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Sample records for monroe county florida

  1. 75 FR 1803 - Lower Florida Keys Refuges, Monroe County, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ..., Florida. These are a collection of low-lying, subtropical islands between the Gulf of Mexico and the... climatically distinct islands provide a haven for a diversity of native flora and fauna, including endemic...

  2. Cities, Towns and Villages, Published in unknown, Monroe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Cities, Towns and Villages dataset as of unknown. Data by this publisher are often provided in NAD_1983_HARN_WISCRS_Monroe_County_Feet coordinate system; in a...

  3. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2012 Digital Orthophotos - Monroe County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This metadata describes the digital orthoimagery covering Monroe County, FL. This 1"=100' scale imagery is comprised of natural color orthoimagery with a GSD (Ground...

  4. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2012 Digital Orthophotos - Monroe County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This metadata describes the digital orthoimagery covering the area of the Everglades in Monroe County, FL as defined by the FL DOR. This 1"=100' scale imagery is...

  5. 78 FR 17468 - Alabama Railroad Co.-Abandonment Exemption-in Monroe County, AL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... Abandonments to abandon approximately 7.42 miles of rail line between milepost 655.20 (east of Route 21 at Tunnel Springs) and milepost 662.62 (west of Main Street in Beatrice), in Monroe County, Ala. The line traverses United States Postal Service Zip Codes 36425 and 36471. ALAB has certified that: (1) No...

  6. Quarry Quest. A Field Trip Guide to the Indiana Limestone District, Monroe and Lawrence Counties, Indiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shewmaker, Sherman N.

    This guide provides information for planning a field trip to the Indiana Limestone District. This district, located in Monroe and Lawrence Counties, Indiana, is responsible for material that has dominated the building-limestone market in the United States for nearly a century. A few of the many well-known buildings using Indiana limestone are the…

  7. 2006 Volusia County, Florida Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is the lidar data for Volusia County, Florida, approximately 1,432 square miles, acquired in early March of 2006. A total of 143 flight lines of Lidar...

  8. Hydrogeology and simulation of regional ground-water-level declines in Monroe County, Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Howard W.; Wright, Kirsten V.; Nicholas, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    Observed ground-water-level declines from 1991 to 2003 in northern Monroe County, Michigan, are consistent with increased ground-water demands in the region. In 1991, the estimated ground-water use in the county was 20 million gallons per day, and 80 percent of this total was from quarry dewatering. In 2001, the estimated ground-water use in the county was 30 million gallons per day, and 75 percent of this total was from quarry dewatering. Prior to approximately 1990, the ground-water demands were met by capturing natural discharge from the area and by inducing leakage through glacial deposits that cover the bedrock aquifer. Increased ground-water demand after 1990 led to declines in ground-water level as the system moves toward a new steady-state. Much of the available natural discharge from the bedrock aquifer had been captured by the 1991 conditions, and the response to additional withdrawals resulted in the observed widespread decline in water levels. The causes of the observed declines were explored through the use of a regional ground-water-flow model. The model area includes portions of Lenawee, Monroe, Washtenaw, and Wayne Counties in Michigan, and portions of Fulton, Henry, and Lucas Counties in Ohio. Factors, including lowered water-table elevations because of below average precipitation during the time period (1991 - 2001) and reduction in water supply to the bedrock aquifer because of land-use changes, were found to affect the regional system, but these factors did not explain the regional decline. Potential ground-water capture for the bedrock aquifer in Monroe County is limited by the low hydraulic conductivity of the overlying glacial deposits and shales and the presence of dense saline water within the bedrock as it dips into the Michigan Basin to the west and north of the county. Hydrogeologic features of the bedrock and the overlying glacial deposits were included in the model design. An important step of characterizing the bedrock aquifer was the

  9. 78 FR 57682 - Norfolk Southern Railway Company-Discontinuance of Service Exemption-in Monroe County, Mich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-19

    ... service over an approximately 1.7-mile line of railroad extending between milepost XV 0.0 and milepost XV 1.7, in Monroe County, Mich. (the Line). The Line traverses United States Postal Service Zip Code 48161. NSR has certified that: (1) No local traffic has moved over the Line for at least two years;...

  10. 2004 St. Johns County, Florida Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is the bare earth lidar data for St. Johns County, Florida, acquired in early January and February of 2004. This data was collected to develop...

  11. 2006 Volusia County Florida LiDAR

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is the lidar data for Volusia County, Florida, approximately 1,432 square miles, acquired in early March of 2006. A total of 143 flight lines of Lidar...

  12. 2004 St. Johns County, Florida Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is the bare earth lidar data for St. Johns County, Florida, acquired in early January and February of 2004. This data was collected to develop...

  13. The surficial aquifer in Pinellas County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causseaux, K.W.

    1985-01-01

    The surficial aquifer in Pinellas County, Florida, contains potable water throughout most of the county and is a potential source of water to augment the public supply that is presently imported from adjacent counties. The county accounts for 38 percent of the public supply consumption of ground water in the 11-county area of west-central Florida and 68 percent of this water is imported from two adjacent counties. The surficial aquifer has a saturated thickness of more than 30 feet throughout most of the county. Specific capacity per foot of screen for wells is less than 0.1 gallon per minute per foot of drawdown in some parts of the county, but yield is sufficient in most of the county for many small uses with shallow-well pumps. Minimum potential yield varies from 5 gallons per minute in the northern part of the county to more than 30 gallons per minute in the south. Concentrations of iron are high enough in parts of the county to cause staining. Chloride concentrations are less than 100 milligrams per liter in most of the county and do not pose a problem for many uses. (USGS)

  14. 78 FR 43881 - Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Site, Davie, Broward County, Florida; Notice of Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-22

    ... AGENCY Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Site, Davie, Broward County, Florida; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Protection Agency has entered into a settlement with Jap. Tech, Inc. concerning the Florida Petroleum... Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Florida Petroleum Reprocesssors Site by one...

  15. 2008 NWFWMD (Northwest Florida Water Management District) Florida LiDAR: Inland Okaloosa County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) LAS dataset is a survey of inland Okaloosa County, Florida not covered in the 2008 Florida Department of Emergency...

  16. Evaluation of borehole geophysical and video logs, at Butz Landfill Superfund Site, Jackson Township, Monroe County, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, D.J.; Conger, R.W.

    2001-01-01

    Between February 1996 and November 2000, geophysical logging was conducted in 27 open borehole wells in and adjacent to the Butz Landfill Superfund Site, Jackson Township, Monroe County, Pa., to determine casing depth and depths of water-producing zones, water-receiving zones, and zones of vertical borehole flow. The wells range in depth from 57 to 319 feet below land surface. The geophysical logging determined the placement of well screens and packers, which allow monitoring and sampling of water-bearing zones in the fractured bedrock so that the horizontal and vertical distribution of contaminated ground water migrating from known sources could be determined. Geophysical logging included collection of caliper, natural-gamma, single-point-resistance, fluid-resistivity, fluid-temperature, and video logs. Caliper and video logs were used to locate fractures, joints, and weathered zones. Inflections on single-point-resistance, fluid-temperature, and fluid-resistivity logs indicated possible water-bearing fractures, and heatpulse-flowmeter measurements verified these locations. Natural-gamma logs provided information on stratigraphy.

  17. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Monroe County Swiss Valley Associates, Inc..

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Sweet Grass County, MT. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  18. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Monroe County Swiss Valley Associates, Inc..

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Sheridan County, MT. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  19. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Monroe County Swiss Valley Associates, Inc..

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Phillips County, MT. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  20. Parcels and Land Ownership, Published in 2011, Monroe County Swiss Valley Associates, Inc..

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Parcels and Land Ownership dataset as of 2011. The extent of these data is generally Big Horn County, MT. This metadata was auto-generated through the Ramona...

  1. EVALUATION OF COLLIER COUNTY, FLORIDA LANDFILL MINING DEMONSTRATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report describes the landfill mining process as demonstrated under the U.S. EPA, Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory's Municipal Waste Innovative Technology Evaluation (MITE) Program by the Collier County (Florida) Solid Waste Management Department. Landfill mining is the ...

  2. Hydrology of Hunters Lake, Hernando County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, S.E.

    1986-01-01

    The size and shape of Hunters Lake, Florida has been significantly altered by development of the surrounding Spring Hill residential community. The lake is the largest in Hernando County, enlarged by lakeshore excavation and connection to nearby ponds to an area of 360 acres at an average stage of 17.2 ft above sea level. Hunters Lake is naturally a closed lake, but development of Spring Hill has resulted in a surface water outflow from the lake in its southwest corner. Inflow to the lake could occur on the east side during extreme high-water periods. The karst terrain of the Hunters Lake area is internally drained through permeable soils, depressions, and sinkholes, and natural surface drainage is absent. The underlying Floridan aquifer system is unconfined except locally near coastal springs. Flow in the groundwater system is to the west regionally and to the southwest in the immediate area of Hunters Lake. Water level gradients in the groundwater system increase from 1.4 ft/mi east of the lake to about 8 ft/mi southwest of the lake. Hunters Lake is hydraulically connected to the groundwater system, receiving groundwater on the northeast side and losing water to the groundwater system on the southwest side. This close relationship with the groundwater system is demonstrated by graphical and numerical comparison of Hunters Lake stage with water levels in nearby groundwater sites. During 1965-84, the stage of Hunters Lake fluctuated between 12.48 and 20.7 ft above sea level. Because area lakes are all directly affected by groundwater levels, they also show a close relationship with water levels in Hunters Lake. Analysis of water quality data for Hunters Lake indicates that the water of the lake is a soft calcium bicarbonate type with ionic concentrations higher than in water from nearby shallow wells and lower than in water from the Upper Floridan aquifer. Samples collected in 1981-1983 indicate slightly higher levels of ionic concentration than in 1965

  3. Genetic relatedness of dengue viruses in Key West, Florida, USA, 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Jordán, Jorge L; Santiago, Gilberto A; Margolis, Harold; Stark, Lillian

    2013-04-01

    Sequencing of dengue virus type 1 (DENV-1) strains isolated in Key West/Monroe County, Florida, indicate endemic transmission for >2 years of a distinct and predominant sublineage of the American-African genotype. DENV-1 strains isolated elsewhere in Florida grouped within a separate Central American lineage. Findings indicate endemic transmission of DENV into the continental United States.

  4. 75 FR 53694 - Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    ...] Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site located in Davie, Broward County, Florida for publication..., identified by Docket ID No. EPA-RO4- SFUND-2010-0729 or Site name Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund...

  5. HYDROLOGY, MONROE COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydrology data include spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydrologic procedures for estimating flood discharges for a flood insurance...

  6. Effects of the Gulf Oil Spill in Escambia County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killingsworth, Kelcey Ray

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of the British Petroleum Gulf Oil Spill on resource change, psychological stress, and resilience for business owners, residents, and workers in Escambia County, Florida. This study was based on Hobfoll's (1988, 1989) Conservation of Resources theory. All business owners, residents, and…

  7. Water resources and effects of development in Hernando County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fretwell, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    In spite of the hill and valley terrain in the Brooksville Ridge area of Hernando County, Florida, little surface drainage occurs within the county. Recharge to the Floridan aquifer system occurs as infiltration of precipitation within the county or as ground-water flow from Sumter County to the east and Pasco County to the south. Discharge is principally to the Gulf of Mexico, but some ground water flows north into Citrus County before it reaches the Gulf. The Floridan aquifer system is generally unconfined. Water quality is generally good except near the coast where high chloride occurs. Water from the Floridan aquifer system accounted for 87 percent of the water used for irrigation, industry, and rural and public supply in 1982. Sixty-seven percent of this water was used by industry. Rock mining, the major industry, used 99 percent of the industrial water. The anticipated increase in population in the county between 1982 and 2000 will increase demand for water primarily from public water-supply systems. This higher demand will cause about a 1 percent reduction in flow from Weeki Wachee Springs, but little change in lake levels or saltwater intrusion will occur if the projected additional supplies are developed far enough inland from the coast. (USGS)

  8. 2007 Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) Lidar Project: Wakulla County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This report pertains to a Specific Purpose Lidar Survey of Wakulla County, Florida, conducted in the summer of 2007 for the Florida Division of Emergency Management...

  9. 2008 Northwest Florida Water Management District (NWFWMD) LiDAR: Inland Okaloosa County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) LAS dataset is a survey of inland Okaloosa County, Florida not covered in the 2008 Florida Department of Emergency...

  10. Broward County Florida Reef Track Thermographic Data Sept 2000 - Oct 2002, (NODC Accession 0000829)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Broward County Florida has responsibility for the resource management of coral reefs in marine waters adjacent to Broward County. The Department of Planning and...

  11. 2009 St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) Lidar: Portions of Orange and Seminole Counties, Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The project area covers 318 square miles in the eastern half of Seminole County plus portions of north central and northeast Orange County in the state of Florida....

  12. A one-dimensional, steady-state, dissolved-oxygen model and waste-load assimilation study for Clear Creek, Monroe County, Indiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilber, William G.; Crawford, Charles G.; Peters, J.G.; Girardi, F.P.

    1979-01-01

    A digital model calibrated to conditions in Clear Creek, Monroe County, IN, was used to develop alternatives for future waste loadings that would be compatible with Indiana stream water-quality standards defined for two critical hydrologic conditions, summer and winter low flows. The Winston Thomas wastewater-treatment facility is the only point-source waste load affecting the modeled reach of Clear Creek. A new waste-water-treatment facility under construction at Dillman Road (river mile 13.78) will replace the Winston Thomas wastewater-treatment facility (river mile 16.96) in 1980. Natural streamflow during the summer and annual 7-day, 10-year low flow is zero, so no benefit from dilution is provided. The model indicates that ammonia-nitrogen toxicity is the most significant factor affecting the stream water quality during summer and winter low flows. The ammonia-nitrogen concentration of the wastewater effluent exceeds the maximum total ammonia-nitrogen concentration of 2.5 milligrams per liter for summer months (June through August) and 4.0 milligrams per liter for winter months (November through March) required for Indiana streams. Nitrification, benthic-oxygen demand, and algal respiration were the most significant factors affecting the dissolved-oxygen concentration in Clear Creek during the model calibration. Nitrification should not significantly affect the dissolved-oxygen concentration in Clear Creek during summer low flows when the ammonia-nitrogen toxicity standards are met. (USGS)

  13. Northeast Florida Regional Sediment Management: Implementation Strategies and Recommendations for Nassau County and Duval County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    overall lifecycle costs. Purpose of the study This USACE Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC), Coastal and Hydraulics Laboratory (CHL...lines. Sediment needs in the study area include the authorized Nassau County and Duval County SPPs, as well as a local beach nourishment project...south, and therefore would be where sediment enters the study area. The sediment budget will be used to help understand coastal processes in the

  14. 78 FR 13339 - Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-27

    ... AGENCY Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Agency has entered into a settlement with 2238 NW. 86th Street Inc. concerning the Florida Petroleum... Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Florida Petroleum Reprocesssors Site by one...

  15. 77 FR 16548 - Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-21

    ...] Florida Petroleum Reprocessors Superfund Site; Davie, Broward County, FL; Notice of Settlements AGENCY... entered into four (4) settlements for past response costs concerning the Florida Petroleum Reprocessors... settlement are available from Ms. Paula V. Painter. Submit your comments by Site name Florida Petroleum...

  16. Bathymetry of Lake Manatee, Manatee County, Florida, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellino, Jason C.; Pfeiffer, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Lake Manatee, located in central Manatee County, Florida, is the principal drinking-water source for Manatee and Sarasota Counties. The drainage basin of Lake Manatee encompasses about 120 square miles, and the reservoir covers a surface area of about 1,450 acres at an elevation of 38.8 feet above NAVD 88 or 39.7 feet above NGVD 29. The full pool water-surface elevation is 39.1 feet above NAVD 88 (40.0 feet above NGVD 29), and the estimated minimum usable elevation is 25.1 feet above NAVD 88 (26.0 feet above NGVD 29). The minimum usable elevation is based on the elevation of water intake structures. Manatee County has used the stage/volume relation that was developed from the original survey in the 1960s to estimate the volume of water available for consumption. Concerns about potential changes in storage capacity of the Lake Manatee reservoir, coupled with a recent drought, led to this bathymetry mapping effort.

  17. Manatee use of power plant effluents in Brevard County, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shane, S.H.

    The relationship between manatees and power plants was investigated at 2 power plants on the Indian River in Brevard County, Florida from January 1978-February 1980. Manatee presence in the power plant effluent zones was correlated with cold air and water temperatures. When air temperatures were below 16 C most manatees in the country were found in the effluent zones. Manatees in the effluent zones move with the wind-blown warm water plume, demonstrating a sensitivity to small changes in water temperature. Some individuals were frequently resighted at 1 plant, while others moved between the 2 plants. Because industrial warm water sources are less reliable than natural warm water refuges, it is recommended that no new artificial warm water effluents be constructed north of the species' traditional winter range. 16 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  18. Integrated solid waste management of Palm Beach County, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The subject document reports the results of an in-depth investigation of the fiscal year 1992 cost of the Palm Beach County, Florida integrated municipal solid waste management system (IMSWMS), the energy consumed to operate the system, and the environmental performance requirements for each of the system`s waste-processing and disposal facilities. Actual data from records kept by participants is reported in this document. Every effort was made to minimize the use of assumptions, and no attempt is made to interpret the data reported. Analytical approaches are documented so that interested analysts may perform manipulation or further analysis of the data. As such, the report is a reference document for MSW management professionals who are interested in the actual costs and energy consumption for a one-year period, of an operating IMSWMS.

  19. Application of a karst disturbance index in Hillsborough County, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Beynen, Philip; Feliciano, Nilda; North, Leslie; Townsend, Kaya

    2007-02-01

    Hillsborough County, Florida, is a karst region that is heavily urbanized, yet no study has been undertaken measuring the degree of human disturbance. Van Beynen and Townsend (2005) created a hierarchical and standardized disturbance index specifically designed for karst environments. To address the problem of determining human disturbance in the county, the above index was successfully applied and it was found that Hillsborough was highly disturbed (disturbance score of 0.69 of 1.0) because of its predominant urban and rural land use. Furthermore, the application of the index allowed for its refinement and the highlighting of environmental aspects in need of remediation such as soil compaction, deforestation, disturbance of archaeological sites, and the expanding urban footprint. Several minor issues arose during the application: the need for broader indicator descriptions that encompass a variety of scenarios, the need for a revised water quality indicator, inadequate data on sinkholes, and a lack of data for species richness and species population density. The utility of the index to resource managers arises from emphasizing certain areas of the environment that require immediate attention and determining temporal changes in environmental quality. Future application of the index requires potential retooling of the biota indicators, tightening of scoring descriptions for certain indicators, and further examination of the scale at which the index can be applied.

  20. 2007 Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) Lidar Project: Nassau County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This report pertains to a Specific Purpose LiDAR Survey of Nassau County, Florida. The LiDAR aerial acquisition was conducted by Terrapoint USA between August 18,...

  1. 2008 Northwest Florida Water Management District (NWFWMD) Lidar: Eglin Air Force Base, Walton County, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In the summer of 2008, the Northwest Florida Water Management District collected lidar data over a portion of Walton County, FL (Eglin Air force Base) to support...

  2. Coral and artificial reef shape files, Broward County, Florida, (NODC Accession 0000244)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Coral reef and artificial reef location shape files and accompanying table files for reefs located off shore of Broward County, Florida. Accompanying "attribute"...

  3. 2004 Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) Lidar Project: Pasco County (Classified)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Earthdata International was contracted to provide mapping services in Pasco County, Florida. Conventional aerial photography along with LIDAR observations were made....

  4. 2005 St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) Lidar: Western Seminole County, Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of a bare earth data set of 498 files covering a geographic area of 175 square miles in western Seminole County, Florida and includes small...

  5. 2006 Florida LiDAR: Escambia, Santa Rosa, and Walton Counties

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — ESCAMBIA: The Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) LAS dataset is a survey of select areas within Escambia County, Florida. These data were produced for Dewberry and...

  6. 2005 St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) Lidar: Western Seminole County, Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set consists of a bare earth data set of 498 files covering a geographic area of 175 square miles in western Seminole County, Florida and includes small...

  7. 2008 Northwest Florida Water Management District Lidar: Eglin Air Force Base, Walton County, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In the summer of 2008, the Northwest Florida Water Management District collected lidar data over a portion of Walton County, FL (Eglin Air force Base) to support...

  8. Comparison of Airborne Lidar and Multibeam Bathymetric Data in the Florida Reef Tract Along Broward County

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, N. E.; Burd, J. J.

    2003-12-01

    Although large, well-known concentrations of corals are found in deeper waters off Florida's eastern seaboard, most mapping of Florida's coral resources addresses the relatively shallow waters of the Florida Keys. To date, technological limitations precluded mapping corals in these deeper waters. Satellite imaging systems and natural color aerial photography, two mapping mainstays, are generally only effective in Florida waters shallower than 20 meters. Conservation of the northern portion of the Florida reef tract, which parallels the Atlantic coast in Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties, has been hampered by minimal or nonexistent coordinated management, monitoring, and mapping activities. In November 2000, the Simrad EM3000 multibeam system was used to collect data south of Port Everglades. Additionally, the Broward County shore protection project conducted a Laser Airborne Depth Sounder (LADS) survey in 2001. Wavelet analyses performed on overlapping transects of the two data sets compare the accuracy of reef bathymetry and complexity captured in the two data collection projects.

  9. TERRAIN, MONROE COUNTY, TN, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. FLOODPLAIN, MONROE COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  11. BASEMAP, MONROE COUNTY, MI, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — FEMA Framework Basemap datasets comprise six of the seven FGDC themes of geospatial data that are used by most GIS applications (Note: the seventh framework theme,...

  12. FLOODPLAIN, MONROE COUNTY, MI, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — FEMA Framework Basemap datasets comprise six of the seven FGDC themes of geospatial data that are used by most GIS applications (Note: the seventh framework theme,...

  13. FLOODPLAIN, Monroe County, Michigan, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  14. Data on selected deep wells in south Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, C.A.; Lidz, Lauralee; Meyer, F.W.

    1982-01-01

    A data base of 870 deep wells was assembled for the south Florida part of the Southeastern Limestone Regional Aquifer Study. The data in this report are for wells in Broward, Collier , Dade, Hendry, Lee, Martin, Monroe, Palm Beach, and St. Lucie Counties. Data are compiled for water wells, oil test wells, injection wells, and monitor wells. These data consist of: (1) well identification and geographic location; (2) well construction and site use; (3) logs available (geologic and geophysical); and (4) selected water-quality parameters. The well locations are shown, by counties, on maps. The number of wells in each county are: Broward, 6; Collier, 237; Dade, 61; Hendry, 130; Lee, 226; Martin, 91; Monroe, 34; Palm Beach, 33; and St. Lucie, 52. Data are stored in the National Water Data Storage and Retrieval system (WATSTORE) in the following files: header, water-quality, and ground-water site inventory (GWSI). (USGS)

  15. A spatial emergy model for Alachua County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, James David

    A spatial model of the distribution of energy flows and storages in Alachua County, Florida, was created and used to analyze spatial patterns of energy transformation hierarchy in relation to spatial patterns of human settlement. Emergy, the available energy of one kind previously required directly or indirectly to make a product or service, was used as a measure of the quality of the different forms of energy flows and storages. Emergy provides a common unit of measure for comparing the productive contributions of natural processes with those of economic and social processes---it is an alternative to using money for measuring value. A geographic information system was used to create a spatial model and make maps that show the distribution and magnitude of different types of energy and emergy flows and storages occurring in one-hectare land units. Energy transformities were used to convert individual energy flows and storages into emergy units. Maps of transformities were created that reveal a clear spatial pattern of energy transformation hierarchy. The maps display patterns of widely-dispersed areas with lower transformity energy flows and storages, and smaller, centrally-located areas with higher transformities. Energy signature graphs and spatial unit transformities were used to characterize and compare the types and amounts of energy being consumed and stored according to land use classification, planning unit, and neighborhood categories. Emergy ratio maps and spatial unit ratios were created by dividing the values for specific emergy flows or storages by the values for other emergy flows or storages. Spatial context analysis was used to analyze the spatial distribution patterns of mean and maximum values for emergy flows and storages. The modeling method developed for this study is general and applicable to all types of landscapes and could be applied at any scale. An advantage of this general approach is that the results of other studies using this method

  16. Index of hydrologic data for selected sites in Broward County, Florida, 1939-80

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonenshein, R.S.; Fish, J.E.; Causaras, C.R.; Poore, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of the surficial aquifers, of southeast Florida, including the Biscayne aquifer, was begun in 1979 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District. In the initial phase of the study, an inventory was made of existing data available in the files of the U.S. Geological Survey and other public agencies of Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties. This report indexes through tables and maps, the ground-water quality, ground-water level, surface-water stage, and geologic data bases for Broward County. (USGS)

  17. Index of hydrologic data for selected sites in Dade County, Florida, 1923-80

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonenshein, R.S.; Causaras, C.R.; Fish, John E.

    1984-01-01

    A comprehensive assessment of the surficial aquifers of southeast Florida, including the Biscayne aquifer, was begun in 1979 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District. In the initial phase of the study, an inventory was made of existing data available in the files of the U.S. Geological Survey and other public agencies of Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach Counties. This report indexes, through tables and maps, the ground-water quality, ground-water level, surface-water stage, and geologic data bases for Dade County. (USGS)

  18. Altitude of water table, surficial aquifer, Palm Beach County, Florida, April 24-26, 1984

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Wesley L.

    1985-01-01

    Water levels in Palm Beach County, Florida, were measured in April 1984 to determine the altitude of the water table in the surficial aquifer. A total of 104 wells and 50 surface-water measurement sites were used to contour the altitude of the water table at 2 and 4-foot intervals. The water-level measurements made in April represent low-water levels near the end of south Florida 's dry season. Contours of the water table at this time ranged from 22 feet above sea level in the north-central part of the county to 2 feet near the coast. (USGS)

  19. Index of hydrologic data for selected sites in Palm Beach County, Florida, 1928-1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonenshein, R.S.; Causaras, C.R.; Fish, John E.

    1986-01-01

    A regional assessment of the surficial aquifers in Dade, Broward , and Palm Beach Counties, Florida, including the Biscayne aquifer, was begun in 1979 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District. The purpose of the first phase of the project was to determine the geologic, hydrologic, and water quality data available in the files of the U.S. Geological Survey and other public agencies. This report summarizes, through tables and maps, the types of data available for Palm Beach County. (USGS)

  20. 2007 Northwest Florida Water Management District (NWFWMD) Lidar: Holmes County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LIDAR-derived binary (.las) files containing points classified as bare-earth and canopy (first return) were produced for the 2007/2008 Northwest Florida Water...

  1. Gadsden, a Florida County in Word and Picture

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Company A of the Fourth Florida Infantry was mustered into Confederate service at Fort Mallory on St. Vincent's Island. Most of their first year of service was spent...

  2. 2007 Northwest Water Manangement District Lidar: Gadsden County, Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LIDAR-derived binary (.las) files containing points classified as bare-earth and canopy (first return) were produced for the 2007 Northwest Florida Water Management...

  3. Hydrogeology and Analysis of Aquifer Characteristics in West-Central Pinellas County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    the Study Area Pinellas County is a peninsula in west-central Florida bounded by Tampa Bay to the east and the Gulf of Mexico to the west (fig. 1). The...packstones. The foraminiferal limestones in the unit commonly contain benthic foraminifera , bryozoan, echinoid, and mollusk fossils. The Ocala Limestone...county is part of the Gulf Coastal Lowlands physiographic region described by White (1970) which consists of low angle scarps and terraces formed

  4. Direct-current resistivity data from 94 sites in northeastern Palm Beach County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Cathleen J.

    1988-01-01

    Direct-current resistivity data were collected from 94 vertical electric sounding profiles in northeastern Palm Beach County, Florida. Direct-current resistivity data, which may be used to determine the location and thicknesses of shallow, semipermeable marls or locate zones of high chloride concentration, are presented in this report. The resistivity data consist of field data, smoothed data, layer resistivity from smoothed data, and Cartesian graphs of resistivity in relation to depth for 94 sites located in northeastern Palm Beach County. (USGS)

  5. 76 FR 78702 - Progress Energy Florida, Inc. (Combined License Application for Levy County Nuclear Power Plant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Progress Energy Florida, Inc. (Combined License Application for Levy County Nuclear Power Plant...) and 2.321(b), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board (Board) in the above-captioned Progress Energy...

  6. 76 FR 61475 - Environmental Impact Statement: Walton and Bay Counties, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-04

    ... project information can be found at the following web address: http://www.westbayparkway.com . To ensure... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Walton and Bay Counties, Florida AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of intent. SUMMARY: The FHWA is issuing this...

  7. Ground-water recharge in Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    Ground water is a major component of Florida's water resources, accounting for 90 percent of all public-supply and self-supplied domestic water withdrawals, and 58 percent of self-supplied commercial-industrial and agricultural withdrawals of freshwater (Marella, 1992). Ground-water is also an important source of water for streams, lakes, and wetlands in Florida. Because of their importance, a good understanding of these resources is essential for their sound development, use, and protection. One area in which our understanding is lacking is in characterizing the rate at which ground water in aquifers is recharged, and how recharge rates vary geographically. Ground-water recharge (recharge) is the replenishment of ground water by downward infiltration of water from rainfall, streams, and other sources (American Society of Civil Engineers, 1987, p. 222). The recharge rates in many areas of Florida are unknown, of insufficient accuracy, or mapped at scales that are too coarse to be useful. Improved maps of recharge rates will result in improved capabilities for managing Florida's ground-water resources. In 1989, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Florida Department of Environmental Regulation, began a study to delineate high-rate recharge areas in several regions of Florida (Vecchioli and others, 1990). This study resulted in recharge maps that delineated areas of high (greater than 10 inches per year) and low (0 to 10 inches per year) recharge in three counties--Okaloosa, Pasco, and Volusia Counties--at a scale of 1:100,000. This report describes the results of a similar recharge mapping study for Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties (fig. 1), in which areas of high- and low-rates of recharge to the sand-and-gravel aquifer and Upper Floridan aquifer are delineated. The study was conducted in 1992 and 1993 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Florida Department of Environmental Protection.

  8. Water-use data by category, county, and water management district in Florida, 1950-90

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marella, R.L.

    1995-01-01

    The population for Florida in 1990 was estimated at 12.94 million, an increase of nearly 10.17 million (370 percent) from the population of 2.77 million in 1950. Consequently, water use (fresh and saline) in Florida increased nearly 510 percent (15,175 million gallons per day) between 1950 and 1990. The resident population of the State is projected to surpass 20 million by the year 2020. Through the cooperation of the Florida Department of Environ- mental Protection and the U.S. Geologial Survey, water-use data for the period between 1950 and 1990 has been consolidated into one publication. This report aggregates and summarizes the quantities of water withdrawn annually for all water-use categories (public supply, self-supplied domestic, self-supplied commercial-industrial, agriculture, and thermoelectric power generation), by counties, and water management districts in Florida from 1950 through 1990. Total water withdrawn in Florida increased from 2,923 million gallons per day in 1950 to 17,898 million gallons per day in 1990. Surface- water withdrawals during 1950 totaled 2,333 million gallons per day but were not differentiated between fresh and saline, therefore, comparisons between fresh and saline water were made beginning with 1955 data. Freshwater withdrawals increased 245 percent between 1955 and 1990. Saline water withdrawals increased more than 1,500 percent between 1955 and 1990. In 1955, more than 47 percent of the fresh- water used was withdrawn from ground-water sources and 53 percent was withdrawn from surface-water sources. In 1990, nearly 62 percent of the fresh- water withdrawn was from ground-water sources, while 38 percent was withdrawn from surface-water sources. The steady increase in ground-water withdrawals since the 1950's primarily is a result of the ability to drill and pump water more economically from large, deep wells and the reliability of both the quality and quantity of water from these wells. Water withdrawn for public supply in

  9. Records of selected wells and lithologic logs of test holes, Hendry County and adjacent areas, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, John E.; Causaras, Carmen R.; O'Donnell, T. H.

    1983-01-01

    To provide water-resource information for Hendry County, Florida , geologic test holes were drilled in the surficial aquifer, and an extensive inventory was compiled of wells in the surficial aquifer and deep artesian aquifers. This report provides: (1) records for 788 selected wells and test holes including location , construction, water use, water level, chloride concentration, specific conductance, temperature, yield, hydrogen sulfide, and iron-staining problems; and (2) lithologic logs for 26 test holes ranging in depth from 90 to 650 feet. A few inventoried wells and two test holes are in adjacent parts of Collier or Glades Counties. (USGS)

  10. Hydrology of the sand-and-gravel aquifer, southern Okaloosa and Walton Counties, northwest Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, L.R.; Barr, D.E.

    1982-01-01

    The sand-and-gravel aquifer in southern Okaloosa and Walton Counties, northwest Florida, extends from land surface to depth of 50 to 150 feet. Intervening layers of clay generally separate the aquifer into an unconfined surficial zone, composed principally of fine to medium sand, and a lower confined zone, consisting of variable amounts of medium to coarse sand and gravel. Well yields of 50 to 500 gallons per minute are possible in most of the area, and yields of 500 to 1,000 gallons per minute can be developed in parts of southwestern Okaloosa County. (USGS)

  11. Policy Implications for Local Application of the 2009 Youth Risk Behavior Survey, Duval County, Florida

    OpenAIRE

    Livingood, William C.; Bryant, Thomas; Bowles, Kathy; Bell, Dale; LaVine, Marcy; Kane, Rick; Butterfield, Ryan; Luminita, Razaila; Filipowicz, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) data have rarely been analyzed at the subcounty level. The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility of such analysis and its potential to inform local policy and resource allocation. Methods We administered the 2009 YRBS to 5,860 students from 46 public middle and high schools in Duval County, Florida. In addition to asking core questions, we asked a set of questions customized for local needs, including questions about zip codes. The...

  12. 2011 Georgia Department of Natural Resources (GADNR) Environmental Protection Division (EPD) Lidar: Seven Counties (Bibb, Harris, Heard, Jasper, Jones, Monroe, Walton)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is the topographic elevation point data derived from multiple return light detection and ranging (LiDAR) measurements for seven counties in Georgia....

  13. 2011 Georgia Department of Natural Resources (GADNR) Environmental Protection Division (EPD) Lidar: Seven Counties (Bibb, Harris, Heard, Jasper, Jones, Monroe, Walton)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is the topographic elevation point data derived from multiple return light detection and ranging (LiDAR) measurements for seven counties in Georgia....

  14. Hurricane Modification and Adaptation in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klima, K.; Lin, N.; Emanuel, K.; Morgan, G.; Grossmann, I.

    2012-12-01

    Annual losses from tropical cyclones (TCs) in the United States are estimated to average about $10-billion/year. Damages can be caused by wind, storm surge, and floods. Some U.S. coastal areas experience high TC wind speeds and contain geophysical features vulnerable to storm surges and flooding. Since the Miami-Dade County coastline contains a range of topography, bathymetry and infrastructure with different susceptibilities to TCs, optimal policy choices regarding methods to reduce TC damages depend strongly on locale. Various adaptation techniques, including "hardening", are available to reduce damages from TCs. Strategies to reduce the intensity of a TC, while still hypothetical, offer a very different approach to reducing damages. Here we investigate tropical cyclone wind and storm surge damage reduction for five areas along the Miami-Dade County coastline either by hardening buildings or by the hypothetical application of wind-wave pumps to modify storms. We calculate surge height and wind speed as functions of return period and sea surface temperature reduction by wind-wave pumps. We then estimate costs and economic losses with the FEMA HAZUS-MH MR3 damage model and census data on property at risk. All areas experience more surge damages for short return periods, and more wind damages for long periods. The return period at which the dominating hazard component switches depends on location. We also calculate the seasonal expected fraction of control damage for different scenarios to reduce damages. Surge damages are best reduced through a surge barrier. Wind damages are best reduced by a portfolio of techniques that, assuming they work and are correctly deployed, include wind-wave pumps.

  15. Exploring trends, sources, and causes of environmental funding: a study of Florida counties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, XiaoHu

    2011-11-01

    Florida is one of the largest spenders on the environment in the U.S. Employing a database from Florida counties, this study examines two distinct environmental funding areas in government: funding to protect the environment, and funding to develop the environment. These two types of funding serve different purposes, support different activities and operations, and draw from different revenue sources. The results show that environmental funding in government is a response to the environmental pressure generated by economic activities and population growth. Counties with a higher level of manufacturing and farming activity spend more to protect the environment, while counties with higher population densities spend more to develop the environment. Moreover, counties with more funding for public safety and economic development activities spend less on the environment, indicating that environmental funding is influenced by the political processes in public budgeting in which diversified interests compete for resources. These results show that environmental spending in government is the result of combined forces arising from environmental pressure and budgetary politics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Prime Time Initiative of Palm Beach County, Florida: QIS Development Process Evaluation--Year 2 Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielberger, Julie; Lockaby, Tracey

    2006-01-01

    This report covers the second year of a 3-year process evaluation of the Prime Time Initiative of Palm Beach County, Florida, a system-building effort to strengthen the availability and quality of after-school programs in the county. During the past two decades, the after-school field has expanded enormously. This growth has occurred partly in…

  17. Comparison of Airborne Lidar and Mulitbeam Bathymetric Data in the Florida Reef Tract Along Broward County

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, N. E.; Burd, J. J.; McIntyre, M. L.; O'Kiefe, K. M.; Wheaton, J. L.; Naar, D. F.; Donahue, B. T.; Kohler, M. F.

    2002-12-01

    Most mapping of Florida's coral resources has been in the relatively shallow waters of the Florida Keys. However, it is well known that large concentrations of corals are found in deeper waters off Florida's eastern seaboard. To date, technological limitations have precluded the mapping of corals in these deeper waters. Satellite imaging systems and natural color aerial photography, two mapping mainstays, are generally only effective in Florida waters shallower than 20 meters. Conservation of the northern portion of the Florida reef tract, which parallels the Atlantic coast in Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties, has been hampered by the fact that there are little or no coordinated management, monitoring and mapping activities in place. To assist the Broward county shore protection project geographic information systems database, a Laser Airborne Depth Sounder (LADS) survey was performed in 2001. The surveyFlanked the 43 km shoreline to a depth of ~50m and distances out to 2km in the north and 3.5km in the southern portion at a spatial resolution of 1.524m (5ft). Additionally, in November 2000 as part of a container vessel grounding lawsuit, funding was allocated to find an alternative anchorage for Port Everglades. The Simrad EM3000 multibeam system was used to collect data in a 2km x 2km square south of Port Everglades, offshore at a depth from 7m to 36m deep and at a spatial resolution of 1m. The area of overlap coincided with the second and third reef tracts, which have the highest biodiversity of the three reef tracts. These datasets were compared at overlapping geographic extents.

  18. The Effects of Leader-Member Exchanges on the Relationships Between Extension Agents and County Extension Directors in Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Benge

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between a supervisor and employee has a direct effect on the employee’s job satisfaction, work productivity, and efficiency. Understanding the interactions between Extension agents and County Extension Directors is critical to maintaining positive relationships and providing adequate support to Extension supervisors through professional development and training opportunities. This article examined the dyadic relationships between Extension agents and County Extension Directors in Florida. The majority of Florida Extension agents have high-quality relationship with their County Extension Directors. In addition, over half of relationships of five years or less are in the partner phase, suggesting new employees of the Florida Cooperative Extension Service progress through the leadership making process in a relatively short amount of time. UF/IFAS Extension Administration should provide increased leadership training for County Extension Directors to ensure all dyads progress through the leadership-making process to the partner phase, such as relationship building, and management and supervisory training.

  19. Agricultural irrigated land-use inventory for Polk County, Florida, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marella, Richard L.; Berry, Darbi; Dixon, Joann F.

    2017-08-16

    An accurate inventory of irrigated crop acreage is not available at the level of resolution needed to better estimate agricultural water use or to project future water demands in many Florida counties. A detailed digital map and summary of irrigated acreage was developed for Polk County, Florida, during the 2016 growing season. This cooperative project between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Office of Agricultural Water Policy of the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services is part of an effort to improve estimates of water use and projections of future demands across all counties in the State. The irrigated areas were delineated by using land-use data provided by the Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services, along with information obtained from the South and Southwest Florida Water Management Districts consumptive water-use permits. Delineations were field verified between April and December 2016. Attribute data such as crop type, primary water source, and type of irrigation system were assigned to the irrigated areas.The results of this inventory and field verification indicate that during the 2016 growing seasons (spring, summer, fall, and winter), an estimated 88,652 acres were irrigated within Polk County. Of the total field-verified crops, 83,995 acres were in citrus; 2,893 acres were in other non-citrus fruit crops (blueberries, grapes, peaches, and strawberries); 621 acres were in row crops (primarily beans and watermelons); 1,117 acres were in nursery (container and tree farms) and sod production; and 26 acres were in field crops including hay and pasture. Of the total inventoried irrigated acreage within Polk County, 98 percent (86,566 acres) was in the Southwest Florida Water Management District, and the remaining 2 percent (2,086 acres) was in the South Florida Water Management District.About 85,788 acres (96.8 percent of the acreage inventoried) were irrigated by a microirrigation system, including drip, bubblers, and

  20. Mineral resource assessment map of the Big Gum Swamp Roadless Area, Columbia and Baker counties, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathcart, J.B.; Cameron, C.C.; Patterson, S.H.

    1986-01-01

    The Big Gum Swamp Roadless Area (figs, 1 and 2) comprises 13,600 acres in the north-central part of the Osceola National Forest in Columbia and Baker Counties, about 12 airline miles northeast of Lake City, Fla. The area is bounded by Forest Service road 211 and Florida highway 250 on the south, Forest Service roads 233 and 232 on the west and north, and Forest Service road 235 on the east. The area can be reached by traveling 11.7 mi on Florida Highway 250 northeast from its junction with U.S. Highway 441, north of Lake City to the junction of Highway 250 and Forest Service road 233, thence north 1.3 mi on the Forest Service road to the southern corner of the area.

  1. Hydrology and water quality of East Lake Tohopekaliga, Osceola County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffer, Donna M.

    1987-01-01

    East Lake Tohopekaliga, one of the major lakes in central Florida, is located in the upper Kissimmee River basin in north-east Osceola County. It is one of numerous lakes in the upper basin used for flood control, in addition to recreation and some irrigation of surrounding pasture. This report is the fourth in a series of lake reconnaissance studies in the Kissimmee River basin prepared in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District. The purpose of the report is to provide government agencies and the public with a brief summary of the lake 's hydrology and water quality. Site information is given and includes map number, site name, location, and type of data available (specific conductivity, pH, alkalinity, turbidity, color, dissolved oxygen, hardness, dissolved chlorides, dissolved sodium, dissolved calcium, dissolved magnesium, dissolved potassium, nitrogen, ammonia, nitrates, carbon and phosphorus). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) maintained a lake stage gaging station on East Lake Tohopekaliga from 1942 to 1968. The South Florida Water Management District has recorded lake stage since 1963. Periodic water quality samples have been collected from the lake by the South Florida Water Management District and USGS. Water quality and discharge data have been collected for one major tributary to the lake, Boggy Creek. Although few groundwater data are available for the study area, results of previous studies of the groundwater resources of Osceola County are included in this report. To supplement the water quality data for East Lake Tohopekaliga, water samples were collected at selected sites in November 1982 (dry season) and in August 1983 (rainy season). Samples were taken at inflow points, and in the lake, and vertical profiles of dissolved oxygen and temperature were measured in the lake. A water budget from an EPA report on the lake is also included. (Lantz-PTT)

  2. Manatee County government's commitment to Florida's water resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunsicker, C.

    1998-07-01

    With ever increasing development demands in coastal areas and subsequent declines in natural resources, especially water, coastal communities must identify creative options for sustaining remaining water resources and an accepted standard of living. The Manatee County agricultural reuse project, using reclaimed wastewater is part of a water resource program, is designed to meet these challenges. The reuse system works in concert with consumer conservation practices and efficiency of use measures which are being implemented by all public and private sector water users in this southwest Florida community.

  3. Hydrologic data for Okaloosa, Walton, and southeastern Santa Rosa counties, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jeffrey R.; Hayes, L.R.; Lewis, C.E.; Barr, D.E.

    1980-01-01

    This report presents hydrologic and water-quality data collected within Okaloosa, Walton, and southeastern Santa Rosa Counties in northwest Florida. The data are presented in graphs and tables. Groundwater data include descriptions of wells and test holes, analyses of water quality, water level measurements, hydrographs of water levels and chloride concentrations in wells open to the upper part of the Floridan aquifer, and municipal and federal facilities pumpage. Surface-water data include streamflow measurements, streamflow hydrographs and analyses of water quality at selected stations. Maps of the area show locations of wells and surface-water stations. (USGS)

  4. Presence of Alcohol and Drugs in Hispanic Versus Non-Hispanic Youth Suicide Victims in Miami-Dade County, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Daniel; Kosoy, Jennifer Ellyn; Ayllon, Karla Diaz; Acuna, Juan

    2016-10-01

    This study examines the association between the presence of drugs and alcohol at time of suicide in Hispanic versus non-Hispanic youth suicide victims in Miami-Dade County, Florida. The Medical Examiner's records of 435 persons aged 24 years or younger classified as suicides in Miami-Dade County, Florida, from 1990 to 2011 were reviewed. Hispanic youth in Miami-Dade County, Florida were 1.62 times more likely than non-Hispanic youth to have used drugs and alcohol at time of suicide (OR 1.62; 95 % CI 1.07-2.04; p = 0.049). Firearm use was significantly associated with drug and alcohol use at time of death. Use of drugs and alcohol at the time of death are important risk factors for suicide in Hispanic youth.

  5. Willem de Kooning: "Marilyn Monroe."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Karen G.

    1988-01-01

    Presents a lesson plan which introduces students in grades 7-9 to Willem de Kooning and the qualities that make his oil painting "Marilyn Monroe," an example of abstract expressionist style. Includes background information on the artist and the painting as well as instructional strategies, studio activities, and evaluation procedures.…

  6. Chemical characteristics of water in the surficial aquifer system, Broward County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howie, Barbara

    1987-01-01

    Water quality data was collected in 1981 and 1982 during the drilling of test holes at 27 sites throughout Broward County, Florida. Determinations were made for the following physical properties and chemical constituents: pH, alkalinity, specific conductance, major ions, selected nutrients and dissolved iron, aluminum, and manganese. Determinations for the trace elements-arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, lead, zinc, selenium, and mercury-were made at 14 wells. Water in the surficial aquifer system between the coastal ridge and the conservation areas is potable and usually is a calcium bicarbonate type for the first 140 ft or more below land surface. Between depths of 140 and 230 ft, groundwater generally grades into a mixed-ion water type. In some areas, diluted seawater occurs beneath the mixed water zone. Dissolved iron concentrations between the coastal ridge and the conservation areas are variable but generally exceed 1,000 micrograms/L. Beneath the conservation areas and the western edge of Broward County, groundwater in the first 100 ft below land surface generally is either a calcium bicarbonate type or a mixed-ion type. At depths between 100 and 200 ft, diluted residual seawater occurs, except along the far western edge of the county. Residual seawater is least diluted in the north. Dissolved iron concentrations generally are between 300 and 1 ,000 micrograms/L but increase to the east of the conservation areas. Other findings of the investigation include: (1) groundwater in some areas west of the coastal ridge probably would be suitable for most domestic, agricultural, and industrial uses if it were treated for carbonate hardness; (2) groundwater in much of Broward County is chemically altered by natural softening and magnesium enrichment (natural softening increases to the west and is very pronounced beneath the far western edge of the county); and (3) there is evidence of mineralized water from the conservation areas mixing with groundwater east of the

  7. 78 FR 18314 - Foreign-Trade Zone 169-Manatee County, Florida; Application for Production Authority; ASO, LLC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 169--Manatee County, Florida; Application for Production Authority; ASO, LLC; Subzone 169A (Textile Fabric Adhesive Bandage Coating and Production);...

  8. The Alternative School: Alachua County (Florida) Public Schools. Descriptive Materials Covering the Secondary Center for Emotionally Disturbed Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alachua County Schools, Gainesville, FL.

    Compiled are materials which describe the Alternative School of the Alachua County, Florida, Public School District, which serves a severely emotionally disturbed population of about 75-85 adolescents. The following materials are included: an introductory letter, which includes information on staff operations and the curriculum framework, given…

  9. 76 FR 11522 - In the Matter of Progress Energy Florida, Inc. (Combined License Application, Levy County Nuclear...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION In the Matter of Progress Energy Florida, Inc. (Combined License Application, Levy County Nuclear... relating to pending appeal filed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff in this case. Mr. Dehmel has...

  10. Ground-water quality in the Davie Landfill, Broward County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattraw, H.C.

    1976-01-01

    Ground-water adjacent to a disposal pond for septic tank sludge, oil, and grease at the Davie landfill, Broward County, Florida was tested for a variety of ground-water contaminants. Three wells adjacent to the disposal pond yielded water rich in nutrients, organic carbon and many other chemical constituents. Total coliform bacteria ranged from less than 100 to 660 colonies per 100 milliliters in samples collected from the shallowest well (depth 20 feet). At well depths of 35 and 45 feet bacterial counts were less than 20 colonies per 100 milliliters or zero. Concentrations of several constituents in water samples collected from the wells downgradient from the landfill, disposal pond, and an incinerator wash pond were greater than in samples collected from wells immediately upgradient of the landfill. A comparison of sodium-chloride ion ratios indicated that downgradient ground-water contamination was related to the incinerator wash water pond rather than the septic tank sludge pond. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. Fort Monroe Historic Image Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    ERDC/CERL SR-10-8 August 2010 Fort Monroe Historic Image Report Adam Smith , Megan Weaver Tooker, Meghan Roller, and Rory Nicholson Construction... Adam Smith was the CERL Project Manager and lead architectural historian, Megan Weaver Tooker was the lead land- scape architect, and Meghan Roller...5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S). Adam Smith , Megan Weaver Tooker, Meghan Roller and Rory Nicholson 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK

  12. Habitat associations of eastern equine encephalitis transmission in Walton County Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelen, Patrick T Vander; Downs, Joni A; Burkett-Cadena, Nathan D; Ottendorfer, Christy L; Hill, Kevin; Sickerman, Stephen; Hernandez, José; Jinright, Joseph; Hunt, Brenda; Lusk, John; Hoover, Victor; Armstrong, Keith; Unnasch, Robert S; Stark, Lillian M; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2012-05-01

    Eastern Equine Encephalitis virus (EEEV; family Togaviridae, genus Alphavirus) a highly pathogenic mosquito-borne virus is endemic to eastern North America. The ecology of EEEV in Florida differs from that in other parts of the United States; EEEV in the northeastern United States is historically associated with freshwater wetlands. No formal test of habitat associations of EEEV in Florida has been reported. Geographical Information Sciences (GIS) was used in conjunction with sentinel chicken EEEV seroconversion rate data as a means to examine landscape features associated with EEEV transmission in Walton County, FL. Sentinel sites were categorized as enzootic, periodically enzootic, and negative based on the number of chicken seroconversions to EEEV from 2005 to 2009. EEEV transmission was then categorized by land cover usage using Arc GIS 9.3. The land classification data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test for each land use class to determine which habitats may be associated with virus transmission as measured by sentinel chicken seroconversion rates. The habitat class found to be most significantly associated with EEEV transmission was tree plantations. The ecological factor most commonly associated with reduced levels of EEEV transmission was vegetated nonforest wetlands. Culiseta melanura (Coquillett), the species generally considered to be the major enzootic EEEV vector, was relatively evenly distributed across all habitat classes, while Aedes vexans (Meigen) and Anopheles crucians Weidemann were most commonly associated with tree plantation habitats.

  13. A Balanced Marine Aquarium [and] The Biology of Marine Aquarium Fishes Collected in Monroe County, Florida. A Two-Paper NOAA Technical Memorandum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palko, Barbara Jayne; And Others

    This document consists of two separate papers. The first paper, "A Balanced Marine Aquarium" (Barbara Jayne Palko), discusses various aspects of a balanced marine aquarium. Information provided includes the basic and optional equipment needed to construct a balanced aquarium, preparations for setting up the aquarium, preparing the…

  14. Helicopter electromagnetic survey of the Model Land Area, Southeastern Miami-Dade County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitterman, David V.; Deszcz-Pan, Maria; Prinos, Scott T.

    2012-01-01

    This report describes a helicopter electromagnetic survey flown over the Model Land Area in southeastern Miami-Dade County, Florida, to map saltwater intrusion in the Biscayne aquifer. The survey, which is located south and east of Florida City, Florida, covers an area of 115 square kilometers with a flight-line spacing of 400 meters. A five-frequency, horizontal, coplanar bird with frequencies ranging from 400 to 100,000 Hertz was used. The data were interpreted using differential resistivity analysis and inversion to produce cross sections and resistivity depth-slice maps. The depth of investigation is as deep as 100 meters in freshwater-saturated portions of the Biscayne aquifer and the depth diminishes to about 50 meters in areas that are intruded by saltwater. The results compare favorably with ground-based, time-domain electromagnetic soundings and induction logs from observation wells in the area. The base of a high-resistivity, freshwater-saturated zone mapped in the northern 2 kilometers of the survey area corresponds quite well with the base of the surficial aquifer that has been determined by drilling. In general, saltwater in the survey area extends 9 to 12 kilometers inland from the coast; however, there is a long nose of saltwater centered along the Card Sound Road Canal that extends 15 kilometers inland. The cause of this preferential intrusion is likely due to uncontrolled surface flow along the canal and subsequent leakage of saltwater into the aquifer. Saltwater also extends farther inland in the area between U.S. Highway 1 and Card Sound Road than it does to the west of this area. Until 1944, a railroad grade occupied the current location of U.S. Highway 1. Borrow ditches associated with the railroad grade connected to Barnes Sound and allowed saltwater to flow during droughts and storm surges to within a few kilometers of Florida City. Relicts of this saltwater that settled to the bottom of the Biscayne aquifer can be seen in the helicopter

  15. DCS Hydraulics Submission for Monroe County, Ohio

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  16. HYDRAULICS, MONROE COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI AND INCORPORATED AREAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  17. Floodplain Submission for Monroe County MS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  18. DCS Hydraulic Submission for Monroe County, Michigan

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  19. DCS Hydraulic Submission for Monroe County, Michigan

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  20. Analyzing effective municipal solid waste recycling programs: the case of county-level MSW recycling performance in Florida, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seejeen; Berry, Frances S

    2013-09-01

    Municipal solid waste (MSW) recycling performance, both nationally and in Florida, USA, has shown little improvement during the past decade. This research examines variations in the MSW recycling program performance in Florida counties in an attempt to identify effective recycling programs. After reviewing trends in the MSW management literature, we conducted an empirical analysis using cross-sectional multiple regression analysis. The findings suggest that the convenience-based hypothesis was supported by showing that curbside recycling had a positive effect on MSW recycling performance. Financial (cost-saving) incentive-based hypotheses were partially supported meaning that individual level incentives can influence recycling performance. Citizen environmental concern was found to positively affect the amount of county recycling, while education and political affiliation yielded no significant results. In conclusion, this article discusses the implications of the findings for both academic research and practice of MSW recycling programs.

  1. STEM Education: Introduction of Quantitative Math and Science Content into Elementary Education, STEM Enrichment Effort in Title One Elementary and Middle Schools in Bay County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Enrichment Effort in Title One Elementary and Middle Schools In Bay County, Florida Ginger Littleton Florida State University Joseph Wander Tyndall...S) Ginger Littleton – Florida State University Joseph Wander – AFRL/RXQ 5d. PROJECT NUMBER GOVT 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER X0EG...along. As stated above, the team’s task was to determine the best available concentration and size of ceria nanoparticles (nanoceria) to add to an

  2. Potential for saltwater intrusion into the Upper Floridan aquifer, Hernando and Manatee counties, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    Pumpage from the Upper Floridan aquifer has caused a lowering of the potentiometric surface and has increased potential for saltwater intrusion into the aquifer in coastal areas of west-central Florida. Groundwater withdrawals are likely to increase because of expected population growth, especially in coastal areas. To increase the understanding of the potential and mechanics of saltwater intrusion, two sites were selected for study. Data were collected at each site from a centrally located deep well, and digital models were developed to simulate groundwater flow and solute transport. The northern site is in Hernando County near the town of Aripeka. The test well in the area was drilled about 1 mile from the coast to a depth of 820 ft. Freshwater was present in the carbonate rock aquifer to a depth of about 500 ft and saltwater occurred from 560 ft to the base of the aquifer at about 750 ft. Between the freshwater and saltwater is the zone of transition, also referred to as the freshwater-saltwater interface. The southern site is in Manatee County near the town of Rubonia. Drilling of the test well was completed at 1,260 ft, just below the base of the Upper Floridan aquifer. The transition zone in this well occurs between 875 and 975 ft within a highly permeable zone. Digital simulations show flow patterns similar to the cyclic flow of seawater and interface theory. Simulations have shown that saltwater contamination of coastal wells would not be noticed as quickly as water-level declines resulting from inland pumpage. (USGS)

  3. Ecological Evaluation of a Beach Nourishment Project at Hallandale (Broward County) Florida. Volume II. Evaluation of Benthic Communities Adjacent to a Restored Beach, Hallandale (Broward County), Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    Department of Biological Sciences AREA & ORK UNIT NUMBERS Florida Atlantic University G31266 Boca Raton, Florida 33431 11. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND...in September 1979. -Core samples at sand stations yielded 114 invertebrate species, not includ- ing nemerteans and oligochaete annelids. More than 90...samples from the two transects yielded 114 species of benthic invertebrates, not including the oligochaete and nemertean worms which were not

  4. Effects of land use on surface-water quality in the East Everglades, Dade County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waller, Bradley G.

    1982-01-01

    Water-quality characteristics were determined at five developed areas in the East Everglades, Dade County, Florida, during the 1978 wet season (June through October). These areas are designated as: Coopertown; Chekika Hammock State Park; residential area; rock-plowed tomato field; and Cracker Jack Slough agricultural area. Data from the developed areas were compared with data from four baseline sites in undeveloped areas to determine the effects of land use on the surface-water quality. The rock-plowed tomato field was the only area where surface-water quality was affected. Water quality at this field is affected by agricultural activities and chemical applications as indicated by increased concentrations of orthophosphate, organic nitrogen, organic carbon, copper, manganese, mercury, and potassium. The remaining four areas of land use had water-quality characteristics typical of baseline sites in nearby Northeast Shark River Slough or Taylor Slough. Chemical analyses of soil indicated chlorinated-hydrocarbon insecticide residues at Coopertown and the two agricultural areas, Cracker Jack Slough and the rock-plowed tomato field. Trace elements in concentrations greater than base level occurred at both agricultural areas (manganese), Chekika Hammock State Park (manganese), and at Coopertown (lead and zinc). (USGS)

  5. Gun Violence, Mental Illness, And Laws That Prohibit Gun Possession: Evidence From Two Florida Counties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Jeffrey W.; Easter, Michele M.; Robertson, Allison G.; Swartz, Marvin S.; Alanis-Hirsch, Kelly; Moseley, Daniel; Dion, Charles; Petrila, John

    2016-01-01

    Gun violence kills about ninety people every day in the United States, a toll measured in wasted and ruined lives and with an annual economic price tag exceeding $200 billion. Some policy makers suggest that reforming mental health care systems and improving point-of-purchase background checks to keep guns from mentally disturbed people will address the problem. Epidemiological research shows that serious mental illness contributes little to the risk of interpersonal violence but is a strong factor in suicide, which accounts for most firearm fatalities. Meanwhile, the effectiveness of gun restrictions focused on mental illness remains poorly understood. This article examines gun-related suicide and violent crime in people with serious mental illnesses, and whether legal restrictions on firearm sales to people with a history of mental health adjudication are effective in preventing gun violence. Among the study population in two large Florida counties, we found that 62 percent of violent gun crime arrests and 28 percent of gun suicides involved individuals not legally permitted to have a gun at the time. Suggested policy reforms include enacting risk-based gun removal laws and prohibiting guns from people involuntarily detained in short-term psychiatric hospitalizations. PMID:27269024

  6. Gun Violence, Mental Illness, And Laws That Prohibit Gun Possession: Evidence From Two Florida Counties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Jeffrey W; Easter, Michele M; Robertson, Allison G; Swartz, Marvin S; Alanis-Hirsch, Kelly; Moseley, Daniel; Dion, Charles; Petrila, John

    2016-06-01

    Gun violence kills about ninety people every day in the United States, a toll measured in wasted and ruined lives and with an annual economic price tag exceeding $200 billion. Some policy makers suggest that reforming mental health care systems and improving point-of-purchase background checks to keep guns from mentally disturbed people will address the problem. Epidemiological research shows that serious mental illness contributes little to the risk of interpersonal violence but is a strong factor in suicide, which accounts for most firearm fatalities. Meanwhile, the effectiveness of gun restrictions focused on mental illness remains poorly understood. This article examines gun-related suicide and violent crime in people with serious mental illnesses, and whether legal restrictions on firearm sales to people with a history of mental health adjudication are effective in preventing gun violence. Among the study population in two large Florida counties, we found that 62 percent of violent gun crime arrests and 28 percent of gun suicides involved individuals not legally permitted to have a gun at the time. Suggested policy reforms include enacting risk-based gun removal laws and prohibiting guns from people involuntarily detained in short-term psychiatric hospitalizations.

  7. Preliminary Assessment of Landslides Along the Florida River Downstream from Lemon Reservoir, La Plata County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, William H.; Coe, Jeffrey A.; Ellis, William L.; Kibler, John D.

    2006-01-01

    Nearly two-dozen shallow landslides were active during spring 2005 on a hillside located along the east side of the Florida River about one kilometer downstream from Lemon Reservoir in La Plata County, southwestern Colorado. Landslides on the hillside directly threaten human safety, residential structures, a county roadway, utilities, and the Florida River, and indirectly threaten downstream areas and Lemon Dam. Most of the area where the landslides occurred was burned during the 2002 Missionary Ridge wildfire. We performed geologic mapping, subsurface exploration and sampling, radiocarbon dating, and shallow ground-water and ground-displacement monitoring to assess landslide activity. Active landslides during spring 2005 were as large as 35,000 m3 and confined to colluvium. Debris flows were mobilized from most of the landslides, were as large as 1,500 m3, and traveled as far as 250 m. Landslide activity was triggered by elevated ground-water pressures within the colluvium caused by infiltration of snowmelt. Landslide activity ceased as ground-water pressures dropped during the summer. Shallow landslides on the hillside appear to be much more likely following the Missionary Ridge fire because of the loss of tree root strength and evapotranspiration. We used monitoring data and observations to develop preliminary, approximate rainfall/snowmelt thresholds above which shallow landslide activity can be expected. Landslides triggered during spring 2005 occurred within a 1.97 x 107 m3 older landslide that extends, on average, about 40 m into bedrock. The south end of this older landslide appears to have experienced deep secondary landsliding. Radiocarbon dating of sediments at the head of the older landslide suggests that the landslide was active about 1,424-1,696 years ago. A relatively widespread wildfire may have preceded the older landslide, and the landslide may have occurred during a wetter time. The wetter climate and effects of the wildfire would likely have

  8. Florida Men Sentenced for Poisoning Wildlife and Hunting Dogs in Bullock County

    Science.gov (United States)

    ATLANTA - Daryl Fischer of Seminole, Florida and Russell Taylor of Loxahatchee, Florida were sentenced on Tuesday, April 28, 2015, to terms of probation for improper use of the pesticide Aldicarb, which is marketed as Temik, announced the United Sta

  9. Hydrology and water quality of lakes and streams in Orange County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, Edward R.; Adamski, James C.

    2005-01-01

    Orange County, Florida, is continuing to experience a large growth in population. In 1920, the population of Orange County was less than 20,000; in 2000, the population was about 896,000. The amount of urban area around Orlando has increased considerably, especially in the northwest part of the County. The eastern one-third of the County, however, had relatively little increase in urbanization from 1977-97. The increase of population, tourism, and industry in Orange County and nearby areas changed land use; land that was once agricultural has become urban, industrial, and major recreation areas. These changes could impact surface-water resources that are important for wildlife habitat, for esthetic reasons, and potentially for public supply. Streamflow characteristics and water quality could be affected in various ways. As a result of changing land use, changes in the hydrology and water quality of Orange County's lakes and streams could occur. Median runoff in 10 selected Orange County streams ranges from about 20 inches per year (in/yr) in the Wekiva River to about 1.1 in/yr in Cypress Creek. The runoff for the Wekiva River is significantly higher than other river basins because of the relatively constant spring discharge that sustains streamflow, even during drought conditions. The low runoff for the Cypress Creek basin results from a lack of sustained inflow from ground water and a relatively large area of lakes within the drainage basin. Streamflow characteristics for 13 stations were computed on an annual basis and examined for temporal trends. Results of the trend testing indicate changes in annual mean streamflow, 1-day high streamflow, or 7-day low streamflow at 8 of the 13 stations. However, changes in 7-day low streamflow are more common than changes in annual mean or 1-day high streamflow. There is probably no single reason for the changes in 7-day low streamflows, and for most streams, it is difficult to determine definite reasons for the flow

  10. Reconnaissance of Chemical and Physical Characteristics of Selected Bottom Sediments of the Caloosahatchee River and Estuary, Tributaries, and Contiguous Bays, Lee County, Florida, July 20-30, 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    areas of Lee County discharge through stormwater conveyances into the Caloosahatchee River estuary (Tony Pellicer , Natural Resource Manager, Lee County... Pellicer , Tony, Natural Resource Manager, Lee County, Florida, 1999, verbal communication. Seal, Thomas, Florida Department of Environmental...23 24 25 26 2829 30 31 32 33 34 35 38 39 40 40A 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 7 9 13 27 37 51 52 21 8 Franklin Lock Olga Fort

  11. Geophysical investigation of sentinel lakes in Lake, Seminole, Orange, and Volusia Counties, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Christopher; Flocks, James; Davis, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    This study was initiated in cooperation with the St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) to investigate groundwater and surface-water interaction in designated sentinel lakes in central Florida. Sentinel lakes are a SJRWMD established set of priority water bodies (lakes) for which minimum flows and levels (MFLs) are determined. Understanding both the structure and lithology beneath these lakes can ultimately lead to a better understanding of the MFLs and why water levels fluctuate in certain lakes more so than in other lakes. These sentinel lakes have become important water bodies to use as water-fluctuation indicators in the SJRWMD Minimum Flows and Levels program and will be used to define long-term hydrologic and ecologic performance measures. Geologic control on lake hydrology remains poorly understood in this study area. Therefore, the U.S. Geological Survey investigated 16 of the 21 water bodies on the SJRWMD priority list. Geologic information was obtained by the tandem use of high-resolution seismic profiling (HRSP) and direct-current (DC) resistivity profiling to isolate both the geologic framework (structure) and composition (lithology). Previous HRSP surveys from various lakes in the study area have been successful in identifying karst features, such as subsidence sinkholes. However, by using this method only, it is difficult to image highly irregular or chaotic surfaces, such as collapse sinkholes. Resistivity profiling was used to complement HRSP by detecting porosity change within fractured or collapsed structures and increase the ability to fully characterize the subsurface. Lake Saunders (Lake County) is an example of a lake composed of a series of north-south-trending sinkholes that have joined to form one lake body. HRSP shows surface depressions and deformation in the substrate. Resistivity data likewise show areas in the southern part of the lake where resistivity shifts abruptly from approximately 400 ohm meters (ohm-m) along the

  12. Waterborne typhoid fever in Dade County, Florida. Clinical and therapeutic evaluation of 105 bacteremic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, T A; Ruiz, C J; Counts, G W; Sachs, J M; Nitzkin, J L

    1975-10-01

    An extensive outbreak of waterborne typhoid fever occurred in 1973 at a migrant labor camp in Dade County, Florida. Blood cultures from 105 of the 188 patients with proved or presumptive cases of typhoid fever grew Salmonella typhi. The clinical and laboratory findings in these patients were reviewed. Fever, usually with temperatures above 38.8 degrees C and of the sustained type, was a primary manifestation of disease, although a majority of the patients also complained of headache and gastroenteric symptoms. Hepatic or splenic enlargement was present in 52 per cent and 42 per cent, respectively, whereas rose spots were detected in only 13 per cent. The total leukocyte count was normal in 74 per cent, but serum levels of liver and muscle enzymes were frequently elevated. Gastrointestinal, pulmonary and neurologic complications were infrequent; circulatory failure was not observed. Defervescence in response to antibiotic therapy was variable; however, the median response among 68 patients who received chloramphenicol was two days less than that in 34 patients treated with ampicillin. There was one possible treatment failure with ampicillin. The relapse rate of 10 per cent in chloramphenicol-treated patients was not significantly greater than the 3 per cent rate among those treated with ampicillin. Serologic studies for typhoid fever were of limited diagnostic value since the titer of agglutinins was 1:160 or higher in 49 per cent of the serums obtained before treatment, and a fourfold rise in titer occurred in only 24 per cent of 57 patients studied. The serologic response to chloramphenicol treatment did not differ from that to ampicillin.

  13. Broward County Florida thermographic data collected at twelve locations along four eastward lines that cross three offshore reef Tracks during the time period July 2000 to the present using self-recording temperature gauges (NODC Accession 0000829)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Broward County Florida has responsibility for the resource management of coral reefs in marine waters adjacent to Broward County. The Department of Planning and...

  14. Hydrostratigraphic Framework and Selection and Correlation of Geophysical Log Markers in the Surficial Aquifer System, Palm Beach County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Ronald S.; Wacker, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    The surficial aquifer system is the major source of freshwater for public water supply in Palm Beach County, Florida, yet many previous studies of the hydrogeology of this aquifer system have focused only on the eastern one-half to one-third of the county in the more densely populated coastal area (Land and others, 1973; Swayze and others, 1980; Swayze and Miller, 1984; Shine and others, 1989). Population growth in the county has resulted in the westward expansion of urbanized areas into agricultural areas and has created new demands on the water resources of the county. Additionally, interest in surface-water resources of central and western areas of the county has increased. In these areas, plans for additional surface-water storage reservoirs are being made under the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan originally proposed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the South Florida Water Management District (1999), and stormwater treatment areas have been constructed by the South Florida Water Management District. Surface-water and ground-water interactions in the Everglades are thought to be important to water budgets, water quality, and ecology (Harvey and others, 2002). Most of the previous hydrogeologic and ground-water flow simulation studies of the surficial aquifer system have not utilized a hydrostratigraphic framework, in which stratigraphic or sequence stratigraphic units, such as those proposed in Cunningham and others (2001), are delineated in this stratigraphically complex aquifer system. A thick zone of secondary permeability mapped by Swayze and Miller (1984) was not subdivided and was identified as only being within the Anastasia Formation of Pleistocene age. Miller (1987) published 11 geologic sections of the surficial aquifer system, but did not delineate any named stratigraphic units in these sections. This limited interpretation has resulted, in part, from the complex facies changes within rocks and sediments of the surficial aquifer

  15. 2007 Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) Lidar Project: Coastal Jefferson County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) LAS dataset is a topographic survey conducted for a coalition of GIS practitioners, including the Florida Division of...

  16. 2008 Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) Lidar Project: Pasco County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is one component of a digital terrain model (DTM) for the Florida Division of Emergency Management's (FDEM) Project Management and Technical Services...

  17. 2007 Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) Lidar Project: Franklin County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) LAS dataset is a topographic survey conducted for a coalition of GIS practitioners, including the Florida Division of...

  18. 2007 Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) Lidar Project: Portions of Clay and Putnam Counties

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) LAS dataset is a topographic survey conducted for a coalition of GIS practitioners, including the Florida Division of...

  19. 2007 Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) Lidar Project: Coastal Okaloosa County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) LAS dataset is a topographic survey conducted for a coalition of GIS practitioners, including the Florida Division of...

  20. 2007 Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) Lidar Project: Coastal Jefferson County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) LAS dataset is a topographic survey conducted for a coalition of GIS practitioners, including the Florida Division of...

  1. 2007 Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) Lidar Project: Eastern Indian River County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) LAS dataset is a topographic survey conducted for a coalition of GIS practitioners, including the Florida Division of...

  2. 2005 Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) LiDAR: Marion County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digital terrain models (DTM) provide a 3-dimensional representation of the earth's surface. The DTM for the Southwest Florida Water Management District project was...

  3. 2007 Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) Lidar Project: Taylor County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) LAS dataset is a topographic survey conducted for a coalition of GIS practitioners, including the Florida Division of...

  4. 2010 Northwest Florida Water Management District (NWFWMD) Lidar: Mission 2010 (Portions of Liberty and Calhoun Counties)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LIDAR-derived binary (.las) files containing points classified as: Unclassified (1), Ground (2) and Water (9) were produced for the 2010 Northwest Florida Water...

  5. 2007 Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) LiDAR: Hernando County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset is one component of a digital terrain model (DTM) for the Southwest Florida Water Management Districts FY2006 Digital Orthophoto (B089) and LiDAR...

  6. 2007 Northwest Florida Water Management District (NWFWMD)Lidar: Holmes County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LIDAR-derived binary (.las) files containing points classified as bare-earth and canopy (first return) were produced for the 2007/2008 Northwest Florida Water...

  7. 2010 Northwest Florida Water Management District (NWFWMD) Lidar: Mission 2010 (Portions of Liberty and Calhoun Counties)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LIDAR-derived binary (.las) files containing points classified as: Unclassified (1), Ground (2) and Water (9) were produced for the 2010 Northwest Florida Water...

  8. 2007 Northwest Florida Water Manangement District(NWFWMD) Lidar: Gadsden County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — LIDAR-derived binary (.las) files containing points classified as bare-earth and canopy (first return) were produced for the 2007 Northwest Florida Water Management...

  9. 2007 Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) Lidar Project: Bay County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) LAS dataset is a topographic survey conducted for a coalition of GIS practitioners, including the Florida Division of...

  10. 2007 Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) Lidar Project: Eastern Indian River County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) LAS dataset is a topographic survey conducted for a coalition of GIS practitioners, including the Florida Division of...

  11. 2007 Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) Lidar Project: Taylor County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) LAS dataset is a topographic survey conducted for a coalition of GIS practitioners, including the Florida Division of...

  12. 2007 Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) Lidar Project: Bay County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) LAS dataset is a topographic survey conducted for a coalition of GIS practitioners, including the Florida Division of...

  13. 2007 Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) Lidar Project: Brevard County

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) LAS dataset is a topographic survey conducted for a coalition of GIS practitioners, including the Florida Division of...

  14. Regional Sediment Management Strategies for the Vicinity of St. Augustine Inlet, St. Johns County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Ponte Vedra Beach and Vilano Beach, data indicate that it is best suited to beaches south of the inlet such as Anastasia Island and St. Augustine Beach...11 St. Johns County HSDR Feasibility Study: South Ponte Vedra Beach...feasibility study of potential additional segments of the overall St. Johns County SPP for nourishment, including South Ponte Vedra Beach and Vilano

  15. Agricultural irrigated land-use inventory for the counties in the Suwannee River Water Management District in Florida, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marella, Richard L.; Dixon, Joann F.; Berry, Darbi R.

    2016-07-28

    A detailed inventory of irrigated crop acreage is not available at the level of resolution needed to accurately estimate agricultural water use or to project future water demands in many Florida counties. A detailed digital map and summary of irrigated acreage during the 2015 growing season was developed for 13 of the 15 counties that compose the Suwannee River Water Management District. The irrigated areas were delineated using land-use data, orthoimagery, and information obtained from the water management district consumptive water-use permits that were then field verified between May and November of 2015. Selected attribute data were collected for the irrigated areas, including crop type, primary water source, and type of irrigation system. Results indicate that an estimated 113,134 acres were either irrigated or had potential for irrigation in all or part of the 13 counties within the Suwannee River Water Management District during 2015. This estimate includes 108,870 acres of field-verified, irrigated crops and 4,264 acres of irrigated land observed as (1) idle (with an irrigation system visible but no crop present at the time of the field-verification visit), (2) acres that could not be verified during field visits, or (3) acres that were located on publicly owned research lands.

  16. Hydrogeology of a zone of secondary permeability in the surficial aquifer of eastern Palm Beach County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swayze, L.J.; Miller, W.L.

    1984-01-01

    The surficial aquifer is the primary source of freshwater for the heavily developed coastal area in eastern Palm Beach County, Florida. Well fields are generally located in a discontinuous zone of higher secondary permeability, the northernmost extension of the Biscayne aquifer in the surficial aquifer, that extends from the Juno Beach area south to Broward County and varies in width from about 4 to 15 miles. The zone was formed by varying dissolution of aquifer limestone materials during Pleistocene age changes in sea level, and ranges in depth from about sea level to 220 feet below sea level. Because of proximity to the Atlantic Ocean and saltwater estuaries, the aquifer is susceptible to saltwater intrusion. Ground water to the west of the zone of higher secondary permeability is of poor quality. The ground water is calcium bicarbonate dominant. Dissolved solids, calcium carbonate hardness, and chloride are greatest along the saltwater intruded coastline and in the western part of the study area where diluted residual seawater exists. Total organic carbon increases inland due to infiltration of rainwater through thicker layers of organic soils. Ground-water levels in the surficial aquifer in eastern Palm Beach County are strongly influenced by controlled levels in canals. In March 1981, after 12 months of below average rainfall, ground-water levels ranged from about 2 feet above sea level along the coast to nearly 21 feet above sea level 15 miles inland in the northwest section of the study area. (USGS)

  17. Discharge, water temperature, and water quality of Warm Mineral Springs, Sarasota County, Florida: A retrospective analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Patricia A.

    2016-09-27

    Warm Mineral Springs, located in southern Sarasota County, Florida, is a warm, highly mineralized, inland spring. Since 1946, a bathing spa has been in operation at the spring, attracting vacationers and health enthusiasts. During the winter months, the warm water attracts manatees to the adjoining spring run and provides vital habitat for these mammals. Well-preserved late Pleistocene to early Holocene-age human and animal bones, artifacts, and plant remains have been found in and around the spring, and indicate the surrounding sinkhole formed more than 12,000 years ago. The spring is a multiuse resource of hydrologic importance, ecological and archeological significance, and economic value to the community.The pool of Warm Mineral Springs has a circular shape that reflects its origin as a sinkhole. The pool measures about 240 feet in diameter at the surface and has a maximum depth of about 205 feet. The sinkhole developed in the sand, clay, and dolostone of the Arcadia Formation of the Miocene-age to Oligocene-age Hawthorn Group. Underlying the Hawthorn Group are Oligocene-age to Eocene-age limestones and dolostones, including the Suwannee Limestone, Ocala Limestone, and Avon Park Formation. Mineralized groundwater, under artesian pressure in the underlying aquifers, fills the remnant sink, and the overflow discharges into Warm Mineral Springs Creek, to Salt Creek, and subsequently into the Myakka River. Aquifers described in the vicinity of Warm Mineral Springs include the surficial aquifer system, the intermediate aquifer system within the Hawthorn Group, and the Upper Floridan aquifer in the Suwannee Limestone, Ocala Limestone, and Avon Park Formation. The Hawthorn Group acts as an upper confining unit of the Upper Floridan aquifer.Groundwater flow paths are inferred from the configuration of the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer for September 2010. Groundwater flow models indicate the downward flow of water into the Upper Floridan aquifer

  18. Discharge, water temperature, and water quality of Warm Mineral Springs, Sarasota County, Florida: A retrospective analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Patricia A.

    2016-09-27

    Warm Mineral Springs, located in southern Sarasota County, Florida, is a warm, highly mineralized, inland spring. Since 1946, a bathing spa has been in operation at the spring, attracting vacationers and health enthusiasts. During the winter months, the warm water attracts manatees to the adjoining spring run and provides vital habitat for these mammals. Well-preserved late Pleistocene to early Holocene-age human and animal bones, artifacts, and plant remains have been found in and around the spring, and indicate the surrounding sinkhole formed more than 12,000 years ago. The spring is a multiuse resource of hydrologic importance, ecological and archeological significance, and economic value to the community.The pool of Warm Mineral Springs has a circular shape that reflects its origin as a sinkhole. The pool measures about 240 feet in diameter at the surface and has a maximum depth of about 205 feet. The sinkhole developed in the sand, clay, and dolostone of the Arcadia Formation of the Miocene-age to Oligocene-age Hawthorn Group. Underlying the Hawthorn Group are Oligocene-age to Eocene-age limestones and dolostones, including the Suwannee Limestone, Ocala Limestone, and Avon Park Formation. Mineralized groundwater, under artesian pressure in the underlying aquifers, fills the remnant sink, and the overflow discharges into Warm Mineral Springs Creek, to Salt Creek, and subsequently into the Myakka River. Aquifers described in the vicinity of Warm Mineral Springs include the surficial aquifer system, the intermediate aquifer system within the Hawthorn Group, and the Upper Floridan aquifer in the Suwannee Limestone, Ocala Limestone, and Avon Park Formation. The Hawthorn Group acts as an upper confining unit of the Upper Floridan aquifer.Groundwater flow paths are inferred from the configuration of the potentiometric surface of the Upper Floridan aquifer for September 2010. Groundwater flow models indicate the downward flow of water into the Upper Floridan aquifer

  19. Detection of land-use and land cover changes in Franklin, Gulf, and Liberty Counties, Florida, with multitemporal landsat thematic mapper images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shufen Pan; Guiying Li

    2007-01-01

    Florida Panhandle region has been experiencing rapid land transformation in the recent decades. To quantify land use and land-cover (LULC) changes and other landscape changes in this area, three counties including Franklin, Liberty and Gulf were taken as a case study and an unsupervised classification approach implemented to Landsat TM images acquired from 1985 to 2005...

  20. 黑色珍珠 Earl Monroe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    chinshen

    2009-01-01

    有人喜欢尊称他为"黑色魔术(Black Magic)",也有人习惯敬呼他"黑色耶稣(Black Jesus)"而略其名,不过蒙罗(Earl Monroe)最著名的外号,还是与他名字发音最接近的,"珍珠(Pearl)"。

  1. Determining the extent and characterizing coral reef habitats of the northern latitudes of the Florida Reef Tract (Martin County).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Brian K; Gilliam, David S

    2013-01-01

    Climate change has recently been implicated in poleward shifts of many tropical species including corals; thus attention focused on higher-latitude coral communities is warranted to investigate possible range expansions and ecosystem shifts due to global warming. As the northern extension of the Florida Reef Tract (FRT), the third-largest barrier reef ecosystem in the world, southeast Florida (25-27° N latitude) is a prime region to study such effects. Most of the shallow-water FRT benthic habitats have been mapped, however minimal data and limited knowledge exist about the coral reef communities of its northernmost reaches off Martin County. First benthic habitat mapping was conducted using newly acquired high resolution LIDAR bathymetry and aerial photography where possible to map the spatial extent of coral reef habitats. Quantitative data were collected to characterize benthic cover and stony coral demographics and a comprehensive accuracy assessment was performed. The data were then analyzed in a habitat biogeography context to determine if a new coral reef ecosystem region designation was warranted. Of the 374 km(2) seafloor mapped, 95.2% was Sand, 4.1% was Coral Reef and Colonized Pavement, and 0.7% was Other Delineations. Map accuracy assessment yielded an overall accuracy of 94.9% once adjusted for known map marginal proportions. Cluster analysis of cross-shelf habitat type and widths indicated that the benthic habitats were different than those further south and warranted designation of a new coral reef ecosystem region. Unlike the FRT further south, coral communities were dominated by cold-water tolerant species and LIDAR morphology indicated no evidence of historic reef growth during warmer climates. Present-day hydrographic conditions may be inhibiting poleward expansion of coral communities along Florida. This study provides new information on the benthic community composition of the northern FRT, serving as a baseline for future community shift and

  2. On the mineral characteristics and geochemistry of the Florida phosphate of Four Corners and Hardee County mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baghdady, Ashraf R.; Howari, Fares M.; Al-Wakeel, Mohamed I.

    2016-08-01

    The Florida phosphate deposits in Four Corners and Hardee County mines are composed mainly of phosphate minerals and quartz in addition to subordinate proportions of feldspars, dolomite, calcite, gypsum, kaolinite, attapulgite and montmorillonite. These phosphorites contain three structurally different types of mudclasts: massive mudclasts, mudclasts with concentric structure and mudclasts consisting of agglomerates of apatite microparticles. The latter are represented by particles resembling phosphatized fossil bacteria associated with microbial filaments, and hollow apatite particles having surfacial coatings and connected to microbial filaments. The Florida phosphate particles are reworked and vary in mineral composition, color and shape. They are composed of a mixture of well-crystalline species including carbonate fluorapatite (francolite), carbonate apatite and fluorapatite. The color variation of the phosphate particles is related to difference in mineral composition, extent of diagenetic effects and reworking. The light-colored mudclasts are characterized by the presence of carbonate apatite and aluminum hydroxide phosphate minerals, whereas the dark mudclasts are rich in iron aluminum hydroxide phosphate minerals. The Florida phosphorites are suggested to be formed partially by authigenetic precipitation, replacement of the sea floor carbonate and diatomite, and microbial processes. With respect to elemental geochemistry, the analyzed particles contain small percentages of sulfur and iron which are related to the occurrence of pyrite. Traces of silica and alumina are recorded which may be attributed to the diagenetic. Some of the tested particles are relatively rich in phosphorous, fluorine, calcium, and magnesium, while poor in silicon, potassium and sulfur. Whereas, the bioclasts (especially teeth) are relatively rich in calcium, phosphorous and fluorine while poor in silicon, aluminum, magnesium and potassium. Hence, the microchemical analyses revealed

  3. Determining the extent and characterizing coral reef habitats of the northern latitudes of the Florida Reef Tract (Martin County.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian K Walker

    Full Text Available Climate change has recently been implicated in poleward shifts of many tropical species including corals; thus attention focused on higher-latitude coral communities is warranted to investigate possible range expansions and ecosystem shifts due to global warming. As the northern extension of the Florida Reef Tract (FRT, the third-largest barrier reef ecosystem in the world, southeast Florida (25-27° N latitude is a prime region to study such effects. Most of the shallow-water FRT benthic habitats have been mapped, however minimal data and limited knowledge exist about the coral reef communities of its northernmost reaches off Martin County. First benthic habitat mapping was conducted using newly acquired high resolution LIDAR bathymetry and aerial photography where possible to map the spatial extent of coral reef habitats. Quantitative data were collected to characterize benthic cover and stony coral demographics and a comprehensive accuracy assessment was performed. The data were then analyzed in a habitat biogeography context to determine if a new coral reef ecosystem region designation was warranted. Of the 374 km(2 seafloor mapped, 95.2% was Sand, 4.1% was Coral Reef and Colonized Pavement, and 0.7% was Other Delineations. Map accuracy assessment yielded an overall accuracy of 94.9% once adjusted for known map marginal proportions. Cluster analysis of cross-shelf habitat type and widths indicated that the benthic habitats were different than those further south and warranted designation of a new coral reef ecosystem region. Unlike the FRT further south, coral communities were dominated by cold-water tolerant species and LIDAR morphology indicated no evidence of historic reef growth during warmer climates. Present-day hydrographic conditions may be inhibiting poleward expansion of coral communities along Florida. This study provides new information on the benthic community composition of the northern FRT, serving as a baseline for future

  4. Saltwater intrusion in the Floridan aquifer, coastal Citrus and Hernando Counties, Florida, 1975

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, L.R.; Ryder, Paul D.

    1977-01-01

    The coastal parts of Citrus and Hernando Counties, Fla., are undergoing extensive urban development along U.S. Highway 19. The Floridan aquifer, a thick sequence of limestone and dolomite , is the principal source of water supply for the coastal parts of these two counties. The construction of canals that penetrate the Floridan aquifer, deficient rainfall during 1964-75, and pumping of ground water, have caused saltwater to intrude the aquifer. A map shows the inland extend of that intrusion as of 1975. The report is based on field data collected in 1964, 1973, and 1975. (Woodard-USGS)

  5. Hydrogeologic and Hydraulic Characterization of the Surficial Aquifer System, and Origin of High Salinity Groundwater, Palm Beach County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Ronald S.; Wacker, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies of the hydrogeology of the surficial aquifer system in Palm Beach County, Florida, have focused mostly on the eastern one-half to one-third of the county in the more densely populated coastal areas. These studies have not placed the hydrogeology in a framework in which stratigraphic units in this complex aquifer system are defined and correlated between wells. Interest in the surficial aquifer system has increased because of population growth, westward expansion of urbanized areas, and increased utilization of surface-water resources in the central and western areas of the county. In 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the South Florida Water Management District, initiated an investigation to delineate the hydrogeologic framework of the surficial aquifer system in Palm Beach County, based on a lithostratigraphic framework, and to evaluate hydraulic properties and characteristics of units and permeable zones within this framework. A lithostratigraphic framework was delineated by correlating markers between all wells with data available based primarily on borehole natural gamma-ray geophysical log signatures and secondarily, lithologic characteristics. These correlation markers approximately correspond to important lithostratigraphic unit boundaries. Using the markers as guides to their boundaries, the surficial aquifer system was divided into three main permeable zones or subaquifers, which are designated, from shallowest to deepest, zones 1, 2, and 3. Zone 1 is above the Tamiami Formation in the Anastasia and Fort Thompson Formations. Zone 2 primarily is in the upper part or Pinecrest Sand Member of the Tamiami Formation, and zone 3 is in the Ochopee Limestone Member of the Tamiami Formation or its correlative equivalent. Differences in the lithologic character exist between these three zones, and these differences commonly include differences in the nature of the pore space. Zone 1 attains its greatest thickness (50 feet or more

  6. HOUSING FOR FLORIDA'S MIGRANTS, A SURVEY OF MIGRATORY FARM LABOR HOUSING IN DADE COUNTY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MIRENGOFF, WILLIAM; SHOSTACK, ALBERT

    AT THE PEAK OF THE 1955-56 WINTER SEASON, 1,300 FAMILIES AND 5,600 SINGLE MIGRANT WORKERS WERE LIVING IN DADE COUNTY'S URBAN AREAS AND 71 LABOR CAMPS. MOST LIVED IN OVERCROWDED QUARTERS, BUT THE UNITS WERE SOUNDLY CONSTRUCTED. WATER AND SEWAGE WERE ADEQUATE, BUT THERE WERE MANY STRUCTURAL DEFICIENCIES, INCLUDING LACK OF SCREENS AND LACK OF…

  7. Hydrologic conditions in urban Miami-Dade County, Florida, and the effect of groundwater pumpage and increased sea level on canal leakage and regional groundwater flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Joseph D.; White, Jeremy T.

    2014-01-01

    The extensive and highly managed surface-water system in southeastern Florida constructed during the 20th Century has allowed for the westward expansion of urban and agricultural activities in Miami-Dade County. In urban areas of the county, the surface-water system is used to (1) control urban flooding, (2) supply recharge to production well fields, and (3) control seawater intrusion. Previous studies in Miami-Dade County have determined that on a local scale, leakage from canals adjacent to well fields can supply a large percentage (46 to 78 percent) of the total groundwater pumpage from production well fields. Canals in the urban areas also receive seepage from the Biscayne aquifer that is derived from a combination of local rainfall and groundwater flow from Water Conservation Area 3 and Everglades National Park, which are west of urban areas of Miami-Dade County.

  8. Abundance, distribution and use of power plant effluents by manatees (Trichechus manatus) in Brevard county, Florida. Final report, Jan 1978-Feb 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shane, S.H.

    1981-01-01

    Brevard County, on Florida's east coast, contains one of the largest concentrations of manatees remaining in Florida. This population was studied from January 1978 through February 1980 using aerial surveys, and boat and land observations. As many as 250 manatees were counted in the county in the spring of 1979. During the warm months most manatees were observed in the Banana River, but during the winter most manatees (up to 100) were found in the warm effluent zones of two power plants on the Indian River. Declining air and water temperatures were significantly correlated with increases in the number of manatees in the power plant effluents. Manatees rely heavily upon these power plants as winter refuges, and plant shut-downs could prove disastrous for these animals.

  9. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Manatee County Habitat for Humanity, Ellenton, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-09-01

    In this 18-home community, all homes are LEED Platinum and meet ENERGY STAR for Homes Version 3 requirements, HERS 23–53. Half way through the project, Habitat for Humanity heard about the DOE Challenge Home program and signed on, committing to build the next home, a three-bedroom, two-bath, 1,143 ft2 duplex, to Challenge Home criteria. The home is the first DOE Challenge Home in Manatee County, and was awarded a 2013 Housing Innovation Award in the affordable builder category.

  10. Pipeline corridors through wetlands - impacts on plant communities: Deep Creek and Brandy Branch crossings, Nassau County, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shem, L.M.; Van Dyke, G.D.; Zimmerman, R.E.

    1994-12-01

    The goal of the Gas Research Institute Wetland Corridors Program is to document impacts of existing pipelines on the wetlands they traverse. To accomplish this goal, 12 existing wetland crossings were surveyed. These sites varied in elapsed time since pipeline construction, wetland type, pipeline installation techniques, and right-of-way (ROW) management practices. This report presents the results of surveys conducted July 14-18, 1992, at the Deep Creek and the Brandy Branch crossings of a pipeline installed during May 1991 in Nassau County, Florida. Both floodplains supported bottomland hardwood forests. The pipeline at the Deep Creek crossing was installed by means of horizontal directional drilling after the ROW had been clear-cut, while the pipeline at the Brandy Branch crossing was installed by means of conventional open trenching. Neither site was seeded or fertilized. At the time of sampling, a dense vegetative community, made up primarily of native perennial herbaceous species, occupied the ROW within the Deep Creek floodplain. The Brandy Branch ROW was vegetated by a less dense stand of primarily native perennial herbaceous plants. Plant diversity was also lower at the Brandy Branch crossing than at the Deep Creek crossing. The results suggest that some of the differences in plant communities are related to the more hydric conditions at the Brandy Branch floodplain.

  11. Assessment of water quality in the South Indian River Water Control District, Palm Beach County, Florida, 1989-94

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietz, A.C.

    1996-01-01

    A study was conducted to assess ground-water and surface-water quality in the South Indian River Water Control District in northern Palm Beach County from 1989 to 1994. Contamination of the surficial aquifer system and availability of a potable water supply have become of increasing concern. The study consisted of sampling 11 ground-water wells and 14 surface- water sites for determination of major inorganic constituents and physical characteristics, trace metals, nitrogen and phosphorus species, and synthetic organic compounds. Sodium and chloride concentrations exceeded Florida drinking-water standards in ground water at two wells, dissolved- solids concentrations at five ground-water wells and one surface-water site, and color values at all 11 ground-water wells and all 14 surface-water sites. Other constituents also exhibited concentrations that exceeded drinking-water standards. Cadmium and zinc concentrations exceeded the standards in ground water at one well, and lead concentrations exceeded the standard in ground water at five wells. Nitrogen and phosphorus specie concentrations did not exceed respective drinking-water standards in any ground-water or surface-water samples. Several synthetic organic compounds were detected at or above 50 micrograms per liter in water samples collected from six ground-water wells and three surface-water sites.

  12. Use of Surveillance Systems in Detection of a Ciguatera Fish Poisoning Outbreak - Orange County, Florida, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klekamp, Benjamin G; Bodager, Dean; Matthews, Sarah D

    2015-10-16

    What is already known on this topic? Ciguatera fish poisoning (CFP), caused by the ingestion of predatory reef-dwelling fish harboring ciguatoxins is one of the most commonly reported fish-associated marine intoxications. Ciguatoxin retains toxicity regardless of freezing or cooking. Prompt treatment can reduce debilitating neurologic symptoms that are associated with CFP.What is added by this report? Syndromic surveillance systems in Florida identified six adults with CFP following consumption of black grouper. Five patients sought medical attention; health care providers did not make a diagnosis of CFP or report the cases to public health authorities, and none of the patients received treatment. Close collaboration among several investigating agencies allowed traceback efforts to link black grouper consumed by all patients to a common international distributor.What are the implications for public health practice? Syndromic surveillance systems capable of detecting CFP are essential public health tools to identify outbreaks and enhance investigations. Medical and public health practitioners should be educated to inquire about recent fish consumption when evaluating patients with clinically compatible signs and symptoms to allow for prompt treatment, and report suspected CFP cases to public health authorities to facilitate source-food traceback efforts. Public education on avoidance of consumption of relatively large predatory reef fish species known to be from ciguatoxic-endemic areas might reduce the risk for CFP.

  13. Drinking and Driving Among Undocumented Latino Immigrants in Miami-Dade County, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Eduardo; de la Rosa, Mario; Sánchez, Mariana; Babino, Rosa; Taylor, Eileen

    2016-08-01

    There is concern that by failing to understand fully the risks associated with driving under the influence (DUI), some Latino immigrants-undocumented in particular-may be overrepresented in alcohol-related crashes. Until now, data on undocumented immigrants has been absent. Data came from an ongoing longitudinal sample of Latino immigrants to Miami-Dade County, FL. Descriptive analyses and regression techniques were applied. Compared with permanent residents, undocumented drivers are more likely to binge drink, less likely to understand DUI laws, and less likely to perceive the risks associated with DUI-three factors largely associated with high DUI rates. Despite facing these risk factors, undocumented immigrants showed low DUI rates, partly due to their limited amount of driving. Differences in risk perceptions and actual DUI events between Latino immigrants of different residency statuses suggest the possibility of early interventions aimed at reducing DUI among Latino immigrants.

  14. 75 FR 33273 - Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for Disposal and Reuse of Fort Monroe, VA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... Department of the Army Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) for Disposal and Reuse of Fort Monroe, VA... socioeconomic impacts associated with the disposal and reuse of Fort Monroe, Virginia. DATES: The waiting period... reuse of Fort Monroe. The 2005 BRAC Commission Report directed the closure of Fort Monroe and...

  15. Hydrogeologic framework and salinity distribution of the Floridan aquifer system of Broward County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Ronald S.; Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    Concerns about water-level decline and seawater intrusion in the surficial Biscayne aquifer, currently the principal source of water supply to Broward County, prompted a study to refine the hydrogeologic framework of the underlying Floridan aquifer system to evaluate its potential as an alternative source of supply. This report presents cross sections that illustrate the stratigraphy and hydrogeology in eastern Broward County; maps of the upper surfaces and thicknesses of several geologic formations or units within the Floridan aquifer system; and maps of two of the potentially productive water-bearing zones within the system, the Upper Floridan aquifer and the Avon Park permeable zone. An analysis of data on rock depositional textures, associated pore networks, and flow zones in the Floridan aquifer system shows that groundwater moves through the system in two ways. These data support a conceptual, dual-porosity model of the system wherein groundwater moves either as concentrated flow in discrete, thin bedding-plane vugs or zones of vuggy megaporosity, or as diffuse flow through rocks with primarily interparticle and moldic-particle porosity. Because considerable exchange of groundwater may occur between the zones of vuggy and matrix-dominated porosity, understanding the distribution of that porosity and flow zone types is important to evaluating the suitability of the several units within the Floridan aquifer system for managing the water through practices such as aquifer storage and recovery (ASR). The salinity of the water in the Floridan aquifer system is highest in the central part of the study area, and lower toward the north and south. Although salinity generally increases with depth, in the western part of the study area a zone of relatively high saline water is perched above water of lower salinity in the underlying Avon Park permeable zone. Overall, the areas of highest salinity in the aquifer system coincide with those with the lowest estimated

  16. Local Mosquito-Borne Transmission of Zika Virus - Miami-Dade and Broward Counties, Florida, June-August 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likos, Anna; Griffin, Isabel; Bingham, Andrea M; Stanek, Danielle; Fischer, Marc; White, Stephen; Hamilton, Janet; Eisenstein, Leah; Atrubin, David; Mulay, Prakash; Scott, Blake; Jenkins, Patrick; Fernandez, Danielle; Rico, Edhelene; Gillis, Leah; Jean, Reynald; Cone, Marshall; Blackmore, Carina; McAllister, Janet; Vasquez, Chalmers; Rivera, Lillian; Philip, Celeste

    2016-09-30

    During the first 6 months of 2016, large outbreaks of Zika virus disease caused by local mosquito-borne transmission occurred in Puerto Rico and other U.S. territories, but local mosquito-borne transmission was not identified in the continental United States (1,2). As of July 22, 2016, the Florida Department of Health had identified 321 Zika virus disease cases among Florida residents and visitors, all occurring in either travelers from other countries or territories with ongoing Zika virus transmission or sexual contacts of recent travelers.* During standard case investigation of persons with compatible illness and laboratory evidence of recent Zika virus infection (i.e., a specimen positive by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction [rRT-PCR], or positive Zika immunoglobulin M [IgM] with supporting dengue serology [negative for dengue IgM antibodies and positive for dengue IgG antibodies], or confirmation of Zika virus neutralizing antibodies by plaque reduction neutralization testing [PRNT]) (3), four persons were identified in Broward and Miami-Dade counties whose infections were attributed to likely local mosquito-borne transmission. Two of these persons worked within 120 meters (131 yards) of each other but had no other epidemiologic connections, suggesting the possibility of a local community-based outbreak. Further epidemiologic and laboratory investigations of the worksites and surrounding neighborhood identified a total of 29 persons with laboratory evidence of recent Zika virus infection and likely exposure during late June to early August, most within an approximate 6-block area. In response to limited impact on the population of Aedes aegypti mosquito vectors from initial ground-based mosquito control efforts, aerial ultralow volume spraying with the organophosphate insecticide naled was applied over a 10 square-mile area beginning in early August and alternated with aerial larviciding with Bacillus thuringiensis subspecies

  17. Geologic features of areas of abnormal radioactivity south of Ocala, Marion County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espenshade, Gilbert H.

    1956-01-01

    Areas of abnormal radioactivity south of Ocala, Marion County, Fla., discovered in 1953 by aerial survey, were investigated by surface examination and by 10 power auger drill holes. Inter-bedded clay, clayey sand, and uraniferous phosphorite occur in the areas of anomalous radioactivityo Miocene fossils occur at three localities in these beds which are evidently outliers- of Miocene sediments on the Ocala limestone of Eocene age. The preserved outliers are southwest of the main belt of Miocene sediments. The principal uraniferous rocks are clayey, sandy, pellet phosphori1te that occurs in beds a few feet thick, and very porous, phosphatic sand rock which makes abundant float at many places. Apatite forms the phosphate pellets in the unweathered phosphorite. The very porous, phosphatic sand rock is the highly leached residuum of the pellet phosphorite and is composed mainly of quartz, kaolinite, wavellite, and crandallite (pseudowavellite). It closely resembles the aluminum phosphate rock of the 'leached zone' of the Bone Valley formation in the land-pebble phosphate district.

  18. Ground-water resources of coastal Citrus, Hernando, and southwestern Levy counties, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fretwell, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    Ground water in the coastal parts of Citrus, Hernando, and Levy Counties is obtained almost entirely from the Floridan aquifer. The aquifer is unconfined near the coast and semiconfined in the ridge area. Transmissivity ranges from 20,000 feet squared per day in the ridge area to greater than 2,000,000 feet squared per day near major springs. Changes in the potentiometric surface of the aquifer are small between the wet and dry seasons. Water quality within the study area is generally very good except immediately adjacent to the coast where saltwater from the Gulf of Mexico poses a threat to freshwater supply. This threat can be compensated for by placing well fields a sufficient distance away from the zone of transition from saltwater to freshwater so as not to reduce or reverse the hydraulic gradient in that zone. Computer models are presently available to help predict the extent of influence of ground-water withdrawals in an area. These may be used as management tools in planning ground-water development of the area. (USGS)

  19. Vector control programs in Saint Johns County, Florida and Guayas, Ecuador: successes and barriers to integrated vector management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Diana P; Qualls, Whitney A; Jurado, Hugo; Perez, Juan C; Xue, Rui-De; Gomez, Eduardo; Beier, John C

    2014-07-02

    Vector-borne diseases (VBDs) and mosquito control programs (MCPs) diverge in settings and countries, and lead control specialists need to be aware of the most effective control strategies. Integrated Vector Management (IVM) strategies, once implemented in MCPs, aim to reduce cost and optimize protection of the populations against VBDs. This study presents a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis to compare IVM strategies used by MCPs in Saint Johns County, Florida and Guayas, Ecuador. This research evaluates MCPs strategies to improve vector control activities. Methods included descriptive findings of the MCP operations. Information was obtained from vector control specialists, directors, and residents through field trips, surveys, and questionnaires. Evaluations of the strategies and assets of the control programs where obtained through SWOT analysis and within an IVM approach. Organizationally, the Floridian MCP is a tax-based District able to make decisions independently from county government officials, with the oversight of an elected board of commissioners. The Guayas program is directed by the country government and assessed by non-governmental organizations like the World health Organization. Operationally, the Floridian MCP conducts entomological surveillance and the Ecuadorian MCP focuses on epidemiological monitoring of human disease cases. Strengths of both MCPs were their community participation and educational programs. Weaknesses for both MCPs included limitations in budgets and technical capabilities. Opportunities, for both MCPs, are additional funding and partnerships with private, non-governmental, and governmental organizations. Threats experienced by both MCPs included political constraints and changes in the social and ecological environment that affect mosquito densities and control efforts. IVM pillars for policy making were used to compare the information among the programs. Differences included how the Ecuadorian

  20. Vector control programs in Saint Johns County, Florida and Guayas, Ecuador: successes and barriers to integrated vector management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Vector-borne diseases (VBDs) and mosquito control programs (MCPs) diverge in settings and countries, and lead control specialists need to be aware of the most effective control strategies. Integrated Vector Management (IVM) strategies, once implemented in MCPs, aim to reduce cost and optimize protection of the populations against VBDs. This study presents a strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats (SWOT) analysis to compare IVM strategies used by MCPs in Saint Johns County, Florida and Guayas, Ecuador. This research evaluates MCPs strategies to improve vector control activities. Methods Methods included descriptive findings of the MCP operations. Information was obtained from vector control specialists, directors, and residents through field trips, surveys, and questionnaires. Evaluations of the strategies and assets of the control programs where obtained through SWOT analysis and within an IVM approach. Results Organizationally, the Floridian MCP is a tax-based District able to make decisions independently from county government officials, with the oversight of an elected board of commissioners. The Guayas program is directed by the country government and assessed by non-governmental organizations like the World health Organization. Operationally, the Floridian MCP conducts entomological surveillance and the Ecuadorian MCP focuses on epidemiological monitoring of human disease cases. Strengths of both MCPs were their community participation and educational programs. Weaknesses for both MCPs included limitations in budgets and technical capabilities. Opportunities, for both MCPs, are additional funding and partnerships with private, non-governmental, and governmental organizations. Threats experienced by both MCPs included political constraints and changes in the social and ecological environment that affect mosquito densities and control efforts. IVM pillars for policy making were used to compare the information among the programs. Differences

  1. Stochastic analyses to identify wellfield withdrawal effects on surface-water and groundwater in Miami-Dade County, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Eric

    2012-12-30

    Several stochastic analyses were conducted in Miami-Dade County, Florida, to evaluate the effects of wellfield withdrawal on aquifer water levels, canal stage, and canal flow. Multiyear data for withdrawals at four water-supply wellfields, water levels at the S-121 canal control structure and groundwater head at a nearby monitoring well were used to determine the interrelation between wellfield withdrawals and water levels in the canal and aquifer. A spectral analysis was performed first on the wellfield withdrawals, showing similar patterns of fluctuations, but no well-defined seasonality. In order to compare water-level response with withdrawals at each wellfield, the intercorrelation effects between wellfields was removed through a 'causal chain' approach where the inter-wellfield correlation is used to isolate the wellfield/water-level correlation. Most computed correlations have magnitudes less than 5 percent, but with statistical significance above 90 percent. Results indicate that withdrawals from the wellfields most distant from the canal had no significant correlation to the canal levels. However the highest correlation was not at the wellfield closest to the canal, but at the two wellfields at the intermediate distance that have higher withdrawal rates. The hydraulic interconnectivity of the canal with the rest of the canal network, covering the study area, allows the canal equalizes with all connected canals. This explains why proximity to a particular canal location does not appear to be as important a factor as the withdrawal rate. Groundwater levels are more highly correlated to a wellfield on the same side of the canal, and to pumping wells in the same wellfield on the same side of the canal. This indicates that canals are an effective barrier and source/sink for the groundwater. Further nonlinear correlation analysis indicates that high withdrawal rates disproportionally affect water levels and are the predominant effect on the canal.

  2. Hydrogeology and results of injection tests at waste-injection test sites in Pinellas County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, John J.

    1982-01-01

    Potential benefits or hazards to freshwater resources could result from subsurface injection of treated wastewater. Recognizing this, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with Pinellas County and the city of St. Petersburg, undertook an evaluation of the hydrogeology and injection of wastewater at proposed test sites on the Pinellas peninsula. The injection sites are underlain by sedimentary rocks ranging in age from Cretaceous to Pleistocene. Lower Eocene carbonate rocks were penetrated to a maximum depth of 3,504 feet and were found to have relatively low water yields. The most permeable part of the investigated section was in rocks of middle Eocene age within the Floridan aquifer. At the injection sites, the Floridan aquifer was subdivided into four permeable zones and three semiconfining beds. The test injection zone is within the Avon Park Limestone, the most productive of the identified permeable zones, with a transmissivity of about 1,000,000 feet squared per day. Two semiconfining beds are above the injection zone in the Suwannee Limestone and Ocala Limestone and have vertical hydraulic conductivities estimated to range from about 0.1 to 1 foot per day where these beds do not contain clay. Limited fresh ground-water supplies exist in the Floridan aquifer within the Pinellas peninsula. At all test sites, chloride concentration in the injection zone ranged from 19,000 to 20,000 milligrams per liter. Injection tests ranging in duration from 3 to 91.1 days were run at three different sites. Pressure buildup occurred in permeable zones above and below the injection zone during these tests. Calculated pressure buildup in observation wells close to and at some distance from the test wells was typically less than 1 pound per square inch. Injection and formation water will probably move slowly through the semiconfining bed overlying the injection zone, and long-term injection tests will be needed to determine the effectiveness of these beds to retard flow. The

  3. Hydrologic monitoring program in Eldridge-Wilde and East Lake Road well-field areas, Pinellas and Hillsborough counties, Florida, 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, L.R.

    1980-01-01

    This report describes the observation-well network in Eldridge-Wilde and East Lake Road well-field areas, Pinellas and Hillsborough Counties, Florida. Data obtained in 1978 from the network in and adjacent to the two well fields, as well as rainfall and pumpage records, are presented. The Southwest Florida Water Management District has established regulatory water-level limits in four observation wells and water-quality limits in three observation wells. Water levels dropped below regulatory limits in the spring of 1978 in three wells. Chloride concentrations in 1978 remained above regulatory limits for the entire year in one well and exceeded the limit during the late spring in the other two deep wells, both west of Eldridge-Wilde well field. (USGS)

  4. Hydrology of the coastal springs ground-water basin and adjacent parts of Pasco, Hernando, and Citrus Counties, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knochenmus, Lari A.; Yobbi, Dann K.

    2001-01-01

    The coastal springs in Pasco, Hernando, and Citrus Counties, Florida consist of three first-order magnitude springs and numerous smaller springs, which are points of substantial ground-water discharge from the Upper Floridan aquifer. Spring flow is proportional to the water-level altitude in the aquifer and is affected primarily by the magnitude and timing of rainfall. Ground-water levels in 206 Upper Floridan aquifer wells, and surface-water stage, flow, and specific conductance of water from springs at 10 gaging stations were measured to define the hydrologic variability (temporally and spatially) in the Coastal Springs Ground-Water Basin and adjacent parts of Pasco, Hernando, and Citrus Counties. Rainfall at 46 stations and ground-water withdrawals for three counties, were used to calculate water budgets, to evaluate long-term changes in hydrologic conditions, and to evaluate relations among the hydrologic components. Predictive equations to estimate daily spring flow were developed for eight gaging stations using regression techniques. Regression techniques included ordinary least squares and multiple linear regression techniques. The predictive equations indicate that ground-water levels in the Upper Floridan aquifer are directly related to spring flow. At tidally affected gaging stations, spring flow is inversely related to spring-pool altitude. The springs have similar seasonal flow patterns throughout the area. Water-budget analysis provided insight into the relative importance of the hydrologic components expected to influence spring flow. Four water budgets were constructed for small ground-water basins that form the Coastal Springs Ground-Water Basin. Rainfall averaged 55 inches per year and was the only source of inflow to the Basin. The pathways for outflow were evapotranspiration (34 inches per year), runoff by spring flow (8 inches per year), ground-water outflow from upward leakage (11 inches per year), and ground-water withdrawal (2 inches per year

  5. Pinellas County, Florida Site Environmental Restoration Project Semiannual Progress Report for the 4.5 Acre Site June through November 2016 January 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Survochak, Scott [USDOE Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC (United States); Daniel, Joe [Navarrao Research and Engineering, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-01-01

    This Pinellas County, Florida, Site Environmental Restoration Project Semiannual Progress Report for the 4.5 Acre Site describes environmental restoration activities for the 4.5 Acre Site located in Pinellas County, Largo, Florida (Figure 1). The former U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pinellas Plant facility consisted of the 4.5 Acre Site and what is now the STAR Center (Young - Rainey Science, Technology, and Research Center). Both the 4.5 Acre Site and the STAR Center are part of the overall Pinellas County, Florida, Site (Figure 2). The 4.5 Acre Site is located immediately northwest of the STAR Center, in the northeast quarter of Section 13, Township 30 South, Range 15 East. DOE owned this parcel from 1957 to 1972, at which time it was sold to a private landowner. During the period of DOE ownership, the property was used for the disposal of drums of waste resins and solvents. As a result of this practice, the surficial aquifer was impacted by volatile organic compounds (VOCs)—trichloroethene (TCE), cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cDCE), trans-1,2-dichloroethene (tDCE), vinyl chloride (VC), and benzene. Detailed background information for the site is contained in the Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for the Pinellas Site (DOE 2016). That document and other site-related documents can be accessed at this website: http://www.lm.doe.gov/Pinellas/Sites.aspx. Recent remediation activities consist of the injection of emulsified soybean oil and the microorganism Dehalococcoides mccartyi (formerly known as Dehalococcoides ethenogenes) into the subsurface in February 2010 and again in July 2013 to enhance contaminant biodegradation (hereafter described as bioinjection). Monitoring the performance of these actions, in the form of monitoring well sampling, is ongoing.

  6. Evaluation of the use of reach transmissivity to quantify leakage beneath Levee 31N, Miami-Dade County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemeth, Mark S.; Wilcox, Walter M.; Solo-Gabriele, Helena M.

    2000-01-01

    A coupled ground- and surface-water model (MODBRANCH) was developed to estimate ground-water flow beneath Levee 31N in Miami-Dade County, Florida, and to simulate hydrologic conditions in the surrounding area. The study included compilation of data from monitoring stations, measurement of vertical seepage rates in wetlands, and analysis of the hydrogeologic properties of the ground-water aquifer within the study area. In addition, the MODBRANCH code was modified to calculate the exchange between surface-water channels and ground water using a relation based on the concept of reach transmissivity. The modified reach-transmissivity version of the MODBRANCH code was successfully tested on three simple problems with known analytical solutions. It was also tested and determined to function adequately on one field problem that had previously been solved using the unmodified version of the software. The modified version of MODBRANCH was judged to have performed satisfactorily, and it required about 60 percent as many iterations to reach a solution. Additionally, its input parameters are more physically-based and less dependent on model-grid spacing. A model of the Levee 31N area was developed and used with the original and modified versions of MODBRANCH, which produced similar output. The mean annual modeled ground-water heads differed by only 0.02 foot, and the mean annual canal discharge differed by less than 1.0 cubic foot per second. Seepage meters were used to quantify vertical seepage rates in the Everglades wetlands area west of Levee 31N. A comparison between results from the seepage meters and from the computer model indicated substantial differences that seemed to be a result of local variations in the hydraulic properties in the topmost part of the Biscayne aquifer. The transmissivity of the Biscayne aquifer was estimated to be 1,400,000 square feet per day in the study area. The computer model was employed to simulate seepage of ground water beneath Levee 31N

  7. Evapotranspiration (ET) at Blue Cypress marsh site, daily data, Indian River County, Florida, June 1, 1995 – October 20, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, David M.

    2017-01-01

    This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) data release consists of daily evapotranspiration (ET) measurements/estimates for the time period June 1, 1995 to October 2014. These data are derived from (1) measurements of actual ET conducted at the USGS Blue Cypress marsh station (USGS station number 274143080424100) and (2) estimates of actual ET inferred from statistical regressions between the measurements of actual ET and potential ET. The station is located at a nearly flat wetlands site (27 degrees 41 minutes 43 seconds North / 080 degrees 42 minutes 41 seconds West) within the Blue Cypress Marsh Conservation Area, Indian River County, Florida. The dominant plant cover at the study site is sawgrass (Cladium jamaicense), with secondary amounts of other wetland plant species. Sawgrass height generally varies from 1.8 to 2.4 meters. The canopy can be temporarily removed through fire, followed by rapid re-growth. The soils at the site are peats. The water-table generally is above land surface but can be greater than a meter below land surface during droughts. Actual ET measurements derived using the eddy-covariance method are available for January 1, 2000 to September 1, 2005; and December 11, 2009 to October 20, 2014. The contribution of the present Data Release is dissemination of a dataset of actual ET estimates for a period prior to the first period of actual ET measurements (June 1, 1995 to December 31, 1999) and for the time interval between the two periods of actual ET measurement (September 2, 2005 to December 10, 2009). Estimates of actual ET during periods of missing actual ET measurements were obtained using regression-determined, monthly vegetation coefficient multipliers applied to potential ET data. The source of potential ET data was an existing Statewide database developed through an assimilation of satellite- and field-based meterological data. A seamless time series of measured and estimated actual ET for the period June 1, 1999 to December 10, 2014 is

  8. Bioinjection Performance Review for the Building 100 Area and 4.5 Acre Site at the Pinellas County, Florida, Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Survochak, Scott [US Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Legacy Management; Daniel, Joe [Navarro Research and Engineering, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-05-01

    This document provides a summary of a review of the performance of bioinjection activities at the Building 100 Area and the 4.5 Acre Site at the Pinellas County, Florida, Site since 2010, determines how best to optimize future injection events, and identifies the approach for the bioinjection event in 2016 at (1) the 4.5 Acre Site and (2) the Essentra property at the Building 100 Area. Because this document describes the next bioinjection event at the 4.5 Acre Site, it also serves as an addendum to the Interim Remedial Action Plan for Emulsified Edible Oil Injection at the 4.5 Acre Site (DOE 2013). In addition, this document revises the injection layout and injection intervals for the Essentra property that were originally described in the Interim Corrective Measure Work Plan for Source and Plume Treatment at the Building 100 Area (DOE 2014), and is a de facto update of that document. Bioinjection consists of injection of emulsified vegetable oil (EVO) and the microorganism Dehalococcoides mccartyi (DHM; formerly known as Dehalococcoides ethenogenes) into the subsurface to enhance biodegradation of trichloroethene (TCE), dichloroethene (DCE), and vinyl chloride (VC). VC is the only contaminant that exceeds its maximum contaminant level (10 micrograms per liter onsite and 1 microgram per liter onsite) on the 4.5 Acre Site and the Essentra property. Bioinjection was conducted at the 4.5 Acre Site in 2010 and 2013. Approximately 49,900 gallons of EVO and DHM were injected at 95 injection points in February 2010, and approximately 22,900 gallons of EVO and DHM were injected at 46 injection points in July 2013. The injection locations are shown on Figure 1. The goal of bioinjection at the 4.5 Acre Site is to decrease contaminant concentrations to maximum contaminant levels along the west and southwest property boundaries (to meet risk–based corrective action requirements) and to minimize the extent of the contaminant plume in the interior of the site. Bioinjection was

  9. Methodology for estimating nutrient loads discharged from the east coast canals to Biscayne Bay, Miami-Dade County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietz, Arthur C.

    1999-01-01

    Biscayne Bay is an oligotrophic, subtropical estuary located along the southeastern coast of Florida that provides habitat for a variety of plant and animal life. Concern has arisen with regard to the ecological health of Biscayne Bay because of the presence of nutrient-laden discharges from the east coast canals that drain into the bay. This concern, as well as planned diversion of discharges for ecosystem restoration from the urban and agricultural corridors of Miami-Dade County to Everglades National Park, served as the impetus for a study conducted during the 1996 and 1997 water years to estimate nutrient loads discharged from the east coast canals into Biscayne Bay. Analytical results indicated that the highest concentration of any individual nutrient sampled for in the study was 4.38 mg/L (milligrams per liter) for nitrate at one site, and the lowest concentrations determined were below the detection limits for orthophosphate at six sites and nitrite at four sites. Median concentrations for all the sites were 0.75 mg/L for total organic nitrogen, 0.10 mg/L for ammonia, 0.02 mg/L for nitrite, 0.18 mg/L for nitrate, 0.20 mg/L for nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen, 0.02 mg/L for total phosphorus, and 0.005 mg/L for orthophosphate. The maximum total phosphorus concentration of 0.31 mg/L was the only nutrient concentration to exceed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (1986) water-quality criteria. High concentrations of total phosphorus usually reflect contamination as a result of human activities. Five sites exceeded the fresh-water quality standard of 0.5 mg/L for ammonia concentration as determined by the Miami-Dade County Department of Environmental Resources Management. Median total organic nitrogen concentrations were higher in urban and forested/wetland areas than in agricultural areas; median concentrations of nitrite, nitrate, and nitrite plus nitrate nitrogen were higher in agricultural areas than in urban and forested/wetland areas; and ammonia, total

  10. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, MONROE COUNTY, GEORGIA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk Information And supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk;...

  11. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, MONROE COUNTY MICHIGAN, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  12. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, MONROE COUNTY, NEW YORK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  13. BASEMAP Framework Submission for MONROE COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI AND INCORPORATED AREAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — FEMA Framework Basemap datasets comprise six of the seven FGDC themes of geospatial data that are used by most GIS applications (Note: the seventh framework theme,...

  14. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, MONROE COUNTY, OHIO, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — FEMA Framework Basemap datasets comprise six of the seven FGDC themes of geospatial data that are used by most GIS applications (Note: the seventh framework theme,...

  15. SURVEY, OSCEOLA COUNTY, FLORIDA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  16. BROWARD COUNTY, FLORIDA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydrology data include spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydrologic procedures for estimating flood discharges for a flood insurance...

  17. HYDROLOGY, GLADES COUNTY, FLORIDA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydrology data include spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydrologic procedures for estimating flood discharges for a Flood Insurance...

  18. HYDROLOGY, CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydrology data include spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydrologic procedures for estimating flood discharges for a flood insurance...

  19. The Effects of Leader-Member Exchanges on the Relationships Between Extension Agents and County Extension Directors in Florida

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matt Benge; Amy Harder

    2017-01-01

    .... Understanding the interactions between Extension agents and County Extension Directors is critical to maintaining positive relationships and providing adequate support to Extension supervisors...

  20. Michael Musto as Lindsay Lohan as Marilyn Monroe in 'The Ultimate Re-Vamping'

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Musto, Michael

    2008-01-01

    In 2008, actress Lindsay Lohan followed in the steps of her self-proclaimed idol Marilyn Monroe by doing a photo shoot with Bert Stern reminiscent of the shoot Monroe did with Stern just weeks before she died...

  1. Analysis of tests of subsurface injection, storage, and recovery of freshwater in the lower Floridan aquifer, Okeechobee County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinones-Aponte, Vicente; Kotun, Kevin; Whitley, J.F.

    1996-01-01

    A series of freshwater subsurface injection, storage, and recovery tests were conducted at an injection-well site near Lake Okeechobee in Okeechobee County, Florida, to assess the recoverability of injected canal water from the Lower Floridan aquifer. At the study site, the Lower Floridan aquifer is characterized as having four local, relatively independent, high-permeability flow zones (389 to 398 meters, 419 to 424 meters, 456 to 462 meters, and 472 to 476 meters below sea level). Four subsurface injection, storage, and recovery cycles were performed at the Lake Okeechobee injection-well site in which volumes of water injected ranged from about 387,275 to 1,343,675 cubic meters for all the cycles, and volumes of water recovered ranged from about 106,200 to 484,400 cubic meters for cycles 1, 2, and 3. The recovery efficiency for successive cycles 2 and 3 increased from 22 to 36 percent and is expected to continue increasing with additional cycles. A comparison of chloride concentration breakthrough curves at the deep monitor well (located about 171 meters from the injection well) for cycles 1, 4, and test no. 4 (from a previous study) revealed unexpected finings. One significant result was that the concentration asymptote, expected to be reached at concentration levels equivalent or close to the injected water concentration, was instead reached at higher concentration levels. The injection to recovery rate ratio might affect the chloride concentration breakthrough curve at the deep monitor well, which could explain this unexpected behavior. Because there are four high-permeability zones, if the rate of injection is smaller than the rate of recovery (natural artesian flow), the head differential might not be transmitted through the entire open wellbore, and injected water would probably flow only through the upper high- permeability zones. Therefore, observed chloride concentration values at the deep monitor well would be higher than the concentration of the

  2. 77 FR 60373 - Monroe Mountain Aspen Ecosystems Restoration Project Fishlake National Forest; Sevier and Piute...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-03

    ... Forest Service Monroe Mountain Aspen Ecosystems Restoration Project Fishlake National Forest; Sevier and... alternatives, within the Monroe Mountain Aspen Ecosystems Restoration Project area. The purpose of the Monroe Mountain Aspen Ecosystems Restoration Project is to implement land management activities that are...

  3. Migrant Programs in Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Migrant Information Clearinghouse, Austin, TX. Juarez-Lincoln Center.

    As the last of 3 directories, this lists services available to migrants in Florida. Migrant programs, Community Action Agencies, and labor camps in the state are identified by county. Information for each county includes total population, estimated migrant population, migrant labor demand, estimated migrant wages, crops, work periods, migrant…

  4. An Evaluation of the Special Educational Project for Migrant Children in Dade County Public Schools, Miami, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Special Educational Project for Migrant Children, Naranja, FL.

    Evaluated are the various features of a project for the education of migrant children in a rural section of Florida. The objectives of the program were to ascertain the special educational needs of this population and to develop programs to meet their needs; to offer necessary supplemental and remedial activities and social and educational…

  5. SUPERFUND TREATABILITY CLEARINGHOUSE: SUMMARY REPORT ON THE FIELD INVESTIGATION OF THE SAPP BATTERY SITE JACKSON COUNTY, FLORIDA

    Science.gov (United States)

    This treatability study presents the results of field investigations at the Sapp Battery site in Florida, an abandoned battery recycling operation. The site is estimated to contain 14,300 cubic yards of soils with lead levels in excess of 1,000 ppm. The soils in the immediate v...

  6. Examining the association between possessing a regular source of healthcare and adherence with cancer screenings among Haitian households in Little Haiti, Miami-Dade County, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Hauchie; Cataldi, Mariel; Allseits, Emmanuelle; Ward-Peterson, Melissa; de la Vega, Pura Rodríguez; Castro, Grettel; Acuña, Juan Manuel

    2017-08-01

    Immigrant minorities regularly experience higher incidence and mortality rates of cancer. Frequently, a variety of social determinants create obstacles for those individuals to get the screenings they need. This is especially true for Haitian immigrants, a particularly vulnerable immigrant population in South Florida, who have been identified as having low cancer screening rates. While Haitian immigrants have some of the lowest cancer screening rates in the country, there is little existing literature that addresses barriers to cancer screenings among the population of Little Haiti in Miami-Dade County, Florida. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between having a regular source of healthcare and adherence to recommended cancer screenings in the Little Haiti population of Miami.This secondary analysis utilized data collected from a random-sample, population-based household survey conducted from November 2011 to December 2012 among a geographic area approximating Little Haiti in Miami-Dade County, Florida. A total of 421 households identified as Haitian. The main exposure of interest was whether households possessed a regular source of care. Three separate outcomes were considered: adherence with colorectal cancer screening, mammogram adherence, and Pap smear adherence. Analysis was limited to households who met the age criteria for each outcome of interest. Bivariate associations were examined using the chi square test and Fisher exact test. Binary logistic regression was used to estimate unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs).After adjusting for the head of household's education and household insurance status, households without a regular source of care were significantly less likely to adhere with colorectal cancer screening (OR = 0.33; 95% CI: 0.14-0.80) or mammograms (OR = 0.28; 95% CI: 0.11-0.75). Households with insurance coverage gaps were significantly less likely to adhere with

  7. Pinellas County, Florida, Site Environmental Restoration Project Sitewide Environmental Monitoring Semiannual Progress Report for the Young - Rainey STAR Center June Through November 2016, January 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surovchak, Scott [USDOE Office of Legacy Management, Washington, DC (United States); Daniel, Joe [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The Young - Rainey STAR Center (Science, Technology, and Research Center) at the Pinellas County, Florida, Site is a former U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facility constructed in the mid-1950s. The 96-acre STAR Center is located in Largo, Florida, and lies in the northeast quarter of Section 13, Township 30 South, Range 15 East (Figure 1). While it was owned by DOE, the purpose of the site was to develop and manufacture components for the nation’s nuclear weapons program. In 1987, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) performed a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Facility Assessment (EPA 1988) at the site to gather information on potential releases of hazardous materials. In February of 1990, EPA issued a Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments permit to DOE, requiring DOE to investigate and perform remediation activities in those areas designated as solid-waste management units (SWMUs) contaminated by hazardous materials resulting from DOE operations. A total of 17 SWMUs were identified and investigated at the STAR Center. By 1997, 13 of the 17 SWMUs had been remediated or approved for no further action. More recently, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) executed Conditional Site Rehabilitation Completion Orders for the Northeast Site and the Wastewater Neutralization Area on July 27, 2016, stating that no further action is required for those SWMUs. The Building 100 Area (a combination of the Old Drum Storage Site and the Building 100-Industrial Drain Leaks SWMUs) comprises the only two active SWMUs at the STAR Center (Figure 2). This document serves as the semiannual progress report for the SWMUs by providing the results of recent monitoring activities and a summary of ongoing and projected work. The STAR Center is owned by the Pinellas County Industrial Development Authority, but DOE is responsible for remediation activities at the site. Additional background information for the site is contained in the Long-Term Surveillance

  8. Evapotranspiration (ET) data at Immokalee row crop site, Collier County, Florida, September 22, 2008 - January 8, 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swancar, Amy

    2017-01-01

    This U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) data release consists of evapotranspiration measurements made at the USGS Immokalee row crop climate station beginning September 22, 2008 and ending January 8, 2009. Daily evapotranspiration rates corrected to a near-surface energy-budget varied from 0.1 millimeter (9/28/2008) to 3.3 millimeters (9/24/2008). The eddy-covariance method was used, with high-frequency sensors installed above an experimental field planted in green peppers to measure sensible and latent heat fluxes. Ancillary meteorological data are also included in the data set: net radiation, soil temperature and moisture, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, and ground-water level. Data were collected at 30-minute resolution, with evapotranspiration corrected to the near-surface energy-budget at that timescale. The study was conducted at an experimental field on the University of Florida Southwest Florida Research and Education Center (SWFREC) in Immokalee, Florida (Latitude 26 27 40 North Longitude 81 26 24 West, in degrees minutes seconds, North American Datum 83, Section 20, Township 46S, Range 29E). The full data release associated with this site consists of: 1.  Immokalee row crop evapotranspiration, 30-minute data, from September 22, 2008 through January 8, 2009 (comma delimited text format) 2. Immokalee row crop evapotranspiration, daily data, from September 23, 2008 through January 7, 2009 (comma delimited text format) including an ancillary file: Vegetation and equipment photographs (zipped jpeg files).

  9. Potential effects of alterations to the hydrologic system on the distribution of salinity in the Biscayne aquifer in Broward County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Joseph D.; Sifuentes, Dorothy F.; White, Jeremy T.

    2016-03-15

    To address concerns about the effects of water-resource management practices and rising sea level on saltwater intrusion, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Broward County Environmental Planning and Community Resilience Division, initiated a study to examine causes of saltwater intrusion and predict the effects of future alterations to the hydrologic system on salinity distribution in eastern Broward County, Florida. A three-dimensional, variable-density solute-transport model was calibrated to conditions from 1970 to 2012, the period for which data are most complete and reliable, and was used to simulate historical conditions from 1950 to 2012. These types of models are typically difficult to calibrate by matching to observed groundwater salinities because of spatial variability in aquifer properties that are unknown, and natural and anthropogenic processes that are complex and unknown; therefore, the primary goal was to reproduce major trends and locally generalized distributions of salinity in the Biscayne aquifer. The methods used in this study are relatively new, and results will provide transferable techniques for protecting groundwater resources and maximizing groundwater availability in coastal areas. The model was used to (1) evaluate the sensitivity of the salinity distribution in groundwater to sea-level rise and groundwater pumping, and (2) simulate the potential effects of increases in pumping, variable rates of sea-level rise, movement of a salinity control structure, and use of drainage recharge wells on the future distribution of salinity in the aquifer.

  10. Outbreak of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157 infection associated with a day camp petting zoo--Pinellas County, Florida, May-June 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    On June 7, 2007, the Pinellas County Health Department in central Florida was notified by a private physician regarding a positive laboratory result for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157 (STEC O157) infection in a child aged 9 years. Initial interviews revealed the child had attended a week-long session at a day camp and had come into contact with animals in the camp's petting zoo. On June 8, an investigation was begun by the Pinellas County Health Department; the same day, the petting zoo was closed on the recommendation of the health department. This report summarizes the results of the investigation, which identified seven cases of STEC O157 infection: four laboratory-confirmed primary cases, two probable primary cases, and one laboratory-confirmed secondary case, all associated directly or indirectly with the petting zoo. Two children were hospitalized; all seven patients recovered. Petting zoo operators should adhere to guidelines for supervised handwashing and other prevention measures that will help minimize the risk in children for infection from animal contact.

  11. Londoni oksjoni staar oli Monroe teemantsõrmus / Arko Olesk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Olesk, Arko, 1981-

    2002-01-01

    5. augustil möödub 40 aastat Hollywoodi staari Marilyn Monroe siiani salapäraga ümbritsetud surmast. Seda arvesse võttes tõi Cooper Oweni oksjon taas välja temaga seotud esemed. Lisatud oksjonil kõige kallimalt müüdud esemete nimekiri

  12. Londoni oksjoni staar oli Monroe teemantsõrmus / Arko Olesk

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Olesk, Arko, 1981-

    2002-01-01

    5. augustil möödub 40 aastat Hollywoodi staari Marilyn Monroe siiani salapäraga ümbritsetud surmast. Seda arvesse võttes tõi Cooper Oweni oksjon taas välja temaga seotud esemed. Lisatud oksjonil kõige kallimalt müüdud esemete nimekiri

  13. 76 FR 68625 - Establishment of the Fort Monroe National Monument

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ...'' by Captain John Smith in 1607 when the first English colonists came to America. It was here that the... generations escaping enslavement. During the Civil War, Fort Monroe stood as a foremost Union outpost in the... freedom for thousands of enslaved people during the Civil War and served as a forerunner of...

  14. 78 FR 74227 - CSX Transportation, Inc.-Abandonment Exemption-in Alachua County, Fla. and Florida Northern...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-10

    ... Line traverses United States Postal Service Zip Codes 32643 and 32669. \\1\\ The FNOR Line is a portion... CSXT to abandon approximately 11.62 miles of rail line on CSXT's Southern Region, Jacksonville Division... County, Fla. (the Line); and (2) FNOR to discontinue service over approximately 9.81 miles of...

  15. Geology and structure of the Pine River, Florida River, Carbon Junction, and Basin Creek gas seeps, La Plata County, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassett, James E.; Condon, Steven M.; Huffman, A. Curtis; Taylor, David J.

    1997-01-01

    Introduction: This study was commissioned by a consortium consisting of the Bureau of Land Management, Durango Office; the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission; La Plata County; and all of the major gas-producing companies operating in La Plata County, Colorado. The gas-seep study project consisted of four parts; 1) detailed surface mapping of Fruitland Formation coal outcrops in the above listed seep areas, 2) detailed measurement of joint and fracture patterns in the seep areas, 3) detailed coal-bed correlation of Fruitland coals in the subsurface adjacent to the seep areas, and 4) studies of deep-seated seismic patterns in those seep areas where seismic data was available. This report is divided into three chapters labeled 1, 2, and 3. Chapter 1 contains the results of the subsurface coal-bed correla-tion study, chapter 2 contains the results of the surface geologic mapping and joint measurement study, and chapter 3, contains the results of the deep-seismic study. A preliminary draft of this report was submitted to the La Plata County Group in September 1996. All of the members of the La Plata Group were given an opportunity to critically review the draft report and their comments were the basis for revising the first draft to create this final version of a geologic report on the major La Plata County gas seeps located north of the Southern Ute Indian Reservation.

  16. 75 FR 59695 - Foreign-Trade Zone 169-Manatee County, Florida; Extension of Subzone; Aso LLC (Adhesive Bandage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... (Adhesive Bandage Manufacturing); Sarasota County, FL An application has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade... strips per year) was approved by the Board in 2000 for the manufacture of adhesive bandages under FTZ... has at times instead used various duty suspension provisions on adhesive tape. Aso is now...

  17. 76 FR 69761 - National Register of Historic Places; Notification of Pending Nominations and Related Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ..., 11000859 FLORIDA Monroe County Alligator Reef Light, (Light Stations of the United States MPS) Offshore 3.5... Columbus Dr., Yazoo Lake, Garfield, Monroe, & Gen. Lee Sts. & Wright, Lafayette, & McKinley...

  18. SEAWAT model used to evaluate the potential effects of alterations to the hydrologic system on the distribution of salinity in the Biscayne aquifer in Broward County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Joseph D.; Sifuentes, Dorothy F.; White, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    A three-dimensional, variable-density solute-transport model (SEAWAT) was developed to examine causes of saltwater intrusion and predict the effects of future alterations to the hydrologic system on salinity distribution in eastern Broward County, Florida. The model was calibrated to conditions from 1970 to 2012, the period for which data are most complete and reliable, and was used to simulate historical conditions from 1950 to 2012. The model was used to (1) evaluate the sensitivity of the salinity distribution in groundwater to sea-level rise and groundwater pumping , and (2) simulate the potential effects of increases in pumping, variable rates of sea-level rise, movement of a salinity control structure, and use of drainage recharge wells on the future distribution of salinity in the aquifer. This USGS data release contains all of the input and output files for the simulations described in the associated model documentation report (http://dx.doi.org/10.3133/sir20165022). This data release also includes (1) preprocessing python scripts and associated input data files for creating the sensitivity and scenarios runs, (2) flopy source code, and (3) SEAWAT (v4) source code. This groundwater model was created to examine causes of saltwater intrusion and predict the effects of future alterations to the hydrologic system on salinity distribution in eastern Broward County, Florida. The development of the model input and output files included in this data release are documented in U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2016-5022 (http://dx.doi.org/10.3133/sir20165022). The models, along with pre- and post-processing tools, will run successfully only if the original directory structure is correctly restored. The model archive is broken into several pieces to reduce the likelihood of download timeouts. Instructions for reconstructing the original directory structure and running the models included in this data release and described in the model

  19. Solar energy system economic evaluation: final report for SEMCO-Loxahatchee, Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, Palm Beach County, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-07-01

    The economic analysis of the solar energy system that was installed at Loxahatchee, Florida Operational Test Site (OTS) is developed for Loxahatchee and four other sites typical of a wide range of environmental and economic conditions in the continental United States. This analysis is accomplished based on the technical and economic models in the f-Chart design procedure with inputs based on the characteristics of the installed system and local conditions. The results are expressed in terms of the economic parameters of present worth of system costs over a projected twenty year life, life cycle savings, year of positive savings and year of payback for the optimized solar energy system at each of the analysis sites. The sensitivity of the economic evaluation to uncertainties in constituent system and economic variables is also investigated. The results demonstrate that the solar energy system is economically viable at all of the five sites for which the analysis was conducted.

  20. Backtalk: Adult Services in Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giblon, Della L.

    1979-01-01

    Initiates a new state emphasis for the column by highlighting recent public library programs and services for adults in Florida. Music, photography, and women's programs offered by the Leon County Public Library are described in more detail. (JD)

  1. Endoscopic excision of intraventricular neurocysticercosis blocking foramen of Monro bilaterally

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Harshil Chimanlal; Jain, Kapil; Shah, Jaimin Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a parasitic infestation of the central nervous system. NCC parasitic infestation can be misdiagnosed as hydatid cyst or intraventricular epidermoid cyst that can cause a diagnostic dilemma. A 23-year-old male patient presented with headache and vomiting for 3–4 days and giddiness for 4–5 days. Magnetic resonance imaging with contrast was suggestive of a rim-enhancing lesion at the level of the foramen of Monro. Endoscopic excision of the lesion was done, and the patient had relief of a headache and vomiting immediately after the procedure. He is being followed up regularly. Intraventricular NCC occluding both foramen of Monro is a rare entity. Complete endoscopic surgical excision followed by appropriate drug therapy should be given to achieve a cure. PMID:27057236

  2. Influence of potential sea level rise on societal vulnerability to hurricane storm-surge hazards, Sarasota County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Tim G.; Wood, Nathan; Yarnal, Brent; Bauer, Denise H.

    2010-01-01

    Although the potential for hurricanes under current climatic conditions continue to threaten coastal communities, there is concern that climate change, specifically potential increases in sea level, could influence the impacts of future hurricanes. To examine the potential effect of sea level rise on community vulnerability to future hurricanes, we assess variations in socioeconomic exposure in Sarasota County, FL, to contemporary hurricane storm-surge hazards and to storm-surge hazards enhanced by sea level rise scenarios. Analysis indicates that significant portions of the population, economic activity, and critical facilities are in contemporary and future hurricane storm-surge hazard zones. The addition of sea level rise to contemporary storm-surge hazard zones effectively causes population and asset (infrastructure, natural resources, etc) exposure to be equal to or greater than what is in the hazard zone of the next higher contemporary Saffir–Simpson hurricane category. There is variability among communities for this increased exposure, with greater increases in socioeconomic exposure due to the addition of sea level rise to storm-surge hazard zones as one progresses south along the shoreline. Analysis of the 2050 comprehensive land use plan suggests efforts to manage future growth in residential, economic and infrastructure development in Sarasota County may increase societal exposure to hurricane storm-surge hazards.

  3. The effects of implementing a feral cat spay/neuter program in a Florida county animal control service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kathy L; Slater, Margaret R; Haller, Linda

    2002-01-01

    In 1995, a county animal control service implemented a feral cat sterilization program with the goal of reducing the number of healthy cats euthanized, complaints, and the county's costs. The service collected data from a 6-year period both before and after the program's implementation. The service totaled the numbers of both cat and dog impoundments, surgeries, adoptions, euthanasias, and complaints for each year; standardized both sets of numbers on a per- 10,000-person basis to compare trends between dogs and cats; and calculated estimated costs for neutering versus impounding and euthanizing the feral cats. Changing from a policy of euthanasia of feral cats to support for trap-neuter-return did not result in an increase in the number of complaints or cat impoundments. The percentage of impounded cats euthanized decreased between the periods before and after the program began, and the percentage adopted increased. The ratio of complaints to impounds decreased between the 2 periods, and the ratio of surgeries to impounds increased. Impoundments of cats were relatively steady in spite of the continually increasing human population. Euthanasias decreased for both cats and dogs since 1997. Since 1996, complaints decreased for both. Surgeries for both cats and dogs increased over the 12 years. Adoptions for cats and dogs increased greatly in fiscal year 1998/1999.

  4. Integrated mined-area reclamation and land use planning. Volume 3B. A case study of surface mining and reclamation planning: international minerals and chemical corporation, phosphate operations, Polk County, Florida. [Land reclamation and use planning for phosphate operations in Polk County, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaFevers, J R; Brown, L A; Fountain, R C

    1977-02-01

    The reports in this series are designed primarily to familiarize professional land use and resource planners with the range of possibilities and effective procedures for achieving integrated mining, reclamation, and land use planning. These reports are based on a research program which included an extensive literature review, the compilation and analysis of case study data, and close coordination and interaction with related government programs. In Volume 3, A Guide to Mined Area Reclamation Technology for Reclamation and Land Use Planners, the method used to reclaim land in each of several mineral industries are discussed in relation to the physical and cultural constraints that must be considered in planning a reclamation program. Much of the information for this document was obtained from case studies conducted in several mining districts. Volume 3B presents data from a case study of surface mining and reclamation planning, International Minerals and Chemical Corporation, Phosphate Operations, Polk County, Florida.

  5. Map of the approximate inland extent of saltwater at the base of the Biscayne aquifer in the Model Land Area of Miami-Dade County, Florida, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinos, Scott T.

    2017-07-11

    The inland extent of saltwater at the base of the Biscayne aquifer in the Model Land Area of Miami-Dade County, Florida, was mapped in 2011. Since that time, the saltwater interface has continued to move inland. The interface is near several active well fields; therefore, an updated approximation of the inland extent of saltwater and an improved understanding of the rate of movement of the saltwater interface are necessary. A geographic information system was used to create a map using the data collected by the organizations that monitor water salinity in this area. An average rate of saltwater interface movement of 140 meters per year was estimated by dividing the distance between two monitoring wells (TPGW-7L and Sec34-MW-02-FS) by the travel time. The travel time was determined by estimating the dates of arrival of the saltwater interface at the wells and computing the difference. This estimate assumes that the interface is traveling east to west between the two monitoring wells. Although monitoring is spatially limited in this area and some of the wells are not ideally designed for salinity monitoring, the monitoring network in this area is improving in spatial distribution and most of the new wells are well designed for salinity monitoring. The approximation of the inland extent of the saltwater interface and the estimated rate of movement of the interface are dependent on existing data. Improved estimates could be obtained by installing uniformly designed monitoring wells in systematic transects extending landward of the advancing saltwater interface.

  6. Inventory of drainage wells and potential sources of contaminants to drainage-well inflow in Southwest Orlando, Orange County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, George Fred

    1993-01-01

    Potential sources of contaminants that could pose a threat to drainage-well inflow and to water in the Floridan aquifer system in southwest Orlando, Florida, were studied between October and December 1990. Drainage wells and public-supply wells were inventoried in a 14-square-mile area, and available data on land use and activities within each drainage well basin were tabulated. Three public-supply wells (tapping the Lower Floridan aquifer) and 38 drainage wells (open to the Upper Floridan aquifer) were located in 17 drainage basins within the study area. The primary sources of drainage-well inflow are lake overflow, street runoff, seepage from the surficial aquifer system, and process-wastewater disposal. Drainage-well inflow from a variety of ares, including resi- dential, commercial, undeveloped, paved, and industrial areas, are potential sources of con- taminants. The four general types of possible contaminants to drainage-well inflow are inorganic chemicals, organic compounds, turbidity, and microbiological contaminants. Potential contami- nant sources include plant nurseries, citrus groves, parking lots, plating companies, auto- motive repair shops, and most commonly, lake- overflow water. Drainage wells provide a pathway for contaminants to enter the Upper Floridan aquifer and there is a potential for contaminants to move downward from the Upper Floridan to the Lower Floridan aquifer.

  7. Water-quality data from a landfill-leachate treatment and disposal site, Pinellas County, Florida, January 1979-August 1980

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, G.L.; Fernandez, Mario

    1981-01-01

    Water-quality data collected between January 1979 and August 1980 at the landfill leachate treatment site in Pinellas County, Fla., are presented. Data include field and laboratory measurements of physical properties, major chemical constituents , nitrogen and phosphorus species, chemical oxygen demand, trace metals, coliform bacteria, taxonomy of macroinvertebrates and phytoplankton, and chlorophyll analyses. Data were collected as part of a study to determine water-quality changes resulting from aeration and ponding of leachate pumped from landfill burial trenches and for use in determining the rate of movement and quality changes as the leachate migrates through the surficial aquifer. Samples were collected from 81 surficial-aquifer water-quality monitoring wells constructed in January 1975, February 1979, and March 1979, and 8 surface-water quality monitoring sites established in January 1975, February 1978, and November 1978. (USGS)

  8. Ground-water quality near the northwest 58th Street solid-waste disposal facility, Dade County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattraw, H.C.; Hull, John E.; Klein, Howard

    1978-01-01

    The Northwest 58th Street solid-waste disposal facility, 3 miles west of a major Dade County municipal water-supply well field, overlays the Biscayne aquifer, a permeable, solution-riddled limestone which transmits leachates eastward at a calculated rate of 2.9 feet per day. A discrete, identifiable leachate plume has been recognized under and downgradient from the waste disposal facility. Concentrations of sodium, ammonia, and dissolved solids decreased with depth beneath the disposal area and downgradient in response to an advective and convective dispersion. At a distance of about one-half downgradient, the rate of contribution of leachate from the source to the leading edge of the plume was about equal to the rate of loss of leachate from the leading edge of the plume by diffusion and dilution by rainfall infiltration during the period August 1973 - July 1975. Heavy metals and pesticides are filtered, adsorbed by aquifer materials, or are precipitated near the disposal area. (Woodard-USGS)

  9. Major-ion and selected trace-metal chemistry of the Biscayne Aquifer, Southeast Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radell, M.J.; Katz, B.G.

    1991-01-01

    The major-ion and selected trace-metal chemistry of the Biscayne aquifer was characterized as part of the Florida Ground-Water Quality Monitoring Network Program, a multiagency cooperative effort concerned with delineating baseline water quality for major aquifer systems in the State. The Biscayne aquifer is unconfined and serves as the sole source of drinking water for more than 3 million people in southeast Florida. The Biscayne aquifer consists of highly permeable interbedded limestone and sandstone of Pleistocene and Pliocene age underlying most of Dade and Broward Counties and parts of Palm Beach and Monroe Counties. The high permeability is largely caused by extensive carbonate dissolution. Water sampled from 189 wells tapping the Biscayne aquifer was predominantly a calcium bicarbonate type with some mixed types occurring in coastal areas and near major canals. Major - ion is areally uniform throughout the aquifer. According to nonparametric statistical tests of major ions and dissolved solids, the concentrations of calcium, sodium, bicarbonate, and dissolved solids increased significantly with well depth ( 0.05 significance level ), probably a result of less circulation at depth. Potassium and nitrate concentrations decreased significantly with depth. Although the source of recharge to the aquifer varies seasonally, there was no statistical difference in the concentration of major ions in pared water samples from 27 shallow wells collected during wet and dry seasons. Median concentrations for barium, chromium, copper, lead, and manganese were below maximum or secondary maximum contaminant levels set by the US Environmental Protection Agency. The median iron concentration only slightly exceeded the secondary maximum contaminant level. The concentration of barium was significantly related (0.05 significance level) to calcium and bicarbonate concentration. No distinct areal pattern or vertical distribution of the selected trace metals was evident in water from

  10. Geochemical and isotopic composition of ground water with emphasis on sources of sulfate in the upper Floridan Aquifer in parts of Marion, Sumter, and Citrus counties, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Laura A.

    1996-01-01

    In inland areas of northwest central Florida, sulfate concentrations in the Upper Floridan aquifer are extremely variable and sometimes exceed drinking water standards (250 milligrams per liter). This is unusual because the aquifer is unconfined and near the surface, allowing for active recharge. The sources of sulfate and geochemical processes controlling ground-water composition were evaluated in this area. Water was sampled from thirty-three wells in parts of Marion, Sumter, and Citrus Counties, within the Southwest Florida Water Management District; these included at least a shallow and a deep well at fifteen separate locations. Ground water was analyzed for major ions, selected trace constituents, dissolved organic carbon, and stable isotopes (sulfur-34 of sulfate and sulfide, carbon-13 of inorganic carbon, deuterium, and oxygen-18). Sulfate concentrations ranged from less than 0.2 to 1,400 milligrams per liter, with higher sulfate concentrations usually in water from deeper wells. The samples can be categorized into a low sulfate group (less than 30 milligrams per liter) and a high sulfate group (greater than 30 milligrams per liter). For the high sulfate water, concentrations of calcium and magnesium increased concurrently with sulfate. Chemical and isotopic data and mass-balance modeling indicate that the composition of high sulfate waters is controlled by dedolomitization reactions (dolomite dissolution and calcite precipitation, driven by dissolution of gypsum). Gypsum occurs deeper in the aquifer than open intervals of sampled wells. Upward flow has been documented in deeper parts of the aquifer in the study area, which may be driven by localized discharge areas or rapid flow in shallow parts of the aquifer. Mixing between shallow ground water and sulfate-rich water that dissolved gypsum at the base of the aquifer is probably responsible for the range of concentrations observed in the study area. Other solutes that increased with sulfate apparently

  11. Hydrogeology, water quality, and potential for contamination of the Upper Floridan aquifer in the Silver Springs ground-water basin, central Marion County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, G.G.

    1994-01-01

    The Upper Floridan aquifer, composed of a thick sequence of very porous limestone and dolomite, is the principal source of water supply in the Silver Springs ground-water basin of central Marion County, Florida. The karstic nature of the local geology makes the aquifer susceptible to contaminants from the land surface. Contaminants can enter the aquifer by seepage through surficial deposits and through sinkholes and drainage wells. Potential contaminants include agricultural chemicals, landfill leachates and petroleum products from leaking storage tanks and accidental spills. More than 560 sites of potential contamination sources were identified in the basin in 1990. Detailed investigation of four sites were used to define hydrologic conditions at representative sites. Ground-water flow velocities determined from dye trace studies ranged from about 1 foot per hour under natural flow conditions to about 10 feet per hour under pumping conditions, which is considerably higher than velocities estimated using Darcy's equation for steady-state flow in a porous medium. Water entering the aquifer through drainage wells contained bacteria, elevated concentrations of nutrients, manganese and zinc, and in places, low concentrations of organic compounds. On the basis of results from the sampling of 34 wells in 1989 and 1990, and from the sampling of water entering the Upper Floridan aquifer through drainage wells, there has been no widespread degradation of water quality in the study area. In an area of karst, particularly one in which fracture flow is significant, evaluating the effects from contaminants is difficult and special care is required when interpolating hydrogeologic data from regional studies to a specific. (USGS)

  12. TIGER/Line Shapefile, 2013, county, Monroe County, MO, Current Address Ranges Relationship File

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Census Bureau, Department of Commerce — The TIGER/Line shapefiles and related database files (.dbf) are an extract of selected geographic and cartographic information from the U.S. Census Bureau's Master...

  13. Suicidal traits in Marilyn Monroe's Fragments: an LIWC analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Cabana, M; García-Caballero, A; Alves-Pérez, M T; García-García, M J; Mateos, R

    2013-01-01

    Linguistic inquiry and word count (LIWC), a computerized method for text analysis, is often used to examine suicide writings in order to characterize the quantitative linguistic features of suicidal texts. To analyze texts compiled in Marilyn Monroe's Fragments using LIWC, in order to explore the use of different linguistic categories in her narrative over the years. Selected texts were grouped into four periods of similar word count and processed with LIWC. Spearman's rank correlation was used to assess changes in language use across the documents over time. The Kruskal-Wallis test was applied to compare means between periods and for each of the 80 LIWC output scores. Significant differences (p Monroe approached the time of her death. The consistently elevated usage of first-person personal singular pronouns and the consistently diminished usage of first-person personal plural pronouns are in line with previous studies linking this pattern with a low level of social integration, which has been related to suicide according to different theories.

  14. Genome sequence analysis of dengue virus 1 isolated in Key West, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dongyoung; Richards, Stephanie L; Alto, Barry W; Bettinardi, David J; Smartt, Chelsea T

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is transmitted to humans through the bite of mosquitoes. In November 2010, a dengue outbreak was reported in Monroe County in southern Florida (FL), including greater than 20 confirmed human cases. The virus collected from the human cases was verified as DENV serotype 1 (DENV-1) and one isolate was provided for sequence analysis. RNA was extracted from the DENV-1 isolate and was used in reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to amplify PCR fragments to sequence. Nucleic acid primers were designed to generate overlapping PCR fragments that covered the entire genome. The DENV-1 isolate found in Key West (KW), FL was sequenced for whole genome characterization. Sequence assembly, Genbank searches, and recombination analyses were performed to verify the identity of the genome sequences and to determine percent similarity to known DENV-1 sequences. We show that the KW DENV-1 strain is 99% identical to Nicaraguan and Mexican DENV-1 strains. Phylogenetic and recombination analyses suggest that the DENV-1 isolated in KW originated from Nicaragua (NI) and the KW strain may circulate in KW. Also, recombination analysis results detected recombination events in the KW strain compared to DENV-1 strains from Puerto Rico. We evaluate the relative growth of KW strain of DENV-1 compared to other dengue viruses to determine whether the underlying genetics of the strain is associated with a replicative advantage, an important consideration since local transmission of DENV may result because domestic tourism can spread DENVs.

  15. Genome sequence analysis of dengue virus 1 isolated in Key West, Florida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongyoung Shin

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is transmitted to humans through the bite of mosquitoes. In November 2010, a dengue outbreak was reported in Monroe County in southern Florida (FL, including greater than 20 confirmed human cases. The virus collected from the human cases was verified as DENV serotype 1 (DENV-1 and one isolate was provided for sequence analysis. RNA was extracted from the DENV-1 isolate and was used in reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR to amplify PCR fragments to sequence. Nucleic acid primers were designed to generate overlapping PCR fragments that covered the entire genome. The DENV-1 isolate found in Key West (KW, FL was sequenced for whole genome characterization. Sequence assembly, Genbank searches, and recombination analyses were performed to verify the identity of the genome sequences and to determine percent similarity to known DENV-1 sequences. We show that the KW DENV-1 strain is 99% identical to Nicaraguan and Mexican DENV-1 strains. Phylogenetic and recombination analyses suggest that the DENV-1 isolated in KW originated from Nicaragua (NI and the KW strain may circulate in KW. Also, recombination analysis results detected recombination events in the KW strain compared to DENV-1 strains from Puerto Rico. We evaluate the relative growth of KW strain of DENV-1 compared to other dengue viruses to determine whether the underlying genetics of the strain is associated with a replicative advantage, an important consideration since local transmission of DENV may result because domestic tourism can spread DENVs.

  16. Effects of two stormwater management methods on the quality of water in the upper Biscayne aquifer at two commercial areas in Dade County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, D.J.; Irwin, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    This study is part of a continued effort to assess the effects of urban stormwater recharge on the water quality of the Biscayne aquifer in southeast Florida. In this report, the water-quality effects on shallow ground water resulting from stormwater disposal by exfiltration trench and grassy swale were investigated at two small commercial areas in Dade County, Florida. One study area (airport ) was located near the Miami International Airport and had a drainage area of about 10 acres overlying a sandy soil; the other study area ( free zone ) was located at the Miami International Free Trade Zone and had a drainage area of about 20 acres overlying limestone. The monitoring design for each study area consisted of seven sites and included water-quality sampling of the stormwater in the catch basin of the exfiltration trench, ground water from two wells 1 foot from the trench (trench wells), two wells 20 feet from the trench, and ground water from two wells at the swale from April 1985 through May 1986. Eleven water-quality variables (target variables) commonly found in high levels in urban stormwater runoff were used as tracers to estimate possible changes in ground-water quality that may have been caused by stormwater recharge. Comparison of the distribution of target variables indicated that the concentrations tended to be greater in the stormwater in the exfiltration trench than in water from the two wells 1 foot from the trench at both study areas. The concentration difference for several target variables was statistically significant at the 5-percent level. Lead, for example, had median concentrations of 23 and 4 micrograms per liter, respectively, in stormwater and water from the two trench wells at the airport study area, and 38 and 2 micrograms per liter, respectively, in stormwater and groundwater at the free zone. Similar reductions in concentrations between stormwater and water from the two trench wells were indicated for zinc at both study areas and also

  17. FLOODPLAIN, SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  18. BASEMAP, COLLIER COUNTY, FLORIDA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — FEMA Framework Basemap datasets comprise six of the seven FGDC themes of geospatial data that are used by most GIS applications (Note: the seventh framework theme,...

  19. TERRAIN, SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. HYDROLOGY, ST LUCIE COUNTY, FLORIDA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydrology data include spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydrologic procedures for estimating flood discharges for a flood insurance...

  1. HYDRAULICS, MANATEE COUNTY, FLORIDA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  2. FLOODPLAIN MAPPING, POLK COUNTY, FLORIDA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  3. BASEMAP, LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — FEMA Framework Basemap datasets comprise six of the seven FGDC themes of geospatial data that are used by most GIS applications (Note: the seventh framework theme,...

  4. FLOODPLAIN, COLLIER COUNTY, FLORIDA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  5. Relations between well-field pumping and induced canal leakage in east-central Miami-Dade County, Florida, 2010-2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Katherine; Antolino, Dominick J.; Turtora, Michael; Adam Foster,

    2015-08-26

    An extensive canal and water management system exists in south Florida to prevent flooding, replenish groundwater, and impede saltwater intrusion. The unconfined Biscayne aquifer, which underlies southeast Florida and provides water for millions of residents, interacts with the canal system. The Biscayne aquifer is composed of a highly transmissive karst limestone; therefore, canal stage and flow may be affected by production well pumping, especially in locations where production wells and canals are in proximity.

  6. Geophysical study of the Monroe-Red Hill geothermal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mase, C.W.; Chapman, D.S.; Ward, S.H.

    1978-10-01

    A detailed geophysical study consisting of heat flow, dipole-dipole resistivity, ground magnetics and gravity was conducted in the vicinity of Monroe, Utah to assess the resource potential of an identified hydrothermal system. The detailed study covered a 40 km/sup 2/ area along the Sevier fault near the Monroe-Red Hill hot springs. Fourteen 100m dipole-dipole resistivity profiles across the system were used to construct a first separation apparent resistivity contour map. The map effectively outlines the trace of the Sevier fault and reveals an elongate zone of low resistivity (< 10 ..cap omega..-m) associated with the hydrothermal system. Similar features are evident on the total magnetic intensity anomaly map. Gravity modeling across the system indicates that the Sevier fault is comprised of three or more nearly vertical en echelon faults. On the basis of geological mapping and surface geophysical surveys a series of eleven shallow boreholes (40 to 90m was drilled on two profiles across the system. Surface geothermal gradients vary from 240/sup 0/C km/sup -1/ to over 1000/sup 0/C km/sup -1/ along the profiles. Heat flow values vary smoothly from 550 mW m/sup -2/ to over 3000 mW m/sup -2/, a significant enhancement over background Basin and Range heat flow of 80 mW m/sup -2/. Heat budget calculations based on conductive heat loss and enthalpy of the discharge waters indicae a net power loss of 7.8 MW.

  7. Neuroendoscopic treatment of idiopathic occlusion of unilateral foramen of Monro presenting as chronic headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhaval Shukla

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Asymmetric ventriculomegly due to idiopathic occlusion of the foramen of Monro is rare. Such patients present with clinical features of raised intracranial pressure (ICP. Presentation as chronic headache has not been previously described. In the absence of raised ICP, pursuing surgical treatment raises a clinical dilemma as the headache may be a primary headache with no improvement after surgery. A 21-year-old woman presented with chronic headache. She was found to have asymmetric ventriculomegaly due to the occlusion of the foramen of Monro. She underwent endoscopic septostomy and widening of the foramen of Monro. Her headache subsided after surgery. At 15 months of follow-up, she was free from headache without medications. Unilateral occlusion of the foramen of Monro can present with asymmetric ventriculomegaly resulting in chronic headache. Though the symptoms of raised ICP may not be present, still endoscopic relief of ventriculomegaly leads to cure of headache.

  8. Tools and data acquisition of borehole geophysical logging for the Florida Power and Light Company Turkey Point Power Plant in support of a groundwater, surface-water, and ecological monitoring plan, Miami-Dade County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wacker, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Borehole geophysical logs were obtained from selected exploratory coreholes in the vicinity of the Florida Power and Light Company Turkey Point Power Plant. The geophysical logging tools used and logging sequences performed during this project are summarized herein to include borehole logging methods, descriptions of the properties measured, types of data obtained, and calibration information.

  9. Building America Case Study: Supplemental Ductless Mini-Split Heat Pump in the Hot-Humid Climate, Brevard and Volusia Counties, Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-02-01

    "The BAPIRC team and Florida Power and Light (FPL) electric utility pursued a pilot phased energy-efficiency retrofit program in Florida by creating detailed data on the energy and economic performance of two levels of retrofit - simple and deep. For this Phased Deep Retrofit (PDR) project, a total of 56 homes spread across the utility partner's territory in east central Florida, southeast Florida, and southwest Florida were instrumented between August 2012 and January 2013, and received simple pass-through retrofit measures during the period of March 2013 - June 2013. Ten of these homes received a deeper package of retrofits during August 2013 - December 2013. A full account of Phase I of this project, including detailed home details and characterization, is found in Parker et al, 2015 (currently in draft). Phase II of this project, which is the focus of this report, applied the following additional retrofit measures to select homes that received a shallow retrofit in Phase I: supplemental mini-split heat pump (MSHP) (6 homes), ducted and space coupled heat pump water heater (8 homes), exterior insulation finish system (EIFS) (1 homes), window retrofit (3 homes), smart thermostat (21 homes: 19 NESTs; 2 Lyrics), heat pump clothes dryer (8 homes), and variable speed pool pump (5 homes).

  10. Origins and delineation of saltwater intrusion in the Biscayne aquifer and changes in the distribution of saltwater in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinos, Scott T.; Wacker, Michael A.; Cunningham, Kevin J.; Fitterman, David V.

    2014-01-01

    Intrusion of saltwater into parts of the shallow karst Biscayne aquifer is a major concern for the 2.5 million residents of Miami-Dade County that rely on this aquifer as their primary drinking water supply. Saltwater intrusion of this aquifer began when the Everglades were drained to provide dry land for urban development and agriculture. The reduction in water levels caused by this drainage, combined with periodic droughts, allowed saltwater to flow inland along the base of the aquifer and to seep directly into the aquifer from the canals. The approximate inland extent of saltwater was last mapped in 1995. An examination of the inland extent of saltwater and the sources of saltwater in the aquifer was completed during 2008–2011 by using (1) all available salinity information, (2) time-series electromagnetic induction log datasets from 35 wells, (3) time-domain electromagnetic soundings collected at 79 locations, (4) a helicopter electromagnetic survey done during 2001 that was processed, calibrated, and published during the study, (5) cores and geophysical logs collected from 8 sites for stratigraphic analysis, (6) 8 new water-quality monitoring wells, and (7) analyses of 69 geochemical samples. The results of the study indicate that as of 2011 approximately 1,200 square kilometers (km2) of the mainland part of the Biscayne aquifer were intruded by saltwater. The saltwater front was mapped farther inland than it was in 1995 in eight areas totaling about 24.1 km2. In many of these areas, analyses indicated that saltwater had encroached along the base of the aquifer. The saltwater front was mapped closer to the coast than it was in 1995 in four areas totaling approximately 6.2 km2. The changes in the mapped extent of saltwater resulted from improved spatial information, actual movement of the saltwater front, or a combination of both. Salinity monitoring in some of the canals in Miami-Dade County between 1988 and 2010 indicated influxes of saltwater, with maximum

  11. On the Season, a Report of a Public Health Project Conducted Among Negro Migrant Agricultural Workers in Palm Beach County, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Robert H.; Northcutt, Travis J., Jr.

    A 5-year project to develop public health services for migrant workers was initiated in Florida in 1956. The project staff consisted of 8 public health personnel: 2 public health nurses, a public health educator, a public health nutritionist, a medical social worker, a part-time sanitarian, a liaison worker, and a secretary. Two practicing…

  12. Relations between precipitation, groundwater withdrawals, and changes in hydrologic conditions at selected monitoring sites in Volusia County, Florida, 1995--2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Louis C.

    2012-01-01

    A study to examine the influences of climatic and anthropogenic stressors on groundwater levels, lake stages, and surface-water discharge at selected sites in northern Volusia County, Florida, was conducted in 2009 by the U.S. Geological Survey. Water-level data collected at 20 monitoring sites (17 groundwater and 3 lake sites) in the vicinity of a wetland area were analyzed with multiple linear regression to examine the relative influences of precipitation and groundwater withdrawals on changes in groundwater levels and lake stage. Analyses were conducted across varying periods of record between 1995 and 2010 and included the effects of groundwater withdrawals aggregated from municipal water-supply wells located within 12 miles of the project sites. Surface-water discharge data at the U.S. Geological Survey Tiger Bay canal site were analyzed for changes in flow between 1978 and 2001. As expected, water-level changes in monitoring wells located closer to areas of concentrated groundwater withdrawals were more highly correlated with withdrawals than were water-level changes measured in wells further removed from municipal well fields. Similarly, water-level changes in wells tapping the Upper Floridan aquifer, the source of municipal supply, were more highly correlated with groundwater withdrawals than were water-level changes in wells tapping the shallower surficial aquifer system. Water-level changes predicted by the regression models over precipitation-averaged periods of record were underestimated for observations having large positive monthly changes (generally greater than 1.0 foot). Such observations are associated with high precipitation and were identified as points in the regression analyses that produced large standardized residuals and/or observations of high influence. Thus, regression models produced by multiple linear regression analyses may have better predictive capability in wetland environments when applied to periods of average or below average

  13. 75 FR 60495 - Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at Monroe Regional Airport...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-30

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice of Intent To Rule on Request To Release Airport Property at Monroe Regional Airport, Monroe, LA AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) DOT. ACTION: Request for Public... Regional Airport under the provisions of Title 49, U.S.C. Section 47153(c). DATES: Comments must...

  14. A Robbins-Monro procedure for estimation in semiparametric regression models

    CERN Document Server

    Bercu, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the parametric estimation of a shift together with the nonparametric estimation of a regression function in a semiparametric regression model. We implement a Robbins-Monro procedure very efficient and easy to handle. On the one hand, we propose a stochastic algorithm similar to that of Robbins-Monro in order to estimate the shift parameter. A preliminary evaluation of the regression function is not necessary for estimating the shift parameter. On the other hand, we make use of a recursive Nadaraya-Watson estimator for the estimation of the regression function. This kernel estimator takes in account the previous estimation of the shift parameter. We establish the almost sure convergence for both Robbins-Monro and Nadaraya-Watson estimators. The asymptotic normality of our estimates is also provided.

  15. Statistical analysis and mapping of water levels in the Biscayne aquifer, water conservation areas, and Everglades National Park, Miami-Dade County, Florida, 2000–2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinos, Scott T.; Dixon, Joann F.

    2016-02-25

    Statistical analyses and maps representing mean, high, and low water-level conditions in the surface water and groundwater of Miami-Dade County were made by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Miami-Dade County Department of Regulatory and Economic Resources, to help inform decisions necessary for urban planning and development. Sixteen maps were created that show contours of (1) the mean of daily water levels at each site during October and May for the 2000–2009 water years; (2) the 25th, 50th, and 75th percentiles of the daily water levels at each site during October and May and for all months during 2000–2009; and (3) the differences between mean October and May water levels, as well as the differences in the percentiles of water levels for all months, between 1990–1999 and 2000–2009. The 80th, 90th, and 96th percentiles of the annual maximums of daily groundwater levels during 1974–2009 (a 35-year period) were computed to provide an indication of unusually high groundwater-level conditions. These maps and statistics provide a generalized understanding of the variations of water levels in the aquifer, rather than a survey of concurrent water levels. Water-level measurements from 473 sites in Miami-Dade County and surrounding counties were analyzed to generate statistical analyses. The monitored water levels included surface-water levels in canals and wetland areas and groundwater levels in the Biscayne aquifer.

  16. Scleria lacustris (Cyperaceae), an aquatic and wetland sedge introduced to Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacono, C.C.

    2001-01-01

    A non-native species of Scleria, S. lacustris is reported from six counties and three major hydrologic regions in Florida. Biogeography and habitat in Florida are addressed. A description, key features and illustration are presented.

  17. Estimating Hydraulic Properties of the Floridan Aquifer System by Analysis of Earth-Tide, Ocean-Tide, and Barometric Effects, Collier and Hendry Counties, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merritt, Michael L.

    2004-01-01

    Aquifers are subjected to mechanical stresses from natural, non-anthropogenic, processes such as pressure loading or mechanical forcing of the aquifer by ocean tides, earth tides, and pressure fluctuations in the atmosphere. The resulting head fluctuations are evident even in deep confined aquifers. The present study was conducted for the purpose of reviewing the research that has been done on the use of these phenomena for estimating the values of aquifer properties, and determining which of the analytical techniques might be useful for estimating hydraulic properties in the dissolved-carbonate hydrologic environment of southern Florida. Fifteen techniques are discussed in this report, of which four were applied. An analytical solution for head oscillations in a well near enough to the ocean to be influenced by ocean tides was applied to data from monitor zones in a well near Naples, Florida. The solution assumes a completely non-leaky confining unit of infinite extent. Resulting values of transmissivity are in general agreement with the results of aquifer performance tests performed by the South Florida Water Management District. There seems to be an inconsistency between results of the amplitude ratio analysis and independent estimates of loading efficiency. A more general analytical solution that takes leakage through the confining layer into account yielded estimates that were lower than those obtained using the non-leaky method, and closer to the South Florida Water Management District estimates. A numerical model with a cross-sectional grid design was applied to explore additional aspects of the problem. A relation between specific storage and the head oscillation observed in a well provided estimates of specific storage that were considered reasonable. Porosity estimates based on the specific storage estimates were consistent with values obtained from measurements on core samples. Methods are described for determining aquifer diffusivity by comparing the

  18. Using state-of-the-art technology to evaluate saltwater intrusion in the Biscayne aquifer of Miami-Dade County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinos, Scott T.

    2014-01-01

    The fresh groundwater supplies of many communities have been adversely affected or limited by saltwater intrusion. An insufficient understanding of the origin of intruded saltwater may lead to inefficient or ineffective water-resource management. A 2008–2012 cooperative U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Miami-Dade County study of saltwater intrusion describes state-of-the art technology used to evaluate the origin and distribution of this saltwater.

  19. On the Historical Significance and Structure of Monroe Beardsley's "Aesthetics": An Appreciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Noel

    2010-01-01

    Monroe C. Beardsley's "Aesthetics: Problems in the Philosophy of Criticism," published in 1958 by Harcourt, Brace and World Inc., was a watershed event in the history of analytic aesthetics--a climax of sorts with respect to what preceded it and, at the same time, the opening of a new, more intricately developed and defended research program in…

  20. 33 CFR 334.350 - Chesapeake Bay off Fort Monroe, Va.; firing range danger zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Va.; firing range danger zone. 334.350 Section 334.350 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.350 Chesapeake Bay off Fort Monroe, Va.; firing range danger zone. (a) The danger zone. All of...

  1. Endoscopic resection of cavernoma of foramen of Monro in a patient with familial multiple cavernomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Ricardo; Galeano, Inmaculada

    2008-09-01

    Intraventricular cavernomas are extremely infrequent and only 11 cases of cavernous hemangioma to occur at the foramen of Monro have been reported in the literature. This 56 years old patient was admitted with progressive and intractable headache of 10 days of evolution. He was known to suffer familial multiple cavernomatosis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), revealed obstructive hydrocephalus due to a cavernoma located in the area of the left foramen of Monro. Under neuronavigation guidance, complete endoscopic resection of the cavernoma was performed and normal ventricular size achieved. The patient experienced transient recent memory loss that resolved within a month after surgery. In the literature attempted endoscopic resection is reported to be abandoned due to bleeding and ineffectiveness of piecemeal endoscopic resection. In this case, the multiplicity of the lesions made it advisable to resect the lesion endoscopically, to avoid an open procedure in a patient with multiple potentially surgical lesions. Endoscopic resection was uneventful with easy control of bleeding with irrigation, suction, and bipolar coagulation despite dense vascular appearance of the lesion. During the procedure, precise visualization of the vascular structures around the foramen of Monro allowed complete resection with satisfactory control of the instruments. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first published cavernoma of foramen of Monro successfully resected using an endoscopic approach.

  2. High-Dimensional Exploratory Item Factor Analysis by a Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Li

    2010-01-01

    A Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro (MH-RM) algorithm for high-dimensional maximum marginal likelihood exploratory item factor analysis is proposed. The sequence of estimates from the MH-RM algorithm converges with probability one to the maximum likelihood solution. Details on the computer implementation of this algorithm are provided. The…

  3. Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro Algorithm for Confirmatory Item Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Li

    2010-01-01

    Item factor analysis (IFA), already well established in educational measurement, is increasingly applied to psychological measurement in research settings. However, high-dimensional confirmatory IFA remains a numerical challenge. The current research extends the Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro (MH-RM) algorithm, initially proposed for…

  4. Contrasting Models of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Reply to Monroe and Mineka (2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntsen, Dorthe; Rubin, David C.; Bohni, Malene Klindt

    2008-01-01

    The authors address the 4 main points in S. M. Monroe and S. Mineka's comment. First, the authors show that the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed., text rev.; American Psychiatric Association, 2000) posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) diagnosis includes an etiology and that it is based on a theoretical model with a…

  5. High-Dimensional Exploratory Item Factor Analysis by a Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Li

    2010-01-01

    A Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro (MH-RM) algorithm for high-dimensional maximum marginal likelihood exploratory item factor analysis is proposed. The sequence of estimates from the MH-RM algorithm converges with probability one to the maximum likelihood solution. Details on the computer implementation of this algorithm are provided. The…

  6. Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro Algorithm for Confirmatory Item Factor Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Li

    2010-01-01

    Item factor analysis (IFA), already well established in educational measurement, is increasingly applied to psychological measurement in research settings. However, high-dimensional confirmatory IFA remains a numerical challenge. The current research extends the Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro (MH-RM) algorithm, initially proposed for…

  7. James Monroe High School Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes, 1986-1987. OEA Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Ana L.; And Others

    In its second year of Title VII funding, James Monroe High Schools's Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes (Project New Horizons) served 344 limited-English-speaking recent arrivals from Latin America and the Caribbean, in grades 9 through 12. The program has built on the strengths of the high school's extensive computer-assisted instruction (CAI) program,…

  8. Nuevos Horizontes, James Monroe High School, 1987-1988. Evaluation Section Report. OREA Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berney, Tomi D.; Lista, Carlos

    Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes (Project New Horizons) at James Monroe High School (New York City) served 328 students of limited English proficiency (LEP) in grades 9-12 during the final year of a 3-year funding cycle. The project's purpose was to build on the strengths of the school's extensive computer-assisted instructional program in order to…

  9. James Monroe High School Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes, 1985-1986. OEA Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn. Office of Educational Assessment.

    Proyecto Nuevos Horizontes, a 3-year Title VII-funded bilingual education program, serves 287 Spanish speaking students at James Monroe High School (Bronx, New York). This report evaluates the project's first year of operation, 1985-86. The report contains an introduction describing the school and project goals; information on student…

  10. Dengue in Florida (USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge R. Rey

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Florida (USA, particularly the southern portion of the State, is in a precarious situation concerning arboviral diseases. The geographic location, climate, lifestyle, and the volume of travel and commerce are all conducive to arbovirus transmission. During the last decades, imported dengue cases have been regularly recorded in Florida, and the recent re-emergence of dengue as a major public health concern in the Americas has been accompanied by a steady increase in the number of imported cases. In 2009, there were 28 cases of locally transmitted dengue in Key West, and in 2010, 65 cases were reported. Local transmission was also reported in Martin County in 2013 (29 cases, and isolated locally transmitted cases were also reported from other counties in the last five years. Dengue control and prevention in the future will require close cooperation between mosquito control and public health agencies, citizens, community and government agencies, and medical professionals to reduce populations of the vectors and to condition citizens and visitors to take personal protection measures that minimize bites by infected mosquitoes.

  11. Hydrology of the southern parts of Okaloosa and Walton Counties, northwest Florida, with special emphasis on the upper limestone of the Floridan Aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, D.E.; Hayes, L.R.; Kwader, Thomas

    1985-01-01

    Increasing population in southern Okaloosa and Walton Counties have resulted in regional declines in the potentiometric surface of the upper limestone of the Floridan aquifer. Water levels have declined as much as 160 feet since 1940, and during peak seasonal demand as much as 190 feet. The Pensacola clay confining bed inhibits interchange of water between the Floridan aquifer and the surficial sand-and-gravel aquifer. The latter aquifer is of secondary importance as a public supply source. The Bucatunna clay confining bed separates the Floridan into upper and lower limestone units; the Floridan is underlain by the relatively impermeable Lisbon/Tallahatta confining unit. The Floridan aquifer dips south to the Gulf of Mexico, and is recharged by rainfall in northern Okaloosa and Walton Counties and in Alabama. The regional gradient of the potentiometric surface of the upper limestone, and presumably that of the lower limstone also, is south. Pumpage was variable in 1978; from 10.9 to 19.0 million gallons per day in January and June, respectively. Saline water in the upper limestone of the Floridan aquifer is less than 10 milligrams per liter inland but may be more than 150 milligrams per liter along the coast. Lower limestone water may exceed 250 milligrams per liter chloride. (USGS)

  12. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, MONROE COUNTY, WISCONSIN (AND INCORPORATED AREAS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  13. National Dam Safety Program. Court Street Dam (Inventory Number NY 6843), Monroe County, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-30

    PtAr , 6-hOUR 24-dOOk 72-doUR TOTAL, VOLUME CFS 299012. 21b47y. 235844. 120159. 1836321. C.46 4b7. v395. 678. 3403. b1999. Ifis 2.57 8.16 12.48 15.89 A...obbo o03. 5750. sib5. 5030. 471. 4358. 40bb. 3194. PtAr . 6-ti0LH 24-OUR 72-tiOU 101 L v0Lu’qi CES 213945. - 21u0-9. 1921o7. 12,222. 19535ub. C-6 tw5o...408. PtAR b-OUt 24-hOUR 72-flOOR XU1AL VOLUIE Crs 49b9d. 4958. 38477. 18396. 27b970. c i 14u7. 1404. 1090. 521. 79U0.1..Cn0S 1.80 5.59 8.02 10.14 4

  14. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2009 Digital Orthophotos - Monroe County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — The RGB, 8-bit, one-foot orthophotos to be mapped consists of 810 cells (approximately 727 square miles) flown with a Z/I Intergraph DMC airborne digital sensor. The...

  15. Vertical Land Change, Chippewa, Eau Claire, Jackson, Monroe, Trempealeau, and Wood Counties, Wisconsin

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The vertical land change activity focuses on the detection, analysis, and explanation of topographic change. These detection techniques include both quantitative...

  16. Contaminant survey of the White River National Wildlife Refuge, Arkansas, Monroe, Phillips, and Desha Counties, Arkansas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Several contaminant surveys have been conducted on the refuge from 1985 to 1987 (Fish and Wildlife Service 1986; Fish and Wildlife Service unpublished data 1987, and...

  17. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2009 Digital Orthophotos - Monroe County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — The RGB, 8-bit, one-foot orthophotos to be mapped consists of 810 cells (approximately 727 square miles) flown with a Z/I Intergraph DMC airborne digital sensor. The...

  18. Hydrologic monitoring program in Eldridge-Wilde and East Lake Road well-field areas, Pinellas and Hillsborough counties, Florida, 1977 water year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Boyd F.; Gerhart, James M.

    1980-01-01

    The observation-well network in the vicinity of the two well fields is described in detail. Data obtained from the network from October 1976 through September 1977, as well as rainfall and pumpage records, are presented and discussed. Below-normal rainfall caused the water table and potentiometric surface of the Floridan aquifer in Eldridge-Wilde well field to recover 2 feet less in September 1977 than in the previous September. Water levels in East Lake Road will field were approximately the same in Spetember of both years. The Southwest Florida Water Management District has established regulatory water-level and water-quality limits in several observation wells. Water levels did not drop below regulatory limits during the year. Water from two deep wells west of Eldridge-Wilde well field exceeded the regulatory limits for chloride concentrations. The position of the 250 milligram per liter chloride line is shown in cross section in the vicinity of Eldridge-Wilde well field in September 1977. Network modifications are proposed that would result in a more comprehensive knowledge of the hydrologic system. (USGS)

  19. Marketing Fresh Produce to Local Schools: The North Florida Cooperative Experience [and] Cultivating Schools as Customers in a Local Market: The New North Florida Cooperative Experience [and] Acquiring Capital and Establishing a Credit History: The North Florida Cooperative Experience [and] Success of the New North Florida Cooperative: A Progress Report on Producer Direct Sales to School Districts. Small Farmer Success Story. Bulletins 1-4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Agriculture, Washington, DC.

    These four bulletins describe how a group of limited-resource small farmers in northern Florida's Jackson County, the USDA, the West Florida Resource Conservation and Development Council, Florida A&M University, and the Federation of Southern Cooperatives organized the New North Florida Cooperative to increase farm income by introducing…

  20. Analysis of water-level fluctuations of Lakes Winona and Winnemissett-- two landlocked lakes in a karst terrane in Volusia County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, G.H.

    1979-01-01

    The water levels of Lakes Winona and Winnemissett in Volusia County, Fla., correlate reasonably well during dry spells but only poorly during wet spells. Disparities develop mostly at times when the lake levels rise abruptly owing to rainstorms passing over the lake basins. The lack of correlation is attributed to the uneven distribution of the storm rainfall, even though the average annual rainfall at National Weather Service gages in the general area of the lakes is about the same. Analyses of the monthly rainfall data show that the rainfall variability between gages is sufficient to account for most of the disparity between monthly changes in the levels of the two lakes. The total annual rainfall at times may differ between rainfall gages by as much as 15 to 20 inches. Such differences tend to balance over the long term but may persist in the same direction for two or more years, causing apparent anomalies in lake-level fluctuations. (Woodard-USGS)

  1. Florida Investigates 2nd Possible Local Transmission of Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... html Florida Investigates 2nd Possible Local Transmission of Zika Virus If confirmed, cases would be first instances of ... Broward County, north of Miami. Infection with the Zika virus, which in most cases is transmitted by mosquitoes, ...

  2. Hydrogeology and Migration of Septic-Tank Effluent in the Surficial Aquifer System in the Northern Midlands Area, Palm Beach County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Wesley L.

    1992-01-01

    The northern Midlands area in Palm Beach County is an area of expected residential growth, but its flat topography, poor drainage, and near-surface marl layers retard rainfall infiltration and cause frequent flooding. Public water supplies and sewer services are not planned for the area, thus, residents must rely on domestic wells and septic tanks. The water table in the northern Midlands area is seldom more than 5 feet below land surface, and regional ground-water flows are east, southwest, and south from the north-central part of the area where ground-water levels are highest. Ground-water quality in the western part of the area and in the Loxahatchee Slough is greatly influenced by residual seawater emplaced during the Pleistocene Epoch. Chloride and dissolved-solids concentrations of ground water in the surficial aquifer system in these areas often exceed secondary drinking-water standards. Residual seawater has been more effectively flushed from the more permeable sediments elsewhere in the eastern and southwestern parts of the study area. Test at three septic-tank sites showed traces of effluent in ground water (38-92 feet from the septic tank outlets) and that near-surface marl layers greatly impede the downward migration of the effluent in the surficial aquifer system throughout the northern midlands.

  3. Regional CMS Modeling: Southwest Florida Gulf Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    counties and over 70 miles of southwest Florida shoreline along the Gulf of Mexico . The study region is entirely within the USACE Jacksonville...2 Figure 1. Sediment budget extent and active USACE Jacksonville District (SAJ) projects in Pinellas, Manatee, and Sarasota Counties, FL. METHOD ...The CMS is a product of the Coastal Inlets Research Program (http://cirp.usace. army.mil), a USACE Navigation Research Development and Technology

  4. Endoscopic management of large multicompartmental intraventricular arachnoid cyst extending from foramen magnum to foramen of Monro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yadav Y

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment options for symptomatic arachnoid cysts are shunting, open craniotomy, and endoscopic fenestration. Endoscopic fenestration of large arachnoid cyst is safe and effective. Postoperative subdural hematoma and intraparenchymal hemorrhage can be avoided by endoscopic fenestration. This technique has the additional advantage of identifying and treating ventricular abnormalities, such as foramen of Monro stenosis and cerebral aqueduct occlusion. This report describes endoscopic dual fenestration in a child with large multicompartmental intraventricular arachnoid cyst extending from foramen magnum to foramen of Monro. The child presented with difficulty to hold the neck in upright position, irritability, vomiting, and large head. Follow-up postoperative magnetic resonance imaging at 3 months showed a significant reduction in size of the cyst. Clinically, the patient showed a gradual improvement at 10 months follow-up. Probably this is the first report of this nature.

  5. Uma política para o continente - reinterpretando a Doutrina Monroe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Gustavo Poggio Teixeira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A declaração de novembro de 2013 do Secretário de Estado dos Estados Unidos, John Kerry, de que "a era da Doutrina Monroe terminou" é uma excelente oportunidade para rediscutir essa que é considerada um dos princípios cardeais da política externa norte-americana para a América Latina desde a independência dos Estados latino-americanos. O presente artigo pretende jogar luz em um aspecto frequentemente menosprezado pelas análises acerca da Doutrina Monroe, qual seja, o fato de que tal doutrina, longe de ser uma política concreta para todo o continente, tinha duas facetas bastante distintas tanto do ponto vista retórico como político. Através do exame principalmente de bibliografia produzida nos Estados Unidos, em especial daquelas que tiveram acesso a fontes primárias, o artigo demonstra que a Doutrina Monroe tinha um caráter claramente caribenho - e não latino-americano - a partir do reconhecimento, por parte tanto dos formuladores de política dos Estados Unidos como dos sul-americanos, de que a América do Sul era um sistema separado da América do Norte. Assim, o artigo defende que ao sul do Panamá, a Doutrina Monroe adquiriu um aspecto consideravelmente mais "multilateral", o que foi evidenciado até mesmo pelo seu famoso Corolário Roosevelt.

  6. Controversial neuroendoscopic Monro foraminoplasty in the management of isolated lateral ventricle in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max O. Krucoff

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, imaging characteristics, and current literature regarding the minimally invasive neuroendoscopic treatment of a rare condition: idiopathic unilateral hydrocephalus presenting late in adulthood. This paper also addresses the current controversy regarding septum pellucidotomy and/or Monro foraminoplasty as mono- or dual therapies for UH. A 63 year old African American female presented with headaches, blurry vision, and gait instability for six months. She was referred for neurosurgical consultation after an MRI demonstrated enlargement of the right lateral ventricle with left septal deviation. The patient underwent endoscopic transventricular fenestration of an idiopathic membrane occluding the foramen of Monro, as well as foraminoplasty of the foramen of Monro and septum pellucidotomy. Postoperatively the patient had transient difficulty with short term recall that improved rapidly, and she was discharged home on postoperative day 2. Follow-up one month later demonstrated complete resolution of her headache, blurry vision, and imbalance, as well as continued improvement of her memory. At six months, she had durable resolution of hydrocephalus and no short term memory complaints.

  7. Evaluation of Emerging Contaminants of Concern at the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant Based on Seasonal Events, Miami-Dade County, Florida, 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietz, Arthur C.; Meyer, Michael T.

    2006-01-01

    The Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan has identified highly treated wastewater as a possible water source for the restoration of natural water flows and hydroperiods in selected coastal areas, including the Biscayne Bay coastal wetlands. One potential source of reclaimed wastewater for the Biscayne Bay coastal wetlands is the effluent from the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant in southern Miami-Dade County. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan Wastewater Reuse Technology Pilot Project Delivery Team, initiated a study to assess the presence of emerging contaminants of concern in the South District Wastewater Treatment Plant influent and effluent using current wastewater-treatment methods. As part of the study, 24-hour composite and discrete samples were collected at six locations (influent at plants 1 and 2, effluent pump, reuse train, chlorine dioxide unit, and ultraviolet pilot unit) at the plant during: (1) a dry-season, low-flow event on March 2-3, 2004, with an average inflow rate of 83.7 million gallons per day; (2) a wet-season, average-flow event on July 20-21, 2004, with an average inflow rate of 89.7 million gallons per day; and (3) high-rate disinfection tests on October 5 and 20, 2004, with average flow rates of 84.1 and 119.6 million gallons per day, respectively. During these four sampling events, 26, 27, 29, and 35 constituents were detected, respectively. The following transformations in concentration were determined in the waste stream: -100 to 180 percent at the effluent pump and -100 to 85 percent at the reuse train on March 2-3, 2004, and -100 to 1,609 percent at the effluent pump and -100 to 832 percent at the reuse train on July 20-21, 2004; -100 to -37 percent at the effluent pump, -100 to -62 percent at the reuse train, -100 to -56 percent at the chlorine dioxide unit, and -100 to -40 percent at the ultraviolet pilot unit on October 5, 2004; and -100 to -4 percent at the

  8. 50 CFR 226.216 - Critical habitat for elkhorn (Acropora palmata) and staghorn (A. cervicornis) corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... of the Atlantic Ocean offshore of Palm Beach, Broward, Miami-Dade, and Monroe counties, Florida, and... south side of Boynton Inlet, Palm Beach County at 26° 32′ 42.5″ N; then runs due east to the point of... of water deeper than 98 ft (30 m) are not included. (1) Florida Area: The Florida area contains...

  9. County Spending

    Data.gov (United States)

    Montgomery County of Maryland — This dataset includes County spending data for Montgomery County government. It does not include agency spending. Data considered sensitive or confidential and will...

  10. Structure and Process in Collaboration: Florida's Collaborative Model Project as a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Fleet, Alanson A.

    The Collaboration Model Project Council, at the University of Florida, represents an attempt to establish interinstitutional collaboration among (1) a university and two community colleges, (2) three county public school systems, (3) the teachers' associations of three counties, (4) community parents and citizens of three counties, and (5) college…

  11. Floodplain Mapping for Jackson County, Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  12. Floodplain Mapping for Holmes County, Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  13. Floodplain Mapping for Citrus County, Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  14. Hydraulic, HOLMES COUNTY AND INCORPOATED AREAS, FLORIDA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  15. Floodplain Mapping Submission, LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  16. FINAL Database, LAKE COUNTY, FLORIDA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  17. Hydraulic, JACKSON COUNTY AND INCORPOATED AREAS, FLORIDA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  18. Hydraulic, JACKSON COUNTY AND INCORPOATED AREAS, FLORIDA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  19. BASEMAP, OSCEOLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND INCORPORATED AREAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — FEMA Framework Basemap datasets comprise six of the seven FGDC themes of geospatial data that are used by most GIS applications (Note: the seventh framework theme,...

  20. BASEMAP, HOLMES COUNTY, FLORIDA AND INCORPORATED AREAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — FEMA Framework Basemap datasets comprise six of the seven FGDC themes of geospatial data that are used by most GIS applications (Note: the seventh framework theme,...

  1. Floodplain Mapping, MANATEE COUNTY, FLORIDA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  2. Monro-Kellie 2.0: The dynamic vascular and venous pathophysiological components of intracranial pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    For 200 years, the ‘closed box’ analogy of intracranial pressure (ICP) has underpinned neurosurgery and neuro-critical care. Cushing conceptualised the Monro-Kellie doctrine stating that a change in blood, brain or CSF volume resulted in reciprocal changes in one or both of the other two. When not possible, attempts to increase a volume further increase ICP. On this doctrine’s “truth or relative untruth” depends many of the critical procedures in the surgery of the central nervous system. However, each volume component may not deserve the equal weighting this static concept implies. The slow production of CSF (0.35 ml/min) is dwarfed by the dynamic blood in and outflow (∼700 ml/min). Neuro-critical care practice focusing on arterial and ICP regulation has been questioned. Failure of venous efferent flow to precisely match arterial afferent flow will yield immediate and dramatic changes in intracranial blood volume and pressure. Interpreting ICP without interrogating its core drivers may be misleading. Multiple clinical conditions and the cerebral effects of altitude and microgravity relate to imbalances in this dynamic rather than ICP per se. This article reviews the Monro-Kellie doctrine, categorises venous outflow limitation conditions, relates physiological mechanisms to clinical conditions and suggests specific management options. PMID:27174995

  3. Estimation of Contextual Effects through Nonlinear Multilevel Latent Variable Modeling with a Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ji Seung; Cai, Li

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to improve estimation efficiency in obtaining maximum marginal likelihood estimates of contextual effects in the framework of nonlinear multilevel latent variable model by adopting the Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro algorithm (MH-RM). Results indicate that the MH-RM algorithm can produce estimates and standard…

  4. Estimation of Contextual Effects through Nonlinear Multilevel Latent Variable Modeling with a Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ji Seung; Cai, Li

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to improve estimation efficiency in obtaining maximum marginal likelihood estimates of contextual effects in the framework of nonlinear multilevel latent variable model by adopting the Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro algorithm (MH-RM). Results indicate that the MH-RM algorithm can produce estimates and standard…

  5. Mangos of Florida, country contribution: Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    The book chapter presents a review of the historical importance of mango in Florida; geographical distribution of mangos in Florida; statistical data including total and seasonal production, main cultivars and their descriptors; cultural practices (i.e. propagation, fertilization, pruning); pests an...

  6. Culex (Culex) declarator, a mosquito species new to Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darsie, Richard F; Shroyer, Donald A

    2004-09-01

    One specimen of a mosquito new to Florida, Culex declarator, was first found in 1998 in Indian River County. A 2nd specimen was collected in 2002. Beginning in September 2003, Cx. declarator adults were regularly encountered in routine mosquito surveillance sampling, with more than 300 specimens appearing in 45 collections. Prior to our find, the U.S. distrubution was thought to be restricted to south Texas. The full extent of this species' distribution in Florida has yet to be determined.

  7. Estimation of capture zones and drawdown at the Northwest and West Well Fields, Miami-Dade County, Florida, using an unconstrained Monte Carlo analysis: recent (2004) and proposed conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakefield, Linzy K.; Hughes, Joseph D.; Langevin, Christian D.; Chartier, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Travel-time capture zones and drawdown for two production well fields, used for drinking-water supply in Miami-Dade County, southeastern Florida, were delineated by the U.S Geological Survey using an unconstrained Monte Carlo analysis. The well fields, designed to supply a combined total of approximately 250 million gallons of water per day, pump from the highly transmissive Biscayne aquifer in the urban corridor between the Everglades and Biscayne Bay. A transient groundwater flow model was developed and calibrated to field data to ensure an acceptable match between simulated and observed values for aquifer heads and net exchange of water between the aquifer and canals. Steady-state conditions were imposed on the transient model and a post-processing backward particle-tracking approach was implemented. Multiple stochastic realizations of horizontal hydraulic conductivity, conductance of canals, and effective porosity were simulated for steady-state conditions representative of dry, average and wet hydrologic conditions to calculate travel-time capture zones of potential source areas of the well fields. Quarry lakes, formed as a product of rock-mining activities, whose effects have previously not been considered in estimation of capture zones, were represented using high hydraulic-conductivity, high-porosity cells, with the bulk hydraulic conductivity of each cell calculated based on estimates of aquifer hydraulic conductivity, lake depths and aquifer thicknesses. A post-processing adjustment, based on calculated residence times using lake outflows and known lake volumes, was utilized to adjust particle endpoints to account for an estimate of residence-time-based mixing of lakes. Drawdown contours of 0.1 and 0.25 foot were delineated for the dry, average, and wet hydrologic conditions as well. In addition, 95-percent confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for the capture zones and drawdown contours to delineate a zone of uncertainty about the median estimates

  8. Euroopal tuleb leida vastus Vene Monroe-doktriinile / Lennart Meri ; intervjueerinud Olaf Ihlan, Andreas Lorentz

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Meri, Lennart, 1929-2006

    1993-01-01

    Eesti Vabariigi president L. Meri Baltikumist ja suurvene šovinismist. Intervjuu ajakirjale "Der Spiegel", nr. 44, 1. nov. 1993, lk. 200, 202-203, 206, pealkiri: "Dann wird Europa verbluten" : Estlands Präsident Lennart Meri über das Baltikum und den grossrussischen Chauvinismus. Ilmunud ka: Õhtuleht, 8. nov., lk. 5, pealkiri: "Siis voolab Euroopas veri" : Eesti president Lennart Meri Baltikumist ja suurvene šovinismist ; Rahva Hääl, 9. nov., lk., 3 ; Eesti Rada (Köln, 1993) nr. 6, lk. 3, pealkiri: President Lennart Meri intervjuu "Spiegelile" / refereerinud ja tsiteerinud J. P ; Eesti Päevaleht (Stockholm), 24. nov., lk. 2 : ill., pealkiri: President Lennart Meri : "Venemaa laiendab oma huvisfääri" ; Vaba Eestlane (Toronto), 9. dets., lk. 3, 11, pealkiri: "Euroopal tuleb leida vastus Vene - Monroe doktriinile" ; Meie Kodu, 15. dets., lk. 6, pealkiri: Eesti Vabariigi President Lennart Meri Baltikumist ja suurvene šovinismist

  9. Neuroendoscopic surgery for unilateral hydrocephalus due to inflammatory obstruction of the Monro foramen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco A. Vaz-Guimarães Filho

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Unilateral hydrocephalus (UH is characterized by enlargement of just one lateral ventricle. In this paper, the authors will demonstrate their experiences in the neuroendoscopic management of this uncommon type of hydrocephalus. METHOD: The authors retrospectively reviewed a serie of almost 800 neuroendoscopic procedures performed from September 1995 to July 2010 and selected seven adult patients with UH. Clinical and radiological charts were reviewed and analyzed. RESULTS: Six patients had intraventricular neurocysticercosis and one patient had congenital stenosis of the foramen of Monro. Headaches were the most common symptom. A septostomy restored cerebrospinal fluid circulation. During follow-up period (65.5 months, range 3-109 no patient has presented clinical recurrence as well as no severe complications have been observed. CONCLUSION: UH is a rare condition. A successful treatment can be accomplished through a neuroendoscopic approach avoiding the use of ventricular shunts.

  10. Euroopal tuleb leida vastus Vene Monroe-doktriinile / Lennart Meri ; intervjueerinud Olaf Ihlan, Andreas Lorentz

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Meri, Lennart, 1929-2006

    1993-01-01

    Eesti Vabariigi president L. Meri Baltikumist ja suurvene šovinismist. Intervjuu ajakirjale "Der Spiegel", nr. 44, 1. nov. 1993, lk. 200, 202-203, 206, pealkiri: "Dann wird Europa verbluten" : Estlands Präsident Lennart Meri über das Baltikum und den grossrussischen Chauvinismus. Ilmunud ka: Õhtuleht, 8. nov., lk. 5, pealkiri: "Siis voolab Euroopas veri" : Eesti president Lennart Meri Baltikumist ja suurvene šovinismist ; Rahva Hääl, 9. nov., lk., 3 ; Eesti Rada (Köln, 1993) nr. 6, lk. 3, pealkiri: President Lennart Meri intervjuu "Spiegelile" / refereerinud ja tsiteerinud J. P ; Eesti Päevaleht (Stockholm), 24. nov., lk. 2 : ill., pealkiri: President Lennart Meri : "Venemaa laiendab oma huvisfääri" ; Vaba Eestlane (Toronto), 9. dets., lk. 3, 11, pealkiri: "Euroopal tuleb leida vastus Vene - Monroe doktriinile" ; Meie Kodu, 15. dets., lk. 6, pealkiri: Eesti Vabariigi President Lennart Meri Baltikumist ja suurvene šovinismist

  11. A Robbins-Monro procedure for a class of models of deformation

    CERN Document Server

    Fraysse, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The paper deals with the statistical analysis of several data sets associated with shape invariant models with different translation, height and scaling parameters. We propose to estimate these parameters together with the common shape function. Our approach extends the recent work of Bercu and Fraysse to multivariate shape invariant models. We propose a very efficient Robbins-Monro procedure for the estimation of the translation parameters and we use these estimates in order to evaluate scale parameters. The main pattern is estimated by a weighted Nadaraya-Watson estimator. We provide almost sure convergence and asymptotic normality for all estimators. Finally, we illustrate the convergence of our estimation procedure on simulated data as well as on real ECG data.

  12. 2005 Southwest Florida Water Management District (SWFWMD) LiDAR: Weeki Wachee

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set is one component of a digital terrain model (DTM) for Weeki Wachee, Hernando County, Florida encompassing approximately 13.5 square miles. This dataset...

  13. ¿En defensa de la Doctrina Monroe? Los desencuentros en América Latina entre España y Estados Unidos (1880-1890)

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    This article analyzes the role played by the Monroe Doctrine in the disagreements that took place between Spain and the United States in Latin America during the 1880s. Based on diplomatic sources preserved in archives in the United States and Spain, the article argues that these apparently peripheral incidents reveal that the Monroe Doctrine was a lasting, although flexible, principle of U.S. foreign policy in Latin America. Sspecifically, the evidence suggests that the motor behind the evol...

  14. Florida "State" Migrant Health Project. Third Annual Progress Report, 1965-1966.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Board of Health, Jacksonville.

    The Third Annual Report on the Florida Migrant Health Project covered migrant health activities engaged in by 14 counties for the period May 1, 1965, through April 30, 1966. The project was designed to develop a basic statewide program of health services for migrant farm workers and their dependents in Florida. Three of the 12 objectives included…

  15. Environmental Assessment, SR 123 (Roger J. Clary Highway) from North of the Intersection of SR 123 and SR 85S to SR 85N, Okaloosa County, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Loggerhead Sea Turtle, Green Sea Turtle, Leatherback Sea Turtle, and Florida Perforate Lichen . Other federally- listed species such as the West Indian... Lichen , and Gulf Sturgeon). A Flatwoods Salamander Recovery Plan is currently in draft stage. There are 67 state-listed T&E species found on Eglin. Most...morphological analyses and mitochondrial DNA , two species of flatwoods salamanders have been recognized – the threatened Frosted Flatwoods Salamander

  16. Implementing a Compressed Air System Leak Management Program at an Automotive Plant (Visteon's Monroe Plant)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2001-01-01

    The energy team at Visteon’s Monroe plant, formerly owned by Ford Motor Company, implemented an ongoing compressed air system leak management program. The team developed an approach that combined a traditional “find and fix” effort with an innovative implementation and marketing program. As a result of the leak management program, compressed air system consumption was reduced by more than 50% on a per production unit basis.

  17. The decline of the Monroe Doctrine? Colombia and Brazil, between a traditional north and a renewed south

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Since the formulation of the Monroe Doctrine, United States defined Latin America as his ‘backyard’in the XIXth and XXth centuries. However, the global and regional transformations in the XXIst century have weakened the Doctrine, and promoted a new idea of the space, named South America. This paper analyzes the role of Brazil as a regional power, which leads the creation of this new space. Furthermore, it analyzes the role of Colombia, a United States traditional ally, facing the Brazilian le...

  18. Integration of seismic-reflection and well data to assess the potential impact of stratigraphic and structural features on sustainable water supply from the Floridan aquifer system, Broward County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey and Broward County water managers commenced a 3.5-year cooperative study in July 2012 to refine the geologic and hydrogeologic framework of the Floridan aquifer system (FAS) in Broward County. A lack of advanced stratigraphic knowledge of the physical system and structural geologic anomalies (faults and fractures originating from tectonics and karst-collapse structures) within the FAS pose a risk to the sustainable management of the resource. The principal objective of the study is to better define the regional stratigraphic and structural setting of the FAS in Broward County. The objective will be achieved through the acquisition, processing, and interpretation of new seismic-reflection data along several canals in Broward County. The interpretation includes integration of the new seismic-reflection data with existing seismic-reflection profiles along Hillsboro Canal in Broward County and within northeast Miami-Dade County, as well as with data from nearby FAS wellbores. The scope of the study includes mapping the geologic, hydrogeologic, and seismic-reflection framework of the FAS, and identifying stratigraphic and structural characteristics that could either facilitate or preclude the sustainable use of the FAS as an alternate water supply or a treated effluent repository. In addition, the investigation offers an opportunity to: (1) improve existing groundwater flow models, (2) enhance the understanding of the sensitivity of the groundwater system to well-field development and upconing of saline fluids, and (3) support site selection for future FAS projects, such as Class I wells that would inject treated effluent into the deep Boulder Zone.

  19. Direct utilization of geothermal resources field experiments at Monroe, Utah. Final report, July 14, 1978-July 13, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blair, C.K.; Owen, L.B. (eds.)

    1982-12-01

    The City of Monroe, Utah undertook a project to demonstrate the economic and technical viability of utilizing a low temperature geothermal resource to provide space and hot water heating to commercial, municipal, and domestic users within the community. During the course of the project, resource development and assessment, including drilling of a production well, was successfully completed. Upon completion of the field development and assessment phase of the program and of a preliminary design of the district heating system, it was determined that the project as proposed was not economically viable. This was due to: (1) a significant increase in estimated capital equipment costs resulting from the general inflation in construction costs, the large area/low population density in Monroe, and a more remote fluid disposal well site than planned, could not balance increased construction costs, (2) a lower temperature resource than predicted, and (3) due to predicted higher pumping and operating costs. After a thorough investigation of alternatives for utilizing the resource, further project activities were cancelled because the project was no longer economical and an alternative application for the resource could not be found within the constraints of the project. The City of Monroe, Utah is still seeking a beneficial use for the 600 gpm, 164/sup 0/F geothermal well. A summary of project activities included.

  20. Florida Energy Assurance Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Niescja E.; Murtagh, William; Guthrie, Kevin; Nykyri, Katariina; Radasky, William A.; Senkowicz, Eric

    2012-08-01

    This spring, Florida held the nation's first statewide emergency preparedness training and exercises geared specifically to the aftermath of severe geomagnetic events. Funded by the State of Florida Division of Emergency Management (FDEM) via a Department of Energy grant and held in collaboration with Watch House International, Inquesta Corporation, and the Florida Institute of Technology, the 17-19 April 2012 workshop had 99 on-site attendees in an oceanfront hotel in Melbourne, Florida, as well as 16 over live Web streaming. The workshop was the capstone to a three-month season of 21 regional space weather training sessions and workshops serving 386 attendees in total.

  1. Combustion testing and heat recovery study: Frank E. Van Lare Wastewater Treatment Plant, Monroe County. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to record and analyze sludge management operations data and sludge incinerator combustion data; ascertain instrumentation and control needs; calculate heat balances for the incineration system; and determine the feasibility of different waste-heat recovery technologies for the Frank E. Van Lare (FEV) Wastewater Treatment Plant. As an integral part of this study, current and pending federal and state regulations were evaluated to establish their impact on furnace operation and subsequent heat recovery. Of significance is the effect of the recently promulgated Federal 40 CFR Part 503 regulations on the FEV facility. Part 503 regulations were signed into law in November 1992, and, with some exceptions, affected facilities must be in compliance by February 19, 1994. Those facilities requiring modifications or upgrades to their incineration or air pollution control equipment to meet Part 503 regulations must be in compliance by February 19, 1995.

  2. Dollar Summary of Prime Contract Awards by State, County, Contractor and Place. Part 3 (Midland-Monroe)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    co .(4 4N c- td o0-40 YV oC)wV oi C V) M0 in C2C N 0 La4 LID Co. 10 Ili " CO ---.- -& 0 .4C n0 0 CO4- 40 0 e CC SOwV 0 C In qt in. n 0 so cy I I 4 4 I...f*0 OI a* C N O (. I’ P. -4q n Y 1 1J cm P ONO Cn IsmlP .-4 .44O CV) P.O 10In Z0 o IIC C24 02 n r HZJ I W MI I.-I Iz I. U 0 0 -C-440 I. co 1.- WI00 0...an -4 COX CIO a- L-a N C’) C N a Z a C) C.= td ~ 4> I C’P a 4- ’ aCL OL. =2-e 20 0UaM 0a 0=C𔃾C r MC1 L -EEcEC.o ,Et a % 00 U a -(a a a a a)> 0 U a

  3. Cities, Towns and Villages, Minor Civil Divisions, Published in 2008, 1:7200 (1in=600ft) scale, Monroe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Cities, Towns and Villages dataset, published at 1:7200 (1in=600ft) scale, was produced all or in part from Published Reports/Deeds information as of 2008. It...

  4. 76 FR 25301 - Foreign-Trade Zone 141-County of Monroe, New York; Application for Reorganization Under...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-04

    ..., Kathleen Boyce of the FTZ Staff is designated examiner to evaluate and analyze the facts and information..., contact Kathleen Boyce at Kathleen.Boyce@trade.gov or (202) 482-1346. Dated: April 28, 2011. Andrew...

  5. NOAA Office for Coastal Management Coastal Inundation Digital Elevation Model: Miami (FL) WFO - Collier and Monroe (Mainland) Counties

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This digital elevation model (DEM) is a part of a series of DEMs produced for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office for Coastal Management's Sea...

  6. Evaluate Testing Sites 22M0676 & 22M0677, Monroe County, Mississippi, Tombigbee River Multi-Resource District,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    subject to frequent, seasonal inundation. The alluvial soils are well suited for mixed mesophytic to hydro- phytic hardwoods such as Tupelo-gum, cypress...except in the case of Feature 12. Two hundred fifty milliliter S samples were set aside from this provenience because of the small volume of...excavated material which it contained. Although soil chemistry samples were I set aside , no such tests were conducted due to time and budget constraints. All

  7. Water withdrawals in Florida, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marella, Richard L.

    2015-09-01

    In 2012, the total amount of water withdrawn in Florida was estimated to be 14,237 million gallons per day (Mgal/d). Saline water accounted for 7,855 Mgal/d (55 percent), and freshwater accounted for 6,383 Mgal/d (45 percent). Groundwater accounted for 4,167 Mgal/d (65 percent) of freshwater withdrawals, and surface water accounted for the remaining 2,216 Mgal/d (35 percent). Surface water accounted for nearly all (99.9 percent) saline-water withdrawals. Freshwater withdrawals were greatest in Palm Beach County (682 Mgal/d), and saline-water withdrawals were greatest in Pasco County (1,822 Mgal/d). Fresh groundwater provided drinking water (through either public supply or private domestic wells) for 17.699 million residents (93 percent of Florida’s population), and fresh surface water provided drinking water for 1.375 million residents (7 percent). The statewide public-supply gross per capita water use for 2012 was estimated at 136 gallons per day.

  8. Industrial hygiene walk-through survey report of General Motors Corporation, Fisher Guide Division, Monroe, Louisiana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCammon, C.S.; Krishnan, E.R.; Goodman, R.J.

    1987-08-17

    A walk-through industrial-hygiene survey was conducted at the General Motors Corporation Fisher Guide manufacturing facility located in Monroe, Louisiana. The investigation centered on possible exposure to acrylates or methacrylates during the manufacture of adhesive-sealed, flame-sealed, or composite headlamps. Methacrylate-based adhesives and acrylated coatings have been used at the facility since 1981. Both the adhesives and coatings were cured by ultraviolet radiation. Ninety-four employees had potential contact with acrylates or methacrylates during the application of adhesives and coatings. Adhesives were used for sealing the lens/reflector area and the bulb location of the terminal area. Base coats were applied to the composite headlamps to provide an adhering surface for the aluminized coating. Top coats were applied as a protective coating for the aluminum coating. Two cases of chemical dermatitis have been reported at the facility since 1981 due to skin contact with acrylates/methacrylates. When an automated system was used to apply adhesive materials during headlamp assembly, there was a lower potential for employee exposure to the hazardous chemicals. The authors recommend that the company move toward complete automation of this part of the production process. Levels of butyl-acetate should be checked as there was a strong smell of this chemical in part of the production line.

  9. A 2-D simulation of hydrocephalus in the Foramens of Monro of the human ventricular system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammourah, S.; Aroussi, A. [Univ. of Nottingham, School of Mechanical, Materials, Manufacturing and Management, University Park, Nottingham (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: eaxsaka@nottingham.ac.uk; Vloeberghs, M. [Queen' s Medical Centre, Dept. of Child Health, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    This study investigates the Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow behavior in a two-dimensional plane (2-D) of the human ventricular system when the hydrocephalus in the Foramens of Monro (F.O.M) occurs. In order to understand the CSF behaviour when the hydrocephalus occurs, it is essential to comprehend its normal flow dynamics i.e. the healthy case with no hydrocephalus. This had been done numerically by reconstructing the ventricular system geometry from the MRI scans and then made a 15{sup o} degree cut in the surgical line to obtain the outlines of the 2-D plane. The healthy cases were solved for the CSF actual flow rate, which is between 100-500 ml/day in 100 incremental steps. The unhealthy cases were studied for the average flow rate, which is 300 ml/day but for blockage ratios of the Foramen diameter of 20%, 50% and 75%. These obstructions are designed to simulate the hydrocephalus. The results show that as the flow rate increases the pressure and the velocity values increases, but no changes in the flow pattern occurs. The maximum pressure on the normal cases occurred in the lateral ventricles and the maximum velocity occurred in the aqueduct neck. The results of the hydrocephalus cases show that as the obstruction degree increases the pressure in the lateral ventricle increases accompanied with a velocity increase in the obstructed Foramen, which may cause unwanted stress on the neighboring tissues. (author)

  10. Idiopathic bilateral occlusion of the foramen of Monro: An unusual entity with varied clinical presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizrahi, Cezar J; Cohen, José E; Gomori, J M; Shoshan, Yigal; Spektor, Sergey; Moscovici, Samuel

    2016-12-01

    We review our experience with four patients who presented to our Medical Center from 2005-2015 with adult idiopathic occlusion of the foramen of Monro (FM). All patients underwent CT scanning and MRI. Standard MRI was performed in each patient to rule out a secondary cause of obstruction (T1-weighted without- and with gadolinium, T2-weighted, fluid-attenuated inversion recovery [FLAIR] and diffusion-weighted imaging [DWI] protocols). When occlusion of the FM appeared to be idiopathic, further high-resolution MRI with multiplanar reconstructions for evaluation of stenosis or an occluding membrane at the level of the FM was performed (T1-weighted without- and with gadolinium, T2-weighted 3D turbo spin-echo). Occlusion of the FM was due to unilateral stenosis and septum pellucidum deviation in two patients, to an occluding membrane in one, and to bilateral stenosis in one patient. Urgent surgical intervention is mandatory when there are signs of increased intracranial pressure while asymptomatic patients may be managed conservatively. In this patient series, truly bilateral stenotic obstruction of the FM was best managed with ventriculoperitoneal shunt and patients with membranous obstruction or unilateral stenosis with septum deviation were treated endoscopically. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Orimulsion fails to come to Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monahan, J.

    1998-10-01

    On 24th June the Governor of Florida and his Cabinet voted 6-1 against the use of Venezuelan-produced Orimulsion. The state`s biggest utility, Florida Power and Light (FPL), had been seeking permission for its use for almost four years in its 1,600 megawatt (MW) Manatee county power plant south of Tampa. It was a landmark decision. The use of Orimulsion - a fossil fuel made of natural bitumen, to which water and a surfactant is added to turn it into an emulsion - was being contemplated on a commercial basis in the United States for the first time. The legal, economic and environmental factors behind this decision are given with an analysis of why Orimulsion, forecast to be the 1990s major new fuel, has not succeeded as predicted.

  12. Storms, hanged pirates, anemia, exsanguination: the contributions of Monro, Kellie and Abercrombie in understanding intracranial blood circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale De Bonis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The so-called Monro-Kellie doctrine states that with an intact skull, the sum of the volume of the brain plus the cerebrospinal fluid volume plus the intracranial blood volume is constant. Therefore an increase in one should cause a reduction in one or both of the remaining two. The researcher who expressed the doctrine in such a way was indeed Harvey Cushing in 1925, during a lecture in Edinburgh. The original Monro-Kellie doctrine is the result of observations on autopsies and several animal experiments. What the original doctrine states is a dynamic explanation of the intracranial system, aimed at explaining how a pulsatile and continuous perfusion may occur in a closed-non-expandable and fully filled system. During each cardiac cycle the quantity of blood within the head must be the same: during the systole, the brain arteries dilate, and, in the mean time, a quantity of blood, equal to that which is dilating them, is passing out of the head through the veins. During the succeeding diastole, the quantity which dilated the brain arteries passes into the corresponding veins and, at the same time, as much passes from the sinuses out of the head, as enters into the head from the arteries situated between the heart and the head. Monro implicitly states that the blood coming out from the cerebral veins into the sinuses must be pulsatile and (almost synchronous with the arteries. That is deeply different from the concept of a constant content of a rigid case, as expressed by Cushing.

  13. Florida Abandoned Vessel Inventory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA Abandoned Vessel Project Data for Florida. Abandoned vessels pose a significant threat to the NOAA Trust resources through physical destruction of coral...

  14. Late Gale in Florida

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — A severe gale in August of 1856 caused a lot of destruction in Florida. Ships and warehouses were damaged, a lighthouse was destroyed, crops were ruined, and several...

  15. Colombia y la Doctrina Monroe: el caso del Ferrocarril de Panamá y las intervenciones estadounidenses en el Istmo

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    La construcción y puesta en marcha del Ferrocarril de Panamá se constituyó como uno de los procesos de inversión extranjera en América Latina durante el siglo XIX. Este ferrocarril, construido como una forma de superar las dificultades de navegación entre el mar Caribe y el Océano Pacífico, permite evidenciar el despliegue de la Doctrina Monroe sobre América Latina y el Caribe, la interrelación entre los intereses de las élites locales y los intereses internacionales, y la forma en que se est...

  16. El dilema de Colombia en las Américas entre el monroísmo y el sudamericanismo

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    La alineación con Estados Unidos es uno de los rasgos más constantes de la política exterior colombiana. Sin embargo, el paso del orden bipolar a uno multipolar, la emergencia de Brasil como potencia regional, y la llegada de Juan Manuel Santos a la presidencia de Colombia, pueden estar incitando un cambio respecto a este alineamiento incondicional. Uno de los elementos más significativos en este cambio es el debilitamiento de la Doctrina Monroe como patrón de relacionamiento entre Colombia y...

  17. ¿En defensa de la Doctrina Monroe? Los desencuentros en América Latina entre España y Estados Unidos (1880-1890

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Sánchez Padilla

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the role played by the Monroe Doctrine in the disagreements that took place between Spain and the United States in Latin America during the 1880s. Based on diplomatic sources preserved in archives in the United States and Spain, the article argues that these apparently peripheral incidents reveal that the Monroe Doctrine was a lasting, although flexible, principle of U.S. foreign policy in Latin America. Sspecifically, the evidence suggests that the motor behind the evolution of the doctrine was U.S. domestic policy.

  18. O caso Marylin Monroe: evidências da forclusão do sujeito e de seu ato Marylin Monroe's case: evidences of the subject's Verwerfung and of its act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jéferson Machado Pinto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A objetivação da transferência sustenta uma posição epistemológica característica do discurso da ciência e implica a forclusão do real do sujeito e de sua verdade, excluindo a possibilidade do ato analítico. Para mostrá-lo, o trabalho utiliza dados biográficos e relatos das últimas sessões da análise de Marylin Monroe. Destaca que o masoquismo, vertente real do enlaçamento amoroso da atriz com o Outro, foi elidido em favor da interpretação simbólica do inconsciente e da transferência tomada como simples repetição das relações de objeto, com trágicas consequências para o sujeito.The transfer objectification is based on an epistemological position characteristic of the science discourse and implies the Verwerfung of the subject's real and of its truth, excluding the possibility of the analytical act. To discuss it, this paper uses biographical data and reports of Marylin Monroe's last analytical sessions emphasizing that masochism, the real part of the actress' love engagements with the Other, was ignored in favor of the symbolic interpretation of the unconscious and of the transfer taken as a mere repetition of the object relationships, with tragic consequences on the subject.

  19. Colloid cysts posterior and anterior to the foramen of Monro: Anatomical features and implications for endoscopic excision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed A Azab

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Colloid cysts are usually located at the rostral part of the third ventricle in proximity to the foramina of Monro. Some third ventricular colloid cysts, however, attain large sizes, reach a very high distance above the roof of the third ventricle, and pose some challenges during endoscopic excision. These features led to the speculation that for such a pattern of growth to take place, the points of origin of these cysts should be at areas away from the foramina of Monro at which some anatomical "windows" exist that are devoid of compact, closely apposed forniceal structures. Methods: A review of the literature on anatomical variations of the structures in the vicinity of the roof of the third ventricle and on reported cases with similar features was conducted. Results: Colloid cysts may grow vertically up past the roof of the third ventricle through anatomical windows devoid of the mechanical restraint of the forniceal structures. Conclusion: Some anatomical variations of the forniceal structures may allow unusually large sizes and superior vector of growth of a retro- or post-foraminal colloid cyst. Careful preoperative planning and knowledge of the pertinent pathoanatomy of these cysts before endoscopic excision is very important to avoid complications.

  20. Estimation of Contextual Effects through Nonlinear Multilevel Latent Variable Modeling with a Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro Algorithm. CRESST Report 833

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ji Seung; Cai, Li

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to improve estimation efficiency in obtaining full-information maximum likelihood (FIML) estimates of contextual effects in the framework of a nonlinear multilevel latent variable model by adopting the Metropolis-Hastings Robbins-Monro algorithm (MH-RM; Cai, 2008, 2010a, 2010b). Results indicate that the MH-RM…

  1. Vertical and horizontal distribution and seasonal dynamics of an invasive thrips species, Scirtothrips dorsalis (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in south Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chilli thrips, Scirtothrips dorsalis Hood, is a newly introduced insect pest of various tropical and subtropical crops that poses a significant economic threat to U.S. agriculture and trade. Since its introduction in 2005, S. dorsalis has established in 30 counties of Florida and 8 counties of T...

  2. School-Based Management/Shared Decision Making in Dade County (Miami).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cistone, Peter J.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Summarizes the historical background, planning, and implementation of a School-Based Management/Shared Decision Making (SBM/SDM) program in Dade County (Florida). Highlights interim evaluation findings and recommendations. (FMW)

  3. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2009 Digital Orthophotos - Collier County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This dataset is a single orthophoto from a collection of GeoTIFF format, natural-color orthophotos covering Collier County, Florida. The dataset covers an area of...

  4. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2007 Digital Orthophotos - FDEM - Putnam County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Clay-Putnam County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed image data...

  5. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2013 Digital Orthophotos - Dixie County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Dixie County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed image data in...

  6. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2013 Digital Orthophotos - Holmes County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Holmes County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed image data in...

  7. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2007 Digital Orthophotos - Washington County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Washington, Holmes, and Bay County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely...

  8. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2012 Digital Orthophotos - Washington County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Holmes and Washington County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed...

  9. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2007 Digital Orthophotos - FDEM - Clay County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Clay-Putnam County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed image data...

  10. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2013 Digital Orthophotos - Gilchrist County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Gilchrist County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed image data in...

  11. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2007 Digital Orthophotos - Holmes County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Washington, Holmes, and Bay County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely...

  12. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2013 Digital Orthophotos - Washington County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Holmes County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed image data in...

  13. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2011 Digital Orthophotos - Bradford County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF natural color orthophotos covering Baker, Bradford, and Union counties within Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed image...

  14. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2011 Digital Orthophotos - Baker County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF natural color orthophotos covering Baker, Bradford, and Union counties within Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed image...

  15. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2013 Digital Orthophotos - Union County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF natural color orthophotos covering Union County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed image data in which displacement...

  16. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2009 Digital Orthophotos - Washington County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Washington and Holmes County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed...

  17. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2008 Digital Orthophotos - Duval County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Duval County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed image data in...

  18. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2007 Digital Orthophotos - Bay County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Washington, Holmes, and Bay County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely...

  19. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2007 Digital Orthophotos - FDEM - Brevard County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Brevard County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed image data in...

  20. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2008 Digital Orthophotos - Clay County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Duval County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed image data in...

  1. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2012 Digital Orthophotos - Holmes County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Holmes and Washington County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed...

  2. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2013 Digital Orthophotos - Lafayette County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Lafayette County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed image data in...

  3. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2011 Digital Orthophotos - Union County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF natural color orthophotos covering Baker, Bradford, and Union counties within Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed image...

  4. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2013 Digital Orthophotos - Dixie County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Dixie County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed image data in...

  5. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2013 Digital Orthophotos - Holmes County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Holmes County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed image data in...

  6. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2007 Digital Orthophotos - FDEM - Nassau County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Nassau County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed image data in...

  7. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2013 Digital Orthophotos - Washington County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Holmes County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed image data in...

  8. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2009 Digital Orthophotos - Holmes County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Washington and Holmes County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed...

  9. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2011 Digital Orthophotos - Union County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF natural color orthophotos covering Baker, Bradford, and Union counties within Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed image...

  10. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2007 Digital Orthophotos - FDEM - Brevard County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Brevard County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed image data in...

  11. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2013 Digital Orthophotos - Lafayette County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Lafayette County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed image data in...

  12. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2011 Digital Orthophotos - Baker County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF natural color orthophotos covering Baker, Bradford, and Union counties within Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed image...

  13. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2011 Digital Orthophotos - Bradford County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF natural color orthophotos covering Baker, Bradford, and Union counties within Florida. An orthophoto is remotely sensed image...

  14. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2007 Digital Orthophotos - Bay County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Washington, Holmes, and Bay County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely...

  15. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Ortho-Corrected - 2007 Digital Orthophotos - Holmes County

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This dataset is a collection of GeoTIFF and MrSID format natural color orthophotos covering Washington, Holmes, and Bay County, Florida. An orthophoto is remotely...

  16. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety

  17. The Maya of Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Allan F.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the Maya people who fled Guatemala due to a civil war and illegally entered the U.S. and settled in Florida. Presents a picture of their living conditions, employment opportunities, cultural traditions, community development, and family organization. Discusses a Kanjobal Association and the CORN-MAYA program, and explains immigration…

  18. The Maya of Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Allan F.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the Maya people who fled Guatemala due to a civil war and illegally entered the U.S. and settled in Florida. Presents a picture of their living conditions, employment opportunities, cultural traditions, community development, and family organization. Discusses a Kanjobal Association and the CORN-MAYA program, and explains immigration…

  19. Conservation: saving Florida's manatees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonde, Robert K.

    2008-01-01

    Robert K. Bonde of the U.S. Geological Survey writes about the protected population of manatees in Crystal River, Florida, including information about the threats they face as they migrate in and out of protected waters. Photographer Carol Grant shares images of "Angel," a newborn manatee she photographed early one winter morning.

  20. Adapting Bulls to Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    The adaptation of bulls used for natural breeding purposes to the Gulf Coast region of the United States including all of Florida is an important topic. Nearly 40% of the U.S. cow/calf population resides in the Gulf Coast and Southeast. Thus, as A.I. is relatively rare, the number of bulls used for ...

  1. Bothrigaster variolaris (Trematoda: Cyclocoelidae) infection in two Florida snail kites (Rostrhamus sociabilis plumbeus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, R.A.; Thomas, N.J.; Roderick, C.L.

    1995-01-01

    Two Florida snail kites (Rostrhamus sociabilis plumbeus, Say) collected in August and December 1993 from Osceola County (28 degrees 15'N, 81 degrees 17'W) and Glades County (26 degrees 45'N, 81 degrees 10'W), Florida (USA), respectively, were infected with Bothrigaster variolaris (Trematoda: Cyclocoelidae); this parasite has not been reported previously from birds in the United States. One bird, a fledgling female, harbored 270 specimens of B. variolaris; the helminths caused airsacculitis and bronchitis, possible contributing factors in the death of this bird. The other bird, a subadult female, was infected with 40 trematodes and had gross and microscopic lesions consistent with trauma as the cause of death.

  2. 40 CFR 81.310 - Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the St. John's River from its confluence with Long Branch Creek, to Main Street north along Main... Creek to the St. John's River X Seminole County X 1 Polk County X 1 That portion of Hillsborough County... Escambia County Flagler County Franklin County Gadsden County Gilchrist County Glades County Gulf...

  3. Colombia y la Doctrina Monroe: el caso del Ferrocarril de Panamá y las intervenciones estadounidenses en el Istmo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Santiago Correa R

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available La construcción y puesta en marcha del Ferrocarril de Panamá se constituyó como uno de los procesos de inversión extranjera en América Latina durante el siglo XIX. Este ferrocarril, construido como una forma de superar las dificultades de navegación entre el mar Caribe y el Océano Pacífico, permite evidenciar el despliegue de la Doctrina Monroe sobre América Latina y el Caribe, la interrelación entre los intereses de las élites locales y los intereses internacionales, y la forma en que se estaba definiendo el concepto mismo de nación durante el siglo XIX.

  4. 76 FR 32984 - Mississippi; Major Disaster and Related Determinations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-07

    ... this declared major disaster: Clarke, Greene, Hinds, Jasper, Kemper, Lafayette, and Monroe Counties for Individual Assistance. Clarke, Greene, Hinds, Jasper, Kemper, Lafayette, and Monroe Counties for...

  5. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety

  6. Orlando, Florida, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Much of central Florida, including this detailed view of Orlando (28.5N, 81.0W) can be seen in this single photo. Disney World is at the top center of the scene and the crescent shaped Lake Tohopekaliga is near the bottom. The large round lakes are believed to be sinkholes formed during glacial times when ocean levels were several hundred feet lower than the present. Linear patterns east of Orlando are thought to be ancient shoreline ridges.

  7. 多视角看爱丽丝·门罗小说的文体特征--以门罗短篇小说《逃离》为例%Stylistic features of Monroe Alice's novels from multiple perspectives--Taking Monroe's short story "escape" as an example

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    尉艳英

    2016-01-01

    The novel has its own special style and way of expression, as wel as their own special cultural environment. Different writers have their own creation and writing style, the Alice Monroe's short story "escape", for example, from the point of view of Monroe's language features, narrative technique to explore the stylistic features of the novel Monroe to prove the Monroe novels of psychological realism color, Gothic style, and the feminist and aesthetic reflected.%小说有自己特殊的文体表达规范和方式,还有各自特殊的文化环境。不同的小说作者,又有各自创作和写作风格,本文以爱丽丝·门罗的短篇小说《逃离》为例,从门罗的语言特征、叙事手法等角度,对门罗小说的文体特征进行探究,来印证门罗小说的心理现实主义色彩,哥特式风格,以及其女性主义和美学体现。

  8. Palm Beach County's Prime Time Initiative: Improving the Quality of After-School Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielberger, Julie; Lockaby, Tracey

    2008-01-01

    This report covers the third year of Chapin Hall's process evaluation of the Prime Time Initiative of Palm Beach County, Florida, a system-building effort to strengthen the quality of after-school programs in the county. During the past two decades, the after-school field has expanded enormously, partly in response to increasing concern about…

  9. 75 FR 4839 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permit, St. Lucie County, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-29

    ... industrial warehouse condominiums, and supporting infrastructure in St. Lucie County, Florida (Project). The..., several light industrial warehouse condominiums, and supporting infrastructure in St. Lucie County... Appendix 1 and 516 DM 6 Appendix 1), and as defined in our Habitat Conservation Planning Handbook...

  10. ASK Florida; a climate change education professional development program for middle school teachers in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihs, R. R.

    2012-12-01

    A series of professional development workshops covering the fundamentals of climate change have been developed and facilitated for two groups of middle school science teachers in three Florida counties. The NASA-supported joint venture between Florida State University's Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS) and the University of South Florida's (USF's) Coalition for Science Literacy, ASK Florida, focuses on expanding and deepening teachers' content knowledge of a wide range of climate change topics, connecting local and regional changes to the global picture, and supporting classroom implementation and effective teaching practices. Education experts from USF, climate scientists from COAPS, and Hillsborough county teachers and science coaches coordinated and developed the workshop content, which is based on Florida's Next Generation Sunshine State Standards in science, science curriculum guides for 6th grade, and teacher interest. Several scientists have facilitated activities during the workshop, including professors in meteorology and climatology, research scientists in the field, a NOAA program manager, the state climatologists for Florida, and others. Having these climate scientists present during the workshop provides teachers an opportunity to interact directly with the scientists and gain insight into the climatology field. Additionally, we host an open-forum discussion panel during which teachers can ask the experts about any topics of interest. Activities are designed to enhance the scientific skill level of the teachers. Introductory activities reinforce teachers' abilities to distinguish facts from opinions and to evaluate sources. Other activities provide hands-on experience using actual scientific data from NASA and other agencies. For example, teachers analyze precipitation data to create distributions of Florida rainfall, examine sea level trends at various locations, identify Atlantic hurricane frequencies during the phases of ENSO

  11. 近二十年来孟禄研究述评%A Review of Monroe Research for the Past Two Decades

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐浩真

    2014-01-01

    Monroe is an important founder of the historiography of American education, and has greatly promoted the develop-ment and prosperity of the subject. From the 1910s to the 1940s, Monroe came to China for more than 10 times, conducting activi-ties of education survey, discussion and academic lectures. In particular, his visit in 1921 greatly promoted the promulgation of Renxu School System, the reform of secondary education and vocational education, and the development of science education. The paper summarizes and comments on Monroe research for the past two decades to draw scholars' attention to the research and further related studies.%孟禄是20世纪美国教育史学的重要奠基人。他十余次来华进行教育调查、座谈讨论、学术讲演,特别是1921年访华对我国壬戌学制的颁布,中学教育、职业教育的改革,科学教育的发展等起着巨大的推动作用。对近二十年来孟禄研究作一总结与述评,以期引起学者对孟禄研究的重视并推动相关研究的开展。

  12. How Disasters Affect Local Labor Markets: The Effects of Hurricanes in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belasen, Ariel R.; Polachek, Solomon W.

    2009-01-01

    This study improves upon the Difference in Difference approach by examining exogenous shocks using a Generalized Difference in Difference (GDD) technique that identifies economic effects of hurricanes. Based on the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages data, worker earnings in Florida counties hit by a hurricane increase up to 4 percent,…

  13. Creative Capital Financing: Lease Purchase and Leasing Air Space (The Florida Approach).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Franklin L.

    1983-01-01

    Among recent creative financing arrangements for public sector construction in Florida are the Duval County Central Administration Building, constructed with a lease purchase arrangement, and state legislation that provides for the leasing or sale of air space by local school boards or boards of regents. (MLF)

  14. 76 FR 22861 - Approval and Promulgation of State Plans for Designated Facilities and Pollutants: Florida...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    ... received negative declarations for Other Solid Waste Incinerator (OSWI) units from the State of Florida; Large Municipal Waste Combustor (LMWC), Small Municipal Waste Combustor (SMWC), and OSWI units from... OSWI units from Mecklenburg County, North Carolina; LMWC, SMWC, Hospital/Medical/Infectious...

  15. 78 FR 9449 - Noise Exposure Map Notice, Southwest Florida International Airport, Fort Myers, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-08

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Noise Exposure Map Notice, Southwest Florida International Airport, Fort... Administration (FAA) announces its determination that the Noise Exposure Maps submitted by the Lee County Port... (Aviation Safety and Noise Abatement Act) and 14 CFR Part 150 are in compliance with applicable...

  16. Libraries in Florida: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Library → Libraries in Florida URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/florida.html Libraries in Florida ... Pancake Atlantis, FL 33462-1197 561-548-3480 http://opac.libraryworld.com/cgi-bin/opac.pl?command= ...

  17. Orange County Government Solar Demonstration and Research Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Renee [Orange County Florida, Orlando, Florida (United States); Cunniff, Lori [Orange County Florida, Orlando, Florida (United States)

    2015-05-12

    Orange County Florida completed the construction of a 20 kilowatt Solar Demonstration and Research Facility in March 2015. The system was constructed at the Orange County/University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center whose electric service address is 6021 South Conway Road, Orlando, Florida 32802. The Solar Demonstration and Research Facility is comprised of 72 polycrystalline photovoltaic modules and 3 inverters which convert direct current from the solar panels to alternating current electricity. Each module produces 270 watts of direct current power, for a total canopy production of just under 20,000 watts. The solar modules were installed with a fixed tilt of 5 degrees and face south, toward the equator to maximize the amount of sunlight captures. Each year, the electricity generated by the solar array will help eliminate 20 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions as well as provide covered parking for staff and visitors vehicles. The solar array is expected to generate 27,000 kilowatt hours of electricity annually equating to an estimated $266 savings in the monthly electric bill, or $3,180 annually for the Orange County/University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center. In addition to reducing the electric bill for the Extension Center, Orange County’s solar array also takes advantage of a rebate incentive offered by the local utility, Orlando Utility Commission, which provided a meter that measures the amount of power produced by the solar array. The local utility company’s Solar Photovoltaic Production Incentive will pay Orange County $0.05 per kilowatt hour for the power that is produced by the solar array. This incentive is provided in addition to Net Metering benefits, which is an effort to promote the use of clean, renewable energy on the electric grid. The Photovoltaic Solar Demonstration and Research Facility also serves an educational tool to the public; the solar array is tied directly into a data logger that provides real time power

  18. Orange County Government Solar Demonstration and Research Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Renee [Orange County Florida, Orlando, Florida (United States); Cunniff, Lori [Orange County Florida, Orlando, Florida (United States)

    2015-05-12

    Orange County Florida completed the construction of a 20 kilowatt Solar Demonstration and Research Facility in March 2015. The system was constructed at the Orange County/University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center whose electric service address is 6021 South Conway Road, Orlando, Florida 32802. The Solar Demonstration and Research Facility is comprised of 72 polycrystalline photovoltaic modules and 3 inverters which convert direct current from the solar panels to alternating current electricity. Each module produces 270 watts of direct current power, for a total canopy production of just under 20,000 watts. The solar modules were installed with a fixed tilt of 5 degrees and face south, toward the equator to maximize the amount of sunlight captures. Each year, the electricity generated by the solar array will help eliminate 20 metric tons of carbon dioxide emissions as well as provide covered parking for staff and visitors vehicles. The solar array is expected to generate 27,000 kilowatt hours of electricity annually equating to an estimated $266 savings in the monthly electric bill, or $3,180 annually for the Orange County/University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center. In addition to reducing the electric bill for the Extension Center, Orange County’s solar array also takes advantage of a rebate incentive offered by the local utility, Orlando Utility Commission, which provided a meter that measures the amount of power produced by the solar array. The local utility company’s Solar Photovoltaic Production Incentive will pay Orange County $0.05 per kilowatt hour for the power that is produced by the solar array. This incentive is provided in addition to Net Metering benefits, which is an effort to promote the use of clean, renewable energy on the electric grid. The Photovoltaic Solar Demonstration and Research Facility also serves an educational tool to the public; the solar array is tied directly into a data logger that provides real time power

  19. The Spanish Emergency Military Unit: Military Capabilities in a Civilian Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-23

    Hurricane Andrew devastated the south coast of Florida , especially Palm Beach, Broward, Collier, Monroe, and Dade Counties.74 With sixty people killed...July 1993), 1.5-9.5, and Unclassified Working Paper, “Hurricane Andrew, 24 August 1992, South Florida , DOD Force Protection Lessons Learned,” 31 August...Force Andrew (JTFA), 9 October 1992. Unclassified Working Paper. “Hurricane Andrew, 24 August 1992, South Florida , DOD Force Protection Lessons

  20. The Florida Library History Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, Catherine; McCook, Kathleen de la Pena

    The Florida Library History Project (FLHP) began in January 1998. Letters requesting histories were sent to all public libraries in Florida with follow-up letters sent after an initial response was received from the libraries. E-mail messages were sent out to FL-LIB listservs encouraging participation in the project. A poster session was presented…

  1. Biotechnology's new wave in Florida

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    Marine biotechnology is a new economic sector globally, and is in its infancy in Florida. As an industry, it is still a very small part of biotechnology overall, but one where Florida has potential and real advantages over many areas for developing a robust commercial, technical and educational investment. (8pp.)

  2. FLORIDA TOWER FOOTPRINT EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    WATSON,T.B.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; HENDREY, G.; LEWIN, K.; NAGY, J.; LECLERC, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Florida Footprint experiments were a series of field programs in which perfluorocarbon tracers were released in different configurations centered on a flux tower to generate a data set that can be used to test transport and dispersion models. These models are used to determine the sources of the CO{sub 2} that cause the fluxes measured at eddy covariance towers. Experiments were conducted in a managed slash pine forest, 10 km northeast of Gainesville, Florida, in 2002, 2004, and 2006 and in atmospheric conditions that ranged from well mixed, to very stable, including the transition period between convective conditions at midday to stable conditions after sun set. There were a total of 15 experiments. The characteristics of the PFTs, details of sampling and analysis methods, quality control measures, and analytical statistics including confidence limits are presented. Details of the field programs including tracer release rates, tracer source configurations, and configuration of the samplers are discussed. The result of this experiment is a high quality, well documented tracer and meteorological data set that can be used to improve and validate canopy dispersion models.

  3. "Multi-County Diagnostic-Instructional Program for Young Deaf Children" (Serving Lee, Collier, Hendry and Charlotte Counties).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee County Board of Public Instruction, Fort Myers, FL.

    Described is a 1 year program designed to provide a sequential diagnostic-instructional program for 16 young deaf and hearing impaired children in four Florida counties. Objectives of the program are said to have included the development of language and communication skills, inservice education for staff members, parent activities to encourage…

  4. Impact of Hurricane Exposure on Reproductive Health Outcomes, Florida, 2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabich, Shannon C; Robinson, Whitney R; Konrad, Charles E; Horney, Jennifer A

    2017-08-01

    Prenatal hurricane exposure may be an increasingly important contributor to poor reproductive health outcomes. In the current literature, mixed associations have been suggested between hurricane exposure and reproductive health outcomes. This may be due, in part, to residual confounding. We assessed the association between hurricane exposure and reproductive health outcomes by using a difference-in-difference analysis technique to control for confounding in a cohort of Florida pregnancies. We implemented a difference-in-difference analysis to evaluate hurricane weather and reproductive health outcomes including low birth weight, fetal death, and birth rate. The study population for analysis included all Florida pregnancies conceived before or during the 2003 and 2004 hurricane season. Reproductive health data were extracted from vital statistics records from the Florida Department of Health. In 2004, 4 hurricanes (Charley, Frances, Ivan, and Jeanne) made landfall in rapid succession; whereas in 2003, no hurricanes made landfall in Florida. Overall models using the difference-in-difference analysis showed no association between exposure to hurricane weather and reproductive health. The inconsistency of the literature on hurricane exposure and reproductive health may be in part due to biases inherent in pre-post or regression-based county-level comparisons. We found no associations between hurricane exposure and reproductive health. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2017;11:407-411).

  5. Florida-focused climate change lesson demonstrations from the ASK Florida global and regional climate change professional development workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weihs, R. R.

    2013-12-01

    A variety of Florida-focused climate change activities will be featured as part of the ASK Florida global and regional climate change professional development workshops. In a combined effort from Florida State University's Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies (COAPS) and University of South Florida's Coalition for Science Literacy (CSL), and supported by NASA's NICE initiative, the ASK Florida professional development workshops are a series of workshops designed to enhance and support climate change information and related pedagogical skills for middle school science teachers from Title-I schools in Florida. These workshops took place during a two-year period from 2011 to 2013 and consisted of two cohorts in Hillsborough and Volusia counties in Florida. Featured activities include lab-style exercises demonstrating topics such as storm surge and coastal geometry, sea level rise from thermal expansion, and the greenhouse effect. These types of labs are modified so that they allow more independent, inquiry thinking as they require teachers to design their own experiment in order to test a hypothesis. Lecture based activities are used to cover a broad range of topics including hurricanes, climate modeling, and sink holes. The more innovative activities are group activities that utilize roll-playing, technology and resources, and group discussion. For example, 'Climate Gallery Walk' is an activity that features group discussions on each of the climate literacy principles established by the United States Global Change Research Program. By observing discussions between individuals and groups, this activity helps the facilitators gather information on their previous knowledge and identify possible misconceptions that will be addressed within the workshops. Furthermore, 'Fact or Misconception' presents the challenge of identifying whether a given statement is fact or misconception based on the material covered throughout the workshops. It serves as a way to

  6. FLOODPLAIN MAPPING SUBMISSION FOR CLAY COUNTY, FLORIDA AND INCORPORATED AREAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  7. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, BAY COUNTY, FLORIDA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  8. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, POLK COUNTY, FLORIDA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk Information And supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk;...

  9. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, PASCO COUNTY, FLORIDA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk Information And supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk;...

  10. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, UNION COUNTY, FLORIDA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  11. COASTAL STUDY, COLLIER COUNTY, FLORIDA AND INCORPORATED AREAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Coastal study data as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix D: Guidance for Coastal Flooding Analyses and Mapping, submitted as a result of a...

  12. FLOODPLAIN MAPPING SUBMISSION FOR OSCEOLA COUNTY, FLORIDA AND INCORPORATED AREAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  13. BASEMAP Framework Submission for CLAY COUNTY, FLORIDA AND INCORPORATED AREAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — FEMA Framework Basemap datasets comprise six of the seven FGDC themes of geospatial data that are used by most GIS applications (Note: the seventh framework theme,...

  14. FLOODPLAIN MAPPING SUBMISSION FOR GILCHRIST COUNTY, FLORIDA AND INCORPORATED AREAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  15. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, LEE COUNTY, FLORIDA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  16. FLOODPLAIN MAPPING SUBMISSION FOR BROWARD COUNTY, FLORIDA AND INCORPORATED AREAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  17. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, SUMTER COUNTY, FLORIDA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  18. BASEMAP Framework Submission for BROWARD COUNTY, FLORIDA AND INCORPORATED AREAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — FEMA Framework Basemap datasets comprise six of the seven FGDC themes of geospatial data that are used by most GIS applications (Note: the seventh framework theme,...

  19. BASEMAP Framework Submission for CITRUS COUNTY, FLORIDA AND INCORPORATED AREAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — FEMA Framework Basemap datasets comprise six of the seven FGDC themes of geospatial data that are used by most GIS applications (Note: the seventh framework theme,...

  20. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, MADISON COUNTY, FLORIDA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  1. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  2. BASEMAP Framework Submission for BREVARD COUNTY, FLORIDA AND INCORPORATED AREAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — FEMA Framework Basemap datasets comprise six of the seven FGDC themes of geospatial data that are used by most GIS applications (Note: the seventh framework theme,...

  3. SURVEY, Brevard County and Incorporated Areas, Florida, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Survey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in the survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  4. FLOODPLAIN MAPPING SUBMISSION FOR BREVARD COUNTY, FLORIDA AND INCORPORATED AREAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  5. DCS Survey Submission for POLK COUNTY, FLORIDA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Sruvey data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary to digitally represent data collected in teh survey phase of the study. (Source: FEMA Guidelines and...

  6. Hydrologic description of Lake Hancock, Polk County, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammett, K.M.; Snell, L.J.; Joyner, Boyd F.

    1981-01-01

    Available data were evaluated to document hydrologic conditions in the Lake Hancock basin. Bathymetric data indicate that Lake Hancock is very shallow, having a maximum depth of about 3 feet. The lake bottom is covered by a layer of organic material that may be more than 5 feet thick near the center of the lake. Lake Hancock 's stage fluctuates within 0.5 foot of average stage about 40 percent of the time. Lake outflow is through an operable control. There are many days with no outflow in some years. A water-budget analysis of the lake indicates that substantial lake stage declines in 1968 and 1975 followed successive years of deficient precipitation and were primarily the result of a net loss of water from the lake to the ground-water system. During a period in 1971-72 when lake stage remained relatively stable, the ground-water system contributed a significant volume of water to the lake. Water-quality data indicate that Lake Hancock is in a eutrophic state. The eutrophication process appears to have been accelerated through the addition of nutrients from inflow of wastewater effluent from secondary treatment plants. (USGS)

  7. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, NASSAU COUNTY, FLORIDA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  8. FLOODPLAIN MAPPING AND REDELINEATION SUBMISSION, NASSAU COUNTY, FLORIDA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Floodplain Mapping/Redelineation study deliverables depict and quantify the flood risks for the study area. The primary risk classifications used are the...

  9. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, HAMILTON COUNTY, FLORIDA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  10. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FLORIDA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  11. DIGITAL FLOOD INSURANCE RATE MAP DATABASE, MIAMI - DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — The Digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) Database depicts flood risk information and supporting data used to develop the risk data. The primary risk...

  12. Administrative Order -- Lake County Waste To Energy Facility Okahumpka, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  13. Epidemiology of Ciguatera in Florida

    OpenAIRE

    Radke, Elizabeth G.; Reich, Andrew; Morris, John Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Ciguatera is the most commonly reported marine food-borne illness worldwide. Because there is a biological plausibility that ciguatera may be impacted by long-term climate variability and Florida is on the northern border of the geographic distribution of ciguatera, it is important to update our understanding of its epidemiology in Florida. We performed an analysis of 291 reports in Florida from 2000 to 2011 and an e-mail survey of 5,352 recreational fishers to estimate incidence and underrep...

  14. Orange County Photovoltaic Project & Educational COmponent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, Renee [Orange County Government, FL (United States)

    2016-02-12

    The purpose of this report is to discuss the projects implemented, utilizing Department of Energy grant funds, to support the use and understanding of renewable energy in Orange County, Florida and the Greater Orlando Area. Orange County is located in the State of Florida and is most popularly referred to as Orlando. The greater Orlando area’s current population is 1,225,267 and in 2015 was the first destination to surpass 60 million visitors. Orange County utilized grant funds to add to the growing demand for access to charging stations by installing one level 2 dual NovaCharge CT4021 electric vehicle charging station at the Orange County/University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center. The charging station is considered a “smart” charger connected to a central network operated by a third party. Data collected includes the number of charging sessions, session start and end times, the electricity usage, greenhouse gases saved and other pertinent data used for reporting purposes. Orange County continues to support the use of electric vehicles in Metro Orlando and this project continues to bring awareness to our public regarding using alternative vehicles. Additionally, we offer all visitors to the Orange County/University of Florida Cooperative Extension Center free charges for their electric vehicles 24 hours a day. Since the operation of the charging station there have been 52 unique driver users, a total of 532.2258 kg of greenhouse gas savings and 159.03 gallons of gasoline savings. The installation of the additional electric vehicle charging station is part of a county-wide goal of promoting implementation of renewable energy technologies as well as supporting the use of electric vehicles including the Drive Electric Orlando & Florida programs. http://driveelectricorlando.com/ & ; http://www.driveelectricflorida.org/ . Grant funds were also used for Outreach and Educational efforts. Educational efforts about renewable energy were accomplished through

  15. North Florida is part of the stroke belt.

    OpenAIRE

    Siegel, P. Z.; Wolfe, L E; Wilcox, D.; Deeb, L C

    1992-01-01

    Florida is the only State in the southeastern United States that is not part of the "stroke belt." The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), National Institutes of Health, defines the stroke belt as those States with an age-adjusted stroke mortality rate for the years 1979 to 1981 that is more than 10 percent above the national annual rate of 40.3 per 100,000 population. By reproducing at the county level the methods that were used at the State level to describe the stroke belt, ...

  16. Teaching CPR to Florida's Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varnes, Jill W.; Crone, Ernest G.

    1980-01-01

    A program in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) instruction for Florida's school children is described. Program guidelines and support services are detailed for other schools wishing to implement such a program. (JN)

  17. Florida's Panhandle : A Quiet Appeal

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This article discusses the quiet appeal, abundant history, and untouched outdoors of Florida's Panhandle. A description of St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge is...

  18. Florida Panther Reintroduction Feasibility Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Summary and final report of a Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission study to evalaute initial stocking of mountain lion populations in northern...

  19. Spatial epidemiology of eastern equine encephalitis in Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vander Kelen Patrick T

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eastern Equine Encephalitis virus (EEEV is an alphavirus with high pathogenicity in both humans and horses. Florida continues to have the highest occurrence of human cases in the USA, with four fatalities recorded in 2010. Unlike other states, Florida supports year-round EEEV transmission. This research uses GIS to examine spatial patterns of documented horse cases during 2005–2010 in order to understand the relationships between habitat and transmission intensity of EEEV in Florida. Methods Cumulative incidence rates of EEE in horses were calculated for each county. Two cluster analyses were performed using density-based spatial clustering of applications with noise (DBSCAN. The first analysis was based on regional clustering while the second focused on local clustering. Ecological associations of EEEV were examined using compositional analysis and Euclidean distance analysis to determine if the proportion or proximity of certain habitats played a role in transmission. Results The DBSCAN algorithm identified five distinct regional spatial clusters that contained 360 of the 438 horse cases. The local clustering resulted in 18 separate clusters containing 105 of the 438 cases. Both the compositional analysis and Euclidean distance analysis indicated that the top five habitats positively associated with horse cases were rural residential areas, crop and pastureland, upland hardwood forests, vegetated non-forested wetlands, and tree plantations. Conclusions This study demonstrates that in Florida tree plantations are a focus for epizootic transmission of EEEV. It appears both the abundance and proximity of tree plantations are factors associated with increased risk of EEE in horses and therefore humans. This association helps to explain why there is are spatially distinct differences in the amount of EEE horse cases across Florida.

  20. Spaceport Florida Authority: Business Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The Spaceport Florida Authority (SFA) was established under Florida Statute by the Governor and Legislature to assist the development of our nation's space transportation industry and to generate new space-related jobs, investment and opportunities statewide. Included in the Authorities' business plan is the statement of work and list of team members involved in creating the report, SFA's current operating concept, market analysis, assessment of accomplishments, a sample operating concept and a "roadmap to success".

  1. Allegheny County Address Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains address points which represent physical address locations assigned by the Allegheny County addressing authority. Data is updated by County...

  2. Allegheny County Air Quality

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Air quality data from Allegheny County Health Department monitors throughout the county. Air quality monitored data must be verified by qualified individuals before...

  3. Allegheny County Council Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset portrays the boundaries of the County Council Districts in Allegheny County. The dataset is based on municipal boundaries and City of Pittsburgh ward...

  4. Allegheny County Municipal Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset demarcates the municipal boundaries in Allegheny County. Data was created to portray the boundaries of the 130 Municipalities in Allegheny County the...

  5. Allegheny County Address Points

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains address points which represent physical address locations assigned by the Allegheny County addressing authority. Data is updated by County...

  6. Allegheny County Council Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset portrays the boundaries of the County Council Districts in Allegheny County. The dataset is based on municipal boundaries and City of Pittsburgh ward...

  7. Allegheny County Municipal Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset demarcates the municipal boundaries in Allegheny County. Data was created to portray the boundaries of the 130 Municipalities in Allegheny County the...

  8. 5 CFR Appendix C to Subpart B of... - Appropriated Fund Wage and Survey Areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Highlands Martin Monroe Okeechobee Palm Beach St. Lucie Panama City Survey Area Florida: Bay Gulf Area of... San Bernardino County except that portion occupied by, and south and west of, the Angeles and San... Bernardino (Only that portion occupied by, and south and west of the Angeles and San Bernardino...

  9. 78 FR 43197 - Duke Energy Florida, Inc.; Florida Power & Light Company; Tampa Electric Company; Orlando...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-19

    ... Company; Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Compliance Filings Take notice that on July 10, 2013, Duke Energy Florida, Inc., Florida Power & Light Company, Tampa Electric Company, and Orlando...

  10. Appenzell Creek, Aquashicola Creek, Buck Hill Creek, Bush Kill Creek, Cherry Creek, Cranberry Creek, Marshall Creek, Pocono Creek, and Swiftwater Creek Field SURVEY, Monroe COUNTY, PA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Hydrology data includes spatial datasets and data tables necessary for documenting the hydrologic procedures for estimating flood discharges for the flood insurance...

  11. National Dam Safety Program. Larkin Creek Dam (Inventory Number NY 711). Lake Ontario Basin, Monroe County, New York. Phase I Inspection Report,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-30

    of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service 19. Guidebook for Field Trips in Wester New York, 1956, New York State Geological Association 28th Annual...WiTH _ LB WT CA BLOt Ilk. . i lIl - i SLCHESTER CONCRETE AND SOIL-TESTING AND INSPECTION /7DRILLING 45 Steel Street a Rochester. New York 14606 [p

  12. Appenzell Creek, Aquashicola Creek, Buck Hill Creek, Bush Kill Creek, Cherry Creek, Cranberry Creek, Marshall Creek, Pocono Creek, and Swiftwater Creek Field SURVEY, Monroe COUNTY, PA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Recent developments in digital terrain and geospatial database management technology make it possible to protect this investment for existing and future projects to...

  13. NOAA Office for Coastal Management Coastal Inundation Digital Elevation Model: Miami (FL) WFO - Palm Beach, Broward, Miami-Dade, and Monroe (Keys) Counties

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This digital elevation model (DEM) is a part of a series of DEMs produced for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Office for Coastal Management's Sea...

  14. The Integration of Climate Science and Collaborative Processes in Building Regional Climate Resiliency in Southeast Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurado, J.

    2016-12-01

    Southeast Florida is widely recognized as one of the most vulnerable regions in the United States to the impacts of climate change, especially sea level rise. Dense urban populations, low land elevations, flat topography, complex shorelines and a porous geology all contribute to the region's challenges. Regional and local governments have been working collaboratively to address shared climate mitigation and adaptation concerns as part of the four-county Southeast Florida Regional Climate Change Compact (Compact). This partnership has emphasized, in part, the use of climate data and the development of advanced technical tools and visualizations to help inform decision-making, improve communications, and guide investments. Prominent work products have included regional vulnerability maps and assessments, a unified sea level rise projection for southeast Florida, the development and application of hydrologic models in scenario planning, interdisciplinary resilient redesign planning workshops, and the development of regional climate indicators. Key to the Compact's efforts has been the engagement and expertise of academic and agency partners, including a formal collaboration between the Florida Climate Institute and the Compact to improve research and project collaborations focused on southeast Florida. This presentation will focus on the collaborative processes and work products that have served to accelerate resiliency planning and investments in southeast Florida, with specific examples of how local governments are using these work products to modernize agency processes, and build support among residents and business leaders.

  15. The Flood of June 2003 in Southwest Central Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Richard L.

    2003-01-01

    A series of severe thunderstorms brought heavy rainfall and flooding to southwest-central Florida during June 21-24, 2003. The storms and resultant precipitation were caused by a late-season stationary cool front (Canadian high pressure ridge) that combined with tropical moisture from the Gulf of Mexico to produce above-normal rainfall over already saturated ground (National Weather Service, written commun., 2003). Rainfall totals at U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow-gaging stations ranged from 9 to 17 inches and record flooding occurred in parts of Charlotte, De Soto, Hardee, Manatee, and Sarasota Counties, Florida (fig. 1). The floods caused $11.3 million in damage to public and private property, including damage or destruction of 119 homes (Binette and Saewitz, 2003). Western De Soto, western Hardee, Manatee, and Sarasota Counties are drained by the Horse Creek, Manatee River, and Myakka River systems. Water in these watersheds flows southwestward to Charlotte Harbor and the Gulf of Mexico (fig. 1).

  16. 76 FR 48941 - Alabama & Florida Railway Co., Inc.-Abandonment Exemption-in Geneva, Coffee, and Covington...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Alabama & Florida Railway Co., Inc.--Abandonment Exemption--in Geneva, Coffee..., Coffee and Covington Counties, Ala. The line constitutes A&F's entire rail system and traverses...

  17. Methanol production from eucalyptus wood chips. Attachment VI. Florida's eucalyptus energy farm: the natural system interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fishkind, H.H.

    1982-05-01

    A review of pertinent literature covered the following: eucalypt background, the candidate species, biomass plantation considerations, effects of site production, leachate and allelopathy, and some exotic flora considerations. The comparative eucalypt field survey covers mined land stands, unmined south Florida stands, and Glade County eucalypt stands. The problem of eucalypt naturalization is discussed.

  18. Rethinking "Turner v. Keefe": The Parallel Mobilization of African-American and White Teachers in Tampa, Florida, 1936-1946

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shircliffe, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    In 1941, members of the local unit of the Florida State Teachers Association (FSTA) met in Tampa to plan a lawsuit against Hillsborough County's school board for paying African-American teachers less than white teachers. Hilda Turner, who taught history and economics at Tampa's historically black high school, agreed to serve as plaintiff; she was…

  19. Epidemiology of Ciguatera in Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radke, Elizabeth G; Reich, Andrew; Morris, John Glenn

    2015-08-01

    Ciguatera is the most commonly reported marine food-borne illness worldwide. Because there is a biological plausibility that ciguatera may be impacted by long-term climate variability and Florida is on the northern border of the geographic distribution of ciguatera, it is important to update our understanding of its epidemiology in Florida. We performed an analysis of 291 reports in Florida from 2000 to 2011 and an e-mail survey of 5,352 recreational fishers to estimate incidence and underreporting and identify high risk demographic groups, fish types, and catch locations. Incidence was 5.6 per 100,000 adjusted for underreporting. Hispanics had the highest incidence rate (relative risk [RR] = 3.4) and were more likely to eat barracuda than non-Hispanics. The most common catch locations for ciguatera-causing fish were the Bahamas and Florida Keys. Cases caused by fish from northern Florida were infrequent. These results indicate that ciguatera incidence is higher than estimated from public health reports alone. There is little evidence that incidence or geographic range has increased because of increased seawater temperatures since earlier studies.

  20. Supreme Court to hear Florida clinic access case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-15

    On April 27, 1994, the US Supreme Court will review a Florida Supreme Court decision ensuring access to women's health clinics that offer abortion services. In October 1993, the Florida High Court determined that an order issued by Brevard/Seminole County Circuit Judge Robert McGregor that requires anti-abortion protestors to remain 36 feet from the clinic grounds, prohibits approaching any clinic patient within 300 feet of the facility, bars excessive noise during clinic hours, and creates a 300 foot safety zone around the homes of clinic staff was reasonable. Anti-abortion activists had challenged Judge McGregor's injunction, maintaining that it violated their First Amendment rights and was overboard. Days before the Florida High Court ruling, however, the US Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit had rejected Judge McGregor's injunction as unconstitutional. Although the appeal to the US Supreme Court, Madsen vs Women's Health Center, was filed by anti-abortion activists, pro-choice groups are supporting the review as a means of resolving the confusion created by conflicting state and federal rulings.

  1. Water withdrawals, use, discharge, and trends in Florida, 1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marella, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    In 1995, the total amount of water withdrawn in Florida was nearly 18,200 million gallons per day (Mgal/d), of which 60 percent was saline and 40 percent was freshwater. Ground water accounted for 60 percent of freshwater withdrawals and surface water accounted for the remaining 40 percent. Ninety-three percent of the 14.15 million people in Florida relied on ground water for their drinking water needs in 1995. Almost all (99.9 percent) saline water withdrawals were from surface water. Public supply accounted for 43 percent of ground water withdrawn in 1995, followed by agricultural self-supplied (35 percent), commercial-industrial self-supplied (including mining) (10 percent), domestic self-supplied (7 percent), recreational irrigation (4.5 percent), and power generation (0.5 percent). Agricultural self-supplied accounted for 60 percent of fresh surface water withdrawn in 1995, followed by power generation (21 percent), commercial-industrial self-supplied (9 percent), public supply (7 percent), and recreational irrigation (3 percent). Almost all of saline water withdrawn was used for power generation. The largest amount of freshwater was withdrawn in Palm Beach County and the largest amount of saline water was withdrawn in Hillsborough County. Significant withdrawals (more than 200 Mgal/d) of fresh ground water occurred in Dade, Broward, Polk, Orange, and Palm Beach Counties. Significant withdrawals (more than 200 Mgal/d) of fresh surface water occurred in Palm Beach, Hendry, and St. Lucie Counties. The South Florida Water Management District accounted for the largest amount of freshwater withdrawn (nearly 50 percent). About 57 percent of the total ground water withdrawn was from the Floridan aquifer system; 20 percent was from the Biscayne aquifer. Most of the surface water used in Florida was from managed and maintained canal systems or large water bodies. Major sources of fresh surface water include the Caloosahatchee River, Deer Point Lake, Hillsborough River

  2. Water withdrawals, use, discharge, and trends in Florida, 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marella, Richard L.

    2004-01-01

    In 2000, the estimated amount of water withdrawn in Florida was 20,148 million gallons per day (Mgal/d), of which 59 percent was saline and 41 percent was fresh. Ground water accounted for 62 percent of freshwater withdrawals and surface water accounted for the remaining 38 percent. Ninety-two percent of the 15.98 million people in Florida relied on ground water for their drinking water needs in 2000. Almost all of the saline water withdrawals (99.9 percent) were from surface water. Public supply accounted for 43 percent of ground water withdrawn in 2000, followed by agricultural self-supplied (39 percent), commercial-industrial self-supplied (including mining) (8.5 percent), recreational irrigation (4.5 percent), domestic self-supplied (4 percent), and power generation (1 percent). Agricultural self-supplied accounted for 62 percent of fresh surface water withdrawn in 2000, followed by power generation (20 percent), public supply (8 percent), recreational irrigation (6 percent), and commercial-industrial self-supplied (4 percent). Almost all of saline water withdrawn was used for power generation. The largest amount of freshwater was withdrawn in Palm Beach County and the largest amount of saline water was withdrawn in Hillsborough County. Significant withdrawals (more than 200 Mgal/d) of fresh ground water occurred in Miami-Dade, Polk, Orange, Palm Beach, Broward, and Collier Counties. Significant withdrawals (more than 200 Mgal/d) of fresh surface water occurred in Palm Beach, Hendry, and Escambia Counties. The South Florida Water Management District accounted for the largest amount of freshwater withdrawn (49 percent). About 62 percent of the total ground water withdrawn was from the Floridan aquifer system; 17 percent was from the Biscayne aquifer. Most of the surface water used in Florida was from managed and maintained canal systems or large water bodies. Major sources of fresh surface water include the Caloosahatchee River, Deer Point Lake, Hillsborough

  3. La “nueva” Doctrina Monroe de 1895 y sus implicaciones para el Caribe español: algunas interpretaciones coetáneas españolas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilton, Sylvia L.

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Not available.

    El análisis de una selección de periódicos españoles de diversas ideologías políticas demuestra que la mayoría de los comentaristas relacionaban la política de Cleveland en la disputa anglo-venezolana en 1895 con la de McKinley en la crisis colonial española de 1895-1898, interpretando ambas intervenciones como una función de la Doctrina Monroe. Sin embargo, al contrario que el presidente Cleveland, McKinley no apeló a esta Doctrina como justificación de su política exterior iberoamericana o de su actitud ante la guerra hispano- cubana, por lo que se interpreta que las referencias a ella en el discurso periodístico peninsular de estos años obedecen a móviles más relacionados con los resortes y objetivos de la propia retórica periodística, dentro del contexto de la política española, tanto doméstica y colonial como internacional. Esto explica las contradicciones y diferencias interpretativas en torno a la Doctrina Monroe que se reflejan en la prensa española.

  4. Review of Aquifer Storage and Recovery Performance in the Upper Floridan Aquifer in Southern Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Ronald S.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Interest and activity in aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) in southern Florida has increased greatly during the past 10 to 15 years. ASR wells have been drilled to the carbonate Floridan aquifer system at 30 sites in southern Florida, mostly by local municipalities or counties located in coastal areas. The primary storage zone at these sites is contained within the brackish to saline Upper Floridan aquifer of the Floridan aquifer system. The strategy for use of ASR in southern Florida is to store excess freshwater available during the wet season in an aquifer and recover it during the dry season when needed for supplemental water supply. Each ASR cycle is defined by three periods: recharge, storage, and recovery. This fact sheet summarizes some of the findings of a second phase retrospective assessment of existing ASR facilities and sites.

  5. [Book review] Stevenson, H.M. & Anderson, B.H. 1994. The Birdlife of Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushlan, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    The book consists of species accounts of each species including, where information is available, such topics as overall distribution, Florida status, relative abundance, migration, haunts and habits, adverse factors, problems of identification, variation, references and a distribution map symbolically showing seasonal distribution records by county. The book also has an addendum of records in 1993-1994 and an extensive bibliography. Any faunistic treatment of Florida or study of the status of any Florida species will need to use the text as a starting point, although not necessarily an ending point. Those concerned with having the most solidly verified species list would be best advised to continue to use Robertson and Woolfenden's Annotated List and its successors. But for a compendium of information on the birds of this fascinating peninsula, one could do no better.

  6. Hydrology of Southeast Florida and Associated Topics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsour, William, Comp.; Moyer, Maureen, Comp.

    This booklet deals with the hydrology of southeastern Florida. It is designed to provide the citizen, teacher, or student with hydrological information, to promote an understanding of water resources, and to initiate conservation practices within Florida communities. The collection of articles within the booklet deal with Florida water resources…

  7. The use of remote sensing in solving Florida's geological and coastal engineering problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, H. K.; Ruth, B. E.; Wang, Y. H.; Ferguson, R. L.

    1977-01-01

    LANDSAT imagery and NASA high altitude color infrared (CIR) photography were used to select suitable sites for sanitary landfill in Volusia County, Florida and to develop techniques for preventing sand deposits in the Clearwater inlet. Activities described include the acquisition of imagery, its analysis by the IMAGE 100 system, conventional photointerpretation, evaluation of existing data sources (vegetation, soil, and ground water maps), site investigations for ground truth, and preparation of displays for reports.

  8. Environmental Assessment for the Solar Photovoltaic Array, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-24

    systems. ● Sequence construction activities to limit the soil exposure for long periods of time. 5 Water Resources ● Do not alter natural flow...construction activities to limit the soil exposure for long periods of time. Management Practices Management Actions January 2014 Solar Photovoltaic Array...ENVIRONMENTAL !ASSESSMENT FOR THE SOLAR PHOTOVOLTAIC ARRAY AT EGLIN AIR FORCE BASE- OKALOOSA COUNTY, FLORIDA. I USAF - DEA, SOLAR PHOTOVOL TAlC ARRAY AT EGLIN

  9. Regional Sediment Management (RSM) Assessment of Longboat Pass, Manatee County, FL

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Pass , Manatee County, FL by Kelly R. Legault PURPOSE: This Coastal and Hydraulics Engineering Technical Note (CHETN) describes the history of...ebb shoal morphology at Longboat Pass , Manatee County, FL, based on a review of the history and the recent inlet management studies for proposed...navigational dredging of the Pass . The study area is located on the southwest Gulf of Mexico coast of Florida (Figure 1). The goals of the study were to

  10. Water withdrawals, use, and trends in Florida, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marella, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, the total amount of water withdrawn in Florida was estimated to be 14,988 million gallons per day (Mgal/d). Saline water accounted for 8,589 Mgal/d (57 percent) and freshwater accounted for 6,399 Mgal/d (43 percent). Groundwater accounted for 4,166 Mgal/d (65 percent) of freshwater withdrawals, and surface water accounted for the remaining 2,233 Mgal/d (35 percent). Surface water accounted for nearly all (99.9 percent) saline-water withdrawals. An additional 659 Mgal/d of reclaimed wastewater was used in Florida during 2010. Freshwater withdrawals were greatest in Palm Beach County (707 Mgal/d), and saline-water withdrawals were greatest in Hillsborough County (1,715 Mgal/d). Fresh groundwater provided drinking water (public supplied and self-supplied) for 17.33 million people (92 percent of Florida’s population), and fresh surface water provided drinking water for 1.47 million people (8 percent). The statewide public-supply gross per capita use for 2010 was 134 gallons per day, whereas the statewide public-supply domestic per capita use was 85 gallons per day. The majority of groundwater withdrawals (almost 62 percent) in 2010 were obtained from the Floridan aquifer system, which is present throughout most of the State. The majority of fresh surface-water withdrawals (56 percent) came from the southern Florida hydrologic unit subregion and is associated with Lake Okeechobee and the canals in the Everglades Agricultural Area of Glades, Hendry, and Palm Beach Counties, as well as the Caloosahatchee River and its tributaries in the agricultural areas of Collier, Glades, Hendry, and Lee Counties. Overall, agricultural irrigation accounted for 40 percent of the total freshwater withdrawals (ground and surface), followed by public supply with 35 percent. Public supply accounted for 48 percent of groundwater withdrawals, followed by agricultural self-supplied (34 percent), commercial-industrial-mining self-supplied (7 percent), recreational

  11. Water Withdrawals, Use, and Trends in Florida, 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marella, Richard L.

    2009-01-01

    In 2005, the total amount of water withdrawals in Florida was estimated at 18,359 million gallons per day (Mgal/d). Saline water accounted for 11,486 Mgal/d (63 percent), and freshwater accounted for 6,873 Mgal/d (37 percent). Groundwater accounted for 4,247 Mgal/d (62 percent) of freshwater withdrawals, and surface water accounted for the remaining 2,626 Mgal/d (38 percent). Surface water accounted for nearly all (99.9 percent) saline-water withdrawals. An additional 660 Mgal/d of reclaimed wastewater was used in Florida during 2005. The largest amount of freshwater was withdrawn from Palm Beach County, and the largest amount of saline water was withdrawn from Pasco County. Fresh groundwater provided drinking water (public supplied and self-supplied) for 16.19 million people (90 percent of Florida's population), and fresh surface water provided drinking water for 1.73 million people (10 percent). The majority of groundwater withdrawals (nearly 60 percent) in 2005 was obtained from the Floridan aquifer system which is present throughout the entire State. The majority of fresh surface-water withdrawals (59 percent) came from the southern Florida hydrologic unit subregion and is associated with Lake Okeechobee and the canals in the Everglades Agricultural Area of Glades, Hendry, and Palm Beach Counties, as well as the Caloosahatchee River and its tributaries in the agricultural areas of Collier, Glades, Hendry, and Lee Counties. Overall, agricultural irrigation accounted for 40 percent of the total freshwater withdrawals (ground and surface), followed by public supply with 37 percent. Public supply accounted for 52 percent of groundwater withdrawals, followed by agricultural self-supplied (31 percent), ommercial-industrial-mining self-supplied (8.5 percent), recreational irrigation and domestic self-supplied (4 percent each), and power generation (0.5 percent). Agricultural self-supplied accounted for 56 percent of fresh surface-water withdrawals, followed by power

  12. Taxonomy Icon Data: Florida lancelet (amphioxus) [Taxonomy Icon

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Florida lancelet (amphioxus) Branchiostoma floridae Chordata/Urochordata,Cephalochorda...ta Branchiostoma_floridae_L.png Branchiostoma_floridae_NL.png Branchiostoma_floridae_S.png Branchiostoma_florida...e_NS.png http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Branchiostoma+floridae&t=L http://bioscienc...edbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Branchiostoma+floridae&t=NL http://biosciencedbc....jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Branchiostoma+floridae&t=S http://biosciencedbc.jp/taxonomy_icon/icon.cgi?i=Branchiostoma+florida

  13. Fort Monroe Historic Viewsheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    of North America.2 These groups also appear to have had a strong in- terest in high quality , lithic material found farther west in the state. During...very large multi-band camps through smaller band camps to very small micro-band foraging sites. In matters of subsistence there may be differences...show evidence of maize agriculture. It was the groups of the Late Woodland who would encounter the European explorers in the late sixteenth and

  14. Merilin Monro : Posledneje intervju

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2002-01-01

    Studio Universal esitles dokumentaalfilmi "Marilyn - viimane intervjuu", mille aluseks on ajakirja "Life" ajakirjaniku 8-tunnine intervjuu näitlejatariga, tehtud paar päeva enne viimase siiani salapärast surma

  15. Merilin Monro : Posledneje intervju

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2002-01-01

    Studio Universal esitles dokumentaalfilmi "Marilyn - viimane intervjuu", mille aluseks on ajakirja "Life" ajakirjaniku 8-tunnine intervjuu näitlejatariga, tehtud paar päeva enne viimase siiani salapärast surma

  16. Supplement Analysis for the Transmission System Vegetation Management Program FEIS (DOE/EIS-0285/SA-106)SnoKing Tap to Monroe-Samamish Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Mark A. [Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (United States)

    2002-09-30

    Vegetation Management along the SnoKing Tap to the Monroe-Samamish transmission line from structure 8/1 through structure 20/6. BPA proposes to remove unwanted vegetation along the right-of-way, access roads and around tower structures along the subject transmission line corridor. The right-of-way will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide treatments. Approximately 12 miles of access roads will be cleared using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide treatments. Approximately 65 tower sites will be treated using selective and non-selective methods that include hand cutting, mowing and herbicide treatments. Vegetation management is required for unimpeded operation and maintenance of the subject transmission line. See Section 1of the attached checklist for a complete description of the proposal.

  17. La “nueva” Doctrina Monroe de 1895 y sus implicaciones para el Caribe español: algunas interpretaciones coetáneas españolas

    OpenAIRE

    1998-01-01

    Not available.

    El análisis de una selección de periódicos españoles de diversas ideologías políticas demuestra que la mayoría de los comentaristas relacionaban la política de Cleveland en la disputa anglo-venezolana en 1895 con la de McKinley en la crisis colonial española de 1895-1898, interpretando ambas intervenciones como una función de la Doctrina Monroe. Sin embargo, al contrario que el presidente Cleveland, McKinley no apeló a esta Doctrina como justificación de su p...

  18. Allegheny County TIF Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Tax Increment Financing (TIF) outline parcels for Allegheny County, PA. TIF closing books contain all necessary documentation related to a TIF in order to close on...

  19. Allegheny County TIF Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Tax Increment Financing (TIF) outline parcels for Allegheny County, PA. TIF closing books contain all necessary documentation related to a TIF in order to close on...

  20. Allegheny County Property Assessments

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Real Property parcel characteristics for Allegheny County, PA. Includes information pertaining to land, values, sales, abatements, and building characteristics (if...

  1. Allegheny County Street Centerlines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains the locations of the street centerlines for vehicular and foot traffic in Allegheny County. Street Centerlines are classified as Primary...

  2. Allegheny County Parks Outlines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Shows the size and shape of the nine Allegheny County parks. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open data portal...

  3. Allegheny County Street Centerlines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains the locations of the street centerlines for vehicular and foot traffic in Allegheny County. Street Centerlines are classified as Primary Road,...

  4. Allegheny County Depression Medication

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — These Census Tract-level datasets described here provide de-identified diagnosis data for customers of three managed care organizations in Allegheny County (Gateway...

  5. Allegheny County Diabetes Hospitalization

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This data includes the number of people hospitalized with diabetes between 2013-2015, by age group, for Allegheny County Zip Codes.

  6. Allegheny County Plumbers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — All master plumbers must be registered with the Allegheny County Health Department. Only Registered Master Plumbers who possess a current plumbing license or...

  7. Allegheny County Dam Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset shows the point locations of dams in Allegheny County. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open data portal...

  8. Westmoreland County Crash Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Contains locations and information about every crash incident reported to the police in Westmoreland County from 2011 to 2015. Fields include injury severity,...

  9. Allegheny County Crash Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Contains locations and information about every crash incident reported to the police in Allegheny County from 2004 to 2015. Fields include injury severity,...

  10. County Population Vulnerability

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — This layer summarizes the social vulnerability index for populations within each county in the United States at scales 1:3m and below. It answers the question...

  11. Beaver County Crash Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Contains locations and information about every crash incident reported to the police in Beaver County from 2011 to 2015. Fields include injury severity, fatalities,...

  12. Washington County Crash Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Contains locations and information about every crash incident reported to the police in Washington County from 2011 to 2015. Fields include injury severity,...

  13. Allegheny County Street Centerlines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains the locations of the street centerlines for vehicular and foot traffic in Allegheny County. Street Centerlines are classified as Primary Road,...

  14. Allegheny County Obesity Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Obesity rates for each Census Tract in Allegheny County were produced for the study “Developing small-area predictions for smoking and obesity prevalence in the...

  15. Allegheny County Major Rivers

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains locations of major rivers that flow through Allegheny County. These shapes have been taken from the Hydrology dataset. The Ohio River,...

  16. Allegheny County Boundary

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains the Allegheny County boundary. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open data portal...

  17. Allegheny County Smoking Rates

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Smoking rates for each Census Tract in Allegheny County were produced for the study “Developing small-area predictions for smoking and obesity prevalence in the...

  18. Allegheny County Hospitals

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The data on health care facilities includes the name and location of all the hospitals and primary care facilities in Allegheny County. The current listing of...

  19. Taos County Roads

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Vector line shapefile under the stewardship of the Taos County Planning Department depicting roads in Taos County, New Mexico. Originally under the Emergency...

  20. Allegheny County Homicides

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The dataset has location information on homicides that occurred in Allegheny County from 2002-2014. Age group, gender, and race and year of death have been...

  1. Allegheny County Parcel Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This dataset contains parcel boundaries attributed with county block and lot number. Use the Property Information Extractor for more control downloading a filtered...

  2. Allegheny County Property Viewer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Webmap of Allegheny municipalities and parcel data. Zoom for a clickable parcel map with owner name, property photograph, and link to the County Real Estate website...

  3. Allegheny County Tobacco Vendors

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — The tobacco vendor information provides the location of all tobacco vendors in Allegheny County in 2015. Data was compiled from administrative records managed by...

  4. Allegheny County Asbestos Permits

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Asbestos permit data issued by the County for commercial building demolitions and renovations as required by the EPA. This file is updated daily and can be...

  5. Allegheny County Anxiety Medication

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — These Census Tract-level datasets described here provide de-identified diagnosis data for customers of three managed care organizations in Allegheny County (Gateway...

  6. Butler County Crash Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Contains locations and information about every crash incident reported to the police in Butler County from 2011 to 2015. Fields include injury severity, fatalities,...

  7. Allegheny County Hypertension Hospitalization

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This data provides hypertension prevalence data for each Zip Code in Allegheny County. The information was produced by Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment...

  8. Allegheny County Traffic Counts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Traffic sensors at over 1,200 locations in Allegheny County collect vehicle counts for the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. Data included in the Health...

  9. Disseminated toxoplasmosis Toxoplasma gondii in a wild Florida manatee Trichechus manatus latirostris and seroprevalence in two wild populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lauren N; Waltzek, Thomas B; Rotstein, David S; Francis-Floyd, Ruth; Walsh, Michael T; Wellehan, James F X; Gerhold, Rick; Chapman, Alycia E; de Wit, Martine

    2016-11-22

    Marine mammals are important indicators for ecosystem health and serve as sentinel species for infectious agents including zoonoses. Histological examination of tissues from a stranded Florida manatee Trichechus manatus latirostris revealed protozoal cysts in the cerebrum and intrahistiocytic tachyzoites in the liver and caudal mesenteric lymph node. Disseminated Toxoplasma gondii infection was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and sequencing of the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region of formalin-fixed tissues. The lack of baseline information on Florida manatees' exposure to this pathogen prompted a study into the seroprevalence of T. gondii in 2 separate geographic habitats in Florida, USA, during the winters from 2011-2014. Serum was collected during routine health assessments of 44 apparently healthy manatees from Crystal River (n = 26) on the west central coast of Florida and Brevard County (n = 18) on the east coast of Florida. Serum was screened for detection of T. gondii immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies via the modified agglutination test. Two animals from Crystal River from 2011 and 2012 (7.7%) and one animal from Brevard County from 2011 (5.6%) tested positive for T. gondii antibodies. Overall seroprevalence for T. gondii was low in the 2 sampled populations and may reflect a low seroprevalence or animal susceptibility. However, continued monitoring of this pathogen in aquatic ecosystems is warranted due to both possible anthropogenic sources and zoonotic potential.

  10. Manatee County Displaced Homemakers Program. Final Report from July 1, 1983 to August 31, 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joynes, Margot

    In the Displaced Homemaker project at the New Options Center in Manatee County, Bradenton, Florida, clients were displaced homemakers, single household heads needing training, homemakers seeking full-time employment, and anyone interested in jobs or training nontraditional to his/her sex. Various outreach methods--public service announcements,…

  11. S.T.E.P. in Bay County. The Rutherford Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee. Office of Environment Education.

    This document presents an explanation, illustration, and evaluation of a Students Toward Environmental Participation (S.T.E.P.) Project at Rutherford High School in Bay County, Florida. The main objective of this S.T.E.P. Project was to train high school students to teach environmental awareness activities to elementary students. This booklet…

  12. Phage therapy for Florida corals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, Christina A.

    2007-01-01

    Coral disease is a major cause of reef decline in the Florida Keys. Bacterium has been defined as the most common pathogen (disease-causing organism). Although much is being done to catalog coral diseases, map their locations, determine the causes of disease, or measure the rates of coral demise, very little research has been directed toward actually preventing or eliminating the diseases affecting coral and coral reef decline.

  13. Genetic variability in the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClenaghan, Leroy R.; O'Shea, Thomas J.

    1988-01-01

    Tissue was obtained from 59 manatee (Trichechus manatus) carcasses salvaged from 20 counties in Florida. Allozyme phenotypes at 24 structural loci were determined by gel electrophoresis. Averages for the proportion of polymorphic loci and mean heterozygosity were 0.300 (range, 0.167-0.417) and 0.050 (range, 0.028-0.063), respectively. These estimates are equivalent to or higher than those generally reported for other species of marine mammals and do not support the hypothesis that body size and heterozygosity in mammals are related inversely. Among-region gene diversity accounted for only 4% of the total diversity. High rates of gene flow probably account for genetic homogeneity across regions. An F-statistic analysis revealed a general tendency toward excess homozygosity within regions. Management efforts to prevent future reductions in population size that would erode existing genic diversity should continue.

  14. Florida court asked to decide legality of limiting suits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-06-14

    The state Supreme Court of Florida will rule on the legitimacy of a statute that restricts the ability of a plaintiff to sue for damages arising from HIV-contaminated blood transfusion. Under the malpractice law, patients have 4 years from the time of injury to file suit. In most HIV and AIDS cases, however, symptoms do not appear within the 4-year period. The Broward County Circuit Court recently dismissed a contaminated blood transfusion suit based on the expiration of the 4-year statute of repose. The Court of Appeals held the trial judge's application of the law correct, but found the statute uniquely unfair and harsh in HIV/AIDS cases. The State Supreme Court has been asked to rule on the issue.

  15. Woody biomass production systems for Florida

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockwood, D.L.; Pathak, N.N.; Satapathy, P.C. (Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Forestry)

    1993-01-01

    Woody biomass production research in Florida has addressed genetic improvement, coppice productivity, clonal propagation, biomass properties, and economics of Eucalyptus and other species in short rotation, intensive culture systems. Improved E. grandis seedlings could more than double productivity, but exceptional clones offer more immediate potential in southern Florida. E. tereticornis and E. camaldulensis appear to have frost-resistance and good growth in central and southern Florida. For northern Florida, E. amplifolia has good frost-resilience and coppicing ability. Eucalytpus species are suitable for fermentation processes. Other promising species include Casuarina glauca and Taxodium distichum in southern Florida, and Sapium sebiferum state-wide. Break-even costs for biomass production systems with Eucalyptus range from approximately $2.00 to $4.00 GJ[sup -1]; short rotation culture appears feasible for slash pine in northern and central Florida but cannot yet be advised for sand pine. (author)

  16. The Impact of One Florida Initiative on Florida's Public Law Schools: A Critical Race Theory Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Adriel A.; Gasman, Marybeth; Wood, J. Luke

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of the One Florida Initiative (OFI) on racial diversity in Florida's public law schools and legal profession using the lens of Critical Race Theory (CRT). This study seeks to determine what, if any, impact this event has had on recruitment, admissions, and enrollment of Florida's public schools of…

  17. Authorized Course of Instruction for the Quinmester Program. Science: Introduction to Marine Science; Recreation and the Sea; Oceanography; Marine Ecology of South Florida, and Invertebrate Marine Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    All five units, developed for the Dade County Florida Quinmester Program, included in this collection concern some aspect of marine studies. Except for "Recreation and the Sea," intended to give students basic seamanship skills and experience of other marine recreation, all units are designed for students with a background in biology or…

  18. Benthic Habitats of Estero Bay Area, Florida 1999 Geodatabase

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data produced for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's Florida Marine Research Institute (FMRI) in partnership with the South Florida Water...

  19. Benthic Habitats of Estero Bay Area, Florida 1999 Biotic

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data produced for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's Florida Marine Research Institute (FMRI) in partnership with the South Florida Water...

  20. Benthic Habitats of Estero Bay Area, Florida 1999 Geoform

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Data produced for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission's Florida Marine Research Institute (FMRI) in partnership with the South Florida Water...