WorldWideScience

Sample records for monoxide methane ethane

  1. CRYOCHEM calculation: Minor components influence solid solutions in nitrogen-methane atmospheres - ethane on Titan and carbon monoxide on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S. P.; Kargel, J. S.; Adidharma, H.; Marion, G. M.

    2016-12-01

    In the extremely cold conditions on Triton, Pluto and other Kuiper Belt Objects, and Titan's tropopause and lower stratosphere, the atmospheres as a whole, not components individually, are subject to freeze into solid phases as solutions, notpure ices. This is in contrast to water ice in Earth's atmosphere, where the atmosphere stays in gaseous phase when water freezes into a solid phase of presumably pure water due to the much higher temperatures involved. A molecular-based thermodynamic model for cryogenic chemical systems, referred to as CRYOCHEM, has been developed to include the phase equilibria involving multi-component solid solutions. Calculations using CRYOCHEM, therefore, can provide us with compositions of solid solutions that are in equilibrium with the gaseous atmosphere. There is no longer a need to assume pure solids conventionally used in modeling, or even as binary (two-component) mixtures, which commonly consider only nitrogen and methane. Two examples will be discussed: (1) on Titan where ethane plays a significant role in precipitation of high-altitude solid aerosols; and (2) on Pluto where carbon monoxide may also play some important role in the sublimation/condensation cycle at the surface and shallow subsurface, e.g., zone of solid-state greenhouse heating. The presence of these third components essentially affects the solid-gas phase equilibria of nitrogen-methane binary system at their respective conditions on Titan and Pluto, the information of which is useful for future modeling, including those on other bodies in the outer Solar System and comets that share similar volatiles.

  2. Demonstration of an ethane spectrometer for methane source identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacovitch, Tara I; Herndon, Scott C; Roscioli, Joseph R; Floerchinger, Cody; McGovern, Ryan M; Agnese, Michael; Pétron, Gabrielle; Kofler, Jonathan; Sweeney, Colm; Karion, Anna; Conley, Stephen A; Kort, Eric A; Nähle, Lars; Fischer, Marc; Hildebrandt, Lars; Koeth, Johannes; McManus, J Barry; Nelson, David D; Zahniser, Mark S; Kolb, Charles E

    2014-07-15

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and tropospheric ozone precursor. Simultaneous observation of ethane with methane can help identify specific methane source types. Aerodyne Ethane-Mini spectrometers, employing recently available mid-infrared distributed feedback tunable diode lasers (DFB-TDL), provide 1 s ethane measurements with sub-ppb precision. In this work, an Ethane-Mini spectrometer has been integrated into two mobile sampling platforms, a ground vehicle and a small airplane, and used to measure ethane/methane enhancement ratios downwind of methane sources. Methane emissions with precisely known sources are shown to have ethane/methane enhancement ratios that differ greatly depending on the source type. Large differences between biogenic and thermogenic sources are observed. Variation within thermogenic sources are detected and tabulated. Methane emitters are classified by their expected ethane content. Categories include the following: biogenic (gas (1-6%), wet gas (>6%), pipeline grade natural gas (natural gas liquids (>30%). Regional scale observations in the Dallas/Fort Worth area of Texas show two distinct ethane/methane enhancement ratios bridged by a transitional region. These results demonstrate the usefulness of continuous and fast ethane measurements in experimental studies of methane emissions, particularly in the oil and natural gas sector.

  3. Ignition-promoting effect of NO2 on methane, ethane and methane/ethane mixtures in a rapid compression machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gersen, S.; Mokhov, A.V.; Darmeveil, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Autoignition delay times of stoichiometric methane, ethane and methane/ethane mixtures doped with 100 and 270ppm of NO2 have been measured in a RCM in the temperature range 900–1050K and pressures from 25 to 50bar. The measurements show that addition of NO2 to CH4/O2/N2/Ar and CH4/C2H6/O2/N2/Ar m...

  4. Methane, Ethane, and Nitrogen Liquid Stability on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Jennifer; Thompson, Garrett Leland; Roe, Henry G.; Grundy, Will; Tegler, Stephen C.; Lindberg, Gerrick Eugene; Trilling, David E.

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that the lakes of Titan are composed of methane and/or ethane, but the relative proportions are mostly unclear. Understanding the past and current stability of these lakes requires characterizing the interactions of liquid methane and ethane, along with nitrogen. Previous studies have shown that the freezing point of methane is depressed when mixed with nitrogen. Our cryogenic laboratory setup allows us to explore ices down to 30 K through imaging and transmission spectroscopy. Recent work (see Thompson et al., this conference) discovered that although methane and ethane have similar freezing points, when mixed they can remain liquid down to 72 K. Concurrently with the freezing point measurements we acquire transmission spectra of these mixtures to understand how the spectral features change with concentration and temperature. Any mixing of these two species together will depress the freezing point of the lake below Titan's surface temperature, preventing them from freezing. Also, when ethane ice forms, it freezes on the bottom of the liquid, while methane ice freezes at the top of the liquid, implying ethane ice is denser than the solution, while methane ice is less dense; this holds for all concentrations. We will present new results exploring the ternary system of methane, ethane and nitrogen. In particular we will map out the N2-C2H6 liquidus, as has been done for CH4-N2, as well as explore the effect of nitrogen on the eutectic of the methane-ethane system. This behavior has implications for not only the lakes on the surface of Titan, but also for the evaporation/condensation/cloud cycle in the atmosphere. These results will help interpretation of future observational data, and guide current theoretical models.

  5. Investigation of Compton profiles of molecular methane and ethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Xiao-Li; Xu, Long-Quan; Kang, Xu; Liu, Ya-Wei; Ni, Dong-Dong; Zhu, Lin-Fan, E-mail: lfzhu@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Modern Physics,University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Yang, Ke, E-mail: yangke@sinap.ac.cn; Ma, Yong-Peng; Yan, Shuai [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201204 (China)

    2015-02-28

    The Compton profiles of methane and ethane molecules have been determined at an incident photon energy of 20 keV based on the third generation synchrotron radiation, and the statistical accuracy of 0.2% is achieved near p{sub z} = 0. The density functional theory with aug-cc-pVTZ basis set was used to calculate the Compton profiles of methane and ethane. The present experimental Compton profiles are in better agreement with the theoretical calculations in the whole p{sub z} region than the previous experimental results, which indicates that the present experimental Compton profiles are accurate enough to serve as the benchmark data for methane and ethane molecules.

  6. Active Thermochemical Tables: Sequential Bond Dissociation Enthalpies of Methane, Ethane, and Methanol, and the Related Thermochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruscic, Branko

    2015-07-16

    Active Thermochemical Tables (ATcT) thermochemistry for the sequential bond dissociations of methane, ethane, and methanol systems were obtained by analyzing and solving a very large thermochemical network (TN). Values for all possible C–H, C–C, C–O, and O–H bond dissociation enthalpies at 298.15 K (BDE298) and bond dissociation energies at 0 K (D0) are presented. The corresponding ATcT standard gas-phase enthalpies of formation of the resulting CHn, n = 4–0 species (methane, methyl, methylene, methylidyne, and carbon atom), C2Hn, n = 6–0 species (ethane, ethyl, ethylene, ethylidene, vinyl, ethylidyne, acetylene, vinylidene, ethynyl, and ethynylene), and COHn, n = 4–0 species (methanol, hydroxymethyl, methoxy, formaldehyde, hydroxymethylene, formyl, isoformyl, and carbon monoxide) are also presented. The ATcT thermochemistry of carbon dioxide, water, hydroxyl, and carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen atoms is also included, together with the sequential BDEs of CO2 and H2O. The provenances of the ATcT enthalpies of formation, which are quite distributed and involve a large number of relevant determinations, are analyzed by variance decomposition and discussed in terms of principal contributions. The underlying reasons for periodic appearances of remarkably low and/or unusually high BDEs, alternating along the dissociation sequences, are analyzed and quantitatively rationalized. The present ATcT results are the most accurate thermochemical values currently available for these species.

  7. Catalytic selective oxidation or oxidative functionalization of methane and ethane to organic oxygenates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Selective oxidation or oxidative functionalization of methane and ethane by both homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis is presented concerning: (1) selective oxidation of methane and ethane to organic oxygenates by hydrogen peroxide in a water medium in the presence of homogeneous osmium catalysts, (2) selective oxidation of methane to formaldehyde over highly dispersed iron and copper heterogeneous catalysts, (3) selective oxidation of ethane to acetaldehyde and formaldehyde over supported molybdenum catalysts, and (4) oxidative carbonylation of methane to methyl acetate over heterogeneous catalysts containing dual sites of rhodium and iron.

  8. Raman Spectroscopic Studies of Methane-Ethane Mixtures as a Function of Pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Susanne Brunsgaard; Berg, Rolf W.; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

    2001-01-01

    Raman spectra of methane and methane-ethane mixtures (100, 85, and 49 mole % CH4) have been obtained as a function of pressure in the pressure range 0.1 to 15.3 MPaA (MPa absolute). For these mixtures methane nu (1) (symmetric C-H stretching) band positions are given as a function of pressure......; for pure methane they are in agreement with previous results. The new data on the methane nu (1) band position of ethane-containing mixtures clearly depend on the kind of molecules surrounding the vibrating methane molecule. The nu (1) band position decreases with increasing pressure; the stronger...... the dependency, the higher the content of ethane. The ethane nu (1) band position in the two mixtures showed the same kind of dependency, A qualitative explanation for this behavior is attempted, relating it to changes in van der Waals-type interactions on pressure....

  9. Study on synchronous detection method of methane and ethane with laser absorption spectroscopy technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ying; Zhang, Yu-jun; You, Kun; Gao, Yan-wei; Chen, Chen; Liu, Jian-guo; Liu, Wen-qing

    2016-10-01

    The main ingredient of mash gas is alkenes, and methane is the most parts of mash gas and ethane is a small portion of it. Fast, accurate, real-time measurement of methane and ethane concentration is an important task for preventing coal mining disaster. In this research, a monitoring system with tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technology has been set up for simultaneous measurement of methane and ethane, and a DFB laser at wavelength of 1.653μm was used as the laser source. The absorption spectroscopy information of methane and ethane, especially the characteristic of the spectrum peak positions and relative intensity were determined by available spectral structures from previous study and available database. Then, the concentration inversion algorithm method based on the spectral resolution and feature extraction was designed for methane and ethane synchronous detection. At last, the continuously experimental results obtained by different concentration of methane and ethane sample gases with the multiple reflection cell and the standard distribution system. In this experiment, the standard distribution system made with the standard gas and two high precision mass flow meters of D07 Sevenstar series whose flow velocity is 1l/min and 5l/min respectively. When the multiple reflection cell work stably, the biggest detection error of methane concentration inversion was 3.7%, and the biggest detection error of ethane was 4.8%. So it is verified that this concentration inversion algorithm works stably and reliably. Thus, this technology could realize the real-time, fast and continuous measurement requirement of mash gas and it will provide the effective technical support to coal mining production in safety for our country.

  10. Activation of methane and ethane and their selective oxidation to the alcohols in protic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, A.; Benvenuto, M.A.; Lin, M.; Hutson, A.C.; Basickes, N. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States))

    1994-02-09

    The selective oxidation of methane and ethane to the alcohols in solvents ranging from strong acids to neutral aqueous medium has been studied. In 98% sulfuric acid, methane is oxidized to CH[sub 3]OSO[sub 3]H by a variety of 1e[sup [minus

  11. Influence of potassium on the competition between methane and ethane in steam reforming over Pt supported on yttrium-stabilized zirconia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graf, P.O.; Mojet, Barbara; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2008-01-01

    effect of addition of potassium to Pt supported on yttrium-stabilized zirconia (PtYSZ) catalyst for steam reforming of methane, ethane and methane/ethane mixtures was explored. Addition of potassium has a positive effect on preferential steam reforming of methane in mixtures of methane and ethane

  12. Influence of potassium on the competition between methane and ethane in steam reforming over Pt supported on yttrium-stabilized zirconia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graf, P.O.; Mojet, Barbara; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2008-01-01

    effect of addition of potassium to Pt supported on yttrium-stabilized zirconia (PtYSZ) catalyst for steam reforming of methane, ethane and methane/ethane mixtures was explored. Addition of potassium has a positive effect on preferential steam reforming of methane in mixtures of methane and ethane ov

  13. Influence of potassium on the competition between methane and ethane in steam reforming over Pt supported on yttrium-stabilized zirconia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graf, Patrick O.; Mojet, Barbara L.; Lefferts, Leon

    2008-01-01

    effect of addition of potassium to Pt supported on yttrium-stabilized zirconia (PtYSZ) catalyst for steam reforming of methane, ethane and methane/ethane mixtures was explored. Addition of potassium has a positive effect on preferential steam reforming of methane in mixtures of methane and ethane ov

  14. Ethane's 12C/13C Ratio in Titan: Implications for Methane Replenishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Nixon, C. A.; Romani, P. N.; Bjoraker, G. L.; Sada, P. V.; Lunsford, A. W.; Boyle, R. J.; Hesman, B. E.; McCabe, G. H.

    2009-01-01

    As the .main destination of carbon in the destruction of methane in the atmosphere of Titan, ethane provides information about the carbon isotopic composition of the reservoir from which methane is replenished. If the amount of methane entering the atmosphere is presently equal to the amount converted to ethane, the 12C/13C ratio in ethane should be close to the ratio in the reservoir. We have measured the 12C/13C ratio in ethane both with Cassini CIRS(exp 1) and from the ground and find that it is very close to the telluric standard and outer planet values (89), consistent with a primordial origin for the methane reservoir. The lower 12C/13C ratio measured for methane by Huygens GCMS (82.3) can be explained if the conversion of CH4 to CH3 (and C2H6) favors 12C over 13C with a carbon kinetic isotope effect of 1.08. The time required for the atmospheric methane to reach equilibrium, i.e., for replenishment to equal destruction, is approximately 5 methane atmospheric lifetimes.

  15. Experimental determination of acetylene and ethylene solubility in liquid methane and ethane: Implications to Titan's surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S.; Combe, J.-Ph.; Cordier, D.; Wagner, A.; Chevrier, V. F.; McMahon, Z.

    2017-07-01

    In this study, the solubility of acetylene (or ethyne, C2H2) and ethylene (or ethene, C2H4) in liquid methane (CH4) and ethane (C2H6) has been experimentally determined at Titan surface temperature (90 K) and pressure (1.5 bars). As predicted by theoretical models, the solubilities of acetylene and ethylene are very large at Titan temperature and these species are most likely to be abundantly present in the lakes and as evaporites on the shores or dry lake beds. Our results indicate the solubility of 4.9 × 10-2 mole fraction for acetylene in methane and 48 × 10-2 mole fraction in ethane; for ethylene, 5.6 × 10-1 mole fraction in methane and 4.8 × 10-1 mole fraction in ethane. Assuming the mole fractions from atmospheric models in the lower stratosphere and equilibrium with the surface, we determined that the lakes on Titan that cover ∼400,000 km2 are not saturated. The liquid lakes on Titan act as an important reservoir for both acetylene and ethylene. Assuming difference of methane and ethane content in the lakes at different latitudes, the difference in solubility in liquid methane and ethane, solutes in lakes may change with the temporal evolution (such as; evaporation and condensation) over seasons and geological time scales.

  16. Recent decreases in fossil-fuel emissions of ethane and methane derived from firn air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Murat; Verhulst, Kristal R; Saltzman, Eric S; Battle, Mark O; Montzka, Stephen A; Blake, Donald R; Tang, Qi; Prather, Michael J

    2011-08-10

    Methane and ethane are the most abundant hydrocarbons in the atmosphere and they affect both atmospheric chemistry and climate. Both gases are emitted from fossil fuels and biomass burning, whereas methane (CH(4)) alone has large sources from wetlands, agriculture, landfills and waste water. Here we use measurements in firn (perennial snowpack) air from Greenland and Antarctica to reconstruct the atmospheric variability of ethane (C(2)H(6)) during the twentieth century. Ethane levels rose from early in the century until the 1980s, when the trend reversed, with a period of decline over the next 20 years. We find that this variability was primarily driven by changes in ethane emissions from fossil fuels; these emissions peaked in the 1960s and 1970s at 14-16 teragrams per year (1 Tg = 10(12) g) and dropped to 8-10 Tg  yr(-1) by the turn of the century. The reduction in fossil-fuel sources is probably related to changes in light hydrocarbon emissions associated with petroleum production and use. The ethane-based fossil-fuel emission history is strikingly different from bottom-up estimates of methane emissions from fossil-fuel use, and implies that the fossil-fuel source of methane started to decline in the 1980s and probably caused the late twentieth century slow-down in the growth rate of atmospheric methane.

  17. C-12/C-13 Ratio in Ethane on Titan and Implications for Methane's Replenishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Donald E.; Romani, Paul N.; Bjoraker, Gordon L.; Sada, Pedro V.; Nixon, Conor A.; Lunsford, Allen W.; Boyle, Robert J.; Hesman, Brigette E.; McCabe, George H.

    2009-01-01

    The C-12/C-13 abundance ratio in ethane in the atmosphere of Titan has been measured at 822 cm(sup -1) from high spectral resolution ground-based observations. The value 89(8), coincides with the telluric standard and also agrees with the ratio seen in the outer planets. It is almost identical to the result for ethane on Titan found by the composite infrared spectrometer (CIRS) on Cassini. The C-12/C-13 ratio for ethane is higher than the ratio measured in atmospheric methane by Cassini/Huygens GCMS, 82.3(l), representing an enrichment of C-12 in the ethane that might be explained by a kinetic isotope effect of approximately 1.1 in the formation of methyl radicals. If methane is being continuously resupplied to balance photochemical destruction, then we expect the isotopic composition in the ethane product to equilibrate at close to the same C-12/C-13 ratio as that in the supply. The telluric value of the ratio in ethane then implies that the methane reservoir is primordial.

  18. Hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and methane in the marine environment

    OpenAIRE

    Bullister, John Logan

    1980-01-01

    EXTRACT (SEE PDF FOR FULL ABSTRACT): The horizontal and vertical distribution of three dissolved trace gases, namely molecular hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and methane, was measured in coastal and oceanic areas. Atmospheric concentrations of these gases were measured both at locations influenced by nearby human activity, and in areas far removed from these inputs.

  19. Shock tube measurements of growth constants in the branched-chain ethane-carbon monoxide-oxygen system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brokaw, R. S.; Brabbs, T. A.; Snyder, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    Exponential free radical growth constants have been measured for ethane carbon monoxide oxygen mixtures by monitoring the growth of oxygen atom concentration as manifested by CO flame band emission. Data were obtained over the temperature range of 1200 to 1700 K. The data were analyzed using an ethane oxidation mechanism involving seven elementary reaction steps. Calculated growth constants were close to experimental values at lower temperatures, up to about 1400 K, but at higher temperatures computed growth constants were considerably smaller than experiment. In attempts to explain these results additional branching reactions were added to the mechanism. However, these additional reactions did not appreciably change calculated growth constants.

  20. Selective oxidation of methane to ethane and ethylene over various oxide catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, J.A.; Bakker, A.G.; Bosch, H.; van Ommen, J.G.; Ross, J.R.H.

    1987-01-01

    Preliminary results are reported for the oxidative coupling of methane to give ethane/ethylene mixtures over a series of different catalyst formulations; the temperature range studied is 650–850°C. A comparison is made of the behaviour of lead/alumina and lithium/magnesia materials. It is found that

  1. ANALYSIS OF DISSOLVED METHANE, ETHANE, AND ETHYLENE IN GROUND WATER BY A STANDARD GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The measurement of dissolved gases such as methane, ethane, and ethylene in ground water is important in determining whether intrinsic bioremediation is occurring in a fuel- or solvent-contaminated aquifer. A simple procedure is described for the collection and subsequent analys...

  2. ANALYSIS OF DISSOLVED METHANE, ETHANE, AND ETHYLENE IN GROUND WATER BY A STANDARD GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC TECHNIQUE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The measurement of dissolved gases such as methane, ethane, and ethylene in ground water is important in determining whether intrinsic bioremediation is occurring in a fuel- or solvent-contaminated aquifer. A simple procedure is described for the collection and subsequent analys...

  3. Observation of ice sheet formation on methane and ethane gas hydrates using a scanning confocal microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagao, J.; Shimomura, N.; Ebinuma, T.; Narita, H. [National Inst. of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Toyohira, Sapporo (Japan). Methane Hydrate Research Lab.

    2008-07-01

    Interest in gas hydrates has increased in recent years due to the discovery of large deposits under the ocean floor and in permafrost regions. Natural gas hydrates, including methane, is expected to become a new energy source and a medium for energy storage and transportation. Gas hydrates consist of an open network of water molecules that are hydrogen-bonded in a similar manner to ice. Gas molecules are interstitially engaged under high pressures and low temperatures. Although the dissociation temperature of methane hydrate under atmospheric pressure is about 193 K, studies have shown that methane hydrate can be stored at atmospheric pressure and 267 K for 2 years. Because of this phenomenon, known as self-preservation, transportation and storage of methane hydrate can occur at temperature conditions milder than those for liquefied methane gas at atmospheric pressure. This study examined the surface changes of methane and ethane hydrates during dissociation using an optical microscope and confocal scanning microscope (CSM). This paper reported on the results when the atmospheric gas pressure was decreased. Ice sheets formed on the surfaces of methane and ethane gas hydrates due to depressurizing dissociation of methane and ethane hydrates when the methane and ethane gas pressures were decreased at designated temperatures. The dissociation of methane gas hydrate below below 237 K resulted in the generation of small ice particles on the hydrate surface. A transparent ice sheet formed on the hydrate surface above 242 K. The thickness of the ice sheet on the methane hydrate surface showed the maximum of ca. 30 {mu}m at 253 K. In the case of ethane hydrates, ice particles and ice sheets formed below 262 and 267 respectively. Since the ice particles and ice sheets were formed by water molecules generated during the gas hydrate dissociation, the mechanism of ice sheet formation depends on the dissociation rate of hydrate, ice particle sintering rate, and water molecule

  4. Renewed methane increase (2007-2014): contribution of oil and natural gas emissions determined from methane and ethane column observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, Petra; Sussmann, Ralf; Smale, Dan

    2016-04-01

    Harmonized time series of column-averaged mole fractions of atmospheric methane and ethane over the period 1999-2014 are derived from solar Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements at the Zugspitze summit (47° N, 2964 m a.s.l.) and at Lauder (45° S, 370 m a.s.l.). Long-term trend analysis reveals a consistent renewed methane increase since 2007 of 6.2 [5.6, 6.9] ppb yr-1 at the Zugspitze and 6.0 [5.3, 6.7] ppb yr-1 at Lauder (95 % confidence intervals). Several recent studies provide pieces of evidence that the renewed methane increase is most likely driven by two main factors: (i) increased methane emissions from tropical wetlands, followed by (ii) increased thermogenic methane emissions due to growing oil and natural gas production. Here, we quantify the magnitude of the second class of sources, using long-term measurements of atmospheric ethane as tracer for thermogenic methane emissions. In 2007, after years of weak decline, the Zugspitze ethane time series shows the sudden onset of a significant positive trend (2.3 [1.8, 2.8] × 10-2 ppb yr-1 for 2007-2014), while a negative trend persists at Lauder after 2007 (-0.4 [-0.6, -0.1] × 10-2 ppb yr-1). Zugspitze methane and ethane time series are significantly correlated for the period 2007-2014 and can be assigned to thermogenic methane emissions with an ethane-to-methane ratio of 10-21 %. We present optimized emission scenarios for 2007-2014 derived from an atmospheric two-box model. From our trend observations we infer a total ethane emission increase over the period 2007-2014 from oil and natural gas sources of 1-11 Tg yr-1 along with an overall methane emission increase of 24-45 Tg yr-1. Based on these results, the oil and natural gas emission contribution C to the renewed methane increase is deduced using three different emission scenarios with dedicated ranges of methane-to-ethane ratios (MER). Reference scenario 1 assumes an oil and gas emission combination with MER = 3.3-7.6, which results in a

  5. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSNG OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerry Myers

    2005-04-15

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The scope of the work involved designing and developing an airborne, optical remote sensor capable of sensing methane and, if possible, ethane for the detection of natural gas pipeline leaks. Flight testing using a custom dual wavelength, high power fiber amplifier was initiated in February 2005. Ophir successfully demonstrated the airborne system, showing that it was capable of discerning small amounts of methane from a simulated pipeline leak. Leak rates as low as 150 standard cubic feet per hour (scf/h) were detected by the airborne sensor.

  6. Methane and Ethane Measurements from a New TCCON Station in Los Angeles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunch, D.; Roehl, C. M.; Blavier, J. L.; Allen, N.; Treffers, R.; Toon, G. C.; Wennberg, P. O.

    2012-12-01

    The Los Angeles urban region emits large amounts of methane (~0.44Tg/year) into the atmosphere. It is currently unclear exactly how much of this is biogenic (landfills, cattle), and how much is from natural gas (natural seeps or fugitive emissions from the natural gas infrastructure). Since natural gas contains ethane, whereas biogenic emissions contain none, simultaneous measurements of ethane and methane offer the possibility of separating the biogenic versus natural gas emissions of methane. We investigate this using total column measurements from a new Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) remote sensing station in the Los Angeles suburb of Pasadena, which began measurements in July 2012. These measurements will be put into the context of historical remote sensing and in situ measurements described by Wennberg et al., 2012 (doi:10.1021/es301138y).

  7. Dissociation behavior of methane--ethane mixed gas hydrate coexisting structures I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Masato; Jin, Yusuke; Takahashi, Nobuo; Nagao, Jiro; Narita, Hideo

    2010-09-09

    Dissociation behavior of methane-ethane mixed gas hydrate coexisting structures I and II at constant temperatures less than 223 K was studied with use of powder X-ray diffraction and solid-state (13)C NMR techniques. The diffraction patterns at temperatures less than 203 K showed both structures I and II simultaneously convert to Ih during the dissociation, but the diffraction pattern at temperatures greater than 208 K showed different dissociation behavior between structures I and II. Although the diffraction peaks from structure II decreased during measurement at constant temperatures greater than 208 K, those from structure I increased at the initial step of dissociation and then disappeared. This anomalous behavior of the methane-ethane mixed gas hydrate coexisting structures I and II was examined by using the (13)C NMR technique. The (13)C NMR spectra revealed that the anomalous behavior results from the formation of ethane-rich structure I. The structure I hydrate formation was associated with the dissociation rate of the initial methane-ethane mixed gas hydrate.

  8. Catalysis of carbon monoxide methanation by deep sea manganate minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, A. L.; Maple, M. B.; Arrhenius, G.

    1990-01-01

    The catalytic activity of deep sea manganese nodule minerals for the methanation of carbon monoxide was measured with a microcatalytic technique between 200 and 460 degrees C. The manganate minerals were activated at 248 degrees C by immersion into a stream of hydrogen in which pulses of carbon monoxide were injected. Activation energies for the methanation reaction and hydrogen desorption from the manganate minerals were obtained and compared with those of pure nickel. Similar energy values indicate that the activity of the nodule materials for the reaction appears to be related to the amount of reducible transition metals present in the samples (ca. 11 wt.-%). Since the activity of the nodule minerals per gram is comparable to that of pure nickel, most of the transition metal ions located between manganese oxide layers appear to be exposed and available to catalyze the reaction.

  9. Identification of Methane, Ethane, and Propane Oxidizing Bacteria at Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps by Stable Isotope Probing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, M.; Ding, H.; Friedrich, M. W.; Valentine, D. L.

    2008-12-01

    Hydrocarbon seeps emit substantial amounts of oil and natural gas into the marine environment, where they can be oxidized by microorganisms in the sediment and water column. Here, we used stable isotope probing of DNA and lipid biomarkers to identify the microorganisms actively consuming 13C-labeled natural gas compounds in seep sediment samples. Surface sediment was collected from the Coal Oil Point seep field (offshore Santa Barbara, California, USA) and incubated under aerobic conditions with 13C labeled methane, ethane, or propane for up to 37 days, with sediment sub-samples taken at 3-4 intermediate time points. DNA was extracted from sediment and separated by CsCl density gradient centrifugation. The microbial community in each fraction was profiled using T-RFLP, and bacterial 16S rRNA gene clone libraries were constructed from un-incubated hydrocarbon seep sediment and selected isotopically 'heavy' (13C) and 'light' (12C) gradient fractions from ethane incubations. All clone libraries were dominated by sequences from members of the family Rhodobacteraceae (>25% of sequences) and a diverse group of Gammaproteobacteria, including sequences related to those of methylotrophs and to those of bacteria known to consume the longer-chain alkanes present in crude oil. After 14 days of incubation, the relative abundance of Rhodobacteraceae was higher in 'heavy' fractions from the 13C-ethane incubation than in 'light' fractions, suggesting incorporation of 13C label. The Rhodobacteraceae are very diverse metabolically, but have often been observed in abundance in oil contaminated seawater. Several members of this group have been shown to oxidize longer chain alkanes (C10 or higher), but none have been previously linked to the consumption of the gaseous alkanes ethane, propane, and butane. For the final time point, 13C content of phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) were also analyzed, showing substantial incorporation of 13C over 37 days. In the methane incubation

  10. Three-dimensional methane fingerprinting using simultaneous measurements of ethane and deuterium and 13C isotopologues of methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Derek; Hoffnagle, John; Saad, Nabil; He, Yonggang

    2017-04-01

    Methane is a growing source of energy in the world that is the source of heat for billions of people which offers efficient burning and is sufficiently cleaner than coal. With an increase in global demand and a move toward methane sequestration, methods for monitoring and distinguishing origins of gas are essential. Methane identification is not only necessary for source discrimination, but also aids in gas and oil exploration by mapping reservoir types and distinguish between gas well, oil wells, or dry wells. Presence of ethane, longer hydrocarbons and measurements of δ13C in CH4 can distinguish the stage the gas was produced, while deuterium in CH4,δD, can further classify natural gas reservoir types. This study describes an analyzer used for measuring methane sources and mapping them to determine sources and processes these gasses originate from. This has been done by developing cavity ring-down analyzer that measures both δ13C and δD in CH4, as well as the ethane to methane ratio (C2:C1). For a continuous flow sample at 10,000ppm CH4, δ13C and δD can be measured to hydrocarbons.

  11. Equilibrium adsorption of methane, ethane, ethylene, and propylene and their mixtures on activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, E.; Calleja, G.; Marron, C.; Jimenez, A.; Pau, J. (Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (ES))

    1989-04-01

    The authors discuss pure gas adsorption isotherms of methane, ethane, ethylene, and propylene on activated carbon determined at 323{Kappa} and pressures in the range 0-100 kPa. Binary and ternary adsorption isotherms were also determined at the same temperature and pressures for all the mixtures of these adsorbates, with the exception of methane-propylene mixtures due to their difference in adsorption capacity. Two models have been applied for correlation and prediction of mixture adsorption equilibria-the ideal adsorbed solution (IAS) and the real adsorbed solution (RAS). This second model provides better results for all the systems.

  12. Bottom-up simulations of methane and ethane emissions from global oil and gas systems 1980 to 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglund-Isaksson, Lena

    2017-02-01

    Existing bottom-up emission inventories of methane from global oil and gas systems do not satisfactorily explain year-on-year variation in atmospheric methane estimated by top-down models. Using a novel bottom-up approach this study quantifies and attributes methane and ethane emissions from global oil and gas production from 1980 to 2012. Country-specific information on associated gas flows from published sources are combined with inter-annual variations in observed flaring of associated gas from satellite images from 1994 to 2010, to arrive at country-specific annual estimates of methane and ethane emissions from flows of associated gas. Results confirm trends from top-down models and indicate considerably higher methane and ethane emissions from oil production than previously shown in bottom-up inventories for this time period.

  13. Methane, Ethane, and Propane Sensor for Real-time Leak Detection and Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roscioli, Joseph R. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States); Herndon, Scott [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States); Nelson, David D. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States); Yacovitch, Tara [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States)

    2017-03-24

    The Phase I effort demonstrated the technical viability of a fast, sensitive, mobile hydrocarbon monitor. The instrument will enable the oil and gas industry, researchers, and regulators to rapidly identify and chemically profile leaks from facilities. This capability will allow operators to quickly narrow down and mitigate probable leaking equipment, minimizing product loss and penalties due to regulatory non-compliance. During the initial development phase, we demonstrated operation of a prototype monitor that is capable of measuring methane, ethane, and propane at sub-part-per-billion sensitivities in 1 second, using direct absorption infrared spectroscopy. To our knowledge, this is the first instrument capable of fast propane measurements at atmospheric concentrations. In addition, the electrical requirements of the monitor have been reduced from the 1,200 W typical of a spectrometer, to <500 W, making it capable of being powered by a passenger vehicle, and easily deployed by the industry. The prototype monitor leverages recent advances in laser technology, using high-efficiency interband cascade lasers to access the 3 μm region of the mid-infrared, where the methane, ethane, and propane absorptions are strongest. Combined with established spectrometer technology, we have achieved precisions below 200 ppt for each compound. This allows the monitor to measure fast plumes from oil and gas facilities, as well as ambient background concentrations (typical ambient levels are 2 ppm, 1.5 ppb, and 0.7 ppb for methane, ethane and propane, respectively). Increases in instrument operating pressure were studied in order to allow for a smaller 125 W pump to be used, and passive cooling was explored to reduce the cooling load by almost 90% relative to active (refrigerated) cooling. In addition, the simulated infrared absorption profiles of ethane and propane were modified to minimize crosstalk between species, achieving <1% crosstalk between ethane and propane. Finally, a

  14. The Global Search for Abiogenic GHGs, via Methane Isotopes and Ethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malina, Edward; Muller, Jan-Peter; Walton, David; Potts, Dale

    2015-04-01

    The importance of Methane as an anthropogenic Green House Gas (GHG) is well recognized in the scientific community, and is second only to Carbon Dioxide in terms of influence on the Earth's radiation budget (Parker, et al, 2011) suggesting that the ability to apportion the source of the methane (whether it is biogenic, abiogenic or thermogenic) has never been more important. It has been proposed (Etiope, 2009) that it may be possible to distinguish between a biogenic methane source (e.g. bacteria fermentation) and an abiogenic source (e.g. gas seepage or fugitive emissions) via the retrieval of the abundances of methane isotopes (12CH4 and 13CH4) and through the ratio of ethane (C2H6) to methane (CH4) concentrations. Using ultra fine spectroscopy (lower levels of the atmosphere. Using HiTran2012 simulations, we show that it is possible to distinguish between methane isotopes using the FTS based instruments on ACE and GOSAT, and retrieve the abundances in the Short Wave Infra-red (SWIR) at 1.65μm, 2.3μm, 3.3μm and Thermal IR, 7.8μm wavebands for methane, and the 3.3μm and 7μm wavebands for ethane. Initially we use the spectral line database HITRAN to determine the most appropriate spectral waveband to retrieve methane isotopes (and ethane) with minimal water vapour, CO2 and NO2 impact. Following this, we have evaluated the detectability of these trace gases using the more sophisticated Radiative Transfer Models (RTMs) SCIATRAN, the Oxford RFM and MODTRAN 5 in the SWIR, in order to determine the barriers to retrieving methane isotopes in both ACE (limb profile) and GOSAT (nadir measurements) instruments, including a preliminary investigation into the effects of clouds, aerosols, surface reflectance on the retrieval of methane isotopes. The aim of these RTM simulations is to further narrow down the spectral regions (originally identified in the HITRAN assessment) where methane isotopes can/may be retrieved from orbit. The key outputs from the RTM study are

  15. Comparative study of two theoretical models of methane and ethane steam reforming process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brus, Grzegorz; Kaczmarczyk Marcin Tomiczek, Robert; Mozdzierz, Marcin

    2016-09-01

    From the chemical point of view the reforming process of heavy hydrocarbons such as Associated Petroleum Gas (APG) is very complex. One of the main issue is a set of undesired chemical reactions that causes deposition of solid carbon and consequently block catalytic property of a reactor. The experimental investigation is crucial to design APG reforming reactors. However, the experiment needs to be preceded by careful thermodynamical analysis to design safe operation conditions. In case of small number of reactants and reactions such as in case of steam reforming of pure methane, the problem can be solved by treating each equilibrium reaction constant as an element of the system of non-linear equations. The system of equations can be solved by Newton-Raphson method. However in case of large number of reactants and reaction, such as in case of APG reforming this method is inefficient. A large number of strongly non-linear equations leads often to converge problem. In this paper the authors suggest to use different approach called Parametric Equation Method. In this method a system of non-linear equations is replaced by a set of single non-linear equations solved separately. The methods were used to simulate steam reforming of methane-ethane rich fuel. The results of computations from both methods were juxtaposed and comparative study were conducted. Finally safe operation conditions for steam reforming of methane-ethane fuel were calculated and presented.

  16. Global thermodynamic behaviour of supercritical fluids: example of methane and ethane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizi A.

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Do to the fluctuations associated with the critical region of fluids. The behavior of thermodynamic properties these can not be predicted by mean field theories. To do so, a global equation of state based on the crossover model has been used. This equation of state is formulated on the basis of comparison of selected measurements of pressure-density-temperature data, isochoric and isobaric heat capacity of fluids.The model can be applied in a wide range of temperatures and densities around the critical point for ethane and methane. It is found that the developed model represents most of the reliable experimental data accurately.

  17. Absorption cross-section measurements of methane, ethane, ethylene and methanol at high temperatures

    KAUST Repository

    Alrefae, Majed

    2014-09-01

    Mid-IR absorption cross-sections are measured for methane, ethane, ethylene and methanol over 2800-3400 cm-1 (2.9-3.6 μm) spectral region. Measurements are carried out using a Fourier-Transform-Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer with temperatures ranging 296-1100 K and pressures near atmospheric. As temperature increases, the peak cross-sections decrease but the wings of the bands increase as higher rotational lines appear. Integrated band intensity is also calculated over the measured spectral region and is found to be a very weak function of temperature. The absorption cross-sections of the relatively small fuels studied here show dependence on the bath gas. This effect is investigated by studying the variation of absorption cross-sections at 3.392 μm using a HeNe laser in mixtures of fuel and nitrogen, argon, or helium. Mixtures of fuel with He have the highest value of absorption cross-sections followed by Ar and N2. Molecules with narrow absorption lines, such as methane and methanol, show strong dependence on bath gas than molecules with relatively broader absorption features i.e. ethane and ethylene. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPLINE LEAK DETECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerry Myers

    2004-05-12

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. The third six-month technical report contains a summary of the progress made towards finalizing the design and assembling the airborne, remote methane and ethane sensor. The vendor has been chosen and is on contract to develop the light source with the appropriate linewidth and spectral shape to best utilize the Ophir gas correlation software. Ophir has expanded upon the target reflectance testing begun in the previous performance period by replacing the experimental receiving optics with the proposed airborne large aperture telescope, which is theoretically capable of capturing many times more signal return. The data gathered from these tests has shown the importance of optimizing the fiber optic receiving fiber to the receiving optic and has helped Ophir to optimize the design of the gas cells and narrowband optical filters. Finally, Ophir will discuss remaining project issues that may impact the success of the project.

  19. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerry Myers

    2003-11-12

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. This second six-month technical report summarizes the progress made towards defining, designing, and developing the hardware and software segments of the airborne, optical remote methane and ethane sensor. The most challenging task to date has been to identify a vendor capable of designing and developing a light source with the appropriate output wavelength and power. This report will document the work that has been done to identify design requirements, and potential vendors for the light source. Significant progress has also been made in characterizing the amount of light return available from a remote target at various distances from the light source. A great deal of time has been spent conducting laboratory and long-optical path target reflectance measurements. This is important since it helps to establish the overall optical output requirements for the sensor. It also reduces the relative uncertainty and risk associated with developing a custom light source. The data gathered from the optical path testing has been translated to the airborne transceiver design in such areas as: fiber coupling, optical detector selection, gas filters, and software analysis. Ophir will next, summarize the design progress of the transceiver hardware and software development. Finally, Ophir will discuss remaining project issues that may impact the success of the project.

  20. Absorption cross-section measurements of methane, ethane, ethylene and methanol at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrefae, Majed; Es-sebbar, Et-touhami; Farooq, Aamir

    2014-09-01

    Mid-IR absorption cross-sections are measured for methane, ethane, ethylene and methanol over 2800-3400 cm-1 (2.9-3.6 μm) spectral region. Measurements are carried out using a Fourier-Transform-Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer with temperatures ranging 296-1100 K and pressures near atmospheric. As temperature increases, the peak cross-sections decrease but the wings of the bands increase as higher rotational lines appear. Integrated band intensity is also calculated over the measured spectral region and is found to be a very weak function of temperature. The absorption cross-sections of the relatively small fuels studied here show dependence on the bath gas. This effect is investigated by studying the variation of absorption cross-sections at 3.392 μm using a HeNe laser in mixtures of fuel and nitrogen, argon, or helium. Mixtures of fuel with He have the highest value of absorption cross-sections followed by Ar and N2. Molecules with narrow absorption lines, such as methane and methanol, show strong dependence on bath gas than molecules with relatively broader absorption features i.e. ethane and ethylene.

  1. AIRBORNE, OPTICAL REMOTE SENSING OF METHANE AND ETHANE FOR NATURAL GAS PIPELINE LEAK DETECTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jerry Myers

    2003-05-13

    Ophir Corporation was awarded a contract by the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory under the Project Title ''Airborne, Optical Remote Sensing of Methane and Ethane for Natural Gas Pipeline Leak Detection'' on October 14, 2002. This six-month technical report summarizes the progress for each of the proposed tasks, discusses project concerns, and outlines near-term goals. Ophir has completed a data survey of two major natural gas pipeline companies on the design requirements for an airborne, optical remote sensor. The results of this survey are disclosed in this report. A substantial amount of time was spent on modeling the expected optical signal at the receiver at different absorption wavelengths, and determining the impact of noise sources such as solar background, signal shot noise, and electronic noise on methane and ethane gas detection. Based upon the signal to noise modeling and industry input, Ophir finalized the design requirements for the airborne sensor, and released the critical sensor light source design requirements to qualified vendors. Responses from the vendors indicated that the light source was not commercially available, and will require a research and development effort to produce. Three vendors have responded positively with proposed design solutions. Ophir has decided to conduct short path optical laboratory experiments to verify the existence of methane and absorption at the specified wavelength, prior to proceeding with the light source selection. Techniques to eliminate common mode noise were also evaluated during the laboratory tests. Finally, Ophir has included a summary of the potential concerns for project success and has established future goals.

  2. The effect of potassium addition to Pt supported on YSZ on steam reforming of mixtures of methane and ethane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graf, P.O.; Mojet, Barbara; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2009-01-01

    The influence of potassium addition on Pt supported on yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was studied with FT-IR CO adsorption and CO-FT-IR-TPD, in order to understand the effect of potassium on the performance of the catalyst in reforming of mixtures of methane and ethane. Potassium modification of

  3. The effect of potassium addition to Pt supported on YSZ on steam reforming of mixtures of methane and ethane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graf, Patrick O.; Mojet, Barbara L.; Lefferts, Leon

    2009-01-01

    The influence of potassium addition on Pt supported on yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was studied with FT-IR CO adsorption and CO-FT-IR-TPD, in order to understand the effect of potassium on the performance of the catalyst in reforming of mixtures of methane and ethane. Potassium modification of

  4. Measured temperature and pressure dependence of Vp and Vs in compacted, polycrystalline sI methane and sII methane-ethane hydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgerud, M.B.; Waite, W.F.; Kirby, S.H.; Nur, A.

    2003-01-01

    We report on compressional- and shear-wave-speed measurements made on compacted polycrystalline sI methane and sII methane-ethane hydrate. The gas hydrate samples are synthesized directly in the measurement apparatus by warming granulated ice to 17??C in the presence of a clathrate-forming gas at high pressure (methane for sI, 90.2% methane, 9.8% ethane for sII). Porosity is eliminated after hydrate synthesis by compacting the sample in the synthesis pressure vessel between a hydraulic ram and a fixed end-plug, both containing shear-wave transducers. Wave-speed measurements are made between -20 and 15??C and 0 to 105 MPa applied piston pressure.

  5. Raman Spectra of Methane, Ethylene, Ethane, Dimethyl ether, Formaldehyde and Propane for Combustion Applications

    KAUST Repository

    Magnotti, G.

    2015-05-09

    Spontaneous Raman scattering measurements of temperature and major species concentration in hydrocarbon-air flames require detailed knowledge of the Raman spectra of the hydrocarbons present when fuels more complex than methane are used. Although hydrocarbon spectra have been extensively studied at room temperature, there are no data available at higher temperatures. Quantum mechanical calculations, when available are not sufficiently accurate for combustion applications. This work presents experimental measurements of spontaneous Stokes-Raman scattering spectra of methane, ethylene, ethane, dimethyl ether, formaldehyde and propane in the temperature range 300-860 K. Raman spectra from heated hydrocarbons jets have been collected with a higher resolution than is generally employed for Raman measurements in combustion applications. A set of synthetic spectra have been generated for each hydrocarbon, providing the basis for extrapolation to higher temperatures. The spectra provided here will enable simultaneous measurements of multiple hydrocarbons in flames. This capability will greatly extend the range of applicability of Raman measurements in combustion applications. In addition, the experimental spectra provide a validation dataset for quantum mechanical models.

  6. Homogeneous nucleation in supersaturated vapors of methane, ethane, and carbon dioxide predicted by brute force molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Horsch, Martin; Bernreuther, Martin; Grottel, Sebastian; Reina, Guido; Wix, Andrea; Schaber, Karlheinz; Hasse, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is applied to the condensation process of supersaturated vapors of methane, ethane, and carbon dioxide. Simulations of systems with up to a million particles were conducted with a massively parallel MD program. This leads to reliable statistics and makes nucleation rates down to the order of 10^30/(m^3 s) accessible to the direct simulation approach. Simulation results are compared to the classical nucleation theory (CNT) as well as the theory of Laaksonen, Ford, and Kulmala (LFK) which introduces a size dependence of the specific surface energy. CNT describes the nucleation of ethane and carbon dioxide excellently over the entire studied temperature range, whereas LFK provides a better approach to methane at low temperatures.

  7. A Low Temperature Eutectic Methane-Ethane Liquid: A Potential Geologic Fluid in the Outermost Solar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Garrett Leland; Hanley, Jennifer; Grundy, Will; Tegler, Stephen C.; Roe, Henry G.; Lindberg, Gerrick Eugene; Trilling, David E.

    2016-10-01

    Many icy bodies and moons in the solar system contain methane and ethane, including Titan, Triton, Pluto, Eris, Makemake, and likely others. The material properties of these species and their interactions with one another are still inadequately characterized. To provide insight into the behaviors of these species we conducted a series of laboratory experiments to map the liquidus line as a function of temperature and composition. The interaction of ethane and methane yields a eutectic mixture and depresses the freezing point to ~72 K, almost 20 K colder than the normal freezing points of either pure species. The eutectic composition is 64% CH4 and 36% C2H6. This phenomenon may enable geological processes involving liquids in the near surface environments of bodies once thought too cold and/or that have surface pressures too low to support liquid phases. The addition of other cosmochemically abundant species may suppress freezing points even further (see Hanley et al., this conference).

  8. Monte-Carlo simulations of methane/carbon dioxide and ethane/carbon dioxide mixture adsorption in zeolites and comparison with matrix treatment of statistical mechanical lattice model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunne, Lawrence J.; Furgani, Akrem; Jalili, Sayed; Manos, George

    2009-05-01

    Adsorption isotherms have been computed by Monte-Carlo simulation for methane/carbon dioxide and ethane/carbon dioxide mixtures adsorbed in the zeolite silicalite. These isotherms show remarkable differences with the ethane/carbon dioxide mixtures displaying strong adsorption preference reversal at high coverage. To explain the differences in the Monte-Carlo mixture isotherms an exact matrix calculation of the statistical mechanics of a lattice model of mixture adsorption in zeolites has been made. The lattice model reproduces the essential features of the Monte-Carlo isotherms, enabling us to understand the differing adsorption behaviour of methane/carbon dioxide and ethane/carbon dioxide mixtures in zeolites.

  9. Selective methanation of carbon monoxide in hydrogen rich stream over Ni/CeO2 nanocatalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Behzad Nematollahi; Mehran Rezaei; Ebrahim Nemati Lay

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, selective methanation of carbon monoxide in hydrogen rich stream was investigated over Ni/CeO2 nanocatalysts. The obtained results revealed that increasing in nickel loading decreased the BET surface area, pore volume and nickel dispersion. The 25%Ni/CeO2 with a NiO crystal size of 12 nm exhibited the highest activity in CO methanation reaction and reached to maximum CO conversion and CH4 selectivity at temperatures above 230 ºC. The catalytic results revealed that CO selective methanation well progressed at lower temperatures while CO2 methanation was completely suppressed until CO conversion reached to maximum value.

  10. Long term trends of methane, non methane hydrocarbons, and carbon monoxide in urban atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ezaz; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Jeon, Eui-Chan; Brown, Richard J C

    2015-06-15

    The concentrations of methane (CH4), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), and carbon monoxide (CO) were measured at two urban locations (Guro (GR) and Nowon (NW)) in Seoul, Korea between 2004 and 2013. The mean amount fractions of CH4, NMHC, and CO, measured at GR over this period were 2.06±0.02, 0.32±0.03, and 0.61±0.05 ppm, respectively, while at NW they were 2.08±0.06, 0.33±0.05, and 0.54±0.06 ppm, respectively. The ratio of CH4 to the total hydrocarbon amount fraction remained constant across the study years: 0.82 to 0.90 at GR and 0.81 to 0.89 at NW. Similarly, stable ratios were also observed between NMHC and THC at the two sites. In contrast, the annual mean ratios for CH4/NMHC showed a larger variation: between 4.55 to 8.67 at GR and 4.25 to 8.45 at NW. The seasonality of CO was characterized by wintertime maxima, while for CH4 and NMHC the highest amount fractions were found in fall. The analysis of their long-term trends based on Mann-Kendall and Sen's methods showed an overall increase of THC and CH4, whereas a decreasing trend was observed for NMHC and CO.

  11. Separating methane emissions from biogenic sources and natural gas by vertical column enhancements of ammonia, ethane, and methane in the Colorado Front Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, R.; Volkamer, R. M.; Blumenstock, T.; Hase, F.; Hannigan, J. W.; Kille, N.; Frey, M.; Kumar Sha, M.; Orphal, J.

    2015-12-01

    Methane sources in the Colorado Front Range include biogenic sources from cattle feedlots and natural gas operations. Although numerous studies have measured methane emissions, there remains significant uncertainty regarding the relative contributions of these various methane emission sources. Here we present data from a March 2015 field campaign that deployed two Bruker EM27 Sun Fourier Transform Spectrometers (FTS) and the University of Colorado Solar Occultation Flux (CU-SOF) FTS in Eaton, Colorado; the former were used to measure enhancements in the methane vertical column densities (VCD), while the latter was used to measure ethane and ammonia VCDs. A third EM27 FTS was deployed to a background site in Westminster, Colorado which was far removed from cattle and petroleum operations. Northerly winds make possible the determination of methane VCD column enhancement from Westminster to Eaton. All instruments were compared during several background days at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) in Boulder, Colorado. This presentation explores the potential of methane source attribution using ammonia as a tracer for feedlot emissions and ethane as a tracer for petroleum emissions.

  12. Cyclic process for producing methane from carbon monoxide with heat removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Albert C.; Yang, Chang-lee

    1982-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are converted to methane by a cyclic, essentially two-step process in which said carbon monoxide is disproportionated to form carbon dioxide and active surface carbon deposited on the surface of a catalyst, and said carbon is reacted with steam to form product methane and by-product carbon dioxide. The exothermic heat of reaction generated in each step is effectively removed during each complete cycle so as to avoid a build up of heat from cycle-to-cycle, with particularly advantageous techniques being employed for fixed bed, tubular and fluidized bed reactor operations.

  13. Phase equilibria of the system methane-ethane from temperature scaling Gibbs Ensemble Monte Carlo simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhigang; Duan, Zhenhao

    2002-10-01

    A new technique of temperature scaling method combined with the conventional Gibbs Ensemble Monte Carlo simulation was used to study liquid-vapor phase equilibria of the methane-ethane (CH 4-C 2H 6) system. With this efficient method, a new set of united-atom Lennard-Jones potential parameters for pure C 2H 6 was found to be more accurate than those of previous models in the prediction of phase equilibria. Using the optimized potentials for liquid simulations (OPLS) potential for CH 4 and the potential of this study for C 2H 6, together with a simple mixing rule, we simulated the equilibrium compositions and densities of the CH 4-C 2H 6 mixtures with accuracy close to experiments. The simulated data are supplements to experiments, and may cover a larger temperature-pressure-composition space than experiments. Compared with some well-established equations of state such as Peng-Robinson equation of state (PR-EQS), the simulated results are found to be closer to experiments, at least in some temperature and pressure ranges.

  14. Phase diagrams for clathrate hydrates of methane, ethane, and propane from first-principles thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaoxiao; Huang, Yingying; Li, Wenbo; Zheng, Zhaoyang; Jiang, Xue; Su, Yan; Zhao, Jijun; Liu, Changling

    2016-01-28

    Natural gas hydrates are inclusion compounds composed of major light hydrocarbon gaseous molecules (CH4, C2H6, and C3H8) and a water clathrate framework. Understanding the phase stability and formation conditions of natural gas hydrates is crucial for their future exploitation and applications and requires an accurate description of intermolecular interactions. Previous ab initio calculations on gas hydrates were mainly limited by the cluster models, whereas the phase diagram and equilibrium conditions of hydrate formation were usually investigated using the thermodynamic models or empirical molecular simulations. For the first time, we construct the chemical potential phase diagrams of type II clathrate hydrates encapsulated with methane/ethane/propane guest molecules using first-principles thermodynamics. We find that the partially occupied structures (136H2O·1CH4, 136H2O·16CH4, 136H2O·20CH4, 136H2O·1C2H6, and 136H2O·1C3H8) and fully occupied structures (136H2O·24CH4, 136H2O·8C2H6, and 136H2O·8C3H8) are thermodynamically favorable under given pressure-temperature (p-T) conditions. The theoretically predicted equilibrium pressures for pure CH4, C2H6 and C3H8 hydrates at the phase transition point are consistent with the experimental data. These results provide valuable guidance for establishing the relationship between the accurate description of intermolecular noncovalent interactions and the p-T equilibrium conditions of clathrate hydrates and other molecular crystals.

  15. Fugitive methane emission pinpointing and source attribution using ethane measurements in a portable cavity ring-down analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, Derek; Hoffnagle, John; Yiu, John; Chong, Johnston; Tan, Sze

    2017-04-01

    Methane source pinpointing and attribution is ever more important because of the vast network of natural gas distribution which has led to a very large emission sources. Ethane can be used as a tracer to distinguish gas sources between biogenic and natural gas. Having this measurement sensitive enough can even distinguish between gas distributors, or maturity through gas wetness. Here we present data obtained using a portable cavity ring-down spectrometer weighing less than 11 kg and consuming less than 35W that simultaneously measures methane and ethane with a raw 1-σ precision of 50ppb and 4.5ppb, respectively at 2 Hz. These precisions allow for a C2:C1 ratio 1-σ measurement of right above the ground, correlations in the variations in C2H6 and CH4 are used to derive a source C2:C1. Additional hardware is needed for steady state concentration measurements to reliably measure the C2:C1 ratio instantaneously. Source discrimination data of local leaks and methane sources using this analysis method are presented. Additionally, two-dimensional plume snapshots are constructed using an integrated onboard GPS to visualize horizontal plane gas propagation.

  16. Experimental reflectance study of methane and ethane ice at Titan's surface conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, G.; Singh, S.; Wagner, A.; Chevrier, V. F.; Combe, J.-P.; Gainor, M.

    2017-10-01

    Cassini's Visible and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) has provided evidence of several different hydrocarbons on the surface of Titan using seven atmospheric windows. Methane (CH4) and ethane (C2H6) are suggested to exist in both the liquid and solid states on Titan. Even if the average surface temperature (90-94 K) of Titan is clearly in the liquid stability field of both CH4 and C2H6, the particles can condense in the atmosphere (˜65 km for C2H6 and lower stratosphere for CH4 Anderson et al. in Icarus, 243:129-138, 2014) and precipitate allowing them to melt and/or sublimate. It is also suggested that these liquids can freeze on the surface due to evaporative cooling. We conducted a laboratory study at Titan surface conditions to determine the phase change of CH4 and C2H6 and to test if they would freeze on the surface of Titan. Using NIR reflectance spectroscopy, we calculated the reflectivity ratio (R_{solid}/R_{liquid}) of CH4 and C2H6 of 1.08 and 1.36, respectively, suggesting an 8% increase in reflectivity for CH4 and a 36% increase for C2H6 during phase change. The low albedo in liquid phase for both CH4 and C2H6 is consistent with observations made by VIMS in both Titan's northern and southern latitudes. We also find the evaporation rate of amorphous CH4 close to Titan conditions, which is 9.0 ± 0.3 × 10^{-5} kg s^{-1} m^{-2} at 87 K and we estimated a sublimation rate of 0.22 × 10^{-5} kg s^{-1} m^{-2} at 83 K for a 1.5 bar N2 atmosphere. The freezing rate of ˜46 m/year for C2H6 was observed whereas, for CH4, we observed that CH4 does not freeze at 87 K due to a high N2 dissolution rate. However, the viscosity of CH4 increases with a decreasing temperature that results in amorphous CH4. The results show a remarkable difference between the formation of ice for two liquids with different N2 dissolution rates. Consequently, using the results obtained from the laboratory study we predict that the observed change is albedo during and after rainfall

  17. Quantifying the Loss of Processed Natural Gas Within California's South Coast Air Basin Using Long-term Measurements of Ethane and Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunch, D.; Toon, G. C.; Hedelius, J.; Vizenor, N.; Roehl, C. M.; Saad, K.; Blavier, J. F.; Blake, D. R.; Wennberg, P. O.

    2016-12-01

    In California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB), the methane emissions inferred from atmospheric measurements exceed estimates based on inventories. We seek to provide insight into the sources of the discrepancy with two records of atmospheric trace gas total column abundances in the SoCAB: one temporally sparse dataset that began in the late 1980s, and a temporally dense dataset that began in 2012. We use their measurements of ethane and methane to partition the sources of the excess methane. The early few years of the sparse record show a rapid decline in ethane emissions at a much faster rate than decreasing vehicle exhaust or natural gas and crude oil production can explain. Between 2010 and 2015, ethane emissions have grown gradually, which is in contrast to the steady production of natural gas liquids over that time. Since 2012, ethane to methane ratios in the natural gas withdrawn from a storage facility within the SoCAB have been increasing; these ratios are tracked in our atmospheric measurements with about half of the rate of increase. From this, we infer that about half of the excess methane in the SoCAB between 2012-­2015 is attributable to losses from the natural gas infrastructure.

  18. Comparative study of steam reforming of methane, ethane and ethylene on Pt, Rh and Pd supported on yttrium-stabilized zirconia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graf, P.O.; Mojet, Barbara; van Ommen, J.G.; Lefferts, Leonardus

    2007-01-01

    In the present paper steam reforming of methane, ethane and ethylene was compared on Pt, Rh and Pd supported on yttrium-stabilized zirconia (YSZ). Both reactivity and product distribution changed with the use of different catalysts. The order of activity for the hydrocarbons on Rh was C2H6 > C2H4 >

  19. Quantifying the loss of processed natural gas within California's South Coast Air Basin using long-term measurements of ethane and methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunch, Debra; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Hedelius, Jacob K.; Vizenor, Nicholas; Roehl, Coleen M.; Saad, Katherine M.; Blavier, Jean-François L.; Blake, Donald R.; Wennberg, Paul O.

    2016-11-01

    Methane emissions inventories for Southern California's South Coast Air Basin (SoCAB) have underestimated emissions from atmospheric measurements. To provide insight into the sources of the discrepancy, we analyze records of atmospheric trace gas total column abundances in the SoCAB starting in the late 1980s to produce annual estimates of the ethane emissions from 1989 to 2015 and methane emissions from 2007 to 2015. The first decade of measurements shows a rapid decline in ethane emissions coincident with decreasing natural gas and crude oil production in the basin. Between 2010 and 2015, however, ethane emissions have grown gradually from about 13 ± 5 to about 23 ± 3 Gg yr-1, despite the steady production of natural gas and oil over that time period. The methane emissions record begins with 1 year of measurements in 2007 and continuous measurements from 2011 to 2016 and shows little trend over time, with an average emission rate of 413 ± 86 Gg yr-1. Since 2012, ethane to methane ratios in the natural gas withdrawn from a storage facility within the SoCAB have been increasing by 0.62 ± 0.05 % yr-1, consistent with the ratios measured in the delivered gas. Our atmospheric measurements also show an increase in these ratios but with a slope of 0.36 ± 0.08 % yr-1, or 58 ± 13 % of the slope calculated from the withdrawn gas. From this, we infer that more than half of the excess methane in the SoCAB between 2012 and 2015 is attributable to losses from the natural gas infrastructure.

  20. Atomic chlorine concentrations derived from ethane and hydroxyl measurements over the equatorial Pacific Ocean: Implication for dimethyl sulfide and bromine monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingenter, Oliver W.; Sive, Barkley C.; Blake, Nicola J.; Blake, Donald R.; Rowland, F. Sherwood

    2005-10-01

    Atomic chlorine and bromine monoxide concentrations ([Cl] and [BrO]) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) sea-air fluxes are estimated from data collected during a Lagrangian flight made near Christmas Island (2°N, 157°W) during August 1996 aboard the NASA P3-B aircraft. Intensive hydrocarbon sampling began in the surface layer (SL) one-half hour after sunrise and continued until ˜1300 local solar time. Our empirical model includes in situ observations of hydroxyl [HO] and precise measurements of ethane (C2H6) mixing ratios. Ethane was ˜40 pptv higher in the buffer layer (BuL) than in the SL, thus vertical exchange tended to replace any C2H6 that was photochemically removed in the SL. In spite of this, SL C2H6 mixing ratios decreased significantly during the flight. Using only the measured [HO] and estimated vertical mixing, our mass balance equation cannot explain all of the observed SL C2H6 loss. However, when an initial [Cl] of 8.4 (±2.0) × 104 Cl cm-3, decreasing to 5.7 (±2.0) × 104 Cl cm-3 at midday, is included, the observed and estimated C2H6 values are in excellent agreement. Using our [Cl], we estimate a DMS flux a factor of 2 higher than when HO is the only oxidant considered. This flux estimate, when compared to that derived by Lenschow et al. (1999), suggests that if the differences are real, we may be missing a loss term. Best agreement occurs when an average BrO mixing ratio of 1.3 (±1.3) pptv is included in our mass balance equation.

  1. Validation of Carbon Monoxide and Methane Vertical Column Densities Retrieved from SCIAMACHY Infrared Nadir Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstaffl, Philipp; Hamidouche, Mourad; Schreier, Franz; Gimeno Garcia, Sebastian; Lichtenberg, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Carbon monoxide and methane are key species of Earth's atmosphere, highly relevant for climate and air quality. Accordingly, a large number of spaceborne sensors are observing these species in the microwave, thermal and near infrared. For the analysis of short wave infrared spectra measured by SCIAMACHY aboard the ENVISAT satellite and similar instrument(s) we had developed the Beer InfraRed Retrieval Algorithm: BIRRA is a separable least squares fit of the measured radiance with respect to molecular column densities and auxiliary parameters (optional: surface albedo, baseline, slit function width, and wavenumber shift). BIRRA has been implemented in the operational SCIAMACHY L1 to 2 processor for the retrieval of CO and CH4 from channel 8 (2.3 mue) and 6 (1.6 mue), respectively. Our tests are based on separate comparisons with existing space or ground-based measurements of carbon monoxide and methane column densities. In this poster intercomparisons of CO and CH4 columns estimated from SCIAMACHY with coincident and co-located retrievals provided by ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy are provided. More specifically, we have used data from several NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change) and TCCON (Total Carbon Column Observing Network) stations. Our strategy for quality check of these products and the selection of specific geographical areas will be discussed.

  2. Non-oxidative coupling reaction of methane to ethane and hydrogen catalyzed by the silica-supported tantalum hydride: ([triple bond]SiO)2Ta-H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulivong, Daravong; Norsic, Sébastien; Taoufik, Mostafa; Copéret, Christophe; Thivolle-Cazat, Jean; Chakka, Sudhakar; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2008-04-16

    Silica-supported tantalum hydride, (SiO)2Ta-H (1), proves to be the first single-site catalyst for the direct non-oxidative coupling transformation of methane into ethane and hydrogen at moderate temperatures, with a high selectivity (>98%). The reaction likely involves the tantalum-methyl-methylidene species as a key intermediate, where the methyl ligand can migrate onto the tantalum-methylidene affording the tantalum-ethyl.

  3. Autoignited laminar lifted flames of methane, ethylene, ethane, and n-butane jets in coflow air with elevated temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Byungchul

    2010-12-01

    The autoignition characteristics of laminar lifted flames of methane, ethylene, ethane, and n-butane fuels have been investigated experimentally in coflow air with elevated temperature over 800. K. The lifted flames were categorized into three regimes depending on the initial temperature and fuel mole fraction: (1) non-autoignited lifted flame, (2) autoignited lifted flame with tribrachial (or triple) edge, and (3) autoignited lifted flame with mild combustion. For the non-autoignited lifted flames at relatively low temperature, the existence of lifted flame depended on the Schmidt number of fuel, such that only the fuels with Sc > 1 exhibited stationary lifted flames. The balance mechanism between the propagation speed of tribrachial flame and local flow velocity stabilized the lifted flames. At relatively high initial temperatures, either autoignited lifted flames having tribrachial edge or autoignited lifted flames with mild combustion existed regardless of the Schmidt number of fuel. The adiabatic ignition delay time played a crucial role for the stabilization of autoignited flames. Especially, heat loss during the ignition process should be accounted for, such that the characteristic convection time, defined by the autoignition height divided by jet velocity was correlated well with the square of the adiabatic ignition delay time for the critical autoignition conditions. The liftoff height was also correlated well with the square of the adiabatic ignition delay time. © 2010 The Combustion Institute.

  4. Fully Borylated Methane and Ethane by Ruthenium-Mediated Cleavage and Coupling of CO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batsanov, Andrei S; Cabeza, Javier A; Crestani, Marco G; Fructos, Manuel R; García-Álvarez, Pablo; Gille, Marie; Lin, Zhenyang; Marder, Todd B

    2016-04-04

    Many transition-metal complexes and some metal-free compounds are able to bind carbon monoxide, a molecule which has the strongest chemical bond in nature. However, very few of them have been shown to induce the cleavage of its C-O bond and even fewer are those that are able to transform CO into organic reagents with potential in organic synthesis. This work shows that bis(pinacolato)diboron, B2pin2, reacts with ruthenium carbonyl to give metallic complexes containing borylmethylidyne (CBpin) and diborylethyne (pinBC≡CBpin) ligands and also metal-free perborylated C1 and C2 products, such as C(Bpin)4 and C2 (Bpin)6, respectively, which have great potential as building blocks for Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling and other reactions. The use of (13)CO-enriched ruthenium carbonyl has demonstrated that the boron-bound carbon atoms of all of these reaction products arise from CO ligands.

  5. The chemistry and transport of methane and carbon monoxide in the troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, L. K.; Chameides, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    The present understanding of the physical and chemical behavior of methane, carbon monoxide and the chemical species involved in the conversion of CH4 to CO in the troposphere is reviewed. Following a brief summary of CO and CH4 emission and reactions in urban areas, attention is given to measurements of the spatial and temporal distributions of CO and CH4 in the rural atmosphere, the contribution of the oceans to atmospheric CO and CH4 concentrations, and interactions of CH4 and CO with soils and vegetation. Estimates of the transport of CH4 and CO from the troposphere to the stratosphere are discussed, and photochemical reactions of the constituents are examined. Two- and three-dimensional models for CH4 and CO transport are presented, and possible future variations in atmospheric abundances of the molecules are considered. Finally, present estimates of the global methane and carbon dioxide budgets are summarized, and it is pointed out that, despite the large contribution of anthropogenic sources, the budgets appear to be in balance.

  6. Evaluating ethane and methane emissions associated with the development of oil and natural gas extraction in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, B.; Mahieu, E.; Emmons, L. K.; Tzompa-Sosa, Z. A.; Fischer, E. V.; Sudo, K.; Bovy, B.; Conway, S.; Griffin, D.; Hannigan, J. W.; Strong, K.; Walker, K. A.

    2016-04-01

    Sharp rises in the atmospheric abundance of ethane (C2H6) have been detected from 2009 onwards in the Northern Hemisphere as a result of the unprecedented growth in the exploitation of shale gas and tight oil reservoirs in North America. Using time series of C2H6 total columns derived from ground-based Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) observations made at five selected Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change sites, we characterize the recent C2H6 evolution and determine growth rates of ˜5% yr-1 at mid-latitudes and of ˜3% yr-1 at remote sites. Results from CAM-chem simulations with the Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollutants, Phase II bottom-up inventory for anthropogenic emissions are found to greatly underestimate the current C2H6 abundances. Doubling global emissions is required to reconcile the simulations and the observations prior to 2009. We further estimate that North American anthropogenic C2H6 emissions have increased from 1.6 Tg yr-1 in 2008 to 2.8 Tg yr-1 in 2014, i.e. by 75% over these six years. We also completed a second simulation with new top-down emissions of C2H6 from North American oil and gas activities, biofuel consumption and biomass burning, inferred from space-borne observations of methane (CH4) from Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite. In this simulation, GEOS-Chem is able to reproduce FTIR measurements at the mid-latitudinal sites, underscoring the impact of the North American oil and gas development on the current C2H6 abundance. Finally we estimate that the North American oil and gas emissions of CH4, a major greenhouse gas, grew from 20 to 35 Tg yr-1 over the period 2008-2014, in association with the recent C2H6 rise.

  7. Cofeeding of Methane and Ethane to Produce Syngas over a LiLaNiO/γ -Al2O3 Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Partial oxidation of methane and ethane to syngas over a LiLaNiO/γ -Al2O3 catalyst was investigated with a flow-reactor, XPS and XRD. Excellent reaction performance for CH4-C2H6-O2 to syngas over the LiLaNiO/γ -Al2O3 catalyst was achieved at 1073K, obtaining CO selectivity of 90%-95% and CH4 conversion of~97%, with a wide range of C2H6 content in the feed and of space velocity.

  8. Two test-cases for synergistic detections in the Martian atmosphere: Carbon monoxide and methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, S.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Daerden, F.; De Mazière, M.; De Wachter, E.; Neary, L.; Vandenbussche, S.; Vandaele, A. C.

    2017-03-01

    In the frame of the scientific preparation of ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (EMTGO), synergistic retrievals were performed on synthetic spectra of two different remote sensing instruments of the Martian atmosphere. To benefit from their diversity, we have simulated spectra of a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS), working in the middle to far infrared and of a grating spectrometer (GA) working in the middle infrared. As control runs, non-synergistic retrievals were performed as well. Two molecules of interest in the Martian atmosphere were chosen to test this method: carbon monoxide and methane. Scenarios were selected and two different vibrational bands for each molecule were used to retrieve molecular volume mixing ratios. Synergistic retrievals for CO are useful both in solar occultation and in nadir, while for CH4, the concentration of which is expected to be very low, the results for FTS and GA in synergy are not as conclusive due to the weak signal in the ν4 vibrational band (covered by FTS) compared to the stronger ν3 band (covered by GA). Our results represent a first step to an optimized use of infrared spectra to be recorded in Martian orbit by two instruments of EMTGO.

  9. Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide and methane at an immobilized cobalt protoporphyrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jing; Kortlever, Ruud; Kas, Recep; Birdja, Yuvraj Y.; Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Kwon, Youngkook; Ledezma-Yanez, Isis; Schouten, Klaas Jan P.; Mul, Guido; Koper, Marc T. M.

    2015-01-01

    The electrochemical conversion of carbon dioxide and water into useful products is a major challenge in facilitating a closed carbon cycle. Here we report a cobalt protoporphyrin immobilized on a pyrolytic graphite electrode that reduces carbon dioxide in an aqueous acidic solution at relatively low overpotential (0.5 V), with an efficiency and selectivity comparable to the best porphyrin-based electrocatalyst in the literature. While carbon monoxide is the main reduction product, we also observe methane as by-product. The results of our detailed pH-dependent studies are explained consistently by a mechanism in which carbon dioxide is activated by the cobalt protoporphyrin through the stabilization of a radical intermediate, which acts as Brønsted base. The basic character of this intermediate explains how the carbon dioxide reduction circumvents a concerted proton–electron transfer mechanism, in contrast to hydrogen evolution. Our results and their mechanistic interpretations suggest strategies for designing improved catalysts. PMID:26324108

  10. Kinetics of methane-ethane gas replacement in clathrate-hydrates studied by time-resolved neutron diffraction and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murshed, M Mangir; Schmidt, Burkhard C; Kuhs, Werner F

    2010-01-14

    The kinetics of CH(4)-C(2)H(6) replacement in gas hydrates has been studied by in situ neutron diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Deuterated ethane structure type I (C(2)H(6) sI) hydrates were transformed in a closed volume into methane-ethane mixed structure type II (CH(4)-C(2)H(6) sII) hydrates at 5 MPa and various temperatures in the vicinity of 0 degrees C while followed by time-resolved neutron powder diffraction on D20 at ILL, Grenoble. The role of available surface area of the sI starting material on the formation kinetics of sII hydrates was studied. Ex situ Raman spectroscopic investigations were carried out to crosscheck the gas composition and the distribution of the gas species over the cages as a function of structure type and compared to the in situ neutron results. Raman micromapping on single hydrate grains showed compositional and structural gradients between the surface and core of the transformed hydrates. Moreover, the observed methane-ethane ratio is very far from the one expected for a formation from a constantly equilibrated gas phase. The results also prove that gas replacement in CH(4)-C(2)H(6) hydrates is a regrowth process involving the nucleation of new crystallites commencing at the surface of the parent C(2)H(6) sI hydrate with a progressively shrinking core of unreacted material. The time-resolved neutron diffraction results clearly indicate an increasing diffusion limitation of the exchange process. This diffusion limitation leads to a progressive slowing down of the exchange reaction and is likely to be responsible for the incomplete exchange of the gases.

  11. Theoretical study on the gas-phase reaction mechanism between palladium monoxide and methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua-Qing; Hu, Chang-Wei; Gao, Chao; Yang, Meng-Yao; Li, Fang-Ming; Li, Cai-Qin; Li, Xiang-Yuan

    2011-12-01

    The gas-phase reaction mechanism between palladium monoxide and methane has been theoretically investigated on the singlet and triplet state potential energy surfaces (PESs) at the CCSD(T)/AVTZ//B3LYP/6-311+G(2d, 2p), SDD level. The major reaction channel leads to the products PdCH(2) + H(2)O, whereas the minor channel results in the products Pd + CH(3)OH, CH(2)OPd + H(2), and PdOH + CH(3). The minimum energy reaction pathway for the formation of main products (PdCH(2) + H(2)O), involving one spin inversion, prefers to start at the triplet state PES and afterward proceed along the singlet state PES, where both CH(3)PdOH and CH(3)Pd(O)H are the critical intermediates. Furthermore, the rate-determining step is RS-CH(3) PdOH → RS-2-TS1cb → RS-CH(2)Pd(H)OH with the rate constant of k = 1.48 × 10(12) exp(-93,930/RT). For the first C-H bond cleavage, both the activation strain ΔE(≠)(strain) and the stabilizing interaction ΔE(≠)(int) affect the activation energy ΔE(≠), with ΔE(≠)(int) in favor of the direct oxidative insertion. On the other hand, in the PdCH(2) + H(2) O reaction, the main products are Pd + CH(3)OH, and CH(3)PdOH is the energetically preferred intermediate. In the CH(2)OPd + H(2) reaction, the main products are Pd + CH(3)OH with the energetically preferred intermediate H(2)PdOCH(2). In the Pd + CH(3)OH reaction, the main products are CH(2)OPd + H(2), and H(2)PdOCH(2) is the energetically predominant intermediate. The intermediates, PdCH(2), H(2) PdCO, and t-HPdCHO are energetically preferred in the PdC + H(2), PdCO + H(2), and H(2)Pd + CO reactions, respectively. Besides, PdO toward methane activation exhibits higher reaction efficiency than the atom Pd and its first-row congener NiO.

  12. Parametric performance of circumferentially grooved heat pipes with homogeneous and graded-porosity slab wicks at cryogenic temperatures. [methane and ethane working fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groll, M.; Pittman, R. B.; Eninger, J. E.

    1976-01-01

    A recently developed, potentially high-performance nonarterial wick was extensively tested. This slab wick has an axially varying porosity which can be tailored to match the local stress imposed on the wick. The purpose of the tests was to establish the usefulness of the graded-porosity slab wick at cryogenic temperatures between 110 and 260 K, with methane and ethane as working fluids. For comparison, a homogeneous (i.e., uniform porosity) slab wick was also tested. The tests included: maximum heat pipe performance as a function of fluid inventory, maximum performance as a function of operating temperature, maximum performance as a function of evaporator elevation, and influence of slab wick orientation on performance. The experimental data were compared with theoretical predictions obtained with the GRADE computer program.

  13. Desorption Kinetics of Ar, Kr, Xe, N2, O2, CO, Methane, Ethane, and Propane from Graphene and Amorphous Solid Water Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, R. Scott; May, Robert A.; Kay, Bruce D.

    2016-03-03

    The desorption kinetics for Ar, Kr, Xe, N2, O2, CO, methane, ethane, and propane from grapheme covered Pt(111) and amorphous solid water (ASW) surfaces are investigated using temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The TPD spectra for all of the adsorbates from graphene have well-resolved first, second, third, and multi- layer desorption peaks. The alignment of the leading edges is consistent the zero-order desorption for all of the adsorbates. An Arrhenius analysis is used to obtain desorption energies and prefactors for desorption from graphene for all of the adsorbates. In contrast, the leading desorption edges for the adsorbates from ASW do not align (for coverages < 2 ML). The non-alignment of TPD leading edges suggests that there are multiple desorption binding sites on the ASW surface. Inversion analysis is used to obtain the coverage dependent desorption energies and prefactors for desorption from ASW for all of the adsorbates.

  14. External influences on Europe's air quality: Baseline methane, carbon monoxide and ozone from 1990 to 2030 at Mace Head, Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derwent, R. G.; Simmonds, P. G.; O'Doherty, S.; Stevenson, D. S.; Collins, W. J.; Sanderson, M. G.; Johnson, C. E.; Dentener, F.; Cofala, J.; Mechler, R.; Amann, M.

    A global 3-D chemistry-transport model STOCHEM has been employed to study trends in the mole fractions of methane, carbon monoxide and ozone in baseline air masses entering Europe from the Atlantic Ocean over the period from 1990 to 2030. With a range of emission scenarios for man-made ozone precursor emission sources available, a wide range of model trends were predicted for the period up to 2030. In the scenario based on current planned air pollution controls, IIASA CLE, methane shows a strong upward trend, ozone shows a weaker upward trend, and carbon monoxide is approximately flat in baseline air masses. In one of the more pessimistic IPCC SRES scenarios, A2, all three gases show future increases. However, in the scenario based on maximum feasible emission reductions, IIASA MFR all three trace gases decline. By 2030, projected climate change reduces the growth in CH 4, but has insignificant effects on baseline CO and O 3 in these simulations. Global or hemispheric ozone precursor emissions and their controls exert a potentially large external influence on Europe's air quality. This influence is currently not taken into account in future European air quality policy formulation.

  15. Measurement of ethylene and methane production in a temperate forest soil using inhibition of acetylene and carbon monoxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU XingKai; INUBUSHI Kazuyuki

    2008-01-01

    We studied in the laboratory the effects of acetylene (C2H2) concentrations on the accumulation and consumption of ethylene and methane in a temperate pine forest soil, and in situ ethylene and methane production and flush effects of nitrogen sources on both productions in the pine forest stand (Pinus sylvestris L.). The addition of C2H2 at concentrations more than 50 Pa C2H2 in the headspace caused a more than 95% reduction in rates of ethylene and methane consumption in forest soil compared to those with no C2H2. Furthermore, addition of acetylene within a range of 50 to 10, 000 Pa C2H2 induced a similar rate of methane accumulation in forest soil. Hence, it can be concluded that presence of more than 50 Pa C2H2 in the headspace is an effective method to measure methane production in forest soil. The addition of C2H2 at concentrations more than 50 Pa C2H2 induced an increasing concentration of ethylene in the headspace (P≤0.05), indicating the reduction of acetylene to ethylene in forest soil. Using inhibition of 0.5 kPa C2H2 in combination with 5 kPa carbon monoxide that inhibits the reduction of acetylene in a short term, it was observed that there was a larger in situ methane production rate (218±26 μg C m-2 h-1 (μg C per square meter per hour, the same below)) than in situethylene produc-tion rate (92 ± 6 μg C m-2 h-1) in the pine forest soil. The addition of nitrogen sources such as urea, urea plus a nitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide, and potassium nitrate, could induce a 5-fold greater in-crease in rates of in situ ethylene and methane production compared to those in the control, particu-larly in the latter (P≤0.05). The results can promote in situ measurement of ethylene and methane production in forest soils at different sites.

  16. Oxidative Condensation of Methane — a New Pathway to the Synthesis of Ethane, Ethylene, and Other Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minachev, Khabib M.; Usachev, Nikolay Ya; Udut, V. N.; Khodakov, Yu S.

    1988-03-01

    During the last five years, the chemistry of methane has been enriched by the possibility of obtaining C2 and other hydrocarbons as a result of the oxidative condensation of methane in the presence of a series of catalytic systems. The availability of the starting materials (CH4 and O2) leads to extensive prospects for the replacement of the petroleum raw materials by natural gas in single-stage syntheses of valuable compounds and in the first place ethylene. This review gives a systematic account of the results of the selection of effective catalysts and surveys the information leading to the elucidation of the mechanism for the formation of the products of the extensive oxidation and oxidative condensation of methane. The bibliography includes 118 references.

  17. Calculations of NMR properties for sI and sII clathrate hydrates of methane, ethane and propane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siuda, Paweł; Sadlej, Joanna

    2014-12-01

    Calculations of NMR parameters (the absolute shielding constants and the spin-spin coupling constants) for 5(12), 5(12)6(2) and 5(12)6(4) cages enclathrating CH4, C2H6 and C3H8 molecules are presented. The DFT/B3LYP/HuzIII-su3 level of theory was employed. The (13)C shielding constants of guest molecules are close to available experimental data. In two cases (the ethane in 5(12) and the propane in 5(12)6(2) cages) the (13)C shielding constants are reported for the first time. Inversion of the methyl/methylene (13)C and (1)H shielding constants order is found for propane in the 5(12)6(2) cage. Topological criteria are used to interpret the changes of values of NMR parameters of water molecules and they establish a connection between single cages and bulk crystal.

  18. Reduction of Quartz to Silicon Monoxide by Methane-Hydrogen Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Zhang, Guangqing; Tronstad, Ragnar; Ostrovski, Oleg

    2016-08-01

    The reduction of quartz was studied isothermally in a fluidized bed reactor using continuously flowing methane-hydrogen gas mixture in the temperature range from 1623 K to 1773 K (1350 °C to 1500 °C). The CO content in the off-gas was measured online using an infrared gas analyzer. The main phases of the reduced samples identified by XRD analysis were quartz and cristobalite. Significant weight loss in the reduction process indicated that the reduction products were SiO and CO. Reduction of SiO2 to SiO by methane starts with adsorption and dissociation of CH4 on the silica surface. The high carbon activity in the CH4-H2 gas mixture provided a strongly reducing condition. At 1623 K (1350 °C), the reduction was very slow. The rate and extent of reduction increased with the increasing temperature to 1723 K (1450 °C). A further increase in temperature to 1773 K (1500 °C) resulted in a decrease in the rate and extent of reduction. An increase in the gas flow rate from 0.4 to 0.8 NL/min and an increase in the methane content in the CH4-H2 gas mixture from 0 to 5 vol pct facilitated the reduction. Methane content in the gas mixture should be maintained at less than 5 vol pct in order to suppress methane cracking.

  19. GASP - THERMODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF HELIUM, METHANE, NEON, NITROGEN, CARBON MONOXIDE, CARBON DIOXIDE, OXYGEN, AND ARGON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program, GASP, has been written to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, fluorine, methane, neon, nitrogen, and oxygen. GASP accepts any two of pressure, temperature, or density as input. In addition, entropy and enthalpy are possible inputs. Outputs are temperature, density, pressure, entropy, enthalpy, specific heats, expansion coefficient, sonic velocity, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and surface tension. A special technique is provided to estimate the thermal conductivity near the thermodynamic critical point. GASP is a group of FORTRAN subroutines. The user typically would write a main program that invoked GASP to provide only the described outputs. Subroutines are structured so that the user may call only those subroutines needed for his particular calculations. Allowable pressures range from 0.l atmosphere to 100 to l,000 atmospheres, depending on the fluid. Similarly, allowable pressures range from the triple point of each substance to 300 degrees K to 2000 degrees K, depending on the substance. The GASP package was developed to be used with heat transfer and fluid flow applications. It is particularly useful in applications of cryogenic fluids. Some problems associated with the liquefication, storage, and gasification of liquefied natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas can also be studied using GASP. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and is available for implementation on IBM 7000 series computers. GASP was developed in 1971.

  20. GASP - THERMODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF HELIUM, METHANE, NEON, NITROGEN, CARBON MONOXIDE, CARBON DIOXIDE, OXYGEN, AND ARGON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program, GASP, has been written to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, fluorine, methane, neon, nitrogen, and oxygen. GASP accepts any two of pressure, temperature, or density as input. In addition, entropy and enthalpy are possible inputs. Outputs are temperature, density, pressure, entropy, enthalpy, specific heats, expansion coefficient, sonic velocity, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and surface tension. A special technique is provided to estimate the thermal conductivity near the thermodynamic critical point. GASP is a group of FORTRAN subroutines. The user typically would write a main program that invoked GASP to provide only the described outputs. Subroutines are structured so that the user may call only those subroutines needed for his particular calculations. Allowable pressures range from 0.l atmosphere to 100 to l,000 atmospheres, depending on the fluid. Similarly, allowable pressures range from the triple point of each substance to 300 degrees K to 2000 degrees K, depending on the substance. The GASP package was developed to be used with heat transfer and fluid flow applications. It is particularly useful in applications of cryogenic fluids. Some problems associated with the liquefication, storage, and gasification of liquefied natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas can also be studied using GASP. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and is available for implementation on IBM 7000 series computers. GASP was developed in 1971.

  1. Methane, Carbon Monoxide, and Ammonia in Brown Dwarfs and Self-Luminous Giant Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Zahnle, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    We address disequilibrum abundances of some simple molecules in the atmospheres of solar composition brown dwarfs and self-luminous extrasolar giant planets using a kinetics-based 1D atmospheric chemistry model. We employ cloudless atmospheres of approximately solar metallicity. Our approach is to use the complete model to survey the parameter space with effective temperatures between 500 K and 1100 K. In all of these worlds equilibrium chemistry favors CH4 over CO in the parts of the atmosphere that can be seen from Earth. Small surface gravity of planets strongly discriminates against CH4 when compared to an otherwise comparable brown dwarf. If vertical mixing is comparable to Jupiter's, methane becomes more abundant than CO in Jupiter-mass planets cooler than 500 K. Sluggish vertical mixing can raise this threshold to 600 K; but clouds or more vigorous vertical mixing could lower this threshold to 400 K. The comparable threshold in brown dwarfs is 1100 K. Ammonia is also sensitive to gravity, but unlike CH...

  2. Development of a pre-concentration system and auto-analyzer for dissolved methane, ethane, propane, and butane concentration measurements with a GC-FID

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chepigin, A.; Leonte, M.; Colombo, F.; Kessler, J. D.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved methane, ethane, propane, and butane concentrations in natural waters are traditionally measured using a headspace equilibration technique and gas chromatograph with flame ionization detector (GC-FID). While a relatively simple technique, headspace equilibration suffers from slow equilibration times and loss of sensitivity due to concentration dilution with the pure gas headspace. Here we present a newly developed pre-concentration system and auto-analyzer for use with a GC-FID. This system decreases the time required for each analysis by eliminating the headspace equilibration time, increases the sensitivity and precision with a rapid pre-concentration step, and minimized operator time with an autoanalyzer. In this method, samples are collected from Niskin bottles in newly developed 1 L plastic sample bags rather than glass vials. Immediately following sample collection, the sample bags are placed in an incubator and individually connected to a multiport sampling valve. Water is pumped automatically from the desired sample bag through a small (6.5 mL) Liqui-Cel® membrane contactor where the dissolved gas is vacuum extracted and directly flushed into the GC sample loop. The gases of interest are preferentially extracted with the Liqui-Cel and thus a natural pre-concentration effect is obtained. Daily method calibration is achieved in the field with a five-point calibration curve that is created by analyzing gas standard-spiked water stored in 5 L gas-impermeable bags. Our system has been shown to substantially pre-concentrate the dissolved gases of interest and produce a highly linear response of peak areas to dissolved gas concentration. The system retains the high accuracy, precision, and wide range of measurable concentrations of the headspace equilibration method while simultaneously increasing the sensitivity due to the pre-concentration step. The time and labor involved in the headspace equilibration method is eliminated and replaced with the

  3. Spatial and temporal variability of urban fluxes of methane, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide above London, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfter, Carole; Tremper, Anja H.; Halios, Christoforos H.; Kotthaus, Simone; Bjorkegren, Alex; Grimmond, C. Sue B.; Barlow, Janet F.; Nemitz, Eiko

    2016-08-01

    We report on more than 3 years of measurements of fluxes of methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) taken by eddy-covariance in central London, UK. Mean annual emissions of CO2 in the period 2012-2014 (39.1 ± 2.4 ktons km-2 yr-1) and CO (89 ± 16 tons km-2 yr-1) were consistent (within 1 and 5 % respectively) with values from the London Atmospheric Emissions Inventory, but measured CH4 emissions (72 ± 3 tons km-2 yr-1) were over two-fold larger than the inventory value. Seasonal variability was large for CO with a winter to summer reduction of 69 %, and monthly fluxes were strongly anti-correlated with mean air temperature. The winter increment in CO emissions was attributed mainly to vehicle cold starts and reduced fuel combustion efficiency. CO2 fluxes were 33 % higher in winter than in summer and anti-correlated with mean air temperature, albeit to a lesser extent than for CO. This was attributed to an increased demand for natural gas for heating during the winter. CH4 fluxes exhibited moderate seasonality (21 % larger in winter), and a spatially variable linear anti-correlation with air temperature. Differences in resident population within the flux footprint explained up to 90 % of the spatial variability of the annual CO2 fluxes and up to 99 % for CH4. Furthermore, we suggest that biogenic sources of CH4, such as wastewater, which is unaccounted for by the atmospheric emissions inventories, make a substantial contribution to the overall budget and that commuting dynamics in and out of central business districts could explain some of the spatial and temporal variability of CO2 and CH4 emissions. To our knowledge, this study is unique given the length of the data sets presented, especially for CO and CH4 fluxes. This study offers an independent assessment of "bottom-up" emissions inventories and demonstrates that the urban sources of CO and CO2 are well characterized in London. This is however not the case for CH4 emissions which are

  4. Determination of carbon monoxide with a modified zeolite sorbent and methanization-gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juntarawijit, C; Poovey, H G; Rando, R J

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an alternative sorbent sampling technique to concentrate CO from an air sample for subsequent instrumental analysis. Y52 zeolite doped with 9.4 wt % cuprous ions was found to have high capacity, stability to air, and thermal reversibility for CO. The Cu(I)-modified zeolite was packed in glass tubes, preceded by a drying tube containing silica gel. Air was sampled through the tubes at the flow rate of 100 mL/min. Collected CO was thermally desorbed at 300 degrees C and determined by gas chromatography with reduction of CO to methane and flame ionization detection (TD-GC-CH4-FID). Breakthrough capacity of the sorbent was found to be 2.74 mg CO per gram of sorbent. For 2-L air samples containing 12.5 to 100 ppm CO and 50% relative humidity at room temperature, recovery of CO was found to be 96.6% with pooled relative standard deviation of 5.8%. The estimated detection limit for a 2-L sample was 0.2 ppm. Collected CO was stable at room temperature for 1 day and up to 7 days at 4 degrees C if the sorbent tube was flushed with helium before storage. In field testing, the ratio of CO measured by the new technique and by a reference technique was found to be 0.93 with pooled relative standard deviation of 6.3%. This unique new sorbent coupled with TD-GC-CH4-FID shows promise as a sensitive and specific alternative for measurement of CO in air.

  5. Methane, carbon monoxide, and ammonia in brown dwarfs and self-luminous giant planets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahnle, Kevin J.; Marley, Mark S., E-mail: Kevin.J.Zahnle@NASA.gov, E-mail: Mark.S.Marley@NASA.gov [NASA Ames Research Center, MS-245-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    We address disequilibrium abundances of some simple molecules in the atmospheres of solar composition brown dwarfs and self-luminous extrasolar giant planets using a kinetics-based one-dimensional atmospheric chemistry model. Our approach is to use the full kinetics model to survey the parameter space with effective temperatures between 500 K and 1100 K. In all of these worlds, equilibrium chemistry favors CH{sub 4} over CO in the parts of the atmosphere that can be seen from Earth, but in most disequilibrium favors CO. The small surface gravity of a planet strongly discriminates against CH{sub 4} when compared to an otherwise comparable brown dwarf. If vertical mixing is like Jupiter's, the transition from methane to CO occurs at 500 K in a planet. Sluggish vertical mixing can raise this to 600 K, but clouds or more vigorous vertical mixing could lower this to 400 K. The comparable thresholds in brown dwarfs are 1100 ± 100 K. Ammonia is also sensitive to gravity, but, unlike CH{sub 4}/CO, the NH{sub 3}/N{sub 2} ratio is insensitive to mixing, which makes NH{sub 3} a potential proxy for gravity. HCN may become interesting in high-gravity brown dwarfs with very strong vertical mixing. Detailed analysis of the CO-CH{sub 4} reaction network reveals that the bottleneck to CO hydrogenation goes through methanol, in partial agreement with previous work. Simple, easy to use quenching relations are derived by fitting to the complete chemistry of the full ensemble of models. These relations are valid for determining CO, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, HCN, and CO{sub 2} abundances in the range of self-luminous worlds we have studied, but may not apply if atmospheres are strongly heated at high altitudes by processes not considered here (e.g., wave breaking).

  6. A survey of carbon monoxide and non-methane hydrocarbons in the Arctic Ocean during summer 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tran

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available During the ARK XXV 1 + 2 expedition in the Arctic Ocean carried out in June–July 2010 aboard the R/V Polarstern, we measured carbon monoxide (CO, non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC and phytoplankton pigments at the sea surface and down to a depth of 100 m. The CO and NMHC sea-surface concentrations were highly variable; CO, propene and isoprene levels ranged from 0.6 to 17.5 nmol L−1, 1 to 322 pmol L−1 and 1 to 541 pmol L−1, respectively. The CO and alkene concentrations as well as their sea–air fluxes were enhanced in polar waters off of Greenland, which were more stratified because of ice melting and richer in chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM than typical North Atlantic waters. The spatial distribution of the surface concentrations of CO was consistent with our current understanding of CO-induced UV photoproduction in the sea. The vertical distributions of the CO and alkenes were comparable and followed the trend of light penetration, with the concentrations displaying a relatively regular exponential decrease down to non-measurable values below 50 m. However, no diurnal variations of CO or alkene concentrations were observed in the stratified and irradiated surface layers. On several occasions, we observed the existence of subsurface CO maxima at the level of the deep chlorophyll maximum. This finding suggests the existence of a non-photochemical CO production pathway, most likely of phytoplanktonic origin. The corresponding production rates normalized to the chlorophyll content were in the range of those estimated from laboratory experiments. In general, the vertical distributions of isoprene followed that of the phytoplankton biomass. These data support the existence of a dominant photochemical source of CO and light alkenes enhanced in polar waters of the Arctic Ocean, with a minor contribution of a biological source of CO. The biological source of isoprene is observed in the different water masses but significantly

  7. The fate of ethane in Titan's hydrocarbon lakes and seas

    CERN Document Server

    Mousis, Olivier; Hayes, Alexander G; Hofgartner, Jason D

    2015-01-01

    Ethane is expected to be the dominant photochemical product on Titan's surface and, in the absence of a process that sequesters it from exposed surface reservoirs, a major constituent of its lakes and seas. Absorption of Cassini's 2.2 cm radar by Ligeia Mare however suggests that this north polar sea is dominated by methane. In order to explain this apparent ethane deficiency, we explore the possibility that Ligeia Mare is the visible part of an alkanofer that interacted with an underlying clathrate layer and investigate the influence of this interaction on an assumed initial ethane-methane mixture in the liquid phase. We find that progressive liquid entrapment in clathrate allows the surface liquid reservoir to become methane-dominated for any initial ethane mole fraction below 0.75. If interactions between alkanofers and clathrates are common on Titan, this should lead to the emergence of many methane-dominated seas or lakes.

  8. A two-state computational investigation of methane C--H and ethane C--C oxidative addition to [CpM(PH3)]n+ (M = Co, Rh, Ir; n = 0, 1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Alban; Richard, Philippe; Cacelli, Ivo; Poli, Rinaldo

    2006-01-11

    Reductive elimination of methane from methyl hydride half-sandwich phosphane complexes of the Group 9 metals has been investigated by DFT calculations on the model system [CpM(PH(3))(CH(3))(H)] (M = Co, Rh, Ir). For each metal, the unsaturated product has a triplet ground state; thus, spin crossover occurs during the reaction. All relevant stationary points on the two potential energy surfaces (PES) and the minimum energy crossing point (MECP) were optimized. Spin crossover occurs very near the sigma-CH(4) complex local minimum for the Co system, whereas the heavier Rh and Ir systems remain in the singlet state until the CH(4) molecule is almost completely expelled from the metal coordination sphere. No local sigma-CH(4) minimum was found for the Ir system. The energetic profiles agree with the nonexistence of the Co(III) methyl hydride complex and with the greater thermal stability of the Ir complex relative to the Rh complex. Reductive elimination of methane from the related oxidized complexes [CpM(PH(3))(CH(3))(H)](+) (M = Rh, Ir) proceeds entirely on the spin doublet PES, because the 15-electron [CpM(PH(3))](+) products have a doublet ground state. This process is thermodynamically favored by about 25 kcal mol(-1) relative to the corresponding neutral system. It is essentially barrierless for the Rh system and has a relatively small barrier (ca. 7.5 kcal mol(-1)) for the Ir system. In both cases, the reaction involves a sigma-CH(4) intermediate. Reductive elimination of ethane from [CpM(PH(3))(CH(3))(2)](+) (M = Rh, Ir) shows a similar thermodynamic profile, but is kinetically quite different from methane elimination from [CpM(PH(3))(CH(3))(H)](+): the reductive elimination barrier is much greater and does not involve a sigma-complex intermediate. The large difference in the calculated activation barriers (ca. 12.0 and ca. 30.5 kcal mol(-1) for the Rh and Ir systems, respectively) agrees with the experimental observation, for related systems, of oxidatively

  9. Methane, Ethane, And Ethylene Laminar Counterflow Diffusion Flames At Elevated Pressures: Experimental And Computational Investigations Up To 2.0MPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-27

    predicted computationally by Sohn and Chung [2]. In addition, Figura and Gomez [3] successfully stabi- lized non-premixed methane flames at elevated...side of stagnation plane in that limit [10] as explicitly indicated later [11]. The momentum balance imposed experimentally gives q1V12 = q2V22, which... Figura and Gomez [3]. As indicated by the previously stated values of the stoichiome- tric mixture fractions, the peak temperatures are expected to lie on

  10. Effect of the ruthenium loading and barium addition on the activity of ruthenium/carbon catalysts in carbon monoxide methanation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truszkiewicz Elżbieta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A group of supported ruthenium catalysts was prepared and tested in methanation of small CO amounts (7000 ppm in hydrogen-rich streams. High surface area graphitized carbon (484 m2/g was used as a support for ruthenium and RuCl3 was used as a Ru precursor. Some of the Ru/C systems were additionally doped with barium (Ba(NO32 was barium precursor. The catalysts were characterized by the chemisorption technique using CO as an adsorbate. To determine the resistance of the catalysts to undesired carbon support methanation, the TG-MS experiments were performed. They revealed that the barium addition inhibits support losses. The studies of CO methanation (fl ow reactor, atmospheric pressure have shown that some of the supported ruthenium catalysts exhibit high activities referred to the metal mass. The catalytic properties of ruthenium proved to be dependent on metal dispersion. Some of the Ru/C and Ba-Ru/C systems exhibit higher activity in CO hydrogenation than the commercial nickel-based catalyst.

  11. An atmospheric history of ethane from South Pole firn air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhulst, K. R.; Aydin, K. M.; Lang, P.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2009-12-01

    Ethane (C2H6) is the most abundant non-methane hydrocarbon in the atmosphere and is important to tropospheric photochemistry. Sources of ethane include natural gas and oil leaks, automotive emissions and biomass burning, with smaller contributions from oceanic, vegetative, and soil emissions. The primary loss pathway for ethane is via reaction with hydroxyl radical, which controls ethane seasonality and lifetime (1-2 months during summer). There is a relatively limited database of atmospheric ethane measurements, which is insufficient to characterize long-term trends in the sources and sinks of this compound or to determine anthropogenic influence on the ethane budget. In this study, an atmospheric history of ethane over the past century is reconstructed from South Pole firn air measurements, in conjunction with a 1-D firn air diffusion model. Eighty firn air samples were collected in glass flasks from two adjacent holes drilled to 118 m at South Pole, Antarctica during the 2008/2009 season. The flasks were shipped back and analyzed by high resolution GC/MS at UCI. Firn air dating was based on the measured CO2 profile and known atmospheric history of CO2. Ethane levels in the firn increased from about 132 ppt in the deepest sample, to 259 ppt at 106 m, then decreased to 230 ppt at 30 m. Dating based on mean CO2 ages indicates that the ethane levels over Antarctica roughly doubled (from 130 to 260 ppt) between 1930 and the 1980’s. Over this time period, ethane increased at a rate of about 0.7 ppt yr-1 from 1930-1950 and 3.2 ppt yr-1 from 1950-1987. Ethane levels stabilized during the 1980’s and declined by approximately 1.8 ppt yr-1 from 1988-2004. Surface air measurements from several high latitude southern hemisphere sites indicate that the modern mean atmospheric ethane level is approximately 200 ppt.

  12. Detection of (C-13)-ethane in Jupiter's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Guenter; Bjoraker, Gordon L.; Jennings, Donald E.

    1991-01-01

    High-resolution (C-12)- and (C-13)-ethane spectra of Jupiter were acquired with the Kitt Peak 4 m Fourier spectrometer and the Goddard postdisperser in June 1987. A relative abundance ratio (C-12/C-13) of 94 +/- 12 was derived from the measurements. This nearly terrestrial value indicates little or no fractionation of carbon isotopes when ethane is produced in the photolysis of methane in Jupiter's atmosphere.

  13. Observations of carbon dioxide, methane, and carbon monoxide at Tae-Ahn peninsula (Korea), Mount Waliguan (China), Ulaan Uul (Mongolia) and at Mauna Loa (Hawaii USA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Y.S. [Korea National Univ. of Education, Chongwon (Korea, Republic of); Tans, P.P.; Conway, T.J.; Dlugokencky, E.J. [Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Lab., Bouler (United States); Novelli, P.C.; Tolier, M. [Colorado Univ. (United States). Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences; Wen, Y. [Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing (China); Dagvadorj, D. [Mongolian Hydrometeorological Research Inst., Ulaan Batar (Mongolia)

    1995-12-31

    It has been discussed that the greenhouse gases, e.g. carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) methane (CH{sub 4}), enhance warming in the biosphere. Many scientists are therefore interested in monitoring the minor constituents of the atmosphere and in the carbon cycle. In cooperation with the Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (CMDL) of U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and carbon monoxide (CO) at the western tip of the Tae-ahn Peninsula (TAP) in central Korea since October 1990 has been measured. Shortly thereafter, two more sites were added for the measurement of greenhouse gases in East Asia; one at Mount Waliguar Qinghai Province (QPC) in China and another at Ulaan Uul (UUM), the Gobi Desert in Mongolia. Also, trace gas data obtained at Mauna Loa (MLO) in Hawaii in the USA has been used. The Hawaiian data represent the world`s longest period of CO{sub 2} monitoring since 1958. The present monitoring is a part of the Global Air Sampling Network the WMO`s Global Atmospheric Watch. The method of collecting and measuring CO{sub 2}, CO and CH{sub 4} have been described else where. Here the four year monitoring of the trace gases at the three sites in East Asia is reported. The results are also compared with the measured values obtained at the free troposphere background site at MLO in Hawaii

  14. Determination of carbon monoxide, methane and carbon dioxide in refinery hydrogen gases and air by gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiński, Marian; Kartanowicz, Rafal; Jastrzebski, Daniel; Kamiński, Marcin M

    2003-03-14

    This paper illustrates a method for determining trace amounts of CO, CH4 and CO2 with the detection limit of 0.15, 0.15 and 0.20 microg/l, respectively, in refinery hydrogen gases or in air. A simple modification of a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame-ionization detector is presented. A Porapak Q column, additionally connected with a short molecular sieve 5A packed column and a catalytic hydrogenation reactor on the Ni catalyst have been applied. The principle of the analytical method proposed is the separation of CO from O2 before the introduction of CO to the methanizer. The analytical procedure and examples of the results obtained have been presented. The modification applied makes it possible to use the GC instrument for other determinations, requiring utilization of the Porapak Q column and the flame-ionization detector. In such cases, the short molecular sieve 5A column and the methanizer can be by-passed.

  15. Model Analysis of the Factors Regulating Trends and Variability of Methane, Carbon Monoxide and OH: 1. Model Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshorbany, Y. F.; Strode, S.; Wang, J.; Duncan, B.

    2014-01-01

    Methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG). Its 100-year global warming potential (GWP) is 25 times larger than that for carbon dioxide. The 100-yr integrated GWP of CH4 is sensitive to changes in OH levels. Methane's atmospheric growth rate was estimated to be more than 10 ppb yr(exp -1) in 1998 but less than zero in 2001, 2004 and 2005 (Kirschke et al., 2013). Since 2006, the CH4 is increasing again. This phenomena is yet not well understood. Oxidation of CH4 by OH is the main loss process, thus affecting the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere and contributing to the global ozone background. Current models typically use an annual cycle of offline OH fields to simulate CH4. The implemented OH fields in these models are typically tuned so that simulated CH4 growth rates match that measured. For future and climate simulations, the OH tuning technique may not be suitable. In addition, running full chemistry, multi-decadal CH4 simulations is a serious challenge and currently, due to computational intensity, almost impossible.

  16. Sequestration of ethane in the cryovolcanic subsurface of Titan

    CERN Document Server

    Mousis, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    Saturn's largest satellite, Titan, has a thick atmosphere dominated by nitrogen and methane. The dense orange-brown smog hiding the satellite's surface is produced by photochemical reactions of methane, nitrogen and their dissociation products with solar ultraviolet, which lead primarily to the formation of ethane and heavier hydrocarbons. In the years prior to the exploration of Titan's surface by the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft, the production and condensation of ethane was expected to have formed a satellite-wide ocean one kilometer in depth, assuming that it was generated over the Solar system's lifetime. However, Cassini-Huygens observations failed to find any evidence of such an ocean. Here we describe the main cause of the ethane deficiency on Titan: cryovolcanic lavas regularly cover its surface, leading to the percolation of the liquid hydrocarbons through this porous material and its accumulation in subsurface layers built up during successive methane outgassing events. The liquid stored in the pores...

  17. A DFT-D study of the interaction of methane, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen with cation-exchanged SAPO-34

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Michael [Bremen Univ. (Germany). Fachgebiet Kristallographie; University College London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry; Bell, Robert G. [University College London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    2015-07-01

    Density-functional theory calculations including a semi-empirical dispersion correction (DFT-D) are employed to study the interaction of small guest molecules (CH{sub 4}, CO, N{sub 2}) with the cation sites in the silicoaluminophosphate SAPO-34. Eight different cations from three different groups (alkali cations, alkaline earth cations, transition metals) are included in the study. For each case, the total interaction energy as well as the non-dispersive contribution to the interaction are analysed. Electron density difference plots are used to investigate the nature of this non-dispersive contribution in more detail. Despite a non-negligible contribution of polarisation interactions, the total interaction remains moderate in systems containing main group cations. In SAPOs exchanged with transition metals, orbital interactions between the cations and CO and N{sub 2} lead to a very strong interaction, which makes these systems attractive as adsorbents for the selective adsorption of these species. A critical comparison with experimental heats of adsorption shows reasonable quantitative agreement for CO and N{sub 2}, but a pronounced overestimation of the interaction strength for methane. While this does not affect the conclusions regarding the suitability of TM-exchanged SAPO-34 materials for gas separations, more elaborate computational approaches may be needed to improve the quantitative accuracy for this guest molecule.

  18. The Formation of Ethane from Carbon Dioxide under Cold Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Pulsed-corona plasma has been used as a new method for ethane dehydrogenation at low temperature and normal pressure using carbon dioxide as an oxidant in this paper. The effect of carbon dioxide content in the feed, power input, and flow rate of the reactants on the ethane dehydrogenation has been investigated. The experimental results show that the conversion of ethane increases with the increase in the amount of carbon dioxide in the feed. The yield of ethylene and acetylene decreases with the increase in the yield of carbon monoxide, indicating that the increased carbon dioxide leads to the part of ethylene and acetylene being oxidized to carbon monoxide. Power input is primarily an electrical parameter in pulsed-corona plasma, which plays an important role in reactant conversion and product formation. When the power input reaches 16 W, ethane conversion is 41.0% and carbon dioxide conversion is 26.3%. The total yield of ethylene and acetylene is 15.6%. The reduced flow rate of feed improves the conversion of ethane,carbon dioxide and the yield of acetylene, and induces carbon deposit as well.

  19. Titan's missing ethane: From the atmosphere to the subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilliam, Ashley E.; Lerman, Abraham

    2016-09-01

    The second most abundant component of the present-day Titan atmosphere, methane (CH4), is known to undergo photolytic conversion to ethane (C2H6) that accumulates as a liquid on Titan's surface. Condensation temperature of ethane is higher than that of methane, so that ethane "rain" may be expected to occur before the liquefaction of methane. At present, the partial pressure of ethane in the atmosphere is 1E-5 bar, much lower than 1E-1 bar of CH4. Estimated 8.46E17 kg or 1.37E6 km3 of C2H6 have been produced on Titan since accretion. The Titan surface reservoirs of ethane are lakes and craters, of estimated volume of 50,000 km3 and 61,000 km3, respectively. As these are smaller than the total volume of liquid ethane produced in the course of Titan's history, the excess may be stored in the subsurface of the crust, made primarily of water ice. The minimum porosity of the crust needed to accommodate all the liquid ethane would be only 0.9% of the uppermost 2 km of the crust. The occurrence of CH4 and liquid C2H6 on Titan has led to much speculation on the possibility of life on that satellite. The aggregation of organic molecules in a "primordial soup or bullion" depends in part on the viscosity of the medium, diffusivity of organic molecules in it, and rates of polymerization reactions. The temperatures on Titan, much lower than on primordial Earth, are less favorable to the "Second Coming of life" on Titan.

  20. Constraints on emissions of carbon monoxide, methane, and a suite of hydrocarbons in the Colorado Front Range using observations of 14CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. Tans

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric radiocarbon (14CO represents an important observational constraint on emissions of fossil-fuel derived carbon into the atmosphere due to the absence of 14CO in fossil fuel reservoirs. The high sensitivity and precision that accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS affords in atmospheric 14CO analysis has greatly increased the potential for using such measurements to evaluate bottom-up emissions inventories of fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff, as well as those for other co-emitted species. Here we use observations of 14CO2 and a series of hydrocarbons and combustion tracers from discrete air samples collected between June 2009 and September 2010 at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO; Lat: 40.050° N, Lon: 105.004° W to derive emission ratios of each species to CO2ff. From these emission ratios, we estimate emissions of these species by using the Vulcan CO2ff high resolution data product as a reference. The species considered in this analysis are carbon monoxide (CO, methane (CH4, acetylene (C2H2, benzene (C6H6, and C3–C5 alkanes. Comparisons of top-down emissions estimates are made to existing inventories of these species for Denver and adjacent counties, as well as to previous efforts to estimate emissions from atmospheric observations over the same area. We find that CO is overestimated in the 2008 National Emissions Inventory (NEI, 2008 by a factor of ~2. A close evaluation of the inventory suggests that the ratio of CO emitted per unit fuel burned from on-road gasoline vehicles is likely over-estimated by a factor of 2.5. The results also suggest that while the oil and gas sector is the largest contributor to the CH4 signal in air arriving from the north and east, it is very likely that other sources, including agricultural sources, contribute to this signal and must be accounted for when attributing these signals to oil and gas industry activity from a top-down perspective. Our results are

  1. A survey of carbon monoxide and non-methane hydrocarbons in the Arctic Ocean during summer 2010: assessment of the role of phytoplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tran

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available During the ARK XXV 1+2 expedition in the Arctic Ocean carried out in June–July 2010 aboard the R/V Polarstern, we measured carbon monoxide (CO, non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC and phytoplankton pigments at the sea surface and down to a depth of 100 m. The CO and NMHC sea-surface concentrations were highly variable; CO, propene and isoprene levels ranged from 0.6 to 17.5 nmol l−1, 1 to 322 pmol l−1 and 1 to 541 pmol l−1, respectively. The CO and alkene concentrations were enhanced in polar waters off of Greenland, which were more stratified because of ice melting and richer in chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM than typical North Atlantic waters. The spatial distribution of the surface concentrations of CO was consistent with our current understanding of CO-induced UV photo-production in the sea. The vertical distributions of the CO and alkenes followed the trend of light penetration, with the concentrations displaying a relatively regular exponential decrease down to non-measurable values below 50 m. However, no diurnal variations of CO or alkene concentrations were observed in the stratified and irradiated surface layers. This finding suggests that the production and removal processes of CO and alkenes were tightly coupled. We tentatively determined a first-order rate constant for the microbial consumption of CO of 0.5 d−1, which is in agreement with previous studies. On several occasions, we observed the existence of subsurface CO maxima at the level of the deep chlorophyll maximum. This finding represents field evidence for the existence of a non-photochemical CO production pathway, most likely of phytoplanktonic origin. The corresponding production rates normalized to the chlorophyll content were in the range of those estimated from laboratory experiments. In general, the vertical distributions of isoprene followed that of the phytoplankton biomass. Hence, oceanic data

  2. GASP: A computer code for calculating the thermodynamic and transport properties for ten fluids: Parahydrogen, helium, neon, methane, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, oxygen, fluorine, argon, and carbon dioxide. [enthalpy, entropy, thermal conductivity, and specific heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Baron, A. K.; Peller, I. C.

    1975-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV subprogram called GASP is discussed which calculates the thermodynamic and transport properties for 10 pure fluids: parahydrogen, helium, neon, methane, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, oxygen, fluorine, argon, and carbon dioxide. The pressure range is generally from 0.1 to 400 atmospheres (to 100 atm for helium and to 1000 atm for hydrogen). The temperature ranges are from the triple point to 300 K for neon; to 500 K for carbon monoxide, oxygen, and fluorine; to 600 K for methane and nitrogen; to 1000 K for argon and carbon dioxide; to 2000 K for hydrogen; and from 6 to 500 K for helium. GASP accepts any two of pressure, temperature and density as input conditions along with pressure, and either entropy or enthalpy. The properties available in any combination as output include temperature, density, pressure, entropy, enthalpy, specific heats, sonic velocity, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and surface tension. The subprogram design is modular so that the user can choose only those subroutines necessary to the calculations.

  3. Formation of ketene (H{sub 2}CCO) in interstellar analogous methane (CH{sub 4})-carbon monoxide (CO) ices: A combined FTIR and reflectron time-of-flight mass spectroscopic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maity, Surajit; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Jones, Brant M. [W. M. Keck Research Laboratory in Astrochemistry, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii, HI 96822 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The formation of ketene (H{sub 2}CCO) in methane-carbon monoxide (CH{sub 4}-CO) ices was investigated upon its exposure to ionizing radiation in the form of energetic electrons at 5.5 K. The radiation-induced nonthermal equilibrium processing of these ices was monitored online and in situ via infrared spectroscopy complimented with post-irradiation temperature programmed desorption studies exploiting highly sensitive reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ReTOF) coupled with single photon fragment-free photo ionization (PI) at 10.49 eV. The detection of ketene in irradiated (isotopically labeled) methane-carbon monoxide ices was confirmed via the ν{sub 2} infrared absorption band and substantiated during the warm-up phase based on sublimation profiles obtained from the ReTOF-PI spectra of the corresponding isotopic masses. The experiments conducted with the mixed isotopic ices of {sup 12}CD{sub 4}-{sup 13}CO provide clear evidence of the formation of at least two ketene isotopomers (D{sub 2} {sup 12}C{sup 13}CO and D{sub 2} {sup 13}C{sup 13}CO), allowing for the derivation of two competing formation pathways. We have also proposed underlying reaction mechanisms to the formation of ketene based on kinetic fitting of the temporal evolution of the ketene isotopomers.

  4. Non-catalytic pyrolysis of ethane to ethylene in the presence of CO2 with or without limited O2

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vasant R Choudhary; Kartick C Mondal; Shafeek A R Mulla

    2006-05-01

    Influence of the presence of CO2, which is a mild oxidant, on the performance of the thermal cracking of ethane to ethylene in the absence or presence of limited O2 at different temperatures (750-900°C), space velocities (1500-9000 h-1) and CO2/C2H6 and O2/C2H6 mole ratios (0-2.0 and 0-0.3 respectively) has been investigated. In both the presence and absence of limited O2, ethane conversion increases markedly because of the presence of CO2, indicating its beneficial effect on the ethane to ethylene cracking. The increased ethane conversion is, however, not due to the oxidation of ethane to ethylene by CO2; the formation of carbon monoxide in the presence of CO2 is found to be very small. It is most probably due to the activation of ethane in the presence of CO2.

  5. Continuous measurements of nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, methane and carbon dioxide in the surface ocean with novel laser-absorption analysers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Jan; Grefe, Imke; Wager, Natalie; Bakker, Dorothee C. E.; Lee, Gareth A.

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, improvements in spectroscopic technology have revolutionised atmospheric trace gas research. In particular, cavity-based optical absorption analysers allow determination of gas concentrations with high frequency, repeatability, reproducibility and long-term stability. These qualities make them particularly suitable for autonomous measurements on voluntary observing ships (VOS). Here, we present results from three of the first deployments of such analysers on research ships, as a first step towards VOS installations. Los Gatos off-axis ICOS (Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy) analysers were used to measure nitrous oxide (N2O), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios in ocean surface water during research cruises in 2010, 2011 and 2012. The analysers were coupled to an equilibrator fed by the scientific seawater supply in the ship's laboratories. The equilibrator measurements were alternated with regular measurements of marine air and calibrated standard gases. Short-term precision for 10 s-average N2O mole fractions at an acquisition rate of 1 Hz was better than 0.2 nmol mol-1. The same value was achieved for duplicate measurements of a standard gas analysed within 1 hour of each other. The response time to concentration changes in water was 142-203 s, depending on the headspace flow rate. During the first deployment on the AMT20 cruise (Atlantic Meridional Transect, Southampton to Punta Arenas, 12 October to 25 November 2010), we unexpectedly found the subtropical gyres to be slightly undersaturated in N2O, implying that this region acted as a sink for this greenhouse gas. In contrast, the equatorial region was supersaturated and a source of nitrous oxide to the atmosphere. Mean sea-to-air fluxes were overall small and ranged between -1.6 and 0.11 μmol m-2 d-1 (negative fluxes imply an net uptake by the ocean). Despite the good short-term repeatability, significant calibration drift occurred between the six

  6. Geodetic data support trapping of ethane in Titan's polar crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotin, Christophe; Rambaux, Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Titan's surface is characterized by polar depressions that strongly influence interpretations of the gravity data. This study investigates several geodynamical models that can explain these depressions. For each model, the values of the three moments of inertia are computed numerically by discretizing the interior in spherical coordinates. The study shows that a Pratt model where the polar subsurface is made of ethane clathrates can explain the polar depression, the abrupt jump in altitude at about 60 degrees latitude, and the values of the degree 2 gravity coefficients. This model, proposed by Choukroun and Sotin [1], is based on the stability of ethane clathrate hydrates relative to methane clathrate hydrates. In addition to fitting the geodetic data, it explains the absence of ethane in Titan's atmosphere although ethane is the main product of the photolysis of methane. Other geophysical models based on latitudinal variations in the tidal heating production or in the heat flux at the base of the icy crust do not provide such a good match to the gravity and topographic observations. The ethane-clathrate model predicts that all the ethane produced by photolysis of methane at the present rate during the last billion years could be stored in the polar subsurface. It is consistent with the age of Titan's surface and that of Titan's atmospheric methane inferred from geological and geochemical observations by the Cassini/Huygens mission. The present study also emphasizes the role of mass anomalies on the interpretation of the degree 2 gravity coefficients. It shows that for Titan, a slow rotator, the values of the two equatorial moments of inertia (MoI) are largely affected by the polar depressions whereas the value of polar MoI is not. Therefore, as pointed out by previous calculations [2], calculating the moment of inertia (MoI) factor from the value of J2 could lead to major errors. This is not the case for our preferred Titan's model for which the negative polar

  7. Co-conversion of Ethane and Methanol into Higher Hydrocarbons over Ga/H-ZSM-5, Mo/H-ZSM-5 and Ga-Mo/H-ZSM-5

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mentzel, Uffe Vie; Rovik, Anne; Christensen, Claus H.

    2009-01-01

    Ethane and methanol are converted simultaneously over Ga/H-ZSM-5, Mo/H-ZSM-5 and Ga-Mo/H-ZSM-5 to produce light olefins and aromatics. The presence of methanol in the reactant stream is intended to facilitate activation of ethane following literature reports on co-conversion of methane and methanol....... However, the conversion of ethane actually decreases significantly when methanol is present. To gain insight into mechanistic details, C-13-labeled methanol is co-converted with unlabeled ethane. These isotopic labeling studies show that carbon atoms from ethane and methanol are mixed in the products...

  8. Partial oxidation of ethane to oxygenates using Fe- and Cu-containing ZSM-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forde, Michael M; Armstrong, Robert D; Hammond, Ceri; He, Qian; Jenkins, Robert L; Kondrat, Simon A; Dimitratos, Nikolaos; Lopez-Sanchez, Jose Antonio; Taylor, Stuart H; Willock, David; Kiely, Christopher J; Hutchings, Graham John

    2013-07-31

    Iron and copper containing ZSM-5 catalysts are effective for the partial oxidation of ethane with hydrogen peroxide giving combined oxygenate selectivities and productivities of up to 95.2% and 65 mol kgcat(-1) h(-1), respectively. High conversion of ethane (ca. 56%) to acetic acid (ca. 70% selectivity) can be observed. Detailed studies of this catalytic system reveal a complex reaction network in which the oxidation of ethane gives a range of C2 oxygenates, with sequential C-C bond cleavage generating C1 products. We demonstrate that ethene is also formed and can be subsequently oxidized. Ethanol can be directly produced from ethane, and does not originate from the decomposition of its corresponding alkylperoxy species, ethyl hydroperoxide. In contrast to our previously proposed mechanism for methane oxidation over similar zeolite catalysts, the mechanism of ethane oxidation involves carbon-based radicals, which lead to the high conversions we observe.

  9. Effect of alloying on carbon formation during ethane dehydrogenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rovik, Anne; Kegnæs, Søren; Dahl, Søren

    2009-01-01

    The structure sensitivity of different transition metals in the hydrogenolysis, dehydrogenation, and coking reactions during ethane conversion has been investigated. The investigated metals, Ni, Ru, Rh, and Pd, are co-impregnated with Ag onto an inactive MgAl2O4 spinel support and tested in the c......The structure sensitivity of different transition metals in the hydrogenolysis, dehydrogenation, and coking reactions during ethane conversion has been investigated. The investigated metals, Ni, Ru, Rh, and Pd, are co-impregnated with Ag onto an inactive MgAl2O4 spinel support and tested...... in the conversion of ethane. A tendency is clear for all catalysts: In the first period of time 100% ethane is converted and roughly half of the carbon is converted into coke and deposited on the catalyst. The other half of the carbon is converted into methane. The active sites in the hydrogenolysis are blocked...... by coke during the initial period where after dehydrogenation of ethane is observed. It has previously been predicted in surface science studies that Ag covers the steps of certain transition metals. Here it is documented that the hydrogenolysis and coking reactions are significantly suppressed by co...

  10. The identification of liquid ethane in Titan's Ontario Lacus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R H; Soderblom, L A; Soderblom, J M; Clark, R N; Jaumann, R; Barnes, J W; Sotin, C; Buratti, B; Baines, K H; Nicholson, P D

    2008-07-31

    Titan was once thought to have global oceans of light hydrocarbons on its surface, but after 40 close flybys of Titan by the Cassini spacecraft, it has become clear that no such oceans exist. There are, however, features similar to terrestrial lakes and seas, and widespread evidence for fluvial erosion, presumably driven by precipitation of liquid methane from Titan's dense, nitrogen-dominated atmosphere. Here we report infrared spectroscopic data, obtained by the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on board the Cassini spacecraft, that strongly indicate that ethane, probably in liquid solution with methane, nitrogen and other low-molecular-mass hydrocarbons, is contained within Titan's Ontario Lacus.

  11. Retrievals of ethane from ground-based high-resolution FTIR solar observations with updated line parameters: determination of the optimum strategy for the Jungfraujoch station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, W.; Perrin, A.; Jacquemart, D.; Sudo, K.; Yashiro, H.; Gauss, M.; Demoulin, P.; Servais, C.; Mahieu, E.

    2012-04-01

    Ethane (C2H6) is the most abundant Non-Methane HydroCarbon (NMHC) in the Earth's atmosphere, with a lifetime of approximately 2 months. C2H6 has both anthropogenic and natural emission sources such as biomass burning, natural gas loss and biofuel consumption. Oxidation by the hydroxyl radical is by far the major C2H6 sink as the seasonally changing OH concentration controls the strong modulation of the ethane abundance throughout the year. Ethane lowers Cl atom concentrations in the lower stratosphere and is a major source of peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN) and carbon monoxide (by reaction with OH). Involved in the formation of tropospheric ozone and in the destruction of atmospheric methane through changes in OH, C2H6 is a non-direct greenhouse gas with a net-global warming potential (100-yr horizon) of 5.5. The retrieval of ethane from ground-based infrared (IR) spectra is challenging. Indeed, the fitting of the ethane features is complicated by numerous interferences by strong water vapor, ozone and methane absorptions. Moreover, ethane has a complicated spectrum with many interacting vibrational modes and the current state of ethane parameters in HITRAN (e.g. : Rothman et al., 2009, see http://www.hitran.com) was rather unsatisfactory in the 3 μm region. In fact, PQ branches outside the 2973-3001 cm-1 range are not included in HITRAN, and most P and R structures are missing. New ethane absorption cross sections recorded at the Molecular Spectroscopy Facility of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (Harrison et al., 2010) are used in our retrievals. They were calibrated in intensity by using reference low-resolution spectra from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) IR database. Pseudoline parameters fitted to these ethane spectra have been combined with HITRAN 2004 line parameters (including all the 2006 updates) for all other species encompassed in the selected microwindows. Also, the improvement brought by the update of the line positions and intensities

  12. Rich methane premixed laminar flames doped by light unsaturated hydrocarbons - Part I : allene and propyne

    CERN Document Server

    Gueniche, Hadj-Ali; Dayma, Guillaume; Fournet, Ren{é}; Battin-Leclerc, Fr{é}d{é}rique

    2006-01-01

    The structure of three laminar premixed rich flames has been investigated: a pure methane flame and two methane flames doped by allene and propyne, respectively. The gases of the three flames contain 20.9% (molar) of methane and 33.4% of oxygen, corresponding to an equivalence ratio of 1.25 for the pure methane flame. In both doped flames, 2.49% of C3H4 was added, corresponding to a ratio C3H4/CH4 of 12% and an equivalence ratio of 1.55. The three flames have been stabilized on a burner at a pressure of 6.7 kPa using argon as dilutant, with a gas velocity at the burner of 36 cm/s at 333 K. The concentration profiles of stable species were measured by gas chromatography after sampling with a quartz microprobe. Quantified species included carbon monoxide and dioxide, methane, oxygen, hydrogen, ethane, ethylene, acetylene, propyne, allene, propene, propane, 1,2-butadiene, 1,3-butadiene, 1-butene, isobutene, 1-butyne, vinylacetylene, and benzene. The temperature was measured using a PtRh (6%)-PtRh (30%) thermocou...

  13. Reversal of global atmospheric ethane and propane trends largely due to US oil and natural gas production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmig, Detlev; Rossabi, Samuel; Hueber, Jacques; Tans, Pieter; Montzka, Stephen A.; Masarie, Ken; Thoning, Kirk; Plass-Duelmer, Christian; Claude, Anja; Carpenter, Lucy J.; Lewis, Alastair C.; Punjabi, Shalini; Reimann, Stefan; Vollmer, Martin K.; Steinbrecher, Rainer; Hannigan, James W.; Emmons, Louisa K.; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Franco, Bruno; Smale, Dan; Pozzer, Andrea

    2016-07-01

    Non-methane hydrocarbons such as ethane are important precursors to tropospheric ozone and aerosols. Using data from a global surface network and atmospheric column observations we show that the steady decline in the ethane mole fraction that began in the 1970s halted between 2005 and 2010 in most of the Northern Hemisphere and has since reversed. We calculate a yearly increase in ethane emissions in the Northern Hemisphere of 0.42 (+/-0.19) Tg yr-1 between mid-2009 and mid-2014. The largest increases in ethane and the shorter-lived propane are seen over the central and eastern USA, with a spatial distribution that suggests North American oil and natural gas development as the primary source of increasing emissions. By including other co-emitted oil and natural gas non-methane hydrocarbons, we estimate a Northern Hemisphere total non-methane hydrocarbon yearly emission increase of 1.2 (+/-0.8) Tg yr-1. Atmospheric chemical transport modelling suggests that these emissions could augment summertime mean surface ozone by several nanomoles per mole near oil and natural gas production regions. Methane/ethane oil and natural gas emission ratios could suggest a significant increase in associated methane emissions; however, this increase is inconsistent with observed leak rates in production regions and changes in methane's global isotopic ratio.

  14. Biogeochemical aspects of atmospheric methane

    OpenAIRE

    Cicerone, RJ; Oremland, RS

    1988-01-01

    Methane is the most abundant organic chemical in Earth's atmosphere, and its concentration is increasing with time, as a variety of independent measurements have shown. Photochemical reactions oxidize methane in the atmosphere; through these reactions, methane exerts strong influence over the chemistry of the troposphere and the stratosphere and many species including ozone, hydroxyl radicals, and carbon monoxide. Also, through its infrared absorption spectrum, methane is an important greenho...

  15. Raman spectra of ethane adn ethylene adsorbed of surface of catalyst Sm 2 O 3/MgO at high temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrov, A. V.; Plate, S. E.; Kadushin, A. A.; Kimel'feld, Ya. M.; Seleznev, V. A.; Tulenin, Yu. P.

    1992-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been applied for the investigation in situ of catalytic transformations of ethane ethylene and deuterated ethylene on the surface of catalyst Sm 2O 3/MgO at high temperatures (up to 980 K). Ethane and ethylene are the products of the oxidation dehydration of methane. For the understanding of mechanism of this process it is interesting to study of the spectra of ethane and ethylene in the conditions of the real process at high temperature. In the previous paper [1] we have shown that during the flowring of mixture methane with oxygen through the catalyst Sm 2O 3/MgO methane dissociates on CH 3 and CH 2 groups. It has been confirmed by experiment with deuterated methane. The purpose of this work is to study the interaction of ethane and ethylene with Sm 2O 3/MgO in similar conditions by Raman spectroscopy.

  16. Atmospheric chemistry: The return of ethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakola, Hannele; Hellén, Heidi

    2016-07-01

    Ethane emissions can lead to ozone pollution. Measurements at 49 sites show that long-declining atmospheric ethane concentrations started rising in 2010 in the Northern Hemisphere, largely due to greater oil and gas production in the USA.

  17. a Hamiltonian to Obtain a Global Frequency Analysis of all the Vibrational Bands of Ethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazzen-Ahmadi, Nasser; Norooz Oliaee, Jalal

    2016-06-01

    The interest in laboratory spectroscopy of ethane stems from the desire to understand the methane cycle in the atmospheres of planets and their moons and from the importance of ethane as a trace species in the terrestrial atmosphere. Solar decomposition of methane in the upper part of these atmospheres followed by a series of reactions leads to a variety of hydrocarbon compounds among which ethane is often the second most abundant species. Because of its high abundance, ethane spectra have been measured by Voyager and Cassini in the regions around 30, 12, 7, and 3 μm. Therefore, a complete knowledge of line parameters of ethane is crucial for spectroscopic remote sensing of planetary atmospheres. Experimental characterization of torsion-vibration states of ethane lying below 1400 cm-1 have been made previously, but extension of the Hamiltonian model for treatment of the strongly perturbed νb{8} fundamental and the complex band system of ethane in the 3 micron region requires careful examination of the operators for many new torsionally mediated vibration-rotation interactions. Following the procedures outlined by Hougen, we have re-examined the transformation properties of the total angular momentum, the translational and vibrational coordinates and momenta of ethane, and for vibration-torsion-rotation interaction terms constructed by taking products of these basic operators. It is found that for certain choices of phase, the doubly degenerate vibrational coordinates with and symmetry can be made to transform under the group elements in such a way as to yield real matrix elements for the torsion-vibration-rotation couplings whereas other choices of phase may require complex algebra. In this talk, I will discuss the construction of a very general torsion-vibration-rotation Hamiltonian for ethane, as well as the prospect for using such a Hamiltonian to obtain a global frequency analysis (based in large part on an extension of earlier programs and ethane fits^a from

  18. Testing different scenarios of emissions from global fossil fuel production using a multi-decadal record of simulated and observed ethane data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, L. B.; Butenhoff, C. L.; Rice, A. L.; Kahlil, A.

    2016-12-01

    Ethane is emitted with methane and other trace gases in the production of oil and natural gas during drilling, venting, flaring, and from infrastructure leaks during storage and distribution. Fugitive emissions from oil and gas production are one of the largest anthropogenic sources of ethane and methane and contribute significantly to global trends in their atmospheric burdens. The climate advantage of replacing coal with natural gas in energy portfolios depends critically on methane leakage rates. Because gas fluxes vary widely across production fields and distribution networks, efforts to estimate national and global rates of emissions using bottom-up accounting methods face significant challenges. Recent studies of firn and surface observations show a marked decline in global atmospheric ethane in the 1980s and 1990s which have been interpreted as a decline in fossil fuel ethane emissions. However, this conclusion is contradicted by some bottom-up emissions inventories and global inversions of isotopic methane which find fossil fuel emissions have been flat or increased during this time with a decline in biomass burning emissions. To investigate the temporal record of ethane emissions further, we use four decades (1982 - 2015) of surface air observations of ethane from three sampling networks to test competing ethane emissions scenarios evaluated with the three-dimensional atmospheric chemical-transport model GEOS-Chem. Because ethane's main sources (fossil fuel production, biomass and biofuel burning) have different spatial footprints, we hypothesize that temporal trends for each source, if they exist, will leave unique signatures in the latitudinal distribution of ethane over time. We use GEOS-Chem to predict the source latitudinal trend signatures and assess the ability of the observational ethane record to eliminate different emissions scenarios, providing insight into the recent history of fugitive emissions from fossil fuel production.

  19. 75 FR 3668 - Conditional Approval and Promulgation of State Implementation Plans; Ohio; Carbon Monoxide and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-22

    ... your e-mail address will be automatically captured and included as part of the comment that is placed...; metallic carbonates; ammonium carbonate; methane (except methane from landfill gases); and ethane. This... miscellaneous metal and plastic parts coatings document in September, 2008. This limit is less stringent...

  20. Recent increase of ethane detected in the remote atmosphere of the Northern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Bruno; Bader, Whitney; Bovy, Benoît; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Fischer, Emily V.; Strong, Kimberly; Conway, Stephanie; Hannigan, James W.; Nussbaumer, Eric; Bernath, Peter F.; Boone, Chris D.; Walker, Kaley A.

    2015-04-01

    Ethane (C2H6) has a large impact on tropospheric composition and air quality because of its involvement in the global VOC (volatile organic compound) - HOx - NOx chemistry responsible for generating and destroying tropospheric ozone. By acting as a major sink for tropospheric OH radicals, the abundance of C2H6 influences the atmospheric content of carbon monoxide and impacts the lifetime of methane. Moreover, it is an important source of PAN, a thermally unstable reservoir for NOx radicals. On a global scale, the main sources of C2H6 are leakage from the production, transport of natural gas loss, biofuel consumption and biomass burning, mainly located in the Northern Hemisphere. Due to its relatively long lifetime of approximately two months, C2H6 is a sensitive indicator of tropospheric pollution and transport. Using an optimized retrieval strategy (see Franco et al., 2014), we present here a 20-year long-term time series of C2H6 column abundance retrieved from ground-based Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) solar spectra recorded from 1994 onwards at the high-altitude station of Jungfraujoch (Swiss Alps, 46.5° N, 3580 m a.s.l.), part of the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC, see http://www.ndacc.org). After a regular 1994 - 2008 decrease of the C2H6 amounts, which is very consistent with prior major studies (e.g., Aydin et al., 2011; Simpson et al., 2012) and our understanding of global C2H6 emissions, trend analysis using a bootstrap resampling tool reveals a C2H6 upturn and a statistically-significant sharp burden increase from 2009 onwards (Franco et al., 2014). We hypothesize that this observed recent increase in C2H6 could affect the whole Northern Hemisphere and may be related to the recent massive growth in the exploitation of shale gas and tight oil reservoirs. This hypothesis is supported by measurements derived from solar occultation observations performed since 2004 by the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment - Fourier

  1. Non-equilibrium Plasma Dehydrogenation Coupling of Methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A few factors effecting the reaction of plasma dehydrocoupling of methane have been investigated. The experiment shows that plasma power load, i.e. the ratio of methane flow to plasma power, is the most important factor effecting methane dehydrocoupling. The products of the reaction are mainly acetylene, ethylene, ethane and unreacted methane etc. If oxygen with a suitable molar ratio is introduced into plasma region at a reasonable position, the selectivity of C2 hydrocarbons can be increased greatly.

  2. Carbon monoxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and smokers. Carbon monoxide can harm a fetus (unborn baby still in the womb). Symptoms of carbon ... symptoms Outlook (Prognosis) Carbon monoxide poisoning can cause death. For those who survive, recovery is slow. How ...

  3. CARBON MONOXIDE TREATMENT GUIDELINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Brvar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide is the leading cause of unintentional poisoning-related death in Slovenia. It is an odorless, colorless gas that usually remains undetectable until exposures result in injury or death. Exposure to carbon monoxide is most commonly accompanied by headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, confusion, drowsiness, fatigue and collapse. Carbon monoxide poisoning management includes normobaric oxygen therapy. Hyperbaric-oxygen treatments reduce the risk of cognitive sequelae after carbon monoxide poisoning. 

  4. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... main content Languages 简体中文 English Bahasa Indonesia 한국어 Español ภาษาไทย Tiếng Việt Text Size: Decrease Font Increase ... Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as ...

  5. Ethan Frome:A Yearning for Freedom

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟怡

    2015-01-01

    This thesis deals with Edith Wharton’s famous novella Ethan Frome. After a summary of its plot, this paper dissect Mrs. Wharton’s Naturalistic view in this story and point out that it’s the author’s naturalistic view that leads to Ethan’s tragedy. By applying reader-response approach, I then analyzed Ethan Frome’s significance.

  6. Retrievals of ethane from ground-based high-resolution FTIR solar observations with updated line parameters: determination of the optimum strategy for the Jungfraujoch station.

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Ethane (C2H6) is the most abundant Non-Methane HydroCarbon (NMHC) in the Earth’s atmosphere, with a lifetime of approximately 2 months. C2H6 has both anthropogenic and natural emission sources such as biomass burning, natural gas loss and biofuel consumption. Oxidation by the hydroxyl radical is by far the major C2H6 sink as the seasonally changing OH concentration controls the strong modulation of the ethane abundance throughout the year. Ethane lowers Cl atom concentrations in the lower str...

  7. High-pressure oxidation of ethane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hashemi, Hamid; G. Jacobsen, Jon; Rasmussen, Christian T.

    2017-01-01

    Ethane oxidation at intermediate temperatures and high pressures has been investigated in both a laminar flow reactor and a rapid compression machine (RCM). The flow-reactor measurements at 600–900 K and 20–100 bar showed an onset temperature for oxidation of ethane between 700 and 825 K, depending...... as well as results at elevated pressure from literature. The experimental results and the modeling predictions do not support occurrence of NTC behavior in ethane oxidation. Even at the high-pressure conditions of the present work where the C2H5 + O2 reaction yields ethylperoxyl rather than C2H4 + HO2...

  8. Transformation of γ-Ray-Formed Methyl Radicals in Methane Hydrate at 10 MPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kenji; Tani, Atsushi; Otsuka, Takahiro; Nakashima, Satoru

    2007-01-01

    The stability of methyl radicals formed in synthetic methane hydrate by γ-ray irradiation at 77 K was studied at 200-273 K and 10 MPa. The methyl radicals decayed under these conditions, despite the stability of methane hydrate, and changed into other molecules that could not be detected by electron spin resonance (ESR). Decay products were investigated by gas cell infrared (IR) spectroscopy by measuring the decomposed gas from the γ-irradiated methane hydrate. Only ethane molecules were detected from the irradiated sample, while these were absent in an unirradiated sample. The molar ratio of ethane to methane (C2H6/CH4) was 12± 1 ppm, which did not contradict with that of methyl radical to methane (CH3{}\\bullet/CH4) in the literature. Hence, most of the methyl radicals generated by irradiation were supposed to be transformed to ethane in methane hydrate.

  9. Nitrous Oxide Ethane Ethylene Engine Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Nitrous Oxide Ethane-Ethylene (NEE) engine is a proposed technology designed to provide spacecraft with non-toxic non-cryogenic high-performance propulsion. With...

  10. Deuterated Methane and Ethane in the Atmosphere of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, C. D.; Yung, Y. L.; Lee, A. Y.; Crisp, D.

    2003-12-01

    CH3D and C2H5D are isotopic tracers in the deep Jovian atmosphere and susceptible to transport and chemical effects. It is expected that the tropospheric ([D]/[H])CH4 ratios determined from the various observations made should be relatively invariable, yet previous determinations of this quantity for Jupiter have given results inconsistent with experimental error bars. This suggests that there may be a problem with the interpretion of some of the observations, or that the apparent CH3D column abundance is variable. We report on the effects of varying important parameters over this pressure regime on the CH3D and C2H5D mixing ratios, CH3D and C2H5D fractionation, the ([D]/[H])CH4, ([D]/[H])C2H_6 and D/H (= ([D]/[H])H2) ratios and compare with the various CH3D and HD observations. Our results show that since the CH3D and C2H5D mixing ratios are strongly dependent upon K(z) in the region of interest where temporal or latitudinal variations in K(z) could significantly impact the measured ([D]/[H])CH4 ratio. The K(z) adopted represents complex upward convection and downdraft mixing that occurs in the Jovian atmosphere as evidenced by recent observations (Gierasch et al., 2000; Ingersoll et al., 2000; Roos-Serote et al., 2000; Vincent et al., 2000). Using our technique allows for the first time a way to explain the discrepancies in the ([D]/[H])CH4 ratio observations by offering a plausible link between the CH3D and C2H5D observations and upper tropospheric dynamical processes. In any case our calculations show how ([D]/[H])CH4 and ([D]/[H])C2H_6 can be used as a diagnostic tracer to constrain K(z) and to better understand the dynamics of the atmosphere in this pressure regime. Additionally, we have made calculations of the C2H5D in the thermosphere of Jupiter. The principal reactions determining the D abundance appear to be generation by reaction of H with vibrationally hot HD and loss by reaction of D with H2(v=0,1) and CH3. The H, CH3D and C2H5D distributions have been calculated using the Caltech/JPL KINETICS 1-D photochemistry-diffusion model with the column H constrained using the H lyman-alpha airglow. Reactions involving C2H5D are described by Parkinson (2002). Performing sensitivity studies, we have found an enhancement of greater than two orders of magnitude in C2H5D due to the vibrational chemistry, which is significantly larger than that for CH3D enhancement reported by Parkinson et al (2003). This is of great interest and suggests that C2H5D should be detectable in the lower thermosphere: we propose that observations of this species should be made. Enhancement of deuterated hydrocarbons indicates that there may be exchange of these species between the statosphere and troposphere and further show their usefulness as isotopic tracers in the Jovian atmosphere.

  11. High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Stratospheric Ethane Following the Jupiter Impact of 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Kelly; Kostiuk, Theodor; Livengood, Timothy A.; Hewagama, Tilak; Amen, John

    2010-01-01

    We report on high-resolution infrared spectroscopy of ethane (C2H6) performed at the latitude of an impact site on Jupiter discovered on 19 July 2009 by A. Wesley from a location in Murrumbateman, Australia. The observations used the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Heterodyne Instrument for Planetary Wind and Composition (HIPWAC) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. HIPWAC is a mid-infrared (9-12 microns) heterodyne spectrometer operating at the highest limit of spectral resolving power (lambda\\Delta\\lambda > l06), providing information on atmospheric constituent abundance and temperature through fully resolved tine shapes. Ethane is a stable trace product of methane photochemistry that is nearly uniformly mixed in Jupiter's stratosphere, providing an effective probe of that altitude region. Ethane emission line profiles near 11,74 microns in the Ug band were measured in Jupiter's stratosphere at 25 MHz (11.00083/cm) resolution. A sequence of spectra of ethane acquired over a range of longitude at the impact latitude (56S planetocentric) probes constituent abundance and temperature profile, both on and off the impact region. Near the site of the impact, ethane emission increased above levels measured well outside the impact region. Radiative transfer analysis indicates increased ethane mole fraction (30% greater). Variation in the measured continuum level and line intensities within 75deg of the impact longitude indicate the presence of an opacity source (haze) at altitudes near and above the tropopause and as high as the 10-mbar level near the impact site. The indication of possible haze opacity up to the 10-mbar level in the atmosphere is consistent with measurements made by HIPWAC's predecessor as part of the IRTF Shoemaker Levy-9 campaign in 1994.

  12. Shock-tube and modeling study of ethane pyrolysis and oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hidaka, Yoshiaki; Sato, Kazutaka; Hoshikawa, Hiroki; Nishimori, Toshihide; Takahashi, Rie; Tanaka, Hiroya; Inami, Koji; Ito, Nobuhiro

    2000-02-01

    Pyrolysis and oxidation of ethane were studied behind reflected shock waves in the temperature range 950--1,900 K at pressures of 1.2--4.0 atm. Ethane decay rates in both pyrolysis and oxidation were measured using time-resolved infrared (IR) laser absorption at 3.39 {micro}m, and CO{sub 2} production rates in oxidation were measured by time-resolved thermal IR emission at 4.24 {micro}m. The product yields were also determined using a single-pulse method. The pyrolysis and oxidation of ethane were modeled using a reaction mechanism with 157 reaction steps and 48 species including the most recent submechanisms for formaldehyde, ketene, methane, acetylene, and ethylene oxidation. The present and previously reported shock tube data were reproduced using this mechanism. The rate constants of the reactions C{sub 2}H{sub 6} {yields} CH{sub 3} + CH{sub 3}, C{sub 2}H{sub 5} + H {yields} H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 5} + O{sub 2} {yields} C{sub 2}H{sub 4} + HO{sub 2} were evaluated. These reactions were important in predicting the previously reported and the present data, which were for mixture compositions ranging from ethane-rich (including ethane pyrolysis) to ethane-lean. The evaluated rate constants of the reactions C{sub 2}H{sub 5} + H {yields} C{sub 2}H{sub 4} + H{sub 2} and C{sub 2}H{sub 5} + O{sub 2} {yields} C{sub 2}H{sub 4} + HO{sub 2} were found to be significantly different from currently accepted values.

  13. The gas phase chlorination of ethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsbye, Unni; Myhrvold, Elisabeth M.; Slagtern, Aase; Dahl, Ivar M. [SINTEF Applied Chemistry, Oslo (Norway)

    1999-07-01

    Light alkanes are dehydrogenated to their corresponding olefins before further reactions to more valuable chemicals. The conversion of ethane to ethene in a steam cracker requires the addition of a substantial amount of heat (90 kJ/mol). Oxidative processes for ethane dehydrogenation could in principle be carried out adiabatically, however, the oxidation selectivity towards hydrogen is too low in existing systems, which leads to low ethene selectivities. This paper discusses the potential for light alkane derivatization through chlorination.

  14. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Estimates OCTOBER 13, 2015 Incidents, Deaths, and In-Depth Investigations Associated with Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide from Engine-Driven Generators and ... Engine-Driven Tools, 2004–2014 JANUARY 08, 2015 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2011 Annual Estimates View All ... Inside CPSC Accessibility ...

  15. Measurements of methane emissions from natural gas gathering facilities and processing plants: measurement methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. R. Roscioli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased natural gas production in recent years has spurred intense interest in methane (CH4 emissions associated with its production, gathering, processing, transmission and distribution. Gathering and processing facilities (G&P facilities are unique in that the wide range of gas sources (shale, coal-bed, tight gas, conventional, etc. results in a wide range of gas compositions, which in turn requires an array of technologies to prepare the gas for pipeline transmission and distribution. We present an overview and detailed description of the measurement method and analysis approach used during a 20-week field campaign studying CH4 emissions from the natural gas G&P facilities between October 2013 and April 2014. Dual tracer flux measurements and onsite observations were used to address the magnitude and origins of CH4 emissions from these facilities. The use of a second tracer as an internal standard revealed plume-specific uncertainties in the measured emission rates of 20–47%, depending upon plume classification. Combining downwind methane, ethane (C2H6, carbon monoxide (CO, carbon dioxide (CO2, and tracer gas measurements with onsite tracer gas release allows for quantification of facility emissions, and in some cases a more detailed picture of source locations.

  16. Characterization of non-methane hydrocarbons in Asian summer monsoon outflow observed by the CARIBIC aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. Baker

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Between April and December 2008 the CARIBIC commercial aircraft conducted monthly measurement flights between Frankfurt, Germany and Chennai, India. These flights covered the period of the Asian summer monsoon (June–September, during which enhancements in a number of atmospheric species were observed in monsoon outflow. In addition to in situ measurements of trace gases and aerosols, whole air samples were collected during the flights, and these were subsequently analyzed for a suite of trace gases that included the non-methane hydrocarbons. Non-methane hydrocarbons are relatively short-lived compounds and the large enhancements in their mixing ratios in the upper troposphere over Southwest Asia between June and September, sometimes more than double their spring and fall means, provides qualitative evidence for the influence of convectively uplifted boundary layer air. The particularly large enhancements of the combustion tracers benzene and ethyne, along with the similarity of their ratios to carbon monoxide and emission ratios from the burning of household biofuels, indicate a strong influence of biofuel burning to NMHC emissions in this region. Conversely, the ratios of ethane and propane to carbon monoxide, along with the ratio between i-butane and n-butane, indicate a significant source of these compounds from the use of LPG and natural gas, and comparison to previous campaigns suggests that this source could be increasing. Photochemical aging patterns of NMHCs showed that the CARIBIC samples were collected in two distinctly different regions of the monsoon circulation: a southern region where air masses had been recently influenced by low level contact and a northern region, where air parcels had spent substantial time in transit in the upper troposphere before being probed. Estimates of age using ratios of individual NMHCs have ranges of 3–6 d in the south and 9–12 d in the north.

  17. Photocatalytic oxidation of methane over silver decorated zinc oxide nanocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuxing; Li, Yunpeng; Pan, Xiaoyang; Cortie, David; Huang, Xintang; Yi, Zhiguo

    2016-07-20

    The search for active catalysts that efficiently oxidize methane under ambient conditions remains a challenging task for both C1 utilization and atmospheric cleansing. Here, we show that when the particle size of zinc oxide is reduced down to the nanoscale, it exhibits high activity for methane oxidation under simulated sunlight illumination, and nano silver decoration further enhances the photo-activity via the surface plasmon resonance. The high quantum yield of 8% at wavelengths oxide nanostructures shows great promise for atmospheric methane oxidation. Moreover, the nano-particulate composites can efficiently photo-oxidize other small molecular hydrocarbons such as ethane, propane and ethylene, and in particular, can dehydrogenize methane to generate ethane, ethylene and so on. On the basis of the experimental results, a two-step photocatalytic reaction process is suggested to account for the methane photo-oxidation.

  18. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION Search CPSC Search Menu Home Recalls Recall List CPSC Recall API Recall Lawsuits ... and Bans Report an Unsafe Product Consumers Businesses Home Safety Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information ...

  19. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths ... 2011 Annual Estimates View All CO-Related Injury Statistics and Technical Reports Related Links Recalls Safety Education ...

  20. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

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    Full Text Available ... On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide ... Related Links Recalls Safety Education Regulations, Laws & Standards Research & Statistics Business & Manufacturing Small Business Resources OnSafety Blogs ...

  1. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

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    Full Text Available ... Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster Contest Pool Safely Business & Manufacturing Business & Manufacturing Business ... Featured Resources CPSC announces winners of carbon monoxide poster contest Video View the blog Clues You Can ...

  2. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Criminal Penalties Federal Court Orders & Decisions Research & Statistics Research & Statistics Technical Reports Injury Statistics NEISS Injury Data ... On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths ...

  3. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

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    Full Text Available ... Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 Annual Estimates OCTOBER 13, 2015 Incidents, Deaths, and In-Depth Investigations Associated with Non-Fire ...

  4. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Unites States die every year from accidental non-fire related CO poisoning associated with consumer products, including ... CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of ...

  5. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

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    Full Text Available ... Import Safety International Recall Guidance Civil and Criminal Penalties Federal Court Orders & ... 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 ...

  6. Carbon Monoxide Nonattainment Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer identifies areas in the U.S. where air pollution levels have not met the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Carbon Monoxide and have...

  7. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Unites States die every year from accidental non-fire related CO poisoning associated with consumer products, including ... CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of ...

  8. “Stark” Destiny-Ethan Frome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周烨

    2013-01-01

    Ethan Frome, the protagonist, has been dodging in his misery-ridden life. He lives in the farm cal ed “starkfield”, and marries to a woman he doesn’t love at al . Life is lifeless til he fal s in love with the cousin. Yet destiny doesn’t give him the chance of rebirth, even suicide fails him. Final y, he surrenders to his doom, choosing to be a walking death. In this thesis, Ethan Forme’s destiny is decoded through the reader’s understanding and the analysis of the author’s writing skil s.

  9. Ethane C-C clumping in natural gas : a proxy for cracking processes ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clog, M. D.; Ferreira, A. A.; Santos Neto, E. V.; Eiler, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Ethane (C2H6) is the second-most abundant alkane in most natural gas reservoirs, and is used to produce ethylene for petrochemical industries. It is arguably the simplest molecule that can manifest multiple 13C substitutions. There are several plausible controls on ∆13C2H6in natural gas: thermodynamically controlled homogeneous isotope exchange reactions analogous to those behind carbonate clumped isotope thermometry; inheritance from larger biomolecules that undergo thermal degradation to produce natural gas; mixing of natural gases that differ markedly in bulk isotopic composition; diffusive fractionation; or combinations of these and/or other, less expected fractionations. There is little basis for predicting which of these will control isotopic variations among natural ethanes, but we think it likely that addition of this new isotopic proxy will reveal new insights into the natural chemistry of ethane. We have developed a method to measure the abundance of 13C2H6 in natural samples, using high-resolution mass spectrometry. We define ∆13C2H6 as 1000 . ((13C2H6/12C2H6)measured/(13C2H6/12C2H6)stochastic -1). We studied several suites of natural gas samples and experimentally produced or modified ethane. Natural ethanes, including closely related samples from a single natural gas field, exhibit surprisingly large ranges in ∆13C2H6 (4 ‰ overall; up to 3 ‰ in one gas field). Such ranges cannot be explained by thermodynamic equilibrium at a range of different temperatures, or by diffusive fractionation. Kinetic isotope effects associated with 'cracking' reactions, and/or inheritance of non-equilibrium carbon isotope structures from source organics are more likely causes. We observe a correlation between ∆13C2H6 and the concentration of alkanes other than methane in several suites of natural gases, suggesting the causes of clumped isotope variations are tied to the controls on gas wetness. An experiment examining ethane residual to high

  10. Ethane-xenon mixtures under shock conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flicker, Dawn; Magyar, Rudolph; Root, Seth; Cochrane, Kyle; Mattsson, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    Mixtures of light and heavy elements arise in inertial confinement fusion and planetary science. We present results on the physics of molecular scale mixing through a validation study of equation of state (EOS) properties. Density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT/QMD) at elevated-temperature and pressure is used to obtain the properties of pure xenon, ethane, and various compressed mixture compositions along their principal Hugoniots. To validate the QMD simulations, we performed high-precision shock compression experiments using Sandia's Z-Machine. A bond tracking analysis of the simulations correlates the sharp rise in the Hugoniot curve with completion of dissociation in ethane. DFT-based simulation results compare well with experimental data and are used to provide insight into the dissociation as a function of mixture composition. Interestingly, we find that the compression ratio for complete dissociation is similar for ethane, Xe-ethane, polymethyl-pentene, and polystyrene, suggesting that a limiting compression exists for C-C bonded systems. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Company, Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. A Sunny Boy——Ethan Ruan

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李成民

    2011-01-01

    He is not perfect. He wasn’t a good student and he is not the most handsome boy around.But Taiwanese actor Ethan Ruan(阮经天)has his own charm (魅力):he is sporty; he is sunny;he works hard.

  12. Reconstruction of Northern Hemisphere 1950-2010 atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmig, D.; Petrenko, V.; Martinerie, P.; Witrant, E.; Rockmann, T.; Zuiderweg, A.; Holzinger, R.; Hueber, J.; Thompson, C.; White, J. W. C.; Sturges, W.; Baker, A.; Blunier, T.; Etheridge, D.; Rubino, M.; Tans, P.

    2014-01-01

    The short-chain non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) are mostly emitted into the atmosphere by anthropogenic processes. Recent studies have pointed out a tight linkage between the atmospheric mole fractions of the NMHC ethane and the atmospheric growth rate of methane. Consequently, atmospheric NMHC are

  13. Reconstruction of Northern Hemisphere 1950-2010 atmospheric non-methane hydrocarbons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helmig, D.; Petrenko, V.; Martinerie, P.; Witrant, E.; Rockmann, T.; Zuiderweg, A.; Holzinger, R.; Hueber, J.; Thompson, C.; White, J. W. C.; Sturges, W.; Baker, A.; Blunier, T.; Etheridge, D.; Rubino, M.; Tans, P.

    2014-01-01

    The short-chain non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) are mostly emitted into the atmosphere by anthropogenic processes. Recent studies have pointed out a tight linkage between the atmospheric mole fractions of the NMHC ethane and the atmospheric growth rate of methane. Consequently, atmospheric NMHC are

  14. Attributing Atmospheric Methane to Anthropogenic Emission Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, David

    2016-07-19

    Methane is a greenhouse gas, and increases in atmospheric methane concentration over the past 250 years have driven increased radiative forcing of the atmosphere. Increases in atmospheric methane concentration since 1750 account for approximately 17% of increases in radiative forcing of the atmosphere, and that percentage increases by approximately a factor of 2 if the effects of the greenhouse gases produced by the atmospheric reactions of methane are included in the assessment. Because of the role of methane emissions in radiative forcing of the atmosphere, the identification and quantification of sources of methane emissions is receiving increased scientific attention. Methane emission sources include biogenic, geogenic, and anthropogenic sources; the largest anthropogenic sources are natural gas and petroleum systems, enteric fermentation (livestock), landfills, coal mining, and manure management. While these source categories are well-known, there is significant uncertainty in the relative magnitudes of methane emissions from the various source categories. Further, the overall magnitude of methane emissions from all anthropogenic sources is actively debated, with estimates based on source sampling extrapolated to regional or national scale ("bottom-up analyses") differing from estimates that infer emissions based on ambient data ("top-down analyses") by 50% or more. To address the important problem of attribution of methane to specific sources, a variety of new analytical methods are being employed, including high time resolution and highly sensitive measurements of methane, methane isotopes, and other chemical species frequently associated with methane emissions, such as ethane. This Account describes the use of some of these emerging measurements, in both top-down and bottom-up methane emission studies. In addition, this Account describes how data from these new analytical methods can be used in conjunction with chemical mass balance (CMB) methods for source

  15. Methane Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Methane (CH4) flux is the net rate of methane exchange between an ecosystem and the atmosphere. Data of this variable were generated by the USGS LandCarbon project...

  16. 10 CFR 221.11 - Natural gas and ethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Natural gas and ethane. 221.11 Section 221.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL PRIORITY SUPPLY OF CRUDE OIL AND PETROLEUM PRODUCTS TO THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE UNDER THE DEFENSE PRODUCTION ACT Exclusions § 221.11 Natural gas and ethane. The supply of natural...

  17. Ethane Ices in the Outer Solar System: Spectroscopy and Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, R. L.; Moore, M. H.; Raines, L. L.

    2009-01-01

    We report recent experiments on ethane ices made at temperatures applicable to the outer Solar System. New near- and mid-infrared data for crystalline and amorphous ethane, including new spectra for a seldom-studied solid phase that exists at 35-55 K, are presented along with radiation-chemical experiments showing the formation of more-complex hydrocarbons

  18. Mechanism of Oxidation of Ethane to Ethanol at Iron(IV)-Oxo Sites in Magnesium-Diluted Fe2(dobdc).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Pragya; Vogiatzis, Konstantinos D; Planas, Nora; Borycz, Joshua; Xiao, Dianne J; Long, Jeffrey R; Gagliardi, Laura; Truhlar, Donald G

    2015-05-06

    The catalytic properties of the metal-organic framework Fe2(dobdc), containing open Fe(II) sites, include hydroxylation of phenol by pure Fe2(dobdc) and hydroxylation of ethane by its magnesium-diluted analogue, Fe0.1Mg1.9(dobdc). In earlier work, the latter reaction was proposed to occur through a redox mechanism involving the generation of an iron(IV)-oxo species, which is an intermediate that is also observed or postulated (depending on the case) in some heme and nonheme enzymes and their model complexes. In the present work, we present a detailed mechanism by which the catalytic material, Fe0.1Mg1.9(dobdc), activates the strong C-H bonds of ethane. Kohn-Sham density functional and multireference wave function calculations have been performed to characterize the electronic structure of key species. We show that the catalytic nonheme-Fe hydroxylation of the strong C-H bond of ethane proceeds by a quintet single-state σ-attack pathway after the formation of highly reactive iron-oxo intermediate. The mechanistic pathway involves three key transition states, with the highest activation barrier for the transfer of oxygen from N2O to the Fe(II) center. The uncatalyzed reaction, where nitrous oxide directly oxidizes ethane to ethanol is found to have an activation barrier of 280 kJ/mol, in contrast to 82 kJ/mol for the slowest step in the iron(IV)-oxo catalytic mechanism. The energetics of the C-H bond activation steps of ethane and methane are also compared. Dehydrogenation and dissociation pathways that can compete with the formation of ethanol were shown to involve higher barriers than the hydroxylation pathway.

  19. Source attribution of methane emissions from global oil and gas production: results of bottom-up simulations over three decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglund-Isaksson, Lena

    2016-04-01

    Existing bottom-up emission inventories of historical methane and ethane emissions from global oil and gas systems do not well explain year-on-year variations estimated by top-down models from atmospheric measurements. This paper develops a bottom-up methodology which allows for country- and year specific source attribution of methane and ethane emissions from global oil and natural gas production for the period 1980 to 2012. The analysis rests on country-specific simulations of associated gas flows which are converted into methane and ethane emissions. The associated gas flows are constructed from country-specific information on oil and gas production and associated gas generation and recovery, and coupled with generic assumptions to bridge regional information gaps on the fractions of unrecovered associated gas that is vented instead of flared. Summing up emissions from associated gas flows with global estimates of emissions from unintended leakage and natural gas transmission and distribution, the resulting global emissions of methane and ethane from oil and gas systems are reasonably consistent with corresponding estimates from top-down models. Also revealed is that the fall of the Soviet Union in 1990 had a significant impact on methane and ethane emissions from global oil and gas systems.

  20. Reaction performance of methanation of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide over supported ruthenium catalysts. ; Mainly on effects of remaining chlorine and dechlorination. Ruthenium tanji shokubaijo no issanka tanso oyobi nisanka tanso no methane ka no hanno tokusei. ; Shutoshite zanryu enso no eikyo to datsuenso shori no koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasaoka, S.; Sasaoka, E.; Okazaki, Y.; Hanaya, M. (Okayama University, Okayama (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1991-07-10

    An establishment of the methanation catalytic process is desired on CO and CO {sub 2} generated in coal gasification and other various processes. In this study as one reply to this requirement, Ru catalysts supported on ZrO {sub 2}, Al {sub 2} O {sub 3} ({theta}) and SiO {sub 2} were prepared, and the relationship between the reaction condition and the catalytic reaction performance was investigated, especially from a view to the effects of remaining chlorine in catalysts and dechlorination based on raw salt of Ru. Experiments were carried out using a flow fixed-bed reactor under an atmospheric temperature at mainly 120-350 {degree}C. The results are as follows: Knowledge was obtained about the amount of remaining chlorine after a hydrogen reduction treatment or after washing with warm water at 85 {degree}C; the effect of remaining chlorine one the catalytic activity was much larger for CO {sub 2} methanation than for CO methanation; the remaining chlorine suppresses the formation of carbonaceous species on the catalyst surface and decreases the catalytic activity; and Ru/ZrO {sub 2}, dechlorinated with water washing at 85 {degree}C is most active. 10 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Temperature Dependence of Carbon Kinetic Isotope Effect for the Oxidation Reaction of Ethane by Hydroxyl Radicals Under Atmospherically Relevant Conditions: Experimental and Theoretical Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Piansawan, Tammarat

    2016-01-01

           Ethane is the second most abundant hydrocarbon in the atmosphere, after methane, impacting on air quality, human health and climate. A quantification of its effects requires accurate knowledge of sources, processes along transport, and sinks. Carbon stable isotopic ratio investigations, complementarily to concentration measurements, were demonstrated to give more insight in source apportionment and atmospheric processing of organic compounds.        Yet, apportionment of atmospher...

  2. Carbon Dioxide in Exoplanetary Atmospheres: Rarely Dominant Compared to Carbon Monoxide and Water

    CERN Document Server

    Heng, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the abundance of carbon dioxide in exoplanetary atmospheres. We construct analytical models of systems in chemical equilibrium that include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, water, methane and acetylene and relate the equilibrium constants of the chemical reactions to temperature and pressure via the tabulated Gibbs free energies. We prove that such chemical systems may be described by a quintic equation for the mixing ratio of methane. By examining the abundances of these molecules across a broad range of temperatures (spanning equilibrium temperatures from 600 to 2500 K), pressures (via temperature-pressure profiles that explore albedo and opacity variations) and carbon-to-oxygen ratios (from 0.1 to 100), we conclude that carbon dioxide is subdominant compared to carbon monoxide and water. Atmospheric mixing does not alter this conclusion if carbon dioxide is subdominant everywhere in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide may attain comparable abundances if th...

  3. GRI methane chemistry program review meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dignon, J.; Grant, K.; Grossman, A.; Wuebles, D.; Brasseur, G.; Madronich, S.; Huang, T.; Chang, J.; Lott, B.

    1997-02-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas which affects the atmosphere directly by the absorption and re-emission of infrared radiation as well as indirectly, through chemical interactions. Emissions of several important greenhouse gases (GHGS) including methane are increasing, mainly due to human activity. Higher concentrations of these gases in the atmosphere are projected to cause a decrease in the amount of infrared radiation escaping to space, and a subsequent warming of global climate. It is therefore vital to understand not only the causes of increased production of methane and other GHGS, but the effect of higher GHG concentrations on climate, and the possibilities for reductions of these emissions. In GRI-UIUC methane project, the role of methane in climate change and greenhouse gas abatement strategies is being studied using several distinct approaches. First, a detailed treatment of the mechanisms controlling each important methane source and sink, and hence the atmospheric concentration of methane, is being developed for use with the UIUC Integrated Science Assessment Model. The focus of this study is to resolve the factors which determine methane emissions and removal, including human population, land use, energy demand, global temperature, and regional concentrations of the hydroxyl radical, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxides, non-methane hydrocarbons, water vapor, tropospheric and stratospheric ozone.

  4. Simultaneous monitoring of atmospheric methane and speciated non-methane hydrocarbon concentrations using Peltier effect sub-ambient pre-concentration and gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, D; Seakins, P W; Lewis, A C

    2000-02-01

    Sub-ambient trapping, used to pre-concentrate atmospheric samples for non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) analysis by gas chromatography, can also be used to measure ambient methane concentrations. Above a sample volume of 40 ml, a dynamic equilibrium is established between ambient and trapped methane allowing for simultaneous quantitative determinations of methane and NMHC. The temperature stability of the trap is critical for quantitative methane analysis and this can be achieved by Peltier effect cooling. Simultaneous measurements of methane and NMHC reduce the equipment required for field trips and can ease the interpretation and modelling of atmospheric data. The feasibility for deployment of the system in remote locations was demonstrated by running the apparatus virtually unattended for a 5-day period. The correlations between the concentrations of methane, ethane and ethene measured during this period are discussed.

  5. Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir When power outages occur after severe weather (such as winter storms, hurricanes or tornadoes), using alternative sources of power can cause carbon monoxide (CO) to build up in a ...

  6. Carbon Monoxide Mixing Ratio System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Carbon Monoxide (CO) system provides high-precision atmospheric concentration measurements of CO mixing ratio (ppbv dry air) every 10...

  7. Research advances in the catalysts for the selective oxidation of ethane to aldehydes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhe; ZHAO Zhen; XU Chunming

    2005-01-01

    Selective oxidation of ethane to aldehydes is one of the most difficult processes in the catalysis researches of low alkanes. The development of selective oxidation of ethane to aldehydes (formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acrolein) is discussed. The latest progress of the catalysts, including bulk or supported metal oxide catalysts, highly dispersed and isolated active sites catalysts, and the photo-catalytic ethane oxidation catalysts, partial oxidation of ethane in the gas phase, and the proposed reaction pathways from ethane to aldehydes are involved.

  8. Pathways and Bioenergetics of Anaerobic Carbon Monoxide Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diender, Martijn; Stams, Alfons J M; Sousa, Diana Z

    2015-01-01

    Carbon monoxide can act as a substrate for different modes of fermentative anaerobic metabolism. The trait of utilizing CO is spread among a diverse group of microorganisms, including members of bacteria as well as archaea. Over the last decade this metabolism has gained interest due to the potential of converting CO-rich gas, such as synthesis gas, into bio-based products. Three main types of fermentative CO metabolism can be distinguished: hydrogenogenesis, methanogenesis, and acetogenesis, generating hydrogen, methane and acetate, respectively. Here, we review the current knowledge on these three variants of microbial CO metabolism with an emphasis on the potential enzymatic routes and bio-energetics involved.

  9. Pathways and bioenergetics of anaerobic carbon monoxide fermentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn eDiender

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide can act as a substrate for different modes of fermentative anaerobic metabolism. The trait of utilizing CO is spread among a diverse group of microorganisms, including members of bacteria as well as archaea. Over the last decade this metabolism has gained interest due to the potential of converting CO rich gas, such as synthesis gas, into bio-based products. Three main types of fermentative CO metabolism can be distinguished: hydrogenogenesis, methanogenesis and acetogenesis, generating hydrogen, methane and acetate, respectively. Here, we review the current knowledge on these three variants of microbial CO metabolism with an emphasis on the potential enzymatic routes and bio-energetics involved.

  10. Supercritical Extraction of Lycopene from Tomato Industrial Waste with Ethane

    OpenAIRE

    Nobre, Beatriz P.; Gouveia, L.; Patricia G. S. Matos; Cristino, Ana F.; António F. Palavra; Mendes, Rui L.

    2012-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction of all-E-lycopene from tomato industrial wastes (mixture of skins and seeds) was carried out in a semi-continuous flow apparatus using ethane as supercritical solvent. The effect of pressure, temperature, feed particle size, solvent superficial velocity and matrix initial composition was evaluated. Moreover, the yield of the extraction was compared with that obtained with other supercritical solvents (supercritical CO2 and a near critical mixture of ethane and p...

  11. Reference Correlation for the Viscosity of Ethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Eckhard, E-mail: eckhard.vogel@uni-rostock.de [Institut für Chemie, Universität Rostock, D-18059 Rostock (Germany); Span, Roland [Lehrstuhl für Thermodynamik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Herrmann, Sebastian [Fachgebiet Technische Thermodynamik, Hochschule Zittau/Görlitz, D-02763 Zittau (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    A new representation of the viscosity for the fluid phase of ethane includes a zero-density correlation and a contribution for the critical enhancement, initially both developed separately, but based on experimental data. The higher-density contributions are correlated as a function of the reduced density δ = ρ/ρ{sub c} and of the reciprocal reduced temperature τ = T{sub c}/T (ρ{sub c}—critical density and T{sub c}—critical temperature). The final formulation contains 14 coefficients obtained using a state-of-the-art linear optimization algorithm. The evaluation and choice of the selected primary data sets is reviewed, in particular with respect to the assessment used in earlier viscosity correlations. The new viscosity surface correlation makes use of the reference equation of state for the thermodynamic properties of ethane by Bücker and Wagner [J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 35, 205 (2006)] and is valid in the fluid region from the melting line to temperatures of 675 K and pressures of 100 MPa. The viscosity in the limit of zero density is described with an expanded uncertainty of 0.5% (coverage factor k = 2) for temperatures 290 < T/K < 625, increasing to 1.0% at temperatures down to 212 K. The uncertainty of the correlated values is 1.5% in the range 290 < T/K < 430 at pressures up to 30 MPa on the basis of recent measurements judged to be very reliable as well as 4.0% and 6.0% in further regions. The uncertainty in the near-critical region (1.001 < 1/τ < 1.010 and 0.8 < δ < 1.2) increases with decreasing temperature up to 3.0% considering the available reliable data. Tables of the viscosity calculated from the correlation are listed in an appendix for the single-phase region, for the vapor–liquid phase boundary, and for the near-critical region.

  12. Methane present in an extrasolar planet atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Swain, Mark R; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2008-01-01

    Molecules present in exoplanetary atmospheres are expected to strongly influence the atmospheric radiation balance, trace dynamical and chemical processes, and indicate the presence of disequilibrium effects. Since molecules have the potential to reveal the exoplanet atmospheric conditions and chemistry, searching for them is a high priority. The rotational-vibrational transition bands of water, carbon monoxide, and methane are anticipated to be the primary sources of non-continuum opacity in hot-Jovian planets. Since these bands overlap in wavelength, and the corresponding signatures from them are weak, decisive identification requires precision infrared spectroscopy. Here we report on a near-infrared transmission spectrum of the planet HD 189733b showing the presence of methane. Additionally, a resolved water-vapour band at 1.9 microns confirms the recent claim of water in this object. On thermochemical grounds, carbon-monoxide is expected to be abundant in the upper atmosphere of hot-Jovian exoplanets; thu...

  13. Arctic methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dyupina, E.; Amstel, van A.R.

    2013-01-01

    What are the risks of a runaway greenhouse effect from methane release from hydrates in the Arctic? In January 2013, a dramatic increase of methane concentration up to 2000 ppb has been measured over the Arctic north of Norway in the Barents Sea. The global average being 1750 ppb. It has been

  14. Arctic methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dyupina, E.; Amstel, van A.R.

    2013-01-01

    What are the risks of a runaway greenhouse effect from methane release from hydrates in the Arctic? In January 2013, a dramatic increase of methane concentration up to 2000 ppb has been measured over the Arctic north of Norway in the Barents Sea. The global average being 1750 ppb. It has been sugges

  15. Photolytic degradation of decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Chen, Shejun; Nie, Xin; Tian, Mi; Luo, Xiaojun; An, Taicheng; Mai, Bixian

    2012-10-01

    The photolytic degradation of decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), an alternative flame retardant to decabromodiphenyl ether, was investigated in a variety of matrixes (n-hexane, tetrahydrofuran, methanol/water, humic acid/water, and silica gel) by irradiation under ultraviolet light and in n-hexane under natural light. Photolytic degradation of DBDPE occurs in all the matrixes investigated within the irradiation period (n-hexane (t(1/2)=16.6 min)>humic acid/water (30silica gel (t(1/2)=75.9 min)>methanol/water (t(1/2)>240 min). The reaction in tetrahydrofuran, n-hexane, and silica gel matrixes can be described by the pseudo first order kinetics. Nevertheless, the matrixes have little effect on the degradation product distributions of DBDPE. A numbers of debrominated intermediates were identified. The degradation involves the initial formation of nona-BDPEs and the subsequent decomposition of these congeners to lower brominated congeners (octa- and hepta-BDPEs) within the irradiation time. To our knowledge, the present work is the first attempt to investigate the photolytic degradation kinetics and the identification of intermediates, as well as the degradation mechanism, during the degradation of DBDPE. Further research is needed to understand the photolytic degradation pattern of DBDPE in the natural environment.

  16. Biological production of methane from coal synthesis gas under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, C.W.; Vega, J.L.; Barik, S.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    Carbon monoxide, hydrogen and carbon dioxide, the major components of coal synthesis gas, may be converted to methane by the action of anaerobic bacteria. Both pure and mixed cultures have been developed to carry out the water-gas shift and methanation reactions. Reaction rates are severely limited by mass-transfer of these gaseous substrates. Research studies show that increased pressure results in a proportionate increase in reaction rate. This paper examines the effects of high pressure on the performance of organisms, such as P. productus and Methanothrix, in converting coal gas into methane. The effects of carbon monoxide inhibition and high pressure are presented and discussed.

  17. Detection of methane on Kuiper Belt Object (50000) Quaoar

    CERN Document Server

    Schaller, E L

    2007-01-01

    The near-infrared spectrum of (50000) Quaoar obtained at the Keck Observatory shows distinct absorption features of crystalline water ice, solid methane and ethane, and possibly other higher order hydrocarbons. Quaoar is only the fifth Kuiper belt object on which volatile ices have been detected. The small amount of methane on an otherwise water ice dominated surface suggests that Quaoar is a transition object between the dominant volatile-poor small Kuiper belt objects (KBOs) and the few volatile-rich large KBOs such as Pluto and Eris.

  18. Quantifying sources of methane and light alkanes in the Los Angeles Basin, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peischl, Jeff; Ryerson, Thomas; Atlas, Elliot; Blake, Donald; Brioude, Jerome; Daube, Bruce; de Gouw, Joost; Frost, Gregory; Gentner, Drew; Gilman, Jessica; Goldstein, Allen; Harley, Robert; Holloway, John; Kuster, William; Santoni, Gregory; Trainer, Michael; Wofsy, Steven; Parrish, David

    2013-04-01

    We use ambient measurements to apportion the relative contributions of different source sectors to the methane (CH4) emissions budget of a U.S. megacity. This approach uses ambient measurements of methane and C2-C5 alkanes (ethane through pentanes) and includes source composition information to distinguish between methane emitted from landfills and feedlots, wastewater treatment plants, tailpipe emissions, leaks of dry natural gas in pipelines and/or local seeps, and leaks of locally produced (unprocessed) natural gas. Source composition information can be taken from existing tabulations or developed by direct sampling of emissions using a mobile platform. By including C2-C5 alkane information, a linear combination of these source signatures can be found to match the observed atmospheric enhancement ratios to determine relative emissions strengths. We apply this technique to apportion CH4 emissions in Los Angeles, CA (L.A.) using data from the CalNex field project in 2010. Our analysis of L.A. atmospheric data shows the two largest CH4 sources in the city are emissions of gas from pipelines and/or from geologic seeps (47%), and emissions from landfills (40%). Local oil and gas production is a relatively minor source of CH4, contributing 8% of total CH4 emissions in L.A. Absolute CH4 emissions rates are derived by multiplying the observed CH4/CO enhancement ratio by State of California inventory values for carbon monoxide (CO) emissions in Los Angeles. Apportioning this total suggests that emissions from the combined natural and anthropogenic gas sources account for the differences between top-down and bottom-up CH4 estimates previously published for Los Angeles. Further, total CH4 emission attributed in our analysis to local gas extraction represents 17% of local production. While a derived leak rate of 17% of local production may seem unrealistically high, it is qualitatively consistent with the 12% reported in a recent state inventory survey of the L.A. oil and

  19. Methane sensor based on palladium/MWNT nanocomposites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Ping Li; Yong Guo; Suo Zhu Wu; Shao Min Shuang; Chuan Dong

    2009-01-01

    Methane gas sensor was fabricated based on electrocatalytic properties of the Pd/MWNT nanocomposites on indium tin oxide (ITO) glass substrates.A linear response for methane was obtained in the range of 0-16% (v/v) with a detection limit of 0.167% (v/v) and R.S.D.of 4.1%.After 100 times sensing or stable stored more than 12 months in atmosphere,unconspicuous measurable decrease was observed.The response time was less than 60 s at room temperature and ambient pressure.Some common potential interferents in samples such as N2,CO,CO2,ethane,propane,pentane,methanol,ethanol,H2 and NH3 were investigated and all the effects were less than 5% on the response for 3.0% (v/v) methane.The sensor was applied to methane determinations in man-made gas samples,the results are satisfied.

  20. (Carbon monoxide metabolism by photosynthetic bacteria)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    Research continued on the metabolism of carbon monoxide by Rhodospirillum rubrum. This report discusses progress on the activity, induction, inhibition, and spectroscopic analysis of the enzyme Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase. (CBS)

  1. Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System (COSRS) is an innovative method that for the first time uses the strong reductant carbon monoxide to both reduce iron...

  2. Diffusion of methane and other alkanes in metal-organic frameworks for natural gas storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borah, B; Zhang, HD; Snurr, RQ

    2015-03-03

    Diffusion of methane, ethane, propane and n-butane was studied within the micropores of several metal organic frameworks (MOFs) of varying topologies, including the MOFs PCN-14, NU-125, NU-1100 and DUT-49. Diffusion coefficients of the pure components, as well as methane/ethane, methane/ propane and methane/butane binary mixtures, were calculated using molecular dynamics simulations to understand the effect of the longer alkanes on uptake of natural gas in MOB. The calculated self diffusion coefficients of all four components are on the order of 10(-8) m(2)/s. The diffusion coefficients of the pure components decrease as a function of chain length in all of the MOFs studied and show different behaviour as a function of loading in different MOB. The self-diffusivities follow the trend DPCN-14 < DNU-125 approximate to DNU-1100 < DDUT-49, which is exactly the reverse order of the densities of the MOFs: PCN-14 > NU-125 approximate to NU-1100 > DUT-49. By comparing the diffusion of pure methane and methane mixtures vvith the higher alkancs, it is observed that the diffusivity of methane is unaffected by the presence of the higher alkanes in the MOFs considered, indicating that the diffusion path of methane is not blocked by the higher alkanes present in natural gas. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. High selective ethane cracking to ethylene at Veba Oel plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundaram, K.M. [ABB Lummus Crest, Bloomfield, NJ (United States); Albano, J.V. [ABB Lummus Crest, Bloomfield, NJ (United States); Goldmann, K. [Ruhr Oel GmbH, Muenchsmuenster (Germany)

    1995-03-01

    Thermal dehydrogenation is the only commercially feasible route to produce ethylene from ethane even today. Like many dehydrogenation reactions, this is also equilibrium limited under typical operating conditions. Factors such as feed impurities, operating conditions, reactor design and surface conditions influence the selectivity to ethylene. These are illustrated in the paper based on experimental data. Based on these results and through the use of rigorous kinetic models to describe the cracking furnace, a state of the art heater was built to crack ethane at Veba Oel. This furnace achieved high selectivity to ethylene ad long run lengths. The improvement in selectivity over conventional long residence time coils was significant and the deterioration of selectivity from start of run to end of run due to coke deposition in the new design was negligible. This heater also achieved long run lengths with high olefin contents in the ethane feed. (orig.)

  4. Carbon monoxide formation in tomatoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladon, R.J.; Staby, G.L.

    1979-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is not emanated to any large extent from tomato fruits (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill. cvs. Rutgers and Ohio MR-13), but is retained within the internal atmosphere. CO is found during all stages of fruit development, but no set pattern of CO concentration is evident.

  5. MOPITT Carbon Monoxide Over India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    MOPITT observed high levels of carbon monoxide (red and yellow pixels) over the Indian sub-continent during March. These values are associated with industrial activity in the region just south of the Himalayan Mountains. Notice that to the north, the Himalayas are characterized by low values (blue pixels).

  6. Geologic seepage of methane and light alkanes in Los Angeles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doezema, L. A.; Chang, K.; Baril, R.; Nwachuku, I.; Contreras, P.; Marquez, A.; Howard, D.

    2013-12-01

    Natural geologic seepage of methane from underground oil and natural gas reservoirs has been suggested to be an underreported part of the global methane budget. Other light alkanes are also given off in combination with the methane seepage, making it possible that geologic seepage is also a potentially significant global source of these light alkanes. This study reports C1-C5 findings from geologic seepage made in the Los Angeles region. Microseepage, invisible escape of gases, was measured primarily at Kenneth Hahn Regional Park, while macroseepage, the visible release of gases, was measured at the La Brea Tar Pits. Samples were collected using stainless steel canisters and flux chambers and were analyzed using gas chromatography with flame ionization detectors (GC-FID). Average microseepage flux rates of 0.95 μg m-2 h-1 for ethane and 0.51 μg m-2 h-1 were found for propane, while average macroseepage rates for methane, ethane, and propane were 664, 19.8, and 18.1 mg m-2 h-1 respectively. Relationships between microseepage flux rate and location of underground oil and natural deposit and earthquake fault lines are presented. Additionally, the relative importance of findings in context with global budgets and local air quality is discussed.

  7. Supercritical extraction of lycopene from tomato industrial wastes with ethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobre, Beatriz P; Gouveia, Luisa; Matos, Patricia G S; Cristino, Ana F; Palavra, António F; Mendes, Rui L

    2012-07-11

    Supercritical fluid extraction of all-E-lycopene from tomato industrial wastes (mixture of skins and seeds) was carried out in a semi-continuous flow apparatus using ethane as supercritical solvent. The effect of pressure, temperature, feed particle size, solvent superficial velocity and matrix initial composition was evaluated. Moreover, the yield of the extraction was compared with that obtained with other supercritical solvents (supercritical CO₂ and a near critical mixture of ethane and propane). The recovery of all-E-lycopene increased with pressure, decreased with the increase of the particle size in the initial stages of the extraction and was not practically affected by the solvent superficial velocity. The effect of the temperature was more complex. When the temperature increased from 40 to 60 °C the recovery of all-E-lycopene increased from 80 to 90%. However, for a further increase to 80 °C, the recovery remained almost the same, indicating that some E-Z isomerization could have occurred, as well as some degradation of lycopene. The recovery of all-E-lycopene was almost the same for feed samples with different all-E-lycopene content. Furthermore, when a batch with a higher all-E-lycopene content was used, supercritical ethane and a near critical mixture of ethane and propane showed to be better solvents than supercritical CO₂ leading to a faster extraction with a higher recovery of the carotenoid.

  8. Revisiting the metathesis of 13C-monolabeled ethane

    KAUST Repository

    Maury, Olivier

    2010-12-13

    The metathesis of 13C-monolabeled ethane leads to the parallel occurrence of degenerate and productive reactions, affording the statistical distribution of the various product isotopomers, which can be rationalized in terms of a mechanistic reaction scheme combining both processes. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  9. Ethane and propane in the Southern marine troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarkson, T. S.; Martin, R. J.; Rudolph, J.

    Nearly 500 measurements of the ethane and propane mixing ratios have been made in clean marine air at Baring Head (New Zealand) and Scott Base (Antarctica) between 1991 and 1996. The annual averages of the mixing ratios (285 and 40 ppt) are lower than previously reported for the Southern Hemisphere. A striking feature of the seasonal cycle is the abrupt drop in mixing ratios of both compounds around November and a corresponding increase in the ethane/propane ratio (from about 7 in winter to > 10 in summer), suggesting a sharp decrease in Southern Hemisphere sources (e.g. biomass burning or fossil gas emissions) of these compounds in the spring. From a simple budget estimate it is concluded that biomass burning is most likely the dominant source of ethane and propane in the Southern Hemisphere. The seasonal variability of the emissions which are required to balance the Southern Hemisphere propane budget agrees very well with the seasonality derived for ethane emissions in a previous study.

  10. Geometrical changes during the internal rotation in ethane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Monkhorst, H. J.

    1969-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental indications are presented that the predominant geometrical change during the internal rotation in ethane is a stretching of the CC bond by about 1%. going from the staggered to the eclipsed conformation. This suggests that the rotation barrier is primarily caused by the

  11. Conversion of methane through dielectric-barrier discharge plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baowei WANG; Xiaolei CAO; Kuanhui YANG; Genhui XU

    2008-01-01

    Methane coupling to produce C2 hydrocar-bons through a dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) plasma reaction was studied in four DBD reactors. The effects of high voltage electrode position, different discharge gap, types of inner electrode, volume ratio of hydrogen to methane and air cooling method on the conversion of methane and distribution of products were investigated. Conversion of methane is obviously lower when a high voltage electrode acts as an outer electrode than when it acts as an inner electrode. The lifting of reaction temper-ature becomes slow due to cooling of outer electrode and the temperature can be controlled in the expected range of 60℃-150℃ for ensuring better methane conversion and safe operation. The parameters of reactors have obvious effects on methane conversion, but it only slightly affects distribution of the products. The main products are ethyl-ene, ethane and propane. The selectivity of C2 hydrocar-bons can reach 74.50% when volume ratio of hydrogen to methane is 1.50.

  12. Diacetonitrile[N,N′-bis(2,6-diisopropyl­phenyl)ethane-1,2-diimine]dichloridochromium(II) acetonitrile solvate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitz, Stephan; Peulecke, Normen; Müller, Bernd H.; Spannenberg, Anke; Rosenthal, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    The title compound, [CrCl2(CH3CN)2(C26H36N2)]·CH3CN, was synthesized by the reaction of CrCl2(THF)2 with N,N′-bis­(2,6-diisopropyl­phen­yl)ethane-1,2-diimine in dichloro­methane/acetonitrile. The chromium center is coordinated by two N atoms of the chelating diimine ligand, two chloride ions in a trans configuration with respect to each other, and by two N atoms of two acetonitrile mol­ecules in a distorted octa­hedral geometry. PMID:21578093

  13. Analysis of local-scale background concentrations of methane and other gas-phase species in the Marcellus Shale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Douglas Goetz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Marcellus Shale is a rapidly developing unconventional natural gas resource found in part of the Appalachian region. Air quality and climate concerns have been raised regarding development of unconventional natural gas resources. Two ground-based mobile measurement campaigns were conducted to assess the impact of Marcellus Shale natural gas development on local scale atmospheric background concentrations of air pollution and climate relevant pollutants in Pennsylvania. The first campaign took place in Northeastern and Southwestern PA in the summer of 2012. Compounds monitored included methane (CH4, ethane, carbon monoxide (CO, nitrogen dioxide, and Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometer (PTR-MS measured volatile organic compounds (VOC including oxygenated and aromatic VOC. The second campaign took place in Northeastern PA in the summer of 2015. The mobile monitoring data were analyzed using interval percentile smoothing to remove bias from local unmixed emissions to isolate local-scale background concentrations. Comparisons were made to other ambient monitoring in the Marcellus region including a NOAA SENEX flight in 2013. Local background CH4 mole fractions were 140 ppbv greater in Southwestern PA compared to Northeastern PA in 2012 and background CH4 increased 100 ppbv from 2012 to 2015. CH4 local background mole fractions were not found to have a detectable relationship between well density or production rates in either region. In Northeastern PA, CO was observed to decrease 75 ppbv over the three year period. Toluene to benzene ratios in both study regions were found to be most similar to aged rural air masses indicating that the emission of aromatic VOC from Marcellus Shale activity may not be significantly impacting local background concentrations. In addition to understanding local background concentrations the ground-based mobile measurements were useful for investigating the composition of natural gas emissions in the region.

  14. Bis[N,N′-bis­(2,6-diisopropyl­phen­yl)ethane-1,2-diimine]-1κ2 N,N′;2κ2 N,N′-tri-μ-trichlorido-1:2κ6 Cl:Cl-chlorido-1κCl-tetra­hydro­furan-2κO-dichromium(II) dichloro­methane 4.5-solvate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitz, Stephan; Peulecke, Normen; Müller, Bernd H.; Spannenberg, Anke; Rosenthal, Uwe

    2009-01-01

    In the mol­ecular structure of the title compound, [Cr2Cl4(C26H36N2)2(C4H8O)]·4.5CH2Cl2, the two CrII centers are bridged by three Cl atoms, forming a dinuclear complex. Each CrII center is coordinated by one chelating bis­(2,6-diisopropyl­phen­yl)ethane-1,2-diimine ligand via both N atoms. An additional chloride ion binds to one chromium center, whereas an additional tetra­hydro­furan mol­ecule coordinates to the second CrII center. The coordination geometry at each CrII center can be best described as distorted octa­hedral. PMID:21578607

  15. Carbon monoxide kinetics following simulated cigarette smoking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnik, A.S. (Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI); Coin, E.J.

    1980-05-01

    Carbon monoxide kinetics were measured in the blood (% carboxyhemoglobin) and alveolar phase (ppM carbon monoxide) after simulated cigarette smoking. Cigarette smoking was siumlated using the same amount of carbon monoxide that 2R1F cigarettes manufactured by the Tobacco Research Institute would contain. Ten boluses of air containing carbon monoxide equivalent to smoking one cigarette were inhaled by six healthy nonsmoker volunteers. Carbon monoxide in the air phase was measured by an Ecolyzer and carboxyhemoglobin was measured by a CO-Oximeter. The mean rise in alveolar carbon monoxide immediately and 20 min after inhaling the last bolus was 3.3 and 3.1 ppM, respectively (p<.005). The mean rise in carboxyhemoglobin immediately and 20 min after inhalation of the last bolus was 0.8 and 0.5% respectively (P<.005). The changes in carboxyhemoglobin were found to be similar to changes that occur when one cigarette is actually smoked.

  16. Complex Hydrocarbon Chemistry in Interstellar and Solar System Ices Revealed: A Combined Infrared Spectroscopy and Reflectron Time-of-flight Mass Spectrometry Analysis of Ethane (C2H6) and D6-Ethane (C2D6) Ices Exposed to Ionizing Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abplanalp, Matthew J.; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2016-08-01

    The irradiation of pure ethane (C2H6/C2D6) ices at 5.5 K, under ultrahigh vacuum conditions was conducted to investigate the formation of complex hydrocarbons via interaction with energetic electrons simulating the secondary electrons produced in the track of galactic cosmic rays. The chemical modifications of the ices were monitored in situ using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and during temperature-programmed desorption via mass spectrometry exploiting a quadrupole mass spectrometer with electron impact ionization (EI-QMS) as well as a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer coupled to a photoionization source (PI-ReTOF-MS). FTIR confirmed previous ethane studies by detecting six molecules: methane (CH4), acetylene (C2H2), ethylene (C2H4), the ethyl radical (C2H5), 1-butene (C4H8), and n-butane (C4H10). However, the TPD phase, along with EI-QMS, and most importantly, PI-ReTOF-MS, revealed the formation of at least 23 hydrocarbons, many for the first time in ethane ice, which can be arranged in four groups with an increasing carbon-to-hydrogen ratio: C n H2n+2 (n = 3, 4, 6, 8, 10), C n H2n (n = 3-10), {{{C}}}n{{{H}}}2n-2 (n = 3-10), and {{{C}}}n{{{H}}}2n-4 (n = 4-6). The processing of simple ethane ices is relevant to the hydrocarbon chemistry in the interstellar medium, as ethane has been shown to be a major product of methane, as well as in the outer solar system. These data reveal that the processing of ethane ices can synthesize several key hydrocarbons such as C3H4 and C4H6 isomers, which ha­ve been found to synthesize polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons like indene (C9H8) and naphtha­lene (C10H8) in the ISM and in hydrocarbon-rich atmospheres of planets and their moons such as Titan.

  17. Kinetic modeling of ethane pyrolysis at high conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Al Shoaibi, Ahmed Sultan; Wang, Chenguang; Carstensen, Hans-Heinrich; Dean, Anthony M

    2011-09-29

    The primary objective of this study is to develop an improved first-principle-based mechanism that describes the molecular weight growth kinetics observed during ethane pyrolysis. A proper characterization of the kinetics of ethane pyrolysis is a prerequisite for any analysis of hydrocarbon pyrolysis and oxidation. Flow reactor experiments were performed with ~50/50 ethane/nitrogen mixtures with temperatures ranging from 550 to 850 °C at an absolute pressure of ~0.8 atm and a residence time of ~5 s. These conditions result in ethane conversions ranging from virtually no reaction to ~90%. Comparisons of predictions using our original mechanism to these data yielded very satisfactory results in terms of the temperature dependence of ethane conversion and prediction of the major products ethylene and hydrogen. However, there were discrepancies in some of the minor species concentrations that are involved in the molecular weight growth kinetics. We performed a series of CBS-QB3 analyses for the C(3)H(7), C(4)H(7), and C(4)H(9) potential energy surfaces to better characterize the radical addition reactions that lead to molecular weight growth. We also extended a published C(6)H(9) PES to include addition of vinyl to butadiene. The results were then used to calculate pressure-dependent rate constants for the multiple reaction pathways of these addition reactions. Inclusion of the unadjusted rate constants resulting from these analyses in the mechanism significantly improved the description of several of the species involved in molecular weight growth kinetics. We compare the predictions of this improved model to those obtained with a consensus model recently published as well as to ethane steam cracking data. We find that a particularly important reaction is that of vinyl addition to butadiene. Another important observation is that several radical addition reactions are partially equilibrated. Not only does this mean that reliable thermodynamic parameters are essential

  18. Cyclic process for producing methane in a tubular reactor with effective heat removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Albert C.; Yang, Chang-Lee

    1986-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are converted to methane by a cyclic, essentially two-step process in which said carbon monoxide is disproportionated to form carbon dioxide and active surface carbon deposited on the surface of a catalyst, and said carbon is reacted with steam to form product methane and by-product carbon dioxide. The exothermic heat of reaction generated in each step is effectively removed during each complete cycle so as to avoid a build up of heat from cycle-to-cycle, with particularly advantageous techniques being employed for fixed bed, tubular and fluidized bed reactor operations.

  19. Material processing with hydrogen and carbon monoxide on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Linne, Diane L.

    1991-01-01

    Several novel proposals are examined for propellant production from carbon dioxide and monoxide and hydrogen. Potential uses were also examined of CO as a fuel or as a reducing agent in metal oxide processing as obtained or further reduced to carbon. Hydrogen can be reacted with CO to produce a wide variety of hydrocarbons, alcohols, and other organic compounds. Methanol, produced by Fischer-Tropsch chemistry may be useful as a fuel; it is easy to store and handle because it is a liquid at Mars temperatures. The reduction of CO2 to hydrocarbons such as methane or acetylene can be accomplished with hydrogen. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen require cryogenic temperatures for storage as liquids. Noncryogenic storage of hydrogen may be accomplished using hydrocarbons, inorganic hydrides, or metal hydrides. Noncryogenic storage of CO may be accomplished in the form of iron carbonyl (FE(CO)5) or other metal carbonyls. Low hydrogen content fuels such as acetylene (C2H2) may be effective propellants with low requirements for earth derived resources. The impact on manned Mars missions of alternative propellant production and utilization is discussed.

  20. Measuring Concentrations of Dissolved Methane and Ethane and the (13) C of Methane in Shale and Till.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, M Jim; Barbour, S Lee; Schmeling, Erin E; Mundle, Scott O C

    2017-01-01

    Baseline characterization of concentrations and isotopic values of dissolved natural gases is needed to identify contamination caused by the leakage of fugitive gases from oil and gas activities. Methods to collect and analyze baseline concentration-depth profiles of dissolved CH4 and C2 H6 and δ(13) C-CH4 in shales and Quaternary clayey tills were assessed at two sites in the Williston Basin, Canada. Core and cuttings samples were stored in Isojars(®) in a low O2 headspace prior to analysis. Measurements and multiphase diffusion modeling show that the gas concentrations in core samples yield well-defined and reproducible depth profiles after 31-d equilibration. No measurable oxidative loss or production during core sample storage was observed. Concentrations from cuttings and mud gas logging (including IsoTubes(®) ) were much lower than from cores, but correlated well. Simulations suggest the lower concentrations from cuttings can be attributed to drilling time, and therefore their use to define gas concentration profiles may have inherent limitations. Calculations based on mud gas logging show the method can provide estimates of core concentrations if operational parameters for the mud gas capture cylinder are quantified. The δ(13) C-CH4 measured from mud gas, IsoTubes(®) , cuttings, and core samples are consistent, exhibiting slight variations that should not alter the implications of the results in identifying the sources of the gases. This study shows core and mud gas techniques and, to a lesser extent, cuttings, can generate high-resolution depth profiles of dissolved hydrocarbon gas concentrations and their isotopes. © 2016, National Ground Water Association.

  1. Supercritical Extraction of Lycopene from Tomato Industrial Wastes with Ethane

    OpenAIRE

    Mendes, Rui L.; Cristino, Ana F.; Nobre, Beatriz P.; Luisa Gouveia; António F. Palavra; Patricia G. S. Matos

    2012-01-01

    Supercritical fluid extraction of all-E-lycopene from tomato industrial wastes (mixture of skins and seeds) was carried out in a semi-continuous flow apparatus using ethane as supercritical solvent. The effect of pressure, temperature, feed particle size, solvent superficial velocity and matrix initial composition was evaluated. Moreover, the yield of the extraction was compared with that obtained with other supercritical solvents (supercritical CO2...

  2. Supercritical Extraction of Lycopene from Tomato Industrial Wastes with Ethane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui L. Mendes

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Supercritical fluid extraction of all-E-lycopene from tomato industrial wastes (mixture of skins and seeds was carried out in a semi-continuous flow apparatus using ethane as supercritical solvent. The effect of pressure, temperature, feed particle size, solvent superficial velocity and matrix initial composition was evaluated. Moreover, the yield of the extraction was compared with that obtained with other supercritical solvents (supercritical CO2 and a near critical mixture of ethane and propane. The recovery of all-E-lycopene increased with pressure, decreased with the increase of the particle size in the initial stages of the extraction and was not practically affected by the solvent superficial velocity. The effect of the temperature was more complex. When the temperature increased from 40 to 60 °C the recovery of all-E-lycopene increased from 80 to 90%. However, for a further increase to 80 °C, the recovery remained almost the same, indicating that some E-Z isomerization could have occurred, as well as some degradation of lycopene. The recovery of all-E-lycopene was almost the same for feed samples with different all-E-lycopene content. Furthermore, when a batch with a higher all-E-lycopene content was used, supercritical ethane and a near critical mixture of ethane and propane showed to be better solvents than supercritical CO2 leading to a faster extraction with a higher recovery of the carotenoid.

  3. Extraction of Peace River bitumen using supercritical ethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jeffrey Lawrence

    2000-10-01

    As the supply of conventional crude oil continues to decline, petroleum companies are looking for alternative hydrocarbon sources. The vast reserves of heavy oil and bitumen located in northern Alberta are among the alternatives. The challenge facing engineers is to develop a process for recovering this oil which is economic, efficient and environmentally acceptable. Supercritical fluid extraction is one method being investigated which could potentially meet all of these criteria. In this study, Peace River bitumen was extracted using supercritical ethane. The bitumen was mixed with sand and packed into a semi-batch extractor. Ethane contacted the bitumen/sand mixture and the fraction of the bitumen soluble in the ethane was removed and subsequently collected in a two phase separator. The flow of ethane was such that the experiments were governed by equilibrium and not mass transfer. Experimental temperatures and pressures were varied in order to observe the effect of these parameters on the mass and composition of the extracted material. The extraction yields increased as the temperature decreased and pressure increased. Samples were collected at various time intervals to measure changes in the properties of the extracted bitumen over the duration of the process. As the extraction proceeded, the samples became heavier and more viscous. The bitumen feed was characterised and the experimental data was then modelled using the Peng-Robinson equation of state. The characterisation process involved the distillation of the bitumen into five fractions. The distillation curve and density of each fraction was measured and this data was used in conjunction with correlations to determine the critical properties of the bitumen. Interaction parameters in the equation of state were then optimised until the predicted composition of extracted bitumen matched the experimental results.

  4. Multi-objective optimisation in carbon monoxide gas management at TRONOX KXN Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stadler, Johan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is a by-product of the ilmenite smelting process from which titania slag and pig iron are produced. Prior to this project, the CO at Tronox KZN Sands in South Africa was burnt to get rid of it, producing carbon dioxide (CO2. At this plant, unprocessed materials are pre-heated using methane gas from an external supplier. The price of methane gas has increased significantly; and so this research considers the possibility of recycling CO gas and using it as an energy source to reduce methane gas demand. It is not possible to eliminate the methane gas consumption completely due to the energy demand fluctuation, and sub-plants have been assigned either CO gas or methane gas over time. Switching the gas supply between CO and methane gas involves production downtime to purge supply lines. Minimising the loss of production time while maximising the use of CO arose as a multi-objective optimisation problem (MOP with seven decision variables, and computer simulation was used to evaluate scenarios. We applied computer simulation and the multi-objective optimisation cross-entropy method (MOO CEM to find good solutions while evaluating the minimum number of scenarios. The proposals in this paper, which are in the process of being implemented, could save the company operational expenditure while reducing the carbon footprint of the smelter.

  5. PARTIAL OXIDATION OF ETHANE TO SYNGAS OVER NICKEL-BASED CATALYSTS%Ni基催化剂上的乙烷部分氧化制合成气

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘盛林; 熊国兴; 盛世善; 杨维慎; 徐龙伢

    1999-01-01

    @@ There is abundant supply of light alkanes and relatively few routes of converting them to more valuable products. Although CH4 predominates in natural gas, it also contains C2H6, C3H8 and C4H10 (from 5 % to 30% ), and with C2H6 as the most abundant secondary component[1]. Partial oxidation of methane to syngas (CH4 +0.5O2 →CO + 2H2) over nickel-based catalysts has received intensive attention[2]and much research has been devoted to conversion of ethane to ethylene[3]. Ethylene has been shown to be formed from ethane by thermal dehydrogenation (C2H6 →C2H4 + H2) and oxidative dehydrogenation (C2H6 + 0. 5O2 →C2H4 + H2O). These processes are operated under severely fuel-rich conditions. The carbon-deposition and consequent deactivation of the catalysts are major problems, which leads to poor conversion of the above mentioned reactions. As an alternative strategy for the elaboration of ethane, little work on the partial oxidation of ethane (POE) to syngas over nickel-based catalysts has been reported. Provided it could be produced from C2H6with high selectivity and high conversion over nickel-based catalysts, syngas could be directly obtained from natural gas including CH4 and C2H6 with high selectivity and conversion. This may lead to better utilization of the light fractions from natural gas and refineries. In the present paper, POE to syngas over nickel-based catalysts was investigated.

  6. Carbon monoxide conversion by anaerobic bioreactor sludges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipma, J.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lens, P.N.L.; Lettinga, G.

    2003-01-01

    Seven different anaerobic sludges from wastewater treatment reactors were screened for their ability to convert carbon monoxide (CO) at 30 and 55degreesC
    Seven different anaerobic sludges from wastewater treatment reactors were screened for their ability to convert carbon monoxide (CO) at 30 and

  7. Solid state 13C NMR studies of methane dehydroaromatization reaction on Mo/HZSM-5 and W/HZSM-5 catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Ma, Ding; Deng, Feng; Luo, Qing; Zhang, Mingjin; Bao, Xinhe; Ye, Chaohui

    2002-12-21

    Methane dehydroaromatization on Mo/HZSM-5 and W/HZSM-5 catalysts was studied by solid state 13C NMR spectroscopy, both variation of the state of transition metal component and products such as ethane, benzene, ethene adsorbed on or in zeolite were observed after high temperature (900-1000 K) reaction.

  8. Electric Field-Enhanced Catalytic Conversion of Methane: AN Experimental Study on the Effects of Corona Discharge on Methane Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marafee, Abdulathim M. J.

    The oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) is currently being actively studied for the production of higher hydrocarbons from natural gas. The present study concentrates on the oxidative conversion of methane in a high-pressure (one atmosphere), nonthermal plasma formed by corona discharge. Here, methyl radicals are formed by the reaction of methane with negatively-charged oxygen species created in the corona discharge. The results of methane conversion in the presence of both AC and DC corona discharges revealed that ethane and ethylene product selectivity is affected by electrode polarity, frequency, and oxygen partial pressure in the feed. Higher C_2 yields were obtained with the AC corona. All of the AC corona discharges specified here were initiated at room temperature (i.e., no oven or other heat source used), with temperature increases from 300 to 500^circC due to the exothermic gas discharge and exothermic reaction. A reaction mechanism is presented to explain the observed phenomena. The results suggest that AC and/or DC gas discharge techniques should be further studied for improved economics of methane conversion. The oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane in DC corona discharges was investigated. The atomic oxygen radicals initiated by corona discharges are thought to be active for the OXD of ethane. The selectivity to ethylene is affected by the reaction temperature, the DC applied voltage, voltage polarity, and the C_2H _6/O_2 ratio. The results of this study suggest the corona discharge process to be very efficient and selective in the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane. The effects of DC corona discharge were examined in the presence of a typical OCM catalyst, Sr/La _2O_3. Experimental investigations have correspondingly been conducted, in which all reactive gases passed through a catalyst bed situated within the corona-induced plasma zone. The methane conversion and C_2 yield increased (with O_2 partial pressure) during the corona-enhanced catalytic

  9. Re/HZSM-5: a new catalyst for ethane aromatization with improved stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Anne; Hansen, Thomas W.; Christensen, Claus Hviid

    2003-01-01

    Rhenium-impregnated HZSM-5 is found to be a promising catalyst for ethane aromatization. The Re–HZSM-5 catalyst deactivates significantly slower than well-known ethane aromatization Zn–HZSM-5 catalyst. Product selectivities for the two catalysts are similar, indicating that the shape selectivity...... and acid-function of the zeolite are the determining factors, and the metal function is only responsible for the activation of ethane by dehydrogenation to ethylene....

  10. Modeling the process of producing hydrogen from methane

    OpenAIRE

    Dubinin, A. M.; Tuponogov, V. G.; Ikonnikov, I. S.

    2013-01-01

    Using the chemical reactions that accompany the production of syngas via the steam reforming of methane as a basis, the differential material balance equations were derived and solved for all conversion products on an aluminum/nickel catalyst. For the following stage of hydrogen synthesis on an iron/chromium catalyst, the system of two differential equations of the material balance of the direct and reverse reactions of steam carbon monoxide conversion was obtained and solved. The analytical ...

  11. The Carbon Monoxide Tape Recorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeberl, M. R.; Duncan, B. N.; Douglass, A. R.; Waters, J.; Livesey, N.; Read, W.; Filipiak, M.

    2006-01-01

    Using Aura MLS data we have identified the stratospheric tape recorder in carbon monoxide (CO). Unlike the water vapor tape recorder, which is controlled by upper troposphere processes, the CO tape recorder is linked to seasonal biomass burning. Since CO has a lifetime of only a few months, the CO tape recorder barely extends above 20 km. The tape head for CO appears to be close to 360K near the same location as the water vapor tape head [Read et al, 20041. Both tape heads are below the equatorial cold point tropopause but above the base of the tropical tropopause layer. The tape recorder signal becomes more distinct from 360K to 380K suggesting that convective detrainment of plays a decreasingly important role with altitude. The Global Modeling Initiative chemical transport model forced by the climatology of biomass burning reproduces the CO tape recorder.

  12. Methane rich gasification of wood pellets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joka Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the work there are shown the results of experimental studies on methane rich gasification of pinewood pellets in Bio-CONOx technology. The experiment was carried out on a laboratory scale gasifier (5 kW, which design features allow producing a high quality gas with a high methane content. In the results there was identified the impact of the quantity of Bio-CONOx on the amount of flammable gas compounds (methane, hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the synthesis gas and the gas calorific value. The additive was added in 10,20,30 and 50% concentrations to the gasifier chamber. It has been shown that increasing the amount of the additive has a positive effect on the calorific value of the synthesis gas (Fig.1,2. Gas with a high content of methane (and high calorific value was obtained from gasification of biomass with a 50% addition of Bio-CONOx. There was also examined the proportion of blowing air (gasifying medium for which the properties of obtained syngas were the best.

  13. Oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane to ethylene using vanadia based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Ailing; Kalevaru, V.N. [Univ. Rostock e.V., Rostock (Germany). Leibniz-Inst. fuer Katalyse; Humar, A.S.; Lingaiah, N.; Sai Prasad, P.S.; Martin, A. [Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad (India). Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Div.

    2011-07-01

    In this work, we describe the application of V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of ethane to ethylene. A series of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} supported V{sub 2}O{sub 5} catalysts were prepared by impregnation technique. NH{sub 4}VO{sub 3} was used as a precursor for V{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The content of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} is varied in the range from 5 to 20 wt%. Catalytic tests were carried out in a fixed bed quartz reactor in the temperature range from 500 to 600 C. The conversion of ethane has been increased from ca. 20 to 35 % with increase in temperature from 500 to 600 C, while the yield of ethylene is increased from about 5 to 12 % only. CO and CO{sub 2} are the only major by-products of the reaction. The activity tests were performed at low O{sub 2} concentration in the feed and hence low conversions were achieved. Furthermore, the conversion of ethane is found to increase continuously with increase in V{sub 2}O{sub 5} loading while the yield of C{sub 2}H{sub 4} increased only up to 10wt% V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and then decreased. Results revealed that the catalytic activity and selectivity is found to depend on the V{sub 2}O{sub 5} loading. Among all, 10wt% V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} catalyst has displayed the superior performance. (orig.)

  14. Oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane to ethylene using vanadia based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Ailing; Kalevaru, V.N. [Univ. Rostock e.V., Rostock (Germany). Leibniz-Inst. fuer Katalyse; Humar, A.S.; Lingaiah, N.; Sai Prasad, P.S.; Martin, A. [Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad (India). Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Div.

    2011-07-01

    In this work, we describe the application of V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} catalysts for the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of ethane to ethylene. A series of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} supported V{sub 2}O{sub 5} catalysts were prepared by impregnation technique. NH{sub 4}VO{sub 3} was used as a precursor for V{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The content of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} is varied in the range from 5 to 20 wt%. Catalytic tests were carried out in a fixed bed quartz reactor in the temperature range from 500 to 600 C. The conversion of ethane has been increased from ca. 20 to 35 % with increase in temperature from 500 to 600 C, while the yield of ethylene is increased from about 5 to 12 % only. CO and CO{sub 2} are the only major by-products of the reaction. The activity tests were performed at low O{sub 2} concentration in the feed and hence low conversions were achieved. Furthermore, the conversion of ethane is found to increase continuously with increase in V{sub 2}O{sub 5} loading while the yield of C{sub 2}H{sub 4} increased only up to 10wt% V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and then decreased. Results revealed that the catalytic activity and selectivity is found to depend on the V{sub 2}O{sub 5} loading. Among all, 10wt% V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} catalyst has displayed the superior performance. (orig.)

  15. Engineering evidence for carbon monoxide toxicity cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatsis, Kosmas

    2016-07-01

    Unintentional carbon monoxide poisonings and fatalities lead to many toxicity cases. Given the unusual physical properties of carbon monoxide-in that the gas is odorless and invisible-unorganized and erroneous methods in obtaining engineering evidence as required during the discovery process often occurs. Such evidence gathering spans domains that include building construction, appliance installation, industrial hygiene, mechanical engineering, combustion and physics. In this paper, we attempt to place a systematic framework that is relevant to key aspects in engineering evidence gathering for unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning cases. Such a framework aims to increase awareness of this process and relevant issues to help guide legal counsel and expert witnesses.

  16. Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet İbrahim Turan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide poisoning is a major cause of death following attempted suicide and accidental exposures. Although clinical presentation depends on the duration and the intensity of exposure, the assessment of the severity of intoxication is difficult. A small percentage of patients who show complete initial recovery may develop delayed neurological deficits. Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning is a rare and poor prognosis neurologic disorders and there is no specific treatment. We present a case with early onset of delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning with typical cranial imaging findings in a child with atypical history and clinical presentation.

  17. Oxidative Coupling of Methane over Li/MgO: Catalyst and Nanocatalyst Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsi, Ali; Moradi, Ali; Ghader, Sattar; Shadravan, Vahid

    2011-02-01

    The Li/MgO catalyst and nanocatalyst were prepared by the incipient wetness impregnation and sol-gel method, respectively. The catalytic performance of the Li/MgO catalyst and nanocatalyst on oxidative coupling of methane was compared. The catalysts prepared in two ways were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface and transmission electron microscope. The catalyst was tested at temperature of 973-1073 K with constant total pressure of 101 kPa. Experimental results showed that Li/MgO nanocatalyst in the oxidative coupling of methane would result in higher conversion of methane, higher selectivity, and higher yield of main products (ethane and ethylene) compared to ordinary catalyst. The results show the improved influence of nanoscale Li/MgO catalyst performance on oxidative coupling of methane.

  18. Environmental analysis of higher brominated diphenyl ethers and decabromodiphenyl ethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierkegaard, Amelie; Sellström, Ulla; McLachlan, Michael S

    2009-01-16

    Methods for environmental analysis of higher brominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), in particular decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE209), and the recently discovered environmental contaminant decabromodiphenyl ethane (deBDethane) are reviewed. The extensive literature on analysis of BDE209 has identified several critical issues, including contamination of the sample, degradation of the analyte during sample preparation and GC analysis, and the selection of appropriate detection methods and surrogate standards. The limited experience with the analysis of deBDethane suggests that there are many commonalities with BDE209. The experience garnered from the analysis of BDE209 over the last 15 years will greatly facilitate progress in the analysis of deBDethane.

  19. Kinetics of methane fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. R.; Hashimoto, A. G.

    1978-01-01

    The kinetics on methane fermentation are described using published data for livestock residue, sewage sludge, and municipal refuse. Methods are presented to determine the kinetic constants and the finally attainable methane production using steady-state methane production data. The effects of temperature, loading rate, and influent substrate concentration on methane fermentation kinetics are discussed. These relationships were used to predict the rate of methane production of a pilot-scale fermentor with excellent results.

  20. Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System (COSRS) is a novel technology for producing large quantities of oxygen on the Moon. Oxygen yields of 15 kilograms per...

  1. Protect Yourself from Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-20

    Learn about carbon monoxide - a colorless, odorless gas - and how to protect yourself and your family.  Created: 11/20/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 12/4/2007.

  2. Catalysts for conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siriwardane, Ranjani V.

    1993-01-01

    Catalysts for converting methane to higher hydrocarbons such as ethane and ethylene in the presence of oxygen at temperatures in the range of about 700.degree. to 900.degree. C. are described. These catalysts comprise calcium oxide or gadolinium oxide respectively promoted with about 0.025-0.4 mole and about 0.1-0.7 mole sodium pyrophosphate. A preferred reaction temperature in a range of about 800.degree. to 850.degree. C. with a preferred oxygen-to-methane ratio of about 2:1 provides an essentially constant C.sub.2 hydrocarbon yield in the range of about 12 to 19 percent over a period of time greater than about 20 hours.

  3. Partial oxidation of methane by pulsed corona discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeben, W. F. L. M.; Boekhoven, W.; Beckers, F. J. C. M.; van Heesch, E. J. M.; Pemen, A. J. M.

    2014-09-01

    Pulsed corona-induced partial oxidation of methane in humid oxygen or carbon dioxide atmospheres has been investigated for future fuel synthesis applications. The obtained product spectrum is wide, i.e. saturated, unsaturated and oxygen-functional hydrocarbons. The generally observed methane conversion levels are 6-20% at a conversion efficiency of about 100-250 nmol J-1. The main products are ethane, ethylene and acetylene. Higher saturated hydrocarbons up to C6 have been detected. The observed oxygen-functional hydrocarbons are methanol, ethanol and lower concentrations of aldehydes, ketones, dimethylether and methylformate. Methanol seems to be exclusively produced with CH4/O2 mixtures at a maximum production efficiency of 0.35 nmol J-1. CH4/CO2 mixtures appear to yield higher hydrocarbons. Carboxylic acids appear to be mainly present in the aqueous reactor phase, possibly together with higher molecular weight species.

  4. Ethene/ethane separation by the MOF membrane ZIF-8: Molecular correlation of permeation, adsorption, diffusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bux, H.; Chmelik, C.; Krishna, R.; Caro, J.

    2011-01-01

    The newly developed MOF membrane ZIF-8 separates an equimolar ethene/ethane mixture at room temperature for 1 and 6 bar feed pressure, respectively, with a selectivity of 2.8 and 2.4. Independent sorption uptake studies of an ethene/ethane mixture on a big ZIF-8 single crystal by IR microscopy

  5. Synthesis and characterization of conventional and mesoporous Ga-MFI for ethane dehydrogenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth, Karen Thrane; Rovik, Anne Krogh; Holm, Martin Spangsberg

    2008-01-01

    difference being the morphology of the crystals. The catalytic properties of the samples were tested in ethane dehydrogenation at 823 K and at atmospheric pressure. The two Ga-MFI samples differ greatly in conversion of ethane, as a result of their difference in porosity, and it is found that the conversion...

  6. Ethene/ethane separation by the MOF membrane ZIF-8: Molecular correlation of permeation, adsorption, diffusion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bux, H.; Chmelik, C.; Krishna, R.; Caro, J.

    2011-01-01

    The newly developed MOF membrane ZIF-8 separates an equimolar ethene/ethane mixture at room temperature for 1 and 6 bar feed pressure, respectively, with a selectivity of 2.8 and 2.4. Independent sorption uptake studies of an ethene/ethane mixture on a big ZIF-8 single crystal by IR microscopy detec

  7. Theoretical and experimental study of the vibrational excitations in ethane monolayers adsorbed on graphite (0001) surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Taub, H.

    1987-01-01

    The collective vibrational excitations of two different crystalline monolayer phases of ethane (C2H6) adsorbed on the graphite (0001) surface have been investigated theoretically and experimentally. The monolayer phases studied are the commensurate 7/8 ×4 structure in which the ethane molecules lie...

  8. Integrated electricity and carbon monoxide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, J.

    1994-03-23

    In a process for the production of carbon monoxide and electric power in an IGCC with the removal of sulphur compounds, between the outlet of quenched gas from a partial oxidation unit and a fuel inlet to a combined cycle gas turbine there is a permeable membrane unit to separate a non-permeable stream, which is utilised as a source of carbon monoxide, and a permeate stream, which is used as fuel for the gas turbine of the combined cycle unit. (author)

  9. Hearing Loss due to Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Houshang Mehrparvar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the rare causes of hearing loss which may cause reversible or irreversible, unilateral or bilateral hearing loss after acute or chronic exposure. In this report, we present a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in a secondary smelting workshop worker after an acute exposure to carbon monoxide. This complication was diagnosed by pure-tone audiometry and confirmed by transient evoked otoacoustic emissions. Hearing loss has not improved after 3 months of followup.

  10. Identification of the flame retardant decabromodiphenyl ethane in the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kierkegaard, Amelie; Björklund, Jonas; Fridén, Ulrika

    2004-06-15

    The brominated flame retardant decabromodiphenyl ethane, DeBDethane, is marketed as an alternative to decabromodiphenyl ether, BDE209. There are currently no data available about the presence of DeBDethane in the environment. In this study, DeBDethane was positively identified by high-resolution mass spectrometry and quantified by low-resolution mass spectrometry with electron capture negative ionization in sewage sludge, sediment, and indoor air. It was found in 25 of the 50 Swedish sewage treatment plants investigated, with estimated levels up to about 100 ng/g dry weight. The concentration of DeBDethane in sediment from Western Scheldt in The Netherlands was 24 ng/g dry weight, and in an air sample from a Swedish electronics dismantling facility it was 0.6 ng/m3. DeBDethane was also found together with nonabromodiphenyl ethanes in water piping insulation. All samples contained BDE209 in higher concentrations as compared to DeBDethane (DeBDethane/BDE209 ratios ranging from 0.02 to 0.7), probably reflecting the higher and longer usage of BDE209. There is an ongoing risk assessment within the European Union regarding BDE209. Since DeBDethane has similar applications, it is important to investigate its environmental behavior before using it to replace BDE209.

  11. Fugitive emissions from the Bakken shale illustrate role of shale production in global ethane shift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kort, E. A.; Smith, M. L.; Murray, L. T.; Gvakharia, A.; Brandt, A. R.; Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Sweeney, C.; Travis, K.

    2016-05-01

    Ethane is the second most abundant atmospheric hydrocarbon, exerts a strong influence on tropospheric ozone, and reduces the atmosphere's oxidative capacity. Global observations showed declining ethane abundances from 1984 to 2010, while a regional measurement indicated increasing levels since 2009, with the reason for this subject to speculation. The Bakken shale is an oil and gas-producing formation centered in North Dakota that experienced a rapid increase in production beginning in 2010. We use airborne data collected over the North Dakota portion of the Bakken shale in 2014 to calculate ethane emissions of 0.23 ± 0.07 (2σ) Tg/yr, equivalent to 1-3% of total global sources. Emissions of this magnitude impact air quality via concurrent increases in tropospheric ozone. This recently developed large ethane source from one location illustrates the key role of shale oil and gas production in rising global ethane levels.

  12. Spatial patterns and source attribution of urban methane in the Los Angeles Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Francesca M.; Kort, Eric A.; Bush, Susan E.; Ehleringer, James R.; Lai, Chun-Ta; Blake, Donald R.; Randerson, James T.

    2016-03-01

    Urban areas are increasingly recognized as a globally important source of methane to the atmosphere; however, the location of methane sources and relative contributions of source sectors are not well known. Recent atmospheric measurements in Los Angeles, California, USA, show that more than a third of the city's methane emissions are unaccounted for in inventories and suggest that fugitive fossil emissions are the unknown source. We made on-road measurements to quantify fine-scale structure of methane and a suite of complementary trace gases across the Los Angeles Basin in June 2013. Enhanced methane levels were observed across the basin but were unevenly distributed in space. We identified 213 methane hot spots from unknown emission sources. We made direct measurements of ethane to methane (C2H6/CH4) ratios of known methane emission sources in the region, including cattle, geologic seeps, landfills, and compressed natural gas fueling stations, and used these ratios to determine the contribution of biogenic and fossil methane sources to unknown hot spots and to local urban background air. We found that 75% of hot spots were of fossil origin, 20% were biogenic, and 5% of indeterminate source. In regionally integrated air, we observed a wider range of C2H6/CH4 values than observed previously. Fossil fuel sources accounted for 58-65% of methane emissions, with the range depending on the assumed C2H6/CH4 ratio of source end-members and model structure. These surveys demonstrated the prevalence of fugitive methane emissions across the Los Angeles urban landscape and suggested that uninventoried methane sources were widely distributed and primarily of fossil origin.

  13. Dispersion forces in methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.; Coulon, P.; Luyckx, R.

    1977-01-01

    The coefficients of the R-6 and R-7 terms in the series representation of the dispersion interaction between two methane molecules and between methane and helium, neon and argon are calculated by a variation method.

  14. Methane emissions from natural gas infrastructure and use in the urban region of Boston, Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKain, Kathryn; Down, Adrian; Raciti, Steve M; Budney, John; Hutyra, Lucy R; Floerchinger, Cody; Herndon, Scott C; Nehrkorn, Thomas; Zahniser, Mark S; Jackson, Robert B; Phillips, Nathan; Wofsy, Steven C

    2015-02-17

    Methane emissions from natural gas delivery and end use must be quantified to evaluate the environmental impacts of natural gas and to develop and assess the efficacy of emission reduction strategies. We report natural gas emission rates for 1 y in the urban region of Boston, using a comprehensive atmospheric measurement and modeling framework. Continuous methane observations from four stations are combined with a high-resolution transport model to quantify the regional average emission flux, 18.5 ± 3.7 (95% confidence interval) g CH4 ⋅ m(-2) ⋅ y(-1). Simultaneous observations of atmospheric ethane, compared with the ethane-to-methane ratio in the pipeline gas delivered to the region, demonstrate that natural gas accounted for ∼ 60-100% of methane emissions, depending on season. Using government statistics and geospatial data on natural gas use, we find the average fractional loss rate to the atmosphere from all downstream components of the natural gas system, including transmission, distribution, and end use, was 2.7 ± 0.6% in the Boston urban region, with little seasonal variability. This fraction is notably higher than the 1.1% implied by the most closely comparable emission inventory.

  15. Membrane-based ethylene/ethane separation: The upper bound and beyond

    KAUST Repository

    Rungta, Meha

    2013-08-02

    Ethylene/ethane separation via cryogenic distillation is extremely energy-intensive, and membrane separation may provide an attractive alternative. In this paper, ethylene/ethane separation performance using polymeric membranes is summarized, and an experimental ethylene/ethane polymeric upper bound based on literature data is presented. A theoretical prediction of the ethylene/ethane upper bound is also presented, and shows good agreement with the experimental upper bound. Further, two ways to overcome the ethylene/ethane upper bound, based on increasing the sorption or diffusion selectivity, is also discussed, and a review on advanced membrane types such as facilitated transport membranes, zeolite and metal organic framework based membranes, and carbon molecular sieve membranes is presented. Of these, carbon membranes have shown the potential to surpass the polymeric ethylene/ethane upper bound performance. Furthermore, a convenient, potentially scalable method for tailoring the performance of carbon membranes for ethylene/ethane separation based on tuning the pyrolysis conditions has also been demonstrated. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  16. Formation of a new benzene-ethane co-crystalline structure under cryogenic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, Tuan Hoang; Cable, Morgan L; Choukroun, Mathieu; Hodyss, Robert; Beauchamp, Patricia

    2014-06-12

    We report the first experimental finding of a solid molecular complex between benzene and ethane, two small apolar hydrocarbons, at atmospheric pressure and cryogenic temperatures. Considerable amounts of ethane are found to be incorporated inside the benzene lattice upon the addition of liquid ethane onto solid benzene at 90-150 K, resulting in formation of a distinctive co-crystalline structure that can be detected via micro-Raman spectroscopy. Two new features characteristic of these co-crystals are observed in the Raman spectra at 2873 and 1455 cm(-1), which are red-shifted by 12 cm(-1) from the υ1 (a1g) and υ11 (eg) stretching modes of liquid ethane, respectively. Analysis of benzene and ethane vibrational bands combined with quantum mechanical modeling of isolated molecular dimers reveal an interaction between the aromatic ring of benzene and the hydrogen atoms of ethane in a C-H···π fashion. The most favored configuration for the benzene-ethane dimer is the monodentate-contact structure, with a calculated interaction energy of 9.33 kJ/mol and an equilibrium bonding distance of 2.66 Å. These parameters are comparable to those for a T-shaped co-crystalline complex between benzene and acetylene that has been previously reported in the literature. These results are relevant for understanding the hydrocarbon cycle of Titan, where benzene and similar organics may act as potential hydrocarbon reservoirs due to this incorporation mechanism.

  17. Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Ethane to Ethylene over LiCI/MnOx/PC Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛庆杰; 李文钊; 于春英; 徐恒泳

    2001-01-01

    The caalytic stability of LiCl/MnOx/PC catalyst have been investigated, the deactivation mechanism was discussed. Tne experimental results show that ethane conversion decreases and etihylene selectivotu keeps about 90% as reaction time increases. The main deactivation reasons LiCI/MnOx/PCcatalyst for oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane (ODHE) to ethylene are the transiton of active species Mn2O3 TO MnOspecies and the loss of active component Cl in catalyst. Instead of ethane with FCC tailed-gas, the stability of LiCl/MnOx/PC catalyst has been largely improved.

  18. The Reduction of Lunar Regolith by Carbothermal Processing Using Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Gokoglu, S. A.; Hegde, U.

    2010-01-01

    The processing of lunar regolith for the production of oxygen is a key component of the In-Situ Resource Utilization plans currently being developed by NASA. In the carbothermal process, a portion of the surface of the regolith in a container is heated by exposure to a heat source so that a small zone of molten regolith is established. A continuous flow of methane is maintained over the molten regolith zone. In this paper, we discuss the development of a chemical conversion model of the carbothermal process to predict the rate of production of carbon monoxide. Our model is based on a mechanism where methane pyrolyzes when it comes in contact with the surface of the hot molten regolith to form solid carbon and hydrogen gas. Carbon is deposited on the surface of the melt, and hydrogen is released into the gas stream above the melt surface. We assume that the deposited carbon mixes in the molten regolith and reacts with metal oxides in a reduction reaction by which gaseous carbon monoxide is liberated. Carbon monoxide bubbles through the melt and is released into the gas stream. It is further processed downstream to ultimately produce oxygen.

  19. Quantification of Methane Leaks from Abandoned Oil and Gas Wells in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebel, E.; Kang, M.; Lu, H.; Jackson, R. B.

    2016-12-01

    Abandoned oil and gas wells can provide a pathway for subterranean methane and other gases to be emitted to the atmosphere. However, abandoned wells are unaccounted for in greenhouse gas emissions inventories. While relatively little is known about abandoned wells, previous studies have shown that emissions from abandoned wells contribute approximately 4-7% of anthropogenic methane emissions in Pennsylvania (Kang et al. 2014) and measure individual abandoned wells in California to estimate state-wide methane emissions from these wells. In addition to measuring methane concentrations, we measure ethane, propane, isobutane, n-butane, and 13-CH4 to understand whether this methane has a biogenic or thermogenic source. We hope that our research will determine whether or not abandoned oil and gas wells are a significant source of anthropogenic methane emissions in California. Our results along with measurements in other parts of the United States can be used to scale up methane emission estimates to the national level, accounting for the millions of abandoned wells in the country.

  20. Pulmonary edema in acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kun Sang; Chang, Kee Hyun; Lee, Myung Uk [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1974-10-15

    Acute carbon monoxide poisoning has frequently occurred in Korean, because of the coal briquette being widely used as fuel in Korean residences. Carbon monoxide poisoning has been extensively studied, but it has been sparsely reported that pulmonary edema may develop in acute CO poisoning. We have noticed nine cases of pulmonary edema in acute CO poisoning last year. Other possible causes of pulmonary edema could be exclude in all cases but one. The purpose of this paper is to describe nine cases of pulmonary edema complicated in acute CO poisoning and discuss the pathogenesis and the prognosis.

  1. 40 CFR 60.103 - Standard for carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Refineries § 60.103 Standard for carbon monoxide. Each owner or operator of any fluid catalytic cracking unit... regenerator any gases that contain carbon monoxide (CO) in excess of 500 ppm by volume (dry basis)....

  2. [Carbon monoxide metabolism by photosynthetic bacteria]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    Research continued on the metabolism of carbon monoxide by Rhodospirillum rubrum. This report discusses progress on the activity, induction, inhibition, and spectroscopic analysis of the enzyme Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase. (CBS)

  3. Carbon Monoxide Hazards from Small Gasoline Powered Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH CARBON MONOXIDE Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this Page Recommendations NIOSH Publications Worker Notification Program Carbon Monoxide Hazards from Small Gasoline Powered Engines Many ...

  4. Modeling and Measurements of Atmospheric Methane at Four Corners, NM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costigan, K. R.; Lindenmaier, R.; Dubey, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    Methane (CH4) fugitive emissions from fossil energy mining remain highly uncertain and scrutinized with the rapid expansion in domestic production by hydraulic fracturing. Top down observational studies of reported bottom up inventories are limited, but the latter may be biased low. We focus on the Four Corners region of the Southwestern United States, a region with extensive coal bed methane production, to verify its current emissions. At our site we measured methane over a range of scales using ground-based, in-situ instruments and a Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS), which is part of the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON). Measurements of CH4 produced much higher concentrations of methane in this rural area than previously expected. The diurnal variation and wind direction dependence in the CH4 concentrations suggest a source location tied to topographically induced winds and consistent with oil and gas production. This paper presents the results of WRF-Chem simulations that are performed to simulate methane concentrations in this region. Emissions from the Emissions Database for Global Atmospheric Research (EDGAR) indicate large CH4 emissions, associated with the gas production and distribution sector, in one 0.1 x 0.1 degree grid cell within the region and these emissions are employed in the simulations. A series of six simulations are run at two-month intervals during 2012. Each simulates a six-day time series to demonstrate the diurnal and seasonal characteristics of the methane concentrations that would be expected at the FTS location, from the sources reported in the EDGAR data set. The results of these simulations will be presented, along with the implications for interpretation of the FTS measurements. We will also interpret our FTS measurements of ethane (C2H6), which is emitted only from fossil fuel mining, to attribute leaks.

  5. Evaluation of methyl fluoride and dimethyl ether as inhibitors of aerobic methane oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R.S.; Culbertson, C.W.

    1992-01-01

    Methyl fluoride (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) were effective inhibitors of aerobic methanotrophy in a variety of soils. MF and DME blocked consumption of CH4 as well as the oxidation of 14CH4 to 14CO2, but neither MF nor DME affected the oxidation of [14C]methanol or [14C]formate to 14CO2. Cooxidation of ethane and propane by methane-oxidizing soils was also inhibited by MF. Nitrification (ammonia oxidation) in soils was inhibited by both MF and DME. Production of N2O via nitrification was inhibited by MF; however, MF did not affect N2O production associated with denitrification. Methanogenesis was partially inhibited by MF but not by DME. Methane oxidation was ~100-fold more sensitive to MF than was methanogenesis, indicating that an optimum concentration could be employed to selectively block methanotrophy. MF inhibited methane oxidation by cell suspensions of Methylococcus capsulatus; however, DME was a much less effective inhibitor.

  6. Catalysis Conversion Methane into C2 Hydrocarbons via Electric Field Enhanced Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bao Wei WANG; Gen Hui XU

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the effect of catalyst and carrier in electric field enhanced plasma on methane conversion into C2 hydrocarbons was investigated. Methane coupling reaction was studied in the system of continuous flow reactor on Ni, MoO3, MnO2 catalysts and different ZSM-5 carriers. The per pass conversion of methane can be as high as 22%, the selectivity of ethylene can be as high as 23.8%, of acetylene 60.8%, of ethane 5.4% and of total C2 hydrocarbons was more than 90%. ZSM-5-25 was the better carrier and MnO2 was the better active component. The efficiency of energy was as high as 7.81%.

  7. Catalytic functionalization of methane and light alkanes in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, M Ángeles; Olmos, Andrea; Muñoz, Bianca K; Jacob, Kane; González-Núñez, M Elena; Mello, Rossella; Asensio, Gregorio; Caballero, Ana; Etienne, Michel; Pérez, Pedro J

    2014-08-25

    The development of catalytic methods for the effective functionalization of methane yet remains a challenge. The best system known to date is the so-called Catalytica Process based on the use of platinum catalysts to convert methane into methyl bisulfate with a TOF rate of 10(-3) s. In this contribution, we report a series of silver complexes containing perfluorinated tris(indazolyl)borate ligands that catalyze the functionalization of methane into ethyl propionate upon reaction with ethyl diazoacetate (EDA) by using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) as the reaction medium. The employment of this reaction medium has also allowed the functionalization of ethane, propane, butane, and isobutane.

  8. On the effect of coverage-dependent adsorbate-adsorbate interactions for CO methanation on transition metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lausche, Adam C.; Medford, Andrew J.; Khan, Tuhin Suvra

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneously catalyzed reactions involving the dissociation of strongly bonded molecules typically need quite reactive catalysts with high coverages of intermediate molecules. Methanation of carbon monoxide is one example, where CO dissociation has been reported to take place on step sites wit...

  9. In vitro dermal absorption of decabromodiphenyl ethane in rat and human skin

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — In vitro dermal absorption of decabromodiphenyl ethane in rat and human skin. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Knudsen, G., J.M. Sanders,...

  10. An integral proton conducting SOFC for simultaneous production of ethylene and power from ethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xian-Zhu; Luo, Jing-Li; Sanger, Alan R; Danilovic, Nemanja; Chuang, Karl T

    2010-03-28

    A novel, integral, tri-layered, proton conducting membrane SOFC was readily fabricated for simultaneous conversion of ethane at 650-700 degrees C to electrical power and ethylene with high selectivity.

  11. Ethane and n-pentane in exhaled breath are biomarkers of exposure not effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorham, Katrine A; Sulbaek Andersen, Mads P; Meinardi, Simone; Delfino, Ralph J; Staimer, Norbert; Tjoa, Thomas; Rowland, F Sherwood; Blake, Donald R

    2009-02-01

    The relationship of exhaled ethane and n-pentane to exhaled NO, carbonylated proteins, and indoor/outdoor atmospheric pollutants were examined in order to evaluate ethane and n-pentane as potential markers of airway inflammation and/or oxidative stress. Exhaled NO and carbonylated proteins were found to have no significant associations with either ethane (p = 0.96 and p = 0.81, respectively) or n-pentane (p = 0.44 and 0.28, respectively) when outliers were included. In the case where outliers were removed n-pentane was found to be inversely associated with carbonylated proteins. Exhaled hydrocarbons adjusted for indoor hydrocarbon concentrations were instead found to be positively associated with air pollutants (NO, NO(2) and CO), suggesting pollutant exposure is driving exhaled hydrocarbon concentrations. Given these findings, ethane and n-pentane do not appear to be markers of airway inflammation or oxidative stress.

  12. Ethane and n-pentane in exhaled breath are biomarkers of exposure not effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorham, Katrine A; Andersen, Mads Peter Sulbæk; Meinardi, Simone

    2009-01-01

    The relationship of exhaled ethane and n-pentane to exhaled NO, carbonylated proteins, and indoor/outdoor atmospheric pollutants were examined in order to evaluate ethane and n-pentane as potential markers of airway inflammation and/or oxidative stress. Exhaled NO and carbonylated proteins were...... found to have no significant associations with either ethane (p = 0.96 and p = 0.81, respectively) or n-pentane (p = 0.44 and 0.28, respectively) when outliers were included. In the case where outliers were removed n-pentane was found to be inversely associated with carbonylated proteins. Exhaled...... hydrocarbons adjusted for indoor hydrocarbon concentrations were instead found to be positively associated with air pollutants (NO, NO(2) and CO), suggesting pollutant exposure is driving exhaled hydrocarbon concentrations. Given these findings, ethane and n-pentane do not appear to be markers of airway...

  13. Assessment of carbon monoxide values in smokers: a comparison of carbon monoxide in expired air and carboxyhaemoglobin in arterial blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Mette F; Møller, Ann M

    2010-01-01

    Smoking increases perioperative complications. Carbon monoxide concentrations can estimate patients' smoking status and might be relevant in preoperative risk assessment. In smokers, we compared measurements of carbon monoxide in expired air (COexp) with measurements of carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb...

  14. The Presence of Methane in the Atmosphere of an Extrasolar Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Mark R.; Vasisht, Gautam; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2008-01-01

    Molecules present in the atmospheres of extrasolar planets are expected to influence strongly the balance of atmospheric radiation, to trace dynamical and chemical processes, and to indicate the presence of disequilibrium effects. As molecules have the potential to reveal atmospheric conditions and chemistry, searching for them is a high priority. The rotational-vibrational transition bands of water, carbon monoxide and methane are anticipated to be the primary sources of non-continuum opacity in hot-Jupiter planets. As these bands can overlap in wavelength, and the corresponding signatures from them are weak, decisive identification requires precision infrared spectroscopy. Here we report a near-infrared transmission spectrum of the planet HD 189733b that shows the presence of methane. Additionally, a resolved water vapour band at 1.9 (micro)m confirms the recent claim4 of water in this object. On thermochemical grounds, carbon monoxide is expected to be abundant in the upper atmosphere of hot-Jupiter planets, but is not identifiable here; therefore the detection of methane rather than carbon monoxide in such a hot planet could signal the presence of a horizontal chemical gradient away from the permanent dayside, or it may imply an ill-understood photochemical mechanism that leads to an enhancement of methane.

  15. The Presence of Methane in the Atmosphere of an Extrasolar Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Mark R.; Vasisht, Gautam; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2008-01-01

    Molecules present in the atmospheres of extrasolar planets are expected to influence strongly the balance of atmospheric radiation, to trace dynamical and chemical processes, and to indicate the presence of disequilibrium effects. As molecules have the potential to reveal atmospheric conditions and chemistry, searching for them is a high priority. The rotational-vibrational transition bands of water, carbon monoxide and methane are anticipated to be the primary sources of non-continuum opacity in hot-Jupiter planets. As these bands can overlap in wavelength, and the corresponding signatures from them are weak, decisive identification requires precision infrared spectroscopy. Here we report a near-infrared transmission spectrum of the planet HD 189733b that shows the presence of methane. Additionally, a resolved water vapour band at 1.9 (micro)m confirms the recent claim4 of water in this object. On thermochemical grounds, carbon monoxide is expected to be abundant in the upper atmosphere of hot-Jupiter planets, but is not identifiable here; therefore the detection of methane rather than carbon monoxide in such a hot planet could signal the presence of a horizontal chemical gradient away from the permanent dayside, or it may imply an ill-understood photochemical mechanism that leads to an enhancement of methane.

  16. Methane fluxes to the atmosphere from deepwater hydrocarbon seeps in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Lei; Yvon-Lewis, Shari A.; Kessler, John D.; MacDonald, Ian R.

    2012-01-01

    Three deepwater hydrocarbon seep sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico that feature near-seafloor gas hydrates, MC118 (depth = 900 m), GC600 (depth = 1250 m) and GC185 (depth = 550 m), were investigated during the Remote Sensing and Sea-Truth Measurements of Methane Flux to the Atmosphere (HYFLUX) study in July 2009. Continuous measurements of air and sea surface concentrations of methane were made to obtain high spatial and temporal resolution of the diffusive net sea-to-air fluxes. The atmospheric methane fluctuated between 1.70 and 2.40 parts per million (ppm) during the entire cruise except for high concentrations (up to 4.01 ppm) sampled during the end of the occupation of GC600 and the transit between GC600 and GC185. In conjunction with air-mass back trajectory analysis, these high concentrations are likely from a localized methane source to the atmosphere. Methane concentrations in surface seawater and methane net sea-to-air fluxes show high temporal and spatial variability within and between sites. The presence of ethane and propane in the surface seawater indicates a thermogenic source in the plume areas, suggesting the surface methane could be at least partly attributable to transport from the deepwater hydrocarbon seeps. Results from interpolations within the survey areas show the daily methane fluxes to the atmosphere at the three sites range from 0.744 to 300 mol d-1. Extrapolating the highest daily sea-to-air flux of methane to other deepwater seeps in the northern Gulf of Mexico suggests that the net diffusive sea-to-air flux from deepwater hydrocarbon seeps in this region is an insignificant source to the atmospheric methane.

  17. Hearing Loss due to Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Davari, Mohammad Hossein; Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl

    2013-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the rare causes of hearing loss which may cause reversible or irreversible, unilateral or bilateral hearing loss after acute or chronic exposure. In this report, we present a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in a secondary smelting workshop worker...

  18. Methane Sensitivity to Perturbations in Tropospheric Oxidizing Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegorova, Elena; Duncan, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and has a 25 times greater global warming potential than CO2 on a century timescale. Yet there are considerable uncertainties in the magnitude and variability of its sources and sinks. The response of the coupled non-linear methane-carbon monoxide-hydroxyl radical (OH) system is important in determining the tropospheric oxidizing capacity. Using the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) chemistry climate model, we study the response of methane to perturbations of OH and wetland emissions. We use a computationally-efficient option of the GEOS-5 CCM that includes an OH parameterization that accurately represents OH predicted by a full chemical mechanism. The OH parameterization allows for studying non-linear CH4-CO-OH feedbacks in computationally fast sensitivity experiments. We compare our results with surface observations (GMD) and discuss the range of uncertainty in OH and wetland emissions required to bring modeling results in better agreement with surface observations. Our results can be used to improve projections of methane emissions and methane growth.

  19. Microreactor for the Catalytic Partial Oxidation of Methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Widodo Wahyu Puwanto; Yuswan Muharam

    2006-01-01

    Fixed-bed reactors for the partial oxidation of methane to produce synthetic gas still pose hotspot problems. An alternative reactor, which is known as the shell-and-tube-typed microreactor, has been developed to resolve these problems. The microreactor consists of a 1 cm outside-diameter, 0.8 cm insidediameter and 11 cm length tube, and a 1.8 cm inside-diameter shell. The tube is made of dense alumina and the shell is made of quartz. Two different methods dip and spray coating were performed to line the tube side with the LaNixOy catalyst. Combustion and reforming reactions take place simultaneously in this reactor. Methane is oxidized in the tube side to produce flue gases (CO2 and H2O) which flow counter-currently and react with the remaining methane in the shell side to yield synthesis gas. The methane conversion using the higher-loading catalyst spray-coated tube reaches 97% at 700 ℃, whereas that using the lower-loading catalyst dip-coated tube reaches only 7.78% because of poor adhesion between the catalyst film and the alumina support. The turnover frequencies (TOFs) using the catalyst spray-and 900 ℃ provides better performance than that at 1250 ℃ because sintering reduces the surface-area. The hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio produced by the spray-coated catalyst is greater than the stoichiometric ratio, which is caused by carbon deposition through methane cracking or the Boudouard reaction.

  20. High Resolution Investigation of the Ethane Spectrum at 7 μ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Linda R.; Sung, K.; Di Lauro, C.; Lattanzi, F.; Vander Auwera, J.; Mantz, A. W.; Smith, M. A. H.

    2010-10-01

    A new theoretical analysis of the ethane spectrum between 1330 and 1610 cm-1 has been undertaken in order to create the first line-by-line database of molecular parameters for this spectral region. For this, high resolution spectra were obtained at room and cold (130 K) temperatures with two Bruker Fourier transform spectrometers (at 0.002 cm-1 resolution in Brussels and at 0.003 cm-1 resolution in Pasadena). Over 5000 lines were assigned to five bands in the region: v6, v8, v4+v12 and 2v4+v9 cold bands, and one hot band (v4+v8-v4). This new study employed a much improved theoretical Hamiltonian to reproduce the very complicated spectral structures resulting from numerous interactions between these vibrational modes. This advancement has enabled us to provide a quantum mechanical prediction of line positions and intensities of C2H6 at 7 micron long needed for remote sensing of outer planets and Titan. Two manuscripts are in preparation. Part of the research described in this paper was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Connecticut College, and NASA Langley under contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and with funding from FRS-FNRS in Belgium.

  1. Measurements on high temperature fuel cells with carbon monoxide-containing fuel gases; Messungen an Hochtemperatur-Brennstoffzellen mit kohlenmonoxidhaltigen Brenngasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apfel, Holger

    2012-10-10

    In the present work the different power density of anode-supported high-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (ASC-SOFCs) were examined for carbon monoxide-containing fuels. In addition to wet hydrogen / carbon monoxide mixtures the cells were run with synthetic gas mixtures resembling the products of an autothermal reformer, and actual reformate generated by a 2 kW autothermal reformer. It was found that the power-voltage characteristics of an ASC depends primarily on the open circuit voltages of different gas mixtures, but is nearly independent of the hydrogen concentration of the fuel, although the reaction rates of other potential fuels within the gas mixture, namely carbon monoxide and methane, are much lower that the hydrogen reaction rate. The probable reason is that the main fuel for the electrochemical oxidation within the cell is hydrogen, while the nickel in the base layer of the anode acts as a reformer which replenishes the hydrogen by water reduction via carbon monoxide and methane oxidation.

  2. The kinetic studies of direct methane oxidation to methanol in the plasma process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    INDARTO Antonius; CHOI Jae-Wook; LEE Hwaung; SONG Hyung Keun

    2008-01-01

    The research outlined here includes a study of methanol production from direct methane conversion by means of thermal and plasma method. The kinetic study, derived from thermal-based approach, was carried out to investigate thoroughly the possible intermediate species likely to be presented in the process. A set of plasma experiments was undertaken by using dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), classified as non-thermal plasma, done at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. Plasma proc-ess yields more methanol than thermal process at the same methane conversion rates and methane to oxygen feed ratios. Oxidation reaction of thermal process resulted CO and CO2 as the most dominant products and the selectivity reached 19% and 68%, respectively. Moreover, more CO and less CO2 were produced in plasma process than in thermal process. The selectivity of CO and CO2 by plasma was 47% and 20%, respectively. Ethane (C2H6) was detected as the only higher hydrocarbon with a signifi-cant concentration. The concentration of ethane reached 9% of the total products in plasma process and 17% in thermal process. The maximum selectivity of methanol, the target material of this research, was 12% obtained by plasma method and less than 5% by thermal process. In some certain points, the kinetic model closely matched with the experimental results.

  3. In silico search for novel methane steam reforming catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Yue; Lausche, Adam C; Wang, Shengguang

    2013-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a method for screening transition metal and metal alloy catalysts based on their predicted rates and stabilities for a given catalytic reaction. This method involves combining reaction and activation energies (available to the public via a web-based application ‘Cat......App’) with a microkinetic modeling technique to predict the rates and selectivities of a prospective material. This paper illustrates this screening technique using the steam reforming of methane to carbon monoxide and hydrogen as a test reaction. While catalysts are already commercially available for this process...

  4. Martian methane and stability of clathrates in the crust of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloesener, E.; Karatekin, Ö.; Dehant, V.

    2013-09-01

    In recent years, methane was detected in the Martian atmosphere [4, 5, 6, 7, 9]. However, its origin is still unknown at present time and several mechanisms have been suggested to explain its presence on the red planet such as volcanic activity, contribution from meteorites and comets, photolysis of water in presence of carbon monoxide, hydrogeochemical processes or biological activity [1, 2]. Whatever the process of methane formation, past or present CH4 can be stored in clathrates. These chemical compounds formed by water and gas are stable in the Martian crust and could serve as methane reservoirs. A change in temperature or pressure can lead to the dissociation of clathrates and thus the release of the trapped gas. The stability zone of clathrates approach the Martian surface with increasing latitude. Seasonal and interannual thermal oscillations could therfore destabilize clathrates at high latitude and cause the release of methane.

  5. The future of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, D.G.

    1995-12-31

    Natural gas, mainly methane, produces lower CO{sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} and particulate emissions than either oil or coal; thus further substitutions of methane for these fuels could help mitigate air pollution. Methane is, however, a potent greenhouse gas and the domestication of ruminants, cultivation of rice, mining of coal, drilling for oil, and transportation of natural gas have all contributed to a doubling of the amount of atmospheric methane since 1800. Today nearly 300,000 wells yearly produce ca. 21 trillion cubic feet of methane. Known reserves suggest about a 10 year supply at the above rates of recovery; and the potential for undiscovered resources is obscured by uncertainty involving price, new technologies, and environmental restrictions steming from the need to drill an enormous number of wells, many in ecologically sensitive areas. Until all these aspects of methane are better understood, its future role in the world`s energy mix will remain uncertain. The atomic simplicity of methane, composed of one carbon and four hydrogen atoms, may mask the complexity and importance of this, the most basic of organic molecules. Within the Earth, methane is produced through thermochemical alteration of organic materials, and by biochemical reactions mediated by metabolic processes of archaebacteria; some methane may even be primordial, a residue of planetary accretion. Methane also occurs in smaller volumes in landfills, rice paddies, termite complexes, ruminants, and even many humans. As an energy source, its full energy potential is controversial. Methane is touted by some as a viable bridge to future energy systems, fueled by the sun and uranium and carried by electricity and hydrogen.

  6. Methane Emissions from the Arctic Ocean to the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Stephen; Hermansen, Ova; Schmidbauer, Norbert; Pisso, Ignacio; Silyakova, Anna; Ferré, Benedicte; Lowry, Dave; Percival, Carl; Mienert, Jürgen; Myhre, Cathrine Lund

    2015-04-01

    The release of methane (CH4) presently stored in vast hydrate deposits under the seafloor is a potential climate tipping point and a major uncertainty in the global methane budget. Significant methane hydrate deposits are located in shallow waters in the Arctic where they may destabilise, releasing methane to the atmosphere due to ocean warming. To address this issue the Methane Emissions from Arctic Ocean to Atmosphere (MOCA, http://moca.nilu.no/) project was established in cooperation with the CAGE Centre of Excellence (http:cage.uit.no/). State-of-the-art oceanographic and atmospheric measurement techniques were applied over a large area of the Arctic including northern Norway, the Barents Sea, and areas of shallow water around Svalbard during summer 2014. Oceanographic measurements included the deployment of 63 measurement stations (temperature, salinity, density, oxygen, fluorescence, turbidity, etc.), water column sampling (CH4, nitrate, phosphate, silicates), and echo sounding (revealing locations where streams of gas bubbles are vented). Atmospheric on-line measurements were performed aboard the research vessel Helmer Hanssen (CH4, CO2, CO, meteorological parameters) and during a flight campaign (CH4, etc.). Air samples were collected for isotopic analysis (13C, 2H) and quantification of other hydrocarbons (ethane, propane, etc.). Finally, atmospheric measurements are compared with long term data sets from the nearby Zeppelin Mountain monitoring station (Ny Ålesund, Svalbard). Back-trajectory analysis and FLEXPART modelling are used to rule out non-local sources. Here we present an overview of all of these activities and the first results from MOCA in cooperation with CAGE - Centre for Arctic Gas Hydrate, and Climate at UiT, The Arctic University of Norway. We demonstrate that there are hotspots of activity where hydrocarbons are being emitted from the ocean, while in some areas emissions are surprisingly well contained by local biological and hydrological

  7. Gaseous abundances and methane supersaturation in Titan's troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuelson, Robert E.; Nath, Nitya R.; Borysow, Aleksandra

    1997-01-01

    Various properties of Titan's troposphere are inferred from an analysis of Voyager I infrared spectrometer (IRIS) data between 200 and 600/ cm. Two homogeneous spectral averages acquired at widely separated emission angles are chosen for the analysis. Both data sets are associated with northern low latitudes very close to that of the radio science ingress occultation point. Solutions require simultaneous nonlinear least-squares fits to the two IRIS data sets, coupled with iteration of the radio occultation refractivity data. Values and associated 1-sigma uncertainties of several parameters are inferred from our analysis. These include mole fractions for molecular hydrogen (approx. 0.0011), argon (small), and methane near the surface ( approx. 0.057). Solutions are also obtained for the hydrogen parafraction (close to equilibrium, with considerable uncertainty), air temperature near the surface ( approx. 93 K), surface surface temperature discontinuity (approx. 1 K), and maximum degree of methane supersaturation in the upper troposphere (approx. 1.5). Actual values for the above-mentioned parameters depend on the amount of ethane cloud near the tropopause. There is no evidence for methane clouds in the upper troposphere, nor is their presence compatible with large degrees of supersaturation. A wave number dependence for the stratospheric haze opacity is inferred similar to that found for a polymeric residue created in laboratory discharge experiments. This haze appears to be uniformly distributed with latitude between altitudes of 40 and 160 km, provided those nighttime data at southern high latitudes that are discounted.

  8. Non Methane Hydrocarbons (NMHCs) at the centre of Athens: variability and relative contribution of traffic and wood burning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panopoulou, Anastasia; Liakakou, Eleni; Psiloglou, Basil; Gros, Valerie; Bonsang, Bernard; Sauvage, Stephane; Locoge, Nadine; Lianou, Maria; Gerasopoulos, Evangelos; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2016-04-01

    Non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC) can be found in significant concentrations in urban areas. They are emitted by biogenic and anthropogenic sources like vehicle exhaust, gasoline evaporation and solvent use. Once emitted they mainly react with hydroxyl radicals (OH) and in the presence of nitrogen oxides (NOx) lead to the formation of secondary pollutants such as ozone (O3), peroxy acetyl nitrate (PAN) and secondary organic aerosols. In Great Athens Area (GAA) despite the numerous air quality issues especially with exceedances in ozone and particulate matter (PM), continuous monitoring of NMHCs is absent. This work presents the first results of a ChArMEX/TRANSEMED project dealing with VOC source apportionment and emission inventory evaluation in megacities around the Mediterranean basin. A representative site in the centre of Athens is progressively equipped with high performance instruments in order to measure continuously NMHCs (time resolution of 30 min) over a long period. The main objective of this presentation is the determination of the ambient level and temporal variability of C2-C6 NMHCs, as well as the impact of the sources controlling their variability. The importance of this work is attributed to the high time resolution measurements providing a detailed light hydrocarbons profile of the area for first time in the GAA. An automatic gas chromatograph (airmoVOC C2-C6 Chromatrap GC, Chromatotec, France) equipped with a flame ionization detector (FID) has been used for the in-situ measurements of NMHCS with two to six carbon atoms (C2-C6 NMHCs) during the period from the 16 of October to end of December 2015. In addition, meteorological and auxiliary data for major gases (CO, O3, NOx) and particulates (PM and Black Carbon (BC) are also available. Atmospheric concentrations of NMHCs range from below the detection limit to a few ppbs, for example almost 14 ppb, 20 ppb and 25 ppb for ethane, propane and acetylene respectively. Between the NMHCs being monitored

  9. The complex analytical method for assessment of passive smokers' exposure to carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czogala, Jan; Goniewicz, Maciej Lukasz

    2005-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is one of the toxic constituents in tobacco smoke. The aim of the study was to evaluate a complex analytical method that allows quantification of the exposure of passive smokers to CO. The exposed volunteers were placed in the model room where portions of cigarettes (5, 10, or 15 cigarettes every 30 or 60 min over 4 h) were smoked using a homemade smoking machine. The concentrations of CO and of the ventilation marker (methane) were monitored for the duration of each experiment. CO and methane were analyzed on-line using GC-FID with methanization. Carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) was analyzed twice: just before and after the experiment. After hemolysis of a 100-microL blood sample, CO was quantitatively released by adding 10% K3[Fe(CN)6] inside a small reactor and under stable pressure transported through a microtube with an absorbing agent on a chromatography loop. The proposed analytical method allows us to quantify exposure of passive smokers by measuring the dose-effect correlation. We observed that increasing COHb levels were directly correlated with the CO concentration in the air, but were also intermediately correlated with the frequency and number of smoked cigarettes and with the ventilation coefficient.

  10. Revisiting global fossil fuel and biofuel emissions of ethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzompa-Sosa, Z. A.; Mahieu, E.; Franco, B.; Keller, C. A.; Turner, A. J.; Helmig, D.; Fried, A.; Richter, D.; Weibring, P.; Walega, J.; Yacovitch, T. I.; Herndon, S. C.; Blake, D. R.; Hase, F.; Hannigan, J. W.; Conway, S.; Strong, K.; Schneider, M.; Fischer, E. V.

    2017-02-01

    Recent measurements over the Northern Hemisphere indicate that the long-term decline in the atmospheric burden of ethane (C2H6) has ended and the abundance increased dramatically between 2010 and 2014. The rise in C2H6 atmospheric abundances has been attributed to oil and natural gas extraction in North America. Existing global C2H6 emission inventories are based on outdated activity maps that do not account for current oil and natural gas exploitation regions. We present an updated global C2H6 emission inventory based on 2010 satellite-derived CH4 fluxes with adjusted C2H6 emissions over the U.S. from the National Emission Inventory (NEI 2011). We contrast our global 2010 C2H6 emission inventory with one developed for 2001. The C2H6 difference between global anthropogenic emissions is subtle (7.9 versus 7.2 Tg yr-1), but the spatial distribution of the emissions is distinct. In the 2010 C2H6 inventory, fossil fuel sources in the Northern Hemisphere represent half of global C2H6 emissions and 95% of global fossil fuel emissions. Over the U.S., unadjusted NEI 2011 C2H6 emissions produce mixing ratios that are 14-50% of those observed by aircraft observations (2008-2014). When the NEI 2011 C2H6 emission totals are scaled by a factor of 1.4, the Goddard Earth Observing System Chem model largely reproduces a regional suite of observations, with the exception of the central U.S., where it continues to underpredict observed mixing ratios in the lower troposphere. We estimate monthly mean contributions of fossil fuel C2H6 emissions to ozone and peroxyacetyl nitrate surface mixing ratios over North America of 1% and 8%, respectively.

  11. Partial oxidation of methane (POM) assisted solid oxide co-electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Fanglin; Wang, Yao

    2017-02-21

    Methods for simultaneous syngas generation by opposite sides of a solid oxide co-electrolysis cell are provided. The method can comprise exposing a cathode side of the solid oxide co-electrolysis cell to a cathode-side feed stream; supplying electricity to the solid oxide co-electrolysis cell such that the cathode side produces a product stream comprising hydrogen gas and carbon monoxide gas while supplying oxygen ions to an anode side of the solid oxide co-electrolysis cell; and exposing the anode side of the solid oxide co-electrolysis cell to an anode-side feed stream. The cathode-side feed stream comprises water and carbon dioxide, and the anode-side feed stream comprises methane gas such that the methane gas reacts with the oxygen ions to produce hydrogen and carbon monoxide. The cathode-side feed stream can further comprise nitrogen, hydrogen, or a mixture thereof.

  12. Utilization of coalbed methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavson, J.B. [Gustavson Associates Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Substantial progress has been made in capturing coalbed methane (CBM gas), which constitutes a valuable source of clean burning energy. It is of importance to study the various potential uses of coalbed methane and to understand the various technologies required, as well as their economics and any institutional constraints. In industrialised countries, the uses of coalbed methane are almost solely dependent on microeconomics; coalbed methane must compete for a market against natural gas and other energy sources - and frequently, coalbed methane is not competitive against other energy sources. In developing countries, on the other hand, particularly where other sources of energy are in short supply, coalbed methane economics yield positive results. Here, constraints to development of CBM utilization are mainly lack of technology and investment capital. Sociological aspects such as attitude and cultural habits, may also have a strong negative influence. This paper outlines the economics of coalbed methane utilization, particularly its competition with natural gas, and touches upon the many different uses to which coalbed methane may be applied. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Methane and Climate Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reay, D.; Smith, P.; Amstel, van A.R.

    2010-01-01

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and is estimated to be responsible for approximately one-fifth of man-made global warming. Per kilogram, it is 25 times more powerful than carbon dioxide over a 100-year time horizon -- and global warming is likely to enhance methane release from a number of sour

  14. Methane and Climate Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reay, D.; Smith, P.; Amstel, van A.R.

    2010-01-01

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and is estimated to be responsible for approximately one-fifth of man-made global warming. Per kilogram, it is 25 times more powerful than carbon dioxide over a 100-year time horizon -- and global warming is likely to enhance methane release from a number of

  15. Methane emissions from ruminants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-02-21

    Feb 21, 2011 ... Review. Livestock-environment interactions: Methane emissions from ruminants. Aluwong, T.1* ... perception of air quality by human neighbours.The three ... on the climate; the global warming potential of methane is. 21-times that of ... has serious impact on high atmosphere ozone formation. It is important ...

  16. Photosynthetic carbon monoxide metabolism by sugarcane leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kortschak, H.P.; Nickell, L.G.

    1973-01-01

    The photosynthetic carbon monoxide metabolism by sugarcane was studied to determine whether substantial quantities of CO are removed from the air by fields in Hawaii. Leaves metabolized low CO concentrations photosynthetically, with sucrose as an end product. Rates of uptake were of the order of 10/sup -4/ power mg/d sq m/hr. This was to low to be significant in removing CO from the atmosphere.

  17. Sensorineural Hearing Loss following Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P. Pillion

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A case study is presented of a 17-year-old male who sustained an anoxic brain injury and sensorineural hearing loss secondary to carbon monoxide poisoning. Audiological data is presented showing a slightly asymmetrical hearing loss of sensorineural origin and mild-to-severe degree for both ears. Word recognition performance was fair to poor bilaterally for speech presented at normal conversational levels in quiet. Management considerations of the hearing loss are discussed.

  18. Methane Emissions from Point and Area Sources in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peischl, J.; Ryerson, T. B.; Frost, G. J.; Holloway, J. S.; McKeen, S. A.; Neuman, J.; Nowak, J. B.; Pollack, I. B.; Roberts, J. M.; Trainer, M.; Parrish, D. D.

    2010-12-01

    Airborne measurements of methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), sulfur dioxide, ammonia, and nitric oxides were made aboard the NOAA WP-3D during May and June 2010, during the CalNex (Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change) field campaign based out of Ontario, California. Emission ratios of CH4 to these other trace gas species are calculated from observations downwind of point sources and compared to national emissions inventories. Further, background urban ratios of CH4 to CO are established, and enhancements from known area CH4 sources, such as rice paddies and cattle ranches, are analyzed. Finally, significant methane emissions from point sources not in emissions inventories are examined.

  19. Density Functional Theory and MP2 Calculations of the Transition States and Reaction Paths on Coupling Reaction of Methane through Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG,En-Cui(杨恩翠); ZHAO,Xiao-Jun(赵小军); TIAN,Peng(田鹏); HAO,Jin-Ku(郝金库)

    2004-01-01

    The two possible reaction paths of producing ethane on coupling reaction of methane through plasma were theoretically investigated by B3LYP and MP2 methods with 6-311G* respectively and further compared with the previous results calculated from B3LYP/6-31G*.The new investigated results consistently confirmed the previous conclusion.And the influences of the calculation methods and basis sets on the calculated results were also discussed.

  20. Evaluation of Methyl Fluoride and Dimethyl Ether as Inhibitors of Aerobic Methane Oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Oremland, Ronald S.; Culbertson, Charles W.

    1992-01-01

    Methyl fluoride (MF) and dimethyl ether (DME) were effective inhibitors of aerobic methanotrophy in a variety of soils. MF and DME blocked consumption of CH4 as well as the oxidation of 14CH4 to 14CO2, but neither MF nor DME affected the oxidation of [14C]methanol or [14C]formate to 14CO2. Cooxidation of ethane and propane by methane-oxidizing soils was also inhibited by MF. Nitrification (ammonia oxidation) in soils was inhibited by both MF and DME. Production of N2O via nitrification was in...

  1. CFD Modeling of a Laser-Induced Ethane Pyrolysis in a Wall-less Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadnichenko, Olga; Snytnikov, Valeriy; Yang, Junfeng; Matar, Omar

    2014-11-01

    Ethylene, as the most important feedstock, is widely used in chemical industry to produce various rubbers, plastics and synthetics. A recent study found the IR-laser irradiation induced ethane pyrolysis yields 25% higher ethylene production rates compared to the conventional steam cracking method. Laser induced pyrolysis is initiated by the generation of radicals upon heating of the ethane, then, followed by ethane/ethylene autocatalytic reaction in which ethane is converted into ethylene and other light hydrocarbons. This procedure is governed by micro-mixing of reactants and the feedstock residence time in reactor. Under mild turbulent conditions, the turbulence enhances the micro-mixing process and allows a high yield of ethylene. On the other hand, the high flow rate only allows a short residence time in the reactor which causes incomplete pyrolysis. This work attempts to investigate the interaction between turbulence and ethane pyrolysis process using large eddy simulation method. The modelling results could be applied to optimize the reactor design and operating conditions. Skolkovo Foundation through the UNIHEAT Project.

  2. Visualizing a Catalyst at Work during the Ignition of the Catalytic Partial Oxidation of Methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimmerle, Bertram; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Baiker, Alfons

    2009-01-01

    We present a spatiotemporal operando X-ray absorption study of a highly dynamic process, the ignition of the noble metal catalyzed partial oxidation of methane. Evolvement and propagation of the platinum component's structural changes are investigated with a high-speed X-ray camera, which in comb...... in combination with temperature profiling by IR-thermography and catalytic activity measurements by online mass spectrometry gives insight into the first stages of the ignition of the reaction toward hydrogen and carbon monoxide....

  3. Carbon monoxide total column retrievals from TROPOMI shortwave infrared measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgraf, Jochen; aan de Brugh, Joost; Scheepmaker, Remco; Borsdorff, Tobias; Hu, Haili; Houweling, Sander; Butz, Andre; Aben, Ilse; Hasekamp, Otto

    2016-10-01

    The Tropospheric Monitoring Instrument (TROPOMI) spectrometer is the single payload of the Copernicus Sentinel 5 Precursor (S5P) mission. It measures Earth radiance spectra in the shortwave infrared spectral range around 2.3 µm with a dedicated instrument module. These measurements provide carbon monoxide (CO) total column densities over land, which for clear sky conditions are highly sensitive to the tropospheric boundary layer. For cloudy atmospheres over land and ocean, the column sensitivity changes according to the light path through the atmosphere. In this study, we present the physics-based operational S5P algorithm to infer atmospheric CO columns satisfying the envisaged accuracy ( information on atmospheric scattering. For efficient processing, we deploy a linearized two-stream radiative transfer model as forward model and a profile scaling approach to adjust the CO abundance in the inversion. Based on generic measurement ensembles, including clear sky and cloudy observations, we estimated the CO retrieval precision to be ≤ 11 % for surface albedo ≥ 0.03 and solar zenith angle ≤ 70°. CO biases of ≤ 3 % are introduced by inaccuracies in the methane a priori knowledge. For strongly enhanced CO concentrations in the tropospheric boundary layer and for cloudy conditions, CO errors in the order of 8 % can be introduced by the retrieval of cloud parameters of our algorithm. Moreover, we estimated the effect of a distorted spectral instrument response due to the inhomogeneous illumination of the instrument entrance slit in the flight direction to be < 2 % with pseudo-random characteristics when averaging over space and time. Finally, the CO data exploitation is demonstrated for a TROPOMI orbit of simulated shortwave infrared measurements. Overall, the study demonstrates that for an instrument that performs in compliance with the pre-flight specifications, the CO product will meet the required product performance well.

  4. Highly selective oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane with supported molten chloride catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaertner, C.A.; Veen, A.C. van; Lercher, J.A. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Catalysis Research Center

    2011-07-01

    Ethene production is one of the most important transformations in chemical industry, given that C{sub 2}H{sub 4} serves as building block for many mass-market products. Besides conventional thermal processes like steam cracking of ethane, ethane can be produced selectively by catalytic processes. One of the classes of catalysts that have been reported in literature as active and highly selective for the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane is that of supported molten chloride catalysts, containing an alkali chloride overlayer on a solid support. This work deals with fundamental aspects of the catalytic action in latter class of catalysts. Results from kinetic reaction studies are related to observations in detailed characterization and lead to a comprehensive mechanistic understanding. Of fundamental importance towards mechanistic insights is the oxygen storage capacity of the catalysts that has been determined by transient step experiments. (orig.)

  5. Organic peroxide production in the Cl2-ethane-air photoreaction system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    HPLC along with FT-IR technique was used to study the formationof organic peroxides in the Cl2-ethane-air photoreaction system. Ethyl hydroperoxide (CH3CH2OOH, EHP) and peroxyacetic acid ( CH3C(O)OOH, PAA) were conformed to be the peroxide product in the reaction system. In addition, methyl hydroperoxide (CH3OOH, MHP), hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide (HOCH2OOH, HMHP) and two unidentified organic peroxides were detected for the first time. EHP and MHP were the dominant peroxide products. The identification of HMHP showed that Criegee biradical CH2OO may be formed as an intermediate in the oxidation of ethane. Simulation results showed that photo-oxidation of ethane may make substantial contribution to source of organic peroxides in the atmos-phere.

  6. An Overview of Recent Advances of the Catalytic Selective Oxidation of Ethane to Oxygenates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Armstrong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The selective partial oxidation of short chain alkanes is a key challenge within catalysis research. Direct ethane oxidation to oxygenates is a difficult aim, but potentially rewarding, and it could lead to a paradigm shift in the supply chain of several bulk chemicals. Unfortunately, low C–H bond reactivity and kinetically labile products are just some reasons affecting the development and commercialisation of such processes. Research into direct ethane oxidation is therefore disparate, with approaches ranging from oxidation in the gas phase at high temperatures to enzyme catalysed hydroxylation under ambient conditions. Furthermore, in overcoming the barrier posed by the chemically inert C–H bond a range of oxidants have been utilised. Despite years of research, this remains an intriguing topic from both academic and commercial perspectives. Herein we describe some recent developments within the field of catalytic ethane oxidation focusing on the formation of oxygenated products, whilst addressing the key challenges which are still to be overcome.

  7. Metal oxides modified NiO catalysts for oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane to ethylene

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Haibo

    2014-06-01

    The sol-gel method was applied to the synthesis of Zr, Ti, Mo, W, and V modified NiO based catalysts for the ethane oxidative dehydrogenation reaction. The synthesized catalysts were characterized by XRD, N2 adsorption, SEM and TPR techniques. The results showed that the doping metals could be highly dispersed into NiO domains without the formation of large amount of other bulk metal oxide. The modified NiO materials have small particle size, larger surface area, and higher reduction temperature in contrast to pure NiO. The introduction of group IV, V and VI transition metals into NiO decreases the catalytic activity in ethane ODH. However, the ethylene selectivity is enhanced with the highest level for the Ni-W-O and Ni-Ti-O catalysts. As a result, these two catalysts show improved efficiency of ethylene production in the ethane ODH reaction. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Compact Instrument for Measurement of Atmospheric Carbon Monoxide Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Southwest Sciences proposed the development of a rugged, compact, and automated instrument for the high sensitivity measurement of tropospheric carbon monoxide...

  9. Cobalt--zirconia catalysts for the synthesis of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulanova, T.F.; Lapidus, A.L.

    1972-01-01

    Laboratory and pilot plant experiments were done in order to replace thoria by more readily available and biologically inactive promoters in kieselguhr-supported cobalt and cobalt-magnesia catalysts. Maximum activity, stability, and yields of ceresins boiling above 460/sup 0/C were obtained with a zirconia-cobalt weight ratio of 1:10. The activity of this catalyst remained spectacularly high for five months. The optimum reaction temperature was 190/sup 0/C at 8 to 9 atm pressure of the carbon monoxide-hydrogen mixture. The experimental procedures and the chemical and grain-size composition of five catalysts are given, as well as the yields of methane, C/sub 2-4/fraction, gasoline, oils, and ceresin.

  10. Electrochemical Reduction of 1,2-Di(p-tolylimino)ethane and 1,2-Di(2,4-dimethylphenylimino)ethane in Dimethylformamide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FOTOUHI, Lida; ZEIENALI, Mahbobeh; DEHGHANPOUR, Saeed; NEMATOLLAHI, Davood

    2007-01-01

    1,2-Di(p-tolylimino)ethane (Ⅰ) and 1,2-Di(2,4-dimethylphenylimino)ethane (Ⅱ) were synthesized and their electrochemical behavior investigated in dimethylformamide using classical voltammetry, differential pulse voltammetry, cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, controlled potential electrolysis and coulometry. Both bis-Schiff base ligands examined show a cathodic irreversible peak which corresponds to one-electron reduction of the substrate to form anion radical. According to the fact obtained from cyclic voltammetry, that the current function(ip/v1/2) is a decreasing function of the scan rate, it can be concluded that there is a following coupling chemical reaction (EC mechanism). Thus, the most probable mechanism of electroreduction of both ligands is the coupling of two radicals to form a dimer.

  11. Methane as a biomarker in the search for extraterrestrial life: Lessons learned from Mars analog hypersaline environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebout, B.; Tazaz, A.; Kelley, C. A.; Poole, J. A.; Davila, A.; Chanton, J.

    2010-12-01

    Methane released from discrete regions on Mars, together with previous reports of methane determined with ground-based telescopes, has revived the possibility of past or even extant life near the surface on Mars, since 90% of the methane on Earth has a biological origin. This intriguing possibility is supported by the abundant evidence of large bodies of liquid water, and therefore of conditions conducive to the origin of life, early in the planet's history. The detection and analysis of methane is at the core of NASA’s strategies to search for life in the solar system, and on extrasolar planets. Because methane is also produced abiotically, it is important to generate criteria to unambiguously assess biogenicity. The stable carbon and hydrogen isotopic signature of methane, as well as its ratio to other low molecular weight hydrocarbons (the methane/(ethane + propane) ratio: C1/(C2 + C3)), has been suggested to be diagnostic for biogenic methane. We report measurements of the concentrations and stable isotopic signature of methane from hypersaline environments. We focus on hypersaline environments because spectrometers orbiting Mars have detected widespread chloride bearing deposits resembling salt flats. Other evaporitic minerals, e.g., sulfates, are also abundant in several regions, including those studied by the Mars Exploration Rovers. The presence of evaporitic minerals, together with the known evolution of the Martian climate, from warmer and wetter to cold and hyper-arid, suggest that evaporitic and hypersaline environments were common in the past. Hypersaline environments examined to date include salt ponds located in Baja California, the San Francisco Bay, and the Atacama Desert. Methane was found in gas produced both in the sediments, and in gypsum- and halite-hosted (endolithic) microbial communities. Maximum methane concentrations were as high as 40% by volume. The methane carbon isotopic (δ13C) composition showed a wide range of values, from about

  12. Nickel-containing catalysts for methane oxidation to synthesis gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusman Dossumov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas was studied on oxides of metals of variable valence (Mn, La, Cr and Ni, supported on a carrier – ɣ-Al2O3. Among the catalysts studied, the sample of 3% Ni/ɣ-Al2O3 showed the best characteristics by yields of hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the reaction of partial oxidation of methane. The optimal conditions of the process (the reaction temperature of 850 °C, the volume rate of 4500 h-1, and the ratio CH4: O2 = 2:1 cause the increase the concentration of hydrogen and carbon monoxide to 72.2 and 75.3%, respectively. The effect of the heat-treatment temperature and textural characteristics of the Ni/ ɣ-Al2O3 catalyst on its catalytic activity was studied. The NiCe/Al2O3 catalyst developed showed a high stability during 30 hours.

  13. Vapor liquid equilibrium constants through a non-equation of state approach: methane-free aliphatic binary systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiung, T.H.; Thodos, G.

    1975-06-01

    Northwestern University developed an alternate method to help predict vapor-liquid equilibrium constants without an equation of state by using the fundamental properties associated with the pure-state components and the critical pressure of the mixture. The method consists of developing correlations to help predict K-constants for other aliphatic binary mixtures not containing methane from vapor-liquid equilibrium measurements available in the literature for the 3 binaries of the system ethane-butane-heptane. This approach was tested for 7 other binaries (ethane/n-hexane, propane/i-butane, propane/i-butane, propane/n-pentane, propane/i-pentane, poprane/n-decane, and propylene/i-butane). The K-values obtained displayed good agreement with experimental measurements, especially in the vicinity of the critical point.

  14. A Southern Hemisphere atmospheric history of carbon monoxide from South Pole firn air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhulst, K. R.; Aydin, M.; Novelli, P. C.; Holmes, C. D.; Prather, M. J.; Saltzman, E. S.

    2013-12-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a reactive trace gas and is important to tropospheric photochemistry as a major sink of hydroxyl radicals (OH). Major sources of CO are fossil fuel combustion, linked mostly to automotive emissions, biomass burning, and oxidation of atmospheric methane. Understanding changes in carbon monoxide over the past century will improve our understanding of man's influence on the reactivity of the atmosphere. Little observational information is available about CO levels and emissions prior to the 1990s, particularly for the Southern Hemisphere. The NOAA global flask network provides the most complete instrumental record of CO, extending back to 1988. Annually averaged surface flask measurements suggest atmospheric CO levels at South Pole were relatively stable from 2004-2009 at about 51 nmol mol-1 [Novelli and Masarie, 2013]. In this study, a 20th century atmospheric history of CO is reconstructed from South Pole firn air measurements, using a 1-D firn air diffusion model. Firn air samples were collected in glass flasks from two adjacent holes drilled from the surface to 118 m at South Pole, Antarctica during the 2008/2009 field season and CO analysis was carried out by NOAA/CCG. Carbon monoxide levels increase from about 45 nmol mol-1 in the deepest firn sample at 116 m to 52 nmol mol-1 at 107 m, and remain constant at about 51-52 nmol mol-1 at shallower depths. Atmospheric histories based on the firn air reconstructions suggest that CO levels over Antarctica increased by roughly 40% (from about 36 to 50 nmol mol-1) between 1930-1990, at a rate of about 0.18 nmol mol-1 yr-1. Firn air and surface air results suggest the rate of CO increase at South Pole slowed considerably after 1990. The firn air-based atmospheric history is used to infer changes in Southern Hemisphere CO emissions over the 20th century.

  15. Methane prediction in collieries

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Creedy, DP

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available The primary aim of the project was to assess the current status of research on methane emission prediction for collieries in South Africa in comparison with methods used and advances achieved elsewhere in the world....

  16. Analysis of Carbon Monoxide in Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddle, Benjamin P.; Stephens, Joseph C.

    2003-04-01

    Forensic tests used to perform the qualitative and quantitative analyses of carbon monoxide in blood are described. The qualitative test uses the diffusion of CO, which is released from blood by reaction with H2SO4, into a PdCl2 solution in a Conway cell and the resultant formation of a palladium mirror. The quantitative analysis is based on the absorption of visible light by carboxyhemoglobin at 541 nm and reduced hemoglobin at 555 nm. Both procedures are suitable for undergraduate chemistry experiments.

  17. Chemical Looping Combustion of Hematite Ore with Methane and Steam in a Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Bayham

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Chemical looping combustion is considered an indirect method of oxidizing a carbonaceous fuel, utilizing a metal oxide oxygen carrier to provide oxygen to the fuel. The advantage is the significantly reduced energy penalty for separating out the CO2 for reuse or sequestration in a carbon-constrained world. One of the major issues with chemical looping combustion is the cost of the oxygen carrier. Hematite ore is a proposed oxygen carrier due to its high strength and resistance to mechanical attrition, but its reactivity is rather poor compared to tailored oxygen carriers. This problem is further exacerbated by methane cracking, the subsequent deposition of carbon and the inability to transfer oxygen at a sufficient rate from the core of the particle to the surface for fuel conversion to CO2. Oxygen needs to be readily available at the surface to prevent methane cracking. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate the use of steam to overcome this issue and improve the conversion of the natural gas to CO2, as well as to provide data for computational fluid dynamics (CFD validation. The steam will gasify the deposited carbon to promote the methane conversion. This work studies the performance of hematite ore with methane and steam mixtures in a 5 cm fluidized bed up to approximately 140 kPa. Results show an increased conversion of methane in the presence of steam (from 20–45% without steam to 60–95% up to a certain point, where performance decreases. Adding steam allows the methane conversion to carbon dioxide to be similar to the overall methane conversion; it also helped to prevent carbon accumulation from occurring on the particle. In general, the addition of steam to the feed gas increased the methane conversion. Furthermore, the addition of steam caused the steam methane reforming reaction to form more hydrogen and carbon monoxide at higher steam and methane concentrations, which was not completely converted at higher concentrations and

  18. Occurrence and origin of methane in groundwater in Alberta (Canada): Gas geochemical and isotopic approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humez, P., E-mail: phumez@ucalgary.ca [Department of Geoscience, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Mayer, B.; Ing, J.; Nightingale, M.; Becker, V.; Kingston, A. [Department of Geoscience, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); Akbilgic, O. [Department of Geoscience, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada); UTHSC-ORNL Center for Biomedical Informatics, 910 Madison Avenue, Memphis, TN, 38104 (United States); Taylor, S. [Department of Geoscience, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    To assess potential future impacts on shallow aquifers by leakage of natural gas from unconventional energy resource development it is essential to establish a reliable baseline. Occurrence of methane in shallow groundwater in Alberta between 2006 and 2014 was assessed and was ubiquitous in 186 sampled monitoring wells. Free and dissolved gas sampling and measurement approaches yielded comparable results with low methane concentrations in shallow groundwater, but in 28 samples from 21 wells methane exceeded 10 mg/L in dissolved gas and 300,000 ppmv in free gas. Methane concentrations in free and dissolved gas samples were found to increase with well depth and were especially elevated in groundwater obtained from aquifers containing coal seams and shale units. Carbon isotope ratios of methane averaged − 69.7 ± 11.1‰ (n = 63) in free gas and − 65.6 ± 8.9‰ (n = 26) in dissolved gas. δ{sup 13}C values were not found to vary with well depth or lithology indicating that methane in Alberta groundwater was derived from a similar source. The low δ{sup 13}C values in concert with average δ{sup 2}H{sub CH4} values of − 289 ± 44‰ (n = 45) suggest that most methane was of biogenic origin predominantly generated via CO{sub 2} reduction. This interpretation is confirmed by dryness parameters typically > 500 due to only small amounts of ethane and a lack of propane in most samples. Comparison with mud gas profile carbon isotope data revealed that methane in the investigated shallow groundwater in Alberta is isotopically similar to hydrocarbon gases found in 100–250 meter depths in the WCSB and is currently not sourced from thermogenic hydrocarbon occurrences in deeper portions of the basin. The chemical and isotopic data for methane gas samples obtained from Alberta groundwater provide an excellent baseline against which potential future impact of deeper stray gases on shallow aquifers can be assessed. - Highlights: • Analysis of gas geochemical data from 186

  19. Genetic and temporal relations between formation waters and biogenic methane: Upper Devonian Antrim Shale, Michigan Basin, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, A. M.; Walter, L. M.; Budai, J. M.; Ku, T. C. W.; Kaiser, C. J.; Schoell, M.

    1998-05-01

    Controversy remains regarding how well geochemical criteria can distinguish microbial from thermogenic methane. Natural gas in most conventional deposits has migrated from a source rock to a reservoir, rarely remaining associated with the original or cogenetic formation waters. We investigated an unusual gas reservoir, the Late Devonian Antrim Shale, in which large volumes of variably saline water are coproduced with gas. The Antrim Shale is organic-rich, of relatively low thermal maturity, extensively fractured, and is both source and reservoir for methane that is generated dominantly by microbial activity. This hydrogeologic setting permits integration of chemical and isotopic compositions of coproduced water and gas, providing a unique opportunity to characterize methane generating mechanisms. The well-developed fracture network provides a conduit for gas and water mass transport within the Antrim Shale and allows invasion of meteoric water from overlying aquifers in the glacial drift. Steep regional concentration gradients in chemical and isotopic data are observed for formation waters and gases; dilute waters grade into dense brines (300,000 ppm) over lateral distances of less than 30 km. Radiogenic ( 14C and 3H) and stable isotope ( 18O and D) analyses of shallow Antrim Shale formation waters and glacial drift groundwaters indicate recharge times from modern to 20,000 yr BP. Carbon isotope compositions of methane from Antrim Shale wells are typical of the established range for thermogenic or mixed gas (δ 13C = -47 to -56‰). However, the unusually high δ 13C values of CO 2 coproduced with methane (˜+22‰) and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in formation waters (˜+28‰) require bacterial mediation. The δD values of methane and coproduced formation water provide the strongest evidence of bacterial methanogenesis. Methane/[ethane + propane] ratios and δ 13C values for ethane indicate: (1) the presence of a thermogenic gas component that increases

  20. [Carbon monoxide poisoning by a heating system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Eric; Gehl, Axel; Friedrich, Peter; Kappus, Stefan; Petter, Franz; Maurer, Klaus; Püschel, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    A case of accidental carbon monoxide poisoning in several occupants of two neighboring residential buildings in Hamburg-Harburg (Germany) caused by a defective gas central heating system is described. Because of leaks in one of the residential buildings and the directly adjacent wall of the neighboring house, the gas could spread and accumulated in both residential buildings, which resulted in a highly dangerous situation. Exposure to the toxic gas caused mild to severe intoxication in 15 persons. Three victims died still at the site of the accident. Measures to protect the occupants were taken only with a great delay. As symptoms were unspecific, it was not realized that the various alarms given by persons involved in the accident were related to the same cause. In order to take appropriate measures in time it is indispensible to recognize, assess and check potential risks, which can be done by using carbon monoxide warning devices and performing immediate COHb measurements with special pulse oximeters on site. Moreover, the COHb content in the blood should be routinely determined in all patients admitted to an emergency department with unspecific symptoms.

  1. Observations of iodine monoxide columns from satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schönhardt

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Iodine species in the troposphere are linked to ozone depletion and new particle formation. In this study, a full year of iodine monoxide (IO columns retrieved from measurements of the SCIAMACHY satellite instrument is presented, coupled with a discussion of their uncertainties and the detection limits. The largest amounts of IO are found near springtime in the Antarctic. A seasonal variation of iodine monoxide in Antarctica is revealed with high values in springtime, slightly less IO in the summer period and again larger amounts in autumn. In winter, no elevated IO levels are found in the areas accessible to satellite measurements. This seasonal cycle is in good agreement with recent ground-based measurements in Antarctica. In the Arctic region, no elevated IO levels were found in the period analysed. This implies that different conditions with respect to iodine release exist in the two Polar Regions. To investigate possible release mechanisms, comparisons of IO columns with those of tropospheric BrO, and ice coverage are described and discussed. Some parallels and interesting differences between IO and BrO temporal and spatial distributions are identified. Overall, the large spatial coverage of satellite retrieved IO data and the availability of a long-term dataset provide new insight about the abundances and distributions of iodine compounds in the troposphere.

  2. Methane Emissions from Upland Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megonigal, Patrick; Pitz, Scott; Wang, Zhi-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Global budgets ascribe 4-10% of atmospheric methane sinks to upland soils and assume that soils are the sole surface for methane exchange between upland forests and the atmosphere. The dogma that upland forests are uniformly atmospheric methane sinks was challenged a decade ago by the discovery of abiotic methane production from plant tissue. Subsequently a variety of relatively cryptic microbial and non-microbial methane sources have been proposed that have the potential to emit methane in upland forests. Despite the accumulating evidence of potential methane sources, there are few data demonstrating actual emissions of methane from a plant surface in an upland forest. We report direct observations of methane emissions from upland tree stems in two temperate forests. Stem methane emissions were observed from several tree species that dominate a forest located on the mid-Atlantic coast of North America (Maryland, USA). Stem emissions occurred throughout the growing season while soils adjacent to the trees simultaneously consumed methane. Scaling fluxes by stem surface area suggested the forest was a net methane source during a wet period in June, and that stem emissions offset 5% of the soil methane sink on an annual basis. High frequency measurements revealed diurnal cycles in stem methane emission rates, pointing to soils as the methane source and transpiration as the most likely pathway for gas transport. Similar observations were made in an upland forest in Beijing, China. However, in this case the evidence suggested the methane was not produced in soils, but in the heartwood by microbial or non-microbial processes. These data challenge the concept that forests are uniform sinks of methane, and suggest that upland forests are smaller methane sinks than previously estimated due to stem emissions. Tree emissions may be particularly important in upland tropical forests characterized by high rainfall and transpiration.

  3. Nitric oxide and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity of the lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, I. van der

    2006-01-01

    The single breath diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) is measure for gas uptake by the lung, and consists of a membrane and a vascular component. Nitric oxide (NO) binds 400 times faster to hemoglobin than carbon monoxide, thus the uptake of NO by the blood is very large.

  4. Nitric oxide and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity of the lung

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, I. van der

    2006-01-01

    The single breath diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) is measure for gas uptake by the lung, and consists of a membrane and a vascular component. Nitric oxide (NO) binds 400 times faster to hemoglobin than carbon monoxide, thus the uptake of NO by the blood is very large. There

  5. Fatal carbon monoxide intoxication after acetylene gas welding of pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonsson, Ann-Beth; Christensson, Bengt; Berge, Johan; Sjögren, Bengt

    2013-06-01

    Acetylene gas welding of district heating pipes can result in exposure to high concentrations of carbon monoxide. A fatal case due to intoxication is described. Measurements of carbon monoxide revealed high levels when gas welding a pipe with closed ends. This fatality and these measurements highlight a new hazard, which must be promptly prevented.

  6. Real World of Industrial Chemistry: Organic Chemicals from Carbon Monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolb, Kenneth E.; Kolb, Doris

    1983-01-01

    Carbon Monoxide obtained from coal may serve as the source for a wide variety of organic compounds. Several of these compounds are discussed, including phosgene, benzaldehyde, methanol, formic acid and its derivatives, oxo aldehydes, acrylic acids, and others. Commercial reactions of carbon monoxide are highlighted in a table. (JN)

  7. Determination of the Rotational Barrier in Ethane by Vibrational Spectroscopy and Statistical Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercolani, Gianfranco

    2005-01-01

    The finite-difference boundary-value method is a numerical method suited for the solution of the one-dimensional Schrodinger equation encountered in problems of hindered rotation. Further, the application of the method, in combination with experimental results for the evaluation of the rotational energy barrier in ethane is presented.

  8. A co-crystal between benzene and ethane: a potential evaporite material for Saturn's moon Titan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen E. Maynard-Casely

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Using synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction, the structure of a co-crystal between benzene and ethane formed in situ at cryogenic conditions has been determined, and validated using dispersion-corrected density functional theory calculations. The structure comprises a lattice of benzene molecules hosting ethane molecules within channels. Similarity between the intermolecular interactions found in the co-crystal and in pure benzene indicate that the C—H...π network of benzene is maintained in the co-crystal, however, this expands to accommodate the guest ethane molecules. The co-crystal has a 3:1 benzene:ethane stoichiometry and is described in the space group R\\bar 3 with a = 15.977 (1 Å and c = 5.581 (1 Å at 90 K, with a density of 1.067 g cm−3. The conditions under which this co-crystal forms identify it is a potential that forms from evaporation of Saturn's moon Titan's lakes, an evaporite material.

  9. Search of medical literature for indoor carbon monoxide exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, T.; Ivanovich, M.

    1995-12-01

    This report documents a literature search on carbon monoxide. The search was limited to the medical and toxicological databases at the National Library of Medicine (MEDLARS). The databases searched were Medline, Toxline and TOXNET. Searches were performed using a variety of strategies. Combinations of the following keywords were used: carbon, monoxide, accidental, residential, occult, diagnosis, misdiagnosis, heating, furnace, and indoor. The literature was searched from 1966 to the present. Over 1000 references were identified and summarized using the following abbreviations: The major findings of the search are: (1) Acute and subacute carbon monoxide exposures result in a large number of symptoms affecting the brain, kidneys, respiratory system, retina, and motor functions. (2) Acute and subacute carbon monoxide (CO) poisonings have been misdiagnosed on many occasions. (3) Very few systematic investigations have been made into the frequency and consequences of carbon monoxide poisonings.

  10. Hydrocarbon emissions and characterization of methane sources in the Barnett Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, J. E.; Townsend-Small, A.; Meinardi, S.; Blake, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    As energy demand and costs continue to rise worldwide, so does the development of energy from natural gas. The United States in particular has expanded its natural gas industry, becoming one of the world's top gas producing countries. The Barnett Shale of northern Texas is one of the most developed and productive natural gas shale plays in the United States. However, emissions from the many oil and gas system components in the region have not been fully characterized. An extensive list of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) was measured from 120 whole air canisters collected throughout the Barnett shale in October 2013. Known methane sources were targeted and included oil and natural gas well pads, compressor stations, distribution pipelines and city gates, cattle feedlots and landfills. C1-C5 alkanes were elevated throughout the region and were similar to or greater than concentrations in major U.S. cities. The VOC source signature for oil and gas operations was distinguished from biogenic sources. Average ethane content relative to methane was calculated for each of the source types, and ranged from 0.7 to 12.8%. For the whole region, the ethane content was 7.2±6.1%, illustrating the high variability and effect of the various hydrocarbon sources on the local air.

  11. Methane Conversion to C2 Hydrocarbons in Solid State Oxide Electrolyte Membrane Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jun; ZHAO Ling; ZHU Zhong-nan; XI Dan-li

    2005-01-01

    Provskite-type catalysts, Ln0.6 Sr0.4 FexCo1-x O3 (Ln = Nd,Pr, Gd, Sm, La, 0<x<1) and Ln0.8Na0.2CoO3(Ln= La,Gd, Sm) were synthesized, their catalytic properties in the oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) were examined in a fixed-bed reactor. The former group presented higher activity in the OCM, but the main product was carbon dioxide. While the later group showed lower activity but much higher selectivity to C2 hydrocarbons compared with the former. Electrochemical measurements were conducted in a solid oxide membrane reactor with La0.8 Na0.2CoO3 as catalyst. The results showed that methane was oxidized to carbon dioxide and ethane by two parallel reactions. Ethane was oxidized to ethene and carbon dioxide. A fraction of ethene was oxidized deeply to carbon dioxide. The total selectivity to C2 hydrocarbons exceeded 70%. Based on the experimental results, a kinetic model was suggested to describe the reaction results.

  12. Deep Sediment-Sourced Methane Contribution to Shallow Sediment Organic Carbon: Atwater Valley, Texas-Louisiana Shelf, Gulf of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard B. Coffin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Coastal methane hydrate deposits are globally abundant. There is a need to understand the deep sediment sourced methane energy contribution to shallow sediment carbon relative to terrestrial sources and phytoplankton. Shallow sediment and porewater samples were collected from Atwater Valley, Texas-Louisiana Shelf, Gulf of Mexico near a seafloor mound feature identified in geophysical surveys as an elevated bottom seismic reflection. Geochemical data revealed off-mound methane diffusion and active fluid advection on-mound. Gas composition (average methane/ethane ratio ~11,000 and isotope ratios of methane on the mound (average δ13CCH4(g = −71.2‰; D14CCH4(g = −961‰ indicate a deep sediment, microbial source. Depleted sediment organic carbon values on mound (δ13CSOC = −25.8‰; D14CSOC = −930‰ relative to off-mound (δ13CSOC = −22.5‰; D14CSOC = −629‰ suggest deep sourced ancient carbon is incorporated into shallow sediment organic matter. Porewater and sediment data indicate inorganic carbon fixed during anaerobic oxidation of methane is a dominant contributor to on-mound shallow sediment organic carbon cycling. A simple stable carbon isotope mass balance suggests carbon fixation of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC associated with anaerobic oxidation of hydrate-sourced CH4 contributes up to 85% of shallow sediment organic carbon.

  13. Equilibrium clumped-isotope effects in doubly substituted isotopologues of ethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Michael A.; Wang, Yimin; Braams, Bastiaan J.; Bowman, Joel M.; Miller, Thomas F.

    2017-01-01

    We combine path-integral Monte Carlo methods with a new intramolecular potential energy surface to quantify the equilibrium enrichment of doubly substituted ethane isotopologues due to clumped-isotope effects. Ethane represents the simplest molecule to simultaneously exhibit 13C-13C, 13C-D, and D-D clumped-isotope effects, and the analysis of corresponding signatures may provide useful geochemical and biogeochemical proxies of formation temperatures or reaction pathways. Utilizing path-integral statistical mechanics, we predict equilibrium fractionation factors that fully incorporate nuclear quantum effects, such as anharmonicity and rotational-vibrational coupling which are typically neglected by the widely used Urey model. The magnitude of the calculated fractionation factors for the doubly substituted ethane isotopologues indicates that isotopic clumping can be observed if rare-isotope substitutions are separated by up to three chemical bonds, but the diminishing strength of these effects suggests that enrichment at further separations will be negligible. The Urey model systematically underestimates enrichment due to 13C-D and D-D clumped-isotope effects in ethane, leading to small relative errors in the apparent equilibrium temperature, ranging from 5 K at 273.15 K to 30 K at 873.15 K. We additionally note that the rotameric dependence of isotopologue enrichment must be carefully considered when using the Urey model, whereas the path-integral calculations automatically account for such effects due to configurational sampling. These findings are of direct relevance to future clumped-isotope studies of ethane, as well as studies of 13C-13C, 13C-D, and D-D clumped-isotope effects in other hydrocarbons.

  14. Na-montmorillonite hydrates under ethane rich reservoirs: NPzzT and MuPzzT simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Odriozola, G; Lopez-Lemus, J

    2005-01-01

    Na-montmorillonite hydrates in presence of ethane molecules are studied by means of hybrid Monte Carlo simulations in the NPzzT and MuPzzT ensembles. The NPzzT ensemble allows us to study the interlaminar distance as a function of water and ethane content. These data show clear plateaus for lower ethane contents and mainly for water contents consistent with the formation of a single water layer. In addition, from this ensemble the structure for some of these interlaminar compositions were analyzed. For systems containing few ethane molecules and water enough to complete a single layer, it was observed that ethane mainly situates close to the interlayer midplane and adopts a nearly parallel arrangement to the clay surface. On the other hand, the MuPzzT ensemble allows us to determine the interlaminar distance and water-ethane content for any specific reservoir. Here, some important findings are the following: the partial exchange of water by ethane molecules that enhances for decreasing the water vapor pressur...

  15. Direct catalytic conversion of methane and light hydrocarbon gases. Final report, October 1, 1986--July 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Posin, B.M.; Chan, Yee-Wai

    1995-06-01

    This project explored conversion of methane to useful products by two techniques that do not involve oxidative coupling. The first approach was direct catalytic dehydrocoupling of methane to give hydrocarbons and hydrogen. The second approach was oxidation of methane to methanol by using heterogenized versions of catalysts that were developed as homogeneous models of cytochrome-P450, an enzyme that actively hydroxylates hydrocarbons by using molecular oxygen. Two possibilities exist for dehydrocoupling of methane to higher hydrocarbons: The first, oxidative coupling to ethane/ethylene and water, is the subject of intense current interest. Nonoxidative coupling to higher hydrocarbons and hydrogen is endothermic, but in the absence of coke formation the theoretical thermodynamic equilibrium yield of hydrocarbons varies from 25% at 827{degrees}C to 65% at 1100{degrees}C (at atmospheric pressure). In this project we synthesized novel, highly dispersed metal catalysts by attaching metal clusters to inorganic supports. The second approach mimics microbial metabolism of methane to produce methanol. The methane mono-oxygenase enzyme responsible for the oxidation of methane to methanol in biological systems has exceptional selectivity and very good rates. Enzyme mimics are systems that function as the enzymes do but overcome the problems of slow rates and poor stability. Most of that effort has focused on mimics of cytochrome P-450, which is a very active selective oxidation enzyme and has a metalloporphyrin at the active site. The interest in nonporphyrin mimics coincides with the interest in methane mono-oxygenase, whose active site has been identified as a {mu}-oxo dinuclear iron complex.We employed mimics of cytochrome P-450, heterogenized to provide additional stability. The oxidation of methane with molecular oxygen was investigated in a fixed-bed, down-flow reactor with various anchored metal phthalocyanines (PC) and porphyrins (TPP) as the catalysts.

  16. Reduction of carbon monoxide. Past research summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrock, R.R.

    1981-10-01

    Research programs for the year on the preparation, characterization, and reactions of binuclear tantalum complexes are described. All evidence to date suggest the following of these dimeric molecules: (1) the dimer does not break into monomers under mild conditions; (2) intermolecular hydride exchange is not negligible, but it is slow; (3) intermolecular non-ionic halide exchange is fast; (4) the ends of the dimers can rotate partially with respect to one another. The binuclear tantalum hydride complexes were found to react with carbon monoxide to give a molecule which is the only example of reduction of CO by a transition metal hydride to give a complex containing a CHO ligand. Isonitrides also reacted in a similar manner with dimeric tantalum hydride. (ATT)

  17. Research on the Influence of Hydrogen and Carbon Monoxide on Methane HCCI Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Susumu; Yamasaki, Yudai; Kawamura, Hideo; Iida, Norimasa

    In this research, the influence on natural gas combustion of H2 and CO was investigated by numerical calculations with elementary reactions. The investigation was carried out using the following procedures: 1. To research basic oxidation characteristics of CH4/H2/CO mixed fuel, parametric calculations for initial temperature were carried out. 2. For investigation of the effect of H2 and CO on CH4 combustion, the calculations with H2 and CO initial mole fraction variation was carried out. As a result, it was clarified that the oxidation temperature of CO was higher than that of CH4 and H2, the increase of H2 initial fraction has the effect to advance CH4 ignition timing, and increase of the CO fraction, under the condition that only CO was added, has the opposite effect of H2 addition.

  18. Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide and methane at an immobilized cobalt protoporphyrin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, J.; Kortlever, R.; Kas, Recep; Mul, Guido; Koper, M.T.M.

    2015-01-01

    The electrochemical conversion of carbon dioxide and water into useful products is a major challenge in facilitating a closed carbon cycle. Here we report a cobalt protoporphyrin immobilized on a pyrolytic graphite electrode that reduces carbon dioxide in an aqueous acidic solution at relatively low

  19. Calibration of an open-path FTIR spectrometer for methane, ethylene and carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamp, T.; Radmacher, M.; Weber, K. [Fachhochschule Duesseldorf (Germany); Gaertner, A.; Nitz, R.; Broeker, G. [Environmental State Agency of Northrhine Westphalia, Essen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    A calibration experiment was performed by the Fachhochschule Duesseldorf co-working with the official calibration laboratory of the Environmental State Agency of Northrhine Westphalia. This was the first calibration of an OP-FTIR spectrometer at an official calibration laboratory in Germany. The calibration measurements are carried out along the standard ISO/DIS 9169, ``Air quality - Determination of performance characteristics of measurement methods``. A multipass cell with a light path of 20m was used. During these measurements the deviation between the calibration gas concentration and the measured concentration was increasing rapidly with higher concentration. This indicates a not linear calibration function of the used OP-FTIR spectrometer and might be addressed to the used spectral resolution of 1.0 wave numbers. The calibration measurement are still continued for other gases. The detailed results will be presented in this presentation.

  20. Quenching of Carbon Monoxide and Methane in the Atmospheres of Cool Brown Dwarfs and Hot Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Visscher, Channon

    2011-01-01

    We explore CO-CH4 quench kinetics in the atmospheres of substellar objects using updated time-scale arguments, as suggested by a thermochemical kinetics and diffusion model that transitions from the thermochemical-equilibrium regime in the deep atmosphere to a quench-chemical regime at higher altitudes. More specifically, we examine CO quench chemistry on the T dwarf Gliese 229B and CH4 quench chemistry on the hot-Jupiter HD 189733b. We describe a method for correctly calculating reverse rate coefficients for chemical reactions, discuss the predominant pathways for CO-CH4 interconversion as indicated by the model, and demonstrate that a simple time-scale approach can be used to accurately describe the behavior of quenched species when updated reaction kinetics and mixing-length-scale assumptions are used. Proper treatment of quench kinetics has important implications for estimates of molecular abundances and/or vertical mixing rates in the atmospheres of substellar objects. Our model results indicate signific...

  1. Direct Activation Of Methane

    KAUST Repository

    Basset, Jean-Marie

    2013-07-15

    Heteropolyacids (HPAs) can activate methane at ambient temperature (e.g., 20.degree. C.) and atmospheric pressure, and transform methane to acetic acid, in the absence of any noble metal such as Pd). The HPAs can be, for example, those with Keggin structure: H.sub.4SiW.sub.12O.sub.40, H.sub.3PW.sub.12O.sub.40, H.sub.4SiMo.sub.12O.sub.40, or H.sub.3PMo.sub.12O.sub.40, can be when supported on silica.

  2. Assessing the Efficacy of the Aerobic Methanotrophic Biofilter in Methane Hydrate Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentine, David

    2012-09-30

    process as a biofilter by studying the distribution of methane oxidation and disposition of methanotrophic populations in the Pacific Ocean. We investigated several environments including the basins offshore California, the continental margin off Central America, and the shallow waters around gas seeps. We succeeded in identifying the distributions of activity in these environments, identified potential physical and chemical controls on methanotrophic activity, we further revealed details about the methanotrophic communities active in these settings, and we developed new approaches to study methanotrophic communities. These findings should improve our capacity to predict the methanotrophic response in ocean waters, and further our ability to generate specific hypotheses as to the ecology and efficacy of pelagic methanotrophic communites. The discharge of methane and other hydrocarbons to Gulf of Mexico that followed the sinking of the Deepwater Horizon provided a unique opportunity to study the methanotorphic biofilter in the deep ocean environment. We set out to understand the consumption of methane and the bloom of methanotrophs resulting from this event, as a window into the regional scale release of gas hydrate under rapid warming scenarios. We found that other hydrocarbon gases, notably propane and ethane, were preferred for consumption over methane, but that methane consumption accelerated rapidly and drove the depletion of methane within a matter of months after initial release. These results revealed the identity of the responsible community, and point to the importance of the seed population in determining the rate at which a methanotrophic community is able to respond to an input of methane. Collectively, these results provide a significant advance in our understanding of the marine methanotrohic biofilter, and further provide direction and context for future investigations of this important phenomenon. This project has resulted in fourteen publications to date

  3. Mechanistic and kinetic analysis of the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane via novel supported alkali chloride catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaertner, C.; Veen, A.C. van; Lercher, J.A. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen (Germany). Catalysis Research Center

    2013-11-01

    The oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane over advanced catalysts is promising to selectively produce ethylene, an essential building block for the chemical industry. In this way, ethane from shale gas can be efficiently valorized. Supported alkali chloride catalysts are investigated in this work. Essential feature of those materials is the presence of a solid core (magnesium oxide in part doped with Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3}) covered under reaction conditions with a molten alkali chloride shell. It is shown that especially the lowered melting point of eutectic mixtures of LiCl with other alkali/alkaline earth metals is the key to taylor highly efficient materials. Elucidating the ODH reaction mechanism is essential to understand the reactivity of this novel catalyst class and provides the basis for improving performances. Information about elementary steps and the rate determining step were extracted from kinetic measurements, both in steady state and in transient configuration. Furthermore, isotopic labelling studies were performed, i.e. SSITKA studies and temperature programmed isotopic exchange experiments. Step experiments showed a significant oxygen uptake by the catalysts. Retained oxygen reacted quantitatively with ethane at nearly 100% selectivity to ethylene and conversion rates were comparable with rates observed during steady state operation. Thus, chemically bound oxygen in the melt is the active and selective intermediate in the ODH. Therefore, it is required to consider an intermediate and the activation is concluded to relate to the oxygen dissociation. The total concentration of stored oxygen can be correlated to the steady-state activity, while the viscosity of the melts mainly influences the selectivity towards ethene. Properties of the solid core impact on the catalyst efficiency suggesting that the oxygen species forms at the interface between support and overlayer. The quantity of retained oxygen additionally depends on the properties of the chloride

  4. Bi-layer functionally gradient thick film semiconducting methane sensors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Banerjee; A K Haldar; J Mondal; A Sen; H S Maiti

    2002-11-01

    Gas sensors based on metal oxide semiconductors like tin dioxide are widely used for the detection of toxic and combustible gases like carbon monoxide, methane and LPG. One of the problems of such sensors is their lack of sensitivity, which to some extent, can be circumvented by using different catalysts. However, highly reactive volatile organic compounds (VOC) coming from different industrial and domestic products (e.g. paints, lacquers, varnishes etc) can play havoc on such sensors and can give rise to false alarms. Any attempt to adsorb such VOCs (e.g. by using activated charcoal) results in sorption of the detecting gases (e.g. methane) too. To get round the problem, bi-layer sensors have been developed. Such tin oxide based functionally gradient bi-layer sensors have different compositions at the top and bottom layers. Here, instead of adsorbing the VOCs, they are allowed to interact and are consumed on the top layer of the sensors and a combustible gas like methane being less reactive, penetrates the top layer and interacts with the bottom layer. By modifying the chemical compositions of the top and bottom layers and by designing the electrode-lead wire arrangement properly, the top layer can be kept electrically shunted from the bottom layer and the electrical signal generated at the bottom layer from the combustible gas is collected. Such functionally gradient sensors, being very reliable, can find applications in domestic, industrial and strategic sectors.

  5. Beyond-thermal-equilibrium" conversion of methane to acetylene and hydrogen under pulsed corona discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱爱民; 宫为民; 张秀玲; 李小松

    2002-01-01

    At ambient temperature and pressure, C2H2 and H2 are the dominating products from pure methane conversion under pulsed corona discharge (PCD). When the energy density of 194-1788 kJ/mol was applied, 7%-30% of C2H2 yield and 6%-35% of H2 yield per pass have been obtained. These results are higher than the maximum thermodynamic yield of C2H2 (5.1%) and H2 (3.8%) at 100 kPa and 1100 K, respectively. Thereby, pulsed corona discharge is a very effective tool for "beyond-thermal-equilibrium" conversion of methane to C2H2 and H2 at ambient temperature and pressure. In the PCD energy density range of 339-822 kJ/mol, the carbon distribution of the methane conversion products is found to be: C2H2 86%-89%, C2H6 4%-6%, C2H4 4%-6%, C3 -2%, C4 -1%. Through comparison of the product from pure methane, ethane and ethylene conversion at the same discharge conditions, it can be concluded that three pathways may be responsible for the C2H2 formation via CHx radicals produced from the collisions of CH4 molecules with energi

  6. Syncope Associated with Carbon Monoxide Poisoning due to Narghile Smoking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seda Ozkan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Narghile smoking is a traditional method of tobacco use, and it has been practiced extensively for 400 years. Traditionally, narghile smoking is a matter of culture mainly in Middle East, Asia, and Africa. In recent years, its use as a social activity has increased worldwide, especially among young people. Narghile smoking is an unusual cause of carbon monoxide poisoning. Narghile smoking, compared to cigarette smoking, can result in more smoke exposure and greater levels of carbon monoxide. We present an acute syncope case of a 19-year-old male patient who had carbon monoxide poisoning after narghile smoking.

  7. Latent methane in fossil coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.D. Alexeev; E.V. Ulyanova; G.P. Starikov; N.N. Kovriga [Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Donetsk (Ukraine). Institute for Physics of Mining Processes

    2004-07-01

    It is established experimentally using 1H NMR wide line spectroscopy that methane can exist in coals not only in open or closed porosity and fracture systems but also in solid solutions in coal substance, in particular, under methane pressure 2 MPa or higher. Methane dissolved in coal minerals reversibly modifies their lattice parameters as determined from X-ray diffraction analysis. Co-existence of these methane forms in fossil coals causes multi-step desorption kinetics. It is shown experimentally that the long-term latent methane desorption is effected mainly by closed porosity, which in turn is determined by coal rank. 21 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Real-time monitoring of ethane in human breath using mid-infrared cavity leak-out spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahnke, H.; Kleine, D.; Hering, P.; Mürtz, M.

    2001-06-01

    We report on spectroscopic real-time analysis of ethane traces in exhaled human breath. Ethane is considered the most important volatile marker of free-radical induced lipid peroxidation and cell damage in the human body. Our measurements were carried out by means of mid-infrared cavity leak-out spectroscopy in the 3 μm region, a cw variant of cavity ring-down spectroscopy. The spectrometer is based on a CO overtone laser with tunable microwave sidebands. The resulting system proved to be an unique tool with high sensitivity and selectivity for rapid and precise breath testing. With a 5 s integration time, we achieved a detection limit on the order of 100 parts per trillion ethane in human breath. Thus, sample preconcentration is unnecessary. Time-resolved monitoring of the decaying ethane fraction in breath after smoking a cigarette is demonstrated.

  9. Methane emissions from grasslands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol-van Dasselaar, van den A.

    1998-01-01

    IntroductionMethane (CH 4 ) is an important greenhouse gas. The concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has been increasing since pre-industrial times, mainly due to human activities. This increase gives concern, because it may cause global warming due to an enhanced greenhous

  10. Terrestrial plant methane production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Bruhn, Dan; Møller, Ian M.

    We evaluate all experimental work published on the phenomenon of aerobic methane (CH4) generation in terrestrial plants. We conclude that the phenomenon is true. Four stimulating factors have been observed to induce aerobic plant CH4 production, i.e. cutting injuries, increasing temperature...

  11. Direct Aromaization of Methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Marcelin

    1997-01-15

    The thermal decomposition of methane offers significant potential as a means of producing higher unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons when the extent of reaction is limited. Work in the literature previous to this project had shown that cooling the product and reacting gases as the reaction proceeds would significantly reduce or eliminate the formation of solid carbon or heavier (Clo+) materials. This project studied the effect and optimization of the quenching process as a means of increasing the amount of value added products during the pyrolysis of methane. A reactor was designed to rapidly quench the free-radical combustion reaction so as to maximize the yield of aromatics. The use of free-radical generators and catalysts were studied as a means of lowering the reaction temperature. A lower reaction temperature would have the benefits of more rapid quenching as well as a more feasible commercial process due to savings realized in energy and material of construction costs. It was the goal of the project to identify promising routes from methane to higher hydrocarbons based on the pyrolysis of methane.

  12. Determination of ethane, pentane and isoprene in exhaled air--effects of breath-holding, flow rate and purified air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lärstad, M A E; Torén, K; Bake, B; Olin, A-C

    2007-01-01

    Exhaled ethane, pentane and isoprene have been proposed as biomarkers of oxidative stress. The objectives were to explore whether ethane, pentane and isoprene are produced within the airways and to explore the effect of different sampling parameters on analyte concentrations. The flow dependency of the analyte concentrations, the concentrations in dead-space and alveolar air after breath-holding and the influence of inhaling purified air on analyte concentrations were investigated. The analytical method involved thermal desorption from sorbent tubes and gas chromatography. The studied group comprised 13 subjects with clinically stable asthma and 14 healthy controls. Ethane concentrations decreased slightly, but significantly, at higher flow rates in subjects with asthma (P = 0.0063) but not in healthy controls. Pentane levels were increased at higher flow rates both in healthy and asthmatic subjects (P = 0.022 and 0.0063 respectively). Isoprene levels were increased at higher flow rates, but only significantly in healthy subjects (P = 0.0034). After breath-holding, no significant changes in ethane levels were observed. Pentane and isoprene levels increased significantly after 20 s of breath-holding. Inhalation of purified air before exhalation resulted in a substantial decrease in ethane levels, a moderate decrease in pentane levels and an increase in isoprene levels. The major fractions of exhaled ethane, pentane and isoprene seem to be of systemic origin. There was, however, a tendency for ethane to be flow rate dependent in asthmatic subjects, although to a very limited extent, suggesting that small amounts of ethane may be formed in the airways.

  13. Another Source of Atmospheric Methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于心科

    1997-01-01

    The atmospheric concentration of methane is steadily increasin.Lacking of precise estimates of source and sink strengths for the atmospheric methane severely limits the current understanding of the global methane cycle.Agood budget of atmospheric methane can enhance our understanding of the global carbon cycle and global climate change,The known estimates of the main source and sink strengths are gresented in this paper,In terms of carbon isotopic studies,it is evidenced that the earth's primodial methane,which was trapped in the earth during its formation,may be another source of methane,with extensive,earth's degassing which is calleld the "breathing" process of the earth and played an important role in the formation of the promitive atmosphere,large amounts of methane were carried from the deep interior to the surface and then found its way into the atmosphere.

  14. Methane capture from livestock manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauseef, S M; Premalatha, M; Abbasi, Tasneem; Abbasi, S A

    2013-03-15

    It has been estimated that livestock manure contributes about 240 million metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent of methane to the atmosphere and represents one of the biggest anthropogenic sources of methane. Considering that methane is the second biggest contributor to global warming after carbon dioxide, it is imperative that ways and means are developed to capture as much of the anthropogenic methane as possible. There is a major associated advantage of methane capture: its use as a source of energy which is comparable in 'cleanness' to natural gas. The present review dwells upon the traditional ways of methane capture used in India, China, and other developing countries for providing energy to the rural poor. It then reviews the present status of methane capture from livestock manure in developed countries and touches upon the prevalent trends.

  15. Green synthesis of Ni-Nb oxide catalysts for low-temperature oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Haibo

    2015-03-05

    The straightforward solid-state grinding of a mixture of Ni nitrate and Nb oxalate crystals led to, after mild calcination (T<400°C), nanostructured Ni-Nb oxide composites. These new materials efficiently catalyzed the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of ethane to ethylene at a relatively low temperature (T<300°C). These catalysts appear to be much more stable than the corresponding composites prepared by other chemical methods; more than 90% of their original intrinsic activity was retained after 50h with time on-stream. Furthermore, the stability was much less affected by the Nb content than in composites prepared by classical "wet" syntheses. These materials, obtained in a solvent-free way, are thus promising green and sustainable alternatives to the current Ni-Nb candidates for the low-temperature ODH of ethane.

  16. An analysis of substituent effects in ethane derivatives: the quantum theory of atoms in molecules approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabowski, Slawomir J; Krygowski, Tadeusz M; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2009-02-12

    MP2/6-311++G(d,p) calculations were performed on ethane and its simple derivatives. Different substituents such as: Li, Na, BeH, BH(2), OH, NH(2), F and NO(2) were considered. The mono- and disubstituted derivatives of ethane were analyzed. The quantum theory of "atoms in molecules" was applied to localize bond critical points and to analyze relationships between their locations and characteristics of the species. The numerous correlations were found showing the crucial influence of substituent effects. It was also revealed that such parameters as the carbon-carbon distance, or the electron density at C-C bond critical point do not show the systematic changes caused by substituent effects. This means that some of QTAIM parameters, especially the positions of BCPs may be useful to detect numerous sensitive effects if the latter ones do not affect the traditionally analyzed geometrical parameters of a molecule, such as bond lengths.

  17. 无CO2排放型乙烷质子陶瓷膜燃料电池的研究%Ethane protonic ceramic membrane SOFCs without CO2 emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林洁媛; 符显珠; 骆静利; Karl T.CHUANG; 池汝安

    2012-01-01

    Y and Nd co-doped barium cerate (BCYN) proton conductor was synthesized by citric-nitrate combustion method. Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) were fabricated using porous Pt electrodes and BCYN membrane electrolyte for co-generation of electricity and ethylene from ethane. Porous Pt electrodes had good catalytic activity toward to ethane dehydrogenation and oxygen reduction. BCYN proton conducting membrane could separate hydrocarbon in anode chamber and oxygen in cathode chamber thus could avoid ethane deep oxidation to CO2 emission and improve the ethylene selectivity. At 650 t, the maximum power density was 146 mW/cm2, the ethane conversion was 18.6%, the ethylene selectivity was 96.7%, and the main by-production was methane.%采用柠檬酸-硝酸盐燃烧法合成了Y和Nd共掺杂的铈酸钡BaCe0.8Y0.15Nd0.05O3- δ(BCYN)质子导体,并将其与多孔Pt电极组装了乙烷制乙烯共发电固体氧化物燃料电池(SOFC).多孔Pt电极对乙烷脱氢和氧还原均具有很好的催化活性.BCYN质子陶瓷电解质膜则能够将阳极的碳氢化合物气体与阴极的氧隔开,从而避免乙烷的深度氧化而排放出CO2温室气体并且提高乙烯产物的选择性.在650℃时,电池的最大功率密度为146 mW/cm2,乙烷的转化率为18.6%,选择性为96.7%,主要副产物为甲烷.

  18. Methane Leakage from Oil & Gas Operations. What have we learned from recent studies in the U.S.?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala-Araiza, Daniel; Hamburg, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Methane, the principal component of natural gas, is a powerful greenhouse gas. Methane losses from the natural gas supply chain erode the climate benefits of fuel switching to natural gas from other fossil fuels, reducing or eliminating them for several decades or longer. Global data on methane emissions from the oil and gas sector is uncertain and as a consequence, measuring and characterizing methane emissions is critical to the design of effective mitigation strategies. In this work, we synthesize lessons learned from dozens of U.S. studies that characterized methane emissions along each stage of the natural gas supply chain. These results are relevant to the design of methane measurement campaigns outside the U.S. A recurring theme in the research conducted in the U.S. is that public emissions inventories (e.g., The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Greenhouse gas Inventory) tend to underestimate emissions for two key reasons: (1) use of non-representative emission factors and (2) inaccurate activity data (incomplete counts of facilities and equipment). Similarly, the accuracy of emission factors and the effectiveness of mitigation strategies are heavily affected by the existence of low-probability, unpredictable high emitters-which have been observed all along the supply chain- and are spatiotemporally variable. We conducted a coordinated campaign to measure methane emissions in a major gas producing region of the U.S. (Barnett Shale region of Texas) using a diversity of approaches. As part of this study we identified methods for effective quantification of regional fossil methane emissions using atmospheric data (through replicate mass balance flights and source apportionment using methane to ethane ratios) as well as how to build an accurate inventory that includes a statistical estimator that more rigorously captures the magnitude and frequency of high emitters. We found agreement between large-scale atmospheric sampling estimates and source

  19. An interesting cause of pulmonary emboli: Acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevinc, A.; Savli, H.; Atmaca, H. [Gaziantep University, Gaziantep (Turkey). School of Medicine

    2005-07-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning, a public health problem of considerable significance, is a relatively frequent event today, resulting in thousands of hospitalizations annually. A 70-year-old lady was seen in the emergency department with a provisional diagnosis of carbon monoxide poisoning. The previous night, she slept in a tightly closed room heated with coal ember. She was found unconscious in the morning with poor ventilation. She had a rare presentation of popliteal vein thrombosis, pulmonary emboli, and possible tissue necrosis with carbon monoxide poisoning. Oxygen treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin (nadroparine) and warfarin therapy resulted in an improvement in both popliteal and pulmonary circulations. In conclusion, the presence of pulmonary emboli should be sought in patients with carbon monoxide poisoning.

  20. US EPA Region 9 carbon monoxide designated areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Polygon Feature class of Nonattainment Areas for Carbon Monoxide. Nonattainment areas are geographic areas which have not met National Ambient Air Quality Standards...

  1. Carbon monoxide poisoning in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Kaabi, Juma M; Wheatley, Andrew D; Barss, Peter; Al Shamsi, Mariam; Lababidi, Anis; Mushtaq, Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is rare in the Arabian Peninsula and occurs almost exclusively during the winter months. Knowledge and perception of the hazards of carbon monoxide is limited. Migrant workers from warm climates appear particularly at risk. We investigated 46 cases of carbon monoxide poisoning presenting at emergency departments from 2007-2009 of the two main hospitals in Al Ain city, United Arab Emirates. Interviews, hospital records, and administered questionnaires were used to collect the data. Among the 46 cases investigated, 24 (52%) were males. Foreign nationals compromised 80% of the cases and the incidence was 3.1 cases per 100,000 residents per year. Burning charcoal in poorly ventilated residences was the predominant source of the carbon monoxide poisoning. Almost all cases (98%) were admitted during the winter months, most in the early morning hours. Carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb) was significantly increased in cases with loss of consciousness and depressed consciousness. There were no reported fatalities.

  2. Same Exposure, Various Clinical Pictures: The Carbon Monoxide Enigma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Salmanoglu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available -Children and adolescents exposed to the same source of carbon monoxide have been shown to demonstrate different clinical pictures (1,2. The same condition probably may be extrapolated between children with varying ages and hence lung surface areas. Smaller children will receive larger doses of carbon monoxide, because they have greater lung surface area/body weight ratios and increased minute volumes/weight ratios. As carbon monoxide accumulation is expected to be more significant nearer to the ground, another explanation for varying clinical pictures in poisoning events may be the different level of sleeping positions of the casualties. Herein, we report a cluster poisoning of carbon monoxide affecting 5 children from the same family at the same time but in different clinical pictures. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2013; 12(1.000: 118-118

  3. Vapour Liquid Equilibrium in Asymmetric Mixtures of n-Alkanes with Ethane

    OpenAIRE

    Duta, Anca

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents a vapour liquid equilibria study in binary mixtures of n-alkanes with high dimensional asymmetry. Each mixture contains ethane and alkanes higher than eicosane. Calculations were done using two equations of state, Peng-Robinson (PR) and Soave (SRK), in combination with van der Waals mixing rules, corrected with two interaction parameters. A limited temperature dependence of the interaction parameters was found. The correlations between the interaction parameters a...

  4. (μ-Ethane-1,1,2,2-tetracarboxylatobis[tetraaquamanganese(II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Wei Xue

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In the centrosymmetric title molecule, [Mn2(C6H2O8(H2O8], the MnII atom is in an octahedral environment coordinated by six O-atom donors from water molecules and ethane-1,1,2,2-tetracarboxylate ligands. The crystal structure features a three-dimensional hydrogen-bonding network based on a strong and distinctive pattern of O—H...O hydrogen-bonding interactions.

  5. Studies on the extraction of uranium (VI) by bis(hexylsulfinyl)ethane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Yan-Zhao; ZHANG Qi; ZENG Shan; BAO Li-Ping; SUN Si-Xiu

    2003-01-01

    The extraction of uranium (Ⅵ) by bis(hexylsulfinyl)ethane(BHxSE) in nitric acid aqueous solution hasbeen investigated. The extracted species appeared to be UO2(NO3)2@2BHxSE. Influences of nitric acid concentration,NaNO3 concentration, Na2C2O4 concentration and temperature on the extraction equilibrium were investigated andthe thermodynamic functions of the extraction reaction were obtained.

  6. The relationship between methane migration and shale-gas well operations near Dimock, Pennsylvania, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Patrick A.

    2016-03-01

    Migration of stray methane gas near the town of Dimock, Pennsylvania, has been at the center of the debate on the safety of shale gas drilling and hydraulic fracturing in the United States. The presented study relates temporal variations in molecular concentrations and stable isotope compositions of methane and ethane to shale-gas well activity (i.e., vertical/horizontal drilling, hydraulic fracturing and remedial actions). This was accomplished by analyzing data collected, between 2008 and 2012, by state and federal agencies and the gas well operator. In some cases, methane migration started prior to hydraulic fracturing. Methane levels of contaminated water wells sampled were one to several orders of magnitude greater than the concentrations due to natural variation in water wells of the local area. Isotope analyses indicate that all samples had a thermogenic origin at varying maturity levels, but from formations above the hydraulically fractured Marcellus Shale. The results from the initial water well samples were similar to annular gas values, but not those of production gases. This indicates that leakage by casing cement seals most likely caused the impacts, not breaks in the production casing walls. Remediation by squeeze cementing was partially effective in mitigating impacts of gas migration. In several cases where remediation caused a substantial reduction in methane levels, there were also substantial changes in the isotope values, providing evidence of two sources, one natural and the other man-induced. Sampling water wells while venting gas wells appears to be a cost-effective method for determining if methane migration has occurred.

  7. High-performance carbon molecular sieve membranes for ethylene/ethane separation derived from an intrinsically microporous polyimide

    KAUST Repository

    Salinas, Octavio

    2015-11-18

    An intrinsically microporous polymer with hydroxyl functionalities, PIM-6FDA-OH, was used as a precursor for various types of carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes for ethylene/ethane separation. The pristine polyimide films were heated under controlled N2 atmosphere at different stages from 500 to 800 °C. All CMS samples carbonized above 600 °C surpassed the polymeric ethylene/ethane upper bound. Pure-gas selectivity reached 17.5 for the CMS carbonized at 800 °C with an ethylene permeability of about 10 Barrer at 2 bar and 35 °C, becoming the most selective CMS for ethylene/ethane separation reported to date. As expected, gravimetric sorption experiments showed that all CMS membranes had ethylene/ethane solubility selectivities close to one. The permselectivity increased with increasing pyrolysis temperature due to densification of the micropores in the CMS membranes, leading to enhanced diffusivity selectivity. Mixed-gas tests with a binary 50:50 v/v ethylene/ethane feed showed a decrease in selectivity from 14 to 8.3 as the total feed pressure was increased from 4 to 20 bar. The selectivity drop under mixed-gas conditions was attributed to non-ideal effects: (i) Competitive sorption that reduced the permeability of ethylene and (ii) dilation of the CMS that resulted in an increase in the ethane permeability.

  8. Oxidative Coupling of Methane over Li/MgO: Catalyst and Nanocatalyst Performance%甲烷氧化偶联锂/氧化镁催化剂和纳米催化剂

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Farsi; Ali Moradi; Sattar Ghader; Vahid Shadravan

    2011-01-01

    The Li/MgO catalyst and nanocatalyst were prepared by the incipient wetness impregnation and sol-gel method, respectively. The catalytic performance of the Li/MgO catalyst and nanocatalyst on oxidative coupling of methane was compared. The catalysts prepared in two ways were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, Brunauer-Emmett-Tcllcr surface and transmission electron microscope. The catalyst was tested at temperature of 973-1073 K with constant total pressure of 101 kPa. Experimental results showed that Li/MgO nanocatalyst in the oxidative coupling of methane would result in higher conversion of methane, higher selectivity, and higher yield of main products (ethane and ethylene) compared to ordinary catalyst. The results show the improved influence of nanoscale Li/MgO catalyst performance on oxidative coupling of methane.

  9. Fragrance material review on 1-(3,3-dimethylcyclohexyl)ethan-1-one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scognamiglio, J; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2013-12-01

    A Toxicologic and Dermatologic review of 1-(3,3-dimethylcyclohexyl)ethan-1-one when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. 1-(3,3-Dimethylcyclohexyl)ethan-1-one is a member of the fragrance structural group Alkyl Cyclic Ketones. These fragrances can be described as being composed of an alkyl, R1, and various substituted and bicyclic saturated or unsaturated cyclic hydrocarbons, R2, in which one of the rings may include up to 12 carbons. Alternatively, R2 may be a carbon bridge of C2-C4 carbon chain length between the ketone and cyclic hydrocarbon. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for 1-(3,3-dimethylcyclohexyl)ethan-1-one were evaluated then summarized and includes physical properties, skin irritation, mucous membrane (eye) irritation, skin sensitization, and genotoxicity data. A safety assessment of the entire Alkyl Cyclic Ketones will be published simultaneously with this document; please refer to Belsito et al., 2013(1) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all Alkyl Cyclic Ketones in fragrances. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Ethan Allen公司将推出生态友好家具系列

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    管宁

    2008-01-01

    美国:总部在美国的家具制造和零售商Ethan Allen将推出一个30~40件的生态友好家具系列,特点是采用水溶性涂料和回收材料、有机材料床罩、生态友好的亚麻等软垫织物等。Ethan Allen是为数很少的仍用本国木材制造家具的厂家之一。该公司还经营两家制材厂,以保证材料供应。5年前,Ethan Allen开始在软垫家具上使用水溶性涂料,这种家具的木件较少,试用新涂料较容易。现在该公司已很好地掌握并广泛应用了此种涂饰技术。公司在取暖、照明等方面也重视节能,投入近200万美元提高能源利用效率。

  11. Combustión de mezclas ricas de etano-aire en medios porosos inertes Combustion of rich ethane-air mixtures in inert porous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khriscia Utria S

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available El presente trabajo tiene por objetivo analizar teórica-experimentalmente la combustión de mezclas ricas de etano-aire en medios porosos inertes (MPI para evaluar la producción de hidrógeno y gas de síntesis. Se analizan los perfiles de temperatura, las velocidades de propagación de llama y los productos principales de la combustión, como son el hidrógeno (H2 y el monóxido de carbono (CO, mediante el uso de cromatografía gaseosa, para relaciones de equivalencia en el rango de 1,0 a 2,5 y dos diámetros de esferas de alúmina que componen el medio poroso. Se simula numéricamente el proceso de combustión mediante el uso del programa PREMIX utilizando dos mecanismos de reacción, como son el GRI-MECH 1.2 y GRI-MECH 3.0. Con GRI-MECH 3.0 se obtienen resultados numéricos que predicen correctamente los resultados experimentales para todo el rango de relaciones de equivalencia con un medio poroso compuesto por esferas de alúmina de 3,5 mm. La máxima generación de hidrógeno H2 y CO presentes en los productos de combustión son de 14,3% y 18,0%, respectivamente. El porcentaje de conversión de etano en H2 (61,3% y en CO (81% muestra el potencial de este combustible como generador de gas de síntesis.This research develops the theoretical and experimental analysis of ethane-air combustion in inert porous media (IPM to evaluate hydrogen and syngas production. Temperature profiles, flame propagation rates and major combustion products such as hydrogen (H2 and carbon monoxide (CO, through gas chromatography, are analysed at a range of equivalence ratios between 1.0 and 2.5, with two different alumina sphere diameters composing the porous media. Combustion of ethane-air mixture in IPM is simulated numerically using the PREMIX program with two reaction mechanisms, such as GRI-MECH 1.2 and GRI-MECH 3.0. GRI-MECH 3.0 numerical results predict correctly experimental results for a porous media with 3.5 mm alumina spheres along the range of

  12. Implications of Representative Concentration Pathway 4.5 Methane Emissions to Stabilize Radiative Forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emanuel, William R.; Janetos, Anthony C.

    2013-02-01

    Increases in the abundance of methane (CH4) in the Earth’s atmosphere are responsible for significant radiative forcing of climate change (Forster et al., 2007; Wuebbles and Hayhoe, 2002). Since 1750, a 2.5 fold increase in atmospheric CH4 contributed 0.5 W/m2 to direct radiative forcing and an additional 0.2 W/m2 indirectly through changes in atmospheric chemistry. Next to water and carbon dioxide (CO2), methane is the most abundant greenhouse gas in the troposphere. Additionally, CH4 is significantly more effective as a greenhouse gas on a per molecule basis than is CO2, and increasing atmospheric CH4 has been second only to CO2 in radiative forcing (Forster et al., 2007). The chemical reactivity of CH4 is important to both tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry. Along with carbon monoxide, methane helps control the amount of the hydroxyl radical (OH) in the troposphere where oxidation of CH4 by OH leads to the formation of formaldehyde, carbon monoxide, and ozone.

  13. Carbon monoxide exposure in blast furnace workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, S; Mason, C; Srna, J

    1992-09-01

    This study investigated the occupational exposure to carbon monoxide (CO) of a group of blast furnace workers from an integrated steelworks, compared to a control group having no significant occupational CO exposure from other areas in the same works. The study was undertaken in 1984 at Port Kembla, New South Wales. Carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb) levels before and after an eight-hour work shift were measured in 98 male steelworkers: 52 from two CO-exposed iron blast furnaces and 46 controls from production areas in the same steelworks. The sample was stratified by smoking habits. Environmental air CO levels had been found to be consistently higher on one furnace than on the other. Absorption of CO from the working environment occurred in workers on the blast furnace with higher CO levels, regardless of smoking habits. On this blast furnace, some readings of COHb levels after a workshift in nonsmokers approached the proposed Australian occupational limit of 5 per cent COHb saturation. Overall, workers with the highest occupational exposure who smoked most heavily had the highest absorption of CO over a work shift. Biological monitoring gives an accurate measure of individual worker 'dose' of CO from all sources. Both environmental monitoring and biological monitoring need to be included as part of a program for controlling occupational CO exposure.

  14. Carbon Monoxide: An Essential Signalling Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Brian E.

    Carbon monoxide (CO), like nitric oxide (NO), is an essential signalling molecule in humans. It is active in the cardiovascular system as a vasodilator. In addition, CO possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and anti-proliferative properties and protects tissues from hypoxia and reperfusion injury. Some of its applications in animal models include suppression of organ graft rejection and safeguarding the heart during reperfusion after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. CO also suppresses arteriosclerotic lesions following angioplasty, reverses established pulmonary hypertension and mitigates the development of post-operative ileus in the murine small intestine and the development of cerebral malaria in mice as well as graft-induced intimal hyperplasia in pigs. There have been several clinical trials using air-CO mixtures for the treatment of lung-, heart-, kidney- and abdominal-related diseases. This review examines the research involving the development of classes of compounds (with particular emphasis on metal carbonyls) that release CO, which could be used in clinically relevant conditions. The review is drawn not only from published papers in the chemical literature but also from the extensive biological literature and patents on CO-releasing molecules (CO-RMs).

  15. First-Principles Investigations on Europium Monoxide

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hao

    2011-05-01

    Europium monoxide is both an insulator and a Heisenberg ferromagnet (Tc=69 K). In the present thesis, the author has investigated the electronic structure of different types of EuO by density functional theory. The on-site Coulomb interaction of the localized Eu 4f and 5d electrons, which is wrongly treated in the standard generalized gradient approximation method, is found to be crucial to obtain the correct insulating ground state as observed in experiments. Our results show that the ferromagnetism is stable under pressure, both hydrostatic and uniaxial. For both types of pressure an insulator-metal transition is demonstrated. Moreover, the experimentally observed insulator-metal transition in oxygen deficient and gadolinium-doped EuO is reproduced in our calculations for impurity concentrations of 6.25% and 25%. Furthermore, a 10- layer EuO thin film is theoretically predicted to be an insulator with a narrow band gap of around 0.08 eV, while the Si/EuO interface shows metallic properties with the Si and O 2p as well as Eu 5d bands crossing the Fermi level.

  16. Chlorine Monoxide in the Antarctic Spring Stratosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Ayerbe, Mauricio

    1988-06-01

    A series of observations of stratospheric chlorine monoxide (ClO) were carried out during the austral springs of 1986 and 1987 in McMurdo Station, Antarctica, as part of two experimental campaigns sent to investigate the seasonal decrease in ozone over the antarctic continent (the ozone "hole"). Measurements of the vertical distribution of ClO were obtained by high resolution ground-based emission spectroscopy at 278 GHz, using the Stony Brook mm-wave receiver. They show the presence of an anomalous layer of lower stratospheric ClO which is not observed at other latitudes. This anomalous layer is centered at ~20 km altitude and exhibits a pronounced diurnal variation, reaching a maximum at midday and disappearing at night. During the period of Sep. 20-24, 1987, the lower-stratospheric ClO had a maximum volume mixing ratio of 1.8_sp{+0cdot5}{ -0cdot9} ppbv. A normal ClO layer centered at ~36 km was also observed, with concentrations and diurnal behavior similar to those seen in tropical latitudes. These findings are evidence of anomalous chlorine chemistry taking place in the lower stratosphere during the antarctic spring, and indicate that increasing anthropogenic chlorine is a prime causative agent in the formation of the ozone hole.

  17. Project identification for methane reduction options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, T.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses efforts directed at reduction in emission of methane to the atmosphere. Methane is a potent greenhouse gas, which on a 20 year timeframe may present a similar problem to carbon dioxide. In addition, methane causes additional problems in the form of smog and its longer atmospheric lifetime. The author discusses strategies for reducing methane emission from several major sources. This includes landfill methane recovery, coalbed methane recovery, livestock methane reduction - in the form of ruminant methane reduction and manure methane recovery. The author presents examples of projects which have implemented these ideas, the economics of the projects, and additional gains which come from the projects.

  18. Assessment of carbon monoxide values in smokers: a comparison of carbon monoxide in expired air and carboxyhaemoglobin in arterial blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Mette F; Møller, Ann M

    2010-01-01

    Smoking increases perioperative complications. Carbon monoxide concentrations can estimate patients' smoking status and might be relevant in preoperative risk assessment. In smokers, we compared measurements of carbon monoxide in expired air (COexp) with measurements of carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb) ......) in arterial blood. The objectives were to determine the level of correlation and to determine whether the methods showed agreement and evaluate them as diagnostic tests in discriminating between heavy and light smokers....

  19. Carbon Monoxide Distribution over Peninsular Malaysia from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajab, Jaso M.; MatJafri, M. Z.; Lim, H. S.; Abdullah, K.

    2009-07-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) onboard NASA's Aqua satellite. It daily coverage of ˜70% of the planet represents a significant evolutionary advance in satellite traces gas remote sensing. AIRS, the part of a large international investment to upgrade the operational meteorological satellite systems, is first of the new generation of meteorological advanced sounders for operational and research use, Providing New Insights into Weather and Climate for the 21st Century. Carbon monoxide (CO) is a ubiquitous, an indoor and outdoor air pollutant, is not a significant greenhouse gas as it absorbs little infrared radiation from the Earth. However, it does have an influence on oxidization in the atmosphere through interaction with hydroxyl radicals (OH), which also react with methane, halocarbons and tropospheric ozone. It produced by the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and biomass burning, and that it has a role as a smog. The aim of this investigation is to study the (CO) carbon monoxide distribution over Peninsular Malaysia. The land use map of the Peninsular Malaysia was conducted by using CO total column amount, obtained from AIRS data, the map & data was processed and analyzed by using Photoshop & SigmaPlot 11.0 programs and compared for timing of various (day time) (28 August 2005 & 29 August 2007) for both direct comparison and the comparison using the same a priori profile, the CO concentrations in 28/8/2005 higher. The CO maps were generated using Kriging Interpolation technique. This interpolation technique produced high correlation coefficient, R2 and low root mean square error, RMS for CO. This study provided useful information for influence change of CO concentration on varies temperature.

  20. Terrestrial plant methane production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard; Bruhn, Dan; Møller, Ian M.

    We evaluate all experimental work published on the phenomenon of aerobic methane (CH4) generation in terrestrial plants. We conclude that the phenomenon is true. Four stimulating factors have been observed to induce aerobic plant CH4 production, i.e. cutting injuries, increasing temperature......, ultraviolet radiation and reactive oxygen species. Further, we analyze rates of measured emission of aerobically produced CH4 in pectin and in plant tissues from different studies and argue that pectin is very far from the sole contributing precursor. Hence, scaling up of aerobic CH4 emission needs to take...... the aerobic methane emission in plants. Future work is needed for establishing the relative contribution of several proven potential CH4 precursors in plant material....

  1. Coal Bed Methane Primer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Arthur; Bruce Langhus; Jon Seekins

    2005-05-25

    During the second half of the 1990's Coal Bed Methane (CBM) production increased dramatically nationwide to represent a significant new source of income and natural gas for many independent and established producers. Matching these soaring production rates during this period was a heightened public awareness of environmental concerns. These concerns left unexplained and under-addressed have created a significant growth in public involvement generating literally thousands of unfocused project comments for various regional NEPA efforts resulting in the delayed development of public and fee lands. The accelerating interest in CBM development coupled to the growth in public involvement has prompted the conceptualization of this project for the development of a CBM Primer. The Primer is designed to serve as a summary document, which introduces and encapsulates information pertinent to the development of Coal Bed Methane (CBM), including focused discussions of coal deposits, methane as a natural formed gas, split mineral estates, development techniques, operational issues, producing methods, applicable regulatory frameworks, land and resource management, mitigation measures, preparation of project plans, data availability, Indian Trust issues and relevant environmental technologies. An important aspect of gaining access to federal, state, tribal, or fee lands involves education of a broad array of stakeholders, including land and mineral owners, regulators, conservationists, tribal governments, special interest groups, and numerous others that could be impacted by the development of coal bed methane. Perhaps the most crucial aspect of successfully developing CBM resources is stakeholder education. Currently, an inconsistent picture of CBM exists. There is a significant lack of understanding on the parts of nearly all stakeholders, including industry, government, special interest groups, and land owners. It is envisioned the Primer would being used by a variety of

  2. Methane emission by termites: Impacts on the self-cleansing mechanisms of the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mugedo, J.Z.A. [Maseno Univ. College (Kenya)

    1996-12-31

    Termites are reported to emit large quantities of methane, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen and dimethyl sulfide. The emission of other trace gases, namely C{sub 2} to C{sub 10} hydrocarbons, is also documented. We have carried out, both in the field and in the laboratory, measurements of methane emissions by Macrotermes subhyalinus (Macrotermitinae), Trinervitermes bettonianus (Termitinae), and unidentified Cubitermes and Microcerotermes species. Measured CH{sub 4} field flux rates ranged from 3.66 to 98.25g per m{sup 2} of termite mound per year. Laboratory measurements gave emission rates that ranged from 14.61 to 165.05 mg CH{sub 4} per termite per year. Gaseous production in all species sampled varied both within species and from species to species. Recalculated global emission of methane from termites was found to be 14.0 x 10{sup 12} g CH{sub 4}, per year. From our study, termites contribution to atmospheric methane content is between 1.11% and 4.25% per year. This study discusses the greenhouse effects as well as photochemical disposal of methane in the lower atmosphere in the tropics and the impacts on the chemistry of HO{sub x} systems and CL{sub x} cycles.

  3. Methanogens, Methane and Gastrointestinal Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Chang, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic fermentation of the undigested polysaccharide fraction of carbohydrates produces hydrogen in the intestine which is the substrate for methane production by intestinal methanogens. Hydrogen and methane are excreted in the flatus and in breath giving the opportunity to indirectly measure their production using breath testing. Although methane is detected in 30%-50% of the healthy adult population worldwide, its production has been epidemiologically and clinically associated with constipation related diseases, like constipation predominant irritable bowel syndrome and chronic constipation. While a causative relation is not proven yet, there is strong evidence from animal studies that methane delays intestinal transit, possibly acting as a neuromuscular transmitter. This evidence is further supported by the universal finding that methane production (measured by breath test) is associated with delayed transit time in clinical studies. There is also preliminary evidence that antibiotic reduction of methanogens (as evidenced by reduced methane production) predicts the clinical response in terms of symptomatic improvement in patients with constipation predominant irritable bowel syndrome. However, we have not identified yet the mechanism of action of methane on intestinal motility, and since methane production does not account for all constipation associated cases, there is need for high quality clinical trials to examine methane as a biomarker for the diagnosis or as a biomarker that predicts antibiotic treatment response in patients with constipation related disorders. PMID:24466443

  4. Air-sea flux of methane from selected marine hydrate/seep sites in the northern Gulf of Mexico during HYFLUX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, L.; Yvon-Lewis, S. A.; Kessler, J. D.; MacDonald, I.

    2009-12-01

    Methane is one of the most important greenhouse gases, playing a significant role in global climate change and atmospheric chemistry. In spite of tremendous efforts made to constrain the strength of its sources and sinks, large uncertainties remain for some individual sources. Based on the previous observations and modeling studies, the flux of CH4 from marine hydrates and seeps to the atmosphere comprises a significant fraction of the entire methane flux from the global ocean. However, most of the estimates are based on the seafloor methane flux or discrete water column concentrations of methane and the averaged atmospheric methane ratios. In this study, we investigated three marine hydrate/seep sites in northern Gulf of Mexico in July of 2009 during the HYFLUX cruise. Continuous saturation-anomaly (deviation from equilibrium) measurements of methane, ethane and propane were made by alternately sampling the air or the headspace of Weiss-type equilibrator and analyzing it in a GC-FID system. Some 13CH4 measurements were also made continuously using a cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS). During this cruise, the maximum concentrations observed at the 3 marine hydrate/seep sites MC118, GC600, and GC185 were 14.5, 5.1, and 2.2 nmol/L, respectively. The air-sea fluxes, calculated from saturation anomalies, are used to create extremely high resolution flux maps for the three marine hydrate/seeps sites.

  5. Direct catalytic conversion of methane and light hydrocarbon gases. Quarterly report No. 6, January 16, 1988--April 15, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Chan, Yee Wai; Posin, B.M.

    1988-05-20

    The goal of this research is to develop catalysts that directly convert methane and light hydrocarbons to intermediates that later can be converted to either liquid fuels or value-added chemicals, as economics dictate. During this reporting period, we synthesized several phthalocyanine catalysts supported on magnesia (MgO) in Task 3. In Task 4 we have tested these catalysts for oxidation of methane and did a number of blank experiments to determine the cause of the low methanol yield we have observed. Magnesia supported catalysts were prepared by first synthesizing the various metal tetrasulfophthalocyanines (TSPCs), converting them to the acid form, and then supporting these complexes on a basic support (MgO) by a neutralization reaction. The metals used were Ru, Pd, Cu, Fe, Co, Mn, and Mo. CoTSPC was also synthesized in zeolite Y using our standard template techniques described in Quarterly Report No. 1. These complexes were examined for catalytic activity in the oxidation of methane. The PdTSPC/MgO had greater activity, and oxidized some of the methane (selectivity of 2.8% from the methane oxidized at 375{degrees}C) to ethane. This is a much lower temperature for this reaction than previously reported in the literature. We also examined the reactivity of various components of the system in the oxidation of the product methanol. The reactor showed some activity for the oxidation of methanol to carbon dioxide. When zeolite or magnesia were added, this activity increased. The magnesia oxidized most of the methanol to carbon dioxide, while the zeolite reduced some of the methanol to hydrocarbons. With oxygen in the feed gas stream (i.e., the conditions of our methane oxidation), a very large fraction of the methanol was oxidized to carbon dioxide when passed over magnesia. From this, we can conclude that any methanol formed in the oxidation of methane would probably be destroyed very quickly on the catalyst bed.

  6. High temperature thermodynamics and vaporization of stoichiometric titanium monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheldon, R.I.; Gilles, P.W.

    1976-08-17

    Three vaporization experiments were performed on samples of nearly stoichiometric titanium monoxide. Two experiments were constant temperature experiments (1806/sup 0/K) designed to measure the equilibrium vapor pressures of Ti(g) and TiO(g). In one experiment titanium monoxide was vaporized from a tungsten Knudsen effusion cell; the vapor was collected on a water cooled quartz cap surrounding the cell; and the total amount of titanium deposited on the cap was analyzed colorimetrically. In the second constant temperature experiment (1806/sup 0/K) the vapor composition in equilibrium with nearly stoichiometric titanium monoxide was measured mass spectrometrically. The mass spectrometer results were used to apportion the total titanium collected in the first experiment to Ti(g) and TiO(g). In the third experiment the temperature dependence of the ions Ti/sup +/(48) and TiO(64) was measured spectrometrically. The results obtained in this work are compared with published thermodynamic properties of the titanium oxygen system, and indicate the standard free energy of formation of titanium monoxide obtained from the earliest calorimetric measurements yielded a result not negative enough and also oxygen pressures obtained by emf measurements for stoichiometric titanium monoxide at 1806/sup 0/K are high by a factor of 42.6. The present results are in good agreement with the thermodynamic properties reported in recently issued pages of the JANAF Thermochemical Tables.

  7. [In-situ DRIFTS study of coupling partial oxidation of methane and carbon dioxide reforming].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Hong-bing; Xu, Jian-hua; Xie, Jun-feng; Chen, Qing-lin

    2008-06-01

    8%Ru-5%Ce/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst exhibited excellent catalytic performance for low temperature activation of methane. Although the conversion rates of methane were 25.3% for exothermal partial oxidation of methane, and 0.8% for endothermal carbon dioxide reforming, whose activity was rather low, 38.8% of conversion rate of methane could be obtained for the obtained coupling reaction at 500 degrees C owing to the coupling intensification between endothermal carbon dioxide reforming reaction and exothermal partial oxidation of methane. The mechanism of coupling partial oxidation of methane and carbon dioxide reforming on supported Ru catalyst was investigated by in-situ DRIFTS. The adsorption of CO on 8%Ru-5%Ce/gamma-Al2O3 showed that two kinds of doublet peaks which were characteristic adsorption of the gaseous CO at 2167 cm(-1) (2118 cm(-1)) to form Ru(CO)2 at 2031 cm(-1) (2034 cm(-1)) to form Ce(CO)2 were observed. These CO adsorption species wee easy to be desorbed from the surface of the catalyst at high temperature. The results of in-situ DRIFTS showed that carbonate, formal (formate) and carbon monoxide formed on the surface of catalyst, and formal (formate) was intermediate for the methane partial oxidation. This intermediate was formed through the combination of the adsorption species of methane CHx and the lattice oxygen adsorption species on the surface of catalyst, and syngas was produced through the splitting of this intermediate. The DRIFTS researching on carbon dioxide reforming showed that there was no new adsorption species on the surface of the catalyst, which indicated that the mechanism for carbon dioxide reforming was through the dissociation of the adsorbed methane and carbon dioxide. During the reaction of the coupling of carbon dioxide reforming reaction and partial oxidation of methane, there was hydroxyl adsorption species on the surface of catalyst. The mechanism of coupling methane, carbon dioxide and oxygen might be composed of the above

  8. Dehydrogenation of ethane to ethylene via radical pathways enhanced by alkali metal based catalyst in oxysteam condition

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2016-08-21

    The dehydrogenation of ethane to ethylene in the presence of oxygen and water was conducted using Na2WO4/SiO2 catalyst at high temperatures. At 923 K, the conversion rate without water was proportional to ethane pressure and a half order of oxygen pressure, consistent with a kinetically relevant step where an ethane molecule is activated with dissociated oxygen on the surface. When water was present, the ethane conversion rate was drastically enhanced. An additional term in the rate expression was proportional to a quarter of the oxygen pressure and a half order of the water pressure. This mechanism is consistent with the quasi-equilibrated OH radical formation with subsequent ethane activation. The attainable yield can be accurately described by taking the water contribution into consideration. At high conversion levels at 1073 K, the C2H4 yield exceeded 60% in a single-pass conversion. The C2H4 selectivity was almost insensitive to the C2H6 and O2 pressures. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  9. Thermal Tuning of Ethylene/Ethane Selective Cavities of Intrinsically Microporous Polymers

    KAUST Repository

    Salinas, Octavio

    2016-06-21

    Ethylene is the most important organic molecule with regard to production volume. Therefore, the energy spent in its separation processes, based on old-fashioned distillation, takes approx. 33% of total operating costs. Membranes do not require significant thermal energy input; therefore, membrane processes may separate hydrocarbons cheaply and just as reliably as distillation columns. Olefin/paraffin separations are the future targets of commercial membrane applications, provided high-performing materials become available at reasonable prices. This thesis addresses the development of advanced carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes derived from intrinsically microporous polymers (PIMs). Chronologically, Chapter 4 of this work reports the evaluation of PIMs as potential ethylene/ethane selective materials, while Chapters 5 to 7 propose PIMs as carbonization precursors. The gravimetric sorption studies conducted in this work regarding both the polymers and their heated-derivatives revealed that this separation is entirely controlled by diffusion differences. The pristine polymers examined in this study presented BET surface areas from 80 to 720 m2g-1. Furthermore, the effect of using bromine-substituted PIM-polyimides elucidated a boost in ethylene permeability, but with a significant drop in selectivity. The hydroxyl functionalization of PIM-polyimides was confirmed as a valuable strategy to increase selectivity. Functionalized PMDA-HSBF is the most selective polyimide of intrinsic microporosity known to date (= 5.1) due to its hydrogen-bonded matrix. In spite of their novelty, pristine PIMs based on the spirobisindane moiety were not tight enough to distinguish between the 0.2 Å difference in diameter of the ethylene/ethane molecules. Therefore, they did not surpass the upper bound limit performance of known polymeric membranes. Nevertheless, the carbons derived from these polymers were excellent ethylene/ethane sieves by virtue of their narrow and tight

  10. Quantifying Methane Emissions from the Arctic Ocean Seabed to the Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Stephen; Pisso, Ignacio; Schmidbauer, Norbert; Hermansen, Ove; Silyakova, Anna; Ferré, Benedicte; Vadakkepuliyambatta, Sunil; Myhre, Gunnar; Mienert, Jürgen; Stohl, Andreas; Myhre, Cathrine Lund

    2016-04-01

    Large quantities of methane are stored under the seafloor in the shallow waters of the Arctic Ocean. Some of this is in the form of hydrates which may be vulnerable to deomposition due to surface warming. The Methane Emissions from Arctic Ocean to Atmosphere MOCA, (http://moca.nilu.no/) project was established in collaboration with the Centre for Arctic Gas Hydrate, Environment and Climate (CAGE, https://cage.uit.no/). In summer 2014, and summer and autumn 2015 we deployed oceanographic CTD (Conductivity, Temperature, Depth) stations and performed state-of-the-art atmospheric measurements of CH4, CO2, CO, and other meteorological parameters aboard the research vessel Helmer Hanssen west of Prins Karl's Forland, Svalbard. Air samples were collected for isotopic analysis (13C, 2H) and quantification of other hydrocarbons (ethane, propane, etc.). Atmospheric measurements are also available from the nearby Zeppelin Observatory at a mountain close to Ny-Ålesund, Svalbard. We will present data from these measurements that show an upper constraint of the methane flux in measurement area in 2014 too low to influence the annual CH4 budget. This is further supported by top-down constraints (maximum release consistent with observations at the Helmer Hansen and Zeppelin Observatory) determined using FLEXPART foot print sensitivities and the OsloCTM3 model. The low flux estimates despite the presence of active seeps in the area (numerous gas flares were observed using echo sounding) were apparently due to the presence of a stable ocean pycnocline at ~50 m.

  11. Kinetics of oxidative coupling of methane: Bridging the gap between comprehension and description

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Yu. Sinev; Z.T. Fattakhova; V.I. Lomonosov; Yu. A. Gordienko

    2009-01-01

    The development of notions about the mechanism of the oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) over oxide catalysts and corresponding progress in its kinetic description are reviewed and discussed. The latter becomes essential at the stage of scaling up and optimization of the process in pilot and industrial reactors. It is demonstrated that the main achievements in the development of kinetic models can be reached by combining the approaches conventionally used in homo-geneous gas-phase kinetics and in heterogeneous catalysis. In partic-ular,some important features of the OCM process can be described if several elementary reactions of free radical species (formation and transformation) with surface active sites are included into the detailed scheme of methane oxidation in gas. However,some important fea-tures,such as a non-additive character of the reciprocal influence of methane and ethane in the case of their simultaneous presence in the reaction mixture,cannot yet be described and comprehended in the framework of schemes developed so far. Possible ways towards an advanced kinetic model,accounting the main principles of catalyst functioning (redox nature of active sites) and pathways of product formation (via free radicals) are traced.

  12. Nb effect in the nickel oxide-catalyzed low-temperature oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Haibo

    2012-01-01

    A method for the preparation of NiO and Nb-NiO nanocomposites is developed, based on the slow oxidation of a nickel-rich Nb-Ni gel obtained in citric acid. The resulting materials have higher surface areas than those obtained by the classical evaporation method from nickel nitrate and ammonium niobium oxalate. These consist in NiO nanocrystallites (7-13 nm) associated, at Nb contents >3 at.%., with an amorphous thin layer (1-2 nm) of a niobium-rich mixed oxide with a structure similar to that of NiNb 2O 6. Unlike bulk nickel oxides, the activity of these nanooxides for low-temperature ethane oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) has been related to their redox properties. In addition to limiting the size of NiO crystallites, the presence of the Nb-rich phase also inhibits NiO reducibility. At Nb content >5 at.%, Nb-NiO composites are thus less active for ethane ODH but more selective, indicating that the Nb-rich phase probably covers part of the unselective, non-stoichiometric, active oxygen species of NiO. This geometric effect is supported by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy observations. The close interaction between NiO and the thin Nb-rich mixed oxide layer, combined with possible restructuration of the nanocomposite under ODH conditions, leads to significant catalyst deactivation at high Nb loadings. Hence, the most efficient ODH catalysts obtained by this method are those containing 3-4 at.% Nb, which combine high activity, selectivity, and stability. The impact of the preparation method on the structural and catalytic properties of Nb-NiO nanocomposites suggests that further improvement in NiO-catalyzed ethane ODH can be expected upon optimization of the catalyst. © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fragrance material review on 1-(2,5,5-trimethylcycloheptyl)ethan-1-one.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scognamiglio, J; Letizia, C S; Api, A M

    2013-12-01

    A toxicologic and dermatologic review of 1-(2,5,5-trimethylcycloheptyl)ethan-1-one when used as a fragrance ingredient is presented. 1-(2,5,5-Trimethylcycloheptyl)ethan-1-one is a member of the fragrance structural group Alkyl Cyclic Ketones. These fragrances can be described as being composed of an alkyl, R1, and various substituted and bicyclic saturated or unsaturated cyclic hydrocarbons, R2, in which one of the rings may include up to 12 carbons. Alternatively, R2 may be a carbon bridge of C2-C4 carbon chain length between the ketone and cyclic hydrocarbon. This review contains a detailed summary of all available toxicology and dermatology papers that are related to this individual fragrance ingredient and is not intended as a stand-alone document. Available data for 1-(2,5,5-trimethylcycloheptyl)ethan-1-one were evaluated then summarized and includes physical properties, skin irritation, mucous membrane (eye) irritation, and skin sensitization data. A safety assessment of the entire Alkyl Cyclic Ketones will be published simultaneously with this document; please refer to Belsito et al. (Belsito, D., Bickers, D., Bruze, M., Calow, P., Dagli, M., Fryer, A.D., Greim, H., Miyachi, Y., Saurat, J.H., Sipes, I.G., 2013. A toxicologic and dermatologic assessment of alkyl cyclic ketones when used as fragrance ingredients. (submitted for publication)) for an overall assessment of the safe use of this material and all Alkyl Cyclic Ketones in fragrances. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Methane from wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, T. F.; Barreto, L.; Kypreos, S.; Stucki, S

    2005-07-15

    The role of wood-based energy technologies in the Swiss energy system in the long-term is examined using the energy-system Swiss MARKAL model. The Swiss MARKAL model is a 'bottom-up' energy-systems optimization model that allows a detailed representation of energy technologies. The model has been developed as a joint effort between the Energy Economics Group (EEG) at Paul Scherrer Institute PSI) and the University of Geneva and is currently used at PSI-EEG. Using the Swiss MARKAL model, this study examines the conditions under which wood-based energy technologies could play a role in the Swiss energy system, the most attractive pathways for their use and the policy measures that could support them. Given the involvement of PSI in the ECOGAS project, especial emphasis is put on the production of bio-SNG from wood via gasification and methanation of syngas and on hydrothermal gasification of woody biomass. Of specific interest as weIl is the fraction of fuel used in passenger cars that could be produced by locally harvested wood. The report is organized as follows: Section 2 presents a brief description of the MARKAL model. Section 3 describes the results of the base case scenario, which represents a plausible, 'middle-of-the-road' development of the Swiss energy system. Section 4 discusses results illustrating the conditions under which the wood-based methanation technology could become competitive in the Swiss energy market, the role of oil and gas prices, subsidies to methanation technologies and the introduction of a competing technology, namely the wood-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. FinaIly, section 5 outlines some conclusions from this analysis. (author)

  15. Occurrence of decabromodiphenyl ethane in captive Chinese alligators (Alligator sinensis) from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Bing; Wu, Ting; Zhao, Guangchao; Sun, Yuxin; Wang, Xinming; Zhao, Juan; Yi, Zhigang; Wu, Xiaobing; Mai, Bixian

    2015-01-01

    Decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), a replacement for decabromodiphenyl ether (deca-BDE), was investigated in captive Chinese alligators from China. DBDPE was detected in adult tissues, neonates and eggs of Chinese alligators with concentrations ranging from 4.74-192, 0.24-1.94, and 0.01-0.51 ng g(-1) lipid weight, respectively. Compared to PBDEs and PCBs, DBDPE contamination was limited in Chinese alligators. Additionally, DBDPE concentrations in adult muscles were one to three orders of magnitude higher than those in neonates and eggs, suggesting the limited maternal transfer potential of DBDPE in Chinese alligators. This is the first study to report the occurrence of DBDPE in Chinese alligators.

  16. Diffusion quantum Monte Carlo for equilibrium structures and harmonic frequencies of ethane and ozone molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shih-I.

    2004-06-01

    Application of the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck diffusion quantum Monte Carlo method in combination with a trial wave function constructed from the floating spherical Gaussian orbitals and spherical Gaussian geminals to studies on the equilibrium structures and harmonic frequencies of ethane and ozone is presented. These Monte Carlo computed results are compared with those of experiments as well as the coupled cluster methods with the correlation consistent basis sets for the two molecules. For ozone, we also compare the Monte Carlo results with the results from multireference calculations.

  17. Mo-V-Te-Nb oxides as catalysts for ethene production by oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartmann, D. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Dept. of Chemistry and Catalysis Research Center; Meiswinkel, A.; Thaller, C.; Bock, M.; Alvarado, L. [Linde AG, Pullach (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    The availability of ethane in shale gas, as well as the interest in valorising previously underutilized carbon feedstocks, makes the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of ethane an attractive alternative to the industrially established processes for production of ethylene. Mo-V-Te-Nb mixed oxide has been chosen as catalyst for the ODH reaction in view of its outstanding ability to activate alkane molecules. Catalytic test results showed that this type of catalyst can selectively oxidize ethane to ethene at moderate temperatures (350-400 C) with minor production of CO{sub x}. The catalytic performance of Mo-V-Te-Nb mixed-oxide is mainly attributable to the crystalline phase 'M1'. Rietveld analysis of the X-Ray diffractograms allowed us to quantify the amount of MoVTeNb oxide that has crystallized as M1. In this way, it was possible to find a linear correlation of the reaction rate with the abundance of M1 in the solid. Therefore, it is clear that for improving the efficiency of MoVTeNb oxide in ODH, the amount of M1 in the catalyst should be maximized. With this purpose, several MoVTeNb oxides were subject to different thermal treatments prior to the catalytic test. Structural changes in the catalyst were monitored by in-situ XRD technique. Under oxidative atmosphere, it was observed a recrystallization of M2 and possibly, amorphous oxide, into M1 phase, leading to correspondingly more active and selective catalysts (selectivities above 95 % for ethane conversions up to 40 % under industrially relevant conditions). The active site of M1 involves V species, likely with redox properties enhanced by the proximity of Mo and Te species, while the function of the crystalline structure itself is to provide the spatial configuration that allows interaction between these species. However, ethene formation rate was observed to be independent of the V content of the samples. The vanadium species exposed at the surface were studied by LEIS and by IR spectroscopy of CO

  18. METH-108H型甲烷化催化剂还原探讨%The research for reduction of METH -108H methanation catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈思

    2011-01-01

    A reduction of METH -108H methanation catalyst in Chitianhua Co. was introduced. The reduction took place under high air speed, high concentration of carbon monoxide, higher temperature and shorter time, better effect. To ensure deep reduction of METH -108H methanation catalyst, the key step is controlling concentration of carbon monoxide by high temperature convertor.%介绍了赤天化股份公司对METH-108H型甲烷化催化剂还原的情况。还原在高空速,高一氧化碳浓度下进行,还原温度高,时间短,效果好。要保证METH-108H型甲烷化催化剂得到深度还原,利用高变气控制一氧化碳浓度是关键。

  19. Instruments for Methane Gas Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mr. Sibu Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives the explanation of different instruments for detecting methane gas in detail. This paper discusses their working principles. Methane gas detection is essentially required in the areas like in coal mines, power plant, Waste Water Treatment, Boiler Rooms etc. This paper also discusses their roles in various applications.

  20. A Methane Balloon Inflation Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwinski, Curtis J.; Cordes, Tanya J.; Franek, Joe

    2005-01-01

    The various equipments, procedure and hazards in constructing the device for inflating a methane balloon using a standard methane outlet in a laboratory are described. This device is fast, safe, inexpensive, and easy to use as compared to a hydrogen gas cylinder for inflating balloons.

  1. Methane adsorption on activated carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perl, Andras; Koopman, Folkert; Jansen, Peter; Rooij, Marietta de; Gemert, Wim van

    2014-01-01

    Methane storage in adsorbed form is a promising way to effectively and safely store fuel for vehicular transportation or for any other potential application. In a solid adsorbent, nanometer wide pores can trap methane by van der Waals forces as high density fluid at low pressure and room temperature

  2. [Conversion of acetic acid to methane by thermophiles: Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinder, S.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this project is to provide an understanding of thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms capable of breaking down acetic acid, the precursor of two-thirds of the methane produced by anaerobic bioreactors. Recent results include: (1) the isolation of Methanothrix strain CALLS-1, which grows much more rapidly than mesophilic strains; (2) the demonstration that thermophilic cultures of Methanosarcina and Methanothrix show minimum thresholds for acetate utilization of 1--2.5 mM and 10--20{mu}m respectively, in agreement with ecological data indicating that Methanothrix is favored by low acetate concentration; (3) the demonstration of high levels of thermostable acetyl-coA synthetase and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase in cell-free extracts of Methanothrix strains CALS-1; (4) the demonstration of methanogenesis from acetate and ATP in cell free extracts of strain CALS-1. (5) the demonstration that methanogenesis from acetate required 2 ATP/methane, and, in contrast to Methanosarcina, was independent of hydrogen and other electron donors; (6) the finding that entropy effects must be considered when predicting the level of hydrogen in thermophilic syntrophic cultures. (7) the isolation and characterization of the Desulfotomaculum thermoacetoxidans. Current research is centered on factors which allow thermophilic Methanothrix to compete with Methanosarcina.

  3. (Conversion of acetic acid to methane by thermophiles: Progress report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinder, S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to provide an understanding of thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms capable of breaking down acetic acid, the precursor of two-thirds of the methane produced by anaerobic bioreactors. Recent results include: (1) the isolation of Methanothrix strain CALLS-1, which grows much more rapidly than mesophilic strains; (2) the demonstration that thermophilic cultures of Methanosarcina and Methanothrix show minimum thresholds for acetate utilization of 1--2.5 mM and 10--20{mu}m respectively, in agreement with ecological data indicating that Methanothrix is favored by low acetate concentration; (3) the demonstration of high levels of thermostable acetyl-coA synthetase and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase in cell-free extracts of Methanothrix strains CALS-1; (4) the demonstration of methanogenesis from acetate and ATP in cell free extracts of strain CALS-1. (5) the demonstration that methanogenesis from acetate required 2 ATP/methane, and, in contrast to Methanosarcina, was independent of hydrogen and other electron donors; (6) the finding that entropy effects must be considered when predicting the level of hydrogen in thermophilic syntrophic cultures. (7) the isolation and characterization of the Desulfotomaculum thermoacetoxidans. Current research is centered on factors which allow thermophilic Methanothrix to compete with Methanosarcina.

  4. [Massive poisoning with carbon monoxide: an update from a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Mariano; Crapanzano, Gabriel; Cabrerizo, Silvia; Aichele, Cristina; Deurtiaga, Alejandra; Vallejos, Yamila

    2017-02-01

    Carbon monoxide is known as the "silent murderer" because it is a colorless and odorless gas. According to these characteristics, toxicity goes unnoticed which makes the diagnosis difficult. In most cases, the cold periods and group poisoning make suspect its presence because inappropriate heat both in home or public environments. Our goal is to inform about a mass carbon monoxide poisoning in a children's parties room using a combustion source installed, not for the purpose of heating, but as a supply of light (generator), emphasizing that it can occur in any time of the year.

  5. Structural and magnetic properties of mechanochemically synthesized nanocrystalline titanium monoxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barudžija Tanja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nano-sized titanium monoxide (TiO powder was prepared by mechanochemical synthesis. A mixture of commercial Ti and TiO2 (rutile powders with the molar ratio of 1:1 was milled in a planetary ball mill for 5, 10, 20, 30 and 60 min under argon atmosphere. The final single-phase titanium monoxide sample was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, magnetic measurements using a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer (SQUID and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA. The temperature dependency of the magnetic susceptibility is characterized by significant contribution of Pauli paramagnetism due to conduction electrons.

  6. Effect of hydrogen combustion reaction on the dehydrogenation of ethane in a fixed-bed catalytic membrane reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masoud Hasany; Mohammad Malakootikhah; Vahid Rahmanian; Soheila Yaghmaei

    2015-01-01

    A two-dimensional non-isothermal mathematical model has been developed for the ethane dehydrogenation reaction in a fixed-bed catalytic membrane reactor. Since ethane dehydrogenation is an equilibrium reaction, removal of produced hydrogen by the membrane shifts the thermodynamic equilibrium to ethylene production. For further displacement of the dehydrogenation reaction, oxidative dehydrogenation method has been used. Since ethane dehydrogenation is an endothermic reaction, the energy produced by the oxidative dehydrogena-tion method is consumed by the dehydrogenation reaction. The results show that the oxidative dehydrogenation method generated a substantial improvement in the reactor performance in terms of high conversions and significant energy saving. It was also established that the sweep gas velocity in the shell side of the reactor is one of the most important factors in the effectiveness of the reactor.

  7. Remote Sensing and Sea-Truth Measurements of Methane Flux to the Atmosphere (HYFLUX project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ian MacDonald

    2011-05-31

    A multi-disciplinary investigation of distribution and magnitude of methane fluxes from seafloor gas hydrate deposits in the Gulf of Mexico was conducted based on results obtained from satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) remote sensing and from sampling conducted during a research expedition to three sites where gas hydrate occurs (MC118, GC600, and GC185). Samples of sediments, water, and air were collected from the ship and from an ROV submersible using sediments cores, niskin bottles attached to the ROV and to a rosette, and an automated sea-air interface collector. The SAR images were used to quantify the magnitude and distribution of natural oil and gas seeps that produced perennial oil slicks on the ocean surface. A total of 176 SAR images were processed using a texture classifying neural network algorithm, which segmented the ocean surface into oil-free and oil-covered water. Geostatistical analysis indicates that there are a total of 1081 seep formations distributed over the entire Gulf of Mexico basin. Oil-covered water comprised an average of 780.0 sq. km (sd 86.03) distributed with an area of 147,370 sq. km. Persistent oil and gas seeps were also detected with SAR sampling on other ocean margins located in the Black Sea, western coast of Africa, and offshore Pakistan. Analysis of sediment cores from all three sites show profiles of sulfate, sulfide, calcium and alkalinity that indicated anaerobic oxidation of methane with precipitation of authigenic carbonates. Difference among the three sampling sites may reflect the relative magnitude of methane flux. Methane concentrations in water column samples collected by ROV and rosette deployments from MC118 ranged from {approx}33,000 nM at the seafloor to {approx}12 nM in the mixed layer with isolated peaks up to {approx}13,670 nM coincident with the top of the gas hydrate stability field. Average plume methane, ethane, and propane concentrations in the mixed layer are 7, 630, and 9,540 times saturation

  8. Oxygen-Methane Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, Tim

    2012-01-01

    An oxygen-methane thruster was conceived with integrated igniter/injector capable of nominal operation on either gaseous or liquid propellants. The thruster was designed to develop 100 lbf (approximately 445 N) thrust at vacuum conditions and use oxygen and methane as propellants. This continued development included refining the design of the thruster to minimize part count and manufacturing difficulties/cost, refining the modeling tools and capabilities that support system design and analysis, demonstrating the performance of the igniter and full thruster assembly with both gaseous and liquid propellants, and acquiring data from this testing in order to verify the design and operational parameters of the thruster. Thruster testing was conducted with gaseous propellants used for the igniter and thruster. The thruster was demonstrated to work with all types of propellant conditions, and provided the desired performance. Both the thruster and igniter were tested, as well as gaseous propellants, and found to provide the desired performance using the various propellant conditions. The engine also served as an injector testbed for MSFC-designed refractory combustion chambers made of rhenium.

  9. A 60-yr record of atmospheric carbon monoxide reconstructed from Greenland firn air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Petrenko

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a reconstruction of the Northern Hemisphere (NH high latitude atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO mole fraction from Greenland firn air. Firn air samples were collected at three deep ice core sites in Greenland (NGRIP in 2001, Summit in 2006 and NEEM in 2008. CO records from the three sites agree well with each other as well as with recent atmospheric measurements, indicating that CO is well preserved in the firn at these sites. CO atmospheric history was reconstructed back to the year 1950 from the measurements using a combination of two forward models of gas transport in firn and an inverse model. The reconstructed history suggests that Arctic CO was already higher in 1950 than it is today. CO mole fractions rose gradually until the 1970s and peaked in the 1970s or early 1980s, followed by a decline to today's levels. We compare the CO history with the atmospheric histories of methane, light hydrocarbons, molecular hydrogen, CO stable isotopes and hydroxyl radical (OH, as well as with published CO emission inventories and results of a historical run from a chemistry-transport model. We find that the reconstructed Greenland CO history cannot be reconciled with available emission inventories unless large changes in OH are assumed. We argue that the available CO emission inventories chronically underestimate NH emissions, and fail to capture the emission decline starting in the late 1970s, which was most likely due to reduced emissions from road transportation in North America and Europe.

  10. Changing distributions of carbon monoxide (CO) over Africa from climate and land use driven fire patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, Helen; Bloom, Anthony; Worden, John

    2017-04-01

    Satellite measurements of atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO) provide a signature for biomass burning and anthropogenic combustion-related pollution emissions. CO plays an important role in both air quality and climate as a precursor for tropospheric ozone and as a major sink of OH, the atmospheric "detergent" that affects the lifetime of methane and other pollutants. Worden et al., [2013] showed decreasing global CO values in time series of satellite total column CO measurements over the past decade. All of the satellite instruments that measure CO in the thermal infrared showed consistent inter-annual variability due to fires and possibly the global recession in late 2008. Observed decreases in CO over N. America and Europe were consistent with expected decreases in CO emissions inventories [Granier et al., 2011], however, the decrease is not uniform globally. In particular, some regions of Africa show negligible trends in CO. Here we examine the 14-year time series (2002-2015) of surface and total column CO concentrations from MOPITT and fire radiative power (FRP) from MODIS over Africa to study the attribution of changes in CO. We are interested in changes in fires due to climate variability (El Nino) and land-use, including urbanization, and their effect on atmospheric CO burden.

  11. Changing distributions of carbon monoxide (CO) from climate and land use driven fire patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, H. M.

    2016-12-01

    Satellite measurements of atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO) provide a signature for biomass burning and anthropogenic combustion-related pollution emissions. CO plays an important role in both air quality and climate as a precursor for tropospheric ozone and as a major sink of OH, the atmospheric "detergent" that affects the lifetime of methane and other pollutants. Worden et al., [2013] showed decreasing global CO values in time series of satellite total column CO measurements over the past decade. All of the satellite instruments that measure CO in the thermal infrared showed consistent inter-annual variability due to fires and possibly the global recession in late 2008. Observed decreases in CO over N. America and Europe were consistent with expected decreases in CO emissions inventories [Granier et al., 2011], however, the decrease is not uniform globally. In particular, some regions of Africa show negligible trends in CO. Here we examine the 14-year time series (2002-2015) of surface and total column CO concentrations from MOPITT and fire radiative power (FRP) from MODIS over Africa and Indonesia to study the attribution of changes in CO. We are interested in changes in fires due to climate variability (El Nino) and land-use, including urbanization, and their effect on atmospheric CO burden.

  12. Synergistic effect of carbon monoxide with other biologically active injurious factors on the organism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankow, D.; Ponsold, W.

    1974-09-01

    The combined effects on biological organisms are reported for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sodium nitrite, hydrocyanic acid, carbon disulfide, sulfur dioxide, ammonia, hydrogen peroxide, ethanol, trichloroethylene, carbon tetrachloride, methane, benzene, iodine acetate, cholesterol, benzpyrene, hexobarbitol, zoxazolamine, nembutal, luminal, morphine, adrenalin, persantin, cytochrome c, aldrin, carbaryl, cyclodiene epoxide; and physical influences such as ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure, ionizing radiation, noise, and vibration. A literature review shows that with increasing CO/sub 2/ and decreasing oxygen concentration in the inhalation air, the toxicity of CO increased in experiments with mice and canaries. Oxides of nitrogen enhance the toxic effect of CO in an additive way and at times synergistically. At 500 m from a metallurgical plant in the USSR the maximum allowable immission concentrations for CO and SO/sub 2/ were exceeded. In children residing there a higher normal erythrocyte number, hemoglobin content, and catalase activity were found in the blood along with higher concentrations of coproporphyrin and 17-ketosteroids. All values returned to normal after an 8-week stay of these children away from the metallurgical plant.

  13. Gas turbine combustion performance test of hydrogen and carbon monoxide synthetic gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min Chul Lee; Seok Bin Seo; Jae Hwa Chung; Si Moon Kim; Yong Jin Joo; Dal Hong Ahn [Korea Electric Power Corporation, Daejeon (Republic of Korea). Green Growth Laboratory

    2010-07-15

    The development of coal IGCC (Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle) technology has made it possible to exploit electricity generated from coal at a low cost. Furthermore, IGCC is a pre-requisite for the development of CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage) technology and hydrogen generated from coal. To achieve the need to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, Korea's 300 MW IGCC RDD&D (Research Development, Demonstration and Dissemination) project was launched in December 2006 under the leadership of the Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO), with the support of the Korea Ministry of Knowledge Economy. When a new fuel is adapted to a gas turbine (such as syngas for IGCC), it is necessary to study the gas turbine combustion characteristics of the fuel, because gas turbines are very sensitive to its physical and chemical properties. This experimental study was conducted by investigating the combustion performance of synthetic gas, which is composed chiefly of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. The results of a test on synthetic gas combustion performance were compared with the results of methane combustion, which is a major component of natural gas. The results of the combustion test of both gases were examined in terms of the turbine's inlet temperature, combustion dynamics, emission characteristics, and flame structure. From the results of this experimental study, we were able to understand the combustion characteristics of synthetic gas and anticipate the problems when synthetic gas rather than natural gas is fuelled to a gas turbine. 21 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Hydroxylation of methane through component interactions in soluble methane monooxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Jae

    2016-04-01

    Methane hydroxylation through methane monooxygenases (MMOs) is a key aspect due to their control of the carbon cycle in the ecology system and recent applications of methane gas in the field of bioenergy and bioremediation. Methanotropic bacteria perform a specific microbial conversion from methane, one of the most stable carbon compounds, to methanol through elaborate mechanisms. MMOs express particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) in most strains and soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) under copper-limited conditions. The mechanisms of MMO have been widely studied from sMMO belonging to the bacterial multicomponent monooxygenase (BMM) superfamily. This enzyme has diiron active sites where different types of hydrocarbons are oxidized through orchestrated hydroxylase, regulatory and reductase components for precise control of hydrocarbons, oxygen, protons, and electrons. Recent advances in biophysical studies, including structural and enzymatic achievements for sMMO, have explained component interactions, substrate pathways, and intermediates of sMMO. In this account, oxidation of methane in sMMO is discussed with recent progress that is critical for understanding the microbial applications of C-H activation in one-carbon substrates.

  15. Electrochemical oxidation of methane at metal and oxide electrodes. Annual report, December 1, 1987-December 1, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, D.P.; Pound, B.G.; Frese, K.W.

    1989-03-01

    Electrochemical oxidation of methane at noble metal electrodes was investigated. Auger electron spectra showed no buildup of carbon on Rh electrodes after extended electroysis in 140C H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/. The surface oxidation of Rh in 140C H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ was studied. The open-circuit potential decay method was applied to the reaction between surface oxygen species on Pt and Rh and CH/sub 4/, C/sub 2/H/sub 6/, and C/sub 3/H/sub 8/, and H/sub 2/. Methane was the least reactive hydrocarbon. The peak oxidation currents at 1 atm gas pressure were: 480 micro A cm/sq, 110 micro A cm/sq, 3.5 micro A cm/sq, for propane, ethane, and methane, respectively. Methane oxidation to CO/sub 2/ at Rh surfaces onsets at 0.3 V vs. SCE, is maximal at 0.7 to 0.8 V, and then declines at higher anodic potentials. The rising portion of the rate characteristic precedes detectible oxygen deposition, but the drop in oxidation is correlated with blocking of sites with adsorbed oxygen species.

  16. Chemical and isotopic fractionations of natural gases during their migration. Importance of methane solubilization and diffusion during geological times; Fractionnements chimiques et isotopiques des gaz naturels lors de leur migration. Importance de la solubilisation et de la diffusion du methane au cours des temps geologiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pernaton, E.

    1998-09-09

    Two experimental devices have been elaborated in the purpose of simulating in laboratory the solubilization of methane in water and the migration by solubilization/diffusion of some gas species (methane, ethane, propane and nitrogen) through porous media saturated with water. Significant shifts in isotopic ratios of diffused methane (carbon and hydrogen) have been observed. Those fractionations for carbon isotopes, which in most cases are characterised by a {sup 12}C-enriched diffused methane, have fundamental consequences about the interpretation of the origin of methane in sedimentary basins and, in a more general way, about the genetic characterisation of hydrocarbon gases in reservoirs. Indeed, this gives an ambiguous origin for any gas having {sup 12}C-enriched methane, two different interpretations are possible: mixing between thermogenic and bacterial hydrocarbon gases and a diffusive trend during migration. Using a diagram C2/C1 versus {delta}{sup 13}C1, we have shown that in some geological cases, these two processes, mixing and diffusion, exist and that it is possible to discern them.The chemical and isotopic compositions of natural gases do not only reflect genetic processes but are also an indication of their migration. Moreover, the experiments have shown that the gas transport by solubilization/diffusion is a potential operator of gas leakage from natural accumulations. In consequence, a numerical model of gas migration through cap rocks of reservoirs has been elaborated and will be integrated into sedimentary basin models. (author)

  17. Methane production and methane consumption: a review of processes underlying wetland methane fluxes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, R.

    1998-01-01

    Potential rates of both methane production and methane consumption vary over three orders of magnitude and their distribution is skew. These rates are weakly correlated with ecosystem type, incubation temperature, in situ aeration, latitude, depth and distance to oxic/anoxic interface. Anaerobic

  18. Methane production and methane consumption: a review of processes underlying wetland methane fluxes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, R.

    1998-01-01

    Potential rates of both methane production and methane consumption vary over three orders of magnitude and their distribution is skew. These rates are weakly correlated with ecosystem type, incubation temperature, in situ aeration, latitude, depth and distance to oxic/anoxic interface. Anaerobic car

  19. Stable isotope composition of atmospheric carbon monoxide. A modelling study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gromov, Sergey S.

    2014-11-01

    This study aims at an improved understanding of the stable carbon and oxygen isotope composition of the carbon monoxide (CO) in the global atmosphere by means of numerical simulations. At first, a new kinetic chemistry tagging technique for the most complete parameterisation of isotope effects has been introduced into the Modular Earth Submodel System (MESSy) framework. Incorporated into the ECHAM/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry (EMAC) general circulation model, an explicit treatment of the isotope effects on the global scale is now possible. The expanded model system has been applied to simulate the chemical system containing up to five isotopologues of all carbon- and oxygen-bearing species, which ultimately determine the δ{sup 13}C, δ{sup 18}O and Δ{sup 17}O isotopic signatures of atmospheric CO. As model input, a new stable isotope-inclusive emission inventory for the relevant trace gases has been compiled. The uncertainties of the emission estimates and of the resulting simulated mixing and isotope ratios have been analysed. The simulated CO mixing and stable isotope ratios have been compared to in-situ measurements from ground-based observatories and from the civil-aircraft-mounted CARIBIC-1 measurement platform. The systematically underestimated {sup 13}CO/{sup 12}CO ratios of earlier, simplified modelling studies can now be partly explained. The EMAC simulations do not support the inferences of those studies, which suggest for CO a reduced input of the highly depleted in {sup 13}C methane oxidation source. In particular, a high average yield of 0.94 CO per reacted methane (CH{sub 4}) molecule is simulated in the troposphere, to a large extent due to the competition between the deposition and convective transport processes affecting the CH{sub 4} to CO reaction chain intermediates. None of the other factors, assumed or disregarded in previous studies, however hypothesised to have the potential in enriching tropospheric CO in {sup 13}C, were found significant

  20. Decay rate of critical fluctuations in ethane + carbon dioxide mixtures near the critical line including the critical azeotrope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, R. F.; Doiron, T.; Pegg, I. L.

    1986-03-01

    Using the technique of photon correlation spectroscopy we have measured the decay rate of critical fluctuations in mixtures of ethane and carbon dioxide of various compositions including a near-azeotropic mixture. Our experimental data indicate that there is only one dominant mode of fluctuations and the decay rate is well described by the predictions of the mode-coupling theory with the exponent v=0.63 for all compositions. The decay rate, its background contributions, the shear viscosity, and the correlation length for the mixtures appear to interpolate simply between those of ethane and carbon dioxide.

  1. Decay rate of critical fluctuations in ethane+carbon dioxide mixtures near the critical line including the critical azeotrope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, R.F.; Doiron, T.; Pegg, I.L.; Hanley, H.J.M.; Cezairliyan, A.

    1986-03-01

    Using the technique of photon correlation spectroscopy we have measured the decay rate of critical fluctuations in mixtures of ethane and carbon dioxide of various compositions including a near-azeotropic mixture. Our experimental data indicate that there is only one dominant mode of fluctuations and the decay rate is well described by the predictions of the mode-coupling theory with the exponent v=0.63 for all compositions. The decay rate, its background contributions, the shear viscosity, and the correlation length for the mixtures appear to interpolate simply between those of ethane and carbon dioxide.

  2. A Simple Molecular Orbital Treatment of the Barrier to Internal Rotation in the Ethane Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Derek W.

    1998-07-01

    The origin of the barrier to internal rotation in the ethane molecule is explored in terms of elementary molecular orbital (MO) considerations. Emphasis is placed on the antibonding effect, i.e. the result that an antibonding MO is more destabilized than its bonding counterpart is stabilized, relative to the parent atomic orbitals (AOs). It is shown that, in the case of two equivalent AOs, this effect is approximately proportional to the square of the overlap integral. By constructing the ethane Mos from those of two methyl fragments, it is shown that the most important orbital energy changes consequent upon rotation about the C-C bond can be expressed in terms of the antibonding effect arising from the filled twofold-degenerate p-bonding and -antibonding MOs. This can be reduced to the dependence on the rotation angle of the vicinal H-H overlap integrals, which are calculated explicitly, showing that the antibonding effect is minimised in the staggered conformation. A letter from Lawrence J. Sacks in our April 2000 issue addresses the above.

  3. Carbohydrate and ethane release with Erwinia carotovora subspecies betavasculorum--induced necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuykendall, L David; Hunter, William J

    2008-02-01

    Erwinia carotovora subspecies betavasculorum, also known as E. betavasculorum and Pectobacterium betavasculorum, is a soil bacterium that has the capacity to cause root rot necrosis of sugarbeets. The qualitatively different pathogenicity exhibited by the virulent E. carotovora strain and two avirulent strains, a Citrobacter sp. and an Enterobacter cloacae, was examined using digital analysis of photographic evidence of necrosis as well as for carbohydrate, ethane, and ethylene release compared with uninoculated potato tuber slices. Visual scoring of necrosis was superior to digital analysis of photographs. The release of carbohydrates and ethane from potato tuber slices inoculated with the soft rot necrosis-causing Erwinia was significantly greater than that of potato tuber slices that had not been inoculated or that had been inoculated with the nonpathogenic E. cloacae and Citrobacter sp. strains. Interestingly, ethylene production from potato slices left uninoculated or inoculated with the nonpathogenic Citrobacter strain was 5- to 10-fold higher than with potato slices inoculated with the pathogenic Erwinia strain. These findings suggest that (1) carbohydrate release might be a useful measure of the degree of pathogenesis, or relative virulence; and that (2) bacterial suppression of ethylene formation may be a critical step in root rot disease formation.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation studies on ethane and acetylene mixture in CuBTC metal organic framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhudesai, S. A.; Sharma, V. K.; Mitra, S.; Mukhopadhyay, R.

    2014-04-01

    Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulation studies have been carried out on the mixture containing ethane and acetylene molecules in 1:1 ratio at various concentrations of each species in CuBTC metal organic framework (MOF). MOFs are important class of materials which are tremendously useful for applications such as gas storage and separation. They have complex structure consisting of pore and pockets connected by windows. Results obtained from MD simulation showed that the self diffusivity of the ethane increases with the concentration while it decreases in case of acetylene. Correlation effects are responsible for this kind of phenomena. Pair distribution function showed the strong peaks at higher correlation length indicating the complex crystalline structure of the host matrix. We have also obtained the velocity auto correlation function (VACF) and velocity cross correlation functions (VCCF) at each studied concentration and found that the contribution from VCCF is almost negligible at lower concentration. Since the transport properties of mixture also depend on the mutual diffusivity and distinct diffusivity besides the self diffusivity, attempt has been made to quantify both the diffusivities. In the present system, at lower concentration, contribution to the mutual diffusivity comes from self diffusivities of species alone and distinct diffusivity contributes only at higher concentration.

  5. Ethane Adsorption in Single Walled Carbon Nanotube by Density Functional Theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张现仁

    2002-01-01

    Density functional theory(DFT)is used to calculate adsorption of thane molecules in single walled carbon nanotubes,A comparison of DFT calculations and grand canonical ensemble Monte Carlo(GCMC)simulations is made first and the two methods are in good agreement.Adsorption isotherms and structures of ethane molecules inside the tubes have been studied by DFT for nanotubes of diameters 0.954, 2.719 and 4.077nm at 157K and ambient temperature,300K,By using the grand potential,the positions of phase transitions are exactly located,and the effect of temperature and tube diameter on phase transitions and adsorption is discussed.We found that lowering temperature and increasing the pore size of several nanometer is preferable for the ethane adsorption when temperature is in the range of 157K-300K and operating pressure reaches several MPa.Layering transitions and capillary condensations are observed at 157K in two larger pore diameters,while these phase transitions disappear or the hysteres is loops become very narrow at 300K.

  6. Density Functional Study on the Reaction Mechanism for the Reaction of Ni+ with Ethane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG,Dong-Ju(张冬菊); LIU,Cheng-Bu(刘成卜); LIU,Yong-Jun(刘永军); HU,Hai-Quan(胡海泉)

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of the reaction of Ni+ (2D) with ethane in the gas-phase was studied by using density functional theory. Both the B3LYP and BLYP functionals with standard all-electron basis sets are used to give the detailed information of the potential energy surface (PES) of [Ni, C2, H6 ] +. Tne mechanisms forming the products CH4 and H2 in the reaction of Ni+with ethane are proposed. The reductive eliminations of CH4and H2 are typical addition-elimination reactions. Each of the two reactions consists of two elementary steps: C-C or CH bond activations to form inserted species followed by isomerizations to form product-like intermediate. The rate determining steps for the elimination reatcions of forming CH4 and H2 are the isomerizations of the inserted species rather than C-C or C-H bond activations. The elimination reaction of forming H2 was found to be thermodynamically favored compared to that of CH4.

  7. The Effects of Low Level Prenatal Carbon Monoxide on Neocortical Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-02

    378.1958). Ginsberg MD, Myers RE (Fetal brain damage following maternal carbon monoxide intoxication: an experimental study. Acta obstetricia et...monoxide production and blood loss at delivery. Acta obstetricia et gynecologica Scandinavica 48:362-370.1969). Longo LD (Carbon monoxide in the

  8. Methane emission from wetland rice fields.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denier van der Gon, H.A.C.

    1996-01-01

    Methane (CH 4 ) is an important greenhouse gas and plays a key role in tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry. Wetland rice fields are an important source of methane, accounting for approximately 20% of the global anthropogenic methane emission. Methane fluxes fro

  9. Oceanic Methane Concentrations in Three Mexican Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The atmospheric concentration of methane has increased significantly over the last several decades. Methane is an important greenhouse gas, and it is important to better quantify methane sources and sinks. Dissolved methane in the ocean is produced by biological and hydrothermal ...

  10. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Amharic (amarunya) Arabic (العربية) Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) French (français) ... Kiswahili) Tagalog (Tagalog) Tigrinya (tigrinya) Vietnamese (Tiếng Việt) Amharic (amarunya) Prevention Guidelines: You Can Prevent Carbon Monoxide ...

  11. Pathways and bioenergetics of anaerobic carbon monoxide fermentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diender, Martijn; Stams, Fons; Machado de Sousa, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Carbon monoxide can act as a substrate for different modes of fermentative anaerobic metabolism. The trait of utilizing CO is spread among a diverse group of microorganisms, including members of bacteria as well as archaea. Over the last decade this metabolism has gained interest due to the poten

  12. UV-induced carbon monoxide emission from living vegetation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Dan; Albert, Kristian Rost; Mikkelsen, Teis Nørgaard

    2013-01-01

    The global burden of carbon monoxide (CO) is rather uncertain. In this paper we address the potential for UV-induced CO emission by living terrestrial vegetation surfaces. Real-time measurements of CO concentrations were made with a cavity enhanced laser spectrometer connected in closed loop...

  13. Study on Response Time of SPE Carbon Monoxide Sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The influence of structural design and the parameters of the working electrode on the response time of a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) carbon monoxide sensor has been studied. Results show that the response time is mainly determined by the RC time constant of the catalyst layer and also related with the working electrode potential.

  14. Carbon monoxide : A quantitative tracer for fossil fuel CO2?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gamnitzer, Ulrike; Karstens, Ute; Kromer, Bernd; Neubert, Rolf E. M.; Meijer, Harro A. J.; Schroeder, Hartwig; Levin, Ingeborg

    2006-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and radiocarbon ((CO2)-C-14) measurements have been made in Heidelberg from 2001 to 2004 in order to determine the regional fossil fuel CO2 component and to investigate the application of CO as a quantitative tracer for fossil fuel CO2 (CO2(foss)). The obs

  15. Carbon monoxide poisoning mimicking long-QT induced syncope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.M. Onvlee-Dekker (Irene); A.C.H. de Vries (Andrica); A.D.J. ten Harkel (Arend)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractCarbon monoxide (CO)poisoning is a rare cause of QT prolongation, and is therefore easily missed. The case of a patient with unexplained syncope and QT prologation on the electrocardiogram that turned out to be related to CO poisoning is reported here. In patients with QT prolongation,

  16. Optimization of Treatment Policy for Acute Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. N. Akalayev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency of combination use of hyperbaric oxygenation, succinate-containing solutions, and anti-edematous agents in patients with acute carbon monoxide poisoning. Subjects and methods. The results of treatment were analyzed in 32 patients admitted in 2009—2011 for severe acute carbon monoxide poisoning and a Glasgow coma score of 6—8. The patients were divided into 2 groups: 1 patients whose combination therapy involved hyperbaric oxygenation, Succinasol infusions, and L-lysine-aescinate injections; 2 those who received traditional therapy. All the patients underwent complex clinical, laboratory, and neurophysiologic examinations. Results. Just 24 hours after the combination use of Succinasol and L-lysine-aescinate, Group I patients were observed to have substantially reduced lactate, the content of the latter approached the normal value following 48 hours, which was much below the values in the control group. The similar pattern was observed when endogenous intoxication parameters were examined. During the performed therapy, the level of consciousness and that of intellect according to the MMSE and FAB scales were restored more rapidly in the study group patients than in Group 2. Conclusion. The combination use of hyperbaric oxygenation, the succinate-containing solution Succinasol, and the anti-edematous agent L-lysine-aescinate considerably enhances the efficiency of intensive therapy for acute carbon monoxide poisoning. Key words: carbon monoxide, toxic hypoxic encephalopathy, combination therapy, hyperbaric oxygenation, succinic acid, L-lysine-aescinate.

  17. Implications of CO Bias for Ozone and Methane Lifetime in a CCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strode, Sarah; Duncan, Bryan Neal; Yegorova, Elena; Douglass, Anne

    2013-01-01

    A low bias in carbon monoxide compared to observations at high latitudes is a common feature of chemistry climate models. CO bias can both indicate and contribute to a bias in modeled OH and methane lifetime. This study examines possible causes of CO bias in the ACCMIP simulation of the GEOSCCM, and considers how attributing the CO bias to uncertainty in CO emissions versus biases in other constituents impacts the relationship between CO bias and methane lifetime. We use a simplified model of CO tagged by source with specified OH to quantify the sensitivity of the CO bias to changes in CO emissions or OH concentration, comparing the modeled CO to surface and MOPITT observations. The simplified model shows that decreasing OH in the northern hemisphere removes most of the global mean and inter-hemispheric bias in surface CO. We then use results from this analysis to explore how adjusting CO sources in the CCM impacts the concentrations of ozone, OH and methane. The CCM simulation also exhibits biases in ozone and water vapor compared to observations. We use a parameterized CO-OH-CH4 model that takes ozone and water vapor as inputs to the parameterization to examine whether correcting water and ozone biases can alter OH enough to remove the CO bias. Through this analysis, we aim to better quantify the relationship between CO bias and model biases in ozone concentrations and methane lifetime.

  18. Anthropogenic methane ebullition and continuous flux measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshboul, Zeyad

    2017-04-01

    Keywords: Methane, Wastewater, Effluent, Anaerobic treatment. Municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) have shown to emit significant amount of methane during treatment processes. While most of studies cover only in-plant diffusive methane flux, magnitude and sources of methane ebullition have not well assessed. Moreover, the reported results of methane emissions from WWTPs are based on low spatial and temporal resolution. Using a continuous measurement approach of methane flux rate for effluent system and secondary clarifier treatment process at one WWTP in Southwest Germany, our results show that high percentage of methane is emitted by ebullition during the anaerobic treatment (clarification pond) with high spatial and temporal variability. Our measurements revealed that no ebullition is occur at the effluent system. The observed high contribution of methane ebullition to the total in-plant methane emission, emphasizes the need for considering in-plant methane emission by ebullition as well as the spatial and temporal variability of these emissions.

  19. Recent advances in methane activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huuska, M.; Kataja, K. [VTT Chemical Technology, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Considerable work has been done in the research and development of methane conversion technologies. Although some promising conversion processes have been demonstrated, further advances in engineering and also in the chemistry are needed before these technologies become commercial. High-temperature processes, e.g. the oxidative coupling of methane, studied thoroughly during the last 15 years, suffer from severe theoretical yield limits and poor economics. In the long term, the most promising approaches seem to be the organometallic and, especially, the biomimetic activation of methane. (author) (22 refs.)

  20. Reconciling Top-Down and Bottom-Up Estimates of Oil and Gas Methane Emissions in the Barnett Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamburg, S.

    2015-12-01

    Top-down approaches that use aircraft, tower, or satellite-based measurements of well-mixed air to quantify regional methane emissions have typically estimated higher emissions from the natural gas supply chain when compared to bottom-up inventories. A coordinated research campaign in October 2013 used simultaneous top-down and bottom-up approaches to quantify total and fossil methane emissions in the Barnett Shale region of Texas. Research teams have published individual results including aircraft mass-balance estimates of regional emissions and a bottom-up, 25-county region spatially-resolved inventory. This work synthesizes data from the campaign to directly compare top-down and bottom-up estimates. A new analytical approach uses statistical estimators to integrate facility emission rate distributions from unbiased and targeted high emission site datasets, which more rigorously incorporates the fat-tail of skewed distributions to estimate regional emissions of well pads, compressor stations, and processing plants. The updated spatially-resolved inventory was used to estimate total and fossil methane emissions from spatial domains that match seven individual aircraft mass balance flights. Source apportionment of top-down emissions between fossil and biogenic methane was corroborated with two independent analyses of methane and ethane ratios. Reconciling top-down and bottom-up estimates of fossil methane emissions leads to more accurate assessment of natural gas supply chain emission rates and the relative contribution of high emission sites. These results increase our confidence in our understanding of the climate impacts of natural gas relative to more carbon-intensive fossil fuels and the potential effectiveness of mitigation strategies.

  1. Is methane a new therapeutic gas?

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Wenwu; Wang Dong; Tao Hengyi; Sun XueJun

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Methane is an attractive fuel. Biologically, methanogens in the colon can use carbon dioxide and hydrogen to produce methane as a by-product. It was previously considered that methane is not utilized by humans. However, in a recent study, results demonstrated that methane could exert anti-inflammatory effects in a dog small intestinal ischemia-reperfusion model. Point of view Actually, the bioactivity of methane has been investigated in gastrointestinal diseases, but the e...

  2. Global Methane Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeburgh, W. S.

    2003-12-01

    Methane (CH4) has been studied as an atmospheric constituent for over 200 years. A 1776 letter from Alessandro Volta to Father Campi described the first experiments on flammable "air" released by shallow sediments in Lake Maggiore (Wolfe, 1996; King, 1992). The first quantitative measurements of CH4, both involving combustion and gravimetric determination of trapped oxidation products, were reported in French by Boussingault and Boussingault, 1864 and Gautier (1901), who reported CH4 concentrations of 10 ppmv and 0.28 ppmv (seashore) and 95 ppmv (Paris), respectively. The first modern measurements of atmospheric CH4 were the infrared absorption measurements of Migeotte (1948), who estimated an atmospheric concentration of 2.0 ppmv. Development of gas chromatography and the flame ionization detector in the 1950s led to observations of vertical CH4 distributions in the troposphere and stratosphere, and to establishment of time-series sampling programs in the late 1970s. Results from these sampling programs led to suggestions that the concentration of CH4, as that of CO2, was increasing in the atmosphere. The possible role of CH4 as a greenhouse gas stimulated further research on CH4 sources and sinks. Methane has also been of interest to microbiologists, but findings from microbiology have entered the larger context of the global CH4 budget only recently.Methane is the most abundant hydrocarbon in the atmosphere. It plays important roles in atmospheric chemistry and the radiative balance of the Earth. Stratospheric oxidation of CH4 provides a means of introducing water vapor above the tropopause. Methane reacts with atomic chlorine in the stratosphere, forming HCl, a reservoir species for chlorine. Some 90% of the CH4 entering the atmosphere is oxidized through reactions initiated by the OH radical. These reactions are discussed in more detail by Wofsy (1976) and Cicerone and Oremland (1988), and are important in controlling the oxidation state of the atmosphere

  3. The methane rating system to determine coal face methane conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, A.P.; van Vuuren, J.J. [Itasca Africa (Pty) Ltd, Johannesburg (South Africa)

    2001-07-01

    Methane Rating was developed from a need in South Africa to measure coal seam gas contents, as well as emission rates into the cutting zone for mechanical miners. These are then combined and compared to the average and normal conditions to provide a risk assessment tool for continuous miner operations. The last two years have seen widespread acceptance of Methane Rating as a practical and simple means of identifying seam gas contents and emission rates during mining, and of rating the changing methane conditions. The system uses proven direct methods of methane measurement to quantify the contents and emissions, combined with an innovative rating system. Each new result is compared with the expected average or normal conditions to determine its Methane Rating between 1 and 5. The present South African national database of over 340 individual samples from 31 mines shows methane contents can normally be expected between 0,2 m{sup 3}/t and 1,4 m{sub 3}/t, with emission rates during coal cutting of 20 l/t/min to 80 l/t/min. The highest risk rated mines are presently in the Secunda and eastern Witbank areas, with the lowest risk rated mines to the west of Witbank. 6 refs., 9 figs.

  4. Effect of methanogenic substrates on anaerobic oxidation of methane and sulfate reduction by an anaerobic methanotrophic enrichment.

    KAUST Repository

    Meulepas, Roel J W

    2010-05-06

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction (SR) is assumed to be a syntrophic process, in which methanotrophic archaea produce an interspecies electron carrier (IEC), which is subsequently utilized by sulfate-reducing bacteria. In this paper, six methanogenic substrates are tested as candidate-IECs by assessing their effect on AOM and SR by an anaerobic methanotrophic enrichment. The presence of acetate, formate or hydrogen enhanced SR, but did not inhibit AOM, nor did these substrates trigger methanogenesis. Carbon monoxide also enhanced SR but slightly inhibited AOM. Methanol did not enhance SR nor did it inhibit AOM, and methanethiol inhibited both SR and AOM completely. Subsequently, it was calculated at which candidate-IEC concentrations no more Gibbs free energy can be conserved from their production from methane at the applied conditions. These concentrations were at least 1,000 times lower can the final candidate-IEC concentration in the bulk liquid. Therefore, the tested candidate-IECs could not have been produced from methane during the incubations. Hence, acetate, formate, methanol, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen can be excluded as sole IEC in AOM coupled to SR. Methanethiol did inhibit AOM and can therefore not be excluded as IEC by this study.

  5. Oxygen-Methane Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Orion Propulsion, Inc. proposes to develop an Oxygen and Methane RCS Thruster to advance the technology of alternate fuels. A successful Oxygen/CH4 RCS Thruster will...

  6. Oxygen-Methane Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Two main innovations will be developed in the Phase II effort that are fundamentally associated with our gaseous oxygen/gaseous methane RCS thruster. The first...

  7. Miniature Airborne Methane Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — KalScott Engineering, and the subcontractor, Princeton University propose the development and demonstration of compact and robust methane sensor for small Unmanned...

  8. Methane Liquid Level Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Technologies Group, Inc. proposes the development of a Methane Liquid-Level Sensor, (MLS) for In-Space cryogenic storage capable of continuous monitoring of...

  9. Methane LIDAR Laser Technology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Fibertek proposes to develop laser technology intended to meet NASA's need for innovative lidar technologies for atmospheric measurements of methane. NASA and the...

  10. Effect of catalyst structure on oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane and propane on alumina-supported vanadia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Argyle, Morris D.; Chen, Kaidong; Bell, Alexis T.; Iglesia, Enrique

    2001-09-11

    The catalytic properties of Al2O3-supported vanadia with a wide range of VOx surface density (1.4-34.2 V/nm2) and structure were examined for the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane and propane. UV-visible and Raman spectra showed that vanadia is dispersed predominantly as isolated monovanadate species below {approx}2.3 V/nm2. As surface densities increase, two-dimensional polyvanadates appear (2.3-7.0 V/nm2) along with increasing amounts of V2O5 crystallites at surface densities above 7.0 V/nm2. The rate constant for oxidative dehydrogenation (k1) and its ratio with alkane and alkene combustion (k2/k1 and k3/k1, respectively) were compared for both alkane reactants as a function of vanadia surface density. Propene formation rates (per V-atom) are {approx}8 times higher than ethene formation rates at a given reaction temperature, but the apparent ODH activation energies (E1) are similar for the two reactants and relatively insensitive to vanadia surface density. Ethene and propene formation rates (per V-atom) are strongly influenced by vanadia surface density and reach a maximum value at intermediate surface densities ({approx}8 V/nm2). The ratio of k2/k1 depends weakly on reaction temperature, indicating that activation energies for alkane combustion and ODH reactions are similar. The ratio of k2/k1 is independent of surface density for ethane, but increase slightly with vanadia surface density for propane, suggesting that isolated structures prevalent at low surface densities are slightly more selective for alkane dehydrogenation reactions. The ratio of k3/k1 decreases markedly with increasing reaction temperature for both ethane and propane ODH. Thus, the apparent activation energy for alkene combustion (E3) is much lower than that for alkane dehydrogenation (E1) and the difference between these two activation energies decreases with increasing surface density. The lower alkene selectivities observed at high vanadia surface densities are attributed to an

  11. The kinetic and mechanistic aspects of the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane over Li/Na/MgO catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaan, H.M.; Swaan, H.M.; Toebes, A.; Toebes, A.; van Ommen, J.G.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Ross, J.R.H.; Ross, J.R.H.

    1992-01-01

    Kinetic and mechanistic aspects of the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane catalysed by Li/MgO and Li/Na/MgO have been investigated. Initial rate measurements at 600°C; revealed that the Li/MgO catalyst produced C2H4, CO2, CO and H2 by parallel reactions whereas the sodium-promoted catalyst produced

  12. Analysis of metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid chirality in groundwater: A tool for dating groundwater movement in agricultural settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemical chirality of pesticides can be a useful tool for studying environmental processes. The chiral forms of metolachlor ethane sulfonic acid (MESA), an abundant metabolite of metolachlor, and metolachlor were examined over a 6 year period in groundwater and a groundwater-fed stream in a riparia...

  13. Comparative Study on Oxidative Treatments of NAPL Containing Chlorinated Ethanes and Ethenes using Hydrogen Peroxide and Persulfate in Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this study was to assess the oxidation of NAPL in soil, 30% of which were composed of chlorinated ethanes and ethenes, using catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (CHP), activated persulfate (AP), and H2O2–persulfate (HP) co-amendment systems. Citrate, a buffer and iron ligand,...

  14. Laser-based trace gas detection of ethane as a result of photo-oxidative damage in chilled cucumber leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santosa, I.E.; Laarhoven, L.J.; Harbinson, J.; Driscoll, S.; Harren, F.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    At low temperatures, high light intensity induces strong photooxidative lipid peroxidation in chilling sensitive cucumber leaves. A sensitive laser-based photoacoustic detector was employed to monitor on-line the evolution of ethane, one of the end products of lipid peroxidation. The Deltav=2 CO las

  15. Methane adsorption on activated carbon

    OpenAIRE

    Perl, Andras; Koopman, Folkert; Jansen, Peter; Rooij, Marietta de; Gemert, Wim van

    2014-01-01

    Methane storage in adsorbed form is a promising way to effectively and safely store fuel for vehicular transportation or for any other potential application. In a solid adsorbent, nanometer wide pores can trap methane by van der Waals forces as high density fluid at low pressure and room temperature. This provides the suitable technology to replace bulky and expensive cylindrical compressed natural gas tanks. Activated carbons with large surface area and high porosity are particularly suitabl...

  16. The oxidative coupling of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helton, T.; Anthony, R.G.; Gadalla, A.M. (Texas A and M Univ., College Park, TX (US))

    1988-01-01

    In this paper the spinel phase of cobalt oxide is evaluated as a potential coupling catalyst for converting methane to C/sub 2/+ hydrocarbons. Thermodynamic calculations indicate that the Gibbs free energies for forming higher hydrocarbons using the spinel form of cobalt oxide are similar to the free energies obtained for manganese (III) oxide. The oxidative coupling of methane was performed in an oxidation-reduction cycle.

  17. Methane management in sewage treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Cookney, Joanna

    2011-01-01

    Poly-di-methyl-siloxane (PDMS) hollow fibre membrane modules were designed and built for the specific de-gassing of real and synthetic process liquids to understand: (i) the feasibility of operation; and (ii) classify the mass transfer characteristics to aid design at full scale. Liquid saturated with pure methane or a binary methane and carbon dioxide mixture was introduced into the shell side of the extraction unit, whilst sweep gas or vacuum was employed counter-currently as a stripping me...

  18. Validation and updating of detailed kinetic mechanisms: The case of ethane oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rota, R.; Bonini, F.; Servida, A.; Morbidelli, M.; Carra, S. (Politecnico di Milano (Italy). Dipt. di Chimica Fisica Applicata)

    1994-11-01

    The authors have investigated experimentally the oxidation of ethane in a perfectly stirred reactor in the temperature range 870--1,080 K and for fuel-air stoichiometric ratio ranging from 0.25 to 1.27. The concentrations of the main molecular species have been measured by probe sampling and GC analysis. These experimental results have been compared with predictions of three popular detailed kinetic mechanisms previously presented in the literature. A reasonable agreement between the experimental results and the model predictions has been found for almost all the species and the mechanisms. The only relevant exception is acetylene, which is greatly overpredicted by one of the mechanisms for all the investigated conditions. Parametric sensitivity analysis has been used for updating such a mechanism in order to improve the agreement with the experimental observations.

  19. Oxidation Reactions of Ethane over Ba-Ce-O Based Perovskites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, James E.; Sault, Allen G.; Trudell, Daniel E.; Nenoff, Tina M.; Thoma, Steven G.; Jackson, Nancy B.

    1999-08-18

    Ethane oxidation reactions were studied over pure and Ca-, Mg-, Sr-, La-, Nd-, and Y-substituted BaCeO{sub 3} perovskites under oxygen limited conditions. Several of the materials, notably the Ca- and Y-substituted materials, show activity for complete oxidation of the hydrocarbon to CO{sub 2} at temperatures below 650 C. At higher temperatures, the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) to ethylene becomes significant. Conversions and ethylene yields are enhanced by the perovskites above the thermal reaction in our system in some cases. The perovskite structure is not retained in the high temperature reaction environment. Rather, a mixture of carbonates and oxides is formed. Loss of the perovskite structure correlates with a loss of activity and selectivity to ethylene.

  20. In-vacuum thermolysis of ethane 1,2-diamineborane for the synthesis of ternary borocarbonitrides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimi, Lorenzo; Grazia Betti, Maria; Caramazza, Simone; Postorino, Paolo; Mariani, Carlo; Latini, Alessandro; Leardini, Fabrice

    2016-10-01

    High-temperature (1000 °C) thermolytic decomposition of ethane 1,2-diamineborane (BH3NH2CH2CH2NH2BH3) deposited onto a Cu foil has been performed in an ultra-high-vacuum environment. A combined thermolytic, structural (x-ray diffraction), microscopic (scanning electron microscopy) and spectroscopic (Raman, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy) analysis, has identified a ternary borocarbonitride (BCN) compound as a result of the process. The obtained BCN compound is nanocrystalline, surrounded by crystallites of ammonium hydroxide borate hydrate. The ternary compound presents a 0.2:0.6:0.2 B:C:N composition in the bulk and 0.11:0.76:0.13 stoichiometry at the very surface, richer in C-C networks with respect to the bulk. Furthermore, the resulting BCN compound does not show oxidation at the surface due to the in-vacuum thermolysis of the single precursor.

  1. Solubility of carbon dioxide and ethane in lemon oil at elevated pressures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C.de la Fuente B

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available The solubility of ethane and carbon dioxide in lemon oil at elevated pressures has been measured using a variable volume cell, over temperature ranges of 298 - 308 K and 303 - 313 K, respectively, at pressures from 0.44 to 8.75 MPa. Partial liquid miscibility was not observed at any concentration measured. Molar densities of the saturated liquid mixtures are also reported. The Soave- Redlich- Kwong equation of state was used to fit experimental vapor- liquid equilibria of near critical light component- lemon oil mixtures. An appropriate representation of the experimental data was obtained by using a binary interaction parameter in the combinatorial rule for the cross energy parameter a ij. The application of a quadratic mixing rule for the co- volume b with a binary interaction coefficient l ij did not improve greatly the performance of the model.

  2. Book Review of 'Evolutionary and Interpretive Archaeologies' Edited by Ethan E. Cochrane and Andrew Gardner

    CERN Document Server

    Gabora, Liane

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary and Interpretive Archaeologies, edited by Ethan E. Cochrane and Andrew Gardner, grew out of a seminar at the Institute for Archaeology at University College London in 2007. It consists of 15 chapters by archaeologists who self-identify themselves as practitioners who emphasize the benefits of evolutionary or interpretive approaches to the study of the archaeological record. While the authors' theoretical views are dichotomous, the editors' aim for the book as a whole is not to expound on the differences between these two kinds of archaeology but to bring forward a richer understanding of the discipline and to highlight areas of mutual concern. Some chapters come across as a bit of a sales pitch, but the majority of the contributions emphasize how each approach can be productively used to address the goals of the other. The book seeks to contribute to a mutually beneficial and more productive discipline, and overall, it succeeds in this effort.

  3. Quantum molecular dynamics simulations of equation of state of warm dense ethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuan-Ying; Wang, Cong; Li, Yong-Sheng; Li, Da-Fang; Li, Zi; Zhang, Ping

    2016-09-01

    The equation of state of warm dense ethane is obtained using quantum molecular dynamics simulations based on finite-temperature density functional theory for densities from 0.1 g / cm 3 to 3.1 g / cm 3 and temperatures from 0.1 eV to 5.17 eV. The calculated pressure and internal energy are fitted with cubic polynomials in terms of density and temperature. Specific density-temperature-pressure tracks such as the principal and double shock Hugoniot curves along with release isentropes are predicted which are fundamental for the analysis and interpretation of high-pressure experiments. The principal and double shock Hugoniot curves are in agreement with the experimental data from the Sandia Z-Machine [Magyar et al., Phys. Rev. B 91, 134109 (2015)].

  4. Infrared Spectra and Optical Constants of Astronomical Ices: II. Ethane and Ethylene

    CERN Document Server

    Hudson, R L; Moore, M H

    2015-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopic observations have established the presence of hydrocarbon ices on Pluto and other TNOs, but the abundances of such molecules cannot be deduced without accurate optical constants (n, k) and reference spectra. In this paper we present our recent measurements of near- and mid-infrared optical constants for ethane (C$_2$H$_6$) and ethylene (C$_2$H$_4$) in multiple ice phases and at multiple temperatures. As in our recent work on acetylene (C$_2$H$_2$), we also report new measurements of the index of refraction of each ice at 670 nm. Comparisons are made to earlier work where possible, and electronic versions of our new results are made available.

  5. Infrared Spectra and Optical Constants of Astronomical Ices: II. Ethane and Ethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Gerakines, Perry A.; Moore, M. H.

    2014-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopic observations have established the presence of hydrocarbon ices on Pluto and other TNOs, but the abundances of such molecules cannot be deduced without accurate optical constants (n, k) and reference spectra. In this paper we present our recent measurements of near- and mid-infrared optical constants for ethane (C2H6) and ethylene (C2H4) in multiple ice phases and at multiple temperatures. As in our recent work on acetylene (C2H2), we also report new measurements of the index of refraction of each ice at 670 nm. Comparisons are made to earlier work where possible, and electronic versions of our new results are made available.

  6. Quantification of methane emissions from danish landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheutz, Charlotte; Mønster, Jacob; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Whole-landfill methane emission was quantified using a tracer technique that combines controlled tracer gas release from the landfill with time-resolved concentration measurements downwind of the landfill using a mobile high-resolution analytical instrument. Methane emissions from 13 Danish...... landfills varied between 2.6 and 60.8 kg CH4 h–1. The highest methane emission was measured at the largest (in terms of disposed waste amounts) of the 13 landfills, whereas the lowest methane emissions (2.6-6.1 kgCH4 h–1) were measured at the older and smaller landfills. At two of the sites, which had gas...... collection, emission measurements showed that the gas collection systems only collected between 30-50% of the methane produced (assuming that the produced methane equalled the sum of the emitted methane and the collected methane). Significant methane emissions were observed from disposed shredder waste...

  7. Is methane a new therapeutic gas?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wenwu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methane is an attractive fuel. Biologically, methanogens in the colon can use carbon dioxide and hydrogen to produce methane as a by-product. It was previously considered that methane is not utilized by humans. However, in a recent study, results demonstrated that methane could exert anti-inflammatory effects in a dog small intestinal ischemia-reperfusion model. Point of view Actually, the bioactivity of methane has been investigated in gastrointestinal diseases, but the exact mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory effects is required to be further elucidated. Methane can cross the membrane and is easy to collect due to its abundance in natural gas. Although methane is flammable, saline rich in methane can be prepared for clinical use. These seem to be good news in application of methane as a therapeutic gas. Conclusion Several problems should be resolved before its wide application in clinical practice.

  8. Structure, spectroscopy and DFT calculations of 1,2-di(3-hydroxymethylpyridinium)ethane dibromide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komasa, Anna; Barczyński, Piotr; Ratajczak-Sitarz, Małgorzata; Katrusiak, Andrzej; Dega-Szafran, Zofia; Szafran, Mirosław

    2016-09-01

    The molecular structure of 1,2-di(3-hydroxymethylpyridinium)ethane dibromide (1) has been characterized by X-ray diffraction, B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) calculations, FTIR, Raman and NMR spectra. The crystals are monoclinic, space group C2/c. 1,2-Di(3-hydroxymethylpyridinium)ethane dication and hydrogen-bonded bromide anions in crystals are located at the inversion center. The both CH2OH groups are engaged in two equal length hydrogen bonds with bromide anions. Two structures (2) and (3) were optimized at the B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. The optimized complex (2) resembles the crystal structure, while complex (3) is preferred energetically. The O⋯Br- hydrogen bonds distances are: 3.289(2) Å in crystals (1), but in the optimized structures (2) and (3) they are 3.303 Å and 3.461 Å, respectively. The investigated complex is additionally stabilized by the N+⋯Br- electrostatic attractions. The potential energy distributions (PED) were used for the assignments of IR and Raman frequencies in the experimental and calculated spectra of the title compound. The FTIR spectrum of (1) is consistent with the X-ray results. Interpretation of the 1H and 13C NMR spectra in DMSO-d6 has been based on 2D experiments. The calculated GIAO/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) magnetic shielding constants have been used to predict 1H and 13C chemical shifts for the optimized structures of (2) and (3).

  9. Structure-sensitivity of ethane hydrogenolysis over molybdenum carbides: A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ke-Zhen; Wang, Gui-Chang; Zheng, Wen-Jun

    2013-07-01

    The adsorption and hydrogenolysis of ethane on fcc-Mo2C (1 0 0) and hcp-Mo2C (1 0 1) has been studied using density functional theory calculations with the periodic slab model. We found that the reaction mechanism for ethane hydrogenolysis are basically the same on both fcc and hcp phase Mo2C catalysts, that is, C2H6 (a) → C2H5 (a) → CH2 (a) → CH3 (a) → CH4. For the rate-controlling step (C2H5 → CH2 + CH3), the activation energy on hcp-Mo2C (1 0 1) (1.53 eV) is lower than that on fcc-Mo2C (1 0 0) (1.81 eV), which indicated that the hcp-Mo2C (1 0 1) shows higher reactivity than that of fcc-Mo2C (1 0 0). The possible reason may come form the fact that the hcp-Mo2C (1 0 1) is more open and corrugated than fcc-Mo2C (1 0 0), which results in the interaction (mainly the repulsion effect) between CH2 and CH3 at transition state is relatively weak on hcp-Mo2C (1 0 1), and thus the higher reactivity on hcp-Mo2C (101) can be expected. Moreover, it was found that the pre-adsorbed hydrogen atom can effectively reduce the barrier of C2H5 → CH2 + CH3 on Mo2C catalysts.

  10. Carbon molecular sieve dense film membranes derived from Matrimid® for ethylene/ethane separation

    KAUST Repository

    Rungta, Meha

    2012-04-01

    Development of dense film carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes for ethylene/ethane (C 2H 4/C 2H 6) separation is reported. A commercial polyimide, Matrimid®, was pyrolyzed under vacuum and inert argon atmosphere, and the resultant CMS films were characterized using pure C 2H 4 and C 2H 6 permeation at 35 °C, 50 psia feed pressure. The effects on C 2H 4/C 2H 6 separation caused by different final vacuum pyrolysis temperatures from 500 to 800 °C are reported. For all pyrolysis temperatures separation surpassed the estimated \\'upper bound\\' solution processable polymer line for C 2H 4 permeability vs. C 2H 4/C 2H 6 selectivity. C 2H 4 permeability decreased and selectivity increased with increasing pyrolysis temperature until 650-675 °C where an optimum combination of C 2H 4 permeability ∼14-15 Barrer with C 2H 4/C 2H 6 selectivity ∼12 was observed. A modified heating rate protocol for 675 °C showed further increase in permeability with no selectivity loss. CMS films produced from argon pyrolysis showed results comparable to vacuum pyrolysis. Further, mixed gas (63.2 mol% C 2H 4 + 36.8 mol% C 2H 6) permeation showed a slightly lower C 2H 4 permeability with C 2H 4/C 2H 6 selectivity increase rather than a decrease that is often seen with polymers. The high selectivity of these membranes was shown to arise from a high \\'entropic selection\\' indicating that the \\'slimmer\\' ethylene molecule has significant advantage over ethane in passing through the rigid \\'slit-shaped\\' CMS pore structure. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Matrimid® derived carbon molecular sieve hollow fiber membranes for ethylene/ethane separation

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Liren

    2011-09-01

    Carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes have shown promising separation performance compared to conventional polymeric membranes. Translating the very attractive separation properties from dense films to hollow fibers is important for applying CMS materials in realistic gas separations. The very challenging ethylene/ethane separation is the primary target of this work. Matrimid® derived CMS hollow fiber membranes have been investigated in this work. Resultant CMS fiber showed interesting separation performance for several gas pairs, especially high selectivity for C2H4/C2H6. Our comparative study between dense film and hollow fiber revealed very similar selectivity for both configurations; however, a significant difference exists in the effective separation layer thickness between precursor fibers and their resultant CMS fibers. SEM results showed that the deviation was essentially due to the collapse of the porous substructure of the precursor fiber. Polymer chain flexibility (relatively low glass transition temperature (Tg) for Matrimid® relative to actual CMS formation) appears to be the fundamental cause of substructure collapse. This collapse phenomenon must be addressed in all cases involving intense heat-treatment near or above Tg. We also found that the defect-free property of the precursor fiber was not a simple predictor of CMS fiber performance. Even some precursor fibers with Knudsen diffusion selectivity could be transformed into highly selective CMS fibers for the Matrimid® precursor. To overcome the permeance loss problem caused by substructure collapse, several engineering approaches were considered. Mixed gas permeation results under realistic conditions demonstrate the excellent performance of CMS hollow fiber membrane for the challenging ethylene/ethane separation. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Identifying sources, formation pathways and geological controls of methane in shallow groundwater above unconventional natural gas plays in Alberta, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, B.; Humez, P.; Nightingale, M.; Ing, J.; Kingston, A. W.; Clarkson, C.; Cahill, A.; Parker, B. L.; Cherry, J. A.; Millot, R.; Kloppmann, W.; Osadetz, K.; Lawton, D.

    2015-12-01

    With the advent of shale gas development facilitated by hydraulic fracturing it has become increasingly important to develop tracer tools to scientifically determine potential impacts of stray gases on shallow aquifers. To assess potential future impacts on shallow aquifers by leakage of natural gas from unconventional energy resource development, it is essential to establish a reliable baseline. Occurrence of methane in shallow groundwater in Alberta (Canada) between 2006 and 2014 was assessed and was ubiquitous in 186 sampled monitoring wells. Free and dissolved gas sampling and measurement approaches yielded comparable results with often low methane concentrations in shallow groundwater, but in 28 samples methane exceeded 10 mg/L in dissolved gas and 300,000 ppmv in free gas. Methane concentrations in free and dissolved gas samples were found to increase with well depth and were especially elevated in groundwater obtained from aquifers containing coal seams and shale units. Carbon isotope ratios of methane averaged -69.7 ± 11.1 ‰ in free gas and -65.6 ± 8.9 ‰ in dissolved gas. δ13C values were not found to vary with well depth or lithology indicating that the methane in Alberta groundwater was formed via a similar mechanism. The low δ13C values in concert with average δ2H values of -289 ± 44 ‰ suggest that most methane was of biogenic origin predominantly generated via CO2 reduction. This interpretation is confirmed by gas dryness parameters typically >500 due to only small amounts of ethane and a lack of propane in most samples. Novel approaches of in-situ concentration and isotope measurements for methane during drilling of a 530 m deep well yielded a mud-gas profile characterizing natural gas occurrences in the intermediate zone. Comparison with mudgas profile carbon isotope data revealed that methane in the investigated shallow groundwater in Alberta is isotopically similar to hydrocarbon gases found in 100-250 meter depths in the Western

  13. Making methane visible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gålfalk, Magnus; Olofsson, Göran; Crill, Patrick; Bastviken, David

    2016-04-01

    Methane (CH4) is one of the most important greenhouse gases, and an important energy carrier in biogas and natural gas. Its large-scale emission patterns have been unpredictable and the source and sink distributions are poorly constrained. Remote assessment of CH4 with high sensitivity at a m2 spatial resolution would allow detailed mapping of the near-ground distribution and anthropogenic sources in landscapes but has hitherto not been possible. Here we show that CH4 gradients can be imaged on the

  14. Methane production from steam-exploded bamboo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Fumihisa; Take, Harumi; Asada, Chikako; Nakamura, Yoshitoshi

    2004-01-01

    To convert unutilized plant biomass into a useful energy source, methane production from bamboo was investigated using a steam explosion pretreatment. Methane could not be produced from raw bamboo but methane production was enhanced by steam explosion. The maximum amount of methane produced, i.e., about 215 ml, was obtained from 1 g of exploded bamboo at a steam pressure of 3.53 MPa and a steaming time of 5 min. A negative correlation between the amount of methane produced and the amount of Klason lignin was observed in the methane fermentation of steam-exploded bamboo.

  15. Digit and letter alexia in carbon monoxide poisoning

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingyu Shen; Xiaoming Rong; Rui Pan; Ying Peng; Wei Peng; Yamei Tang

    2012-01-01

    This study examined a 24-year-old patient with delayed encephalopathy, who was admitted to hospital with complaints of headache and visual impairment 1 week after acute carbon monoxide poisoning. The results of a visual field assessment, electroencephalography and head magnetic resonance imaging indicated damage to the cerebral cortex. After a 2-week treatment period, the patient had recovered from the visual impairment, but exhibited digit- and letter-reading difficulty. The Chinese aphasia battery and the number and letter battery supplement were conducted. The results revealed that the patient exhibited digit and letter alexia, while the ability to read Chinese characters was preserved. In contrast, the patient exhibited a deficit in Chinese character writing, while number and letter writing remained intact. Following treatment, reading and writing ability was improved and electroencephalographic abnormalities were ameliorated. Overall, our experimental findings demonstrated that delayed encephalopathy following acute carbon monoxide poisoning was characterized by digit and letter alexia.

  16. Effect of carbon monoxide on plants. [Mimosa pudica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimmerman, P.W.; Crocker, W.; Hitchcock, A.E.

    1933-01-01

    Of 108 species of plants treated with one per cent carbon monoxide, 45 showed epinastic growth of leaves. Several species showed hyponasty which caused upward curling of leaves. Other effects included: retarded stem elongation; abnormally small new leaves; abnormal yellowing of the leaves, beginning with the oldest; abscission of leaves usually associated with yellowing; and hypertrophied tissues on stems and roots. During recovery an abnormally large number of side shoots arose from latent buds of many species. Motion pictures of Mimosa pudica showed a loss of correlation, normal equilibrium position to gravity, and sensitiveness to contact or heat stimuli; however, the leaves moved about more rapidly than those of controls. Since carbon monoxide causes growth rigor and loss of sensitiveness to external stimuli, it is here considered as an anesthetic.

  17. Characterization of Methane Degradation and Methane-Degrading Microbes in Alaska Coastal Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchman, David L. [Univ. of Delaware, Lewes, DE (United States)

    2012-03-29

    The net flux of methane from methane hydrates and other sources to the atmosphere depends on methane degradation as well as methane production and release from geological sources. The goal of this project was to examine methane-degrading archaea and organic carbon oxidizing bacteria in methane-rich and methane-poor sediments of the Beaufort Sea, Alaska. The Beaufort Sea system was sampled as part of a multi-disciplinary expedition (Methane in the Arctic Shelf or MIDAS) in September 2009. Microbial communities were examined by quantitative PCR analyses of 16S rRNA genes and key methane degradation genes (pmoA and mcrA involved in aerobic and anaerobic methane degradation, respectively), tag pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes to determine the taxonomic make up of microbes in these sediments, and sequencing of all microbial genes (metagenomes ). The taxonomic and functional make-up of the microbial communities varied with methane concentrations, with some data suggesting higher abundances of potential methane-oxidizing archaea in methane-rich sediments. Sequence analysis of PCR amplicons revealed that most of the mcrA genes were from the ANME-2 group of methane oxidizers. According to metagenomic data, genes involved in methane degradation and other degradation pathways changed with sediment depth along with sulfate and methane concentrations. Most importantly, sulfate reduction genes decreased with depth while the anaerobic methane degradation gene (mcrA) increased along with methane concentrations. The number of potential methane degradation genes (mcrA) was low and inconsistent with other data indicating the large impact of methane on these sediments. The data can be reconciled if a small number of potential methane-oxidizing archaea mediates a large flux of carbon in these sediments. Our study is the first to report metagenomic data from sediments dominated by ANME-2 archaea and is one of the few to examine the entire microbial assemblage potentially involved in

  18. [Sudden unilateral sensorineural hearing loss after carbon monoxide intoxication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalska-Piechowiak, Teresa; Miarzyńska, Maria; Perlik-Gattner, Irena

    2004-01-01

    A case of unilateral sensorineural hearing loss of the left ear after carbon monoxide intoxication was presented. The diagnosis was based upon an interview, medical examinations and audiometric investigations. Results of diagnostic evaluations, clinical presentation and treatment were discussed. Hearing improvement was obtained after 6 days of treatment and normal hearing returned after 14 days. Patients who suffer from CO intoxication are at risk of hearing impairment, therefore, there is a need for audiometric follow up in these patients.

  19. Pregnancy Hypertenssion and Preeclampsia in Enviromental Expossure to Carbon Monoxide

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    Introduction: In this study relationship between carbon monoxide (CO) with pregnancy induced hypertension and preeclampsia in mothers in various levels of CO pollution was evaluated. Methods: The study was carried out in three teaching hospitals and 4500 pregnant women living area divided in one low-level CO polluted and as the second level, three moderate to high polluted areas (central, south and west). The subjects, residence places were within 5 kilometers of the air pollution monitoring ...

  20. Mobile Carbon Monoxide Monitoring System Based on Arduino-Matlab for Environmental Monitoring Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azieda Mohd Bakri, Nur; Junid, Syed Abdul Mutalib Al; Razak, Abdul Hadi Abdul; Idros, Mohd Faizul Md; Karimi Halim, Abdul

    2015-11-01

    Nowadays, the increasing level of carbon monoxide globally has become a serious environmental issue which has been highlighted in most of the country globally. The monitoring of carbon monoxide content is one of the approaches to identify the level of carbon monoxide pollution towards providing the solution for control the level of carbon monoxide produced. Thus, this paper proposed a mobile carbon monoxide monitoring system for measuring the carbon monoxide content based on Arduino-Matlab General User Interface (GUI). The objective of this project is to design, develop and implement the real-time mobile carbon monoxide sensor system and interfacing for measuring the level of carbon monoxide contamination in real environment. Four phases or stages of work have been carried out for the accomplishment of the project, which classified as sensor development, controlling and integrating sensor, data collection and data analysis. As a result, a complete design and developed system has been verified with the handheld industrial standard carbon monoxide sensor for calibrating the sensor sensitivity and measurement in the laboratory. Moreover, the system has been tested in real environments by measuring the level of carbon monoxide in three different lands used location; industrial area; residential area and main road (commercial area). In this real environment test, the industrial area recorded the highest reading with 71.23 ppm and 82.59 ppm for sensor 1 and sensor 2 respectively. As a conclusion, the mobile realtime carbon monoxide system based on the Arduino-Matlab is the best approach to measure the carbon monoxide concentration in different land-used since it does not require a manual data collection and reduce the complexity of the existing carbon monoxide level concentration measurement practise at the same time with a complete data analysis facilities.

  1. Sources of greenhouse gases and carbon monoxide in central London (UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfter, Carole; Tremper, Anja; Zazzeri, Giulia; Barlow, Janet F.; Nemitz, Eiko

    2015-04-01

    Biosphere-atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) has been on the scientific agenda for several decades and new technology now also allows for high-precision, continuous monitoring of fluxes of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O). Compared to the natural environment, flux measurements in the urban environment, which is home to over 50% of the population globally, are still rare despite high densities of anthropogenic sources of pollutants. We report on over three years of measurements atop a 192 m tower in central London (UK), Europe's largest city, which started in October 2011. Fluxes of methane, carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide are measured by eddy-covariance (EC) at the British Telecom tower (51° 31' 17.4' N 0° 8' 20.04' W). In addition to the long-term measurements, EC fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O) were measured in February 2014. All four trace gases exhibit diurnal trends consistent with anthropogenic activities with minimum emissions at night and early afternoon maxima. Segregating emissions by wind direction reveals heterogeneous source distributions with temporal patterns and source strengths that differ between compounds. The lowest emissions for CO, CO2 and CH4 were recorded for NW winds. The highest emissions of methane were in the SE sector, in the NE for CO2 and in the W for CO. Fluxes of all 3 gases exhibited marked seasonal trends characterised by a decrease in emissions in summer (63% reduction for CO, 36% for CO2 and 22% for CH4). Monthly fluxes of CO and CO2 were linearly correlated to air temperature (R2 = 0.7 and 0.59 respectively); a weaker dependence upon temperature was also observed for CH4 (R2 = 0.31). Diurnal and seasonal emissions of CO and CO2 are mainly controlled by local fossil fuel combustion and vehicle cold starts are thought to account for 20-30% of additional emissions of CO during the winter. Fugitive emissions of CH4 from the natural gas distribution network are thought to be substantial, which is consistent

  2. Electronic transport in disordered n-alkanes: From fluid methane to amorphous polyethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubero, David; Quirke, Nicholas; Coker, David F.

    2003-08-01

    We use a fast Fourier transform block Lanczos diagonalization algorithm to study the electronic states of excess electrons in fluid alkanes (methane, ethane, and propane) and in a molecular model of amorphous polyethylene (PE) relevant to studies of space charge in insulating polymers. We obtain a new pseudopotential for electron-PE interactions by fitting to the electronic properties of fluid alkanes and use this to obtain new results for electron transport in amorphous PE. From our simulations, while the electronic states in fluid methane are extended throughout the whole sample, in amorphous PE there is a transition between localized and delocalized states slightly above the vacuum level (˜+0.06 eV). The localized states in our amorphous PE model extend to -0.33 eV below this level. Using the Kubo-Greenwood equation we compute the zero-field electron mobility in pure amorphous PE to be μ≈2×10-3 cm2/V s. Our results highlight the importance of electron transport through extended states in amorphous regions to an understanding of electron transport in PE.

  3. Methane Conversion Using Dielectric Barrier Discharge: Comparison with Thermal Process and Catalyst Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Antonius Indarto; Jae-Wook Choi; Hwaung Lee; Hyung Keun Song

    2006-01-01

    The direct conversion of methane using a dielectric barrier discharge has been experimentally studied. Experiments with different values of flow rates and discharge voltages have been performed to investigate the effects on the conversion and reaction products both qualitatively and quantitatively.Experimental results indicate that the maximum conversion of methane has been 80% at an input flow rate of 5 ml/min and a discharge voltage of 4 kV. Experimental results also show that the optimum condition has occurred at a high discharge voltage and higher input flow rate. In terms of product distribution, a higher flow rate or shorter residence time can increase the selectivity for higher hydrocarbons. No hydrocarbon product was detected using the thermal method, except hydrogen and carbon. Increasing selectivity for ethane was found when Pt and Ru catalysts presented in the plasma reaction. Hydrogenation of acetylene in the catalyst surface could have been the reason for this phenomenon as the selectivity for acetylene in the products was decreasing.

  4. Modeling the methane hydrate formation in an aqueous film submitted to steady cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avendano-Gomez, J.R. [ESIQIE, Laboratorio de Ingenieria Quimica Ambiental, Mexico (Mexico). Inst. Politecnico Nacional; Garcia-Sanchez, F. [Laboratorio de Termodinamica, Mexico (Mexico). Inst. Mexicano del Petroleo; Gurrola, D.V. [UPIBI, Laboratorio de Diseno de Plantas, Mexico (Mexico). Inst. Politecnico Nacional

    2008-07-01

    Gas hydrates, or clathrate hydrates, are ice-like compounds that results from the kinetic process of crystallization of an aqueous solution supersaturated with a dissolved gas. This paper presented a model that took into account two factors involved in the hydrate crystallization, notably the stochastic nature of crystallization that causes sub-cooling and the heat resulting from the exothermic enthalpy of hydrate formation. The purpose of this study was to model the thermal evolution inside a hydrate forming system which was submitted to an imposed steady cooling. The study system was a cylindrical thin film of aqueous solution at 19 Mpa. The study involved using methane as the hydrate forming molecule. It was assumed that methane was homogeneously dissolved in the aqueous phase. Ethane hydrate was formed through a kinetic process of nucleation and crystallization. In order to predict the onset time of nucleation, the induction time needed to be considered. This paper discussed the probability of nucleation as well as the estimation of the rate of nucleation. It also presented the mathematical model and boundary conditions. These included assumptions and derivation of the model; boundary conditions; initial conditions; and numerical solution of the model equation. It was concluded that the heat source must be considered when investigating crystallization effects. 34 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  5. Methane as a climate gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsdottir, S.

    1996-03-01

    This paper was read at the workshop ``The Norwegian Climate and Ozone Research Programme`` held on 11-12 March 1996. Methane is a key component in the atmosphere where its concentration has increased rapidly since pre-industrial time. About 2/3 of it is caused by human activities. Changes in methane will affect the concentrations of other gases, and a model is a very important tool to study sensitivity due to changes in concentration of gases. The author used a three-dimensional global chemistry transport model to study the effect of changes in methane concentration on other trace gases. The model includes natural and anthropogenic emissions of NOx, CO, CH{sub 4} and non-methane hydrocarbons. Wet and dry deposition are also included. The chemical scheme in the model includes 49 compounds, 101 reactions, and 16 photolytic reactions. The trace gas concentrations are calculated every 30 min, using a quasi steady state approximation. Model calculations of three cases are reported and compared. Enhanced methane concentration will have strongest effect in remote regions. In polluted areas local chemistry will have remarked effect. The feedback was always positive. Average atmospheric lifetime calculated in the model was 7.6 years, which agrees with recent estimates based on observations. 8 refs.

  6. Kinetics and activation thermodynamics of methane monooxygenase compound Q formation and reaction with substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazeau, B J; Lipscomb, J D

    2000-11-07

    The transient kinetics of formation and decay of the reaction cycle intermediates of the Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b methane monooxygenase (MMO) catalytic cycle are studied as a function of temperature and substrate type and deuteration. Kinetic evidence is presented for the existence of three intermediates termed compounds O, P, and P forming after the addition of O(2) to diferrous MMO hydroxylase (H(r)) and before the formation of the reactive intermediate compound Q. The Arrhenius plots for these reactions are linear and independent of substrate concentration and type, showing that substrate does not participate directly in the oxygen activation phase of the catalytic cycle. Analysis of the transient kinetic data revealed only small changes relative to the weak optical spectrum of H(r) for any of these intermediates. In contrast, large changes in the 430 nm spectral region are associated with the formation of Q. The decay reaction of Q exhibits an apparent first-order concentration dependence for all substrates tested, and the observed rate constant depends on the substrate type. The kinetics of the decay reaction of Q yield a nonlinear Arrhenius plot when methane is the substrate, and the rates in both segments of the plot increase linearly with methane concentration. Together these observations suggest that at least two reactions with a methane concentration dependence, and perhaps two methane molecules, are involved in the decay process. When CD(4) is used as the substrate, a large isotope effect and a linear Arrhenius plot are observed. Analogous plots for all other MMO substrates tested (e.g., ethane) are linear, and no isotope effect for deuterated analogues is observed. This demonstrates that a step other than C-H bond breaking is rate limiting for alternative MMO substrates. A two step Q decay mechanism is proposed that provides an explanation for the lack of an isotope effect for alternative MMO substrates and the fact that rate of oxidation of

  7. Advances in Methane Isotope Measurements via Direct Absorption Spectroscopy with Applications to Oil and Gas Source Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacovitch, T. I.; Herndon, S. C.; Roscioli, J. R.; Petron, G.; Shorter, J. H.; Jervis, D.; McManus, J. B.; Nelson, D. D.; Zahniser, M. S.; Kolb, C. E., Jr.

    2015-12-01

    Instrumental developments in the measurement of multiple isotopes of methane (12CH4, 13CH4 and 12CH3D) are presented. A first generation 8-micron instrument quantifies 12CH4 and 13CH4 at a 1-second rate via tunable infrared direct absorption spectroscopy (TILDAS). A second generation instrument uses two 3-micron intraband cascade lasers in an Aerodyne dual laser chassis for simultaneous measurement of 12CH4, 13CH4 and 12CH3D. Sensitivity and noise performance improvements are examined. The isotopic signature of methane provides valuable information for emission source identification of this greenhouse gas. A first generation spectrometer has been deployed in the field on a mobile laboratory along with a sophisticated 4-tank calibration system. Calibrations are done on an agressive schedule, allowing for the correction of measured isotope ratios to an absolute isotope scale. Distinct isotopic signatures are found for a number of emission sources in the Denver-Julesburg Basin: oil and gas gathering stations, compressor stations and processing plants; a municipal landfill, and dairy/cattle operations. The isotopic signatures are compared with measured ethane/methane ratios. These direct absorption measurements have larger uncertainties than samples measured via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, but have several advantages over canister sampling methods: individual sources of short duration are easier to isolate; calibrated isotope ratio results are available immediately; replicate measurements on a single source are easily performed; and the number of sources sampled is not limited by canister availability and processing time.

  8. A five year record of high-frequency in situ measurements of non-methane hydrocarbons at Mace Head, Ireland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Grant

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Continuous high-frequency in situ measurements of a range of non-methane hydrocarbons have been made at Mace Head since January 2005. Mace Head is a background Northern Hemispheric site situated on the eastern edge of the Atlantic. Five year measurements (2005–2009 of eleven non-methane hydrocarbons, namely C2–C5 alkanes, benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene and the xylenes, have been separated into baseline Northern Hemispheric and European polluted air masses, among other sectors. Seasonal cycles in baseline Northern Hemispheric air masses and European polluted air masses arriving at Mace Head have been studied. Baseline air masses show a broad summer minima between June and September for shorter lived species, longer lived species show summer minima in July/August. All species displayed a winter maxima in February. European air masses showed baseline elevated mole fractions for all non-methane hydrocarbons, largest elevations (of up to 360 ppt for ethane maxima from baseline data were observed in winter maxima, with smaller elevations observed during the summer. Analysis of temporal trends using the Mann-Kendall test showed small (<6%/year but statistically significant decreases in the butanes, i-pentane and o-xylene between 2005 and 2009 in European air. Toluene was found to have an increasing trend of 34%/year in European air. No significant trends were found for any species in baseline air.

  9. A Possible Sink for Methane on Mars

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nørnberg, P.; Jensen, S. J. K.; Skibsted, J.; Jakobsen, H. J.; ten Kate, I. L.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Merrison, J. P.; Finster, K.; Bak, E.; Iversen, J. J.; Kondrup, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical simulated wind activation of mineral surfaces act as a trap for Methane through formation of covalent Si-C bonds stable up to temperatures above 250 C. This mechanism is proposed as a Methane sink on Mars.

  10. Methane production from plant biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zauner, E.

    1985-01-01

    Methane fermentations of plant biomass were performed to increase basic knowledge necessary for development of suitable conversion technologies. Effects of bacterial inoculants, substrate compounds and varied process conditions were analyzed in batch and continuous fermentation experiments. Use of enriched bacterial populations precultured and adapted to plant materials was proved to be advantageous for inoculation. Methane yields and productivities as well as chemical and bacterial composition of digester fluids were determined at various loading rates and retention times during fermentation of different grass and maize silages. Recycling for favorable amounts of decomposed effluent for neutralization of supplied acid raw materials was important to achieve high methane yields. Quantity and composition of acido-, aceto- and methanogenic bacteria were not essentially influenced by changed fermentation conditions. Results of these laboratory examinations have to be completed by long run and scale up experiments to develop control parameters for plant biogas digesters.

  11. A 60 yr record of atmospheric carbon monoxide reconstructed from Greenland firn air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Petrenko

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We present the first reconstruction of the Northern Hemisphere (NH high latitude atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO mole fraction from Greenland firn air. Firn air samples were collected at three deep ice core sites in Greenland (NGRIP in 2001, Summit in 2006 and NEEM in 2008. CO records from the three sites agree well with each other as well as with recent atmospheric measurements, indicating that CO is well preserved in the firn at these sites. CO atmospheric history was reconstructed back to the year 1950 from the measurements using a combination of two forward models of gas transport in firn and an inverse model. The reconstructed history suggests that Arctic CO in 1950 was 140–150 nmol mol−1, which is higher than today's values. CO mole fractions rose by 10–15 nmol mol−1 from 1950 to the 1970s and peaked in the 1970s or early 1980s, followed by a ≈ 30 nmol mol−1 decline to today's levels. We compare the CO history with the atmospheric histories of methane, light hydrocarbons, molecular hydrogen, CO stable isotopes and hydroxyl radicals (OH, as well as with published CO emission inventories and results of a historical run from a chemistry-transport model. We find that the reconstructed Greenland CO history cannot be reconciled with available emission inventories unless unrealistically large changes in OH are assumed. We argue that the available CO emission inventories strongly underestimate historical NH emissions, and fail to capture the emission decline starting in the late 1970s, which was most likely due to reduced emissions from road transportation in North America and Europe.

  12. Methane emission from wetland rice fields.

    OpenAIRE

    H.A.C. Denier van der Gon

    1996-01-01

    Methane (CH 4 ) is an important greenhouse gas and plays a key role in tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry. Wetland rice fields are an important source of methane, accounting for approximately 20% of the global anthropogenic methane emission. Methane fluxes from wetland rice fields in the Philippines were monitored with a closed chamber technique in close cooperation with the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI). The field studies were complemented by laboratory and greenhouse ex...

  13. [Advances in biomolecular machine: methane monooxygenases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jixue; Wang, Shizhen; Fang, Baishan

    2015-07-01

    Methane monooxygenases (MMO), regarded as "an amazing biomolecular machine", catalyze the oxidation of methane to methanol under aerobic conditions. MMO catalyze the oxidation of methane elaborately, which is a novel way to catalyze methane to methanol. Furthermore, MMO can inspire the biomolecular machine design. In this review, we introduced MMO including structure, gene and catalytic mechanism. The history and the taxonomy of MMO were also introduced.

  14. Central Diabetes Insipidus and Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar State Following Accidental Carbon Monoxide Poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ul Abideen, Zain; Mahmud, Syed Nayer; Rasheed, Amna; Farooq Qasim, Yusaf; Ali, Furqan

    2017-06-03

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is common and carries significant morbidity and mortality. The nervous system, particularly the brain, is frequently affected by it, owing to its high metabolic activity and oxygen requirements. Carbon monoxide damages the nervous system by both hypoxic and inflammatory mechanisms. Central diabetes insipidus is an extremely rare complication of carbon monoxide poisoning. Herein, we report the case of a young lady, who developed this complication and severe hypernatremia after accidental carbon monoxide poisoning. She also developed a hyperglycemic hyperosmolar state during the treatment for hypernatremia. To the best of our knowledge, both these entities have not been reported together in association with carbon monoxide poisoning. The purpose of this article is to emphasize the anticipation and early recognition of central diabetes insipidus in carbon monoxide poisoning. This can prevent severe hypernatremia and complications associated with its presence and treatment.

  15. Handbook methane potential; Handbok metanpotential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, My (AnoxKaldnes AB (Sweden)); Schnurer, Anna (Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden))

    2011-07-15

    Before using a organic material for biogas production it is essential to evaluate the methane production potential. The methane potential is one important tool possible to use during planning of new plants but also when new materials are considered for already running biogas plants. The chemical composition of different organic material varies extensively and this will have an impact on both the degradability and the methane potential. Information about the methane potential of a specific material can sometimes be found in the literature or can be calculated after a chemical/ physical or biological characterization. Here, the BMP test (Biochemical Methane Potential) is a commonly used method. Today the BMP test is a commonly used method to determine the methane potential. Many national and international research groups, consultants as well as personal at biogas plants are using this method and there is a lot of data available in the literature from such tests. In addition there are several protocols giving guidelines on how to execute a BMP-test. The BMP-test is performed in many different ways, not always under optimized conditions, and there is a lack of information on how to interpret the obtained data. This report summarizes knowledge from the literature and the experience from a Swedish referee group, consisting of persons being active performers of BMP-tests. The report does not include a standardized protocol as the procedure can be performed in different ways depending on available equipment and on the type of material to be tested. Instead the report discusses different factors of great importance for a successful test giving reliable results. The report also summarizes important information concerning the interpretation and how to present results in order to allow comparison of data from different test.

  16. Potential methane reservoirs beneath Antarctica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadham, J L; Arndt, S; Tulaczyk, S; Stibal, M; Tranter, M; Telling, J; Lis, G P; Lawson, E; Ridgwell, A; Dubnick, A; Sharp, M J; Anesio, A M; Butler, C E H

    2012-08-30

    Once thought to be devoid of life, the ice-covered parts of Antarctica are now known to be a reservoir of metabolically active microbial cells and organic carbon. The potential for methanogenic archaea to support the degradation of organic carbon to methane beneath the ice, however, has not yet been evaluated. Large sedimentary basins containing marine sequences up to 14 kilometres thick and an estimated 21,000 petagrams (1 Pg equals 10(15) g) of organic carbon are buried beneath the Antarctic Ice Sheet. No data exist for rates of methanogenesis in sub-Antarctic marine sediments. Here we present experimental data from other subglacial environments that demonstrate the potential for overridden organic matter beneath glacial systems to produce methane. We also numerically simulate the accumulation of methane in Antarctic sedimentary basins using an established one-dimensional hydrate model and show that pressure/temperature conditions favour methane hydrate formation down to sediment depths of about 300 metres in West Antarctica and 700 metres in East Antarctica. Our results demonstrate the potential for methane hydrate accumulation in Antarctic sedimentary basins, where the total inventory depends on rates of organic carbon degradation and conditions at the ice-sheet bed. We calculate that the sub-Antarctic hydrate inventory could be of the same order of magnitude as that of recent estimates made for Arctic permafrost. Our findings suggest that the Antarctic Ice Sheet may be a neglected but important component of the global methane budget, with the potential to act as a positive feedback on climate warming during ice-sheet wastage.

  17. Methanation reaction on ruthenium thin films: a mechanistic investigation. [PhD. thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaughter, M.D.

    1979-07-01

    The kinetics of the methanation reaction were measured on thin ruthenium films in the temperature range 548 to 623K. The pressures of the reactant gases were varied over the ranges 1.5 to 1500 ..mu..m for CO and 300 to 75000 ..mu..m for H/sub 2/ to yield kinetic orders for each gas. The CO kinetic order varied from +1 at low pressures to -2 at high pressures. As the H/sub 2/ pressure was increased its kinetic order varied from +2 to -1. Both of these order plots had unusually sharp maxima. The reaction is zero order in both CH/sub 4/ and H/sub 2/O. The apparent activation energy was dependent upon temperature with a value of 21.9 kcal/mole at 573K. Auger spectroscopy (AES) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicated that the surface was always covered with carbon. This carbon could be divided into two types based upon its reactivity toward hydrogen. Type-1 was very reactive to 3.5 torr hydrogen doses at 573K and was completely removed in less than 300 seconds. Type-2 was less reactive and required about 48 hours under the same conditions for removal. No oxygen was ever detected on the surface after methanation. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and XPS indicated respectively, that neither graphite nor bulk carbide was associated with the used catalyst. The deposition of up to 0.75 monolayer of carbon enhanced the rate of methanation. More carbon caused a drop in the initial rate. Methanol could be hydrogenated to methane at about the same rate as carbon monoxide. A mechanism was developed which quantitatively fits the kinetic data and qualitatively predicts all of the other observations. This mechanism involves adsorbed hydrogen interacting with non-dissociated carbon monoxide. The rate limiting step involves the interaction of Ru--H and Ru--CH/sub 3/ to form methane. A methylene carbonyl hydride is believed to act as a reversible poison at high H/sub 2/:CO ratios.

  18. 46 CFR 154.703 - Methane (LNG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Methane (LNG). 154.703 Section 154.703 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR... and Temperature Control § 154.703 Methane (LNG). Unless a cargo tank carrying methane (LNG)...

  19. Nitrogen-fixing methane-utilizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bont, de J.A.M.

    1976-01-01

    Methane occurs abundantly in nature. In the presence of oxygen this gas may be metabolized by bacteria that are able to use it as carbon and energy source. Several types of bacteria involved in the oxidation of methane have been described in literature. Methane-utilizing bacteria have in common that

  20. Methane oxidation needs less stressed plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaoqi; Smaill, Simeon J; Clinton, Peter W

    2013-12-01

    Methane oxidation rates in soil are liable to be reduced by plant stress responses to climate change. Stressed plants exude ethylene into soil, which inhibits methane oxidation when present in the soil atmosphere. Here we discuss opportunities to use 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase to manage methane oxidation by regulating plant stress responses.

  1. Are methane production and cattle performance related?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methane is a product of fermentation of feed in ruminant animals. Approximately 2 -12% of the gross energy consumed by cattle is released through enteric methane production. There are three primary components that contribute to the enteric methane footprint of an animal. Those components are dry ...

  2. Nitrogen-fixing methane-utilizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bont, de J.A.M.

    1976-01-01

    Methane occurs abundantly in nature. In the presence of oxygen this gas may be metabolized by bacteria that are able to use it as carbon and energy source. Several types of bacteria involved in the oxidation of methane have been described in literature. Methane-utilizing bacteria have in

  3. Turbulent methane combustion in a laboratory-scale furnace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oksanen, A.; Maeki-Mantila, E. [Tampere Univ. of Technology (Finland). Energy and Process Engineering

    1996-12-31

    Methane combustion in the 400 rotational symmetric test chamber by ENEL was investigated. The prediction of the reaction rates of methane and carbon monoxide was based on the models which are taking into consideration the effect of turbulence on the oxidation phenomena namely the eddy dissipation concept model (EDC) and the eddy dissipation model (EDM). The experimental results of the distributions of the different species concentrations, temperature, velocities, turbulence quantities etc. were measured in the chamber cross-sections. The formation of nitric oxide was modelled using the thermal- and prompt-NO formation mechanisms and the formulation was based on the chemical kinetics and the probability density function (pdf) with the {beta}- and {delta}-distributions. If more than one variable is taken into consideration in the use of pdf it is very difficult to find distribution for different variables and especially to solve them with the moderate amount of the computing time. Therefore, in this presentation the amount of the pdf variables was limited as small as possible i.e. only one variable namely the mixture fraction was used the variance of which was solved from the transport equation. The computational domain which was divided into about seven thousand cells includes areas where the mean values of the variables can be supposed to be known and where the distribution of the probability is very narrow. Because in every computational cell the probability distribution as accurate as possible is wanted the linearization of the integration was made. The effect of the local extinction on the reaction rates was also included in the paper

  4. Co-Generation of C2 Hydrocarbons and Synthesis Gases from Methane and Carbon Dioxide: a Thermodynamic Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Istadi; Nor Aishah Saidina Amin

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with thermodynamic chemical equilibrium analysis using the method of direct minimization of Gibbs free energy for all possible CH4 and CO2 reactions. The effects of CO2/CH4 feed ratio,reaction temperature,and system pressure on equilibrium composition,conversion,selectivity and yield were studied. In addition,carbon and no carbon formation regions were also considered at various reaction temperatures and CO2/CH4 feed ratios in the reaction system at equilibrium. It was found that the reaction temperature above 1100 K and CO2/CH4 ratio=1 were favourable for synthesis gas production with H2/CO ratio unity,while carbon dioxide oxidative coupling of methane (CO2 OCM) reaction to produce ethane and ethylene is less favourable thermodynamically. Numerical results indicated that the no carbon formation region was at temperatures above 1000 K and CO2/CH4 ratio larger than 1.

  5. Methane, vegetation and global climate change; Methan, Pflanzen und Klimawandel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keppler, F. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Chemie (Otto-Hahn-Institut), Mainz (Germany); Roeckmann, T. [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands). Inst. fuer Meeres- und Atmosphaerenforschung

    2007-05-15

    In a recent publication, the authors were able to prove that plants produce and emit methane. This means a major change in the global emission balance of this climate-relevant gas. Plants are not involved in global climate change, however. (orig.)

  6. Preparation and characterization of Ni-Zr-O nanoparticles and its catalytic behavior for ethane oxidative dehydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ying; Gao, Jing; He, Yiming; Wu, Tinghua

    2012-03-01

    Ni-Zr-O nanoparticles with various Zr contents were prepared by a modified sol-gel method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning/high-resolution transmission electron microscope (SEM/HRTEM), BET surface area analysis, H2 temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and O2 temperature-programmed desorption (O2-TPD). The oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane (ODHE) to ethylene was applied to evaluate catalytic performance of the samples. The results show that the doping of Zr affected the cell parameter and the chemical environment of the catalysts, indicating the existence of strong interaction between Ni and Zr. The interaction plays an important role in the lessened reducibility and the distribution of adsorbed oxygen species, consequently influence their catalytic performance. The best yield to ethylene was obtained over the 10% Ni-Zr-O catalyst with 60% ethane conversion and 66% ethylene selectivity.

  7. Efficient 1.5-μm Raman generation in ethane-filled hollow-core fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yubin; Gu, Bo; Wang, Zefeng; Lu, Qisheng

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrated for the first time a novel and effective method for obtaining both high peak-power and narrow linewidth 1.5 μm fiber sources through gas Raman effect in hollow core fibers. An Ethane-filled ice-cream antiresonance hollow-core fiber is pumped with a high peak-power pulse 1064 nm microchip laser, generating 1552.7 nm Stokes wave by pure vibrational stimulated Raman scattering of ethane molecules. A maximum peak-power of about 400 kW is achieved with 6 meter fiber length at 2 bar pressure, and the linewidth is about 6.3 GHz. The maximum Raman conversion efficiency of 1064 nm to 1552.7 nm is about 38%, and the corresponding laser slope efficiency is about 61.5%.

  8. Oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane over RE-NiO (RE=La, Nd, Sm, Gd)catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qin; ZHOU Dishan; WU Ying; WU Tinghua

    2013-01-01

    RE-NiO (RE=La,Nd,Sm,Gd) catalysts were prepared by a modified sol-gel method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD),transmission electron microscopy (TEM),BET surface area analysis,H2 temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR),and O2 temperature-programmed desorption (O2-TPD).The oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane (ODHE) to ethylene was applied to evaluate catalytic performance of the samples.The results showed that the doping of RE affected the physicochemical properties of the catalysts.The strong interaction between Gd and NiO played an important role in the lessened reducibility and the distribution of adsorbed oxygen species,consequently influenced the catalytic performance.The best yield to ethylene of 29% was obtained over the Gd-NiO catalyst with an ethane conversion of 56%.

  9. Tetraaquatetrakis{μ3-3,3′-[(E,E-ethane-1,2-diylbis(nitrilomethylidyne]benzene-1,2-diolato}octazinc(II N,N-dimethylformamide hexasolvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan-Sun Zheng

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetric unit of the title compound [Zn8(C16H12N2O44(H2O4]·6C3H7NO, consists of eight ZnII cations, four tetravalent anionic ligands, L4− (L4− = 3,3′-(1E,1′E-(ethane-1,2-diylbis(azan-1-yl-1-ylidenebis(methan-1-yl-1-ylidenedibenzene-1,2-bis(olate, four coordinated water molecules and six N,N-dimethylformamide solvate molecules. The coordination complex comprises an octanuclear ZnII unit with its ZnII centers coordinated in two discrete distorted square-pyramidal geometries. Four ZnII atoms each coordinate to two nitrogen atoms and two phenolate oxygen atoms from an individual L4− ligand and one coordinated water molecule. The other four ZnII atoms each bind to five phenolate oxygen atoms from three different L4− ligands. In the crystal structure, the ZnII complex unit, coordinated water molecules and dimethylformamide solvate molecules are linked via O—H...O and C—H...O hydrogen bonds. Molecules are connected by additional intermolecular O—H...O and C—H...O hydrogen bonds, forming an extensive three dimensional framework.

  10. Design and evaluation of a porous burner for the mitigation of anthropogenic methane emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Susie; Fletcher, David F; Joseph, Stephen D; Dawson, Adrian; Harris, Andrew T

    2009-12-15

    Methane constitutes 15% of total global anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. The mitigation of these emissions could have a significant near-term effect on slowing global warming, and recovering and burning the methane would allow a wasted energy resource to be exploited. The typically low and fluctuating energy content of the emission streams makes combustion difficult; however porous burners-an advanced combustion technology capable of burning low-calorific value fuels below the conventional flammability limit-are one possible mitigation solution. Here we discuss a pilot-scale porous burner designed for this purpose. The burner comprises a cylindrical combustion chamber filled with a porous bed of alumina saddles, combined with an arrangement of heat exchanger tubes for preheating the incoming emission stream. A computational fluid dynamics model was developed to aid in the design process. Results illustrating the burner's stable operating range and behavior are presented: stable ultralean combustion is demonstrated at natural gas concentrations as low as 2.3 vol%, with transient combustion at concentrations down to 1.1 vol%; the system is comparatively stable to perturbations in the operating conditions, and emissions of both carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons are negligible. Based on this pilot-scale demonstration, porous burners show potential as a methane mitigation technology.

  11. [Conversion of acetic acid to methane by thermophiles]. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinder, S.H.

    1994-02-01

    Acetate is the precursor of approximately two-thirds of the methane produced by anaerobic bioreactors and many other methanogenic habitats. Besides their intrinsic interest, thermophilic acetotrophic methanogenic cultures usually grow at least twice as fast as their mesophilic counterparts, making them more amenable to study. In recent years, attention has been mainly focused on the thermophilic acetate utilizing methanogen Methanothrix strain CALS-1. Methanothrix, also called Methanosaeta, is one of only two methanogenic genera known to convert acetate to methane, the other being Methanosarcina. The faster-growing more versatile Methanosarcina has been better studied. However, when one examines anaerobic digestor contents, Methanothrix is often the dominant acetate-utilizing methanogen. As described in previous progress reports, the authors have achieved methanogenesis from acetate in cell-free extracts of Methanothrix strain CALS-1 grown in a pH auxostat. Using these cell extracts, specific activities for methanogenesis from acetate and ATP of 100--300 nmol/min were routinely obtained, levels comparable to the rate in whole cells, which is not usually the case in methanogenic extracts. Recently obtained results are given and discussed for the following: Methanogenesis in crude extracts; Role of the cell membrane in methanogenesis from acetate; Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase; Novel thermophilic cultures converting acetate to methane; and Methanol-utilizing methanogen.

  12. Phenomenon of methane driven caused by hydraulic fracturing in methane-bearing coal seams

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Bingxiang; Cheng Qingying; Chen Shuliang

    2016-01-01

    The methane concentration of the return current will always be enhanced to a certain degree when hydraulic fracturing with bedding drilling is implemented to a gassy coal seam in an underground coal mine. The methane in coal seam is driven out by hydraulic fracturing. Thus, the phenomenon is named as methane driven effect of hydraulic fracturing. After deep-hole hydraulic fracturing at the tunneling face of the gassy coal seam, the coal methane content exhibits a‘low-high-low”distribution along exca-vation direction in the following advancing process, verifying the existence of methane driven caused by hydraulic fracturing in methane-bearing coal seam. Hydraulic fracturing causes the change of pore-water and methane pressure in surrounding coal. The uneven distribution of the pore pressure forms a pore pressure gradient. The free methane migrates from the position of high pore (methane) pressure to the position of low pore (methane) pressure. The methane pressure gradient is the fundamental driving force for methane-driven coal seam hydraulic fracturing. The uneven hydraulic crack propagation and the effect of time (as some processes need time to complete and are not completed instantaneously) will result in uneven methane driven. Therefore, an even hydraulic fracturing technique should be used to avoid the negative effects of methane driven; on the other hand, by taking fully advantage of methane driven, two technologies are presented.

  13. Carbon monoxide may be an important molecule in migraine and other headaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arngrim, Nanna; Schytz, Henrik W; Hauge, Mette K

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Carbon monoxide was previously considered to just be a toxic gas. A wealth of recent information has, however, shown that it is also an important endogenously produced signalling molecule involved in multiple biological processes. Endogenously produced carbon monoxide may thus play...... an important role in nociceptive processing and in regulation of cerebral arterial tone. DISCUSSION: Carbon monoxide-induced headache shares many characteristics with migraine and other headaches. The mechanisms whereby carbon monoxide causes headache may include hypoxia, nitric oxide signalling and activation...

  14. Characterization of nitrogen-fixing bacteria from a temperate saltmarsh lagoon, including isolates that produce ethane from acetylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbles, B J; Rawlings, D E

    1994-01-01

    Nitrogen-fixing bacteria were isolated from sediments and water of a saltmarsh lagoon on the west coast of South Africa, and characterized according to factors that regulate nitrogen fixation in the marine environment. The majority of isolates were assigned to the Photobacterium or Vibrio genera on the basis of physiological and biochemical characteristics. One isolate was further assigned to the species Vibrio diazotrophicus. Carbohydrate utilization by each diazotrophic isolate was examined. Abilities of the isolates to utilize a range of mono-, di-, and polysaccharides largely reflected the predicted availability of organic carbon and energy in the lagoon, except that chitin was not utilized. Biochemical tests on the utilization of combined nitrogen showed that one isolate could utilize nitrate, and that this strain was susceptible to full repression of nitrogenase activity by 10mM nitrate. Urease activity was not detected in any of the isolates. In the absence of molybdenum two of the isolates, a Photobacterium spp. and V. diazotrophicus, reduced acetylene to ethylene and ethane, a property frequently associated with the activity of alternative nitrogenases. Addition of 25µM molybdenum inhibited ethane production by V. diazotrophicus, but stimulated ethylene and ethane production by the Photobacterium isolate. Addition of 28µM vanadium did not appear to regulate ethane production by either strain. Assays of nitrogenase activity in sediments from which some isolates were obtained indicated that molybdenum was not limiting nitrogenase activity at naturally-occurring concentrations. Southern hybridizations of the chromosomes of these strains with the anfH and vnfH genes of Azotobacter vinelandii and the nifH gene of Klebsiella pneumoniae indicated the presence of only one nitrogenase in these isolates.

  15. Substituted ethan phosphonic acid esters as reagents for the separation of molybdenum from rhenium by solvent extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordanov, N; Mareva, S; Borisov, G; Jordanov, B

    1968-02-01

    New esters of the ethan phosphonic acids have been synthesized and their extraction properties studied with respect to Mo(VI), Re(VII), Fe(III),Au(III),Tl(III) and Sb(V). A possibility is shown for the analytical separation of molybdenum from rhenium (beta = 700). The state of these new extraction agents in carbon tetrachloride solution, and the mechanism of the extraction processes, have been investigated by means of infrared spectra.

  16. Determination of ethane, pentane and isoprene in exhaled air using a multi-bed adsorbent and end-cut gas-solid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lärstad, Mona; Loh, Carina; Ljungkvist, Göran; Olin, Anna-Carin; Torén, Kjell

    2002-11-01

    A method for the determination of exhaled ethane, pentane and isoprene was developed and validated. The method was based on pre-concentration of the analytes on a multi-bed solid adsorbent tube containing Tenax TA, Carboxen 569 and Carboxen 1000, thermal desorption and gas chromatography (GC) with flame ionisation detection (FID). A pre-column in an end-cut GC system was used to avoid problems with water and strongly retained substances. The detection limits were 5, 2 and 6 pmol per sample for ethane, pentane and isoprene, respectively, using a sample volume of 500 ml. The linearity was good for all analytes with correlation coefficients exceeding 0.999. The repeatability for exhaled air samples was 7, 10 and 12% for ethane, pentane and isoprene, respectively. Analysis of a certified reference material of ethane and pentane did not differ significantly from the certified values. Ethane and pentane levels were stable up to six days of storage in sample tubes. Isoprene levels were not stable during storage in the sample tubes used here, but using Carbopack X instead of Carboxen 569, levels were stable up to two days. The levels of exhaled ethane, pentane and isoprene in healthy subjects (n = 4) were 8.1+/-5.8 pmol l(-1), 11+/-5.8 pmol l(-1) and 2.4+/-0.90 mnol l(-1), respectively. The method could, with minor modifications, be used to determine other low-molecular hydrocarbons in exhaled air as well.

  17. Cryptic Methane Emissions from Upland Forest Ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Megonigal, Patrick [Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC (United States); Pitz, Scott [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC (United States)

    2016-04-19

    This exploratory research on Cryptic Methane Emissions from Upland Forest Ecosystems was motivated by evidence that upland ecosystems emit 36% as much methane to the atmosphere as global wetlands, yet we knew almost nothing about this source. The long-term objective was to refine Earth system models by quantifying methane emissions from upland forests, and elucidate the biogeochemical processes that govern upland methane emissions. The immediate objectives of the grant were to: (i) test the emerging paradigm that upland trees unexpectedly transpire methane, (ii) test the basic biogeochemical assumptions of an existing global model of upland methane emissions, and (iii) develop the suite of biogeochemical approaches that will be needed to advance research on upland methane emissions. We instrumented a temperate forest system in order to explore the processes that govern upland methane emissions. We demonstrated that methane is emitted from the stems of dominant tree species in temperate upland forests. Tree emissions occurred throughout the growing season, while soils adjacent to the trees consumed methane simultaneously, challenging the concept that forests are uniform sinks of methane. High frequency measurements revealed diurnal cycling in the rate of methane emissions, pointing to soils as the methane source and transpiration as the most likely pathway for methane transport. We propose the forests are smaller methane sinks than previously estimated due to stem emissions. Stem emissions may be particularly important in upland tropical forests characterized by high rainfall and transpiration, resolving differences between models and measurements. The methods we used can be effectively implemented in order to determine if the phenomenon is widespread.

  18. Introduction of π-complexation into porous aromatic framework for highly selective adsorption of ethylene over ethane

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Baiyan

    2014-06-18

    In this work, we demonstrate for the first time the introduction of π-complexation into a porous aromatic framework (PAF), affording significant increase in ethylene uptake capacity, as illustrated in the context of Ag(I) ion functionalized PAF-1, PAF-1-SO3Ag. IAST calculations using single-component-isotherm data and an equimolar ethylene/ethane ratio at 296 K reveal that PAF-1-SO3Ag shows exceptionally high ethylene/ethane adsorption selectivity (Sads: 27 to 125), far surpassing benchmark zeolite and any other MOF reported in literature. The formation of π-complexation between ethylene molecules and Ag(I) ions in PAF-1-SO 3Ag has been evidenced by the high isosteric heats of adsorption of C2H4 and also proved by in situ IR spectroscopy studies. Transient breakthrough experiments, supported by simulations, indicate the feasibility of PAF-1-SO3Ag for producing 99.95%+ pure C 2H4 in a Pressure Swing Adsorption operation. Our work herein thus suggests a new perspective to functionalizing PAFs and other types of advanced porous materials for highly selective adsorption of ethylene over ethane. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  19. Methane on the greenhouse agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, Kathleen B.; Hoffman, John S.; Thompson, Anne M.

    1991-01-01

    Options for reducing methane emissions, which could have a significant effect on global warming, are addressed. Emissions from landfills, coal mining, oil and natural gas systems, ruminants, animal wastes and wastewater, rice cultivation, and biomass burning are considered. Methods for implementing these emission reductions are discussed.

  20. Methane production in terrestrial arthropods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackstein, J.H.P.; Stumm, C.K. (Catholic Univ. of Nijmegen (Netherlands))

    1994-06-07

    The authors have screened more than 110 representatives of the different taxa of terrestrial arthropods for methane production in order to obtain additional information about the origins of biogenic methane. Methanogenic bacteria occur in the hindguts of nearly all tropical representatives of millipedes (Diplopoda), cockroaches (Blattaria), termites (Isoptera), and scarab beetles (Scarabaeidae), while such methanogens are absent from 66 other arthropod species investigated. Three types of symbiosis were found: in the first type, the arthropod's hindgut is colonized by free methanogenic bacteria; in the second type, methanogens are closely associated with chitinous structures formed by the host's hindgut; the third type is mediated by intestinal anaerobic protists with intracellular methanogens. Such symbiotic associations are likely to be a characteristic property of the particular taxon. Since these taxa represent many families with thousands of species, the world populations of methane-producing arthropods constitute an enormous biomass. The authors show that arthropod symbionts can contribute substantially to atmospheric methane.