WorldWideScience

Sample records for monoxide nitrogen oxide

  1. Exposure assessment for nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide in German hard coal mining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmann, Dirk; Morfeld, Peter; Monz, Christian; Noll, Birgit; Gast, Frank

    2009-11-01

    The exposure situation of German hard coal miners with respect to the components nitrogen monoxide and nitrogen dioxide. Carbon monoxide was measured additionally and the results are displayed but not discussed in detail in this paper. The data were used to estimate personal long-term exposures in an inception cohort. For all three components, time weighted 8-h shift values were determined for typical groups of coalminers according to the European measurement standard. An expert panel from the coal mining company made an effort to estimate major potential changes in the exposure situation. The main sources of nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide in hard coal mining were the diesel engines. Blasting fumes contributed only to a lesser degree and with different exposure characteristics, e.g. much reduced NO(2) levels compared to the mines' rear areas. As rough 8 h-shift averages describing the current exposure situation, we found 1.35 ppm NO and 0.21 ppm NO(2) for the diesel engine drivers. Blasting specialists were more difficult to evaluate but rough 8 h-shift averages of 0.84 ppm NO and 0.014 ppm NO(2) could be estimated from our measurement series. By applying these data and the estimates of experts about the retrospective exposure situation to a cohort of 1,369 coalminers, we derived mean (max) cumulative exposures in ppm x number of shifts of 1,748 (5,928) for NO and 19.6 (1,013) for NO(2) when summarizing over the follow-up period from 1974 until 1998. Especially for the diesel engine drivers, exposure can be regarded as rather high, in particular, when compared to recommended limits by SCOEL and MAK, though the exposures have been in line with the enforced German occupational exposure limits. Whether this exposure situation has caused adverse health effects will be investigated epidemiologically.

  2. DFT studies on the SCR reaction mechanism of nitrogen monoxide with propylene catalyzed by copper oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Ying; XU Jing; ZHAO Jing-xiang

    2007-01-01

    The SCR reaction mechanism of NO with C3H6catalyzed by CuO was studied by the method of Density Functional Theory (DFT) at the B3LYP/LanL2DZ levels. The optimized geometries of the stationary points on the potential surface were obtained and the transition state was confirmed by IRC and vibration analysis. The activation energy was calculated being 34. 26 kJ/mol. It was shown that propylene reacted firstly with Cu forming intermediate, and then nitrogen monoxide immediately reacted with the intermediate to be reduced. It was proved to be a direct interaction mechanism.

  3. Concentrations of Carbon Monoxide and Nitrogen Oxides From a 25 kW Boiler Supplied Periodically and Continuously with Wood Pellets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juszczak Marek

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The impact of the fuel feeding mode (continuous or periodic with different stand-by/operation time ratios on carbon monoxide (CO and nitrogen oxides (NO, NOx concentration values in the flue gas was analysed for coniferous wood pellet firing. Experiments were performed in a 25 kW water boiler equipped with an over-fed wood pellet furnace located in a full scale heat station simulating real-life conditions. Influence of oxygen concentration and temperature in the combustion chamber on carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxide concentrations was presented in diagrams. Dust and hydrocarbon concentrations were also monitored. It was concluded that the commonly used periodic fuel supply does not necessarily cause a significant increase of carbon monoxide concentration, as compared to the continuous fuel feeding mode. Continuous fuel supply can even induce higher carbon monoxide concentrations when fuel mass stream is not chosen properly. Each time new fuel type is used in a specific furnace, one should perform experiments to determine the adequate settings (stand-by/operation time ratio, fuel mass streams, air stream to obtain the optimal, lowest possible emission for a certain boiler heat output

  4. Nitrogen-monoxide gas-sensing properties of transparent p-type copper-oxide nanorod arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Soojeong; Kim, Hyojin; Kim, Dojin [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    We report the nitrogen-monoxide (NO) gas-sensing properties of transparent p-type copper-oxide (CuO) nanorod arrays synthesized by using the hydrothermal method with a CuO nanoparticle seed layer deposited on a glass substrate via sputtering process. We synthesized polycrystalline CuO nanorods measuring 200 to 300 nm in length and 20 to 30 nm in diameter for three controlled molarity ratios of 1:1, 1:2 and 1:4 between copper nitrate trihydrate [Cu(NO{sub 2}){sub 2}·3H{sub 2}O] and hexamethylenetetramine (C{sub 6}H{sub 12}N{sub 4}). The crystal structures and morphologies of the synthesized CuO nanorod arrays were examined using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The gas-sensing measurements for NO gas in dry air indicated that the CuO nanorodarray-based gas sensors synthesized under hydrothermal condition at a molarity ratio of 1:2 showed the best gas sensing response to NO gas. These CuO nanorod-array gas sensors exhibited a highly sensitive response to NO gas, with a maximum sensitivity of about 650% for 10 ppm NO in dry air at an operating temperature of 100 .deg. C. These transparent p-type CuO nanorod-array gas sensors have shown a reversible and reliable response to NO gas over a range of operating temperatures. These results indicate certain potential use of p-type oxide semiconductor CuO nanorods as sensing materials for several types of gas sensors, including p - n junction gas sensors.

  5. Method of removing nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas using a water-soluble iron ion-dithiocarbamate, xanthate or thioxanthate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D. Kwok-Keung; Chang, Shih-Ger

    1987-08-25

    The present invention relates to a method of removing of nitrogen monoxide from a nitrogen monoxide-containing gas which method comprises contacting a nitrogen oxide-containing gas with an aqueous solution of water soluble organic compound-iron ion chelate complex. The NO absorption efficiency of ferrous urea-dithiocarbamate and ferrous diethanolamine-xanthate as a function of time, oxygen content and solution ph is presented. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Measurements of hydrocarbons, oxygenated hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen oxides in an urban basin in Colorado: Implications for Emission Inventories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldan, P. D.; Trainer, M.; Kuster, W. C.; Parrish, D. D.; Carpenter, J.; Roberts, J. M.; Yee, J. E.; Fehsenfeld, F. C.

    1995-11-01

    Concentrations of a wide variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the C3 to C10 range, CO, NOy (total reactive oxidized nitrogen), SO2, and meteorological parameters were measured concurrently at a site on the western perimeter of Boulder, Colorado, during February 1991. The measurement site, located some 150 m above the Boulder urban basin, receives air masses typifying averaged local sources. The highest hydrocarbon concentrations observed showed little effects of photochemical loss processes and reflect the pattern of the local emission sources. The observed ratios of CO and the VOCs to NOy are compared to those predicted by the 1985 National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program (NAPAP) inventory.These comparisons indicate (1) good agreement for CO/NOY, (2) significant overpredictions by the NAPAP inventory for many of the hydrocarbon to NOY ratios, (3) much more benzene from mobile sources (and less from area sources) than predicted by the NAPAP inventory, and (4) large underpredictions of the light alcohols and carbonyls by the NAPAP inventory. These first two results are in marked contrast to the conclusions of the recent tunnel study reported by Ingalls in 1989. Source profile reconciliation implies substantial input from both a local propane source and gasoline headspace venting.

  7. Effect of varying the combustion parameters on the emissions of carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides in the exhaust gases from propane-fueled vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberge, B

    2000-05-01

    Propane-fueled forklifts are one source of carbon monoxide (CO) contamination of workplace air. The previous study carried out by the Quebec Occupational Health and Safety Research Institute dealt with worker exposure to CO during forklift use in buildings. It recommends that exhaust gas emissions be kept below a 1 percent concentration. However, this control has not produced a significant reduction in worker exposure to CO, when factors (ventilation, type of work tasks, and management of vehicle fleet) specific to companies are taken into account. Consequently, a reduction in CO emissions below the threshold of 0.3 percent should be considered. The experience acquired with propane-fueled ice resurfacers can be used to determine the effect of combustion parameters on exhaust gas emissions. It is known that a reduction in CO emissions from ice resurfacers resulted in the appearance of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and eventually in nitrogen dioxide (NO2) poisoning. Few publications present NOx results in relation to the CO measured in the exhaust gases of propane-fueled vehicles. The objective of this study is to define the level to which CO emissions can be reduced without increasing NOx concentrations. This real-situation study quantified the CO, NO, and NOx in the exhaust gases of a fleet of propane-fueled forklifts in relation to the mixture ratio. The results show the impact of the motor speed and mixture ratio on the CO, NO, and NO2 concentrations. They confirm an increase in NOx concentrations when CO concentrations are reduced. They also show that proper maintenance of forklifts combined with optimal adjustments can reduce CO and NOx emissions. The study proposes a compromise between CO and NOx emissions by taking into account worker health and safety as well as vehicle performance. Monitoring must be done to control air quality in work areas and worker exposure to CO and NO2. A forklift preventive maintenance program and general building ventilation are the favored

  8. O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of ferrous nitrosylated human serum heme-albumin is limited by nitrogen monoxide dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ascenzi, Paolo, E-mail: ascenzi@uniroma3.it [Interdepartmental Laboratory of Electron Microscopy, University Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 79, I-00146 Roma (Italy); National Institute for Infectious Diseases I.R.C.C.S. ' Lazzaro Spallanzani' , Via Portuense 292, I-00149 Roma (Italy); Gullotta, Francesca; Gioia, Magda; Coletta, Massimo [Department of Experimental Medicine and Biochemical Sciences, University of Roma ' Tor Vergata' , Via Montpellier 1, I-00133 Roma (Italy); Interuniversity Consortium for the Research on the Chemistry of Metals in Biological Systems, Piazza Umberto I 1, I-87100 Bari (Italy); Fasano, Mauro [Department of Structural and Functional Biology, and Center of Neuroscience, University of Insubria, Via Alberto da Giussano 12a, I-21052 Busto Arsizio, VA (Italy)

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Human serum heme-albumin displays globin-like properties. {yields} O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of ferrous nitrosylated human serum heme-albumin. {yields} Allosteric modulation of human serum heme-albumin reactivity. {yields} Rifampicin is an allosteric effector of human serum heme-albumin. {yields} Human serum heme-albumin is a ROS and NOS scavenger. -- Abstract: Human serum heme-albumin (HSA-heme-Fe) displays globin-like properties. Here, kinetics of O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of ferrous nitrosylated HSA-heme-Fe (HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO) is reported. Values of the first-order rate constants for O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO (i.e., for ferric HSA-heme-Fe formation) and for NO dissociation from HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO (i.e., for NO replacement by CO) are k = 9.8 x 10{sup -5} and 8.3 x 10{sup -4} s{sup -1}, and h = 1.3 x 10{sup -4} and 8.5 x 10{sup -4} s{sup -1}, in the absence and presence of rifampicin, respectively, at pH = 7.0 and T = 20.0 {sup o}C. The coincidence of values of k and h indicates that NO dissociation represents the rate limiting step of O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO. Mixing HSA-heme-Fe(II)-NO with O{sub 2} does not lead to the formation of the transient adduct(s), but leads to the final ferric HSA-heme-Fe derivative. These results reflect the fast O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation of ferrous HSA-heme-Fe and highlight the role of drugs in modulating allosterically the heme-Fe-atom reactivity.

  9. Highly-resolved Modeling of Emissions and Concentrations of Carbon Monoxide, Carbon Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxides, and Fine Particulate Matter in Salt Lake City, Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, D. L.; Lin, J. C.; Mitchell, L.; Ehleringer, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate, high-resolution data on air pollutant emissions and concentrations are needed to understand human exposures and for both policy and pollutant management purposes. An important step in this process is also quantification of uncertainties. We present a spatially explicit and highly resolved emissions inventory for Salt Lake County, Utah, and trace gas concentration estimates for carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and fine particles (PM2.5) within Salt Lake City. We assess the validity of this approach by comparing measured concentrations against simulated values derived from combining the emissions inventory with an atmospheric model. The emissions inventory for the criteria pollutants was constructed using the 2011 National Emissions Inventory (NEI). The spatial and temporal allocation methods from the Emission Modeling Clearinghouse data set are used to downscale the NEI data from annual to hourly scales and from county-level to 500 m x 500 m resolution. Onroad mobile source emissions were estimated by combining a bottom-up emissions calculation approach for large roadway links with a top-down spatial allocation approach for other roadways. Vehicle activity data for road links were derived from automatic traffic responder data. The emissions inventory for CO2 was obtained from the Hestia emissions data product at an hourly, building, facility, and road link resolution. The AERMOD and CALPUFF dispersion models were used to transport emissions and estimate air pollutant concentrations at an hourly temporal and 500 m x 500 m spatial resolution. Modeled results were compared against measurements from a mobile lab equipped with trace gas measurement equipment traveling on pre-determined routes in the Salt Lake City area. The comparison between both approaches to concentration estimation highlights spatial locations and hours of high variability/uncertainty. Results presented here will inform understanding of variability and

  10. Catalyst for Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Patricia; Brown, Kenneth; VanNorman, John; Brown, David; Upchurch, Billy; Schryer, David; Miller, Irvin

    2010-01-01

    In many applications, it is highly desirable to operate a CO2 laser in a sealed condition, for in an open system the laser requires a continuous flow of laser gas to remove the dissociation products that occur in the discharge zone of the laser, in order to maintain a stable power output. This adds to the operating cost of the laser, and in airborne or space applications, it also adds to the weight penalty of the laser. In a sealed CO2 laser, a small amount of CO2 gas is decomposed in the electrical discharge zone into corresponding quantities of CO and O2. As the laser continues to operate, the concentration of CO2 decreases, while the concentrations of CO and O2 correspondingly increase. The increasing concentration of O2 reduces laser power, because O2 scavenges electrons in the electrical discharge, thereby causing arcing in the electric discharge and a loss of the energetic electrons required to boost CO2 molecules to lasing energy levels. As a result, laser power decreases rapidly. The primary object of this invention is to provide a catalyst that, by composition of matter alone, contains chemisorbed water within and upon its structure. Such bound moisture renders the catalyst highly active and very long-lived, such that only a small quantity of it needs to be used with a CO2 laser under ambient operating conditions. This object is achieved by a catalyst that consists essentially of about 1 to 40 percent by weight of one or more platinum group metals (Pt, Pd, Rh, Ir, Ru, Os, Pt being preferred); about 1 to 90 percent by weight of one or more oxides of reducible metals having multiple valence states (such as Sn, Ti, Mn, Cu, and Ce, with SnO2 being preferred); and about 1 to 90 percent by weight of a compound that can bind water to its structure (such as silica gel, calcium chloride, magnesium sulfate, hydrated alumina, and magnesium perchlorate, with silica gel being preferred). Especially beneficial results are obtained when platinum is present in the

  11. Nitric oxide and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity of the lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, I. van der

    2006-01-01

    The single breath diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) is measure for gas uptake by the lung, and consists of a membrane and a vascular component. Nitric oxide (NO) binds 400 times faster to hemoglobin than carbon monoxide, thus the uptake of NO by the blood is very large.

  12. Nitric oxide and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity of the lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, I. van der

    2006-01-01

    The single breath diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) is measure for gas uptake by the lung, and consists of a membrane and a vascular component. Nitric oxide (NO) binds 400 times faster to hemoglobin than carbon monoxide, thus the uptake of NO by the blood is very large. There

  13. Adsorption of nitrogen and carbon monoxide on clinoptilolite: determination and prediction of pure and binary isotherms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triebe, R.W.; Tezel, F.H. [University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Department of Chemical Engineering

    1995-10-01

    The adsorption of carbon monoxide and nitrogen on clinoptilolite is studied to determine the natural zeolite`s potential for air purification. Pure and binary isotherms were determined for nitrogen and carbon monoxide on a natural Turkish clinoptilolite under near ambient conditions. Experimentally determined isotherms are compared to predictions based on various models from the literature. The Wilson form of the Vacancy Solution Theory is the only model that provides reasonable agreement with the binary isotherm. Clinoptilolite is concluded to be a promising sorbent for separation of carbon monoxide and nitrogen. 30 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. Personal Exposure Monitoring of Particulate Matter, Nitrogen Dioxide, and Carbon Monoxide, including Susceptible Groups

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    R. M. Harrison; C. A. Thornton; R. G. Lawrence; D. Mark; R. P. Kinnersley; J. G. Ayres

    2002-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the relation between personal exposures to nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, and PM10, and exposures estimated from static concentrations of these pollutants measured within the same...

  15. Cobalt promoted copper manganese oxide catalysts for ambient temperature carbon monoxide oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher; Taylor, Stuart H; Burrows, Andrew; Crudace, Mandy J; Kiely, Christopher J; Hutchings, Graham J

    2008-04-14

    Low levels of cobalt doping (1 wt%) of copper manganese oxide enhances its activity for carbon monoxide oxidation under ambient conditions and the doped catalyst can display higher activity than current commercial catalysts.

  16. Oxidation of carbon monoxide by perferrylmyoglobin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Libardi, Silvia H; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt; Cardoso, Daniel R

    2014-01-01

    Perferrylmyoglobin is found to oxidize CO in aerobic aqueous solution to CO2. Tryptophan hydroperoxide in the presence of tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)-porphyrinate-iron(III) or simple iron(II)/(III) salts shows similar reactivity against CO. The oxidation of CO is for tryptophan hydroperoxide conclud...

  17. Natural clinoptilolite exchanged with iron: characterization and catalytic activity in nitrogen monoxide reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Tito-Ferro

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to characterize the natural clinoptilolite from Tasajeras deposit, Cuba, modified by hydrothermal ion-exchange with solutions of iron (II sulfate and iron (III nitrate in acid medium. Besides this, its catalytic activity to reduce nitrogen monoxide with carbon monoxide/propene in the presence of oxygen was evaluated. The characterization was performed by Mössbauer and UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopies and adsorption measurements. The obtained results lead to conclude that in exchanged samples, incorporated divalent and trivalent irons are found in octahedral coordination. Both irons should be mainly in cationic extra-framework positions inside clinoptilolite channels as charge compensating cations, and also as iron oxy-hydroxides resulting from limited hydrolysis of these cations. The iron (III exchanged samples has a larger amount of iron oxy-hydroxides agglomerates. The iron (II exchanged samples have additionally iron (II sulfate adsorbed. The catalytic activity in the nitrogen monoxide reduction is higher in the exchanged zeolites than starting. Among all samples, those exchanged of iron (II has the higher catalytic activity. This lead to outline that, main catalytically active centers are associated with divalent iron.

  18. Effects of carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide on garden pea and string bean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chakrabarti, A.G.

    1976-02-01

    Garden Peas (Pisum Sativum) and beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) were exposed to 24 ppM of carbon monoxide (CO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO/sub 2/). Germination of bean seeds was delayed about 48 hours. On the 18th day after exposure none of the bean seedlings exposed to NO/sub 2/ survived while about 30 percent of the beans exposed to CO survived. The survival of the pea seedlings was not affected. No effect was noted on stem length. Formation of new leaves was decreased and dropping of old leaves was increased in both test species with more drastic effects noted in the beans. (JTE)

  19. Tsukamurella carboxydivorans sp. nov., a carbon monoxide-oxidizing actinomycete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sae W; Kim, Sung M; Park, Sang T; Kim, Young M

    2009-06-01

    A Gram-positive, slightly acid-alcohol-fast, carbon monoxide-oxidizing bacterium, strain Y2(T), was isolated from a soil sample collected from a roadside in Seoul, Korea. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence comparative analyses, strain Y2(T) was shown to belong to the genus Tsukamurella and was most closely related to Tsukamurella tyrosinosolvens DSM 44234(T) (GenBank accession no. AY238514; 99.8 %). The predominant fatty acids were C(18 : 1)omega9c and C(16 : 0). The cell-wall peptidoglycan of strain Y2(T) contained meso-diaminopimelic acid as the diagnostic diamino acid. Strain Y2(T) contained galactose and arabinose as the whole cell sugars. The DNA G+C content was 77 mol%. The DNA-DNA relatedness value between strain Y2(T) and T. tyrosinosolvens DSM 44234(T) was 62.7 %. Based on the combination of the carbon source utilization pattern, fatty acid profile, cell-wall chemotype, DNA G+C content and DNA-DNA hybridization experiments, it is proposed that strain Y2(T) (=KCCM 42885(T)=JCM 15482(T)) represents the type strain of a novel species, Tsukamurella carboxydivorans sp. nov.

  20. 40 CFR 52.269 - Control strategy and regulations: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and carbon monoxide. 52.269 Section 52.269 Protection of Environment... PLANS California § 52.269 Control strategy and regulations: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) and... provide for attainment and maintenance of the national standards for photochemical oxidants...

  1. REDUCTION OF NITRIC OXIDE BY CARBON MONOXIDE OVER A SILICA SUPPORTED PLATINUM CATALYST: INFRARED AND KINETIC STUDIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorimer, D.H.

    1978-08-01

    The reduction of nitric oxide by carbon monoxide over a 4.5 weight precent platinum catalyst supported on silica was studied at 300 C. Reaction rate data was obtained together with in situ infrared spectra of species on the catalyst surface. The kinetics of the system were found to exhibit two distinct trends, depending on the molar ratio of CO/NO in the reactor. For net reducing conditions (CO/NO> 1) the catalyst underwent a transient deactivation, the extent of which was dependent on the specific CO/NO ratio during reaction. Reactivation of the catalyst was obtained with both oxidizing and reducing pretreatments. For molar feed ratios of CO/NO less than one, carbon monoxide conversion was typically 95 to 100%, resulting in strongly oxidizing conditions over the catalyst. Under these conditions no deactivation was apparent. Infrared spectra recorded under reaction conditions revealed intense bands at 2075 and 2300 cm{sup -1} , which were identified as carbon monoxide adsorbed on Pt and Si-NCO, respectively. Isocyanate bands formed under reducing conditions were more intense and exhibited greater stability than those formed under oxidizing conditions. A reaction mechanism based on the dissociation of nitric oxide as the rate-limiting step was used to correlate nitric oxide reaction rates and nitrous oxide selectivities observed under reducing conditions. As part of this mechanism it is assumed that nitrous bxide is formed via a Langmuir-Hinshelwood process in which an adsorbed nitrogen atom reacts with an adsorbed nitric oxide molecule. The nitric oxide reaction rate was found to be first order in nitric oxide partial pressure, and inverse second order in carbon monoxide partial pressure. A mechanism is proposed to qualitatively explain the deactivation process observed under reducing conditions. The essential part of this mechanism is the formation of an isocyanate species on the Pt crystallites of the catalyst and the subsequent transient diffusion of these

  2. Carbon monoxide and nitric oxide from biofuel fires in Kenya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kituyi, E.; Wandiga, S.O.; Jumba, I.O. [University of Nairobi (Kenya). Dept. of Chemistry; Marufu, L.; Andreae, M.O.; Helas, G. [Max Planck Inst. for Chemistry, Mainz (Germany). Dept. of Biochemistry

    2001-09-01

    Emission ratios (ER) of CO and NO relative to CO{sub 2} are reported from real time emission measurements on biofuel fires in Kenya. The experiments were based on available fuels burning in local popular traditional and improved stoves. The mean dCO/dCO{sub 2} ratios were 71, 79 and 74 mmol mol{sup -1} for firewood, charcoal and agricultural residues, respectively, while the corresponding mean dNO/dCO{sub 2} ratios for these fuels, in the same order, were 1.8, 2 and 2.2 mmol mol{sup -1}, respectively. Whereas stove design characteristics largely influenced the dCO/dCO{sub 2} ratios, the fuel nitrogen content was the major factor determining the dNO/dCO{sub 2} ratios. The dCO/dCO{sub 2} ratio for fuel derived NO is not affected by fire temperature but linearly depend on the fuel nitrogen content. Other important fuel parameters that influenced the observed emission ratio patterns include fuel moisture content, size and volatile matter content in the case of charcoal. In comparison to savanna and forest fires, biofuel fires tend to favour formation of reduced or partially oxidized compounds. It is clear that a change in energy preference up the ''energy ladder'' leads to a reduction in the CO ER, and important results for emission mitigation policy design. (author)

  3. Electrochemical oxidation of carbon monoxide: from platinum single crystals to low temperature fuel cells catalysts. Part I: Carbon monoxide oxidation onto low index platinum single crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PHILIP N. ROSS JR

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical oxidation of carbon monoxide and the interfacial structure of the CO adlayer (COads on platinum low index single crystals, Pt(111, Pt(100 and two reconstruction of Pt(110, were examined using the rotation disk electrode method in combination with the in situ surface X-ray diffraction scattering technique. The mechanism of CO oxidation is discussed on the basis of the findings that, depending on the potential, two energetic states of COads exist on the platinum surfaces. Thus, at lower potentials, weakly bonded states (COads,w and at higher potentials strongly bonded states (COads,s are formed. The mechanism of the oxidation of hydrogen-carbon monoxide mixtures is also proposed.

  4. Foliage plants for indoor removal of the primary combustion gases carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolverton, B. C.; Mcdonald, R. C.; Mesick, H. H.

    1985-01-01

    Foliage plants were evaluated for their ability to sorb carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide, the two primary gases produced during the combustion of fossil fuels and tobacco. The spider plant (Chlorophytum elatum var. vittatum) could sorb 2.86 micrograms CO/sq cm leaf surface in a 6 h photoperiod. The golden pothos (Scindapsus aureus) sorbed 0.98 micrograms CO/sq cm leaf surface in the same time period. In a system with the spider plant, greater than or equal to 99 percent of an initial concentration of 47 ppm NO2 could be removed in 6 h from a void volume of approximately 0.35 cu m. One spider plant potted in a 3.8 liter container can sorb 3300 micrograms CO and effect the removal of 8500 micrograms NO2/hour, recognizing the fact that a significant fraction of NO2 at high concentrations will be lost by surface sorption, dissolving in moisture, etc.

  5. Electro-catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLarnon, C.R.

    1989-12-01

    Nitrogen oxides have been linked to a broad range of air pollution problems including acid rain and the atmospheric production of photochemical ozone. Over twenty million tons of nitrogen oxides are emitted into the atmosphere each year as a result of the high temperature combustion of fossil fuels. Efforts to control nitrogen oxides emissions have lagged because of the generally low discharge concentrations of nitrogen oxides in combustion exhaust and because nitrogen oxides are more difficult to remove due to their lower reactivity. No catalyst has yet been found that will achieve significant reduction of nitrogen oxides in an oxidizing environment. Oxygen in the exhaust stream competes with nitrogen oxides for the active catalyst sites. Also, the dissociated oxygen atoms produced by decomposition of nitrogen oxides deactivate the surface of the catalyst. Externally applied electric fields have been used to control oxygen adsorption on metal and semi-conductor surfaces. In this investigation, a stream containing nitric oxide has been subjected to intense electric fields in the presence of catalyst materials including steel, stainless steel, and gold plated stainless steel wools and glass wool. The electric fields have been generated using DC, AC and rectified AC potentials in the range of 0--20 KV. The effect of parameters such as inlet nitric oxide concentration, oxygen and water content, gas residence time and temperature have also been studied.

  6. Investigation of the Carbon Monoxide Gas Sensing Characteristics of Tin Oxide Mixed Cerium Oxide Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad B. Haider

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Thin films of tin oxide mixed cerium oxide were grown on unheated substrates by physical vapor deposition. The films were annealed in air at 500 °C for two hours, and were characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and optical spectrophotometry. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy results reveal that the films were highly porous and porosity of our films was found to be in the range of 11.6–21.7%. The films were investigated for the detection of carbon monoxide, and were found to be highly sensitive. We found that 430 °C was the optimum operating temperature for sensing CO gas at concentrations as low as 5 ppm. Our sensors exhibited fast response and recovery times of 26 s and 30 s, respectively.

  7. The Oxides of Nitrogen in Air Pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Air Resources Board, Sacramento.

    Research on the health effects of oxides of nitrogen and on the role of oxides of nitrogen in producing photochemical smog effects is presented in this report. Prepared by the California State Department of Public Health at the request of the State Legislature, it gives a comprehensive review of available information, as well as the need for air…

  8. An infrared spectroscopic study of the adsorption of carbon monoxide on silica-supported copper oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, K.P. de; Geus, John W.; Joziasse, J.

    1980-01-01

    Adsorption of carbon monoxide at room temperature (0.1–50 Torr) on silica-supported copper oxide was studied by infrared spectroscopy. Catalysts were prepared by deposition-precipitation or impregnation. After calcination two types of adsorbed CO were identified showing absorption bands at 2136 ± 3

  9. Determination of nitrogen monoxide in high purity nitrogen gas with an atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, K.

    1985-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure ionization mass spectrometric (API-MS) method was studied for the determination of residual NO in high purity N2 gas. The API-MS is very sensitive to NO, but the presence of O2 interferes with the NO measurement. Nitrogen gas in cylinders as sample gas was mixed with NO standard gas and/or O2 standard gas, and then introduced into the API-MS. The calibration curves of NO and O2 has linearity in the region of 0 - 2 ppm, but the slopes changed with every cylinder. The effect of O2 on NO+ peak was additive and proportional to O2 concentration in the range of 0 - 0.5 ppm. The increase in NO+ intensity due to O2 was (0.07 - 0.13)%/O2, 1 ppm. Determination of NO and O2 was carried out by the standard addition method to eliminate the influence of variation of slopes. The interference due to O2 was estimated from the product of the O2 concentration and the ratio of slope A to Slope B. Slope A is the change in the NO+ intensity with the O2 concentration. Slope B is the intensity with O2 concentration.

  10. Carbon monoxide oxidation using Zn-Cu-Ti hydrotalcite-derived catalysts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    O Saber; T Zaki

    2014-07-01

    Multioxide catalysts of zinc, copper and titanium with different ratios obtained from layered double hydroxide (LDH) precursors were used in the oxidation of carbon monoxide. The catalysts were characterized by energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, thermal analyses (TG, DTG and DTA) and scanning electron microscopy. X-ray diffraction showed different phases of double hydroxide structures. On increasing the percentage of zinc, hydrotalcite structure became the main phase in these samples. SEM images confirmed the presence of layered double hydroxide as plate-like structure. Experimental results indicated a sharp increase in the catalytic activities of the calcined samples towards the oxidation of carbon monoxide at temperatures in the range of 225-275°C. High conversion of carbon monoxide (90 ∼ 95%) was achieved at reaction temperature of 275°C by samples having ZnTiO3 as a main phase. These results suggested that hydrotalcite structure of Zn-Ti has a positive catalytic effect towards carbon monoxide oxidation.

  11. Surface structure and relaxation during the oxidation of carbon monoxide on Pt Pd bimetallic surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, C. A.; Markovic, N. M.; Ball, M.; Stamenkovic, V.; Climent, V.; Ross, P. N.

    2001-05-01

    The atomic structure and surface relaxation of Pd monolayer on Pt(1 1 1) has been studied by surface X-ray scattering, in an aqueous environment under electrostatic potential control, during the adsorption and oxidation of carbon monoxide. The results show that the Pd-Pt layer spacing contracts at the onset of CO oxidation before the Pd adlayer forms an oxide structure that is incommensurate with the Pt lattice. Both the oxide formation and the lattice contraction are fully reversible over many cycles of the applied electrode potential.

  12. Gold catalysts supported on nanosized iron oxide for low-temperature oxidation of carbon monoxide and formaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zheng; Zhang, Weidong; Li, Yi; Huang, Zuming; Guo, Huishan; Wu, Feng; Li, Jinjun

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to optimize synthesis of gold catalyst supported on nanosized iron oxide and to evaluate the activity in oxidation of carbon monoxide and formaldehyde. Nanosized iron oxide was prepared from a colloidal dispersion of hydrous iron oxide through a dispersion-precipitation method. Gold was adsorbed onto nanosized iron oxide under self-generated basic conditions. Characterization results indicate that the iron oxide consisted of hematite/maghemite composite with primary particle sizes of 6-8 nm. Gold was highly dispersed on the surface of the support. The catalysts showed good activity in the oxidation of airborne carbon monoxide and formaldehyde. The optimal pH for their synthesis was ∼7. The catalytic performance could be enhanced by extending the adsorption time of gold species on the support within 21 h. The optimized catalyst was capable of achieving complete oxidation of 1% carbon monoxide at -20 °C and 33% conversion of 450 ppm formaldehyde at ambient temperature. The catalyst may be applicable to indoor air purification.

  13. Data assimilation of satellite retrieved ozone, carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide with ECMWF's Composition-IFS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Inness

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Daily global analyses and 5 day forecasts are generated in the context of the European Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate (MACC project using an extended version of the Integrated Forecasting System (IFS of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF. IFS now includes modules for chemistry, deposition and emission of reactive gases, aerosols, and greenhouse gases, and the 4-dimensional variational data assimilation scheme makes use of multiple satellite observations of atmospheric composition in addition to meteorological observations. This paper describes the data assimilation setup of the new Composition-IFS (C-IFS with respect to reactive gases and validates analysis fields of ozone (O3, carbon monoxide (CO, and nitrogen dioxide (NO2 for the year 2008 against independent observations and a control run without data assimilation. The largest improvement in CO by assimilation of MOPITT CO columns is seen in the lower troposphere of the Northern Hemisphere (NH Extratropics during winter, and during the South African biomass burning season. The assimilation of several O3 total column and stratospheric profile retrievals greatly improves the total column, stratospheric and upper tropospheric O3 analysis fields relative to the control run. The impact on lower tropospheric ozone, which comes from the residual of the total column and stratospheric profile O3 data, is smaller, but nevertheless there is some improvement particularly in the NH during winter and spring. The impact of the assimilation of OMI tropospheric NO2 columns is small because of the short lifetime of NO2, suggesting that NO2 observations would be better used to adjust emissions instead of initial conditions. The results further indicate that the quality of the tropospheric analyses and of the stratospheric ozone analysis obtained with the C-IFS system has improved compared to the previous "coupled" model system of MACC.

  14. Selective oxidation of carbon monoxide in the presence of butane and maleic anhydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbin, D.R.; Bonifaz, C. (DuPont Company, Wilmington, DE (United States))

    1994-03-01

    The selective oxidation of carbon monoxide in the presence of butane and maleic anhydride has been studied over platinum- and palladium-containing zeolites as well as palladium-on-silica (Pd/SiO[sub 2]) catalysts. The results show that although a zeolite support is needed in many systems to effect a kinetic control to improve selectivity, thermodynamic control using Pd([approximately]2-4 ppm)/SiO[sub 2] is sufficient to give the desired selectivities in this system. In addition, a palladium-containing vanadium-phosphate catalyst was prepared that showed complete oxidation of carbon monoxide, conversion of butane to maleic anhydride, and no observable decomposition of the maleic anhydride. 14 refs., 4 tabs.

  15. Resveratrol Induces Hepatic Mitochondrial Biogenesis Through the Sequential Activation of Nitric Oxide and Carbon Monoxide Production

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Seul-Ki; Joe, Yeonsoo; Min ZHENG; Kim, Hyo Jeong; Yu, Jae-Kyoung; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Chang, Ki Churl; Kim, Hyoung Kyu; Han, Jin; Ryter, Stefan W.; Chung, Hun Taeg

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Nitric oxide (NO) can induce mitochondrial biogenesis in cultured cells, through increased guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate (cGMP), and activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α). We sought to determine the role of NO, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and its reaction product (carbon monoxide [CO]) in the induction of mitochondrial biogenesis by the natural antioxidant resveratrol. Results: S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP), an NO donor, induced ...

  16. Carbon monoxide-induced reduction and healing of graphene oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narayanan, B.; Weeks, S. L.; Jariwala, B. N.; Macco, B.; Weber, J.; Rathi, S. J.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Sutter, P.; Agarwal, S.; Ciobanu, C. V.

    2013-01-01

    Graphene oxide holds promise as a carbon-based nanomaterial that can be produced inexpensively in large quantities. However, its structural and electrical properties remain far from those of the graphene sheets obtained by mechanical exfoliation or by chemical vapor deposition unless efficient reduc

  17. Carbon monoxide-induced reduction and healing of graphene oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narayanan, B.; Weeks, S. L.; Jariwala, B. N.; Macco, B.; Weber, J.; Rathi, S. J.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,; Sutter, P.; Agarwal, S.; Ciobanu, C. V.

    2013-01-01

    Graphene oxide holds promise as a carbon-based nanomaterial that can be produced inexpensively in large quantities. However, its structural and electrical properties remain far from those of the graphene sheets obtained by mechanical exfoliation or by chemical vapor deposition unless efficient reduc

  18. Interaction and reactivity of nitric oxide and carbon monoxide on ruthenium surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quick, E.E.

    1980-03-01

    A multifaceted investigation of the reduction of nitric oxide by carbon monoxide using a ruthenium (102) single crystal catalyst in the pressure range 10/sup -3/ to 10 Torr and temperature range of 300 to 475/sup 0/C has been undertaken. Kinetic and isotopic results indicate that the reaction products CO/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/ were produced via two reaction mechanisms. Using a reducing gas mixture (low P/sub NO//P/sub CO/ ratio) a two site mechanism was operative involving NO dissociation. The carbon monoxide kinetic order varied from +1 to -3 and the nitric oxide order varied from +1 to 0. The catalyst under these conditions was determined to be metallic ruthenium with oxygen bonded within the first surface layer. The oxygen was unreactive and formed a (1 x 3)-0 LEED pattern. Under oxidizing conditions (high P/sub NO//P/sub CO/ ratio) the catalyst was ruthenium dioxide and the functional mechanism under these reaction conditions yielded a nitric oxide order of +2 to -4. Inclusion of a site poisoning mechanism under reducing conditions and an RuO/sub 2/ growth mechanism involving ruthenium cation transfer under oxidizing conditions into the kinetic rate laws led to an overall rate law which could be fit to the carbon monoxide and nitric oxide order plots. Using isotopically oxygen labelled reactants, it was observed that the three possible isotopes of carbon dioxide were produced. A ..gamma..-CO surface species is postulated as an intermediate in the exchange process. The reaction was observed to be initially surface structure insensitive and the reaction kinetics were derived using a Langmuir-Hinshelwood formalism.

  19. Selective catalytic reduction of sulfur dioxide by carbon monoxide over iron oxide supported on activated carbon

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The selective reduction of sulfur dioxide with carbon monoxide to elemental sulfur was studied over AC-supported transition-metal oxide catalysts. According to the study, Fe2O3/AC was the most active catalyst among the 4 AC-supported catalysts tested. By using Fe2O3/AC, the best catalyst, when the feed conditions were properly optimized (CO/SO2 molar ratio = 2:1; sulfidation temperature, 400 °C; Fe content, 20 wt%; GHSV = 7000 mL g-1 h-1), 95.43% sulfur dioxide conversion and 86.59% sulfur yi...

  20. Hydrogen Oxidation on Gas Diffusion Electrodes for Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells in the Presence of Carbon Monoxide and Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gang, Xiao; Li, Qingfeng; Hjuler, Hans Aage

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen oxidation has been studied on a carbon-supported platinum gas diffusion electrode in a phosphoric acidelectrolyte in the presence of carbon monoxide and oxygen in the feed gas. The poisoning effect of carbon monoxide presentin the feed gas was measured in the temperature range from 80...... to 150°C. It was found that throughout the temperaturerange, the potential loss due to the CO poisoning can be reduced to a great extent by the injection of small amounts ofgaseous oxygen into the hydrogen gas containing carbon monoxide. By adding 5 volume percent (v/o) oxygen, an almost......CO-free performance can be obtained for carbon monoxide concentrations up to 0.5 v/o CO at 130°C, 0.2 v/o CO at 100°C,and 0.1 v/o CO at 80°C, respectively....

  1. Reduction of nitric oxide with carbon monoxide on the Al-Mo(110) surface alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorkina, G. S.; Tvauri, I. V.; Kaloeva, A. G.; Burdzieva, O. G.; Sekiba, D.; Ogura, S.; Fukutani, K.; Magkoev, T. T.

    2016-05-01

    Coadsorption and reaction of carbon monoxide (CO) and nitric oxide (NO) on Al-Mo(110) surface alloy have been studied by means of Auger electron, reflection-absorption infrared and temperature programmed desorption spectroscopies (AES, RAIRS, TPD), low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and work function measurements. The Al-Mo(110) surface alloy was obtained by thermal annealing at 800 K of aluminum film deposited on Mo(110) held at room temperature. Upon annealing Al penetrates the surface, most likely forming stoichiometric hexagonal surface monolayer of the compound Al2Mo. The NO and CO adsorb molecularly on this alloy surface at 200 K, unlike totally dissociative adsorption on bare Mo(110) and Al(111) film. Adsorption of CO on NO precovered Al-Mo(110) substrate dramatically affects the state of NO molecules, most probably displacing them to higher-coordinated sites with their simultaneous tilting to the surface plane. Heating to about room temperature (320 K) causes reduction of nitric oxide with carbon monoxide, yielding CO2, and substrate nitridation. This behavior can be associated with the surface reconstruction providing additional Al/Mo interface reaction sites and change of the d-band upon alloying.

  2. Carbon monoxide gas sensing using zinc oxide film deposited by spray pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leano, J. M. G.; Villapando, J. M. L. A.; Balaaldia, A. E.; Gianan, G.; Manalo, F. K. B.; Florido, E. A.

    2017-05-01

    This study was aimed to determine the carbon monoxide (CO) gas sensing ability of zinc oxide (ZnO) film fabricated by spray pyrolysis on glass substrate heated at 3000C using 0.2 M zinc acetate precursor solution. The temperature of the precursor solution was maintained at room temperature. Carbon monoxide gas was synthesized by mixing the required amount of formic acid and excess sulfuric acid in the ratio of 1:6 to produce CO gas concentrations of 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 parts per million (ppm) v/v. There were five trials for each concentration. The films produced exhibited good sensor characteristics such as high linearity in current voltage relationship and voltage response versus concentration. Electrical characterization using the four-point probe showed a linear relationship between current and voltage with resistivity of 0.49 ohm-cm and R2 value of 0.994 The zinc oxide film exhibited a sensitivity of 0.19 Volt per 100 ppm of CO gas and linearity R2 value of 0.993.

  3. Health risk evaluation of nitrogen oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berglund, M.; Ewetz, L.; Gustafsson, L.; Moldeus, P.; Pershagen, G.; Victorin, K. [Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Inst. of Environmental Medicine

    1995-12-31

    At the request of the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency a criteria document on nitrogen oxides has been prepared, and is intended to serve as a basis for revised air quality standards in Sweden. The criteria document is based on a thorough literature survey, and the health risk assessment is summarized in this presentation. The present standard for nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) is 110 {mu}g/m{sup 3} as 1-hour mean (98th percentile); 75 {mu}g/m{sup 3} as 24- hour mean (98th percentile); and 50 {mu}g/m{sup 3} as 6-month mean (arithmetic eman during winter half-year). (author)

  4. A Review on Preferential Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide in Hydrogen Rich Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mishra

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this review, recent works on the preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide in hydrogen rich gases for fuel cell applications are summarized. H2 is used as a fuel for polymer-electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC. It is produced by reforming of natural gas or liquid fuels followed by water gas shift reaction. The produced gas consists of H2, CO, and CO2. In which CO content is around 1%, which is highly poisonous for the Pt anode of the PEMFC so that further removal of CO is needed. Catalytic preferential oxidation of CO (CO-PROX is one of the most suitable methods of purification of H2 because of high CO conversion rate at low temperature range, which is preferable for PEMFC operating conditions. Catalysts used for COPROX are mainly noble metal based; gold based and base metal oxide catalysts among them Copper-Ceria based catalysts are the most appropriate due to its low cost, easy availability and result obtained by these catalysts are comparable with the conventional noble metal catalysts. Copyright © 2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 22nd October 2010, Revised: 12nd January 2011, Accepted: 19th January 2011[How to Cite: A. Mishra, R. Prasad. (2011. A Review on Preferential Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide in Hydrogen Rich Gases. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6 (1: 1-14. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.1.191.1-14][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.1.191.1-14 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/191] | View in 

  5. [Effect of low-intensity ultrasound on endothelin-1 and nitrogen monoxide in uterine tissues of SD rats following abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanxia; Guo, Jufang; Lin, Chuan; Lu, Lu; Li, Chengzhi

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the effect of low-intensity ultrasound on the contents of endothelin (ET-1) and nitrogen monoxide (NO) in uterine tissues of SD rats after abortion. Thirty female pregnant rats were randomly divided into treatment group and control group and received mifepristone and misoprostol to induce abortion. The rats in the treatment group were treated by low-intensity ultrasound for 30 min/day for 5 consecutive days, and those in the control group received sham treatment. The uterine tissue was then taken and homogenized for measurement of ET-1 and NO contents using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and chemical testing. ET-1 content in the uterine tissues was significantly higher in the treatment group than in the control group (P0.05). Low-intensity ultrasound can promote the contraction of uterine smooth muscles by increasing the level of ET-1 to modulate the homeostasis of ET-1 and NO.

  6. Highly n-Type Titanium Oxide as an Electronically Active Support for Platinum in the Catalytic Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide

    KAUST Repository

    Baker, L. Robert

    2011-08-18

    The role of the oxide-metal interface in determining the activity and selectivity of chemical reactions catalyzed by metal particles on an oxide support is an important topic in science and industry. A proposed mechanism for this strong metal-support interaction is electronic activation of surface adsorbates by charge carriers. Motivated by the goal of using electronic activation to drive nonthermal chemistry, we investigated the ability of the oxide support to mediate charge transfer. We report an approximately 2-fold increase in the turnover rate of catalytic carbon monoxide oxidation on platinum nanoparticles supported on stoichiometric titanium dioxide (TiO2) when the TiO2 is made highly n-type by fluorine (F) doping. However, for nonstoichiometric titanium oxide (TiOX<2) the effect of F on the turnover rate is negligible. Studies of the titanium oxide electronic structure show that the energy of free electrons in the oxide determines the rate of reaction. These results suggest that highly n-type TiO2 electronically activates adsorbed oxygen (O) by electron spillover to form an active O- intermediate. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  7. Oxygen permeation flux through La1-ySryFeO3 limited by the carbon monoxide oxidation rate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hassel, B.A.; van Hassel, B.A.; ten Elshof, Johan E.; Bouwmeester, Henricus J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The oxygen permeation flux through La1-ySryFeO3-δ (y = 0.1, 0.2) in a large oxygen partial pressure gradient (air/CO, CO2 mixture) was found to be limited by the carbon monoxide oxidation rate at the low oxygen partial pressure side of the membrane. The oxygen permeation flux through the membrane

  8. The phylogenetic distribution and ecological role of carbon monoxide oxidation in the genus Burkholderia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Carolyn F; King, Gary M

    2012-01-01

    Burkholderia is a physiologically and ecologically diverse genus that occurs commonly in assemblages of soil and rhizosphere bacteria. Although Burkholderia is known for its heterotrophic versatility, we demonstrate that 14 distinct environmental isolates oxidized carbon monoxide (CO) and possessed the gene encoding the catalytic subunit of form I CO dehydrogenase (coxL). DNA from a Burkholderia isolate obtained from a passalid beetle also contained coxL as do the genomic sequences of species H160 and Ch1-1. Isolates were able to consume CO at concentrations ranging from 100 ppm (vol/vol) to sub-ambient ( 2.5 mM), but mixotrophic consumption of CO and pyruvate occurred when initial pyruvate concentrations were lower (c. 400 lM). With the exception of an isolate most closely related to Burkholderia cepacia, all CO-oxidizing isolates examined were members of a nonpathogenic clade and were most closely related to Burkholderia species, B. caledonica, B. fungorum, B. oxiphila, B. mimosarum, B. nodosa, B. sacchari, B. bryophila, B. ferrariae, B. ginsengesoli, and B. unamae. However, none of these type strains oxidized CO or contained coxL based on results from PCR analyses. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the presence of CO oxidation within members of the Burkholderia genus is variable but it is most commonly found among rhizosphere inhabitants that are not closely related to B. cepacia.

  9. Interfacial Cu+ promoted surface reactivity: Carbon monoxide oxidation reaction over polycrystalline copper-titania catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Pappoe, Naa Adokaley; Nguyen-Phan, Thuy-Duong; Luo, Si; Li, Yuanyuan; Xu, Wenqian; Liu, Zongyuan; Mudiyanselage, Kumudu; Johnston-Peck, Aaron C.; Frenkel, Anatoly I.; Heckler, Ilana; Stacchiola, Dario; Rodriguez, José A.

    2016-10-01

    We have studied the catalytic carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation (CO + 0.5O2 → CO2) reaction using a powder catalyst composed of both copper (5 wt.% loading) and titania (CuOx-TiO2). Our study was focused on revealing the role of Cu, and the interaction between Cu and TiO2, by systematic comparison between two nanocatalysts, CuOx-TiO2 and pure CuOx. We interrogated these catalysts under in situ conditions using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) to probe the structure and electronic properties of the catalyst at all stages of the reaction and simultaneously probe the surface states or intermediates of this reaction. With the aid of several ex situ characterization techniques including transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the local catalyst morphology and structure were also studied. Our results show that a CuOx-TiO2 system is more active than bulk CuOx for the CO oxidation reaction due to its lower onset temperature and better stability at higher temperatures. Our results also suggest that surface Cu+ species observed in the CuOx-TiO2 interface are likely to be a key player in the CO oxidation mechanism, while implicating that the stabilization of this species is probably associated with the oxide-oxide interface. Both in situ DRIFTS and XAFS measurements reveal that there is likely to be a Cu(Ti)-O mixed oxide at this interface. We discuss the nature of this Cu(Ti)-O interface and interpret its role on the CO oxidation reaction.

  10. Modeling the chemical evolution of nitrogen oxides near roadways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan Jason; DenBleyker, Allison; McDonald-Buller, Elena; Allen, David; Zhang, K. Max

    2011-01-01

    The chemical evolution of nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) and nitrogen monoxide (NO) in the vicinity of roadways is numerically investigated using a computational fluid dynamics model, CFD-VIT-RIT and a Gaussian-based model, CALINE4. CFD-VIT-RIT couples a standard k- ɛ turbulence model for turbulent mixing and the Finite-Rate model for chemical reactions. CALINE4 employs a discrete parcel method, assuming that chemical reactions are independent of the dilution process. The modeling results are compared to the field measurement data collected near two roadways in Austin, Texas, State Highway 71 (SH-71) and Farm to Market Road 973 (FM-973), under parallel and perpendicular wind conditions during the summer of 2007. In addition to ozone (O 3), other oxidants and reactive species including hydroperoxyl radical (HO 2), organic peroxyl radical (RO 2), formaldehyde (HCHO) and acetaldehyde (CH 3CHO) are considered in the transformation from NO to NO 2. CFD-VIT-RIT is shown to be capable of predicting both NO x and NO 2 profiles downwind. CALINE4 is able to capture the NO x profiles, but underpredicts NO 2 concentrations under high wind velocity. Our study suggests that the initial NO 2/NO x ratios have to be carefully selected based on traffic conditions in order to assess NO 2 concentrations near roadways. The commonly assumed NO 2/NO x ratio by volume of 5% may not be suitable for most roadways, especially those with a high fraction of heavy-duty truck traffic. In addition, high O 3 concentrations and high traffic volumes would lead to the peak NO 2 concentration occurring near roadways with elevated concentrations persistent over a long distance downwind.

  11. Cobalt Oxide Nanosheet and CNT Micro Carbon Monoxide Sensor Integrated with Readout Circuit on Chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ching-Liang; Chen, Yen-Chi; Wu, Chyan-Chyi; Kuo, Chin-Fu

    2010-01-01

    The study presents a micro carbon monoxide (CO) sensor integrated with a readout circuit-on-a-chip manufactured by the commercial 0.35 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) process and a post-process. The sensing film of the sensor is a composite cobalt oxide nanosheet and carbon nanotube (CoOOH/CNT) film that is prepared by a precipitation-oxidation method. The structure of the CO sensor is composed of a polysilicon resistor and a sensing film. The sensor, which is of a resistive type, changes its resistance when the sensing film adsorbs or desorbs CO gas. The readout circuit is used to convert the sensor resistance into the voltage output. The post-processing of the sensor includes etching the sacrificial layers and coating the sensing film. The advantages of the sensor include room temperature operation, short response/recovery times and easy post-processing. Experimental results show that the sensitivity of the CO sensor is about 0.19 mV/ppm, and the response and recovery times are 23 s and 34 s for 200 ppm CO, respectively. PMID:22294897

  12. Cobalt Oxide Nanosheet and CNT Micro Carbon Monoxide Sensor Integrated with Readout Circuit on Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Liang Dai

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The study presents a micro carbon monoxide (CO sensor integrated with a readout circuit-on-a-chip manufactured by the commercial 0.35 μm complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS process and a post-process. The sensing film of the sensor is a composite cobalt oxide nanosheet and carbon nanotube (CoOOH/CNT film that is prepared by a precipitation-oxidation method. The structure of the CO sensor is composed of a polysilicon resistor and a sensing film. The sensor, which is of a resistive type, changes its resistance when the sensing film adsorbs or desorbs CO gas. The readout circuit is used to convert the sensor resistance into the voltage output. The post-processing of the sensor includes etching the sacrificial layers and coating the sensing film. The advantages of the sensor include room temperature operation, short response/recovery times and easy post-processing. Experimental results show that the sensitivity of the CO sensor is about 0.19 mV/ppm, and the response and recovery times are 23 s and 34 s for 200 ppm CO, respectively.

  13. Marine Engines and Nitrogen Oxides Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corneliu Moroianu

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Current international policy initiatives by the International Maritime Organization (IMO to reduce emissions from ship propulsion systems (NOx and SOx, primarily mark the first efforts to define a framework to address this issue. Oxides of nitrogen (NOx emissions from ship engines are significant on a global level. NOx emissions participate in the formation of photochemical smog and acid rain. Marine sourced emissions have significant impact on air quality on land. The challenge is to control NOx emissions without increasing fuel consumption and smoke. Most engine manufacturers can meet the current IMO limits by engine tuning measures

  14. Nitrogen oxides storage catalysts containing cobalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauterbach, Jochen; Snively, Christopher M.; Vijay, Rohit; Hendershot, Reed; Feist, Ben

    2010-10-12

    Nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) storage catalysts comprising cobalt and barium with a lean NO.sub.x storage ratio of 1.3 or greater. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be used to reduce NO.sub.x emissions from diesel or gas combustion engines by contacting the catalysts with the exhaust gas from the engines. The NO.sub.x storage catalysts can be one of the active components of a catalytic converter, which is used to treat exhaust gas from such engines.

  15. Absorption and oxidation of nitrogen oxide in ionic liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunov-Kruse, Andreas Jonas; Thomassen, Peter Langelund; Riisager, Anders;

    2016-01-01

    A new strategy for capturing nitrogen oxide, NO, from the gas phase is presented. Dilute NO gas is removed from the gas phase by ionic liquids under ambient conditions. The nitrate anion of the ionic liquid catalyzes the oxidation of NO to nitric acid by atmospheric oxygen in the presence of water...... investigations of the reaction and products are presented. The procedure reveals a new vision for removing the pollutant NO by absorption into a non-volatile liquid and converting it into a useful bulk chemical, that is, HNO3....

  16. Absorption and oxidation of nitrogen oxide in ionic liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunov-Kruse, Andreas Jonas; Thomassen, Peter Langelund; Riisager, Anders

    2016-01-01

    . The nitric acid is absorbed in the ionic liquid up to approximately one mole HNO3 per mole of the ionic liquid due to the formation of hydrogen bonds. The nitric acid can be desorbed by heating, thereby regenerating the ionic liquid with excellent reproducibility. Here, time-resolved in-situ spectroscopic......A new strategy for capturing nitrogen oxide, NO, from the gas phase is presented. Dilute NO gas is removed from the gas phase by ionic liquids under ambient conditions. The nitrate anion of the ionic liquid catalyzes the oxidation of NO to nitric acid by atmospheric oxygen in the presence of water...

  17. Role of Amorphous Manganese Oxide in Nitrogen Loss

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LILIANG-MO; WUQI-TU

    1991-01-01

    Studies have been made,by 15N-tracer technique on nitrogen loss resulting from adding amorphous manganese oxide to NH4+-N medium under anaerobic conditions.The fact that the total nitrogen recovery was decreased and that 15NO2,15N2O,15N14NO,15NO,15N2 and 15N14N were emitted has proved that,like amorphous iron oxide,amorphous manganese oxide can also act as an electron acceptor in the oxidation of NH4+-N under anaerobic conditions and give rise to nitrogen loss.This once again illustrates another mechanism by which the loss of ammonium nitrogen in paddy soils is brought about by amorphous iron and manganese oxides.The quantity of nitrogen loss by amorphous manganese oxide increased with an increase in the amount of amorphous manganese oxide added and lessened with time of its aging.The nitrogen loss resulting from amorphous manganese oxide was less than that from amorphous iron oxide.And the nitrogen loss resulting from amorphous manganese oxide was less than that from amorphous iron oxide.And the nitrogen loss by cooperation of amorphous manganese oxide and microorganisms (soil suspension) was larger than that by amorphous manganese oxide alone.In the system,nitrogen loss was associated with the specific surface ares and oxidation-reduction of amorphous manganese oxide.However,their quantitative relationship and the exact reaction processes of nitrogen loss induced by amorphous manganese oxide remain to be further studied.

  18. 40 CFR 60.72 - Standard for nitrogen oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standard for nitrogen oxides. 60.72... Plants § 60.72 Standard for nitrogen oxides. (a) On and after the date on which the performance test...) Contain nitrogen oxides, expressed as NO2, in excess of 1.5 kg per metric ton of acid produced (3.0 lb...

  19. Catalytic reduction of nitric oxide with carbon monoxide on copper-cobalt oxides supported on nano-titanium dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xia; Zhang, Junfeng; Huang, Yan; Tong, Zhiquan; Huang, Ming

    2009-01-01

    A series of copper-cobalt oxides supported on nano-titanium dioxide were prepared for the reduction of nitric oxide with carbon monoxide and characterized using techniques such as XRD, BET and TPR. Catalyst CuCoOx/TiO2 with Cu/Co molar ratio of 1/2, Cu-Co total loading of 30% at the calcination temperature of 350 degrees C formed CuCo2O4 spinel and had the highest activity. NO conversion reached 98.9% at 200 degrees C. Mechanism of the reduction was also investigated, N2O was mainly yielded below 100 degrees C, while N2 was produced instead at higher temperature. O2 was supposed to accelerate the reaction between NOx and CO for its oxidation of NO to give more easily reduced NO2, but the oxidation of CO by O2 to CO2 decreased the speed of the reaction greatly. Either SO2 or H2O had no adverse impact on the activity of NO reduction; however, in the presence of both SO2 and H2O, the catalyst deactivated quickly.

  20. Carbon monoxide pollution aggravates ischemic heart failure through oxidative stress pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboul, Cyril; Boissière, Julien; André, Lucas; Meyer, Gregory; Bideaux, Patrice; Fouret, Gilles; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Obert, Philippe; Lacampagne, Alain; Thireau, Jérôme; Cazorla, Olivier; Richard, Sylvain

    2017-01-03

    Risk of hospital readmission and cardiac mortality increases with atmospheric pollution for patients with heart failure. The underlying mechanisms are unclear. Carbon monoxide (CO) a ubiquitous environmental pollutant could be involved. We explored the effect of daily exposure of CO relevant to urban pollution on post-myocardial infarcted animals. Rats with ischemic heart failure were exposed 4 weeks to daily peaks of CO mimicking urban exposure or to standard filtered air. CO exposure worsened cardiac contractile dysfunction evaluated by echocardiography and at the cardiomyocyte level. In line with clinical reports, the animals exposed to CO also exhibited a severe arrhythmogenic phenotype with numerous sustained ventricular tachycardias as monitored by surface telemetric electrocardiograms. CO did not affect cardiac β-adrenergic responsiveness. Instead, mitochondrial dysfunction was exacerbated leading to additional oxidative stress and Ca(2+) cycling alterations. This was reversed following acute antioxidant treatment of cardiomyocytes with N-acetylcysteine confirming involvement of CO-induced oxidative stress. Exposure to daily peaks of CO pollution aggravated cardiac dysfunction in rats with ischemic heart failure by specifically targeting mitochondria and generating ROS-dependent alterations. This pathway may contribute to the high sensibility and vulnerability of individuals with cardiac disease to environmental outdoor air quality.

  1. Carbon monoxide pollution aggravates ischemic heart failure through oxidative stress pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reboul, Cyril; Boissière, Julien; André, Lucas; Meyer, Gregory; Bideaux, Patrice; Fouret, Gilles; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Obert, Philippe; Lacampagne, Alain; Thireau, Jérôme; Cazorla, Olivier; Richard, Sylvain

    2017-01-01

    Risk of hospital readmission and cardiac mortality increases with atmospheric pollution for patients with heart failure. The underlying mechanisms are unclear. Carbon monoxide (CO) a ubiquitous environmental pollutant could be involved. We explored the effect of daily exposure of CO relevant to urban pollution on post-myocardial infarcted animals. Rats with ischemic heart failure were exposed 4 weeks to daily peaks of CO mimicking urban exposure or to standard filtered air. CO exposure worsened cardiac contractile dysfunction evaluated by echocardiography and at the cardiomyocyte level. In line with clinical reports, the animals exposed to CO also exhibited a severe arrhythmogenic phenotype with numerous sustained ventricular tachycardias as monitored by surface telemetric electrocardiograms. CO did not affect cardiac β–adrenergic responsiveness. Instead, mitochondrial dysfunction was exacerbated leading to additional oxidative stress and Ca2+ cycling alterations. This was reversed following acute antioxidant treatment of cardiomyocytes with N-acetylcysteine confirming involvement of CO-induced oxidative stress. Exposure to daily peaks of CO pollution aggravated cardiac dysfunction in rats with ischemic heart failure by specifically targeting mitochondria and generating ROS-dependent alterations. This pathway may contribute to the high sensibility and vulnerability of individuals with cardiac disease to environmental outdoor air quality. PMID:28045070

  2. GASP - THERMODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF HELIUM, METHANE, NEON, NITROGEN, CARBON MONOXIDE, CARBON DIOXIDE, OXYGEN, AND ARGON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program, GASP, has been written to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, fluorine, methane, neon, nitrogen, and oxygen. GASP accepts any two of pressure, temperature, or density as input. In addition, entropy and enthalpy are possible inputs. Outputs are temperature, density, pressure, entropy, enthalpy, specific heats, expansion coefficient, sonic velocity, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and surface tension. A special technique is provided to estimate the thermal conductivity near the thermodynamic critical point. GASP is a group of FORTRAN subroutines. The user typically would write a main program that invoked GASP to provide only the described outputs. Subroutines are structured so that the user may call only those subroutines needed for his particular calculations. Allowable pressures range from 0.l atmosphere to 100 to l,000 atmospheres, depending on the fluid. Similarly, allowable pressures range from the triple point of each substance to 300 degrees K to 2000 degrees K, depending on the substance. The GASP package was developed to be used with heat transfer and fluid flow applications. It is particularly useful in applications of cryogenic fluids. Some problems associated with the liquefication, storage, and gasification of liquefied natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas can also be studied using GASP. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and is available for implementation on IBM 7000 series computers. GASP was developed in 1971.

  3. GASP - THERMODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF HELIUM, METHANE, NEON, NITROGEN, CARBON MONOXIDE, CARBON DIOXIDE, OXYGEN, AND ARGON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program, GASP, has been written to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, fluorine, methane, neon, nitrogen, and oxygen. GASP accepts any two of pressure, temperature, or density as input. In addition, entropy and enthalpy are possible inputs. Outputs are temperature, density, pressure, entropy, enthalpy, specific heats, expansion coefficient, sonic velocity, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and surface tension. A special technique is provided to estimate the thermal conductivity near the thermodynamic critical point. GASP is a group of FORTRAN subroutines. The user typically would write a main program that invoked GASP to provide only the described outputs. Subroutines are structured so that the user may call only those subroutines needed for his particular calculations. Allowable pressures range from 0.l atmosphere to 100 to l,000 atmospheres, depending on the fluid. Similarly, allowable pressures range from the triple point of each substance to 300 degrees K to 2000 degrees K, depending on the substance. The GASP package was developed to be used with heat transfer and fluid flow applications. It is particularly useful in applications of cryogenic fluids. Some problems associated with the liquefication, storage, and gasification of liquefied natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas can also be studied using GASP. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and is available for implementation on IBM 7000 series computers. GASP was developed in 1971.

  4. CRYOCHEM calculation: Minor components influence solid solutions in nitrogen-methane atmospheres - ethane on Titan and carbon monoxide on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S. P.; Kargel, J. S.; Adidharma, H.; Marion, G. M.

    2016-12-01

    In the extremely cold conditions on Triton, Pluto and other Kuiper Belt Objects, and Titan's tropopause and lower stratosphere, the atmospheres as a whole, not components individually, are subject to freeze into solid phases as solutions, notpure ices. This is in contrast to water ice in Earth's atmosphere, where the atmosphere stays in gaseous phase when water freezes into a solid phase of presumably pure water due to the much higher temperatures involved. A molecular-based thermodynamic model for cryogenic chemical systems, referred to as CRYOCHEM, has been developed to include the phase equilibria involving multi-component solid solutions. Calculations using CRYOCHEM, therefore, can provide us with compositions of solid solutions that are in equilibrium with the gaseous atmosphere. There is no longer a need to assume pure solids conventionally used in modeling, or even as binary (two-component) mixtures, which commonly consider only nitrogen and methane. Two examples will be discussed: (1) on Titan where ethane plays a significant role in precipitation of high-altitude solid aerosols; and (2) on Pluto where carbon monoxide may also play some important role in the sublimation/condensation cycle at the surface and shallow subsurface, e.g., zone of solid-state greenhouse heating. The presence of these third components essentially affects the solid-gas phase equilibria of nitrogen-methane binary system at their respective conditions on Titan and Pluto, the information of which is useful for future modeling, including those on other bodies in the outer Solar System and comets that share similar volatiles.

  5. Oxidation of Octopus vulgaris hemocyanin by nitrogen oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salvato, B.; Giacometti, G.M.; Beltramini, M.; Zilio, F.; Giacometti, G.; Magliozzo, R.S.; Peisach, J.

    1989-01-24

    The reaction of Octopus vulgaris hemocyanin with nitrite was studied under a variety of conditions in which the green half-met derivative is formed. Analytical evidence shows that the amount of chemically detectable nitrite in various samples of the derivative is not proportional to the cupric copper detected by EPR. The kinetics of oxidation of hemocyanin as a function of protein concentration and pH, in the presence of nitrite and ascorbate, is consistent with a scheme in which NO/sub 2/ is the reactive oxidant. We suggest that the green half-methemocyanin contains a metal center with one cuprous and one cupric copper without an exogenous nitrogen oxide ligand.

  6. Transient kinetic modeling of the ethylene and carbon monoxide oxidation over a commercial automotive exhaust gas catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmsen, J.M.A.; Hoebink, J.H.B.J.; Schouten, J.C.

    2000-03-01

    The transient kinetics of ethylene oxidation by oxygen over a commercial Pt/Rh/CeO{sub 2}/{gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} three-way catalyst were modeled. Experiments were carried out in a fixed-bed microreactor with two separate inlets, enabling alternate feeding of ethylene and oxygen with frequencies up to {1/4} Hz. The experimental conditions resemble the cold-start period of an Otto engine in a car. Two types of adsorbed ethylene species seem to exist. A selective catalyst deactivation for oxygen adsorption, due to deposition of carbonaceous species, was found. A kinetic model was developed, based on elementary reaction steps, that allows one to describe the experiments quantitatively. Furthermore, this model was combined with the published model for transient carbon monoxide oxidation over the same catalyst, which enables one to predict the results of simultaneous ethylene and carbon monoxide oxidation. Both components react in rather distinct zones, with ethylene being converted only when carbon monoxide oxidation is almost complete.

  7. Catalyst for reduction of nitrogen oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Kevin C.

    2010-04-06

    A Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalyst was prepared by slurry coating ZSM-5 zeolite onto a cordierite monolith, then subliming an iron salt onto the zeolite, calcining the monolith, and then dipping the monolith either into an aqueous solution of manganese nitrate and cerium nitrate and then calcining, or by similar treatment with separate solutions of manganese nitrate and cerium nitrate. The supported catalyst containing iron, manganese, and cerium showed 80 percent conversion at 113 degrees Celsius of a feed gas containing nitrogen oxides having 4 parts NO to one part NO.sub.2, about one equivalent ammonia, and excess oxygen; conversion improved to 94 percent at 147 degrees Celsius. N.sub.2O was not detected (detection limit: 0.6 percent N.sub.2O).

  8. Modeling Nitrogen Oxides in the Lower Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawa, S. Randy; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This talk will focus on the status of current understanding (not a historical review) as regards modeling nitrogen oxides (NOy) in the lower stratosphere (LS). The presentation will be organized around three major areas of process understanding: 1) NOy sources, sinks, and transport to the LS, 2) NOy species partitioning, and 3) polar multiphase processes. In each area, process topics will be identified with an estimate of the degree of confidence associated with their representation in numerical models. Several exotic and/or speculative processes will also be discussed. Those topics associated with low confidence or knowledge gaps, weighted by their prospective importance in stratospheric chemical modeling, will be collected into recommendations for further study. Suggested approaches to further study will be presented for discussion.

  9. Intercontinental transport of nitrogen oxide pollution plumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wenig

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the first satellite observation of intercontinental transport of nitrogen oxides emitted by power plants, verified by simulations with a particle tracer model. The analysis of such episodes shows that anthropogenic NOx plumes may influence the atmospheric chemistry thousands of kilometers away from its origin, as well as the ocean they traverse due to nitrogen fertilization. This kind of monitoring became possible by applying an improved algorithm to extract the tropospheric fraction of NO2 from the spectral data coming from the GOME instrument. As an example we show the observation of NO2 in the time period 4--14 May, 1998, from the South African Plateau to Australia which was possible due to favourable weather conditions during that time period which availed the satellite measurement. This episode was also simulated with the Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART which uses NOx emissions taken from an inventory for industrial emissions in South Africa and is driven with analyses from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts. Additionally lightning emissions were taken into account by utilizing Lightning Imaging Sensor data. Lightning was found to contribute probably not more than 25% of the resulting concentrations. Both, the measured and simulated emission plume show matching patterns while traversing the Indian Ocean to Australia and show great resemblance to the aerosol and CO2 transport observed by Piketh et al. (2000.

  10. Zinc Oxide-Multi Walled Carbon Nanotubes Nanocomposites for Carbon Monoxide Gas Sensor Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharbi, Najlaa D; Ansari, M Shahnawaze; Salah, Numan; Khayyat, Suzan A; Khan, Zishan H

    2016-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO)/multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) composites based sensors with different ZnO concentrations were fabricated to improve carbon monoxide (CO) gas sensing properties in comparison to the sensors based on bare MWCNTs. To study the structure, morphology and elemental composition of the resultant products, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were carried out. It has been observed that as the concentration of ZnO is increased more and more ZnO nanoparticles in the form of nodes get attached to MWCNTs resulting the reduction in average diameter of MWCNTs. The typical response of ZnO/MWCNTs composites based gas sensors for different CO concentrations (40, 100, 140 and 200 ppm) was studied by using very advanced sensing setup attached to I-V measurement system. Different sensing parameters such as: resistive response, sensitivity and response time were estimated at room temperature for all the fabricated sensors. The results indicated that the sensor based on nanocomposite which has 30 mg ZnO dispersed on 20 mg MWCNTs showing highest sensitivity and fastest response. All the sensors showed response times ranging from 8 to 23 seconds. The sensing mechanism behind the sensors based on ZnO/MWCNTs nanocomposites for CO gas at room temperature is also discussed in the present report.

  11. Nitric oxide modulates hypoxic pulmonary smooth muscle cell proliferation and apoptosis by regulating carbon monoxide pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-fei WANG; Hong TIAN; Chao-shu TANG; Hong-fang JIN; Jun-bao DU

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To explore the role of carbon monoxide (CO) in the regulation of hypoxic pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation and apoptosis by nitric oxide (NO). Methods: PASMC of Wistar rats was cultured in vitro in the presence of a NO donor, sodium nitroprusside, or an inhibitor of heme oxygenase (HO), zinc protoporphyrin-IX, or under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions.Nitrite and carboxyhemoglobin in PASMC medium were detected with spectrophotometry. The proliferating and apoptotic percentage of PASMC was measured by flow cytometry. The expression of HO-1 mRNA in PASMC was analyzed by fluorescent real-time quantitative PCR, and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen and caspase-3 were examined by immunocytochemical analysis. Results: The results showed that hypoxia suppressed NO generation from PASMC, which promoted hypoxic PASMC proliferation and induced apoptosis. Meanwhile, hy-poxia induced HO-1 expression in PASMC and promoted CO production from PASMC, which inhibited PASMC proliferation and regulated PASMC apoptosis. NO upregulated the expression of HO-1 mRNA in hypoxic PASMC; NO also inhib-ited proliferation and promoted apoptosis of hypoxic PASMC, possibly by regu-lating the production of CO. Conclusion: The results indicated that CO could inhibit proliferation and regulate apoptosis of PASMC, and NO inhibited prolifera-tion and promoted apoptosis of hypoxic PASMC, possibly by regulating the pro-duction of CO.

  12. Interaction between endogenous nitric oxide and carbon monoxide in the pathogenesis of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the interaction between nitric oxygenase (NOS)/ nitric oxide (NO) and heme oxygenase (HO)/ carbon monoxide (CO) system in the pathogenesis of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. On a rat model of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension, the pulmonary artery pressure was measured, and NO formation and expression of NOS in pulmonary tissues were examined after treatment with ZnPP-IX, an HO-1 inhibitor. The pulmonary artery pressure, CO formation and expression of HO-1 in pulmonary tissues were examined after treatment with L-NAME, a NOS inhibitor. We found that pulmonary hypertension developed after 2-week hypoxia, while the concentration of NO in the pulmonary tissue homogenates and the expression of NOS in intrapulmonary artery endothelial cells decreased markedly. ZnPP-IX worsened pulmonary hypertension of hypoxic rats. However, it increased endogenous production of NO and the expression of NOS obviously. The concentration of CO in the pulmonary tissue homogenates and the expression of HO-1 in intrapulmonary artery smooth muscle cells increased markedly with hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. L-NAME worsened pulmonary hypertension of hypoxic rats, but inhibited CO formation and HO-1 expression (P < 0.01). The results of this study suggested that endogenous NOS/NO and HO/CO systems might interact with each other and therefore play an important regulating role in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension.

  13. A simultaneous single breath measurement of pulmonary diffusing capacity with nitric oxide and carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borland, C D; Higenbottam, T W

    1989-01-01

    Pulmonary diffusing capacity (DL) for carbon monoxide (CO) and nitric oxide (NO) were simultaneously measured in man using the single breath method, by adding 4O ppm of NO to the inspired gas and analysing the expirate for NO by a chemiluminescent method. The mean ratio of DLNO to DLCO in thirteen subjects was 4.3 (SD 0.3), mean DLNO = 49 mmol.min-1.kPa-1 (SD 10) and mean DLCO = 11 mmol.min-1.kPa-1 (SD 2). An increase in alveolar oxygen concentration from a mean of 18 to 68% in five subjects was associated with a 54% fall in DLCO but no change in DLNO. A reduction of lung volume from total lung capacity (TLC) (mean of 7 l) to a mean volume of 3.9 l in five subjects caused a fall in both DLNO (by 34%) and DLCO (by 8%). With 175 watts cycle exercise in three subjects the DLCO rose by 45% and DLNO by 25%. Since NO reacts much faster with haemoglobin than CO, DLNO should be influenced much less by reaction with haemoglobin, and perhaps represents a better index for the diffusing capacity of the alveolar-capillary membrane (Dm) than DLCO.

  14. Control of Disease Tolerance to Malaria by Nitric Oxide and Carbon Monoxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktória Jeney

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO are gasotransmitters that suppress the development of severe forms of malaria associated with Plasmodium infection. Here, we addressed the mechanism underlying their protective effect against experimental cerebral malaria (ECM, a severe form of malaria that develops in Plasmodium-infected mice, which resembles, in many aspects, human cerebral malaria (CM. NO suppresses the pathogenesis of ECM via a mechanism involving (1 the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF-2, (2 induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, and (3 CO production via heme catabolism by HO-1. The protection afforded by NO is associated with inhibition of CD4+ T helper (TH and CD8+ cytotoxic (TC T cell activation in response to Plasmodium infection via a mechanism involving HO-1 and CO. The protective effect of NO and CO is not associated with modulation of host pathogen load, suggesting that these gasotransmitters establish a crosstalk-conferring disease tolerance to Plasmodium infection.

  15. Alleviation of copper-induced oxidative damage in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii by carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qi; Meng, Qian; Wei, Yuan Yuan; Yang, Zhi Min

    2011-08-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is an endogenous gaseous molecule in plants and animals. Recent studies have shown that it is one of the most essential cellular components regulating many aspects of plant growth and development. However, whether CO regulates the green algae adaptive response to heavy metal toxicity is unknown. The present study investigated the role of CO in regulating Cu-induced oxidative stress in eukaryotic algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Cells pretreated with 5 μM CO for 30 min and followed by exposure to 5 μM Cu(II) for 4 days showed attenuated toxicity. The CO-improved growth of algae was correlated with reduced lipid peroxidation and increased chlorophyll accumulation. The beneficial effect of CO was confirmed by histochemical staining with reactive oxygen species. Further, treatment with 5 μM CO increased the activity of catalase with Cu. However, a reduced superoxide dismutase activity was observed in the CO + Cu-treated algae compared to the control (activity of Cu treatment alone). Under the same condition, the activity of ascorbate peroxidase was not significantly changed. These results suggest that CO can play an important role in regulating the response of algae to Cu stress.

  16. Equation of state of initially liquid carbon monoxide and nitrogen mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The modified liquid perturbation variational theory and the improved vdW-1f model were applied to calculating the equation of the state of liquid CO-N2 mixture with the ratio of 1:1, 4:1 and 1:4, respectively, in the shock pressure range of 9-49 GPa. It was shown that the calculated result for CO-N2 mixture with the ratio of 1:1 is well consistent with the earlier experimental data. The thermodynamics equilibrium, chemical equilibrium and phase equilibrium were all considered in detail. It was found that Hugoniot of liquid CO-N2 mixture is moderately softened in the pressure range of 20-30 GPa and 30-49 GPa for different initial proportions, and that the Hugoniot is more softened in the latter pressure range, which means that the structural phase transition occurs near 20 GPa and 30 GPa. Since the shock pro-ductions may absorb a plenty of systematic energy, the shock temperature and pressure decline compared with the case of no chemical reaction. Pressures and temperatures increase gradually with the increase in the mole fraction of nitrogen composition. The results for the 1:1 CO-N2 mixture lie in the middle of two others. Therefore, it was shown that the modified Lorentz-Berthelor rule used in the scheme is effective to study shock-compression properties of liquid CO-N2 mixture under high temperatures and high pressures.

  17. Kinetics of carbon monoxide oxidation over modified supported CuO catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loc, Luu Cam; Tri, Nguyen; Cuong, Hoang Tien; Thoang, Ho Si [Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology (VAST), Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam). Inst. of Chemical Technology; Agafonov, Yu.A.; Gaidai, N.A.; Lapidus, A.L. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). N.D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry

    2013-11-01

    The following supported on {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts: 10(wt.)%CuO (CuAl), 10%CuO+10%Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} (CuCrAl) and 10%CuO+20%CeO{sub 2} (CuCeAl) were under the investigation. Physico-chemical characteristics of the catalysts were determined by the methods of BET, X-ray Diffraction (XRD), and Temperature-Programmed Reduction (TPR). A strong interaction of copper with support in CuAl resulted in the formation of low active copper aluminates. The bi-oxide CuCrAl was more active than CuAl owing to the formation of high catalytically active spinel CuCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}. The fact of very high activity of the sample CuCeAl can be explained by the presence of the catalytically active form of CuO-CeO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The kinetics of CO total oxidation was studied in a gradientless flow-circulating system at the temperature range between 200 C and 270 C. The values of initial partial pressures of carbon monoxide (P{sup o}{sub CO}), oxygen (P{sup o}{sub O2}), and specially added carbon dioxide (P{sup o}{sub CO{sub 2}}) were varied in ranges (hPa): 10 / 45; 33 / 100, and 0 / 30, respectively. (orig.)

  18. Equation of state of initially liquid carbon monoxide and nitrogen mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG JinWen; SUN Dong; SUN Yue; SHI ShangChun

    2008-01-01

    Academy of Engineering Physics,Mianyang 621900,ChinaThe modified liquid perturbation variational theory and the improved vdW-1f model were applied to calculating the equation of the state of liquid CO-N2 mixture with the ratio of 1:1,4:1 and 1:4,respectively,in the shock pressure range of 9-49 Gpa.It was shown that the calculated result for CO-N2 mixture with the ratio of 1:1 is well consistent with the earlier experimental data.The thermodynamics equilibrium,chemical equilibrium and phase equilibrium were all considered in detail.It was found that Hugoniot of liquid CO-N2 mixture is moderately softened in the pressure range of 20-30 Gpa and 30-49 Gpa for different initial proportions,and that the Hugoniot is more softened in the latter pressure range,which means that the structural phase transition occurs near 20 Gpa and 30 Gpa.Since the shock pro-ductions may absorb a plenty of systematic energy,the shock temperature and pressure decline compared with the case of no chemical reaction.Pressures and temperatures increase gradually with the increase in the mole fraction of nitrogen composition.The results for the 1:1 CO-N2 mixture lie in the middle of two others.Therefore,it was shown that the modified Lorentz-Berthelor rule used in the scheme is effective to study shock-compression properties of liquid CO-N2 mixture under high temperatures and high pressures.

  19. Comparative Assessment of Antimicrobial Efficiency of Ionic Silver, Silver Monoxide, and Metallic Silver Incorporated onto an Aluminum Oxide Nanopowder Carrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Maria Jastrzębska

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper provides comparative assessment of antimicrobial efficiency of ionic silver (Ag+, silver monoxide (Ag2O, and metallic silver (Ag incorporated onto an aluminum oxide nanopowder carrier (Al2O3. The deposition of Ag+ ions, Ag2O nanoparticles, and Ag nanoparticles on an different phases of aluminum oxide nanopowder carrier was realized using consecutive stages of dry sol-gel method. The Al2O3-Ag+, Al2O3-Ag2O, and Al2O3-Ag nanopowders were widely characterized qualitatively and quantitatively by SEM, physical nitrogen sorption and XRD analyses. Results indicate that the Al2O3 nanopowders added with Ag+, Ag2O, and Ag, apart from phase composition, were not differing considerably from one another in terms of their morphology and physical properties. However, nanopowders of Al2O3-Ag were more agglomerated than Al2O3-Ag2O and Al2O3-Ag+ nanopowders. The antibacterial activity of the nanopowders was examined by the spread plate method using bacterial strains such as Escherichia coli, Sarcina lutea, and Bacillus subtilis. The best antibacterial properties against Sarcina lutea strain were achieved in the amorphous-Al2O3-Ag+ and Al2O3-Ag2O nanopowders, whereas the worst antimicrobial activity against Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli was shown by the Al2O3-Ag+ and Al2O3-Ag nanopowders. The observed increase of the antibacterial activity as the silver content was not however significant for Al2O3-Ag nanopowders. The results obtained in the present experiments show that the Al2O3-Ag+, Al2O3-Ag2O, and Al2O3-Ag nanopowders, possessing good bactericidal properties, can be produced by using consecutive stages of dry sol-gel method, and Al2O3 nanopowder added with Ag2O is considered as the best raw material in the production of antiseptic materials.

  20. REFORMULATION OF COAL-DERIVED TRANSPORTATION FUELS: SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF CARBON MONOXIDE ON METAL FOAM CATALYSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mr. Paul Chin; Dr. Xiaolei Sun; Professor George W. Roberts; Professor James J. Spivey; Mr. Amornmart Sirijarhuphan; Dr. James G. Goodwin, Jr.; Dr. Richard W. Rice

    2002-12-31

    Several different catalytic reactions must be carried out in order to convert hydrocarbons (or alcohols) into hydrogen for use as a fuel for polyelectrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Each reaction in the fuel-processing sequence has a different set of characteristics, which influences the type of catalyst support that should be used for that particular reaction. A wide range of supports are being evaluated for the various reactions in the fuel-processing scheme, including porous and non-porous particles, ceramic and metal straight-channel monoliths, and ceramic and metal monolithic foams. These different types of support have distinctly different transport characteristics. The best choice of support for a given reaction will depend on the design constraints for the system, e.g., allowable pressure drop, and on the characteristics of the reaction for which the catalyst is being designed. Three of the most important reaction characteristics are the intrinsic reaction rate, the exothermicity/endothermicity of the reaction, and the nature of the reaction network, e.g., whether more than one reaction takes place and, in the case of multiple reactions, the configuration of the network. Isotopic transient kinetic analysis was used to study the surface intermediates. The preferential oxidation of low concentrations of carbon monoxide in the presence of high concentrations of hydrogen (PROX) is an important final step in most fuel processor designs. Data on the behavior of straight-channel monoliths and foam monolith supports will be presented to illustrate some of the factors involved in choosing a support for this reaction.

  1. Copper-cerium oxides supported on carbon nanomaterial for preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高美怡; 江楠; 赵宇宏; 徐长进; 苏海全; 曾尚红

    2016-01-01

    The CuxO-CeO2/Fe@CNSs, CuxO-CeO2/MWCNTs-Co and CuxO-CeO2/MWCNTs-Ni catalysts were prepared by the im-pregnation method and characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffrac-tion, H2-temperature programmed reduction and N2 adsorption-desorption techniques. It was found that the Fe nanoparticles were encapsulated into the multi-layered carbon nanospheres (CNSs). However, the multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTS) were generated on the Co/Al2O3 and Ni/Al2O3 precursor. The addition of carbon nanomaterial as supports could improve structural properties and low-temperature activity of the CuO-CeO2 catalyst, and save the used amount of metal catalysts in the temperature range with high selectivity for CO oxidation. The copper-cerium oxides supported on carbon nanomaterial had good resistence to H2O and CO2.

  2. A comparative study of formaldehyde and carbon monoxide complete oxidation on MnOx-CeO2 catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xuesong; LU Jiqing; QIAN Kun; HUANG Weixin; LUO Mengfei

    2009-01-01

    MnOx-CeO2 composite catalysts were prepared by a coprecipitation method and tested for formaldehyde (HCHO) and carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation. X-ray photon spectroscopy (XPS) results indicated that the average oxidation state of surface Mn species in CeMn composite catalyst was higher compared to the pure MnOx. The enhancement of reactivity for HCHO oxidation was due to the activation of the lattice oxygen species in MnOx by the addition of CeO2, which was confirmed by the H2 temperature programmed reduction (H2-TPR) results. The remarkable enhancement of reactivity for CO oxidation by the addition of CeO2 was due to the active oxygen species generated on the CeO2 surface which directly participated in the reaction.

  3. Nitrogen Oxides in the Arctic Troposphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honrath, Richard Edward, Jr.

    Nitrogen oxides play a critical role in tropospheric photochemistry. In order to characterize these compounds in the arctic troposphere, ground-level concentrations of total reactive nitrogen (NO_{y} ) and NO were determined over an extended period at a site near Barrow, Alaska. A high-sensitivity instrument developed for this purpose was used in three measurement campaigns: summer 1988, spring 1989, and March-December 1990. During the 1990 campaign, the detection limit for NO was 3-10 pptv (depending on averaging period), and the NO_{y} uncertainty was +/-26%. A screening algorithm was applied to the data to eliminate effects from local (Barrow) sources, and the remaining data were divided into "background periods" (unaffected by local or regional NO_ {x} sources), and "events" (periods when emissions from a regional NO_{x} source--the Prudhoe Bay oil-producing region--apparently impacted Barrow). These measurements revealed a sharp seasonal cycle of background NO_{y} concentrations, with high values in early spring (median 560-620 pptv) and ~70 pptv (median) during summer. This cycle is similar to that of other compounds in arctic haze but is partially attributed to a reduction in NO _{y} lifetime due to organic nitrate decomposition as temperatures and insolation increased. Evidence indicates that the springtime arctic NO_{y} reservoir was primarily composed of stable removal-resistant species, including PAN and other organic nitrates. PAN decomposition as temperatures rose in late spring likely caused an observed pulse of NO to ~35 pptv (maximum hourly average); hourly-average NO concentrations were otherwise generally <8 pptv. NO_ {x} production from PAN decomposition due to the onset of spring or southward advection may affect springtime O_3<=vels both in the Arctic and in the northern mid-latitudes. NO_{y} and O _3 concentrations were positively correlated during summer, possibly indicating long-range transport of both and/or the presence of a mid

  4. Exposure to oxidized nitrogen: lipid peroxidation and neonatal health risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabacova, S; Baird, D D; Balabaeva, L

    1998-01-01

    Pregnant women exposed to extensive environmental contamination by oxidized nitrogen compounds were studied at parturition, their neonatal health status was assessed and the involvement of oxidative stress in pathology was evaluated. Methemoglobin in maternal and cord blood was measured as a biomarker of individual exposure. Blood lipid peroxides and glutathione (reduced and total) were determined as oxidative stress biomarkers. Birthweight, Apgar scores, and clinical diagnosis at birth were used as neonatal health endpoints. Elevated exposure to oxidized nitrogen compounds was associated with increased lipid peroxidation in both maternal and cord blood. Poor birth outcome was associated with high blood lipid peroxides. Controlling for maternal age, parity, and smoking did not affect the relationships materially. The results showed that maternal/fetal exposure to oxidized nitrogen compounds is associated with increased risk of adverse birth outcome and suggest a role of oxidative damage in the pathogenic pathway.

  5. Biotransformation of sulfur and nitrogen oxides in stack gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Govind, R.; Puligadda, R. [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States); Bishop, D.F. [Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The Nation`s large supply of high sulfur coal and increasingly stringent emission regulation led to priority development of advanced innovative processes for treating pollutants in flue gases from coal combustion. The principal pollutants in flue gases, sulfur oxides (SO{sub 2},SO{sub 3}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) cause acid rain. Thus, the Department of Energy`s Clean Coal Program is funding projects to commercialize technologies that minimize emission of sulfur and nitrogen oxides at power plants. This report describes the controlled use of bioconversion processes to remove the oxides from flue gas. Two bioreactor experiments were conducted to investigate the removal of sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, and carbon dioxide from stack gases.

  6. Process and Equipment for Nitrogen Oxide Waste Conversion to Fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor); Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention describes a process for converting vapor streams from sources containing at least one nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent therein to a liquid fertilizer composition comprising the steps of: (1) directing a vapor stream containing at least nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent to a first contact zone; (2) contacting said vapor stream with water to form nitrogen oxide(s) from said at least one nitrogen- containing oxidizing agent; (3) directing said acid(s) as a second stream to a second contact zone; (4) exposing said second stream to hydrogen peroxide which is present within said second contact zone in a relative amount of at least 0.1% by weight of said second stream within said second contact zone to convert at least some of any nitrogen oxide species or ions other than in the nitrite form present within said second stream to nitrate ion; (5) sampling said stream within said second contact zone to determine the relative amount of hydrogen peroxide within said second contact zone; (6) adding hydrogen peroxide to said second contact zone when a level on hydrogen peroxide less than 0.1% by weight in said second stream is determined by said sampling; (7) adding a solution comprising potassium hydroxide to said second stream to maintain a pH between 6.0 and 11.0 within said second stream within said second contact zone to form a solution of potassium nitrate; and (8) removing sais solution of potassium nitrate from said second contact zone.

  7. Effect of exhaust gas recirculation on diesel engine nitrogen oxide reduction operating with jojoba methyl ester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, H.E. [Mechanical Power Department, Faculty of Engineering, Mattaria, Helwan University, 9 k Eltaaweniat, Nasr Road, P.O. Box 11718, Cairo (Egypt)

    2009-10-15

    Jojoba methyl ester (JME) has been used as a renewable fuel in numerous studies evaluating its potential use in diesel engines. These studies showed that this fuel is good gas oil substitute but an increase in the nitrogenous oxides emissions was observed at all operating conditions. The aim of this study mainly was to quantify the efficiency of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) when using JME fuel in a fully instrumented, two-cylinder, naturally aspirated, four-stroke direct injection diesel engine. The tests were carried out in three sections. Firstly, the measured performance and exhaust emissions of the diesel engine operating with diesel fuel and JME at various speeds under full load are determined and compared. Secondly, tests were performed at constant speed with two loads to investigate the EGR effect on engine performance and exhaust emissions including nitrogenous oxides (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbons (HC) and exhaust gas temperatures. Thirdly, the effect of cooled EGR with high ratio at full load on engine performance and emissions was examined. The results showed that EGR is an effective technique for reducing NO{sub x} emissions with JME fuel especially in light-duty diesel engines. With the application of the EGR method, the CO and HC concentration in the engine-out emissions increased. For all operating conditions, a better trade-off between HC, CO and NO{sub x} emissions can be attained within a limited EGR rate of 5-15% with very little economy penalty. (author)

  8. Oxides of nitrogen measurement at exhaust gases of combustion engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prietsch, W.; Alter, C.; Naumann, M.

    1975-01-01

    Chemical and physical methods available for the determination of nitrogen oxides were tested and compared with respect to their suitability for spark-ignition and diesel engine exhaust oxides of nitrogen analysis. Of all methods tested (Saltzmans method, phenoldisulfonic acid method, as well as non-dispersive infrared, ultraviolet absorption, and chemiluminescence methods), the chemiluminescence method was best for the determination of the total nitrogen oxides concentration in vehicle exhaust, even though the nitrogen dioxide conversion is still problematic, and the NO/sub 2/ concentrations lie within the dispersion limits of the nitric oxide analyzer. Measurement of NO is possible by the NDIR method provided the cross-sensitivity for water is simultaneously measured, and adequate correction is used. The Saltzman method is preferable to the phenoldisulfonic acid method under stationary analytical conditions due to its simplicity and reliability. For a concentration range of 100 to 1000 ppM, a Saltzman factor of 0.72 is best for exhaust nitrogen oxides analysis.

  9. 78 FR 54813 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Maine; Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-06

    ... Nitrogen Exemption and Ozone Transport Region Restructuring AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA...; Oxides of Nitrogen Exemption and Ozone Transport Region Restructuring (August 5, 2013). The EPA...

  10. Carbon monoxide, skeletal muscle oxidative stress, and mitochondrial biogenesis in humans

    OpenAIRE

    Rhodes, Michael A.; Carraway, Martha Sue; Piantadosi, Claude A.; Reynolds, Crystal M; Cherry, Anne D.; Wester, T. E.; Natoli, Michael J.; Massey, E. Wayne; Moon, Richard E.; Suliman, Hagir B.

    2009-01-01

    Given that the physiology of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) encompasses mitochondrial biogenesis, we tested the hypothesis that the HO-1 product, carbon monoxide (CO), activates mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle and enhances maximal oxygen uptake (V̇o2max) in humans. In 10 healthy subjects, we biopsied the vastus lateralis and performed V̇o2max tests followed by blinded randomization to air or CO breathing (1 h/day at 100 parts/million for 5 days), a contralateral muscle biopsy on day 5, a...

  11. Volatile organic compounds and oxides of nitrogen. Further emission reductions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Froste, H. [comp.

    1996-12-31

    This report presents the current status in relation to achievement of the Swedish Environmental target set by Parliament to reduce emission of volatile organic compounds by 50 per cent between 1988 and 2000. It also instructed the Agency to formulate proposed measures to achieve a 50 per cent reduction of emission of nitrogen oxides between 1985 and 2005. The report presents an overall account of emission trends for volatile organic compounds (from all sectors) and nitrogen oxides (from the industry sector) and steps proposed to achieve further emission reductions. 43 refs

  12. Method for removal of nitrogen oxides from stationary combustion sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Charles D. (Inventor); Clausen, III, Christian A. (Inventor); Collins, Michelle M. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method for removing NO.sub.X from gas streams emanating from stationary combustion sources and manufacturing plants utilizes the injection of hydrogen peroxide into the gas stream for rapid gas-phase oxidation of NO to NO.sub.2 and water-soluble nitrogen acids HNO.sub.2 and HNO.sub.3. The nitrogen acids may be removed from the oxidized gas stream by wet scrubbing or by contact with a particulate alkaline material to form a nitrite/nitrate salt.

  13. Surface composition tuning of Au-Pt bimetallic nanoparticles for enhanced carbon monoxide and methanol electro-oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suntivich, Jin; Xu, Zhichuan; Carlton, Christopher E; Kim, Junhyung; Han, Binghong; Lee, Seung Woo; Bonnet, Nicéphore; Marzari, Nicola; Allard, Lawrence F; Gasteiger, Hubert A; Hamad-Schifferli, Kimberly; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2013-05-29

    The ability to direct bimetallic nanoparticles to express desirable surface composition is a crucial step toward effective heterogeneous catalysis, sensing, and bionanotechnology applications. Here we report surface composition tuning of bimetallic Au-Pt electrocatalysts for carbon monoxide and methanol oxidation reactions. We establish a direct correlation between the surface composition of Au-Pt nanoparticles and their catalytic activities. We find that the intrinsic activities of Au-Pt nanoparticles with the same bulk composition of Au0.5Pt0.5 can be enhanced by orders of magnitude by simply controlling the surface composition. We attribute this enhancement to the weakened CO binding on Pt in discrete Pt or Pt-rich clusters surrounded by surface Au atoms. Our finding demonstrates the importance of surface composition control at the nanoscale in harnessing the true electrocatalytic potential of bimetallic nanoparticles and opens up strategies for the development of highly active bimetallic nanoparticles for electrochemical energy conversion.

  14. Final report on COOMET.QM-S1 (COOMET project no 483/RU/09): Supplementary comparison of primary standard gas mixtures: Nitrogen monoxide in nitrogen (50 µmol/mol)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopelko, L. A.; Kustikov, Y. A.; Kolobova, A. V.; Shor, N. B.; Efremova, O. V.; Rozhnov, M. S.; Melnyk, D. M.; Kozia, V. G.; Shpilnyi, S. A.; Petryshyn, P. V.; Iakubov, S. E.; Kluchits, A. S.; Ananyin, V. N.; Mironchik, A. M.; Mokhnach, M. V.; Valkova, M.; Stovcik, V.; Walden, J.; Augusto, C. R.; Fioravante, A. L.; Ribeiro, C. C.; Sobrinho, D. C. G.; Oudwater, R. J.; da Cunha, V. S.

    2014-01-01

    Nitrogen monoxide is one of the main contaminants present in the atmospheric air due to emissions of vehicles and power stations. Taking into account the positive experience of VNIIM in the pilot study CCQM-P73 (Nitrogen monoxide gas standards, 30 µmol/mol to 70 µmol/mol), a COOMET project (No 483/RU/09) on the subject was decided and registered in the KCDB as supplementary comparison COOMET.QM-S1. This involved six National Metrology Institutes, aiming to consolidate or support their Calibration and Measurement Capabilities in this field. It was found that most of the results were consistent with the reference (gravimetric) values, with observed differences not exceeding ±1.3% and not exceeding either the appropriate assigned expanded uncertainties. There was, however, one exception: the INMETRO difference from the reference value is slightly higher than the expended uncertainty. The mixtures prepared for this exercise were found to be stable during about one year within the uncertainty of the measurements. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by COOMET, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  15. Process for Nitrogen Oxide Waste Conversion to Fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueck, Dale E. (Inventor); Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention describes a process for converting vapor streams from sources containing at least one nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent therein to a liquid fertilizer composition comprising the steps of: a) directing a vapor stream containing at least one nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent to a first contact zone; b) contacting said vapor stream with water to form nitrogen oxide(s) from said at least one nitrogen-containing oxidizing agent; c) directing said acid(s) as a second stream to a second contact zone; d) exposing said second stream to hydrogen peroxide which is present within said second contact zone in a relative amount of at least 0.1% by weight of said second stream within said second contact zone to convert at least some of any nitrogen oxide species or ions other than in the nitrate form present within said second stream to nitrate ion; e) sampling said stream within said second contact zone to determine the relative amount of hydrogen peroxide within said second contact zone; f) adding hydrogen peroxide to said second contact zone when a level of hydrogen peroxide less than 0.1 % by weight in said second stream is determined by said sampling; g) adding a solution comprising potassium hydroxide to said second stream to maintain a pH between 6.0 and 11.0 within said second stream within said second contact zone to form a solution of potassium nitrate; and h) removing said solution of potassium nitrate from said second contact zone.

  16. Oxidative and nitrative modifications of enkephalins by reactive nitrogen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Mario; Pecci, Laura; Schininá, Maria Eugenia; Montefoschi, Gabriella; Rosei, Maria Anna

    2006-07-01

    The interaction of Leucine-enkephalin (Leu-enkephalin) with reactive nitrogen species has been investigated. Reactive nitrogen species are capable of nitrating and oxidizing Leu-enkephalin. HPLC analysis shows the formation of two major enkephalin derivatives by peroxynitrite. The tyrosine amino-terminal residue of Leu-enkephalin is converted either to 3-nitrotyrosine thus producing nitroenkephalin and to dityrosine by dimerization with the production of an enkephalin dimer. The evidence of the formation of the nitroenkephalin and of the enkephalin dimer--dienkephalin--was achieved by electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry. In addition to peroxynitrite, the methylene blue photosensitized oxidation of enkephalin in the presence of nitrite leads to the formation of the nitrated peptide. Moreover, the nitropeptide can be also obtained by peroxidase-generated nitrogen reactive species.

  17. Emissions of nitrogen oxides and particulates of diesel vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kadijk, G.; Ligterink, N.E.; Mensch, P. van; Spreen, J.S.; Vermeulen, R.J.; Vonk, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    In real-world conditions, modern Euro VI heavy-duty vehicles produce an average of ten times less nitrogen oxide (NOx)emissions than previous generations of Euro IV and Euro V heavy-duty vehicles. However, Euro 6 passenger cars and light commercial vehicles present an entirely different picture sinc

  18. 40 CFR 60.332 - Standard for nitrogen oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... from paragraph (a) of this section. (f) Stationary gas turbines using water or steam injection for... engaged by manufacturers in research and development of equipment for both gas turbine emission control... Turbines § 60.332 Standard for nitrogen oxides. (a) On and after the date on which the performance...

  19. 40 CFR 90.318 - Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... at any point, use the best-fit non-linear equation which represents the data to within two percent of... been set to the most common operating range. (4) Introduce into the NOX generator analyzer-system an NO... off the NOX generator but maintain gas flow through the system. The oxides of nitrogen analyzer...

  20. Nitrogen oxide abatement by distributed fuel addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, J.O.L.; Mereb, J.B.

    1991-09-20

    Reburning is examined as a means of NO{sub x} destruction in a 17 kW down-fired pulverized coal combustor. In reburning, a secondary fuel is introduced downstream of the primary flame to produce a reducing zone, favorable to NO destruction, and air is introduced further downstream to complete the combustion. Emphasis is on natural gas reburning and a bituminous coal primary flame. A parametric examination of reburning employing a statistical experimental design, is conducted, complemented by detailed experiments. Mechanisms governing the inter-conversion of nitrogenous species in the fuel rich reburn zone is explored. The effect of reburning on N{sub 2}O emissions, the effect of primary flame mode (premixed and diffusion) and the effect of distributing the reburning fuel, are also investigated.

  1. 40 CFR Appendix S to Part 50 - Interpretation of the Primary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) S Appendix S to Part 50 Protection... National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen (Nitrogen Dioxide) 1. General (a) This... national ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen as measured by nitrogen dioxide (“NO2...

  2. Ultrasensitive optoelectronic sensors for nitrogen oxides and explosives detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtas, J.; Bielecki, Z.; Stacewicz, T.; Mikolajczyk, J.

    2013-01-01

    The article describes application of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) for detection of nitrogen oxides and vapours of explosives. The oxides are important greenhouse gases that are of large influence on environment, living organisms and human health. These compounds are also markers of some human diseases as well as they are emitted by commonly used explosives. Therefore sensitive nitrogen oxides sensors are of great importance for many applications, e. g. for environment protection (air monitoring), for medicine investigation (analyzing of exhaled air) and finally for explosives detection. In the Institute of Optoelectronics MUT different types of optoelectronic sensors employing CEAS were developed. They were designed to measure trace concentration of nitrogen dioxide, nitric oxide, and nitrous oxide. The sensors provide opportunity for simultaneous measurement of these gases concentration at ppb level. Their sensitivity is comparable with sensitivities of instruments based on other methods, e.g. gas chromatography or mass spectrometry. Our sensors were used for some explosives detection as well. The experiment showed that the sensors provide possibility to detect explosive devices consisting of nitroglycerine, ammonium nitrate, TNT, PETN, RDX and HMX.

  3. Carbon monoxide alleviates ethanol-induced oxidative damage and inflammatory stress through activating p38 MAPK pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yanyan; Gao, Chao; Shi, Yanru; Tang, Yuhan; Liu, Liang; Xiong, Ting; Du, Min [Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Ministry of Education Lab of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Xing, Mingyou [Department of Infectious Diseases, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Liu, Liegang [Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Ministry of Education Lab of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Yao, Ping, E-mail: yaoping@mails.tjmu.edu.cn [Department of Nutrition and Food Hygiene, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Ministry of Education Lab of Environment and Health, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China); Hubei Key Laboratory of Food Nutrition and Safety, School of Public Health, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 13 Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430030 (China)

    2013-11-15

    Stress-inducible protein heme oxygenase-1(HO-1) is well-appreciative to counteract oxidative damage and inflammatory stress involving the pathogenesis of alcoholic liver diseases (ALD). The potential role and signaling pathways of HO-1 metabolite carbon monoxide (CO), however, still remained unclear. To explore the precise mechanisms, ethanol-dosed adult male Balb/c mice (5.0 g/kg.bw.) or ethanol-incubated primary rat hepatocytes (100 mmol/L) were pretreated by tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II) dimmer (CORM-2, 8 mg/kg for mice or 20 μmol/L for hepatocytes), as well as other pharmacological reagents. Our data showed that CO released from HO-1 induction by quercetin prevented ethanol-derived oxidative injury, which was abolished by CO scavenger hemoglobin. The protection was mimicked by CORM-2 with the attenuation of GSH depletion, SOD inactivation, MDA overproduction, and the leakage of AST, ALT or LDH in serum and culture medium induced by ethanol. Moreover, CORM-2 injection or incubation stimulated p38 phosphorylation and suppressed abnormal Tnfa and IL-6, accompanying the alleviation of redox imbalance induced by ethanol and aggravated by inflammatory factors. The protective role of CORM-2 was abolished by SB203580 (p38 inhibitor) but not by PD98059 (ERK inhibitor) or SP600125 (JNK inhibitor). Thus, HO-1 released CO prevented ethanol-elicited hepatic oxidative damage and inflammatory stress through activating p38 MAPK pathway, suggesting a potential therapeutic role of gaseous signal molecule on ALD induced by naturally occurring phytochemicals. - Highlights: • CO alleviated ethanol-derived liver oxidative and inflammatory stress in mice. • CO eased ethanol and inflammatory factor-induced oxidative damage in hepatocytes. • The p38 MAPK is a key signaling mechanism for the protective function of CO in ALD.

  4. Oxidation-reduction catalyst and its process of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Schryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    This invention relates generally to a ruthenium stabilized oxidation-reduction catalyst useful for oxidizing carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds, and reducing nitrogen oxide species in oxidizing environments, substantially without the formation of toxic and volatile ruthenium oxide species upon said oxidizing environment being at high temperatures.

  5. Low Temperature Oxidation of Methane: The Influence of Nitrogen Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Anders Broe; Glarborg, Peter; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2000-01-01

    An experimental investigation of methane oxidation in the presence of NO and NO2 has been made in an isothermal plug-flow reactor at 750-1250K. The temperature for on-set of oxidation was lowered by 250 K in the presence of NO or NO2 at residence times of 200 ms. At shorter residence times (140 ms...

  6. Band gap engineering of indium zinc oxide by nitrogen incorporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, J.J., E-mail: jjosila@hotmail.com [Unidad Académica de Física, Universidad Autónoma de Zacatecas, Calzada Solidaridad esq. Paseo la Bufa, Fracc. Progreso, C.P. 98060 Zacatecas (Mexico); Doctorado Institucional de Ingeniería y Ciencia de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Av. Salvador Nava, Zona Universitaria, C.P. 78270 San Luis Potosí (Mexico); Aguilar-Frutis, M.A.; Alarcón, G. [Centro de Investigación en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnología Avanzada del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Unidad Legaría, Calz. Legaría No. 694, Col. Irrigación, C.P. 11500 México D.F. (Mexico); Falcony, C. [Departamento de Física, Centro de Investigación y Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional campus Zacatenco, Av. Instituto Politécnico Nacional 2508, Col. San Pedro Zacatenco, C.P. 07360 México D.F. (Mexico); and others

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • IZON thin films were deposited by RF reactive sputtering at room temperature. • The effects of nitrogen on physical properties of IZO were analyzed. • Optical properties of IZON were studied by SE and UV–vis spectroscopy. • Adachi and classical parameters were quantitative and qualitatively congruent. • Nitrogen induces a gradual narrowing band gap from 3.5 to 2.5 eV on IZON films. - Abstract: The effects of nitrogen incorporation in indium zinc oxide films, as grown by RF reactive magnetron sputtering, on the structural, electrical and optical properties were studied. It was determined that the variation of the N{sub 2}/Ar ratio, in the reactive gas flux, was directly proportional to the nitrogen percentage measured in the sample, and the incorporated nitrogen, which substituted oxygen in the films induces changes in the band gap of the films. This phenomenon was observed by measurement of absorption and transmission spectroscopy in conjunction with spectral ellipsometry. To fit the ellipsometry spectra, the classical and Adachi dispersion models were used. The obtained optical parameters presented notable changes related to the increment of the nitrogen in the film. The band gap narrowed from 3.5 to 2.5 eV as the N{sub 2}/Ar ratio was increased. The lowest resistivity obtained for these films was 3.8 × 10{sup −4} Ω cm with a carrier concentration of 5.1 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup −3}.

  7. Carbon monoxide oxidation on Pt single crystal electrodes: understanding the catalysis for low temperature fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Gonzalo; Koper, Marc T M

    2011-08-01

    Herein the general concepts of fuel cells are discussed, with special attention to low temperature fuel cells working in alkaline media. Alkaline low temperature fuel cells could well be one of the energy sources in the next future. This technology has the potential to provide power to portable devices, transportation and stationary sectors. With the aim to solve the principal catalytic problems at the anode of low temperature fuel cells, a fundamental study of the mechanism and kinetics of carbon monoxide as well as water dissociation on stepped platinum surfaces in alkaline medium is discussed and compared with those in acidic media. Furthermore, cations involved as promoters for catalytic surface reactions are also considered. Therefore, the aim of the present work is not only to provide the new fundamental advances in the electrocatalysis field, but also to understand the reactions occurring at fuel cell catalysts, which may help to improve the fabrication of novel electrodes in order to enhance the performance and to decrease the cost of low temperature fuel cells.

  8. Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide over Cu/CeO2 Catalysts Prepared by SMAI

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Supported Cu catalysts for low-temperature CO oxidation were prepared by solvated metal atom impregnation (SMAI). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigations indicated that the copper in all the samples was in a metallic state. XRD measurements showed that the mean diameters of Cu particles prepared by SMAI were small. Catalytical tests showed that the SMAI catalyst had high CO oxidation activity.

  9. Dynamics of Nitric Oxide and Nitrous Oxide Emission during Nitrogen Conversion Processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampschreur, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions can be a serious threat to the environment. Rising levels of N2O in the atmosphere contribute to global warming and destruction of the ozone layer. This thesis describes an investigation on the emission of NO and N2O during nitrogen conversion proc

  10. Oxides of nitrogen and the clouds of Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, A. J.; Donahue, T. M.; Stedman, D. H.; Knollenberg, R. G.; Ragent, B.; Blamont, J.

    1979-01-01

    Nitric oxide may be produced in the atmosphere of Venus by lightning storms in the clouds. The paper suggests that the odd nitrogen thus formed may play an important part in the chemistry of the clouds. Specifically, production rates for NO2 in the limiting case of high NO concentrations are estimated. If the NO density is high, it is suggested that NO2 may catalyse the production of sulfuric acid aerosol from sulfur dioxide and water vapor, and may also form nitrogen-sulfur compounds such as nitrosyl sulfuric acid, NOHSO4. The large partricles seen by the Pioneer Venus sounder probe may contain considerable quantities of NOHSO4. If this is the case, odd nitrogen must be present in the atmosphere in at least a parts-per-million mixing ratio.

  11. Carbon monoxide, skeletal muscle oxidative stress, and mitochondrial biogenesis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Michael A; Carraway, Martha Sue; Piantadosi, Claude A; Reynolds, Crystal M; Cherry, Anne D; Wester, T E; Natoli, Michael J; Massey, E Wayne; Moon, Richard E; Suliman, Hagir B

    2009-07-01

    Given that the physiology of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) encompasses mitochondrial biogenesis, we tested the hypothesis that the HO-1 product, carbon monoxide (CO), activates mitochondrial biogenesis in skeletal muscle and enhances maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2max)) in humans. In 10 healthy subjects, we biopsied the vastus lateralis and performed Vo(2max) tests followed by blinded randomization to air or CO breathing (1 h/day at 100 parts/million for 5 days), a contralateral muscle biopsy on day 5, and repeat Vo(2max) testing on day 8. Six independent subjects underwent CO breathing and two muscle biopsies without exercise testing. Molecular studies were performed by real-time RT-PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunochemistry. After Vo(2max) testing plus CO breathing, significant increases were found in mRNA levels for nuclear respiratory factor-1, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha, mitochondrial transcription factor-A (Tfam), and DNA polymerase gamma (Polgamma) with no change in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copy number or Vo(2max). Levels of myosin heavy chain I and nuclear-encoded HO-1, superoxide dismutase-2, citrate synthase, mitofusin-1 and -2, and mitochondrial-encoded cytochrome oxidase subunit-I (COX-I) and ATPase-6 proteins increased significantly. None of these responses were reproduced by Vo(2max) testing alone, whereas CO alone increased Tfam and Polgamma mRNA, and COX-I, ATPase-6, mitofusin-2, HO-1, and superoxide dismutase protein. These findings provide evidence linking the HO/CO response involved in mitochondrial biogenesis in rodents to skeletal muscle in humans through a set of responses involving regulation of the mtDNA transcriptosome and mitochondrial fusion proteins autonomously of changes in exercise capacity.

  12. CuO/CeO2 Catalysts for Selective Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide in Excess Hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘春涛; 史鹏飞; 张菊香

    2004-01-01

    CuO/CeO2 catalysts were prepared by a coprecipitation method and tested for CO removal from reformed fuels via selective oxidation. The influence of the calcination temperature on the chemical compositions and catalytic performance of CuO/CeO2 catalysts were studied. It was found that CuO/CeO2 catalysts exhibit excellent CO oxidation activity and selectivity,and the complete removal of CO is attained when the catalysts are calcined at appropriate temperatures. XRD, TPR and XPS results indicate that CuO/CeO2 catalysts exhibit higher catalytic performance in CO selective oxidation due to the strong interaction between copper oxide and cerium dioxide, which promotes the dispersion and hydrogen reduction activity of copper.

  13. Influence of Process Parameters on Nitrogen Oxide Formation in

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lans, Robert Pieter Van Der; Glarborg, Peter; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes the influence of burner operating conditions, burner geometry and fuel parameters on the formation of nitrogen oxide during combustion of pulverized coal. Main attention has been paid to combustion test facilities with self-sustaining flames, while extensions have been made...... to full scale boilers and furnace modeling. Since coal combustion and flame aerodynamics have been reviewed earlier, these phenomena are only treated briefly....

  14. The adsorption of nitrogen oxides on crystalline ice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bartels

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The partitioning of nitrogen oxides between ice and air is of importance to the ozone budget in the upper troposphere. In the present study, adsorption of nitrogen oxides on ice was investigated at atmospheric pressure using a chromatographic technique with radioactively labelled nitrogen oxides at low concentrations. The measured retentions solely depended on molecular adsorption and were not influenced by dimerisation, formation of encapsulated hydrates on the ice surface, dissociation of the acids, nor by migration into a quasi-liquid layer or grain boundaries. Based on the chromatographic retention and the model of thermo-chromatography, the standard adsorption enthalpy of -20 kJ mol-1 for NO, -22kJ mol-1 for NO2, -30kJ mol-1 for peroxyacetyl nitrate, -32kJ mol-1 for HON} and -44 kJ mol-1 for HNO3 was calculated. To perform those calculations within the model of thermo-chromatography, the standard adsorption entropy was calculated based on statistical thermodynamics. In this work, two different choices of standard states were applied, and consequently different values of the standard adsorption entropy, of either between -39 kJ mol-1 and -45kJ mol-1, or -164 kJ mol-1 and -169 kJ mol-1 for each nitrogen oxide were derived. The standard adsorption enthalpy was identical for both standard adsorption entropies and thus shown to be independent of the choice of standard state. A brief outlook on environmental implications of our findings indicates that adsorption on ice might be an important removal process of HNO3. In addition, it might be of some importance for HONO and peroxyacetyl nitrate and irrelevant for NO and NO2.

  15. De-etiolation of wheat seedling leaves: cross talk between heme oxygenase/carbon monoxide and nitric oxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahui Liu

    Full Text Available Greening of etiolated plants is predominantly stimulated by light but the complete molecular mechanism is still unknown. Multiple studies currently focus on the important physiological effects of heme oxygenase (HO/carbon monoxide (CO in plants. In this report, firstly, the role of HO/CO in light-induced de-etiolation process was investigated. We discovered that light could significantly increase HO activities, HO-1 gene expression, CO release, and chlorophyll accumulation, all of which were sensitive to zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPPIX, the potent inhibitor of HO-1, respectively. Both HO-1 inducer hematin (H and CO aqueous solution were able to relieve etiolation in wheat seedling leaves under completely darkness by up-regulating endogenous HO/CO system, so as nitric oxide (NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP did. Similarly, endogenous NO production was also boost in response to light, SNP, hematin and CO aqueous solution in wheat seedling leaves. Additionally, the restoration of chlorophyll contents was blocked, when the inhibitor of mammalian nitric oxide synthase N(G-nitro-L-arginine methylester hydrochloride (L-NAME or the specific scavenger of NO 2-(4-carboxyphenyl-4, 4, 5, 5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide potassium salt (cPTIO was added, respectively. Furthermore, the inducible effects of light were different from those of SNP, hematin, and CO on Pfr accumulation and PHYA transcripts. However, all of sodium nitroprusside (SNP, hematin, and CO could accelerate NO emission, which suggested that HO/CO in wheat seedlings de-etiolation under dark-light transition may have a cross talk with NO.

  16. Kinetics of Carbon Monoxide Electro-Oxidation in Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells from Ni-YSZ Patterned-Anode Measurements

    KAUST Repository

    Hanna, J.

    2013-04-17

    A mathematical model is developed around the framework of a reduced mechanism describing electrochemical oxidation of carbon monoxide on Ni-YSZ patterned anodes. The electro-oxidation mechanism involves three reactions, one describing adsorption/ desorption of COonNi, and two single-electron charge-transfer steps inwhich the surface adsorbate CO(Ni) participates directly. These steps are coupled with surface transport in a reaction-diffusion model for which analytic equilibrium and steady-state solutions are derived. As much as possible, we make use of existing, independent, published information about heterogeneous chemistry, surface transport, and other model parameters. The only unknowns in our model are taken to be the kinetic rate constants of the electrochemical reactions, which we evaluate by fitting the model predictions to previously published patterned-anode experiments [B. Habibzadeh, Ph.D. Thesis, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA (2007)]. The results show that diffusion of CO on the Ni surface to the three-phase boundary is the rate-controlling process for CO electro-oxidation. Moreover, from a reaction standpoint, the charge-transfer process is dominated by a slow step involving CO(Ni). These findings collectively demonstrate the critical dependence of the electro-oxidation process to the direct participation of CO. © 2013 The Electrochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  17. Modeling of carbon monoxide oxidation kinetics over NASA carbon dioxide laser catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, Richard K.

    1989-01-01

    The recombination of CO and O2 formed by the dissociation of CO2 in a sealed CO2 laser discharge zone is examined. Conventional base-metal-oxide catalysts and conventional noble-metal catalysts are not effective in recombining the low O2/CO ratio at the low temperatures used by the lasers. The use of Pt/SnO2 as the noble-metal reducible-oxide (NMRO), or other related materials from Group VIIIA and IB and SnO2 interact synergistically to produce a catalytic activity that is substantially higher than either componet separately. The Pt/SnO2 and Pd/SnO2 were reported to have significant reaction rates at temperatures as low as -27 C, conditions under which conventional catalysts are inactive. The gas temperature range of lasers is 0 + or - 40 C. There are three general ways in which the NMRO composite materials can interact synergistically: one component altering the properties of another component; the two components each providing independent catalytic functions in a complex reaction mechanism; and the formation of catalytic sites through the combination of two components at the atomic level. All three of these interactions may be important in low temperature CO oxidation over NMRO catalysts. The effect of the noble metal on the oxide is discussed first, followed by the effect of the oxide on the noble metal, the interaction of the noble metal and oxide to form catalytic sites, and the possible ways in which the CO oxidation reaction is catalyzed by the NMRO materials.

  18. Nitrogen-doped graphene: effect of graphite oxide precursors and nitrogen content on the electrochemical sensing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megawati, Monica; Chua, Chun Kiang; Sofer, Zdenek; Klímová, Kateřina; Pumera, Martin

    2017-06-21

    Graphene, produced via chemical methods, has been widely applied for electrochemical sensing due to its structural and electrochemical properties as well as its ease of production in large quantity. While nitrogen-doped graphenes are widely studied materials, the literature showing an effect of graphene oxide preparation methods on nitrogen quantity and chemical states as well as on defects and, in turn, on electrochemical sensing is non-existent. In this study, the properties of nitrogen-doped graphene materials, prepared via hydrothermal synthesis using graphite oxide produced by various classical methods using permanganate or chlorate oxidants Staudenmaier, Hummers, Hofmann and Brodie oxidation methods, were studied; the resulting nitrogen-doped graphene oxides were labeled as ST-GO, HU-GO, HO-GO and BR-GO, respectively. The electrochemical oxidation of biomolecules, such as ascorbic acid, uric acid, dopamine, nicotinamide adenine nucleotide and DNA free bases, was carried out using cyclic voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry techniques. The nitrogen content in doped graphene oxides increased in the order ST-GO doped graphene followed this trend, as shown in the cyclic voltammograms. This is a very important finding that provides insight into the electrocatalytic effect of N-doped graphene. The nitrogen-doped graphene materials exhibited improved sensitivity over bare glassy carbon for ascorbic acid, uric acid and dopamine detection. These studies will enhance our understanding of the effects of graphite oxide precursors on the electrochemical sensing properties of nitrogen-doped graphene materials.

  19. The effect of carbon monoxide integrating nitric oxide through auxin signal in Arabidopsis to modulate iron deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming eYang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO and nitric oxide (NO are essential modulators that regulate the plant response to iron deficiency (-Fe. Auxin is a phytohormone that plays important roles in plant growth and development. We report here that in Arabidopsis –Fe enhanced heme oxygenase-dependent CO generation and auxin transport through redistribution of PIN1 protein, which subsequently increased NO accumulation; NO signaling regulated the activity of ferric chelate reductase (FCR and the expression of Fe-uptake genes including basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor (FIT and the ferric reduction oxidase 2 (FRO2. Over-expression of HY1 encoding heme oxygenase, or treatment with CO donor enhanced basipetal auxin transport, FCR activity, and the expressions of FIT and FRO2 under –Fe. Such effects were compromised in the mutant aux1-7 impaired in auxin transport or in the mutant noa1 or nia1/nia2 defective in NO biosynthesis. -Fe failed to promote auxin transport and FCR activity in hy1 mutant; such inability was reversed in the double mutant of hy1/yucca1 with elevated auxin production, or in hy1/cue1 mutant with NO over-accumulation. Taken together, our results suggest that CO modulates NO signaling through auxin to cope with Fe deficiency in Arabidopsis.

  20. Amperometric Microsensors Monitoring Glutamate-Evoked In Situ Responses of Nitric Oxide and Carbon Monoxide from Live Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yejin Ha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the brain, nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO are important signaling gases which have multifaceted roles, such as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and vasodilators. Even though it is difficult to measure NO and CO in a living system due to their high diffusibility and extremely low release levels, electrochemical sensors are promising tools to measure in vivo and in vitro NO and CO gases. In this paper, using amperometric dual and septuple NO/CO microsensors, real-time NO and CO changes evoked by glutamate were monitored simultaneously for human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y cells. In cultures, the cells were differentiated and matured into functional neurons by retinoic acid and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. When glutamate was administrated to the cells, both NO and CO increases and subsequent decreases returning to the basal levels were observed with a dual NO/CO microsensor. In order to facilitate sensor’s measurement, a flower-type septuple NO/CO microsensor was newly developed and confirmed in terms of the sensitivity and selectivity. The septuple microsensor was employed for the measurements of NO and CO changes as a function of distances from the position of glutamate injection. Our sensor measurements revealed that only functionally differentiated cells responded to glutamate and released NO and CO.

  1. Characterization of the oxygen tolerance of a hydrogenase linked to a carbon monoxide oxidation pathway in Rubrivivax gelatinosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maness, Pin-Ching; Smolinski, Sharon; Dillon, Anne C; Heben, Michael J; Weaver, Paul F

    2002-06-01

    A hydrogenase linked to the carbon monoxide oxidation pathway in Rubrivivax gelatinosus displays tolerance to O2. When either whole-cell or membrane-free partially purified hydrogenase was stirred in full air (21% O2, 79% N2), its H2 evolution activity exhibited a half-life of 20 or 6 h, respectively, as determined by an anaerobic assay using reduced methyl viologen. When the partially purified hydrogenase was stirred in an atmosphere containing either 3.3 or 13% O2 for 15 min and evaluated by a hydrogen-deuterium (H-D) exchange assay, nearly 80 or 60% of its isotopic exchange rate was retained, respectively. When this enzyme suspension was subsequently returned to an anaerobic atmosphere, more than 90% of the H-D exchange activity was recovered, reflecting the reversibility of this hydrogenase toward O2 inactivation. Like most hydrogenases, the CO-linked hydrogenase was extremely sensitive to CO, with 50% inhibition occurring at 3.9 microM dissolved CO. Hydrogen production from the CO-linked hydrogenase was detected when ferredoxins of a prokaryotic source were the immediate electron mediator, provided they were photoreduced by spinach thylakoid membranes containing active water-splitting activity. Based on its appreciable tolerance to O2, potential applications of this hydrogenase are discussed.

  2. Numerical modeling of oxides of nitrogen based on density of biodiesel fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gopinath, Sukumar Puhan, G. Nagarajan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel is an alternative fuel derived from vegetable oils or animal fats. Research has shown that biodiesel fueled engines produce lesser carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbon, and particulate emissions compared to mineral based diesel fuel but emit higher oxides of nitrogen (NOx emissions. NOx could be strongly correlated with density or cetane number of a fuel. The objective of the present work is to predict the NOx concentration of a neat biodiesel fueled compression ignition engine from the density of biodiesel fuels using regression model. Experiments were conducted at different engine loads and the results were given as inputs to develop the regression model. A single cylinder, four stroke, constant speed, air cooled, direct injection diesel engine was used for the experiments. Five different biodiesel fuels were used and NOx were measured at different engine loads. The NOx concentration was taken as response (dependent variable and the density values were taken as explanatory (independent variables. The regression model has yielded R2 values between 0.918 and 0.995. The maximum prediction error was found to be 3.01 %.

  3. Platinum supported catalysts for carbon monoxide preferential oxidation: Study of support influence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padilla, R.; Rodriguez, L.; Serrano-Lotina, A.; Daza, L. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie 2, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Benito, M. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie 2, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this work is to study the influence of the addition of different oxides to an alumina support, on surface acidity and platinum reducibility in platinum-based catalysts, as well as their effect on the activity and selectivity in CO preferential oxidation, in presence of hydrogen. A correlation between surface acidity and acid strength of surface sites and metal reducibility was obtained, being Pt-support interaction a function of the acid sites concentration under a particular temperature range. In platinum supported on alumina catalysts, CO oxidation follows a Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism, where O{sub 2} and CO compete in the adsorption on the same type of active sites. It is noteworthy that the addition of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} modifies the reaction mechanism. In this case, CO is not only adsorbed on the Pt active sites but also on La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, forming bridge bonded carbonates which leads to high reactivity at low temperatures. An increase on temperature produces CO desorption from Pt surface sites and favours oxygen adsorption producing CO{sub 2}. CO oxidation with surface hydroxyl groups was activated producing simultaneously CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. (author)

  4. Self-sustained carbon monoxide oxidation oscillations on size-selected platinum nanoparticles at atmospheric pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Robert; Andersen, Thomas; Nierhoff, Anders Ulrik Fregerslev

    2013-01-01

    High-quality mass spectrometry data of the oscillatory behavior of CO oxidation on SiO2 supported Pt-nanoparticles at atmospheric pressure have been acquired as a function of pressure, coverage, gas composition and nanoparticle size. The oscillations are self-sustained for several days at constant...

  5. Effect of low-intensity focused ultrasound on endothelin-1, nitrogen monoxide and oxytocin receptor in the uterine tissues of Sprague-Dawley rats following abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanxia; Guo, Jufang; Lin, Chuan; Lu, L U; Li, Chengzhi

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of low-intensity focused ultrasound on endothelin-1 (ET-1), nitrogen monoxide (NO) and oxytocin receptor (OXTR) levels in the uterine tissues of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats following abortion. A total of 30 SD rats undergoing complete abortion were randomly divided into ultrasound irradiation and sham irradiation groups (15 rats per group). The rats in the ultrasound irradiation group were treated with low-intensity ultrasound (sound intensity, 2 W/cm(2); frequency, 0.8 MHz) for 30 min daily for 5 consecutive days, and those in the sham irradiation group received sham treatment. The uterine tissue was removed to measure the levels of ET-1, NO and OXTR using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunohistochemistry, respectively. The ET-1 level in the uterine tissues was significantly higher in the ultrasound irradiation group compared to the sham irradiation group (P0.05). In the uterine myometrium and endometrium, the strong positive expression of OXTR was observed in the ultrasound irradiation group, which was significantly higher compared to the sham irradiation group (Pultrasound could promote uterine involution by increasing ET-1 levels, modifying the balance of ET-1 and NO, and enhancing the expression of OXTR in the uterine myometrium and endometrium.

  6. Operando atomic structure and active sites of TiO2(110)-supported gold nanoparticles during carbon monoxide oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Lager, Marie-Claire; Laoufi, Issam; Bailly, Aude

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that gold nanoparticles supported on TiO2 act as a catalyst for CO oxidation, even below room temperature. Despite extensive studies, the origin of this catalytic activity remains under debate. Indeed, when the particle size decreases, many changes may occur; thus modifying the nanoparticles' electronic properties and consequently their catalytic performances. Thanks to a state-of-the-art home-developed setup, model catalysts can be prepared in ultra-high vacuum and their morphology then studied in operando conditions by Grazing Incidence Small Angle X-ray Scattering, as well as their atomic structure by Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction as a function of their catalytic activity. We previously reported on the existence of a catalytic activity maximum observed for three-dimensional gold nanoparticles with a diameter of 2-3 nm and a height of 6-7 atomic planes. In the present work we correlate this size dependence of the catalytic activity to the nanoparticles' atomic structure. We show that even when their size decreases below the optimum diameter, the gold nanoparticles keep the face-centered cubic structure characteristic of bulk gold. Nevertheless, for these smallest nanoparticles, the lattice parameter presents anisotropic strains with a larger contraction in the direction perpendicular to the surface. Moreover a careful analysis of the atomic-scale morphology around the catalytic activity maximum tends to evidence the role of sites with a specific geometry at the interface between the nanoparticles and the substrate. This argues for models where atoms at the interface periphery act as catalytically active sites for carbon monoxide oxidation.

  7. Biofilter for removal of nitrogen oxides from contaminated gases under aerobic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, William A.

    1998-01-01

    A biofilter for reducing concentrations of gaseous nitrogen oxides in a polluted gas comprises a porous organic filter bed medium disposed in a housing, the filter bed medium including a mixed culture of naturally occurring denitrifying bacteria for converting the nitrogen oxides to nitrogen gas, carbon dioxide, and water. A method of reducing concentrations of nitrogen oxides in polluted gas comprises conducting the polluted gas through the biofilter so that the denitrifying bacteria can degrade the nitrogen oxides. A preferred filter medium is wood compost, however composts of other organic materials are functional. Regulation of pH, moisture content, exogenous carbon sources, and temperature are described.

  8. 40 CFR 52.235 - Control strategy for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... nitrogen. 52.235 Section 52.235 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen. EPA is approving an exemption request submitted by the Monterey Bay... the area from implementing the oxides of nitrogen (NOX) requirements for reasonably available...

  9. Studies on Nitrogen Oxides Removal Using Plasma Assisted Catalytic Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V. Ravi; Young Sun Mok; B. S. Rajanikanth; Ho-Chul Kang

    2003-01-01

    An electric discharge plasma reactor combined with a catalytic reactor was studied for removing nitrogen oxides. To understand the combined process thoroughly, discharge plasma and catalytic process were separately studied first, and then the two processes were combined for the study. The plasma reactor was able to oxidize NO to NO2 well although the oxidation rate decreased with temperature. The plasma reactor alone did not reduce the NOx (NO+NO2)level effectively, but the increase in the ratio of NO2 to NO as a result of plasma discharge led to the enhancement of NOx removal efficiency even at lower temperatures over the catalyst surface (V2O5-WOa/TiO2). At a gas temperature of 100℃, the NOx removal efficiency obtained using the combined plasma catalytic process was 88% for an energy input of 36 eV/molecule or 30 J/1.

  10. Preparation of PdCu Alloy Nanocatalysts for Nitrate Hydrogenation and Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Cai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Alloying Pd with Cu is important for catalytic reactions such as denitrification reaction and CO oxidation reaction, but understanding of the catalyst preparation and its correlation with the catalyst’s activity and selectivity remains elusive. Herein, we report the results of investigations of the preparation of PdCu alloy nanocatalysts using different methods and the catalytic properties of the catalysts in catalytic denitrification reaction and CO oxidation reaction. PdCu alloy nanocatalysts were prepared by conventional dry impregnation method and ligand-capping based wet chemical synthesis method, and subsequent thermochemical activation as well. The alloying characteristics depend on the bimetallic composition. PdCu/Al2O3 with a Pd/Cu ratio of 50:50 was shown to exhibit an optimized hydrogenation activity for the catalytic denitrification reaction. The catalytic activity of the PdCu catalysts was shown to be highly dependent on the support, as evidenced by the observation of an enhanced catalytic activity for CO oxidation reaction using TiO2 and CeO2 supports with high oxygen storage capacity. Implications of the results to the refinement of the preparation of the alloy nanocatalysts are also discussed.

  11. Nitrogen oxides under pressure: stability, ionization, polymerization, and superconductivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongxu; Oganov, Artem R; Dong, Xiao; Zhou, Xiang-Feng; Zhu, Qiang; Qian, Guangrui; Dong, Huafeng

    2015-11-17

    Nitrogen oxides are textbook class of molecular compounds, with extensive industrial applications. Nitrogen and oxygen are also among the most abundant elements in the universe. We explore the N-O system at 0 K and up to 500 GPa though ab initio evolutionary simulations. Results show that two phase transformations of stable molecular NO2 occur at 7 and 64 GPa, and followed by decomposition of NO2 at 91 GPa. All of the NO(+)NO3(-) structures are found to be metastable at T = 0 K, so experimentally reported ionic NO(+)NO3(-) is either metastable or stabilized by temperature. N2O5 becomes stable at 9 GPa, and transforms from P-1 to C2/c structure at 51 GPa. NO becomes thermodynamically stable at 198 GPa. This polymeric phase is superconducting (Tc = 2.0 K) and contains a -N-N- backbone.

  12. Stochastic resonance in surface catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide induced by colored noise

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG Yubing; HOU Zhonghuai; XIN Houwen

    2004-01-01

    The dynamical behavior of surface catalytic oxidation reaction of Pt(110)/CO+O2modulated by colored noise, under the condition of specific temperature, has been investigated when the partial pressure of CO gas is near the supercritical Hopf bifurcation point. By computer simulation the oscillation and stochastic resonance induced by colored noise are observed. The influences of the intensity and correlation time of colored noise on stochastic resonance are discussed. The range of sensitivity of the system to the environmental fluctuation is analyzed.

  13. REFORMULATION OF COAL-DERIVED TRANSPORTATION FUELS: SELECTIVE OXIDATION OF CARBON MONOXIDE ON METAL FOAM CATALYSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Chin; Xiaolei Sun; George W. Roberts; Amornmart Sirijarhuphan; Sourabh Pansare; James G. Goodwin Jr; Richard W. Rice; James J. Spivey

    2005-06-01

    Hydrocarbon fuels must be reformed in a series of steps to provide hydrogen for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). Preferential oxidation (PROX) is one method to reduce the CO concentration to less than 10 ppm in the presence of {approx}40% H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and steam. This will prevent CO poisoning of the PEMFC anode. Structured supports, such as ceramic monoliths, can be used for the PROX reaction. Alternatively, metal foams offer a number of advantages over the traditional ceramic monolith.

  14. CO Oxidation by Group 3 Metal Monoxide Cations Supported on [Fe(CO)4 ](2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Chaoxian; Qu, Hui; Meng, Luyan; Kong, Fanchen; Luo, Mingbiao; Zhou, Mingfei

    2017-09-10

    Infrared photodissociation spectroscopy of mass-selected heteronuclear cluster anions in the form of OMFe(CO)5(-) (M=Sc, Y, La) indicates that all these anions involve an 18-electron [Fe(CO)4 ](2-) building block that is bonded with the M center through two bridged carbonyl ligands. The OLaFe(CO)5(-) anion is determined to be a CO-tagged complex involving a [Fe(CO)4 ](2-) [LaO](+) anion core. In contrast, the OYFe(CO)5(-) anion is characterized to have a [Fe(CO)4 ](2-) [Y(η(2) -CO2 )](+) structure involving a side-on bonded CO2 ligand. The CO-tagged complex and the [Fe(CO)4 ](2-) [Sc(η(2) -CO2 )](+) isomer co-exist for the OScFe(CO)5(-) anion. These observations indicate that both the ScO(+) and YO(+) cations supported on [Fe(CO)4 ](2-) are able to oxidize CO to CO2 . Theoretical analyses show that [Fe(CO)4 ](2-) coordination significantly weakens the MO(+) bond and decreases the energy gap of the interacting valence orbitals between MO(+) and CO, leading to the CO oxidation reactions being both thermodynamically exothermic and kinetically facile. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Changes of vascular endothelial growth factor and nitrogen monoxide in retina of rats with diabetes%糖尿病大鼠视网膜血管内皮生长因子和一氧化氮的变化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈少强; 陈瑞华; 黄焱; 张更

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND:There is positive correlation between vascular endothelia growth factor(VEGF) and nitrogen monoxide in peripheral blood of diabetic patients.However,if there is any change of VEGF and nitrogen monoxide in retina tissues of diabetic patients is till uncertain. OBJECTIVE:To explore the changes of VEGF and nitrogen monoxide in retina tissues of diabetic rats and their effects on the origin and development of diabetic retinopathy(DR). DESIGN:Randomized case controlled study. INTERVENTIONS:The rats were randomly divided into normal control group,one month diabetic group,three months diabetic group and five months diabetic group,each with 20 rats.All the rats except the rats of normal group were abdominally injected strptozotin(STZ) once to induce diabetes models.Immunohistochemical method was applied to observe the expression of VEGF in retina tissues of each group.The activity of nitric oxide synthase(NOS) and the content changes of nitrogen monoxide of retina tissues were tested. RESULTS:Immunological positive reaction of VEGF is only found in inner nucleus layer of retina in normal rats,the content of NOS and NO was(36.17± 1.83) μ kat/g and(36.77± 2.33) μ mol/g respectively.In the third month,the expression of VEGF in the retina of diabetic rats increased significantly and the content of NOS and NO was(115.91± 31.5) μ kat/g and(68.34± 5.46) μ mol/g respectively.There was significant difference between this group and normal group(t=7.43,8.15,P< 0.01).In the fifth month,the expression of VEGF in retina was higher than that of rats in the third month diabetic group.The contents of NOS and NO were(72.35± 16.34) μ kat/g and(50.62± 3.01) μ mol/g.There was difference on this between the five months group and the third months group(t=4.76, 4.19,P< 0.05). CONCLUSION:The overexpression of VEGF,the activity of NOS as well as the content change of nitrogen monoxide in retina of rats with diabetes play important role on the origin and development of DR

  16. Effect of Nitrogen Compounds on the Oxidation Stability of Saturate Fractions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOUYasong; LINShixiong

    2002-01-01

    A custom built dynamic oxygen uptake tester was used to study the influence of nitrogen compounds on the oxidation characteristics of the saturate fractions from mineral base oils. Expermental results indicate that nitrogen compounds,especially quinoline and indole,take part in the oxidation of saturates.It is also found that indole is more active than quinoline. The latter can be oxidized partly into ketoimine,and the former is more rapidly oxidized into acylamide.The oxidation products, ketoimine or acylamide, could inhibit the oxidation of the saturates by decomposing hydroperoxide.The influences of indole and quinoline on oxidation of saturates are more complex.For lower nitrogen content, the oxidation processes were accelerated.However, at high nitrogen content, the oxidation induction peroids were increased. The oxidation characteristics of saturates were also dependent on the type of catalysts presented.

  17. Lung diffusion capacity for nitric oxide and carbon monoxide is impaired similarly following short-term graded exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavorsky, Gerald S; Lands, Larry C

    2005-02-01

    Study aimed to determine whether short-term graded exercise affects single-breath lung diffusion capacity for nitric oxide (DLNO) and carbon monoxide (DLCO) similarly, and whether the DLNO/DLCO ratios during rest are altered post-exercise compared to pre-exercise. Eleven healthy subjects (age=29+/-6 years; weight=76.6+/-13.2 kg; height=177.9+/-13.2 cm; and maximal oxygen uptake or V(.-)(O(2max) = 52.7 +/- 9.3 ml kg(-1) min(-1))performed simultaneous single-breath DLNO and DLCO measurements at rest (inspired NO concentration=43.2+/-4.1 ppm, inspired CO concentration=0.30%) 15 min before and 2h after a graded exercise test to exhaustion (exercise duration=593+/-135 s). Resting DLNO and DLCO was similarly reduced 2h post-exercise (DLNO=-7.8+/-3.5%, DLCO=-10.3+/-6.9%, and PDLNO post-exercise such that 68% of the variance in the change in DLCO was accounted for by the variance in the change in DLNO (PDLNO/DLCO ratio was not altered post-exercise (5.87+/-0.37) compared to pre-exercise (5.70+/-0.34). We conclude that the decrease in single-breath DLNO and DLCO from pre- to post-exercise is similar, the magnitude of the change in DLCO closely reflects that of the change in DLNO, and single-breath DLNO/DLCO ratios are independent of the timing of measurement suggesting that using NO and CO transfer gases are valid in looking at short-term changes in lung diffusional conductance.

  18. Nitrogen oxide formation from chemically-bound nitrogen during the combustion of fossil fuels. [Extended Zeldovich reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, R.E.

    1976-06-01

    One of the many problems associated with the firing of fossil fuels is the impact on the ambient levels of nitrogen oxides. Since the use of coals, oils and coal-derived fuels is expected to triple by 1985, it is urgent that the formation of nitrogen oxides from molecular nitrogen and organo-nitrogen species be fully characterized so that emission abatement strategies can be formulated. The thermal fixation of atmospheric nitrogen and the free radical reactions of nitrogenous species are the sources of NO/sub x/. The fixation reactions can be described by the extended Zeldovich mechanism, and techniques such as staged combustion and flue gas recirculation have been employed to reduce combustion temperatures and, hence, thermally formed NO. These techniques have had little effect, however, on the conversion of chemically-bound nitrogen to NO/sub x/. The fate of chemically-bound nitrogen depends upon such factors as the nitrogen content of the fuel and the equivalence ratio and upon the physical processes governing combustion. Research is proposed to establish the kinetic processes involved in the conversion of fuel nitrogen to NO and N/sub 2/ in environments characteristic of fossil fuel combustion and to identify those conditions which favor the reduction of NO to N/sub 2/.

  19. Nitrogen Impurity Gettering in Oxide Dispersion Ductilized Chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Anderson, Ian M [ORNL; Weaver, Mark [University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Walker, Larry R [ORNL; Miller, Michael K [ORNL; Larson, David James [ORNL; Wright, Ian G [ORNL; Sikka, Vinod K [ORNL; Rar, Andrei [ORNL; Pharr, George Mathews [ORNL; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Walls, Claudia Alexandra [ORNL

    2003-01-01

    Work by Scruggs in the 1960s demonstrated that tensile ductility could be achieved at room temperature in powder metallurgically-produced Cr alloyed with MgO. During consolidation, much of the MgO converted to the MgCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel phase, which was hypothesized to getter nitrogen from the Cr, rendering it ductile. We have duplicated this effect, achieving room temperature tensile elongations of 4% for hot-pressed Cr-6MgO-(0-1)Ti (wt.%) and 10% for hot-pressed and extruded Cr-6MgO-0.75Ti. Direct incorporation of nitrogen into the MgCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} phase was not detected; however, impurities, particularly nitrogen and sulfur, were observed to segregate to and/or precipitate at interfaces between the MgO/MgCr{sub 2}O{sub 4} phases and the Cr matrix. Exploratory studies of other non-spinel forming oxide dispersions (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiO{sub 2} and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}) showed a similar pattern of impurity segregation/precipitation, suggesting that there is nothing unique about spinel dispersions in Cr with regards to impurities. However, none of these other dispersions resulted in similar levels of tensile elongation.

  20. Hydrogenase activity in Azospirillum brasilense is inhibited by nitrite, nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and acetylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tibelius, K.H.; Knowles, R.

    1984-10-01

    Nitrite, NO, CO, and C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ inhibited O/sub 2/-dependent H/sub 2/ uptake (H/sup 3/H oxidation) in denitrifying Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 grown anaerobically on N/sub 2/O or NO/sub 3//sup -/. The apparent K/sub i/ values for inhibition of O/sub 2/-dependent H/sub 2/ uptake were 20 ..mu..M for NO/sub 2//sup -/, 0.4 ..mu..M for NO, 28 ..mu..M for CO, and 88 ..mu..M for C/sub 2/H/sub 2/. These inhibitors also affected methylene blue-dependent H/sub 2/ uptake, presumably by acting directly on the hydrogenase. Nitrite and NO inhibited H/sub 2/ uptake irreversibly, whereas inhibition due to CO was easily reversed by repeatedly evacuating and backfilling with N/sub 2/. The C/sub 2/H/sub 2/ inhibition was not readily reversed, partly due to difficulty in removing the last traces of this gas from solution. The NO/sub 2//sup -/ inhibition of malate-dependent respiration was readily reversed by repeatedly washing the cells, in contrast to the effect of NO/sub 2//sup -/ on H/sub 2/-dependent respiration. These results suggest that the low hydrogenase activities observed in NO/sub 3//sup -/-grown cultures of A. brasilense may be due to the irreversible inhibition of hydrogenase by NO/sub 2//sup -/ and NO produced by NO/sub 3//sup -/ reduction.

  1. Reactive nitrogen oxides and ozone above a taiga woodland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakwin, Peter S.; Jacob, Daniel J.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Munger, J. William; Daube, Bruce C.; Bradshaw, John D.; Sandholm, Scott T.; Talbot, Robert W.; Singh, Hanwant B.; Gregory, Gerald L.; Blake, Donald R.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of reactive nitrogen oxides (NOx and NOy) and ozone (O3) were made in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) above a taiga woodland in northern Quebec, Canada, during June-August, 1990, as part of NASA Artie Boundary Layer Expedition (ABLE) 3B. Levels of nitrogen oxides and O3 were strongly modulated by the synoptic scale meteorology that brought air from various source regions to the site. Industrial pollution from the Great Lakes region of the U.S. and Canada appears to be a major source for periodic elevation of NOx, NOy and O3. We find that NO/NO2 ratios at this site at midday were approximately 50% those expected from a simple photochemical steady state between NOx and O3, in contrast to our earlier results from the ABLE 3A tundra site. The difference between the taiga and tundra sites is likely due to much larger emissions of biogenic hydrocarbons (particularly isoprene) from the taiga vegetation. Hydrocarbon photooxidation leads to relatively rapid production of peroxy radicals, which convert NO to NO2, at the taiga site. Ratios of NOx to NOy were typically 2-3 times higher in the PBL during ABLE 3B than during ABLE 3 A. This is probably the result of high PAN levels and suppressed formation of HNO3 from NO2 due to high levels of biogenic hydrocarbons at the ABLE 3B site.

  2. Nitrogen oxides emission from two beech forests subjected to different nitrogen loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kitzler

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We analysed nitrogen oxides (N2O, NO and carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions from two beech forest soils close to Vienna, Austria, which were exposed to different nitrogen input from the atmosphere. The site Schottenwald (SW received 20.2 kg N ha−1 y−1 and Klausenleopoldsdorf (KL 12.6 kg N ha−1 y−1 through wet deposition. Nitric oxide emissions from soil were measured hourly with an automatic dynamic chamber system. Daily N2O measurements were carried out by an automatic gas sampling system. Measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O and CO2 emissions were conducted over larger areas on a biweekly (SW or monthly (KL basis by manually operated chambers. We used an autoregression procedure (time-series analysis for establishing time-lagged relationships between N-oxides emissions and different climate, soil chemistry and N-deposition data. It was found that changes in soil moisture and soil temperature significantly effected CO2 and N-oxides emissions with a time lag of up to two weeks and could explain up to 95% of the temporal variations of gas emissions. Event emissions after rain or during freezing and thawing cycles contributed significantly (for NO 50% to overall N-oxides emissions. In the two-year period of analysis the annual gaseous N2O emissions at SW ranged from 0.64 to 0.79 kg N ha−1 y−1 and NO emissions were 0.24 to 0.49 kg N ha−1 per vegetation period. In KL significantly lower annual N2O emissions (0.52 to 0.65 kg N2O-N kg ha−1 y−1 as well as considerably lower NO-emissions were observed. During a three-month measurement campaign NO emissions at KL were 0.02 kg N ha−1, whereas in the same time period significantly more NO was emitted in SW (0.32 kg NO-N ha−1. Higher N-oxides emissions, especially NO emissions from the high N-input site (SW may indicate that atmospheric deposition has an impact on emissions of gaseous N from our forest soils. At KL there was a strong correlation between N-deposition and N-emission over time

  3. Simulating reactive nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and ozone in California during ARCTAS-CARB 2008 with high wildfire activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chenxia; Kulkarni, Sarika; Zhao, Zhan; Kaduwela, Ajith P.; Avise, Jeremy C.; DaMassa, John A.; Singh, Hanwant B.; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Cohen, Ronald C.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Wennberg, Paul; Dibb, Jack E.; Huey, Greg; Wisthaler, Armin; Jimenez, Jose L.; Cubison, Michael J.

    2016-03-01

    Predictions of O3, CO, total NOy and individual NOy species (NO, NO2, HNO3, PAN, alkyl nitrates and aerosol nitrate) from a fine resolution regional air quality modeling system for the South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) and San Joaquin Valley Air Basin (SJVAB) of California are presented and evaluated for the 2008 ARCTAS-CARB campaign. The measurements of the chemical compounds from the fire plumes during the field campaign allow for the evaluation of the model's ability to simulate fire-influenced air masses as well. In general, the model successfully simulated the broad spatial distribution of chemical compounds in both air basins as well as the variation within the basins. Using inventories that reflect 2008 emissions levels, the model performed well in simulating NOx (NO + NO2) in SoCAB. Therefore, the under prediction of O3 over these areas is more likely caused by uncertainties with the VOC emissions, chemistry, or discrepancies in the meteorology. The model did not capture the relatively high levels of O3, and some reactive nitrogen species that were measured off shore of the SoCAB, indicating potential missing sources or the transport from on shore to off shore was not successfully captured. In SJVAB, the model had good performance in simulating different chemical compounds in the Fresno and Arvin areas. However, enhanced concentrations of O3, NOx, HNO3 and PAN near dairy farms were significantly underestimated in the model. Negative biases also exist for O3 and HNO3 near oil fields, suggesting larger uncertainties associated with these emission sources. While the model simulated the total NOy mixing ratios reasonably well, the prediction for partitioning between individual compounds showed larger uncertainties in the model simulation. Although the fire emissions inventory was updated to include the latest emissions estimates and speciation profiles, our model shows limited improvement in simulating the enhancement of O3, CO, and PAN under fire impact as

  4. Interactions between nitrogen cycling and methane oxidation in the pelagic waters of the Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joye, S. B.; Weber, S.; Battles, J.; Montoya, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas that plays a critical role in climate variation. Although a variety of marine methane sources and sinks have been identified, key aspects of the fate of methane in the ocean remain poorly constrained. At cold seeps in the Gulf of Mexico and elsewhere, methane is introduced into the overlying water column via fluid escape from the seabed. We quantified the fate of methane in the water column overlying seafloor cold seeps, in a brine basin, and at several control sites. Our goals were to determine the factors that regulated methane consumption and assimilation and to explore how these controlling factors varied among and between sites. In particular, we examined the impact of nitrogen availability on methane oxidation and studied the ability of methane oxidizing bacteria to fix molecular nitrogen. Methane oxidation rates were highest in the methane rich bottom waters of natural hydrocabron seeps. At these sites, inorganic nitrogen addition stimulated methane oxidation in laboratory experiments. In vitro shipboard experiments revealed that rates of methane oxidation and nitrogen fixation were correlated strongly, suggesting that nitrogen fixation may have been mediated by methanotrophic bacteria. The highest rates of methane oxidation and nitrogen fixation were observed in the deepwater above at natural hydrocarbon seeps. Rates of methane oxidation were substantial along the chemocline of a brine basin but in these ammonium-rich brines, addition of inorganic nitrogen had little impact on methane oxidation suggesting that methanotrophy in these waters were not nitrogen limited. Control sites exhibited the lowest methane concentrations and methane oxidation rates but even these waters exhibited substantial potential for methane oxidation when methane and inorganic nitrogen concentrations were increased. Together, these data suggest that the availability of inorganic nitrogen plays a critical role in regulating methane oxidation in

  5. Effects of acupuncture on contents of nitrogen monoxide and nitrogen monoxide synthase in the hippocampus of obese rats%针刺对肥胖大鼠海马组织一氧化氮含量和一氧化氮合酶活性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘志诚; 孙凤岷; 袁锦虹; 徐炳国; 马燕; 姜军作; 衣运玲

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The abnormality of the content of nitrogen monoxide (NO)and activity of nitrogen monoxide synthase(NOS) may be an important factor of obesity. It has been known that the mechanisms of acupuncture treating obesity are related to nervous and neurohumoral regulation. What is the regulating effect of acupuncture on NO content and NOS activity in hippocampal tissues?OBJECTIVE: To study the effects of acupuncture on the content of NO and NOS, and further investigate central nervous functional mechanism of reducing weight by acupuncture.DESIGN: Self-controlled and mutual controlled experiment.SETTING: Acupuncture Institute of Second Clinical Medical College, Nanjing University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, and Department of Reproduction Medicine, Nanjing College for Population Programmed Management.PARTICIPANTS: This experiment was carried out in the Acupuncture Institute of Second Clinical Medical College; One-month old male SD rats just in allactation, weighing 50 -70 g were provided by the Animal Experiment Center of General Hospital of Nanjing Military Area Command[Certification No. SYXK(Su) 2002-0017], and the animals were in the clean grade (Certification No. Su Animal Quality 970101 ).INTERVENTIONS: Rats fed with ordinary diet were in the normal group.Experimental obese rats models were randomly divided as control group and acupuncture group, 6 in each. Rats in the acupuncture group were given acupuncture treatment for 14 days, and rats in the normal and control groups were put into rat fixation-machine for 15 minutes, lasting for 14 days. Body mass, body lipid and contents of NO and NOS in hippocampal tissues in obese rats before and after acupuncture were observed with nervous biochemical technology.Effect of acupuncture on NO and NOS contents in hippocampal tissue of and Lee's index in hippocampal tissue of obese rats.RESULTS: The body mass[ (458.33 ± 7.43)g], Lee' s index (302.23± 4. 11 ) and body fat content of obesity were all significantly

  6. Catalytic Oxidation of Propylene, Toluene, Carbon Monoxide, and Carbon Black over Au/CeO2 Solids: Comparing the Impregnation and the Deposition-Precipitation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Aboukaïs

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Au/CeO2 solids were prepared by two methods: deposition-precipitation (DP and impregnation (Imp. The prepared solids were calcined under air at 400°C. Both types of catalysts have been tested in the total oxidation of propylene, toluene, carbon monoxide, and carbon black. Au/CeO2-DP solids were the most reactive owing to the high number of gold nanoparticles and Au+ species and the low concentration of Cl- ions present on its surface compared to those observed in Au/CeO2-Imp solids.

  7. Nitrate and Nitrogen Oxides: Sources, Health Effects and Their Remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakeem, Khalid Rehman; Sabir, Muhammad; Ozturk, Munir; Akhtar, Mohd Sayeed; Ibrahim, Faridah Hanum; Ashraf, Muhammad; Ahmad, Muhammad Sajid Aqeel

    Increased use of nitrogenous (N) fertilizers in agriculture has significantly altered the global N-cycle because they release nitrogenous gases of environmental concerns. The emission of nitrous oxide (N2O) contributes to the global greenhouse gas accumulation and the stratospheric ozone depletion. In addition, it causes nitrate leaching problem deteriorating ground water quality. The nitrate toxicity has been reported in a number of studies showing the health hazards like methemoglobinemia in infants and is a potent cause of cancer. Despite these evident negative environmental as well as health impacts, consumption of N fertilizer cannot be reduced in view of the food security for the teeming growing world population. Various agronomic and genetic modifications have been practiced to tackle this problem. Some agronomic techniques adopted include split application of N, use of slow-release fertilizers, nitrification inhibitors and encouraging the use of organic manure over chemical fertilizers. As a matter of fact, the use of chemical means to remediate nitrate from the environment is very difficult and costly. Particularly, removal of nitrate from water is difficult task because it is chemically non-reactive in dilute aqueous solutions. Hence, the use of biological means for nitrate remediation offers a promising strategy to minimize the ill effects of nitrates and nitrites. One of the important goals to reduce N-fertilizer application can be effectively achieved by choosing N-efficient genotypes. This will ensure the optimum uptake of applied N in a balanced manner and exploring the molecular mechanisms for their uptake as well as metabolism in assimilatory pathways. The objectives of this paper are to evaluate the interrelations which exist in the terrestrial ecosystems between the plant type and characteristics of nutrient uptake and analyze the global consumption and demand for fertilizer nitrogen in relation to cereal production, evaluate the various methods

  8. Nitrogen oxides emission from two beech forests subjected to different nitrogen loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Kitzler

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available We analysed nitrogen oxides (N2O, NO and NO2 and carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions from two beech forest soils close to Vienna, Austria, which were exposed to different nitrogen input from the atmosphere. The site Schottenwald (SW received 22.6 kg N y-1 and Klausenleopoldsdorf (KL 13.5 kg N y-1 through wet and dry deposition. Nitrogen oxide emissions from soil were measured hourly with an automatic dynamic chamber system. Daily N2O measurements were carried out by an automatic gas sampling system. Measurements of nitrous oxide (N2O and CO2 emissions were conducted over larger areas on a biweekly (SW or monthly (KL basis by manually operated chambers. We used an autoregression procedure (time-series analysis for establishing time-lagged relationships between N-oxide emissions and different climate, soil chemistry and N-deposition data. It was found that changes in soil moisture and soil temperature significantly effected CO2 and N-oxide emissions with a time lag of up to two weeks and could explain up to 95% of the temporal variations of gas emissions. Event emissions after rain or during freezing and thawing cycles contributed significantly (for NO 50% to overall N-oxides emissions. In the two-year period of analysis the annual gaseous N2O losses at SW ranged from 0.65 to 0.77 kg N ha-1 y-1 and NO losses were 0.18 to 0.67 kg N ha-1 per vegetation period. In KL significantly lower annual N2O emissions (0.52 kg N2O-N kg ha-1 y-1 as well as considerably lower NO-losses were observed. During a three-month measurement campaign NO losses at KL were 0.02 kg, whereas in the same time period significantly more NO was emitted in SW (0.32 kg NO-N ha-1. Higher N-oxide emissions, especially NO emissions from the high N-input site (SW indicate that atmospheric

  9. Mechanochemical Synthesis of Visible-light Induced Photocatalyst with Nitrogen and Carbon Doping

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen and/or carbon doped titania photocatalysts were prepared by a novel mechanochemical method. The prepared powders possessed two absorption edges around 400 and 540 nm wavelengths and showed excellent photocatalytic ability for nitrogen monoxide oxidation under visible light irradiation. Under the irradiation of visible light of wavelength >510 nm, 37% of nitrogen monoxide could be continuously removed by the carbon and nitrogen co-doped titania prepared by planetary ball milling of P-25 titania-10% hexamethylenetetramine mixture followed by calcination in air at 400 ℃.

  10. Catalyst and method for reduction of nitrogen oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Kevin C.

    2008-05-27

    A Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalyst was prepared by slurry coating ZSM-5 zeolite onto a cordierite monolith, then subliming an iron salt onto the zeolite, calcining the monolith, and then dipping the monolith either into an aqueous solution of manganese nitrate and cerium nitrate and then calcining, or by similar treatment with separate solutions of manganese nitrate and cerium nitrate. The supported catalyst containing iron, manganese, and cerium showed 80 percent conversion at 113 degrees Celsius of a feed gas containing nitrogen oxides having 4 parts NO to one part NO.sub.2, about one equivalent ammonia, and excess oxygen; conversion improved to 94 percent at 147 degrees Celsius. N.sub.2O was not detected (detection limit: 0.6 percent N.sub.2O).

  11. 40 CFR 52.136 - Control strategy for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Control strategy for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen. 52.136 Section 52.136 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... for ozone: Oxides of nitrogen. EPA is approving an exemption request submitted by the State of...

  12. 78 FR 70040 - Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Nitrogen Oxides-Health Criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... AGENCY Draft Integrated Science Assessment for Nitrogen Oxides--Health Criteria AGENCY: Environmental... for Nitrogen Oxides--Health Criteria'' (EPA/600/R-13/202). The draft document was prepared by the... Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee (CASAC) and the public (meeting date and location to...

  13. 40 CFR 52.277 - Oxides of nitrogen, combustion gas concentration limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Oxides of nitrogen, combustion gas concentration limitations. 52.277 Section 52.277 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Oxides of nitrogen, combustion gas concentration limitations. (a) The following rules are being retained...

  14. Formation of nitrogen oxides from atmospheric electrodeless microwave plasmas in nitrogen-oxygen mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jungwun; Sun, Hojoong; Im, Seong-kyun; Soo Bak, Moon

    2017-08-01

    Electrodeless microwave plasmas were produced in nitrogen-oxygen mixtures at atmospheric pressure to investigate the formation of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from the plasma. The oxygen content in the mixtures is varied in the range of 1%-3%, and the total flowrate is varied in the range of 25-45 slpm while the microwave power is fixed at 2 kW. The rotational and vibrational temperatures of the plasma are measured based on plasma optical emission spectroscopy, and the amount of NOx is measured using a NOx analyzer far downstream from the plasma. The temperatures at the plasma region reach ˜6700 K, and little difference is observed between the rotational and vibrational temperatures as a result of fast vibrational-translational relaxation. Moreover, these temperatures are found to be independent of the flowrate. As the flowrate decreases and the oxygen content in the mixture increases, the level of NOx is increased from 1612 ppm to 9380 ppm. For detailed investigation, plasma kinetic simulations considering trans-rotational, vibrational, and electron temperatures separately are developed and conducted for the plasma region. The level of NOx from the kinetic simulations is found to be considerably smaller than that measured. As the equilibrium mole fraction of NOx is the highest at a temperature of 3120 ± 100 K, with the variation attributable to the composition of species, significant production of NOx is expected to occur at the post-plasma region when the plasma stream is quenched by mixing with the surrounding flow.

  15. Effect of nitrogen precursors on the electrochemical performance of nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide towards oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soo, Li Ting, E-mail: nicolesoo90@gmail.com [Fuel Cell Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi UKM, Selangor (Malaysia); Loh, Kee Shyuan, E-mail: ksloh@ukm.edu.my [Fuel Cell Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi UKM, Selangor (Malaysia); Mohamad, Abu Bakar, E-mail: drab@ukm.edu.my [Fuel Cell Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi UKM, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi UKM, Selangor (Malaysia); Daud, Wan Ramli Wan, E-mail: wramli@ukm.edu.my [Fuel Cell Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi UKM, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi UKM, Selangor (Malaysia); Wong, Wai Yin, E-mail: waiyin.wwy@gmail.com [Fuel Cell Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi UKM, Selangor (Malaysia); School of Engineering, Taylor' s University' s Lakeside Campus, No. 1, Jalan Taylor' s, 46500 Subang Jaya, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-08-25

    A series of nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxides (NGs) with different ratios are synthesized by thermal annealing of graphene oxide with melamine or urea. The total nitrogen content in NG is high, with values of up to 5.88 at.%. The NG samples prepared by melamine exhibited thin transparent graphene sheets structure, with consist of higher nitrogen doping level and quaternary N content compared to those NG samples prepared from urea. Electrochemical characterizations show that NG is a promising metal-free electrocatalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Incorporation of nitrogen atoms into graphene basal plane can enhances its electrocatalytic activity toward ORR in alkaline media. The onset potential and mean number of electron transfers on NG 1 are −0.10 V and 3.80 respectively, which is higher than that of reduced graphene oxide (−0.15 V, 3.52). This study suggests that quaternary-N of the NG samples is the active site which determines the ORR activity Moreover, the NG samples with the transparent layer of graphene-like structure have better ORR performances than that of bulk graphite-like NG samples. - Highlights: • Synthesis of nitrogen-doped graphene (NG) via thermal annealing. • The effects of the nitrogen precursors on the synthesized NG are discussed. • Electrochemical performances of the NG are correlated to N doping and EASA. • Graphitic-N is proposed to be the active site for ORR.

  16. 40 CFR 50.11 - National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). 50.11 Section... PRIMARY AND SECONDARY AMBIENT AIR QUALITY STANDARDS § 50.11 National primary and secondary ambient air quality standards for oxides of nitrogen (with nitrogen dioxide as the indicator). (a) The level of...

  17. Gas-phase energies of actinide oxides -- an assessment of neutral and cationic monoxides and dioxides from thorium to curium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcalo, Joaquim; Gibson, John K.

    2009-08-10

    An assessment of the gas-phase energetics of neutral and singly and doubly charged cationic actinide monoxides and dioxides of thorium, protactinium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium, americium, and curium is presented. A consistent set of metal-oxygen bond dissociation enthalpies, ionization energies, and enthalpies of formation, including new or revised values, is proposed, mainly based on recent experimental data and on correlations with the electronic energetics of the atoms or cations and with condensed-phase thermochemistry.

  18. Effect of nitrogen oxide pretreatments on enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borrevik, R.K.; Wilke, C.R.; Brink, D.L.

    1978-09-01

    This work considers the effect of nitrogen oxide pretreatments on the subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis by Trichoderma viride cellulase of the cellulose occurring in wheat straw; Triticum Aestivum-L, em. Thell. In the pretreatment scheme the straw is first reacted with nitric oxide and air, and then extracted in aqueous solution. In this way, overall sugar yields increased from 17% for the case of no pretreatment to 70%. The glucose yield increased from 20 to 60%. The yield of glucose during enzymatic hydrolysis is dependent on the reaction time of the gas phase reaction. For a 24 hour reaction the yield is 60%, but drops to 45% for a reaction time of 2 hours. Xylose, a potentially valuable side product of the pretreatment, is obtained by dilute acid hydrolysis during the extraction stage in yields of 90 to 96%. In acidic media, the kinetics of both the rate of formation and destruction of xylose were found to follow the first-order rate laws reported in the literature. These were determined to be 4.5 (liter/gmole)(hr./sup -1/) and 0.03 hr./sup -1/, respectively. However, the rate of formation is much greater (20.4 (liter/gmole) (hr./sup -1/)) when the extraction liquor is recycled. The most likely explanation for this is that the increased total acidity of the recycled liquor compensates for diffusional limitations. A preliminary design and cost analysis of the pretreatment-hydrolysis scheme indicates that glucose can be produced at 10.86 cents per pound, exclusive of straw cost. The corresponding cost per pound of total sugars produced is 5.0 cents. Sensitivity analyses indicate that 42% of the pretreatment cost (excluding hydrolysis) can be attributed to nitric oxide production, and the high yield of sugar obtained is advantageous when considering the cost of straw.

  19. Near-ambient X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and kinetic approach to the mechanism of carbon monoxide oxidation over lanthanum substituted cobaltites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hueso, J. L.; Martinez-Martinez, D.; Cabalerro, Alfonso; Gonzalez-Elipe, Agustin Rodriguez; Mun, Bongjin Simon; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-07-31

    We have studied the oxidation of carbon monoxide over a lanthanum substituted perovskite (La0.5Sr0.5CoO3-d) catalyst prepared by spray pyrolysis. Under the assumption of a first-order kinetics mechanism for CO, it has been found that the activation energy barrier of the reaction changes from 80 to 40 kJ mol-1 at a threshold temperature of ca. 320 oC. In situ XPS near-ambient pressure ( 0.2 torr) shows that the gas phase oxygen concentration over the sample decreases sharply at ca. 300 oC. These two observations suggest that the oxidation of CO undergoes a change of mechanism at temperatures higher than 300 oC.

  20. RESEARCH THE CHANGE RULE OF OXIDATION ZONE WIDTH CAUSED BY NITROGEN INJECTION IN GOB

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐精彩; 文虎; 葛岭梅; 代爱萍

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of heat-transfer and chemical kinetics theory, both connections coal self-ignite with oxygen concentration and range of oxidation zone with air-leak intensity are analyzed, and calculating method is deduced to gain the lower limit of oxygen concentration and the range of oxidation zone. The change rule of correlative parameter is quantitatively researched between before nitrogen injection and after nitrogen injection in gob, such as oxygen concentration, oxidation zone width, etc. According to theoretical calculation, the relation position and flow of nitrogen injection with oxidation zone width is conformed, and computational formulas of the best flow and position of nitrogen injection are obtained. It offers a theoretic criterion for preventing and controlling float coal self-ignite by nitrogen injection in gob.

  1. Zeolite ZSM5 catalysts for abatement of nitrogen oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganemi, Bager

    1999-07-01

    Airborne pollutants from the combustion of fossil fuels are a global problem. Emission of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) is increasing with the worldwide increase in the use of energy. Atmospheric and photochemical reactions link nitrogen oxides to hydrocarbons and tropospheric ozone. The emission of NO{sub x} has to be tackled urgently in order to limit the harmful effects of anthropogenic activity on the environment. The subject of this thesis is catalytic nitrogen oxide abatement through direct decomposition and reduction by methane over ion-exchanged zeolite ZSM5. The work covers catalytic conversion and surface intermediates, including correlations with the level of exchanged Cu{sup 2+} cations and Ni{sup 2+} or Pd{sup 2+} co-cations. Special attention is given to the aluminium content of the support and changes in structural parameters. It was found that NO{sub x} conversion over cation-exchanged ZSM5 is strongly influenced by the ion-exchange procedure and by the above material parameters. Characterization of Cu-ZSM5 reveals that approximately two molecules of water per Cu{sup 2+} ion desorb at temperatures between 150 and 350 Deg C, in addition to the conventional dehydration at lower temperatures. The desorbed water comes from the decomposition of Cu(OH){sub 2}. Decomposition of hydroxylated copper ions results in the formation Of Cu{sup 2+}-O-Cu{sup 2+} dimers, which are suggested to be the active sites for catalytic decomposition of NO. Acid sites are important for the dispersion of copper ions on the catalyst surface. Acid sites are also important for the interaction between copper species and the zeolite. Increased acidity leads to a stronger interaction between the exchanged cation and the framework, i.e. the exchanged cations become more resistant to mobility. The stronger bond between the exchanged cations and lattice oxygen also prevents dealumination of the catalyst and decreases the thermal expansion at higher temperatures. The temperature of

  2. GASP: A computer code for calculating the thermodynamic and transport properties for ten fluids: Parahydrogen, helium, neon, methane, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, oxygen, fluorine, argon, and carbon dioxide. [enthalpy, entropy, thermal conductivity, and specific heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Baron, A. K.; Peller, I. C.

    1975-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV subprogram called GASP is discussed which calculates the thermodynamic and transport properties for 10 pure fluids: parahydrogen, helium, neon, methane, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, oxygen, fluorine, argon, and carbon dioxide. The pressure range is generally from 0.1 to 400 atmospheres (to 100 atm for helium and to 1000 atm for hydrogen). The temperature ranges are from the triple point to 300 K for neon; to 500 K for carbon monoxide, oxygen, and fluorine; to 600 K for methane and nitrogen; to 1000 K for argon and carbon dioxide; to 2000 K for hydrogen; and from 6 to 500 K for helium. GASP accepts any two of pressure, temperature and density as input conditions along with pressure, and either entropy or enthalpy. The properties available in any combination as output include temperature, density, pressure, entropy, enthalpy, specific heats, sonic velocity, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and surface tension. The subprogram design is modular so that the user can choose only those subroutines necessary to the calculations.

  3. Allowed energetic pathways for the three-body recombination reaction of nitrogen monoxide with the hydroxyl radical and their potential atmospheric implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca D´Ottone

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The OH initiated oxidation of nitric oxide (NO is an important atmospheric reaction being, during the day time, the main channel that leads to the formation of HONO a reservoir species for both OH and odd nitrogen. This work reports ab initio study of the Potential Energy Surface (PES of NO + OH using density functional theory calculations conducted at the B3LYP level of theory with a 6-311g (d,p basis set. We confirmed experimental observations pointing out that the main channel for this reaction is the formation the HONO. From the addition of OH to NO both cis and trans isomers of HONO were found to be the formed as stable intermediate, both having a negative enthalpy of formation relative to the reactants, the cis isomer being more stable than the trans one. The ab initio calculations were extended to include the hydrogen extraction mechanism with its respective transition state to investigate the potential existence of a reaction channel leading to the formation of NO2 + H, that was found not to be of significant interest.

  4. Nitrogen loss by anaerobic ammonium oxidation in unconfined aquifer soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanyun; Radny, Dirk; Huang, Shuangbing; Zhuang, Linjie; Zhao, Siyan; Berg, Michael; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Zhu, Guibing

    2017-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is recognized as an important process for nitrogen cycling, yet little is known about its role in the subsurface biosphere. In this study, we investigated the presence, abundance, and role of anammox bacteria in upland soil cores from Tianjin, China (20 m depth) and Basel, Switzerland (10 m depth), using isotope-tracing techniques, (q)PCR assays, and 16 S rRNA & hzsB gene clone libraries, along with nutrient profiles of soil core samples. Anammox in the phreatic (water-saturated) zone contributed to 37.5–67.6% of the N-loss (up to 0.675 gN m‑2 d‑1), with anammox activities of 0.005–0.74 nmolN g‑1 soil h‑1, which were even higher than the denitrification rates. By contrast, no significant anammox was measured in the vadose zone. Higher anammox bacterial cell densities were observed (0.75–1.4 × 107 copies g‑1 soil) in the phreatic zone, where ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) maybe the major source of nitrite for anammox bacteria. The anammox bacterial cells in soils of the vadose zone were all <103 copies g‑1 soil. We suggest that the subsurface provides a favorable niche for anammox bacteria whose contribution to N cycling and groundwater nitrate removal seems considerably larger than previously known.

  5. Nitrogen loss by anaerobic ammonium oxidation in unconfined aquifer soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanyun; Radny, Dirk; Huang, Shuangbing; Zhuang, Linjie; Zhao, Siyan; Berg, Michael; Jetten, Mike S. M.; Zhu, Guibing

    2017-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) is recognized as an important process for nitrogen cycling, yet little is known about its role in the subsurface biosphere. In this study, we investigated the presence, abundance, and role of anammox bacteria in upland soil cores from Tianjin, China (20 m depth) and Basel, Switzerland (10 m depth), using isotope-tracing techniques, (q)PCR assays, and 16 S rRNA & hzsB gene clone libraries, along with nutrient profiles of soil core samples. Anammox in the phreatic (water-saturated) zone contributed to 37.5–67.6% of the N-loss (up to 0.675 gN m−2 d−1), with anammox activities of 0.005–0.74 nmolN g−1 soil h−1, which were even higher than the denitrification rates. By contrast, no significant anammox was measured in the vadose zone. Higher anammox bacterial cell densities were observed (0.75–1.4 × 107 copies g−1 soil) in the phreatic zone, where ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) maybe the major source of nitrite for anammox bacteria. The anammox bacterial cells in soils of the vadose zone were all <103 copies g−1 soil. We suggest that the subsurface provides a favorable niche for anammox bacteria whose contribution to N cycling and groundwater nitrate removal seems considerably larger than previously known. PMID:28071702

  6. Production of Nitrogen Oxides by Laboratory Simulated Transient Luminous Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, H.; Bailey, M.; Hallett, J.; Beasley, W.

    2007-12-01

    Restoration of the polar stratospheric ozone layer has occurred at rates below those originally expected following reductions in chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) usage. Additional reactions affecting ozone depletion now must also be considered. This research examines nitrogen oxides (NOx) produced in the middle atmosphere by transient luminous events (TLEs), with NOx production in this layer contributing to the loss of stratospheric ozone. In particular, NOx produced by sprites in the mesosphere would be transported to the polar stratosphere via the global meridional circulation and downward diffusion. A pressure-controlled vacuum chamber was used to simulate middle atmosphere pressures, while a power supply and in-chamber electrodes were used to simulate TLEs in the pressure controlled environment. Chemiluminescence NOx analyzers were used to sample NOx produced by the chamber discharges- originally a Monitor Labs Model 8440E, later a Thermo Environment Model 42. Total NOx production for each discharge as well as NOx per ampere of current and NOx per Joule of discharge energy were plotted. Absolute NOx production was greatest for discharge environments with upper tropospheric pressures (100-380 torr), while NOx/J was greatest for discharge environments with stratospheric pressures (around 10 torr). The different production efficiencies in NOx/J as a function of pressure pointed to three different production regimes, each with its own reaction mechanisms: one for tropospheric pressures, one for stratospheric pressures, and one for upper stratospheric to mesospheric pressures (no greater than 1 torr).

  7. Nitrogen oxides and methane treatment by non-thermal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva, E.; Pacheco, M.; Colín, A.; Sánchez, V.; Pacheco, J.; Valdivia, R.; Soria, G.

    2015-03-01

    Non thermal plasma was used to treat nitrogen oxides (NOx) and methane (CH4), since they are important constituents of hydrocarbon combustion emissions processes and, both gases, play a key role in the formation of tropospheric ozone. These gases are involved in environmental problems like acid rain and some diseases such as bronchitis and pneumonia. In the case of methane is widely known its importance in the global climate change, and currently accounts for 30% of global warming. There is a growing concern for methane leaks, associated with a rapid expansion of unconventional oil and gas extraction techniques as well as a large-scale methane release from Arctic because of ice melting and the subsequent methane production of decaying organic matter. Therefore, methane mitigation is a key to avoid dangerous levels of global warming. The research, here reported, deals about the generation of non-thermal plasma with a double dielectric barrier (2DBD) at atmospheric pressure with alternating current (AC) for NOx and CH4 treatment. The degradation efficiencies and their respective power consumption for different reactor configurations (cylindrical and planar) are also reported. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of gases degradation are reported before and after treatment with cold plasma. Experimental and theoretical results are compared obtaining good removal efficiencies, superior to 90% and to 20% respectively for NOx and CH4.

  8. Final Technical Report "Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide and Olefin Oxidation" Grant number : DE-FG02-86ER13615

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayland, B.B.

    2009-08-31

    Title: Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide and Olefin Oxidation Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER13615 PI: Wayland, B. B. (wayland@sas.upenn.edu) Abstract Development of new mechanistic strategies and catalyst materials for activation of CO, H2, CH4, C2H4, O2, and related substrates relevant to the conversion of carbon monoxide, alkanes, and alkenes to organic oxygenates are central objectives encompassed by this program. Design and synthesis of metal complexes that manifest reactivity patterns associated with potential pathways for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide through metallo-formyl (M-CHO), dimetal ketone (M-C(O)-M), and dimetal dionyl (M-C(O)-C(O)-M) species is one major focus. Hydrocarbon oxidation using molecular oxygen is a central goal for methane activation and functionalization as well as regioselective oxidation of olefins. Discovery of new reactivity patterns and control of selectivity are pursued through designing new metal complexes and adjusting reaction conditions. Variation of reaction media promotes distinct reaction pathways that control both reaction rates and selectivities. Dimetalloradical diporphyrin complexes preorganize transition states for substrate reactions that involve two metal centers and manifest large rate increases over mono-metalloradical reactions of hydrogen, methane, and other small molecule substrates. Another broad goal and recurring theme of this program is to contribute to the thermodynamic database for a wide scope of organo-metal transformations in a range of reaction media. One of the most complete descriptions of equilibrium thermodynamics for organometallic reactions in water and methanol is emerging from the study of rhodium porphyrin substrate reactions in aqueous and alcoholic media. Water soluble group nine metalloporphyrins manifest remarkably versatile substrate reactivity in aqueous and alcoholic media which includes producing rhodium formyl (Rh-CHO) and hydroxy methyl (Rh-CH2OH) species. Exploratory

  9. Nitrogen monoxide vector of ultrasonic atomizing inhalation improves vertebro-basilar artery insufficiency Hemodynamic changes are detected by transcranial Doppler test

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Latest researches at home and abroad indicate that glycerol trinitrate plays its function because it can metabolize into nitrogen monoxide (NO) in vivo.OBJECTIVE: To study the therapeutic effects of NO vector of ultrasonic atomizing inhalation on vertebro-basilar artery insufficiency (VBI) through transcranial Doppler (TCD) detection and serum NO content and indirect effect of TCD on cerebral blood flow changes.DESIGN: Randomized grouping and controlled clinical study.SETTING: Department of Neurology, the Fourth People's Hospital of Jinan.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 130 patients who were diagnosed as VBI were selected from Department of Neurology, the Fourth People's Hospital of Jinan from December 2001 to December 2005. The involved inpatients were checked by CT and MRI, and met the VBI diagnostic standard enacted by the Fourth National Academic Meeting of Cerebrovascular Disease in 1995. All patients and their relatives provided the confirmed consent. They were randomly divided into low-dose treatment group (n =60), high-lose treatment group (n =30) and control group (n =40).METHODS: Patients in the low-dose and high-dose treatment groups were given ultrasonic atomizing inhalation of 3 mg and 5 mg glycerol trinitrate, respectively, for 20 minutes, once a day. In addition,ligustrazine and energy mixture were used once a day for three days in a course. Cases in the control group were only given ligustrazine and energy mixture. All selected cases accepted TCD, blood NO content was checked at the time of beginning, after the first time and after a period of treatment. According to the TCD test, VBI patients were divided into two groups (high-low flow velocity). The vertebral artery (VA) and basal artery (BA) of left or right sides were detected by 2 Hz detector via occipital window.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: ① Blood flow velocity of systolic phase, blood flow velocity of diastole phase and vascular resistance in left and right VA and BA detected by using TCD

  10. Evaluation of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions over California in Spring 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, M.; Bowman, K. W.; Carmichael, G. R.; Chai, T.; Pierce, R.; Pollack, I. B.; Ryerson, T. B.

    2013-12-01

    Nitrogen Dioxide (NO2) belongs to the regulated 'six common air pollutants' by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), due to its adverse impacts on the human respiratory system. It is also often used as the indicator for the highly reactive group of gases nitrogen oxides (NOx), the important ozone precursors. We model California air quality during the NOAA CalNex field campaign period in May 2010 using the STEM chemical transport model on a 12 km horizontal resolution grid. Three different anthropogenic emission inventories were used in the simulations: 1) 2005 National Emission Inventory (NEI 2005); 2) daily-varying emissions recently developed by California Air Resources Board (CARB); and 3) NEI 2008. The model-simulated NO2 were compared with the measurements by aircraft and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board of the Aura satellite. We further conduct NO2 emission inversion using the four-dimensional variational approach [Chai et al., 2009] and the OMI NO2 column data. The inversion generated grid-based emission scaling factors on the NEI 2005, and the resulting NOx fields were 'cross-validated' by comparing with aircraft NO2 measurements. The adjustment on original emissions was then compared with 1) the CARB-documented NOx emission trends, 2) other 'top-down' estimates of California NOx emissions using aircraft measurements [Brioude et al., 2013], and 3) the space-observed NO2 column trends [Russell et al., 2012]. References Chai, T., Carmichael, G., Tang, Y., and Sandu, A., Regional NO2 emission inversion through four-dimensional variational approach using Sciamachy tropospheric column observations, Atmos. Environ., 43, 5046-5055, 2009. Brioude, J., Angevine, W. M., Ahmadov, R., Kim, S.-W., Evan, S., McKeen, S. A., Hsie, E.-Y., Frost, G. J., Neuman, J. A., Pollack, I. B., Peischl, J., Ryerson, T. B., Holloway, J., Brown, S. S., Nowak, J. B., Roberts, J. M., Wofsy, S. C., Santoni, G. W., Oda, T., and Trainer, M.: Top-down estimate of surface

  11. Effect of the chemical termination of conductive diamond substrate on the resistance to carbon monoxide-poisoning during methanol oxidation of platinum particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spătaru, Tanţa; Osiceanu, Petre; Anastasescu, Mihai; Pătrinoiu, Greta; Munteanu, Cornel; Spătaru, Nicolae; Fujishima, Akira

    2014-09-01

    Boron-doped diamond (BDD) films were annealed in hydrogen or oxygen streams and were further used as substrates for Pt electrochemical deposition. SEM and AFM measurements have shown that, from the point of view of the efficiency of noble metal utilization, a hydrogen-terminated diamond (HT-BDD) support is more convenient because it enables better dispersion and smaller size of the deposited particles. An enhancement of ca. 23% of the electrocatalyst specific surface area was observed for Pt/HT-BDD, compared to the case of Pt deposited at oxygen-terminated diamond (OT-BDD). Nevertheless, it was found that when deposited on oxidized BDD, Pt particles are more resistant to fouling during methanol oxidation. Electrochemical oxidation of adsorbed carbon monoxide was investigated by anodic stripping voltammetry and it was demonstrated that the use of OT-BDD substrate facilitates oxidative desorption of CO from the platinum active sites. This behavior was tentatively ascribed to the high surface concentration of oxygenated carbon species, evidenced by XPS, which may act as oxygen donors and/or could partially weaken Pt-CO bonds, thus enabling easier CO eviction from the electrocatalyst surface.

  12. Distribution and diversity of carbon monoxide-oxidizing bacteria and bulk bacterial communities across a succession gradient on a Hawaiian volcanic deposit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, C F; King, G M

    2010-07-01

    Relatively little is known about the distribution and diversity of CO-oxidizing bacteria during succession on volcanic deposits even though they are among the primary colonists. We surveyed CO-oxidizing communities across a vegetation gradient on a 1959 cinder deposit using coxL (large subunit gene of carbon monoxide dehydrogenase) sequences. Sequences most closely related to a coxL sequence from Ktedonobacter racemifer, dominated unvegetated cinders, while Proteobacteria-like sequences dominated vegetated sites. The number of coxL operational taxonomic units (OTUs) increased threefold with increased vegetation, and correlated most strongly with the increased beta-Proteobacteria richness (r = 0.987). These compositional shifts were also reflected in overall bacterial community compositions as determined by 16S rRNA gene analysis. Notably, coxL OTU:16S rRNA OTU ratios increased with increased vegetation, indicating that CO oxidizers became a larger fraction of total bacterial richness during succession. Results from most probable number estimates and maximum potential CO uptake activity assays indicate that increased richness is paralleled by increased CO oxidizer abundance, which likely results from increased vegetation and organic carbon content. Collectively, results suggest that in contrast to patterns observed for plant succession, a versatile bacterial functional group that is important during early colonization and succession can remain important in later stages of succession, irrespective of dramatic environmental changes.

  13. Photocatalytic property of nitrogen and nicked codoped titanium oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Yong; Jun, Kyeong Mun; Kwon, Ki Young [Dept. of Chemistry, Research Institute of Natural Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Seok Hoon; Hwang, Jun Yeon [Institute of Advanced Composite Materials, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Wanju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Nitrogen or nitrogen and nickel codoped TiO{sub 2}s are prepared by a hydrothermal method. The doped TiO{sub 2}s are applied to the photodecomposition of methylene blue (MB) under visible-light irradiation. The chemical and physical properties of catalysts are characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscope, energy dispersive spectroscopy mapping, zeta potential, and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller. We found that nickel and nitrogen atoms are well dispersed in TiO{sub 2}. While the adsorption of MB on the TiO{sub 2} surface are improved by the nitrogen doping, the photodecomposition capability of MB is barely affected by the nitrogen doping level. Particularly, the photodegradation power of the nickel and nitrogen codoped TiO{sub 2} is better than that of commercial TiO{sub 2} (Degussa P25)

  14. Nitrogen Stable Isotope Composition of Various Fossil-fuel Combustion Nitrogen Oxide Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, W.; Michalski, G. M.; Fang, H.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2) are important trace gases that impact atmospheric chemistry, air quality, and climate. In order to help constrain NOx source contributions, the nitrogen (N) stable isotope composition of NOx (δ15N-NOx) may be a useful indicator for NOx source partitioning. However, despite anthropogenic emissions being the most prevalent source of NOx, there is still large uncertainty in the δ15N-NOx values for anthropogenic sources. To this end, this study provides a detailed analysis of several fossil-fuel combustion NOx sources and their δ15N-NOx values. To accomplish this, exhaust or flue samples from several fossil-fuel combustion sources were sampled and analyzed for their δ15N-NOx that included airplanes, gasoline-powered vehicles not equipped with a catalytic converter, gasoline-powered lawn tools and utility vehicles, diesel-electric buses, diesel semi-trucks, and natural gas-burning home furnace and power plant. A relatively large range of δ15N-NOx values were measured from -28.1 to 0.3‰ for individual exhaust/flue samples with cold started diesel-electric buses contributing on average the lowest δ15N-NOx values at -20.9‰, and warm-started diesel-electric buses contributing on average the highest values of -1.7‰. The NOx sources analyzed in this study primarily originated from the "thermal production" of NOx and generally emitted negative δ15N-NOx values, likely due to the kinetic isotope effect associated with its production. It was found that there is a negative correlation between NOx concentrations and δ15N-NOx for fossil-fuel combustion sources equipped with catalytic NOx reduction technology, suggesting that the catalytic reduction of NOx may have an influence on δ15N-NOx values. Based on the δ15N-NOx values reported in this study and in previous studies, a δ15N-NOx regional and seasonal isoscape was constructed for the contiguous United States. The constructed isoscape demonstrates the seasonal importance of various

  15. Total atmospheric deposition of oxidized nitrogen in the United States Pacific Northwest for 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent the amount of wet and dry deposition of oxidized nitrogen in the Pacific...

  16. Total atmospheric deposition of oxidized and reduced nitrogen in the United States Pacific Northwest for 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent the amount of wet and dry deposition of oxidized and reduced nitrogen in the...

  17. Wet deposition of oxidized nitrogen in the United States Pacific Northwest for 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This spatial data set was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to represent the amount of wet deposition of oxidized nitrogen in the Pacific Northwest region...

  18. Nickel supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes as hydrogen oxidation reaction catalyst in alkaline electrolyte

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhuang, Zhongbin; Giles, Stephen A; Zheng, Jie; Jenness, Glen R; Caratzoulas, Stavros; Vlachos, Dionisios G; Yan, Yushan

    2016-01-01

    .... Here we report that a composite catalyst, nickel nanoparticles supported on nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes, has hydrogen oxidation activity similar to platinum-group metals in alkaline electrolyte...

  19. Future trends in worldwide river nitrogen transport and related nitrous oxide emissions : a scenario analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroeze, C.; Seitzinger, S.P.; Domingues, R.

    2001-01-01

    We analyze possible future trends in dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) export by world rivers and associated emissions of nitrous oxide (N2O). Our scenarios either assume that current trends continue or that nitrogen (N) inputs to aquatic systems are reduced as a result of changes in agriculture pr

  20. Nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide as electrode material for high rate supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwak, Agata; Grzyb, Bartosz; Díez, Noel; Gryglewicz, Grażyna

    2017-03-01

    Nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxides (N-rGOs) have been synthesized at various temperatures by a facile hydrothermal route involving the doping of an aqueous graphene oxide dispersion with amitrole. The N-rGOs had a nitrogen content ranging from 10.9 to 13.4 at%, which is among the highest reported for this type of material. The predominant nitrogen species were pyridinic followed by amide/amine, pyrrolic, and quaternary nitrogen. Cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy measurements performed on the N-doped and nitrogen-free samples revealed that nitrogen fixation provided the material with pseudocapacitive behaviour and improved ion diffusion and charge propagation. A high specific capacitance of 244 F g-1 was obtained at a high scan rate of 100 mV s-1 for the N-rGO with the highest nitrogen content. An outstanding rate capability for the N-rGO, with increasing scan rates, of 98% was obtained, while only 70% was obtained for the non-doped rGO. 92% of the initial capacitance was maintained over 5000 charge/discharge cycles due to the high stability of the electrochemically active nitrogen moieties. Hydrothermal synthesis using amitrole as a nitrogen dopant represents a simple route for the synthesis of graphene with very high nitrogen content and exceptional behaviour for use as electrode material in high-power supercapacitors.

  1. Influence of nitrogen dose on the charge density of nitrogen-implanted buried oxide in SOI wafers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng Zhongshan [Department of Physics, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022 (China); Liu Zhongli; Li Ning; Li Guohua [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang Enxia, E-mail: ss_zhengzs@ujn.edu.c [College of Material Engineering, Shanghai University of Engineering Science, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2010-02-15

    To harden silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers fabricated using separation by implanted oxygen (SIMOX) to total-dose irradiation, the technique of nitrogen implantation into the buried oxide (BOX) layer of SIMOX wafers can be used. However, in this work, it has been found that all the nitrogen-implanted BOX layers reveal greater initial positive charge densities, which increased with increasing nitrogen implantation dose. Also, the results indicate that excessively large nitrogen implantation dose reduced the radiation tolerance of BOX for its high initial positive charge density. The bigger initial positive charge densities can be ascribed to the accumulation of implanted nitrogen near the Si-BOX interface after annealing. On the other hand, in our work, it has also been observed that, unlike nitrogen-implanted BOX, all the fluorine-implanted BOX layers show a negative charge density. To obtain the initial charge densities of the BOX layers, the tested samples were fabricated with a metal-BOX-silicon (MBS) structure based on SIMOX wafers for high-frequency capacitance-voltage (C-V) analysis. (semiconductor technology)

  2. Emission control system for nitrogen oxides using enhanced oxidation, scrubbing, and biofiltration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, A.; Cabezas, J. [Texas A& amp; M University Kingsville, Kingsville, TX (United States). Dept. of Environmental Engineering

    2009-05-15

    Nitric oxide (NO) constitutes about 90% of the nitrogen oxide (NOx) species in the flue gases emitted from combustion processes, but NO is difficult to remove in existing scrubbers due to its low solubility. NO may be oxidized with hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) into soluble species that can be partially removed in wet scrubbers simultaneously with sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and biofilters located downstream of the scrubber can increase the removal efficiency. This article presents the results of a bench-scale evaluation of such an integrated system combining enhanced oxidation, scrubbing, and biofiltration. Main components of the bench-scale system consisted of a quartz tube in a furnace to simulate the NO oxidation stage and two vertical packed bed cylinders constituting the scrubber and the biofilter. Inlet synthetic gas had a concentration of 50 mu L/L of NO. Overall removal efficiency by the integrated system was in the range of 53% to 93% with an average of 79%, absorption accounted for 43% and biofiltration for 36% of the total removal. Key parameters in the operation of the system are the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}:NO mole ratio, the reaction temperature, the liquid to gas flow ratio, and the biofilter residence time. Experimental results suggest a path for optimization of the technology focusing simultaneously in minimizing H{sub 2}O{sub 2} use in the enhanced oxidation stage, reducing water consumption in the scrubber stage and balancing the residence times in the three stages of the integrated system.

  3. Evaluation of a Colorimetric Personal Dosimeter for Nitrogen Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Philip

    A personal colorimetric dosimeter for nitrogen dioxide was developed. Tests were performed to determine the response of these strips to various concentrations of NO2. The dosimeter strips were satisfactory for approximate determinations of total exposure (concentration + time) of nitrogen dioxide. The total exposure was calculated in terms of time…

  4. Electrochemical oxidation of carbon monoxide: from platinum single crystals to low temperature fuel catalysts. Part II: Electrooxidation of H2, CO and H2/CO mixtures on well characterized PtMo alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PHILIP N. ROSS JR.

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of hydrogen and hydrogen–carbon monoxide mixture has been investigated on well-characterized metallurgically prepared platinum–molybdenum (PtMo alloys. It was concluded that the optimum surface concentration of molybdenum is near 23 mol.%. Based on experimentally determined parameters and simulations, the mechanism of the oxidation of CO/H2 mixtures is discussed.

  5. Spectroelectrochemical Study of Carbon Monoxide and Ethanol Oxidation on Pt/C, PtSn(3:1/C and PtSn(1:1/C Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubén Rizo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available PtSn-based catalysts are one of the most active materials toward that contribute ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR. In order to gain a better understanding of the Sn influence on the carbon monoxide (principal catalyst poison and ethanol oxidation reactions in acidic media, a systematic spectroelectrochemical study was carried out. With this end, carbon-supported PtSnx (x = 0, 1/3 and 1 materials were synthesized and employed as anodic catalysts for both reactions. In situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIRS and differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS indicate that Sn diminishes the amount of bridge bonded CO (COB and greatly improves the CO tolerance of Pt-based catalysts. Regarding the effect of Sn loading on the EOR, it enhances the catalytic activity and decreases the onset potential. FTIRS and DEMS analysis indicate that the C-C bond scission occurs at low overpotentials and at the same potential values regardless of the Sn loading, although the amount of C-C bond breaking decreases with the rise of Sn in the catalytic material. Therefore, the elevated catalytic activity toward the EOR at PtSn-based electrodes is mainly associated with the improved CO tolerance and the incomplete oxidation of ethanol to form acetic acid and acetaldehyde species, causing the formation of a higher amount of both C2 products with the rise of Sn loading.

  6. Achievement report for fiscal 1998 on the preceding research related to global environment industry technologies. Survey and research on reduction of nitrogen monoxide; 1998 nendo chikyu sangyo gijutsu ni kakawaru sendo kenkyu asanka chisso no haishutsu teigen ni kansuru chosa kenkyu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Nitrogen monoxide is a strong greenhouse effect gas having warming up index per molecule 300 times greater than that of CO2, and is designated as the object of reduction in the Kyoto Conference. The present preceding research discusses necessity of performing research and development works related to reducing the emission of nitrogen monoxide, and if it is necessary, places the final objective on proposition of what researches should be planned. Fiscal 1997 being the first fiscal year of the preceding research has surveyed emission amount from different emission sources, and enumerated the research and development assignments. Fiscal 1998 falling under the final fiscal year summarizes the emission amount including the future trends, surveys the feasibility of the promising technological measures through experiments, and proposed finally a research and development plan desired of implementation in the future. The proposal contains a research plan placing development of nitrogen monoxide decomposing catalysts and automobile catalysts as the main objectives. Among the domestic nitrogen monoxide generating sources, about 2/3 is the man-made generation sources, hence catalysts, if developed, may be applied to such facilities as combustion furnaces. (NEDO)

  7. Mechanisms of formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides during polyamide incineration in a fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahnel, F.; Gadiou, R.; Prado, G. [Univ. de Haute Alsace, Mulhouse (France). Lab. de Gestion des Risques et Environnement

    1998-09-01

    In order to study the incineration of nitrogen-containing polymers, a fludized bed has been built. This paper reports the results for polyamide 6-6 incineration. The main nitrogen containing species have been identified, and the axial profiles of concentration of nitrogen oxides, HCN and NH3 have been measured. The main steps of decomposition of the polyamide were identified. We present an experimental investigation of the influence of operating parameters (temperature, excess air) on the formation and reduction of polymer combustion products. The yields of conversion of nitrogen to the different N-species have been calculated as a function of excess air in the fluidized bed. (orig.)

  8. Influence of periodic nitrogen functionality on the selective oxidation of alcohols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan-Thaw, Carine E. [Universita di Milano, Italy; Villa, Alberto [Universita di Milano, Italy; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Kaiasam, Kamalakannan [Berlin Institute of Technology (Technische Universitat Berlin); Adamczyk, Leslie A [ORNL; Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL; Prati, Laura [Universita di Milano, Italy; Thomas, Arne [Berlin Institute of Technology (Technische Universitat Berlin)

    2012-01-01

    For the first time, we attribute the enhancement in catalytic alcohol oxidation activity to the presence of nitrogen heteroatoms on the external surface of a support material surface. The same Pd particles (3.1 3.2 nm) were supported on polymeric carbon-nitrogen supports and used as catalysts to selectively oxidize benzyl alcohol. The polymeric carbon-nitrogen materials include covalent triazine frameworks (CTF) and carbon nitride (CN) materials with nitrogen content varying from 9 to 58 atomic percent N. Withcomparable metal exposure, via XPS, the activity of these catalysts correlates with the concentration of nitrogen species on the surface which enhanced the Lewis basicity of these moieties thus promoting alcoholate formation and subsequent hydride abstraction.

  9. 氧化沟的脱氮除磷%Nitrogen and phosphorus removal of oxidation ditch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭继锋; 杨云龙

    2009-01-01

    阐述了氧化沟脱氮除磷的特点、机理、影响氧化沟脱氮除磷的因素及各种形式氧化沟的脱氮除磷,最后提出了氧化沟的未来发展方向,以期既节约能源又实现最佳的除磷脱氮效果.%The characteristics and working mechanism of nitrogen and phosphorus removal of oxidation ditch are elaborated as well as the fac-tors influencing the removal ratio of nitrogen and phosphorus and various nitrogen and phosphorus removal ways of oxidation ditches. In the end the developmental direction of oxidation ditch is pointed out in order to realize optimal removal effect of nitrogen and phosphorus on the prince of saving energy.

  10. Carbon monoxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and smokers. Carbon monoxide can harm a fetus (unborn baby still in the womb). Symptoms of carbon ... symptoms Outlook (Prognosis) Carbon monoxide poisoning can cause death. For those who survive, recovery is slow. How ...

  11. Low-temperature carbon monoxide oxidation over zirconia-supported CuO-CeO2 catalysts: Effect of zirconia support properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretti, Elisa; Molina, Antonia Infantes; Sponchia, Gabriele; Talon, Aldo; Frattini, Romana; Rodriguez-Castellon, Enrique; Storaro, Loretta

    2017-05-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the effect of the preparation route of ZrO2 in CuO-CeO2/ZrO2 catalysts for the oxidation of carbon monoxide at low temperature (COX). Four ZrO2 supports were synthetized via either type sol-gel methodology or precipitation. The final Cu-Ce-Zr oxide catalysts were prepared by incipient wetness co-impregnation with copper and cerium solutions (with a loading of 6 wt% of CuO and 20 wt% of CeO2). The catalyst crystalline phases, texture and active species reducibility were determined by XRD, N2 physisorption at -196 °C and H2-TPR, respectively; meanwhile the surface composition and copper-cerium electronic states were studied by XPS. The catalytic activity was evaluated in the oxidation of CO to CO2, in the 40-215 °C temperature range. Catalytic results evidenced that the samples prepared by a sol-gel methodology showed, after the impregnation, a severe decrease of specific surface area and pore volume attributable to a wide degree of pore blockage caused by the presence of metal oxide particles and a collapse of the structure partially burying the active sites. A simple co-impregnation of a zirconia support, obtained through facile and fast precipitation, provided instead a catalyst with very good redox properties and high dispersion of the active phases, which completely oxidizes CO in the range 115-215 °C with T50 of 65 °C. This higher observed activity was ascribed to the formation of a larger fraction of highly dispersed and easily reducible Cu species and ceria nanocrystallites, mainly present as Ce(IV), with an average size of 5 nm.

  12. CARBON MONOXIDE TREATMENT GUIDELINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Brvar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide is the leading cause of unintentional poisoning-related death in Slovenia. It is an odorless, colorless gas that usually remains undetectable until exposures result in injury or death. Exposure to carbon monoxide is most commonly accompanied by headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, confusion, drowsiness, fatigue and collapse. Carbon monoxide poisoning management includes normobaric oxygen therapy. Hyperbaric-oxygen treatments reduce the risk of cognitive sequelae after carbon monoxide poisoning. 

  13. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... main content Languages 简体中文 English Bahasa Indonesia 한국어 Español ภาษาไทย Tiếng Việt Text Size: Decrease Font Increase ... Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as ...

  14. Nitrosation Reaction Without Nitrogen Oxide Waste Gas Emission and Its Engineering Practice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chunguang; FENG Yaqing; NIU Weiwei; CHEN Xuexi

    2013-01-01

    The gas-liquid phase equilibrium is used in controlling the nitrosation reaction process.Decomposition of nitrous acid and oxidation side reaction are suppressed in a closed reaction system.The system pressure is used as the criterion of the end of reaction,avoiding excessive feeding and reducing the decomposition of nitrous acid.The head space of the reactor is used as the gas buffer,stabilizing the feeding fluctuations and inhibiting the side reaction,decomposition of nitrous acid.Nitrogen oxide concentration is controlled at the minimum level.Thus the zero release of nitrogen oxide waste gas can be achieved without using any absorption process.

  15. Photocatalytic Destruction of Nitrogen Monoxide over La3+ and N Co-doped SrTiO3 Powders under Visible Light Irradiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金淑; 马淑云; 王国红

    2004-01-01

    Lanthanum and nitrogen co-doped SrTiO3 was prepared by a mechanochemical reaction using SrTiO3, urea and La2O3 as the raw materials. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectrometer, transmission electron microscopy, and nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherm measurements. Lanthanum doping could increase the doping content of nitrogen in the sample. The sample prepared with 0.2 mol% La2O3, 22 mol% urea and 77.8 mol% SrTiO3 by mechanochemical reaction, which has nearly the same nitrogen and lanthanum doping fractions, exhibited high photocatalytic activities. Under the irradiation of light with wavelength larger than 400, and 290 nm, the photocatalytic activity of nitrogen and lanthanum co-doped SrTiO3 were 2.6 and 2 times greater than that of pure SrTiO3.

  16. The complex interplay of iron metabolism, reactive oxygen species, and reactive nitrogen species: insights into the potential of various iron therapies to induce oxidative and nitrosative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koskenkorva-Frank, Taija S; Weiss, Günter; Koppenol, Willem H; Burckhardt, Susanna

    2013-12-01

    Production of minute concentrations of superoxide (O2(*-)) and nitrogen monoxide (nitric oxide, NO*) plays important roles in several aspects of cellular signaling and metabolic regulation. However, in an inflammatory environment, the concentrations of these radicals can drastically increase and the antioxidant defenses may become overwhelmed. Thus, biological damage may occur owing to redox imbalance-a condition called oxidative and/or nitrosative stress. A complex interplay exists between iron metabolism, O2(*-), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and NO*. Iron is involved in both the formation and the scavenging of these species. Iron deficiency (anemia) (ID(A)) is associated with oxidative stress, but its role in the induction of nitrosative stress is largely unclear. Moreover, oral as well as intravenous (iv) iron preparations used for the treatment of ID(A) may also induce oxidative and/or nitrosative stress. Oral administration of ferrous salts may lead to high transferrin saturation levels and, thus, formation of non-transferrin-bound iron, a potentially toxic form of iron with a propensity to induce oxidative stress. One of the factors that determine the likelihood of oxidative and nitrosative stress induced upon administration of an iv iron complex is the amount of labile (or weakly-bound) iron present in the complex. Stable dextran-based iron complexes used for iv therapy, although they contain only negligible amounts of labile iron, can induce oxidative and/or nitrosative stress through so far unknown mechanisms. In this review, after summarizing the main features of iron metabolism and its complex interplay with O2(*-), H2O2, NO*, and other more reactive compounds derived from these species, the potential of various iron therapies to induce oxidative and nitrosative stress is discussed and possible underlying mechanisms are proposed. Understanding the mechanisms, by which various iron formulations may induce oxidative and nitrosative stress, will help us

  17. Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apodaca, Lori E.

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an overview of the nitrogen chemical market as of July 2013, including the production of ammonia compounds. Industrial uses for ammonia include fertilizers, explosives, and plastics. Other topics include industrial capacity of U.S. ammonia producers CF Industries Holdings Inc., Koch Nitrogen Co., PCS Nitrogen, Inc., and Agrium Inc., the impact of natural gas prices on the nitrogen industry, and demand for corn crops for ethanol production.

  18. Nitrous oxide production by lithotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and implications for engineered nitrogen-removal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Kartik; Stein, Lisa Y; Klotz, Martin G; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2011-12-01

    Chemolithoautotrophic AOB (ammonia-oxidizing bacteria) form a crucial component in microbial nitrogen cycling in both natural and engineered systems. Under specific conditions, including transitions from anoxic to oxic conditions and/or excessive ammonia loading, and the presence of high nitrite (NO₂⁻) concentrations, these bacteria are also documented to produce nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N₂O) gases. Essentially, ammonia oxidation in the presence of non-limiting substrate concentrations (ammonia and O₂) is associated with N₂O production. An exceptional scenario that leads to such conditions is the periodical switch between anoxic and oxic conditions, which is rather common in engineered nitrogen-removal systems. In particular, the recovery from, rather than imposition of, anoxic conditions has been demonstrated to result in N₂O production. However, applied engineering perspectives, so far, have largely ignored the contribution of nitrification to N₂O emissions in greenhouse gas inventories from wastewater-treatment plants. Recent field-scale measurements have revealed that nitrification-related N₂O emissions are generally far higher than emissions assigned to heterotrophic denitrification. In the present paper, the metabolic pathways, which could potentially contribute to NO and N₂O production by AOB have been conceptually reconstructed under conditions especially relevant to engineered nitrogen-removal systems. Taken together, the reconstructed pathways, field- and laboratory-scale results suggest that engineering designs that achieve low effluent aqueous nitrogen concentrations also minimize gaseous nitrogen emissions.

  19. Attempts to minimize nitrogen oxide emission from diesel engine by using antioxidant-treated diesel-biodiesel blend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashedul, Hasan Khondakar; Kalam, Md Abdul; Masjuki, Haji Hassan; Teoh, Yew Heng; How, Heoy Geok; Monirul, Islam Mohammad; Imdadul, Hassan Kazi

    2017-02-23

    The study represents a comprehensive analysis of engine exhaust emission variation from a compression ignition (CI) diesel engine fueled with diesel-biodiesel blends. Biodiesel used in this investigation was produced through transesterification procedure from Moringa oleifera oil. A single cylinder, four-stroke, water-cooled, naturally aspirated diesel engine was used for this purpose. The pollutants from the exhaust of the engine that are monitored in this study are nitrogen oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbon (HC), and smoke opacity. Engine combustion and performance parameters are also measured together with exhaust emission data. Some researchers have reported that the reason for higher NO emission of biodiesel is higher prompt NO formation. The use of antioxidant-treated biodiesel in a diesel engine is a promising approach because antioxidants reduce the formation of free radicals, which are responsible for the formation of prompt NO during combustion. Two different antioxidant additives namely 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylphenol (BHT) and 2,2'-methylenebis(4-methyl-6-tert-butylphenol) (MBEBP) were individually dissolved at a concentration of 1% by volume in MB30 (30% moringa biodiesel with 70% diesel) fuel blend to investigate and compare NO as well as other emissions. The result shows that both antioxidants reduced NO emission significantly; however, HC, CO, and smoke were found slightly higher compared to pure biodiesel blends, but not more than the baseline fuel diesel. The result also shows that both antioxidants were quite effective in reducing peak heat release rate (HRR) and brake-specific fuel consumption (BSFC) as well as improving brake thermal efficiency (BTE) and oxidation stability. Based on this study, antioxidant-treated M. oleifera biodiesel blend (MB30) can be used as a very promising alternative source of fuel in diesel engine without any modifications.

  20. Effect of nitrogen monoxide mediated with estrogen on bone formation%一氧化氮介导雌激素的骨形成增加作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    涂意辉; 杨安礼; 杜靖远

    2004-01-01

    素诱导骨形成增加的介导剂.%BACKGROUND: Protective mechanism of estrogen on bone formation is not clear. Nitrogen monoxide(NO) induced by estrogen may have a certain effect on bone formation.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of estrogenic treatment on levels of plasma nitrate/nitrite in ovariectomied rats.DESIGN: Randomized controlled trial.SETTING: The department of Orthopaedics of Central Hospital, Yangpu District, Shanghai.PARTICIPANTS: This experiment was performed in the Animal Experimental Center of Tongji Medical University. A total of 36 healthy clean female Sprague-Dawley(SD) rats, aged 3 months old, weighing 220 - 245 g,were provided by the Animal Experimental Center of Tongji Medical University.INTERVENTIONS: Twelve SD rats were given bilateral ovariectomy completely, as ovariotomy group; Twelve SD rats were treated with their bilateral ovary exposed but not resected, as control group, another 12 SD were carried ovocylin every two weeks, as estrogen treated group.-MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Expression of NO synthetic enzyme in bone tissue was measured with the method of immunohistochemistry staining;The bone mineral density(BMD) was measured with dual energy X-ray; Bone morphological and metrological measurement was made with image analysis system; The levels of plasma nitrate/nitrite were detected with optical density method.RESULTS: Ovariectomy induced significantly the levels of plasma nitrate/nitrite, BMD, the yolume of trabecular bone as well as other bone morphological and metrological parametes. Six weeks after operation, the mean levels of plasma nitrate/nitrite in the control and ovariectomy groups were (22.4 ± 1.7 ) μmol / L and ( 16.2 ± 3.7 ) μmol / L, respectively; the value of BMD were(0. 245 ± 0. 030) g/cm2 and(0. 189 ± 0. 030) g/cm2, respectively, volume of trabecular bone were (31.97±3.50)% and(17.14± 4.20) %, respectively. The differences between the two groups was significant( P < 0. 01) . Estrogen inhibited these changes induced by ovariectomy

  1. Integrated electricity and carbon monoxide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, J.

    1994-03-23

    In a process for the production of carbon monoxide and electric power in an IGCC with the removal of sulphur compounds, between the outlet of quenched gas from a partial oxidation unit and a fuel inlet to a combined cycle gas turbine there is a permeable membrane unit to separate a non-permeable stream, which is utilised as a source of carbon monoxide, and a permeate stream, which is used as fuel for the gas turbine of the combined cycle unit. (author)

  2. Generation and reduction of nitrogen oxides in firing different kinds of fuel in a circulating fluidized bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munts, V. A.; Munts, Yu. G.; Baskakov, A. P.; Proshin, A. S.

    2013-11-01

    The processes through which nitrogen oxides are generated and reduced in the course of firing different kinds of fuel in a circulating fluidized bed are addressed. All experimental studies were carried by the authors on their own laboratory installations. To construct a model simulating the generation of nitrogen oxides, the fuel combustion process in a fluidized bed was subdivided into two stages: combustion of volatiles and combustion of coke residue. The processes through which nitrogen oxides are generated and reduced under the conditions of firing fuel with shortage of oxygen (which is one of efficient methods for reducing nitrogen oxide emissions in firing fuel in a fluidized bed) are considered.

  3. 40 CFR 89.321 - Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... nitrogen analyzer is checked for NO2 to NO converter efficiency according to § 89.317. (c) Initial and...-fit straight line is 2 percent or less of the value at each non-zero data point and within ± 0.3... represents the data to within these limits shall be used to determine concentration. (d) The initial...

  4. 40 CFR 91.318 - Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... two percent at any point, use the best-fit non-linear equation which represents the data to within two... NOX generator analyzer-system an NO-in-nitrogen (N2) mixture with an NO concentration equal to.... Record this value as “a.” (9) Switch off the NOX generator but maintain gas flow through the system....

  5. Air quality at Santiago, Chile: a box modeling approach—I. Carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides and sulfur dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorquera, Héctor

    Ambient monitored data at Santiago, Chile, are analyzed using box models with the goal of assessing contributions of different economic activities to air pollution levels. The period analyzed is 1990-2000, characterized by the introduction of air pollution emissions standards, shift to unleaded gasoline and compressed natural gas, and steady growth of the private and public fleet and the associated fuel consumption growth. The box models explicitly include the seasonal behavior of meteorological variables; the results show that dispersion conditions in fall and winter seasons are 20-30% of the summertime values. This result explains the poor air quality in those seasons and shows that significant emissions reductions are required in order to improve air quality in wintertime. Emissions of CO, NO x and SO 2 are estimated from data on fuel consumption in the city; the estimated parameters are thus fleet-average or industry-average emission factors. In terms of contributions to ambient concentrations, older cars and diesel vehicles are the major contributors to CO and NO x impacts, with more than 60% and 50%, respectively. Ambient concentrations of SO 2 are largely dominated by stationary sources, although long range contributions are not negligible. By contrast, CO and NO x pollution is dominated by local sources within the city boundaries. The box models can be used for forecasting purposes, and they can predict annual average concentrations within 20% of the observed values. The methodology requires data on ambient air quality measurements and fuel consumption statistics, and produces quantitative results, which can be combined with economic models to analyze environmental regulation and public policies.

  6. Chemical Modification of Graphene Oxide by Nitrogenation: An X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Cheng-Hao; Ray, Sekhar C.; Mazumder, Debarati; Sharma, Surbhi; Ganguly, Abhijit; Papakonstantinou, Pagona; Chiou, Jau-Wern; Tsai, Huang-Ming; Shiu, Hung-Wei; Chen, Chia-Hao; Lin, Hong-Ji; Guo, Jinghua; Pong, Way-Faung

    2017-02-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene oxides (GO:Nx) were synthesized by a partial reduction of graphene oxide (GO) using urea [CO(NH2)2]. Their electronic/bonding structures were investigated using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). During GO:Nx synthesis, different nitrogen-bonding species, such as pyrrolic/graphitic-nitrogen, were formed by replacing of oxygen-containing functional groups. At lower N-content (2.7 at%), pyrrolic-N, owing to surface and subsurface diffusion of C, N and NH is deduced from various X-ray spectroscopies. In contrast, at higher N-content (5.0 at%) graphitic nitrogen was formed in which each N-atom trigonally bonds to three distinct sp2-hybridized carbons with substitution of the N-atoms for C atoms in the graphite layer. Upon nitrogen substitution, the total density of state close to Fermi level is increased to raise the valence-band maximum, as revealed by VB-PES spectra, indicating an electron donation from nitrogen, molecular bonding C/N/O coordination or/and lattice structure reorganization in GO:Nx. The well-ordered chemical environments induced by nitrogen dopant are revealed by XANES and RIXS measurements.

  7. Chemical Modification of Graphene Oxide by Nitrogenation: An X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Cheng-Hao; Ray, Sekhar C.; Mazumder, Debarati; Sharma, Surbhi; Ganguly, Abhijit; Papakonstantinou, Pagona; Chiou, Jau-Wern; Tsai, Huang-Ming; Shiu, Hung-Wei; Chen, Chia-Hao; Lin, Hong-Ji; Guo, Jinghua; Pong, Way-Faung

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene oxides (GO:Nx) were synthesized by a partial reduction of graphene oxide (GO) using urea [CO(NH2)2]. Their electronic/bonding structures were investigated using X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS). During GO:Nx synthesis, different nitrogen-bonding species, such as pyrrolic/graphitic-nitrogen, were formed by replacing of oxygen-containing functional groups. At lower N-content (2.7 at%), pyrrolic-N, owing to surface and subsurface diffusion of C, N and NH is deduced from various X-ray spectroscopies. In contrast, at higher N-content (5.0 at%) graphitic nitrogen was formed in which each N-atom trigonally bonds to three distinct sp2-hybridized carbons with substitution of the N-atoms for C atoms in the graphite layer. Upon nitrogen substitution, the total density of state close to Fermi level is increased to raise the valence-band maximum, as revealed by VB-PES spectra, indicating an electron donation from nitrogen, molecular bonding C/N/O coordination or/and lattice structure reorganization in GO:Nx. The well-ordered chemical environments induced by nitrogen dopant are revealed by XANES and RIXS measurements. PMID:28186190

  8. One - Step synthesis of nitrogen doped reduced graphene oxide with NiCo nanoparticles for ethanol oxidation in alkaline media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakaei, Karim; Marzang, Kamaran

    2016-01-15

    Development of anode catalysts and catalyst supporting carbonaceous material containing non-precious metal have attracted tremendous attention in the field of direct ethanol fuel cells (DEFCs). Herein, we report the synthesis and electrochemical properties of nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (NRGO) supported Co, Ni and NiCo nanocomposites. The metal NRGO nanocomposites, in which metal nanoparticles are embedded in the highly porous nitrogen-doped graphene matrix, have been synthesized by simply and one-pot method at a mild temperature using GO, urea choline chloride and urea as reducing and doping agent. The fabricated NiCo/NRGO exhibit remarkable electrocatalytic activity (with Tafel slope of 159.1mVdec(-1)) and high stability for the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR). The superior performance of the alloy based NRGO is attributed to high surface area, well uniform distribution of high-density nitrogen, metal active sites and synergistic effect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Preferential Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide in Excess Hydrogen over Au/Co3O4- CeO2 Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Au/Co3O4-CeO2 mixed-oxide catalysts were shown experimentally to be highly active and selective for the oxidation of CO in hydrogen-rich mixture. Activity was markedly influenced by the composition of the support, aging temperature and Au-loading temperature. It provided that single-step removal of CO from hydrogen-rich stream both in the absence and presence of CO2 and H2O to a PEMFC tolerant level. It was found that catalytic activity is greatly affected by adding CO2 in the mixture and increased by farther adding H2O. It meants H2O has the effect to rise catalytic activity. Moreover,it shows better stability with reaction time for the preferential CO oxidation.

  10. Reduction in nitrogen oxides emission on TGME-464 boiler of IRU power plant (Estonia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslyakov, P. V.; Ionkin, I. L.

    2015-01-01

    The possibility for realization of measures on a reduction in nitrogen oxides emission on a TGME-464 (plant no. 2) boiler of the IRU power plant (Tallinn, Estonia) is investigated. Low-cost techno-logical measures, namely, nonstoichiometric burning and burning with the moderate controlled chemical underburning, are proposed and experimentally tested. Recommendations on the implementation of low-emission modes of burning natural gas into mode diagrams of the boiler are given. Nitrogen oxides emissions are reduced to the required level as a result of the implementation of the proposed measures.

  11. Development of a mechanistically based computer simulation of nitrogen oxide absorption in packed towers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Counce, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    A computer simulation for nitrogen oxide (NO/sub x/) scrubbing in packed towers was developed for use in process design and process control. This simulation implements a mechanistically based mathematical model, which was formulated from (1) an exhaustive literature review; (2) previous NO/sub x/ scrubbing experience with sieve-plate towers; and (3) comparisons of sequential sets of experiments. Nitrogen oxide scrubbing is characterized by simultaneous absorption and desorption phenomena: the model development is based on experiments designed to feature these two phenomena. The model was then successfully tested in experiments designed to put it in jeopardy.

  12. Actions and interactions of nitric oxide, carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulphide in the cardiovascular system and in inflammation--a tale of three gases!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Hsu, Anna; Moore, Philip K

    2009-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S) together make up a family of biologically active gases (the so-called 'gaseous triumvirate') with an increasingly well defined range of physiological effects plus roles to play in a number of disease states. Over the years, most researchers have concentrated their attention on understanding the part played by a single gas in one or more body systems. It is becoming more clear that all three gases are synthesised naturally in the body, often by the same cells within the same organs, and that all three gases exert essentially similar biological effects albeit via different mechanisms. Within the cardiovascular system, for example, all are vasodilators, promote angiogenesis and vascular remodelling and are protective towards tissue damage in for example, ischaemia-reperfusion injury in the heart. Similarly, all exhibit complex effects in inflammation with both pro- and anti-inflammatory effects recognised. It seems likely that cell function is controlled not by the activity of single gases working in isolation but by the concerted activity of all three of these gases working together.

  13. Rhodium based clusters for oxygen reduction and hydrogen oxidation in 0.5 M H2SO4, tolerant to methanol and carbon monoxide, respectively

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uribe-Godinez, J.; Jimenez-Sandoval, O.; Borja-Arco, E.; Altamirano-Gutierrez, A. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Queritaro (Mexico); Castellanos, R.H. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada-Queretaro, Queretaro (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    Rhodium (Rh6(CO)16) and novel Rh-based clusters were prepared using thermolysis techniques under different conditions in N2 and H2 reaction media, as well as in n-nonane, o-xylene, 1,2-dichlorobenzene and dimethylsulfoxide. The clusters were used as novel electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the absence and presence of 1.0 and 2.0 M methanol solutions. The catalysts were also used for hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) with pure hydrogen (H2) and in the presence of carbon monoxide (CO). Rotating disk electrode measurements were used to analyze the materials. The study showed that the electrocatalyst support ratio plays a significant role in the electrochemical behaviour of the materials. Rh6(CO)16 and Rh2(1,2-DCB) presented the best electrocatalytic behaviour for ORR and HOR in the absence and presence of methanol and CO. The study demonstrated that the rhodium-based materials are capable of performing ORR and HOR while being tolerant of both methanol and CO. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Effect of varying alveolar oxygen partial pressure on diffusing capacity for nitric oxide and carbon monoxide, membrane diffusing capacity and lung capillary blood volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borland, C D; Cox, Y

    1991-12-01

    1. To examine the effect of varying oxygen partial pressure (PAO2) on nitric oxide (DLNO) and carbon monoxide (DLCO) diffusing capacity (transfer factor), 10 subjects performed combined DLCO/DLNO measurements with the inspired mixture made up with three different oxygen concentrations (25%, 18% and 15%) to give PAO2 values of 12-20 kPa. 2. A novel method is described for calculating membrane diffusing capacity (DM) and pulmonary capillary volume (Qc) from DLNO and DLCO. 3. The mean DMCO was 52.89 mmol min-1 kPa-1 and Qc was 0.056 litre. Reducing PAO2 from 20 to 12 kPa resulted in an increase in DLCO = -0.124 (O2%) + 11.67 (P less than 0.001) and a fall in DLNO = 0.538 (O2%) + 32.01 (P less than 0.001) and a fall in DLNO/DLCO = 0.107 (O2%) + 2.52 (P less than 0.001). DM (P = 0.59) and Qc (P = 0.64) also tended to fall with falling PAO2. 4. It appears more likely that the minor reduction in DLNO that we have observed with falling PAO2 is due to diffusion rather than reaction limitation.

  15. Lung diffusing capacity for nitric oxide and carbon monoxide in relation to morphological changes as assessed by computed tomography in patients with cystic fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nowak Dennis

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Due to large-scale destruction, changes in membrane diffusion (Dm may occur in cystic fibrosis (CF, in correspondence to alterations observed by computed tomography (CT. Dm can be easily quantified via the diffusing capacity for nitric oxide (DLNO, as opposed to the conventional diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO. We thus studied the relationship between DLNO as well as DLCO and a CF-specific CT score in patients with stable CF. Methods Simultaneous single-breath determinations of DLNO and DLCO were performed in 21 CF patients (mean ± SD age 35 ± 9 y, FEV1 66 ± 28%pred. Patients also underwent spirometry and bodyplethysmography. CT scans were evaluated via the Brody score and rank correlations (rS with z-scores of functional measures were computed. Results CT scores correlated best with DLNO (rS = -0.83; p S = -0.63; p CO (rS = -0.79; p NO were significantly lower than for DLCO (p 1, IVC or bodyplethysmographic (e.g., SRaw, RV/TLC indices were weaker than for DLNO or DLCO but most of them were also significant (p Conclusion In this cross sectional study in patients with CF, DLNO and DLCO reflected CT-morphological alterations of the lung better than other measures. Thus the combined diffusing capacity for NO and CO may play a future role for the non-invasive, functional assessment of structural alterations of the lung in CF.

  16. Acetaldehyde as an Intermediate in the Electroreduction of Carbon Monoxide to Ethanol on Oxide-Derived Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertheussen, Erlend; Verdaguer Casadevall, Arnau; Ravasio, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Oxide-derived copper (OD-Cu) electrodes exhibit unprecedented CO reduction performance towards liquid fuels, producing ethanol and acetate with >50 % Faradaic efficiency at −0.3 V (vs. RHE). By using static headspace-gas chromatography for liquid phase analysis, we identify acetaldehyde as a mino...

  17. Electro-oxidation of carbon monoxide and methanol on bare and Pt-modified Ru(1010) electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, A L N; Zei, M S; Ertl, G

    2005-03-21

    The activity towards CO and methanol electrooxidation of bare and platinum-modified Ru(1010) surfaces has been investigated. The structure/morphology and composition of the modified surfaces were characterized using electron diffraction techniques (LEED, RHEED) and Auger spectroscopy. The bare Ru(1010) surface exhibits a higher catalytic activity towards CO electrooxidation than the Ru(0001) surface due to the lower oxidation potential of the former surface. The early stages of surface oxidation lead to disordering of the surface and further enhancing of the electrocatalytic activity. Electrodeposition of Pt on Ru(1010) leads to epitaxial growth via a Volmer-Weber growth mode. The Pt clusters grow preferentially with the (311) plane parallel to the substrate surface with (011) rows in the layers in contact with the substrate compressed by about 3% with respect to bulk Pt, in order to match with the (1210) rows of the Ru(1010) surface. This compression leads to enhanced catalytic activity towards CO oxidation for thin Pt deposits whereas for large deposited Pt particles the dominating factor for the catalytic enhancement is the higher concentration of surface defects. On the other hand, in the case of methanol oxidation, the dominant factor in determining the catalytic activity is the concentration of adjacent Pt-Ru sites, although surface defects play an important role in the methanol dehydrogenation steps.

  18. Oxidation of carbon monoxide, hydrogen peroxide and water at a boron doped diamond electrode: the competition for hydroxyl radicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisacik, Izzet; Stefanova, Ana; Ernst, Siegfried; Baltruschat, Helmut

    2013-04-07

    Boron doped diamond (BDD) electrodes have an extremely high over-voltage for oxygen evolution from water, which favours its use in oxidation processes of other compounds at high potentials. We used a rotating ring disc (RRDE) assembly and differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS) in order to monitor the consumption or the production of species in the course of the electrode processes. By intercepting the intermediate of the electrochemical water oxidation with chemical reactions we demonstrate clearly, albeit indirectly, that in the water oxidation process at BDD above 2.5 V the first step is the formation of ˙OH radicals. The electro-oxidation of CO to CO2 at BDD electrodes proceeds only via a first attack by ˙OH radicals followed by a further electron transfer to the electrode. At potentials below the onset of oxygen evolution from water, H2O2 is oxidised by a direct electron transfer to the BDD electrode, while at higher potentials, two different reactions paths compete for the ˙OH radicals formed in the first electron transfer from water: one, where these ˙OH radicals react with each other followed by further electron transfers leading to O2 on the one hand and one, where ˙OH radicals react with other species like H2O2 or CO with subsequent electron transfers on the other hand.

  19. Acetaldehyde as an Intermediate in the Electroreduction of Carbon Monoxide to Ethanol on Oxide-Derived Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertheussen, Erlend; Verdaguer Casadevall, Arnau; Ravasio, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Oxide-derived copper (OD-Cu) electrodes exhibit unprecedented CO reduction performance towards liquid fuels, producing ethanol and acetate with >50 % Faradaic efficiency at −0.3 V (vs. RHE). By using static headspace-gas chromatography for liquid phase analysis, we identify acetaldehyde as a mino...

  20. Inhibition of methane oxidation in slurry surface crust by inorganic nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duan, Yun-Feng; Elsgaard, Lars; Petersen, Søren O

    2013-01-01

    Livestock slurry is an important source of methane (CH4). Depending on dry matter content, a floating crust may form where methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) and CH4 oxidation activity have been found, suggesting that surface crusts may reduce CH4 emissions from slurry. However, it is not known how...... MOB in this environment interact with inorganic nitrogen (N). We studied inhibitory effects of ammonium (NH4+), nitrate (NO3–) and nitrite (NO2–) on potential CH4 oxidation in a cattle slurry surface crust. Methane oxidation was assayed at salt concentrations up to 500 mM at 100 and 10,000 ppmv...

  1. Characterization and carbon monoxide oxidation activity of La1-ySryCr1-xRuxO3 perovskites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. MARINOVA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of CO over La1-ySryCr1-xRuxO3 perovskite type oxides with y=0.3 and 0 £ x £ 0.100 have been studied. X-ray fluorescence analysis confirmed that content of elements in the bulk corresponds to the established nominal perovskite stoichiometry, indicating that no significant oxidation of ruthenium into volatile polyvalent oxides with their consequented escape from the sample occurred in air up to the temperature of 1000°C. According to X-ray diffraction analysis, all sampls achieved the perovskite hexagonal with the presence of some SrCrO4. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of ruthenium samples shows higher Ru and Sr surface concentraitions than in the bulk. The binding energy for Ru3p is virtually the same in all samples and consistent with that of Ru4+ (463.6-464.3eV. Kinetic studies were performed in a differential recycle reactor with a recycling ratio 80. The results show that substitution of Ru4+ for Cr3+ in La1-ySryCrO3 leads to a significant increase in both the activity and the activation energy. The global CO oxidation rate, referred on the BET surface area, correlates with the surface Ru4+ atomic concentraiton. Hence, the activity reflect the surface enrichment in ruthenium. Moreover, an identical apparent activation energy E = 93 kJ/mol and the same specific rate per ruthenium surface ion were obtained for samples with a Ru content x ³ 0.05 suggest that exposed Ru4+ ions mainly participate in the reaction.

  2. Preliminary assessment of air quality for sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter, and lead in the Netherlands under European legislation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breugel PB van; Buijsman E; LLO

    2001-01-01

    The current air quality in the Netherlands for sulphur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, nitrogen oxides, particulate matter and lead has been assessed in the context of limit values, margins of tolerance and the assessment thresholds used in the first daughter directive for air quality of the European

  3. Remarkably efficient synthesis of 2H-indazole 1-oxides and 2H-indazoles via tandem carbon-carbon followed by nitrogen-nitrogen bond formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouillon, Isabelle; Zajícek, Jaroslav; Pudelová, Nadĕzda; Krchnák, Viktor

    2008-11-21

    Base-catalyzed tandem carbon-carbon followed by nitrogen-nitrogen bond formations quantitatively converted N-alkyl-2-nitro-N-(2-oxo-2-aryl-ethyl)-benzenesulfonamides to 2H-indazoles 1-oxides under mild conditions. Triphenylphosphine or mesyl chloride/triethylamine-mediated deoxygenation afforded 2H-indazoles.

  4. Electrochemical process for the preparation of nitrogen fertilizers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aulich, Ted R [Grand Forks, ND; Olson, Edwin S [Grand Forks, ND; Jiang, Junhua [Grand Forks, ND

    2012-04-10

    The present invention provides methods and apparatus for the preparation of nitrogen fertilizers including ammonium nitrate, urea, urea-ammonium nitrate, and/or ammonia, at low temperature and pressure, preferably at ambient temperature and pressure, utilizing a source of carbon, a source of nitrogen, and/or a source of hydrogen or hydrogen equivalent. Implementing an electrolyte serving as ionic charge carrier, (1) ammonium nitrate is produced via the reduction of a nitrogen source at the cathode and the oxidation of a nitrogen source at the anode; (2) urea or its isomers are produced via the simultaneous cathodic reduction of a carbon source and a nitrogen source; (3) ammonia is produced via the reduction of nitrogen source at the cathode and the oxidation of a hydrogen source or a hydrogen equivalent such as carbon monoxide or a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen at the anode; and (4) urea-ammonium nitrate is produced via the simultaneous cathodic reduction of a carbon source and a nitrogen source, and anodic oxidation of a nitrogen source. The electrolyte can be aqueous, non-aqueous, or solid.

  5. Oxidation Behaviour of Si3N4 Materials in Air and Nitrogen Atmosphere

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGQitu; LINGZhida

    1999-01-01

    Si3N4 powder and hot-pressed Si3N4 ceramics added with Al2O3 are used for investigate their oxidation behvior in air and nitrogen atmosphere(with oxygen partial pressure PO2=1-10Pa),The oxidation products of Si3N4 are examined by chemical analysi,X-ray diffraction (XRD) and XPS method,Also, thermodynamic calculation is made to analyze oxidation behavior of Si3N4.The results show that only passive oxidation will occur when Si3N4 is oxidized in air at high temperature,whereas in N2 at high temperature,the active oxidation is dominant in spite of the existence of a little passive oxidation.

  6. Preparation and application of porous nitrogen-doped graphene obtained by co-pyrolysis of lignosulfonate and graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hai-Bo; Wang, Wen-Dong; Lü, Qiu-Feng; Lin, Ting-Ting; Lin, Qilang; Yang, Haijun

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped graphene with in-plane porous structure was fabricated by simple co-pyrolysis of lignosulfonate and graphene oxide in the presence of urea. Lignosulfonate first performs as a dispersant adsorbed on the surface of graphene oxide to prevent the aggregation of graphene oxide sheets for preparing homogeneous nitrogen-containing precursor, and then acts as a porogen to render graphene sheets with nanopores in the pyrolysis process of the nitrogen-containing precursor. Urea was used as a nitrogen source to incorporate nitrogen atoms into graphene basal plane. The special nanoporous structure combined with nitrogen content of 7.41at.% endows the nitrogen-doped graphene electrode material with super capacitance up to 170Fg(-1), high rate performance, and excellent cycling stability.

  7. Technologies for the Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulica Arsenie

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available When it comes to gas turbines, their main problem concerning pollutant emissions is represented by nitric oxides. Among other emissions, sulphur oxides being much reduced due to the use of liquid distilled and gas fuels with a low content of sulphur. Using water or steam injection became the favourite method during the '80s and especially the '90s since "dry" methods and catalytic reduction were both at the beginning of the development phase. Catalytic convertors have been used since the '80s and they are still used although the costs of renewing the catalyst are very high. In the last twenty years a gradual decrease has been registered on the limits of nitric oxides from 75 ppm to 25 ppm, and now the target is oriented towards the 9 ppm level. The evolution of burning technologies of combustion makes it possible to control the level of production of nitric oxides even from the source without being necessary to use "humid" methods. This, of course, opened the market for gas turbines because they can function even in areas with limited quality water reserves, such as maritime platforms and in the desert. In this paper, we are going to show that, although water injection is still used, "dry" control technologies of burning became favourite methods for the majority of users on the industrial power generators market. The great dependency between the creation of nitric oxides and the temperature reveals the effect of direct water or steam injection on reducing nitric oxides. Recent research showed that a reduction up to 85% of nitric oxides may be obtained by using the water or steam injection all together with the improvement of aerodynamic character of the burning room.

  8. Deposition of nitrogen oxides and ozone to Danish forest sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, K.; Jensen, N.O.; Hummelshøj, P.

    1995-01-01

    of the influence of meteorological factors. The viscous sub-layer resistance is derived by a new theory, taking the bluff roughness elements of the forest and the dimension of the needles/leaves as well as the LAI into account. The fluxes of nitrogen dioxide and ozone are related to the fluxes of water vapour......Preliminary results of eddy correlation measurements of fluxes of NO2, and O3 made over a coniferous and a deciduous forest site in Denmark are presented. The total resistance to deposition are calculated and subdivided into aerodynamic, viscous sub-layer and surface resistance for investigation...

  9. Onset of the aerobic nitrogen cycle during the Great Oxidation Event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerkle, Aubrey L; Poulton, Simon W; Newton, Robert J; Mettam, Colin; Claire, Mark W; Bekker, Andrey; Junium, Christopher K

    2017-02-23

    The rise of oxygen on the early Earth (about 2.4 billion years ago) caused a reorganization of marine nutrient cycles, including that of nitrogen, which is important for controlling global primary productivity. However, current geochemical records lack the temporal resolution to address the nature and timing of the biogeochemical response to oxygenation directly. Here we couple records of ocean redox chemistry with nitrogen isotope ((15)N/(14)N) values from approximately 2.31-billion-year-old shales of the Rooihoogte and Timeball Hill formations in South Africa, deposited during the early stages of the first rise in atmospheric oxygen on the Earth (the Great Oxidation Event). Our data fill a gap of about 400 million years in the temporal (15)N/(14)N record and provide evidence for the emergence of a pervasive aerobic marine nitrogen cycle. The interpretation of our nitrogen isotope data in the context of iron speciation and carbon isotope data suggests biogeochemical cycling across a dynamic redox boundary, with primary productivity fuelled by chemoautotrophic production and a nitrogen cycle dominated by nitrogen loss processes using newly available marine oxidants. This chemostratigraphic trend constrains the onset of widespread nitrate availability associated with ocean oxygenation. The rise of marine nitrate could have allowed for the rapid diversification and proliferation of nitrate-using cyanobacteria and, potentially, eukaryotic phytoplankton.

  10. 76 FR 48073 - Public Hearing for Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-08

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 50 RIN 2060-AO72 Public Hearing for Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards... titled ``Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur'' which was... ``Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur'' proposed rule should...

  11. The carbon monoxide oxidation reaction over controlled catalyst structures based on gold/cerium dioxide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zheng

    Gold-based catalysts have attracted significant research interest due to their remarkably high activity for many important reactions, including the low-temperature CO oxidation reaction. Despite extensive studies, several fundamental issues in the understanding of CO oxidation over supported gold catalysts are unresolved. The locus and nature of active sites, including the role of the metal, metal oxide support, and their interface, remain controversial. The objectives of this thesis were to study CO oxidation on Au/CeO2 catalysts that were prepared using thin film techniques so as to form geometrically controlled structures in contrast to the typical supported nanoparticle systems. Using these structures enables one to evaluate the contribution of metal oxide support (CeO2), and locate and identify the active sites in the Au/CeO2 system. In particular, the specific contribution to the reaction by the metal/oxide interface, the role and nature of the vacancies in the oxide, the role of the dimensions of the Au and ceria, and the role of stress in the gold films have been investigated. Two catalyst systems, each employing nanoscale films, were investigated. One was formed from a "single layer" of metal or oxide in the form of an extended surface that was then decorated with a thin layer of the other catalyst partner; the second approach was a study of multilayer metal/oxide structures to assess the role of the metal/metal oxide interface. More specifically the reaction sites formed at the three-phase boundary of metal, metal oxide and gas. In the first case, a Au film (4.5nm) was prepared using vapor deposition on SiO2/Si (100) substrates. The gold coalesced into discrete islands with large lateral size (20-100nm) and was found to be only weakly active. The extremely low activity of gold with large lateral extended surface has been attributed to the lack of uncoordinated gold atoms on this type of gold surface. Subsequently decorating the gold with nanosized ceria

  12. 40 CFR 86.123-78 - Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... oxides of nitrogen analyzer must be checked for NO2 to NO converter efficiency. Figure B78-9 is a... = concentration obtained in step (6). d = concentration obtained in step (7). If converter efficiency is not... 2 percent or less of the value at each data point, concentration values may be calculated by use...

  13. 40 CFR 77.6 - Penalties for excess emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... excess emissions, a demand notice for the payment. (d)(1) Except for wire transfers made in accordance... penalties of $25,000 or more may be made by wire transfer to the U.S. Treasury at the Federal Reserve Bank... contemporaneous emission limitations or annual heat input limits, then excess emissions of nitrogen oxides...

  14. Present and past contribution of anaerobic ammonium oxidation to nitrogen cycling as revealed by ladderane lipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeschke, A.

    2009-01-01

    Anammox, the anaerobic oxidation of ammonium to dinitrogen gas with nitrite as the electron acceptor, constitutes a novel route to convert biologically available (fixed) nitrogen to gaseous N2. This process is mediated by specific bacteria belonging to the Planctomycetes that were initially discover

  15. Present and past contribution of anaerobic ammonium oxidation to nitrogen cycling as revealed by ladderane lipids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaeschke, Andrea

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Anammox, the anaerobic oxidation of ammonium to dinitrogen gas with nitrite as the electron acceptor, constitutes a novel route to convert biologically available (fixed) nitrogen to gaseous N2. This process is mediated by specific bacteria belonging to the Planctomycetes that were initially

  16. Removal of nitrogen compounds from Brazilian petroleum samples by oxidation followed by liquid-liquid extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conceicao, L.; Pergher, S.B.C. [Universidade Regional Integrada do Alto Uruguai e das Misses (URI), Erechim, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica], E-mail: pergher@uricer.edu.br; Oliveira, J.V. [Universidade Regional Integrada do Alto Uruguai e das Misses (URI), Erechim, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia dos Alimentos; Souza, W.F. [Petroleo Brasileiro S.A. (CENPES/PETROBRAS), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisas

    2009-10-15

    This work reports liquid-liquid extraction of nitrogen compounds from oxidized and non-oxidized Brazilian petroleum samples. The experiments were accomplished in a laboratory-scale liquid-liquid apparatus in the temperature range of 303 K-323 K, using methanol, n-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and N,Ndimethylformamide (DMF), and their mixtures as extraction solvents, employing solvent to sample volume ratios of 1:2, 1:1 and 2:1, exploring up to three separation stages. Results show that an increase in temperature, solvent to oil ratio, and number of equilibrium stages greatly improves the nitrogen removal from the oxidized sample (from 2600 to 200 ppm). The employed oxidation scheme is thus demonstrated to be an essential and efficient step of sample preparation for the selective liquid-liquid removal of nitrogen compounds. It is shown that the use of mixtures of DMF and NMP as well their use as co-solvents with methanol did not prove to be useful for selective nitrogen extraction since great oil losses were observed in the final process. (author)

  17. 40 CFR 86.1323-84 - Oxides of nitrogen analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... exceeds these limits, then the best-fit non-linear equation which represents the data within these limits... NOX generator analyzer-system an NO-in-nitrogen (N2) mixture with an NO concentration equal to.... (9) Switch off the NOX generator but maintain gas flow through the system. The oxides of...

  18. Nitrogen loss from grassland on peat soils through nitrous oxide production.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koops, J.G.; Beusichem, van M.L.; Oenema, O.

    1997-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) in soils is produced through nitrification and denitrification. The N2O produced is considered as a nitrogen (N) loss because it will most likely escape from the soil to the atmosphere as N2O or N2. Aim of the study was to quantify N2O production in grassland on peat soils in rel

  19. Reduction of nitrogen oxides in aquous Fe-EDTA solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, van der P.M.F.; Sandt, van de T.; Klapwijk, A.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2003-01-01

    The reduction of nitric oxide (NO) in aqueous solutions of Fe(II)EDTA is one of the core processes in BioDeNOx, an integrated physicochemical and biological technique for NO, removal from industrial flue gases. NO reduction in aqueous solutions of Fe(II)EDTA (20-25 mM, pH 7.2 +/- 0.2) was

  20. Nitrogen oxide emissions from a banana plantation in the humid tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veldkamp, Edzo; Keller, Michael

    1997-07-01

    Use of nitrogen fertilizer is thought to contribute significantly to the increase of atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) and nitric oxide (NO). While the current increase of fertilizer use is concentrated in tropical areas, nearly all studies of nitrogen oxide emissions have been conducted in agricultural systems in temperate areas. We measured N2O and NO fluxes from a fertilized banana plantation in the humid tropics of Costa Rica, where 360 kg N ha-1 yr-1 is applied. Using chamber techniques, we sampled an Andisol and an Inceptisol on a monthly basis. Twice on each soil type, we sampled intensively in time following fertilizer applications. There is a strong spatial and temporal dependence of nitrogen oxide emissions on place and time of fertilizer application. We find greater mean N2O and NO emissions from the Andisol (31.4 ng N2O-N cm-2 h-1 and 55.6 ng NO-N cm-2 h-1) than from the Inceptisol (9.3 ng N2O-N cm-2 h-1 and 41.1 ng NO-N cm-2 h-1) under the plants where fertilizer is typically applied. The percentages of applied fertilizer-N that are converted into nitrogen oxide ("yield") are between 1.26 and 2.91% for N2O and between 5.09 and 5.66% for NO depending on soil type. We consistently calculate higher nitrogen oxide yields based on intensive sampling versus monthly sampling. Temporal variation in nitrogen oxide emissions probably causes monthly sampling to underestimate mean annual fluxes. Our results suggest that in some tropical systems a higher percentage of applied nitrogen may be lost in gaseous form than in temperate agriculture. Current global estimates of N2O and NO sources from tropical agriculture are based on information from temperate areas and may cause an underestimate of the contribution of tropical agriculture to the budgets of these trace gases.

  1. Effect of Organic Capping Layers over Monodisperse Platinum Nanoparticles upon Activity for Ethylene Hydrogenation and Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, John N.; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2009-03-24

    The influence of oleylamine (OA), trimethyl tetradecyl ammonium bromide (TTAB), and polyvinlypyrrolidone (PVP) capping agents upon the catalytic properties of Pt/silica catalysts was evaluated. Pt nanoparticles that were 1.5 nm in size were synthesized by the same procedure (ethylene glycol reduction under basic conditions) with the various capping agents added afterward for stabilization. Before examining catalytic properties for ethylene hydrogenation and CO oxidation, the Pt NPs were deposited onto mesoporous silica (SBA-15) supports and characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), H{sub 2} chemisorption, and elemental analysis (ICP-MS). PVP- and TTAB-capped Pt yielded mass-normalized reaction rates that decreased with increasing pretreatment temperature, and this trend was attributed to the partial coverage of the Pt surface with decomposition products from the organic capping agent. Once normalized to the Pt surface area, similar intrinsic activities were obtained regardless of the pretreatment temperature, which indicated no influence on the nature of the active sites. Consequently, a chemical probe technique using intrinsic activity for ethylene hydrogenation was demonstrated as an acceptable method for estimating the metallic surface areas of Pt. Amine (OA) capping exhibited a detrimental influence on the catalytic properties as severe deactivation and low activity were observed for ethylene hydrogenation and CO oxidation, respectively. These results were consistent with amine groups being strong poisons for Pt surfaces, and revealed the need to consider the effects of capping agents on the catalytic properties.

  2. Nitrogen oxide abatement by distributed fuel addition. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, J.O.L.; Mereb, J.B.

    1991-09-20

    Reburning is examined as a means of NO{sub x} destruction in a 17 kW down-fired pulverized coal combustor. In reburning, a secondary fuel is introduced downstream of the primary flame to produce a reducing zone, favorable to NO destruction, and air is introduced further downstream to complete the combustion. Emphasis is on natural gas reburning and a bituminous coal primary flame. A parametric examination of reburning employing a statistical experimental design, is conducted, complemented by detailed experiments. Mechanisms governing the inter-conversion of nitrogenous species in the fuel rich reburn zone is explored. The effect of reburning on N{sub 2}O emissions, the effect of primary flame mode (premixed and diffusion) and the effect of distributing the reburning fuel, are also investigated.

  3. Inhibition of methane oxidation by nitrogenous fertilizers in a paddy soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saiful Alam

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogenous fertilizers are generally thought to have an important role in regulating methane oxidation. In this study, the effect of ammonium on methane oxidation activity was investigated in a paddy soil using urea at concentrations of 0, 50, 100, 200 and 400 μg N per gram dry weight soil (N/g.d.w.s and ammonium sulfate at concentrations of 0, 50 and 200 μg N/g.d.w.s. The results of this study demonstrate that urea concentrations of 200 μg N/g.d.w.s. and above significantly inhibit methane oxidation activity, whereas no statistically significant difference was observed in methane oxidation activity among soil microcosms with urea concentrations of less than 200 μg N/g.d.w.s after incubation for 27 days. Similar results were obtained in a sense that methane oxidation activity was inhibited only when the ammonium sulfate concentration was 200 μg N/g.d.w.s in soil microcosms in this study. Phylogenetic analysis of pmoA genes showed that nitrogen fertilization resulted in apparent changes in the community composition of methane-oxidizing bacteria (MOB. Type I MOB displayed an increased abundance in soil microcosms amended with nitrogenous fertilizers, whereas type II MOB dominated the native soil. Furthermore, although no statistically significant relationship was observed between pmoA gene and amoA gene abundances, methane oxidation activity was significantly negatively correlated with nitrification activity in the presence of urea or ammonium sulfate. Our results indicate that the methane oxidation activity in paddy soils might be inhibited when the concentration of ammonium fertilizers is high and that the interactions between ammonia and methane oxidizers need to be further investigated.

  4. Mechanisms of realization of THz-waves of nitrogen oxide occurrence physiological effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav F. Kirichuk

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this review, there is generalized material of many experimental researches in interaction of THz-waves molecular emission and absorption spectrum (MEAS of nitrogen oxide occurrence with bioobjects. Thrombocytes and experimental animals were used as bioobjects. The experiments let indicate changes caused by THz-waves: at the cellular, tissular, system, organismic levels. There are all data of changes in physiological mechanisms of reglations at all levels: autocrine, paracrine, endocrine and nervous. There is a complex overview of experimental material firstly performed in the article. There had been shown that the effect of THz-waves of the given occurrence is realized by the changed activity of nitroxidergic system. It had been proved that THz-waves of nitrogen oxide occurrence can stimulate nitrogen oxide producing in organs and tissues in condition of its low concentration. Possible mechanisms of antiaggregative effect of the given waves had been described. There had been shown the possibility of regulating of vascular tone and system hemodynamics with the help of the studying these frequencies. The represented data of lipid peroxidation and enzymatic and nonenzymatic components of organism system under the influence of THz-waves of nitrogen oxide occurrence in stress conditions. Besides, there were shown changes of stress-regulating system activity and in concentration of important mediators - catecholamines and glucocorticosteroids. These data let characterize mechanism of realization of THz-waves basic effects. The research had shown the possibility of THz-waves of nitrogen oxide occurrence usage as a method of natural physiological noninvasive regulation of significant organism functions.

  5. XPS study of nitrogen dioxide adsorption on metal oxide particle surfaces under different environmental conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltrusaitis, Jonas; Jayaweera, Pradeep M; Grassian, Vicki H

    2009-10-01

    The adsorption of nitrogen dioxide on gamma aluminium oxide (gamma-Al(2)O(3)) and alpha iron oxide (alpha-Fe(2)O(3)) particle surfaces under various conditions of relative humidity, presence of molecular oxygen and UV light has been investigated. X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to monitor the different surface species that form under these environmental conditions. Adsorption of NO(2) on aluminum oxide particle surfaces results primarily in the formation of surface nitrate, NO(3)(-) with an oxidation state of +5, as indicated by a peak with binding energy of 407.3 eV in the N1s region. An additional minority species, sensitive to the presence of relative humidity and molecular oxygen, is also observed in the N1s region with lower binding energy of 405.9 eV. This peak is assigned to a surface species in the +4 oxidation state. When irradiated with UV light, other species form on the surface. These surface-bound photochemical products all have lower binding energy, between 400 and 402 eV, indicating reduced nitrogen species in the range of N oxidations states spanning +1 to -1. Co-adsorbed water decreases the amount of these reduced surface-bound products while the presence of molecular oxygen completely suppresses the formation of all reduced nitrogen species on aluminum oxide particle surfaces. For NO(2) on iron oxide particle surfaces, photoreduction is enhanced relative to gamma-Al(2)O(3) and surface bound photoreduced species are observed under all environmental conditions. Complementing the experimental data, N1s core electron binding energies (CEBEs) were calculated using DFT for a number of nitrogen-containing species in the gas phase and adsorbed on an Al(8)O(12) cluster. A range of CEBEs is calculated for various nitrogen species in different adsorption modes and oxidation states. These calculated values are discussed in light of the peaks observed in the XPS N1s region and the possible species that form following NO(2) adsorption and

  6. A series of inorganic solid nitrogen sources for the synthesis of metal nitride clusterfullerenes: the dependence of production yield on the oxidation state of nitrogen and counter ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fupin; Guan, Jian; Wei, Tao; Wang, Song; Jiao, Mingzhi; Yang, Shangfeng

    2013-04-01

    A series of nitrogen-containing inorganic solid compounds with variable oxidation states of nitrogen and counter ions have been successfully applied as new inorganic solid nitrogen sources toward the synthesis of Sc-based metal nitride clusterfullerenes (Sc-NCFs), including ammonium salts [(NH4)xH(3-x)PO4 (x = 0-2), (NH4)2SO4, (NH4)2CO3, NH4X (X = F, Cl), NH4SCN], thiocyanate (KSCN), nitrates (Cu(NO3)2, NaNO3), and nitrite (NaNO2). Among them, ammonium phosphates ((NH4)xH(3-x)PO4, x = 1-3) and ammonium thiocyanate (NH4SCN) are revealed to behave as better nitrogen sources than others, and the highest yield of Sc-NCFs is achieved when NH4SCN was used as a nitrogen source. The optimum molar ratio of Sc2O3:(NH4)3PO4·3H2O:C and Sc2O3:NH4SCN:C has been determined to be 1:2:15 and 1:3:15, respectively. The thermal decomposition products of these 12 inorganic compounds have been discussed in order to understand their different performances toward the synthesis of Sc-NCFs, and accordingly the dependence of the production yield of Sc-NCFs on the oxidation state of nitrogen and counter ion is interpreted. The yield of Sc3N@C80 (I(h) + D(5h)) per gram Sc2O3 by using the N2-based group of nitrogen sources (thiocyanate, nitrates, and nitrite) is overall much lower than those by using gaseous N2 and NH4SCN, indicating the strong dependence of the yield of Sc-NCFs on the oxidation state of nitrogen, which is attributed to the "in-situ" redox reaction taking place for the N2-based group of nitrogen sources during discharging. For NH3-based group of nitrogen sources (ammonium salts) which exhibits a (-3) oxidation states of nitrogen, their performance as nitrogen sources is found to be sensitively dependent on the anion, and this is understood by considering their difference on the thermal stability and/or decomposition rate. Contrarily, for the N2-based group of nitrogen sources, the formation of Sc-NCFs is independent to both the oxidation state of nitrogen (+3 or +5) and the

  7. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Estimates OCTOBER 13, 2015 Incidents, Deaths, and In-Depth Investigations Associated with Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide from Engine-Driven Generators and ... Engine-Driven Tools, 2004–2014 JANUARY 08, 2015 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2011 Annual Estimates View All ... Inside CPSC Accessibility ...

  8. Scanning tunneling microscopy of initial nitridation processes on oxidized Si(100) surface with radical nitrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Takahashi, R; Ikeda, H; Sakashita, M; Sakai, A; Yasuda, Y; Nakatsuka, O; Zaima, S

    2003-01-01

    We have investigated the initial nitridation processes on oxidized Si(100) with radical nitrogen at a substrate temperature of 850degC using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS). It is found that the thin oxide layer suppresses the changes of original Si step structures during nitridation, and this effect critically depends on the growth conditions of the oxide layer. Comparison of the nitride island morphology to the case of the clean surface suggests that the migration of the precursor during nitridation is suppressed by the oxygen in the layer. (author)

  9. Nitrogen atmosphere and natural antioxidants effect on muesli oxidation during long-time storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Klensporf-Pawlik

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The effects of natural antioxidants from raspberry and black currant seeds and modified atmosphere packaging on muesli oxidative stability measured by monitoring volatile lipid oxidation products were evaluated. The effectiveness toward lipid oxidation was investigated during 10 months storage at ambient temperature. Both ethanolic extracts as well as nitrogen atmosphere influenced lipid oxidation rate in muesli measured by volatile compounds content. The most abundant lipid derived volatile compounds was hexanal. After storage, its concentration changed from 802 µg/kg to 9.8 mg/kg in muesli stored in air atmosphere, whereas in muesli stored in nitrogen atmosphere with raspberry seed extract addition it raised to 3.1 mg/kg. Although, both natural antioxidants rich in phenolic compounds, were effective towards lipid oxidation, the strongest inhibiting effect had modified atmosphere packaging. The addition of ethanolic extracts did not fortify its positive effect. Total concentration of volatile compounds in muesli after 10 months of storage was 19.6 mg/kg when stored in air and 13.7 and 11.8 mg/kg when stored with raspberry and black currant seeds extract addition respectively, while 9.8 mg/kg when stored in nitrogen atmosphere without antioxidants, and 9.7 and 9.9 mg/kg when stored with antioxidants mentioned above.

  10. Hydrogenation of carbon monoxide over the mixed catalysts composed of cobalt-nickel/manganese oxide-zirconium oxide and zeolite catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, Tatsumi; Iwakuni, Hideharu; Eguchi, Koichi; Arai, Hiromichi (Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan))

    1991-08-15

    Mechanical mixtures of Co-Ni/MnO-ZrO2 and zeolite were used as catalysts for the selective synthesis of gasoline by carbon monoxide hydrogenation. Formation of branched alkanes was promoted, but that of hydrocarbons higher than a carbon number of 10 was suppressed by a combination with zeolite. The reactivity of zeolite for higher hydrocarbons has the decisive role in the product distribution as result of using these mixed catalysts, and thus the product distribution strongly depends on the type of zeolite. Since the hydrogenolysis of higher hydrocarbons proceeds on the strong acid sites, the formation of branched alkanes was promoted by increasing the aluminium content in the zeolite. Ammonia temperature-programmed desorption suggests that increasing the aluminium content in the zeolite increases the number of strong acid sites, but weakens the average strength of the acid sites. Pentasil zeolite with an aluminium content of 1.32 mmolg{sup -1} is effective for enhancing the yield of gasoline as well as its octane number. 8 figs., 1 tab., 20 refs.

  11. Nitrous oxide flux and nitrogen transformations across a landscape gradient in Amazonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingston, Gerald P.; Vitousek, Peter M.; Matson, Pamela A.

    1988-01-01

    Nitrous oxide flux and nitrogen turnover were measured in three types of Amazonian forest ecosystems within Reserva Florestal Ducke near Manaus, Brazil. Nitrogen mineralization and nitrate production measured during 10-day laboratory incubations were 3-4 times higher in clay soils associated with 'terra firme' forests on ridge-top and slope positions than in 'campinarana' forests on bottomland sand soils. In contrast, nitrous oxide fluxes did not differ significantly among sites, but were highly variable in space and time. The observed frequency distribution of flux was positively skewed, with a mean overall sites and all sampling times of 1.3 ng N2O-N/sq cm per hr. Overall, the flux estimates were comparable to or greater than those of temperature forests, but less than others reported for Amazoonia. Results from a field fertilization experiment suggest that most nitrous oxide flux was associated with denitrification of soil nitrate.

  12. Effects of Tai Chi exercise on blood pressure and plasma levels of nitric oxide, carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide in real-world patients with essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaogui; Zhang, Yi; Tao, Sai

    2015-01-01

    Objective was to investigate the effects of Tai Chi exercise on nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) levels, and blood pressure (BP) in patients with essential hypertension (EH). EH patients were assigned to the Tai Chi exercise group (HTC, n = 24), and hypertension group (HP, n = 16) by patients' willingness. Healthy volunteers matched for age and gender were recruited as control (NP, n = 16). HTC group performed Tai Chi (60 min/d, 6 d/week) for 12 weeks. Measurements (blood glucose, cholesterol, NO, CO, H2S and BP) were obtained at week 0, 6, and 12. SBP, MAP, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels decreased, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels increased by week 12 in the HTC group (all p < 0.05 versus baseline). Plasma NO, CO, and H2S levels in the HTC group were increased after 12 weeks (all p < 0.05 versus baseline). SBP, DBP and MAP levels were significantly lower in the HTC than in the HP group (all p < 0.05). However, no changes were observed in the HP and NP groups. Correlations were observed between changes in SBP and changes in NO, CO and H2S (r = -0.45, -0.51 and -0.46, respectively, all p < 0.05), and between changes in MAP and changes in NO, CO and H2S (r = -0.36, -0.45 and -0.42, respectively, all p < 0.05). In conclusion, Tai Chi exercise seems to have beneficial effects on BP and gaseous signaling molecules in EH patients. However, further investigation is required to understand the exact mechanisms underlying these observations, and to confirm these results in a larger cohort.

  13. Reaction Mechanism for the Formation of Nitrogen Oxides (NO x ) During Coke Oxidation in Fluidized Catalytic Cracking Units

    KAUST Repository

    Chaparala, Sree Vidya

    2015-06-11

    Fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) units in refineries process heavy feedstock obtained from crude oil distillation. While cracking feed, catalysts get deactivated due to coke deposition. During catalyst regeneration by burning coke in air, nitrogen oxides (NOx) are formed. The increase in nitrogen content in feed over time has resulted in increased NOx emissions. To predict NOx concentration in flue gas, a reliable model for FCC regenerators is needed that requires comprehensive understanding and accurate kinetics for NOx formation. Based on the nitrogen-containing functional groups on coke, model molecules are selected to study reactions between coke-bound nitrogen and O2 to form NO and NO2 using density functional theory. The reaction kinetics for the proposed pathways are evaluated using transition state theory. It is observed that the addition of O2 on coke is favored only when the free radical is present on the carbon atom instead of nitrogen atom. Thus, NOx formation during coke oxidation does not result from the direct attack by O2 on N atoms of coke, but from the transfer of an O atom to N from a neighboring site. The low activation energies required for NO formation indicate that it is more likely to form than NO2 during coke oxidation. The favorable pathways for NOx formation that can be used in FCC models are identified. Copyright © 2015 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  14. Forming mechanism of nitrogen doped graphene prepared by thermal solid-state reaction of graphite oxide and urea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mou Zhigang [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Chen Xiaoye [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Du Yukou; Wang Xiaomei [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Yang Ping, E-mail: pyang@suda.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Wang Suidong, E-mail: wangsd@suda.edu.cn [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Nitrogen doped graphene was synthesized from graphite oxide and urea by thermal solid-state reaction. The samples were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectra, element analysis, and electrical conductivity measurement. The results reveal that there is a gradual thermal transformation of nitrogen bonding configurations from amide form nitrogen to pyrrolic, then to pyridinic, and finally to 'graphitic' nitrogen in graphene sheets with increasing annealing temperature from 200 to 700 Degree-Sign C. The products prepared at 600 Degree-Sign C and 700 Degree-Sign C show that the quantity of nitrogen incorporated into graphene lattice is {approx}10 at.% with simultaneous reduction of graphite oxide. Oxygen-containing functional groups in graphite oxide are responsible for the doping reaction to produce nitrogen doped graphene.

  15. Quality assessment of ground-based microwave measurements of chlorine monoxide, ozone, and nitrogen dioxide from the NDSC radiometer at the plateau de bure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricaud, P.; Noe, J. de la [Observatoire Aquitain des Sciences de l' Univers (OASU), Lab. d' Astrodynamique, d' Astrophysique et d' Aeronomie de Bordeaux, Floirac (France); Baron, P. [Noveltis, Toulouse (France)

    2004-07-01

    A ground-based microwave radiometer dedicated to chlorine monoxide (ClO) measurements around 278 GHz has been in operation from December 1993-June 1996 at the Plateau de Bure, France (45 N, 5.9 E, 2500 m altitude). It belongs to the international network for the detection of stratospheric change. A detailed study of both measurements and retrieval schemes has been undertaken. Although dedicated to the measurements of ClO, simultaneous profiles of O{sub 3}, ClO and NO{sub 2}, together with information about the instrumental baseline, have been retrieved using the optimal estimation method. The vertical profiles have been compared with other ground-based microwave data, satellite-borne data and model results. Data quality shows: 1) the weak sensitivity of the instrument that obliges to make time averages over several hours; 2) the site location where measurements of good opacities are possible for only a few days per year; 3) the baseline undulation affecting all the spectra, an issue common to all the microwave instruments; 4) the slow drift of some components affecting frequencies by 3-4 MHz within a couple of months. Nevertheless, when temporally averaging data over a few days, ClO temporal variations (diurnal and over several weeks in winter 1995) from 35-50 km are consistent with model results and satellite data, particularly at the peak altitude around 40 km, although temporal coincidences are infrequent in winter 1995. In addition to ClO, it is possible to obtain O{sub 3} information from 30-60 km whilst the instrument is not optimized at all for this molecule. Retrievals of O{sub 3} are reasonable when compared with model and another ground-based data set, although the lowermost layers are affected by the contamination of baseline remnants. Monthly-averaged diurnal variations of NO{sub 2} are detected at 40 km and appear in agreement with photochemical model results and satellite zonally-averaged data, although the amplitude is weaker than the other data sets

  16. Neon-matrix spectroscopic and theoretical studies of the reactivity of titanium dimer with diatomic ligands: comparison of reactions with nitrogen and carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souvi, S M; Berkaïne, N; Alikhani, M E; Manceron, L

    2009-11-14

    The reactivity of diatomic titanium with molecular carbon monoxide has been investigated in solid neon at very low temperature. In contrast to the spontaneous reaction observed between Ti(2) and N(2), our results show that the formation of dititanium oxycarbide (OTi(2)C) from the condensation of effusive beams of Ti and CO in neon matrices involves several intermediate steps including one metastable intermediate. In the absence of electronic excitation, only formation of a Ti(2)(CO) complex occurs spontaneously during the reaction at 9 K of ground state Ti(2) and CO, as reported in solid argon by Xu, Jiang and Tsumori (Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2005, 44, 4338). However, during deposition or following electronic excitation, this species rearranges into a new species: the more stable, OTi(2)C oxycarbide form. Several low-lying excited states of OTi(2)C are also observed between 0.77 and 0.89 eV above the ground state, leading to a complex sequence of interacting vibronic transitions, merging into a broad continuum above 1 eV. Observations of Ti(2)(12)C(16)O, Ti(2)(13)C(16)O and Ti(2)(12)C(18)O and natural titanium isotopic data enable the identification of four fundamental vibrations in the ground electronic state and two others in the first two excited states. Quantum chemical calculations predict an open-shell (1)A(g) ground state with Ti-C and Ti-O distances close to 184 pm, and 91 degrees for the TiCTi and TiOTi bond angles, and give fundamental frequencies in good agreement with observation. The reaction paths of the Ti(2) + N(2) --> Ti(2)N(2) and Ti(2) + CO --> Ti(2)(CO) --> OTi(2)C have been investigated and a reaction scheme is proposed accounting for the similarities in nature and properties of the final products, as well as explaining the observation of a coordination complex with Ti(2) only in the case of the carbonyl ligand.

  17. Quality assessment of ground-based microwave measurements of chlorine monoxide, ozone, and nitrogen dioxide from the NDSC radiometer at the Plateau de Bure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ricaud

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available A ground-based microwave radiometer dedicated to chlorine monoxide (ClO measurements around 278GHz has been in operation from December 1993-June 1996 at the Plateau de Bure, France (45° N, 5.9° E, 2500m altitude. It belongs to the international Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Change. A detailed study of both measurements and retrieval schemes has been undertaken. Although dedicated to the measurements of ClO, simultaneous profiles of O3, ClO and NO2, together with information about the instrumental baseline, have been retrieved using the optimal estimation method. The vertical profiles have been compared with other ground-based microwave data, satellite-borne data and model results. Data quality shows: 1 the weak sensitivity of the instrument that obliges to make time averages over several hours; 2 the site location where measurements of good opacities are possible for only a few days per year; 3 the baseline undulation affecting all the spectra, an issue common to all the microwave instruments; 4 the slow drift of some components affecting frequencies by 3-4MHz within a couple of months. Nevertheless, when temporally averaging data over a few days, ClO temporal variations (diurnal and over several weeks in winter 1995 from 35-50km are consistent with model results and satellite data, particularly at the peak altitude around 40km, although temporal coincidences are infrequent in winter 1995. In addition to ClO, it is possible to obtain O3 information from 30-60km whilst the instrument is not optimized at all for this molecule. Retrievals of O3 are reasonable when compared with model and another ground-based data set, although the lowermost layers are affected by the contamination of baseline remnants. Monthly-averaged diurnal variations of NO2 are detected at 40km and appear in agreement with photochemical model results and satellite zonally-averaged data, although the amplitude

  18. Presence of Ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and Their Influence on Nitrogen Cycling in Ilica Bay, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulecal, Y.; Temel, M.

    2011-12-01

    Recenlty, the processes of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox), and ammonia oxidation within the domain Archaea, have been recognized as two new links in the global nitrogen cycle. The distribution and ubiquity of marine Archaea an important role in global carbon and nitrogen cycling (Ingalls et al., 2006; Leininger et al., 2006; Wuchter et al.,2006a). However, our knowledge on archaeal distribution in aquatic ecosystem was largely confined to the extreme environments for a long time until DeLong (1992, 1998) revealed the ubiquity of archaea in common marine environments. Despite the great progress, more efforts need to be given to the study of archaeal diversity in the vast oceans and of the variations in the ecological environment from coastal to oceanic waters (Massana et al.,2000). Our studying area which Ilica Bay in Izmir (Turkey) has a lot of thermal springs. The aim of study was to investigate the presence of ammonia-oxidizing Archaea and their roles of nitrogen cycling in marine enviroments.We have not only used the geochemical analyses but also genetic tools. This study will supply knowledge for marine nitrogen cycling to understanding very well, in addition how Archea genes players in the process of anammox in shallow coastal marine environments.

  19. Anthropogenic emissions of oxidized sulfur and nitrogen into the atmosphere of the former Soviet Union in 1985 and 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryaboshapko, A.G.; Brukhanov, P.A.; Gromov, S.A.; Proshina, Yu.V; Afinogenova, O.G. [Institute of Global Climate and Ecology, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-09-01

    Anthropogenic emissions of oxidized sulfur and nitrogen over the former Soviet Union for 1985 and 1990 were calculated on the basis of a combination of `bottom-up` and `top-down` approaches. Sulfur dioxide emissions from combustion of hard coal, brown coal, oil products, natural gas, shale oil, peat, wood as well as from metallurgy, sulfuric acid production, and cement production were estimated. Nitrogen oxides emissions were considered separately for large power plants, small power plants, industrial boilers, residential combustion units, and for transport. The sulfur and nitrogen emissions were spatially distributed over the former Soviet Union with 1 x 1 degree resolution. Data on 721 point sources of sulfur dioxide emissions and on the 242 largest power stations as nitrogen oxides sources were used. The area sources of both sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides were distributed according to the population density separately for about 150 administrative units of the former Soviet Union. 63 refs., 19 tabs.

  20. Effect of oxygen plasma and thermal oxidation on shallow nitrogen-vacancy centers in diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, M.; Rugar, D., E-mail: rugar@us.ibm.com [IBM Research Division, Almaden Research Center, San Jose, California 95120 (United States); Center for Probing the Nanoscale, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Mamin, H. J.; Sherwood, M. H.; Rettner, C. T.; Frommer, J. [IBM Research Division, Almaden Research Center, San Jose, California 95120 (United States)

    2014-07-28

    We investigate the effect of two different surface treatments on shallow nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond. Short duration oxygen plasma exposure is found to damage near-surface NV centers, resulting in their disappearance in fluorescence images. Subsequent annealing creates large numbers of new NV centers, attributed to plasma-induced vacancy creation. By tracking individual NV centers during thermal oxidation, we show that oxidation at 550 °C results in modest improvement of spin coherence. Higher temperature oxidations correlate with gradual decline in spin coherence and eventual instability of NV centers before ultimate disappearance. This is indicative of a reduction of the NV-to-surface distance due to oxidative etching. Thermal oxidation can offer controlled access to near-surface NV spins at the nanometer scale, an important requirement for many applications of NV-based nanomagnetometry.

  1. The Influence of Base Metal (M Oxidation State in Au-M-O/TiO2 Systems on Their Catalytic Activity in Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Samson

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Base metal promoted gold/titania catalysts were synthesized, characterized and tested in CO oxidation reaction. Catalysts containing dopant metals in higher oxidation states exhibited higher activity than catalysts containing dopants in reduced states. The activity of fresh catalysts promoted by Cu, Fe and Ni was similar to the unpromoted one, but treatment in reducing and oxidizing atmospheres revealed the supremacy of the copper promoted catalyst. The sequential deposition method proved to be better than the co-deposition—precipitation method. An attempt to explain these differences using XPS, FTIR and H2 TPR was performed.

  2. The role and interactions of nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO), and prostanoids in the pathogenesis of postoperative ileus in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korolkiewicz, R P; Sein-Anand, J; Ruczyński, J; Rekowski, P; Bieniaszewski, L; Chodorowski, Z; Petrusewicz, J; Ujda, M; Dabkowski, J; Bitel, M; Kato, S; Takeuchi, K

    2004-01-01

    The effects of heme oxygenase (HO) inhibitors, zinc-protoporphyrin-IX (ZnPP-IX), and tin protoporphyrin-IX (SnPP-IX) and their interactions with L-arginine/nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cyclooxygenase (COX) pathways were investigated in postoperative ileus in rats. Intestinal transit was measured as Evans blue migration after skin incision, laparotomy or laparotomy plus gut evisceration and handling. Laparotomy and small intestinal manipulations increased blood plasma nitrites/nitrates level 1.88-fold. N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, indomethacin, a selective COX-1 blocker (resveratrol) and COX-2 antagonists (nimesulide, DuP-697, NS-398) reversed the additional inhibitory effects of gut manipulation subsequent to laparotomy. In contrast, N-(3-(aminomethyl)benzyl)acetamidine or S-methylisothiourea, highly selective inducible NOS blockers, remained ineffective. ZnPP-IX and SnPP-IX overturned the effects of laparotomy on dye propulsion, but were only partially effective after laparotomy and gut handling attenuating the additional inhibitory influences of gut manipulation, the intestinal transit reaching 89.21%, 92.87%, 53.46%, and 48.56% of respective controls transit. Salutary effects of L-NAME, ZnPP-IX, and SnPP-IX were dose-dependent, L-arginine or hemin (HO substrate) sensitive. Administration of indomethacin and resveratrol subsequent to SnPP-IX reversed the inhibitory effects of laparotomy and manipulation, amounting to 93.91% and 87.43% of controls. On the other hand, L-NAME injected after SnPP-IX abolished the salutary effects of the latter, study dye migration reached 25.18% of control rat. Therefore we demonstrated that nitric oxide, carbon monoxide, and prostanoids play a role in the pathogenesis of postoperative ileus albeit in different mechanisms. Laparotomy stimulated HO activity, whereas gut manipulation led to an excessive constitutive NOS stimulation accompanied by augmented prostanoid synthesis by COX-1. Unaffected synthesis of either NO

  3. Relationship between lightning activity and tropospheric nitrogen dioxide and the estimation of lightning-produced nitrogen oxides over China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Fengxia; Ju, Xiaoyu; Bao, Min; Lu, Ganyi; Liu, Zupei; Li, Yawen; Mu, Yijun

    2017-02-01

    To better understand the relationship between lightning activity and nitrogen oxides (NO X ) in the troposphere and to estimate lightning-produced NO X (LNO X ) production in China more precisely, spatial and temporal distributions of vertical column densities of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2 VCDs) and lightning activity were analyzed using satellite measurements. The results showed that the spatial distribution of lightning activity is greater in the east than in the west of China, as with NO2 VCDs. However, the seasonal and annual variation between lightning and NO2 density show different trends in the east and west. The central Tibetan Plateau is sparsely populated without modern industry, and NO2 VCDs across the plateau are barely affected by anthropogenic sources. The plateau is an ideal area to study LNO X . By analyzing 15 years of satellite data from that region, it was found that lightning density is in strong agreement with annual, spatial and seasonal variations of NO2 VCDs, with a correlation coefficient of 0.79 from the linear fit. Combining Beirle's method and the linear fit equation, LNO X production in the Chinese interior was determined to be 0.07 (0.02-0.27) TgN yr-1 for 1997-2012, within the range of 0.016-0.384 TgN yr-1 from previous estimates.

  4. Light intensity dependence of the kinetics of the photocatalytic oxidation of nitrogen(II) oxide at the surface of TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillert, Ralf; Engel, Astrid; Große, Julia; Lindner, Patrick; Bahnemann, Detlef W

    2013-12-28

    Air pollution by nitrogen oxides represents a serious environmental problem in urban areas where numerous sources of these pollutants are concentrated. One approach to reduce the concentration of these air pollutants is their light-induced oxidation in the presence of molecular oxygen and a photocatalytically active building material which uses titanium dioxide as the photocatalyst. Herein, results of an investigation concerning the influence of the photon flux and the pollutant concentration on the rate of the photocatalytic oxidation of nitrogen(ii) oxide in the presence of molecular oxygen and UV(A) irradiated titanium dioxide powder are presented. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood-type rate law for the photocatalytic NO oxidation inside the photoreactor comprising four kinetic parameters is derived being suitable to describe the influence of the pollutant concentration and the photon flux on the rate of the photocatalytic oxidation of nitrogen(ii) oxide.

  5. Effects of nitrogen application rate, nitrogen synergist and biochar on nitrous oxide emissions from vegetable field in south China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mu; Pang, Yuwan; Huang, Xu; Huang, Qiaoyi

    2017-01-01

    Globally, vegetable fields are the primary source of greenhouse gas emissions. A closed-chamber method together with gas chromatography was used to measure the fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions in typical vegetable fields planted with four vegetables sequentially over time in the same field: endive, lettuce, cabbage and sweet corn. Results showed that N2O fluxes occurred in pulses with the N2O emission peak varying greatly among the crops. In addition, N2O emissions were linearly associated with the nitrogen (N) application rate (r = 0.8878, n = 16). Excessive fertilizer N application resulted in N loss through nitrous oxide gas emitted from the vegetable fields. Compared with a conventional fertilization (N2) treatment, the cumulative N2O emissions decreased significantly in the growing seasons of four plant species from an nitrogen synergist (a nitrification inhibitor, dicyandiamide and biochar treatments by 34.6% and 40.8%, respectively. However, the effects of biochar on reducing N2O emissions became more obvious than that of dicyandiamide over time. The yield-scaled N2O emissions in consecutive growing seasons for four species increased with an increase in the N fertilizer application rate, and with continuous application of N fertilizer. This was especially true for the high N fertilizer treatment that resulted in a risk of yield-scaled N2O emissions. Generally, the additions of dicyandiamide and biochar significantly decreased yield-scaled N2O-N emissions by an average of 45.9% and 45.7%, respectively, compared with N2 treatment from the consecutive four vegetable seasons. The results demonstrated that the addition of dicyandiamide or biochar in combination with application of a rational amount of N could provide the best strategy for the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions in vegetable field in south China. PMID:28419127

  6. S-nitrosothiols regulate nitric oxide production and storage in plants through the nitrogen assimilation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frungillo, Lucas; Skelly, Michael J; Loake, Gary J; Spoel, Steven H; Salgado, Ione

    2014-11-11

    Nitrogen assimilation plays a vital role in plant metabolism. Assimilation of nitrate, the primary source of nitrogen in soil, is linked to the generation of the redox signal nitric oxide (NO). An important mechanism by which NO regulates plant development and stress responses is through S-nitrosylation, that is, covalent attachment of NO to cysteine residues to form S-nitrosothiols (SNO). Despite the importance of nitrogen assimilation and NO signalling, it remains largely unknown how these pathways are interconnected. Here we show that SNO signalling suppresses both nitrate uptake and reduction by transporters and reductases, respectively, to fine tune nitrate homeostasis. Moreover, NO derived from nitrate assimilation suppresses the redox enzyme S-nitrosoglutathione Reductase 1 (GSNOR1) by S-nitrosylation, preventing scavenging of S-nitrosoglutathione, a major cellular bio-reservoir of NO. Hence, our data demonstrates that (S)NO controls its own generation and scavenging by modulating nitrate assimilation and GSNOR1 activity.

  7. Effects of Nitrogen Fertilizer,Soil Moisture and Temperature on Methane Oxidation in Paddy Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANXIAOYUAN; CAIZUCONG

    1996-01-01

    Effects of nitrogen fertilizer,soil mosture and temperature and temperature on methane oxidation in paddy soil were investigated under laboratory conditions.Addition of 0.05 g N kg-1 soil as NH4Cl strongly inhibited methane oxidation and addition of the same rate of KCl also inhibited the oxidation but with more slight effect,suggesting that the inhibitory effect was partly caused by increase in osmotic potential in microorganism cell,Not only NH4+ but also NO3- greatly affected methane oxidation.Urea did not affect methane oxidation in paddy soil in the first two days of incubation,but strong inhibitory effect was observed afterwards.Methane was oxidized in the treated soil with an optimum moisture of 280 g kg-1 ,and air-drying inhibited methane oxidation entirely.The optimum temperature of methane oxidation was about 30℃ in paddy soil.while no methane oxidation was observed at 5℃or 50℃。

  8. The effect of emission from coal combustion in nonindustrial sources on deposition of sulfur and oxidized nitrogen in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryza, Maciej; Werner, Małgorzata; Błaś, Marek; Dore, Anthony J; Sobik, Mieczysław

    2010-07-01

    Poland has one of the largest sulfur and nitrogen emissions in Europe. This is mainly because coal is a main fuel in industrial and nonindustrial combustion. The aim of this paper is to assess the amount of sulfur and nitrogen deposited from SNAP sector 02 (nonindustrial sources) coal combustion. To assess this issue, the Fine Resolution Atmospheric Multipollutant Exchange (FRAME) model was used. The results suggest that industrial combustion has the largest impact on deposition of oxidized sulfur, whereas the oxidized nitrogen national deposition budget is dominated by transboundary transport. The total mass of pollutants deposited in Poland, originating from nonindustrial coal combustion, is 45 Gg of sulfur and 2.5 Gg of nitrogen, which is over 18% of oxidized sulfur and nearly 2% of oxidized nitrogen deposited. SNAP 02 is responsible for up to 80% of dry-deposited sulfur and 11% of nitrogen. The contribution to wet deposition is largest in central Poland in the case of sulfur and in some areas can exceed 11%. For oxidized nitrogen, nonindustrial emissions contribute less than 1% over the whole area of Poland. The switch from coal to gas fuel in this sector will result in benefits in sulfur and nitrogen deposition reduction.

  9. Nitrogen oxide -- Sensors and systems for engine management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiller, J.M.; Bryan, W.L. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, C.E. [General Motors, Inc., Flint, MI (United States). A.C. Rochester Div.

    1997-06-24

    The goal of this Cooperative Research and Development (CRADA) effort is to further develop sensors and sensor systems in order to meet current and anticipated air emissions requirements due to the operation of Defense Program facilities and the emission standards imposed on new vehicles operating in this country. Specific objectives of this work are to be able to measure and control on-line and in real-time, emissions, engine operation, air-to-fuel intake ratios, and throttle/accelerator positions in future models of consumer automobiles. Sensor and application specific integrated circuit developments within Lockheed Martin Energy Systems are applicable to the monitoring and engine controls needed by General Motors. In the case of emissions sensors, base technology in thick/thin film sensors and optical systems will be further developed to address the combination of high temperature and accumulated deposits expected in the exhaust stream. Other technologies will also be explored to measure fuel-to-air ratios and technologies such as fiber optic and acoustic wave devices that are applicable to the combustion sensing on an individual base. Two non-contact rotary position sensors have been developed for use in control-by-wire throttle control applications. The two CRADA developed sensors consist of a non-contact, differential capacitance position transducer and a custom complementary metal oxide semiconductor (C-MOS) application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) suitable for use in both passenger and engine compartments.

  10. Nitrogen-doped dual mesoporous carbon for the selective oxidation of ethylbenzene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Aibing; Yu, Yifeng; Wang, Rujie; Yu, Yunhong; Zang, Wenwei; Tang, Pei; Ma, Ding

    2015-08-01

    A nanocasting method to fabricate nitrogen-doped dual mesoporous carbon is proposed by the carbonization of nitrile functional ionic liquid (FIL) grafted SBA-15 for the first time. These carbon materials have high nitrogen content (12.8%), large specific surface areas (763 m2 g-1) and uniform rod morphologies, which are derived from FILs grafted on the surface of SBA-15. Furthermore, by adjusting the impregnation amount of ionic liquids on SBA-15, pore structures of these carbon materials can be adjusted from single to dual mesopores. The developed dual mesoporous carbon materials exhibit good catalytic performance in the selective oxidation of ethylbenzene, ascribed to the promoting effects of nitrogen-doping, high surface area and dual mesostructure. It may be concluded that the dual mesostructure has an advantage over a single mesostructure to obtain a fast mass transport rate, resulting in higher acetophenone yield.A nanocasting method to fabricate nitrogen-doped dual mesoporous carbon is proposed by the carbonization of nitrile functional ionic liquid (FIL) grafted SBA-15 for the first time. These carbon materials have high nitrogen content (12.8%), large specific surface areas (763 m2 g-1) and uniform rod morphologies, which are derived from FILs grafted on the surface of SBA-15. Furthermore, by adjusting the impregnation amount of ionic liquids on SBA-15, pore structures of these carbon materials can be adjusted from single to dual mesopores. The developed dual mesoporous carbon materials exhibit good catalytic performance in the selective oxidation of ethylbenzene, ascribed to the promoting effects of nitrogen-doping, high surface area and dual mesostructure. It may be concluded that the dual mesostructure has an advantage over a single mesostructure to obtain a fast mass transport rate, resulting in higher acetophenone yield. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03802b

  11. Nitrogen Loss Processes and Nitrous Oxide Turnover in Oceanic Oxygen Minimum Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, B. B.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrogen is an essential element for life and the maintenance of all ecosystems. For many ecosystems, both aquatic and terrestrial, nitrogen is the element most likely to limit the amount and rate of production. But just as ecosystems can suffer from too little nitrogen, they are also sensitive to too much nitrogen, which leads to eutrophication and structural changes in food webs. Thus the processes by which nitrogen is removed are as critical to our understanding of ecosystem function as are those by which it is added. Nitrogen loss processes in the open ocean have been the focus of research and discovery in recent years. Long thought to be dominated by the bacterial respiratory process of denitrification, N loss is now also known to occur by anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox). We now understand that the ratio of the two processes is controlled by the quality and quantity of organic matter supplied to the anoxic waters of the ocean's major oxygen deficient zones. Coastal environments are also major sites of N loss but excess N loading from land often ameliorates the direct dependence of anammox and denitrification on organic matter composition. The ratio is important partly because of side products: Denitrification is a significant source and sink for nitrous oxide (N2O), while anammox has no significant contribution to N2O biogeochemistry. With the anthropogenic flux of CFCs at least mostly under control, N2O emissions to the atmosphere are the greatest contribution to ozone destruction, and they also contribute to greenhouse warming. Both anthropogenic and natural sources contribute to N2O emissions, and natural sources are sensitive to anthropogenic forcing. Our direct measurements of N2O production and consumption in the ocean agree with modeling results that have implicated multiple microbial processes and complex physical and biological control of N2O fluxes in the ocean.

  12. Evidence for oxidative stress in the developing cerebellum of the rat after chronic mild carbon monoxide exposure (0.0025% in air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez Ivan A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that chronic very mild prenatal carbon monoxide (CO exposure (25 parts per million subverts the normal development of the rat cerebellar cortex. Studies at this chronic low CO exposure over the earliest periods of mammalian development have not been performed to date. Pregnant rats were exposed chronically to CO from gestational day E5 to E20. In the postnatal period, rat pups were grouped as follows: Group A: prenatal exposure to CO only; group B: prenatal exposure to CO then exposed to CO from postnatal day 5 (P5 to P20; group C: postnatal exposure only, from P5 to P20, and group D, controls (air without CO. At P20, immunocytochemical analyses of oxidative stress markers, and structural and functional proteins were assessed in the cerebellar cortex of the four groups. Quantitative real time PCR assays were performed for inducible (iNOS, neuronal (nNOS, and endothelial (eNOS nitric oxide synthases. Results Superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1, SOD2, and hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1 immunoreactivity increased in cells of the cerebellar cortex of CO-exposed pups. INOS and nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity also increased in blood vessels and Purkinje cells (PCs of pups from group-A, B and C. By contrast, nNOS immunoreactivity decreased in PCs from group-B. Endothelial NOS immunoreactivity showed no changes in any CO-exposed group. The mRNA levels for iNOS were significantly up-regulated in the cerebellum of rats from group B; however, mRNA levels for nNOS and eNOS remained relatively unchanged in groups A, B and C. Ferritin-H immunoreactivity increased in group-B. Immunocytochemistry for neurofilaments (structural protein, synapsin-1 (functional protein, and glutamic acid decarboxylase (the enzyme responsible for the synthesis of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA, were decreased in groups A and B. Immunoreactivity for two calcium binding proteins, parvalbumin and calbindin, remained

  13. Solid state chemistry of nitrogen oxides--part II: surface consumption of NO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioppolo, S; Fedoseev, G; Minissale, M; Congiu, E; Dulieu, F; Linnartz, H

    2014-05-14

    Nitrogen oxides are considered to be important astrochemical precursors of complex species and prebiotics. However, apart from the hydrogenation of solid NO that leads to the surface formation of hydroxylamine, little is known about the full solid state reaction network involving both nitrogen and oxygen. Our study is divided into two papers, hereby called Part I and Part II. In the accompanying paper, we investigate the surface reactions NO + O/O2/O3 and NO + N with a focus on the formation of NO2 ice. Here, we complement this study by measurements of the surface destruction of solid NO2, e.g., NO2 + H/O/N. Experiments are performed in two separate ultra-high vacuum setups and therefore under different experimental conditions to better constrain the experimental results. Surface reaction products are monitored by means of Fourier Transform Reflection Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-RAIRS) and Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD) techniques using mass spectrometry. The surface destruction of solid NO2 leads to the formation of a series of nitrogen oxides such as NO, N2O, N2O3, and N2O4 as well as HNO, NH2OH, and H2O. When NO2 is mixed with an interstellar more relevant apolar (i.e., CO) ice, solid CO2 and HCOOH are also formed due to interactions between different reaction routes. The astrophysical implications of the full nitrogen and oxygen reaction network derived from Parts I and II are discussed.

  14. Novel strategy of nitrogen removal from domestic wastewater using pilot Orbal oxidation ditch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Shou-you; PENG Yong-zhen; WANG Shu-ying; YAN Jun

    2006-01-01

    A pilot-scale Orbal oxidation ditch was operated for 17 months to optimize nitrogen removal from domestic wastewater of average COD to total nitrogen ratio of 2.7, with particular concern about the roles of dissolved oxygen (DO), mixed liquor suspended solids (MLSS) and return activated sludge (RAS) recycle ratio. Remarkable simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND) was observed and mean total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiency up to 72.1% was steadily achieved, at DO concentration in the out, middle and inner channel of 0.1, 0.4 and 0.7 mg/L, respectively, with an average MLSS of 5.5 g/L and RAS recycle ratio of 150%. Although the out channel took the major role in TN removal, the role of middle channel should never be ignored. The denitrification potential could be fully developed under low DO, high MLSS with adequate RAS ratio. The sludge settleability was amazingly improved under low DO operation mode, and some explanations were tried. In addition, a series of simplified batch tests were done to determine whether novel microorganisms could make substantial contribution to the performance of nitrogen removal. The results indicated that the SND observed in this Orbal oxidation ditch was more likely a physical phenomenon.

  15. Kinetic and photochemical data for atmospheric chemistry reactions of the nitrogen oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, R. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Data sheets for thermal and photochemical reactions of importance in the atmospheric chemistry of the nitrogen oxides are presented. For each reaction the available experimental data are summarized and critically evaluated, and a preferred value of the rate coefficient is given. The selection of the preferred value is discussed and an estimate of its accuracy is given. For the photochemical process, the data are summarized, and preferred for the photoabsorption cross section and primary quantum yields are given.

  16. Selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides with ammonia over microporous zeolite catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    VENNESTROM, PETER NICOLAI RAVNBORG

    2014-01-01

    With increasing legislative demands to remove nitrogen oxides (NOx) from automotive diesel exhaust, new catalyst systems are investigated and intensely studied in industry as well in academia. The most prevailing catalytic method of choice is the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) where non-toxic urea is used as a reductant for practical reasons. Usually urea is stored in a separate tank and once injected into the exhaust system it hydrolyses into the more aggressive reductant NH3 and CO2. ...

  17. Evaluation of Residence Time on Nitrogen Oxides Removal in Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been introduced over the last few years as a promising after- treatment system for nitrogen oxides and particulate matter removal from diesel exhaust. NTP technology has not been commercialised as yet, due to its high rate of energy consumption. Therefore, it is important to seek out new methods to improve NTP performance. Residence time is a crucial parameter in engine\\ud exhaust emissions treatment. In this paper, different electrode shapes are analysed and the ...

  18. Kinetics of Nitrogen Oxide Production Following Experimental Thermal Injury in Rats,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    Physiol 259:H1038, 1990 11. Ochoa JB, Udekwu AO, Billiar TR, et al: Nitrogen oxide levels in 37. De Nicola L, Blantz RC, Gabbai F: Nitric oxide and...If so, what specific post-hoc test did you use to vasoconstriction. Circulation 83:2038. 1991 analyze within-group data? 42, Alonso K, Rubio V...in the animals compared with It has been reported by Ochoa and his colleagues from Pitts- the results published by Dr. Ochoa from the Pittsburgh

  19. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION Search CPSC Search Menu Home Recalls Recall List CPSC Recall API Recall Lawsuits ... and Bans Report an Unsafe Product Consumers Businesses Home Safety Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information ...

  20. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths ... 2011 Annual Estimates View All CO-Related Injury Statistics and Technical Reports Related Links Recalls Safety Education ...

  1. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide ... Related Links Recalls Safety Education Regulations, Laws & Standards Research & Statistics Business & Manufacturing Small Business Resources OnSafety Blogs ...

  2. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster Contest Pool Safely Business & Manufacturing Business & Manufacturing Business ... Featured Resources CPSC announces winners of carbon monoxide poster contest Video View the blog Clues You Can ...

  3. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Criminal Penalties Federal Court Orders & Decisions Research & Statistics Research & Statistics Technical Reports Injury Statistics NEISS Injury Data ... On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths ...

  4. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 Annual Estimates OCTOBER 13, 2015 Incidents, Deaths, and In-Depth Investigations Associated with Non-Fire ...

  5. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Unites States die every year from accidental non-fire related CO poisoning associated with consumer products, including ... CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of ...

  6. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Import Safety International Recall Guidance Civil and Criminal Penalties Federal Court Orders & ... 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 ...

  7. Carbon Monoxide Nonattainment Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer identifies areas in the U.S. where air pollution levels have not met the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Carbon Monoxide and have...

  8. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Unites States die every year from accidental non-fire related CO poisoning associated with consumer products, including ... CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of ...

  9. [Optimization and comparison of nitrogen and phosphorus removal by different aeration modes in oxidation ditch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chang-Zi; Peng, Dang-Cong; Cheng, Xue-Mei; Wang, Dan

    2012-03-01

    The oxidation ditch operation mode was simulated by sequencing batch reactor (SBR) system with alternate stirring and aeration. The nitrogen and phosphorus removal efficiencies were investigated in two different aeration modes: point aeration and step aeration. Experimental results show that oxygen is dissolved more efficiently in point aeration mode with a longer aerobic region in the same air supply capacity, but dissolved oxygen (DO) utilization efficiency for nitrogen and phosphorus removal is high in step aeration mode. Nitrification abilities of the two modes are equal with ammonia-nitrogen (NH4(+) -N) removal efficiency of 96.68% and 97.03%, respectively. Nitrifier activities are 4.65 and 4.66 mg x (g x h)(-1) respectively. When the ratio of anoxic zones and the aerobic zones were 1, the total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiency of point aeration mode in 2, 4 or 7 partitions was respectively 60.14%, 47.93% and 33.7%. The total phosphorus (TP) removal efficiency was respectively 28.96%, 23.75% and 24.31%. The less the partitions, the higher the nitrogen and phosphorus removal efficiencies, but it is in more favor of TN removal. As for step aeration mode with only one partitioning zone, the TN and TP removal efficiencies are respectively 64.21% and 49.09%, which is better than in point aeration mode, but more conducive to the improvement of TP removal efficiency. Under the condition of sufficient nitrification in step aeration mode, the nitrogen and phosphorus removal is better with the increase of anoxic zone. The removal efficiencies of TN and TP respectively rose to 73.94% and 54.18% when the ratio of anoxic zones and the aerobic zones was increased from 1 : 1 to 1. 8 : 1. As the proportion of anoxic zones was enlarged further, nitrification and operation stability were weakened so as to affect the nitrogen and phosphorus removal efficiencies.

  10. Nitrogen source effects on the denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation culture and anaerobic ammonium oxidation bacteria enrichment process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Liang; Ding, Jing; Lu, Yong-Ze; Ding, Zhao-Wei; Zeng, Raymond J

    2017-05-01

    The co-culture system of denitrifying anaerobic methane oxidation (DAMO) and anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) has a potential application in wastewater treatment plant. This study explored the effects of permutation and combination of nitrate, nitrite, and ammonium on the culture enrichment from freshwater sediments. The co-existence of NO3(-), NO2(-), and NH4(+) shortened the enrichment time from 75 to 30 days and achieved a total nitrogen removal rate of 106.5 mg/L/day on day 132. Even though ammonium addition led to Anammox bacteria increase and a higher nitrogen removal rate, DAMO bacteria still dominated in different reactors with the highest proportion of 64.7% and the maximum abundance was 3.07 ± 0.25 × 10(8) copies/L (increased by five orders of magnitude) in the nitrite reactor. DAMO bacteria showed greater diversity in the nitrate reactor, and one was similar to M. oxyfera; DAMO bacteria in the nitrite reactor were relatively unified and similar to M. sinica. Interestingly, no DAMO archaea were found in the nitrate reactor. This study will improve the understanding of the impact of nitrogen source on DAMO and Anammox co-culture enrichment.

  11. Aspects of the Application of Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopy to Nitrogen Oxides Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbigniew Bielecki

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents design issues of high-sensitive laser absorption spectroscopy systems for nitrogen oxides (NOx detection. Examples of our systems and their investigation results are also described. The constructed systems use one of the most sensitive methods, cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS. They operate at different wavelength ranges using a blue—violet laser diode (410 nm as well as quantum cascade lasers (5.27 µm and 4.53 µm. Each of them is configured as a one or two channel measurement device using, e.g., time division multiplexing and averaging. During the testing procedure, the main performance features such as detection limits and measurements uncertainties have been determined. The obtained results are 1 ppb NO2, 75 ppb NO and 45 ppb N2O. For all systems, the uncertainty of concentration measurements does not exceed a value of 13%. Some experiments with explosives are also discussed. A setup equipped with a concentrator of explosives vapours was used. The detection method is based either on the reaction of the sensors to the nitrogen oxides directly emitted by the explosives or on the reaction to the nitrogen oxides produced during thermal decomposition of explosive vapours. For TNT, PETN, RDX and HMX a detection limit better than 1 ng has been achieved.

  12. Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides Emissions from a Coal-Fired Boiler Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuikov Andrey V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During combustion of fossil fuels a large amount of harmful substances are discharged into the atmospheres of cities by industrial heating boiler houses. The most harmful substances among them are nitrogen oxides. The paper presents one of the most effective technological solutions for suppressing nitrogen oxides; it is arrangement of circulation process with additional mounting of the nozzle directed into the bottom of the ash hopper. When brown high-moisture coals are burnt in the medium power boilers, generally fuel nitrogen oxides are produced. It is possible to reduce their production by two ways: lowering the temperature in the core of the torch or decreasing the excess-air factor in the boiler furnace. Proposed solution includes the arrangement of burning process with additional nozzle installed in the lower part of the ash hopper. Air supply from these nozzles creates vortex involving large unburned fuel particles in multiple circulations. Thereby time of their staying in the combustion zone is prolonging. The findings describe the results of the proposed solution; and recommendations for the use of this technological method are given for other boilers.

  13. Les oxydes d'azote dans l'environnement Nitrogen Oxides in the Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oppeneau J. C.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Le présent article expose les concentrations en oxydes d'azote rencontrées dans l'environnement et fait la part des origines naturelles et anthropogéniques. II présente une des manifestations les plus connues des interactions entre les oxydes d'azote, les molécules organiques, la vapeur d'eau et le rayonnement solaire le brouillard photochimique. Un certain nombre de données sur les effets d'oxydes d'azote sur l'homme et le milieu sont cités et il est mentionné que de nombreuses recherches sont à effectuer pour préciser les connaissances actuelles. Enfin, les réglementations présentes et futures sont décrites. This article describes concentrations of nitrogen oxides found in the environment and explains their natural and anthropogenic origins. It describes one of the best known examples of interactions between nitrogen oxides, organic molecules, water vaporand solorradiation, i. e. photochemical smog. Various data are brought outconcerning the effects of nitrogen oxides on man and the environment, and mention is mode of the many research projects being carried out ta specify current knowledge. Present and future regulations are also described.

  14. 77 FR 7149 - Notice of Workshop and Call for Information on Integrated Science Assessment for Oxides of Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-10

    ... Nitrogen AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice; call for information. SUMMARY: The... Quality Standards (NAAQS) for oxides of nitrogen (NO X ). The scientific review that informs the ISA will include evidence for NO X whereas the indicator for NO X that has been used for the standard is...

  15. Ammonia-Oxidizer Communities in an Agricultural Soil treated with Contrasting Nitrogen Sources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mussie Y. Habteselassie

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The community of ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes was examined in an agricultural soil treated for 6 seasons with contrasting nitrogen (N sources. Molecular tools based on the gene encoding ammonia monooxygenase were used to characterize the ammonia oxidizer communities and their abundance. Soil DNA was extracted from soils sampled from silage corn plots that received no additional N (control, dairy waste compost (DC, liquid dairy waste (LW, and ammonium sulfate (AS treatments at approximately 100 and 200 kg available N ha-1 over 6 years. The N treatment affected the quantity of ammonia oxidizers based on estimates of amoA by real-time PCR. Ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB were higher in soils from the AS200, AS100, and LW200 treatments (2.5 x107, 2.5x107, and 2.1 x107 copies g-1 soil, respectively than in the control (8.1x106copies/g while the abundance of amoA encoding archaea (AOA was not significantly affected by treatment (3.8x107copies g-1 soil, average. The ratio of AOA/AOB was higher in the control and compost treated soils, both treatments have the majority of their ammonium supplied through mineralization of organic nitrogen. Clone libraries of partial amoA sequences indicated AOB related to Nitrosospira multiformis and AOA related to uncultured Nitrososphaera similar to those described by soil fosmid 54d9 were prevalent. Profiles of the amoC-amoA intergenic region indicated that both Nitrosospira- and Nitrosomonas-type AOB were present in all soils examined. In contrast to the intergenic amoC-amoA profile results, Nitrosomonas-like clones were recovered only in the LW200 treated soil-DNA. The impact of six years of contrasting nitrogen sources applications caused changes in ammonia oxidizer abundance while the community composition remained relatively stable for both AOB and AOA.

  16. On the electrocatalytic activity of nitrogen-doped reduced graphene Oxide:Does the nature of nitrogen really control the activity towards oxygen reduction?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sourav Bag; Retna Raj C

    2016-03-01

    Synthesis of metal-free electrocatalyst for the cathodic reduction of oxygen is of great interest forfuel cell and metal-air battery applications. The heteroatom-doped graphene/reduced graphene oxide (rGO)is very promising and the nitrogen-doped rGO (N-rGO) is emerging as a new inexpensive electrocatalyst foroxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Herein, we describe the effect of the chemical nature and amount of nitrogenin N-rGO towards ORR in acidic solution. Four different samples of N-rGO with different nitrogen contentwere synthesized by simple chemical route. The chemical nature and nitrogen content were analyzed with Xray photoelectron spectroscopic measurements. The electrocatalytic performance of the catalyst was examinedby cyclic and hydrodynamic voltammetric studies. All the N-rGO samples favor 4-electron pathway for thereduction of oxygen in acidic solution. The onset potential and kinetic current density depends on the nature ofthe doped nitrogen. It is demonstrated that the chemical nature and the amount of nitrogen actually control theORR activity. The N-rGO which contains a large amount of pyridinic nitrogen with N/C ratio of 0.074 has highcatalytic activity. The carbon bonded to pyridinic nitrogen could be a possible catalytic site in ORR. Our studiessuggest that the graphitic nitrogen does not significantly influence the electrocatalytic activity of N-rGO.

  17. The Range of 1-3 keV Electrons in Solid Oxygen and Carbon Monoxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oehlenschlæger, M.; Andersen, H.H.; Schou, Jørgen

    1985-01-01

    The range of 1-3 keV electrons in films of solid oxygen and carbon monoxide has been measured by a mirror substrate method. The technique used here is identical to the one previously used for range measurements in solid hydrogen and nitrogen. The range in oxygen is slightly shorter than...... that in nitrogen whereas the range in carbon monoxide is about 20% larger than that in the nitrogen....

  18. Observations of the diurnal and seasonal trends in nitrogen oxides in the western Sierra Nevada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Murphy

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Observations of speciated nitrogen oxides, namely NO2, total peroxy nitrates (ΣPNs, total alkyl nitrates (ΣANs, and HNO3 by thermal dissociation laser induced fluorescence (TD-LIF, and supporting chemical and meteorological measurements at Big Hill (1860 m, a high elevation site in California's Sierra Nevada Mountains, are described. From May through October, terrain-driven winds in the region routinely bring air from Sacramento, 100 km southwest of the site, upslope over oak and pine forests to Big Hill during the day, while at night, the site often samples clean, dry air characteristic of the free troposphere. Winter differs mainly in that the meteorology does not favour the buildup of Sacramento's pollution over the Sierra Nevada range, and the urban-influenced air that is seen has been less affected by biogenic VOC emissions, resulting in longer lifetime for NO2 and a predominance of the inorganic forms of nitrogen oxides.

    Summertime observations at Big Hill can be compared with those from Granite Bay, a Sacramento suburb, and from the University of California's Blodgett Forest Research Station to examine the evolution of nitrogen oxides and ozone within the urban plume. Nitrogen oxide radicals (NO and NO2, which dominate total nitrogen oxides (NOy at Granite Bay, are rapidly converted into HNO3, ΣPNs, and ΣANs, such that these compounds contribute 29, 30, and 21% respectively to the NOy budget in the plume at Big Hill. Nevertheless, the decreasing concentrations of NO2 as the plume is advected to Big Hill lead to decreases in the production rate of HNO3 and ozone. The data also demonstrate the role that temperature plays in sequestering NO2 into peroxy nitrates, effectively decreasing the rate of ozone production. The important contribution of ΣANs to NOy in the region suggests that they

  19. Observations of the diurnal and seasonal trends in nitrogen oxides in the western Sierra Nevada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. G. Murphy

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations of speciated nitrogen oxides, namely NO2, total peroxy nitrates (ΣPNs, total alkyl nitrates (ΣANs, and HNO3 by thermal dissociation laser induced fluorescence (TD-LIF, and supporting chemical and meteorological measurements at Big Hill (1860 m, a high elevation site in California's Sierra Nevada Mountains, are described. From May through October, terrain-driven winds in the region routinely bring air from Sacramento, 100 km southwest of the site, upslope over oak and pine forests to Big Hill during the day, while at night, the site often samples clean, dry air characteristic of the free troposphere. Winter differs mainly in that the meteorology does not favour the buildup of Sacramento's pollution over the Sierra Nevada range, and the urban-influenced air that is seen has been less affected by biogenic VOC emissions, resulting in longer lifetime for NO2 and a predominance of the inorganic forms of nitrogen oxides. Summertime observations at Big Hill can be compared with those from Granite Bay, a Sacramento suburb, and from the University of California's Blodgett Forest Research Station to examine the evolution of nitrogen oxides and ozone within the urban plume. Nitrogen oxide radicals (NO and NO2, which dominate total nitrogen oxides (NOy at Granite Bay, are rapidly converted into HNO3, ΣPNs, and ΣANs, such that these compounds contribute 29, 30, and 21% respectively to the NOy budget in the plume at Big Hill. Nevertheless, the decreasing concentrations of NO2 as the plume is advected to Big Hill lead to decreases in the production rate of HNO3 and ozone. The data also demonstrate the role that temperature plays in sequestering NO2 into peroxy nitrates, effectively decreasing the rate of ozone production. The important contribution of ΣANs to NOy in the region suggests that they should be considered with regards to export of NOy from the boundary layer. Nocturnal observations of airmasses characteristic of the

  20. Global modelling of the ClNO2 production impact on tropospheric nitrogen oxides and main oxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas Rodríguez, Carlos Alberto; Brown, Steven S.; Lamarque, Jean-Francoise; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Kinnison, Douglas E.; Lopez-Hilfiker, Felipe; Thornton, Joel A.; Jaegle, Lyatt; Fibiger, Dorothy; McDuffie, Erin E.; Sullivan, Amy P.; Weber, Rodney J.; Dibb, Jack

    2016-04-01

    Heterogeneous uptake of dinitrogen pentoxide, N2O5, to aerosol is one of the most important reactions controlling the global budget of nitrogen oxides, with subsequent impacts on oxidants such as ozone and hydroxyl radical. Most chemistry global models assume that this uptake proceeds through hydrolysis to produce nitric acid, effectively a terminal sink for nitrogen oxides. However, recent field studies have shown that the yield of nitryl chloride, ClNO2, from N2O5 uptake is significant in many locations. Because ClNO2 photolyzes subsequent to its nighttime production to recycle NO2 and produce atomic chlorine, a potent oxidant, the impact of heterogeneous N2O5 uptake and the role of ClNO2 on the scale distribution of oxidants need to be re-assessed. Here we present global simulations using the chemistry-climate model CAM-Chem, including a state of the art halogen chemistry scheme and different assumptions for the magnitude and spatial distribution of ClNO2 yields from N2O5. The model shows a significant effect of ClNO2 production on tropospheric ozone, hydroxyl radical and peroxyacyl nitrates (PAN) during northern hemisphere late winter and early spring. Simulations are compared to observations from recent field campaigns, including ClNO2 and N2O5 from the Wintertime INvestigation of Transport, Emissions and Reactivity (WINTER) study on the NSF / NCAR C-130 aircraft on the U.S. East Coast in February and March of 2015.

  1. [Relationship between Fe, Al oxides and stable organic carbon, nitrogen in the yellow-brown soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Li-Sha; Wang, Dai-Zhang; Jiang, Xin; Rao, Wei; Zhang, Wen-Hao; Guo, Chun-Yan; Li, Teng

    2010-11-01

    The stable organic carbon and nitrogen of the different particles were gained by oxidation of 6% NaOCl in the yellow-brown soils. The relationships between the contents of selective extractable Fe/Al and the stable organic carbon/nitrogen were investigated. It shown that amounts of dithionite-citrate-(Fe(d)) and oxalate-(Fe(o)) and pyrophosphate extractable (Fe(p)) were 6-60.8 g x kg(-1) and 0.13-4.8 g x kg(-1) and 0.03-0.47 g x kg(-1) in 2-250 microm particles, respectively; 43.1-170 g x kg(-1) and 5.9-14.0 g x kg(-1) and 0.28-0.78 g x kg(-1) in soils than in arid yellow-brown soils, and that of selective extractable Al are lower in the former than in the latter. Amounts of the stable organic carbon and nitrogen, higher in paddy yellow-brown soils than in arid yellow-brown soils, were 0.93-6.0 g x kg(-1) and 0.05-0.36 g x kg(-1) in 2-250 microm particles, respectively; 6.05-19.3 g x kg(-1) and 0.61-2.1 g x kg(-1) in organic carbon and nitrogen (C(stable)/N(stable)) were 9.50-22.0 in 2-250 microm particles and 7.43-11.54 in organic carbon and nitrogen were 14.3-50.0 and 11.9-55.6 in 2-250 microm particles, respectively; 53.72-88.80 and 40.64-70.0 in soils than in paddy yellow-brown soils. The organic carbon and nitrogen are advantageously conserved in paddy yellow-brown soil. An extremely significant positive correlation of the stable organic carbon and nitrogen with selective extractable Fe/Al is observed. The most amounts between the stable organic carbon and nitrogen and selective extractable Fe/Al appear in clay particles, namely the clay particles could protect the soil organic carbon and nitrogen.

  2. Continuous measurements of nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, methane and carbon dioxide in the surface ocean with novel laser-absorption analysers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Jan; Grefe, Imke; Wager, Natalie; Bakker, Dorothee C. E.; Lee, Gareth A.

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, improvements in spectroscopic technology have revolutionised atmospheric trace gas research. In particular, cavity-based optical absorption analysers allow determination of gas concentrations with high frequency, repeatability, reproducibility and long-term stability. These qualities make them particularly suitable for autonomous measurements on voluntary observing ships (VOS). Here, we present results from three of the first deployments of such analysers on research ships, as a first step towards VOS installations. Los Gatos off-axis ICOS (Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy) analysers were used to measure nitrous oxide (N2O), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios in ocean surface water during research cruises in 2010, 2011 and 2012. The analysers were coupled to an equilibrator fed by the scientific seawater supply in the ship's laboratories. The equilibrator measurements were alternated with regular measurements of marine air and calibrated standard gases. Short-term precision for 10 s-average N2O mole fractions at an acquisition rate of 1 Hz was better than 0.2 nmol mol-1. The same value was achieved for duplicate measurements of a standard gas analysed within 1 hour of each other. The response time to concentration changes in water was 142-203 s, depending on the headspace flow rate. During the first deployment on the AMT20 cruise (Atlantic Meridional Transect, Southampton to Punta Arenas, 12 October to 25 November 2010), we unexpectedly found the subtropical gyres to be slightly undersaturated in N2O, implying that this region acted as a sink for this greenhouse gas. In contrast, the equatorial region was supersaturated and a source of nitrous oxide to the atmosphere. Mean sea-to-air fluxes were overall small and ranged between -1.6 and 0.11 μmol m-2 d-1 (negative fluxes imply an net uptake by the ocean). Despite the good short-term repeatability, significant calibration drift occurred between the six

  3. Studies on the uptake and incorporation of anthropogenic nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) by sunflowers and maize by using {sup 15}N isotope tracers; Untersuchungen zur Aufnahme und zum Einbau von anthropogenen Stickoxiden (NO{sub x}) durch Sonnenblumen und Mais mittels {sup 15}N-Isotopen-Markierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segschneider, H.J.

    1994-05-01

    The aim of the present thesis was to quantify the uptake of nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) and nitrogen monoxide (NO) by sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L.) and maize (Zea mays L.) in a concentration range corresponding to the concentration range in the present atmosphere. Furthermore, work was carried out on characterizing the parameters responsible for NO{sub 2} and NO uptake by varying the different exposure conditions. In addition by applying {sup 15}N-enriched nitrogen oxides ({sup 15}NO{sub 2}; {sup 15}NO) it was also possible to investigate the incorporation and distribution of the {sup 15}NO{sub x} nitrogen in the plants. After an appropriate cultivation phase, the plants were transferred individually into a specially designed exposure system (Latus, 1989). Quantification of the NO{sub 2} or NO uptake was carried out by two independent measuring methods. On the one hand, the quantities of NO{sub 2} or NO taken up by the plants were determined via the NO{sub 2} concentration difference between the chamber inlet and outlet. On the other hand, the NO{sub 2} and NO uptake was calculated after exposure to {sup 15}N-enriched nitrogen oxides by determining the {sup 15}N/{sup 14}N ratio in the exposed plants using mass spectrometry. Furthermore, by using various analytical procedures it was possible to determine the sizes of the different nitrogen pools in the plants and to evaluate them by mass spectrometry. (orig./UG)

  4. Combined anaerobic ammonium and methane oxidation for nitrogen and methane removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Baoli; Sánchez, Jaime; van Alen, Theo A; Sanabria, Janeth; Jetten, Mike S M; Ettwig, Katharina F; Kartal, Boran

    2011-12-01

    Anammox (anaerobic ammonium oxidation) is an environment-friendly and cost-efficient nitrogen-removal process currently applied to high-ammonium-loaded wastewaters such as anaerobic digester effluents. In these wastewaters, dissolved methane is also present and should be removed to prevent greenhouse gas emissions into the environment. Potentially, another recently discovered microbial pathway, n-damo (nitrite-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation) could be used for this purpose. In the present paper, we explore the feasibility of simultaneously removing methane and ammonium anaerobically, starting with granules from a full-scale anammox bioreactor. We describe the development of a co-culture of anammox and n-damo bacteria using a medium containing methane, ammonium and nitrite. The results are discussed in the context of other recent studies on the application of anaerobic methane- and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria for wastewater treatment.

  5. Massive nitrogen loss from the Benguela upwelling system through anaerobic ammonium oxidation RID B-8834-2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuypers, MMM; Lavik, G.; Woebken, D.;

    2005-01-01

    ) and is commonly attributed to denitrification (reduction of nitrate to N-2 by heterotrophic bacteria). Here, we show that instead, the anammox process (the anaerobic oxidation of ammonium by nitrite to yield N-2) is mainly responsible for nitrogen loss in the OMZ waters of one of the most productive regions...... that anammox bacteria are responsible for massive losses of fixed nitrogen. We have identified and directly linked anammox bacteria to the removal of fixed inorganic nitrogen in the OMZ waters of an open-ocean setting. We hypothesize that anammox could also be responsible for substantial nitrogen loss from...... other OMZ waters of the ocean....

  6. Nitrogen and phosphorus removal in pilot-scale anaerobic-anoxic oxidation ditch system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Yongzhen; HOU Hongxun; WANG Shuying; CUI Youwei; Zhiguo Yuan

    2008-01-01

    To achieve high efficiency of nitrogen and phosphorus removal and to investigate the rule of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification phosphorus removal(SNDPR),a whole course of SNDPR damage and recovery was studied in a pilot-scale,anaerobicanoxic oxidation ditch(OD),where the volumes of anaerobic zone,anoxic zone,and ditches zone of the OD system were 7,21,and 280L,respectively.The reactor was fed with municipal wastewater with a flow rate of 336 L/d.The concept of simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND)rate(rSND) was put forward to quantify SND.The results indicate that:(1)high nitrogen and phosphorus removal efficiencies were achieved during the stable SND phase,total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphate(TP) removal rates were 80%and 85%,respectively;(2)when the system was aerated excessively,the stability of SND was damaged,and rSND dropped from 80% to 20%or less;(3)the natural logarithm of the ratio of NOx to MJ4+ in the effluent had a linear correlation to oxidation-reduction potential (ORP);(4)when NO3- was less than 6 mg/L.high phosphorus removal efficiency could be achieved;(5)denitrifying phosphorus removal (DNPR) could take place in the anaerobic-anoxic OD system.The major innovation was that the SND rate was devised and quantified.

  7. Nitrogen oxides emissions from the MILD combustion with the conditions of recirculation gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min; Shim, Sung Hoon; Jeong, Sang Hyun; Oh, Kwang-Joong; Lee, Sang-Sup

    2017-04-01

    The nitrogen oxides (NOx) reduction technology by combustion modification which has economic benefits as a method of controlling NOx emitted in the combustion process, has recently been receiving a lot of attention. Especially, the moderate or intense low oxygen dilution (MILD) combustion which applied high temperature flue gas recirculation has been confirmed for its effectiveness with regard to solid fuel as well. MILD combustion is affected by the flue gas recirculation ratio and the composition of recirculation gas, so its NOx reduction efficiency is determined by them. In order to investigate the influence of factors which determine the reduction efficiency of NOx in MILD coal combustion, this study changed the flow rate and concentration of nitrogen (N2), carbon dioxide (CO2) and steam (H2O) which simulate the recirculation gas during the MILD coal combustion using our lab-scale drop tube furnace and performed the combustion experiment. As a result, its influence by the composition of recirculation gas was insignificant and it was shown that flue gas recirculation ratio influences the change of NOx concentration greatly. We investigated the influence of factors determining the nitrogen oxides (NOx) reduction efficiency in MILD coal combustion, which applied high-temperature flue gas recirculation. Using a lab-scale drop tube furnace and simulated recirculation gas, we conducted combustion testing changing the recirculation gas conditions. We found that the flue gas recirculation ratio influences the reduction of NOx emissions the most.

  8. Nitrogen transformations in intensive aquaculture system and its implication to climate change through nitrous oxide emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhen; Lee, Jae Woo; Chandran, Kartik; Kim, Sungpyo; Sharma, Keshab; Brotto, Ariane Coelho; Khanal, Samir Kumar

    2013-02-01

    The rapid development of aquaculture could result in significant environmental concerns such as eutrophication and climate change. However, to date, very few studies have been conducted to investigate nitrogen transformations in aquaculture systems; and specifically the emission of nitrous oxide (N(2)O), which is an important greenhouse gas and ozone-depleting substance. In this study, nitrogen transformations in intensive laboratory-scale Chinese catfish (Clarias fuscus) aquaculture systems were investigated by identifying and quantifying N(2)O emissions. Results indicated that about 1.3% of the nitrogen input was emitted as N(2)O gas. Dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations and feeding rates had significant effects on N(2)O emissions. Higher N(2)O emissions were obtained in aquaculture systems with lower DO concentrations and higher feeding rates. Both nitrification and denitrification appeared to be responsible for the emissions of N(2)O. Key factors which correlated with the N(2)O emission rate in aquaculture systems were NO(2)(-), DO and total ammonia nitrogen concentrations.

  9. Achieving lower nitrogen balance and higher nitrogen recovery efficiency reduces nitrous oxide emissions in North America’s maize cropping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Few studies have assessed the common, yet unproven, hypothesis that an increase of plant nitrogen (N) uptake and/or recovery efficiency (NRE) will reduce nitrous oxide (N2O) emission during crop production. Understanding the relationships between N2O emissions and crop N uptake and use efficiency p...

  10. Method for catalyzing oxidation/reduction reactions of simple molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bicker, D.; Bonaventura, J.

    1988-06-14

    A method for oxidizing carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide is described comprising: (1) contacting, together, carbon monoxide, a nitrogen-containing chelating agent and water; wherein the chelating agent is at least one member selected from the group consisting of methmeoglobin bound to a support, ferric hemoglobin bound to a support, iron-containing porphyrins bound to a support, and sperm whale myoglobin bound to a support, wherein the support is glass, a natural fiber, a synthetic fiber, a gel, charcoal, carbon ceramic material, a metal oxide, a synthetic polymer, a zeolite, a silica compound of an alumina compound; and (2) obtaining carbon dioxide.

  11. Quorum Quenching of Nitrobacter winogradskyi Suggests that Quorum Sensing Regulates Fluxes of Nitrogen Oxide(s) during Nitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguere, Andrew T.; Bottomley, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Quorum sensing (QS) is a widespread process in bacteria used to coordinate gene expression with cell density, diffusion dynamics, and spatial distribution through the production of diffusible chemical signals. To date, most studies on QS have focused on model bacteria that are amenable to genetic manipulation and capable of high growth rates, but many environmentally important bacteria have been overlooked. For example, representatives of proteobacteria that participate in nitrification, the aerobic oxidation of ammonia to nitrate via nitrite, produce QS signals called acyl-homoserine lactones (AHLs). Nitrification emits nitrogen oxide gases (NO, NO2, and N2O), which are potentially hazardous compounds that contribute to global warming. Despite considerable interest in nitrification, the purpose of QS in the physiology/ecology of nitrifying bacteria is poorly understood. Through a quorum quenching approach, we investigated the role of QS in a well-studied AHL-producing nitrite oxidizer, Nitrobacter winogradskyi. We added a recombinant AiiA lactonase to N. winogradskyi cultures to degrade AHLs to prevent their accumulation and to induce a QS-negative phenotype and then used mRNA sequencing (mRNA-Seq) to identify putative QS-controlled genes. Our transcriptome analysis showed that expression of nirK and nirK cluster genes (ncgABC) increased up to 19.9-fold under QS-proficient conditions (minus active lactonase). These data led to us to query if QS influenced nitrogen oxide gas fluxes in N. winogradskyi. Production and consumption of NOx increased and production of N2O decreased under QS-proficient conditions. Quorum quenching transcriptome approaches have broad potential to identify QS-controlled genes and phenotypes in organisms that are not genetically tractable.

  12. Effect of nitrogen addition on the structural, electrical, and optical properties of In-Sn-Zn oxide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Junjun; Torigoshi, Yoshifumi; Suko, Ayaka; Nakamura, Shin-ichi; Kawashima, Emi; Utsuno, Futoshi; Shigesato, Yuzo

    2017-02-01

    Indium-tin-zinc oxide (ITZO) films were deposited at various nitrogen flow ratios using magnetron sputtering. At a nitrogen flow ratio of 40%, the structure of ITZO film changed from amorphous, with a short-range-ordered In2O3 phase, to a c-axis oriented InN polycrystalline phase, where InN starts to nucleate from an amorphous In2O3 matrix. Whereas, nitrogen addition had no obvious effect on the structure of indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) films even at a nitrogen flow ratio of 100%. Nitrogen addition also suppressed the formation of oxygen-related vacancies in ITZO films when the nitrogen flow ratio was less than 20%, and higher nitrogen addition led to an increase in carrier density. Moreover, a red-shift in the optical band edge was observed as the nitrogen flow ratio increased, which could be attributed to the generation of InN crystallites. We anticipate that the present findings demonstrating nitrogen-addition induced structural changes can help to understand the environment-dependent instability in amorphous IGZO or ITZO based thin-film transistors (TFTs).

  13. Response of anaerobic ammonium oxidation to inorganic nitrogen fluctuations in temperate estuarine sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Catarina; Magalhães, Catarina; Joye, Samantha B.; Bordalo, Adriano A.

    2016-07-01

    The discovery of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) highlighted the importance of alternative metabolic pathways to inorganic nitrogen removal in natural environments, particularly in those subjected to increased nitrate inputs, such as estuaries. Laboratory enrichment experiments were used to test the effect of increasing loads of nitrate (NO3-), nitrite (NO2-), and ammonium (NH4+) on the anammox process. Three Atlantic temperate estuaries (NW Portugal) were investigated along a salinity gradient, and anammox activity was measured under different NO3-, NO2-, and NH4+ treatments, using the isotope pairing technique. Obtained results showed that NO3- stimulated denitrification but not anammox, whereas NO2- additions had a positive effect on anammox activity, confirming its role as a key environmental control. On the other hand, increasing NH4+ concentrations seemed to inhibit anammox for low salinity sites. Our findings suggested an important role of the natural availability of nitrogen compounds in regulating anammox and the magnitude of anammox versus denitrification in estuarine environments.

  14. Total dose radiation response of modified commercial silicon-on-insulator materials with nitrogen implanted buried oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zhong-Shan; Liu Zhong-Li; Yu Fang; Li Ning

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen ions of various doses are implanted into the buried oxide (BOX) of commercial silicon-on-insulator (SOI)materials,and subsequent annealings are carried out at various temperatures.The total dose radiation responses of the nitrogen-implanted SOI wafers are characterized by the high frequency capacitance-voltage (C-V) technique after irradiation using a Co-60 source.It is found that there exist relatively complex relationships between the radiation hardness of the nitrogen implanted BOX and the nitrogen implantation dose at different irradiation doses.Fhe experimental results also suggest that a lower dose nitrogen implantation and a higher post-implantation annealing temperature are suitable for improving the radiation hardness of SOI wafer.Based on the measured C-V data,secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS),and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy,the total dose responses of the nitrogen-implanted SOI wafers are discussed.

  15. The lifetime of nitrogen oxides in an isoprene-dominated forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romer, Paul S.; Duffey, Kaitlin C.; Wooldridge, Paul J.; Allen, Hannah M.; Ayres, Benjamin R.; Brown, Steven S.; Brune, William H.; Crounse, John D.; de Gouw, Joost; Draper, Danielle C.; Feiner, Philip A.; Fry, Juliane L.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Koss, Abigail; Misztal, Pawel K.; Nguyen, Tran B.; Olson, Kevin; Teng, Alex P.; Wennberg, Paul O.; Wild, Robert J.; Zhang, Li; Cohen, Ronald C.

    2016-06-01

    The lifetime of nitrogen oxides (NOx) affects the concentration and distribution of NOx and the spatial patterns of nitrogen deposition. Despite its importance, the lifetime of NOx is poorly constrained in rural and remote continental regions. We use measurements from a site in central Alabama during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in summer 2013 to provide new insights into the chemistry of NOx and NOx reservoirs. We find that the lifetime of NOx during the daytime is controlled primarily by the production and loss of alkyl and multifunctional nitrates (ΣANs). During SOAS, ΣAN production was rapid, averaging 90 ppt h-1 during the day, and occurred predominantly during isoprene oxidation. Analysis of the ΣAN and HNO3 budgets indicate that ΣANs have an average lifetime of under 2 h, and that approximately 45 % of the ΣANs produced at this site are rapidly hydrolyzed to produce nitric acid. We find that ΣAN hydrolysis is the largest source of HNO3 and the primary pathway to permanent removal of NOx from the boundary layer in this location. Using these new constraints on the fate of ΣANs, we find that the NOx lifetime is 11 ± 5 h under typical midday conditions. The lifetime is extended by storage of NOx in temporary reservoirs, including acyl peroxy nitrates and ΣANs.

  16. Low-temperature synthesis of Mn-based mixed metal oxides with novel fluffy structures as efficient catalysts for selective reduction of nitrogen oxides by ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Bo; Zhao, Zongbin; Chen, Yongsheng; Wang, Xuzhen; Li, Yong; Qiu, Jieshan

    2014-10-21

    A series of Mn-based mixed metal oxide catalysts (Co-Mn-O, Fe-Mn-O, Ni-Mn-O) with high surface areas were prepared via low temperature crystal splitting and exhibited extremely high catalytic activity for the low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides with ammonia.

  17. Nitrogen source effects on nitrous oxide emissions from irrigated cropping systems in Colorado. American Chemical Society Symposium Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitrogen (N) fertilization is essential in most irrigated cropping systems to optimize crop yields and economic returns. Application of inorganic N fertilizers to these cropping systems generally results in increased nitrous oxide (N2O-N) emissions. Nitrous oxide emissions resulting from the appli...

  18. Within-city contrasts in PM composition and sources and their relationship with nitrogen oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minguillón, M C; Rivas, I; Aguilera, I; Alastuey, A; Moreno, T; Amato, F; Sunyer, J; Querol, X

    2012-10-26

    The present work is part of the INMA (INfancia y Medio Ambiente -'Environment and Childhood') project, which aims at assessing the adverse effects of exposure to air pollution during pregnancy and early in life. The present study was performed in the city of Sabadell (Northeast Spain) at three sampling sites covering different traffic characteristics, during two times of the year. It assesses time and spatial variations of PM(2.5) concentrations, chemical components and source contributions, as well as gaseous pollutants. Furthermore, a cross-correlation analysis of PM components and source contributions with gaseous pollutants used as a proxy for exposure assessment is carried out. Our data show the influence of traffic emissions in the Sabadell area. The main PM sources identified by Positive Matrix Factorisation (PMF) were similar between the two seasons: mineral source (traffic-induced resuspension, demolition/construction and natural background), secondary sulphate (higher in summer), secondary nitrate (only during winter), industrial, and road traffic, which was the main contributor to PM(2.5) at two of the sites. The correlation of concentrations of nitrogen oxides was especially strong with those of elemental carbon (EC). The relatively weaker correlations with organic carbon (OC) in summer are attributed to the variable formation of secondary OC. Strong correlations between concentration of nitrogen oxides and PM(2.5) road traffic contributions obtained from source apportionment analysis were seen at all sites. Therefore, under the studied urban environment, nitrogen oxides can be used as a proxy for the exposure to road traffic contribution to PM(2.5); the use of NO(x) concentrations being preferred, with NO and NO(2) as second and third options, respectively.

  19. Removal of nitrogen compounds from gasification gas by selective catalytic or non-catalytic oxidation; Typpiyhdisteiden poisto kaasutuskaasusta selektiivisellae katalyyttisellae ja ei-katalyyttisellae hapetuksella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J.; Koljonen, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    In gasification reactive nitrogenous compounds are formed from fuel nitrogen, which may form nitrogen oxides in gas combustion. In fluidized bed gasification the most important nitrogenous compound is ammonia (NH{sub 3}). If ammonia could be decomposed to N{sub 2} already before combustion, the emissions if nitrogen oxides could be reduced significantly. One way of increasing the decomposition rate of NH{sub 3} could be the addition of suitable reactants to the gas, which would react with NH{sub 3} and produce N{sub 2}. The aim of this research is to create basic information, which can be used to develop a new method for removal of nitrogen compounds from gasification gas. The reactions of nitrogen compounds and added reactants are studied in reductive atmosphere in order to find conditions, in which nitrogen compounds can be oxidized selectively to N{sub 2}. The project consists of following subtasks: (1) Selective non-catalytic oxidation (SNCO): Reactions of nitrogen compounds and oxidizers in the gas phase, (2) Selective catalytic oxidation (SCO): Reactions of nitrogen compounds and oxidizers on catalytically active surfaces, (3) Kinetic modelling of experimental results in co-operation with the Combustion Chemistry Research Group of Aabo Akademi University. The most important finding has been that NH{sub 3} can be made to react selectively with the oxidizers even in the presence of large amounts of CO and H{sub 2}. Aluminium oxides were found to be the most effective materials promoting selectivity. (author)

  20. Keeping the heart in balance: the functional interactions of myoglobin with nitrogen oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flögel, Ulrich; Fago, Angela; Rassaf, Tienush

    2010-01-01

    in the heart. By a dynamic cycle, in which a decrease in tissue O2 tension drives the conversion of Mb from being a NO scavenger under normoxia to a NO producer during hypoxia, mitochondrial respiration is reversibly adapted to the intracellular O2 tension. Therefore, Mb may act as an important O2 sensor...... through which NO can regulate muscle energetics and function. As Mb is widespread throughout the fauna, the diverse oxygen-dependent interactions between Mb and nitrogen oxides may not only be of relevance for mammals but also for other vertebrates as evidenced by comparable phenotypes of ‘artificial...

  1. Emission of Nitrous Oxide in Temperate Forests with Different Stages of Nitrogen Saturation in Central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaoyan, F.

    2015-12-01

    Long-term nitrogen deposition has caused a problem called nitrogen saturation in forest ecosystems globally. Aber et al. (1989) suggested that nitrogen saturation activate soil nitrification in forest systems, which is the main process of N2O production in aerobic condition. Thus, nitrogen saturation may affect significantly the N2O emission from forests, while the impact on flux has not been quantitatively evaluated yet. In the present study, 3-year monitoring of N2O emission was performed in an N-saturated forests (Tama Hill, Tokyo): the emission rate of N2O was measured monthly by a closed chamber method at 12 plots along a slope, and the net nitrification rate of surface soil (0-10 cm) was measured 4 times in situ. In addition, a comparative research was conducted in summer in eight temperate forests with different stages of nitrogen saturation in central Japan; the N2O flux, soil moisture, nitrogen availability and stream water NO3- concentration were measured at each site. In an N-saturated forests, the annual N2O emission was estimated to be 0.88 kg N ha-1year-1 , showing a typical seasonal variation . The seasonal patterns of N2O emission were significantly related to soil moisture and ambient temperature. We also found high spatial variation of N2O flux among 12 plots along the slope, which was generally higher at the bottom. Moreover, a positive correlation was found between the rate of N2O emission and the net nitrification rate with WFPS60% , probably due to the effect of denitrification. In comparison sites, the N2O emission rate ranged nearly 16-fold from 0.13-2.11 g N ha-1day-1 was linearly related to the stream water NO3- concentration ranged 10-fold from 0.14 to 1.4 mg N/L. Our results revealed N enrichment in forest obviously stimulate soil N2O emission. Keywords: Nitrous oxide, nitrogen saturation, nitrification, temperate forest

  2. Interference of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor on the analysis for oxides of nitrogen by chemiluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maahs, H. G.

    1975-01-01

    The interference of small concentrations (less than 4 percent by volume) of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor on the analysis for oxides of nitrogen by chemiluminescence was measured. The sample gas consisted primarily of nitrogen, with less than 100 parts per million concentration of nitric oxide, and with small concentrations of oxygen, carbon dioxide, and water vapor added. Results obtained under these conditions indicate that although oxygen does not measurably affect the analysis for nitric oxide, the presence of carbon dioxide and water vapor causes the indicated nitric oxide concentration to be too low. An interference factor - defined as the percentage change in indicated nitric oxide concentration (relative to the true nitric oxide concentration) divided by the percent interfering gas present - was determined for carbon dioxide to be -0.60 + or - 0.04 and for water vapor to be -2.1 + or - 0.3.

  3. The influence of oxidation with nitric acid on the preparation and properties of active carbon enriched in nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietrzak, Robert [Laboratory of Coal Chemistry and Technology, Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Grunwaldzka 6, 60-780 Poznan (Poland)], E-mail: pietrob@amu.edu.pl; Nowicki, Piotr; Wachowska, Helena [Laboratory of Coal Chemistry and Technology, Faculty of Chemistry, Adam Mickiewicz University, Grunwaldzka 6, 60-780 Poznan (Poland)

    2009-01-01

    The effect of oxidation by 20% nitric acid on the properties and performance of active carbons enriched with nitrogen by means of the reaction with urea in the presence of air has been studied. The study has been made on demineralised orthocoking coal and the carbonisates obtained from it at 600 or 700 deg. C, subjected to the processes of nitrogenation, oxidation and activation with KOH in different sequences. The amount of nitrogen introduced into the carbon with the aid of urea has been found to depend on the stage at which the process of nitrogenation was performed. The process of oxidation of the demineralised coal and the active carbon obtained from the former has been found to favour nitrogen introduction into the carbon structure. In the process of nitrogenation of the carbonisates the amount of nitrogen introduced has inversely depended on the temperature of carbonisation. The modifications of the processes permitted obtaining materials of different textural parameters, different acid-base character of the surface and different iodine sorption capacity.

  4. Effects of planting Phragmites australis on nitrogen removal, microbial nitrogen cycling, and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing and denitrifying microorganisms in sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyama, Tadashi; Nishimura, Yoshiko; Ogata, Yuka; Sei, Kazunari; Mori, Kazuhiro; Ike, Michihiko

    2015-10-21

    We examined the effect of planting an emergent aquatic plant (Phragmites australis) on nitrogen removal from sediments using a 42-d pot experiment. The experimental pot systems comprised two types of sediments planted with and without young P. australis. Total nitrogen (total N), total dissolved N, and NH4-N in the sediments decreased markedly after planting. In contrast, those levels decreased only slightly in the unplanted sediments. The decrease in total N in the P. australis-planted sediments was 7-20 times those in the unplanted sediments. Abundances of bacterial 16S rRNA, archaeal 16S rRNA, ammonia-oxidizing bacterial ammonia monooxygenase (amoA), ammonia-oxidizing archaeal amoA, and denitrifying bacterial nitrite reductase (nirK) genes increased significantly in sediments after planting. Phragmites australis appears to have released oxygen and created a repeating cycle of oxidizing and reducing conditions in the sediments. These conditions should promote mineralization of organic N, nitrification, and denitrification in the sediments. Phragmites australis absorbed bioavailable nitrogen generated by microbial nitrogen metabolism. During the 42-d period after planting, 31-44% of total N was removed by microbial nitrogen cycling, and 56-69% was removed via absorption by P. australis. These results suggest that planting P. australis can increase microbial populations and their activities, and that nitrogen removal can be accelerated by the combined functions of P. australis and microorganisms in the sediment. Thus, planting P. australis has considerable potential as an effective remediation technology for eutrophic sediments.

  5. Catalyst-Packed Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor for Removal of Nitrogen Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, V.; Young, Sun Mok; Rajanikanth, B. S.; Kang, Ho-Chul

    2003-02-01

    A single-stage plasma-catalytic reactor in which catalytic materials were packed was used to remove nitrogen oxides. The packing material was scoria being made of various metal oxides including Al2O3, MgO, TiO2, etc. Scoria was able to act not only as dielectric pellets but also as a catalyst in the presence of reducing agent such as ethylene and ammonia. Without plasma discharge, scoria did not work well as a catalyst in the temperature range of 100 °C to 200 °C, showing less than 10% of NOx removal efficiency. When plasma is produced inside the reactor, the NOx removal efficiency could be increased to 60% in this temperature range.

  6. Biological Effects of Short, High-Level Exposure to Gases: Nitrogen Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOT ES3 This project was one of four under the same contract; the others covered ammonia , carbon monoxide, and sulfur dioxide. 3 IS. KEY wOROS...characterize the biological responses to short, high-level exposures to four gases associated with certain Army weapons systems ( ammonia , carbon monoxide...20- i --- 7 (2) Biochemical and Other Effects Buckley and BalchumlO found biochemical changes, principally in enzyme activity of the liver, spleen

  7. Effects of drought on nitrogen turnover and abundances of ammonia-oxidizers in mountain grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchslueger, L.; Kastl, E.-M.; Bauer, F.; Kienzl, S.; Hasibeder, R.; Ladreiter-Knauss, T.; Schmitt, M.; Bahn, M.; Schloter, M.; Richter, A.; Szukics, U.

    2014-11-01

    Future climate scenarios suggest an increased frequency of summer drought periods in the European Alpine Region. Drought can affect soil nitrogen (N) cycling, by altering N transformation rates, as well as the abundances of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea. However, the extent to which drought affects N cycling under in situ conditions is still controversial. The goal of this study was to analyse effects of drought on soil N turnover and ammonia-oxidizer abundances in soil without drought history. To this end we conducted rain-exclusion experiments at two differently managed mountain grassland sites, an annually mown and occasionally fertilized meadow and an abandoned grassland. Soils were sampled before, during and after drought and were analysed for potential gross rates of N mineralization, microbial uptake of inorganic N, nitrification, and the abundances of bacterial and archaeal ammonia-oxidizers based on gene copy numbers of the amoA gene (AOB and AOA, respectively). Drought induced different responses at the two studied sites. At the managed meadow drought increased NH4+ immobilization rates and NH4+ concentrations in the soil water solution, but led to a reduction of AOA abundance compared to controls. At the abandoned site gross nitrification and NO3- immobilization rates decreased during drought, while AOB and AOA abundances remained stable. Rewetting had only minor, short-term effects on the parameters that had been affected by drought. Seven weeks after the end of drought no differences to control plots could be detected. Thus, our findings demonstrated that in mountain grasslands drought had distinct transient effects on soil nitrogen cycling and ammonia-oxidizers, which could have been related to a niche differentiation of AOB and AOA with increasing NH4+ levels. However, the effect strength of drought was modulated by grassland management.

  8. Manganese oxide nanowires wrapped with nitrogen doped carbon layers for high performance supercapacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Mei, Yuan; Zhang, Lin-Qun; Wang, Jian-Hai; Liu, An-Ran; Zhang, Yuan-Jian; Liu, Song-Qin

    2015-10-01

    In this study, manganese oxide nanowires wrapped by nitrogen-doped carbon layers (MnO(x)@NCs) were prepared by carbonization of poly(o-phenylenediamine) layer coated onto MnO2 nanowires for high performance supercapacitors. The component and structure of the MnO(x)@NCs were controlled through carbonization procedure under different temperatures. Results demonstrated that this composite combined the high conductivity and high specific surface area of nitrogen-doped carbon layers with the high pseudo-capacitance of manganese oxide nanowires. The as-prepared MnO(x)@NCs exhibited superior capacitive properties in 1 M Na2SO4 aqueous solution, such as high conductivity (4.167×10(-3) S cm(-1)), high specific capacitance (269 F g(-1) at 10 mV s(-1)) and long cycle life (134 F g(-1) after 1200 cycles at a scan rate of 50 mV s(-1)). It is reckoned that the present novel hybrid nanowires can serve as a promising electrode material for supercapacitors and other electrochemical devices.

  9. A review on the removal of nitrogen oxides from polluted flow by bioreactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, H.; Leung, D.Y.C. [Hong Kong Univ., (China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2010-07-01

    China's emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) have increased exponentially over the past decades because of rapid economic growth driven by the generation of energy from fossil fuels. The main pollutants of NOx are nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) which are harmful to the environment and human health. The conventional technologies used to control NOx emission from exhaust gas include selective catalytic reduction, selective non-catalytic reduction, adsorption and absorption scrubbing. This paper discussed the feasibility of removing NOx with conventional gas phase bioreactors such as biofilters, biotrickling filters and bioscrubbers. Alternative processes were also presented, such as membrane bioreactors, rotating drum biofilters and rotating biological contactors. The bioreactor appears to be superior to conventional technologies in terms of simplicity and economy in operation, low process energy requirements, and easy treatment of residual products. Two biologically-based NOx removal theories were also reviewed in this paper, notably nitrification and denitrification. The use of bacteria, fungi and microalgae were discussed and compared. It was concluded that the bioreactor is a promising technology that can be used to control NOx emitted during combustion processes. 15 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.

  10. Characterization of metal doped-titanium dioxide and behaviors on photocatalytic oxidation of nitrogen oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A series of nanosized ion-doped TiO2 catalysts with different ion content (between 0.1 and 1.0 at.%) have been prepared by wet impregnation method and investigated with respect to their behaviour for UV photocatalytic oxidation of nitric oxide. The catalytic activity had been correlated with structural, electronic and surface examinations of the catalysts using X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy disperse spectrometer (EDS) and high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) techniques. An enhancement of the photocatalytic activity was observed for Zn2+ doping catalyst ranged from 0.1 to 1.0 at.% which was attributed to the lengthened lifetime of electrons and holes. The improvement in photocatalytic activity could be also observed with the low doping concentration of Cr3+ (0.1 at.%). However, the doping of Fe3+, Mo6+, Mn2+ and the high doping concentration of Cr3+ had no good contribution to photocatalytic activity of nitric oxide.

  11. 氮化合物对饱和烃类氧化的作用%Effect of Nitrogen Compounds on the Oxidation Stability of Saturate Fractions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周亚松; 林世雄

    2002-01-01

    A custom built dynamic oxygen uptake tester was used to study the influence of nitrogen compounds on the oxidation characteristics of the saturate fractions from mineral base oils. Experimental results indicate that nitrogen compounds, especially quinoline and indole, take part in the oxidation of saturates. It is also found that indole is more active than quinoline. The latter can be oxidized partly into ketoimine, and the former is more rapidly oxidized into acylamide. The oxidation products, ketoimine or acylamide, could inhibit the oxidation of the complex. For lower nitrogen content, the oxidation processes were accelerated. However, at higher nitrogen content,the oxidation induction periods were increased. The oxidation characteristics of saturates were also dependent on the type of catalysts presented.

  12. Role of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) in nitrogen removal from a freshwater aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Richard L.; Böhlke, John Karl; B. Song,; C. Tobias,

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) couples the oxidation of ammonium with the reduction of nitrite, producing N2. The presence and activity of anammox bacteria in groundwater were investigated at multiple locations in an aquifer variably affected by a large, wastewater-derived contaminant plume. Anammox bacteria were detected at all locations tested using 16S rRNA gene sequencing and quantification of hydrazine oxidoreductase (hzo) gene transcripts. Anammox and denitrification activities were quantified by in situ 15NO2–tracer tests along anoxic flow paths in areas of varying ammonium, nitrate, and organic carbon abundances. Rates of denitrification and anammox were determined by quantifying changes in 28N2, 29N2, 30N2, 15NO3–, 15NO2–, and 15NH4+ with groundwater travel time. Anammox was present and active in all areas tested, including where ammonium and dissolved organic carbon concentrations were low, but decreased in proportion to denitrification when acetate was added to increase available electron supply. Anammox contributed 39–90% of potential N2 production in this aquifer, with rates on the order of 10 nmol N2–N L–1 day–1. Although rates of both anammox and denitrification during the tracer tests were low, they were sufficient to reduce inorganic nitrogen concentrations substantially during the overall groundwater residence times in the aquifer. These results demonstrate that anammox activity in groundwater can rival that of denitrification and may need to be considered when assessing nitrogen mass transport and permanent loss of fixed nitrogen in aquifers.

  13. The catalytic removal of ammonia and nitrogen oxides from spacecabin atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gully, A. J.; Graham, R. R.; Halligan, J. E.; Bentsen, P. C.

    1973-01-01

    Investigations were made on methods for the removal of ammonia and to a lesser extent nitrogen oxides in low concentrations from air. The catalytic oxidation of ammonia was studied over a temperature range of 250 F to 600 F and a concentration range 20 ppm to 500 ppm. Of the catalysts studied, 0.5 percent ruthenium supported on alumina was found to be superior. This material is active at temperatures as low as 250 F and was found to produce much less nitrous oxide than the other two active catalysts, platinum on alumina and Hopcalite. A quantitative design model was developed which will permit the performance of an oxidizer to be calculated. The ruthenium was found to be relatively insensitive to low concentrations of water and to oxygen concentration between 21 percent and 100 percent. Hydrogen sulfide was found to be a poison when injected in relatively large quantities. The adsorption of ammonia by copper sulfate treated silica gel was investigated at temperatures of 72 F and 100 F. A quantitative model was developed for predicting adsorption bed behavior.

  14. High electrocatalytic performance of nitrogen-doped carbon nanofiber-supported nickel oxide nanocomposite for methanol oxidation in alkaline medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Enizi, Abdullah M.; Elzatahry, Ahmed A.; Abdullah, Aboubakr M.; Vinu, Ajayan; Iwai, Hideo; Al-Deyab, Salem S.

    2017-04-01

    Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanofiber (N-CNF)-supported NiO composite was prepared by electrospinning a sol-gel mixture of graphene and polyaniline (PANi) with aqueous solutions of Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) followed by a high-temperature annealing process. The electrospun was stabilized for 2 h at 280 °C, carbonized for 5 h at 1200 °C then loaded by 10% NiO. The electrocatalytic activities of the produced nanocomposite have been studied using cyclic voltammetry, and chronoamperometry. Also, N-CNF was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), surface area (BET), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and scanning-electron microscopy (SEM). The obtained N-doped carbon nanofiber was found to have a nitrogen content of 2.6 atomic% with a diameter range of (140-160) nm, and a surface area (393.3 m2 g-1). In addition, it showed a high electrocatalytic behavior towards methanol oxidation reaction in alkaline medium and high stability and resistivity to the adsorption of intermediates.

  15. Behavior of incorporated nitrogen in plasma-nitrided silicon oxide formed by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Nao; Itokawa, Hiroshi; Fujitsuka, Ryota; Sekine, Katsuyuki; Onoue, Seiji; Tonotani, Junichi

    2016-04-01

    The behavior of nitrogen (N) atoms in plasma-nitrided silicon oxide (SiO2) formed by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was characterized by physical analysis and from electrical properties. The changes in the chemical bonding and distribution of N in plasma-nitrided SiO2 were investigated for different subsequent processes. N-Si3, N-Si2O, and N2 are formed in a SiO2 film by plasma nitridation. N2 molecules diffuse out during annealing at temperatures higher than 900 °C. NH species are generated from N2 molecules and H in the SiO2 film with subsequent oxide deposition using O3 as an oxidant. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) curves of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors are obtained. The negative shift of the C-V curve is caused by the increase in the density of positive fix charge traps in CVD-SiO2 induced by plasma nitridation. The C-V curve of plasma-nitrided SiO2 subjected to annealing shifts to the positive direction and that subjected to the subsequent oxide deposition shifts markedly to the negative direction. It is clarified that the density of positive charge fixed traps in plasma-nitrided SiO2 films decrease because the amount of N2 molecules is decreased by annealing, and that the density of traps increases because NH species are generated and move to the interface between SiO2 and the Si substrate with the subsequent oxide deposition.

  16. Post Hartree–Fock and DFT Studies on Pyrrole···Nitrogen and Pyrrole···Carbon Monoxide Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kolandaivel

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The hydrogen bonded and van der Waals isomers of pyrrole···nitrogen and pyrrole···carbon monoxide have been studied using ab initio and density functional theory methods. Complex geometries and total energies of the isomers have been determined at HF, MP2, B3LYP and B3PW91 levels of theory employing 6-31G* basis set. For pyrrole···nitrogen complex, only two isomers have stable structure and the more stable one is found to be the hydrogen bonded isomer. Among the five isomers of pyrrole···carbon monoxide complex, the hydrogen bonded isomer is found to be the most stable form. The interaction energy for all these isomers have been calculated after eliminating the basis set superposition errors by using the full counterpoise correction method. Chemical hardness, chemical potential have been calculated and are used to study the stability of the molecules.

  17. Effect the conditions of the acid-thermal modification of clinoptilolite have on the catalytic properties of palladium-copper complexes anchored on it in the reaction of carbon monoxide oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakitskaya, T. L.; Kiose, T. A.; Ennan, A. A.; Golubchik, K. O.; Oleksenko, L. P.; Gerasiova, V. G.

    2016-06-01

    The dependence of the physicochemical and structural-adsorption properties of natural and acid-thermal modified clinoptilolite, and of Pd(II)-Cu(II) catalysts based on them, on the duration of acid-thermal modification is investigated. The samples under study are described via XRD and thermal gravimetric (DTG and DTA) analysis, IR, DR UV-Vis, EPR spectroscopy, and water vapor adsorption. Values of both the specific surface area ( S sp) and pH of aqueous suspensions are determined. The resulting catalysts are tested in the reaction of low-temperature carbon monoxide oxidation with air oxygen. A conclusion is drawn about the nature of surface bimetallic Pd(II)-Cu(II) complexes. The greatest catalytic activity is shown by complexes based on clinoptilolite and modified with 3 M HNO3 for 0.5 and 1 h.

  18. Partial oxidation of methane (POM) assisted solid oxide co-electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Fanglin; Wang, Yao

    2017-02-21

    Methods for simultaneous syngas generation by opposite sides of a solid oxide co-electrolysis cell are provided. The method can comprise exposing a cathode side of the solid oxide co-electrolysis cell to a cathode-side feed stream; supplying electricity to the solid oxide co-electrolysis cell such that the cathode side produces a product stream comprising hydrogen gas and carbon monoxide gas while supplying oxygen ions to an anode side of the solid oxide co-electrolysis cell; and exposing the anode side of the solid oxide co-electrolysis cell to an anode-side feed stream. The cathode-side feed stream comprises water and carbon dioxide, and the anode-side feed stream comprises methane gas such that the methane gas reacts with the oxygen ions to produce hydrogen and carbon monoxide. The cathode-side feed stream can further comprise nitrogen, hydrogen, or a mixture thereof.

  19. Effect of the technology of implanting nitrogen into buried oxide on the radiation hardness of the top gate oxide for partially depleted SOI PMOSFET

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Zhong-Shan; Liu Zhong-Li; Zhang Guo-Qiang; Li Ning; Fan Kai; Zhang En-Xia; Yi Wan-Bing; Chen Meng; Wang Xi

    2005-01-01

    The effect of implanting nitrogen into buried oxide on the top gate oxide hardness against total irradiation does has been investigated with three nitrogen implantation doses(8×1015,2×1016 and 1×1017cm -2) for partially depleted SOI PMOSFET.The experimental results reveal the trend of negative shift of the thershold voltages of the studied transistors with the incerase of nitrogen implantation dose before irradition. After the irradiation with a total dose of 5×105 rad (Si)under a positive gate voltage of 2V,the threshold voltage shift of the transistors corresponding to the nitrogen implantation dose 8×1015cm -2 is smaller than that of the transistors without implantation.However, when the implantation dose reaches 2×1016 and 1×1017cm-2, for the majority of the tested transistors,their top gate oxide was badly damaged due to irratiation. In addition, the radiation also causes damage to the body -drain junctions of thetransistors with the gate oxide damaged.All the results can be interpreted by tracing back to the nitrogen implantation damage to the crystal lattices in the top silicon.

  20. Process for reducing nitrogen oxides in combustion gases by gas reactions with reduction substances containing nitrogen. Verfahren zur Minderung von Stickoxiden in Verbrennungsgasen durch Gasreaktionen mit stickstoffhaltigen Reduktionsmitteln

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, E.; Huebner, K.

    1986-03-06

    In the process for the reduction of nitrogen oxides in waste gases from combustion, according to the invention the waste gas flow is brought into contact with quaternary alkyl ammonium hydroxides and/or salts of primary, secondary and tertiary amines and/or tertiary amines. Triethylamine, monoethanol amine sulphide, methylamine formate, hydrazene sulphate or a mixture of tetramethyl ammonium chloride/hydroxide are used as means of reduction.

  1. A New Approach for Removal of Nitrogen Oxides from Synthetic Gas-streams under High Concentration of Oxygen in Biofilters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao Bin HUANG; Ju Guang ZHANG; He Ping HU; Yue SITU

    2005-01-01

    The potential of using denitrifying and nitrifying concurrent biofilters for the removal of nitrogen oxides from synthetic gas streams was studied under the condition of high oxygen concentration. It was found that more than 85% of nitric oxide was removed from synthetic combustion gas-streams which contained 20% oxygen and 350 μL/L NO, with a residence time of60 seconds. In the process, it was found that the existing of oxygen showed no evident negative effect on the efficiency of nitrogen removal.

  2. Preparation of conductive film via a low temperature synthesis that enables simultaneous nitrogen doping and reduction of graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Tamoghna

    2017-08-01

    A low temperature (‒78 °C), one-pot synthesis that enables the simultaneous reduction of graphene oxide (G-O) and nitrogen doping of reduced graphene oxide (rG-O) is described. The method facilitates the effective removal of oxygen-containing functional groups in the G-O and introduces both ‘graphitic’ and ‘pyridinic’ nitrogen up to 4% in the corresponding product. The N-doped materials displayed relatively high powder electrical conductivities (up to 2.5  ×  103 S m-1).

  3. Analysis of multilayered, nitrogen-doped aluminum oxide and hafnium oxide dielectric films for wide-temperature capacitor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeCerbo, J.N., E-mail: jennifer.decerbo@us.af.mil [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Aerospace Systems Directorate, 2130 Eighth St., WPAFB, OH 45433 (United States); Bray, K.R. [UES, Inc., 4401 Dayton Xenia Rd., Beavercreek, OH 45432 (United States); Merrett, J.N. [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Aerospace Systems Directorate, 2130 Eighth St., WPAFB, OH 45433 (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Capacitors with stable dielectric properties across a wide temperature range are a vital component in many power conditioning applications. High breakdown strength and low loss are also important for many applications. In this study, the dielectric properties of multilayer nitrogen-doped aluminum oxide and hafnium oxide films were characterized, comparing their properties to single layer films. The films were found to be stable from − 50 to 200 °C and from 20 Hz to 1 MHz. An order of magnitude decrease in leakage current was observed for the bilayer films. Breakdown strength for the multilayer films increased up to 75%. This concurs with the hypothesis that the addition of dielectric interfaces provides area to trap and dissipate runaway charge moving through the dielectric, thus lowering leakage current and increasing the breakdown strength. - Highlights: • Multilayer dielectric had stable dielectric properties for a wide temperature range. • Leakage current decreased an order of magnitude with layered dielectrics. • Breakdown strength increase of up to 75% was observed with layered dielectrics.

  4. Enhanced Catalytic Activity of Pt Supported on Nitrogen-Doped Reduced Graphene Oxide Electrodes for Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qizhong; Park, Soo-Jin; Kim, Seok

    2015-11-01

    We report an efficient method for the synthesis of nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide supported Pt nanocatalysts (Pt/N-RGO). Nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-RGO) was prepared by pyrolysis of graphene oxide with cyanamide as a nitrogen source. Then, the Pt nanoparticles were deposited over N-RGO by one-step chemical polyol reduction process. The morphology and structure of as-prepared catalysts were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Subsequently, electrocatalytic activities of the catalysts were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry (CV). As a result, the Pt/N-RGO catalysts exhibit the superior electrochemical activity toward methanol oxidation in compared with that of Pt loaded on undoped reduced graphene oxide (Pt/RGO) and Pt/carbon blacks (Pt/C). This was mainly attributed to the better distribution of Pt nanoparticles as well as the synergistic electrochemical effects of the nitrogen doped supports. These results demonstrate that N-RGO could be a promising candidate as a high performance catalyst support for a fuel cell application.

  5. Adsorption/oxidation of sulfur-containing gases on nitrogen-doped activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coconut shell-based activated carbon (CAC was used for the removal of methyl mercaptan (MM. CAC was modified by urea impregnation and calcined at 450°C and 950°C. The desulfurization activity was determined in a fixed bed reactor under room temperature. The results showed that the methyl mercaptan adsorption/oxidation capacity of modified carbon caicined at 950°C is more than 3 times the capacity of original samples. On the other hand, the modified carbon caicined at 950°C also has a high capacity for the simultaneous adsorption/oxidation of methyl mercaptan and hydrogen sulfide.The introduce of basic nitrogen groups siginificantly increases the desulfurization since it can facilitate the electron transfer process between sulfur and oxygen. The structure and chemical properties are characterized using Boehm titration, N2 adsorption-desorption method, thermal analysis and elemental analysis. The results showed that the major oxidation products were dimethyl disulfide and methanesulfonic acid which adsorbed in the activated carbon.

  6. Evidence for a physiological role of intracellularly occurring photolabile nitrogen oxides in human skin fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opländer, Christian; Wetzel, Wiebke; Cortese, Miriam M; Pallua, Norbert; Suschek, Christoph V

    2008-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a pivotal role in human skin biology. Cutaneous NO can be produced enzymatically by NO synthases (NOS) as well as enzyme independently via photodecomposition of photolabile nitrogen oxides (PNOs) such as nitrite or nitroso compounds, both found in human skin tissue in comparably high concentrations. Although the physiological role of NOS-produced NO in human skin is well defined, nothing is known about the biological relevance or the chemical origin of intracellularly occurring PNOs. We here, for the first time, give evidence that in human skin fibroblasts (FB) PNOs represent the oxidation products of NOS-produced NO and that in human skin fibroblasts intracellularly occurring PNOs effectively protect against the injurious effects of UVA radiation by a NO-dependent mechanism. In contrast, in PNO-depleted FB cultures an increased susceptibility to UVA-induced lipid peroxidation and cell death is observed, whereas supplementation of PNO-depleted FB cultures with physiological nitrite concentrations (10 microM) or with exogenously applied NO completely restores UVA-increased injuries. Thus, intracellular PNOs are biologically relevant and represent an important initial shield functioning in human skin physiology against UVA radiation. Consequently, nonphysiological low PNO concentrations might promote known UVA-related skin injuries such as premature aging and carcinogenesis.

  7. Occurrence and turnover of nitric oxide in a nitrogen-impacted sand and gravel aquifer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R.L.; Yoshinari, T.

    2008-01-01

    Little is known about nitric oxide (NO) production or consumption in the subsurface, an environment which may be conducive to NO accumulation. A study conducted in a nitrogen-contaminated aquifer on Cape Cod, Massachusetts assessed the occurrence and turnover of NO within a contaminant plume in which nitrification and denitrification were known to occur. NO (up to 8.6 nM) was detected in restricted vertical zones located within a nitrate (NO 3-) gradient and characterized by low dissolved oxygen (oxide (N2O) (up to 1 ??M) also was present. Single-well injection tests were used to determine NO production and consumption in situ within these zones. First-order rate constants for NO consumption were similar (0.05-0.08 h-1) at high and low (260 and 10 nM) NO concentrations, suggesting a turnover time at in situ concentrations of 10-20 h. Tracer tests with 15N[NO] demonstrated that oxidation to 15N[NO2-] occurred only during the initial stages, but after 4 h reduction to 15N[N2O] was the primary reaction product Added NO 2- (31 ??M) or NO3- (53 ??M) resulted in a linear NO accumulation at 2.4 and 1.0 nM h-1 for the first 6 h of in situ tests. These results suggest that NO was primarily produced by denitrification within this aquifer. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  8. Effect of nitrogen ion implantation on the structural and optical properties of indium oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sethi, Riti; Aziz, Anver; Siddiqui, Azher M., E-mail: amsiddiqui@jmi.ac.in [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi-110025 (India); Kumar, Pravin [Inter University Accelerator Center, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi-110067 (India); Khan, Sameen Ahmed [Department of Mathematics and Sciences, College of Arts and Applied Sciences (CAAS) Dhofar University, Salalah, Sultanate of Oman (Oman)

    2016-06-10

    : We report here synthesis and subsequent nitrogen ion implantation of indium oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}) thin films. The films were implanted with 25 keV N{sup +} beam for different ion doses between 3E15 to 1E16 ions/cm{sup 2}. The resulting changes in structural and optical properties were investigated using XRD, SEM-EDAX and UV-Vis Spectrometry. XRD studies reveal decrease in crystallite size from 20.06 to 12.42 nm with increase in ion dose. SEM micrographs show an increase in the grain size from 0.8 to 1.35 µm with increase in ion dose because of the agglomeration of the grains. Also, from EDAX data on pristine and N-implanted thin films the presence of indium and oxygen without any traces of impurity elements could be seen. However, at lower ion doses such as 3E15 and 5E15 ions/cm{sup 2}, no evidence of the presence of nitrogen ion was seen. However, for the ion dose of 1E16 ions/cm{sup 2}, evidence of presence of nitrogen can be seen in the EDAX data. Band gap calculations reveal a decrease in band gap from 3.54 to 3.38 eV with increasing ion dose. However, the band gap was found to again show an increase to 3.58 eV at the highest ion dose owing to quantum confinement effect.

  9. Removal of Nitrogen Oxides in Diesel Engine Exhaust by Plasma Assisted Molecular Sieves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper reports the studies conducted on removal of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) from diesel engine exhaust using electrical discharge plasma combined with adsorbing materials such as molecular sieves. This study is being reported for the first time. The exhaust is taken from a diesel engine of 6 kW under no load conditions. The characteristic behavior of a pulse energized dielectric barrier discharge reactor in the diesel exhaust treatment is reported. The NOx removal was not significant (36%) when the reactor without any packing was used. However, when the reactor was packed with molecular sieves (MS -3A, -4A & -13X), the NOx removal efficiency was increased to 78% particularly at a temperature of 200 o C. The studies were conducted at different temperatures and the results were discussed.

  10. Unusually high soil nitrogen oxide emissions influence air quality in a high-temperature agricultural region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oikawa, P Y; Ge, C; Wang, J; Eberwein, J R; Liang, L L; Allsman, L A; Grantz, D A; Jenerette, G D

    2015-11-10

    Fertilized soils have large potential for production of soil nitrogen oxide (NOx=NO+NO2), however these emissions are difficult to predict in high-temperature environments. Understanding these emissions may improve air quality modelling as NOx contributes to formation of tropospheric ozone (O3), a powerful air pollutant. Here we identify the environmental and management factors that regulate soil NOx emissions in a high-temperature agricultural region of California. We also investigate whether soil NOx emissions are capable of influencing regional air quality. We report some of the highest soil NOx emissions ever observed. Emissions vary nonlinearly with fertilization, temperature and soil moisture. We find that a regional air chemistry model often underestimates soil NOx emissions and NOx at the surface and in the troposphere. Adjusting the model to match NOx observations leads to elevated tropospheric O3. Our results suggest management can greatly reduce soil NOx emissions, thereby improving air quality.

  11. Nitrogen removal from sludge dewatering effluent through anaerobic ammonia oxidation process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Shao-hui; ZHENG Ping; HUA Yu-mei

    2005-01-01

    Anaerobic ammonia oxidation(Anammox) process is a novel and promising wastewater nitrogen removal process. The feasibility of transition of Anammox from denitrification and the performance of lab-scale Anammox biofilm reactor were investigated with sludge dewatering effluent. The results showed that Anammox process could be successfully started up after cultivation of denitrification biofilm and using it as inoculum. The transition of Anammox from denitrification was accomplished within 85 d. Anammox process was found suitable to remove ammonia from sludge dewatering effluent. The effluent ammonia concentration was detected to be 23.11 mgN/L at HRT of 28 h when influent ammonia concentration was fed 245 mgN/L, which was less than that for the national discharge standard Ⅱ (25 mgN/L) of 243.25 mg NH4+ -N/L and 288.31 mg NO2- -N/L.

  12. Catalyst-Packed Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor for Removal of Nitrogen Oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A single-stage plasma-catalytic reactor in which catalytic materials were packedwas used to remove nitrogen oxides. The packing material was scoria being made of various metaloxides including A12O3, MgO, TiO2, etc. Scoria was able to act not only as dielectric pelletsbut also as a catalyst in the presence of reducing agent such as ethylene and ammonia. Withoutplasma discharge, scoria did not work well as a catalyst in the temperature range of 100 °Cto 200 °C, showing less than 10% of NOx removal efficiency. When plasma is produced inside thereactor, the NOx removal efficiency could be increased to 60% in this temperature range.

  13. The NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM): Application to Air Quality Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, William; Peterson, Harold; Khan, Maudood; Biazar, Arastoo; Wang, Lihua

    2011-01-01

    Recent improvements to the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) and its application to the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system are discussed. The LNOM analyzes Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) and National Lightning Detection Network(TradeMark)(NLDN) data to estimate the raw (i.e., unmixed and otherwise environmentally unmodified) vertical profile of lightning NO(x) (= NO + NO2). The latest LNOM estimates of lightning channel length distributions, lightning 1-m segment altitude distributions, and the vertical profile of lightning NO(x) are presented. The primary improvement to the LNOM is the inclusion of non-return stroke lightning NOx production due to: (1) hot core stepped and dart leaders, (2) stepped leader corona sheath, K-changes, continuing currents, and M-components. The impact of including LNOM-estimates of lightning NO(x) for an August 2006 run of CMAQ is discussed.

  14. Robust p-type doping of copper oxide using nitrogen implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Marina; Polyakov, Stanislav M.; Cooil, Simon; Schenk, Alex K.; Edmonds, Mark; Thomsen, Lars; Mazzola, Federico; Wells, Justin W.

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate robust p-type doping of Cu2O using low/medium energy ion implantation. Samples are made by controlled oxidation of annealed Cu metal foils, which results in Cu2O with levels of doping close to intrinsic. Samples are then implanted with nitrogen ions using a kinetic energy in the few keV range. Using this method, we are able to produce very high levels of doping, as evidenced by a 350 meV shift in the Fermi level towards the VB maximum. The robustness of the nitrogen implanted samples are tested by exposing them to atmospheric contaminants, and elevated temperatures. The samples are found to survive an increase in temperature of many hundreds of degrees. The robustness of the samples, combined with the fact that the materials used are safe, abundant and non-toxic and that the methods used for the growth of Cu2O and N+ implantation are simple and cheap to implement industrially, underlines the potential of Cu2O:N for affordable intermediate band photovoltaics.

  15. Process-Scale Modeling of Atmosphere-Snowpack Exchange of Nitrogen Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, K. A.; Doskey, P. V.; Ganzeveld, L.

    2013-12-01

    Snowpack over glacial ice is a reservoir for reactive nitrogen gases. Previous studies indicate nitrogen oxides (NOx) are generated in snowpack interstitial air through photolysis of nitrate (NO3-). Gradients in NOx mixing ratios between snowpack interstitial air and the overlying atmosphere regulate exchange of NOx with snowpack, which affects the Arctic ozone budget and climate. To better understand the dynamics of cryosphere-atmosphere exchange of NOx in the Arctic, we collected 2 years of meteorological and chemical data in and above the snowpack at Summit, Greenland. The comprehensive dataset indicates NOx emissions are episodic, with NOx enhancements in snowpack in early spring during high wind speed events (10-20 mph), which elevate NOx levels to ~500 pptv at depths of 2.5 m. Analysis of the observations will be based upon application of a 1-D process-scale model of atmosphere-snowpack exchange of NOx. The model will include representations of the snowpack chemistry in gas and aqueous phases, mass transfer of chemical species between phases, and physical transport by diffusion and wind pumping. The model will calculate the chemical and physical tendencies in three dimensions: depth, time, and intensity. Analysis of the tendencies will allow us to perform model sensitivity tests of pertinent snowpack physical and chemical processes. The end-goal of the project is to simplify the major tendencies into a parameterized model add-on for use in global models to determine the importance of properly representing snowpack in global model simulations.

  16. High-Surface-Area Nitrogen-Doped Reduced Graphene Oxide for Electric Double-Layer Capacitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Hee-Chang; Bak, Seong-Min; Kim, Myeong-Seong; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel A; Lee, Chang-Wook; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Roh, Kwang Chul; Kim, Kwang-Bum

    2015-06-08

    A two-step method consisting of solid-state microwave irradiation and heat treatment under NH3 gas was used to prepare nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide (N-RGO) with a high specific surface area (1007 m(2)  g(-1) ), high electrical conductivity (1532 S m(-1) ), and low oxygen content (1.5 wt %) for electrical double-layer capacitor applications. The specific capacitance of N-RGO was 291 F g(-1) at a current density of 1 A g(-1) , and a capacitance of 261 F g(-1) was retained at 50 A g(-1) , which indicated a very good rate capability. N-RGO also showed excellent cycling stability and preserved 96 % of the initial specific capacitance after 100 000 cycles. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy results provided evidenced for the recovery of π conjugation in the carbon networks with the removal of oxygenated groups and revealed chemical bonding of the nitrogen atoms in N-RGO. The good electrochemical performance of N-RGO is attributed to its high surface area, high electrical conductivity, and low oxygen content.

  17. The importance of climate change and nitrogen use efficiency for future nitrous oxide emissions from agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, David R.; Zhang, Xin; Mauzerall, Denise L.; Malyshev, Sergey; Shevliakova, Elena

    2016-09-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) is an important greenhouse gas and ozone depleting substance. Previous projections of agricultural N2O (the dominant anthropogenic source) show emissions changing in tandem, or at a faster rate than changes in nitrogen (N) consumption. However, recent studies suggest that the carbon dioxide (CO2) fertilization effect may increase plant N uptake, which could decrease soil N losses and dampen increases in N2O. To evaluate this hypothesis at a global scale, we use a process-based land model with a coupled carbon-nitrogen cycle to examine how changes in climatic factors, land-use, and N application rates could affect agricultural N2O emissions by 2050. Assuming little improvement in N use efficiency (NUE), the model projects a 24%-31% increase in global agricultural N2O emissions by 2040-2050 depending on the climate scenario—a relatively moderate increase compared to the projected increases in N inputs (42%-44%) and previously published emissions projections (38%-75%). This occurs largely because the CO2 fertilization effect enhances plant N uptake in several regions, which subsequently dampens N2O emissions. And yet, improvements in NUE could still deliver important environmental benefits by 2050: equivalent to 10 Pg CO2 equivalent and 0.6 Tg ozone depletion potential.

  18. The contribution of anaerobic ammonium oxidation to nitrogen loss in two temperate eutrophic estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Catarina; Magalhães, Catarina; Joye, Samantha B.; Bordalo, Adriano A.

    2014-04-01

    Studies of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) continue to show the significance of this metabolic pathway for the removal of nitrogen (N) in several natural environments, including estuaries. However, the seasonal dynamics of the anammox process and related environmental controls within estuarine systems remains poorly explored. We evaluated the seasonal anammox activity along a salinity gradient in two temperate Atlantic estuaries, the Ave and the Douro (NW Portugal). Anammox potential rates were measured in anaerobic sediment slurries using 15N-labeled NO3- and NH4+ amendments. Production of 29N2 and 30N2 in the slurries was quantified using membrane inlet mass spectrometry (MIMS). Environmental characteristics of the sediment and water column were also monitored. Anammox potentials in the Ave and Douro estuarine sediments varied between 0.8-8.4, and 0-2.9 nmol cm-3 wet sediment h-1, respectively, with high seasonal and spatial fluctuations. Inorganic nitrogen availability emerged as the primary environmental control of anammox activity, while water temperature appeared to modulate seasonal variations. The contribution of anammox to overall N2 production averaged over 20%, suggesting that the role of anammox in removing fixed N from these two systems cannot be neglected.

  19. Nitrogen-doped amorphous oxide semiconductor thin film transistors with double-stacked channel layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Haiting; Wu, Qi; Xu, Ling; Zhang, Lei; Liu, Guochao; Dong, Chengyuan

    2016-11-01

    The amorphous oxide semiconductor (AOS) thin film transistors (TFTs) with the double-stacked channel layers (DSCL) combing the amorphous InZnO (a-IZO) films and the nitrogen-doped amorphous InGaZnO (a-IGZO:N) films were proposed and fabricated, which showed the excellent performance with the field-effect mobility of 49.6 cm2 V-1 s-1 and the subthreshold swing of 0.5 V/dec. More interestingly, very stable properties were observed in the bias stress and light illumination tests for these a-IZO/a-IGZO:N TFTs, as seemed to be the evident improvements over the prior arts. The improved performance and stability might be mainly due to the hetero-junctions in the channel layers and less interface/bulk trap density from the in situ nitrogen doping process in the a-IGZO layers. In addition, the passivation effect of the a-IGZO:N films also made some contributions to the stable properties exhibited in these novel DSCL TFTs.

  20. Numerical simulation of nitrogen oxide formation in lean premixed turbulent H2/O2/N2 flames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Day, Marc S.; Bell, John B.; Gao, Xinfeng

    2011-01-01

    Lean premixed hydrogen flames are thermodiffusively unstable and burn in cellular structures. Within these cellular structures the flame is locally enriched by preferential diffusion of hydrogen, leading to local hotspots that burn more intensely than an idealized flat steady flame at comparable...... examination of the reaction chemistry in these unsteady flames shows that at richer conditions the predominant path taken to convert nitrogen gas to nitric oxide is via NNH. For leaner flames a path through nitrous oxide becomes increasingly important....

  1. Dissimilatory metabolism of nitrogen oxides in bacteria: comparative reconstruction of transcriptional networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial response to nitric oxide (NO is of major importance since NO is an obligatory intermediate of the nitrogen cycle. Transcriptional regulation of the dissimilatory nitric oxides metabolism in bacteria is diverse and involves FNR-like transcription factors HcpR, DNR, and NnrR; two-component systems NarXL and NarQP; NO-responsive activator NorR; and nitrite-sensitive repressor NsrR. Using comparative genomics approaches, we predict DNA-binding motifs for these transcriptional factors and describe corresponding regulons in available bacterial genomes. Within the FNR family of regulators, we observed a correlation of two specificity-determining amino acids and contacting bases in corresponding DNA recognition motif. Highly conserved regulon HcpR for the hybrid cluster protein and some other redox enzymes is present in diverse anaerobic bacteria, including Clostridia, Thermotogales, and delta-proteobacteria. NnrR and DNR control denitrification in alpha- and beta-proteobacteria, respectively. Sigma-54-dependent NorR regulon found in some gamma- and beta-proteobacteria contains various enzymes involved in the NO detoxification. Repressor NsrR, which was previously known to control only nitrite reductase operon in Nitrosomonas spp., appears to be the master regulator of the nitric oxides' metabolism, not only in most gamma- and beta-proteobacteria (including well-studied species such as Escherichia coli, but also in Gram-positive Bacillus and Streptomyces species. Positional analysis and comparison of regulatory regions of NO detoxification genes allows us to propose the candidate NsrR-binding motif. The most conserved member of the predicted NsrR regulon is the NO-detoxifying flavohemoglobin Hmp. In enterobacteria, the regulon also includes two nitrite-responsive loci, nipAB (hcp-hcr and nipC (dnrN, thus confirming the identity of the effector, i.e. nitrite. The proposed NsrR regulons in Neisseria and some other species are extended to include

  2. Dissimilatory metabolism of nitrogen oxides in bacteria: comparative reconstruction of transcriptional networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry A Rodionov

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial response to nitric oxide (NO is of major importance since NO is an obligatory intermediate of the nitrogen cycle. Transcriptional regulation of the dissimilatory nitric oxides metabolism in bacteria is diverse and involves FNR-like transcription factors HcpR, DNR, and NnrR; two-component systems NarXL and NarQP; NO-responsive activator NorR; and nitrite-sensitive repressor NsrR. Using comparative genomics approaches, we predict DNA-binding motifs for these transcriptional factors and describe corresponding regulons in available bacterial genomes. Within the FNR family of regulators, we observed a correlation of two specificity-determining amino acids and contacting bases in corresponding DNA recognition motif. Highly conserved regulon HcpR for the hybrid cluster protein and some other redox enzymes is present in diverse anaerobic bacteria, including Clostridia, Thermotogales, and delta-proteobacteria. NnrR and DNR control denitrification in alpha- and beta-proteobacteria, respectively. Sigma-54-dependent NorR regulon found in some gamma- and beta-proteobacteria contains various enzymes involved in the NO detoxification. Repressor NsrR, which was previously known to control only nitrite reductase operon in Nitrosomonas spp., appears to be the master regulator of the nitric oxides' metabolism, not only in most gamma- and beta-proteobacteria (including well-studied species such as Escherichia coli, but also in gram-positive Bacillus and Streptomyces species. Positional analysis and comparison of regulatory regions of NO detoxification genes allows us to propose the candidate NsrR-binding motif. The most conserved member of the predicted NsrR regulon is the NO-detoxifying flavohemoglobin Hmp. In enterobacteria, the regulon also includes two nitrite-responsive loci, nipAB (hcp-hcr and nipC (dnrN, thus confirming the identity of the effector, i.e. nitrite. The proposed NsrR regulons in Neisseria and some other species are extended to include

  3. Dissimilatory Metabolism of Nitrogen Oxides in Bacteria:Comparative Reconstruction of Transcriptional Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodionov, Dmitry A.; Dubchak, Inna L.; Arkin, Adam P.; Alm, EricJ.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.

    2005-09-01

    Bacterial response to nitric oxide (NO) is of major importance since NO is an obligatory intermediate of the nitrogen cycle. Transcriptional regulation of the dissimilatory nitric oxides metabolism in bacteria is diverse and involves FNR-like transcription factors HcpR, DNR and NnrR, two-component systems NarXL and NarQP, NO-responsive activator NorR, and nitrite sensitive repressor NsrR. Using comparative genomics approaches we predict DNA-binding signals for these transcriptional factors and describe corresponding regulons in available bacterial genomes. Within the FNR family of regulators, we observed a correlation of two specificity-determining amino acids and contacting bases in corresponding DNA signal. Highly conserved regulon HcpR for the hybrid cluster protein and some other redox enzymes is present in diverse anaerobic bacteria including Clostridia, Thermotogales and delta-proteobacteria. NnrR and DNR control denitrification in alpha- and beta-proteobacteria, respectively. Sigma-54-dependent NorR regulon found in some gamma- and beta-proteobacteria contains various enzymes involved in the NO detoxification. Repressor NsrR, which was previously known to control only nitrite reductase operon in Nitrosomonas spp., appears to be the master regulator of the nitric oxides metabolism not only in most gamma- and beta-proteobacteria (including well-studied species like Escherichia coli), but also in Gram-positive Bacillus and Streptomyces species. Positional analysis and comparison of regulatory regions of NO detoxification genes allows us to propose the candidate NsrR-binding signal. The most conserved member of the predicted NsrR regulon is the NO-detoxifying flavohemoglobin Hmp. In enterobacteria, the regulon includes also two nitrite-responsive loci, nipAB (hcp-hcr) and nipC(dnrN), thus confirming the identity of the effector, i.e., nitrite. The proposed NsrR regulons in Neisseria and some other species are extended to include denitrification genes. As the

  4. Nitrogen substituent polarity influences dithiocarbamate-mediated lipid oxidation, nerve copper accumulation, and myelin injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Holly L; Viquez, Olga M; Amarnath, Kalyani; Amarnath, Venkataraman; Zyskowski, Justin; Kassa, Endalkachew N; Valentine, William M

    2009-01-01

    Dithiocarbamates have a wide spectrum of applications in industry, agriculture, and medicine, with new applications being investigated. Past studies have suggested that the neurotoxicity of some dithiocarbamates may result from copper accumulation, protein oxidative damage, and lipid oxidation. The polarity of a dithiocarbamate's nitrogen substituents influences the lipophilicity of the copper complexes that it generates and thus potentially determines its ability to promote copper accumulation within nerve and induce myelin injury. In the current study, a series of dithiocarbamate-copper complexes differing in their lipophilicity were evaluated for their relative abilities to promote lipid peroxidation determined by malondialdehyde levels generated in an ethyl arachidonate oil-in-water emulsion. In a second component of this study, rats were exposed to either N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate or sarcosine dithiocarbamate; both generated dithiocarbamate-copper complexes that were lipid- and water-soluble, respectively. Following the exposures, brain, tibial nerve, spinal cord, and liver tissue copper levels were measured by inductively coupled mass spectroscopy to assess the relative abilities of these two dithiocarbamates to promote copper accumulation. Peripheral nerve injury was evaluated using grip strengths, nerve conduction velocities, and morphologic changes at the light microscope level. Additionally, the protein expression levels of glutathione transferase alpha and heme-oxygenase-1 in nerve were determined, and the quantity of protein carbonyls was measured to assess levels of oxidative stress and injury. The data provided evidence that dithiocarbamate-copper complexes are redox active and that the ability of dithiocarbamate complexes to promote lipid peroxidation is correlated to the lipophilicity of the complex. Consistent with neurotoxicity requiring the formation of a lipid-soluble copper complex, significant increases in copper accumulation, oxidative

  5. Influence of the atmospheric species water, oxygen, nitrogen and carbon dioxide on the degradation of aluminum doped zinc oxide layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, M.; Dasgupta, S.; Vroon, Z.; Kniknie, B.; Barreau, N.; Berkum, J. van; Zeman, M.

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Al) layers were exposed to the atmospheric gases carbon dioxide (CO2), oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N 2) and air as well as liquid H2O purged with these gases, in order to investigate the chemical degradation behavior of these layers. The samples were analyzed by electrical,

  6. Surface and boundary layer exchanges of volatile organic compounds, nitrogen oxides and ozone during the GABRIEL campaign

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganzeveld, L.; Eerdekens, G.; Feig, G.; Fischer, H.; Harder, H.; Konigstedt, R.; Kubistin, D.; Martinez, M.; Meixner, F. X.; Scheeren, H. A.; Sinha, V.; Taraborrelli, D.; Williams, J.; de Arellano, J. Vila-Guerau; Lelieveld, J.

    2008-01-01

    We present an evaluation of sources, sinks and turbulent transport of nitrogen oxides, ozone and volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the boundary layer over French Guyana and Suriname during the October 2005 GABRIEL campaign by simulating observations with a single-column chemistry and climate model

  7. A DFT analysis of the adsorption of nitrogen oxides on Fe-doped graphene, and the electric field induced desorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Arriagada, Diego; Villegas-Escobar, Nery

    2017-10-01

    Density functional theory calculations were carried out to study the adsorption and sensing properties of Fe-doped graphene nanosheets (FeG) toward nitrogen oxides (NO, NO2, and N2O). The results indicated the adsorption of nitrogen oxides is significantly increased onto FeG compared to pristine graphene, reaching adsorption energies of 1.1-2.2 eV, even with a high stability at room temperature. As a result of the larger charge transfer and strong chemical binding, the bandgap of the adsorbent-adsorbate systems is increased in up to 0.5 eV with respect to the free FeG, indicating that FeG is highly sensitive to nitrogen oxides. It was also evidenced the adsorption and sensing properties remain even in the presence of O2 currents for N2O, where a co-adsorption mechanism was analyzed. Besides, NO2 is capable to induce the largest magnetization of FeG. Finally, positive electric fields of at least 0.04 a.u. decrease the stability of the adsorbent-adsorbate interactions, inducing the desorption process. Therefore, FeG emerges as a promising low-dimensional material with excellent adsorption and sensing properties to be applied in solid state sensors of nitrogen oxides, where electric fields can be used as a strategy for the FeG reactivation in repetitive sensing applications.

  8. Abundance and Community Composition of Ammonia-Oxidizers in Paddy Soil at Different Nitrogen Fertilizer Rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Ya-na; LIN Zhi-min

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia oxidation, the ifrst and rate-limiting step of nitriifcation, is carried out by both ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA). However, the relative importance of AOB and AOA to nitriifcation in terrestrial ecosystems is not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of the nitrogen input amount on abundance and community composition of AOB and AOA in red paddy soil. Soil samples of 10-20 cm (root layer soil) and 0-5 cm (surface soil) depths were taken from a red paddy. Rice in the paddy was fertilized with different rates of N as urea of N1 (75 kg N ha-1 yr-1), N2 (150 kg N ha-1 yr-1), N3 (225 kg N ha-1 yr-1) and CK (without fertilizers) in 2009, 2010 and 2011. Abundance and community composition of ammonia oxidizers was analyzed by real-time PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) based on amoA (the unit A of ammonia monooxygenase) gene. Archaeal amoA copies in N3 and N2 were signiifcantly (P<0.05) higher than those in CK and N1 in root layer soil or in surface soil under tillering and heading stages of rice, while the enhancement in bacterial amoA gene copies with increasing of N fertilizer rates only took on in root layer soil. N availability and soil NO3--N content increased but soil NH4+-N content didn’t change with increasing of N fertilizer rates. Otherwise, the copy numbers of archaeal amoA gene were higher (P<0.05) than those of bacterial amoA gene in root lary soil or in surface soil. Redundancy discriminate analysis based on DGGE bands showed that there were no obvious differs in composition of AOA or AOB communities in the ifeld among different N fertilizer rates. Results of this study suggested that the abundance of ammonia-oxidizers had active response to N fertilizer rates and the response of AOA was more obvious than that of AOB. Similarity in the community composition of AOA or AOB among different N fertilizer rates indicate that the community composition of ammonia-oxidizers

  9. Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea grow under contrasting soil nitrogen conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di, Hong J; Cameron, Keith C; Shen, Ju-Pei; Winefield, Chris S; O'Callaghan, Maureen; Bowatte, Saman; He, Ji-Zheng

    2010-06-01

    Nitrification is a key process of the nitrogen (N) cycle in soil with major environmental implications. The recent discovery of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) questions the traditional assumption of the dominant role of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in nitrification. We investigated AOB and AOA growth and nitrification rate in two different layers of three grassland soils treated with animal urine substrate and a nitrification inhibitor [dicyandiamide (DCD)]. We show that AOB were more abundant in the topsoils than in the subsoils, whereas AOA were more abundant in one of the subsoils. AOB grew substantially when supplied with a high dose of urine substrate, whereas AOA only grew in the Controls without the urine-N substrate. AOB growth and the amoA gene transcription activity were significantly inhibited by DCD. Nitrification rates were much higher in the topsoils than in the subsoils and were significantly related to AOB abundance, but not to AOA abundance. These results suggest that AOB and AOA prefer different soil N conditions to grow: AOB under high ammonia (NH(3)) substrate and AOA under low NH(3) substrate conditions.

  10. Atmospheric nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) at Dome C, East Antarctica, during the OPALE campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, M. M.; Roscoe, H. K.; Kukui, A.; Savarino, J.; France, J. L.; King, M. D.; Legrand, M.; Preunkert, S.

    2015-07-01

    Mixing ratios of the atmospheric nitrogen oxides NO and NO2 were measured as part of the OPALE (Oxidant Production in Antarctic Lands & Export) campaign at Dome C, East Antarctica (75.1° S, 123.3° E, 3233 m), during December 2011 to January 2012. Profiles of NOx mixing ratios of the lower 100 m of the atmosphere confirm that, in contrast to the South Pole, air chemistry at Dome C is strongly influenced by large diurnal cycles in solar irradiance and a sudden collapse of the atmospheric boundary layer in the early evening. Depth profiles of mixing ratios in firn air suggest that the upper snowpack at Dome C holds a significant reservoir of photolytically produced NO2 and is a sink of gas-phase ozone (O3). First-time observations of bromine oxide (BrO) at Dome C show that mixing ratios of BrO near the ground are low, certainly less than 5 pptv, with higher levels in the free troposphere. Assuming steady state, observed mixing ratios of BrO and RO2 radicals are too low to explain the large NO2 : NO ratios found in ambient air, possibly indicating the existence of an unknown process contributing to the atmospheric chemistry of reactive nitrogen above the Antarctic Plateau. During 2011-2012, NOx mixing ratios and flux were larger than in 2009-2010, consistent with also larger surface O3 mixing ratios resulting from increased net O3 production. Large NOx mixing ratios at Dome C arise from a combination of continuous sunlight, shallow mixing height and significant NOx emissions by surface snow (FNOx). During 23 December 2011-12 January 2012, median FNOx was twice that during the same period in 2009-2010 due to significantly larger atmospheric turbulence and a slightly stronger snowpack source. A tripling of FNOx in December 2011 was largely due to changes in snowpack source strength caused primarily by changes in NO3- concentrations in the snow skin layer, and only to a secondary order by decrease of total column O3 and associated increase in NO3- photolysis rates. A

  11. Extending the benchmark simulation model no2 with processes for nitrous oxide production and side-stream nitrogen removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    In this work the Benchmark Simulation Model No.2 is extended with processes for nitrous oxide production and for side-stream partial nitritation/Anammox (PN/A) treatment. For these extensions the Activated Sludge Model for Greenhouse gases No.1 was used to describe the main waterline, whereas...... the Complete Autotrophic Nitrogen Removal (CANR) model was used to describe the side-stream (PN/A) treatment. Comprehensive simulations were performed to assess the extended model. Steady-state simulation results revealed the following: (i) the implementation of a continuous CANR side-stream reactor has...... increased the total nitrogen removal by 10%; (ii) reduced the aeration demand by 16% compared to the base case, and (iii) the activity of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria is most influencing nitrous oxide emissions. The extended model provides a simulation platform to generate, test and compare novel control...

  12. Effects of nitrogen and phosphorus additions on nitrous oxide emission in a nitrogen-rich and two nitrogen-limited tropical forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Mianhai; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Lei; Zhu, Weixing; Zhang, Wei; Mo, Jiangming

    2016-06-01

    Nitrogen (N) deposition is generally considered to increase soil nitrous oxide (N2O) emission in N-rich forests. In many tropical forests, however, elevated N deposition has caused soil N enrichment and further phosphorus (P) deficiency, and the interaction of N and P to control soil N2O emission remains poorly understood, particularly in forests with different soil N status. In this study, we examined the effects of N and P additions on soil N2O emission in an N-rich old-growth forest and two N-limited younger forests (a mixed and a pine forest) in southern China to test the following hypotheses: (1) soil N2O emission is the highest in old-growth forest due to the N-rich soil; (2) N addition increases N2O emission more in the old-growth forest than in the two younger forests; (3) P addition decreases N2O emission more in the old-growth forest than in the two younger forests; and (4) P addition alleviates the stimulation of N2O emission by N addition. The following four treatments were established in each forest: Control, N addition (150 kg N ha-1 yr-1), P addition (150 kg P ha-1 yr-1), and NP addition (150 kg N ha-1 yr-1 plus 150 kg P ha-1 yr-1). From February 2007 to October 2009, monthly quantification of soil N2O emission was performed using static chamber and gas chromatography techniques. Mean N2O emission was shown to be significantly higher in the old-growth forest (13.9 ± 0.7 µg N2O-N m-2 h-1) than in the mixed (9.9 ± 0.4 µg N2O-N m-2 h-1) or pine (10.8 ± 0.5 µg N2O-N m-2 h-1) forests, with no significant difference between the latter two. N addition significantly increased N2O emission in the old-growth forest but not in the two younger forests. However, both P and NP addition had no significant effect on N2O emission in all three forests, suggesting that P addition alleviated the stimulation of N2O emission by N addition in the old-growth forest. Although P fertilization may alleviate the stimulated effects of atmospheric N deposition on N2O

  13. Effect of nitrogen doping on structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties of radio frequency magnetron sputtered zinc oxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perumal, R., E-mail: perumal_cgc@yahoo.co.uk; Hassan, Z.

    2016-06-01

    Zinc oxide receives remarkable attention due to its several attractive physical properties. Zinc oxide thin films doped with nitrogen were grown by employing RF magnetron sputtering method at room temperature. Doping was accomplished in gaseous medium by mixing high purity nitrogen gas along with argon sputtering gas. Structural studies confirmed the high crystalline nature with c-axis oriented growth of the nitrogen doped zinc oxide thin films. The tensile strain was developed due to the incorporation of the nitrogen into the ZnO crystal lattice. Surface roughness of the grown films was found to be decreased with increasing doping level was identified through atomic force microscope analysis. The presenting phonon modes of each film were confirmed through FTIR spectral analysis. The increasing doping level leads towards red-shifting of the cut-off wavelength due to decrement of the band gap was identified through UV–vis spectroscopy. All the doped films exhibited p-type conductivity was ascertained using Hall measurements and the obtained results were presented.

  14. Oxidation of diclofenac with chlorine dioxide in aquatic environments: influences of different nitrogenous species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yingling; Liu, Haijin; Liu, Guoguang; Xie, Youhai; Ni, Tianjun

    2015-06-01

    The oxidation of diclofenac (DCF), a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and emerging water pollutant, with chlorine dioxide was investigated under simulated water disinfection conditions. The reaction kinetics as functions of the initial concentrations of DCF, different nitrogenous species, and different pE values were experimentally determined. The results demonstrated that DCF reacted rapidly with ClO2, where more than 75 % of DCF (≤3.00 μM) was removed by 18.94 μM ClO2 within 60 s. All of the reactions followed pseudo first-order kinetics with respect to DCF, and the rate constant, k obs, exhibited a significant decrease from 4.21 × 10(-2) to 8.09 × 10(-3) s(-1), as the initial DCF concentration was increased from 1.00 to 5.00 μM. Furthermore, the degradation kinetics of DCF was clearly dependent on nitrogen-containing ion concentrations in the reaction solution. Ammonium and nitrite ions inhibited the DCF degradation by ClO2, whereas nitrate ion clearly initiated its promotion. In contrast, the inhibitory effect of NO2 (-) was more robust than that of NH4 (+). When the values of pE were gradually increased, the transformation of NH4 (+) to NO2 (-), and subsequently to NO3 (-), would occur, the rate constants were initially decreased, and then increased. When NH4 (+) and NO2 (-) coexisted, the inhibitory effect on the DCF degradation was less than the sum of the partial inhibitory effect. However, when NO2 (-) and NO3 (-) coexisted, the actual inhibition rate was greater than the theoretical estimate. These results indicated that the interaction of NH4 (+) and NO2 (-) was antagonistic, while the coexistence of NO2 (-) and NO3 (-) was observed to have a synergistic effect in aqueous environments.

  15. Effects of Nitrogen Fertilization and Soil Inoculation of Sulfur-Oxidizing or Nitrogen-Fixing Bacteria on Onion Plant Growth and Yield

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted in a newly reclaimed soil at El-Saff region, El-Giza Governorate, Egypt to study the effects of different rates of nitrogen (N: 62 to 248 kg ha-1) with or without soil inoculation of sulfur- (S-) oxidizing bacteria (SoxB) and combined inoculation of SoxB and N-fixing bacteria (NFxB) on yield, quality and nutritional status of onion (Allium cepa L., “Giza 20”). Elemental S at 620 kg ha-1 was applied to all treatments. Application of N at 62, 124, and 248 kg ha...

  16. Carbon monoxide may be an important molecule in migraine and other headaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arngrim, Nanna; Schytz, Henrik W; Hauge, Mette K

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Carbon monoxide was previously considered to just be a toxic gas. A wealth of recent information has, however, shown that it is also an important endogenously produced signalling molecule involved in multiple biological processes. Endogenously produced carbon monoxide may thus play...... an important role in nociceptive processing and in regulation of cerebral arterial tone. DISCUSSION: Carbon monoxide-induced headache shares many characteristics with migraine and other headaches. The mechanisms whereby carbon monoxide causes headache may include hypoxia, nitric oxide signalling and activation...

  17. Catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide and propane on NiO-LaCoO3%NiO-LaCoO3催化剂的丙烷和CO氧化性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    章轩语; 陈忠; 周颖; 邢丰; 胡庚申; 罗孟飞

    2015-01-01

    A series of NiO-LaCoO3were synthesized by solid-phase reaction method. The effects of calcination temperature and the content of Ni in catalyst on the carbon monoxide and propane oxidation performance of the as-synthesized catalysts were investigated. These catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD),hydrogen temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR) and other techniques. The results indicate that lower calcination temperature is beneficial for better catalytic performance. Among all catalysts,10NiO-LaCoO3calcinated at 700℃ exhibited the best catalytic performance. The addition of Ni into the structure of LaCoO3can significantly enhance the carbon monoxide and propane oxidation activity,and the optimal NiO loading is 7.5%. It was also found that the catalytic performance of catalysts is highly associated with oxygen mobility in catalysts.%采用固相反应制备了NiO-LaCoO3催化剂,考察了焙烧温度以及Ni含量对催化剂的CO和丙烷氧化活性的影响.用X射线粉末衍射、H2-程序升温还原等技术对催化剂进行了表征.结果表明,在焙烧温度为700~1000℃时,焙烧温度越高,催化剂的丙烷和CO氧化性能越差,其中700℃焙烧后的10NiO-LaCoO3催化剂的效果最好.助剂Ni能有效提高LaCoO3催化剂的丙烷和CO氧化性能,其中Ni含量为7.5%的7.5NiO-LaCoO3催化剂氧化性能最佳.研究发现催化剂的CO和丙烷氧化活性与催化剂中氧活动性具有相关性.

  18. Competitive interactions between methane- and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria modulate carbon and nitrogen cycling in paddy soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Y.; Huang, R.; Wang, B. Z.; Bodelier, P. L. E.; Jia, Z. J.

    2014-06-01

    Pure culture studies have demonstrated that methanotrophs and ammonia oxidizers can both carry out the oxidation of methane and ammonia. However, the expected interactions resulting from these similarities are poorly understood, especially in complex, natural environments. Using DNA-based stable isotope probing and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA and functional genes, we report on biogeochemical and molecular evidence for growth stimulation of methanotrophic communities by ammonium fertilization, and that methane modulates nitrogen cycling by competitive inhibition of nitrifying communities in a rice paddy soil. Pairwise comparison between microcosms amended with CH4, CH4+Urea, and Urea indicated that urea fertilization stimulated methane oxidation activity 6-fold during a 19-day incubation period, while ammonia oxidation activity was significantly suppressed in the presence of CH4. Pyrosequencing of the total 16S rRNA genes revealed that urea amendment resulted in rapid growth of Methylosarcina-like MOB, and nitrifying communities appeared to be partially inhibited by methane. High-throughput sequencing of the 13C-labeled DNA further revealed that methane amendment resulted in clear growth of Methylosarcina-related MOB while methane plus urea led to an equal increase in Methylosarcina and Methylobacter-related type Ia MOB, indicating the differential growth requirements of representatives of these genera. An increase in 13C assimilation by microorganisms related to methanol oxidizers clearly indicated carbon transfer from methane oxidation to other soil microbes, which was enhanced by urea addition. The active growth of type Ia methanotrops was significantly stimulated by urea amendment, and the pronounced growth of methanol-oxidizing bacteria occurred in CH4-treated microcosms only upon urea amendment. Methane addition partially inhibited the growth of Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas in urea-amended microcosms, as well as growth of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. These

  19. Heme oxygenase-1 and carbon monoxide in pulmonary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slebos, Dirk-Jan; Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K

    2003-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), an inducible stress protein, confers cytoprotection against oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo. In addition to its physiological role in heme degradation, HO-1 may influence a number of cellular processes, including growth, inflammation, and apoptosis. By virtue of anti-inflammatory effects, HO-1 limits tissue damage in response to proinflammatory stimuli and prevents allograft rejection after transplantation. The transcriptional upregulation of HO-1 responds to many agents, such as hypoxia, bacterial lipopolysaccharide, and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. HO-1 and its constitutively expressed isozyme, heme oxygenase-2, catalyze the rate-limiting step in the conversion of heme to its metabolites, bilirubin IXalpha, ferrous iron, and carbon monoxide (CO). The mechanisms by which HO-1 provides protection most likely involve its enzymatic reaction products. Remarkably, administration of CO at low concentrations can substitute for HO-1 with respect to anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects, suggesting a role for CO as a key mediator of HO-1 function. Chronic, low-level, exogenous exposure to CO from cigarette smoking contributes to the importance of CO in pulmonary medicine. The implications of the HO-1/CO system in pulmonary diseases will be discussed in this review, with an emphasis on inflammatory states.

  20. Heme oxygenase-1 and carbon monoxide in pulmonary medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Augustine MK

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, an inducible stress protein, confers cytoprotection against oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo. In addition to its physiological role in heme degradation, HO-1 may influence a number of cellular processes, including growth, inflammation, and apoptosis. By virtue of anti-inflammatory effects, HO-1 limits tissue damage in response to proinflammatory stimuli and prevents allograft rejection after transplantation. The transcriptional upregulation of HO-1 responds to many agents, such as hypoxia, bacterial lipopolysaccharide, and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. HO-1 and its constitutively expressed isozyme, heme oxygenase-2, catalyze the rate-limiting step in the conversion of heme to its metabolites, bilirubin IXα, ferrous iron, and carbon monoxide (CO. The mechanisms by which HO-1 provides protection most likely involve its enzymatic reaction products. Remarkably, administration of CO at low concentrations can substitute for HO-1 with respect to anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects, suggesting a role for CO as a key mediator of HO-1 function. Chronic, low-level, exogenous exposure to CO from cigarette smoking contributes to the importance of CO in pulmonary medicine. The implications of the HO-1/CO system in pulmonary diseases will be discussed in this review, with an emphasis on inflammatory states.

  1. Solid-state charge-based device for control of catalytic carbon monoxide oxidation on platinum nanofilms using external bias and light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, L Robert; Hervier, Antoine; Kennedy, Griffin; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2012-05-09

    Using a Pt/Si catalytic nanodiode, we externally control the rate of CO oxidation on a Pt nanofilm. The catalytic reaction can be turned on and off by alternating between bias states of the device. Additionally, the reaction rate is sensitive to photocurrent induced by visible light. The effects of both bias and light show that negative charge on the Pt increases catalytic activity, while positive charge on the Pt decreases catalytic activity for CO oxidation.

  2. Enhanced Removal of Biogenic Hydrocarbons in Power Plant Plumes Constrains the Dependence of Atmospheric Hydroxyl Concentrations on Nitrogen Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gouw, J. A.; Trainer, M.; Parrish, D. D.; Brown, S. S.; Edwards, P.; Gilman, J.; Graus, M.; Hanisco, T. F.; Kaiser, J.; Keutsch, F. N.; Kim, S. W.; Lerner, B. M.; Neuman, J. A.; Pollack, I. B.; Roberts, J. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Veres, P. R.; Warneke, C.; Wolfe, G.

    2015-12-01

    Hydroxyl (OH) radicals in the atmosphere provide one of the main chemical mechanisms for the removal of trace gases. OH plays a central role in determining the atmospheric lifetime and radiative forcing of greenhouse gases like methane. OH also plays a major role in the oxidation of organic trace gases, which can lead to formation of secondary pollutants such as ozone and PM2.5. Due to its very short atmospheric lifetime of seconds or less, OH concentrations are extremely variable in space and time, which makes measurements and their interpretation very challenging. Several recent measurements have yielded higher than expected OH concentrations. To explain these would require the existence of unidentified, radical recycling processes, but issues with the measurements themselves are also still being discussed. During the NOAA airborne SENEX study in the Southeast U.S., the biogenic hydrocarbons isoprene and monoterpenes were consistently found to have lower mixing ratios in air masses with enhanced nitrogen oxides from power plants. We attribute this to faster oxidation rates of biogenic hydrocarbons due to increased concentrations of OH in the power plant plumes. Measurements at different downwind distances from the Scherer and Harllee Branch coal-fired power plants near Atlanta are used to constrain the dependence of OH on nitrogen oxides. It is found that OH concentrations were highest at nitrogen dioxide concentrations of 1-2 ppbv and decreased at higher and at lower concentrations. These findings agree with the expected dependence of OH on nitrogen oxide concentrations, but do not appear to be consistent with the reports in the literature that have shown high OH concentrations in regions of the atmosphere with high biogenic emissions and low NOx concentrations that would require unidentified radical recycling processes to be explained.

  3. Dynamics of nitrogen oxides and ozone above and within a mixed hardwood forest in northern Michigan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Seok

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic behavior of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2 and ozone (O3 above and within the canopy at the University of Michigan Biological Station AmeriFlux (UMBS Flux site was investigated by continuous multi-height vertical gradient measurements during the summer and the fall of 2008. A daily maximum in nitric oxide (NO mixing ratios was consistently observed during the morning hours between 06:00 and 09:00 EST above the canopy. Daily NO maxima ranged between 0.1 and 2 ppbv (with a median of 0.3 ppbv, which were 2 to 20 times above the atmospheric background. The sources and causes of the morning NO maximum were evaluated using NOx and O3 measurements and synoptic and micrometeorological data. Numerical simulations with a multi-layer canopy-exchange model were done to further support this analysis. The observations indicated that the morning NO maximum was caused by the photolysis of NO2 from non-local air masses, which were transported into the canopy from aloft during the morning breakup of the nocturnal boundary layer. The analysis of simulated process tendencies indicated that the downward turbulent transport of NOx into the canopy compensates for the removal of NOx through chemistry and dry deposition. The sensitivity of NOx and O3 concentrations to soil and foliage NOx emissions was also assessed with the model. Uncertainties associated with the emissions of NOx from the soil or from leaf-surface nitrate photolysis did not explain the observed diurnal behavior in NOx (and O3 and, in particular, the morning peak in NOx mixing ratios. However, a ~30% increase in early morning NOx and NO peak mixing ratios was simulated when a foliage exchange NO2 compensation point was considered. This increase suggests the potential importance of leaf-level, bidirectional exchange of NO2 in understanding the observed temporal variability in NOx at UMBS.

  4. System and method for selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides in combustion exhaust gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A

    2014-04-08

    A multi-stage selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit (32) provides efficient reduction of NOx and other pollutants from about 50-550.degree. C. in a power plant (19). Hydrogen (24) and ammonia (29) are variably supplied to the SCR unit depending on temperature. An upstream portion (34) of the SCR unit catalyzes NOx+NH.sub.3 reactions above about 200.degree. C. A downstream portion (36) catalyzes NOx+H.sub.2 reactions below about 260.degree. C., and catalyzes oxidation of NH.sub.3, CO, and VOCs with oxygen in the exhaust above about 200.degree. C., efficiently removing NOx and other pollutants over a range of conditions with low slippage of NH.sub.3. An ammonia synthesis unit (28) may be connected to the SCR unit to provide NH.sub.3 as needed, avoiding transport and storage of ammonia or urea at the site. A carbonaceous gasification plant (18) on site may supply hydrogen and nitrogen to the ammonia synthesis unit, and hydrogen to the SCR unit.

  5. Evaluation of Residence Time on Nitrogen Oxides Removal in Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebizadeh, Pouyan; Rahimzadeh, Hassan; Babaie, Meisam; Javadi Anaghizi, Saeed; Ghomi, Hamidreza; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Brown, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been introduced over the last few years as a promising after- treatment system for nitrogen oxides and particulate matter removal from diesel exhaust. NTP technology has not been commercialised as yet, due to its high rate of energy consumption. Therefore, it is important to seek out new methods to improve NTP performance. Residence time is a crucial parameter in engine exhaust emissions treatment. In this paper, different electrode shapes are analysed and the corresponding residence time and NOx removal efficiency are studied. An axisymmetric laminar model is used for obtaining residence time distribution numerically using FLUENT software. If the mean residence time in a NTP plasma reactor increases, there will be a corresponding increase in the reaction time and consequently the pollutant removal efficiency increases. Three different screw thread electrodes and a rod electrode are examined. The results show the advantage of screw thread electrodes in comparison with the rod electrode. Furthermore, between the screw thread electrodes, the electrode with the thread width of 1 mm has the highest NOx removal due to higher residence time and a greater number of micro-discharges. The results show that the residence time of the screw thread electrode with a thread width of 1 mm is 21% more than for the rod electrode. PMID:26496630

  6. Annual and seasonal spatial models for nitrogen oxides in Tehran, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amini, Heresh; Taghavi-Shahri, Seyed-Mahmood; Henderson, Sarah B.; Hosseini, Vahid; Hassankhany, Hossein; Naderi, Maryam; Ahadi, Solmaz; Schindler, Christian; Künzli, Nino; Yunesian, Masud

    2016-09-01

    Very few land use regression (LUR) models have been developed for megacities in low- and middle-income countries, but such models are needed to facilitate epidemiologic research on air pollution. We developed annual and seasonal LUR models for ambient oxides of nitrogen (NO, NO2, and NOX) in the Middle Eastern city of Tehran, Iran, using 2010 data from 23 fixed monitoring stations. A novel systematic algorithm was developed for spatial modeling. The R2 values for the LUR models ranged from 0.69 to 0.78 for NO, 0.64 to 0.75 for NO2, and 0.61 to 0.79 for NOx. The most predictive variables were: distance to the traffic access control zone; distance to primary schools; green space; official areas; bridges; and slope. The annual average concentrations of all pollutants were high, approaching those reported for megacities in Asia. At 1000 randomly-selected locations the correlations between cooler and warmer season estimates were 0.64 for NO, 0.58 for NOX, and 0.30 for NO2. Seasonal differences in spatial patterns of pollution are likely driven by differences in source contributions and meteorology. These models provide a basis for understanding long-term exposures and chronic health effects of air pollution in Tehran, where such research has been limited.

  7. Evaluation of Residence Time on Nitrogen Oxides Removal in Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouyan Talebizadeh

    Full Text Available Non-thermal plasma (NTP has been introduced over the last few years as a promising after- treatment system for nitrogen oxides and particulate matter removal from diesel exhaust. NTP technology has not been commercialised as yet, due to its high rate of energy consumption. Therefore, it is important to seek out new methods to improve NTP performance. Residence time is a crucial parameter in engine exhaust emissions treatment. In this paper, different electrode shapes are analysed and the corresponding residence time and NOx removal efficiency are studied. An axisymmetric laminar model is used for obtaining residence time distribution numerically using FLUENT software. If the mean residence time in a NTP plasma reactor increases, there will be a corresponding increase in the reaction time and consequently the pollutant removal efficiency increases. Three different screw thread electrodes and a rod electrode are examined. The results show the advantage of screw thread electrodes in comparison with the rod electrode. Furthermore, between the screw thread electrodes, the electrode with the thread width of 1 mm has the highest NOx removal due to higher residence time and a greater number of micro-discharges. The results show that the residence time of the screw thread electrode with a thread width of 1 mm is 21% more than for the rod electrode.

  8. Evaluation of Residence Time on Nitrogen Oxides Removal in Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebizadeh, Pouyan; Rahimzadeh, Hassan; Babaie, Meisam; Javadi Anaghizi, Saeed; Ghomi, Hamidreza; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Brown, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal plasma (NTP) has been introduced over the last few years as a promising after- treatment system for nitrogen oxides and particulate matter removal from diesel exhaust. NTP technology has not been commercialised as yet, due to its high rate of energy consumption. Therefore, it is important to seek out new methods to improve NTP performance. Residence time is a crucial parameter in engine exhaust emissions treatment. In this paper, different electrode shapes are analysed and the corresponding residence time and NOx removal efficiency are studied. An axisymmetric laminar model is used for obtaining residence time distribution numerically using FLUENT software. If the mean residence time in a NTP plasma reactor increases, there will be a corresponding increase in the reaction time and consequently the pollutant removal efficiency increases. Three different screw thread electrodes and a rod electrode are examined. The results show the advantage of screw thread electrodes in comparison with the rod electrode. Furthermore, between the screw thread electrodes, the electrode with the thread width of 1 mm has the highest NOx removal due to higher residence time and a greater number of micro-discharges. The results show that the residence time of the screw thread electrode with a thread width of 1 mm is 21% more than for the rod electrode.

  9. Ground-high altitude joint detection of ozone and nitrogen oxides in urban areas of Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pengfei Chen; Qiang Zhang; Jiannong Quan; Yang Gao; Delong Zhao; Junwang Meng

    2013-01-01

    Based on observational data of ozone (O3) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) mixing ratios on the ground and at high altitude in urban areas of Beijing during a period of six days in November 2011,the temporal and spatial characteristics of mixing ratios were analyzed.The major findings include:urban O3 mixing ratios are low and NOx mixing ratios are always high near the road in November.Vertical variations of the gases are significantly different in and above the planetary boundary layer.The mixing ratio of O3 is negatively correlated with that of NOx and they are positively correlated with air temperature,which is the main factor directly causing vertical variation of O3 and NOx mixing ratios at 600-2100 m altitude.The NOx mixing ratios elevated during the heating period,while the O3 mixing ratios decreased:these phenomena are more significant at high altitudes compared to lower altitudes.During November,air masses in the urban areas of Beijing are brought bynorthwesterly winds,which transport O3 and NOx at low mixing ratios.Due to Beijing's natural geographical location,northwest air currents are beneficial to the dilution and dispersion of pollutants,which can result in lower O3 and NOx background values in the Beijing urban area.

  10. The response to nitric oxide of the nitrogen-fixing symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meilhoc, Eliane; Cam, Yvan; Skapski, Agnès; Bruand, Claude

    2010-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is crucial in animal- and plant-pathogen interactions, during which it participates in host defense response and resistance. Indications for the presence of NO during the symbiotic interaction between the model legume Medicago truncatula and its symbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti have been reported but the role of NO in symbiosis is far from being elucidated. Our objective was to understand the role or roles played by NO in symbiosis. As a first step toward this goal, we analyzed the bacterial response to NO in culture, using a transcriptomic approach. We identified approximately 100 bacterial genes whose expression is upregulated in the presence of NO. Surprisingly, most of these genes are regulated by the two-component system FixLJ, known to control the majority of rhizobial genes expressed in planta in mature nodules, or the NO-dedicated regulator NnrR. Among the genes responding to NO is hmp, encoding a putative flavohemoglobin. We report that an hmp mutant displays a higher sensitivity toward NO in culture and leads to a reduced nitrogen fixation efficiency in planta. Because flavohemoglobins are known to detoxify NO in numerous bacterial species, this result is the first indication of the importance of the bacterial NO response in symbiosis.

  11. Measurement and mitigation of nitrous oxide emissions from a high nitrogen input vegetable system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Shu Kee; Suter, Helen; Davies, Rohan; Bai, Mei; Sun, Jianlei; Chen, Deli

    2015-02-01

    The emission and mitigation of nitrous oxide (N2O) from high nitrogen (N) vegetable systems is not well understood. Nitrification inhibitors are widely used to decrease N2O emissions in many cropping systems. However, most N2O flux measurements and inhibitor impacts have been made with small chambers and have not been investigated at a paddock-scale using micrometeorological techniques. We quantified N2O fluxes over a four ha celery paddock using open-path Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy in conjunction with a backward Lagrangian stochastic model, in addition to using a closed chamber technique. The celery crop was grown on a sandy soil in southern Victoria, Australia. The emission of N2O was measured following the application of chicken manure and N fertilizer with and without the application of a nitrification inhibitor 3, 4-dimethyl pyrazole phosphate (DMPP). The two techniques consistently demonstrated that DMPP application reduced N2O emission by 37-44%, even though the N2O fluxes measured by a micrometeorological technique were more than 10 times higher than the small chamber measurements. The results suggest that nitrification inhibitors have the potential to mitigate N2O emission from intensive vegetable production systems, and that the national soil N2O emission inventory assessments and modelling predictions may vary with gas measurement techniques.

  12. First-principles Study on Neutral Nitrogen Impurities in Zinc Oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ping Li; Sheng-hua Deng; Yi-bao Li; Li Zhang; Guo-hong Liu; Jing Huang

    2012-01-01

    The atomic geometries,electronic structures,and formation energies of neutral nitrogen impurities in ZnO have been investigated by first-principles calculations.The nitrogen impurities are always deep acceptors,thus having no contributions to p-type conductivity.Among all the neutral nitrogen impurities,nitrogen substituting on an oxygen site has the lowest formation energy and the shallowest acceptor level,while nitrogen substituting on a zinc site has the second-lowest formation energy in oxygen-rich conditions.Nitrogen interstitials are unstable at the tetrahedral site and spontaneously relax into a kick-out configuration.Though nitrogen may occupy the octahedral site,the concentrations will be low for the high formation energy.The charge density distributions in various doping cases are discussed,and self-consistent results are obtained.

  13. Zinc thiolate reactivity toward nitrogen oxides: insights into the interaction of Zn2+ with S-nitrosothiols and implications for nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhukh, Julia; Lippard, Stephen J

    2012-07-02

    Zinc thiolate complexes containing N(2)S tridentate ligands were prepared to investigate their reactivity toward reactive nitrogen species, chemistry proposed to occur at the zinc tetracysteine thiolate site of nitric oxide synthase (NOS). The complexes are unreactive toward nitric oxide (NO) in the absence of dioxygen, strongly indicating that NO cannot be the species directly responsible for S-nitrosothiol formation and loss of Zn(2+) at the NOS dimer interface in vivo. S-Nitrosothiol formation does occur upon exposure of zinc thiolate solutions to NO in the presence of air, however, or to NO(2) or NOBF(4), indicating that these reactive nitrogen/oxygen species are capable of liberating zinc from the enzyme, possibly through generation of the S-nitrosothiol. Interaction between simple Zn(2+) salts and preformed S-nitrosothiols leads to decomposition of the -SNO moiety, resulting in release of gaseous NO and N(2)O. The potential biological relevance of this chemistry is discussed.

  14. System and method for controlling ammonia levels in a selective catalytic reduction catalyst using a nitrogen oxide sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2017-07-25

    A system according to the principles of the present disclosure includes an air/fuel ratio determination module and an emission level determination module. The air/fuel ratio determination module determines an air/fuel ratio based on input from an air/fuel ratio sensor positioned downstream from a three-way catalyst that is positioned upstream from a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst. The emission level determination module selects one of a predetermined value and an input based on the air/fuel ratio. The input is received from a nitrogen oxide sensor positioned downstream from the three-way catalyst. The emission level determination module determines an ammonia level based on the one of the predetermined value and the input received from the nitrogen oxide sensor.

  15. Three-dimensional Nitrogen-Doped Reduced Graphene Oxide/Carbon Nanotube Composite Catalysts for Vanadium Flow Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, Shaofang [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, WA, 99164 USA.; Zhu, Chengzhou [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, WA, 99164 USA.; Song, Junhua [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, WA, 99164 USA.; Engelhard, Mark H. [Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA.; Du, Dan [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, WA, 99164 USA.; Lin, Yuehe [School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, WA, 99164 USA.; Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99354 USA.

    2017-02-22

    The development of vanadium redox flow battery is limited by the sluggish kinetics of the reaction, especially the cathodic VO2+/VO2+ redox couples. Therefore, it is vital to develop new electrocatalyst with enhanced activity to improve the battery performance. Herein, we first synthesized the hydrogel precursor by a facile hydrothermal method. After the following carbonization, nitrogen-doped reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanotube composite was obtained. By virtue of the large surface area and good conductivey, which are ensured by the unique hybrid structure, as well as the proper nitrogen doping, the as-prepared composite presents enhanced catalytic performance toward the VO2+/VO2+ redox reaction. We also demonstrated the composite with carbon nanotube loading of 2 mg/mL exhibits the highest activity and remarkable stability in aqueous solution due to the strong synergy between reduced graphene oxide and carbon nanotubes, indicating that this composite might show promising applications in vanadium redox flow battery.

  16. Hydroxylamine-induced oxidation of ferrous carbonylated truncated hemoglobins from Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Campylobacter jejuni is limited by carbon monoxide dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Ciaccio, Chiara; Gasperi, Tecla; Pesce, Alessandra; Caporaso, Lucia; Coletta, Massimo

    2017-08-01

    Hydroxylamine (HA) is an oxidant of ferrous globins and its action has been reported to be inhibited by CO, even though this mechanism has not been clarified. Here, kinetics of the HA-mediated oxidation of ferrous carbonylated Mycobacterium tuberculosis truncated hemoglobin N and O (Mt-trHbN(II)-CO and Mt-trHbO(II)-CO, respectively) and Campylobacter jejuni truncated hemoglobin P (Cj-trHbP(II)-CO), at pH 7.2 and 20.0 °C, are reported. Mixing Mt-trHbN(II)-CO, Mt-trHbO(II)-CO, and Cj-trHbP(II)-CO solution with the HA solution brings about absorption spectral changes reflecting the disappearance of the ferrous carbonylated derivatives with the concomitant formation of the ferric species. HA oxidizes irreversibly Mt-trHbN(II)-CO, Mt-trHbO(II)-CO, and Cj-trHbP(II)-CO with the 1:2 stoichiometry. The dissociation of CO turns out to be the rate-limiting step for the oxidation of Mt-trHbN(II)-CO, Mt-trHbO(II)-CO, and Cj-trHbP(II)-CO by HA. Values of the second-order rate constant for HA-mediated oxidation of Mt-trHbN(II)-CO, Mt-trHbO(II)-CO, and Cj-trHbP(II)-CO range between 8.8 × 10(4) and 8.6 × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1), reflecting different structural features of the heme distal pocket. This study (1) demonstrates that the inhibitory effect of CO is linked to the dissociation of this ligand, giving a functional basis to previous studies, (2) represents the first comparative investigation of the oxidation of ferrous carbonylated bacterial 2/2 globins belonging to the N, O, and P groups by HA, (3) casts light on the correlation between kinetics of HA-mediated oxidation and carbonylation of globins, and (4) focuses on structural determinants modulating the HA-induced oxidation process.

  17. Studies on nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} and N{sub 2}O) in pressurized fluidized bed combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Yong

    1998-09-01

    This thesis describes the experimental studies of nitrogen oxide (NO, NO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O) emissions in pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC). In the first part of the thesis the background and the objectives of this study are introduced. The second part summarizes the fundamental knowledge about the formation and destruction of nitrogen oxides in coal combustion, particularly in the conditions of PFBC. The instrumentation of test facilities, measurement and data analysis is described in the third part. Then the most important experimental results follow in the next parts. The forth part describes the results from a PFBC test rig and an empirical modelling for predicting the emissions of NO{sub x} and N{sub 2}O. Finally, the fundamental work on coal combustion and fuel nitrogen conversion in a PFBC batch reactor is presented. These studies clearly confirm the potential of PFBC technology in the control nitrogen of oxide emissions. The research in the test rig was concentrated on determining the effects of process parameters on the emissions of nitrogen oxides with different fuels. Another objective was to examine the reduction of nitrogen oxides with the control methods in PFBC conditions, including ammonia injection and air staging combustion for reducing NO, and high temperature operations for reducing N{sub 2}0. The results indicate that pressurized operation suppresses the conversion of fuel-N to nitrogen oxides and favors with employing the reduction methods for further nitrogen oxide reduction, for instance the temperature window of NO reduction with ammonia injection has been found to be widened to even lower temperature range. Maximum reductions of 80-85 % with ammonia injection and 75-80 % with air staging combustion were achieved in the conditions examined. Considerably low emissions of N{sub 2}O (<7 ppm) were obtained in the tests of N{sub 2}O control, and thermal decomposition proved to be the laming pathway of N{sub 2}O destruction in PFBC. In

  18. Photochemical ozone and nitric oxide formation in air-nitrogen dioxide mixtures containing sulfur dioxide or chlorine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, J.S.; Springer, G.S.; Stedman, D.H.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of sulfur dioxide and chlorine on ozone and nitric oxide concentrations in nitrogen dioxide-air mixtures were studied. The presence of 0-10 ppM SO/sub 2/ produced no change in the air mixture. Addition of 1-15 ppm chlorine increased the ozone concentration in the air mixture. A reaction model describing the interactions of chlorine and NO/sub 2/ is presented. (1 diagram, 6 graphs, 30 references, 3 tables)

  19. Modelling horizontal and vertical concentration profiles of ozone and oxides of nitrogen within high-latitude urban area

    CERN Document Server

    Nicholson, J P; Fowler, D

    2000-01-01

    A Lagrangian column model has been developed to simulate the mean (monthly and annual) three-dimensional structure in ozone and nitrogen oxides concentrations in the boundary layer within and immediately around an urban area. Short time-scale photochemical processes of ozone, as well as emissions and deposition to the ground are simulated. The results show that the average surface ozone concentration in the urban area is lower than the surrounding rural areas by typically 50%. Model results are compared with observations.

  20. Facile synthesis of reduced graphene oxide-modified, nitrogen-doped carbon xerogel with enhanced electrochemical capacitance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lei, Gang [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Hu, Xiaoyong [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Peng, Zhiguang [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Hu, Jiawen, E-mail: jwhu@hnu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Liu, Hongtao, E-mail: liuht@csu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China)

    2014-12-15

    In this contribution, we report a reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-modified nitrogen-doped carbon xerogel, which could be easily prepared by pyrolysis of melamine-formaldehyde (MF) resins that are polymerized hydrothermally in an aqueous GO dispersion. Scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier-transformed infrared spectrometry, and nitrogen adsorption-desorption method were employed to reveal the morphologies and structures of the prepared carbon xerogel. Cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, and galvanostatic charge–discharge were used to investigate the electrochemical properties. The results showed that the charge transfer barrier of the mesoporous nitrogen-doped carbon xerogel was decreased evidently, owing to the modification of a layer of rGO on its wall, and the xerogel demonstrated a capacitance of as high as 205 F g{sup −1} at the current of 1 A g{sup −1}. - Graphical abstract: A facile synthesis of rGO-modified, N-doped carbon material for supercapacitor application. - Highlights: • Nitrogen-doping and graphene-attachment in the carbon material are simultaneously achieved. • A thin layer of graphene attached on the wall of the mesoporous carbon material speeds up the charge transfer. • The graphene-modified nitrogen-doped carbon xerogel shows great potential for supercapacitor application.

  1. Effects of feeding oxidized fat with or without dietary antioxidants on nutrient digestibility, microbial nitrogen, and fatty acid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Añón, M; Jenkins, T

    2007-09-01

    A dual-effluent continuous culture system was used to investigate, in a 2 x 2 factorial design, the effect of feeding a fresh (FF) or oxidized (OF) blend of unsaturated fats (33% fish oil, 33% corn oil, 26% soybean oil, and 7% inedible tallow) when supplemented with a blend of antioxidants (AO; Agrado Plus, Novus International Inc.; Agrado Plus is a trademark of Novus International Inc. and is registered in the United States and other countries) on nutrient digestibility, bacterial protein synthesis, and fatty acid metabolism. Twice a day for 10 d, 12 fermenters were fed a diet that consisted of 52% forage and 48% grain mixture that contained 3% (dry matter basis) FF or OF, with or without AO. The OF contained a higher concentration of peroxides (215 vs. 3.5 mEq/kg), and a lower concentration of unsaturated fatty acids than the FF. Feeding OF reduced nitrogen digestibility, microbial nitrogen yield, and efficiency (expressed as kilograms of dry matter digested) and increased the outflow of saturated fatty acids in the effluent when compared with feeding FF. Adding AO improved total carbohydrate, neutral, and acid detergent fiber digestibilities and the amount of digested feed nitrogen converted to microbial nitrogen across the types of fats. From this study, we concluded that feeding OF reduced microbial nitrogen and increased the outflow of saturated fatty acids. Feeding AO improved fiber digestibility by rumen microorganisms, regardless of the type of fat.

  2. Effect of preparation method on the surface characteristics and activity of the Pd/OMS-2 catalysts for the oxidation of carbon monoxide, toluene, and ethyl acetate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lisha; Song, Yong; Fu, Zhidan; Ye, Qing; Cheng, Shuiyuan; Kang, Tianfang; Dai, Hongxing

    2017-02-01

    The cryptomelane-type manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve (OMS-2)-supported Pd (0.5 wt% Pd/OMS-2-DP, 0.5 wt% Pd/OMS-2-PI, and 0.5 wt% Pd/OMS-2-EX) catalysts were prepared by the deposition-precipitation, pre-incorporation, and ion-exchanging strategies, respectively. It is shown that the preparation method exerted an important effect on the physicochemical property of the sample. Among the OMS-2-supported Pd catalysts, 0.5 wt% Pd/OMS-2-DP possessed the highest surface (Mn2+ + Mn3+)/Mn4+ atomic ratio and the highest surface Pd loading and acid sites. The 0.5 wt% Pd/OMS-2 catalysts outperformed the Pd-free counterpart, among which 0.5 wt% Pd/OMS-2-DP presented the best catalytic activity (T50% and T90% were 25 and 55 °C for CO oxidation, 240 and 285 °C for toluene oxidation, and 160 and 200 °C for ethyl acetate oxidation, respectively). We believe that the high Pd surface loading, high surface atomic ratio of (Mn2+ + Mn3+)/Mn4+, and good low-temperature reducibility, good oxygen mobility, and high acidity were responsible for the excellent performance of the 0.5 wt% Pd/OMS-2-DP catalyst.

  3. Impact of nitrogen flushing and oil choice on the progression of lipid oxidation in unwashed fried sliced potato crisps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasca, E; Greetham, D; Herring, S D; Fisk, I D

    2016-05-15

    Unwashed, sliced, batch-fried potato crisps have a unique texture and are growing in popularity in the UK/EU premium snack food market. In this study, the storage stability of unwashed sliced (high surface starch) potatoes (crisps) fried in regular sunflower oil (SO) or in high oleic sunflower oil (HOSO) was compared over accelerated shelf life testing (45°C, 6 weeks); with and without nitrogen gas flushing. Primary oxidation products (lipid hydroperoxides) were measured with a ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange (FOX) assay and volatile secondary oxidation products (hexanal) were quantified by using solid phase micro-extraction gas chromatography mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC/MS). Results revealed that crisps fried in SO were the least stable. Flushing the stored crisps with nitrogen gas proved to be effective in slowing down the oxidation rate after frying with sunflower oil, significantly stabilizing the crisps. However, crisps fried in HOSO were the most stable, with the lowest rate of development of oxidation markers, and this has previously not been shown for crisps with a high free starch content.

  4. Characteristics of autoignited laminar lifted flames in heated coflow jets of carbon monoxide/hydrogen mixtures

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Byungchul

    2012-06-01

    The characteristics of autoignited lifted flames in laminar jets of carbon monoxide/hydrogen fuels have been investigated experimentally in heated coflow air. In result, as the jet velocity increased, the blowoff was directly occurred from the nozzle-attached flame without experiencing a stabilized lifted flame, in the non-autoignited regime. In the autoignited regime, the autoignited lifted flame of carbon monoxide diluted by nitrogen was affected by the water vapor content in the compressed air oxidizer, as evidenced by the variation of the ignition delay time estimated by numerical calculation. In particular, in the autoignition regime at low temperatures with added hydrogen, the liftoff height of the autoignited lifted flames decreased and then increased as the jet velocity increased. Based on the mechanism in which the autoignited laminar lifted flame is stabilized by ignition delay time, the liftoff height can be influenced not only by the heat loss, but also by the preferential diffusion between momentum and mass diffusion in fuel jets during the autoignition process. © 2012 The Korean Society of Mechanical Engineers.

  5. Organic Nitrogen-Driven Stimulation of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungal Hyphae Correlates with Abundance of Ammonia Oxidizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukovská, Petra; Gryndler, Milan; Gryndlerová, Hana; Püschel, David; Jansa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Large fraction of mineral nutrients in natural soil environments is recycled from complex and heterogeneously distributed organic sources. These sources are explored by both roots and associated mycorrhizal fungi. However, the mechanisms behind the responses of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) hyphal networks to soil organic patches of different qualities remain little understood. Therefore, we conducted a multiple-choice experiment examining hyphal responses to different soil patches within the root-free zone by two AM fungal species (Rhizophagus irregularis and Claroideoglomus claroideum) associated with Medicago truncatula, a legume forming nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Hyphal colonization of the patches was assessed microscopically and by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) using AM taxon-specific markers, and the prokaryotic and fungal communities in the patches (pooled per organic amendment treatment) were profiled by 454-amplicon sequencing. Specific qPCR markers were then designed and used to quantify the abundance of prokaryotic taxa showing the strongest correlation with the pattern of AM hyphal proliferation in the organic patches as per the 454-sequencing. The hyphal density of both AM fungi increased due to nitrogen (N)-containing organic amendments (i.e., chitin, DNA, albumin, and clover biomass), while no responses as compared to the non-amended soil patch were recorded for cellulose, phytate, or inorganic phosphate amendments. Abundances of several prokaryotes, including Nitrosospira sp. (an ammonium oxidizer) and an unknown prokaryote with affiliation to Acanthamoeba endosymbiont, which were frequently recorded in the 454-sequencing profiles, correlated positively with the hyphal responses of R. irregularis to the soil amendments. Strong correlation between abundance of these two prokaryotes and the hyphal responses to organic soil amendments by both AM fungi was then confirmed by qPCR analyses using all individual replicate patch samples. Further

  6. Organic nitrogen-driven stimulation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal hyphae correlates with abundance of ammonia oxidizers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra eBukovská

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Large fraction of mineral nutrients in natural soil environments is recycled from complex and heterogeneously distributed organic sources. These sources are explored by both roots and associated mycorrhizal fungi. However, the mechanisms behind the responses of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM hyphal networks to soil organic patches of different qualities remain little understood. Therefore, we conducted a multiple-choice experiment examining hyphal responses to different soil patches within the root-free zone by two AM fungal species (Rhizophagus irregularis and Claroideoglomus claroideum associated with Medicago truncatula, a legume forming nitrogen-fixing root nodules. Hyphal colonization of the patches was assessed microscopically and by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR using AM taxon-specific markers, and the prokaryotic and fungal communities in the patches (pooled per organic amendment treatment were profiled by 454-amplicon sequencing. Specific qPCR markers were then designed and used to quantify the abundance of prokaryotic taxa showing the strongest correlation with the pattern of AM hyphal proliferation in the organic patches as per the 454-sequencing. The hyphal density of both AM fungi increased due to nitrogen (N-containing organic amendments (i.e., chitin, DNA, albumin, and clover biomass, while no responses as compared to the non-amended soil patch were recorded for cellulose, phytate, or inorganic phosphate amendments. Abundances of several prokaryotes, including Nitrosospira sp. (an ammonium oxidizer and an unknown prokaryote with affiliation to Acanthamoeba endosymbiont, which were frequently recorded in the 454-sequencing profiles, correlated positively with the hyphal responses of R. irregularis to the soil amendments. Strong correlation between abundance of these two prokaryotes and the hyphal responses to organic soil amendments by both AM fungi was then confirmed by qPCR analyses using all individual replicate patch samples

  7. Analyzer for measurement of nitrogen oxide concentration by ozone content reduction in gas using solid state chemiluminescent sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelibanov, V. P.; Ishanin, G. G.; Isaev, L. N.

    2014-05-01

    Role of nitrogen oxide in ambient air is described and analyzed. New method of nitrogen oxide concentration measurement in gas phase is suggested based on ozone concentration measurement with titration by nitrogen oxide. Research of chemiluminescent sensor composition is carried out on experimental stand. The sensor produced on the base of solid state non-activated chemiluminescent composition is applied as ozone sensor. Composition is put on the surface of polymer matrix with developed surface. Sensor compositions includes gallic acid with addition of rodamine-6G. Model of interaction process between sensor composition and ozone has been developed, main products appeared during reaction are identified. The product determining the speed of luminescense appearance is found. This product belongs to quinone class. Then new structure of chemiluminescent composition was suggested, with absence of activation period and with high stability of operation. Experimental model of gas analyzer was constructed and operation algorithm was developed. It was demonstrated that developed NO measuring instrument would be applied for monitoring purposes of ambient air. This work was partially financially supported by Government of Russian Federation, Grant 074-U01

  8. Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir When power outages occur after severe weather (such as winter storms, hurricanes or tornadoes), using alternative sources of power can cause carbon monoxide (CO) to build up in a ...

  9. Carbon Monoxide Mixing Ratio System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Carbon Monoxide (CO) system provides high-precision atmospheric concentration measurements of CO mixing ratio (ppbv dry air) every 10...

  10. Rapid start-up of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process for nitrogen removal from wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    The dissertation is associated with the field of biological wastewater treatment and more precisely focus on nitrogen removal from wastewater. The nutrients removal (mainly N and P) from wastewater is necessary in order to avoid the eutrophication of the surface waters. Nitrogen compounds (NH4+, NO2- and NO3-) removal is commonly performed by means of biological processes due to the lower cost as compared to chemical treatment. The conventional nitrogen removal process consists of two steps, ...

  11. Microbial nitrous oxide production and nitrogen cycling associated with aquatic invertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Heisterkamp, Ines

    2012-01-01

    Nitrogen cycling is intimately linked to the activity of microorganisms that mediate the diverse nitrogen transformations and play a fundamental role in regulating the fate of nitrogen in the Earth s terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. Microbial activity is influenced by physical, chemical, and biological factors that can be profoundly shaped by macrofaunal organisms, especially in benthic aquatic systems. This thesis therefore aimed at investigating the interactions between microorganisms an...

  12. Improved creep and oxidation behavior of a martensitic 9Cr steel by the controlled addition of boron and nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayr, Peter [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science; Graz Univ. of Technology (Austria). Inst. of Material Science and Welding; Holzer, Ivan; Mendez-Martin, Francisca [Graz Univ. of Technology (Austria). Inst. of Material Science and Welding; Albu, Mihaela; Mitsche, Stefan [Graz Univ. of Technology (Austria). Inst. for Electron Microscopy; Gonzalez, Vanessa; Agueero, Alina [Instituto Nacional de Tecnica Aeroespacial, Torrejon de Ardoz (Spain)

    2010-07-01

    This manuscript gives an overview on recent developments of a martensitic steel grade based on 9Cr3W3CoVNb with controlled additions of boron and nitrogen. Alloy design by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and calculation of boron-nitrogen solubility is discussed. Out of this alloy design process, two melts of a 9Cr3W3CoVNbBN steel were produced. The investigation focused on microstructural evolution during high temperature exposure, creep properties and oxidation resistance in steam at 650 C. Microstructural characterization of ''as-received'' and creep exposed material was carried out using conventional optical as well as advanced electron microscopic methods. Creep data at 650 was obtained at various stress levels. Longest-running specimens have reached more than 20,000 hours of testing time. In parallel, long-term oxidation resistance has been studied at 650 C in steam atmosphere up to 5,000 hours. Preliminary results of the extensive testing program on a 9Cr3W3CoVNbBN steel show significant improvement in respect to creep strength and oxidation resistance compared to the state-of-the-art 9 wt. % Cr martensitic steel grades. Up to current testing times, the creep strength is significantly beyond the +20% scatterband of standard grade P92 material. Despite the chromium content of 9 wt % the material exhibits excellent oxidation resistance. Steam exposed plain base material shows comparable oxidation behavior to coated material, and the corrosion rate of the boron-nitrogen controlled steel is much lower compared to standard 9 wt % Cr steel grades, P91 and P92. (orig.)

  13. Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling Pursuant to the Great Oxidation Event: Evidence from the Paleoproterozoic of Fennoscandia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kump, L.; Junium, C. K.; Arthur, M. A.; Brasier, A.; Fallick, A. E.; Melezhik, V.; Lepland, A.; Crne, A.; Luo, G.; Far-Deep Drilling Team

    2010-12-01

    been re-mobilized as it occurs in cross-cutting pyrobitumen veinlets. The initial isotopic signatures of both Corg and Ccarb may have therefore been modified in some intervals during post-depositional alteration. However, the strong correlation between δ13Ccarb and δ13Corg through much of the sampled interval, especially during the negative shift, leads us to tentatively interpret it as the end of the LJE and a transformation in basin characteristics from anoxic (and possibly sulfidic) to oxygenated. Highly negative δ13Ccarb values at the end of the event may be correlated with observed 13C-depletion in the time-equivalent Houtenbek Formation in southern Africa. Nitrogen isotopes reflect an apparent reduction in the role of nitrogen fixation at the close of the LJE and an increase in the oxidative cycling of N.

  14. Vehicle Real Driving Emissions of Nitrogen Oxides in an Urban Area from a large Vehicle Fleet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pöhler, Denis; Horbanski, Martin; Oesterle, Tobias; Adler, Tim; Reh, Miriam; Tirpitz, Lukas; Kanatschnig, Florian; Lampel, Joahnnes; Platt, Ulrich

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen Oxide (NOx=NO +NO2) emissions by road vehicles are the major contributor for poor air quality in urban areas. High NOx concentrations, and especially NO2, are typically the most problematic pollution in cities. However, emissions vary significantly depending on the type of vehicle, its engine, the age, condition of the vehicle, driving properties, modifications and many more. Even if official NOx emission data of the manufacturer exist, they are only valid for new vehicles and the current vehicle emission scandal shows clearly that these data are often wrong. Thus, real driving emissions (RDE) of the current vehicle fleet is required. With such data the contribution of individual vehicles to the NO2 and NOx levels in urban areas can be estimated. Significant reduction of NOx concentrations can be achieved by identifying the strong emitting vehicles and excluding, replace or modify them. We developed a precise and fast ICAD (Iterative CAvity DOAS) NO2 instrument which can measure the concentration within the emission plume of vehicles under real driving conditions. The sampling was performed with an inlet at the front of a car which was following the investigated vehicles. The instrument measure NO2 and additionally CO2 with a time resolution of 2 seconds. With the observed NO2 values already strong emitters can easily be identified. With the use of known CO2 emissions, more reliable emissions for NO2 can be calculated for each vehicle. Currently the system is expanded with a NOx channel to derive the total nitrogen oxide emissions. The system was successfully applied in several studies over the last two years to investigate NO2 RDE. More than thousand vehicles were investigated. We observed that several vehicles from various brands show much higher emissions than allowed (more than a factor of 5). Highest emissions correlate for trucks and busses typically to older vehicles, what is not the case for cars. A large variability between different cars was

  15. Regression-based oxides of nitrogen predictors for three diesel engine technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaohan; Schmid, Natalia A; Wang, Lijuan; Clark, Nigel N

    2010-01-01

    Models of diesel engine emissions such as oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)) are valuable when they can predict instantaneous values because they can be incorporated into whole vehicle models, support inventory predictions, and assist in developing superior engine and aftertreatment control strategies. Recent model-year diesel engines using multiple injection strategies, exhaust gas recirculation, and variable geometry turbocharging may have more transient sensitivity and demand more sophisticated modeling than for legacy engines. Emissions data from 1992, 1999, and 2004 model-year U.S. truck engines were modeled separately using a linear approach (with transient terms) and multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS), an adaptive piece-wise regression approach that has limited prior use for emissions prediction. Six input variables based on torque, speed, power, and their derivatives were used for MARS. Emissions time delay was considered for both models. Manifold air temperature (MAT) and manifold air pressure (MAP) were further used in NO(x) modeling to build a plug-in model. The predictive performance for instantaneous NO(x) on part of the certification transient test procedure (Federal Test Procedure [FTP]) of the 2004 engine MARS was lower (R2 = 0.949) than the performance for the 1992 (R2 = 0.981) and 1999 (R2 = 0.988) engines. Linear regression performed similarly for the 1992 and 1999 engines but performed poorly (R2 = 0.896) for the 2004 engine. The MARS performance varied substantially when data from different cycles were used. Overall, the MAP and MAT plug-in model trained by MARS was the best, but the performance differences between LR and MARS were not substantial.

  16. Regional nitrogen oxides emission trends in East Asia observed from space

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Mijling

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to changing economic activity, emissions of air pollutants in East Asia change rapidly in space and time. Monthly emission estimates of nitrogen oxides derived from satellite observations provide valuable insight in the evolution of anthropogenic activity on a regional scale. We present the first results of a new emission estimation algorithm, specifically designed to use daily satellite observations of column concentrations for fast updates of emissions of short-lived atmospheric constituents on a~mesoscopic scale (~ 0.25° × 0.25°. The algorithm is used to construct a monthly NOx emission time series for 2007–2011 from tropospheric NO2 observations of GOME-2 for East Chinese provinces and surrounding countries. The new emission estimates correspond well with the bottom-up inventory of EDGAR v4.2, but are smaller than the inventories of INTEX-B and MEIC. They reveal a strong positive trend during 2007–2011 for almost all Chinese provinces, related to the country's economic development. We find a 41% increment of NOx emissions in East China during this period, which shows the need to update emission inventories in this region on a regular basis. Negative emission trends are found in Japan and South Korea, which can be attributed to a combined effect of local environmental policy and global economic crises. Analysis of seasonal variation distinguishes between regions with dominant anthropogenic or biogenic emissions. For regions with a mixed anthropogenic and biogenic signature, the opposite seasonality can be used for an estimation of the separate emission contributions. Finally, the non-local concentration/emission relationships calculated by the algorithm are used to quantify the direct effect of regional NOx emissions on tropospheric NO2 concentrations outside the region. For regions such as North Korea and Beijing province, a substantial part of the tropospheric NO2 originates from emissions elsewhere.

  17. Role of Oxides of Nitrogen in Tobacco-Specific Nitrosamine Formation in Flue-Cured Tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nestor TB

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco is known to contain a class of nitrosamines known as tobacco-specific nitrosamines or TSNA. Nitrosation of naturally occurring tobacco alkaloids is commonly accepted as the mechanism of TSNA formation in tobacco. Because green and freshly harvested tobaccos are virtually free of TSNA, formation and accumulation of TSNA are generally considered to occur during the curing process. Most recent hypotheses have focused on microbial reduction of nitrate to nitrite and other oxides of nitrogen (NOcompounds that react with tobacco alkaloids to form TSNA during curing. This natural microbial process remains the prevalent hypothesis for TSNA formation in burley and other air-cured tobaccos. However, a different mechanism for the formation of TSNA in flue-cured tobacco, independent of microbial activity, is documented in this paper. It is common practice to flue-cure Virginia or blonde tobacco in bulk barns that incorporate forced air ventilation and temperature control. For the last thirty-five years, many modern bulk barns in North America generally have used liquid propane gas (LPG with direct-fired burners that exhaust combustion gases directly into the barn where the tobacco is exposed to those gases. Our studies indicate that LPG combustion by-products in the exhaust stream, namely NO, react with naturally occurring tobacco alkaloids to form TSNA. Heat exchange curing methods preclude exposure of the tobacco to combustion gases and by-products, thereby eliminating this significant source of TSNA formation, without degrading leaf quality or smoking character. Research findings from 1998 and 1999 are presented to demonstrate the role of NOgases in TSNA formation and the significance of direct-fired curing as a primary source of TSNA formation in flue-cured tobacco. Also, data from an extensive barn conversion program in 2000, which resulted in a 94% average reduction in TSNA levels in cured flue-cured leaf, are presented.

  18. Estimating nitrogen oxides emissions at city scale in China with a nightlight remote sensing model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jianhui; Zhang, Jianying; Zhang, Yangwei; Zhang, Chunlong; Tian, Guangming

    2016-02-15

    Increasing nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions over the fast developing regions have been of great concern due to their critical associations with the aggravated haze and climate change. However, little geographically specific data exists for estimating spatio-temporal trends of NOx emissions. In order to quantify the spatial and temporal variations of NOx emissions, a spatially explicit approach based on the continuous satellite observations of artificial nighttime stable lights (NSLs) from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) was developed to estimate NOx emissions from the largest emission source of fossil fuel combustion. The NSL based model was established with three types of data including satellite data of nighttime stable lights, geographical data of administrative boundaries, and provincial energy consumptions in China, where a significant growth of NOx emission has experienced during three policy stages corresponding to the 9th-11th)Five-Year Plan (FYP, 1995-2010). The estimated national NOx emissions increased by 8.2% per year during the study period, and the total annual NOx emissions in China estimated by the NSL-based model were approximately 4.1%-13.8% higher than the previous estimates. The spatio-temporal variations of NOx emissions at city scale were then evaluated by the Moran's I indices. The global Moran's I indices for measuring spatial agglomerations of China's NOx emission increased by 50.7% during 1995-2010. Although the inland cities have shown larger contribution to the emission growth than the more developed coastal cities since 2005, the High-High clusters of NOx emission located in Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei regions, the Yangtze River Delta, and the Pearl River Delta should still be the major focus of NOx mitigation. Our results indicate that the readily available DMSP/OLS nighttime stable lights based model could be an easily accessible and effective tool for achieving strategic decision making

  19. On the Ratio of Sulfur Dioxide to Nitrogen Oxides as an Indicator of Air Pollution Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirel, Ronit; Dayan, Uri

    2001-07-01

    The ratio of sulfur dioxide to nitrogen oxides (RSN = SO2/NOx) is one indicator of air pollution sources. The role of this ratio in source attribution is illustrated here for the Ashdod area, located in the southern coastal plain of Israel. The main sources of pollution in the area are the tall stacks of the Eshkol power plant, the stacks of oil refineries, and areal sources (stationary and mobile). The factors that affect RSN are studied using four regression models: a binary regression tree in original scale, a tree in logarithmic scale, a data partition produced by a combination of the two trees, and a linear regression model. All models have similar relative prediction error, with the combined partition best highlighting the sources of variability in RSN: (a) very low values (interquartile range of [0.12, 0.48]) are associated with traffic, (b) low values ([0.43, 1.00]) are attributed to the power plant and to daytime emissions of local industry, (c) medium values ([0.74, 1.90]) are associated with local industry emissions during cooler hours of the day and refinery emissions mainly on slow wind episodes, and (d) high values ([1.07, 4.30]) are attributed to refinery emissions during moderate to fast wind episodes. Analysis of the number of episodes of increased concentrations indicates that, during 1996 and 1997, about 42% of SO2 episodes are attributable to the power plant and 33% to the refineries. Increased-NOx episodes are mainly contributed by traffic (91%) and power plant (4.5%) emissions.

  20. Regional nitrogen oxides emission trends in East Asia observed from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijling, B.; van der A, R. J.; Zhang, Q.

    2013-12-01

    Due to changing economic activity, emissions of air pollutants in East Asia are changing rapidly in space and time. Monthly emission estimates of nitrogen oxides derived from satellite observations provide valuable insight into the evolution of anthropogenic activity on a regional scale. We present the first results of a new emission estimation algorithm, specifically designed to use daily satellite observations of column concentrations for fast updates of emissions of short-lived atmospheric constituents on a mesoscopic scale (~ 0.25° × 0.25°). The algorithm is used to construct a monthly NOx emission time series for the period 2007-2011 from tropospheric NO2 observations of GOME-2 for East Chinese provinces and surrounding countries. The new emission estimates correspond well with the bottom-up inventory of EDGAR v4.2, but are smaller than the inventories of INTEX-B and MEIC. They reveal a strong positive trend during 2007-2011 for almost all Chinese provinces, related to the country's economic development. We find a 41% increment of NOx emissions in East China during this period, which shows the need to update emission inventories in this region on a regular basis. Negative emission trends are found in Japan and South Korea, which can be attributed to a combined effect of local environmental policy and global economic crises. Analysis of seasonal variation distinguishes between regions with dominant anthropogenic or biogenic emissions. For regions with a mixed anthropogenic and biogenic signature, the opposite seasonality can be used for an estimation of the separate emission contributions. Finally, the non-local concentration/emission relationships calculated by the algorithm are used to quantify the direct effect of regional NOx emissions on tropospheric NO2 concentrations outside the region. For regions such as North Korea and the Beijing municipality, a substantial part of the tropospheric NO2 originates from emissions elsewhere.

  1. Temporal and spatial characteristics of lightning-produced nitrogen oxides in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fengxia, Guo; Min, Bao; Yijun, Mu; Zupei, Liu; Yawen, Li; Haifeng, Shi

    2016-11-01

    Tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities (NO2VCDs) retrieved from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 satellite spectrometer, as well as lightning flashes measured by an Optical Transient Detector and Lightning Image Sensor from 1997 to 2013 are used to investigate spatial and temporal characteristics of lightning-produced nitrogen oxides (LNOX) under the recent period of rapid and locally-unbalanced economic development in China. Correlations between spatial distributions of lightning flashes and monthly mean tropospheric NO2VCDs were analyzed over this period. Mean production of LNOX per flash is 330 mol[N]/flash which was estimated using the correlation between lightning flashes and monthly mean tropospheric NO2VCD for the Tibetan Plateau. Using this correlation, the spatial and temporal characteristics of the ratio of LNOX to tropospheric NOX in China were determined. Results show that the ratio of LNOX to the tropospheric NOX is small in eastern regions, having a developed industrial sector and dense population, but relatively large in western regions, with a developing industrial sector and sparser population. The annual mean value of LNOX contributing to tropospheric NOX is 7.5% in China, which is lower than global averages (10-20%). The difference in interannual variability of LNOX production contributing to tropospheric NOX in different areas is distinct, ranging from high to low values for the Tibetan Plateau, Pearl River Delta, Yangtze River Delta and Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei regions, respectively. This indicates that lightning had a large influence on the column density of tropospheric NOX on the Tibetan Plateau, a region typically used as a sensitivity indicator for climate change. Lightning had less influence on atmospheric environments of the Pearl River Delta, Yangtze River Delta and Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei regions.

  2. Combined nitrogen oxides/sulfur dioxide control in dry scrubber systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkness, J. B.L.; Gorski, A. J.; Huang, H. S.

    1989-02-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is investigating alternative control concepts that involve modifying existing SO{sub 2}-removal processes and sorbents, with the objective of achieving simultaneous removal of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). Laboratory-scale research conducted using a fixed-bed reactor and a spray-dryer/fabric-filter system has been paralleled by field tests at ANL's commercial-scale (20-MW electric equivalent) dry scrubber. In the fixed-bed experiments, a range of chemical reagents was surveyed, and the best-performing additives were studied in detail. Sodium chloride, sodium bisulfite, sodium hydroxide, and Fe(II)*EDTA were found to increase both NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} removals; the additives did not appear to increase NO{sub x} removal directly, but they interacted strongly with the other primary variables to improve sorbent performance. The laboratory spray-dryer system was used to study the effects on combined NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} removal of the best-performing fixed-bed additives and certain process modifications. The tests showed that sodium chloride increased NO{sub x} removal at all temperatures; sodium bisulfite was generally less effective, and calcium chloride was effective only at 65{degree}C. Up to 80{degree}C, all three additives significantly improved SO{sub 2} removal, but improvement ceased at higher temperatures. This report discusses the experimental results in terms of the effects the additives and principal process variables had on NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} removals and the mechanistic implications. 14 refs., 74 figs., 33 tabs.

  3. Dynamics of nitrogen oxides and ozone above and within a mixed hardwood forest in Northern Michigan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Seok

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic behavior of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO2 and ozone (O3 above and within the canopy at the University of Michigan Biological Station AmeriFlux (UMBS Flux site was investigated by continuous multi-height vertical gradient measurements during the summer and the fall of 2008. A daily maximum in nitric oxide (NO levels was consistently observed during the morning hours between 06:00 and 09:00 EST above the canopy. Daily NO maxima ranged between 0.2 and 2 ppbv (with a median of 0.3 ppbv, which was 2 to 20 times above its atmospheric background. The sources and causes of this NO maximum were evaluated using NOx and O3 measurements and synoptic and micrometeorological data. This analysis was further supported by numerical simulations with a multi-layer canopy exchange model implemented into a single-column chemistry-climate model. The observations indicated that the morning NO maximum was caused by the photolysis of NO2 from non-local air masses, which were transported into the canopy from aloft during the morning breakup of the nocturnal boundary layer. The analysis of simulated process tendencies indicated that the downward turbulent transport of NOx into the canopy compensates for the removal of NOx through chemistry and dry deposition. The sensitivity of NOx and O3 concentrations on soil and foliage NOx emissions was also assessed with the model. Uncertainties associated with the emissions of NOx from the soil or from leaf-surface nitrate photolysis did not explain the observed diurnal behavior in NOx (and O3, and in particular, the morning NOx peak mixing ratio. However, when considering the existence of a NO2 compensation point, an increase in the early morning NOx and NO peak mixing ratios by ~30% was simulated. This increase suggests the potential

  4. On the formation of nitrogen oxides during the combustion of partially pre-vaporized droplets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moesl, Klaus Georg

    2012-12-12

    This study contributes to the topic of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) formation at the level of single droplet and droplet array combustion. The influence of the degree of droplet vaporization and the influence of ambient conditions on NO{sub x} emissions are studied in detail by experiments as well as by numerical simulations. Consequently, this study illustrates correlations and dependencies of the most relevant parameters with respect to the formation of NO{sub x}. It merges the fields of droplet pre-vaporization, ignition, combustion, and exhaust gas formation, including a sophisticated approach to NO{sub x} determination. Even though the study was conducted in order to help understand the fundamental process of burning idealized droplets, the processes in spray combustion have also been taken into consideration within its scope. The portability of results obtained from those idealized droplet burning regimes is evaluated for real applications. Thus, this study may also help to derive design recommendations for liquid-fueled combustion devices. While the experimental part focuses on droplet array combustion, the numerical part highlights spherically symmetric single droplet combustion. By performing experiments in a microgravity environment, quasi-spherical conditions were facilitated for droplet burning, and comparability was provided for the experimental and numerical results. A novelty of the numerical part is the investigation of mechanisms of NO{sub x} formation under technically relevant conditions. This includes partial pre-vaporization of the droplets as well as droplet combustion in a hot exhaust gas environment, such as an aero-engine. The results show that the trade-off between ambient temperature and available oxygen determines the NO{sub x} formation of droplets burning in hot exhaust gas. If the ambient temperature is high and there is still sufficient oxygen for full oxidation of the fuel provided by the droplet, the maximum of NOx formation is

  5. Nitrous oxide fluxes and nitrogen cycling along a pasture chronosequence in Central Amazonia, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Wick

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied nitrous oxide (N2O fluxes and soil nitrogen (N cycling following forest conversion to pasture in the central Amazon near Santarém, Pará, Brazil. Two undisturbed forest sites and 27 pasture sites of 0.5 to 60 years were sampled once each during wet and dry seasons. In addition to soil-atmosphere fluxes of N2O we measured 27 soil chemical, soil microbiological and soil physical variables. Soil N2O fluxes were higher in the wet season than in the dry season. Fluxes of N2O from forest soils always exceeded fluxes from pasture soils and showed no consistent trend with pasture age. At our forest sites, nitrate was the dominant form of inorganic N both during wet and dry season. At our pasture sites nitrate generally dominated the inorganic N pools during the wet season and ammonium dominated during the dry season. Net mineralization and nitrification rates displayed large variations. During the dry season net immobilization of N was observed in some pastures. Compared to forest sites, young pasture sites (≤2 years had low microbial biomass N and protease activities. Protease activity and microbial biomass N peaked in pastures of intermediate age (4 to 8 years followed by consistently lower values in older pasture (10 to 60 years. The C/N ratio of litter was low at the forest sites (~25 and rapidly increased with pasture age reaching values of 60-70 at pastures of 15 years and older. Nitrous oxide emissions at our sites were controlled by C and N availability and soil aeration. Fluxes of N2O were negatively correlated to leaf litter C/N ratio, NH4+-N and the ratio of NO3--N to the sum of NO3--N + NH4+-N (indicators of N availability, and methane fluxes and bulk density (indicators of soil aeration status during the wet season. During the dry season fluxes of N2O were positively correlated to microbial biomass N, β-glucosidase activity, total inorganic N stocks and NH4+-N. In our study region, pastures of all age emitted less N2O than

  6. Lanthanide ions (III) as sensitizers of melatonin oxidation in reaction mixtures providing reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaczmarek, Małgorzata, E-mail: mkaczmar@amu.edu.pl

    2015-06-15

    Chemiluminescence (CL) of the reactive systems providing strong oxidants (reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen) containing lanthanide ions (III) and melatonin, was studied. Kinetic curves of emission decay and spectral distributions of chemiluminescence were obtained. Analysis of differences in the intensity of chemiluminescence and CL spectra proved that excitation of Tb(III) and Dy(III) ions takes place with the energy transfer from the products of melatonin oxidation: N{sup 1}-acetyl-N{sup 2}-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK) and N{sup 1}-acetyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AMK) to the lanthanide ions. In the system Fe(II)/Fe(III)–H{sub 2}O{sub 2}–Mel–Tb(III) a linear correlation was established between the integrated CL intensity and melatonin concent. - Highlights: • Chemiluminescence (CL) of melatonin (Mel) oxidation by reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen. • Tb(III) and Dy(III) ions as sensitizers of a melatonin oxidation process. • New CL method for determination of melatonin in pharmaceutical preparations based on CL of Fe(II)/Fe(III)–H{sub 2}O{sub 2}–Mel–Tb(III) system.

  7. 76 FR 46083 - Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    ... perspective, as well as from an environmental effects perspective. The National Research Council (NRC) has... perspective than are the effects of nitrogen deposition in natural, unmanaged ecosystems, largely due to the... nitrogen and sulfur and aquatic acidification effects relative to other deposition-related...

  8. Synergistic effect of carbon monoxide with other biologically active injurious factors on the organism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankow, D.; Ponsold, W.

    1974-09-01

    The combined effects on biological organisms are reported for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sodium nitrite, hydrocyanic acid, carbon disulfide, sulfur dioxide, ammonia, hydrogen peroxide, ethanol, trichloroethylene, carbon tetrachloride, methane, benzene, iodine acetate, cholesterol, benzpyrene, hexobarbitol, zoxazolamine, nembutal, luminal, morphine, adrenalin, persantin, cytochrome c, aldrin, carbaryl, cyclodiene epoxide; and physical influences such as ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure, ionizing radiation, noise, and vibration. A literature review shows that with increasing CO/sub 2/ and decreasing oxygen concentration in the inhalation air, the toxicity of CO increased in experiments with mice and canaries. Oxides of nitrogen enhance the toxic effect of CO in an additive way and at times synergistically. At 500 m from a metallurgical plant in the USSR the maximum allowable immission concentrations for CO and SO/sub 2/ were exceeded. In children residing there a higher normal erythrocyte number, hemoglobin content, and catalase activity were found in the blood along with higher concentrations of coproporphyrin and 17-ketosteroids. All values returned to normal after an 8-week stay of these children away from the metallurgical plant.

  9. Properties of tin oxide base gas sensors for nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}). Modelling the NO{sub x}-SnO{sub 2} interactions; Proprietes des capteurs de gaz a base d'oxyde d'etain vis a vis des oxydes d'azote (NO{sub x}). Modelisation des interactions NO{sub x}-SnO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leblanc, E.

    1999-12-22

    In order to better resolve the selectivity problems of the tin oxide base sensors for nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), three points have been considered: 1)a thoroughly study of the knowledge of the nitrogen oxides properties: experimental and theoretical studies of the gases present in the studied conditions (thermodynamic aspect) and of their transformation velocities (kinetic aspect) have been carried out 2)an understanding of the NO{sub x}-SnO{sub 2} interactions which lead to the conductance variation of the sensors: studies of the NO{sub x} conversion at the surface of the tin dioxide made with a differential reactor allow to specify the reactional mechanism of the reaction: 2 NO + O{sub 2} = 2 NO{sub 2}. The characterization of the adsorbed species reveals the adsorption of NO{sub 2} in great amount under the nitrate form as well as the key role of these species in the catalytic mechanism. A modelling of the conductance variations of a SnO{sub 2} base sensor under an atmosphere of NO, NO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} is proposed 3)an optimization of the gas sensors properties: after having revealed the strong influence on the sensor sensitivity of the electrodes-SnO{sub 2}, a study on the geometry effects of the electrodes is carried out. No major improvement of the sensitivity has been noticed. The addition of MoO{sub 3} to SnO{sub 2} has been considered. This addition has allowed to strongly improve the sensitivity to the carbon monoxide and to the nitrogen oxide at 450 degrees Celsius. Nevertheless, it has not resolved the selectivity problems. In this study, the perfection of a total NO{sub x} sensor able to measure the sum of the NO and NO{sub 2} amounts has been considered too. (O.M.)

  10. Reducing nitrogen oxides in exhaust gases by means of urea. Final report; Reduzierung von Stickoxiden in Abgasen mittels Harnstoff. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koebel, M.; Elsener, M.; Marti, T. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1994-11-01

    Ammonia has been used for about twenty years as a selective reducing agent for reducing NO{sub x} in lean exhaust gases containing excess oxygen. Although urea has distinct advantages compared with ammonia (solid substance, cheap, practically nontoxic, not explosive) it has hardly been considered for this purpose. In the present work the possibilities of using aqueous urea solutions for the DeNOx processes based on selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and selective non catalytic reduction (SNCR) are explored. SCR: Urea-SCR poses little problems: If the process equipment is properly designed, no appreciable emissions of flue gas components related to urea are found, e.g. isocyanic acid, hydrogen cyanide, nitrous oxide, urea, biuret, cyanuric acid and melamine. On the other hand, like ammonia, use of urea leads to an emission of ammonia which limits the maximum attainable degree of NO{sub x} reduction. With industrial bulk catalysts based on TiO{sub 2}-WO{sub 3}-V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and gas hourly space velocities of 10`000 h{sup -1}, NO{sub x} reductions of over 98% at an ``ammonia slip`` below 10 ppm may be attained. SNCR: The use of urea instead of ammonia shifts the optimum temperature window upwards by about 50 K. Besides an ``ammonia slip``, some isocyanic acid is found, and the emissions of carbon monoxide and nitrous oxide are definitely higher. As nitrous oxide is considered to be a greenhouse gas and a scavenger of stratospheric ozone, the use of urea is no longer recommended in future SNCR installations. If the advantages of storage convenience of urea to be combined optimally with the advantages of ammonia as selective reducing agent, the hydropyrolysis of urea in an external reactor is a possible solution. (author) 38 figs., 5 tabs., 36 refs.

  11. Gold stabilized aqueous sols immobilized on mesoporous CeO2-Al2O3 as catalysts for the preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storaro, Loretta; Lenarda, Maurizio; Moretti, Elisa; Talon, Aldo; Porta, Francesca; Moltrasio, Bernardo; Canton, Patrizia

    2010-10-15

    Nanostructured Au/Al(2)O(3)-CeO(2) catalysts with a low content of precious metal (0.9% wt.) were prepared immobilizing two different stabilized Au sols on a high surface area Al(2)O(3)-CeO(2) mixed oxide with a uniform pore size distribution, synthesized by a one-pot methodology. The samples were characterized by elemental analysis, N(2) physisorption, XRPD, TEM and (27)Al-MAS NMR techniques. The catalytic activity of the two samples in the preferential oxidation of CO in excess of H(2) (CO-PROX) was comparatively evaluated in the 35-110 degrees C temperature range. The Au-THPS/AlCe20 sample, prepared immobilizing a sol obtained reducing an aqueous solution of gold tetrachloroaurate salt with bis[tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium sulfate], resulted very active and selective at low temperatures and its catalytic activity was correlated with the structural characteristics of the metal particles and of the ordered mesoporous support. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Modeling Nitrous Oxide Production during Biological Nitrogen Removal via Nitrification and Denitrification: Extensions to the General ASM Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Ruscalleda, Maël; Pellicer i Nàcher, Carles

    2011-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) can be formed during biological nitrogen (N) removal processes. In this work, a mathematical model is developed that describes N2O production and consumption during activated sludge nitrification and denitrification. The well-known ASM process models are extended to capture N2O...... dynamics during both nitrification and denitrification in biological N removal. Six additional processes and three additional reactants, all involved in known biochemical reactions, have been added. The validity and applicability of the model is demonstrated by comparing simulations with experimental data...... on N2O production from four different mixed culture nitrification and denitrification reactor study reports. Modeling results confirm that hydroxylamine oxidation by ammonium oxidizers (AOB) occurs 10 times slower when NO2– participates as final electron acceptor compared to the oxic pathway. Among...

  13. Enhanced detection of nitrogen dioxide via combined heating and pulsed UV operation of indium oxide nano-octahedra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Oriol; Roso, Sergio; Vilanova, Xavier; Llobet, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    We report on the use of combined heating and pulsed UV light activation of indium oxide gas sensors for enhancing their performance in the detection of nitrogen dioxide in air. Indium oxide nano-octahedra were synthesized at high temperature (900 °C) via vapour-phase transport and screen-printed onto alumina transducers that comprised interdigitated electrodes and a heating resistor. Compared to the standard, constant temperature operation of the sensor, mild heating (e.g., 100 °C) together with pulsed UV light irradiation employing a commercially available, 325 nm UV diode (square, 1 min period, 15 mA drive current signal), results in an up to 80-fold enhancement in sensitivity to nitrogen dioxide. Furthermore, this combined operation method allows for making savings in power consumption that range from 35% to over 80%. These results are achieved by exploiting the dynamics of sensor response under pulsed UV light, which convey important information for the quantitative analysis of nitrogen dioxide.

  14. Enhanced detection of nitrogen dioxide via combined heating and pulsed UV operation of indium oxide nano-octahedra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oriol Gonzalez

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We report on the use of combined heating and pulsed UV light activation of indium oxide gas sensors for enhancing their performance in the detection of nitrogen dioxide in air. Indium oxide nano-octahedra were synthesized at high temperature (900 °C via vapour-phase transport and screen-printed onto alumina transducers that comprised interdigitated electrodes and a heating resistor. Compared to the standard, constant temperature operation of the sensor, mild heating (e.g., 100 °C together with pulsed UV light irradiation employing a commercially available, 325 nm UV diode (square, 1 min period, 15 mA drive current signal, results in an up to 80-fold enhancement in sensitivity to nitrogen dioxide. Furthermore, this combined operation method allows for making savings in power consumption that range from 35% to over 80%. These results are achieved by exploiting the dynamics of sensor response under pulsed UV light, which convey important information for the quantitative analysis of nitrogen dioxide.

  15. Nitrogen-doped carbon-TiO2 composite as support of Pd electrocatalyst for formic acid oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuan-Hang; Li, Yunfeng; Lam, Thomas; Xing, Yangchuan

    2015-06-01

    We report Pd nanoparticles supported on a composite consisting of oxide TiO2 and nitrogen-doped carbon for formic acid oxidation (FAO). The nitrogen-doped carbon-TiO2 (NCx-TiO2) composite support was prepared by a simple polymerization-pyrolysis process using commercial TiO2 nanoparticles (P25). Surface analysis showed that elements of Ti, C, O, and N were present on the composite surface, on which nitrogen existed in both pyridinic and quaternary forms. Pd nanoparticles with a mean size of ca. 4 nm were uniformly deposited on the composite via a polyol process. Electrochemical characterizations showed that the NCx-TiO2-supported Pd particles (Pd/NCx-TiO2) exhibited an electrocatalytic activity towards FAO that almost doubled that of the carbon black-supported Pd particles (Pd/C) with much enhanced electrocatalytic stability. The better performance of the composite supported Pd was attributed to a possible electronic structure modification in the metallic Pd particles and bifunctional effect produced by the NCx-TiO2 composite.

  16. Zinc oxide nanoparticles affect carbon and nitrogen mineralization of Phoenix dactylifera leaf litter in a sandy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Muhammad Imtiaz; Shahzad, Tanvir; Shahid, Muhammad; Ismail, Iqbal M I; Shah, Ghulam Mustafa; Almeelbi, Talal

    2017-02-15

    We investigated the impact of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs; 1000mgkg(-1) soil) on soil microbes and their associated soil functions such as date palm (Phoenix dactylifera) leaf litter (5gkg(-1) soil) carbon and nitrogen mineralization in mesocosms containing sandy soil. Nanoparticles application in litter-amended soil significantly decreased the cultivable heterotrophic bacterial and fungal colony forming units (cfu) compared to only litter-amended soil. The decrease in cfu could be related to lower microbial biomass carbon in nanoparticles-litter amended soil. Likewise, ZnO NPs also reduced CO2 emission by 10% in aforementioned treatment but this was higher than control (soil only). Labile Zn was only detected in the microbial biomass of nanoparticles-litter applied soil indicating that microorganisms consumed this element from freely available nutrients in the soil. In this treatment, dissolved organic carbon and mineral nitrogen were 25 and 34% lower respectively compared to litter-amended soil. Such toxic effects of nanoparticles on litter decomposition resulted in 130 and 122% lower carbon and nitrogen mineralization efficiency respectively. Hence, our results entail that ZnO NPs are toxic to soil microbes and affect their function i.e., carbon and nitrogen mineralization of applied litter thus confirming their toxicity to microbial associated soil functions.

  17. Electron trapping in 4H-SiC MOS capacitors fabricated by pre-oxidation nitrogen implantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, A. F.; Dhar, S.; Mooney, P. M.

    2011-06-01

    Incorporation of nitrogen (N) atoms by ion implantation prior to oxidation of SiO2/4H-SiC interfaces has been investigated by capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics and constant capacitance deep-level-transient spectroscopy (CCDLTS) measurements. The shift of the C-V curves to negative voltages can be explained by the partial activation of implanted N atoms during oxidation. The maximum amplitude of the CCDLTS spectra, proportional to the density of near-interface oxide traps, decreases with increasing N dose, but remains significantly larger than that of SiO2/SiC interfaces fabricated by post oxidation annealing in nitric oxide (NO). Intrinsic defects in the SiC epi-layer associated with implantation damage are also observed in N-implanted samples. In contrast, electron traps energetically close to the SiC conduction band, detected in NO annealed samples and presumably introduced during oxidation, are not observed in N-implanted samples. The improved transport characteristics of MOS transistors fabricated on N-implanted epi-layers compared to those fabricated by NO annealing is suggested to result from the effects of the greater N donor concentration and also possibly to the suppression of shallow electron traps in the SiC epilayer.

  18. Evaluating nitrogen oxide sources and oxidation pathways impacting aerosol production on the Southern Ute Indian Reservation and Navajo Nation using geochemical isotopic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael Z.

    Increased emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO + NO 2) as a result of the development of oil, gas and coal resources in the Four Corners region of the United States have caused concern for area American Indian tribes that levels of ozone, acid rain, and aerosols or particulate matter (PM) may increase on reservation lands. NOx in the atmosphere plays an important role in the formation of these pollutants and high levels are indicators of poor air quality and exposure to them has been linked to a host of human health effects and environmental problems facing today's society. Nitrogen oxides are eventually oxidized in the atmosphere to form nitrate and nitric acid which falls to earth's surface by way of dry or wet deposition. In the end, it is the removal of NOx from the atmosphere by chemical conversion to nitrate that halts this production of oxidants, acids, and aerosols. Despite the importance of understanding atmospheric nitrate (NO3- = HNO3-(g), NO3-(aq), NO3-(s)) production there remains major deficiencies in estimating the significant key reactions that transform NOx into atmospheric nitrate. Stable isotope techniques have shown that variations in oxygen (16O, 17O, 18O) and nitrogen (14N, 15N) isotope abundances in atmospheric nitrate provide significant insight to the sources and oxidation pathways that transform NOx. Therefore, this project applied this resolution using high pressure liquid chromatography and isotope ratio mass spectrometry to determine the chemical and isotopic composition of particulate nitrate (PM2.5 and PM10), collected on the Southern Ute Indian Reservation and Navajo Nation. It was determined that the observed particulate nitrate concentrations on tribal lands were likely linked to seasonal changes in boundary layer height (BLH), local sources, meteorology, photochemistry and increases in windblown crustal material. The Southern Ute Indian Reservation indicated higher delta15N values in comparison to the Navajo Nation study site

  19. Competitive interactions between methane- and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria modulate carbon and nitrogen cycling in paddy soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Zheng

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Pure culture studies have demonstrated that methanotrophs and ammonia oxidizers can both carry out the oxidation of methane and ammonia. However, the expected interactions resulting from these similarities are poorly understood, especially in complex, natural environments. Using DNA-based stable isotope probing and pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA and pmoA genes, we report on biogeochemical and molecular evidence for growth stimulation of methanotrophic communities by ammonium fertilization, and that methane modulates nitrogen cycling by competitive inhibition of nitrifying communities in a rice paddy soil. Pairwise comparison between microcosms amended with CH4, CH4+Urea, and Urea indicated that urea fertilization stimulated methane oxidation activity by 6-fold during a 19 day incubation period, while ammonia oxidation activity was significantly inhibited in the presence of CH4. Pyrosequencing of the total 16S rRNA genes revealed that urea amendment resulted in rapid growth of Methylosarcina-like type Ia MOB, and nitrifying communities appeared to be suppressed by methane. High-throughput sequencing of the 13C-labeled DNA further revealed that methane amendment resulted in clear growth of Methylosarcina-related MOB while methane plus urea led to equal increase in Methylosarcina and Methylobacter-related MOB, indicating the differential growth requirements of representatives of these genera. Strikingly, type Ib MOB did not respond to methane nor to urea. Increase in 13C-assimilation by microorganisms related to methanol oxidizers clearly indicated carbon transfer from methane oxidation to other soil microbes, which was enhanced by urea addition. The active growth of type Ia methanotrops was significantly stimulated by urea amendment, and the pronounced growth of methanol-oxidizing bacteria occurred in CH4-treated microcosms only upon urea amendment. Methane addition inhibited the growth of Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas in urea-amended microcosms, in

  20. Electrocatalytic studies of osmium-ruthenium carbonyl cluster compounds for their application as methanol-tolerant cathodes for oxygen reduction reaction and carbon monoxide-tolerant anodes for hydrogen oxidation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borja-Arco, E.; Uribe-Godinez, J.; Castellanos, R.H. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Escobedo (Mexico); Altamirano-Gutierrez, A.; Jimenez-Sandoval, O. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Inst. Politecnico Nacional, Querataro (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    This paper provided details of an electrokinetic study of novel electrocatalytic materials capable of performing both the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR). Osmium-ruthenium carbonyl cluster compounds (Os{sub x}Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub n}) were synthesized by chemical condensation in non-polar organic solvents at different boiling points and refluxing temperatures. Three different non-polar organic solvents were used: (1) n-nonane; o-xylene; and 1,2-dichlorobenzene. The electrocatalysts were characterized by Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). A rotating disk electrode technique was used to analyze the materials. Results of the analysis showed that the materials performed ORR in both the presence and absence of carbon monoxide (CO), and that electrocatalysts were not poisoned by the presence of CO. Cyclic voltamperometry for the disk electrodes showed that the electrochemical behaviour of the compounds in the acid electrolyte was similar in the presence or absence of methanol. The Tafel slope, exchange current density and the transfer coefficient were also investigated. The electrokinetic parameters for the ORR indicated that the materials with the highest electrocatalytic activity were synthesized in 1,2-dichlorobenzene. Electrocatalytic activity during HOR were prepared in n-nonane. It was concluded that the new materials are good candidates for use as both a cathode and an anode in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). 7 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  1. A new step aeration approach towards the improvement of nitrogen removal in a full scale Carrousel oxidation ditch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Pengkang; Wang, Xianbao; Wang, Xiaochang; Ngo, Huu Hao; Jin, Xin

    2015-12-01

    Two aeration modes, step aeration and point aeration, were used in a full-scale Carrousel oxidation ditch with microporous aeration. The nitrogen removal performance and mechanism were analyzed. With the same total aeration input, both aeration modes demonstrated good nitrification outcomes with the average efficiency in removing NH4(+)-N of more than 98%. However, the average removal efficiencies for total nitrogen were 89.3% and 77.6% under step aeration and point aeration, respectively. The results indicated that an extended aerobic zone followed the aeration zones could affect the proportion of anoxic and oxic zones. The step aeration with larger anoxic zones indicated better TN removal efficiency. More importantly, step aeration provided the suitable environment for both nitrifiers and denitrifiers. The diversity and relative abundance of denitrifying bacteria under the step aeration (1.55%) was higher than that under the point aeration (1.12%), which resulted in an overall higher TN removal efficiency.

  2. Effects of aeration position on organics, nitrogen and phosphorus removal in combined oxidation pond-constructed wetland systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoou; Tian, Yimei; Zhao, Xinhua; Peng, Sen; Wu, Qing; Yan, Lijian

    2015-12-01

    Given that few studies investigated the effects of aeration position (AP) on the performance of aerated constructed wetlands, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of AP on organics, nitrogen and phosphorus removal in lab-scale combined oxidation pond-constructed wetland (OP-CW) systems. Results showed that middle aeration allowed the CW to possess more uniform oxygen distribution and to achieve greater removals of COD and NH3-N, while the CW under bottom aeration and surface aeration demonstrated more distinct stratification of oxygen distribution and surface aeration brought about better TN removal capacity for the OP-CW system. However, no significant influence of artificial aeration or AP on TP removal was observed. Overall, AP could significantly affect the spatial distribution of dissolved oxygen by influencing the oxygen diffusion paths in aerated CWs, thereby influencing the removal of pollutants, especially organics and nitrogen, which offers a reference for the design of aerated CWs.

  3. Effects of cadmium-induced oxidative stress on growth and nitrogen assimilation in blackgram [Vigna mungo (L. Hepper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mobin Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium (Cd accumulation, oxidative damage, and nitrogen metabolism were studied in roots and leaves of 30-d-old blackgram plants [Vigna mungo (L. Hepper], grown in a mixture of soil and compost (3:1 with different Cd concentrations. Significant reductions in both root and shoot dry weight were noted. The concentration of Cd in roots and leaves increased with increasing Cd levels. The level of lipid peroxidation elevated with a consequent increase in H2O2 content under Cd stress in both plant organs. The activity of enzymes mediating the nitrogen assimilation in roots and leaves was greatly reduced in the presence of Cd, except glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH which showed a significant increase.

  4. Characteristics of surface ozone and nitrogen oxides at urban, suburban and rural sites in Ningbo, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Lei; Zhang, Huiling; Yu, Jie; He, Mengmeng; Xu, Nengbin; Zhang, Jingjing; Qian, Feizhong; Feng, Jiayong; Xiao, Hang

    2017-05-01

    Surface ozone (O3) is a harmful air pollutant that has attracted growing concern in China. In this study, the mixing ratios of O3 and nitrogen oxides (NOx) at three different sites (urban, suburban and rural) of Ningbo were continuously measured to investigate the spatiotemporal characteristics of O3 and its relationships with environmental variables. The diurnal O3 variations were characterized by afternoon maxima (38.7-53.1 ppb on annual average) and early morning minima (11.7-26.2 ppb) at all the three sites. Two seasonal peaks of O3 were observed in spring (April or May) and autumn (October) with minima being observed in winter (December). NOx levels showed generally opposite variations to that of O3 with diurnal and seasonal maxima occurring in morning/evening rush-hours and in winter, respectively. As to the inter-annual variations of air pollutants, generally decreasing and increasing trends were observed in NO and O3 levels, respectively, from 2012 to 2015 at both urban and suburban sites. O3 levels were positively correlated with temperature but negatively correlated with relative humidity and NOx levels. Significant differences in O3 levels were observed for different wind speeds and wind directions (p urban site exhibited lower O3 but higher NOx levels due to the influence of traffic emissions. Larger amplitudes of diurnal and monthly O3 variations were observed at the suburban site than those at the urban and rural sites. In general, the O3 levels at the non-urban sites were more affected by the background transport, while both the local and regional contributions played roles in urban O3 variations. The annual average O3 mixing ratios (22.7-37.7 ppb) in Ningbo were generally similar to those of other regions around the world. However, the recommended air quality standards for O3 were often exceeded during warm seasons, which could be a potential threat to both local population and plant growth.

  5. Science Letters:Effect of nitrogen doping on the reduction of nitric oxide with activated carbon in the presence of oxygen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen doping of activated carbon (AC) was performed by annealing both in ammonia and nitric oxide, and the activities of the modified carbons for NO reduction were studied in the presence of oxygen. Results show that nitrogen atoms were incorporated into the carbons, mostly in the form of pyridinic nitrogen or pyridonic nitrogen. The effect of nitrogen doping on the activities of the carbons can be ignored when oxygen is absent, but the doped carbons show desirable activities in the low temperature regime (≤500 ℃) when oxygen is present. The role of the surface nitrogen species is suggested to promote the formation of NO2 in the presence of oxygen, and NO2 can facilitate decomposition of the surface oxygen species in the low temperature regime.

  6. Synthesis of Nitrogen-doped Titania by Solvothermal Reactions in Alcohols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Nitrogen-doped titania nanoparticles were obtained by the homogeneous precipitation in hexamethylenetetraminetitanium trichloride-alcohol aqueous solutions at 90 ℃ followed by heating at 190 ℃. Anatase, rutile and brookite were obtained, where the crystallite size, specific surface area and color greatly changed as 5~50 nm, 20~200 m2/g and light gray to yellow, depending on the solvent and pH. The products after calcination were yellow, indicating doping with nitrogen ion. All colored titania showed photocatalytic activity under visible light irradiation for the oxidative decomposition of nitrogen monoxide in air. Especially, the nanoparticles of anatase type nitrogen-doped titania obtained using methanol aqueous solution showed excellent photocatalytic activity.

  7. Attenuation of acute nitrogen mustard-induced lung injury, inflammation and fibrogenesis by a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malaviya, Rama; Venosa, Alessandro [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Hall, LeRoy [Drug Safety Sciences, Johnson and Johnson, Raritan, NJ 08869 (United States); Gow, Andrew J. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Sinko, Patrick J. [Department of Pharmaceutics, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Debra L., E-mail: laskin@eohsi.rutgers.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Nitrogen mustard (NM) is a toxic vesicant known to cause damage to the respiratory tract. Injury is associated with increased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS). In these studies we analyzed the effects of transient inhibition of iNOS using aminoguanidine (AG) on NM-induced pulmonary toxicity. Rats were treated intratracheally with 0.125 mg/kg NM or control. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) and lung tissue were collected 1 d–28 d later and lung injury, oxidative stress and fibrosis assessed. NM exposure resulted in progressive histopathological changes in the lung including multifocal lesions, perivascular and peribronchial edema, inflammatory cell accumulation, alveolar fibrin deposition, bronchiolization of alveolar septal walls, and fibrosis. This was correlated with trichrome staining and expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Expression of heme oxygenase (HO)-1 and manganese superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) was also increased in the lung following NM exposure, along with levels of protein and inflammatory cells in BAL, consistent with oxidative stress and alveolar-epithelial injury. Both classically activated proinflammatory (iNOS{sup +} and cyclooxygenase-2{sup +}) and alternatively activated profibrotic (YM-1{sup +} and galectin-3{sup +}) macrophages appeared in the lung following NM administration; this was evident within 1 d, and persisted for 28 d. AG administration (50 mg/kg, 2 ×/day, 1 d–3 d) abrogated NM-induced injury, oxidative stress and inflammation at 1 d and 3 d post exposure, with no effects at 7 d or 28 d. These findings indicate that nitric oxide generated via iNOS contributes to acute NM-induced lung toxicity, however, transient inhibition of iNOS is not sufficient to protect against pulmonary fibrosis. -- Highlights: ► Nitrogen mustard (NM) induces acute lung injury and fibrosis. ► Pulmonary toxicity is associated with increased expression of iNOS. ► Transient inhibition of iNOS attenuates acute

  8. Analysis of Chemical Reaction Kinetics Behavior of Nitrogen Oxide During Air-staged Combustion in Pulverized Boiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Xia Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Because the air-staged combustion technology is one of the key technologies with low investment running costs and high emission reduction efficiency for the pulverized boiler, it is important to reveal the chemical reaction kinetics mechanism for developing various technologies of nitrogen oxide reduction emissions. At the present work, a three-dimensional mesh model of the large-scale four corner tangentially fired boiler furnace is established with the GAMBIT pre-processing of the FLUENT software. The partial turbulent premixed and diffusion flame was simulated for the air-staged combustion processing. Parameters distributions for the air-staged and no the air-staged were obtained, including in-furnace flow field, temperature field and nitrogen oxide concentration field. The results show that the air-staged has more regular velocity field, higher velocity of flue gas, higher turbulence intensity and more uniform temperature of flue gas. In addition, a lower negative pressure zone and lower O2 concentration zone is formed in the main combustion zone, which is conducive to the NO of fuel type reduced to N2, enhanced the effect of NOx reduction. Copyright © 2016 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 5th November 2015; Revised: 14th January 2016; Accepted: 16th January 2016  How to Cite: Zhang, J.X., Zhang, J.F. (2016. Analysis of Chemical Reaction Kinetics Behavior of Nitrogen Oxide During Air-staged Combustion in Pulverized Boiler. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 11 (1: 100-108. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.11.1.431.100-108 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.11.1.431.100-108

  9. Analysis of High Frequency Site-Specific Nitrogen and Oxygen Isotopic Composition of Atmospheric Nitrous Oxide at Mace Head, Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, M. J.; Harris, E. J.; Olszewski, W.; Ono, S.; Prinn, R. G.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric nitrous oxide (N2O) significantly impacts Earth's climate due to its dual role as an inert potent greenhouse gas in the troposphere and as a reactive source of ozone-destroying nitrogen oxides in the stratosphere. However, there remain significant uncertainties in the global budget of this gas. The marked spatial divide in its reactivity means that all stages in the N2O life cycle—emission, transport, and destruction—must be examined to understand the overall effect of N2O on climate. Source and sink processes of N2O lead to varying concentrations of N2O isotopologues (14N14N16O, 14N15N16O, 15N14N16O, and 14N14N18O being measured) due to preferential isotopic production and elimination in different environments. Estimation of source and sink fluxes can be improved by combining isotopically resolved N2O observations with simulations using a chemical transport model with reanalysis meteorology and treatments of isotopic signatures of specific surface sources and stratospheric intrusions. We present the first few months of site-specific nitrogen and oxygen isotopic composition data from the Stheno-TILDAS instrument (Harris et al, 2013) at Mace Head, Ireland and compare these to results from MOZART-4 (Model for Ozone and Related Chemical Tracers, version 4) chemical transport model runs including N2O isotopic fractionation processes and reanalysis meterological fields (NCEP/NCAR, MERRA, and GEOS-5). This study forms the basis for future inverse modeling experiments that will improve the accuracy of isotopically differentiated N2O emission and loss estimates. Ref: Harris, E., D. Nelson, W. Olszewski, M. Zahniser, K. Potter, B. McManus, A. Whitehill, R. Prinn, and S. Ono, Development of a spectroscopic technique for continuous online monitoring of oxygen and site-specific nitrogen isotopic composition of atmospheric nitrous oxide, Analytical Chemistry, 2013; DOI: 10.1021/ac403606u.

  10. Partial oxidation of methane to methanol with nitrogen dioxide in dielectric barrier discharge plasma: experimental and molecular modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indarto, Antonius

    2016-04-01

    Non-catalytic conversion of methane (CH4) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) into methanol (CH3OH) has been conducted and presented in this paper. Experiments were carried out using dielectric barrier discharge as the reaction medium in atmospheric pressure and temperature conditions. High yield production of methanol was achieved (18-20% mol) by single-stage plasma reaction with maximum selectivity of 32% mol. Compared to other oxidants, such as O2, the presence of NO2 in the plasma reaction resulted in higher methanol selectivity. For better understanding of the reactions, density functional theory calculations were also performed and discussed.

  11. Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

    1990-08-01

    This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program`s Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

  12. Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

    1990-08-01

    This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program's Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

  13. Prediction of hydrodynamics and chemistry of confined turbulent methane-air flames with attention to formation of oxides of nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elghobashi, S.; Spalding, D. B.; Srivatsa, S. K.

    1977-01-01

    A formulation of the governing partial differential equations for fluid flow and reacting chemical species in a tubular combustor is presented. A numerical procedure for the solution of the governing differential equations is described, and models for chemical equilibrium and chemical kinetics calculations are presented. The chemical equilibrium model is used to characterize the hydrocarbon reactions. The chemical kinetics model is used to predict the concentrations of the oxides of nitrogen. The combustor consists of a cylindrical duct of varying cross sections with concentric streams of gaseous fuel and air entering the duct at one end. Four sample cases with specified inlet and boundary conditions are considered, and the results are discussed

  14. Gas-Phase Photocatalytic Oxidation of Dimethylamine: The Reaction Pathway and Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kachina

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation (PCO and thermal catalytic oxidation (TCO of dimethylamine (DMA on titanium dioxide was studied in a continuous flow simple tubular reactor. Volatile PCO products of DMA included ammonia, formamide, carbon dioxide, and water. Ammonia was further oxidized in minor amounts to nitrous oxide and nitrogen dioxide. Effective at 573 K, TCO resulted in the formation of ammonia, hydrogen cyanide, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water. The PCO kinetic data fit well to the monomolecular Langmuir-Hinshelwood model, whereas TCO kinetic behaviour matched the first-order process. No deactivation of the photocatalyst during the multiple long-run experiments was observed.

  15. Impact of Mg2+ ion incorporation on the phase development of ZrO2-type solid solutions and their application in the catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, Vinko; Kaper, Helena; Pétaud, Guillaume; Ivanda, Mile; Štefanić, Goran

    2017-07-01

    The precursors of ZrO2-MgO system covering the whole concentration range were prepared by co-precipitation of the corresponding nitrate salts. The obtained precursors were calcined in air at different temperatures up to 1000 °C and analyzed at room temperature using X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS). Maximum solubility of Mg2+ ions (∼32 mol%) was obtained in the amorphous precursor. After crystallization at 600 °C the solid solubility of Mg2+ ions decreases to ∼26 mol% of which ∼22 mol% was incorporated inside ZrO2-type lattice while the remaining part of Mg2+ ions was adsorbed on the surface of the particles. Further thermal treatment decreases solubility of Mg2+ ions to 18 mol% (800 °C) and finally to 9 mol% (1000 °C). On the other side of the concentration range, the solubility of Zr4+ ions in MgO lattice was 10 mol%) polymorphs. A precise determination of unit-cell parameters shows that the increase in the Mg2+ content causes a decrease in the parameter c of tetragonal ZrO2 lattice, which in a solid solution with a Mg2+ content ≥10 mol% becomes very close to the lattice parameter a (approaching cubic lattice). The results of FE-SEM analysis show that the addition of Mg2+ ions promotes sintering of samples. The influence of thermal treatment on the crystallization of the amorphous precursors to ZrO2-type lattice was examined by differential thermal analysis and thermogravimetric measurement. The obtained results show that the crystallization temperature increases with increasing Mg content, from 445 °C (0 mol% MgO) to 625 °C (∼50 mol% MgO). The ZrO2 doped with 3 mol% MgO was used as catalyst support for platinum nanoparticles and compared to commercially available 3% yttria-doped stabilized zirconia (3YSZ). The catalysts were used for catalytic CO oxidation and show slightly better performance of the ZrO2-MgO system, which

  16. Adsorption of cadmium and lead onto oxidized nitrogen-doped multiwall carbon nanotubes in aqueous solution: equilibrium and kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Aguilar, Nancy Veronica [Environmental Sciences Department, Institute for Scientific and Technological Research of San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Munoz-Sandoval, Emilio [Advanced Materials Department, Institute for Scientific and Technological Research of San Luis Potosi (Mexico); Diaz-Flores, Paola Elizabeth; Rangel-Mendez, Jose Rene, E-mail: rene@ipicyt.edu.m [Environmental Sciences Department, Institute for Scientific and Technological Research of San Luis Potosi (Mexico)

    2010-02-15

    Nitrogen-doped multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNx) were chemically oxidized and tested to adsorb cadmium and lead from aqueous solution. Physicochemical characterization of carbon nanotubes included morphological analysis, textural properties, and chemical composition. In addition, the cadmium adsorption capacity of oxidized-CNx was compared with commercially available activated carbon and single wall carbon nanotubes. Carboxylic and nitro groups on the surface of oxidized CNx shifted the point of zero charge from 6.6 to 3.1, enhancing their adsorption capacity for cadmium and lead to 0.083 and 0.139 mmol/g, respectively, at pH 5 and 25 {sup o}C. Moreover, oxidized-CNx had higher selectivity for lead when both metal ions were in solution. Kinetic experiments for adsorption of cadmium showed that the equilibrium was reached at about 4 min. Finally, the small size, geometry, and surface chemical composition of oxidized-CNx are the key factors for their higher adsorption capacity than activated carbon.

  17. (Carbon monoxide metabolism by photosynthetic bacteria)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    Research continued on the metabolism of carbon monoxide by Rhodospirillum rubrum. This report discusses progress on the activity, induction, inhibition, and spectroscopic analysis of the enzyme Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase. (CBS)

  18. Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System (COSRS) is an innovative method that for the first time uses the strong reductant carbon monoxide to both reduce iron...

  19. Nitrogen removal pathway of anaerobic ammonium oxidation in on-site aged refuse bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Zhao, Youcai; Xie, Bing; Peng, Qing; Hassan, Muhammad; Wang, Xiaoyuan

    2014-05-01

    The nitrogen removal pathways and nitrogen-related functional genes in on-site three-stage aged refuse bioreactor (ARB) treating landfill leachate were investigated. It was found that on average 90.0% of CODCr, 97.6% of BOD5, 99.3% of NH4(+)-N, and 81.0% of TN were removed with initial CODCr, BOD5, NH4(+)-N, and TN concentrations ranging from 2323 to 2754, 277 to 362, 1237 to 1506, and 1251 to 1580 mg/L, respectively. Meanwhile, the functional genes amoA, nirS and anammox 16S rRNA gene were found to coexist in every bioreactor, and their relative proportions in each bioreactor were closely related to the pollutant removal performance of the corresponding bioreactor, which indicated the coexistence of multiple nitrogen removal pathways in the ARB. Detection of anammox expression proved the presence of the anammox nitrogen removal pathway during the process of recirculating mature leachate to the on-site ARB, which provides important information for nitrogen management in landfills.

  20. Stable and null current hysteresis perovskite solar cells based nitrogen doped graphene oxide nanoribbons hole transport layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeongmo; Mat Teridi, Mohd Asri; Mohd Yusoff, Abd. Rashid Bin; Jang, Jin

    2016-06-01

    Perovskite solar cells are becoming one of the leading technologies to reduce our dependency on traditional power sources. However, the frequently used component poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) has several shortcomings, such as an easily corroded indium-tin-oxide (ITO) interface at elevated temperatures and induced electrical inhomogeneity. Herein, we propose solution-processed nitrogen-doped graphene oxide nanoribbons (NGONRs) as a hole transport layer (HTL) in perovskite solar cells, replacing the conducting polymer PEDOT:PSS. The conversion efficiency of NGONR-based perovskite solar cells has outperformed a control device constructed using PEDOT:PSS. Moreover, our proposed NGONR-based devices also demonstrate a negligible current hysteresis along with improved stability. This work provides an effective route for substituting PEDOT:PSS as the effective HTL.

  1. Nitrogen-Based Diazeniumdiolates: Versatile Nitric Oxide-Releasing Compounds for Biomedical Research and Potential Clinical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Joseph E.; Keefer, Larry K.

    2002-12-01

    Nitric oxide-generating ions of the nitrogen-diazeniumdiolate class with the general structure R1R2N-[N(O)NO]1 have been prepared by exposing primary, secondary, and polyamines to nitric oxide (NO). The resulting complexes regenerate bioactive NO at physiological pH with half-lives ranging from 2 seconds to 20 hours. An important goal in our research is to deliver NO to a specific organ or cell type where it is needed without affecting other NO-sensitive parts of the anatomy. By taking advantage of the remarkable chemical versatility of diazeniumdiolates, we have developed general strategies to prepare either tissue-selective NO donor drugs or materials containing NO delivery agents that can be physically placed near the target sites. Inhibition of blood coagulation, induction of penile erection, relief of pulmonary hypertension, and reversal of cerebral vasospasm are a few examples of their potential clinical applications. See Featured Molecules.

  2. An MCM modeling study of nitryl chloride (ClNO2) impacts on oxidation, ozone production and nitrogen oxide partitioning in polluted continental outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, T. P.; Wolfe, G. M.; Danas, K. T.; Gilman, J. B.; Kuster, W. C.; Bon, D. M.; Vlasenko, A.; Li, S.-M.; Williams, E. J.; Lerner, B. M.; Veres, P. R.; Roberts, J. M.; Holloway, J. S.; Lefer, B.; Brown, S. S.; Thornton, J. A.

    2014-04-01

    Nitryl chloride (ClNO2) is produced at night by reactions of dinitrogen pentoxide (N2O5) on chloride containing surfaces. ClNO2 is photolyzed during the morning hours after sunrise to liberate highly reactive chlorine atoms (Cl·). This chemistry takes place primarily in polluted environments where the concentrations of N2O5 precursors (nitrogen oxide radicals and ozone) are high, though it likely occurs in remote regions at lower intensities. Recent field measurements have illustrated the potential importance of ClNO2 as a daytime Cl· source and a nighttime NOx reservoir. However, the fate of the Cl· and the overall impact of ClNO2 on regional photochemistry remain poorly constrained by measurements and models. To this end, we have incorporated ClNO2 production, photolysis, and subsequent Cl· reactions into an existing master chemical mechanism (MCM version 3.2) box model framework using observational constraints from the CalNex 2010 field study. Cl· reactions with a set of alkenes and alcohols, and the simplified multiphase chemistry of N2O5, ClNO2, HOCl, ClONO2, and Cl2, none of which are currently part of the MCM, have been added to the mechanism. The presence of ClNO2 produces significant changes to oxidants, ozone, and nitrogen oxide partitioning, relative to model runs excluding ClNO2 formation. From a nighttime maximum of 1.5 ppbv ClNO2, the daytime maximum Cl· concentration reaches 1 × 105 atoms cm-3 at 07:00 model time, reacting mostly with a large suite of volatile organic compounds (VOC) to produce 2.2 times more organic peroxy radicals in the morning than in the absence of ClNO2. In the presence of several ppbv of nitrogen oxide radicals (NOx = NO + NO2), these perturbations lead to similar enhancements in hydrogen oxide radicals (HOx = OH + HO2). Neglecting contributions from HONO, the total integrated daytime radical source is 17% larger when including ClNO2, which leads to a similar enhancement in integrated ozone production of 15%. Detectable

  3. Fluxes of methane and nitrogen oxides in various boreal mire ecosystems. Effects of land-use activities and environmental changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martikainen, P.J.; Nykaenen, H.; Regina, K. [National Public Health Inst., Kuopio (Finland). Lab. of Environmental Microbiology; Alm, J.; Silvola, J. [Joensuu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Biology

    1996-12-31

    Atmospheric impact of peatlands is a sum of their gas fluxes. In contrast to carbon dioxide, peatlands are net sources for methane (CH{sub 4}). Methane is an end product in the anaerobic decomposition processes and it has greater capacity to absorb infrared radiation than carbon dioxide. Most of the data on the CH{sub 4} release from northern peatlands is from North America. The total amount of methane released from wetlands is calculated to be 110 Tg yr{sup -1} of which 34 percent (38 Tg yr{sup -1}) is estimated to be emitted from the northern peatlands. Peat with high content of nitrogen is a potential source for gaseous nitrogen oxides, i.e. nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) and nitric oxide (NO). However, the importance of peatlands in producing these trace gases is poorly known. Nitrous oxide and nitric oxide are important components in the atmospheric chemistry and N{sub 2}O also is an effective greenhouse gas. Land-use activities and environmental changes can affect the atmospheric impacts of peatlands by modifying their biogeochemistry. This article presents a short summary of the studies whose objectives were: (1) to measure fluxes of CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O on wide range of natural mires in Finland, (2) to study the short- and long-term changes in fluxes of CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O and NO on boreal peatlands after lowering their water table. Peatlands used for agriculture, forestry and peat mining were included in the studies. The results from mires drained for forestry may reflect the possible changes in the trace gas fluxes if water table will drop in the northern peatlands as a result of drier climate, (3) to study the effects of nitrogen load on the fluxes of CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O and NO, (4) to identify the microbiological processes important for the fluxes of N{sub 2}O, NO and CH{sub 4}, and to study the environmental factors regulating these microbial processes

  4. Kinetic and spectroscopic study of catalysts for water-gas shift and nitrogen oxide removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kispersky, Vincent Frederick

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) are formed in high temperature combustion processes such as in power generation and motor vehicles. Increasingly stringent regulation of these harmful emissions continues to drive interest in developing, understanding and studying new catalytic formulations for exhaust aftertreatment. For mobile sources, predominantly heavy duty diesel engines, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with NH3 has become the principal means of NO x abatement. An alternative technology developed, but now surpassed by SCR, is NOx Storage Reduction (NSR) catalysis. Both technologies have been studied in our laboratory and are the basis for this dissertation. We studied seven different lean NOx trap (LNT) monolith formulations for NSR ranging from 0.6 to 6.2 wt.% Pt and 4 to 20 wt.% Ba loadings on γ-Al 2O3. The noble metal component of a LNT oxidizes NO to NO 2 aiding in the storage of NO2 on the alkaline earth component. Before the storage component saturates, a reductant such as H2 is introduced into the vehicular exhaust and the stored NOx is released and reduced to N2. Once the storage component is free of NOx, reductant flow is ceased and storage is begun anew. Our research focused on understanding the effects that CO2 and H2O have on the storage capacity of the LNT over short as well as extended periods of time. We found that for high Ba loadings, CO 2 had a consistently detrimental effect on the fast NOx storage capacity (NSC), defined as the amount of NOx the catalyst can store before 1% of the inlet NOx is measured in the reactor outlet. Over long NOx storage periods, CO2 continued to inhibit storage compared to the same catalyst in CO2 free conditions. On low loadings of Ba, however, the inhibition of CO2 was significantly reduced. We found that the loading dependent characteristics of the Ba phase affected the way in which CO2 adsorbed on the storage component, which greatly affected the stability of the species on lower Ba loadings. The less stable

  5. Synthesis and Electrochemical Properties of Nitrogen-Doped Graphene (NG)/Nickle Oxide (NiO) Nanocomposite for Supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C N; Ma, T; Zhang, Q; Fan, W; Fu, X W; Wang, Z B

    2015-12-01

    A novel nitrogen-doped graphene (NG)/nickle oxide (NiO) nanocomposite was synthesized by a facile two-step method, where NiO particles were dispersed on the surface of NG. The NG/NiO nanocomposite is characterized by using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy. The electrochemical properties of NG/NiO nanocomposite have been studied using cyclic voltammetry (CV), galvanostatic charge/discharge and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. Compared with the nitrogen-doped graphene, the electrode prepared by NG/NiO nanocomposite has a mass specific capacitance of 342 F g(-1) at scan rate of 5 mV s(-1), which is much higher than that of nitrogen-doped graphene (NG). The galvanostatic charge/discharge results show this new kind nanocomposite has high specific capacitance with 320 F g(-1) in the range of 0.1-0.5 V at a current density of 1 A g(-1). The enhanced supercapacitive performance of NG/NiO nanocomposite suggesting its promising potential in supercapacitors.

  6. [Effect of Ferric Iron on Nitrogen Immigration and Transformation and Nitrous Oxide Emission During Simultaneous Nitrification Denitrification Process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao; Yan, Yu-jie; Xie, Hui-jun; Jia, Wen-lin; Hu, Zhen; Zhang, Jian

    2015-04-01

    Effect of Fe(III) concentration on nitrogen immigration and transformation and nitrous oxide emission during the simultaneous nitrification denitrification (SND) process was investigated. Higher nitrogen removal efficiency was obtained when the Fe(III) concentration was 20 mg x L(-1), while lower nitrogen removal efficiency was observed when the Fe (III) concentration turned to 60 mg x L(-1). In addition, higher Fe(III) concentration significantly enhanced the N2O emission, as well as the N2O conversion ratio. This was mainly attributed to (1) the high concentration of nitrite accumulation during the oxic stage, which was caused by lower dehydrogenase activity at high Fe(III) concentration; (2) less PHB production during the anoxic stage, which would led to shortage of carbon source for denitrification in the following oxic stage. The results also showed that Fe(III) addition could improve the TP removal efficiency. TP removal efficiency increased with increasing Fe(III) concentration, mainly because of extra chemical reaction.

  7. Visible light induced electron transfer process over nitrogen doped TiO(2) nanocrystals prepared by oxidation of titanium nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhongbiao; Dong, Fan; Zhao, Weirong; Guo, Sen

    2008-08-30

    Nitrogen doped TiO(2) nanocrystals with anatase and rutile mixed phases were prepared by incomplete oxidation of titanium nitride at different temperatures. The as-prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), core level X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (CL XPS), valence band X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (VB XPS), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectra (UV-vis DRS), and visible light excited photoluminescence (PL). The photocatalytic activity was evaluated for photocatalytic degradation of toluene in gas phase under visible light irradiation. The visible light absorption and photoactivities of these nitrogen doped TiO(2) nanocrystals can be clearly attributed to the change of the additional electronic (N(-)) states above the valence band of TiO(2) modified by N dopant as revealed by the VB XPS and visible light induced PL. A band gap structure model was established to explain the electron transfer process over nitrogen doped TiO(2) nanocrystals under visible light irradiation, which was consistent with the previous theoretical and experimental results. This model can also be applied to understand visible light induced photocatalysis over other nonmetal doped TiO(2).

  8. Synthesis, characterization and visible light photocatalytic activity of nitrogen-doped zinc oxide nanospheres

    OpenAIRE

    Atul B. Lavand; Yuvraj S. Malghe

    2015-01-01

    Pure and Nitrogen (N)-doped ZnO nanospheres were successfully prepared using microemulsion method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) study indicates formation of nanosized N-doped ZnO with wurtzite phase. Nitrogen incorporation into oxygen site of ZnO causes lattice compression and small peak shift toward lower 2θ value. Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements revealed the presence of N in ZnO lattice. Scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) study revealed spherical morphology of pure and...

  9. Factors controlling regional differences in forest soil emission of nitrogen oxides (NO and N2O)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, K.; Skiba, U.; Ambus, P.;

    2006-01-01

    Soil emissions of NO and N2O were measured continuously at high frequency for more than one year at 15 European forest sites as part of the EU-funded project NOFRETETE. The locations represent different forest types (coniferous/deciduous) and different nitrogen loads. Geoaphically they range from...... to a compact and moist litter layer lead to N2O production and NO consumption in the soil. The two factors soil moisture and soil temperature are often explaining most of the temporal variation within a site. When comparing annual emissions on a regional scale, however, factors such as nitrogen deposition...

  10. Carbon monoxide formation in tomatoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladon, R.J.; Staby, G.L.

    1979-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is not emanated to any large extent from tomato fruits (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill. cvs. Rutgers and Ohio MR-13), but is retained within the internal atmosphere. CO is found during all stages of fruit development, but no set pattern of CO concentration is evident.

  11. MOPITT Carbon Monoxide Over India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    MOPITT observed high levels of carbon monoxide (red and yellow pixels) over the Indian sub-continent during March. These values are associated with industrial activity in the region just south of the Himalayan Mountains. Notice that to the north, the Himalayas are characterized by low values (blue pixels).

  12. Modernizing the boiler installation for unit no. 3 at the Kashirskaya GRES to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.A. Smyshlyaev; S.A. Evdokimov; L.G. Dubovitskaya; I.A. Kochetkov; E. K. Verbovetskii [JSC ' Inzhiniringovaya Kompaniya ZIOMAR' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2008-03-15

    The purpose of modernizing the Pp-1050-25-545 KGZh (P-50R) boiler is to reduce the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) to levels consistent with modern requirements. The following engineering steps were taken, with liquid slag removal from the boiler, to attain NOx levels of 700-750 mg/m{sup 3} for operation with coal and 125 mg/m{sup 3} for operation with natural gas - three-stage combustion with natural gas as the reducing fuel (about 15% thermal) burning in the recirculating gases; and - use of low-emission coal-dust burners with dust feed at high concentrations, overflow burners, and tertiary draft nozzles to lower the amount of excess air in the active combustion zone. The NOx level was further reduced to 570 g/m{sup 3} (just for operation with coal) by using a selective noncatalytic nitrogen oxide reduction system with injection of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) vapor into the boiler in a zone with temperatures of 950{sup o}C.

  13. Potential application of aerobic denitrifying bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa PCN-2 in nitrogen oxides (NOx) removal from flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Maosheng; Li, Can; Liu, Shufeng; Gui, Mengyao; Ni, Jinren

    2016-11-15

    Conventional biological removal of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from flue gas has been severely restricted by the presence of oxygen. This paper presents an efficient alternative for NOx removal at varying oxygen levels using the newly isolated bacterial strain Pseudomonas aeruginosa PCN-2 which was capable of aerobic and anoxic denitrification. Interestingly, nitric oxide (NO), as the obligatory intermediate, was negligibly accumulated during nitrate and nitrite reduction. Moreover, normal nitrate reduction with decreasing NO accumulation was realized under O2 concentration ranging from 0 to 100%. Reverse transcription and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis revealed that high efficient NO removal was attributed to the coordinate regulation of gene expressions including napA (for periplasmic nitrate reductase), nirS (for cytochrome cd1 nitrite reductase) and cnorB (for NO reductase). Further batch experiments demonstrated the immobilized strain PCN-2 possessed high capability of removing NO and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) at O2 concentration of 0-10%. A biotrickling filter established with present strain achieved high NOx removal efficiencies of 91.94-96.74% at inlet NO concentration of 100-500ppm and O2 concentration of 0-10%, which implied promising potential applications in purifying NOx contaminated flue gas.

  14. THE NITROGEN OXIDE CONCENTRATION DEPENDENCE ON HEAT LOSSES WITH EXIT SMOKE GASES OF HEAT-GENERATING PLANTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Sedaev

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement. The most significant heat losses are losses associated with exit gases. It is these losses that determine the scale of heat emissions into the plant air with fuel combustion products and reduce the environmental safety of the plant. Many of the derived methods for reducing the nitrogen oxide emission associated with gas purification systems provide a high degree of smoke gas purification, but these methods are based on the use of various chemicals, which sharply reduces their environmental and operational characteristics.Results. The suggested method of simultaneous purification and recycling of gaseous emissions of heat-generating plants differs profitably from the existing ones. Its application will improve tech-nical and economic and also environmental characteristics of heat-generating plants and will make the characteristics of the energy enterprise a closer match to those of waste-free, environmentally-friendly and profitable enterprises.Conclusions. The obtained results confirm the fact that reduction of heat losses with exit gases re-sults in a reduction of nitrogen oxide emissions. Therefore, an increase in environmental safety of a boiler unit can be achieved in tandem with one in heat efficiency.

  15. Ultrasound coupled with Fenton oxidation pre-treatment of sludge to release organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Changxiu [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Jiang, Jianguo, E-mail: jianguoj@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Key Laboratory for Solid Waste Management and Environment Safety, Ministry of Education of China (China); Collaborative Innovation Center for Regional Environmental Quality, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Li, De' an [School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2015-11-01

    We focused on the effects of ultrasound and Fenton reagent in ultrasonic coupling Fenton oxidation (U + F) pre-treatment processes on the disintegration of wastewater treatment plant sludge. The results demonstrated that U + F treatment could significantly increase soluble COD, TOC, total N, proteins, total P and PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} concentrations in sludge supernatant. This method was more effective than ultrasonic (U) or Fenton oxidation (F) treatment alone. U + F treatment increased the soluble COD by 2.1- and 1.4-fold compared with U and F alone, respectively. U + F treatment increased the total N and P by 1.7- and 2.2-fold, respectively, compared with F alone. After U + F treatment, sludge showed a considerably finer particle size and looser microstructure based on scanning electron microscopy, and the highest OH· signal intensity increased from 568.7 by F treatment to 1106.3 using electron spin resonance. This demonstrated that U + F treatment induces disintegration of sludge and release of organic carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus better. - Highlights: • Combined ultrasound–Fenton pre-treatment was proposed for sludge disintegration. • Ultrasound–Fenton significantly increased carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus release. • Higher level of OH· was detected after combined disintegration than Fenton.

  16. 76 FR 11082 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Ohio; Oxides of Nitrogen Budget...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ... Nitrogen Budget Trading Program; Technical Amendment AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION... Trading Program added to the SIP by EPA rulemaking dated February 13, 2008. This final rule conforms the... Budget Trading Program. On February 13, 2008 (73 FR 8197), EPA approved the State's rule revisions, in...

  17. Nitrogen containing species as intermediates in the oxidation of ammonia over silica supported molybdena catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biermann, J.J.P.; Janssen, F.J.J.G.; Ross, J.R.H.

    1992-01-01

    The behaviour of ammonia and oxygen over silica supported molybdena catalysts has been studied by means of thermal analysis techniques, such as thermo-gravimetry and heat-flow calorimetry. The composition of the reactants and products was determined by means of mass spectrometric analysis. Nitrogen-

  18. Effects of Nitrogen Fertilization and Soil Inoculation of Sulfur-Oxidizing or Nitrogen-Fixing Bacteria on Onion Plant Growth and Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemat M. Awad

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A field experiment was conducted in a newly reclaimed soil at El-Saff region, El-Giza Governorate, Egypt to study the effects of different rates of nitrogen (N: 62 to 248 kg ha-1 with or without soil inoculation of sulfur- (S- oxidizing bacteria (SoxB and combined inoculation of SoxB and N-fixing bacteria (NFxB on yield, quality and nutritional status of onion (Allium cepa L., “Giza 20”. Elemental S at 620 kg ha-1 was applied to all treatments. Application of N at 62, 124, and 248 kg ha-1 rates increased onion yield, plant height, and N uptake by 28 to 76%, 32 to 53%, and 61 to 145%, as compared to those of the plants that received no N. Inoculation of SoxB at various N rates increased onion yields by 47 to 69% and N uptake by 76 to 93%, as compared to those of the plants which received the respective rates of N but no SoxB inoculation. Inoculation with SoxB and NFxB increased onion yield by 221%, plant height by 62%, and N uptake by 629%, as compared to those of the plants grown without inoculation and no N applied.

  19. Recent changes in the oxidized to reduced nitrogen ratio in atmospheric precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurzyca, Iwona; Frankowski, Marcin

    2017-10-01

    In this study, the characteristics of precipitation in terms of various nitrogen forms (NO3-, NO2-, NH4+, Norganic, Ntotal) is presented. The samples were collected in the areas of different anthropogenic pressure (urban area vs. ecologically protected woodland area, ∼30 km distant from each other; Wielkopolska region, Poland). Based on the Nox and Nred emission profiles (Nox/Nred ratio), temporal and spatial comparison was carried out. For both sites, during a decade of observation, more than 60% of samples had higher contribution of N-NH4+ than N-NO3-, the amount of N-NO2- was negligible, and organic nitrogen amounted to 30% of total nitrogen content which varied up to 16 mg/l. The precipitation events w ith high concentration of nitrogen species were investigated in terms of possible local and remote sources of nitrogen (synoptic meteorology), to indicate the areas which can act as potential sources of N-compounds. Based on the chemometric analysis, it was found that Nred implies Nox and vice versa, due to interactions between them in the atmosphere. Taking into account the analysis of precipitation occurring simultaneously in both locations (about 50% of all rainfall episodes), it was observed that such factor as anthropogenic pressure differentiates but does not determine the chemical composition of precipitation in the investigated areas (urban vs. woodland area; distance of ∼30 km). Thermodynamics of the atmosphere had a significant impact on concentrations of N-NO3- and N-NH4+ in precipitation, as well as the circulation of air masses and remote N sources responsible for transboundary inflow of pollutants.

  20. The Protective Role of Carbon Monoxide (CO Produced by Heme Oxygenases and Derived from the CO-Releasing Molecule CORM-2 in the Pathogenesis of Stress-Induced Gastric Lesions: Evidence for Non-Involvement of Nitric Oxide (NO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Magierowska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO produced by heme oxygenase (HO-1 and HO-2 or released from the CO-donor, tricarbonyldichlororuthenium (II dimer (CORM-2 causes vasodilation, with unknown efficacy against stress-induced gastric lesions. We studied whether pretreatment with CORM-2 (0.1–10 mg/kg oral gavage (i.g., RuCl3 (1 mg/kg i.g., zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP (10 mg/kg intraperitoneally (i.p., hemin (1–10 mg/kg i.g. and CORM-2 (1 mg/kg i.g. combined with NG-nitro-l-arginine (l-NNA, 20 mg/kg i.p., 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ, 10 mg/kg i.p., indomethacin (5 mg/kg i.p., SC-560 (5 mg/kg i.g., and celecoxib (10 mg/kg i.g. affects gastric lesions following 3.5 h of water immersion and restraint stress (WRS. Gastric blood flow (GBF, the number of gastric lesions and gastric CO and nitric oxide (NO contents, blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb level and the gastric expression of HO-1, HO-2, hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α, tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α, cyclooxygenase (COX-2 and inducible NO synthase (iNOS were determined. CORM-2 (1 mg/kg i.g. and hemin (10 mg/kg i.g. significantly decreased WRS lesions while increasing GBF, however, RuCl3 was ineffective. The impact of CORM-2 was reversed by ZnPP, ODQ, indomethacin, SC-560 and celecoxib, but not by l-NNA. CORM-2 decreased NO and increased HO-1 expression and CO and COHb content, downregulated HIF-1α, as well as WRS-elevated COX-2 and iNOS mRNAs. Gastroprotection by CORM-2 and HO depends upon CO’s hyperemic and anti-inflammatory properties, but is independent of NO.

  1. Regenerative process and system for the simultaneous removal of particulates and the oxides of sulfur and nitrogen from a gas stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M.R.; Gal, E.

    1993-04-13

    A process and system are described for simultaneously removing from a gaseous mixture, sulfur oxides by means of a solid sulfur oxide acceptor on a porous carrier, nitrogen oxides by means of ammonia gas and particulate matter by means of filtration and for the regeneration of loaded solid sulfur oxide acceptor. Finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor is entrained in a gaseous mixture to deplete sulfur oxides from the gaseous mixture, the finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor being dispersed on a porous carrier material having a particle size up to about 200 microns. In the process, the gaseous mixture is optionally pre-filtered to remove particulate matter and thereafter finely-divided solid sulfur oxide acceptor is injected into the gaseous mixture.

  2. Masimo SET(R)Rad-57碳氧血氧测量仪在急性一氧化碳中毒急救中的应用%Clinical Application of Emergency Treatment in Patients with Carbon Monoxide Poisoning by Masimo SET (R) Rad-57 Carbonic Oxide Poisoning Monitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴耿茂; 林凯胜; 杨小旭; 刘育春; 黄国梁

    2015-01-01

    目的:探讨Masimo SET(R)Rad-57碳氧血氧测量仪在急性一氧化碳中毒患者早期诊断中的价值。方法:将2013年11月-2014年4月收治的急性一氧化碳中毒患者35例按照临床症状和体征分为轻、中、重度一氧化碳中毒,并与Masimo SET(R)Rad-57碳氧血氧测量仪测得的碳氧血红蛋白饱和度进行比较。结果:Masimo SET(R) Rad-57碳氧血氧测量仪测得的碳氧血红蛋白饱和度与一氧化碳中毒的病情相符,且轻、中、重度组间均有显著性差异(P均<0.01)。结论:急诊科应用Masimo SET(R)Rad-57碳氧血氧测量仪对一氧化碳中毒患者有早期诊断价值。%Objective:To investigate the early diagnosis value of patients with carbon monoxide poisoning by Masimo:SET (R)Rad-57 carbonic oxide poisoning monitor. Methods:35 patients with carbonic oxide poisoning were divided into light severity , medium severity and heavy according to the clinical symptoms and signs from Nov 2013 to Apr 2014, and the severities were compared with the saturation of carbonic oxide detected by Masimo SET(R)Rad-57 carbonic oxide poisoning monitor. Results:The saturations of carbonic oxide detected by Masimo SET (R) Rad-57 carbonic oxide poisoning monitor corresponded with the severities of the carbon monoxide poisoning. There were significant differences among the light, moderate and severe groups, all P<0.01. Conclusion:There is early diagnostic value for patients with carbon monoxide poisoning using Masimo SET (R)Rad-57 carbonic oxide poisoning monitor in department of emergency.

  3. Nitrogen-removal performance and community structure of nitrifying bacteria under different aeration modes in an oxidation ditch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chang-Zi; Fu, Wei; Chen, Xue-Mei; Peng, Dang-Cong; Jin, Peng-Kang

    2013-07-01

    Oxidation-ditch operation modes were simulated using sequencing batch reactors (SBRs) with alternate stirring and aerating. The nitrogen-removal efficiencies and nitrifying characteristics of two aeration modes, point aeration and step aeration, were investigated. Under the same air-supply capacity, oxygen dissolved more efficiently in the system with point aeration, forming a larger aerobic zone. The nitrifying effects were similar in point aeration and step aeration, where the average removal efficiencies of NH4(+) N were 98% and 96%, respectively. When the proportion of anoxic and oxic zones was 1, the average removal efficiencies of total nitrogen (TN) were 45% and 66% under point aeration and step aeration, respectively. Step aeration was more beneficial to both anoxic denitrification and simultaneous nitrification and denitrification (SND). The maximum specific ammonia-uptake rates (AUR) of point aeration and step aeration were 4.7 and 4.9 mg NH4(+)/(gMLVSS h), respectively, while the maximum specific nitrite-uptake rates (NUR) of the two systems were 7.4 and 5.3 mg NO2(-)-N/(gMLVSS h), respectively. The proportions of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) to all bacteria were 5.1% under point aeration and 7.0% under step aeration, and the proportions of nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB) reached 6.5% and 9.0% under point and step aeration, respectively. The dominant genera of AOB and NOB were Nitrosococcus and Nitrospira, which accounted for 90% and 91%, respectively, under point aeration, and the diversity of nitrifying bacteria was lower than under step aeration. Point aeration was selective of nitrifying bacteria. The abundance of NOB was greater than that of AOB in both of the operation modes, and complete transformation of NH4(+) N to NO3(-)-N was observed without NO2(-)-N accumulation.

  4. Synthesis, characterization and visible light photocatalytic activity of nitrogen-doped zinc oxide nanospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atul B. Lavand

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pure and Nitrogen (N-doped ZnO nanospheres were successfully prepared using microemulsion method. X-ray diffraction (XRD study indicates formation of nanosized N-doped ZnO with wurtzite phase. Nitrogen incorporation into oxygen site of ZnO causes lattice compression and small peak shift toward lower 2θ value. Raman and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR measurements revealed the presence of N in ZnO lattice. Scanning electron microscopy (FESEM study revealed spherical morphology of pure and N-doped ZnO samples. UV–visible spectra show that N-doping significantly enhanced the light absorption capacity of ZnO in the visible region. N-doped ZnO exhibits higher photocatalytic activity compared with that of commercial and pure ZnO nanoparticles. As prepared nanosized N-doped ZnO photocatalyst is highly stable and reusable.

  5. Coupling Between and Among Ammonia Oxidizers and Nitrite Oxidizers in Grassland Mesocosms Submitted to Elevated CO2 and Nitrogen Supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonin, Marie; Le Roux, Xavier; Poly, Franck; Lerondelle, Catherine; Hungate, Bruce A; Nunan, Naoise; Niboyet, Audrey

    2015-10-01

    Many studies have assessed the responses of soil microbial functional groups to increases in atmospheric CO2 or N deposition alone and more rarely in combination. However, the effects of elevated CO2 and N on the (de)coupling between different microbial functional groups (e.g., different groups of nitrifiers) have been barely studied, despite potential consequences for ecosystem functioning. Here, we investigated the short-term combined effects of elevated CO2 and N supply on the abundances of the four main microbial groups involved in soil nitrification: ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA), ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (belonging to the genera Nitrobacter and Nitrospira) in grassland mesocosms. AOB and AOA abundances responded differently to the treatments: N addition increased AOB abundance, but did not alter AOA abundance. Nitrobacter and Nitrospira abundances also showed contrasted responses to the treatments: N addition increased Nitrobacter abundance, but decreased Nitrospira abundance. Our results support the idea of a niche differentiation between AOB and AOA, and between Nitrobacter and Nitrospira. AOB and Nitrobacter were both promoted at high N and C conditions (and low soil water content for Nitrobacter), while AOA and Nitrospira were favored at low N and C conditions (and high soil water content for Nitrospira). In addition, Nitrobacter abundance was positively correlated to AOB abundance and Nitrospira abundance to AOA abundance. Our results suggest that the couplings between ammonia and nitrite oxidizers are influenced by soil N availability. Multiple environmental changes may thus elicit rapid and contrasted responses between and among the soil ammonia and nitrite oxidizers due to their different ecological requirements.

  6. Nitrous oxide production during nitrogen removal from domestic wastewater in lab-scale sequencing batch reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiuhong; PENG Yi; WU Changyong; AKIO Takigawa; PENG Yongzhen

    2008-01-01

    The production of N2O during nitrogen removal from real domestic wastewater was investigated in a lab-scale aerobic-anoxic sequencing batch reactor with a working volume of 14 L.The results showed that the total N2O-N production reached higher than 1.87 mg/L,and up to 4% of removed nitrogen was converted into N2O.In addition,N2O led to a much higher greenhouse effect than CO2 during aerobic reaction phase,this proved that N2O production could not be neglected.The N2O-N production during nitrification Was 1.85 mg/L,whereas,during denitrification,no N2O was produced,nitrification was the main source of N2O production during nitrogen removal.Furthermore,during denitrification,the dissolved N2O at the end of aeration Was found to be further reduced to N2.Denitrification thus had the potential of controlling N2O production.

  7. Evaluation of simulated photochemical partitioning of oxidized nitrogen in the upper troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. H. Henderson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional and global chemical transport models underpredict NOx (NO + NO2 in the upper troposphere where it is a precursor to the greenhouse gas ozone. The NOx bias has been shown in model evaluations using aircraft data (Singh et al., 2007 and total column NO2 (molecules cm−2 from satellite observations (Napelenok et al., 2008. The causes of NOx underpredictions have yet to be fully understood due to the interconnected nature of simulated emission, transport, and chemistry processes. Recent observation-based studies, in the upper troposphere, identify chemical rate coefficients as a potential source of error (Olson et al., 2006; Ren et al., 2008. Since typical chemistry evaluation techniques are not available for upper tropospheric conditions, this study develops an evaluation platform from in situ observations, stochastic convection, and deterministic chemistry. We derive a stochastic convection model and optimize it using two simulated datasets of time since convection, one based on meteorology, and the other on chemistry. The chemistry surrogate for time since convection is calculated using seven different chemical mechanisms, all of which predict shorter time since convection than our meteorological analysis. We evaluate chemical simulations by inter-comparison and by pairing results with observations based on NOx:HNO3, a photochemical aging indicator. Inter-comparison reveals individual chemical mechanism biases and recommended updates. Evaluation against observations shows that all chemical mechanisms overpredict NOx removal relative to long-lived methanol and carbon monoxide. All chemical mechanisms underpredict observed NOx by at least 30%, and further evaluation is necessary to refine simulation sensitivities to initial conditions and chemical rate uncertainties.

  8. Model uncertainties affecting satellite-based inverse modeling of nitrogen oxides emissions and implications for surface ozone simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-T. Lin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Errors in chemical transport models (CTMs interpreting the relation between space-retrieved tropospheric column densities of nitrogen dioxide (NO2 and emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx have important consequences on the inverse modeling. They are however difficult to quantify due to lack of adequate in situ measurements, particularly over China and other developing countries. This study proposes an alternate approach for model evaluation over East China, by analyzing the sensitivity of modeled NO2 columns to errors in meteorological and chemical parameters/processes important to the nitrogen abundance. As a demonstration, it evaluates the nested version of GEOS-Chem driven by the GEOS-5 meteorology and the INTEX-B anthropogenic emissions and used with retrievals from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI to constrain emissions of NOx. The CTM has been used extensively for such applications. Errors are examined for a comprehensive set of meteorological and chemical parameters using measurements and/or uncertainty analysis based on current knowledge. Results are exploited then for sensitivity simulations perturbing the respective parameters, as the basis of the following post-model linearized and localized first-order modification. It is found that the model meteorology likely contains errors of various magnitudes in cloud optical depth, air temperature, water vapor, boundary layer height and many other parameters. Model errors also exist in gaseous and heterogeneous reactions, aerosol optical properties and emissions of non-nitrogen species affecting the nitrogen chemistry. Modifications accounting for quantified errors in 10 selected parameters increase the NO2 columns in most areas with an average positive impact of 22% in July and 10% in January. This suggests a possible systematic model bias such that the top-down emissions will be overestimated by the same magnitudes if the model is used

  9. Seasonal variation of nitrogen oxides, ozone and biogenic volatile organic compound concentrations and fluxes at Norway spruce forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juran, Stanislav; Vecerova, Kristyna; Holisova, Petra; Zapletal, Milos; Pallozzi, Emanuele; Guidolotti, Gabriele; Calfapietra, Carlo; Vecera, Zbynek; Cudlin, Pavel; Urban, Otmar

    2015-04-01

    Dynamics of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and ozone concentration and their depositions were investigated on the Norway spruce forest at Bily Kriz experimental station at the Silesian Beskydy Mountains (north-eastern part of the Czech Republic). Both NOx and ozone concentration and fluxes were modelled for the whole season and covering thus different climate conditions. Data were recorded for three consecutive years and therefore deeper analyses were performed. During the summer 2014 BVOC field campaign was carried out using proton-transfer-reaction-time-of-flight-mass-spectrometry (PTR-TOF, Ionicon Analytik GmbH, Innsbruck, Austria) and volatile organic compound of biogenic origin (BVOC) were measured at the different levels of tree canopies. By the same time BVOC were trapped into the Tenax tubes (Markes International Ltd., UK) and put afterwards for thermal desorption (Markes Unity System 2, Markes International Ltd., UK) to GS-MS analysis (TSQ Quntum XLS triple Quadrupole, Thermo Scientific, USA). Thus data of different levels of canopies together with different spectra of monoterpenes were obtained. Interesting comparison of both methods will be shown. It was the first BVOC field campaign using PTR technique at any of the forest in the Czech Republic. Highest fluxes and concentrations were recorded around the noon hours, represented particularly by monoterpenes, especially α-pinen and limonene. Other BVOCs than monoterpenes were negligible. Variation of fluxes between different canopies levels was observed, highlighting difference in shaded and sun exposed leaves. Sun leaves emitted up to 2.4 nmol m-2 s-1 of monoterpenes, while shaded leaves emitted only up to 0.6 nmol m-2 s-1 when measured under standard conditions (irradiance 1000 µmol m-2 s-1; temperature 30°C). We discuss here the importance of the most common Norway spruce tree forests in the Czech Republic in bi-directional exchanges of important secondary pollutant such as ozone and nitrogen oxides, their

  10. Membrane targeting of MnSOD is essential for oxidative stress tolerance of nitrogen-fixing cultures of Anabaena sp. strain PCC7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavan, Prashanth S; Rajaram, Hema; Apte, Shree Kumar

    2015-07-01

    The nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium, Anabaena PCC7120 encodes for a membrane-targeted 30 kDa Mn-superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) and a cytosolic FeSOD. The MnSOD is post-translationally processed to 27 and 24 kDa forms in the cytosol and periplasm/thylakoid lumen. The extent of cleavage of signal and linker peptides at the N-terminus is dependent on the availability of combined nitrogen during growth. While the 24 and 27 kDa forms are present in near equal proportions under nitrogen-fixing conditions, the 24 kDa form is predominant under nitrogen-supplemented conditions. Individual contribution of these forms of MnSOD to total oxidative stress tolerance was analysed using recombinant Anabaena strains overexpressing either different molecular forms of MnSOD or MnSOD defective in the cleavage of signal/linker peptide. Targeting of MnSOD to the membrane and subsequent cleavage to release both the 24 and 27 kDa forms was essential for oxidative stress tolerance under nitrogen-fixing conditions. On the other hand, the cleavage of linker peptide was absolutely essential and the release of cytosolic 24 kDa form of MnSOD was obligatory for developing oxidative stress tolerance under nitrogen-supplemented conditions. Thus, a single MnSOD caters to the reduction of superoxide radical in both cytosol and thylakoid lumen/periplasm irrespective of the N-status of growth by regulating its cleavage. This is the first report on the physiological advantage of membrane-targeting and processing of MnSOD in either bacteria or plants. The higher oxidative stress tolerance offered by the cytosolic form of MnSOD has possibly resulted in retention of only the cytosolic form in bacterial non-nitrogen-fixers during evolution.

  11. Modeling nitrous oxide production during biological nitrogen removal via nitrification and denitrification: extensions to the general ASM models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Bing-Jie; Ruscalleda, Maël; Pellicer-Nàcher, Carles; Smets, Barth F

    2011-09-15

    Nitrous oxide (N(2)O) can be formed during biological nitrogen (N) removal processes. In this work, a mathematical model is developed that describes N(2)O production and consumption during activated sludge nitrification and denitrification. The well-known ASM process models are extended to capture N(2)O dynamics during both nitrification and denitrification in biological N removal. Six additional processes and three additional reactants, all involved in known biochemical reactions, have been added. The validity and applicability of the model is demonstrated by comparing simulations with experimental data on N(2)O production from four different mixed culture nitrification and denitrification reactor study reports. Modeling results confirm that hydroxylamine oxidation by ammonium oxidizers (AOB) occurs 10 times slower when NO(2)(-) participates as final electron acceptor compared to the oxic pathway. Among the four denitrification steps, the last one (N(2)O reduction to N(2)) seems to be inhibited first when O(2) is present. Overall, N(2)O production can account for 0.1-25% of the consumed N in different nitrification and denitrification systems, which can be well simulated by the proposed model. In conclusion, we provide a modeling structure, which adequately captures N(2)O dynamics in autotrophic nitrification and heterotrophic denitrification driven biological N removal processes and which can form the basis for ongoing refinements.

  12. European scale modeling of sulfur, oxidized nitrogen and photochemical oxidants. Model development and evaluation for the 1994 growing season

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langner, J.; Bergstroem, R. [Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Inst., Norrkoeping (Sweden); Pleijel, K. [Swedish Environmental Research Inst., Goeteborg (Sweden)

    1998-09-01

    A chemical mechanism, including the relevant reactions leading to the production of ozone and other photochemical oxidants, has been implemented in the MATCH regional tracer transport/chemistry/deposition model. The aim has been to develop a model platform that can be used as a basis for a range of regional scale studies involving atmospheric chemistry, including assessment of the importance of different sources of pollutants to the levels of photochemical oxidants and air pollutant forecasting. Meteorological input data to the model were taken from archived output from the operational version of HIRLAM at SMHI. Evaluation of model calculations over Europe for a six month period in 1994 for a range of chemical components show good results considering known sources of error and uncertainties in input data and model formulation. With limited further work the system is sufficiently good to be applied for scenario studies and for regional scale air pollutant forecasts 42 refs, 24 figs, 17 tabs

  13. Phytoplankton communities from San Francisco Bay Delta respond differently to oxidized and reduced nitrogen substrates - even under conditions that would otherwise suggest nitrogen sufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia M Glibert

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of equivalent additions of nitrogen (N, 30-40 μM-N in different forms (ammonium, NH4+, and nitrate, NO3- under conditions of different light exposure on phytoplankton community composition was studied in a series of four, 5-day enclosure experiments on water collected from the nutrient-rich San Francisco Bay Delta over two years. Overall, proportionately more chlorophyll a and fucoxanthin (generally indicative of diatoms was produced per unit N taken up in enclosures enriched with NO3- and incubated at reduced (~15% of ambient light intensity than in treatments with NO3- with high (~60% of ambient light exposure or with NH4+ under either light condition. In contrast, proportionately more chlorophyll b (generally indicative of chlorophytes and zeaxanthin (generally indicative of cyanobacteria was produced in enclosures enriched with NH4+ and incubated under high light intensity than in treatments with low light or with added NO3- at either light level. Rates of maximal velocities (Vmax of uptake of N substrates, measured using 15N tracer techniques, in all enclosures enriched with NO3- were higher than those enriched with NH4+. Directionality of trends in enclosures were similar to phytoplankton community shifts observed in transects of the Sacramento River to Suisun Bay, a region in which large changes in total N quantity and form occur. These data substantiate the growing body of experimental evidence that dichotomous microbial communities develop when enriched with the same absolute concentration of oxidized vs. reduced N forms, even when sufficient N nutrient was available to the community prior to the N inoculations.

  14. The oxidative p-dichlorobenzene dechlorinating in the presence of copper (ΙΙ complexes and nitrogen (ΙΙ, ΙV oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Yemelyanova

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The results of dechlorination in the solution CuCl2–TBP–NaNO2–О2–Н2О kinetics research are presented in the article. All system components influence to the dechlorination process is studied and quantitatively described. The composition of copper intermediate complexes participating in reaction is studied by the instrumentality of UV-spectroscopy. Established part of binuclear copper complexes in the catalytic intermediate complex constants of formation were estimated and compared with the kinetic and spectrophotometric methods. The composition of the intermediate complexes responsible for process is defined, the mechanism scheme is offered, the p-dichlorobenzene dechlorination limiting stage including redox-disintegration of the intermediate complex consisting of dimeric complex of copper (II, I chloride, nitrogen oxide and p-dichlorobenzene is defined.

  15. Sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides emissions from U.S. pulp and paper mills, 1980-2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkerton, John E

    2007-08-01

    Comprehensive surveys conducted at 5-yr intervals were used to estimate sulfur dioxide (SO,) and nitrogen oxides (NO.) emissions from U.S. pulp and paper mills for 1980, 1985, 1990, 1995, 2000, and 2005. Over the 25-yr period, paper production increased by 50%, whereas total SO, emissions declined by 60% to 340,000 short tons (t) and total NO, emissions decreased approximately 15% to 230,000 t. The downward emission trends resulted from a combination of factors, including reductions in oil and coal use, steadily declining fuel sulfur content, lower pulp and paper production in recent years, increased use of flue gas desulfurization systems on boilers, growing use of combustion modifications and add-on control systems to reduce boiler and gas turbine NO, emissions, and improvements in kraft recovery furnace operations.

  16. In situ fabrication of nickel based oxide on nitrogen-doped graphene for high electrochemical performance supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Denghui; Zhang, Mingmei; Wang, Ying; Yan, Zaoxue; Jing, Junjie; Xie, Jimin

    2017-10-01

    In this article, we synthesize Ni(OH)2 homogeneous grown on nitrogen-doped graphene (Ni(OH)2/NG), subsequently, small and uniform nickel oxide nanoparticle (NiO/NG) is also successfully obtained through tube furnace calcination method. The high specific capacitance of the NiO/NG electrode can reach to 1314.1 F/g at a charge and discharge current density of 2 A/g, meanwhile the specific capacitance of Ni(OH)2/NG electrode is also 1350 F/g. The capacitance of NiO/NG can remain 93.7% of the maximum value after 1000 cycles, while the Ni(OH)2/NG electrode losses 16.9% of the initial capacitance after 1000 cycles. It can be attributed to nickel hydroxide instability during charge-discharge cycles.

  17. Factors controlling regional differences in forest soil emission of nitrogen oxides (NO and N2O)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, K.; Skiba, U.; Ambus, P.

    2006-01-01

    Soil emissions of NO and N2O were measured continuously at high frequency for more than one year at 15 European forest sites as part of the EU-funded project NOFRETETE. The locations represent different forest types (coniferous/deciduous) and different nitrogen loads. Geoaphically they range from...... Finland in the north to Italy in the south and from Hungary in the east to Scotland in the west. The highest NO emissions were observed from coniferous forests, whereas the lowest NO emissions were observed from deciduous forests. The NO emissions from coniferous forests were highly correlated with N...... with the C/N ratio. The difference in N-oxide emissions from soils of coniferous and deciduous forests may partly be explained by differences in N-deposition rates and partly by differences in characteristics of the litter layer and soil. NO was mainly derived from nitrification whereas N2O was mainly...

  18. Agreement of land use regression models with personal exposure measurements of particulate matter and nitrogen oxides air pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montagne, Denise; Hoek, Gerard; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark; Lanki, Timo; Pennanen, Arto; Portella, Meritxell; Meliefste, Kees; Eeftens, Marloes; Yli-Tuomi, Tarja; Cirach, Marta; Brunekreef, Bert

    2013-08-06

    Land use regression (LUR) models are often used to predict long-term average concentrations of air pollutants. Little is known how well LUR models predict personal exposure. In this study, the agreement of LUR models with measured personal exposure was assessed. The measured components were particulate matter with a diameter smaller than 2.5 μm (PM2.5), soot (reflectance of PM2.5), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). In Helsinki, Utrecht, and Barcelona, 15 volunteers (from semiurban, urban background, and traffic sites) followed prescribed time activity patterns. Per participant, six 96 h outdoor, indoor, and personal measurements spread over three seasons were conducted. Soot LUR models were significantly correlated with measured average outdoor and personal soot concentrations. Soot LUR models explained 39%, 44%, and 20% of personal exposure variability (R(2)) in Helsinki, Utrecht, and Barcelona. NO2 LUR models significantly predicted outdoor concentrations and personal exposure in Utrecht and Helsinki, whereas NOx and PM2.5 LUR models did not predict personal exposure. PM2.5, NO2, and NOx models were correlated with personal soot, the component least affected by indoor sources. LUR modeled and measured outdoor, indoor, and personal concentrations were highly correlated for all pollutants when data from the three cities were combined. This study supports the use of intraurban LUR models for especially soot in air pollution epidemiology.

  19. Uptake and incorporation of {sup 15}N marked nitrogen oxides by seasonal and woddy plants; Aufnahme und Einbau {sup 15}N-markierter Stickoxide durch krautige und holzige Pflanzen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eickriede, A.

    1998-07-01

    It the Research Centre Juelich a special system was developed to expose plants under defined climatic conditions to a nitrogen oxide enriched atmosphere. In completition and extension to former studies sunflowers (Helianthus annuus L.), mays (Zea mays L.) and poplar (Populus tremula x P. alba) were exposed to nitrogen oxides. By using {sup 15}N enriched nitrogen oxides ({sup 15}NO{sub 2}, and {sup 15}NO, summarised as {sup 15}NO{sub x}) the uptake and incorporation of {sup 15}NOx in dependance of the exposition concentration (30 to 100 ppb {sup 15}NO, 20 ppb {sup 15}NO{sub 2}), nitrogen nutrition (nitrate or ammonium), and harvesting time were examined. Moreover, the influence of nitrogen oxide exposition on the distribution pattern of {sup 15}NO{sub x} nitrogen within the plants and on the amino acid content of plant leaves was investigated. (orig.)

  20. Theoretical reduction potentials for nitrogen oxides from CBS-QB3 energetics and (C)PCM solvation calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Andrew S; Fukuto, Jon M; Houk, Kendall N

    2005-05-30

    The complete basis set method, CBS-QB3, is used in combination with two continuum solvation models for aqueous solvation to compute reduction potentials previously determined experimentally for 36 nitrogen oxides and related species of the general formula H(V)C(W)N(X)O(Y)Cl(Z). The PCM model led to the correlation E(o)exp (vs NHE) = 0.84E(o)calc + 0.03 V with an average error of 0.12 V (2.8 kcal/mol) and a maximum error of 0.32 V (7.4 kcal/mol). The CPCM/UAKS model gave E(o)exp (vs NHE) = 0.83E(o)calc + 0.11 V with the same average error. This general method was used to predict reduction potentials (+/-0.3 V) for nitrogen oxides for which reduction potentials are not known with certainty: NO2/NO2- (0.6 V), NO3/NO3- (1.9 V), N2O3-/N2O3(2-) (0.5 V), HN2O3/HN2O3- (0.9 V), HONNO,H+/HONNOH (1.6 V), 2NO,H+/HONNO (0.0 V), 2NO/ONNO- (-0.1 V), ONNO-/ONNO(2-) (-0.4 V), HNO,H+/H2NO (0.6 V), H2NO,H+/H2NOH (0.9 V), HNO,2H+/H2NOH (0.8 V), and HNO/HNO- (-0.7 V).