turnover times of organic carbon pools increase with depth from 45 a to 73 a in the surface soil horizon to hundreds of years or millennia or even longer at the deep soil horizons in the alpine meadow ecosystems. The soil-CO2 flux ranges from 103.24 g C m-2 a-1 to 254.93 gC m-2 a-1, with an average of 191.23 g C m-2 a-1. The CO2 efflux produced from microbial decomposition of organic matter varies from 73.3 g C m-2 a-1 to 181 g C m-2 a-1. More than 30% of total soil organic carbon resides in the active carbon pool and 72.8%-81.23% of total CO2 emitted from organic matter decomposition results from the topsoil horizon (from 0 cm to 10 cm) for the Kobresia meadow. Responding to global warming, the storage, volume of flow and fate of the soil organic carbon in the alpine meadow ecosystem of the Tibetan Plateau will be changed, which needs further research.

  20. Identifying Components of Groundwater Flow, Flux, and Storage in Tuolumne Meadows, Yosemite, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vialpando, M., III; Lowry, C.; Visser, A.; Moran, J. E.; Esser, B. K.

    2015-12-01

    High elevation meadows in the Sierra Nevada of California, USA represent mixing zones between surface water and groundwater. Quantifying the exchange between stream water and groundwater, and the residence time of water stored in meadow sediments will allow examination of the possible buffer effect that groundwater has on meadows and streams. This in turn has implications for the resilience of the ecosystem as well as the downstream communities that are dependent upon runoff for water supply. Stream flow was measured and water samples were collected along a 5 km reach of the Tuolumne River and adjacent wells during both spring runoff and baseflow. Water samples were analyzed for concentrations of dissolved noble gases and anions, sulfur-35, tritium and radon to study surface water-groundwater interactions and residence times. Although lower than average because of the ongoing drought in California, discharge in early July 2015 was about 35 times that measured during the previous fall. During baseflow, a small component of fracture flow (2%) is identified using dissolved helium. Radon, anions and stream discharge identify reaches of groundwater discharge. Anions show a steady increase in the groundwater component over the western portion of the meadow during baseflow, and over 50% of stream water is exchanged with meadow groundwater, without a net gain or loss of stream flow. Sulfur-35 and tritium results indicated that groundwater contributing to stream flow has recharged within the previous two years. With the current drought, estimated as the most severe in 1200 years, accurate estimations of water availability are becoming increasingly important to water resource managers.

  1. Seasonal variations in carbon dioxide exchange in an alpine wetland meadow on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhao

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Alpine wetland meadow could functions as a carbon sink due to it high soil organic content and low decomposition. However, the magnitude and dynamics of carbon stock in alpine wetland ecosystems are not well quantified. Therefore, understanding how environmental variables affect the processes that regulate carbon fluxes in alpine wetland meadow on the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau is critical. To address this issue, Gross Primary Production (GPP, Ecosystem Respiration (Reco, and Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE were examined in an alpine wetland meadow using the eddy covariance method from October 2003 to December 2006 at the Haibei Research Station of the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Seasonal patterns of GPP and Reco were closely associated with leaf area index (LAI. The Reco showed a positive exponential to soil temperature and relatively low Reco occurred during the non-growing season after a rain event. This result is inconsistent with the result observed in alpine shrubland meadow. In total, annual GPP were estimated at 575.7, 682.9, and 630.97 g C m−2 in 2004, 2005, and 2006, respectively. Meanwhile, the Reco were equal to 676.8, 726.4, 808.2 g C m−2, and thus the NEE were 101.1, 44.0 and 173.2 g C m−2. These results indicated that the alpine wetland meadow was a moderately source of carbon dioxide (CO2. The observed carbon dioxide fluxes in the alpine wetland meadow were higher than other alpine meadow such as Kobresia humilis meadow and shrubland meadow.

  2. Influence of climate on the presence of colour polymorphism in two montane reptile species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broennimann, Olivier; Ursenbacher, Sylvain; Meyer, Andreas; Golay, Philippe; Monney, Jean-Claude; Schmocker, Hans; Guisan, Antoine; Dubey, Sylvain

    2014-11-01

    The coloration of ectotherms plays an important role in thermoregulation processes. Dark individuals should heat up faster and be able to reach a higher body temperature than light individuals and should therefore have benefits in cool areas. In central Europe, montane local populations of adder (Vipera berus) and asp viper (Vipera aspis) exhibit a varying proportion of melanistic individuals. We tested whether the presence of melanistic V. aspis and V. berus could be explained by climatic conditions. We measured the climatic niche position and breadth of monomorphic (including strictly patterned individuals) and polymorphic local populations, calculated their niche overlap and tested for niche equivalency and similarity. In accordance with expectations, niche overlap between polymorphic local populations of both species is high, and even higher than that of polymorphic versus monomorphic montane local populations of V. aspis, suggesting a predominant role of melanism in determining the niche of ectothermic vertebrates. However, unexpectedly, the niche of polymorphic local populations of both species is narrower than that of monomorphic ones, indicating that colour polymorphism does not always enable the exploitation of a greater variability of resources, at least at the intraspecific level. Overall, our results suggest that melanism might be present only when the thermoregulatory benefit is higher than the cost of predation.

  3. Selective Extraction Methods for Aluminium, Iron and Organic Carbon from Montane Volcanic Ash Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B. JANSEN; F. H. TONNEIJCK; J. M. VERSTRATEN

    2011-01-01

    Montane volcanic ash soils contain disproportionate amounts of soil organic carbon and thereby play an often underestimated role in the global carbon cycle.Given the central role of A1 and Fe in stabilizing organic matter in volcanic ash soils,we assessed various extraction methods of A1,Fe,and C fractions from montane volcanic ash soils in northern Ecuador,aiming at elucidating the role of A1 and Fe in stabilizing soil organic matter (SOM).We found extractions with cold sodium hydroxide,ammonium oxalate/oxalic acid,sodium pyrophosphate,and sodium tetraborate to be particularly useful.Combination of these methods yielded information about the role of the mineral phase in stabilizing organic matter and the differences in type and degree of complexation of organic matter with Al and Fe in the various horizons and soil profiles.Sodium tetraborate extraction proved the only soft extraction method that yielded simultaneous information about the Al,Fe,and C fractions extracted.It also appeared to differentiate between SOM fractions of different stability.The fractions of copper chloride- and potassium chloride-extractable A1 were useful in assessing the total reactive and toxic Al fractions,respectively.The classical subdivision of organic matter into humic acids,fulvic acids,and humin added little useful information.The use of fulvic acids as a proxy for mobile organic matter as done in several model-based approaches seems invalid in the soils studied.

  4. The effects of Pleistocene climate change on biotic differentiation in a montane songbird clade from Wallacea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Nathaniel S R; Wilton, Peter R; Prawiradilaga, Dewi Malia; Tay, Ywee Chieh; Indrawan, Mochamad; Garg, Kritika M; Rheindt, Frank E

    2017-09-01

    The role of Pleistocene Ice Age in tropical diversification is poorly understood, especially in archipelagos, in which glaciation-induced sea level fluctuations may lead to complicated changes in land distribution. To assess how Pleistocene land bridges may have facilitated gene flow in tropical archipelagos, we investigated patterns of diversification in the rarely-collected rusty-bellied fantail Rhipidura teysmanni (Passeriformes: Rhipiduridae) complex from Wallacea using a combination of bioacoustic traits and whole-genome sequencing methods (dd-RADSeq). We report a biogeographic leapfrog pattern in the vocalizations of these birds, and uncover deep genomic divergence among island populations despite the presence of intermittent land connections between some. We demonstrate how rare instances of genetic introgression have affected the evolution of this species complex, and document the presence of double introgressive mitochondrial sweeps, highlighting the dangers of using only mitochondrial DNA in evolutionary research. By applying different tree inference approaches, we demonstrate how concatenation methods can give inaccurate results when investigating divergence in closely-related taxa. Our study highlights high levels of cryptic avian diversity in poorly-explored Wallacea, elucidates complex patterns of Pleistocene climate-mediated diversification in an elusive montane songbird, and suggests that Pleistocene land bridges may have accounted for limited connectivity among montane Wallacean biota. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Community dynamics of a montane Fagus engleriana–Cyclobalanopsis multiervis mixed forest in Shennongjia, Hubei, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jielin Ge

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Montane evergreen and deciduous broad-leaved mixed forests are some of the main vegetation types in China. Specifically, the Fagus–Cyclobalanopsis mixed forest is a dominant forest community in themountainous region of Shennongjia. Using three datasets (2001, 2006, and 2010 from a permanent 120 m ×80 m plot in the montane evergreen and deciduous broad-leaved mixed forest in Shengnongjia, we analyzedthe dynamics of tree species composition and community structure for individual trees (DBH ≥ 4 cm. We found that total species number increased from 81 in 2001 to 84 in 2006, and then decreased to 83 in 2010. Dominant species remained constant throughout the study period, including Cyclobalanopsis multiervis, Fagus engleriana, Rhododendron hypoglaucum and Lithocarpus henryi. Stem number and basal area followed the same trend with an initial increase, followed by a decline. The mortality and recruitment of this survey plot changed substantially over the nine-year study period. Although an ice storm in 2008 had some impact on the community, the species richness and community structure did not alter significantly and the community appeared to be in a state of dynamic equilibrium with strong resilience to external disturbances.

  6. Characterization of the Montane Huntington Wildlife Forest Ecosystem Using Machine Learning Approaches from Remote Sensing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Manqi

    Montane forests are susceptible to various stressors such as land use and climate change. Consequently, research on characterizing montane forest ecosystems should be conducted on a continuous basis for sustainable forest management. In this research, forest type mapping and change analysis, and biomass/carbon stock quantification were performed over a mountainous forest located in the central Adirondack Park, NY, by employing machine learning techniques at the plot level. Multi-temporal Landsat TM data were used to classify forest type cover and to detect forest cover changes for the past 20 years. Forest biomass and carbon stock quantification was then performed using full waveform LiDAR data collected in September 2011. Accuracies from the two case studies were in support of the versatility of machine learning approaches for forest and ecological investigation. Topographic characteristics affected the classification accuracy as well as the forest type change for the past 20 years. LiDAR-derived metrics, especially height-based ones, proved useful for quantifying biomass/carbon stock. Keywords: Landsat TM, full waveform LiDAR, forest classification, forest change analysis, biomass, carbon stock, machine learning

  7. Montane flora of the southern Langeberg, South Africa: a checklist of the flowering plants and ferns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. J. Mcdonald

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The flora of the southern Langeberg is rich, w ith 1 228 species and intraspecific taxa (referred to collectively as species recorded in 361 genera and 105 families. An analysis of the montane flora of the southern Langeberg. Western Cape, South Africa based on an annotated checklist shows that the Asteraceae has the highest number of species per familv (167 and the genus  Erica has the most infrageneric taxa per genus (130 as well as the most endemic species (51. One endemic monotypic family, the Geissolomataceae, two endemic genera Geissoloma and Langebergia (Asteraceae and a total of 167 endemic species are found on the southern Langeberg The plant families of the southern Langeberg flora are ranked according to species-richness of the families and compared with floras of other areas (mainly montane in the Fynbos Biome and marginally to the east of this biome (the Amatole Mountains. The greatest similarity of ranking is evident betw een the plant families of the southern Langeberg and those of the Cape Hangklip Area.

  8. Montane and coastal species diversification in the economically important Mexican grasshopper genus Sphenarium (Orthoptera: Pyrgomorphidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedraza-Lara, Carlos; Barrientos-Lozano, Ludivina; Rocha-Sánchez, Aurora Y; Zaldívar-Riverón, Alejandro

    2015-03-01

    The genus Sphenarium (Pyrgomorphidae) is a small group of grasshoppers endemic to México and Guatemala that are economically and culturally important both as a food source and as agricultural pests. However, its taxonomy has been largely neglected mainly due to its conserved interspecific external morphology and the considerable intraspecific variation in colour pattern of some taxa. Here we examined morphological as well as mitochondrial and nuclear DNA sequence data to assess the species boundaries and evolutionary history in Sphenarium. Our morphological identification and DNA sequence-based species delimitation, carried out with three different approaches (DNA barcoding, general mixed Yule-coalescent model, Bayesian species delimitation), all recovered a higher number of putative species of Sphenarium than previously recognised. We unambiguously delimit seven species, and between five and ten additional species depending on the data/method analysed. Phylogenetic relationships within the genus strongly support two main clades, one exclusively montane, the other coastal. Divergence time estimates suggest late Miocene to Pliocene ages for the origin and most of the early diversification events in the genus, which were probably influenced by the formation of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt. A series of Pleistocene events could have led to the current species diversification in both montane and coastal regions. This study not only reveals an overlooked species richness for the most popular edible insect in Mexico, but also highlights the influence of the dynamic geological and climatic history of the region in shaping its current diversity.

  9. Zooplankton assemblages in montane lakes and ponds of Mount Rainier National Park, Washington State, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, G.L.; Hoffman, R.; McIntire, C.D.; Lienkaemper, G.; Samora, B.

    2009-01-01

    Water quality and zooplankton samples were collected during the ice-free periods between 1988 and 2005 from 103 oligotrophic montane lakes and ponds located in low forest to alpine vegetation zones in Mount Rainier National Park, Washington State, USA. Collectively, 45 rotifer and 44 crustacean taxa were identified. Most of the numerically dominant taxa appeared to have wide niche breadths. The average number of taxa per lake decreased with elevation and generally increased as maximum lake depths increased (especially for rotifers). With one exception, fish presence/absence did not explain the taxonomic compositions of crustacean zooplankton assemblages. Many rotifer species were common members of zooplankton assemblages in montane lakes and ponds in western North America, whereas the crustacean taxa were common to some areas of the west, but not others. Constraints of the environmental variables did not appear to provide strong gradients to separate the distributions of most zooplankton species. This suggests that interspecific competitive interactions and stochastic processes regulate the taxonomic structures of the zooplankton assemblages at the landscape level. Crustacean species that had broad niche breadths were associated with different rotifer taxa across the environmental gradients. Studies of zooplankton assemblages need to address both crustacean and rotifer taxa, not one or the other.

  10. Reproduction and morphology of the common lizard (Zootoca vivipara) from montane populations in Slovakia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváthová, Terézia; Baláž, Michal; Jandzik, David

    2013-02-01

    The common lizard, Zootoca vivipara (Lichtenstein, 1823), shows high variation in life histories and morphology across its range, which comprises almost the entire Palearctic region. However, this variation is not congruent with the species phylogeny. This suggests an important role of the environment in shaping the variation in morphology and life histories of this species. As most data on life histories originate from only a small number of populations and do not cover the species' geographic range and phylogenetic diversity, to fill a gap and provide more information for future comparative studies we investigated reproduction and morphology in two montane populations from Slovakia, central Europe. This region is characterized by taxonomic and phylogenetic diversity and both montane and lowland ecological forms of the common lizard occur here. The common lizards from the Slovak populations are sexually dimorphic, with females having larger body and abdomen lengths and males having larger heads and longer legs. Female common lizards start to reproduce at a relatively large size compared to most other populations. This is consistent with a relatively short activity season, which has been shown to be the main factor driving variation in body size in the common lizard. Clutch size was also relatively high and positively correlated with body size, abdomen size and head size. One third of all females attaining the size of the smallest gravid female showed no signs of reproductive activity despite mating opportunities, suggesting that not all females reproduce annually in this population.

  11. Minimum energy design using grassed spillways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, B. [FIE Aust, Melbourne (Australia)

    2004-09-01

    Small dams for rural communities in Australia often fail due to the Spillway or bywash, because it receives insufficient attention during the design, construction and maintenance processes. More thorough investigation and improved standards of design and construction are needed in order to resolve problems. This paper described some of the reasons for adopting grass spillways on farm dams. It compared grass and earth spillways and also discussed spillway design factors such as site conditions, peak flow estimation, and design spillway size. The factors affecting selection of spillway type and design include safety requirements, hydrological conditions, geological and site topographical conditions, and type of dam. Factors involved in grass selection in spillway design were also identified. These include climate, soils, land systems, and quality and duration of discharge, growth characteristics, hydraulic behaviour, and maintenance. It was concluded that additional research is needed regarding methods of establishing grass cover to inlets and outlet spillway. In particular, there is a need to evaluate the growth of grasses through plastic meshes and geotextiles, which could provide protection against erosion while the grass is becoming established. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  12. Madagascar's grasses and grasslands: anthropogenic or natural?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorontsova, Maria S; Besnard, Guillaume; Forest, Félix; Malakasi, Panagiota; Moat, Justin; Clayton, W Derek; Ficinski, Paweł; Savva, George M; Nanjarisoa, Olinirina P; Razanatsoa, Jacqueline; Randriatsara, Fetra O; Kimeu, John M; Luke, W R Quentin; Kayombo, Canisius; Linder, H Peter

    2016-01-27

    Grasses, by their high productivity even under very low pCO2, their ability to survive repeated burning and to tolerate long dry seasons, have transformed the terrestrial biomes in the Neogene and Quaternary. The expansion of grasslands at the cost of biodiverse forest biomes in Madagascar is often postulated as a consequence of the Holocene settlement of the island by humans. However, we show that the Malagasy grass flora has many indications of being ancient with a long local evolutionary history, much predating the Holocene arrival of humans. First, the level of endemism in the Madagascar grass flora is well above the global average for large islands. Second, a survey of many of the more diverse areas indicates that there is a very high spatial and ecological turnover in the grass flora, indicating a high degree of niche specialization. We also find some evidence that there are both recently disturbed and natural stable grasslands: phylogenetic community assembly indicates that recently severely disturbed grasslands are phylogenetically clustered, whereas more undisturbed grasslands tend to be phylogenetically more evenly distributed. From this evidence, it is likely that grass communities existed in Madagascar long before human arrival and so were determined by climate, natural grazing and other natural factors. Humans introduced zebu cattle farming and increased fire frequency, and may have triggered an expansion of the grasslands. Grasses probably played the same role in the modification of the Malagasy environments as elsewhere in the tropics.

  13. Hydrological and vegetational response to the Younger Dryas climatic oscillations: a high resolution case study from Quoyloo Meadow, Orkney, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maas, David; Abrook, Ashley; Timms, Rhys; Matthews, Ian; Palmer, Adrian; Milner, Alice; Candy, Ian; Sachse, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    The Younger Dryas (Loch Lomond) Stadial is a well defined period of cold climate that in North West Europe punctuated the climatic amelioration during the Last Glacial - Interglacial Transition (LGIT ca. 16-8 ka). A palaeolake record from Quoyloo Meadow, Orkney Islands (N59.067, E-3.309) has been analysed for pollen and stable isotopes on biomarker lipids. n-Alkanes from terrestrial and aquatic sources are present throughout the core. The average chain length (ACL) is relatively low during the interstadial (~28.0) and shows a distinct increase during the Younger Dryas (to 29.0 +), attributed to an increase in grasses and drought resistant shrubs (e.g. Artemisia, Castañeda et al., 2009, Bunting, 1994). At the beginning of the Holocene, the ACL rapidly drops to 28.3 and from thereon gently increases again to ~29.0. There is a continued odd-over-even n-alkane predominance, although even n-alkanes are present in greater quantities in the interstadial, indicating an increasing terrestrial contribution in the Holocene. Ongoing deuterium isotope measurements of the n-alkanes will give independent evidence for palaeohydrological changes and can be compared to the other proxy evidence within the same core. Using a combination of nC29 and nC23 (terrestrial and aquatic end-members, respectively), a change in relative humidity (rH) can be qualified. This is based on the idea that terrestrial vegetation is affected by evapotranspiration processes, whereas aquatic vegetation is not (Rach et al., 2014). This data is supported by a high resolution palynological study; the contiguously sampled record demonstrates ecosystem/environmental responses to millennial-scale climatic change and allows for the possible detection of vegetation shifts at the sub-millennial scale. Vegetation aside, the pollen data can further aid in the interpretation of the recorded n-alkanes and isotopic analyses. This data is placed within a chronological framework derived from a high resolution crypto- and

  14. Afforestation of degraded grass land

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basappa, B.

    1983-01-01

    The suitability of 11 species was tested for planting on degraded land at Kogilemane in Belur Taluk, Karnataka. The soil was alkaline with no humus, litter or topsoil. The original vegetation was grass with the stemless palm Phoenix acaulis, still present at 600 plants per acre. Seedlings 4-6 months old and raised in polythene bags were planted in pits in July 1981; Bambusa vulgaris was planted as 8-month-old cuttings. No fertilizer was applied. The most successful species after the first season was Acacia auriculiformis. Satisfactory survival and growth were also obtained with Cassia siamea, Peltoforum ferruginum, Leucaena leucocephala (although this was later heavily damaged by wild rabbits) and Toona ciliata. The bamboo survived well but there was no culm formation during the experiment. In 1982 only 3 of the species were tested: A. auriculiformis, L. leucocephala (because of its fast growth rate) and Casuarina equisetifolia (which performed badly in 1981 but is suited to alkaline soils). All 3 species performed satisfactorily.

  15. Reaction of cocksfoot (Dactylis glomerata L. in grass-clover mixture on N fertilization and grazing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Andreata-Koren

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Grazing is the most common way of using a hill and mountain areas because of their specific agro-ecological conditions. Cocksfoot is a grass with high productivity and quality, and it is very good for sowing in the sward for grazing. Because of its good adaptability to different growing conditions, especially in very dry and cold areas, it is excellent in relation to some other good grasses, which can not be raised in such areas. The aim of the experiment was to determine effect of N application (0-N0 and 150 kg ha-1 year-1-N150 and rotational grazing by cattle (C and sheep (S, and their interaction on the cocksfoot sown in a mixture of smooth-stalked meadow grass (Poa pratensis L. and white clover (Trifolium repens L. in hill mountain areas. In a three-year average, the application of 150 kg ha-1 N had significant impact on cocksfoot population density (number of tillers m-2, and it was 51.4 % higher than the recorded one before grazing (P<0.05 and 42.2 % higher after grazing (P<0.01 in comparison to N0. The application of 150 kg ha-1 N resulted in significantly higher cocksfoot dry matter (DM yield for 38.6 % (P<0.01 and 15.3 % higher cocksfoot share in the total mixture in relation to N0 (P<0.01. Grazing management and grazing management interaction with N rate did not significantly affect the population density of individual years. However, in the three-year average, grazing management significantly affected cocksfoot DM (P<0.01 and its percentage in the total DM mixture (P<0.01. Cattle grazing resulted in 9.9 % higher cocksfoot DM yield and 15.2 % higher cocksfoot percentage in pasture. Interaction of grazing management and N-level had significant influence on the percentage of cocksfoot DM in grass-clover mixture. On cattle grazed areas fertilized with 150 kg ha-1 N, the percentage of cocksfoot DM was the highest (74. 07%, while the lowest percentage of cocksfoot DM was recorded on the sheep grazed areas without N (55.12%.

  16. Long-term changes in structure and composition following hurricanes in a primary lower montane rain forest in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    P.L. Weaver

    2013-01-01

    Ridges within the lower montane rain forests (sensu Beard) of the Caribbean Basin are dominated by Dacryodes excelsa, a tree species known as tabonuco in Puerto Rico and gommier in the Lesser Antilles. Periodially, hurricanes traverse the islands causing changes in structure, species composition, and dynamics of forests. The chronology of post-hurricane vegetation...

  17. Increases in mean annual temperature do not alter soil bacterial community structure in tropical montane wet forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul C. Selmants; Karen L. Adair; Creighton M. Litton; Christian P. Giardina; Egbert Schwartz

    2016-01-01

    Soil bacteria play a key role in regulating terrestrial biogeochemical cycling and greenhouse gas fluxes across the soil-atmosphere continuum. Despite their importance to ecosystem functioning, we lack a general understanding of how bacterial communities respond to climate change, especially in relatively understudied ecosystems like tropical montane wet...

  18. Diversity and distribution of the bryophyte flora in montane forests in the Chapada Diamantina region of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia de Brito Valente

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Bryophytes constitute an important component of tropical rain forests, which provide microhabitats favorable for their establishment. Bryophytes are also quite responsive to changes in microclimate, which makes them good bioindicators. This study aimed to determine the diversity and distribution of bryophytes in upper and lower montane forests of the Chapada Diamantina region of the state of Bahia, Brazil. To that end, we studied community aspects such as richness, diversity, substrates colonized, life forms and floristic similarity between areas and regions. In 2007 and 2008, we collected specimens from six forest sites, located from the north to the south of the Chapada Diamantina region. We identified a total of 205 infrageneric taxa. In comparison with the lower montane forests, the upper montane forests presented higher diversity and species richness, as well as greater numbers of substrates colonized, life form types, species of restricted geographic distribution and species typical of shaded areas. We also found low similarity in the species composition, the populations of the upper and lower montane forests forming two large and distinct groups. Although presenting relatively high floristic homogeneity among themselves, the Chapada Diamantina areas presented little similarity with those of the Atlantic Forest. This can be explained by the differences between the two regions in terms of environmental conditions, precipitation, seasonality, elevation and continentality.

  19. Dawn chorus variation in East-Asian tropical montane forest birds and its ecological and morphological correlates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, W.-M.; Lee, Y.-F.; Tsai, C.-F.; Yao, C.-T.; Chen, Y.-H.; Li, S.-H.; Kuo, Y.-M.

    2015-01-01

    Many birds in breeding seasons engage in vigorous dawn singing that often turns to a prominent chorus. We examined dawn chorus variation of avian assemblages in a tropical montane forest in Taiwan and tested the hypothesis that onset sequence is affected by eye sizes, foraging heights, and diet of b

  20. Changes in forest structure and composition after fire in tropical montane cloud forests near the Andean treeline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliveras Menor, I.; Malhi, Y.; Salinas, N.; Huaman, V.; Urquiaga-Flores, E.; Kala-Mamani, J.; Quintano-Loaiza, J.A.; Cuba-Torres, I.; Lizarraga-Morales, N.; Roman-Cuesta, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In tropical montane cloud forests (TMCFs) fires can be a frequent source of disturbance near the treeline. Aims: To identify how forest structure and tree species composition change in response to fire and to identify fire-tolerant species, and determine which traits or characteristics a

  1. Root nodulation in the wetland tree Pterocarpus officinalis along coastal and montane systems of Northeast of Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachel Pérez; Tamara Heartsill Scalley

    2008-01-01

    In Puerto Rico, brackish water wetlands were dominated by Pterocarpus officinalis previous to extensive deforestation due to agriculture. Today remnant wetlands are limited to small areas that are threatened by rise in sea level. We examined the root nodules of P. officinalis in montane and coastal sites and at 0, 10, 20 cm from the surface to determine if site...

  2. Wormmos (Pseudocalliergon trifarium) in trilveen in De Wieden: een arctisch-boreaal-montane mossoort, nieuw voor de Benelux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weeda, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Zeer goed onderzochte gebieden blijven verrassingen bieden. Zo is Noordwest- Overijssel is bryologisch grondig onderzocht. Toch kon hier op 20 juni 2006 een nieuwe mossoort voor de Nederlandse flora worden buitgemaakt, en nog wel één met een arctisch-boreaal-montane verspreiding

  3. Analyzing cloud base at local and regional scales to understand tropical montane cloud forest vulnerability to climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley E. Van Beusekom; Grizelle Gonzalez; Martha A. Scholl

    2017-01-01

    The degree to which cloud immersion provides water in addition to rainfall, suppresses transpiration, and sustains tropical montane cloud forests (TMCFs) during rainless periods is not well understood. Climate and land use changes represent a threat to these forests if cloud base altitude rises as a result of regional warming or deforestation. To establish a baseline...

  4. Long-term fragmentation effects on the distribution and dynamics of canopy gaps in a tropical montane forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas R. Vaughn; Gregory P. Asner; Christian P. Giardina

    2015-01-01

    Fragmentation alters forest canopy structure through various mechanisms, which in turn drive subsequent changes to biogeochemical processes and biological diversity. Using repeated airborne LiDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) mappings, we investigated the size distribution and dynamics of forest canopy gaps across a topical montane forest landscape in Hawaii naturally...

  5. Changes in forest structure and composition after fire in tropical montane cloud forests near the Andean treeline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliveras Menor, I.; Malhi, Y.; Salinas, N.; Huaman, V.; Urquiaga-Flores, E.; Kala-Mamani, J.; Quintano-Loaiza, J.A.; Cuba-Torres, I.; Lizarraga-Morales, N.; Roman-Cuesta, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In tropical montane cloud forests (TMCFs) fires can be a frequent source of disturbance near the treeline. Aims: To identify how forest structure and tree species composition change in response to fire and to identify fire-tolerant species, and determine which traits or characteristics

  6. Interaction between Posidonia oceanica meadows upper limit and hydrodynamics of four Mediterranean beaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Muro, Sandro; Ruju, Andrea; Buosi, Carla; Porta, Marco; Passarella, Marinella; Ibba, Angelo

    2017-04-01

    Posidonia oceanica meadow is considered to play an important role in the coastal geomorphology of Mediterranean beach systems. In particular, the importance of the meadow in protecting the coastline from erosion is well-recognized. Waves are attenuated by greater friction across seagrass meadows, which have the capacity to reduce water flow and therefore increase sediment deposition and accumulation as well as beach stability. The P. oceanica meadow upper limit usually occurs within the most dynamic zone of the beach system. Considering the great attention paid in the literature to the connection between the growth of P. oceanica and coastal hydrodynamics (Infantes et al., 2009; Vacchi et al., 2014; De Muro et al., 2016, 2017), this study aims at extending the previous work by investigating the combined influence of hydrodynamic parameters (e.g., wave-induced main currents and wave orbital velocity at the bottom) and different types of sea bottom (e.g., soft sediment, rocky substrates) on the position of the upper limit of the P. oceanica meadow. We applied this approach to 4 Mediterranean beach systems located on the Sardinian coastline (3 on the South and 1 on the North) and characterized by a wide range of orientations and incoming wave conditions. On these beaches, the extension of the P. oceanica meadows and the bathymetry have been obtained through detailed surveying campaigns and aerial photo analysis. In addition, high spatial resolution wave hydrodynamics have been reconstructed by running numerical simulations with Delft 3D. Offshore wave climate has been reconstructed by using measured datasets for those beaches that have a nearby buoy whose dataset is representative of the incoming wave conditions for that particular stretch of coast. Whereas, for those beaches with no availability of a representative measured dataset, wave climate has been analyzed from the NOAA hindcast dataset. From the whole range of incoming wave directions in deep waters, we

  7. Domes, Ash and Dust - Controls on soil genesis in a montane catchment of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, C.; Meding, S. M.; Vazquez, A.; Chorover, J.

    2012-12-01

    Soil genesis in volcanic terrain may be controlled by complex assemblages of parent materials and local topography. The objective of this work was to quantify topographic and parent material controls on soil and catchment evolution in a mixed conifer, montane catchment in the Valles Caldera, New Mexico, as part of the Jemez River Basin Critical Zone Observatory. The field site is a 16 ha catchment at an elevation of 3,000 m, with a frigid soil temperature regime (0-8 *C), ustic soil moisture regime with bimodal precipitation of winter snowfall and convective summer rainfall (880 mm yr-1), and an overstory dominated by spruce and fir with dense grass cover in open areas. The catchment is located on the resurgent Redondo Dome that uplifted shortly after the last major eruption of the Valles Caldera 1.2 My ago. The dome includes a complex assemblage of pre-eruptive caldera materials and extant sedimentary rocks embedded within a welded, hydrothermally altered rhyolitic tuff. We sampled a transect of seven soil profiles spanning the dominant east-west aspect of the catchment across a catena with profiles located in summit, backslope, footslope, and toeslope positions. Soil morphology was described in the field and soil samples analyzed using a range of geochemical and mineralogical techniques including quantitative and qualitative x-ray diffraction of bulk samples and particle size fractions, elemental analysis by x-ray fluorescence, and laser particle size analysis. The data indicated strong landscape position control on soil drainage, grading from well-drained summits to poorly-drained toeslope positions based on the presence/absence of redoximorphic features. The drainage patterns were coupled with downslope thickening of dark, organic matter rich surface horizons, likely a function of both in situ organic matter production and downslope colluvial transport of carbon rich surface materials. Mineralogical and geochemical data indicated clear within profile lithologic

  8. Different techniques to study rumen fermentation characteristics of maturing grass and grass silage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cone, J.W.; Gelder, van A.H.; Soliman, I.A.; Visser, de H.; Vuuren, van A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Grass samples were harvested during the 1993 growing season after a precut on April 27, 1993 and were stored frozen or left to ensile in 30-L buckets. Effects on chemical composition and fermentation kinetics of the maturation of the grass and of ensiling were investigated. Chemical composition and

  9. Analysis of the soil food web structure under grass and grass clover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eekeren, van N.J.M.; Smeding, F.W.; Vries, de F.T.; Bloem, J.

    2006-01-01

    The below ground biodiversity of soil organisms plays an important role in the functioning of the the soil ecosystem, and consequently the above ground plant production. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of grass or grass-clover in combination with fertilisation on the soil

  10. Analysis of the soil food web structure under grass and grass clover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eekeren, van N.J.M.; Smeding, F.W.; Vries, de F.T.; Bloem, J.

    2006-01-01

    The below ground biodiversity of soil organisms plays an important role in the functioning of the the soil ecosystem, and consequently the above ground plant production. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of grass or grass-clover in combination with fertilisation on the soil fo

  11. Analysis of the soil food web structure under grass and grass clover

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eekeren, van N.J.M.; Smeding, F.W.; Vries, de F.T.; Bloem, J.

    2006-01-01

    The below ground biodiversity of soil organisms plays an important role in the functioning of the the soil ecosystem, and consequently the above ground plant production. The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of grass or grass-clover in combination with fertilisation on the soil fo

  12. Atmospheric organic and inorganic nitrogen inputs to coastal urban and montane Atlantic Forest sites in southeastern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Patricia A.; Ponette-González, Alexandra G.; de Mello, William Z.; Weathers, Kathleen C.; Santos, Isimar A.

    2015-06-01

    Tropical regions are currently experiencing changes in the quantity and form of nitrogen (N) deposition as a result of urban and industrial emissions. We quantified atmospheric N inputs to two coastal urban and two montane (400 m and 1000 m) Atlantic Forest sites downwind of the Metropolitan Region of Rio de Janeiro (MRRJ), Brazil, from August 2008 to August 2009. Concentrations of total dissolved nitrogen (TDN), dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) and urea were measured in bulk precipitation at all sites, as well as in canopy throughfall in the lower montane forest. Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) was calculated as the difference between TDN and DIN (NH4+ + NO3- + NO2-). Annual volume-weighted mean bulk concentrations of all N species were higher at the coastal urban than montane forest sites, with DON accounting for 32-56% and 26-32%, respectively, of the TDN concentration in bulk precipitation. Bulk deposition of TDN ranged 12.1-17.2 kg N ha- 1 yr- 1 and tended to decrease with increasing distance from the coastal urban region. In the lower montane forest, throughfall TDN flux, 34.3 kg N ha- 1 yr- 1, was over 2-fold higher than bulk TDN deposition, and DON comprised 57% of the total N deposited by throughfall to the forest soil. Urea comprised 27% of DON in throughfall compared to up to 100% in bulk precipitation. Our findings show that DON is an important, yet understudied, component of TDN deposition in tropical forest regions, comprising one-third to greater than one-half of the N deposited in rainfall and throughfall. Further, in this lower montane Atlantic Forest site, throughfall DIN flux was 1.5-3 fold higher than the suggested empirical critical load for humid tropical forests, highlighting the potential for increasing N pollution emitted from the MRRJ to impact N cycling in adjacent ecosystems.

  13. Spatially explicit feedbacks between seagrass meadows, sediment, and light: habitat suitability for seagrass growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, J. A.; D'Odorico, P.; McGlathery, K.; Wiberg, P. L.

    2011-12-01

    In shallow costal bays in which nutrient loading and riverine inputs are low, turbidity, and the consequent light environment are controlled by resuspension of bed sediments due to wind-waves and tidal currents. When sediment resuspension is high, resultant low light environments can limit benthic primary productivity. However, both currents and waves are affected by the presence of benthic plants such as seagrass. Moreover, vegetated areas influence a larger area than they footprint, including an adjacent downstream area. This region, while barren of seagrass, exhibits reduced shear stresses until boundary layer reformation occurs. We develop a simplistic approach to explore how the patchy structure of seagrass meadows may affect sediment resuspension and the consequent light environment under tidal and wind-wave forcing due to the presence of this sheltered region. In order to investigate the effect of patch modified hydrodynamics we generated heterogeneous vegetation covers comprised of a mosaic of randomly distributed patches with exponentially distributed radii. These heterogenous landscapes were generated from two perspectives. First, circular patches were randomly placed on a bare landscape; with each circular patch assumed to be a seagrass meadow. Second, starting from a landscape assumed to be homogenous meadow with constant shoot density, circular gaps were randomly generated. Each gap was considered a disturbance that completely removed all seagrass from within the circular region. Fractional cover of vegetation on the landscape was used to facilitate comparisons across landscape realizations and perspectives. Each landscape realization was then used to partition wave and current shear stresses on the landscape. Total suspended sediment and light attenuation characteristics were then calculated and averaged over the landscape to examine how both fractional cover and mean water depth affect the bulk sediment and light environment from the meadow or gap

  14. Artificial Management Improves Soil Moisture, C, N and P in an Alpine Sandy Meadow of Western China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Gao-Lin; LI Wei; ZHAO Ling-Ping; SHI Zhi-Hua

    2011-01-01

    Regeneration of degraded grassland ecosystems is a significant issue in restoration ecology globally.To understand the effects of artificial management measures on alpine meadows, we surveyed topsoil properties including moisture, organic carbon (SOC), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) contents five years after fencing and fencing + reseeding management practices in a sandy meadow in the eastern Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau, northwestern China.Both the fencing and fencing + reseeding management practices significantly increased soil moisture storage, SOC, total N, available N, total P, and available P, as compared to the unmanaged control.Fencing plus reseeding was more effective than fencing alone for improving soil C, N, and P contents.These suggested that rehabilitation by reseeding and fencing generally had favorable effects on the soil properties in degraded sandy alpine meadows, and was an effective approach for restoration of degraded meadow ecosystems of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau.

  15. Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Carlton Pond National Wildlife Refuge: Annual narrative report: January 1, 1997 to September 30, 1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This annual narrative report for Sunhaze Meadows NWR and Carlton Pond WPA outlines activities and accomplishments between January and September of 1997. The report...

  16. Influences of the degradation of swamp and alpine meadows on CO2 emission during growing season on the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG JunFeng; WANG GenXu; WANG YiBo; LI YuanShou

    2007-01-01

    CO2 emission fluxes of two types of ecosystem, swamp meadow and alpine meadow, in the Fenghuo- shan region of the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau were studied by the static chamber-portable infrared chromatographic method. The results showed that there was large difference in the CO2 emission fluxes between the two ecosystems and in the same ecosystem of different degradation degrees. CO2 emission flux of the swamp meadow gradually decreased with increasing degradation degree, while that of the alpine meadow gradually increased with increasing degradation degree except in May. The CO2 emission flux of undegraded swamp meadow was 65.1%―80.3% higher than that of undegraded alpine meadow; and the CO2 emission flux of moderately degraded swamp meadow was 22.1%―67.5% higher than that of alpine meadow; but the CO2 emission flux of severely degraded alpine meadow was 14.3%―29.5% higher than that of swamp meadow. The soil moisture content and temperature in the upper 5 cm soil layer and above-ground biomass were significantly correlated with the CO2 emission fluxes and regarded as the main environment factors to control the CO2 emission.

  17. Digestive processes of dairy cows fed silages harvested at four stages of grass maturity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinne, M; Huhtanen, P; Jaakkola, S

    2002-07-01

    The objective of this experiment was to quantify ruminal digestive processes that could help to identify factors limiting DMI when silages differing in grass maturity were fed to dairy cows. Four silages were harvested at 1-wk intervals from a primary growth of a timothy-meadow fescue sward, resulting in feeds with digestible OM content in DM (D-value) of 739, 730, 707, and 639 g/kg in the order of succeeding harvest date. Four ruminally cannulated dairy cows were given ad libitum access to these silages supplemented with 7 kg concentrate per day in a 4 x 4 Latin square design. Rumen function was clearly affected by decreasing digestibility of silage fed. Passage rate of digestible NDF (DNDF) and indigestible NDF (INDF) increased, but it could not prevent the accumulation of DM, NDF, DNDF, and INDF into the rumen when silages of progressing grass maturity were fed. The greatest proportional increases in rumen pool were found in INDF and in medium particles (separated by wet sieving and measuring 315 to 2,500 microm). The passage of medium INDF particles decreased (P silages (0.0216/h to 0.0484/h) but reduction of medium INDF particles to small INDF particles was faster (P silages (0.0436 to 0.0305). Passage of medium size particles and(or) rate of medium particle breakdown to small particles were potential intake-constraining properties of low digestibility forages, whereas large particle reduction to medium particles seemed not to be limiting. The increased feed intake of the early-cut silages was accompanied by decreased rumen fill, suggesting that rumen fill was not at least solely responsible for feed intake control.

  18. Carbon budget of Nyungwe Tropical Montane Rain Forest in Central Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyirambangutse, B.; Zibera, E.; Uwizeye, F. K.; Hansson, L.; Nsabimana, D.; Pleijel, H.; Uddling, J.; Wallin, G.

    2015-12-01

    African tropical rainforests host rich biodiversity and play many roles at different scales such as local, regional and global, in the functioning of the earth system. Despite that the African tropical forests are the world's second largest, it has been neglected in terms of understanding the storage and fluxes of carbon and other nutrients. The question of whether this biome is a net sink or source of atmospheric CO2 is still not answered, and little is known concerning the climate change response. Tropical montane forests are even more poorly sampled compared with their importance. Deeper understanding of these ecosystems is required to provide insights on how they might react under global change. To answer questions related to these issues for African tropical montane forests, 15 permanent 0.5 ha plots were established in 2011 in Nyungwe tropical montane rainforest gazetted as a National Park to protect its extensive floral and faunal diversity. The plots are arranged along an east-westerly transect and includes both primary and secondary forest communities. The study is connected to the global ecosystem monitoring network (GEM, http://gem.tropicalforests.ox.ac.uk/). The aim is to characterize spatial and temporal heterogeneity of carbon and nutrient dynamics processes. The role of microclimate, topography, human disturbances, and plant species to the variability of these pools and processes will be explored. We compare stocks and fluxes of carbon and nutrients of the secondary and primary forest communities. The carbon stock are determined by an inventory of height and diameter at breast height (dbh) of all trees with a dbh above 5 cm, wood density, biomass of understory vegetation, leaf area index, standing and fallen dead wood, fine root biomass and organic content of various soil layers (litter, organic and mineral soil down to 45 cm depth). The carbon fluxes are determined by measurements of photosynthesis and respiration of leaves, above and below ground

  19. Using MODIS data for understanding changes in seagrass meadow health: a case study in the Great Barrier Reef (Australia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petus, Caroline; Collier, Catherine; Devlin, Michelle; Rasheed, Michael; McKenna, Skye

    2014-07-01

    Stretching more than 2000 km along the Queensland coast, the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park (GBR) shelters over 43,000 square km of seagrass meadows. Despite the status of marine protected area and World Heritage listing of the GBR, local seagrass meadows are under stress from reduced water quality levels; with reduction in the amount of light available for seagrass photosynthesis defined as the primary cause of seagrass loss throughout the GBR. Methods have been developed to map GBR plume water types by using MODIS quasi-true colour (hereafter true colour) images reclassified in function of their dominant colour. These data can be used as an interpretative tool for understanding changes in seagrass meadow health (as defined in this study by the seagrass area and abundance) at different spatial and temporal scales. We tested this method in Cleveland Bay, in the northern GBR, where substantial loss in seagrass area and biomass was detected by annual monitoring from 2007 to 2011. A strong correlation was found between bay-wide seagrass meadow area and biomass and exposure to turbid Primary (sediment-dominated) water type. There was also a strong correlation between the changes of biomass and area of individual meadows and exposure of seagrass ecosystems to Primary water type over the 5-year period. Seagrass meadows were also grouped according to the dominant species within each meadow, irrespective of location within Cleveland Bay. These consolidated community types did not correlate well with the exposure to Primary water type, and this is likely to be due to local environmental conditions with the individual meadows that comprise these groupings. This study proved that remote sensing data provide the synoptic window and repetitivity required to investigate changes in water quality conditions over time. Remote sensing data provide an opportunity to investigate the risk of marine-coastal ecosystems to light limitation due to increased water turbidity when in situ

  20. Molecular aspects of flower development in grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaffi, Mario; Paolacci, Anna Rita; Tanzarella, Oronzo Antonio; Porceddu, Enrico

    2011-12-01

    The grass family (Poaceae) of the monocotyledons includes about 10,000 species and represents one of the most important taxa among angiosperms. Their flower morphology is remarkably different from those of other monocotyledons and higher eudicots. The peculiar floral structure of grasses is the floret, which contains carpels and stamens, like eudicots, but lacks petals and sepals. The reproductive organs are surrounded by two lodicules, which correspond to eudicot petals, and by a palea and lemma, whose correspondence to eudicot organs remains controversial. The molecular and genetic analysis of floral morphogenesis and organ specification, primarily performed in eudicot model species, led to the ABCDE model of flower development. Several genes required for floral development in grasses correspond to class A, B, C, D, and E genes of eudicots, but others appear to have unique and diversified functions. In this paper, we outline the present knowledge on the evolution and diversification of grass genes encoding MIKC-type MADS-box transcription factors, based on information derived from studies in rice, maize, and wheat. Moreover, we review recent advances in studying the genes involved in the control of flower development and the extent of structural and functional conservation of these genes between grasses and eudicots.

  1. Evolution of Centromeric Retrotransposons in Grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anupma; Presting, Gernot G.

    2014-01-01

    Centromeric retrotransposons (CRs) constitute a family of plant retroelements, some of which have the ability to target their insertion almost exclusively to the functional centromeres. Our exhaustive analysis of CR family members in four grass genomes revealed not only horizontal transfer (HT) of CR elements between the oryzoid and panicoid grass lineages but also their subsequent recombination with endogenous elements that in some cases created prolific recombinants in foxtail millet and sorghum. HT events are easily identifiable only in cases where host genome divergence significantly predates HT, thus documented HT events likely represent only a fraction of the total. If the more difficult to detect ancient HT events occurred at frequencies similar to those observable in present day grasses, the extant long terminal repeat retrotransposons represent the mosaic products of HT and recombination that are optimized for retrotransposition in their host genomes. This complicates not only phylogenetic analysis but also the establishment of a meaningful retrotransposon nomenclature, which we have nevertheless attempted to implement here. In contrast to the plant-centric naming convention used currently for CR elements, we classify elements primarily based on their phylogenetic relationships regardless of host plant, using the exhaustively studied maize elements assigned to six different subfamilies as a standard. The CR2 subfamily is the most widely distributed of the six CR subfamilies discovered in grass genomes to date and thus the most likely to play a functional role at grass centromeres. PMID:24814286

  2. BIOACCUMULATION OF HEAVY METALS IN FORAGE GRASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Łukowski

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was estimation of bioaccumulation of heavy metals (Pb, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd in forage grasses from the area of Podlasie Province based on the bioaccumulation factor. In the soil samples the pH, organic carbon content and CEC were determined. Determination of heavy metals contents in plant and soil material was carried out by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Soils were characterized mainly by acidic reaction, high cation exchange capacity and organic carbon content. The content of heavy metals in studied forage grasses did not exceed the polish regulations related to plant usage for feeding purposes, except the lead content in seven samples. Coefficients of variation for particular heavy metals content in studied forage grasses were as follows: Pb - 37%, Ni - 63%, Cu - 30%, Zn - 34%, Cd - 48%. The highest bioaccumulation factor was found for nickel and grass from the village Remieńkiń (11.54, while the lowest for cadmium and grass from the village Jemieliste (0.04.

  3. Real-Time Classification of Seagrass Meadows on Flat Bottom with Bathymetric Data Measured by a Narrow Multibeam Sonar System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Hamana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Seagrass meadows, one of the most important habitats for many marine species, provide essential ecological services. Thus, society must conserve seagrass beds as part of their sustainable development efforts. Conserving these ecosystems requires information on seagrass distribution and relative abundance, and an efficient, accurate monitoring system. Although narrow multibeam sonar systems (NMBSs are highly effective in resolving seagrass beds, post-processing methods are required to extract key data. The purpose of this study was to develop a simple method capable of detecting seagrass meadows and estimating their relative abundance in real time using an NMBS. Because most seagrass meadows grow on sandy seafloors, we proposed a way of discriminating seagrass meadows from the sand bed. We classify meadows into three categories of relative seagrass abundance using the 95% confidence level of beam depths and the depth range of the beam depth. These are respectively two times the standard deviation of beam depths, and the difference between the shallowest and the deepest depths in a 0.5 × 0.5 m grid cell sampled with several narrow beams. We examined Zostera caulescens Miki, but this simple NMBS method of seagrass classification can potentially be used to map seagrass meadows with longer shoots of other species, such as Posidonia, as both have gas filled cavities.

  4. Organic farming favours insect-pollinated over non-insect pollinated forbs in meadows and wheat fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batáry, Péter; Sutcliffe, Laura; Dormann, Carsten F; Tscharntke, Teja

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relative effects of landscape-scale management intensity, local management intensity and edge effect on diversity patterns of insect-pollinated vs. non-insect pollinated forbs in meadows and wheat fields. Nine landscapes were selected differing in percent intensively used agricultural area (IAA), each with a pair of organic and conventional winter wheat fields and a pair of organic and conventional meadows. Within fields, forbs were surveyed at the edge and in the interior. Both diversity and cover of forbs were positively affected by organic management in meadows and wheat fields. This effect, however, differed significantly between pollination types for species richness in both agroecosystem types (i.e. wheat fields and meadows) and for cover in meadows. Thus, we show for the first time in a comprehensive analysis that insect-pollinated plants benefit more from organic management than non-insect pollinated plants regardless of agroecosystem type and landscape complexity. These benefits were more pronounced in meadows than wheat fields. Finally, the community composition of insect-pollinated and non-insect-pollinated forbs differed considerably between management types. In summary, our findings in both agroecosystem types indicate that organic management generally supports a higher species richness and cover of insect-pollinated plants, which is likely to be favourable for the density and diversity of bees and other pollinators.

  5. Identification of cyst nematode in alpine meadow steppe,Gansu%甘肃省高寒草原牧草孢囊线虫的鉴定

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李惠霞; 彭焕; 彭德良; 朱锐东; 徐鹏刚; 李建荣

    2015-01-01

    2013年8月下旬,对甘肃天祝高寒草甸草原孢囊线虫发生情况进行调查,从嵩草和矮嵩草根部和根际土样中分离得到孢囊线虫。通过对孢囊和孢囊阴门锥的形态观察,初步鉴定为禾谷孢囊线虫(Heterodera avenae )。其特征为孢囊浅褐色,阔柠檬形,阴门锥双膜孔,未见阴门下桥,泡状突明显。利用通用引物 AB28和 TW81对其群体rDNA-ITS 区进行 PCR 扩增和序列测定,得到 ITS 区序列长度为1045 bp。将所测得序列在 Genbank 和 Blast 上比对,结果显示,此禾谷孢囊线虫群体与 H .avenae 群体相似度达99%~100%。进一步证实寄生于甘肃天祝高寒草甸草原嵩草和矮嵩草的孢囊线虫均为 H .avenae ,这是首次报道莎草科嵩草和矮嵩草也是禾谷孢囊线虫的寄主。%A survey of grass cyst nematodes in Tianzhu alpine meadow steppe,Gansu Province was conducted in August,2013.Cyst nematodes were isolated from the roots and root rhizosphere of Kobresia sp.and Kobresia humilis .The nematodes were initially identified as Heterodera avenae based on cyst characteristics,particular-ly the cyst vulva cones.The cysts were light brown,large lenmon-shaped and contained vulva cones with bifenestrate and obvious bullae and without a vulva under-bridge.The 1045 bp sequence fragment of ITS region was amplified using PCR with general primers AB28 and TW81.The similarities between these groups and H . avena were 99%-100%.Molecular analysis confirmed that the cyst nematodes isolated from Kobresia sp.and Kobresia humilis growing in Tianzhu alpine meadow steppe were H .avenae .This is the first report identifying Kobresia sp.and Kobresia humilis as hosts of H .avenae .

  6. 常压逆流连续萃取褐煤蜡工艺初探%Tentative exploration about Atmospheric Pressure Countercurrent Continuous Extracting Montan Wax Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔东方

    2013-01-01

    概述了褐煤蜡的特性和应用,重点介绍了褐煤蜡连续萃取的工艺流程,旨在推动我国褐煤蜡产业的发展,期望我国褐煤蜡能够大规模生产,从而大幅度提高劳动生产率,提高市场竞争力。%This article summarizes features and applications of Montan Wax, and highlights process of continuous extraction of Montan Wax so as to promote development of Montan Wax industry in our country, at the same time, we also expect large-scale production of Montan Wax, so that increase productivity greatly and improve market competitiveness.

  7. Natural Radionuclides in Meadow and Pasture land in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosén, Klas; Villanueva, José - Luis Gutiérrez; Sundell-Bergman, Synnöve

    The amount of natural radionuclides in the environment differs between the Nordic countries as shown by previous investigations and also by this study. Agricultural areas of high natural background are predominantly found in Sweden, Southern Finland and Norway while low background areas are typical...... transfer for pasture land under the different conditions that prevail in the Nordic countries. The potential health hazards due to chronic ingestion of low concentrations of naturally occurring radionuclides are fairly unknown but the results of this study may provide valuable background information...... for assessing these radiation risks. The aim of this project has been to gain knowledge on the status of natural radionuclides in meadow and pasture land and in grassland plants in different Nordic countries and on the transfer of these radionuclides from soil/water to man via the milk/food chain (soil- meadow...

  8. Stream characteristics and their implications for the protection of riparian fens and meadows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baattrup-Pedersen, A.; Larsen, S.E.; Andersen, Peter Mejlhede

    2011-01-01

    1. Running waters, including associated riparian areas, are embraced by international legal frameworks outlining targets for the preservation, protection and improvement of the quality of the environment. Interactions between stream and river processes and riparian habitats have not received much...... attention in the management of stream ecosystems, and integrated measures that consider both the ecological status of streams and rivers (sensu EU Water Framework Directive, WFD) and the conservation status of riparian habitats and species (sensu EU Habitats Directive, HD) are rare. 2. Here, we analysed...... the influence of stream size, morphology and chemical water characteristics for the distribution of water-dependent terrestrial habitat types, i.e. alkaline fens, periodically inundated meadows and meadows in riparian areas in Denmark using an extensive data set covering a total of 254 stream reaches. A species...

  9. Wild red deer (Cervus elaphus L. grazing may seriously reduce forage production in mountain meadows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Ramanzin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at estimating the impact of red deer grazing on the productivity of meadows located in Pian Cansiglio, north-eastern Italian Pre-Alps. These meadows (383 ha; average elevation 1000 m asl are managed for hay/silage production (1-2 cuts per season and are included in a protected area that hosts a high density of deer (around 30 heads/100 ha. In 2008 and 2010, dry matter (DM production and loss due to deer grazing were estimated with exclusion cages (1 m2; 48 exclusion cages in 2008 and 52 in 2010. Night counts with spotlights were conducted to index deer use of meadows plots. DM production inside the cages was fairly good for the area (first and second cut: 5079 - 2193 Kg DM/ha in 2008, and 4200 - 2615 Kg DM/ha in 2010. DM production outside the cages was significantly lower (first and second cut in 2008: 4314-1389 Kg DM/ha, and in 2010: 3376-2052 Kg DM/ha. Therefore, the magnitude of losses was of 15-20% in the first and 25-40% in the second cut. DM losses in the different meadow plots were positively correlated with index of deer use, which in some plots was as high as 7-8 heads/ha. Deer grazing reduced also crude protein (CP content of forage (15.6±4.4% DM inside exclusion cages and 13.8±3.5% DM outside, with losses being greater where CP content was higher. This study demonstrates that high densities of grazing deer may seriously impact on forage production and quality.

  10. Endophytic fungus decreases plant virus infections in meadow ryegrass (Lolium pratense)

    OpenAIRE

    Lehtonen, Päivi T; Helander, Marjo; Shahid A Siddiqui; Lehto, Kirsi; Saikkonen, Kari

    2006-01-01

    We studied the effects of fungal endophyte infection of meadow ryegrass (Lolium pratense=Festuca pratensis) on the frequency of the barley yellow dwarf virus (BYDV). The virus is transferred by aphids, which may be deterred by endophyte-origin alkaloids within the plant. In our experiment, we released viruliferous aphid vectors on endophyte-infected and endophyte-free plants in a common garden. The number of aphids and the percentage of BYDV infections were lower in endophyte-infected plants ...

  11. Assessment and physiological state of the Posidonia oceanica meadows in Porto Cristo (Manacor, Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureda, Antoni; Box, Antonio; Tejada, Silvia

    2015-12-01

    In the Mediterranean Sea, Posidonia oceanica is the main seagrass meadow that brings food and shelter to many species. The P. oceanica deterioration is an indicator of its own status, since it is sensitive to many disturbances, such as human impacts or alien species. Lately, oxidative stress has been pointed out as another possible biomarker of the animal and plant status. The aim of this work was to evaluate the physiological status of the P. oceanica meadows in the Porto Cristo bay (Manacor, Mallorca, Balearic Islands, Western Mediterranean), evaluating the possible impact induced by human activity performed in the area. In situ measurements were quantified (shoot density, and the maximum length and width of P. oceanica leaves) by scuba divers. Leaf samples were collected to determine the catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. The malondialdehyde (MDA) level as marker of lipid peroxidation was also evaluated. Shoot density, and length and width measurements of the leaves in the inner locations of the bay showed inferior structural features than the leaves from the outer areas. CAT, SOD and GPx enzymatic activities and lipid peroxidation were higher in leaves from the internal zones than in the outer placements. In conclusion, the general status of the of P. oceanica meadows on the Porto Cristo Bay according to structural and oxidative biomarkers evidenced a good physiological condition, although the areas nearest to the harbour and the beach reflect signs of human affection. Altogether, it reflects a good physiological condition of the meadows in the external areas of the Porto Cristo Bay.

  12. Meadow birds on organic and conventional arable farms in the Netherlands: abundance and nest success

    OpenAIRE

    Kragten, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Intensification of agriculture is mentioned to be the key drive behind the decline of farmland birds on grassland and on arable land. This raises the question whether a less intensive system, such as organic, can stop or reverse these declines. The present study compares (1) the territory densities of meadow birds on organic and conventional arable farms, and (2) the nesting success of Lapwings (Vanellus vanellus) on both farm types. The study was carried out in Oostelijk Flevoland and Noordo...

  13. The estimation of some wild flowers seed material from the natural-valuable meadow habitats

    OpenAIRE

    Janicka Maria; Pawluśkiewicz Bogumiła; Małuszyńska Elżbieta; Szydłowska Anna

    2016-01-01

    The restoration of the species composition of the meadow habitats is often linked to the introduction of the typical species’ seeds. The effectiveness of that treatment requires getting the acquired detailed knowledge of the germination biology of peculiar species. Eight typical plant species of four non-forest habitats of the river valleys, representing the following types: Cnidion dubii (6440), Molinion (6410), Arrhenatherion (6510) and Festuco-Brometea (6210) were investigated. The diaspor...

  14. Long-term effect of beach replenishment on natural recovery of shallow Posidonia oceanica meadows

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Correa, José M.; Torquemada, Yolanda Fernández; Sánchez Lizaso, José Luis

    2008-03-01

    The recovery capacity of shallow Posidonia oceanica meadows degraded by beach replenishment eighteen years before was assessed in two impacted meadows and compared with other two undisturbed localities. Inside each locality, we selected randomly three sites separated by 500-1000 m. At site level we study the vitality of P. oceanica meadow assessing the vegetative growth, leaf characteristics, and non-structural carbohydrates of the plants. Additionally, at locality level, silt-clay fraction, organic matter, pH and light intensity incident on the sea bottom were measured to evaluate the environmental conditions. Covering of P. oceanica was significantly lower at the impacted localities while amount of dead "matte" was higher. Leaf production of horizontal rhizomes (14.6 ± 1.11 vs 19.47 ± 1.45 leaves y -1), net total rhizomes recruitment (2.33 ± 0.17 vs 4.3 ± 0.33 branches y -1) and starch concentration (43.625 ± 0.67 vs 54.45 ± 0.74 mg per g of rhizome) at impacted meadows were significantly lower than controls. Leaf features, epiphytes biomass, colonization, elongation and horizontal and vertical rhizome production did not show significant differences. Sediments at impacted localities contained higher silt-clay fraction and higher organic matter load while pH was lower. Light intensity on the sea bottom measured at all localities was over the minimum light requirements estimated for P. oceanica. Our results show that the press impact produced by beach replenishment was enduring in the time slowing natural recovery by 45%. This impact may be related with changes in the sediment features.

  15. Topographic and spatial controls of palm species distributions in a montane rain forest, southern Ecuador

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svenning, J.-C.; Harlev, D.; Sørensen, M.M.

    2009-01-01

    The northern Andes harbour a flora that is as species-rich or even richer than the 18-times larger lowland Amazon basin. Gaining an understanding of how the high species richness of the Andean region is generated and maintained is therefore of particular interest. Environmental sorting due...... to elevational gradients in climate has been emphasized as a driver of vegetation distribution and plant community assembly in tropical mountain areas such as the Andes for two centuries, while alternative mechanisms have been little studied. Here, we investigated the importance of topography and spatial......). Mantel tests and indicator species analysis showed that both topography and spatial location imposed strong controls on palm species distributions at the study site. Our results suggest that species distributions in the studied montane forest landscape were partly determined by the species' habitat...

  16. Taraxacum officinale pollen depresses seed set of montane wildflowers through pollen allelopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre Loughnan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Plant species that share pollinators can suffer from interspecific pollen deposition. Male reproductive success is inevitably reduced by the loss of pollen to flowers of another species. Female reproductive success can be affected by reduced stigmatic area or, more strongly, through allelopathic effects by which the admixture of some foreign pollen reduces seed or fruit set. We tested for allelopathic effects of Taraxacum officinale (Asteracaeae pollen on the seed set of montane wildflowers Erythronium grandiflorum (Liliaceae and Erysimum capitatum (Brassicaceae, by hand-pollinating plants with pollen mixtures. Taraxacum is a common invasive species, which produces allelopathic chemicals in its root and vegetative tissue, making it a likely candidate for pollen allelopathy. Flowers of both species produced fewer well-developed seeds when pollinated with pollen mixtures containing Taraxacum pollen. The pollen-allelopathic potential of weedy dandelion may add to its ability to disrupt communities that it invades.

  17. Species composition of the vegetation along the Sherichhu River, lower montane area of Eastern Bhutan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tenzin Jamtsho

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of the riparian vegetation along the Sherichhu River, lower montane area of Eastern Bhutan was conducted from April to December 2015 to explore the plant communities in terms of species composition. A total number of 18 plots were placed within the remnant patches of the vegetation on either side of the river. In total, 172 species of vascular plant has been recorded. The cluster analysis suggested four types of plant communities in the study area viz., the MallotusDesmodium-Rhus shrubland and the Syzygium venosum woodland communities, which are located in V-shaped valleys and the Albizia-Flueggea woodland and Quercus glauca woodland communities located in U-shaped valleys. In broad-spectrum, the topographic features and environmental variables i.e. litter accumulation and flooding condition might also have some impact on the species composition of the plant communities of this vegetation.

  18. Evidence of a high density population of harvested leopards in a montane environment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia N Chase Grey

    Full Text Available Populations of large carnivores can persist in mountainous environments following extensive land use change and the conversion of suitable habitat for agriculture and human habitation in lower lying areas of their range. The significance of these populations is poorly understood, however, and little attention has focussed on why certain mountainous areas can hold high densities of large carnivores and what the conservation implications of such populations might be. Here we use the leopard (Panthera pardus population in the western Soutpansberg Mountains, South Africa, as a model system and show that montane habitats can support high numbers of leopards. Spatially explicit capture-recapture (SECR analysis recorded the highest density of leopards reported outside of state-protected areas in sub-Saharan Africa. This density represents a temporally high local abundance of leopards and we explore the explanations for this alongside some of the potential conservation implications.

  19. Postdispersal removal and germination of seed dispersed by Cercopithecus nictitans in a West African Montane Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Hazel M; Goldson, Stephen L; Beck, Josie

    2010-01-01

    Factors that determine the effectiveness of primates as seed dispersers include (i) the microsite into which they deposit seed, (ii) secondary removal of seed by other taxa and (iii) the effect of gut passage and/or spitting on subsequent seed germination. This contribution evaluated these factors in the little studied putty-nosed monkey, Cercopithecus nictitans, in a Nigerian montane forest. Field experiments showed that C. nictitans has greatly increased in its importance as a disperser of medium-sized seed (>5 mm) because other large primates have been hunted to near extinction. C. nictitans disperses seed across habitats by spitting and defaecation. Rates of secondary seed removal were high for all seed species irrespective of the presence or absence of C. nictitans faecal matter, size or microsite variables. Gut passage enhanced germination relative to hand-cleaned seed, while spitting had either no effect or decreased the germination rate. Copyright 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Agaricomycetes in low land and montane Atlantic Rain Forest in Northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Gibertoni

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The Atlantic Rain Forest represents a group of extra-amazonic forests, among which the coastal and montane (“brejos de altitude” are the most common in Northeast Brazil. Between 2011 and 2013, 110 field trips were performed in nine reserves in the domain of the Atlantic Rain Forest. Two thousand two hundred sixty three Agaricomycetes were collected and represented 271 species, among which several new species to science, new occurrences to the continent, country, region, biome and States were found. Besides recently collected material, 309 exsiccates of Agaricomycetes deposited in the Herbarium URM were revised and represented 38 species, among which several new occurrences to the region and States. The results indicate the importance of the constant inventories and also of revisions of material deposited in herbaria as tools to improve the knowledge about the Brazilian micota.

  1. Biogas and Methane Yield from Rye Grass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomáš Vítěz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Biogas production in the Czech Republic has expanded substantially, including marginal regions for maize cultivation. Therefore, there are increasingly sought materials that could partially replace maize silage, as a basic feedstock, while secure both biogas production and its quality.Two samples of rye grass (Lolium multiflorum var. westerwoldicum silage with different solids content 21% and 15% were measured for biogas and methane yield. Rye grass silage with solid content of 15% reached an average specific biogas yield 0.431 m3·kg−1 of organic dry matter and an average specific methane yield 0.249 m3·kg−1 of organic dry matter. Rye grass silage with solid content 21% reached an average specific biogas yield 0.654 m3·kg−1 of organic dry matter and an average specific methane yield 0.399 m3·kg−1 of organic dry matter.

  2. Role of carbohydrate metabolism in grass tetany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.K.; Madsen, F.C.; Lentz, D.E.; Hansard, S.L.

    1977-01-01

    Clinical hypomagnesemia is confined primarily to beef cattle in the United States but also occurs in dairy cattle in other countries, probably due to different management practices. During periods when grass tetany is likely, early vegetative temperate zone grasses are usually low in total readily available carbohydrates and magnesium but high in potassium and nitrogen. The tetany syndrome may include hypoglycemia and ketosis, suggesting an imbalance in intermediary energy metabolism. Many enzyme systems critical to cellular metabolism, including those which hydrolyze and transfer phosphate groups, are activated by Mg. Thus, by inference, Mg is required for normal glucose utilization, fat, protein, nucleic acid and coenzyme synthesis, muscle contraction, methyl group transfer, and sulfate, acetate, and formate activation. Numerous clinical and experimental studies suggest an intimate relationship between metabolism of Mg and that of carbohydrate, glucagon, and insulin. The objective is to review this literature and suggest ways in which these relationships might contribute to a chain of events leading to grass tetany.

  3. EPICHLOE SPECIES: fungal symbionts of grasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schardl, C L

    1996-01-01

    Epichloë species and their asexual descendants (Acremonium endophytes) are fungal symbionts of C3 grasses that span the symbiotic continuum from antagonism to mutualism depending on the relative importance, respectively, of horizontal transmission of sexual spores versus vertical clonal transmission in healthy grass seeds. At least seven sexual Epichloë species are identifiable by mating tests, and many asexual genotypes are interspecific hybrids. Benefits conferred by the symbionts on host plants include protection from biotic factors and abiotic stresses such as drought. Four classes of beneficial alkaloids are associated with the symbionts: ergot alkaloids, indolediterpenes (lolitrems), peramine, and saturated aminopyrrolizidines (lolines). These alkaloids protect host plants from insect and vertebrate herbivores, including livestock. Genetic engineering of the fungal symbionts as more suitable biological protectants for forage grasses requires identification of fungal genes for alkaloid biosynthesis, and DNA-mediated transformation of the fungi.

  4. Molecular biomarkers for grass pollen immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Florin-Dan

    2014-03-26

    Grass pollen allergy represents a significant cause of allergic morbidity worldwide. Component-resolved diagnosis biomarkers are increasingly used in allergy practice in order to evaluate the sensitization to grass pollen allergens, allowing the clinician to confirm genuine sensitization to the corresponding allergen plant sources and supporting an accurate prescription of allergy immunotherapy (AIT), an important approach in many regions of the world with great plant biodiversity and/or where pollen seasons may overlap. The search for candidate predictive biomarkers for grass pollen immunotherapy (tolerogenic dendritic cells and regulatory T cells biomarkers, serum blocking antibodies biomarkers, especially functional ones, immune activation and immune tolerance soluble biomarkers and apoptosis biomarkers) opens new opportunities for the early detection of clinical responders for AIT, for the follow-up of these patients and for the development of new allergy vaccines.

  5. Prospects for Hybrid Breeding in Bioenergy Grasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aguirre, Andrea Arias; Studer, Bruno; Frei, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    of different hybrid breeding schemes to optimally exploit heterosis for biomass yield in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) and switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), two perennial model grass species for bioenergy production. Starting with a careful evaluation of current population and synthetic breeding methods......, we address crucial topics to implement hybrid breeding, such as the availability and development of heterotic groups, as well as biological mechanisms for hybridization control such as self-incompatibility (SI) and male sterility (MS). Finally, we present potential hybrid breeding schemes based on SI...... and MS for the two bioenergy grass species, and discuss how molecular tools and synteny can be used to transfer relevant information for genes controlling these biological mechanisms across grass species...

  6. Dairy cow excreta patches change the boreal grass swards from sink to source of methane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marja Elisa Maljanen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available We studied methane (CH4 flux rates from experimental excreta patches on a dairy pasture with a chamber technique during snow free seasons and with a gas gradient technique during winter from timothy-meadow fescue sward with mineral N fertilization (220 kg ha-1 and from grass-white clover mixture without fertilization. The dung and urine patches were applied in June or August two consecutive grazing seasons and the measurements were carried out for a year following each application. There were no significant differences in CH4 fluxes between plant species and emissions originated mainly from the fresh dung pats. The average annual CH4 fluxes from the control sites without excreta were -0.60±0.1 and with the excreta 0.47±0.3 kg CH4 ha-1. Thus, excreta originating from dairy cows can turn boreal swards from weak sinks to small sources of CH4. However, these emissions are only 0.2% of the total CH4 emissions from a dairy cow.

  7. Invasion of Gleditsia triacanthos in Lithraea ternifolia Montane Forests of Central Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marco; Páez

    2000-10-01

    / The aim of this work is to study the invasion system constituted by the alien species Gleditsia triacanthos and the native dominant Lithraea ternifolia in montane forests of central Argentina, considering life history and demographic traits of both the alien and the native species and different site conditions for population growth (good and bad sites). Matrix models are applied to project the consequences of differences in vital rates for population growth. Analyzing these models helps identify which life cycle transitions contributed most to population growth. Obtained population growth rates are considered to assess predicted rates of spread using the reaction-diffusion (R-D) model. G. triacanthos presents many of the life history traits that confer plants high potential for invasiveness: fast growth, clonal and sexual reproduction, short juvenile period, high seed production, and high seed germinability. These traits would ensure G. triacanthos invasive success and the displacement of the slow-growing, relatively less fecund native L. ternifolia. However, since disturbance and environmental heterogeneity complicate the invasibility pattern of G. triacanthos in these montane forests, the outcome of the invasion process is not straightforward as could be if only life history traits were considered.Great variation in demographic parameters was observed between populations of each species at good and bad sites. Though both good and bad sites signified increasing or at least stable populations for G. triacanthos, for L. ternifolia bad sites represented local extinction. Analyzing the results of matrices models helps design the optimal management for the conservation of L. ternifolia populations while preventing the invasion by G. triacanthos. The predicted asymptotic rate of spread for G. triacanthos at the good site was fourfold greater than the predicted one for L. ternifolia, although the difference was much smaller considering the bad site. The usefulness of

  8. Elevational Ranges of Montane Birds and Deforestation in the Western Andes of Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Ocampo-Peñuela

    Full Text Available Deforestation causes habitat loss, fragmentation, degradation, and can ultimately cause extinction of the remnant species. Tropical montane birds face these threats with the added natural vulnerability of narrower elevational ranges and higher specialization than lowland species. Recent studies assess the impact of present and future global climate change on species' ranges, but only a few of these evaluate the potentially confounding effect of lowland deforestation on species elevational distributions. In the Western Andes of Colombia, an important biodiversity hotspot, we evaluated the effects of deforestation on the elevational ranges of montane birds along altitudinal transects. Using point counts and mist-nets, we surveyed six altitudinal transects spanning 2200 to 2800 m. Three transects were forested from 2200 to 2800 m, and three were partially deforested with forest cover only above 2400 m. We compared abundance-weighted mean elevation, minimum elevation, and elevational range width. In addition to analysing the effect of deforestation on 134 species, we tested its impact within trophic guilds and habitat preference groups. Abundance-weighted mean and minimum elevations were not significantly different between forested and partially deforested transects. Range width was marginally different: as expected, ranges were larger in forested transects. Species in different trophic guilds and habitat preference categories showed different trends. These results suggest that deforestation may affect species' elevational ranges, even within the forest that remains. Climate change will likely exacerbate harmful impacts of deforestation on species' elevational distributions. Future conservation strategies need to account for this by protecting connected forest tracts across a wide range of elevations.

  9. DNA Barcoding of an Assembly of Montane Andean Butterflies (Satyrinae): Geographical Scale and Identification Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, M A; Cadavid, I C; Valdés, L; Álvarez, C F; Uribe, S I; Vila, R; Pyrcz, T W

    2017-01-23

    DNA barcoding is a technique used primarily for the documentation and identification of biological diversity based on mitochondrial DNA sequences. Butterflies have received particular attention in DNA barcoding studies, although varied performance may be obtained due to different scales of geographic sampling and speciation processes in various groups. The montane Andean Satyrinae constitutes a challenging study group for taxonomy. The group displays high richness, with more of 550 species, and remarkable morphological similarity among taxa, which renders their identification difficult. In the present study, we evaluated the effectiveness of DNA barcodes in the identification of montane Andean satyrines and the effect of increased geographical scale of sampling on identification performance. Mitochondrial sequences were obtained from 104 specimens of 39 species and 16 genera, collected in a forest remnant in the northwest Andes. DNA barcoding has proved to be a useful tool for the identification of the specimens, with a well-defined gap and producing clusters with unambiguous identifications for all the morphospecies in the study area. The expansion of the geographical scale with published data increased genetic distances within species and reduced those among species, but did not generally reduce the success of specimen identification. Only in Forsterinaria rustica (Butler, 1868), a taxon with high intraspecific variation, the barcode gap was lost and low support for monophyly was obtained. Likewise, expanded sampling resulted in a substantial increase in the intraspecific distance in Morpho sulkowskyi (Kollar, 1850); Panyapedaliodes drymaea (Hewitson, 1858); Lymanopoda obsoleta (Westwood, 1851); and Lymanopoda labda Hewitson, 1861; but for these species, the barcode gap was maintained. These divergent lineages are nonetheless worth a detailed study of external and genitalic morphology variation, as well as ecological features, in order to determine the potential

  10. Demographic responses of boreal-montane orchid Malaxis monophyllos (L. Sw. populations to contrasting environmental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Jermakowicz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In an age of changes in species’ geographical ranges, compounded by climatic and anthropogenic impacts, it become important to know which processes and factors influence plant populations and their persistence in the long term. Here we investigated dynamic and fitness components in twelve populations of Malaxis monophyllos (L. Sw., situated in different geographical (regions and ecological (type of habitat units. Although M. monophyllos is a rare species, characterized by highly fragmented, boreal-montane distribution range, in last few decades it successfully colonized secondary habitats in Polish uplands. Our results indicate that M. monophyllos is represented mainly by small populations, which annual spatial and temporal changes might be very high, what affects the ephemeral character of these populations, regardless of the region and type of habitat. This dynamic structure, in turn, is caused by intensive exchange of individuals in populations, as well as by their short above-ground life span. Despite the large range of variation in size and reproductive traits, we can distinguish some regional patterns, which indicate boreal region as the most optimal for M. monophyllos growth and persistence in the long term, and with montane and upland/anthropogenic populations, due to lower reproductive parameters, as the most threatened. Although it should be considered that anthropogenic populations, despite their lower reproductive parameters and instability in the long term, present an intermediate, geographical and ecological character, therefore they may be valuable in shaping, both M. monophyllos’ future range, as well as its potential for response on ongoing and future changes. In general, reproduction is the main factor differentiating of M. monophyllos populations in regions, and we can suspect that it may become the cause of the future differentiation and isolation of these populations, occurring with progressive range fragmentation.

  11. Elevational Ranges of Montane Birds and Deforestation in the Western Andes of Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocampo-Peñuela, Natalia; Pimm, Stuart L

    2015-01-01

    Deforestation causes habitat loss, fragmentation, degradation, and can ultimately cause extinction of the remnant species. Tropical montane birds face these threats with the added natural vulnerability of narrower elevational ranges and higher specialization than lowland species. Recent studies assess the impact of present and future global climate change on species' ranges, but only a few of these evaluate the potentially confounding effect of lowland deforestation on species elevational distributions. In the Western Andes of Colombia, an important biodiversity hotspot, we evaluated the effects of deforestation on the elevational ranges of montane birds along altitudinal transects. Using point counts and mist-nets, we surveyed six altitudinal transects spanning 2200 to 2800 m. Three transects were forested from 2200 to 2800 m, and three were partially deforested with forest cover only above 2400 m. We compared abundance-weighted mean elevation, minimum elevation, and elevational range width. In addition to analysing the effect of deforestation on 134 species, we tested its impact within trophic guilds and habitat preference groups. Abundance-weighted mean and minimum elevations were not significantly different between forested and partially deforested transects. Range width was marginally different: as expected, ranges were larger in forested transects. Species in different trophic guilds and habitat preference categories showed different trends. These results suggest that deforestation may affect species' elevational ranges, even within the forest that remains. Climate change will likely exacerbate harmful impacts of deforestation on species' elevational distributions. Future conservation strategies need to account for this by protecting connected forest tracts across a wide range of elevations.

  12. Subspecific Differentiation Events of Montane Stag Beetles (Coleoptera, Lucanidae) Endemic to Formosa Island.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Cheng-Lung; Yeh, Wen-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Taxonomic debates have been carrying on for decades over Formosan stag beetles, which consist of a high proportion of endemic species and subspecies featuring morphological variations associated with local adaptation. With the influence of periodical Pleistocene glaciations and the presence of several mountain ranges, the genetic differentiation and taxonomic recognition, within this medium-size island, of two endemic subspecies for each of four montane stag beetles, i.e. Lucanus ogakii, L. kanoi, Prismognathus davidis, and Neolucanus doro, has been an appealing issue. Based on monophyletic lineages and population structure, possible divergent scenarios have been proposed to clarify the subspecific status for each of the above mentioned stag beetles. Phylogenetic inferences based on COI+16S rDNA+28S rDNA of 240 Formosan lucanids have confirmed most species are monophyletic groups; and the intraspecific (2%) genetic distances of the two mitochondrial genes could be applied concordantly for taxonomic identification. On account of Bayesian-based species delimitation, geographic distribution, population structure, and sequence divergences, the subspecific status for L. ogakii, L. kanoi, and Pri. davidis are congruent with their geographic distribution in this island; and the calibration time based on the mitochondrial genes shows the subspecific split events occurred 0.7-1 million years ago. In addition, a more complicated scenario, i.e. genetic differentiation including introgression/hybridization events, might have occurred among L. ogakii, L. kanoi, and L. maculifemoratus. The geological effects of mountain hindrance accompanied by periodical glaciations could have been vital in leading to the geographical subspecific differentiation of these montane stag beetles.

  13. Conservation state of populations of rare plant species in highly transformed meadow steppes of Southern Opillya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Dmytrash-Vatseba

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Degradation of natural habitats causes rapid extinction of rare plant populations. The diversity of rare plant species in the meadow steppes of Southern Opillya (Western Ukraine depends strongly on patch area, pasture digression of vegetation and a variety of eco-coenotical conditions. The main threats for the rare components of the meadow steppe flora are reduction of habitat and overgrazing. Spatial connections between sites are unable to support a constant rare plant population. The analysis of the composition of rare plant meadow-steppe species indicated that habitats with similar rare species composition usually have similar parameters of area, stages of pasture digression and eco-coenotical conditions. Spatial connectivity of patches does not ensure species similarity of rare components of the flora. Rare plant species were grouped according to their preferences for habitat , area and condition. In small patches subject to any stage of pasture digression grow populations of Adonis vernalis L., Pulsatilla patens (L. Mill., P. grandis Wender., Stipa capillata L., S. рennata L., Chamaecytisus blockianus (Pawł. Klásková etc. On the contrary, populations of other species (Carlina onopordifolia Besser. ex Szafer., Kuecz. et Pawł., Adenophora liliifolia (L. Ledeb. ex A. DC., Crambe tataria Sebeók, Euphorbia volhynica Besser ex Racib., Stipa tirsa Stev. etc. prefer large habitats, not changed by pasture digression. Prevention of reduction of rare species diversity requires preservation (also extension of patch area and regulation of grazing intensity.

  14. Solar radiation and tidal exposure as environmental drivers of Enhalus acoroides dominated seagrass meadows.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard K F Unsworth

    Full Text Available There is strong evidence of a global long-term decline in seagrass meadows that is widely attributed to anthropogenic activity. Yet in many regions, attributing these changes to actual activities is difficult, as there exists limited understanding of the natural processes that can influence these valuable ecosystem service providers. Being able to separate natural from anthropogenic causes of seagrass change is important for developing strategies that effectively mitigate and manage anthropogenic impacts on seagrass, and promote coastal ecosystems resilient to future environmental change. The present study investigated the influence of environmental and climate related factors on seagrass biomass in a large ≈250 ha meadow in tropical north east Australia. Annual monitoring of the intertidal Enhalus acoroides (L.f. Royle seagrass meadow over eleven years revealed a declining trend in above-ground biomass (54% significant overall reduction from 2000 to 2010. Partial Least Squares Regression found this reduction to be significantly and negatively correlated with tidal exposure, and significantly and negatively correlated with the amount of solar radiation. This study documents how natural long-term tidal variability can influence long-term seagrass dynamics. Exposure to desiccation, high UV, and daytime temperature regimes are discussed as the likely mechanisms for the action of these factors in causing this decline. The results emphasise the importance of understanding and assessing natural environmentally-driven change when interpreting the results of seagrass monitoring programs.

  15. Long-Term Hydrological Reconstruction From a Beaver Meadow Using Testate Amoebae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Ness, K.; Loisel, J.; Karran, D. J.; Westbrook, C.; Kohlmeyer, C.

    2016-12-01

    Beaver ponds contribute up to 0.8 Tg/yr of atmospheric methane (CH4) globally (Whitfield et al., 2014) and were found to be the largest CH4 emitters among all the wetland types in boreal environments (Roulet et al., 1992). However, the sources and underlying mechanisms of carbon emission and sequestration in beaver ponds requires further elucidation. Here we present the historical development of a beaver meadow located in the Sibbald Research Wetland in the Rocky Mountains of Kananaskis Provincial Park, Alberta, Canada. We use a combination of testate amoebae, plant macrofossils, and other geochemical proxies to provide high-resolution reconstructions along three peat cores extracted in hydrologically distinct portions of the meadow. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt at reconstructing long-term hydrological conditions in these systems. Testate amoebae (Protozoa: Rhizopoda) are single-celled organisms that inhabit moist substrates and produce a decay-resistant test. As each taxon generally occupies a discrete ecological niche related to soil moisture and pH, testate amoebae are good indicators of past and ongoing hydrological change. Preliminary analysis of testate amoebae assemblages downcore suggests that this proxy is suitable to reconstruct hydrological changes in meadows, with wetter and drier communities being in good agreement with wetter and drier plant macrofossil assemblages. The nitrogen isotopic signature of peat samples (ongoing) will be used as a proxy for changes in nutrient input; it could become a proxy for past beaver activity.

  16. Diversity and persistence of arbuscular mycorrhizas in a low-Arctic meadow habitat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietikäinen, Anne; Kytöviita, Minna-Maarit; Husband, Rebecca; Young, J Peter W

    2007-01-01

    Little is known about the ecology and diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in Arctic ecosystems. Here, the diversity and composition of the AM fungal community and its response to host plant community composition were studied in a low-Arctic meadow habitat. The natural vegetation in two low-Arctic meadow sites was manipulated. Plots with natural vegetation, monoculture and no vegetation were established. Seeds of Solidago virgaurea were sown into the plots and the AM fungal community in the seedling roots was analysed using the terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) method. The vegetation manipulation treatments affected the community composition but not the diversity of AM fungi found in S. virgaurea roots. The diversity of AM fungi was higher in S. virgaurea roots in the site with naturally higher plant species diversity. These results show that AM fungi in low-Arctic meadows are able to survive for a period of 2 yr without a host plant. This ability buffers the AM fungal community against short-term changes in host plant community composition and diversity.

  17. Meadow fragmentation and reproductive output of the SE Asian seagrass Enhalus acoroides [rapid communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermaat, Jan E.; Rollon, Rene N.; Lacap, Cristina Day A.; Billot, Claire; Alberto, Filipe; Nacorda, Hildie M. E.; Wiegman, Frank; Terrados, Jorge

    2004-11-01

    Flower and fruit production of the abundant, tall, long-lived, dioecious, surface-pollinating seagrass species Enhalus acoroides (L.) Royle were estimated at seven sites in the reef flats off Bolinao (NW Luzon, The Philippines) featuring different fragmentation of the seagrass meadows. Fragmentation of the seagrass meadow was quantified as cover of E. acoroides and all seagrass species present in 20×20 m plots. E. acoroides and overall seagrass cover were correlated positively. The proportion of female flowers of E. acoroides that developed a fruit increased sharply as overall seagrass cover was around 50%. Apparent sex ratio bore no relationship with overall seagrass cover. This threshold-type of relationship suggests that fragmentation of seagrass meadows can have a major effect on the reproductive output of this species. A possible mechanism underlying these results would be a non-linear increase of the efficiency of trapping the surface-dispersed pollen with increasing seagrass canopy density. This provides the first evidence based on real data that fragmentation can affect the population dynamics of seagrass species.

  18. Seasonal and inter-annual variations of community metabolism rates of a Posidonia oceanica seagrass meadow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champenois, W.; Borges, A. V.

    2012-04-01

    We report gross primary production (GPP), community respiration (CR), and net community production (NCP) over Posidonia oceanica meadow at 10 m in Corsica (Bay of Revellata) based on the open water O2 mass balance from a data-set of hourly measurements with an array of three O2 optodes deployed from August 2006 to October 2009. The method was checked by comparison with discrete measurements of metabolic rates derived from benthic chamber incubations also based on the diel change of O2. This comparison was satisfactory and actually highlights the potential caveats of benthic incubation measurements related to O2 accumulation in small chambers leading to photorespiration, and an under-estimation of GPP. Our data confirmed previous P. oceanica meadows GPP and CR values, strong seasonal variations, and net autotrophy. High resolution data revealed strong inter-annual variability, with a decrease of GPP by 35% and NCP by 87% during 2006-2007 characterized by a mild and less stormy winter compared 2007-2008 and 2008-2009. P. oceanica meadows are then expected to decrease export of organic carbon to adjacent communities (decrease of NCP), since a decrease in frequency and intensity of marine storms is expected in future in the Mediterranean Sea, due to a northward shift of the Atlantic storm track.

  19. Solar radiation and tidal exposure as environmental drivers of Enhalus acoroides dominated seagrass meadows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Richard K F; Rasheed, Michael A; Chartrand, Kathryn M; Roelofs, Anthony J

    2012-01-01

    There is strong evidence of a global long-term decline in seagrass meadows that is widely attributed to anthropogenic activity. Yet in many regions, attributing these changes to actual activities is difficult, as there exists limited understanding of the natural processes that can influence these valuable ecosystem service providers. Being able to separate natural from anthropogenic causes of seagrass change is important for developing strategies that effectively mitigate and manage anthropogenic impacts on seagrass, and promote coastal ecosystems resilient to future environmental change. The present study investigated the influence of environmental and climate related factors on seagrass biomass in a large ≈250 ha meadow in tropical north east Australia. Annual monitoring of the intertidal Enhalus acoroides (L.f.) Royle seagrass meadow over eleven years revealed a declining trend in above-ground biomass (54% significant overall reduction from 2000 to 2010). Partial Least Squares Regression found this reduction to be significantly and negatively correlated with tidal exposure, and significantly and negatively correlated with the amount of solar radiation. This study documents how natural long-term tidal variability can influence long-term seagrass dynamics. Exposure to desiccation, high UV, and daytime temperature regimes are discussed as the likely mechanisms for the action of these factors in causing this decline. The results emphasise the importance of understanding and assessing natural environmentally-driven change when interpreting the results of seagrass monitoring programs.

  20. MoDest GrassUp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rasmus Nyholm; S. Nadimi, Esmaeil

    2010-01-01

    The Technology The technology is one of a kind, as there is no such mathematical model estimating animal feed uptake available today. The estimation of grass uptake, is based on real time wireless sensor data, cow merit and climate data. Relevant cow behaviour data (such as location, movement...... velocity of the cows while grazing and head frequency movements) are measured using wireless sensors (e.g. accelerometers, magnetometers) and collected by a wireless network. Grass length and density are  measured by NIR spectroscopy.   Intellectual Property Rights All intellectual property rights owned...

  1. Technology Optimization of Enzymolysis of Burmuda Grass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Jun-Hong

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Cellulose can be degraded by enzyme to glucose, which provide carbon source for ethanol fermentation. This study, taking Burmuda grass as material, analyzed effects of temperature, time, pH, PBS dosage and ratio of enzyme on reducing sugar. It came to the conclusion that the best conditions of the enzymolysis of Burmuda grass are as follows: 50°C for temperature, 32 h for time, 4.20 for pH, 2 mL for PBS dosage, 4:3 for the ratio of xylanase and cellulase, the yield of reducing sugar reached 78.63%.

  2. Guidelines for growing perennial grasses for biofuel and bioproducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidelines for growing perennial grasses for biofuel and bioproducts Rob Mitchell Abstract: Switchgrass, big bluestem, and warm-season grass mixtures provide numerous benefits. Existing field equipment, herbicides, and cultivar improvement promote rapid establishment in the planting year. These gra...

  3. Importance of soil solution chemistry and land use to growth and distribution of four woodland grasses in south Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunet, J.

    1994-06-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine the effects of soil solution chemistry on growth and distribution of the grasses Festuca altissima, Hordelymus europaeus, Bromus benekenii and Bromus ramosus in south Swedish deciduous woodlands. Laboratory experiments were combined with sampling of soil chemical field data. Particularly emphasized was the simulation of natural soil solution conditions in the experiments. To achieve this, a range of methods were adopted: Initially, woodland soils were used in growth experiments. Soil solutions were obtained by centrifugation of fresh woodland soil. Element concentrations and the share of free cationic Al out of the total Al concentration were measured. Based on these results, synthetic soil solutions were composed for growth experiments in flowing solution culture. I conclude from the results obtained, that high soil solution concentrations of H- or Al-ions are probably the most important factors which exclude the studied grasses from highly acidic solution. The degree H- and Al-toxicity, however, depended on the base cation concentrations of the solution. The results confirm the concept of ion antagonism at uptake sites of the roots as a key mechanism of H- and Al-toxicity. Some additional factors which influence growth and distribution of the grasses were also considered. Historical studies indicate that their restricted distribution even in areas with favourable soil chemical conditions may be related to a negative influence of former land use as wood-pasture or wood-meadow. Observations on permanent plots show that flowering, shoot production and seedling establishment are influenced by both rainfall and woodland management

  4. Fractions of carbohydrates and of nitrogenous compounds of tropical grasses at different cutting ages

    OpenAIRE

    Patrícia Regina de Souza Siqueira Campos; José Fernando Coelho da Silva; Hernán Maldonado Vásquez; Andréa Vittori; Martinho de Almeida e Silva

    2010-01-01

    It was evaluated by the Cornell System carbohidrates fractions and nitrogenous compounds of the following grasses at the cutting ages of 14, 28, 42, and 56 days: nilo grass (Acroceras macrum), angola grass (Brachiaria purpurascens), aleman grass (Echinochloa polystachya), limpo grass (Hemarthria altíssima), setaria grass (Setaria anceps), tanner grass (Brachiaria arrecta), and tifton-85 grass (Cynodon spp). The experiment was carried out in a complete randomized block design, in a split plot ...

  5. Sulfur cycle in the typical meadow Calamagrostis angustifolia wetland ecosystem in the Sanjiang Plain, Northeast China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jingshuang; LI Xinhua

    2008-01-01

    The sulfur cycle and its compartmental distribution within an atmosphere-plant-soil system was studied using a compartment model in the typical meadow Calamagrostis angustifolia wetland in the Sanjiang Plain Northeast China. The results showed that in the typical meadow C. angustifolia wetland ecosystem, soil was the main storage compartment and current hinge of sulfur in which 98.4% sulfur was accumulated, while only 1.6% sulfur was accumulated in the plant compartment. In the plant subsystem, roots and litters were the main storage compartment of sulfur and they remained 83.5% of the total plant sulfur. The calculations of sulfur turnover through the compartments of the typical meadow C. angustifolia wetland ecosystem demonstrated that the above-ground component took up 0.99 gS/m2 from the root, of which 0.16 gS/m2 was translocated to the roots and 0.83 gS/m2 to the litter. The roots took in 1.05 gS/m2 from the soil, subsequent translocation back to the soil accounted for 1.31 gS/m2, while there was 1.84 gS/m2 in the litter and the net transfer of sulfur to the soil was more than 0.44 gS/(m2·a). The emission of H2S from the typical meadow C. angustifolia wetland ecosystem to the atmosphere was 1.83 mgS/(m2·a), while carbonyl sulfide (COS) was absorbed by the typical meadow C. angustifolia wetland ecosystem from the atmosphere at the rate of 1.76 mgS/(m2·a). The input of sulfur by the rainfall to the ecosystem was 4.85 mgS/m2 during the growing season. The difference between input and output was 4.78 mgS/m2, which indicated that sulfur was accumulated in the ecosystem and may cause wetland acidify in the future.

  6. Sulfur cycle in the typical meadow Calamagrostis angustifolia wetland ecosystem in the Sanjiang plain, Northeast China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingshuang; Li, Xinhua

    2008-01-01

    The sulfur cycle and its compartmental distribution within an atmosphere-plant-soil system was studied using a compartment model in the typical meadow Calamagrostis angustifolia wetland in the Sanjiang Plain Northeast China. The results showed that in the typical meadow C. angustifolia wetland ecosystem, soil was the main storage compartment and current hinge of sulfur in which 98.4% sulfur was accumulated, while only 1.6% sulfur was accumulated in the plant compartment. In the plant subsystem, roots and litters were the main storage compartment of sulfur and they remained 83.5% of the total plant sulfur. The calculations of sulfur turnover through the compartments of the typical meadow C. angustifolia wetland ecosystem demonstrated that the above-ground component took up 0.99 gS/m2 from the root, of which 0.16 gS/m2 was translocated to the roots and 0.83 gS/m2 to the litter. The roots took in 1.05 gS/m2 from the soil, subsequent translocation back to the soil accounted for 1.31 gS/m2, while there was 1.84 gS/m2 in the litter and the net transfer of sulfur to the soil was more than 0.44 gS/(m2 x a). The emission of H2S from the typical meadow C. angustifolia wetland ecosystem to the atmosphere was 1.83 mgS/(m2 x a), while carbonyl sulfide (COS) was absorbed by the typical meadow C. angustifolia wetland ecosystem from the atmosphere at the rate of 1.76 mgS/(m2 x a). The input of sulfur by the rainfall to the ecosystem was 4.85 mgS/m2 during the growing season. The difference between input and output was 4.78 mgS/m2, which indicated that sulfur was accumulated in the ecosystem and may cause wetland acidify in the future.

  7. Native Grasses as a Management Alternative on Vegetated Closure Caps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwit, Charles; Collins, Beverly

    2008-06-01

    Capped waste sites often are vegetated with commercial turf grasses to increase evapotranspiration and prevent erosion and possible exposure of the barrier. Fertilizer, frequent watering, and mowing may be required to establish the turf grass and prevent invasion by trees and shrubs. Oldfield vegetation of grasses and forbs is a possible sustainable alternative to turf grass communities. To determine if oldfield vegetation can establish on caps, we (1) compared establishment of a dominant oldfield grass and a commercial turf grass under different combinations of new closure cap management: spring or summer planting and presence or absence of amendments to alleviate drought (watering, mulch) or increase soil fertility (fertilizer, lime, a nitrogen-fixing legume); (2) surveyed existing caps to determine if oldfield species establish naturally; and (3) performed a greenhouse experiment to compare growth of two native grasses under low and amended (added water, soil nutrients) conditions. Both the commercial grass and oldfield species established under new cap conditions; fertilizer, water, and mulch improved vegetation establishment in spring or summer, but legumes decreased grass cover. In the greenhouse, both native grasses grew best with amendments; however, substantial stem and root length were obtained with no fertilizer and only once-weekly watering. Existing vegetated caps supported planted grasses and naturally established oldfield species. Overall, the results indicate native grasses can establish on new caps and oldfields can serve as a management model; further work is needed to determine the management strategy to maintain herbaceous vegetation and slow woody species invasion.

  8. 7 CFR 201.56-5 - Grass family, Poaceae (Gramineae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Grass family, Poaceae (Gramineae). 201.56-5 Section... ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.56-5 Grass... grasses listed in § 201.2(h). (a) Cereals: Agrotricum, barley, oat, rye, mountain rye, wheat,...

  9. 7 CFR 1437.310 - Sea grass and sea oats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Sea grass and sea oats. 1437.310 Section 1437.310 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT... Determining Coverage Using Value § 1437.310 Sea grass and sea oats. (a) Sea grass and sea oats are value...

  10. Convex relationships in ecosystems containing mixtures of trees and grass

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Scholes, RJ

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between grass production and the quantity of trees in mixed tree-grass ecosystems (savannas) is convex for all or most of its range. In other words, the grass production declines more steeply per unit increase in tree quantity...

  11. A Tensile Strength of Bermuda Grass and Vetiver Grass in Terms of Root Reinforcement Ability Toward Soil Slope Stabilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorasyikin, M. N.; Zainab, M.

    2016-07-01

    An examination on root characteristics and root properties has been implemented in this study. Two types of bioengineering were chose which are Vetiver grass and Bermuda grass as these grasses were widely applied for slope stabilization. The root samples were taken to the laboratory to investigate its classification, characteristics and strength. The root of both grasses was found grow with fibrous root matrix system. In terms of root anchorage, the root matrix system of Vetiver grass was exhibits more strengthen than the Bermuda grass. However, observation on root image from Scanning Electron Microscope test reveals that the root of Vetiver grass becomes non-porous as the moisture content reduced. Meanwhile, the root tensile strength of Bermuda grass was obtained acquired low value with higher percentage of moisture content, root morphology and bonding strength. The results indicated that the root tensile strength is mainly influence by percentage of moisture content and root morphology.

  12. The role of dew in the monsoon season assessed via stable isotopes in an alpine meadow in Northern Tibet

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Siyuan; Richards, Keith

    2015-01-01

    Rain in the summer monsoon season is the main water input for the water cycle in the alpine meadow ecosystem of Northern Tibet, however, dew has been observed frequently in Nagqu, especially during consecutive dry days. Under climate change and human disturbance, degradation of the meadow leads to surface property changes and these may affect dew formation. The amount of dew formed on top of the vegetation surface was therefore measured on normal Kobresia pygmaea meadow and partly-degraded crusted meadow soil for 12 dew days in the 40 observation days from early-July to mid-August in 2011. The converted average daily dew depth was significantly higher on the normal meadow and the average of 0.15 mm/night was three times that on the degraded surface between 20:00 and 7:00. To qualitatively identify the role of dew in the local water cycle, water samples from atmospheric water vapour, rain, creek water and groundwater were collected in July and August of 2011 for the analysis of stable water isotopes using the isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy method (IRIS); the vapour samples were collected by cryogenic trapping. It is shown in a δD-δ18O space that the dew contains water that has been terrestrially recycled by evapotranspiration. This research takes an initial step to see the impact of meadow degradation on dew formation, with regard to its formative conditions and moisture source, suggesting that dew may be an active water source for meadow growth and hydrological processes during summer dry spells on the high plateau.

  13. Performance of beef steers on Smuts finger grass and Nile grass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of overwintering level and summer stocking rate ... genetic potential for production (Black, 1990), making it essential to test grass .... winter ration consisted of maize silage, maize meal and poul- ..... Production and quality norms of.

  14. Three new species of Pristimantis (Lissamphibia, Anura from montane forests of the Cordillera Yanachaga in Central Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E. Duellman

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe three additional new species of Pristimantis from the Cordillera Yanachaga, a part of the Andes in central Peru. Analyses of DNA sequences of the mitochondrial rRNA genes show that onespecies is a close relative of P. bipunctatus (P. conspicillatus Group, another is a close relative of P. stictogaster (P. peruvianus Group, and the third is related to several species in the P. unistrigatus Group. The first two species are morphologically similar to their closest relatives but occur at lower elevations. Twenty-nine species of Pristimantis and Phrynopus are known from the vicinity of the Cordillera Yanachaga. The number of species, especially of Pristimantis, is high in the humid montane forestin comparison with other sites in humid montane forests in Peru, but the number is lower than on the western slopes of the Andes in Ecuador.

  15. Development-Induced Displacement in Romania: the Case of Roşia Montană Mining Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian VESALON

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a critical discussion of the population displacement processes involved in the Roşia Montană gold-mining project within the theoretical framework of development-induced displacement (DID. We begin with an overview of the geographical context of the rural community, focusing on the social and economic structure of Roşia Montană. After assessing the relocation and resettlement processes, we examine several problems related to the compensation mechanism set up by the mining company. The aim of the research is to highlight the complexity of the consequences of development-induced displacement and the limits of the policies of relocation and resettlement in the area.

  16. Boston: Community Schools from the Grass Roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, William F.

    1974-01-01

    In Boston, grass roots citizen pressure led to the formation of community schools to replace elementary schools. The community schools are operated by the Boston School Committee during the regular school day and by the Department of Public Facilities in the extended day and evening. (Author/DN)

  17. Basin wildrye: the forgotten grass revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basin wildrye was once a very abundant and widely occurring species throughout the landscapes of northern Nevada. When Captain Simpson, of the topographical Engineers, explored the route for a wagon road across the central Great Basin he marveled at the grass in the valley bottoms that reached to h...

  18. The Prairie Life: The Sea of Grass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratzlaff, Harriet

    1996-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan that explores the importance of the environment for 19th-century frontier settlers and the conflict between ranchers and small farmers over appropriate land use. Students watch a video movie, "The Sea of Grass"; read selections from "O Pioneers!"; and write a compare/contrast essay. (MJP)

  19. Native grasses for rehabilitating Hunter Valley minesites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huxtable, C. [NSW Department of Land and Water Conservation, NSW (Australia)

    1998-04-01

    Introduced plant species, particularly grasses, have long been used to rehabilitate mined land in Australia. Interest in using native species spawned a research project in the Hunter Valley which has demonstrated the suitability of certain native species for rehabilitation and put forward guidelines to enhance the chance of their successful establishment. 4 photos., 1 tab.

  20. Fast growing trees and energy grasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samson, R.

    1993-12-31

    According to both the United States Department of Energy and the Department of Natural Resources Canada, the best way to produce biomass plantations is an agro-forestry system in which fast growing trees are used as a windbreak for fields of energy grasses. (TEC). 1 fig.

  1. Notes on the nomenclature of some grasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henrard, J.Th.

    1940-01-01

    For the incorporation of various grasses in the herbaria of our institutes, we are constantly looking for the correct names to accept, according to the priority. The study of the existing names, as they are given in the Index Kewensis, is therefore indispensable. Working in various genera of the gra

  2. Nowcasting daily minimum air and grass temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Site-specific and accurate prediction of daily minimum air and grass temperatures, made available online several hours before their occurrence, would be of significant benefit to several economic sectors and for planning human activities. Site-specific and reasonably accurate nowcasts of daily minimum temperature several hours before its occurrence, using measured sub-hourly temperatures hours earlier in the morning as model inputs, was investigated. Various temperature models were tested for their ability to accurately nowcast daily minimum temperatures 2 or 4 h before sunrise. Temperature datasets used for the model nowcasts included sub-hourly grass and grass-surface (infrared) temperatures from one location in South Africa and air temperature from four subtropical sites varying in altitude (USA and South Africa) and from one site in central sub-Saharan Africa. Nowcast models used employed either exponential or square root functions to describe the rate of nighttime temperature decrease but inverted so as to determine the minimum temperature. The models were also applied in near real-time using an open web-based system to display the nowcasts. Extrapolation algorithms for the site-specific nowcasts were also implemented in a datalogger in an innovative and mathematically consistent manner. Comparison of model 1 (exponential) nowcasts vs measured daily minima air temperatures yielded root mean square errors (RMSEs) errors for grass minimum temperature and the 4-h nowcasts.

  3. Notes on the nomenclature of some grasses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henrard, J.Th.

    1941-01-01

    In a former article 1) many new combinations and critical observations were published on various grasses all over the world. New investigations in critical genera together with the study of the existing literature made it necessary to accept various other arrangements in this important family. The o

  4. Effects of Different Grazing Intensity of Yak on Vegetation Traits of alpine meadow in Chengduo%称多地区牦牛不同放牧强度对高寒草甸植被特征的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伟; 张明; 魏希杰

    2012-01-01

    Effects of different grazing intensity of Yak on vegetation traits of alpine meadow in Chengduo were studied. The experimental studying showed : the height of Kobresia humilis of alpine meadow under heavy grazing had significant differences ( P 〈 0.05 ) compared with the others treatment, there was not a significant effect of grazing intensity on the height of noxious grass. There were different effects on vegetable cover under different grazing intensity, the cover of Kobresia humilis deereasede under grazing, total covers of the vegetable decreased under heavy grazing, other treatment had no significant effect of total covers. Biomass and underground biomass decreased under heavy grazing and medium grazing.%研究不同放牧强度对高寒草甸植被特征的影响。结果表明称多地区高寒草甸在重度放牧处理下矮嵩草的高度与其它处理存在差异显著性(P〈0.05),放牧强度对毒草类植被高度影响不显著。不同放牧强度对植被盖度的影响各不相同,矮嵩草经放牧处理盖度有明显减少,重度放牧可降低植被总盖度,其它处理影响不显著。重度与中度放牧可使高寒草甸草场地上、地下生物量明显减少。

  5. Genetic variation and risks of introgression in the wild Coffea arabica gene pool in south-western Ethiopian montane rainforests

    OpenAIRE

    Aerts, Raf; Berecha, Gezahegn; Gijbels, Pieter; Hundera, Kitessa; Vandepitte,Katrien; Van Glabeke, Sabine; Muys, Bart; Roldan-Ruiz, Isabel; Honnay, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    The montane rainforests of SW Ethiopia are the primary centre of diversity of Coffea arabica and the origin of all Arabica coffee cultivated worldwide. This wild gene pool is potentially threatened by forest fragmentation and degradation, and by introgressive hybridisation with locally improved coffee varieties. We genotyped 703 coffee shrubs from unmanaged and managed coffee populations, using 24 microsatellite loci. Additionally, we genotyped 90 individuals representing 23 Ethiopian cult...

  6. "Fine-scale climatic variation drives altitudinal niche partitioning of tabanid flies in a tropical montane cloud forest, Ecuadorian Choco"

    OpenAIRE

    Cárdenas Muñoz, Rafael Enrique

    2015-01-01

    In montane systems, global warming may lead communities to disassemble by forcing organisms to shift their distributions to higher elevations or by causing the extinction of those that are unable to adapt. To predict which species are most at risk from environmental change, physiological responses to multiple factors must be measured in natural conditions at fine spatial and temporal scales. To examine the potential drivers of elevational distributions in tabanid flies, specimens were exha...

  7. Hemibeltrania urbanodendrii sp. nov. and Pseudobeltrania angamosensis: new fungal records from the brazilian tropical seasonal semi-deciduous montane forest

    OpenAIRE

    Ronaldo de Castro Fernandes; Denise Castro Lustosa; Robert Weingart Barreto; José Luiz Bezerra

    2007-01-01

    The new species Hemibeltrania urbanodendrii, associated to leaf-spots on Urbanodendron verrucosum (Lauracea) and Pseudobeltrania angamosensis, associated with leaf-spots on Virola gardneri (Myristicaceae), are recorded for the first time in Brazil. They represent additions to the mycobiota of the Tropical Seasonal Semi-Deciduous Montane Forest in Viçosa (Minas Gerais, Brazil), a highly threatened ecosystem.Novas ocorrências de fungos relacionados a manchas foliares são apresentadas: Hemibeltr...

  8. Scale-dependent effects of post-fire canopy cover on snowpack depth in montane coniferous forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Jens T

    2017-09-01

    Winter snowpack in dry montane regions provides a valuable ecosystem service by storing water into the growing season. Wildfire in coniferous montane forests has the potential to indirectly affect snowpack accumulation and ablation (mass loss) rates by reducing canopy cover, which reduces canopy interception of snow but also increases solar radiation and wind speed. These counteracting effects create uncertainty regarding the canopy conditions that maximize post-fire snowpack duration, which is of concern as montane regions across the western United States experience increasingly warm, dry winters with below-average snowpack. The net effect of wildfire on snowpack depth and duration across the landscape is uncertain, and likely scale dependent. In this study, I tested whether intermediate levels of wildfire severity maximize snowpack depth by increasing accumulation while slowing ablation, using gridded, repeated snow depth measurements from three fires in the Sierra Nevada of California. Increasing fire severity had a strong negative effect on snowpack depth, suggesting that increased ablation after fire, rather than increased accumulation, was the dominant control over snowpack duration. Contrary to expectations, the unburned forest condition had the highest overall snowpack depth, and mean snow depth among all site visits was reduced by 78% from unburned forest to high-severity fire. However, at the individual tree scale, snowpack depth was greater under canopy openings than underneath canopy, controlling for effects of fire severity and aspect. This apparent paradox in snowpack response to fire at the stand vs. individual tree scales is likely due to greater variation in canopy cover within unburned and very low severity areas, which creates smaller areas for snow accumulation while reducing ablation via shading. Management efforts to maximize snowpack duration in montane forests should focus on retaining fine-scale heterogeneity in forest structure. © 2017 by

  9. Estimating grass and grass silage degradation characteristics by in situ and in vitro gas production methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danijel Karolyi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Fermentation characteristics of grass and grass silage at different maturities were studied using in situ and in vitro gas production methods. In situ data determined difference between grass and silage. Degradable fraction decreased as grass matured while the undegradable fraction increased. Rate of degradation (kd was slower for silage than fresh grass. Gas production method (GP data showed that fermentation of degradable fraction was different between stage of maturity in both grass and silage. Other data did not show any difference with the exception for the rate of GP of soluble and undegradable fraction. The in situ degradation characteristics were estimated from GP characteristics. The degradable and undegradable fractions could be estimated by multiple relationships. Using the three-phases model for gas production kd and fermentable organic matter could be estimated from the same parameters. The only in situ parameter that could not be estimated with GP parameters was the soluble fraction. The GP method and the three phases model provided to be an alternative to the in situ method for animal feed evaluations.

  10. Grass and herbaceous plants for biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prine, G.M.; Mislevy, P.

    1983-01-01

    Florida has little fossil fuel resources, but the state does have an adequate climate for high plant biomass production. Grasses and herbaceous plants are renewable resources which could furnish a portion of Florida's energy needs. Dry matter yields of various annual and perennial grasses and herbaceous plants which can be grown in Florida are presented in this paper. Residues of crops already being grown for other reasons would be an economical source of biomass. The best alternative for an energy crop appears to be tropical perennial shrub-like legumes and tall, strong-stemmed grasses that have their top growth killed by frosts each winter and that regrow annually from below-ground regenerative plant parts. Napiergrass or elephantgrass (Pennisetum purpureum L.), leucaena (Leucaena leucocephala (Lam.) de Wit) and sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) are examples of such energy plants. Napiergrass (PI 300086) had dry matter yields when cut once at the end of the season of 44.5 and 52.4 Mg/ha in 1981 and 1982 respectively, at Gainesville, Fla. and 56.7 Mg/ha for the first season after planting (1982) at Ona, Fla. A dry matter yield of 73 Mg/ha was obtained from a 10-year-old clump of leucaena at Gainesville in 1981. However, research needs to be conducted on methods of harvesting and storing biomass plants to be used for energy. Napiergrass and other grasses may be solar dried standing after a freeze or following cutting in the fall and then be rolled into large bales for storage in the open or crude shelters. A year-round supply of economical biomass must be available before grasses and herbaceous plants are widely grown and used for energy purposes. 6 references.

  11. Species delimitation, phylogeny and evolutionary demography of co-distributed, montane frogs in the southern Brazilian Atlantic Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firkowski, Carina R; Bornschein, Marcos R; Ribeiro, Luiz F; Pie, Marcio R

    2016-07-01

    The Brazilian Atlantic Forest (BAF) is recognized as one of the world's biodiversity hotspots, with even more species per unit of area than the Amazon, however the mechanisms that led to such astonishing diversity are yet to be fully understood. In this study, we investigate the diversification of two co-distributed frog genera associated with montane areas of southern BAF: Melanophryniscus (Bufonidae) and Brachycephalus (Brachycephalidae). Species delimitation methods using mitochondrial and nuclear loci supported the existence of a remarkable number of highly endemic species in each genus, most of which occupy only one or a few adjacent mountaintops. Their timing of diversification was highly congruent, supporting recent speciation events within the past 600 thousand years. Extended Bayesian skyline plots indicate that most populations have remained relatively stable in size across the evolutionary past, with recent growth after 0.15My, suggesting that the drastic changes found in previous studies on lowland frog species were not shared by these montane taxa. These results are consistent with the existence of a montane refugium in southern BAF, allowing species persistence through the climatic shifts experienced along the BAF during the Quaternary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Population Trends of Central European Montane Birds Provide Evidence for Adverse Impacts of Climate Change on High-Altitude Species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiří Flousek

    Full Text Available Climate change is among the most important global threats to biodiversity and mountain areas are supposed to be under especially high pressure. Although recent modelling studies suggest considerable future range contractions of montane species accompanied with increased extinction risk, data allowing to test actual population consequences of the observed climate changes and identifying traits associated to their adverse impacts are very scarce. To fill this knowledge gap, we estimated long-term population trends of montane birds from 1984 to 2011 in a central European mountain range, the Giant Mountains (Krkonoše, where significant warming occurred over this period. We then related the population trends to several species' traits related to the climate change effects. We found that the species breeding in various habitats at higher altitudes had more negative trends than species breeding at lower altitudes. We also found that the species moved upwards as a response to warming climate, and these altitudinal range shifts were associated with more positive population trends at lower altitudes than at higher altitudes. Moreover, long-distance migrants declined more than residents or species migrating for shorter distances. Taken together, these results indicate that the climate change, besides other possible environmental changes, already influences populations of montane birds with particularly adverse impacts on high-altitude species such as water pipit (Anthus spinoletta. It is evident that the alpine species, predicted to undergo serious climatically induced range contractions due to warming climate in the future, already started moving along this trajectory.

  13. Population Trends of Central European Montane Birds Provide Evidence for Adverse Impacts of Climate Change on High-Altitude Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flousek, Jiří; Telenský, Tomáš; Hanzelka, Jan; Reif, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Climate change is among the most important global threats to biodiversity and mountain areas are supposed to be under especially high pressure. Although recent modelling studies suggest considerable future range contractions of montane species accompanied with increased extinction risk, data allowing to test actual population consequences of the observed climate changes and identifying traits associated to their adverse impacts are very scarce. To fill this knowledge gap, we estimated long-term population trends of montane birds from 1984 to 2011 in a central European mountain range, the Giant Mountains (Krkonoše), where significant warming occurred over this period. We then related the population trends to several species' traits related to the climate change effects. We found that the species breeding in various habitats at higher altitudes had more negative trends than species breeding at lower altitudes. We also found that the species moved upwards as a response to warming climate, and these altitudinal range shifts were associated with more positive population trends at lower altitudes than at higher altitudes. Moreover, long-distance migrants declined more than residents or species migrating for shorter distances. Taken together, these results indicate that the climate change, besides other possible environmental changes, already influences populations of montane birds with particularly adverse impacts on high-altitude species such as water pipit (Anthus spinoletta). It is evident that the alpine species, predicted to undergo serious climatically induced range contractions due to warming climate in the future, already started moving along this trajectory.

  14. Recent rates of carbon accumulation in montane fens ofYosemite National Park, California, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Judith; Fuller, Christopher C.; Orlando, James; Moore, Peggy E.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about recent rates of carbon storage in montane peatlands, particularly in the western United States. Here we report on recent rates of carbon accumulation (past 50 to 100 years) in montane groundwater-fed peatlands (fens) of Yosemite National Park in central California, U.S.A. Peat cores were collected at three sites ranging in elevation from 2070 to 2500 m. Core sections were analyzed for bulk density, % organic carbon, and 210Pb activities for dating purposes. Organic carbon densities ranged from 0.026 to 0.065 g C cm-3. Mean vertical accretion rates estimated using210Pb over the 50-year period from ∼1960 to 2011 and the 100-year period from ∼1910 to 2011 were 0.28 (standard deviation = ±0.09) and 0.18 (±-0.04) cm yr-1, respectively. Mean carbon accumulation rates over the 50- and 100-year periods were 95.4 (±25.4) and 74.7 (±17.2) g C m-2 yr-1, respectively. Such rates are similar to recent rates of carbon accumulation in rich fens in western Canada, but more studies are needed to definitively establish both the similarities and differences in peat formation between boreal and temperate montane fens.

  15. Demographic processes in the montane Atlantic rainforest: molecular and cytogenetic evidence from the endemic frog Proceratophrys boiei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaro, Renata Cecília; Rodrigues, Miguel Trefaut; Yonenaga-Yassuda, Yatiyo; Carnaval, Ana Carolina

    2012-03-01

    Historical climatic refugia predict genetic diversity in lowland endemics of the Brazilian Atlantic rainforest. Yet, available data reveal distinct biological responses to the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) conditions across species of different altitudinal ranges. We show that species occupying Brazil's montane forests were significantly less affected by LGM conditions relative to lowland specialists, but that pre-Pleistocene tectonics greatly influenced their geographic variation. Our conclusions are based on palaeoclimatic distribution models, molecular sequences of the cytochrome b, 16S, and RAG-1 genes, and karyotype data for the endemic frog Proceratophrys boiei. DNA and chromosomal data identify in P. boiei at least two broadly divergent phylogroups, which have not been distinguished morphologically. Cytogenetic results also indicate an area of hybridization in southern São Paulo. The location of the phylogeographic break broadly matches the location of a NW-SE fault, which underwent reactivation in the Neogene and led to remarkable landscape changes in southeastern Brazil. Our results point to different mechanisms underpinning diversity patterns in lowland versus montane tropical taxa, and help us to understand the processes responsible for the large number of narrow endemics currently observed in montane areas of the southern Atlantic forest hotspot.

  16. Comparison of wood-inhabiting myxomycetes in subalpine and montane coniferous forests in the Yatsugatake Mountains of Central Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazunari; Harakon, Yuichi

    2012-05-01

    To demonstrate altitudinal gradients (and resulting temperatures) that affect myxomycete biodiversity and species composition, we statistically compared myxomycete assemblages between a subalpine coniferous forest and a montane pine forest within the region of the Yatsugatake Mountains, Nagano Prefecture, Central Japan. In summer and autumn field surveys during 2003-2010, 53 myxomycete taxa (with varieties treated as species) were observed from 639 records of fruiting bodies in the subalpine forest and 32 taxa were detected from 613 records in the montane forest. There were 20 species in common between the assemblages and the percentage similarity index was 0.400. Myxomycete biodiversity was higher in the subalpine than in the montane forest. Nine myxomycete species were statistically frequent occurrences in the subalpine forest and appeared in autumn: Lamproderma columbinum, Cribraria macrocarpa, Trichia botrytis, Physarum newtonii, Diderma ochraceum, Enteridium splendens, Elaeomyxa cerifera, Trichia verrucosa, and Colloderma oculatum. Five species were restricted to appear in the subalpine forest: Cribraria purpurea, Cribraria rufa, Cribraria ferruginea, Cribraria piriformis, and Lepidoderma tigrinum. Dead wood in the subalpine forest provided a breeding habitat for specific myxomycetes that inhabit cold areas; that is those areas having geographical features of decreasing temperature and increasing elevation, such as the temperate area of Central Japan.

  17. A REVIEW ON LEMON GRASS: AGRICULTURAL AND MEDICINAL ASPECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaibhav Srivastava

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Lemongrass (Cymbopogan flexuosus and Cymbopogan Citraus is regarded as one of the grass which is commonly available in India and abroad. It is widely used in different conditions of pain and discomfort. The oil (Lemongrass oil obtained from the grass has diverse medicinal value. It also produces semi-synthetic Vitamin A that reduces the risk of Xerophthalmia and Night blindness. The grass has great benefits to mankind as it revitalizes the body and mind, helps with infections and act as muscle and skin toner. This review will explore the plant / grass and also suggest for more cultivation of the grass because of its medicinal importance.

  18. Quantifying seasonal volume of groundwater in high elevation meadows: Implications for complex aquifer geometry in a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciruzzi, Dominick M.

    The hydrologic impacts of rising global temperatures are severe and imminent particularly in snow-dominated regions. In the western United States, high elevation meadows are among the ecosystems highly sensitive to climate change. High elevation meadows are groundwater dependent ecosystems and rely on seasonal snowpack melt in order to support ecologic function and baseflow to streams. This stream flow in turn supplies an estimated 2.6 million San Francisco residents with water. Once the snow melts and recharges the aquifer, groundwater supports vegetation separate from the surrounding hillslopes, which promotes important ecologic functions like flood regulation and nutrient cycling. Groundwater also supports baseflow to perennial rivers late into the summer months transferring this snowmelt to downstream ecologic and human communities. By 2100 snowpack accumulation in the Sierra Nevada is expected to decrease by ~40-90% due to near-surface temperature rise. Though precipitation intensity is not expected to change, a decrease in snowpack will change the timing and magnitude of groundwater recharge necessary to sustain high elevation meadows. An additional climate-driven shift and decrease in peak stream flow to early spring away from summer when demand is highest puts into question ecosystem survivability and water supply to downstream users. Here, a new quantitative framework is presented to lay the foundation for the widespread identification of vulnerabilities in high elevation meadows due to climate change. This research proposed and tested a new conceptual model for the volume of groundwater stored in high elevation meadows similar to that of a reservoir with active and dead storage. The seasonal fluctuations in active storage, which is defined as the volume of groundwater able to exchange between the aquifer, streams, and vegetation, are thought to be highly sensitive to aquifer parameters, such as bedrock geometry, meadow gradient, and hydraulic conductivity

  19. Phenols content and 2-D electrophoresis protein pattern: a promising tool to monitor Posidonia meadows health state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randazzo Davide

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The endemic seagrass Posidonia oceanica (L. Delile colonizes soft bottoms producing highly productive meadows that play a crucial role in coastal ecosystems dynamics. Human activities and natural events are responsible for a widespread meadows regression; to date the identification of "diagnostic" tools to monitor conservation status is a critical issue. In this study the feasibility of a novel tool to evaluate ecological impacts on Posidonia meadows has been tested. Quantification of a putative stress indicator, i.e. phenols content, has been coupled to 2-D electrophoretic protein analysis of rhizome samples. Results The overall expression pattern from Posidonia rhizome was determined using a preliminary proteomic approach, 437 protein spots were characterized by pI and molecular weight. We found that protein expression differs in samples belonging to sites with high or low phenols: 22 unique protein spots are peculiar of "low phenols" and 27 other spots characterize "high phenols" samples. Conclusion Posidonia showed phenols variations within the meadow, that probably reflect the heterogeneity of environmental pressures. In addition, comparison of the 2-D electrophoresis patterns allowed to highlight qualitative protein expression differences in response to these pressures. These differences may account for changes in metabolic/physiological pathways as adaptation to stress. A combined approach, based on phenols content determination and 2-D electrophoresis protein pattern, seems a promising tool to monitor Posidonia meadows health state.

  20. Effects of hydrological regime on development of Carex wet meadows in East Dongting Lake, a Ramsar Wetland for wintering waterbirds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Lei; Lu, Cai; Xia, Yan; Shi, Linlu; Zuo, Aojie; Lei, Jialing; Zhang, Hong; Lei, Guangchun; Wen, Li

    2017-01-01

    Wet meadows are one of the most important ecological components in floodplain, and are among the most dynamic ecosystems. Understanding the development of wet meadows and contributing environmental factors can provide better support for wetland management. Carex meadows in East Dongting Lake National Nature Reserve (EDLNNR) provide vital wintering ground for thousands of migratory waterbirds, and their ecological functions are under threated due to hydrological alternation. We measured wet meadow expansion in EDLNNR from 1989 to 2014, and explored its responses to hydrological and climatic factors within the generalised additive models (GAM) framework. We found an overall expansion of wet meadows over the study period. However, in contrast to many previous studies, our results showed that water level fluctuations at the hydrologic indicator site had only limited impacts on their development. Instead, sampling year, timing of water level recession, and local rainfall exerted significant effects. The effects of sampling year reflected the changes in sedimentation within Dongting Lake; and effects of timing of water withdrawal might be explained by the life history of the dominant sedge species. Our study suggested that the impacts of large scale hydrological alternation on vegetation may operate indirectly through its effects on sediment balance. PMID:28165508