WorldWideScience

Sample records for monoxide hydrogen methane

  1. Hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and methane in the marine environment

    OpenAIRE

    Bullister, John Logan

    1980-01-01

    EXTRACT (SEE PDF FOR FULL ABSTRACT): The horizontal and vertical distribution of three dissolved trace gases, namely molecular hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and methane, was measured in coastal and oceanic areas. Atmospheric concentrations of these gases were measured both at locations influenced by nearby human activity, and in areas far removed from these inputs.

  2. Selective methanation of carbon monoxide in hydrogen rich stream over Ni/CeO2 nanocatalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Behzad Nematollahi; Mehran Rezaei; Ebrahim Nemati Lay

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, selective methanation of carbon monoxide in hydrogen rich stream was investigated over Ni/CeO2 nanocatalysts. The obtained results revealed that increasing in nickel loading decreased the BET surface area, pore volume and nickel dispersion. The 25%Ni/CeO2 with a NiO crystal size of 12 nm exhibited the highest activity in CO methanation reaction and reached to maximum CO conversion and CH4 selectivity at temperatures above 230 ºC. The catalytic results revealed that CO selective methanation well progressed at lower temperatures while CO2 methanation was completely suppressed until CO conversion reached to maximum value.

  3. Reduction of Quartz to Silicon Monoxide by Methane-Hydrogen Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Zhang, Guangqing; Tronstad, Ragnar; Ostrovski, Oleg

    2016-08-01

    The reduction of quartz was studied isothermally in a fluidized bed reactor using continuously flowing methane-hydrogen gas mixture in the temperature range from 1623 K to 1773 K (1350 °C to 1500 °C). The CO content in the off-gas was measured online using an infrared gas analyzer. The main phases of the reduced samples identified by XRD analysis were quartz and cristobalite. Significant weight loss in the reduction process indicated that the reduction products were SiO and CO. Reduction of SiO2 to SiO by methane starts with adsorption and dissociation of CH4 on the silica surface. The high carbon activity in the CH4-H2 gas mixture provided a strongly reducing condition. At 1623 K (1350 °C), the reduction was very slow. The rate and extent of reduction increased with the increasing temperature to 1723 K (1450 °C). A further increase in temperature to 1773 K (1500 °C) resulted in a decrease in the rate and extent of reduction. An increase in the gas flow rate from 0.4 to 0.8 NL/min and an increase in the methane content in the CH4-H2 gas mixture from 0 to 5 vol pct facilitated the reduction. Methane content in the gas mixture should be maintained at less than 5 vol pct in order to suppress methane cracking.

  4. Determination of carbon monoxide, methane and carbon dioxide in refinery hydrogen gases and air by gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiński, Marian; Kartanowicz, Rafal; Jastrzebski, Daniel; Kamiński, Marcin M

    2003-03-14

    This paper illustrates a method for determining trace amounts of CO, CH4 and CO2 with the detection limit of 0.15, 0.15 and 0.20 microg/l, respectively, in refinery hydrogen gases or in air. A simple modification of a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame-ionization detector is presented. A Porapak Q column, additionally connected with a short molecular sieve 5A packed column and a catalytic hydrogenation reactor on the Ni catalyst have been applied. The principle of the analytical method proposed is the separation of CO from O2 before the introduction of CO to the methanizer. The analytical procedure and examples of the results obtained have been presented. The modification applied makes it possible to use the GC instrument for other determinations, requiring utilization of the Porapak Q column and the flame-ionization detector. In such cases, the short molecular sieve 5A column and the methanizer can be by-passed.

  5. Catalysis of carbon monoxide methanation by deep sea manganate minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera, A. L.; Maple, M. B.; Arrhenius, G.

    1990-01-01

    The catalytic activity of deep sea manganese nodule minerals for the methanation of carbon monoxide was measured with a microcatalytic technique between 200 and 460 degrees C. The manganate minerals were activated at 248 degrees C by immersion into a stream of hydrogen in which pulses of carbon monoxide were injected. Activation energies for the methanation reaction and hydrogen desorption from the manganate minerals were obtained and compared with those of pure nickel. Similar energy values indicate that the activity of the nodule materials for the reaction appears to be related to the amount of reducible transition metals present in the samples (ca. 11 wt.-%). Since the activity of the nodule minerals per gram is comparable to that of pure nickel, most of the transition metal ions located between manganese oxide layers appear to be exposed and available to catalyze the reaction.

  6. Material processing with hydrogen and carbon monoxide on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Linne, Diane L.

    1991-01-01

    Several novel proposals are examined for propellant production from carbon dioxide and monoxide and hydrogen. Potential uses were also examined of CO as a fuel or as a reducing agent in metal oxide processing as obtained or further reduced to carbon. Hydrogen can be reacted with CO to produce a wide variety of hydrocarbons, alcohols, and other organic compounds. Methanol, produced by Fischer-Tropsch chemistry may be useful as a fuel; it is easy to store and handle because it is a liquid at Mars temperatures. The reduction of CO2 to hydrocarbons such as methane or acetylene can be accomplished with hydrogen. Carbon monoxide and hydrogen require cryogenic temperatures for storage as liquids. Noncryogenic storage of hydrogen may be accomplished using hydrocarbons, inorganic hydrides, or metal hydrides. Noncryogenic storage of CO may be accomplished in the form of iron carbonyl (FE(CO)5) or other metal carbonyls. Low hydrogen content fuels such as acetylene (C2H2) may be effective propellants with low requirements for earth derived resources. The impact on manned Mars missions of alternative propellant production and utilization is discussed.

  7. Modeling the process of producing hydrogen from methane

    OpenAIRE

    Dubinin, A. M.; Tuponogov, V. G.; Ikonnikov, I. S.

    2013-01-01

    Using the chemical reactions that accompany the production of syngas via the steam reforming of methane as a basis, the differential material balance equations were derived and solved for all conversion products on an aluminum/nickel catalyst. For the following stage of hydrogen synthesis on an iron/chromium catalyst, the system of two differential equations of the material balance of the direct and reverse reactions of steam carbon monoxide conversion was obtained and solved. The analytical ...

  8. Study on the hydrogenation coupling of methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    At atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature, the hydrogenation coupling of methane was studied by using pulse corona plasma and its synergism with catalyst. The results showed that (ⅰ) under pulse corona plasma, the coupling of methane could be fulfilled by the addition of hydrogen, and with the increase of the amount of hydrogen, the conversion of methane and the yield of C2 hydrocarbon increased, and the deposit of carbon decreased; (ⅱ) the conversion of methane was affected by pulse voltage and repeated frequency; (ⅲ) in the system, the addition of Ni/g-Al2O3 could improve the distribution of C2 hydrocarbon; (ⅳ) the activity of Ni/g-Al2O3 prepared by cold plasma was better than that by chemical methods. The experiment opened up a new technical route of the coupling of methane.

  9. Producing Hydrogen by Plasma Pyrolysis of Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwater, James; Akse, James; Wheeler, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Plasma pyrolysis of methane has been investigated for utility as a process for producing hydrogen. This process was conceived as a means of recovering hydrogen from methane produced as a byproduct of operation of a life-support system aboard a spacecraft. On Earth, this process, when fully developed, could be a means of producing hydrogen (for use as a fuel) from methane in natural gas. The most closely related prior competing process - catalytic pyrolysis of methane - has several disadvantages: a) The reactor used in the process is highly susceptible to fouling and deactivation of the catalyst by carbon deposits, necessitating frequent regeneration or replacement of the catalyst. b) The reactor is highly susceptible to plugging by deposition of carbon within fixed beds, with consequent channeling of flow, high pressure drops, and severe limitations on mass transfer, all contributing to reductions in reactor efficiency. c) Reaction rates are intrinsically low. d) The energy demand of the process is high.

  10. Long term trends of methane, non methane hydrocarbons, and carbon monoxide in urban atmosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ezaz; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Jeon, Eui-Chan; Brown, Richard J C

    2015-06-15

    The concentrations of methane (CH4), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), and carbon monoxide (CO) were measured at two urban locations (Guro (GR) and Nowon (NW)) in Seoul, Korea between 2004 and 2013. The mean amount fractions of CH4, NMHC, and CO, measured at GR over this period were 2.06±0.02, 0.32±0.03, and 0.61±0.05 ppm, respectively, while at NW they were 2.08±0.06, 0.33±0.05, and 0.54±0.06 ppm, respectively. The ratio of CH4 to the total hydrocarbon amount fraction remained constant across the study years: 0.82 to 0.90 at GR and 0.81 to 0.89 at NW. Similarly, stable ratios were also observed between NMHC and THC at the two sites. In contrast, the annual mean ratios for CH4/NMHC showed a larger variation: between 4.55 to 8.67 at GR and 4.25 to 8.45 at NW. The seasonality of CO was characterized by wintertime maxima, while for CH4 and NMHC the highest amount fractions were found in fall. The analysis of their long-term trends based on Mann-Kendall and Sen's methods showed an overall increase of THC and CH4, whereas a decreasing trend was observed for NMHC and CO.

  11. Cyclic process for producing methane from carbon monoxide with heat removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Albert C.; Yang, Chang-lee

    1982-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are converted to methane by a cyclic, essentially two-step process in which said carbon monoxide is disproportionated to form carbon dioxide and active surface carbon deposited on the surface of a catalyst, and said carbon is reacted with steam to form product methane and by-product carbon dioxide. The exothermic heat of reaction generated in each step is effectively removed during each complete cycle so as to avoid a build up of heat from cycle-to-cycle, with particularly advantageous techniques being employed for fixed bed, tubular and fluidized bed reactor operations.

  12. Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide and methane at an immobilized cobalt protoporphyrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jing; Kortlever, Ruud; Kas, Recep; Birdja, Yuvraj Y.; Diaz-Morales, Oscar; Kwon, Youngkook; Ledezma-Yanez, Isis; Schouten, Klaas Jan P.; Mul, Guido; Koper, Marc T. M.

    2015-01-01

    The electrochemical conversion of carbon dioxide and water into useful products is a major challenge in facilitating a closed carbon cycle. Here we report a cobalt protoporphyrin immobilized on a pyrolytic graphite electrode that reduces carbon dioxide in an aqueous acidic solution at relatively low overpotential (0.5 V), with an efficiency and selectivity comparable to the best porphyrin-based electrocatalyst in the literature. While carbon monoxide is the main reduction product, we also observe methane as by-product. The results of our detailed pH-dependent studies are explained consistently by a mechanism in which carbon dioxide is activated by the cobalt protoporphyrin through the stabilization of a radical intermediate, which acts as Brønsted base. The basic character of this intermediate explains how the carbon dioxide reduction circumvents a concerted proton–electron transfer mechanism, in contrast to hydrogen evolution. Our results and their mechanistic interpretations suggest strategies for designing improved catalysts. PMID:26324108

  13. Microwave Hydrogen Production from Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Reaction 2 to H2/CO2 products according to Reaction 3 at temperatures in the range of 200-400 °C in the presence of an iron-chromium or copper alloys...hydrogen for a 5-kW fuel cell system. The capital and operating costs of the technology will be estimated and compared to compressed hydrogen delivery and onsite electrolysis .

  14. Cobalt--zirconia catalysts for the synthesis of hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulanova, T.F.; Lapidus, A.L.

    1972-01-01

    Laboratory and pilot plant experiments were done in order to replace thoria by more readily available and biologically inactive promoters in kieselguhr-supported cobalt and cobalt-magnesia catalysts. Maximum activity, stability, and yields of ceresins boiling above 460/sup 0/C were obtained with a zirconia-cobalt weight ratio of 1:10. The activity of this catalyst remained spectacularly high for five months. The optimum reaction temperature was 190/sup 0/C at 8 to 9 atm pressure of the carbon monoxide-hydrogen mixture. The experimental procedures and the chemical and grain-size composition of five catalysts are given, as well as the yields of methane, C/sub 2-4/fraction, gasoline, oils, and ceresin.

  15. Hydrogen Recovery by ECR Plasma Pyrolysis of Methane Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a microgravity and hypogravity compatible microwave plasma methane pyrolysis reactor is proposed to recover hydrogen which is lost as methane in the...

  16. A kinetic study on the adsorption and reaction of hydrogen over silica-supported ruthenium and silver-ruthenium catalysts during the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanderWiel, D.P.

    1999-02-12

    Although the catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide has been a subject of considerable investigation for many years, its increasing economical attractiveness as an industrial source of hydrocarbons has recently led to a search for more active and selective catalysts. A fundamental problem in the development of such catalysts is an incomplete knowledge of the operative surface processes, due in large part to the inability to accurately measure surface concentrations of reactant species during reaction. Specifically, the concentration of surface hydrogen proves difficult to estimate using normally revealing techniques such as transient isotopic exchange due to kinetic isotope effects. Knowledge of such concentrations is essential to the determination of the mechanisms of adsorption and reaction, since many kinetic parameters are concentration dependent. It is the aim of this research to investigate the mechanism and kinetics of the adsorption and reaction of hydrogen on silica-supported ruthenium and silver-ruthenium catalysts during the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide. By preadsorbing carbon monoxide onto the surface of ruthenium and silver-ruthenium catalysts, the kinetics of hydrogen adsorption and reaction can be monitored upon exposure of this surface to ambient hydrogen gas. This is accomplished by conducting identical experiments on two separate systems. First, the formation of methane is monitored using mass spectroscopy, and specific reaction rates and apparent activation energies are measured. Next, in situ {sup 1}H-NMR is used to monitor the amount of hydrogen present on the catalyst surface during adsorption and reaction. The results for these two sets of experiments are then combined to show a correlation between the rate of reaction and the surface hydrogen concentration. Finally, transition state theory is applied to this system and is used to explain the observed change in the apparent activation energy. The structure sensitivity of hydrogen

  17. A kinetic study on the adsorption and reaction of hydrogen over silica-supported ruthenium and silver-ruthenium catalysts during the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    VanderWiel, David P. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-02-12

    Although the catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide has been a subject of considerable investigation for many years, its increasing economical attractiveness as an industrial source of hydrocarbons has recently led to a search for more active and selective catalysts. A fundamental problem in the development of such catalysts is an incomplete knowledge of the operative surface processes, due in large part to the inability to accurately measure surface concentrations of reactant species during reaction. Specifically, the concentration of surface hydrogen proves difficult to estimate using normally revealing techniques such as transient isotopic exchange due to kinetic isotope effects. Knowledge of such concentrations is essential to the determination of the mechanisms of adsorption and reaction, since many kinetic parameters are concentration dependent. It is the aim of this research to investigate the mechanism and kinetics of the adsorption and reaction of hydrogen on silica-supported ruthenium and silver-ruthenium catalysts during the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide. By preadsorbing carbon monoxide onto the surface of ruthenium and silver-ruthenium catalysts, the kinetics of hydrogen adsorption and reaction can be monitored upon exposure of this surface to ambient hydrogen gas. This is accomplished by conducting identical experiments on two separate systems. First, the formation of methane is monitored using mass spectroscopy, and specific reaction rates and apparent activation energies are measured. Next, in situ 1H-NMR is used to monitor the amount of hydrogen present on the catalyst surface during adsorption and reaction. The results for these two sets of experiments are then combined to show a correlation between the rate of reaction and the surface hydrogen concentration. Finally, transition state theory is applied to this system and is used to explain the observed change in the apparent activation energy. The structure sensitivity of hydrogen

  18. Hydrogen Recovery by ECR Plasma Pyrolysis of Methane Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a microgravity and hypogravity compatible Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) Plasma Methane Pyrolysis Reactor is proposed to recover hydrogen which is...

  19. Gas turbine combustion performance test of hydrogen and carbon monoxide synthetic gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min Chul Lee; Seok Bin Seo; Jae Hwa Chung; Si Moon Kim; Yong Jin Joo; Dal Hong Ahn [Korea Electric Power Corporation, Daejeon (Republic of Korea). Green Growth Laboratory

    2010-07-15

    The development of coal IGCC (Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle) technology has made it possible to exploit electricity generated from coal at a low cost. Furthermore, IGCC is a pre-requisite for the development of CCS (Carbon Capture and Storage) technology and hydrogen generated from coal. To achieve the need to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, Korea's 300 MW IGCC RDD&D (Research Development, Demonstration and Dissemination) project was launched in December 2006 under the leadership of the Korea Electric Power Corporation (KEPCO), with the support of the Korea Ministry of Knowledge Economy. When a new fuel is adapted to a gas turbine (such as syngas for IGCC), it is necessary to study the gas turbine combustion characteristics of the fuel, because gas turbines are very sensitive to its physical and chemical properties. This experimental study was conducted by investigating the combustion performance of synthetic gas, which is composed chiefly of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. The results of a test on synthetic gas combustion performance were compared with the results of methane combustion, which is a major component of natural gas. The results of the combustion test of both gases were examined in terms of the turbine's inlet temperature, combustion dynamics, emission characteristics, and flame structure. From the results of this experimental study, we were able to understand the combustion characteristics of synthetic gas and anticipate the problems when synthetic gas rather than natural gas is fuelled to a gas turbine. 21 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation study of successive hydrogenation reactions of carbon monoxide producing methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Thi Nu; Ono, Shota; Ohno, Kaoru

    2016-04-01

    Doing ab initio molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate a possibility of hydrogenation of carbon monoxide producing methanol step by step. At first, the hydrogen atom reacts with the carbon monoxide molecule at the excited state forming the formyl radical. Formaldehyde was formed after adding one more hydrogen atom to the system. Finally, absorption of two hydrogen atoms to formaldehyde produces methanol molecule. This study is performed by using the all-electron mixed basis approach based on the time dependent density functional theory within the adiabatic local density approximation for an electronic ground-state configuration and the one-shot GW approximation for an electronic excited state configuration.

  1. Validation of Carbon Monoxide and Methane Vertical Column Densities Retrieved from SCIAMACHY Infrared Nadir Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstaffl, Philipp; Hamidouche, Mourad; Schreier, Franz; Gimeno Garcia, Sebastian; Lichtenberg, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Carbon monoxide and methane are key species of Earth's atmosphere, highly relevant for climate and air quality. Accordingly, a large number of spaceborne sensors are observing these species in the microwave, thermal and near infrared. For the analysis of short wave infrared spectra measured by SCIAMACHY aboard the ENVISAT satellite and similar instrument(s) we had developed the Beer InfraRed Retrieval Algorithm: BIRRA is a separable least squares fit of the measured radiance with respect to molecular column densities and auxiliary parameters (optional: surface albedo, baseline, slit function width, and wavenumber shift). BIRRA has been implemented in the operational SCIAMACHY L1 to 2 processor for the retrieval of CO and CH4 from channel 8 (2.3 mue) and 6 (1.6 mue), respectively. Our tests are based on separate comparisons with existing space or ground-based measurements of carbon monoxide and methane column densities. In this poster intercomparisons of CO and CH4 columns estimated from SCIAMACHY with coincident and co-located retrievals provided by ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy are provided. More specifically, we have used data from several NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change) and TCCON (Total Carbon Column Observing Network) stations. Our strategy for quality check of these products and the selection of specific geographical areas will be discussed.

  2. Particle growth in hydrogen-methane plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, T. [Centre for Interdisciplinary Plasma Science, Max-Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstr. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Jacob, W. [Centre for Interdisciplinary Plasma Science, Max-Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmanstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Thomas, H. [Centre for Interdisciplinary Plasma Science, Max-Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstr. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Morfill, G. [Centre for Interdisciplinary Plasma Science, Max-Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstr. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Abe, T. [Department of Electronic Device and Materials, Tohoku Institute of Technology, 35-1, Kasumi-cho, Yagiyama, Taihaku-ku, Sendai 982-8577 (Japan); Watanabe, Y. [Graduate School of Information Science and Electrical Engineering, Kyushu University, 6-10-1, Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Sato, N. [Centre for Interdisciplinary Plasma Science, Max-Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstr. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Professor Emeritus, Tohoku University, 05, Aramaki-Aza-Aoba, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

    2006-05-26

    Particle growth and the behavior of particle clouds in hydrogen-methane capacitively coupled rf plasmas are investigated. At room temperature, most for different wall temperatures and gas compositions of these particles are due to flakes of layers delaminated from the electrode surfaces. Heating of the electrodes up to 800 K and dilution by hydrogen (up to H{sub 2}:CH{sub 4} = 20:1) suppresses the production of the particles from the electrode surfaces. The electron temperature in the particle levitation region is controlled by introducing an additional electrode made from a grid (= gridded electrode) in between the levitation electrode and the driven electrode. If we introduce diamond seed particles ({approx} 2.8 {mu}m in diameter) into the plasma with the gridded electrode in place, we observe nucleation of new grains ({approx} 100 nm) on the surfaces of the diamond particles. On the other hand, without the gridded electrode, we do not observe nucleation but growth of amorphous carbon films on them.

  3. Characterization of Fe-Co-Mn catalysts after carbon monoxide hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez C, S.L.; Serbia, M.A.; Baechler, R.; Orozco, J. [Laboratorio de Cinetica y Catalisis, Departamento de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Los Andes, Merida 5101A (Venezuela); e-mail: goncor@ula.ve

    2003-07-01

    An Fe-Co-Mn catalysts series after hydrogenation of carbon monoxide has been characterized. The XRD analysis shows the magnetite as main crystalline phase after reaction, in addition of carbon and carbide phases. All these phases lead to hydrogen consumption and oxidation rate changes on Fe-Co-Mn catalysts. A phase transformation superficial diagram is analysed. (Author)

  4. Hydrogen Generator by Methane Pyrolysis with Carbon Capture Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop, fabricate, and test a system to provide 99.999% hydrogen by efficiently performing methane pyrolysis. The system has three unique...

  5. Range Measurements of keV Hydrogen Ions in Solid Oxygen and Carbon Monoxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.; Andersen, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    Ranges of 1.3–3.5 keV/atom hydrogen and deuterium molecular ions have been measured by a thin-film reflection method. The technique, used here for range measurements in solid oxygen and carbon monoxide targets, is identical to the one used previously for range measurements in hydrogen and nitrogen....... The main aim was to look for phase-effects, i.e. gas-solid differences in the stopping processes. While measured ranges in solid oxygen were in agreement with known gas data, the ranges in solid carbon monoxide were up to 50% larger than those calculated from gas-stopping data. The latter result agrees...

  6. The chemistry and transport of methane and carbon monoxide in the troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, L. K.; Chameides, W. L.

    1980-01-01

    The present understanding of the physical and chemical behavior of methane, carbon monoxide and the chemical species involved in the conversion of CH4 to CO in the troposphere is reviewed. Following a brief summary of CO and CH4 emission and reactions in urban areas, attention is given to measurements of the spatial and temporal distributions of CO and CH4 in the rural atmosphere, the contribution of the oceans to atmospheric CO and CH4 concentrations, and interactions of CH4 and CO with soils and vegetation. Estimates of the transport of CH4 and CO from the troposphere to the stratosphere are discussed, and photochemical reactions of the constituents are examined. Two- and three-dimensional models for CH4 and CO transport are presented, and possible future variations in atmospheric abundances of the molecules are considered. Finally, present estimates of the global methane and carbon dioxide budgets are summarized, and it is pointed out that, despite the large contribution of anthropogenic sources, the budgets appear to be in balance.

  7. Separation of hydrogen from carbon monoxide using a hollow fiber polyimide membrane: experimental and simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peer, M.; Mehdi Kamali, S.; Mahdeyarfar, M.; Mohammadi, T. [Research Laboratory for Separation Processes, Chemical Engineering Department, Tehran (Iran)

    2007-10-15

    The separation of hydrogen from carbon monoxide (syngas ratio adjustment) with polymeric membranes was investigated in this work. A polyimide hollow fiber membrane module was used for hydrogen separation. This polymer has shown large permeability and selectivity for hydrogen separation (selectivity of ca. 30). Permeation tests were carried out at different feed conditions. Feed flow rates were varied between 150-300 mL/min, temperature was varied in the range of 20-80 C and feed pressure was varied between 5-9 bar. Mixtures containing 0-50 % carbon monoxide were used when carrying out experiments. Measured membrane permeances for hydrogen and carbon monoxide were about 70-100 GPU (gas permeation units) and 3-5.5 GPU, respectively. In addition, a mathematical model for simulation of gas separation in hollow fiber membrane modules with all flow patterns (crossflow, countercurrent and cocurrent) was presented. This model can be used for calculation of membrane performance or its required surface area for a specific separation. Experimental results have shown good correlation with simulation results. Plasticization, competitive sorption and concentration polarization effect of carbon monoxide on membrane performance is shown with experimental results. This effect reduced hydrogen permeances in mixed gas experiments. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  8. Effect of hydrogen addition on autoignited methane lifted flames

    KAUST Repository

    Choin, Byung Chul

    2012-01-01

    Autoignited lifted flames in laminar jets with hydrogen-enriched methane fuels have been investigated experimentally in heated coflow air. The results showed that the autoignited lifted flame of the methane/hydrogen mixture, which had an initial temperature over 920 K, the threshold temperature for autoignition in methane jets, exhibited features typical of either a tribrachial edge or mild combustion depending on fuel mole fraction and the liftoff height increased with jet velocity. The liftoff height in the hydrogen-assisted autoignition regime was dependent on the square of the adiabatic ignition delay time for the addition of small amounts of hydrogen, as was the case for pure methane jets. When the initial temperature was below 920 K, where the methane fuel did not show autoignition behavior, the flame was autoignited by the addition of hydrogen, which is an ignition improver. The liftoff height demonstrated a unique feature in that it decreased nonlinearly as the jet velocity increased. The differential diffusion of hydrogen is expected to play a crucial role in the decrease in the liftoff height with increasing jet velocity.

  9. Hydrogen and methane breath tests for evaluation of resistant carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rumessen, J J

    1992-01-01

    This review considers in detail the background, principles, techniques, limitations and advantages of the hydrogen and methane breath tests. Resistant food carbohydrates, defined as dietary carbohydrates partly or totally escaping small intestinal assimilation, are fermented in the human colon...... carbohydrates. Methane breath tests may supplement the information gained from hydrogen measurements, but further evaluations are needed. The hydrogen breath technique is rapid, simple and non-invasive as well as non-radioactive. It may be carried out in a large number of intact individuals under physiological...

  10. Methane and hydrogen production from crop biomass through anaerobic digestion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakarinen, O.

    2011-07-01

    The feasibility of methane and hydrogen production from energy crops through anaerobic digestion was evaluated in this thesis. The effects of environmental conditions, e.g. pH and temperature, as well as inoculum source on H{sub 2} yield were studied in batch assays. In addition, the effects of pre-treatments on methane and hydrogen yield as well as the feasibility of two-stage H{sub 2} + CH{sub 4} production was evaluated. Moreover, the effect of storage on methane yield of grasses was evaluated. Monodigestion of grass silage for methane production was studied, as well as shifting the methanogenic process to hydrogenic. Hydrogen production from grass silage and maize was shown to be possible with heat-treated inoculum in batch assays, with highest H{sub 2} yields of 16.0 and 9.9 ml gVS{sub added}-1 from untreated grass silage and maize, respectively. Pre-treatments (NaOH, HCl and water-extraction) showed some potential in increasing H{sub 2} yields, while methane yields were not affected. Two-stage H{sub 2} + CH{sub 4} producing process was shown to improve CH{sub 4} yields when compared to traditional one-stage CH{sub 4} process. Methane yield from grass silage monodigestion in continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) with organic loading rate (OLR) of 2 kgVS (m3d)-1 and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 30 days was at most 218 l kgVS{sub fed}-1. Methanogenic process was shifted to hydrogenic by increasing the OLR to 10 kgVS (m3d)-1 and shortening the HRT to 6 days. Highest H{sub 2} yield from grass silage was 42 l kgVS{sub fed}-1 with a maximum H{sub 2} content of 24 %. Energy crops can be successfully stored even for prolonged periods without decrease in methane yield. However, under sub-optimal storage conditions loss in volatile solids (VS) content and methane yield can occur. According to present results energy crops such as grass silage and maize can be converted to hydrogen or methane in AD process. Hydrogen energy yields are typically only 2-5 % of the

  11. Conversion of Methane to Hydrogen via Pulsed Corona Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lekha Nath Mishra; Kanetoshi Shibata; Hiroaki Ito; Noboru Yugami; Yasushi Nishida

    2004-01-01

    Experiments are performed to develop a pulsed corona discharge system for the conversion of methane to hydrogen at atmospheric pressure (≌760 Tort) without using a catalyst. The corona discharge was energized by 10-12 μs wide voltage pulses (≤7 kV) at a repetition rate of about 1.0-1.5 kHz. The residual gases were characterized by mass spectrometry. The conversion of methane is as high as 50.8%producing the 70% yield of hydrogen. The influences of argon on the discharge of methane were studied.This result could be useful for the mass production of hydrogen in both academic and industrial point of view.

  12. Hydrogen component fugacities in binary mixtures with methane and propane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruno, T.J.; Ely, J.F.; Hume, G.L.

    1986-09-01

    The fugacity coefficients of hydrogen in binary mixtures with methane and propane were measured using a physical equilibrium technique. This technique involves the use of an experimental chamber which is divided into two regions by a semipermeable membrane. Hydrogen can penetrate and pass through the membrane, while the other component (in this case, methane or propane) cannot. At equilibrium, pure hydrogen will permeate into one ''compartment'' of the chamber, while the binary mixture occupies the other compartment. Thus, the pressure of pure hydrogen on one side approaches the partial pressure of hydrogen in the mixture on the other side of the membrane. This allows a direct measurement of the hydrogen component fugacity at a given mixture mole fraction. In this study, results are reported for measurements made on the hydrogen+propane binary at 80 degrees C (353 K) and 130 degrees C (403 K) and the hydrogen+methane binary at 80 degrees C (353 K). All measurements were performed with a total mixture pressure of 3.45 MPa. The experimental results are compared with predictions from the Redlich-Kwong, Peng-Robinson, and extended corresponding-states models.

  13. Hydrogen bonding of formamide, urea, urea monoxide and their thio-analogs with water and homodimers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Damanjit Kaur; Shweta Khanna

    2014-11-01

    Ab initio and DFT methods have been employed to study the hydrogen bonding ability of formamide, urea, urea monoxide, thioformamide, thiourea and thiourea monoxide with one water molecule and the homodimers of the selected molecules. The stabilization energies associated with themonohydrated adducts and homodimers’ formation were evaluated at B3LYP/6-311++G** and MP2/6-311++G∗∗ levels. The energies were corrected for zero-point vibrational energies and basis set superposition error using counterpoise method. Atoms in molecules study has been carried out in order to characterize the hydrogen bonds through the changes in electron density and laplacian of electron density. A natural energy decomposition and natural bond orbital analysis was performed to understand the nature of hydrogen bonding.

  14. Methane and hydrogen production by human intestinal anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, L F; Holbrook, W P; Eastwood, M A

    1982-06-01

    The gas above liquid cultures of a variety of human intestinal anaerobic bacteria was sampled and analysed by headspace gas chromatography. Hydrogen production was greatest with strains of the genus Clostridium, intermediate with anaerobic cocci and least with Bacteroides sp. Very few strains produced methane although small amounts were detected with one strain of B. thetaiotaomicron, C. perfringens and C. histolyticum. There may be a relationship between these anaerobic bacteria and several gastrointestinal disorders in which there is a build up of hydrogen or methane in the intestines.

  15. Two test-cases for synergistic detections in the Martian atmosphere: Carbon monoxide and methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, S.; Camy-Peyret, C.; Daerden, F.; De Mazière, M.; De Wachter, E.; Neary, L.; Vandenbussche, S.; Vandaele, A. C.

    2017-03-01

    In the frame of the scientific preparation of ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter (EMTGO), synergistic retrievals were performed on synthetic spectra of two different remote sensing instruments of the Martian atmosphere. To benefit from their diversity, we have simulated spectra of a Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS), working in the middle to far infrared and of a grating spectrometer (GA) working in the middle infrared. As control runs, non-synergistic retrievals were performed as well. Two molecules of interest in the Martian atmosphere were chosen to test this method: carbon monoxide and methane. Scenarios were selected and two different vibrational bands for each molecule were used to retrieve molecular volume mixing ratios. Synergistic retrievals for CO are useful both in solar occultation and in nadir, while for CH4, the concentration of which is expected to be very low, the results for FTS and GA in synergy are not as conclusive due to the weak signal in the ν4 vibrational band (covered by FTS) compared to the stronger ν3 band (covered by GA). Our results represent a first step to an optimized use of infrared spectra to be recorded in Martian orbit by two instruments of EMTGO.

  16. Chemical Reactions and Kinetics of the Carbon Monoxide Coupling in the Presence of Hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fandong Meng; Genhui Xu; Zhenhua Li; Pa Du

    2002-01-01

    The chemical reactions and kinetics of the catalytic coupling reaction of carbon monoxide to diethyl oxalate were studied in the presence of hydrogen over a supported palladium catalyst in the gaseous phase at the typical coupling reaction conditions. The experiments were performed in a continuous flow fixed-bed reactor. The results indicated that hydrogen only reacts with ethyl nitrite to form ethanol, and kinetic studies revealed that the rate-determining step is the surface reaction of adsorbed hydrogen and the ethoxy radical (EtO-). A kinetic model is proposed and a comparison of the observed and calculated conversions showed that the rate expressions are of rather high confidence.

  17. Bacterial bioaugmentation for improving methane and hydrogen production from microalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The recalcitrant cell walls of microalgae may limit their digestibility for bioenergy production. Considering that cellulose contributes to the cell wall recalcitrance of the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris, this study investigated bioaugmentation with a cellulolytic and hydrogenogenic bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum, at different inoculum ratios as a possible method to improve CH4 and H2 production of microalgae. Results Methane production was found to increase by 17?~?24% with the addition of C. thermocellum, as a result of enhanced cell disruption and excess hydrogen production. Furthermore, addition of C. thermocellum enhanced the bacterial diversity and quantities, leading to higher fermentation efficiency. A two-step process of addition of C. thermocellum first and methanogenic sludge subsequently could recover both hydrogen and methane, with a 9.4% increase in bioenergy yield, when compared with the one-step process of simultaneous addition of C. thermocellum and methanogenic sludge. The fluorescence peaks of excitation-emission matrix spectra associated with chlorophyll can serve as biomarkers for algal cell degradation. Conclusions Bioaugmentation with C. thermocellum improved the degradation of C. vulgaris biomass, producing higher levels of methane and hydrogen. The two-step process, with methanogenic inoculum added after the hydrogen production reached saturation, was found to be an energy-efficiency method for hydrogen and methane production. PMID:23815806

  18. Theoretical study on the gas-phase reaction mechanism between palladium monoxide and methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua-Qing; Hu, Chang-Wei; Gao, Chao; Yang, Meng-Yao; Li, Fang-Ming; Li, Cai-Qin; Li, Xiang-Yuan

    2011-12-01

    The gas-phase reaction mechanism between palladium monoxide and methane has been theoretically investigated on the singlet and triplet state potential energy surfaces (PESs) at the CCSD(T)/AVTZ//B3LYP/6-311+G(2d, 2p), SDD level. The major reaction channel leads to the products PdCH(2) + H(2)O, whereas the minor channel results in the products Pd + CH(3)OH, CH(2)OPd + H(2), and PdOH + CH(3). The minimum energy reaction pathway for the formation of main products (PdCH(2) + H(2)O), involving one spin inversion, prefers to start at the triplet state PES and afterward proceed along the singlet state PES, where both CH(3)PdOH and CH(3)Pd(O)H are the critical intermediates. Furthermore, the rate-determining step is RS-CH(3) PdOH → RS-2-TS1cb → RS-CH(2)Pd(H)OH with the rate constant of k = 1.48 × 10(12) exp(-93,930/RT). For the first C-H bond cleavage, both the activation strain ΔE(≠)(strain) and the stabilizing interaction ΔE(≠)(int) affect the activation energy ΔE(≠), with ΔE(≠)(int) in favor of the direct oxidative insertion. On the other hand, in the PdCH(2) + H(2) O reaction, the main products are Pd + CH(3)OH, and CH(3)PdOH is the energetically preferred intermediate. In the CH(2)OPd + H(2) reaction, the main products are Pd + CH(3)OH with the energetically preferred intermediate H(2)PdOCH(2). In the Pd + CH(3)OH reaction, the main products are CH(2)OPd + H(2), and H(2)PdOCH(2) is the energetically predominant intermediate. The intermediates, PdCH(2), H(2) PdCO, and t-HPdCHO are energetically preferred in the PdC + H(2), PdCO + H(2), and H(2)Pd + CO reactions, respectively. Besides, PdO toward methane activation exhibits higher reaction efficiency than the atom Pd and its first-row congener NiO.

  19. Hydrogen production from methane reforming: thermodynamic assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assis, A.J.; Hori, Carla E.; Avila Neto, Cicero; Franco, Tatiana [Federal University of Uberlandia (UFU), MG (Brazil). School of Chemical Engineering]. E-mail: adilsonjassis@gmail.com

    2008-07-01

    The main contributions of this study are to conduct a comparative thermodynamic analysis of methane reforming reactions and to asses the influence of key operational variables on chemical equilibrium using an in-house code, developed in the open-source software Scilab{sup c} INRIA-ENPC (www.scilab.org). Equilibrium compositions are calculated by two distinct methods: evaluation of equilibrium constants and Lagrange multipliers. Both methods result in systems of non-linear algebraic equations, solved numerically using the Scilab function 'fsolve'. Comparison between experimental and simulated equilibrium data, published in the literature, was used to validate the simulated results. Effects of temperature, pressure, initial H{sub 2}O/CH{sub 4} ratio (steam reforming), initial CH{sub 4}:CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} ratio (dry reforming) and initial O{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} ratio (partial oxidation) on the reaction products were evaluated. (author)

  20. Effects of Hydrogen on the Methane Coupling under Non-equilibrium Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, hydrogen is first utilized in the study on methane coupling under nonequilibrium plasma. Results indicate that the addition of hydrogen is beneficial to the methanecoupling so as to increase the conversion rate of methane and the yield of C2 hydrocarbon with agradual increase in the addition of hydrogen in a certain range of proportionality. This conclusionexplores a new route of hydrogenated methane coupling.PACS: 52.75

  1. Hydrogen production via methane decomposition on Raney-type catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figueiredo, J.L.; Orfao, J.J.M.; Cunha, A.F. [Laboratorio de Catalise e Materiais, Laboratorio Associado LSRE/LCM, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal)

    2010-09-15

    The catalytic decomposition of methane into hydrogen and carbon was studied on La{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped Ni and Ni-Cu Raney-type catalysts. The activity and stability of the catalysts were assessed by comparing the experimental conversions with the calculated equilibrium conversions for each set of experimental conditions, and the maximum conversions with the conversions at the end of (at least) 5 h tests, respectively. Improved stability of La{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped catalysts was ascribed to an electronic promotion effect. There is an optimum load of the promoter, which provides for extended periods of stable catalyst operation. The carbon deposits consist of carbon nanofibers and multiwall carbon nanotubes. The La{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped Ni-Cu Raney-type catalysts presented in this work are remarkably efficient for the production of hydrogen by methane decomposition. (author)

  2. Hydrogen production by catalytic partial oxidation of methane

    OpenAIRE

    Enger, Bjørn Christian

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen production by catalytic partial oxidation of natural gas was investigated using tools ranging from theoretical calculations to experimental work and sophisticated characterization techniques.Catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) was carried out in a conventional continuous flow experimental apparatus using a xed-bed reactor, and operating at 1 atm and furnace temperatures in the range from ambient to 1073 K. The feed typically consisted of a mixture of methane and air, with a CH4/O2 rati...

  3. External influences on Europe's air quality: Baseline methane, carbon monoxide and ozone from 1990 to 2030 at Mace Head, Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derwent, R. G.; Simmonds, P. G.; O'Doherty, S.; Stevenson, D. S.; Collins, W. J.; Sanderson, M. G.; Johnson, C. E.; Dentener, F.; Cofala, J.; Mechler, R.; Amann, M.

    A global 3-D chemistry-transport model STOCHEM has been employed to study trends in the mole fractions of methane, carbon monoxide and ozone in baseline air masses entering Europe from the Atlantic Ocean over the period from 1990 to 2030. With a range of emission scenarios for man-made ozone precursor emission sources available, a wide range of model trends were predicted for the period up to 2030. In the scenario based on current planned air pollution controls, IIASA CLE, methane shows a strong upward trend, ozone shows a weaker upward trend, and carbon monoxide is approximately flat in baseline air masses. In one of the more pessimistic IPCC SRES scenarios, A2, all three gases show future increases. However, in the scenario based on maximum feasible emission reductions, IIASA MFR all three trace gases decline. By 2030, projected climate change reduces the growth in CH 4, but has insignificant effects on baseline CO and O 3 in these simulations. Global or hemispheric ozone precursor emissions and their controls exert a potentially large external influence on Europe's air quality. This influence is currently not taken into account in future European air quality policy formulation.

  4. Methane Pyrolysis for Hydrogen & Carbon Nanotube Recovery from Sabatier Products Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a microgravity and hypogravity compatible catalytic methane pyrolysis reactor is proposed to recover hydrogen which is lost as methane in the...

  5. NOx-Catalyzed Gas-Phase Activation of Methane:the Formation of Hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chaoxian Xiao; Zhen Yan; Yuan Kou

    2003-01-01

    NOx-catalyzed oxidation of methane without a solid catalyst was investigated, and a hydrogen selectivity of 27% was obtained with an overall methane conversion of 34% and a free O2 concentration of 1.7% at 700 ℃.

  6. Methane Pyrolysis for Hydrogen & Carbon Nanotube Recovery from Sabatier Products Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Development of a microgravity and hypogravity compatible catalytic methane pyrolysis reactor is proposed to recover hydrogen which is lost as methane in the...

  7. Hydrogen isotope fractionation in methane plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, François; Derenne, Sylvie; Lombardi, Guillaume; Hassouni, Khaled; Michau, Armelle; Reinhardt, Peter; Duhamel, Rémi; Gonzalez, Adriana; Biron, Kasia

    2017-01-01

    The hydrogen isotope ratio (D/H) is commonly used to reconstruct the chemical processes at the origin of water and organic compounds in the early solar system. On the one hand, the large enrichments in deuterium of the insoluble organic matter (IOM) isolated from the carbonaceous meteorites are interpreted as a heritage of the interstellar medium or resulting from ion‑molecule reactions taking place in the diffuse part of the protosolar nebula. On the other hand, the molecular structure of this IOM suggests that organic radicals have played a central role in a gas-phase organosynthesis. So as to reproduce this type of chemistry between organic radicals, experiments based on a microwave plasma of CH4 have been performed. They yielded a black organic residue in which ion microprobe analyses revealed hydrogen isotopic anomalies at a submicrometric spatial resolution. They likely reflect differences in the D/H ratios between the various CHx radicals whose polymerization is at the origin of the IOM. These isotopic heterogeneities, usually referred to as hot and cold spots, are commensurable with those observed in meteorite IOM. As a consequence, the appearance of organic radicals in the ionized regions of the disk surrounding the Sun during its formation may have triggered the formation of organic compounds.

  8. Hydrogen Oxidation on Gas Diffusion Electrodes for Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells in the Presence of Carbon Monoxide and Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gang, Xiao; Li, Qingfeng; Hjuler, Hans Aage

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen oxidation has been studied on a carbon-supported platinum gas diffusion electrode in a phosphoric acidelectrolyte in the presence of carbon monoxide and oxygen in the feed gas. The poisoning effect of carbon monoxide presentin the feed gas was measured in the temperature range from 80...... to 150°C. It was found that throughout the temperaturerange, the potential loss due to the CO poisoning can be reduced to a great extent by the injection of small amounts ofgaseous oxygen into the hydrogen gas containing carbon monoxide. By adding 5 volume percent (v/o) oxygen, an almost......CO-free performance can be obtained for carbon monoxide concentrations up to 0.5 v/o CO at 130°C, 0.2 v/o CO at 100°C,and 0.1 v/o CO at 80°C, respectively....

  9. Atomic hydrogen and diatomic titanium-monoxide molecular spectroscopy in laser-induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parigger, Christian G.; Woods, Alexander C.

    2017-03-01

    This article gives a brief review of experimental studies of hydrogen Balmer series emission spectra. Ongoing research aims to evaluate early plasma evolution following optical breakdown in laboratory air. Of interest is as well laser ablation of metallic titanium and characterization of plasma evolution. Emission of titanium monoxide is discussed together with modeling of diatomic spectra to infer temperature. The behavior of titanium particles in plasma draws research interests ranging from the modeling of stellar atmospheres to the enhancement of thin film production via pulsed laser deposition.

  10. Measurement of ethylene and methane production in a temperate forest soil using inhibition of acetylene and carbon monoxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU XingKai; INUBUSHI Kazuyuki

    2008-01-01

    We studied in the laboratory the effects of acetylene (C2H2) concentrations on the accumulation and consumption of ethylene and methane in a temperate pine forest soil, and in situ ethylene and methane production and flush effects of nitrogen sources on both productions in the pine forest stand (Pinus sylvestris L.). The addition of C2H2 at concentrations more than 50 Pa C2H2 in the headspace caused a more than 95% reduction in rates of ethylene and methane consumption in forest soil compared to those with no C2H2. Furthermore, addition of acetylene within a range of 50 to 10, 000 Pa C2H2 induced a similar rate of methane accumulation in forest soil. Hence, it can be concluded that presence of more than 50 Pa C2H2 in the headspace is an effective method to measure methane production in forest soil. The addition of C2H2 at concentrations more than 50 Pa C2H2 induced an increasing concentration of ethylene in the headspace (P≤0.05), indicating the reduction of acetylene to ethylene in forest soil. Using inhibition of 0.5 kPa C2H2 in combination with 5 kPa carbon monoxide that inhibits the reduction of acetylene in a short term, it was observed that there was a larger in situ methane production rate (218±26 μg C m-2 h-1 (μg C per square meter per hour, the same below)) than in situethylene produc-tion rate (92 ± 6 μg C m-2 h-1) in the pine forest soil. The addition of nitrogen sources such as urea, urea plus a nitrification inhibitor dicyandiamide, and potassium nitrate, could induce a 5-fold greater in-crease in rates of in situ ethylene and methane production compared to those in the control, particu-larly in the latter (P≤0.05). The results can promote in situ measurement of ethylene and methane production in forest soils at different sites.

  11. GASP: A computer code for calculating the thermodynamic and transport properties for ten fluids: Parahydrogen, helium, neon, methane, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, oxygen, fluorine, argon, and carbon dioxide. [enthalpy, entropy, thermal conductivity, and specific heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Baron, A. K.; Peller, I. C.

    1975-01-01

    A FORTRAN IV subprogram called GASP is discussed which calculates the thermodynamic and transport properties for 10 pure fluids: parahydrogen, helium, neon, methane, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, oxygen, fluorine, argon, and carbon dioxide. The pressure range is generally from 0.1 to 400 atmospheres (to 100 atm for helium and to 1000 atm for hydrogen). The temperature ranges are from the triple point to 300 K for neon; to 500 K for carbon monoxide, oxygen, and fluorine; to 600 K for methane and nitrogen; to 1000 K for argon and carbon dioxide; to 2000 K for hydrogen; and from 6 to 500 K for helium. GASP accepts any two of pressure, temperature and density as input conditions along with pressure, and either entropy or enthalpy. The properties available in any combination as output include temperature, density, pressure, entropy, enthalpy, specific heats, sonic velocity, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and surface tension. The subprogram design is modular so that the user can choose only those subroutines necessary to the calculations.

  12. Marrying gas power and hydrogen energy: A catalytic system for combining methane conversion and hydrogen generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beckers, J.; Gaudillère, C.; Farrusseng, D.; Rothenberg, G.

    2009-01-01

    Ceria-based catalysts are good candidates for integrating methane combustion and hydrogen generation. These new, tuneable catalysts are easily prepared. They are robust inorganic crystalline materials, and perform well at the 400 °C-550 °C range, in some cases even without precious metals. This make

  13. Methane, carbon monoxide, and ammonia in brown dwarfs and self-luminous giant planets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahnle, Kevin J.; Marley, Mark S., E-mail: Kevin.J.Zahnle@NASA.gov, E-mail: Mark.S.Marley@NASA.gov [NASA Ames Research Center, MS-245-3, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2014-12-10

    We address disequilibrium abundances of some simple molecules in the atmospheres of solar composition brown dwarfs and self-luminous extrasolar giant planets using a kinetics-based one-dimensional atmospheric chemistry model. Our approach is to use the full kinetics model to survey the parameter space with effective temperatures between 500 K and 1100 K. In all of these worlds, equilibrium chemistry favors CH{sub 4} over CO in the parts of the atmosphere that can be seen from Earth, but in most disequilibrium favors CO. The small surface gravity of a planet strongly discriminates against CH{sub 4} when compared to an otherwise comparable brown dwarf. If vertical mixing is like Jupiter's, the transition from methane to CO occurs at 500 K in a planet. Sluggish vertical mixing can raise this to 600 K, but clouds or more vigorous vertical mixing could lower this to 400 K. The comparable thresholds in brown dwarfs are 1100 ± 100 K. Ammonia is also sensitive to gravity, but, unlike CH{sub 4}/CO, the NH{sub 3}/N{sub 2} ratio is insensitive to mixing, which makes NH{sub 3} a potential proxy for gravity. HCN may become interesting in high-gravity brown dwarfs with very strong vertical mixing. Detailed analysis of the CO-CH{sub 4} reaction network reveals that the bottleneck to CO hydrogenation goes through methanol, in partial agreement with previous work. Simple, easy to use quenching relations are derived by fitting to the complete chemistry of the full ensemble of models. These relations are valid for determining CO, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, HCN, and CO{sub 2} abundances in the range of self-luminous worlds we have studied, but may not apply if atmospheres are strongly heated at high altitudes by processes not considered here (e.g., wave breaking).

  14. Hydrogen production from methane through catalytic partial oxidation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freni, S.; Calogero, G.; Cavallaro, S.

    This paper reviews recent developments in syn-gas production processes used for partial methane oxidation with and/or without steam. In particular, we examined different process charts (fixed bed, fluidised bed, membrane, etc.), kinds of catalysts (powders, foams, monoliths, etc.) and catalytically active phases (Ni, Pt, Rh, etc.). The explanation of the various suggested technical solutions accounted for the reaction mechanism that may selectively lead to calibrated mixtures of CO and H 2 or to the unwanted formation of products of total oxidation (CO 2 and H 2O) and pyrolysis (coke). Moreover, the new classes of catalysts allow the use of small reactors to treat large amounts of methane (monoliths) or separate hydrogen in situ from the other reaction products (membrane). This leads to higher conversions and selectivity than could have been expected thermodynamically. Although catalysts based on Rh are extremely expensive, they can be used to minimise H 2O formation by maximising H 2 yield.

  15. Characteristics of autoignited laminar lifted flames in heated coflow jets of carbon monoxide/hydrogen mixtures

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Byungchul

    2012-06-01

    The characteristics of autoignited lifted flames in laminar jets of carbon monoxide/hydrogen fuels have been investigated experimentally in heated coflow air. In result, as the jet velocity increased, the blowoff was directly occurred from the nozzle-attached flame without experiencing a stabilized lifted flame, in the non-autoignited regime. In the autoignited regime, the autoignited lifted flame of carbon monoxide diluted by nitrogen was affected by the water vapor content in the compressed air oxidizer, as evidenced by the variation of the ignition delay time estimated by numerical calculation. In particular, in the autoignition regime at low temperatures with added hydrogen, the liftoff height of the autoignited lifted flames decreased and then increased as the jet velocity increased. Based on the mechanism in which the autoignited laminar lifted flame is stabilized by ignition delay time, the liftoff height can be influenced not only by the heat loss, but also by the preferential diffusion between momentum and mass diffusion in fuel jets during the autoignition process. © 2012 The Korean Society of Mechanical Engineers.

  16. Methane formation by oxidation of ascorbic acid using iron minerals and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althoff, Frederik; Jugold, Alke; Keppler, Frank

    2010-06-01

    The possibility of methane formation in an oxidative environment has been intensely debated, especially since the discovery of methane generation by living plants. However, recent studies with animal tissue suggested that under specific conditions aerobic methane formation is also possible. Here, we investigated the generation of methane in an abiotic model system using bioavailable substances. We show formation of methane in a highly oxidative media, using ascorbic acid, ferrihydrite and hydrogen peroxide as reagents. Methane production was shown to be related to reagent ratio, reaction volume and pH. A 2:1 ratio of hydrogen peroxide to ascorbic acid, catalytic amounts of ferrihydrite and acidic conditions (pH 3) enhanced formation of methane. We further show that gaseous oxygen has a strong influence with higher levels found to inhibit methane formation. This study is a first step towards providing an insight for the reaction mechanism of methane formation that would be applicable to aerobic environments.

  17. Separation of hydrogen from a hydrogen/methane mixture using PEM fuel cell technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibeh, B.; Gardner, C.; Ternan, M. [Ottawa Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    This paper presented a newly developed method for transporting hydrogen in natural gas pipelines which involves the use of an electrochemical separation process using proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. It described an experimental procedure in which a single cell 25 cm{sup 2} PEM fuel cell was used and anode polarization curves were determined. Hydrogen partial pressure was reduced as current density was increased to strengthen the anode potential. Hydrogen separation equations were presented in addition to a comparison of calculated and experimental polarization curves. Separation efficiencies were also described. Results of the experiment showed that hydrogen could be separated from the hydrogen-natural gas mixture through the use of PEM technology. It was also observed that methane behaved as an inert gas at low temperatures. Details of costs and capitalized costs for the separation process were also presented. Last, the presentation discussed issues related to electrode fouling by oxidation products and the efficiency of separation processes. tabs., figs.

  18. Final Technical Report "Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide and Olefin Oxidation" Grant number : DE-FG02-86ER13615

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayland, B.B.

    2009-08-31

    Title: Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide and Olefin Oxidation Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER13615 PI: Wayland, B. B. (wayland@sas.upenn.edu) Abstract Development of new mechanistic strategies and catalyst materials for activation of CO, H2, CH4, C2H4, O2, and related substrates relevant to the conversion of carbon monoxide, alkanes, and alkenes to organic oxygenates are central objectives encompassed by this program. Design and synthesis of metal complexes that manifest reactivity patterns associated with potential pathways for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide through metallo-formyl (M-CHO), dimetal ketone (M-C(O)-M), and dimetal dionyl (M-C(O)-C(O)-M) species is one major focus. Hydrocarbon oxidation using molecular oxygen is a central goal for methane activation and functionalization as well as regioselective oxidation of olefins. Discovery of new reactivity patterns and control of selectivity are pursued through designing new metal complexes and adjusting reaction conditions. Variation of reaction media promotes distinct reaction pathways that control both reaction rates and selectivities. Dimetalloradical diporphyrin complexes preorganize transition states for substrate reactions that involve two metal centers and manifest large rate increases over mono-metalloradical reactions of hydrogen, methane, and other small molecule substrates. Another broad goal and recurring theme of this program is to contribute to the thermodynamic database for a wide scope of organo-metal transformations in a range of reaction media. One of the most complete descriptions of equilibrium thermodynamics for organometallic reactions in water and methanol is emerging from the study of rhodium porphyrin substrate reactions in aqueous and alcoholic media. Water soluble group nine metalloporphyrins manifest remarkably versatile substrate reactivity in aqueous and alcoholic media which includes producing rhodium formyl (Rh-CHO) and hydroxy methyl (Rh-CH2OH) species. Exploratory

  19. Carborane-Based Metal-Organic Framework with High Methane and Hydrogen Storage Capacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    NMR , HR -MS, elemental analysis), and crystallographic information files (CIF) for LH4, LEt4, and NU-135; PXRD, adsorption excess isotherms, BET...boron, MOF, metal?organic framework, coordination polymer , porous, hydrogen, methane Vaiva Krungleviciute, Daniel J. Clingerman, Joseph E. Mondloch...framework, coordination polymer , porous, hydrogen, methane ■ INTRODUCTION Nanoporous materials such as metal−organic frameworks (MOFs) with tailorable pore

  20. Ignition properties of methane/hydrogen mixtures in a rapid compression machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gersen, S.; Anikin, N. B.; Mokhov, A. V.; Levinsky, H. B.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate changes in the combustion behavior of methane, the primary component of natural gas, upon hydrogen addition by characterizing the autoignition behavior of methane/hydrogen mixtures in a rapid compression machine (RCM). Ignition delay times were measured under stoichiometric conditions

  1. Hydrogen purification by selective methanation of CO in CO/CO2/H2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Anne Mette; Johannessen, Tue; Livbjerg, Hans

    Normally, the hydrogen-rich feed gas to PEM Fuel Cells has a relatively high concentration of CO, which is poisonous to the anode catalyst. CO can be removed by selective oxidation or by methanation. For methanation, it is desired to minimize the use of hydrogen by selectively removing the CO wit...

  2. Beneficial effects of diminished production of hydrogen sulfide or carbon monoxide on hypertension and renal injury induced by NO withdrawal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesseling, Sebastiaan; Fledderus, Joost O.; Verhaar, Marianne C.; Joles, Jaap A.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Whether NO, carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) compensate for each other when one or more is depleted is unclear. Inhibiting NOS causes hypertension and kidney injury. Both global depletion of H2S by cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) gene deletion

  3. On Estimation of Contamination from Hydrogen Cyanide in Carbon Monoxide Line-intensity Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Dongwoo T.; Li, Tony Y.; Viero, Marco P.; Church, Sarah E.; Wechsler, Risa H.

    2017-09-01

    Line-intensity mapping surveys probe large-scale structure through spatial variations in molecular line emission from a population of unresolved cosmological sources. Future such surveys of carbon monoxide line emission, specifically the CO(1-0) line, face potential contamination from a disjointed population of sources emitting in a hydrogen cyanide emission line, HCN(1-0). This paper explores the potential range of the strength of HCN emission and its effect on the CO auto power spectrum, using simulations with an empirical model of the CO/HCN–halo connection. We find that effects on the observed CO power spectrum depend on modeling assumptions but are very small for our fiducial model, which is based on current understanding of the galaxy–halo connection. Given the fiducial model, we expect the bias in overall CO detection significance due to HCN to be less than 1%.

  4. A Review on Preferential Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide in Hydrogen Rich Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mishra

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this review, recent works on the preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide in hydrogen rich gases for fuel cell applications are summarized. H2 is used as a fuel for polymer-electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC. It is produced by reforming of natural gas or liquid fuels followed by water gas shift reaction. The produced gas consists of H2, CO, and CO2. In which CO content is around 1%, which is highly poisonous for the Pt anode of the PEMFC so that further removal of CO is needed. Catalytic preferential oxidation of CO (CO-PROX is one of the most suitable methods of purification of H2 because of high CO conversion rate at low temperature range, which is preferable for PEMFC operating conditions. Catalysts used for COPROX are mainly noble metal based; gold based and base metal oxide catalysts among them Copper-Ceria based catalysts are the most appropriate due to its low cost, easy availability and result obtained by these catalysts are comparable with the conventional noble metal catalysts. Copyright © 2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 22nd October 2010, Revised: 12nd January 2011, Accepted: 19th January 2011[How to Cite: A. Mishra, R. Prasad. (2011. A Review on Preferential Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide in Hydrogen Rich Gases. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6 (1: 1-14. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.1.191.1-14][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.1.191.1-14 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/191] | View in 

  5. Study on Production of Hydrogen from Methane for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋正昶; 李传统

    2001-01-01

    The hydrogen production from methane for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was studied experimentally. The conversion rate of methane under different steam-carbon ratios, the effect of the different excess air ratios on the constituents of the gas produced, the permeability of hydrogen under different pressure differences, and the effect of different system pressure on the reaction enthalpy of hydrogen were obtained. The results lay the basis for the production of hydrogen applicable to PEMFC, moreover, provide a new way for the comprehensive utilization of the coal bed methane.

  6. Effect of the ruthenium loading and barium addition on the activity of ruthenium/carbon catalysts in carbon monoxide methanation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truszkiewicz Elżbieta

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A group of supported ruthenium catalysts was prepared and tested in methanation of small CO amounts (7000 ppm in hydrogen-rich streams. High surface area graphitized carbon (484 m2/g was used as a support for ruthenium and RuCl3 was used as a Ru precursor. Some of the Ru/C systems were additionally doped with barium (Ba(NO32 was barium precursor. The catalysts were characterized by the chemisorption technique using CO as an adsorbate. To determine the resistance of the catalysts to undesired carbon support methanation, the TG-MS experiments were performed. They revealed that the barium addition inhibits support losses. The studies of CO methanation (fl ow reactor, atmospheric pressure have shown that some of the supported ruthenium catalysts exhibit high activities referred to the metal mass. The catalytic properties of ruthenium proved to be dependent on metal dispersion. Some of the Ru/C and Ba-Ru/C systems exhibit higher activity in CO hydrogenation than the commercial nickel-based catalyst.

  7. Hydrogen production from methane using oxygen-permeable ceramic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Sedigheh

    Non-porous ceramic membranes with mixed ionic and electronic conductivity have received significant interest in membrane reactor systems for the conversion of methane and higher hydrocarbons to higher value products like hydrogen. However, hydrogen generation by this method has not yet been commercialized and suffers from low membrane stability, low membrane oxygen flux, high membrane fabrication costs, and high reaction temperature requirements. In this dissertation, hydrogen production from methane on two different types of ceramic membranes (dense SFC and BSCF) has been investigated. The focus of this research was on the effects of different parameters to improve hydrogen production in a membrane reactor. These parameters included operating temperature, type of catalyst, membrane material, membrane thickness, membrane preparation pH, and feed ratio. The role of the membrane in the conversion of methane and the interaction with a Pt/CeZrO2 catalyst has been studied. Pulse studies of reactants and products over physical mixtures of crushed membrane material and catalyst have clearly demonstrated that a synergy exists between the membrane and the catalyst under reaction conditions. The degree of catalyst/membrane interaction strongly impacts the conversion of methane and the catalyst performance. During thermogravimetric analysis, the onset temperature of oxygen release for BSCF was observed to be lower than that for SFC while the amount of oxygen release was significantly greater. Pulse injections of CO2 over crushed membranes at 800°C have shown more CO2 dissociation on the BSCF membrane than the SFC membrane, resulting in higher CO formation on the BSCF membrane. Similar to the CO2 pulses, when CO was injected on the samples at 800°C, CO2 production was higher on BSCF than SFC. It was found that hydrogen consumption on BSCF particles is 24 times higher than that on SFC particles. Furthermore, Raman spectroscopy and temperature programmed desorption studies of

  8. Methane cracking over commercial carbons for hydrogen production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sarada Prasad, Vivek Dhand, V. Himabindu Y. Anjaneyulu

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A bench scale unit has been designed and developed indigenously for producing hydrogen from methane in the presence of a catalyst. Five number carbon samples (two carbon blacks and three activated carbons of different origin procured from Indian market have been investigated in the bench scale unit with stainless steel continuous fixed bed reactor at a constant temperature of 850 0C and space velocity (VHSV of 1.62 Lit/hr.g. Among all the five samples, activated carbon produced from coconut shells with BET surface area of 1185 m2/g showed promising activity with a sustainability factor (R1/R0 of 0.33 and initial activity (R0 of 0.623 mmol/min.g of catalyst. Accumulated carbon yield (over a period of four hours of the above catalyst is 564 mg/g of catalyst.

  9. Steam Methane Reforming System for Hydrogen Production: Advanced Exergetic Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Morosuk

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Steam methane reforming (SMR is one of the most promising processes for the production of hydrogen. Therefore, the overall thermodynamic efficiency of this process is of particular importance. The thermodynamic inefficiencies in a thermal system are related to exergy destruction and exergy loss. However, a conventional exergetic analysis cannot evaluate the mutual interdependencies among the system components nor the real potential for improving the energy conversion system being considered. One of the tools under development for the improvement of energy conversion systems from the thermodynamic viewpoint is the advanced exergetic analysis. In this paper, the avoidable part of the exergy destruction is estimated and the interactions among components of the overall system are evaluated in terms of endogenous and exogenous exergy destruction. The assumptions required for these calculations are discussed in detail, especially for those components that are typically used in chemical processes. Results of this paper suggest options for increasing the thermodynamic efficiency of hydrogen production by steam-methane reforming.

  10. Oral administration of lactulose: a novel therapy for acute carbon monoxide poisoning via increasing intestinal hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Dan-Feng; Hu, Hui-Jun; Sun, Xue-Jun; Meng, Xiang-En; Zhang, Yu; Pan, Shu-Yi

    2016-01-01

    It has been known that the pathophysiology of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is related to hypoxia, the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and oxidative stress. Studies have shown that the novel, safe and effective free radical scavenger, hydrogen, has neuroprotective effects in both acute CO poisoning and delayed neuropsychological sequelae in CO poisoning. Orally administered lactulose, which may be used by some intestinal bacteria as a food source to produce endogenous hydrogen, can ameliorate oxidative stress. Based on the available findings, we hypothesize that oral administration of lactulose may be a novel therapy for acute CO poisoning via increasing intestinal hydrogen production.

  11. CRYOCHEM calculation: Minor components influence solid solutions in nitrogen-methane atmospheres - ethane on Titan and carbon monoxide on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, S. P.; Kargel, J. S.; Adidharma, H.; Marion, G. M.

    2016-12-01

    In the extremely cold conditions on Triton, Pluto and other Kuiper Belt Objects, and Titan's tropopause and lower stratosphere, the atmospheres as a whole, not components individually, are subject to freeze into solid phases as solutions, notpure ices. This is in contrast to water ice in Earth's atmosphere, where the atmosphere stays in gaseous phase when water freezes into a solid phase of presumably pure water due to the much higher temperatures involved. A molecular-based thermodynamic model for cryogenic chemical systems, referred to as CRYOCHEM, has been developed to include the phase equilibria involving multi-component solid solutions. Calculations using CRYOCHEM, therefore, can provide us with compositions of solid solutions that are in equilibrium with the gaseous atmosphere. There is no longer a need to assume pure solids conventionally used in modeling, or even as binary (two-component) mixtures, which commonly consider only nitrogen and methane. Two examples will be discussed: (1) on Titan where ethane plays a significant role in precipitation of high-altitude solid aerosols; and (2) on Pluto where carbon monoxide may also play some important role in the sublimation/condensation cycle at the surface and shallow subsurface, e.g., zone of solid-state greenhouse heating. The presence of these third components essentially affects the solid-gas phase equilibria of nitrogen-methane binary system at their respective conditions on Titan and Pluto, the information of which is useful for future modeling, including those on other bodies in the outer Solar System and comets that share similar volatiles.

  12. Hydrogen and methane production from household solid waste in the two-stage fermentation process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lui, D.; Liu, D.; Zeng, Raymond Jianxiong

    2006-01-01

    A two-stage process combined hydrogen and methane production from household solid waste was demonstrated working successfully. The yield of 43 mL H-2/g volatile solid (VS) added was generated in the first hydrogen production stage and the methane production in the second stage was 500 mL CH4/g VS....... Furthermore, this study also provided direct evidence in the dynamic fermentation process that, hydrogen production increase was reflected by acetate to butyrate ratio increase in liquid phase. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.......A two-stage process combined hydrogen and methane production from household solid waste was demonstrated working successfully. The yield of 43 mL H-2/g volatile solid (VS) added was generated in the first hydrogen production stage and the methane production in the second stage was 500 mL CH4/g VS...... added. This figure was 21% higher than the methane yield from the one-stage process, which was run as control. Sparging of the hydrogen reactor with methane gas resulted in doubling of the hydrogen production. PH was observed as a key factor affecting fermentation pathway in hydrogen production stage...

  13. Production of hydrogen and methane from wastewater sludge using anaerobic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, C H; Lin, K R; Lee, D J; Tay, J H

    2004-01-01

    The hydrogen and methane were produced from wastewater sludge using a Clostridium strain. The original sludge and the pre-treated (acidified, sterilized, freeze/thawed, and sonicated) sludges were tested. Some pre-treatment could enhance hydrogen yield, and the other tests could enhance methane yield. Hydrogen yield followed freeze/thawed>acidified>sterilized>original sludge>sonicated; while methane yield followed sonicated>freeze/thawed>sterilized>acidified>original sludge. The production and consumption of acetate correlated closely with the trends in both yields.

  14. GASP - THERMODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF HELIUM, METHANE, NEON, NITROGEN, CARBON MONOXIDE, CARBON DIOXIDE, OXYGEN, AND ARGON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program, GASP, has been written to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, fluorine, methane, neon, nitrogen, and oxygen. GASP accepts any two of pressure, temperature, or density as input. In addition, entropy and enthalpy are possible inputs. Outputs are temperature, density, pressure, entropy, enthalpy, specific heats, expansion coefficient, sonic velocity, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and surface tension. A special technique is provided to estimate the thermal conductivity near the thermodynamic critical point. GASP is a group of FORTRAN subroutines. The user typically would write a main program that invoked GASP to provide only the described outputs. Subroutines are structured so that the user may call only those subroutines needed for his particular calculations. Allowable pressures range from 0.l atmosphere to 100 to l,000 atmospheres, depending on the fluid. Similarly, allowable pressures range from the triple point of each substance to 300 degrees K to 2000 degrees K, depending on the substance. The GASP package was developed to be used with heat transfer and fluid flow applications. It is particularly useful in applications of cryogenic fluids. Some problems associated with the liquefication, storage, and gasification of liquefied natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas can also be studied using GASP. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and is available for implementation on IBM 7000 series computers. GASP was developed in 1971.

  15. GASP - THERMODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF HELIUM, METHANE, NEON, NITROGEN, CARBON MONOXIDE, CARBON DIOXIDE, OXYGEN, AND ARGON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program, GASP, has been written to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of argon, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, fluorine, methane, neon, nitrogen, and oxygen. GASP accepts any two of pressure, temperature, or density as input. In addition, entropy and enthalpy are possible inputs. Outputs are temperature, density, pressure, entropy, enthalpy, specific heats, expansion coefficient, sonic velocity, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and surface tension. A special technique is provided to estimate the thermal conductivity near the thermodynamic critical point. GASP is a group of FORTRAN subroutines. The user typically would write a main program that invoked GASP to provide only the described outputs. Subroutines are structured so that the user may call only those subroutines needed for his particular calculations. Allowable pressures range from 0.l atmosphere to 100 to l,000 atmospheres, depending on the fluid. Similarly, allowable pressures range from the triple point of each substance to 300 degrees K to 2000 degrees K, depending on the substance. The GASP package was developed to be used with heat transfer and fluid flow applications. It is particularly useful in applications of cryogenic fluids. Some problems associated with the liquefication, storage, and gasification of liquefied natural gas and liquefied petroleum gas can also be studied using GASP. This program is written in FORTRAN IV for batch execution and is available for implementation on IBM 7000 series computers. GASP was developed in 1971.

  16. Effect of carbon monoxide, hydrogen and sulfate on thermophilic (55 degrees C) hydrogenogenic carbon monoxide conversion in two anaerobic bioreactor sludges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipma, J; Meulepas, R J W; Parshina, S N; Stams, A J M; Lettinga, G; Lens, P N L

    2004-04-01

    The conversion routes of carbon monoxide (CO) at 55 degrees C by full-scale grown anaerobic sludges treating paper mill and distillery wastewater were elucidated. Inhibition experiments with 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES) and vancomycin showed that CO conversion was performed by a hydrogenogenic population and that its products, i.e. hydrogen and CO2, were subsequently used by methanogens, homo-acetogens or sulfate reducers depending on the sludge source and inhibitors supplied. Direct methanogenic CO conversion occurred only at low CO concentrations [partial pressure of CO (PCO) paper mill sludge. The presence of hydrogen decreased the CO conversion rates, but did not prevent the depletion of CO to undetectable levels (sludges showed interesting potential for hydrogen production from CO, especially since after 30 min exposure to 95 degrees C, the production of CH4 at 55 degrees C was negligible. The paper mill sludge was capable of sulfate reduction with hydrogen, tolerating and using high CO concentrations (PCO>1.6 bar), indicating that CO-rich synthesis gas can be used efficiently as an electron donor for biological sulfate reduction.

  17. Molten metal reactor and method of forming hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide using the molten alkaline metal reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2012-11-13

    A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

  18. Use of carbon monoxide and hydrogen by a bacteria-animal symbiosis from seagrass sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiner, Manuel; Wentrup, Cecilia; Holler, Thomas; Lavik, Gaute; Harder, Jens; Lott, Christian; Littmann, Sten; Kuypers, Marcel M M; Dubilier, Nicole

    2015-12-01

    The gutless marine worm Olavius algarvensis lives in symbiosis with chemosynthetic bacteria that provide nutrition by fixing carbon dioxide (CO2 ) into biomass using reduced sulfur compounds as energy sources. A recent metaproteomic analysis of the O. algarvensis symbiosis indicated that carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H2 ) might also be used as energy sources. We provide direct evidence that the O. algarvensis symbiosis consumes CO and H2 . Single cell imaging using nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry revealed that one of the symbionts, the γ3-symbiont, uses the energy from CO oxidation to fix CO2 . Pore water analysis revealed considerable in-situ concentrations of CO and H2 in the O. algarvensis environment, Mediterranean seagrass sediments. Pore water H2 concentrations (89-2147 nM) were up to two orders of magnitude higher than in seawater, and up to 36-fold higher than previously known from shallow-water marine sediments. Pore water CO concentrations (17-51 nM) were twice as high as in the overlying seawater (no literature data from other shallow-water sediments are available for comparison). Ex-situ incubation experiments showed that dead seagrass rhizomes produced large amounts of CO. CO production from decaying plant material could thus be a significant energy source for microbial primary production in seagrass sediments.

  19. Tropospheric carbon monoxide and hydrogen measurements over Kalimantan in Indonesia and northern Australia during October, 1997

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawa, Yousuke; Matsueda, Hidekazu; Tsutsumi, Yukitomo; Jensen, Jørgen B.; Inoue, Hisayuki Y.; Makino, Yukio

    During the PACE-5 campaign over Australia and Indonesia in October 1997, we used an aircraft to measure carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H2). Latitudinal distributions of CO and H2 clearly showed a large increase from northern Australia to Kalimantan in Indonesia. Elevated CO levels over northern Australia were observed only in the smoke plumes of savanna fires. A thick smoke haze from forest fires over Kalimantan contained very high CO mixing ratios of 3 to 9 ppm. These enhanced CO mixing ratios correlated well with increased concentrations of H2, nitrogen oxides (NOx), and aerosols. Emission ratios from biomass burning in Kalimantan ranged 0.06 0.1 for H2/CO (ppb/ppb), 0.0002 to 0.0005 for NOx/CO (ppb/ppb), and 0.43 to 1.0 for number of aerosols/CO (cm-3/ppb). These values were much lower than emission ratios in northern Australia. This difference suggests that the biomass burning in Indonesia was intense and that, due to a strong El Niño event, an unique composition of trace gases was formed in the smoke haze.

  20. STUDY OF MnOx-PROMOTED Cu/γ-Al203 CATALYSTS FOR HYDROGENATION OF CARBON MONOXIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qi Gongxin; Fei Jinhua; Hou Zhaoyin; Zheng Xiaoming

    2001-01-01

    γ-Alumina-supported copper-manganese oxide was prepared by impregnation and used for carbon monoxide hydrogenation. The Cu-MnOx/γ-Al2O3 catalysts exhibit high catalytic activity in CO hydrogenation, showing markedly enhanced catalytic activities due to the synergistic interaction between the copper and manganese oxide. The results of XRD indicated that the addition of manganese enhances the dispersion of CuO, retards the reduction of CuO and enhances the ability of H2-adsorption, which contribute to the activity of DME synthesis from syngas.

  1. Methane, Carbon Monoxide, and Ammonia in Brown Dwarfs and Self-Luminous Giant Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Zahnle, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    We address disequilibrum abundances of some simple molecules in the atmospheres of solar composition brown dwarfs and self-luminous extrasolar giant planets using a kinetics-based 1D atmospheric chemistry model. We employ cloudless atmospheres of approximately solar metallicity. Our approach is to use the complete model to survey the parameter space with effective temperatures between 500 K and 1100 K. In all of these worlds equilibrium chemistry favors CH4 over CO in the parts of the atmosphere that can be seen from Earth. Small surface gravity of planets strongly discriminates against CH4 when compared to an otherwise comparable brown dwarf. If vertical mixing is comparable to Jupiter's, methane becomes more abundant than CO in Jupiter-mass planets cooler than 500 K. Sluggish vertical mixing can raise this threshold to 600 K; but clouds or more vigorous vertical mixing could lower this threshold to 400 K. The comparable threshold in brown dwarfs is 1100 K. Ammonia is also sensitive to gravity, but unlike CH...

  2. Hydrogen production by catalytic partial oxidation of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enger, Bjoern Christian

    2008-12-15

    Hydrogen production by catalytic partial oxidation of natural gas was investigated using tools ranging from theoretical calculations to experimental work and sophisticated characterization techniques. Catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) was carried out in a conventional continuous flow experimental apparatus using a fixed-bed reactor, and operating at 1 atm and furnace temperatures in the range from ambient to 1073 K. The feed typically consisted of a mixture of methane and air, with a CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2} ratio of 2, and the average bed residence time was in the range 10-250 ms. Steam methane reforming (SMR) was carried out in the same apparatus at similar temperatures and pressure in a feed consisting of methane, nitrogen and water, with a steam to carbon ratio of 2.0-4.0. Temperature programmed (TP) techniques, including oxidation (TPO), reduction (TPR), reaction (TPCPO) and methane dissociation (TPMD) was used to characterize catalytic properties such as ignition temperatures, the catalyst reducibility and activation energies. Dispersions from catalyst surface area measurements were compared to X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques and electron microscopy (SEM, TEM,STEM) to obtain information on catalyst particle sizes and dispersion. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) provided information on the specific catalyst surface composition, which was compared to results on the bulk structure obtained by XRD. The effect of modifying cobalt catalysts supported on alumina was investigated by adding small amounts of Ni, Fe, Cr, Re, Mn, W, Mo, V and Ta oxides. The idea behind this work was to investigate whether the cobalt crystals were decorated, covered or encircled by a modifier and to what extent this affected catalyst performance. The choice of modifiers in this study was based on the principle that in any chemical process it may be just as important to identify groups of elements that have negative effects as identifying the best promoters. It was found that the

  3. Hydrogen-methane separation processes and related phenomena. [112 references

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saunders, J.T.; Wang, S.S.; Yang, R.T.

    1981-01-01

    A thorough and up-dated literature survey has been conducted on processes for separating hydrogen and methane. This was done in conjunction with our work of developing a more energy-efficient and lower-cost process based on cyclic, fixed-bed processes using coal chars as the sorbents. Although the review has covered all hydrocarbon separation processes, the focuses were on physical adsorption phenomena and theories (for both single and mixed gases), surface and pore characteristics of coals and heat-treated coals, and the continuous or semi-continuous chromatographic separation methods. There has been a sharply increasing interest in the past 10 to 15 years in developing processes for hydrocarbon separation based on adsorption/desorption; this is particularly true since the energy costs became increasingly higher recently. The rigorous work on competitive adsorption and on the cyclic (including parametric pumping) processes has all been done in the past 13 years. On the other hand, it is disappointing to find the absence of knowledge on adsorption on coal chars and the lack of it on adsorption on raw coals as well.

  4. Heat transfer comparison between methane and hydrogen in a spark ignited engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierens, Roger; Demuynck, Joachim; Paepe, Michel de; Verhelst, Sebastian [Ghent Univ. (Belgium)

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen is one of the alternative fuels which are being investigated at Ghent University. NO{sub x} emissions will occur at high engine loads and they are a constraint for power and efficiency optimization. The formation of NO{sub x} emissions is temperature dependent. Consequently, the heat transfer from the burning gases to the cylinder walls has to be accurately modelled if precise computer calculations of the emissions are wanted. Several engine heat transfer models exist but they have been cited to be inaccurate for hydrogen. We have measured the heat flux in a spark ignited engine with a commercially available heat flux sensor. This paper investigates the difference between the heat transfer of hydrogen and a fossil fuel, in this case methane. Measurements with the same indicated power output are compared and the effect of the heat loss on the indicated efficiency is investigated. The power output of hydrogen combustion is lowered by burning lean in contrast to using a throttle in the case of methane. Although the peak in the heat flux of hydrogen is 3 times higher compared to methane for a high engine power output, the indicated efficiency is only 3% lower. The heat loss for hydrogen at a low engine load is smaller than that of methane which results in a higher indicated efficiency. The richness of the hydrogen-air mixture has a great influence on the heat transfer process in contrast to the in-cylinder mass in the case of methane. (orig.)

  5. Spatial and temporal variability of urban fluxes of methane, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide above London, UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfter, Carole; Tremper, Anja H.; Halios, Christoforos H.; Kotthaus, Simone; Bjorkegren, Alex; Grimmond, C. Sue B.; Barlow, Janet F.; Nemitz, Eiko

    2016-08-01

    We report on more than 3 years of measurements of fluxes of methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) taken by eddy-covariance in central London, UK. Mean annual emissions of CO2 in the period 2012-2014 (39.1 ± 2.4 ktons km-2 yr-1) and CO (89 ± 16 tons km-2 yr-1) were consistent (within 1 and 5 % respectively) with values from the London Atmospheric Emissions Inventory, but measured CH4 emissions (72 ± 3 tons km-2 yr-1) were over two-fold larger than the inventory value. Seasonal variability was large for CO with a winter to summer reduction of 69 %, and monthly fluxes were strongly anti-correlated with mean air temperature. The winter increment in CO emissions was attributed mainly to vehicle cold starts and reduced fuel combustion efficiency. CO2 fluxes were 33 % higher in winter than in summer and anti-correlated with mean air temperature, albeit to a lesser extent than for CO. This was attributed to an increased demand for natural gas for heating during the winter. CH4 fluxes exhibited moderate seasonality (21 % larger in winter), and a spatially variable linear anti-correlation with air temperature. Differences in resident population within the flux footprint explained up to 90 % of the spatial variability of the annual CO2 fluxes and up to 99 % for CH4. Furthermore, we suggest that biogenic sources of CH4, such as wastewater, which is unaccounted for by the atmospheric emissions inventories, make a substantial contribution to the overall budget and that commuting dynamics in and out of central business districts could explain some of the spatial and temporal variability of CO2 and CH4 emissions. To our knowledge, this study is unique given the length of the data sets presented, especially for CO and CH4 fluxes. This study offers an independent assessment of "bottom-up" emissions inventories and demonstrates that the urban sources of CO and CO2 are well characterized in London. This is however not the case for CH4 emissions which are

  6. Determination of carbon monoxide with a modified zeolite sorbent and methanization-gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juntarawijit, C; Poovey, H G; Rando, R J

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an alternative sorbent sampling technique to concentrate CO from an air sample for subsequent instrumental analysis. Y52 zeolite doped with 9.4 wt % cuprous ions was found to have high capacity, stability to air, and thermal reversibility for CO. The Cu(I)-modified zeolite was packed in glass tubes, preceded by a drying tube containing silica gel. Air was sampled through the tubes at the flow rate of 100 mL/min. Collected CO was thermally desorbed at 300 degrees C and determined by gas chromatography with reduction of CO to methane and flame ionization detection (TD-GC-CH4-FID). Breakthrough capacity of the sorbent was found to be 2.74 mg CO per gram of sorbent. For 2-L air samples containing 12.5 to 100 ppm CO and 50% relative humidity at room temperature, recovery of CO was found to be 96.6% with pooled relative standard deviation of 5.8%. The estimated detection limit for a 2-L sample was 0.2 ppm. Collected CO was stable at room temperature for 1 day and up to 7 days at 4 degrees C if the sorbent tube was flushed with helium before storage. In field testing, the ratio of CO measured by the new technique and by a reference technique was found to be 0.93 with pooled relative standard deviation of 6.3%. This unique new sorbent coupled with TD-GC-CH4-FID shows promise as a sensitive and specific alternative for measurement of CO in air.

  7. Temperature responses of carbon monoxide and hydrogen uptake by vegetated and unvegetated volcanic cinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Caitlin E; King, Gary M

    2012-08-01

    Ecosystem succession on a large deposit of volcanic cinders emplaced on Kilauea Volcano in 1959 has resulted in a mosaic of closed-canopy forested patches and contiguous unvegetated patches. Unvegetated and unshaded surface cinders (Bare) experience substantial diurnal temperature oscillations ranging from moderate (16 °C) to extreme (55 °C) conditions. The surface material of adjacent vegetated patches (Canopy) experiences much smaller fluctuations (14-25 °C) due to shading. To determine whether surface material from these sites showed adaptations by carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H(2)) consumption to changes in ambient temperature regimes accompanying succession, we measured responses of CO and H(2) uptake to short-term variations in temperature and long-term incubations at elevated temperature. Based on its broader temperature optimum and lower activation energy, Canopy H(2) uptake was less sensitive than Bare H(2) uptake to temperature changes. In contrast, Bare and Canopy CO uptake responded similarly to temperature during short-term incubations, indicating no differences in temperature sensitivity. However, during extended incubations at 55 °C, CO uptake increased for Canopy but not Bare material, which indicated that the former was capable of thermal adaptation. H(2) uptake for material from both sites was completely inhibited at 55 °C throughout extended incubations. These results indicated that plant development during succession did not elicit differences in short-term temperature responses for Bare and Canopy CO uptake, in spite of previously reported differences in CO oxidizer community composition, and differences in average daily and extreme temperatures. Differences associated with vegetation due to succession did, however, lead to a notable capacity for thermophilic CO uptake by Canopy but not Bare material.

  8. Temperature responses of carbon monoxide and hydrogen uptake by vegetated and unvegetated volcanic cinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Caitlin E; King, Gary M

    2012-01-01

    Ecosystem succession on a large deposit of volcanic cinders emplaced on Kilauea Volcano in 1959 has resulted in a mosaic of closed-canopy forested patches and contiguous unvegetated patches. Unvegetated and unshaded surface cinders (Bare) experience substantial diurnal temperature oscillations ranging from moderate (16 °C) to extreme (55 °C) conditions. The surface material of adjacent vegetated patches (Canopy) experiences much smaller fluctuations (14–25 °C) due to shading. To determine whether surface material from these sites showed adaptations by carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H2) consumption to changes in ambient temperature regimes accompanying succession, we measured responses of CO and H2 uptake to short-term variations in temperature and long-term incubations at elevated temperature. Based on its broader temperature optimum and lower activation energy, Canopy H2 uptake was less sensitive than Bare H2 uptake to temperature changes. In contrast, Bare and Canopy CO uptake responded similarly to temperature during short-term incubations, indicating no differences in temperature sensitivity. However, during extended incubations at 55 °C, CO uptake increased for Canopy but not Bare material, which indicated that the former was capable of thermal adaptation. H2 uptake for material from both sites was completely inhibited at 55 °C throughout extended incubations. These results indicated that plant development during succession did not elicit differences in short-term temperature responses for Bare and Canopy CO uptake, in spite of previously reported differences in CO oxidizer community composition, and differences in average daily and extreme temperatures. Differences associated with vegetation due to succession did, however, lead to a notable capacity for thermophilic CO uptake by Canopy but not Bare material. PMID:22258097

  9. Experimental evaluation of methane dry reforming process on a membrane reactor to hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Fabiano S.A.; Benachour, Mohand; Abreu, Cesar A.M. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. of Chemical Engineering], Email: f.aruda@yahoo.com.br

    2010-07-01

    In a fixed bed membrane reactor evaluations of methane-carbon dioxide reforming over a Ni/{gamma}- Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst were performed at 773 K, 823 K and 873 K. A to convert natural gas into syngas a fixed-bed reactor associate with a selective membrane was employed, where the operating procedures allowed to shift the chemical equilibrium of the reaction in the direction of the products of the process. Operations under hydrogen permeation, at 873 K, promoted the increase of methane conversion, circa 83%, and doubled the yield of hydrogen production, when compared with operations where no hydrogen permeation occurred. (author)

  10. Autoignited laminar lifted flames of methane/hydrogen mixtures in heated coflow air

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Byungchul

    2012-04-01

    Autoignited lifted flame behavior in laminar jets of methane/hydrogen mixture fuels has been investigated experimentally in heated coflow air. Three regimes of autoignited lifted flames were identified depending on initial temperature and hydrogen to methane ratio. At relatively high initial temperature, addition of a small amount of hydrogen to methane improved ignition appreciably such that the liftoff height decreased significantly. In this hydrogen-assisted autoignition regime, the liftoff height increased with jet velocity, and the characteristic flow time - defined as the ratio of liftoff height to jet velocity - correlated well with the square of the adiabatic ignition delay time. At lower temperature, the autoignited lifted flame demonstrated a unique feature in that the liftoff height decreased with increasing jet velocity. Such behavior has never been observed in lifted laminar and turbulent jet flames. A transition regime existed between these two regimes at intermediate temperature. © 2011 The Combustion Institute.

  11. Deep Conversion of Carbon Monoxide to Hydrogen and Formation of Acetate by the Anaerobic Thermophile Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M. Henstra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans is a thermophilic strictly anaerobic bacterium that catalyses the water gas shift reaction, the conversion of carbon monoxide with water to molecular hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The thermodynamically favorable growth temperature, compared to existing industrial catalytic processes, makes this organism an interesting alternative for production of cheap hydrogen gas suitable to fuel CO-sensitive fuel cells in a future hydrogen economy, provided sufficiently low levels of CO are reached. Here we study CO conversion and final CO levels in cultures of C. hydrogenoformans grown in batch cultures that were started with a 100% CO gas phase with and without removal of formed CO2. Final CO levels were 117 ppm without CO2 removal and below 2 ppm with CO2 removal. The Gibbs free energy change calculated with measured end concentrations and the detection of acetate suggest that C. hydrogenoformans shifted from a hydrogenogenic to an acetogenic metabolism.

  12. Hydrogen and methane production from household solid waste in the two-stage fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dawei; Liu, Dapeng; Zeng, Raymond J; Angelidaki, Irini

    2006-06-01

    A two-stage process combined hydrogen and methane production from household solid waste was demonstrated working successfully. The yield of 43 mL H(2)/g volatile solid (VS) added was generated in the first hydrogen production stage and the methane production in the second stage was 500 mL CH(4)/g VS added. This figure was 21% higher than the methane yield from the one-stage process, which was run as control. Sparging of the hydrogen reactor with methane gas resulted in doubling of the hydrogen production. pH was observed as a key factor affecting fermentation pathway in hydrogen production stage. The optimum pH range for hydrogen production in this system was in the range from 5 to 5.5. The short hydraulic retention time (2 days) applied in the first stage was enough to separate acidogenesis from methanogenesis. No additional control for preventing methanogenesis in the first stage was necessary. Furthermore, this study also provided direct evidence in the dynamic fermentation process that, hydrogen production increase was reflected by acetate to butyrate ratio increase in liquid phase.

  13. Viscosity Measurement of Hydrogen-Methane Mixed Gas for Future Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yohei; Kurokawa, Akira; Hirata, Masaru

    In order to reduce the CO2 emission, in May 2004, the European Union (EU) started an experimental approach known as the “naturalhy Project” in order to transport hydrogen by mixing it with the existing high-pressure natural gas in the pipelines. Naturalhy represents a mixture of hydrogen and natural gas. In other words, this gas is also known as hythane, which is an abbreviation of hydrogen and methane. The name “hythane” is the registered trademark of Hydrogen Consulting Inc., USA. Why will this gas gain importance? It is generally considered that the sudden realization of a hydrogen energy society cannot take place. It is normally assumed that the present status of methane as an energy carrier gradually changes to a state of hydrogen-methane mixed gas and finally to 100% hydrogen. This is why the authors investigate the properties of this mixture. This study is considered to be the first to measure the temperature dependence of the viscosity of hydrogen-methane mixed gas. In order to measure the viscosity, the authors used a capillary method that measures the pressure drop in the laminar flow through a pipe. It was conducted in an electrically polished, ultra clean and smooth tube and the pressure drop between the upstream and downstream was carefully measured using a capacitance manometer. In order to remove the effect of temperature dependence, the tube was placed in a constant temperature bath, and the temperature fluctuation was maintained within ±0.3°C throughout this experimental study. The authors obtained the viscosity of the hydrogen-methane mixed gas within a temperature range of 20-70°C.

  14. Oxidation of methane and hydrogen on Ce1-xGdxO2-δ flourrites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammer Hansen, K.; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2005-01-01

    The oxidation of methane and hydrogen was studied on cone shaped electrodes with the composition Ce1-xGdxO2-delta (x equals 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.4). It was shown that the area specific resistance values measured at open-circuit voltage (OCV) for the oxidation of both methane and hydrogen is lowest...... for the composition Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95. The OCV in wet methane was shown to depend on the material composition. It was shown that stable operation in wet methane could be achieved as long as the temperature was kept below 750degreesC. (C) 2004 The Electrochemical Society....

  15. A survey of carbon monoxide and non-methane hydrocarbons in the Arctic Ocean during summer 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tran

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available During the ARK XXV 1 + 2 expedition in the Arctic Ocean carried out in June–July 2010 aboard the R/V Polarstern, we measured carbon monoxide (CO, non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC and phytoplankton pigments at the sea surface and down to a depth of 100 m. The CO and NMHC sea-surface concentrations were highly variable; CO, propene and isoprene levels ranged from 0.6 to 17.5 nmol L−1, 1 to 322 pmol L−1 and 1 to 541 pmol L−1, respectively. The CO and alkene concentrations as well as their sea–air fluxes were enhanced in polar waters off of Greenland, which were more stratified because of ice melting and richer in chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM than typical North Atlantic waters. The spatial distribution of the surface concentrations of CO was consistent with our current understanding of CO-induced UV photoproduction in the sea. The vertical distributions of the CO and alkenes were comparable and followed the trend of light penetration, with the concentrations displaying a relatively regular exponential decrease down to non-measurable values below 50 m. However, no diurnal variations of CO or alkene concentrations were observed in the stratified and irradiated surface layers. On several occasions, we observed the existence of subsurface CO maxima at the level of the deep chlorophyll maximum. This finding suggests the existence of a non-photochemical CO production pathway, most likely of phytoplanktonic origin. The corresponding production rates normalized to the chlorophyll content were in the range of those estimated from laboratory experiments. In general, the vertical distributions of isoprene followed that of the phytoplankton biomass. These data support the existence of a dominant photochemical source of CO and light alkenes enhanced in polar waters of the Arctic Ocean, with a minor contribution of a biological source of CO. The biological source of isoprene is observed in the different water masses but significantly

  16. Methane Coupling Using Hydrogen Plasma and Pt/γ-Al2O3 Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, methane coupling at ambient temperature, under atmospheric pressure and in the presence of hydrogen was firstly investigated by using pulse corona plasma and Pt/γ-Al2O3 catalyst. Experimental results showed that Pt/γ-Al2O3 catalyst has catalytic activity for methane coupling to C2H4. Over sixty percent of outcomes of C2 hydrocarbons were detected to be ethylene.

  17. High-frequency urban measurements of molecular hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the United Kingdom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Grant

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available High-frequency measurements of atmospheric molecular hydrogen (H2 and carbon monoxide (CO were made at an urban site in the United Kingdom (UK from mid-December, 2008 until early March, 2009. Very few measurements of H2 exist in the urban environment, particularly within the UK, but are an essential component in the assessment of anthropogenic emissions of H2 and to a certain extent CO. These data provide detailed information on urban time-series, diurnal cycles as well as sources and sinks of both H2 and CO at urban locations. High-frequency data were found to be strongly influenced by local meteorological conditions of wind speed and temperature. Diurnal cycles were found to follow transport frequency very closely due to the sites proximity to major carriageways, consequently a strong correlation was found between H2 and CO mole fractions. Background subtracted mean and rush hour molar H2/CO emission ratios of 0.53±0.08 and 0.57±0.06 respectively, were calculated from linear fitting of data. The scatter plot of all H2 and CO data displayed an unusual two population pattern, thought to be associated with a large industrial area 85 km to the west of the site. However, the definitive source of this two branch pattern could not be fully elucidated. H2 emissions from transport in the UK were estimated to be 188±39 Gg H2/yr, with 8.1±2.3 Tg/yr of H2 produced from vehicle emissions globally. H2 and CO deposition velocities were calculated during stable night-time inversion events when a clear decay of both species was observed. CO was found to have a much higher deposition velocity than H2, 1.3±0.8×10−3 and 2.2±1.5×10−4 m s−1 (1σ respectively, going against the law of molecular diffusivity. The source of this unusual result was investigated, however no conclusive

  18. Vasoactivity of the gasotransmitters hydrogen sulfide and carbon monoxide in the chicken ductus arteriosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sterren, Saskia; Kleikers, Pamela; Zimmermann, Luc J I; Villamor, Eduardo

    2011-10-01

    Besides nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) is a third gaseous messenger that may play a role in controlling vascular tone and has been proposed to serve as an O(2) sensor. However, whether H(2)S is vasoactive in the ductus arteriosus (DA) has not yet been studied. We investigated, using wire myography, the mechanical responses induced by Na(2)S (1 μM-1 mM), which forms H(2)S and HS(-) in solution, and by authentic CO (0.1 μM-0.1 mM) in DA rings from 19-day chicken embryos. Na(2)S elicited a 100% relaxation (pD(2) 4.02) of 21% O(2)-contracted and a 50.3% relaxation of 62.5 mM KCl-contracted DA rings. Na(2)S-induced relaxation was not affected by presence of the NO synthase inhibitor l-NAME, the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC) inhibitor ODQ, or the K(+) channel inhibitors tetraethylammonium (TEA; nonselective), 4-aminopyridine (4-AP, K(V)), glibenclamide (K(ATP)), iberiotoxin (BK(Ca)), TRAM-34 (IK(Ca)), and apamin (SK(Ca)). CO also relaxed O(2)-contracted (60.8% relaxation) and KCl-contracted (18.6% relaxation) DA rings. CO-induced relaxation was impaired by ODQ, TEA, and 4-AP (but not by L-NAME, glibenclamide, iberiotoxin, TRAM-34 or apamin), suggesting the involvement of sGC and K(V) channel stimulation. The presence of inhibitors of H(2)S or CO synthesis as well as the H(2)S precursor L-cysteine or the CO precursor hemin did not significantly affect the response of the DA to changes in O(2) tension. Endothelium-dependent and -independent relaxations were also unaffected. In conclusion, our results indicate that the gasotransmitters H(2)S and CO are vasoactive in the chicken DA but they do not suggest an important role for endogenous H(2)S or CO in the control of chicken ductal reactivity.

  19. Hydrogen and methane production from desugared molasses using a two‐stage thermophilic anaerobic process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongjan, Prawit; O-Thong, Sompong; Angelidaki, Irini

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen and methane production from desugared molasses by a two‐stage thermophilic anaerobic process was investigated in a series of two up‐flow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors. The first reactor that was dominated with hydrogen‐producing bacteria of Thermoanaerobacterium...... thermosaccharolyticum and Thermoanaerobacterium aciditolerans could generate a high hydrogen production rate of 5600 mL H2/day/L, corresponding to a yield of 132 mL H2/g volatile solid (VS). The effluent from the hydrogen reactor was further converted to methane in the second reactor with the optimal production rate...... of 3380 mL CH4/day/L, corresponding to a yield of 239 mL CH4/g VS. Aceticlastic Methanosarcina mazei was the dominant methanogen in the methanogenesis stage. This work demonstrates that biohydrogen production can be very efficiently coupled with a subsequent step of methane production using desugared...

  20. Development of a combined bio-hydrogen- and methane-production unit using dark fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunstermann, R.; Widmann, R. [Duisburg-Essen Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Urban Water and Waste Management

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen is regarded as a source of energy of the future. Currently, hydrogen is produced, predominantly, by electrolysis of water by using electricity or by stream reforming of natural gas. So both methods are based on fossil fuels. If the used electricity is recovered from renewable recourses, hydrogen produced by water electrolysis may be a clean solution. At present, the production of hydrogen by biological processes finds more and more attention world far. The biology provides a wide range of approaches to produce hydrogen, including bio-photolysis as well as photo-fermentation and dark-fermentation. Currently these biological technologies are not suitable for solving every day energy problems [1]. But the dark-fermentation is a promising approach to produce hydrogen in a sustainable way and was already examined in some projects. At mesophilic conditions this process provides a high yield of hydrogen by less energy demand, [2]. Short hydraulic retention times (HRT) and high metabolic rates are advantages of the process. The incomplete transformation of the organic components into various organic acids is a disadvantage. Thus a second process step is required. Therefore the well known biogas-technique is used to degrade the organic acids predominantly acetic and butyric acid from the hydrogen-production unit into CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2}. This paper deals with the development of a combined hydrogen and methane production unit using dark fermentation at mesophilic conditions. The continuous operation of the combined hydrogen and methane production out of DOC loaded sewages and carbohydrate rich biowaste is necessary for the examination of the technical and economical implementation. The hydrogen step shows as first results hydrogen concentration in the biogas between 40 % and 60 %.The operating efficiency of the combined production of hydrogen and methane shall be checked as a complete system. (orig.)

  1. Thermophilic anaerobic fermentation of olive pulp for hydrogen and methane production: modelling of the anaerobic digestion process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavala, Hariklia N.; Skiadas, Ioannis V.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær;

    2006-01-01

    The present study investigates the thermophilic biohydrogen and methane production from olive pulp, which is the semi-solid. residue coming from the two-phase processing of olives. It focussed on: a) production of methane from the raw olive pulp; b) anaerobic bio-production of hydrogen from...... were performed. The hydrogen potential of the olive pulp amounted to 1.6 mmole H-2 per g TS. The methane potential of the raw olive pulp and hydrogen-effluent was as high as 19 mmole CH4 per g TS suggesting that: a) olive pulp is a suitable substrate for methane production; and b) biohydrogen...

  2. Hydrogenation of Carbon Dioxide to Methane by Ruthenium Nanoparticles in Ionic Liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Catarina I; Szczepańska, Anna; Bogel-Łukasik, Ewa; Nunes da Ponte, Manuel; Branco, Luís C

    2016-05-23

    The efficient transformation of carbon dioxide into fuels can be an excellent alternative to sequestration. In this work, we describe CO2 hydrogenation to methane in imidazolium-based ionic liquid media, using ruthenium nanoparticles prepared in situ as catalyst. The best yield of methane (69 %) was achieved using 0.24 mol % ruthenium catalyst (in [omim][NTf2 ], 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium bistrifluoromethanesulfonylimide, at 40 bar of hydrogen pressure plus 40 bar of CO2 pressure, and at 150 °C.

  3. Numerical analysis of hydrogen and methane propagation during testing of combustion engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dvořák V.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The research of gas-fuelled combustion engines using hydrogen or methane require accordingly equipped test benches which take respect to the higher dangerous of self ignition accidents. This article deals with numerical calculations of flow in laboratory during simulated leakage of gas-fuel from fuel system of tested engine. The influences of local suction and influences of roof exhausters on the flow in the laboratory and on the gas propagation are discussed. Results obtained for hydrogen and for methane are compared. Conclusions for design and performance of suction devices and test benches are deduced from these results.

  4. Gas Sensing Properties and Mechanism of Nano-SnO2-Based Sensor for Hydrogen and Carbon Monoxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weigen Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nano-SnO2 powder was prepared by the hydrothermal method in this paper. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were used to characterize the composition of the crystalline phase and the morphology of the prepared gas-sensitive materials, respectively. In particular, the study focused on the sensing behaviors of nano-SnO2-based sensor towards power transformer fault gases such as hydrogen and carbon monoxide. The optimum working temperature for hydrogen and carbon monoxide is about 400∘C and 360∘C, separately. Further investigations into the adsorption process of gas molecule on SnO2 (110 surface based on the first principles were conducted. The calculations indicated that 1σ orbits of H2 split into several new electronic peaks and 5σ orbits of CO almost degenerated completely in the adsorption process, which promoted charge transfer between gas molecule and SnO2 (110 surface. It provides a qualitative explanation for the prepared nano-SnO2-based sensor exhibiting different gas sensing properties towards H2 and CO.

  5. Optimization of a Pd-based membrane reactor for hydrogen production from methane steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assis, A.J.; Hori, C.E.; Silva, L.C.; Murata, V.V. [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU), MG (Brazil). School of Chemical Engineering]. E-mail: adilsonjassis@gmail.com

    2008-07-01

    In this work, it is proposed a phenomenological model in steady state to describe the performance of a membrane reactor for hydrogen production through methane steam reform as well as it is performed an optimization of operating conditions. The model is composed by a set of ordinary differential equations from mass, energy and momentum balances and constitutive relations. They were used two different intrinsic kinetic expressions from literature. The results predicted by the model were validated using experimental data. They were investigated the effect of five important process parameters, inlet reactor pressure (PR0), methane feed flow rate (FCH40), sweep gas flow rate (FI), external reactor temperature (TW) and steam to methane feed flow ratio (M), both on methane conversion (XCH{sub 4} ) and hydrogen recovery (YH{sub 2}). The best operating conditions were obtained through simple parametric optimization and by a method based on gradient, which uses the computer code DIRCOL in FORTRAN. It is shown that high methane conversion (96%) as well as hydrogen recovery (91%) can be obtained, using the optimized conditions. (author)

  6. On methane generation and decarburization in low-alloy Cr-Mo steels during hydrogen attack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schloegl, S.M.; Leeuwen, Y. van; Giessen, E. van der

    2000-01-01

    Low-carbon, low-alloy Cr-Mo steels may fail by hydrogen attach when they are exposed to high hydrogen pressures at elevated temperature. During this process, the dissolved hydrogen reacts with the carbides of the steel to form methane in grain boundary cavities. The methane pressure inside these cavities depends on the microstructure of the used steel, which consists of a ferritic matrix and alloy carbides such as M{sub 7}C{sub 3}, M{sub 23}C{sub 6}, M{sub 6}C, and M{sub 2}C. The different phases in the multicomponent system Fe-Cr-Mo-V-C are modeled with the sublattice model. Their Gibbs energies are then used to calculate the equilibrium methane pressure as a function of the microstructure. Driven by the methane pressure, the cavities grow due to grain boundary diffusion and dislocation creep, which is described by analytical relations. This leads to progressive development of damage inside the materials but, at the same time, to a decrease of the carbon content in the steel. This reduction depends on, among other factors, the methane pressure and the damage state. As the carbon content also affects the creep parameters, this process of decarburization may accelerate the cavity growth. Model calculations are used to obtain insight into the influence of this decarburization process on damage evolution and the final lifetime.

  7. Hydrogen and methane production from condensed molasses fermentation soluble by a two-stage anaerobic process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chiu-Yue; Liang, You-Chyuan; Lay, Chyi-How [Feng Chia Univ., Taichung, Taiwan (China). Dept. of Environmental Engineering and Science; Chen, Chin-Chao [Chungchou Institute of Technology, Taiwan (China). Environmental Resources Lab.; Chang, Feng-Yuan [Feng Chia Univ., Taichung, Taiwan (China). Research Center for Energy and Resources

    2010-07-01

    The treatment of condensed molasses fermentation soluble (CMS) is a troublesome problem for glutamate manufacturing factory. However, CMS contains high carbohydrate and nutrient contents and is an attractive and commercially potential feedstock for bioenergy production. The aim of this paper is to produce hydrogen and methane by two-stage anaerobic fermentation process. The fermentative hydrogen production from CMS was conducted in a continuously-stirred tank bioreactor (working volume 4 L) which was operated at a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 8 h, organic loading rate (OLR) of 120 kg COD/m{sup 3}-d, temperature of 35 C, pH 5.5 and sewage sludge as seed. The anaerobic methane production was conducted in an up-flow bioreactor (working volume 11 L) which was operated at a HRT of 24 -60 hrs, OLR of 4.0-10 kg COD/m{sup 3}-d, temperature of 35 C, pH 7.0 with using anaerobic granule sludge from fructose manufacturing factory as the seed and the effluent from hydrogen production process as the substrate. These two reactors have been operated successfully for more than 400 days. The steady-state hydrogen content, hydrogen production rate and hydrogen production yield in the hydrogen fermentation system were 37%, 169 mmol-H{sub 2}/L-d and 93 mmol-H{sub 2}/g carbohydrate{sub removed}, respectively. In the methane fermentation system, the peak methane content and methane production rate were 66.5 and 86.8 mmol-CH{sub 4}/L-d with methane production yield of 189.3 mmol-CH{sub 4}/g COD{sub removed} at an OLR 10 kg/m{sup 3}-d. The energy production rate was used to elucidate the energy efficiency for this two-stage process. The total energy production rate of 133.3 kJ/L/d was obtained with 5.5 kJ/L/d from hydrogen fermentation and 127.8 kJ/L/d from methane fermentation. (orig.)

  8. Comparison of alternate fuels for aircraft. [liquid hydrogen, liquid methane, and synthetic aviation kerosene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witcofski, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen, liquid methane, and synthetic aviation kerosene were assessed as alternate fuels for aircraft in terms of cost, capital requirements, and energy resource utilization. Fuel transmission and airport storage and distribution facilities are considered. Environmental emissions and safety aspects of fuel selection are discussed and detailed descriptions of various fuel production and liquefaction processes are given. Technological deficiencies are identified.

  9. Effects of probiotics on the faecal production of hydrogen and methane in patients with meteorism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, Julie Bernstorf; Jespersen, Lene; Westermann, Peter

    Meteorism is a dominating problem in the western world, especially in women. The condition is very difficult to quantify, and effective and documented therapies are not avaiable. We wanted to develop a method for measuring anaerobic production of hydrogen and methane in faeces, and to correlate t...

  10. Research on the Influence of Hydrogen and Carbon Monoxide on Methane HCCI Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Susumu; Yamasaki, Yudai; Kawamura, Hideo; Iida, Norimasa

    In this research, the influence on natural gas combustion of H2 and CO was investigated by numerical calculations with elementary reactions. The investigation was carried out using the following procedures: 1. To research basic oxidation characteristics of CH4/H2/CO mixed fuel, parametric calculations for initial temperature were carried out. 2. For investigation of the effect of H2 and CO on CH4 combustion, the calculations with H2 and CO initial mole fraction variation was carried out. As a result, it was clarified that the oxidation temperature of CO was higher than that of CH4 and H2, the increase of H2 initial fraction has the effect to advance CH4 ignition timing, and increase of the CO fraction, under the condition that only CO was added, has the opposite effect of H2 addition.

  11. Improving accuracy and precision of ice core δD(CH4 analyses using methane pre-pyrolysis and hydrogen post-pyrolysis trapping and subsequent chromatographic separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bock

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Firn and polar ice cores offer the only direct palaeoatmospheric archive. Analyses of past greenhouse gas concentrations and their isotopic compositions in air bubbles in the ice can help to constrain changes in global biogeochemical cycles in the past. For the analysis of the hydrogen isotopic composition of methane (δD(CH4 or δ2H(CH4 0.5 to 1.5 kg of ice was hitherto used. Here we present a method to improve precision and reduce the sample amount for δD(CH4 measurements in (ice core air. Pre-concentrated methane is focused in front of a high temperature oven (pre-pyrolysis trapping, and molecular hydrogen formed by pyrolysis is trapped afterwards (post-pyrolysis trapping, both on a carbon-PLOT capillary at −196 °C. Argon, oxygen, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, unpyrolysed methane and krypton are trapped together with H2 and must be separated using a second short, cooled chromatographic column to ensure accurate results. Pre- and post-pyrolysis trapping largely removes the isotopic fractionation induced during chromatographic separation and results in a narrow peak in the mass spectrometer. Air standards can be measured with a precision better than 1‰. For polar ice samples from glacial periods, we estimate a precision of 2.3‰ for 350 g of ice (or roughly 30 mL – at standard temperature and pressure (STP – of air with 350 ppb of methane. This corresponds to recent tropospheric air samples (about 1900 ppb CH4 of about 6 mL (STP or about 500 pmol of pure CH4.

  12. Effect of biochar addition on hydrogen and methane production in two-phase anaerobic digestion of aqueous carbohydrates food waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunyoto, Nimas M S; Zhu, Mingming; Zhang, Zhezi; Zhang, Dongke

    2016-11-01

    Effect of biochar addition on hydrogen and methane production in two-phase anaerobic digestion of aqueous carbohydrates was studied using bench-scale bioreactors. The cultures with biochar additions were placed in 100ml reactors and incubated at 35°C and pH 5 for hydrogen production. The residual cultures were then used for methane production, incubated at 35°C and pH 7. Daily yields of hydrogen and methane and weekly yield of volatile fatty acids (VFA) were measured. The hydrogen and methane production potentials, rate and lag phases of the two phases were analysed using the Gompertz model. The results showed that biochar addition increased the maximum production rates of hydrogen by 32.5% and methane 41.6%, improved hydrogen yield by 31.0% and methane 10.0%, and shortened the lag phases in the two phases by 36.0% and 41.0%, respectively. Biochar addition also enhanced VFA generation during hydrogen production and VFA degradation in methane production.

  13. Rapid Hydrogen and Methane Sensors for Wireless Leak Detection Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Under NASA STTR NNK07EA39C, ASR&D developed passive surface acoustic wave (SAW) based hydrogen sensors that utilize Pd nanocluster films on self-assembled...

  14. Enhanced coproduction of hydrogen and methane from cornstalks by a three-stage anaerobic fermentation process integrated with alkaline hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xi-Yu; Liu, Chun-Zhao

    2012-01-01

    A three-stage anaerobic fermentation process including H(2) fermentation I, H(2) fermentation II, methane fermentation was developed for the coproduction of hydrogen and methane from cornstalks. Hydrogen production from cornstalks using direct microbial conversion by Clostridium thermocellum 7072 was markedly enhanced in the two-stage thermophilic hydrogen fermentation process integrated with alkaline treatment. The highest total hydrogen yield from cornstalks in the two-stage fermentation process reached 74.4 mL/g-cornstalk. The hydrogen fermentation effluents and alkaline hydrolyzate were further used for methane fermentation by anaerobic granular sludge, and the total methane yield reached 205.8 mL/g-cornstalk. The total energy recovery in the three-stage anaerobic fermentation process integrated with alkaline hydrolysis reached 70.0%.

  15. Operation of a two-stage fermentation process producing hydrogen and methane from organic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Yoshiyuki; Fukui, Hisatomo; Goto, Masafumi

    2007-02-15

    A pilot-scale experimental plant for the production of hydrogen and methane by a two-stage fermentation process was constructed and operated using a mixture of pulverized garbage and shredded paper wastes. Thermophilic hydrogen fermentation was established at 60 degrees C in the first bioreactor by inoculating with seed microflora. Following the hydrogenogenic process, methanogenesis in the second bioreactor was conducted at 55 degrees C using an internal recirculation packed-bed reactor (IRPR). After conducting steady-state operations under a few selected conditions, the overall hydraulic retention time was optimized at 8 d (hydrogenogenesis, 1.2 d; methanogenesis, 6.8 d), producing 5.4 m3/m3/d of hydrogen and 6.1 m3/m3/d of methane with chemical oxygen demand and volatile suspended solid removal efficiencies of 79.3% and 87.8%, respectively. Maximum hydrogen production yield was calculated to be 2.4 mol/mol hexose and 56 L/kg COD loaded. The methanogenic performance of the IRPR was stable, although the organic loading rate and the composition of the effluent from the hydrogenogenic process fluctuated substantially. A clone library analysis of the microflora in the hydrogenogenic reactor indicated that hydrogen-producing Thermoanaerobacterium-related organisms in the inoculum were active in the hydrogen fermentation of garbage and paper wastes, although no aseptic operations were applied. We speculate that the operation at high temperature and the inoculation of thermophiles enabled the selective growth of the introduced microorganisms and gave hydrogen fermentation efficiencies comparable to laboratory experiments. This is the first report on fermentative production of hydrogen and methane from organic waste at an actual level.

  16. Hydrogen and methane production from swine wastewater using microbial electrolysis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Rachel C; Regan, John M; Oh, Sang-Eun; Zuo, Yi; Logan, Bruce E

    2009-03-01

    The production of a useful and valuable product during swine wastewater treatment, such as hydrogen gas, could help to lower treatment costs. Hydrogen can theoretically be produced from wastewater by electrohydrogenesis in a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) or by fermentation. Using a single-chamber MEC with a graphite-fiber brush anode, hydrogen gas was generated at 0.9-1.0 m(3) m(-3) day(-1) H2 using a full-strength or diluted swine wastewater. COD removals ranged from 8 to 29% in 20-h tests, and from 69 to 75% in longer tests (184 h) using full-strength wastewater. The gas produced was up to 77+/-11% hydrogen, with overall recoveries of up to 28+/-6% of the COD in the wastewater as hydrogen gas. Methane was also produced at a maximum of 13+/-4% of total gas volume. The efficiency of hydrogen production, based on the electrical energy needed (but excluding the energy in the wastewater) compared to the energy of the hydrogen gas produced, was as high as 190+/-39% in 42-h batch tests with undiluted wastewater, but was lower in longer batch tests of 184 h (91+/-6%). Hydrogen gas could not be recovered in fermentation tests using wastewater with a heat-treated inoculum. Hydrogen production was shown to be possible by fermentation when the wastewater was sterilized, but this process would not be practical or energy efficient. We therefore conclude from these tests that MECs are an effective method for hydrogen recovery from swine wastewater treatment, although the process needs to be further evaluated for reducing methane production, increasing the efficiency of converting the organic matter into current, and increasing recovery of hydrogen gas produced at the cathode.

  17. Hydrogen production by catalytic processing of renewable methane-rich gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradov, Nazim; Smith, Franklyn; T-Raissi, Ali [Florida Solar Energy Center, University of Central Florida, Cocoa, FL 32922-5703 (United States)

    2008-04-15

    Biomass-derived methane-rich gases such as landfill gas (LFG), biogas and digester gas are promising renewable resources for near-future production of hydrogen. The technical and economical feasibility of hydrogen production via catalytic reforming of LFG and other methane-rich gases is evaluated in this paper. The thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and experimental measurements of reformation of methane-rich CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixtures over Ni-based catalyst were conducted. The problems associated with the catalyst deactivation due to carbon lay down and effects of steam and oxygen on the process sustainability were explored. Two technological approaches distinguished by the mode of heat input to the endothermic process (i.e., external vs autothermal) were modeled using AspenPlus trademark chemical process simulator and validated experimentally. A 5 kW{sub th} pilot unit for hydrogen production from LFG-mimicking CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixture was fabricated and operated. A preliminary techno-economic assessment indicates that the liquid hydrogen production costs are in the range of 3.00-7.00 per kilogram depending upon the plant capacity, the process heat input option and whether or not carbon sequestration is included in the process. (author)

  18. DIRECT DECOMPOSITION OF METHANE TO HYDROGEN ON METAL LOADED ZEOLITE CATALYST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar; Kyle C. Burch; Harry W. Rollins

    2005-08-01

    The manufacture of hydrogen from natural gas is essential for the production of ultra clean transportation fuels. Not only is hydrogen necessary to upgrade low quality crude oils to high-quality, low sulfur ultra clean transportation fuels, hydrogen could eventually replace gasoline and diesel as the ultra clean transportation fuel of the future. Currently, refinery hydrogen is produced through the steam reforming of natural gas. Although efficient, the process is responsible for a significant portion of refinery CO2 emissions. This project is examining the direct catalytic decomposition of methane as an alternative to steam reforming. The energy required to produce one mole of hydrogen is slightly lower and the process does not require water-gas-shift or pressure-swing adsorption units. The decomposition process does not produce CO2 emissions and the product is not contaminated with CO -- a poison for PEM fuel cells. In this work we examined the direct catalytic decomposition of methane over a metal modified zeolite catalyst and the recovery of catalyst activity by calcination. A favorable production of hydrogen was obtained, when compared with previously reported nickel-zeolite supported catalysts. Reaction temperature had a strong influence on catalyst activity and on the type of carbon deposits. The catalyst utilized at 873 and 973 K could be regenerated without any significant loss of activity, however the catalyst utilized at 1073 K showed some loss of activity after regeneration.

  19. Optimizing a steam-methane reformer for hydrogen production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, M.; Reinders, Angelina H.M.E.; Kok, Jacobus B.W.; Westendorp, G.

    2009-01-01

    By means of steam reforming, natural gas is converted to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. The reactions take place in reactor tubes which are covered with catalyst at the inside, where the reactive mixture flows. At the outside they are heated by combustion of natural gas with air. In this paper the

  20. Heterogeneous Catalysis: Deuterium Exchange Reactions of Hydrogen and Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirich, Anne; Miller, Trisha Hoette; Klotz, Elsbeth; Mattson, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Two gas phase deuterium/hydrogen exchange reactions are described utilizing a simple inexpensive glass catalyst tube containing 0.5% Pd on alumina through which gas mixtures can be passed and products collected for analysis. The first of these exchange reactions involves H[subscript 2] + D[subscript 2], which proceeds at temperatures as low as 77…

  1. The Effect of Catalyst Support on the Decomposition of Methane to Hydrogen and Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharif Hussein Sharif Zein Abdul Rahman Mohamed

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Decomposition of methane into carbon and hydrogen over Cu/Ni supported catalysts was investigated. The catalytic activities and the lifetimes of the catalysts were studied. Cu/Ni supported on TiO2 showed high activity and long lifetime for the reaction. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM studies revealed the relationship between the catalyst activity and the formation of the filamentous carbon over the catalyst after methane decomposition. While different types of filamentous carbon formed on the various Cu/Ni supported catalysts, an attractive carbon nanotubes was observed in the Cu/Ni supported on TiO2. Key Words:  Methane decomposition, carbon nanotube, Cu/Ni supported catalysts.

  2. Synthesis of hydrogen gas by thermal decomposition of methane gas with carbon sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, A R [Escuela de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Manrique, C M [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales, GPUSB, Universidad Simon BolIvar, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Castell, R; Ruiz, J [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Simon BolIvar, Caracas (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2008-10-15

    Hydrogen gas synthesis by the thermal decomposition of methane gas in a non-transferred arc thermal plasma reactor is studied. A thermodynamic study was carried out obtaining free energy minimization plots for the C-H-N and C-H-N-Si systems by using the CSIRO thermo package. Nitrogen gas was used as an ionizing gas and metallic silicon fine powder was injected to promote the in fly silicon carbide nucleation. The effect of current intensity on the thermal decomposition of methane was studied. The degree of methane gas decomposition was in the range 84-97%. The fine solid product collected was characterized using the XRD and MEB-EDAX methods. Elemental carbon particles as well as silicon carbide particles in the nanometric range were identified by the last technique.

  3. Raman spectroscopic and mass spectrometric investigations of the hydrogen isotopes and isotopically labelled methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jewett, J.R., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-24

    Suitable analytical methods must be tested and developed for monitoring the individual process steps within the fuel cycle of a fusion reactor and for tritium accountability. The utility of laser-Raman spectroscopy accompanied by mass spectrometry with an Omegatron was investigated using the analysis of all hydrogen isotopes and isotopically labeled methanes as an example. The Omegatron is useful for analyzing all hydrogen isotopes mixed with the stable helium isotopes. The application of this mass spectrometer were demonstrated by analyzing mixtures of deuterated methanes. In addition, it was employed to study the radiochemical Witzbach exchange reaction between tritium and methanes. A laser-Raman spectrometer was designed for analysis of tritium-containing gases and was built from individual components. A tritium-compatible, metal-sealed Raman cuvette having windows with good optical properties and additional means for measuring the stray light was first used successfully in this work. The Raman spectra of the hydrogen isotopes were acquired in the pure rotation mode and in the rotation-vibration mode and were used for on. The deuterated methanes were measured by Raman spectroscopy, the wavenumbers determined were assigned to the corresponding vibrations, and the wavenumbers for the rotational fine-structure were summarized in tables. The fundamental Vibrations of the deuterated methanes produced Witzbach reactions were detected and assigned. The fundamental vibrations of the molecules were obtained with Raman spectroscopy for the first time in this work. The @-Raman spectrometer assembled is well suited for the analysis of tritium- containing gases and is practical in combination with mass spectrometry using an Omegatron, for studying gases used in fusion.

  4. Application of microscopy technology in thermo-catalytic methane decomposition to hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Irene Lock Sow, E-mail: irene.sowmei@gmail.com; Lock, S. S. M., E-mail: serenelock168@gmail.com; Abdullah, Bawadi, E-mail: bawadi-abdullah@petronas.com.my [Chemical Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Sri Iskandar, 31750, Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    Hydrogen production from the direct thermo-catalytic decomposition of methane is a promising alternative for clean fuel production because it produces pure hydrogen without any CO{sub x} emissions. However, thermal decomposition of methane can hardly be of any practical and empirical interest in the industry unless highly efficient and effective catalysts, in terms of both specific activity and operational lifetime have been developed. In this work, bimetallic Ni-Pd on gamma alumina support have been developed for methane cracking process by using co-precipitation and incipient wetness impregnation method. The calcined catalysts were characterized to determine their morphologies and physico-chemical properties by using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Thermogravimetric Analysis. The results suggested that that the catalyst which is prepared by the co-precipitation method exhibits homogeneous morphology, higher surface area, have uniform nickel and palladium dispersion and higher thermal stability as compared to the catalyst which is prepared by wet impregnation method. This characteristics are significant to avoid deactivation of the catalysts due to sintering and carbon deposition during methane cracking process.

  5. Carbothermal Reduction of Quartz in Methane-Hydrogen-Argon Gas Mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Zhang, Guangqing; Tang, Kai; Ostrovski, Oleg; Tronstad, Ragnar

    2015-10-01

    Synthesis of silicon carbide (SiC) by carbothermal reduction of quartz in a CH4-H2-Ar gas mixture was investigated in a laboratory fixed-bed reactor in the temperature range of 1573 K to 1823 K (1300 °C to 1550 °C). The reduction process was monitored by an infrared gas analyser, and the reduction products were characterized by LECO, XRD, and SEM. A mixture of quartz-graphite powders with C/SiO2 molar ratio of 2 was pressed into pellets and used for reduction experiments. The reduction was completed within 2 hours under the conditions of temperature at or above 1773 K (1500 °C), methane content of 0.5 to 2 vol pct, and hydrogen content ≥70 vol pct. Methane partially substituted carbon as a reductant in the SiC synthesis and enhanced the reduction kinetics significantly. An increase in the methane content above 2 vol pct caused excessive carbon deposition which had a detrimental effect on the reaction rate. Hydrogen content in the gas mixture above 70 vol pct effectively suppressed the cracking of methane.

  6. Life cycle assessment of hydrogen production by methane decomposition using carbonaceous catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufour, J.; Moreno, J. [Department of Chemical and Environmental Technology, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Galvez, J.L.; Martinez, G. [National Institute of Aerospace Technology (INTA), Renewable Energies Area Crtra, Ajalvir Km 4, 28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Serrano, D.P. [Department of Chemical and Environmental Technology, ESCET, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos, c/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); IMDEA Energia, c/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-02-15

    Methane decomposition to yield hydrogen and carbon (CH{sub 4} <-> 2H{sub 2} + C) is one of the cleanest alternatives, free of CO{sub 2} emissions, for producing hydrogen from fossil fuels. This reaction can be catalyzed by metals, although they suffer a fast deactivation process, or by carbonaceous materials, which present the advantage of producing the catalyst from the carbon obtained in the reaction. In this work, the environmental performance of methane decomposition catalyzed by carbonaceous catalysts has been evaluated through Life Cycle Assessment tools, comparing it to other decomposition processes and steam methane reforming coupled to carbon capture systems. The results obtained showed that the decomposition using the autogenerated carbonaceous as catalyst is the best option when reaction conversions higher than 65% are attained. These were confirmed by 2015 and 2030 forecastings. Moreover, its environmental performance is highly increased when the produced carbon is used in other commercial applications. Thus, for a methane conversion of 70%, the application of 50% of the produced carbon would lead to a virtually zero-emissions process. (author)

  7. Effect of carbon monoxide, hydrogen and sulfate on thermophilic (55°C) hydrogenogenic carbon monoxide conversion in two anaerobic bioreactor sludges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipma, J.; Meulepas, R.J.W.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lettinga, G.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2004-01-01

    The conversion routes of carbon monoxide (CO) at 55°C by full-scale grown anaerobic sludges treating paper mill and distillery wastewater were elucidated. Inhibition experiments with 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES) and vancomycin showed that CO conversion was performed by a hydrogenogenic population an

  8. Biological production of methane from coal synthesis gas under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, C.W.; Vega, J.L.; Barik, S.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1987-01-01

    Carbon monoxide, hydrogen and carbon dioxide, the major components of coal synthesis gas, may be converted to methane by the action of anaerobic bacteria. Both pure and mixed cultures have been developed to carry out the water-gas shift and methanation reactions. Reaction rates are severely limited by mass-transfer of these gaseous substrates. Research studies show that increased pressure results in a proportionate increase in reaction rate. This paper examines the effects of high pressure on the performance of organisms, such as P. productus and Methanothrix, in converting coal gas into methane. The effects of carbon monoxide inhibition and high pressure are presented and discussed.

  9. Electroactivity of high performance unsupported Pt-Ru nanoparticles in the presence of hydrogen and carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velazquez-Palenzuela, Amado; Cabot, Pere-Lluis; Centellas, Francesc; Garrido, Jose Antonio; Arias, Conchita; Rodriguez, Rosa Maria; Brillas, Enric [Laboratori d' Electroquimica dels Materials i del Medi Ambient, Departament de Quimica Fisica, Universitat de Barcelona, Marti i Franques 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    The electrochemical activity of high performance unsupported (1:1) Pt-Ru electrocatalyst in the presence of hydrogen and carbon monoxide has been studied using the thin-film rotating disk electrode (RDE) technique. The kinetic parameters of these reactions were determined in H{sub 2}- and CO-saturated 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions by means of cyclic voltammetry, including CO stripping, and RDE voltammetry. Pt-Ru/Nafion inks were prepared in one step with different Nafion mass fractions, allowing determining the ionomer influence in electrocatalytic response and obtaining the kinetic current density in absence of mass-transfer effects, being 41 and 12 mA cm{sup 2} (geometrical area), for H{sub 2} and CO oxidation, respectively. These values correspond to mass activities of 1.37 and 0.40 A mg{sub Pt}{sup 1} and to specific activities of 1.52 and 0.44 mA cm{sub Pt}{sup 2}. The Tafel analysis confirmed that hydrogen oxidation was a two-electron reversible reaction, while CO oxidation exhibited an irreversible behavior with a charge-transfer coefficient of 0.42. The kinetic results for CO oxidation are in agreement with the bifunctional theory, in which the reaction between Pt-CO and Ru-OH is the rate-determining step. The exchange current density for hydrogen reaction was 0.28 mA cm{sup 2} (active surface area), thus showing similar kinetics to those found for carbon-supported Pt and Pt-Ru electrocatalyst nanoparticles. (author)

  10. Hydrogen stable isotopic constraints on methane emissions from oil and gas extraction in the Colorado Front Range, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend-Small, A.; Botner, E. C.; Jimenez, K.; Blake, N. J.; Schroeder, J.; Meinardi, S.; Barletta, B.; Simpson, I. J.; Blake, D. R.; Flocke, F. M.; Pfister, G.; Bon, D.; Crawford, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    The climatic implications of a shift from oil and coal to natural gas depend on the magnitude of fugitive emissions of methane from the natural gas supply chain. Attempts to constrain methane emissions from natural gas production regions can be confounded by other sources of methane. Here we demonstrate the utility of stable isotopes, particularly hydrogen isotopes, for source apportionment of methane emissions. The Denver, Colorado area is home to a large oil and gas field with both conventional oil and gas wells and newer hydraulic fracturing wells. The region also has a large metropolitan area with several landfills and a sizable cattle population. As part of the DISCOVER-AQ and FRAPPE field campaigns in summer 2014, we collected three types of canister samples for analysis of stable isotopic composition of methane: 1), samples from methane sources; 2), samples from two stationary ground sites, one in the Denver foothills, and one in an oil and gas field; and 3), from the NCAR C-130 aircraft in samples upwind and downwind of the region. Our results indicate that hydrogen isotope ratios are excellent tracers of sources of methane in the region, as we have shown previously in California and Texas. Use of carbon isotope ratios is complicated by the similarity of natural gas isotope ratios to that of background methane. Our results indicate that, despite the large amount of natural gas production in the region, biological sources such as cattle feedlots and landfills account for at least 50% of total methane emissions in the Front Range. Future work includes comparison of isotopes and alkane ratios as tracers of methane sources, and calculation of total methane fluxes in the region using continuous measurements of methane concentrations during aircraft flights.

  11. Biocatalytic methanation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide in an anaerobic three-phase system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhardt, M; Koschack, T; Busch, G

    2015-02-01

    A new type of anaerobic trickle-bed reactor was used for biocatalytic methanation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide under mesophilic temperatures and ambient pressure in a continuous process. The conversion of gaseous substrates through immobilized hydrogenotrophic methanogenic archaea in a biofilm is a unique feature of this type of reactor. Due to the formation of a three-phase system on the carrier surface and operation as a plug flow reactor without gas recirculation, a complete reaction could be observed. With a methane concentration higher than c(CH4) = 98%, the product gas exhibits a very high quality. A specific methane production of P(CH4) = 1.49 Nm(3)/(m(3)(SV) d) was achieved at a hydraulic loading rate of LR(H2) = 6.0 Nm(3)/(m(3)(SV) d). The relation between trickle flow through the reactor and productivity could be shown. An application for methane enrichment in combination with biogas facilities as a source of carbon dioxide has also been positively proven.

  12. Pretreatment of Rice Straw by Hydrogen Peroxide for Enhanced Methane Yield

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Zi-lin; YAG Gai-he; FENG Yong-zhong; REN Guang-xin; HAN Xin-hui

    2013-01-01

    A pretreatment process for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was optimized to enhance the biodegradation performance of rice straw and increase biogas yield. A determination experiment was conducted under predicted optimal conditions. Optimization was implemented using response surface methodology. The effects of biodegradation and the interactive effects of pretreatment time (PT), H2O2 concentration (HC), and substrate to inoculum ratio (S/I) on methane yield were investigated. The lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose of rice straw were significantly degraded with increasing HC. The optimal conditions for the use of pretreated rice straw in anaerobic digestion were a 6.18-d PT, 2.68%HC (w/w total solid), and 1.08 S/I;these conditions result in a methane yield of 288 mL g-1 volatile solids (VS). A determination coefficient of 95.2%was obtained, indicating that the model used to predict the anabolic digestion process has a favorable fit with the experimental parameters. The determination experiment resulted in a methane yield of 290 mL g-1 VS, 88.0%higher than that of untreated rice straw. Thus, H2O2 pretreatment of rice straw can be used to improve methane yields during biogas production.

  13. Observations of carbon dioxide, methane, and carbon monoxide at Tae-Ahn peninsula (Korea), Mount Waliguan (China), Ulaan Uul (Mongolia) and at Mauna Loa (Hawaii USA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Y.S. [Korea National Univ. of Education, Chongwon (Korea, Republic of); Tans, P.P.; Conway, T.J.; Dlugokencky, E.J. [Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Lab., Bouler (United States); Novelli, P.C.; Tolier, M. [Colorado Univ. (United States). Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences; Wen, Y. [Chinese Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing (China); Dagvadorj, D. [Mongolian Hydrometeorological Research Inst., Ulaan Batar (Mongolia)

    1995-12-31

    It has been discussed that the greenhouse gases, e.g. carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) methane (CH{sub 4}), enhance warming in the biosphere. Many scientists are therefore interested in monitoring the minor constituents of the atmosphere and in the carbon cycle. In cooperation with the Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory (CMDL) of U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and carbon monoxide (CO) at the western tip of the Tae-ahn Peninsula (TAP) in central Korea since October 1990 has been measured. Shortly thereafter, two more sites were added for the measurement of greenhouse gases in East Asia; one at Mount Waliguar Qinghai Province (QPC) in China and another at Ulaan Uul (UUM), the Gobi Desert in Mongolia. Also, trace gas data obtained at Mauna Loa (MLO) in Hawaii in the USA has been used. The Hawaiian data represent the world`s longest period of CO{sub 2} monitoring since 1958. The present monitoring is a part of the Global Air Sampling Network the WMO`s Global Atmospheric Watch. The method of collecting and measuring CO{sub 2}, CO and CH{sub 4} have been described else where. Here the four year monitoring of the trace gases at the three sites in East Asia is reported. The results are also compared with the measured values obtained at the free troposphere background site at MLO in Hawaii

  14. Model Analysis of the Factors Regulating Trends and Variability of Methane, Carbon Monoxide and OH: 1. Model Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshorbany, Y. F.; Strode, S.; Wang, J.; Duncan, B.

    2014-01-01

    Methane (CH4) is the second most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG). Its 100-year global warming potential (GWP) is 25 times larger than that for carbon dioxide. The 100-yr integrated GWP of CH4 is sensitive to changes in OH levels. Methane's atmospheric growth rate was estimated to be more than 10 ppb yr(exp -1) in 1998 but less than zero in 2001, 2004 and 2005 (Kirschke et al., 2013). Since 2006, the CH4 is increasing again. This phenomena is yet not well understood. Oxidation of CH4 by OH is the main loss process, thus affecting the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere and contributing to the global ozone background. Current models typically use an annual cycle of offline OH fields to simulate CH4. The implemented OH fields in these models are typically tuned so that simulated CH4 growth rates match that measured. For future and climate simulations, the OH tuning technique may not be suitable. In addition, running full chemistry, multi-decadal CH4 simulations is a serious challenge and currently, due to computational intensity, almost impossible.

  15. Predicting hydrogen and methane adsorption in carbon nanopores for energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihm, Yungok; Morris, James; Cooper, Valentino; Morris Lab, U. tennessee Collaboration; Advanced material Group, ORNL Collaboration

    2013-03-01

    There are increasing demands for alternate fuels for transportation, which requires safe, high energy density, lightweight storage materials. Experimental measurements and theoretical predictions show relatively low hydrogen storage capacities in various porous materials, limiting hydrogen as a viable alternative for automobiles. In this work, we use a continuum model based on van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF) calculations to elucidate the role that long-range interactions play in the hydrogen adsorption properties of model slit nanopores in carbon. The proper treatment of long-range interactions gives an optimal pore size for hydrogen storage of 8-9 Å (larger than previously predicted). Remarkably, we find a peak hydrogen density close to that of liquid H2 at ambient temperatures, in agreement with recent experimental results on pore-size dependent adsorption in nanoporous carbon. We then show that such nanopores would be better suited to storing methane, possibly providing an alternative to fill the gap between the capacity required by DOE goals and that attainable with current hydrogen storage technology. Research supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  16. Effect of Catalytic Cylinders on Autothermal Reforming of Methane for Hydrogen Production in a Microchamber Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfei Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new multicylinder microchamber reactor is designed on autothermal reforming of methane for hydrogen production, and its performance and thermal behavior, that is, based on the reaction mechanism, is numerically investigated by varying the cylinder radius, cylinder spacing, and cylinder layout. The results show that larger cylinder radius can promote reforming reaction; the mass fraction of methane decreased from 26% to 21% with cylinder radius from 0.25 mm to 0.75 mm; compact cylinder spacing corresponds to more catalytic surface and the time to steady state is decreased from 40 s to 20 s; alteration of staggered and aligned cylinder layout at constant inlet flow rates does not result in significant difference in reactor performance and it can be neglected. The results provide an indication and optimize performance of reactor; it achieves higher conversion compared with other reforming reactors.

  17. Methane conversion using a dielectric barrier discharge reactor at atmospheric pressure for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadir, N.; Khodja, K.; Belasri, A.

    2017-09-01

    In the present paper, we carried out a theoretical study of dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) filled with pure methane gas. The homogeneous discharge model used in this work includes a plasma chemistry unit, an electrical circuit, and the Boltzmann equation. The model was applied to the case of a sinusoidal voltage at a period frequency of 50 kHz and under a gas pressure of 600 Torr. We investigated the temporal variation of electrical and kinetic discharge parameters such as plasma and dielectric voltages, the discharge current density, electric field, deposited power density, and the species concentration. We also checked the physical model validity by comparing its results with experimental work. According to the results discussed herein, the dielectric capacitance is the parameter that has the greatest effect on the methane conversion and H2/CH4 ratio. This work enriches the knowledge for the improvement of DBD for CH4 conversion and hydrogen production.

  18. A quantum chemical study on hydrogen radical reactions with methane and silane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kota; Kojima, Kuniharu; Kawasaki, Masashi; Matsuzaki, Yoshio; Hirano, Tsuneo; Nakano, Masatake; Koinuma, Hideomi

    1989-03-01

    A quantum chemical study on the reaction of CH4 , CF4 , SiH4 , and SiF4 with a hydrogen radical is performed on the basis of an ab initio molecular orbital calculation to predict the photochemical reactivity of methane, silane, and their analogues. The transition state geometry of the reactions is determined by employing a 3-21G basis set. The total energies of reactant molecules at the initial, transition, and final states are calculated by employing a 6-31G** basis set. The exponential parts of the rate constants of these reactions determined from these energies on the basis of the transition state theory are in good agreement with the experimentally obtained relative rates of the reaction. The present calculation was consistent with the experimental results of photochemical reactions for methane and silane derivatives.

  19. Effect of catalytic cylinders on autothermal reforming of methane for hydrogen production in a microchamber reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yunfei; Guo, Hongliang; Zhang, Li; Zhu, Junchen; Yang, Zhongqing; Tang, Qiang; Ji, Xin

    2014-01-01

    A new multicylinder microchamber reactor is designed on autothermal reforming of methane for hydrogen production, and its performance and thermal behavior, that is, based on the reaction mechanism, is numerically investigated by varying the cylinder radius, cylinder spacing, and cylinder layout. The results show that larger cylinder radius can promote reforming reaction; the mass fraction of methane decreased from 26% to 21% with cylinder radius from 0.25 mm to 0.75 mm; compact cylinder spacing corresponds to more catalytic surface and the time to steady state is decreased from 40 s to 20 s; alteration of staggered and aligned cylinder layout at constant inlet flow rates does not result in significant difference in reactor performance and it can be neglected. The results provide an indication and optimize performance of reactor; it achieves higher conversion compared with other reforming reactors.

  20. Kinetic modeling and experimental studies of hydrogen production by non-equilibrium plasma discharge decomposition of methane and other hydrogen-containing species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boutot, T.; Liu, Z. [Atlantic Hydrogen Inc., Fredericton, NB (Canada); Whidden, T.K.; Yang, Y. [New Brunswick Univ., Fredericton, NB (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    Hydrogen as an energy source is an option that is being explored in order to reduce anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. In particular, proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells using hydrogen and emitting no GHGs are under global development. The long-term production process of choice is hydrogen derived directly from water. However, hydrogen from electrolysis is not economically viable and bridging technologies for green hydrogen production must be found. Any new technology for hydrogen production should also accommodate the fact that no infrastructure for the widespread distribution of pure hydrogen exists. Hydrogen production technologies that leverage existing infrastructure for delivery will therefore have a significant economic advantage. This paper described the anaerobic high frequency pulsed plasma pyrolysis of methane using a proprietary reactor system. The paper discussed modeling studies and progress in scaling this reactor to pilot scale operation. It also discussed several experiments on using the system for the dissociation of another hydrogen source, hydrogen sulphide (H2{sub S}). Hydrogen and solid carbon were produced for methane or natural gas as the feedstock. The prototype bench-scale process was scaled to near pilot-scale, treating significant flows of natural gas. Long term data on system performance at conversions producing 20 per cent hydrogen in natural gas as the product were presented. Chemical kinetic models for the dissociation process and characterizational data for the solid carbon product were presented. 48 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.

  1. O-H···C hydrogen bond in the methane-water complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaev, A. N.

    2016-10-01

    Quantum chemical calculations were performed at different levels of theory (SCF, DFT, MP2, and CCSD(T)) to determine the geometry and electronic structure of the HOH···CH4 complex formed by water and methane molecules, in which water is a proton donor and methane carbon ( sp 3) is an acceptor. The charge distribution on the atoms of the complex was analyzed by the CHelpG method and Hirshfeld population analysis; both methods revealed the transfer of electron charge from methane to water. According to the natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis data, the charge transfer upon complexation is caused by the interaction between the σ orbital of the axial C-H bond of methane directed along the line of the O-H···C hydrogen bridge and the antibonding σ* orbital of the O-H bond of the water molecule. Topological analysis of electron density in the HOH···CH4 complex by the AIM method showed that the parameters of the critical point of the bond between hydrogen and acceptor (carbon atom) for the O-H···C interaction are typical for H-bonded systems (the magnitude of electron density at the critical point of the bond, the sign and value of the Laplacian). It was concluded that the intermolecular interaction in the complex can be defined as an H bond of O-H···σ(C-H) type, whose energy was found to be 0.9 kcal/mol in MP2/aug-cc-pVQZ calculations including the basis set superposition error (BSSE).

  2. Methane catalytic decomposition over ordered mesoporous carbons: A promising route for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botas, J.A.; Serrano, D.P. [Department of Chemical and Environmental Technology, ESCET, Rey Juan Carlos University, c/ Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); IMDEA Energia, c/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Guil-Lopez, R.; Pizarro, P.; Gomez, G. [Department of Chemical and Environmental Technology, ESCET, Rey Juan Carlos University, c/ Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    Methane decomposition offers an interesting route for the CO{sub 2}-free hydrogen production. The use of carbon catalysts, in addition to lowering the reaction temperature, presents a number of advantages, such as low cost, possibility of operating under autocatalytic conditions and feasibility of using the produced carbons in non-energy applications. In this work, a novel class of carbonaceous materials, having an ordered mesoporous structure (CMK-3 and CMK-5), has been checked as catalysts for methane decomposition, the results obtained being compared to those corresponding to a carbon black sample (CB-bp) and two activated carbons, presenting micro- (AC-mic) and mesoporosity (AC-mes), respectively. Ordered mesoporous carbons, and especially CMK-5, possess a remarkable activity and stability for the hydrogen production through that reaction. Under both temperature programmed and isothermal experiments, CMK-5 has shown to be a superior catalyst for methane decomposition than the AC-mic and CB-bp materials. Likewise, the catalytic activity of CMK-5 is superior to that of AC-mes in spite of the presence of mesoporosity and a high surface area in the latter. The remarkable stability of the CMK-5 catalyst is demonstrated by the high amount of carbon deposits that can be formed on this sample. This result has been assigned to the growth of the carbon deposits from methane decomposition towards the outer part of the catalyst particles, avoiding the blockage of the uniform mesopores present in CMK-5. Thus, up to 25 g of carbon deposits have been formed per gram of CMK-5, while the latter still retains a significant catalytic activity. (author)

  3. CuO/CeO2 Catalysts for Selective Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide in Excess Hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘春涛; 史鹏飞; 张菊香

    2004-01-01

    CuO/CeO2 catalysts were prepared by a coprecipitation method and tested for CO removal from reformed fuels via selective oxidation. The influence of the calcination temperature on the chemical compositions and catalytic performance of CuO/CeO2 catalysts were studied. It was found that CuO/CeO2 catalysts exhibit excellent CO oxidation activity and selectivity,and the complete removal of CO is attained when the catalysts are calcined at appropriate temperatures. XRD, TPR and XPS results indicate that CuO/CeO2 catalysts exhibit higher catalytic performance in CO selective oxidation due to the strong interaction between copper oxide and cerium dioxide, which promotes the dispersion and hydrogen reduction activity of copper.

  4. Metal-organic frameworks impregnated with magnesium-decorated fullerenes for methane and hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Aaron W; Nairn, Kate M; Hill, James M; Hill, Anita J; Hill, Matthew R

    2009-08-05

    A new concept is described for methane and hydrogen storage materials involving the incorporation of magnesium-decorated fullerenes within metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The system is modeled using a novel approach underpinned by surface potential energies developed from Lennard-Jones parameters. Impregnation of MOF pores with magnesium-decorated Mg(10)C(60) fullerenes, denoted as Mg-C(60)@MOF, places exposed metal sites with high heats of gas adsorption into intimate contact with large surface area MOF structures. Perhaps surprisingly, given the void space occupied by C(60), this impregnation delivers remarkable gas uptake, according to our modeling, which predicts exceptional performance for the Mg-C(60)@MOF family of materials. These predictions include a volumetric methane uptake of 265 v/v, the highest reported value for any material, which significantly exceeds the U.S. Department of Energy target of 180 v/v. We also predict a very high hydrogen adsorption enthalpy of 11 kJ mol(-1) with relatively little decrease as a function of H(2) filling. This value is close to the calculated optimum value of 15.1 kJ mol(-1) and is achieved concurrently with saturation hydrogen uptake in large amounts at pressures under 10 atm.

  5. Platinum and palladium doped tin oxide thick film sensors for sensing methane and hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Meenakshi; Mishra, V. N.; Dwivedi, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, platinum (Pt) and palladium (Pd) doped SnO2 thick film sensors have been developed using solid state derived tin oxide powder. Thick film sensors were fabricated on a 1˝x1˝ alumina substrate. The crystal structure and particle size are confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern. The fabricated sensors are tested for varying concentration (1-5%) of hydrogen and methane gas at different operating temperatures (200-350 °C). The effect of Pt and Pd doping have been analysed on different operating temperature, sensitivity and response/recovery time. The doping effects are also very important from view point of the gas selectivity. Based on the experimental results, we have observed the formation of tetragonal structure and particle size of the powders is drastically decreases from 26 to 19 nm after replacing the platinum dopant with palladium. Both the doped sensors have been found to be sensitive for hydrogen as compare to methane however, Pd-doped SnO2 sensor are most selective for hydrogen with very fast response and recovery time (20 s, 101 s) due to the small size effect.

  6. Catalytic activity of mono and bimetallic Zn/Cu/MWCNTs catalysts for the thermocatalyzed conversion of methane to hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdelyi, B.; Oriňak, A.; Oriňaková, R.; Lorinčík, J.; Jerigová, M.; Velič, D.; Mičušík, M.; Omastová, M.; Smith, R. M.; Girman, V.

    2017-02-01

    Mono and bimetallic multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) fortified with Cu and Zn metal particles were studied to improve the efficiency of the thermocatalytic conversion of methane to hydrogen. The surface of the catalyst and the dispersion of the metal particles were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). It was confirmed that the metal particles were successfully dispersed on the MWCNT surface and XPS analysis showed that the Zn was oxidised to ZnO at high temperatures. The conversion of methane to hydrogen during the catalytic pyrolysis was studied by pyrolysis gas chromatography using different amounts of catalyst. The best yields of hydrogen were obtained using pyrolysis conditions of 900 °C and 1.2 mg of Zn/Cu/MWCNT catalyst for 1.5 mL of methane.The initial conversion of methane to hydrogen obtained with Zn/Cu/MWCNTs was 49%, which represent a good conversion rate of methane to hydrogen for a non-noble metal catalyst.

  7. The effect of moderators on the reactions of hot hydrogen atoms with methane

    CERN Document Server

    Estrup, Peder J.

    1960-01-01

    The reaction of recoil tritium with methane has been examined in further detail. The previous hypothesis that this system involves a hot displacement reaction of high kinetic energy hydrogen to give CH$_{3}$T, CH$_{2}$T and HT is confirmed. The effect of moderator on this process is studied by the addition of noble gases. As predicted these gases inhibit the hot reaction action, their efficiency in this respect being He > Ne > A > Se. The data are quantitatively in accord with a theory of hot atom kinetics. The mechanism of the hot displacement process is briefly discussed.

  8. Carbon Monoxide-induced Stomatal Closure Involves Generation of Hydrogen Peroxide in Vicia faba Guard Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ping She; Xi-Gui Song

    2008-01-01

    Here the regulatory role of CO during stomatal movement In Vicla faba L. was surveyed. Results Indicated that, like hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), CO donor Hematin induced stomatal closure in dose- and time-dependent manners. These responses were also proven by the addition of gaseous CO aqueous solution with different concentrations, showing the first time that CO and H2O2 exhibit the similar regulation role in the atomatal movement. Moreover, our data showed that ascorbic acid (ASA, an important reducing substrate for H2O2 removal) and diphenylene iodonium (DPI, an inhibitor of the H2O2-generating enzyme NADPH oxidase) not only reversed stomatal closure by CO, but also suppressed the H2O2 fluorescence induced by CO, implying that CO induced-atomatal closure probably involves H2O2 signal. Additionally, the CO/NO scavenger hemoglobin (Hb) and CO specific synthetic inhibitor ZnPPIX, ASA and DPI reversed the darkness-induced stomatal closure and H2O2 fluorescence. These results show that, perhaps like H2O2, the levels of CO in guard cells of V. faba are higher In the dark than in light, HO-1 and NADPH oxidase are the enzyme systems responsible for generating endogenous CO and H2O2 in darkness respectively, and that CO is involved in darkness-induced H2O2 synthesis in V. faba guard cells.

  9. Preparation of PdCu Alloy Nanocatalysts for Nitrate Hydrogenation and Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Cai

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Alloying Pd with Cu is important for catalytic reactions such as denitrification reaction and CO oxidation reaction, but understanding of the catalyst preparation and its correlation with the catalyst’s activity and selectivity remains elusive. Herein, we report the results of investigations of the preparation of PdCu alloy nanocatalysts using different methods and the catalytic properties of the catalysts in catalytic denitrification reaction and CO oxidation reaction. PdCu alloy nanocatalysts were prepared by conventional dry impregnation method and ligand-capping based wet chemical synthesis method, and subsequent thermochemical activation as well. The alloying characteristics depend on the bimetallic composition. PdCu/Al2O3 with a Pd/Cu ratio of 50:50 was shown to exhibit an optimized hydrogenation activity for the catalytic denitrification reaction. The catalytic activity of the PdCu catalysts was shown to be highly dependent on the support, as evidenced by the observation of an enhanced catalytic activity for CO oxidation reaction using TiO2 and CeO2 supports with high oxygen storage capacity. Implications of the results to the refinement of the preparation of the alloy nanocatalysts are also discussed.

  10. Molecular simulation and macroscopic modeling of the diffusion of hydrogen, carbon monoxide and water in heavy n-alkane mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrodimitri, Zoi A; Unruh, Dominik J M; Economou, Ioannis G

    2012-03-28

    The self-diffusion coefficient of hydrogen (H(2)), carbon monoxide (CO) and water (H(2)O) in n-alkanes was studied by molecular dynamics simulation. Diffusion in a few pure n-alkanes (namely n-C(8), n-C(20), n-C(64) and n-C(96)) was examined. In addition, binary n-C(12)-n-C(96) mixtures with various compositions as well as more realistic five- and six-n-alkane component mixtures were simulated. In all cases, the TraPPE united atom force field was used for the n-alkane molecules. The force field for the mixture of n-alkanes was initially validated against experimental density values and was shown to be accurate. Moreover, macroscopic correlations for predicting diffusion coefficient of H(2), CO and H(2)O in n-alkanes and mixtures of n-alkanes were developed. The functional form of the correlation was based on the rough hard sphere theory (RHS). The correlation was applied to simulation data and an absolute average deviation (AAD) of 5.8% for pure n-alkanes and 3.4% for n-alkane mixtures was obtained. Correlation parameters vary in a systematic way with carbon number and so they can be used to provide predictions in the absence of any experimental or molecular simulation data. Finally, in order to reduce the number of adjustable parameters, for the n-alkane mixtures the "pseudo-carbon number" approach was used. This approach resulted in relatively higher deviation from MD simulation data (AAD of 18.2%); however, it provides a convenient and fast method to predict diffusion coefficients. The correlations developed here are expected to be useful for engineering calculations related to the design of the Gas-to-Liquid process.

  11. Effect of Hydrogen Addition on Methane HCCI Engine Ignition Timing and Emissions Using a Multi-zone Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi-han; Wang, Chun-mei; Tang, Hua-xin; Zuo, Cheng-ji; Xu, Hong-ming

    2009-06-01

    Ignition timing control is of great importance in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines. The effect of hydrogen addition on methane combustion was investigated using a CHEMKIN multi-zone model. Results show that hydrogen addition advances ignition timing and enhances peak pressure and temperature. A brief analysis of chemical kinetics of methane blending hydrogen is also performed in order to investigate the scope of its application, and the analysis suggests that OH radical plays an important role in the oxidation. Hydrogen addition increases NOx while decreasing HC and CO emissions. Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) also advances ignition timing; however, its effects on emissions are generally the opposite. By adjusting the hydrogen addition and EGR rate, the ignition timing can be regulated with a low emission level. Investigation into zones suggests that NOx is mostly formed in core zones while HC and CO mostly originate in the crevice and the quench layer.

  12. Effect of Hydrogen Addition on Methane HCCI Engine Ignition Timing and Emissions Using a Multi-zone Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-han Wang; Chun-mei Wang; Hua-xin Tang; Cheng-ji Zuo; Hong-ming Xu

    2009-01-01

    Ignition timing control is of great importance in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines. The effect of hydrogen addition on methane combustion was investigated using a CHEMKIN multi-zone model. Results show that hydrogen addition advances ignition tim-ing and enhances peak pressure and temperature. A brief analysis of chemical kinetics of methane blending hydrogen is also performed in order to investigate the scope of its appli-cation, and the analysis suggests that OH radical plays an important role in the oxidation. Hydrogen addition increases NO while decreasing HC and CO emissions. Exhaust gas recir-culation (EGR) also advances ignition timing; however, its effects on emissions are generally the opposite. By adjusting the hydrogen addition and EGR rate, the ignition timing can be regulated with a low emission level. Investigation into zones suggests that NO is mostly formed in core zones while HC and CO mostly originate in the crevice and the quench layer.

  13. The use of renewable energy in the form of methane via electrolytic hydrogen generation using carbon dioxide as the feedstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Kumagai, Naokazu; Izumiya, Koichi; Takano, Hiroyuki; Shinomiya, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Yusuke; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Kato, Zenta

    2016-12-01

    The history reveals the continuous increase in world energy consumption and carbon emissions. For prevention of intolerable global warming and complete exhaustion of fossil fuels we need complete conversion from fossil fuel consumption to renewable energy. We have been performing the research and development of global carbon dioxide recycling for more than 25 years to supply renewable energy to the world in the form of methane produced by the reaction of carbon dioxide captured from chimney with hydrogen generated electrolytically using electricity generated by renewable energy. We created the cathode and anode for electrolytic hydrogen generation and the catalyst for carbon dioxide methanation by the reaction with hydrogen. The methane formation from renewable energy will be the most convenient and efficient key technology for the use of renewable energy by storage of intermittent and fluctuating electricity generated from renewable energy and by regeneration of stable electricity. Domestic and international cooperation of companies for industrialization is in progress.

  14. A DFT-D study of the interaction of methane, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen with cation-exchanged SAPO-34

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Michael [Bremen Univ. (Germany). Fachgebiet Kristallographie; University College London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry; Bell, Robert G. [University College London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

    2015-07-01

    Density-functional theory calculations including a semi-empirical dispersion correction (DFT-D) are employed to study the interaction of small guest molecules (CH{sub 4}, CO, N{sub 2}) with the cation sites in the silicoaluminophosphate SAPO-34. Eight different cations from three different groups (alkali cations, alkaline earth cations, transition metals) are included in the study. For each case, the total interaction energy as well as the non-dispersive contribution to the interaction are analysed. Electron density difference plots are used to investigate the nature of this non-dispersive contribution in more detail. Despite a non-negligible contribution of polarisation interactions, the total interaction remains moderate in systems containing main group cations. In SAPOs exchanged with transition metals, orbital interactions between the cations and CO and N{sub 2} lead to a very strong interaction, which makes these systems attractive as adsorbents for the selective adsorption of these species. A critical comparison with experimental heats of adsorption shows reasonable quantitative agreement for CO and N{sub 2}, but a pronounced overestimation of the interaction strength for methane. While this does not affect the conclusions regarding the suitability of TM-exchanged SAPO-34 materials for gas separations, more elaborate computational approaches may be needed to improve the quantitative accuracy for this guest molecule.

  15. Methane and hydrogen sulfide emissions in UASB reactors treating domestic wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, C L; Chernicharo, C A L; Melo, G C B

    2012-01-01

    The release of CH(4) and H(2)S in UASB reactors was evaluated with the aim to quantify the emissions from the liquid surfaces (three-phase separator and settler compartment) and also from the reactor's discharge hydraulic structures. The studies were carried out in two pilot- (360 L) and one demo-scale (14 m(3)) UASB reactors treating domestic wastewater. As expected, the release rates were much higher across the gas/liquid interfaces of the three-phase separators (5.4-9.7 kg CH(4) m(-2) d(-1) and 23.0-35.8 g S m(-2) d(-1)) as compared with the quiescent settler surfaces (11.0-17.8 g CH(4) m(-2) d(-1) and 0.21 to 0.37 g S m(-2) d(-1)). The decrease of dissolved methane and dissolved hydrogen sulfide was very large in the discharging hydraulic structures very close to the reactor (>60 and >80%, respectively), largely due to the loss to the atmosphere, indicating that the concentration of these compounds will probably fall to values close to zero in the near downstream structures. The emission factors due to the release of dissolved methane in the discharge structure amounted to around 0.040 g CH(4) g COD(infl)(-1) and 0.060 g CH(4) g COD(rem)(-1), representing around 60% of the methane collected in the three-phase separator.

  16. Autothermal catalytic pyrolysis of methane as a new route to hydrogen production with reduced CO{sub 2} emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradov, Nazim; Smith, Franklyn; Huang, Cunping; T-Raissi, Ali [Florida Solar Energy Center, University of Central Florida, Cocoa, FL 32922 (United States)

    2006-08-15

    Hydrogen production plants are among major sources of CO{sub 2} emissions into the atmosphere. The objective of this paper is to explore new routes to hydrogen production from natural gas (or methane) with drastically reduced CO{sub 2} emissions. One approach analyzed in this paper is based on thermocatalytic decomposition (or pyrolysis) of methane into hydrogen gas and elemental carbon over carbon-based catalysts. Several heat input options to the endothermic process are discussed in the paper. The authors conduct thermodynamic analysis of methane decomposition in the presence of small amounts of oxygen in an autothermal (or thermo-neutral) regime using AspenPlus(TM) chemical process simulator. Methane conversion, products yield, effluent gas composition, process enthalpy flows as a function of temperature, pressure and O{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} ratio has been determined. CO{sub 2} emissions (per m{sup 3} of H{sub 2} produced) from the process could potentially be a factor of 3-5 less than from conventional hydrogen production processes. Oxygen-assisted decomposition of methane over activated carbon (AC) and AC-supported iron catalysts over wide range of temperatures and O{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} ratios was experimentally verified. Problems associated with the catalyst deactivation and the effect of iron doping on the catalyst stability are discussed. (author)

  17. Enhancement of bioenergy production from organic wastes by two-stage anaerobic hydrogen and methane production process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Gang; Xie, Li; Zhou, Qi; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-09-01

    The present study investigated a two-stage anaerobic hydrogen and methane process for increasing bioenergy production from organic wastes. A two-stage process with hydraulic retention time (HRT) 3d for hydrogen reactor and 12d for methane reactor, obtained 11% higher energy compared to a single-stage methanogenic process (HRT 15 d) under organic loading rate (OLR) 3 gVS/(L d). The two-stage process was still stable when the OLR was increased to 4.5 gVS/(Ld), while the single-stage process failed. The study further revealed that by changing the HRT(hydrogen):HRT(methane) ratio of the two-stage process from 3:12 to 1:14, 6.7%, more energy could be obtained. Microbial community analysis indicated that the dominant bacterial species were different in the hydrogen reactors (Thermoanaerobacterium thermosaccharolyticum-like species) and methane reactors (Clostridium thermocellum-like species). The changes of substrates and HRT did not change the dominant species. The archaeal community structures in methane reactors were similar both in single- and two- stage reactors, with acetoclastic methanogens Methanosarcina acetivorans-like organisms as the dominant species.

  18. Geochemical effects of compressed air, methane, or hydrogen intrusion into shallow aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berta, Marton; Dethlefsen, Frank; Ebert, Markus; Dahmke, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The fluctuating energy yield of renewable sources, most importantly wind and solar, implies the emerging necessity of energy storage. Already operating possibilities for geological energy storage include storage of compressed air (CAES), methane, and hydrogen. For the safe and sustainable implementation of subsurface energy storage, site specific risk assessment studies and elaborated monitoring strategies are needed, based on proper process understanding. In case of gas storage, this process understanding must include gas-specific reactions to be expected in shallow aquifers following a leakage of compressed air, methane, or hydrogen, and therefore potentially changing the composition of the groundwater, which is protected by law. As the geochemical reactions potentially following gas leakages were not known in a sufficient extent, experiments representing relevant hydrogeological conditions were carried out. The experimental approach included batch and column experiments using mainly sediment from a shallow Pleistocene aquifer percolated by the groundwater from the same aquifer. This water was saturated with the respective gas to simulate a leakage environment in a shallow aquifer. Leakage of compressed air resulted in pyrite oxidation (rates up to 4 μM/h). In our experimental conditions with oxygen partial pressures between 0 and 11 bars pyrite oxidation caused minor (up to 0.5 mM) increase in sulfate concentration and minor (up to 0.5) decrease in pH. The transfer function on reaction kinetics developed using PHREEQC based on the experimental reaction rates for upscaling the results includes a passivation inhibiting more than 90% of the pyrite reactivity. Methane oxidation coupled to reduction of nitrate, and especially sulfate is known from various groundwater and marine environments. However, fugitive methane does not cause detectable changes in groundwater within one year in our experiments. This acknowledges earlier field studies describing no methane

  19. Stable Isotope Measurements of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Hydrogen Sulfide Gas Using Frequency Modulation Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak-Lovato, K.

    2014-12-01

    Seepage from enhanced oil recovery, carbon storage, and natural gas sites can emit trace gases such as carbon dioxide, methane, and hydrogen sulfide. Trace gas emission at these locations demonstrate unique light stable isotope signatures that provide information to enable source identification of the material. Light stable isotope detection through surface monitoring, offers the ability to distinguish between trace gases emitted from sources such as, biological (fertilizers and wastes), mineral (coal or seams), or liquid organic systems (oil and gas reservoirs). To make light stable isotope measurements, we employ the ultra-sensitive technique, frequency modulation spectroscopy (FMS). FMS is an absorption technique with sensitivity enhancements approximately 100-1000x more than standard absorption spectroscopy with the advantage of providing stable isotope signature information. We have developed an integrated in situ (point source) system that measures carbon dioxide, methane and hydrogen sulfide with isotopic resolution and enhanced sensitivity. The in situ instrument involves the continuous collection of air and records the stable isotope ratio for the gas being detected. We have included in-line flask collection points to obtain gas samples for validation of isotopic concentrations using our in-house isotope ratio mass spectroscopy (IRMS). We present calibration curves for each species addressed above to demonstrate the sensitivity and accuracy of the system. We also show field deployment data demonstrating the capabilities of the system in making live dynamic measurements from an active source.

  20. Performance and microbial community analysis of two-stage process with extreme thermophilic hydrogen and thermophilic methane production from hydrolysate in UASB reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongjan, Prawit; O-Thong, Sompong; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-01-01

    The two-stage process for extreme thermophilic hydrogen and thermophilic methane production from wheat straw hydrolysate was investigated in up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors. Specific hydrogen and methane yields of 89ml-H2/g-VS (190ml-H2/g-sugars) and 307ml-CH4/g-VS, respectively were...

  1. Study on the recovery of hydrogen from refinery (hydrogen+methane) gas mixtures using hydrate technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A novel technique for separating hydrogen from (H2 + CH4) gas mixtures through hydrate formation/dissociation was proposed. In this work, a systematic experimental study was performed on the separation of hydrogen from (H2 + CH4) feed mixtures with various hydrogen contents (mole fraction x = 40%-90%). The experimental results showed that the hydrogen content could be enriched to as high as ~94% for various feed mixtures using the proposed hydrate technology under a temperature slightly above 0℃ and a pressure below 5.0 MPa. With the addition of a small amount of suitable additives, the rate of hydrate formation could be increased significantly. Anti-agglomeration was used to disperse hydrate particles into the condensate phase. Instead of preventing hydrate growth (as in the kinetic inhibitor tests), hydrates were allowed to form, but only as small dispersed particles. Anti-agglomeration could keep hydrate particles suspended in a range of condensate types at 1℃ and 5 MPa in the water-in-oil emulsion.

  2. Study on the recovery of hydrogen from refinery (hydrogen + methane) gas mixtures using hydrate technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG XiuLin; CHEN GuangJin; YANG LanYing; ZHANG LinWei

    2008-01-01

    A novel technique for separating hydrogen from (H2 + CH4) gas mixtures through hydrate forma-tion/dissociation was proposed.In this work, a systematic experimental study was performed on the separation of hydrogen from (H2+CH4) feed mixtures with various hydrogen contents (mole fraction x =40%-90%).The experimental results showed that the hydrogen content could be enriched to as high as~94% for various feed mixtures using the proposed hydrate technology under a temperature slightly above 0℃ and a pressure below 5.0 MPa.With the addition of a small amount of suitable additives, the rate of hydrate formation could be increased significantly.Anti-agglomeration was used to disperse hydrate particles into the condensate phase.Instead of preventing hydrate growth (as in the kinetic inhibitor tests), hydrates were allowed to form, but only as small dispersed particles.Anti-agglomera-tion could keep hydrate particles suspended in a range of condensate types at 1℃ and 5 MPa in the water-in-oil emulsion.

  3. Modelisations des effets de surface sur les jets horizontaux subsoniques d'hydrogene et de methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Luis Fernando

    Le developpement des codes et de normes bases sur une methodologie scientifique requiert la capacite de predire l'etendue inflammable de deversements gazeux d'hydrogene sous differentes conditions. Des etudes anterieures ont deja etabli des modeles bases sur les lois de conservation de la mecanique des fluides basees sur des correlations experimentales qui permettent de predire la decroissance de la concentration et de la vitesse d'un gaz le long de l'axe d'un jet libre vertical. Cette etude s'interesse aux effets de proximite a une surface horizontale parallele sur un jet turbulent. Nous nous interessons a son impact sur l'etendue du champ de la concentration et sur l'enveloppe inflammable en particulier. Cette etude est comparative : l'hydrogene est compare au methane. Ceci permet de degager l'influence des effets de difference de la densite sur le comportement du jet, et de comparer le comportement de l'hydrogene aux correlations experimentales, qui ont ete essentiellement etablies pour le methane. Un modele decrivant l'evolution spatio-temporelle du champ de concentration du gaz dilue est propose, base sur la mecanique des fluides computationnelle. Cette approche permet de varier systematiquement les conditions aux frontieres (proximite du jet a la surface, par exemple) et de connaitre en detail les proprietes de l'ecoulement. Le modele est implemente dans le code de simulations par volumes finis de FLUENT. Les resultats des simulations sont compares avec les lois de similitudes decoulant de la theorie des jets d'ecoulements turbulents libres ainsi qu'avec les resultats experimentaux disponibles. L'effet de la difference des masses molaires des constituantes du jet et des constituantes du milieu de dispersion est egalement etudie dans le contexte du comportement d'echelle de la region developpee du jet.

  4. Hydrogen and syngas production from two-step steam reforming of methane using CeO2 as oxygen carrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing Zhu; Hua Wang; Yonggang Wei; Kongzhai Li; Xianming Cheng

    2011-01-01

    CeO2 oxygen carrier was prepared by precipitation method and tested by two-step steam reforming of methane (SRM).Two-step SRM for hydrogen and syngas generation is investigated in a fixed-bed reactor.Methane is directly converted to syngas at a H2/CO ratio close to 2∶ 1 at a high temperature (above 750 ℃) by the lattice oxygen of CeO2; methane cracking is found when the reduction degree of CeO2 was above 5.0% at 850 ℃ in methane isothermal reaction.CeO2-δ obtained from methane isothermal reaction can split water to generate CO-free hydrogen and renew its lattice oxygen at 700 ℃; simultaneously, deposited carbon is selectively oxidized to CO2 by steam following the reaction (C+2H2O→CO2+2H2).Slight deactivation in terms of amounts of desired products (syngas and hydrogen) is observed in ten repetitive two-step SRM process due to the carbon deposition on CeO2 surface as well as sintering of CeO2.

  5. The influence of methane/argon plasma composition on the formation of the hydrogenated amorphous carbon films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Hsin-Hung [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Liao, Jiunn-Der, E-mail: jdliao@mail.ncku.edu.t [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Weng, Chih-Chiang; Hsieh, Jui-Fu; Chang, Chia-Wei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chao-Hsien; Cho, Ting-Pin [Metal Industries Development and Research Centre, 1001 Kaonan Highway, Kaohsiung 811, Taiwan (China)

    2011-01-03

    The quality of the a-C:H films was particularly correlated with the mixed ratio of methane/argon plasma. For a constant supply of energy and flowing rate, the optical emission from H{sub {alpha}} intensity linearly increased with the addition of methane in argon plasma, while that from intensities of radiation of diatmoic radicals (CH*and C{sub 2}*) exponentially decreased. For the a-C:H films, the added methane in argon plasma tended to raise the quantity of hydrogenated carbon or sp{sup 3} C-H structure, which exponentially decreased the nano-hardness and friction coefficient of the films. In contrast, the electric resistance of the films enlarged dramatically with the increase of the methane content in argon plasma. It is therefore advantageous to balance the mechanical properties and electrical resistance of the a-C:H film by adjusting plasma composition in the course of the film-growing process.

  6. A Kinetic Study of Selective Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide to C2 Oxygenates on Rh-Mn-Li-Fe/SiO2 Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongmei Yin; Yunjie Ding; Hongyuan Luo; Daiping He; Weimiao Chen; Zhiyong Ao; Liwu Lin

    2003-01-01

    The kinetics of CO hydrogenation for the synthesis of C2 oxygenates over Rh-Mn-Li-Fe/SiO2was investigated. Kinetic parameters for the formation of ethanol, acetaldehyde, C2 oxygenates, methanol and methane were obtained. The activation energy, H2 and CO dependence orders for ethanol and acetaldehyde formation differed greatly, the large difference seemed to imply that they were formed through different intermediates.

  7. Inclusion of preferential diffusion in simulations of premixed combustion of hydrogen/methane mixtures with flamelet generated manifolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, J.A.M.de; Bastiaans, R.J.M.; Oijen, J.A. van; Goey, L.P.H. de; Cant, R.S.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we study the possibility to account for preferential diffusion effects in lean turbulent premixed flames in numerical predictions with reduced chemistry. We studied the situation when hydrogen is added to methane at levels of 20% and 40% by volume in the fuel, at lean combustion (φ=

  8. Hydrogen production for fuel cells by autothermal reforming of methane over sulfide nickel catalyst on a gamma alumina support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, D. L.; Chan, S. H.; Ding, O. L.

    Experimental and modelling studies have been conducted on catalytic autothermal reforming (ATR) of methane for hydrogen production over a sulfide nickel catalyst on a gamma alumina support. The experiments are performed with different feedstock under thermally neutral conditions. The results show that the performance of the reformer is dependent on the molar air-to-fuel ratio (A/F), the molar water-to-fuel ratio (W/F) and the flowrate of the feedstock mixture. The optimum conditions for high methane conversion and high hydrogen yield are A/F = 3-3.5, W/F = 2-2.5 and a fuel flowrate below 120-250 l h -1. Under these conditions, a methane conversion of 95-99% and a hydrogen yield of 39-41% on a dry basis can be achieved and 1 mole of methane can produce 1.8 moles of hydrogen at an equilibrium reactor temperature of not exceeding 850 °C. A two-dimensional reactor model is developed to simulate the conversion behaviour of the reactor for further study of the reforming process. The model includes all aspects of the major chemical kinetics and the heat and mass transfer phenomena in the reactor. The predicted results are successfully validated with experimental data.

  9. Co-production of hydrogen and carbon nanotubes on nickel foam via methane catalytic decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Dan; Wang, Chaoxian; Dong, Xinfa; Dong, Yingchao

    2016-04-01

    The co-production of COx-free hydrogen and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was achieved on 3-dimensional (3D) macroporous nickel foam (NF) via methane catalytic decomposition (MCD) over nano-Ni catalysts using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. By a simple coating of a NiO-Al2O3 binary mixture sol followed by a drying-calcination-reduction treatment, NF supported composite catalysts (denoted as NiyAlOx/NF) with Al2O3 transition-layer incorporated with well-dispersed nano-Ni catalysts were successfully prepared. The effects of Ni loading, calcination temperature and reaction temperature on the performance for simultaneous production of COx-free hydrogen and CNTs were investigated in detail. Catalysts before and after MCD were characterized by XRD, TPR, SEM, TEM, TG and Raman spectroscopy technology. Results show that increasing Ni loading, lowering calcination temperature and optimizing MCD reaction temperature resulted in high production efficiency of COx-free H2 and carbon, but broader diameter distribution of CNTs. Through detailed parameter optimization, the catalyst with a Ni/Al molar ratio of 0.1, calcination temperature of 550 °C and MCD temperature of 650 °C was favorable to simultaneously produce COx-free hydrogen with a growth rate as high as 10.3% and CNTs with uniform size on NF.

  10. Sequential generation of hydrogen and methane from glutamic acid through combined photo-fermentation and methanogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ao; Cheng, Jun; Lin, Richen; Liu, Jianzhong; Zhou, Junhu; Cen, Kefa

    2013-03-01

    Glutamic acid can hardly produce hydrogen via dark- or photo-fermentation without pretreatment. In this study, a novel process of acidogenic pretreatment with bacteria and zeolite treatment for NH4(+) removal was proposed to use glutamic acid as feedstock in photo-fermentation for efficient hydrogen production. Glutamic acid pretreated with acidogenic bacteria produces soluble metabolite products. After zeolite treatment, the acidulated solution, which mainly contains acetate, butyrate, and NH4(+), shows a decrease in NH4(+) concentration from 36.7mM to 3.2mM (NH4(+) removal efficiency of 91.1%). After NH4(+) removal, the treated solution is incubated with photosynthetic bacteria, exhibiting a maximum hydrogen yield of 292.9mL/g(-glutamic acid) during photo-fermentation. The residual solution from photo-fermentation is reused by methanogenic bacteria to produce a maximum methane yield of 102.7mL/g. The heating value conversion efficiency from glutamic acid to gas fuel significantly increases from 18.9% during photo-fermentation to 40.9% in the combined photo-fermentation and methanogenesis process.

  11. Strategy to eliminate catalyst hot-spots in the partial oxidation of methane: enhancing its activity for direct hydrogen production by reducing the reactivity of lattice oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Cun; Liu, Yi; Guo, Yun; Wang, Yanqin; Lu, Guanzhong

    2010-02-14

    Hydrogen can be produced over Er(2)O(3) in methane oxidation (oxygen/methane = 26). The reactivity of lattice oxygen in the catalyst plays a main role in the conversion of surface hydroxyl species to hydrogen or water. Adding a rare earth element into a catalyst can reduce the reactivity of lattice oxygen, resulting in increased hydrogen production, to eliminate catalyst hot-spots.

  12. An experimental study of premixed laminar methane/oxygen/argon flames doped with hydrogen at low pressure with synchrotron photoionization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG JinHua; HU ErJiang; HUANG ZuoHua; MA ZhiHao; TIAN ZhenYu; WANG Jing; LI YuYang

    2008-01-01

    Laminar premixed stoichiometric methane/hydrogen/oxygen/argon flames were investigated with tun-able synchrotron vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization and molecular-beam sampling mass spec-trometry techniques. The methane/hydrogen fuel blends with hydrogen volumetric fraction of 0, 20%, 40%, 60% and 80% were studied. All observed flame species, including stable intermediates and radi-cals in the flames, were detected by measuring photoionization mass spectra and photoionization effi-ciency (PIE) spectra. Mole fraction profiles of major species and intermediates were derived by scan-ning burner at some selected photon energies near ionization thresholds. The influence of hydrogen addition on mole fraction of major species and intermediates was analyzed. The results show that the major species mole fraction of CO, CO2 and CH4 decreases with the increase of hydrogen fraction. The mole fraction of intermediates measured in this experiment decreases remarkably with the increase of hydrogen fraction. This would be due to the increase of H and OH radicals by hydrogen addition and the high diffusivity and activity of H radical promoting the chemical reaction. In addition, the increase of H/C ratio with the increase of hydrogen fraction also leads to the decrease of the mole fraction of car-bon-related intermediates and contributes to the decrease of unburned and incomplete combustion products.

  13. Constraints on emissions of carbon monoxide, methane, and a suite of hydrocarbons in the Colorado Front Range using observations of 14CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. Tans

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric radiocarbon (14CO represents an important observational constraint on emissions of fossil-fuel derived carbon into the atmosphere due to the absence of 14CO in fossil fuel reservoirs. The high sensitivity and precision that accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS affords in atmospheric 14CO analysis has greatly increased the potential for using such measurements to evaluate bottom-up emissions inventories of fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff, as well as those for other co-emitted species. Here we use observations of 14CO2 and a series of hydrocarbons and combustion tracers from discrete air samples collected between June 2009 and September 2010 at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO; Lat: 40.050° N, Lon: 105.004° W to derive emission ratios of each species to CO2ff. From these emission ratios, we estimate emissions of these species by using the Vulcan CO2ff high resolution data product as a reference. The species considered in this analysis are carbon monoxide (CO, methane (CH4, acetylene (C2H2, benzene (C6H6, and C3–C5 alkanes. Comparisons of top-down emissions estimates are made to existing inventories of these species for Denver and adjacent counties, as well as to previous efforts to estimate emissions from atmospheric observations over the same area. We find that CO is overestimated in the 2008 National Emissions Inventory (NEI, 2008 by a factor of ~2. A close evaluation of the inventory suggests that the ratio of CO emitted per unit fuel burned from on-road gasoline vehicles is likely over-estimated by a factor of 2.5. The results also suggest that while the oil and gas sector is the largest contributor to the CH4 signal in air arriving from the north and east, it is very likely that other sources, including agricultural sources, contribute to this signal and must be accounted for when attributing these signals to oil and gas industry activity from a top-down perspective. Our results are

  14. A survey of carbon monoxide and non-methane hydrocarbons in the Arctic Ocean during summer 2010: assessment of the role of phytoplankton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tran

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available During the ARK XXV 1+2 expedition in the Arctic Ocean carried out in June–July 2010 aboard the R/V Polarstern, we measured carbon monoxide (CO, non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC and phytoplankton pigments at the sea surface and down to a depth of 100 m. The CO and NMHC sea-surface concentrations were highly variable; CO, propene and isoprene levels ranged from 0.6 to 17.5 nmol l−1, 1 to 322 pmol l−1 and 1 to 541 pmol l−1, respectively. The CO and alkene concentrations were enhanced in polar waters off of Greenland, which were more stratified because of ice melting and richer in chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM than typical North Atlantic waters. The spatial distribution of the surface concentrations of CO was consistent with our current understanding of CO-induced UV photo-production in the sea. The vertical distributions of the CO and alkenes followed the trend of light penetration, with the concentrations displaying a relatively regular exponential decrease down to non-measurable values below 50 m. However, no diurnal variations of CO or alkene concentrations were observed in the stratified and irradiated surface layers. This finding suggests that the production and removal processes of CO and alkenes were tightly coupled. We tentatively determined a first-order rate constant for the microbial consumption of CO of 0.5 d−1, which is in agreement with previous studies. On several occasions, we observed the existence of subsurface CO maxima at the level of the deep chlorophyll maximum. This finding represents field evidence for the existence of a non-photochemical CO production pathway, most likely of phytoplanktonic origin. The corresponding production rates normalized to the chlorophyll content were in the range of those estimated from laboratory experiments. In general, the vertical distributions of isoprene followed that of the phytoplankton biomass. Hence, oceanic data

  15. Pathways and Bioenergetics of Anaerobic Carbon Monoxide Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diender, Martijn; Stams, Alfons J M; Sousa, Diana Z

    2015-01-01

    Carbon monoxide can act as a substrate for different modes of fermentative anaerobic metabolism. The trait of utilizing CO is spread among a diverse group of microorganisms, including members of bacteria as well as archaea. Over the last decade this metabolism has gained interest due to the potential of converting CO-rich gas, such as synthesis gas, into bio-based products. Three main types of fermentative CO metabolism can be distinguished: hydrogenogenesis, methanogenesis, and acetogenesis, generating hydrogen, methane and acetate, respectively. Here, we review the current knowledge on these three variants of microbial CO metabolism with an emphasis on the potential enzymatic routes and bio-energetics involved.

  16. Pathways and bioenergetics of anaerobic carbon monoxide fermentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn eDiender

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide can act as a substrate for different modes of fermentative anaerobic metabolism. The trait of utilizing CO is spread among a diverse group of microorganisms, including members of bacteria as well as archaea. Over the last decade this metabolism has gained interest due to the potential of converting CO rich gas, such as synthesis gas, into bio-based products. Three main types of fermentative CO metabolism can be distinguished: hydrogenogenesis, methanogenesis and acetogenesis, generating hydrogen, methane and acetate, respectively. Here, we review the current knowledge on these three variants of microbial CO metabolism with an emphasis on the potential enzymatic routes and bio-energetics involved.

  17. New optical method for heat flux measurements in stagnation point laminar methane/air flames and hydrogen/methane/air flames using thermographic phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmnefi, Mohamed Salem

    2010-11-24

    In the present study, a new optical method was implemented to study the heat transfer from flat stagnation point flames which can be regarded as one-dimensional in the central part. Premixed methane-air flames and hydrogen-methane-air flames were investigated. The effects of burner-to-plate distance and the fresh gas mixture velocity on heat transfer were examined. Experiments were performed using light induced phosphorescence from thermographic phosphors to study the wall temperatures and heat fluxes of nearly one-dimensional flat premixed flames impinging upward normally on a horizontal water cooled circular flat plate. The investigated flames were stoichiometric, lean and rich laminar methane/air flames with different equivalence ratios of {phi} =1, {phi} = 0.75 and {phi} = 1.25 and stoichiometric laminar hydrogen/methane/air flames. Mixtures of air with 10, 25, 50 and 75 % hydrogen in methane (CH{sub 4}) as well as a pure hydrogen flames at ambient pressure were investigated. The central part of this plate was an alumina ceramic plate coated from both sides with chromium doped alumina (ruby) and excited with a Nd:YAG laser or a green light emitting diode (LED) array to measure the wall temperature from both sides and thus the heat flux rate from the flame. The outlet velocity of the gases was varied from 0.1 m/s to 1.2 m/s. The burner to plate distance ranged from 0.5 to 2 times the burner exit diameter (d = 30 mm).The accuracy of the method was evaluated. The measured heat flux indicate the change of the flame stabilization mechanism from a burner stabilized to a stagnation plate stabilized flame. The results were compared to modeling results of a one dimensional stagnation point flow, with a detailed reaction mechanism. In order to prove the model, also measured gas phase temperatures by OH LIF for a stoichiometric stagnation point flame were discussed. It turns out that the flame stabilization mechanism and with it the heat fluxes change from low to high

  18. Formation of ketene (H{sub 2}CCO) in interstellar analogous methane (CH{sub 4})-carbon monoxide (CO) ices: A combined FTIR and reflectron time-of-flight mass spectroscopic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maity, Surajit; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Jones, Brant M. [W. M. Keck Research Laboratory in Astrochemistry, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii, HI 96822 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The formation of ketene (H{sub 2}CCO) in methane-carbon monoxide (CH{sub 4}-CO) ices was investigated upon its exposure to ionizing radiation in the form of energetic electrons at 5.5 K. The radiation-induced nonthermal equilibrium processing of these ices was monitored online and in situ via infrared spectroscopy complimented with post-irradiation temperature programmed desorption studies exploiting highly sensitive reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ReTOF) coupled with single photon fragment-free photo ionization (PI) at 10.49 eV. The detection of ketene in irradiated (isotopically labeled) methane-carbon monoxide ices was confirmed via the ν{sub 2} infrared absorption band and substantiated during the warm-up phase based on sublimation profiles obtained from the ReTOF-PI spectra of the corresponding isotopic masses. The experiments conducted with the mixed isotopic ices of {sup 12}CD{sub 4}-{sup 13}CO provide clear evidence of the formation of at least two ketene isotopomers (D{sub 2} {sup 12}C{sup 13}CO and D{sub 2} {sup 13}C{sup 13}CO), allowing for the derivation of two competing formation pathways. We have also proposed underlying reaction mechanisms to the formation of ketene based on kinetic fitting of the temporal evolution of the ketene isotopomers.

  19. COx-Free Hydrogen and Carbon Nanofibers Produced from Direct Decomposition of Methane on Nickel-Based Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siang-Piao Chai; Sharif Hussein Sharif Zein; Abdul Rahman Mohamed

    2006-01-01

    Direct decomposition of methane was carried out using a fixed-bed reactor at 700 ℃ for the production of COx-free hydrogen and carbon nanofibers. The catalytic performance of NiO-M/SiO2catalysts (where M=AgO, CoO, CuO, FeO, MnOx and MoO) in methane decomposition was investigated.The experimental results indicate that among the tested catalysts, NiO/SiO2 promoted with CuO give the highest hydrogen yield. In addition, the examination of the most suitable catalyst support, including Al2O3, CeO2, La2O3, SiO2, and TiO2, shows that the decomposition of methane over NiO-CuO favors SiO2 support. Furthermore, the optimum ratio of NiO to CuO on SiO2 support for methane decomposition was determined. The experimental results show that the optimum weight ratio of NiO to CuO fell at 8:2(w/w) since the highest yield of hydrogen was obtained over this catalyst.

  20. Effect of dietary nitrate level on enteric methane production, hydrogen emission, rumen fermentation, and nutrient digestibility in dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olijhoek, D W; Hellwing, A L F; Brask, M; Weisbjerg, M R; Højberg, O; Larsen, M K; Dijkstra, J; Erlandsen, E J; Lund, P

    2016-08-01

    Nitrate may lower methane production in ruminants by competing with methanogenesis for available hydrogen in the rumen. This study evaluated the effect of 4 levels of dietary nitrate addition on enteric methane production, hydrogen emission, feed intake, rumen fermentation, nutrient digestibility, microbial protein synthesis, and blood methemoglobin. In a 4×4 Latin square design 4 lactating Danish Holstein dairy cows fitted with rumen, duodenal, and ileal cannulas were assigned to 4 calcium ammonium nitrate addition levels: control, low, medium, and high [0, 5.3, 13.6, and 21.1g of nitrate/kg of dry matter (DM), respectively]. Diets were made isonitrogenous by replacing urea. Cows were fed ad libitum and, after a 6-d period of gradual introduction of nitrate, adapted to the corn-silage-based total mixed ration (forage:concentrate ratio 50:50 on DM basis) for 16d before sampling. Digesta content from duodenum, ileum, and feces, and rumen liquid were collected, after which methane production and hydrogen emissions were measured in respiration chambers. Methane production [L/kg of dry matter intake (DMI)] linearly decreased with increasing nitrate concentrations compared with the control, corresponding to a reduction of 6, 13, and 23% for the low, medium, and high diets, respectively. Methane production was lowered with apparent efficiencies (measured methane reduction relative to potential methane reduction) of 82.3, 71.9, and 79.4% for the low, medium, and high diets, respectively. Addition of nitrate increased hydrogen emissions (L/kg of DMI) quadratically by a factor of 2.5, 3.4, and 3.0 (as L/kg of DMI) for the low, medium, and high diets, respectively, compared with the control. Blood methemoglobin levels and nitrate concentrations in milk and urine increased with increasing nitrate intake, but did not constitute a threat for animal health and human food safety. Microbial crude protein synthesis and efficiency were unaffected. Total volatile fatty acid

  1. Characteristics of hydrogen and methane production from cornstalks by an augmented two- or three-stage anaerobic fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yuan; Lai, Qiheng; Zhang, Chong; Zhao, Hongxin; Ma, Kun; Zhao, Xuebing; Chen, Hongzhang; Liu, Dehua; Xing, Xin-Hui

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents the co-production of hydrogen and methane from cornstalks by a two- or three-stage anaerobic fermentation process augmented with effective artificial microbial community. Two-stage fermentation by using the anaerobic sludge and DGGE analysis showed that effective and stable strains should be introduced into the system. We introduced Enterobacter aerogens or Clostridium paraputrificum into the hydrogen stage, and C. paraputrificum was proven to be more effective. In the three-stage process consisting of the improved hydrolysis, hydrogen and methane production stages, the highest soluble sugars (0.482 kg/kg cornstalks) were obtained after the introduction of Clostridium thermocellum in the hydrolysis stage, under the thermophilic (55 degrees C) and acidic (pH 5.0) conditions. Hydrolysates from 1 kg of cornstalks could produce 2.61 mol (63.7 l) hydrogen by augmentation with C. paraputrificum and 4.69 mol (114.6 l) methane by anaerobic granular sludge, corresponding to 54.1% energy recovery.

  2. Molecular hydrogen (H2) emissions and their isotopic signatures (H/D) from a motor vehicle : implications on atmospheric H2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollmer, M.K.; Walter, S.; Bond, S.W.; Soltic, P.; Röckmann, T.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2), its isotopic signature (deuterium/hydrogen, δD), carbon monoxide (CO) and other compounds were studied in the exhaust of a passenger car engine fuelled with gasoline or methane and run under variable air-fuel ratios and operating modes. H2 and CO concentrations were largely

  3. Molecular hydrogen (H2) emissions and their isotopic signatures (H/D) from a motor vehicle : implications on atmospheric H2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollmer, M.K.; Walter, S.; Bond, S.W.; Soltic, P.; Röckmann, T.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2), its isotopic signature (deuterium/hydrogen, δD), carbon monoxide (CO) and other compounds were studied in the exhaust of a passenger car engine fuelled with gasoline or methane and run under variable air-fuel ratios and operating modes. H2 and CO concentrations were largely

  4. Hydrogen production by catalytic decomposition of methane using a Fe-based catalyst in a fluidized bed reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.Torres; S.de Llobet; J.L.Pinilla; M.J.Lázaro; I.Suelves; R.Moliner

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic decomposition of methane using a Fe-based catalyst for hydrogen production has been studied in this work.A Fe/Al2O3 catalyst previously developed by our research group has been tested in a fluidized bed reactor (FBR).A parametric study of the effects of some process variables,including reaction temperature and space velocity,is undertaken.The operating conditions strongly affect the catalyst performance.Methane conversion was increased by increasing the temperature and lowering the space velocity.Using temperatures between 700 and 900 ℃ and space velocities between 3 and 6 LN/(gcat·h),a methane conversion in the range of 25%-40% for the gas exiting the reactor could be obtained during a 6 h run.In addition,carbon was deposited in the form of nanofilaments (chain like nanofibers and multiwall nanotubes) with similar properties to those obtained in a fixed bed reactor.

  5. Thermo-Catalytic Methane Decomposition for Hydrogen Production: Effect of Palladium Promoter on Ni-based Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Lock Sow Mei

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen production from the direct thermo-catalytic decomposition of methane is a promising alternative for clean fuel production. However, thermal decomposition of methane can hardly be of any practical and empirical interest in the industry unless highly efficient and effective catalysts, in terms of both catalytic activity and operational lifetime have been developed. In this study, the effect of palladium (Pd as a promoter onto Ni supported on alumina catalyst has been investigated by using co-precipitation technique. The introduction of Pd promotes better catalytic activity, operational lifetime and thermal stability of the catalyst. As expected, highest methane conversion was achieved at reaction temperature of 800 °C while the bimetallic catalyst (1 wt.% Ni -1wt.% Pd/Al2O3 gave the highest methane conversion of 70% over 15 min of time-on-stream (TOS. Interestingly, the introduction of Pd as promoter onto Ni-based catalyst also has a positive effect on the operational lifetime and thermal stability of the catalyst as the methane conversion has improved significantly over 240 min of TOS. Copyright © 2016 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 21st January 2016; Revised: 6th February 2016; Accepted: 6th March 2016 How to Cite: Mei, I.L.S., Lock, S.S.M., Vo, D.V.N., Abdullah, B. (2016. Thermo-Catalytic Methane Decomposition for Hydrogen Production: Effect of Palladium Promoter on Ni-based Catalysts. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 11 (2: 191-199 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.11.2.550.191-199 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.11.2.550.191-199

  6. 一氧化碳和硫化氢在颈动脉体缺氧反应中的调节作用%Hypoxia responses led by carotid body is regulated by carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄跃宇; 夏建华; 石学银

    2008-01-01

    传统认为一氧化碳和硫化氢为有毒气体,但近年的研究表明在颈动脉体感受低氧的过程中,这两种气体起重要的调节作用.一氧化碳通过增加内向钾离子电流抑制窦神经;硫化氢供体硫氢化钠则呈剂量依赖性兴奋窦神经.并且一氧化碳供体能完全逆转硫化氢对窦神经的兴奋作用.因而,一氧化碳和硫化氢共同调节颈动脉体对低氧状态反应的信号转导.%Carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide, both of which are well known toxic agents, are now demonstrated as critical gaseous mediators in carotid body when it responds to hypoxia. While carbon monoxide reduces sinus nerve impulses by decreasing inward potassium ion flux, sodium hydrosulfide, a donor of hydrogen sulfide, exerts an opposite effect in a dose - dependent manner.However, the exciting effect of hydrogen sulfide will be reversed completely after the donor of carbon monoxide is subjected. In this way, carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide intermingle into the regulation to the hypoxic information transduetion.

  7. Selection of a cut-off for high- and low-methane producers using a spot-methane breath test: results from a large north American dataset of hydrogen, methane and carbon dioxide measurements in breath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Klaus; Le, Chenxiong; Wacher, Vince; Sliman, Joe; Cruz, Christine; Porter, Tyler; Carter, Stephen

    2017-01-27

    Levels of breath methane, together with breath hydrogen, are determined by means of repeated collections of both, following ingestion of a carbohydrate substrate, at 15-20 minutes intervals, until 10 samples have been obtained. The frequent sampling is required to capture a rise of hydrogen emissions, which typically occur later in the test: in contrast, methane levels are typically elevated at baseline. If methane emissions represent the principal objective of the test, a spot methane test (i.e. a single-time-point sample taken after an overnight fast without administration of substrate) may be sufficient. We analysed 10-sample lactulose breath test data from 11 674 consecutive unique subjects who submitted samples to Commonwealth Laboratories (Salem, MA, USA) from sites in all of the states of the USA over a one-year period. The North American Consensus (NAC) guidelines criteria for breath testing served as a reference standard. The overall prevalence of methane-positive subjects (by NAC criteria) was 20.4%, based on corrected methane results, and 18.9% based on raw data. In our USA dataset, the optimal cut-off level to maximize sensitivity and specificity was ≥4 ppm CH4, 94.5% [confidential interval (CI): 93.5-95.4%] and 95.0% (CI: 94.6-95.5%), respectively. The use of a correction factor (CF) (5% CO2 as numerator) led to reclassifications CH4-high to CH4-low in 0.7 % and CH4-low to CH4-high in 2.1%. A cut-off value for methane at baseline of either ≥4 ppm, as in our USA dataset, or ≥ 5 ppm, as described in a single institution study, are both highly accurate in identifying subjects at baseline that would be diagnosed as 'methane-positive' in a 10-sample lactulose breath test for small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press and Sixth Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-Sen University.

  8. Enhancement of bioenergy production from organic wastes by two-stage anaerobic hydrogen and methane production process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Gang; Xie, Li; Zhou, Qi

    2011-01-01

    The present study investigated a two-stage anaerobic hydrogen and methane process for increasing bioenergy production from organic wastes. A two-stage process with hydraulic retention time (HRT) 3d for hydrogen reactor and 12d for methane reactor, obtained 11% higher energy compared to a single......-stage methanogenic process (HRT 15d) under organic loading rate (OLR) 3gVS/(Ld). The two-stage process was still stable when the OLR was increased to 4.5gVS/(Ld), while the single-stage process failed. The study further revealed that by changing the HRThydrogen:HRTmethane ratio of the two-stage process from 3...

  9. Continuous measurements of nitrous oxide, carbon monoxide, methane and carbon dioxide in the surface ocean with novel laser-absorption analysers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Jan; Grefe, Imke; Wager, Natalie; Bakker, Dorothee C. E.; Lee, Gareth A.

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, improvements in spectroscopic technology have revolutionised atmospheric trace gas research. In particular, cavity-based optical absorption analysers allow determination of gas concentrations with high frequency, repeatability, reproducibility and long-term stability. These qualities make them particularly suitable for autonomous measurements on voluntary observing ships (VOS). Here, we present results from three of the first deployments of such analysers on research ships, as a first step towards VOS installations. Los Gatos off-axis ICOS (Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy) analysers were used to measure nitrous oxide (N2O), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) mixing ratios in ocean surface water during research cruises in 2010, 2011 and 2012. The analysers were coupled to an equilibrator fed by the scientific seawater supply in the ship's laboratories. The equilibrator measurements were alternated with regular measurements of marine air and calibrated standard gases. Short-term precision for 10 s-average N2O mole fractions at an acquisition rate of 1 Hz was better than 0.2 nmol mol-1. The same value was achieved for duplicate measurements of a standard gas analysed within 1 hour of each other. The response time to concentration changes in water was 142-203 s, depending on the headspace flow rate. During the first deployment on the AMT20 cruise (Atlantic Meridional Transect, Southampton to Punta Arenas, 12 October to 25 November 2010), we unexpectedly found the subtropical gyres to be slightly undersaturated in N2O, implying that this region acted as a sink for this greenhouse gas. In contrast, the equatorial region was supersaturated and a source of nitrous oxide to the atmosphere. Mean sea-to-air fluxes were overall small and ranged between -1.6 and 0.11 μmol m-2 d-1 (negative fluxes imply an net uptake by the ocean). Despite the good short-term repeatability, significant calibration drift occurred between the six

  10. Coupling of Wind Energy and Biogas with a High Temperature Steam Electrolyser for Hydrogen and Methane Production

    OpenAIRE

    Monnerie, Nathalie; Roeb, Martin; Houaijia, Anis; Sattler, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The production of environment friendly green fuels is based on energy from renewable sources. Among the renewable sources, wind power is a very growing power technology. An example which has been discussed very widely is hydrogen which is an ideal fuel for a fuel cell. Hydrogen is the energy of the future. It will be used as energy carrier as well as reactant to produce green fuels, like methane which is easier to handle. Direct coupling of a High Temperature Steam Electrolyser (HTSE) with a ...

  11. Preparation of Fe-Mn/K/Al2O3 Fischer-Tropsch Catalyst and Its Catalytic Kinetics for the Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F.Fazlollahi; M.Sarkari; H.Gharebaghi; H.Atashi; M.M.Zarei; A.A.Mirzaei; W.C.Hecker

    2013-01-01

    A K promoted iron-manganese catalyst was prepared by sol-gel method,and subsequently was tested for hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to light olefins.The kinetic experiments on a well-characterized Fe-Mn/K/Al2O3 catalyst were performed in a fixed-bed micro-reactor in a temperature range of 280-380 ℃,pressure range of 0.1-1.2 MPa,H2/CO feed molar ratio range of 1-2.1 and a space velocity range of 2000-7200 h-1.Considering the mechanism of the process and Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hogan-Watson (LHHW) approach,unassisted CO dissociation and H-assisted CO dissociation mechanisms were defined.The best models were obtained using non-linear regression analysis and Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm.Consequently,4 models were considered as the preferred models based on the carbide mechanism.Finally,a model was proposed as a best model that assumed the following kinetically relevant steps in the iron-Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis:(1) CO dissociation occurred without hydrogen interaction and was not a rate-limiting step; (2) the first hydrogen addition to surface carbon was the rate-determining steps.The activation energy and adsorption enthalpy were calculated 40.0 and-30.2 kJ· mol-1,respectively.

  12. Measurements on high temperature fuel cells with carbon monoxide-containing fuel gases; Messungen an Hochtemperatur-Brennstoffzellen mit kohlenmonoxidhaltigen Brenngasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apfel, Holger

    2012-10-10

    In the present work the different power density of anode-supported high-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (ASC-SOFCs) were examined for carbon monoxide-containing fuels. In addition to wet hydrogen / carbon monoxide mixtures the cells were run with synthetic gas mixtures resembling the products of an autothermal reformer, and actual reformate generated by a 2 kW autothermal reformer. It was found that the power-voltage characteristics of an ASC depends primarily on the open circuit voltages of different gas mixtures, but is nearly independent of the hydrogen concentration of the fuel, although the reaction rates of other potential fuels within the gas mixture, namely carbon monoxide and methane, are much lower that the hydrogen reaction rate. The probable reason is that the main fuel for the electrochemical oxidation within the cell is hydrogen, while the nickel in the base layer of the anode acts as a reformer which replenishes the hydrogen by water reduction via carbon monoxide and methane oxidation.

  13. Hydrogen production using thermocatalytic decomposition of methane on Ni30/activated carbon and Ni30/carbon black.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srilatha, K; Viditha, V; Srinivasulu, D; Ramakrishna, S U B; Himabindu, V

    2016-05-01

    Hydrogen is an energy carrier of the future need. It could be produced from different sources and used for power generation or as a transport fuel which mainly in association with fuel cells. The primary challenge for hydrogen production is reducing the cost of production technologies to make the resulting hydrogen cost competitive with conventional fuels. Thermocatalytic decomposition (TCD) of methane is one of the most advantageous processes, which will meet the future demand, hence an attractive route for COx free environment. The present study deals with the production of hydrogen with 30 wt% of Ni impregnated in commercially available activated carbon and carbon black catalysts (samples coded as Ni30/AC and Ni30/CB, respectively). These combined catalysts were not attempted by previous studies. Pure form of hydrogen is produced at 850 °C and volume hourly space velocity (VHSV) of 1.62 L/h g on the activity of both the catalysts. The analysis (X-ray diffraction (XRD)) of the catalysts reveals moderately crystalline peaks of Ni, which might be responsible for the increase in catalytic life along with formation of carbon fibers. The activity of carbon black is sustainable for a longer time compared to that of activated carbon which has been confirmed by life time studies (850 °C and 54 sccm of methane).

  14. EVALUATING HYDROGEN PRODUCTION IN BIOGAS REFORMING IN A MEMBRANE REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. A. Silva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Syngas and hydrogen production by methane reforming of a biogas (CH4/CO2 = 2.85 using carbon dioxide was evaluated in a fixed bed reactor with a Pd-Ag membrane in the presence of a nickel catalyst (Ni 3.31% weight/γ-Al2O3 at 773 K, 823 K, and 873 K and 1.01×105 Pa. Operation with hydrogen permeation at 873 K increased the methane conversion to approximately 83% and doubled the hydrogen yield relative to operation without hydrogen permeation. A mathematical model was formulated to predict the evolution of the effluent concentrations. Predictions based on the model showed similar evolutions for yields of hydrogen and carbon monoxide at temperatures below 823 K for operations with and without the hydrogen permeation. The hydrogen yield reached approximately 21% at 823 K and 47% at 873 K under hydrogen permeation conditions.

  15. Evaluation of aeration pretreatment to prepare an inoculum for the two-stage hydrogen and methane production process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Andrea; Sarli, Valentina; Lavagnolo, Maria Cristina; Spagni, Alessandro

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluates the effect of aeration pretreatment to prepare an inoculum for H₂ and CH₄ production in a two-stage process. Moreover, the biochemical hydrogen potential and biochemical methane potential of waste from the food industry in a two-stage process was assessed. The results confirmed the possibility of using an aerobic stress for selecting a hydrogen-producing inoculum. The inoculum was fairly stable since no hydrogenotrophic-methanogenic activity was observed in 25 days. The yields measured using glucose as substrate were of approximately 160 and 280 N mL(H₂) g(COD⁻¹) of glucose for hydrogen and methane, respectively, which are in agreement with other studies using heat-shock for the pretreatment of the inoculum. When waste of the food industry (wheat milling) was used as substrate, a lower H₂ yield was achieved by the aerobically-pretreated inoculum if compared to heat-shock; however, when combined with methane production in a two-stage process, much higher CH₄ yield was achieved.

  16. Performance of alternative oxide anodes for the electrochemical oxidation of hydrogen and methane in solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, H.; Apfel, H.; Stimming, U. [Department of Physics E19, Technical University of Munich, James-Franck-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    The electrode performances of the alternative oxides: La{sub 0.05}Ca{sub 0.95}Cr{sub 0.05}Ti{sub 0.95}O{sub 3-{delta}}-8YSZ and Ce{sub 0.8}TM{sub 0.2}O{sub 2-{delta}}(TM=Mn, Co) for the direct electrochemical oxidation of methane are investigated to assess their potential as anode materials for efficient methane conversion in a SOFC. The electrochemical oxidation of hydrogen was also studied, for comparison. The oxides are characterised electrochemically with impedance spectroscopy in the frequency range from 10 mHz to 1MHz, using a three-electrode geometry. They are compared to a standard Ni/8YSZ anode for the electrochemical oxidation of hydrogen. It is found that La{sub 0.05}Ca{sub 0.95}Cr{sub 0.05}Ti{sub 0.95}O{sub 3-{delta}}-8YSZ demonstrates a poor electrochemical activity in both hydrogen and methane. However, the electrochemical activity of Ce{sub 0.8}Mn{sub 0.2}O{sub 2-{delta}} is promising, but the electronic conductivity needs to be increased, e.g., by adding a conducting oxide, before it can be used as an anode material in a SOFC. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Calorimetric Thermoelectric Gas Sensor for the Detection of Hydrogen, Methane and Mixed Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam-Hee Park

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel miniaturized calorimeter-type sensor device with a dual-catalyst structure was fabricated by integrating different catalysts on the hot (Pd/θ-Al2O3 and cold (Pt/α-Al2O3 ends of the device. The device comprises a calorimeter with a thermoelectric gas sensor (calorimetric-TGS, combining catalytic combustion and thermoelectric technologies. Its response for a model fuel gas of hydrogen and methane was investigated with various combustor catalyst compositions. The calorimetric-TGS devices detected H2, CH4, and a mixture of the two with concentrations ranging between 200 and 2000 ppm at temperatures of 100–400 °C, in terms of the calorie content of the gases. It was necessary to reduce the much higher response voltage of the TGS to H2 compared to CH4. We enhanced the H2 combustion on the cold side so that the temperature differences and response voltages to H2 were reduced. The device response to H2 combustion was reduced by 50% by controlling the Pt concentration in the Pt/α-Al2O3 catalyst on the cold side to 3 wt%.

  18. Hydrogen and Carbon Black Production from the Degradation of Methane by Thermal Plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Cottet

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Methane gas (CH4 is the main inducer of the so called greenhouse gases effect. Recent scientific research aims to minimize the accumulation of this gas in the atmosphere and to develop processes capable of producing stable materials with added value. Thermal plasma technology is a promising alternative to these applications, since it allows obtaining H2 and solid carbon from CH4, without the parallel formation of byproducts such as CO2 and NOx. In this work, CH4 was degraded by thermal plasma in order to produce hydrogen (H2 and carbon black. The degradation efficiency of CH4, selectivity for H2 production as well as the characterization of carbon black were studied. The best results were obtained in the CH4 flow rate of 5 L min-1 the degradation percentage and the selectivity for H2 production reached 98.8 % and 48.4 %, respectively. At flow rates of less than 5 L min-1 the selectivity for H2 production increases and reaches 91.9 %. The carbon black has obtained amorphous with hydrophobic characteristics and can be marketed to be used in composite material, and can also be activated chemically and/or physically and used as adsorbent material.

  19. Effect of Nickel Levels on Hydrogen Partial Pressure and Methane Production in Methanogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2) consumption and methane (CH4) production in pure cultures of three different methanogens were investigated during cultivation with 0, 0.2 and 4.21 μM added nickel (Ni). The results showed that the level of dissolved Ni in the anaerobic growth medium did not notably affect CH4 production in the cytochrome-free methanogenic species Methanobacterium bryantii and Methanoculleus bourgensis MAB1, but affected CH4 formation rate in the cytochrome-containing Methanosarcina barkeri grown on H2 and CO2. Methanosarcina barkeri also had the highest amounts of Ni in its cells, indicating that more Ni is needed by cytochrome-containing than by cytochrome-free methanogenic species. The concentration of Ni affected threshold values of H2 partial pressure (pH2) for all three methanogen species studied, with M. bourgensis MAB1 reaching pH2 values as low as 0.1 Pa when Ni was available in amounts used in normal anaerobic growth medium. To our knowledge, this is the lowest pH2 threshold recorded to date in pure methanogen culture, which suggests that M.bourgensis MAB1 have a competitive advantage over other species through its ability to grow at low H2 concentrations. Our study has implications for research on the H2-driven deep subsurface biosphere and biogas reactor performance. PMID:27992585

  20. A Nanomesoporous Catalyst from Modified Red Mud and Its Application for Methane Decomposition to Hydrogen Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoke Fang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A type of nanomesoporous modified red mud (MRM catalyst was prepared and utilized for catalytic methane decomposition (CMD to produce hydrogen. The modification process significantly simplified the mineral composition of the red mud (RM; in the meantime, the physical and chemical structure of RM was changed. TEM images suggested that MRM was a kind of nanomesoporous material assembled by a number of uniformly nanoscale particles, BET results showed that the pore size distributions of MRM were ranged from 3 to 12 nm, and the specific surface area and total pore volumes of red mud improved from 8.00 m2/g and 0.08 cm3/g to 190.61 m2/g and 0.39 cm3/g, respectively. The catalytic performance of the catalysts has been tested at 800°C; the results showed that MRM exhibited much higher activity and stability than RM for CMD.

  1. Methane Inhibition Alters the Microbial Community, Hydrogen Flow, and Fermentation Response in the Rumen of Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Fernandez, Gonzalo; Denman, Stuart E.; Yang, Chunlei; Cheung, Jane; Mitsumori, Makoto; McSweeney, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Management of metabolic hydrogen ([H]) in the rumen has been identified as an important consideration when reducing ruminant CH4 emissions. However, little is known about hydrogen flux and microbial rumen population responses to CH4 inhibition when animals are fed with slowly degradable diets. The effects of the anti-methanogenic compound, chloroform, on rumen fermentation, microbial ecology, and H2/CH4 production were investigated in vivo. Eight rumen fistulated Brahman steers were fed a roughage hay diet (Rhode grass hay) or roughage hay:concentrate diet (60:40) with increasing levels (low, mid, and high) of chloroform in a cyclodextrin matrix. The increasing levels of chloroform resulted in an increase in H2 expelled as CH4 production decreased with no effect on dry matter intakes. The amount of expelled H2 per mole of decreased methane, was lower for the hay diet suggesting a more efficient redirection of hydrogen into other microbial products compared with hay:concentrate diet. A shift in rumen fermentation toward propionate and branched-chain fatty acids was observed for both diets. Animals fed with the hay:concentrate diet had both higher formate concentration and H2 expelled than those fed only roughage hay. Metabolomic analyses revealed an increase in the concentration of amino acids, organic, and nucleic acids in the fluid phase for both diets when methanogenesis was inhibited. These changes in the rumen metabolism were accompanied by a shift in the microbiota with an increase in Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratio and a decrease in Archaea and Synergistetes for both diets. Within the Bacteroidetes family, some OTUs assigned to Prevotella were promoted under chloroform treatment. These bacteria may be partly responsible for the increase in amino acids and propionate in the rumen. No significant changes were observed for abundance of fibrolytic bacteria, protozoa, and fungi, which suggests that fiber degradation was not impaired. The observed 30% decrease in

  2. Methane Inhibition Alters the Microbial Community, Hydrogen Flow, and Fermentation Response in the Rumen of Cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Fernandez, Gonzalo; Denman, Stuart E; Yang, Chunlei; Cheung, Jane; Mitsumori, Makoto; McSweeney, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    Management of metabolic hydrogen ([H]) in the rumen has been identified as an important consideration when reducing ruminant CH4 emissions. However, little is known about hydrogen flux and microbial rumen population responses to CH4 inhibition when animals are fed with slowly degradable diets. The effects of the anti-methanogenic compound, chloroform, on rumen fermentation, microbial ecology, and H2/CH4 production were investigated in vivo. Eight rumen fistulated Brahman steers were fed a roughage hay diet (Rhode grass hay) or roughage hay:concentrate diet (60:40) with increasing levels (low, mid, and high) of chloroform in a cyclodextrin matrix. The increasing levels of chloroform resulted in an increase in H2 expelled as CH4 production decreased with no effect on dry matter intakes. The amount of expelled H2 per mole of decreased methane, was lower for the hay diet suggesting a more efficient redirection of hydrogen into other microbial products compared with hay:concentrate diet. A shift in rumen fermentation toward propionate and branched-chain fatty acids was observed for both diets. Animals fed with the hay:concentrate diet had both higher formate concentration and H2 expelled than those fed only roughage hay. Metabolomic analyses revealed an increase in the concentration of amino acids, organic, and nucleic acids in the fluid phase for both diets when methanogenesis was inhibited. These changes in the rumen metabolism were accompanied by a shift in the microbiota with an increase in Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratio and a decrease in Archaea and Synergistetes for both diets. Within the Bacteroidetes family, some OTUs assigned to Prevotella were promoted under chloroform treatment. These bacteria may be partly responsible for the increase in amino acids and propionate in the rumen. No significant changes were observed for abundance of fibrolytic bacteria, protozoa, and fungi, which suggests that fiber degradation was not impaired. The observed 30% decrease in

  3. Methane inhibition alters the microbial community, hydrogen flow and fermentation response in the rumen of cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Martinez-Fernandez

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Management of metabolic hydrogen ([H] in the rumen has been identified as an important consideration when reducing ruminant CH4 emissions. However, little is known about hydrogen flux and microbial rumen population responses to CH4 inhibition when animals are fed with slowly degradable diets. The effects of the anti-methanogenic compound, chloroform, on rumen fermentation, microbial ecology and H2 /CH4 production were investigated in vivo. Eight rumen fistulated Brahman steers were fed a roughage hay diet (Rhode grass hay or roughage hay:concentrate diet (60:40 with increasing levels (low, mid and high of chloroform in a cylcodextrin matrix. The increasing levels of chloroform resulted in an increase in H2 expelled as CH4 production decreased with no effect on dry matter intakes. The amount of expelled H2 per mole of decreased methane, was lower for the hay diet suggesting a more efficient redirection of hydrogen into other microbial products compared with hay:concentrate diet. A shift in rumen fermentation towards propionate and branched-chain fatty acids was observed for both diets. Animals fed with the hay:concentrate diet had both higher formate concentration and H2 expelled than those fed only roughage hay. Metabolomic analyses revealed an increase in the concentration of amino acids, organic and nucleic acids in the fluid phase for both diets when methanogenesis was inhibited. These changes in the rumen metabolism were accompanied by a shift in the microbiota with an increase in Bacteroidetes:Firmicutes ratio and a decrease in Archaea and Synergistetes for both diets. Within the Bacteroidetes family, some OTUs assigned to Prevotella were promoted under choloroform treatment. These bacteria may be partly responsible for the increase in amino acids and propionate in the rumen. No significant changes were observed for abundance of fibrolytic bacteria, protozoa and fungi, which suggests that fibre degradation was not impaired. The observed 30

  4. Partial oxidation of methane (POM) assisted solid oxide co-electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Fanglin; Wang, Yao

    2017-02-21

    Methods for simultaneous syngas generation by opposite sides of a solid oxide co-electrolysis cell are provided. The method can comprise exposing a cathode side of the solid oxide co-electrolysis cell to a cathode-side feed stream; supplying electricity to the solid oxide co-electrolysis cell such that the cathode side produces a product stream comprising hydrogen gas and carbon monoxide gas while supplying oxygen ions to an anode side of the solid oxide co-electrolysis cell; and exposing the anode side of the solid oxide co-electrolysis cell to an anode-side feed stream. The cathode-side feed stream comprises water and carbon dioxide, and the anode-side feed stream comprises methane gas such that the methane gas reacts with the oxygen ions to produce hydrogen and carbon monoxide. The cathode-side feed stream can further comprise nitrogen, hydrogen, or a mixture thereof.

  5. Extreme hydrogen, oxygen and carbon isotope anomalies in the pore waters and carbonates of the sediments and basalts from the Norwegian Sea: Methane and hydrogen from the mantle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, J.R. (Univ. of Houston, University Park, TX (USA)); Taviani, M. (Instituto di Geologia Marina, del C.N.R., Bologna (Italy))

    1988-08-01

    D/H ratios in the pore waters of the sediments from the Norwegian Sea decrease as a function of depth to values as low as {minus}14{per thousand}. Oxygen isotope ratios in the pore waters and carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in carbonates both in the sediments and basalts are low. Extensive alteration of basalt has been given as the explanation for the low oxygen isotope ratios. Material balance calculations suggest that alteration of volcanic material and oxidation of organic matter cannot explain the hydrogen and carbon isotope anomalies. Arguments are presented suggesting that methane and hydrogen from the mantle are oxidized to carbon dioxide and water by sulfate and ferric iron in the basaltic crust to yield the low hydrogen and carbon isotope ratios.

  6. Rhodium based clusters for oxygen reduction and hydrogen oxidation in 0.5 M H2SO4, tolerant to methanol and carbon monoxide, respectively

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uribe-Godinez, J.; Jimenez-Sandoval, O.; Borja-Arco, E.; Altamirano-Gutierrez, A. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Queritaro (Mexico); Castellanos, R.H. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada-Queretaro, Queretaro (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    Rhodium (Rh6(CO)16) and novel Rh-based clusters were prepared using thermolysis techniques under different conditions in N2 and H2 reaction media, as well as in n-nonane, o-xylene, 1,2-dichlorobenzene and dimethylsulfoxide. The clusters were used as novel electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the absence and presence of 1.0 and 2.0 M methanol solutions. The catalysts were also used for hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) with pure hydrogen (H2) and in the presence of carbon monoxide (CO). Rotating disk electrode measurements were used to analyze the materials. The study showed that the electrocatalyst support ratio plays a significant role in the electrochemical behaviour of the materials. Rh6(CO)16 and Rh2(1,2-DCB) presented the best electrocatalytic behaviour for ORR and HOR in the absence and presence of methanol and CO. The study demonstrated that the rhodium-based materials are capable of performing ORR and HOR while being tolerant of both methanol and CO. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Anaerobic treatment of cassava stillage for hydrogen and methane production in continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) under high organic loading rate (OLR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Gang; Xie, Li; Zou, Zhonghai; Wang, Wen; Zhou, Qi [Key Laboratory of Yangtze River Water Environment, Ministry of Education (Tongji University), UNEP-Tongji, Tongji University, Siping Road No. 1239, Shanghai 200092 (China); Shim, Hojae [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Macau, Macau SAR 999078 (China)

    2010-11-15

    Anaerobic hydrogen and methane production from cassava stillage in continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) were investigated in this study. Results showed that the heat-pretreatment of inoculum did not enhance hydrogen yield compared to raw inoculum under mesophilic condition after continuous operation. However, the hydrogen yield increased from about 14 ml H{sub 2}/gVS under mesophilic condition to 69.6 ml H{sub 2}/gVS under thermophilic condition due to the decrease of propionate concentration and inhibition of homoacetogens. Therefore, temperature was demonstrated to be more important than pretreatment of inoculum to enhance the hydrogen production. Under high organic loading rate (OLR) (>10 gVS/(L.d)), the two-phase thermophilic CSTR for hydrogen and methane production was stable with hydrogen and methane yields of 56.6 mlH{sub 2}/gVS and 249 mlCH{sub 4}/gVS. The one-phase thermophilic CSTR for methane production failed due to the accumulation of both acetate and propionate, leading to the pH lower than 6. Instead of propionate alone, the accumulations of both acetate and propionate were found to be related to the breakdown of methane reactor. (author)

  8. Dose dependence of breath hydrogen and methane in healthy volunteers after ingestion of a commercial disaccharide mixture, Palatinit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, M; Siebert, G; Kasper, H

    1985-09-01

    Breath hydrogen and methane were determined by gas chromatography in eleven normal individuals given a low-fibre, mixed diet (control) and after ingestion of 20-50 g Palatinit/d, an equimolar mixture of D-glucosyl-alpha(1----1)-D-mannitol and D-glucosyl-alpha(1----6)-D-glucitol (Isomalt). A linear relation was found (r 0.85; P less than 0.001) between the amount of Palatinit ingested and breath H2 per 10 h in subjects who did not exhale methane. If methane was formed in addition to H2, the sum of both gases followed a linear dose-effect relation. The mouth-to-caecum time, indicated by the first increase in breath H2 after ingestion, was shortened by about half, yet no sign of diarrhoea was observed. Stool weight and stool frequency did not change significantly. The linear relation between a dose of 20-50 g Palatinit and exhalation of H2 (eventually plus methane) indicated that a relatively constant fraction of the dose given underwent cleavage and absorption in the small intestine, the remainder being transported into the large bowel. Microbial gas formation in the colon as well as the fractional transfer of these gases into the expiratory air occurred at fixed proportions, thus allowing an insight into colonic microbial contributions to carbohydrate utilization in the human large bowel.

  9. Generation of Hydrogen and Methane during Experimental Low-Temperature Reaction of Ultramafic Rocks with Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollom, Thomas M.; Donaldson, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    Serpentinization of ultramafic rocks is widely recognized as a source of molecular hydrogen (H2) and methane (CH4) to support microbial activity, but the extent and rates of formation of these compounds in low-temperature, near-surface environments are poorly understood. Laboratory experiments were conducted to examine the production of H2 and CH4 during low-temperature reaction of water with ultramafic rocks and minerals. Experiments were performed by heating olivine or harzburgite with aqueous solutions at 90°C for up to 213 days in glass bottles sealed with butyl rubber stoppers. Although H2 and CH4 increased steadily throughout the experiments, the levels were very similar to those found in mineral-free controls, indicating that the rubber stoppers were the predominant source of these compounds. Levels of H2 above background were observed only during the first few days of reaction of harzburgite when CO2 was added to the headspace, with no detectable production of H2 or CH4 above background during further heating of the harzburgite or in experiments with other mineral reactants. Consequently, our results indicate that production of H2 and CH4 during low-temperature alteration of ultramafic rocks may be much more limited than some recent experimental studies have suggested. We also found no evidence to support a recent report suggesting that spinels in ultramafic rocks may stimulate H2 production. While secondary silicates were observed to precipitate during the experiments, formation of these deposits was dominated by Si released by dissolution of the glass bottles, and reaction of the primary silicate minerals appeared to be very limited. While use of glass bottles and rubber stoppers has become commonplace in experiments intended to study processes that occur during serpentinization of ultramafic rocks at low temperatures, the high levels of H2, CH4, and SiO2 released during heating indicate that these reactor materials are unsuitable for this purpose.

  10. Investigations into the nature of halogen- and hydrogen-bonding interactions of some heteroaromatic rings with dichlorine monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Junyong

    2014-09-01

    We have studied the structures, properties, and nature of halogen- and hydrogen-bonding interactions between some heteroaromatic rings (C(5)H(5)N, C(4)H(4)O, and C(4)H(4)S) with Cl(2)O at the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ level. We also considered the solvent effect on the halogen bonds and hydrogen bonds in the C(5)H(5)N-Cl(2)O complexes and found that the solvent has a weakening effect on the π-type halogen bond and hydrogen bond but a prominent enhancing effect on σ-type halogen bond. The complexes have also been analyzed with symmetry adapted perturbation theory method (SAPT).

  11. Selective catalytic methanation of CO in hydrogen-rich gases over Ni/ZrO2 catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qihai Liu; Xinfa Dong; Xinman Mo; Weiming Lin

    2008-01-01

    Ni/ZrO2 catalysts were prepared by the incipient-wetness impregnation method and were investigated in activity and selectivity for the selective catalytic methanation of CO in hydrogen-rich gases with more than 20 vol%CO2.The result showed that Ni loadings significantly influenced the performance of Ni/ZrO2 catalyst.The 1.6 wt%Ni loading catalyst exhibited the highest catalytic activity among all the catalysts in the selective methanation of CO in hydrogen-rich gas.The outlet concentration of CO was less than 20 ppm with the hydrogen consumption below 7%.at a gas-hourly-space velocity as high as 10000 h-1 and a temperature range of 260℃ to 280℃.The X-ray diffraction(XRD)and temperature programmed reduction (TPR)measurements showed that NiO was dispersed thoroughly on the surface of ZrO2 support if Ni loading was under 1.6 wt%.When N-10ading was increased to 3 wt%or above.the free bulk NiO species began to assemble,which was not favorable to increase the selectivity of the catalyst.

  12. Two-phase anaerobic digestion of mixed waste streams to separate generation of bio-hydrogen and bio-methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, Z.; Horam, N.J. [Leeds Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Civil Engineering

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the net energy potential of single stage mesophilic reactor and two phase mesophilic reactor (hydrogeniser followed by methaniser) using the mix of process industrial food waste (IFW) and sewage sludge (SS). Two-phase reactor efficiency was analysed based on individual optimum influent/environmental (C:N and pH) and reactor/engineering (HRT and OLR) conditions achieved using the batch and continuous reactor study for the hydrogen and methane. Optimum C:N 20 and pH 5.5{+-}0.5 was observed using the Bio-H{sub 2} potential (BHP) and C:N 15 and pH 6.5{+-}0.3 for the biochemical methane potential (BMP) test. The maximum hydrogen content of 47% (v/v) was achieved using OLR 6 g VS/L/d and HRT of 5 days. Increase in hydrogen yield was noticed with consistent decrease in OLR. The volatile solids (VS) removal and hydrogen yield was observed in range 41.3 to 47% and 112.3 to 146.7 mL/ gVS{sub removed}. The specific hydrogen production rate improved at low OLR, 0.2 to 0.4 L/(L.d) using OLR 7.1 and 6 g VS/L/d respectively was well corroborated comparable to previous reported results at OLR 6 gVS/L/d using the enriched carbohydrate waste stream in particular to food wastes. A significant increase in VFA concentrations were noticed shifting OLR higher from 6 g VS/L/d thereby unbalancing the reactor pH and the biogas yield respectively. In similar, maximum methane content of 70% (v/v) was achieved using OLR of 3.3 gVS/L/d and HRT of 10 days. Slight decrease in methane content was noticed thereby increasing HRT to 12 and 15 days respectively. The volatile solids (VS) removal and specific methane production rate was observed in range 57.6 to 68.7 and 0.22 to 1.19 L/(L.d). The specific methane production potential improved thereby reducing the HRT and optimum yield was recorded as 476.6 mL/gVS{sub removed} using OLR 3.3 gVS/L/d. The energy potential of optimum condition in single stage hydorgeniser is 2.27 MW/tonne VS{sub fed}. Using the

  13. Vibrational Spectroscopic Studies of Hydrogen, Carbon-Monoxide and Thiophene Adsorption on Ruthenium-Sulfide and Sulfided Ruthenium Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heise, William Herbert

    The "working surface" of ruthenium hydrodesulfurization (HDS) catalysts has been modeled by preadsorption of sulfur, carbon and carbon plus sulfur on Ru(0001). Adsorption and decomposition of thiophene over these surfaces have been investigated using TDS/TPRS, XPS and EELS. Thiophene is proposed to decompose via a three-step mechanism involving: (i) initial thiophene cracking at 120 K yielding surface sulfur and hydrocarbon species, (ii) hydrogen desorption near 230 K providing additional decomposition ensembles and (iii) continued decomposition to form "metallocycle -like" intermediates which retain EELS features similar to thiophene. Preadsorbed carbon or carbon plus sulfur are not as effective for passivation of the surface toward metallocycle formation as preadsorbed sulfur alone. This result is attributed to the fact that carbon deposited from butadiene annealed and decomposed at 700 K forms islands, while sulfur establishes a well-ordered superlattice on the surface. The decrease in metallocycle formation with increasing poison levels appears to explain HDS selectivity and specific activity trends observed in our laboratory from mildly sulfided (10% H_2S/H_2 , 673 K, 2h) ruthenium catalysts retaining submonolayers of sulfur. Incoherent inelastic neutron scattering (IINS) has been used to characterize hydrogen adsorption sites on ruthenium sulfide. Hydrogen resides on sulfur anions to form SH groups, yielding two non-degenerate bending modes at 600 and 710 cm^{-1}. Complementary hydrogen adsorption and H_2/D _2 exchange data suggest that the active sites for hydrogen adsorption may be coordinatively unsaturated S-S anion pairs. Comparison of CO adsorption on sulfided Ru/Al _2O_3 to sulfur precovered Ru(0001) reveals an adsorption site related to edge/corner atoms directly perturbed by sulfur, consistent with previous kinetic studies demonstrating higher specific activity for thiophene HDS over smaller ruthenium crystallites.

  14. Microbial methane from in situ biodegradation of coal and shale: A review and reevaluation of hydrogen and carbon isotope signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, David S.; Blair, Neal E.; Martini, Anna M.; Larter, Steve; Orem, William H.; McIntosh, Jennifer C.

    2017-01-01

    Stable carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures of methane, water, and inorganic carbon are widely utilized in natural gas systems for distinguishing microbial and thermogenic methane and for delineating methanogenic pathways (acetoclastic, hydrogenotrophic, and/or methylotrophic methanogenesis). Recent studies of coal and shale gas systems have characterized in situ microbial communities and provided stable isotope data (δD-CH4, δD-H2O, δ13C-CH4, and δ13C-CO2) from a wider range of environments than available previously. Here we review the principal biogenic methane-yielding pathways in coal beds and shales and the isotope effects imparted on methane, document the uncertainties and inconsistencies in established isotopic fingerprinting techniques, and identify the knowledge gaps in understanding the subsurface processes that govern H and C isotope signatures of biogenic methane. We also compare established isotopic interpretations with recent microbial community characterization techniques, which reveal additional inconsistencies in the interpretation of microbial metabolic pathways in coal beds and shales. Collectively, the re-assessed data show that widely-utilized isotopic fingerprinting techniques neglect important complications in coal beds and shales.Isotopic fingerprinting techniques that combine δ13C-CH4 with δD-CH4 and/or δ13C-CO2have significant limitations: (1) The consistent ~ 160‰ offset between δD-H2O and δD-CH4 could imply that hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis is the dominant metabolic pathway in microbial gas systems. However, hydrogen isotopes can equilibrate between methane precursors and coexisting water, yielding a similar apparent H isotope signal as hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, regardless of the actual methane formation pathway. (2) Non-methanogenic processes such as sulfate reduction, Fe oxide reduction, inputs of thermogenic methane, anaerobic methane oxidation, and/or formation water interaction can cause the apparent carbon

  15. Preferential Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide in Excess Hydrogen over Au/Co3O4- CeO2 Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Au/Co3O4-CeO2 mixed-oxide catalysts were shown experimentally to be highly active and selective for the oxidation of CO in hydrogen-rich mixture. Activity was markedly influenced by the composition of the support, aging temperature and Au-loading temperature. It provided that single-step removal of CO from hydrogen-rich stream both in the absence and presence of CO2 and H2O to a PEMFC tolerant level. It was found that catalytic activity is greatly affected by adding CO2 in the mixture and increased by farther adding H2O. It meants H2O has the effect to rise catalytic activity. Moreover,it shows better stability with reaction time for the preferential CO oxidation.

  16. Effect of Organic Capping Layers over Monodisperse Platinum Nanoparticles upon Activity for Ethylene Hydrogenation and Carbon Monoxide Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, John N.; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Huang, Wenyu; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2009-03-24

    The influence of oleylamine (OA), trimethyl tetradecyl ammonium bromide (TTAB), and polyvinlypyrrolidone (PVP) capping agents upon the catalytic properties of Pt/silica catalysts was evaluated. Pt nanoparticles that were 1.5 nm in size were synthesized by the same procedure (ethylene glycol reduction under basic conditions) with the various capping agents added afterward for stabilization. Before examining catalytic properties for ethylene hydrogenation and CO oxidation, the Pt NPs were deposited onto mesoporous silica (SBA-15) supports and characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), H{sub 2} chemisorption, and elemental analysis (ICP-MS). PVP- and TTAB-capped Pt yielded mass-normalized reaction rates that decreased with increasing pretreatment temperature, and this trend was attributed to the partial coverage of the Pt surface with decomposition products from the organic capping agent. Once normalized to the Pt surface area, similar intrinsic activities were obtained regardless of the pretreatment temperature, which indicated no influence on the nature of the active sites. Consequently, a chemical probe technique using intrinsic activity for ethylene hydrogenation was demonstrated as an acceptable method for estimating the metallic surface areas of Pt. Amine (OA) capping exhibited a detrimental influence on the catalytic properties as severe deactivation and low activity were observed for ethylene hydrogenation and CO oxidation, respectively. These results were consistent with amine groups being strong poisons for Pt surfaces, and revealed the need to consider the effects of capping agents on the catalytic properties.

  17. New Reactions to Obtain Aromatics and Hydrogen through Methane's Direct Catalytic Dehydroaromatization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yide; XIE Maosong; BAO Xinhe; LIN Liwu; WANG Linsheng

    2007-01-01

    @@ Methane is the main component of natural gas and coal-bed gas. Structurally, its molecule is highly symmetric and hence, it becomes one of the most stable hydrocarbon compounds in nature. For a long time in the past, the research of methane transformation is a permanent "hot spot" and disciplinary frontier for chemists as it can be catalyzed directly into top-quality fuel and chemicals.

  18. Supersaturation of Dissolved Hydrogen and Methane in Rumen of Tibetan Sheep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Ungerfeld, Emilio M.; Wang, Rong; Zhou, Chuan She; Basang, Zhu Zha; Ao, Si Man; Tan, Zhi Liang

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen (H2) is an essential substrate for methanogens to produce methane (CH4), and also influences pathways of volatile fatty acids (VFA) production in the rumen. Dissolved H2 (H2 (aq)) is the form of H2 available to microbes, and dissolved CH4 (CH4 (aq)) is important for indicating methanogens activity. Rumen H2 (aq) concentration has been estimated by assuming equilibrium with headspace gaseous H2 (H2 (g)) concentration using Henry's law, and has also been directly measured in the liquid phase in some in vitro and in vivo experiments. In this in vivo study, H2 (aq) and CH4 (aq) concentration measured directly in rumen fluid and their corresponding concentrations estimated from their gaseous phase concentrations, were compared to investigate the existence of equilibrium between the gas and liquid phases. Twenty-four Tibetan sheep were randomly assigned to two mixed diets containing the same concentrate mixed with oat grass (OG diet) or barley straw (BS diet). Rumen gaseous phase and contents were sampled using rumenocentesis and oral stomach tubing, respectively. Rumen H2 (aq) and CH4 (aq) concentration and VFA profile differed between sheep fed OG and BS diets. Measured H2 (aq) and CH4 (aq) concentration were greater than H2 (aq) and CH4 (aq) concentrations estimated using gas concentrations, indicating lack of equilibrium between gas and liquid phase and supersaturation of H2 and CH4 in rumen fluid. As a consequence, Gibbs energy changes (ΔG) estimated for various metabolic pathways were different when calculated using dissolved gases concentrations directly measured and when using dissolved gases concentrations assuming equilibrium with the gaseous phase. Dissolved CH4, but not CH4 (g), was positively correlated with H2 (aq). Both H2 (aq) and H2 (g) concentrations were positively correlated with the molar percentage of butyrate and negatively correlated with the molar percentage of acetate. In summary, rumen fluid was supersaturated with both H2 and CH4

  19. Non-linear dynamics of stable carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures based on a biological kinetic model of aerobic enzymatic methane oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavilin, Vasily A; Rytov, Sergey V; Shim, Natalia; Vogt, Carsten

    2016-06-01

    The non-linear dynamics of stable carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures during methane oxidation by the methanotrophic bacteria Methylosinus sporium strain 5 (NCIMB 11126) and Methylocaldum gracile strain 14 L (NCIMB 11912) under copper-rich (8.9 µM Cu(2+)), copper-limited (0.3 µM Cu(2+)) or copper-regular (1.1 µM Cu(2+)) conditions has been described mathematically. The model was calibrated by experimental data of methane quantities and carbon and hydrogen isotope signatures of methane measured previously in laboratory microcosms reported by Feisthauer et al. [ 1 ] M. gracile initially oxidizes methane by a particulate methane monooxygenase and assimilates formaldehyde via the ribulose monophosphate pathway, whereas M. sporium expresses a soluble methane monooxygenase under copper-limited conditions and uses the serine pathway for carbon assimilation. The model shows that during methane solubilization dominant carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionation occurs. An increase of biomass due to growth of methanotrophs causes an increase of particulate or soluble monooxygenase that, in turn, decreases soluble methane concentration intensifying methane solubilization. The specific maximum rate of methane oxidation υm was proved to be equal to 4.0 and 1.3 mM mM(-1) h(-1) for M. sporium under copper-rich and copper-limited conditions, respectively, and 0.5 mM mM(-1) h(-1) for M. gracile. The model shows that methane oxidation cannot be described by traditional first-order kinetics. The kinetic isotope fractionation ceases when methane concentrations decrease close to the threshold value. Applicability of the non-linear model was confirmed by dynamics of carbon isotope signature for carbon dioxide that was depleted and later enriched in (13)C. Contrasting to the common Rayleigh linear graph, the dynamic curves allow identifying inappropriate isotope data due to inaccurate substrate concentration analyses. The non-linear model pretty adequately described experimental

  20. Hydrogenation of carbon monoxide over the mixed catalysts composed of cobalt-nickel/manganese oxide-zirconium oxide and zeolite catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, Tatsumi; Iwakuni, Hideharu; Eguchi, Koichi; Arai, Hiromichi (Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan))

    1991-08-15

    Mechanical mixtures of Co-Ni/MnO-ZrO2 and zeolite were used as catalysts for the selective synthesis of gasoline by carbon monoxide hydrogenation. Formation of branched alkanes was promoted, but that of hydrocarbons higher than a carbon number of 10 was suppressed by a combination with zeolite. The reactivity of zeolite for higher hydrocarbons has the decisive role in the product distribution as result of using these mixed catalysts, and thus the product distribution strongly depends on the type of zeolite. Since the hydrogenolysis of higher hydrocarbons proceeds on the strong acid sites, the formation of branched alkanes was promoted by increasing the aluminium content in the zeolite. Ammonia temperature-programmed desorption suggests that increasing the aluminium content in the zeolite increases the number of strong acid sites, but weakens the average strength of the acid sites. Pentasil zeolite with an aluminium content of 1.32 mmolg{sup -1} is effective for enhancing the yield of gasoline as well as its octane number. 8 figs., 1 tab., 20 refs.

  1. Actions and interactions of nitric oxide, carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulphide in the cardiovascular system and in inflammation--a tale of three gases!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Hsu, Anna; Moore, Philip K

    2009-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulphide (H(2)S) together make up a family of biologically active gases (the so-called 'gaseous triumvirate') with an increasingly well defined range of physiological effects plus roles to play in a number of disease states. Over the years, most researchers have concentrated their attention on understanding the part played by a single gas in one or more body systems. It is becoming more clear that all three gases are synthesised naturally in the body, often by the same cells within the same organs, and that all three gases exert essentially similar biological effects albeit via different mechanisms. Within the cardiovascular system, for example, all are vasodilators, promote angiogenesis and vascular remodelling and are protective towards tissue damage in for example, ischaemia-reperfusion injury in the heart. Similarly, all exhibit complex effects in inflammation with both pro- and anti-inflammatory effects recognised. It seems likely that cell function is controlled not by the activity of single gases working in isolation but by the concerted activity of all three of these gases working together.

  2. Control of Carbon and Electron Flow in Clostridium acetobutylicum Fermentations: Utilization of Carbon Monoxide to Inhibit Hydrogen Production and to Enhance Butanol Yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, B H; Bellows, P; Datta, R; Zeikus, J G

    1984-10-01

    Extracts prepared from non-solvent-producing cells of Clostridium acetobutylicum contained methyl viologen-linked hydrogenase activity (20 U/mg of protein at 37 degrees C) but did not display carbon monoxide dehydrogenase activity. CO addition readily inhibited the hydrogenase activity of cell extracts or of viable metabolizing cells. Increasing the partial pressure of CO (2 to 10%) in unshaken anaerobic culture tube headspaces significantly inhibited (90% inhibition at 10% CO) both growth and hydrogen production by C. acetobutylicum. Growth was not sensitive to low partial pressures of CO (i.e., up to 15%) in pH-controlled fermentors (pH 4.5) that were continuously gassed and mixed. CO addition dramatically altered the glucose fermentation balance of C. acetobutylicum by diverting carbon and electrons away from H(2), CO(2), acetate, and butyrate production and towards production of ethanol and butanol. The butanol concentration was increased from 65 to 106 mM and the butanol productivity (i.e., the ratio of butanol produced/total acids and solvents produced) was increased by 31% when glucose fermentations maintained at pH 4.5 were continuously gassed with 85% N(2)-15% CO versus N(2) alone. The results are discussed in terms of metabolic regulation of C. acetobutylicum saccharide fermentations to achieve maximal butanol or solvent yield.

  3. Formation of hydrogen in oxidative coupling of methane over BaCO3 and MgO catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiming Gao; Jiansheng Zhang; Ruiyan Wang

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen formed in oxidative coupling of methane(OCM) over BaCO3 and MgO catalysts was measured since the data of H2 selectivity were missing almost in all articles published heretofore.It was found that H2 selectivity achieved about 18%.when C2 hydrocarbon's selectivity was maintained at 48%-45%over BaCO3 catalyst at the feed molar ratio of CH4/O2=4 in temperature range of 780℃-820℃.Under similar conditions,H2 selectivity was about 14%-16%over MgO catalyst.with C2 selectivity maintained at 41%-42%.Possible routes for hydrogen formation in OCM reaction were discussed.Effect of addition of alkali metallic ions was also investigated.

  4. A Novel Framework for Quantifying past Methane Recycling by Sphagnum-Methanotroph Symbiosis Using Carbon and Hydrogen Isotope Ratios of Leaf Wax Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Jonathan E.; Isles, Peter D. F.; Peteet, Dorothy M.

    2014-01-01

    The concentration of atmospheric methane is strongly linked to variations in Earth's climate. Currently, we can directly reconstruct the total atmospheric concentration of methane, but not individual terms of the methane cycle. Northern wetlands, dominated by Sphagnum, are an important contributor of atmospheric methane, and we seek to understand the methane cycle in these systems. We present a novel method for quantifying the proportion of carbon Sphagnum assimilates from its methanotrophic symbionts using stable isotope ratios of leaf-wax biomarkers. Carbon isotope ratios of Sphagnum compounds are determined by two competing influences, water content and the isotope ratio of source carbon. We disentangled these effects using a combined hydrogen and carbon isotope approach. We constrained Sphagnum water content using the contrast between the hydrogen isotope ratios of Sphagnum and vascular plant biomarkers. We then used Sphagnum water content to calculate the carbon isotope ratio of Sphagnum's carbon pool. Using a mass balance equation, we calculated the proportion of recycled methane contributed to the Sphagnum carbon pool, 'PRM.' We quantified PRM in peat monoliths from three microhabitats in the Mer Bleue peatland complex. Modern studies have shown that water table depth and vegetation have strong influences on the peatland methane cycle on instrumental time scales. With this new approach, delta C-13 of Sphagnum compounds are now a useful tool for investigating the relationships among hydrology, vegetation, and methanotrophy in Sphagnum peatlands over the time scales of entire peatland sediment records, vital to our understanding of the global carbon cycle through the Late Glacial and Holocene.

  5. De-oxygenation of CO2 by using Hydrogen, Carbon and Methane over Alumina-Supported Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Y. Raskar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The de-oxygenation of CO2 was explored by using hydrogen, methane, carbon etc., over alumina supported catalysts. The alumina-supported ruthenium, rhodium, platinum, molybdenum, vanadium and magnesium catalysts were first reduced in hydrogen atmosphere and then used for the de-oxygenation of CO2. Furthermore, experimental variables for the de-oxygenation of CO2 were temperature (range 50 to 650 oC, H2/CO2 mole ratios (1.0 to 5, and catalyst loading (0.5 to 10 wt %. During the de-oxygenation of CO2 with H2 or CH4 or carbon, conversion of CO2, selectivity to CO and CH4 were estimated. Moreover, 25.4 % conversion of CO2 by hydrogen was observed over 1 wt% Pt/Al2O3 catalyst at 650 oC with 33.8 % selectivity to CH4. However, 8.1 to 13.9 % conversion of CO2 was observed over 1 wt% Pt/Al2O3 catalyst at 550 oC in the presence of both H2 and CH4. Moreover, 42.8 to 79.4 % CH4 was converted with 9 to 23.1 % selectivity to CO. It was observed that the de-oxygenation of CO2 by hydrogen, carbon and methane produced carbon, CO and CH4. © 2012 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 6th February 2012; Revised: 23rd April 2012; Accepted: 24th April 2012[How to Cite: R. Y. Raskar, K. B. Kale, A. G. Gaikwad. (2011. De-oxygenation of CO2 by using Hydrogen, Carbon and Methane over Alumina-Supported Catalysts. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7 (1: 59-69.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.1.1631.59-69][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.1.1631.59-69 ] | View in 

  6. The Characteristics of a Sorption-enhanced Steam-Methane Reaction for the Production of Hydrogen Using CO2 Sorbent

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴素芳; T.H.Beum; J.I.Yang; J.N.Kim

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to characterize the production of hydrogen with a sorptionenhanced steam-methane reaction process using Ca(OH)2 as the CO2 adsorbent. Theoretical equilibrium compositions at different operation conditions were calculated using an iterative method. It was found that with Ca(OH)2 as the CO2 sorbent, the concentration of CO2 adsorption was reduced in the product stream, that gave rise to higher methane conversion and higher H2 concentration. An experimental setup was built to test the theoretical calculation. The effects of sorbents and the particle size of Ca(OH)2 on the concentration of CO2 and H2 were investigated in detail. Results showed that the reactor packed with catalyst and Ca(OH)2 particles produced H2 concentration of 94%. It was nearly 96% of the theoretical equilibrium limit, much higher than H2 equilibrium concentration of 67.5% without CO2 sorption under the same conditions of 500℃, 0.2 MPa pressure and a steam-to-methane ratio 6. In addition, the residual mole fraction of CO2 was less than 0.001.

  7. Hydrogen and methane production by co-digestion of waste activated sludge and food waste in the two-stage fermentation process: substrate conversion and energy yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xinyuan; Li, Ruying; Ji, Min; Han, Li

    2013-10-01

    Batch experiments were conducted to produce hydrogen and methane from waste activated sludge and food waste by two-stage mesophilic fermentation. Hydrogen and methane production, energy yield, soluble organic matters, volatile solid removal efficiency and carbon footprint were investigated during two-stage digestion at various food waste proportions. The highest energy yield reached 14.0 kJ/g-VS at the food waste proportion of 85%, with hydrogen and methane yields of 106.4 ml-H2/g-VS and 353.5 ml-CH4/g-VS respectively. The dominant VFA composition was butyrate for co-digestion and sole food waste fermentation, whereas acetate was dominate in VFA for sole waste activated sludge fermentation. The VS removal efficiencies of co-digestion were 10-77% higher than that of waste activated sludge fermentation. Only 0.1-3.2% of the COD in feedstock was converted into hydrogen, and 14.1-40.9% to methane, with the highest value of 40.9% in methane achieved at food waste proportion of 85%. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Thermo catalytic decomposition of methane over Pd/AC and Pd/CB catalysts for hydrogen production and carbon nanofibers formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Srilatha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen production studies have been carried using Thermo Catalytic Decomposition (TCD Unit. Thermo catalytic decomposition of methane is an attractive route for COx free production of hydrogen required in fuel cells. Although metal based catalysts produce hydrogen at low temperatures, carbon formed during methane decomposition reaction rapidly deactivates the catalyst. The present work compares the results of 10 wt% Pd supported on commercially available activated carbon and carbon black catalysts (samples coded as Pd10/AC and Pd10/CB respectively for methane decomposition reaction. Hydrogen has been produced by thermo catalytic decomposition of methane at 1123K and Volume Hourly Space Velocity (VHSV of 1.62 L/h g on the activity of both the catalysts has been studied. XRD of the above catalysts revealed, moderately crystalline peaks of Pd which may be responsible for the increase in catalytic life and formation of carbon fibers. Also during life studies (850°C and 54 sccm of methane it has been observed that the activity of carbon black is sustainable for a longer time compared to that of activated carbon.

  9. Storage of hydrogen, methane, and carbon dioxide in highly porous covalent organic frameworks for clean energy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Yaghi, Omar M

    2009-07-01

    Dihydrogen, methane, and carbon dioxide isotherm measurements were performed at 1-85 bar and 77-298 K on the evacuated forms of seven porous covalent organic frameworks (COFs). The uptake behavior and capacity of the COFs is best described by classifying them into three groups based on their structural dimensions and corresponding pore sizes. Group 1 consists of 2D structures with 1D small pores (9 A for each of COF-1 and COF-6), group 2 includes 2D structures with large 1D pores (27, 16, and 32 A for COF-5, COF-8, and COF-10, respectively), and group 3 is comprised of 3D structures with 3D medium-sized pores (12 A for each of COF-102 and COF-103). Group 3 COFs outperform group 1 and 2 COFs, and rival the best metal-organic frameworks and other porous materials in their uptake capacities. This is exemplified by the excess gas uptake of COF-102 at 35 bar (72 mg g(-1) at 77 K for hydrogen, 187 mg g(-1) at 298 K for methane, and 1180 mg g(-1) at 298 K for carbon dioxide), which is similar to the performance of COF-103 but higher than those observed for COF-1, COF-5, COF-6, COF-8, and COF-10 (hydrogen at 77 K, 15 mg g(-1) for COF-1, 36 mg g(-1) for COF-5, 23 mg g(-1) for COF-6, 35 mg g(-1) for COF-8, and 39 mg g(-1) for COF-10; methane at 298 K, 40 mg g(-1) for COF-1, 89 mg g(-1) for COF-5, 65 mg g(-1) for COF-6, 87 mg g(-1) for COF-8, and 80 mg g(-1) for COF-10; carbon dioxide at 298 K, 210 mg g(-1) for COF-1, 779 mg g(-1) for COF-5, 298 mg g(-1) for COF-6, 598 mg g(-1) for COF-8, and 759 mg g(-1) for COF-10). These findings place COFs among the most porous and the best adsorbents for hydrogen, methane, and carbon dioxide.

  10. Ni/Ce-MCM-41 mesostructured catalysts for simultaneous production of hydrogen and nanocarbon via methane decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guevara, J.C.; Wang, J.A.; Chen, L.F.; Valenzuela, M.A. [ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Col. Zacatenco, Av. Politecnico s/n, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Salas, P. [Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 1-1010, Queretaro 76000 (Mexico); Garcia-Ruiz, A. [UPIICSA, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Te 950 Col. Granjas-Mexico, 08400 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Toledo, J.A.; Cortes-Jacome, M.A.; Angeles-Chavez, C. [Programa de Molecular Ingenieria, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Lazaro Cardenas 152, 07730 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Novaro, O. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A. P. 20-364, 01000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2010-04-15

    For the first time, simultaneous production of hydrogen and nanocarbon via catalytic decomposition of methane over Ni-loaded mesoporous Ce-MCM-41 catalysts was investigated. The catalytic performance of the Ni/Ce-MCM-41 catalysts is very stable and the reaction activity remained almost unchanged during 1400 min steam on time at temperatures 540, 560 and 580 C, respectively. The methane conversion level over these catalysts reached 60-75% with a 100% selectivity towards hydrogen. TEM observations revealed that most of the Ni particles located on the tip of the carbon nanofibers/nanotubes in the used catalysts, keeping their exposed surface clean during the test and thus remaining active for continuous reaction without obvious deactivation. Two kinds of carbon materials, graphitic carbon (C{sub g}) as major and amorphous carbon (C{sub A}) as minor were produced in the reaction, as confirmed by XRD analysis and TEM observations. Carbon nanofibers/nanotubes had an average diameter of approximately 30-50 nm and tens micrometers in length, depending on the reaction temperature, reaction time and Ni particle diameter. Four types of carbon nanofibers/nanotubes were detected and their formations greatly depend on the reaction temperature, time on steam and degree of the interaction between the metallic Ni and support. The respective mechanisms of the formation of nanocarbons were postulated and discussed. (author)

  11. Catalytic decomposition of methane to COx-free hydrogen and carbon nanotubes over Co–W/MgO catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed E. Awadallah

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bimetallic catalysts containing a series of Co/W at 40/10, 30/20, 20/30 and 10/40 wt% supported on MgO with a total metal content of 50 wt% were prepared and used for the catalytic decomposition of methane to COx-free hydrogen and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. The solid fresh and exhausted catalysts were characterized structurally and chemically through XRD, TPR, BET, TGA, TEM and Raman spectroscopy. The 40%Co–10%W/MgO catalyst exhibited the highest activity for the production of both hydrogen and MWCNTs. The formation of a large amount of non-interacted Co3O4 species is considered as the main reason for the catalyst superiority in its activity. On the contrary, catalysts formulations of 20%Co–30%W and 10%Co–40%W demonstrated the formation of a large amount of hardly reducible CoWO4 and MgWO4 particles causing lower activity of these catalysts toward methane decomposition as evidenced through the XRD and TPR results.

  12. Production of CO-rich Hydrogen Gas from Methane Dry Reforming over Co/CeO2 Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamidele V. Ayodele

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Production of CO-rich hydrogen gas from methane dry reforming was investigated over CeO2-supported Co catalyst. The catalyst was synthesized by wet impregnation and subsequently characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM, energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, liquid N2 adsorption-desorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA for the structure, surface and thermal properties. The catalytic activity test of the Co/CeO2 was investigated between 923-1023 K under reaction conditions in a stainless steel fixed bed reactor. The composition of the products (CO2 and H2 from the methane dry reforming reaction was measured by gas chromatography (GC coupled with thermal conductivity detector (TCD. The effects of feed ratios and reaction temperatures were investigated on the catalytic activity toward product selectivity, yield, and syngas ratio. Significantly, the selectivity and yield of both H2 and CO increases with feed ratio and temperature. However, the catalyst shows higher activity towards CO selectivity. The highest H2 and CO selectivity of 19.56% and 20.95% respectively were obtained at 1023 K while the highest yield of 41.98% and 38.05% were recorded for H2 and CO under the same condition. Copyright © 2016 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 21st January 2016; Revised: 23rd February 2016; Accepted: 23rd February 2016 How to Cite: Ayodele, B.V., Khan, M.R., Cheng, C. K. (2016. Production of CO-rich Hydrogen Gas from Methane Dry Reforming over Co/CeO2 Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 11 (2: 210-219 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.11.2.552.210-219 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.11.2.552.210-219

  13. Biogeochemical aspects of atmospheric methane

    OpenAIRE

    Cicerone, RJ; Oremland, RS

    1988-01-01

    Methane is the most abundant organic chemical in Earth's atmosphere, and its concentration is increasing with time, as a variety of independent measurements have shown. Photochemical reactions oxidize methane in the atmosphere; through these reactions, methane exerts strong influence over the chemistry of the troposphere and the stratosphere and many species including ozone, hydroxyl radicals, and carbon monoxide. Also, through its infrared absorption spectrum, methane is an important greenho...

  14. Influence of Methane on Ignition Delays of Hydrogen at Impulse Discharge from High Pressure Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocharnikov, V. M.; Golovastov, S. V.; Golub, V. V.

    Features of hydrogen self-ignition discharged into a channel filled by air were experimentally investigated. Required condition for hydrogen self-ignition is to maintain the high temperature for a time long enough for hydrogen and air to mix on the contact surface and inflammation to take place.

  15. Visualizing a Catalyst at Work during the Ignition of the Catalytic Partial Oxidation of Methane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kimmerle, Bertram; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Baiker, Alfons

    2009-01-01

    We present a spatiotemporal operando X-ray absorption study of a highly dynamic process, the ignition of the noble metal catalyzed partial oxidation of methane. Evolvement and propagation of the platinum component's structural changes are investigated with a high-speed X-ray camera, which in comb...... in combination with temperature profiling by IR-thermography and catalytic activity measurements by online mass spectrometry gives insight into the first stages of the ignition of the reaction toward hydrogen and carbon monoxide....

  16. Hydrogen in natural gases. [In natural gas, in methane in coal deposits and in petroleum deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A.K.

    1983-01-01

    Extensive factual material regarding hydrogen in the most diverse gases is generalized. Especial attention is focused on hydrogen contained in gases of carboniferous basins. Results are presented of studies of hydrogen content of coal gases of the Donets and L'vov-Volynskiy carboniferous basins, and also in gases of the fields of the Dnieper-Donets Basin. Differences were established in gases of the petroleum and coal series according to their content of hydrogen, and also coal beds and surrounding rocks which are dangerous and not dangerous for sudden blowout. Questions are examined of the genesis of hydrogen. Results are presented of experimental studies to reveal the secondary hydrogen in gases. It is indicated that hydrogen can serve as an important criterion in prospecting for a number of minerals and an indicator in predicting sudden blowouts of coal, rock and gas in mines.

  17. Molecular hydrogen (H2) combustion emissions and their isotope (D/H) signatures from domestic heaters, diesel vehicle engines, waste incinerator plants, and biomass burning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollmer, M.K.; Walter, S.; Mohn, J.; Steinbacher, M.; Bond, S.W.; Röckmann, T.; Reimann, S.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2), its stable isotope signature ( D), and the key combustion parameters carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4) were measured from various combustion processes. H2 in the exhaust of gas and oil-fired heaters and of waste incinerator plants was generally de

  18. Molecular hydrogen (H2) combustion emissions and their isotope (D/H) signatures from domestic heaters, diesel vehicle engines, waste incinerator plants, and biomass burning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vollmer, M.K.; Walter, S.; Mohn, J.; Steinbacher, M.; Bond, S.W.; Röckmann, T.; Reimann, S.

    2012-01-01

    Molecular hydrogen (H2), its stable isotope signature ( D), and the key combustion parameters carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and methane (CH4) were measured from various combustion processes. H2 in the exhaust of gas and oil-fired heaters and of waste incinerator plants was generally

  19. The global influence of the hydrogen isotope composition of water on that of bacteriogenic methane from shallow freshwater environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldron, S.; Fallick, A.E. [Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre, East Kilbride (United Kingdom); Lansdown, J.M. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). School of Oceanography; Scott, E.M.; Hall, A.J. [Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    1999-08-01

    The authors propose that the hydrogen isotope composition of recently produced microbial methane, {delta}D(CH{sub 4}), in sulfate-poor, shallow freshwater environments, is directly related to the hydrogen isotopic composition of the system water {delta}D(H{sub 2}O). As {delta}D(H{sub 2}O) varies globally, systematic differences in {delta}D(CH{sub 4}) as a function of {delta}D(H{sub 2}O) should be observed. From available mean paired measurements from 46 sites, the relationship for {delta}D(CH{sub 4}) and {delta}D(H{sub 2}O) in the natural environment can be defined as {delta}D(CH{sub 4}) = 0.675{delta}D(H{sub 2}O) {minus}284{per_thousand} (p < 0.0001). This relationship is statistically distinct from that generated by considering three separate laboratory-based anaerobic inoculations that contain similar methanogenic communities to the natural freshwater samples and therefore, are likely to produce methane by similar metabolic pathways: {delta}D(CH{sub 4}) = 0.444{delta}D(H{sub 2}O) {minus}321{per_thousand} (p < 0.0001). The authors suggest that the relationship arising from the laboratory incubations defines the {delta}D(CH{sub 4}) of methane produced at source in shallow freshwater environments. They can approximate that 50% of the variation in natural {delta}D(CH{sub 4}) samples can be explained by {delta}D(H{sub 2}O), with isotopic fractionation postproduction, or mixing with gas already fractionated likely responsible for most of the noise in the natural system and difference of the natural sample relationship to the laboratory relationship. Methanogenic pathway may also influence {delta}D(CH{sub 4}), but the foundations for this hypothesis need to be reconsidered, and field and laboratory data exist that do not support it. The relationships presented here describe {delta}D of methane from only shallow (subsurface) freshwater environments; paired {delta}D(CH{sub 4})-{delta}D(H{sub 2}O) values from other environments (e.g., marine, glacial drift) suggest that a

  20. Beyond-thermal-equilibrium" conversion of methane to acetylene and hydrogen under pulsed corona discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱爱民; 宫为民; 张秀玲; 李小松

    2002-01-01

    At ambient temperature and pressure, C2H2 and H2 are the dominating products from pure methane conversion under pulsed corona discharge (PCD). When the energy density of 194-1788 kJ/mol was applied, 7%-30% of C2H2 yield and 6%-35% of H2 yield per pass have been obtained. These results are higher than the maximum thermodynamic yield of C2H2 (5.1%) and H2 (3.8%) at 100 kPa and 1100 K, respectively. Thereby, pulsed corona discharge is a very effective tool for "beyond-thermal-equilibrium" conversion of methane to C2H2 and H2 at ambient temperature and pressure. In the PCD energy density range of 339-822 kJ/mol, the carbon distribution of the methane conversion products is found to be: C2H2 86%-89%, C2H6 4%-6%, C2H4 4%-6%, C3 -2%, C4 -1%. Through comparison of the product from pure methane, ethane and ethylene conversion at the same discharge conditions, it can be concluded that three pathways may be responsible for the C2H2 formation via CHx radicals produced from the collisions of CH4 molecules with energi

  1. Towards the methane society? Use of hydrogen for upgrading biogas and synthetic methane production. Phase 1. Final report; Pae vej mod metansamfundet? - anvendelse af brint til opgradering af biogas og kunstig metanfremstilling. Fase 1. Slutrapport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortensen, Claus [Agro Business Park, Tjele (Denmark)

    2012-11-15

    Biogas consists of methane (CH4) and CO{sub 2}. If you react hydrogen produced with wind power with CO{sub 2} in sulfur purified biogas you get biogas upgraded to pure methane, ie. to natural gas quality. The pure methane can for example be sold via the natural gas grid or pressurized and sold for transport. The purpose of the present project is to contribute to the development of a concept and a technology that can store wind energy into the existing natural gas network through the upgrading of CO{sub 2} in biogas. Overall the project combines the technique and concept of electrolysis, biogas upgrading and natural gas network, so that: - electrolysis creates hydrogen and heat from wind turbines; - CO{sub 2} in biogas reacts with H2 from the electrolysis and produces CH4 and high-value steam by biogas reacting directly with H2 in a catalyst ; - The natural gas network is used as distribution and storage of the produced methane. The following main results are achieved in the first phase: - Design and construction of a pilot plant for the purification of biogas, which allows a Sabatier reaction later in the methanization process; - Sensitivity analyses have been carried out of methane prices, which have proven to be competitive compared to other upgrading technologies in the market; - A business plan is developed for a demonstration plant, which among other things will be used in phase 2: demonstration plant. The competitor analysis shows, among other things, a higher efficiency rate of the Danish technology than on the methanization plants being developed in Germany. (LN)

  2. From Fundamental Understanding To Predicting New Nanomaterials For High Capacity Hydrogen/Methane Storage and Carbon Capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yildirim, Taner [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-03-03

    On-board hydrogen/methane storage in fuel cell-powered vehicles is a major component of the national need to achieve energy independence and protect the environment. The main obstacles in hydrogen storage are slow kinetics, poor reversibility and high dehydrogenation temperatures for the chemical hydrides; and very low desorption temperatures/energies for the physisorption materials (MOF’s, porous carbons). Similarly, the current methane storage technologies are mainly based on physisorption in porous materials but the gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities are below the target values. Finally, carbon capture, a critical component of the mitigation of CO2 emissions from industrial plants, also suffers from similar problems. The solid-absorbers such as MOFs are either not stable against real flue-gas conditions and/or do not have large enough CO2 capture capacity to be practical and cost effective. In this project, we addressed these challenges using a unique combination of computational, synthetic and experimental methods. The main scope of our research was to achieve fundamental understanding of the chemical and structural interactions governing the storage and release of hydrogen/methane and carbon capture in a wide spectrum of candidate materials. We studied the effect of scaffolding and doping of the candidate materials on their storage and dynamics properties. We reviewed current progress, challenges and prospect in closely related fields of hydrogen/methane storage and carbon capture.[1-5] For example, for physisorption based storage materials, we show that tap-densities or simply pressing MOFs into pellet forms reduce the uptake capacities by half and therefore packing MOFs is one of the most important challenges going forward. For room temperature hydrogen storage application of MOFs, we argue that MOFs are the most promising scaffold materials for Ammonia-Borane (AB) because of their unique interior active metal-centers for AB binding and well

  3. Effects of Tai Chi exercise on blood pressure and plasma levels of nitric oxide, carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide in real-world patients with essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaogui; Zhang, Yi; Tao, Sai

    2015-01-01

    Objective was to investigate the effects of Tai Chi exercise on nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) levels, and blood pressure (BP) in patients with essential hypertension (EH). EH patients were assigned to the Tai Chi exercise group (HTC, n = 24), and hypertension group (HP, n = 16) by patients' willingness. Healthy volunteers matched for age and gender were recruited as control (NP, n = 16). HTC group performed Tai Chi (60 min/d, 6 d/week) for 12 weeks. Measurements (blood glucose, cholesterol, NO, CO, H2S and BP) were obtained at week 0, 6, and 12. SBP, MAP, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels decreased, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels increased by week 12 in the HTC group (all p < 0.05 versus baseline). Plasma NO, CO, and H2S levels in the HTC group were increased after 12 weeks (all p < 0.05 versus baseline). SBP, DBP and MAP levels were significantly lower in the HTC than in the HP group (all p < 0.05). However, no changes were observed in the HP and NP groups. Correlations were observed between changes in SBP and changes in NO, CO and H2S (r = -0.45, -0.51 and -0.46, respectively, all p < 0.05), and between changes in MAP and changes in NO, CO and H2S (r = -0.36, -0.45 and -0.42, respectively, all p < 0.05). In conclusion, Tai Chi exercise seems to have beneficial effects on BP and gaseous signaling molecules in EH patients. However, further investigation is required to understand the exact mechanisms underlying these observations, and to confirm these results in a larger cohort.

  4. Coproduction of hydrogen and methane via anaerobic fermentation of cornstalk waste in continuous stirred tank reactor integrated with up-flow anaerobic sludge bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Xi-Yu; Li, Qian; Liu, Chun-Zhao

    2012-06-01

    A 10 L continuous stirred tank reactor (CSTR) system was developed for a two-stage hydrogen fermentation process with an integrated alkaline treatment. The maximum hydrogen production rate reached 218.5 mL/L h at a cornstalk concentration of 30 g/L, and the total hydrogen yield and volumetric hydrogen production rate reached 58.0 mL/g-cornstalk and 0.55-0.57 L/L d, respectively. A 10 L up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) was used for continuous methane fermentation of the effluents obtained from the two-stage hydrogen fermentation. At the optimal organic loading rate of 15.0 g-COD/Ld, the COD removal efficiency and volumetric biogas production rate reached 83.3% and 4.6L/Ld, respectively. Total methane yield reached 200.9 mL/g-cornstalk in anaerobic fermentation with the effluents and alkaline hydrolysate. As a result, the total energy recovery by coproduction of hydrogen and methane with anaerobic fermentation of cornstalk reached 67.1%.

  5. Comparison and evaluation of methods for the determination of flammability limits, applied to methane/hydrogen/air mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Schoor, F; Hermanns, R T E; van Oijen, J A; Verplaetsen, F; de Goey, L P H

    2008-02-11

    Different methods, both experimental and numerical, to determine the flammability limits are compared and evaluated, exemplified by a determination of the flammability limits of methane/hydrogen/air mixtures for hydrogen fuel molar fractions of 0, 0.2, 0.4 and 0.6, at atmospheric pressure and ambient temperature. Two different experimental methods are used. The first method uses a glass tube with visual observation of the flame, whereas the second method uses a closed spherical vessel with a pressure rise criterion to determine whether flame propagation has occurred. In addition to these experiments, the flammability limits are determined numerically. Unsteady planar and spherically expanding flames are calculated with a one-dimensional flame code with the inclusion of radiation heat loss in the optically thin limit. Comparison of the experimental results with the results of the planar flame calculations shows large differences, especially for lean mixtures. These differences increase with increasing hydrogen content in the fuel. Better agreement with the experimental results is found for the spherically expanding flame calculations. A limiting burning velocity of 5 cm/s is found to predict the upper flammability limit determined with the tube method very well, whereas the limiting flame temperature approach was found to give poorer agreement. Further analysis indicates that the neglect of flame front instabilities is the probable cause of the large differences between experimental and numerical results at the lower flammability limit.

  6. Combined crossed molecular beam and ab initio investigation of the multichannel reaction of boron monoxide (BO; X2Σ+) with Propylene (CH3CHCH2; X1A'): competing atomic hydrogen and methyl loss pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Surajit; Dangi, Beni B; Parker, Dorian S N; Kaiser, Ralf I; An, Yi; Sun, Bing-Jian; Chang, A H H

    2014-10-16

    The reaction dynamics of boron monoxide ((11)BO; X(2)Σ(+)) with propylene (CH(3)CHCH(2); X(1)A') were investigated under single collision conditions at a collision energy of 22.5 ± 1.3 kJ mol(-1). The crossed molecular beam investigation combined with ab initio electronic structure and statistical (RRKM) calculations reveals that the reaction follows indirect scattering dynamics and proceeds via the barrierless addition of boron monoxide radical with its radical center located at the boron atom. This addition takes place to either the terminal carbon atom (C1) and/or the central carbon atom (C2) of propylene reactant forming (11)BOC(3)H(6) intermediate(s). The long-lived (11)BOC(3)H(6) doublet intermediate(s) underwent unimolecular decomposition involving at least three competing reaction mechanisms via an atomic hydrogen loss from the vinyl group, an atomic hydrogen loss from the methyl group, and a methyl group elimination to form cis-/trans-1-propenyl-oxo-borane (CH(3)CHCH(11)BO), 3-propenyl-oxo-borane (CH(2)CHCH(2)(11)BO), and ethenyl-oxo-borane (CH(2)CH(11)BO), respectively. Utilizing partially deuterated propylene (CD(3)CHCH(2) and CH(3)CDCD(2)), we reveal that the loss of a vinyl hydrogen atom is the dominant hydrogen elimination pathway (85 ± 10%) forming cis-/trans-1-propenyl-oxo-borane, compared to the loss of a methyl hydrogen atom (15 ± 10%) leading to 3-propenyl-oxo-borane. The branching ratios for an atomic hydrogen loss from the vinyl group, an atomic hydrogen loss from the methyl group, and a methyl group loss are experimentally derived to be 26 ± 8%:5 ± 3%:69 ± 15%, respectively; these data correlate nicely with the branching ratios calculated via RRKM theory of 19%:5%:75%, respectively.

  7. Investigation of bonded hydrogen defects in nanocrystalline diamond films grown with nitrogen/methane/hydrogen plasma at high power conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, C. J.; Hou, Haihong; Fernandes, A. J. S.; Jiang, X. F.; Pinto, J. L.; Ye, H.

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we investigate the influence of some growth parameters such as high microwave power ranging from 3.0 to 4.0 kW and N2 additive on the incorporation of bonded hydrogen defects in nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) films grown through a small amount of pure N2 addition into conventional 4% CH4/H2 plasma using a 5 kW microwave plasma CVD system. Incorporation form and content of hydrogen point defects in the NCD films produced with pure N2 addition was analyzed by employing Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for the first time. A large amount of hydrogen related defects was detected in all the produced NCD films with N2 additive ranging from 29 to 87 μm thick with grain size from 47 nm to 31 nm. Furthermore, a specific new H related sharp absorption peak appears in all the NCD films grown with pure N2/CH4/H2 plasma at high powers and becomes stronger at powers higher than 3.0 kW and is even stronger than the 2920 cm-1 peak, which is commonly found in CVD diamond films. Based on these experimental findings, the role of high power and pure nitrogen addition on the growth of NCD films including hydrogen defect formation is analyzed and discussed.

  8. Methane Formation by Flame-Generated Hydrogen Atoms in the Flame Ionization Detector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil; Madsen, Jørgen Øgaard

    1996-01-01

    The precombustion degradation of organic compounds in the flame ionization detector has been studied (1) by heating the additives in hydrogen in a quartz capillary and analyzing the reaction products by GC and (2) by following the degradation of the additives in a hydrogen flame, by means of a th...

  9. The Reduction of Lunar Regolith by Carbothermal Processing Using Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Gokoglu, S. A.; Hegde, U.

    2010-01-01

    The processing of lunar regolith for the production of oxygen is a key component of the In-Situ Resource Utilization plans currently being developed by NASA. In the carbothermal process, a portion of the surface of the regolith in a container is heated by exposure to a heat source so that a small zone of molten regolith is established. A continuous flow of methane is maintained over the molten regolith zone. In this paper, we discuss the development of a chemical conversion model of the carbothermal process to predict the rate of production of carbon monoxide. Our model is based on a mechanism where methane pyrolyzes when it comes in contact with the surface of the hot molten regolith to form solid carbon and hydrogen gas. Carbon is deposited on the surface of the melt, and hydrogen is released into the gas stream above the melt surface. We assume that the deposited carbon mixes in the molten regolith and reacts with metal oxides in a reduction reaction by which gaseous carbon monoxide is liberated. Carbon monoxide bubbles through the melt and is released into the gas stream. It is further processed downstream to ultimately produce oxygen.

  10. Experimental investigation on combustion of hydrogen-oxygen and methane-oxygen mixtures in the medium of low-superheated steam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribaturin, N. A.; Fedorov, V. A.; Alekseev, M. V.; Bogomolov, A. R.; Sorokin, A. L.; Azikhanov, S. S.; Shevyrev, S. A.

    2016-05-01

    Experimental data are represented on the investigation of combustion of hydrogen-oxygen and methane-oxygen mixtures in the medium of low-superheated (initial temperature of approximately 150°C) steam at atmospheric pressure. The influence of the ratio of mass flows of the combustible mixture and steam on the qualitative composition of combustion products and the temperature of produced steam is revealed. Main laws for combustion of the hydrogen-oxygen mixture within the steam flow, which affect the completeness of mixture combustion, are determined. Experimental data on the influence of concentrations of the hydrogen-oxygen mixture within the flow of the steam and the combustible mixture upon the completeness of combustion are given. It is found that, when burning the hydrogen-oxygen mixture within the steam flow with a temperature of 1000-1200°C, it is possible using a variation of the combustible mixture flow. At the same time, the volume fraction of noncondensable gases in the produced steam is no more than 2%. It is revealed that there are several combustion modes of the hydrogen-oxygen mixture within the steam flow, in which, in one case, the steam always suppresses combustion and, in another one, detonation of the combustible mixture combustible mixture occurs. It is found that with the excess air factor close to unit, the combustion of the methane-oxygen mixture within steam and the vapor conversion of methane, which result in the appearance of free hydrogen in the produced high-temperature steam, are possible. The description and the principle of the operation of the experimental bench for investigation of combustion of methane-oxygen and hydrogen-oxygen mixtures in the medium of steam are given. Results of experimental investigations of burning fuel and oxygen in the medium of steam are used in the development of a steam superheater for a hightemperature steam turbine.

  11. Conversion of organic solid waste to hydrogen and methane by two-stage fermentation system with reuse of methane fermenter effluent as diluting water in hydrogen fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyung-Won; Moon, Chungman; Cho, Si-Kyung; Kim, Sang-Hyoun; Shin, Hang-Sik; Kim, Dong-Hoon

    2013-07-01

    In this study, a two-stage system converting organic solid waste (food waste+sewage sludge) to H2 and CH4 was operated. In the first stage of dark fermentative hydrogen production (DFHP), a recently proposed method that does not require external inoculum, was applied. In the second stage, anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) and an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASBr) were followed to treat H2 fermenter effluent. (H2+CH4-ASBR) system showed better performance in terms of total biogas conversion (78.6%), while higher biogas production rate (2.03 L H2/Lsystem/d, 1.96 L CH4/Lsystem/d) was achieved in (H2+CH4-UASBr) system. To reduce the alkali addition requirement in DFHP process, CH4 fermenter effluent was tested as a diluting water. Both the ASBR and UASBr effluent was effective to keep the pH above 6 without CH4 production. In case of using ASBR effluent, H2 production dropped by 15%, but alkali addition requirement was reduced by 50%.

  12. Intermolecular hydrogen transfer between guest species in small and large cages of methane + propane mixed gas hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugahara, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Yusuke; Tani, Atsushi; Inoue, Tatsuya; Ohgaki, Kazunari

    2012-03-15

    To investigate the molecular interaction between guest species inside of the small and large cages of methane + propane mixed gas hydrates, thermal stabilities of the methyl radical (possibly induced in small cages) and the normal propyl and isopropyl radicals (induced in large cages) were investigated by means of electron spin resonance measurements. The increase of the total amount of the normal propyl and isopropyl radicals reveals that the methyl radical in the small cage withdraws one hydrogen atom from the propane molecule enclathrated in the adjacent large cage of the structure-II hydrate. A guest species in a hydrate cage has the ability to interact closely with the other one in the adjacent cages. The clathrate hydrate may be utilized as a possible nanoscale reaction field.

  13. Influence of microwave treatment under a hydrogen or methane atmosphere on the flotability of the macerals in Shenfu coals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Wei; Yang Fusheng; Li Yuangang; Qu Jianlin; Zhou Anning

    2011-01-01

    The modification of Shenfu coals by a microwave treatment carried out under a hydrogen or a methane atmosphere,and the subsequent maceral separation by flotation,are described in this paper,The surface contact angle and the Zeta potential of the coal macerals were measured both with and without the treatment.The results show that the surface wettability ofSFF (Shenfu Fusain) and SFV (Shenfu Vitrain) can be changed by the microwave treatment.An increase in the difference in surface wettability of SFF and SFV causes in a subsequent increase in the enrichment of inertinite and vitrinite.The results of the Zeta potential measurements show that the surface potentials of SFF and SFV are also changed by the treatment.

  14. CO{sub x}-free hydrogen and carbon nanofibers production by methane decomposition over nickel-alumina catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayat, Nima; Rezaei, Mehran; Meshkani, Fereshteh [Faculty of Engineering, University of Kashan, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Nickel catalysts supported on mesoporous nanocrystalline gamma alumina with various nickel loadings were prepared and employed for thermocatalytic decomposition of methane into CO{sub x}-free hydrogen and carbon nanofibers. The prepared catalysts with different nickel contents exhibited mesoporous structure with high surface area in the range of 121.3 to 66.2m{sup 2}g{sup -1}. Increasing in nickel content decreased the pore volume and increased the crystallite size. The catalytic results revealed that the nickel content and operating temperature both play important roles on the catalytic performance of the prepared catalysts. The results showed that increasing in reaction temperature increased the initial conversion of catalysts and significantly decreased the catalyst lifetime. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of the spent catalysts evaluated at different temperatures revealed the formation of intertwined carbon filaments. The results showed that increasing in reaction temperature decreased the diameters of nanofibers and increased the formation of encapsulating carbon.

  15. Optimum temperature policy for sorption enhanced steam methane reforming process for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Retnamma, Rajasree [National Laboratory of energy and Geology (LNEG), Lisbon (PT). Energy Systems Modeling and Optimization Unit (UMOSE); Ravi Kumar, V.; Kulkarni, B.D. [National Chemical Laboratory, Pune (India). Chemical Engineering and Process Development

    2010-07-01

    Sorption enhanced steam methane reforming (SE-SMR) process offers high potential for producing H{sub 2} in fuel cell applications compared to conventional catalytic steam methane reforming (SMR) process. The reactor temperature can significantly affect the performance of the SE-SMR reaction and simultaneous adsorption behavior of CO{sub 2}. Determination of an optimal temperature policy in SE-SMR reactor is therefore an important optimization issue. Multi-stage operation is a possible way to implement optimum temperature policies. In the present work, simulation study has been carried out for multi-stage operation using a mathematical model incorporating basic mechanisms operating in a fixed bed reactor with nonlinear reaction kinetic features of an SE-SMR process. Three cases were considered for implementing the multi-stage concept and the results show that increase in temperature based on a policy leads to considerable improvement in the process performance. (orig.)

  16. Reverse microemulsion prepared Ni–Pt catalysts for methane cracking to produce COx-free hydrogen

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Lu

    2017-09-08

    A monodispersed 15 nm Ni9Pt1 catalyst synthesized via a reverse microemulsion method, shows a lower activation energy than both Ni and Pt catalysts during the methane cracking reaction. Thanks to the synergic effect of Ni–Pt alloy, this catalyst presents a stable H2 formation rate at 700 °C, and forms carbon nanotubes, anchoring the catalyst particles on top.

  17. Simultaneous Hydrogen and Methane Production Through Multi-Phase Anaerobic Digestion of Paperboard Mill Wastewater Under Different Operating Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farghaly, Ahmed; Tawfik, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Multi-phase anaerobic reactor for H2 and CH4 production from paperboard mill wastewater was studied. The reactor was operated at hydraulic retention times (HRTs) of 12, 18, 24, and 36 h, and organic loading rates (OLRs) of 2.2, 1.5, 1.1, and 0.75 kg chemical oxygen demand (COD)/m(3) day, respectively. HRT of 12 h and OLR of 2.2 kg COD/m(3) day provided maximum hydrogen yield of 42.76 ± 14.5 ml/g CODremoved and volumetric substrate uptake rate (-rS) of 16.51 ± 4.43 mg COD/L h. This corresponded to the highest soluble COD/total COD (SCOD/TCOD) ratio of 56.25 ± 3.3 % and the maximum volatile fatty acid (VFA) yield (YVFA) of 0.21 ± 0.03 g VFA/g COD, confirming that H2 was mainly produced through SCOD conversion. The highest methane yield (18.78 ± 3.8 ml/g CODremoved) and -rS of 21.74 ± 1.34 mgCOD/L h were achieved at an HRT of 36 h and OLR of 0.75 kg COD/m(3) day. The maximum hydrogen production rate (HPR) and methane production rate (MPR) were achieved at carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratio of 47.9 and 14.3, respectively. This implies the important effect of C/N ratio on the distinction between the dominant microorganism bioactivities responsible for H2 and CH4 production.

  18. Vertical observation of molecular hydrogen and carbon monoxide: Implication for non-photochemical H2 production at ocean surface and subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawagucci, S.; Narita, T.; Obata, H.; Ogawa, H.; Gamo, T.

    2009-12-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation is a key metabolism controlling marine N-cycling and also known as a main H2 source. Recently, it was proposed that a monitoring of surface H2 concentration could be used quickly to figure out the spatial extent of biological nitrogen fixation activity without onboard incubation required for currently used methods for detecting the activity. However, H2 behavior in ocean water was still unresolved. This study carried out vertical observation of H2 and CO concentrations in south of Japan, western North Pacific. Because carbon monoxide, CO, in seawater has no relation with nitrogen fixation metabolism and is produced dominantly by the photochemical reaction, which is an altanative H2 source, simultaneous observation and comparison of H2 and CO concentration is helpful to investigate H2 behavior in ocean water. Reductive gases in seawater were observed during the R/V Tansei-maru KT-08-14 cruise by using a wired CTD-CMS (CTD-carousel multiple sampling) system to conduct vertical sampling (at most 200 m depth) and by using a plastic bucket for sampling surface seawater. The sample in the Niskin-X bottle was directed to the bottom of a 120 mL brown-colored glass vial allowed to overflow by 2 volumes before the tube was slowly withdrawn. After the addition of 0.5 mL HgCl2-saturated solution for poisoning, the PTFE-lined butyl-gum septum was used to cap the vials. Molecular hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) were analyzed at an onboard laboratory within 6 hours after subsampling. 20 mL of sample water was substituted by 20 mL of H2- and CO-free air using a gas-tight syringe; then the vial was put on an automatic shaker and shaken upside down for 6 minutes to achieve a complete equilibrium between the dissolved and head space gases in the vial. The equilibrated headspace was taken by another gas-tight syringe and then injected into a gas chromatograph equipped with a trace reduced gas detector. Vertical distribution of dissolved H2 and CO

  19. Possible practical utility of an enzyme cocktail produced by sludge-degrading microbes for methane and hydrogen production from digested sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hayato; Kuribayashi, Kyohei; Fujii, Katsuhiko

    2016-01-25

    Digested sludge (DS) is a major waste product of anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge and is resistant to biodegradation. In this study, we examined suitability of the hydrolases produced by DS-degrading fungal strains (DS-hydrolases) for methane and hydrogen fermentation from DS. Although the strains are mesophilic, DS-hydrolases showed strong chitinase and keratinase activity at ∼50°C. SDS-PAGE analysis suggested that the strains possess a multienzyme system, which allows the hydrolases of some strains to be stable in a wide range of temperatures. Addition of the DS-hydrolases to a vial-scale anaerobic digester enhanced methane and hydrogen production from DS at pH 9.0 and 5.0, respectively. The hydrogen production was also enhanced by the use of methacrylate ester-precipitated DS as a substrate. Further improvement of culture and reaction conditions may make these hydrolases suitable for production of renewable fuels.

  20. Hydrogen and carbon isotope systematics in hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis under H2-limited and H2-enriched conditions: implications for the origin of methane and its isotopic diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Tomoyo; Kawagucci, Shinsuke; Saito, Yayoi; Matsui, Yohei; Takai, Ken; Imachi, Hiroyuki

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen and carbon isotope systematics of H2O-H2-CO2-CH4 in hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and their relation to H2 availability were investigated. Two H2-syntrophic cocultures of fermentatively hydrogenogenic bacteria and hydrogenotrophic methanogens under conditions of pure cultures of hydrogenotrophic methanogens under conditions of 105 Pa-H2 were tested. Carbon isotope fractionation between CH4 and CO2 during hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis was correlated with pH2, as indicated in previous studies. The hydrogen isotope ratio of CH4 produced during rapid growth of the thermophilic methanogen Methanothermococcus okinawensis under high pH2 conditions ( 105 Pa) was affected by the isotopic composition of H2, as concluded in a previous study of Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus. This " {δ D}_{{H}_2} effect" is a possible cause of the diversity of previously reported values for hydrogen isotope fractionation between CH4 and H2O examined in H2-enriched culture experiments. Hydrogen isotope fractionation between CH4 and H2O, defined by (1000 + {δ D}_{{CH}_4} )/(1000 + {δ D}_{{H}_2O} ), during hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis of the H2-syntrophic cocultures was in the range 0.67-0.69. The hydrogen isotope fractionation of our H2-syntrophic dataset overlaps with those obtained not only from low- pH2 experiments reported so far but also from natural samples of "young" methane reservoirs (0.66-0.74). Conversely, such hydrogen isotope fractionation is not consistent with that of "aged" methane in geological samples (≥0.79), which has been regarded as methane produced via hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis from the carbon isotope fractionation. As a possible process inducing the inconsistency in hydrogen isotope signatures between experiments and geological samples, we hypothesize that the hydrogen isotope signature of CH4 imprinted at the time of methanogenesis, as in the experiments and natural young methane, may be altered by diagenetic hydrogen isotope exchange

  1. Hydrogen Effect on Coke Removal and Catalytic Performance in Pre-Carburization and Methane Dehydro-Aromatization Reaction on Mo/HZSM-5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongtao Ma; Ryoichi Kojima; Satoshi Kikuchi; Masaru Ichikawa

    2005-01-01

    In this study,the effects of pre-carburization of catalyst,hydrogen addition to methane feed and the space velocity of methane on the catalytic performance in methane to benzene (MTB) reaction were discussed in detail over Mo/HZSM-5 catalyst at 1023 K and 0.3 MPa. Compared with the non-precarburized catalyst,the Mo catalyst pre-carburized under the flow of CH4+4H2 at 973 K was found to have the higher activity and better stability. Further 6% H2 addition to the methane feed suppressed the aromatic type of coke formation effectively,and improved the stability of catalyst markedly,moreover gave a much longer reaction life of catalyst (53 h at 1023 K and 5400 ml/(g·h)) and much more formation amounts of benzene and hydrogen. With increase of methane space velocity,both the naphthalene formation selectivity and the coke formation selectivity were decreased by the shortened contact time;the benzene formation selectivity and total formation amount before the complete deactivation of catalyst were increased ly,while the total naphthalene and coke formation amounts did not change much.At high methane space velocity (≥5400 ml/(g·h)),a new middle temperature coke derived from the high temperature aromatic coke was formed on the catalyst; all the coke formed could be burnt off at lower temperature in oxygen,compared with those obtained at low space velocity. Considering the benzene formation amount and catalyst stability together,5400 ml/(g·h) was proved to be the most efficient methane space velocity for benzene production.

  2. Mechanistic aspects of gas-phase hydrogen-atom transfer from methane to [CO](·+) and [SiO](·+) : why do they differ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietl, Nicolas; Troiani, Anna; Schlangen, Maria; Ursini, Ornella; Angelini, Giancarlo; Apeloig, Yitzhak; de Petris, Giulia; Schwarz, Helmut

    2013-05-17

    The reactivity of the two diatomic congeneric systems [CO](·+) and [SiO](·+) towards methane has been investigated by means of mass spectrometry and quantum-chemical calculations. While [CO](·+) gives rise to three different reaction channels, [SiO](·+) reacts only by hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) from methane under thermal conditions. A theoretical analysis of the respective HAT processes reveals two distinctly different mechanistic pathways for [CO](·+) and [SiO](·+), and a comparison to the higher metal oxides of Group 14 emphasizes the particular role of carbon as a second-row p element.

  3. Effects of reaction conditions on hydrogen production and carbon nanofiber properties generated by methane decomposition in a fixed bed reactor using a NiCuAl catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suelves, I.; Pinilla, J.L.; Lazaro, M.J.; Moliner, R. [Instituto de Carboquimica CSIC, Miguel Luesma Castan, 4, 50015 Zaragoza (Spain); Palacios, J.M. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, CSIC, Cantoblanco, Marie Curie 2, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, the results obtained in the catalytic decomposition of methane in a fixed bed reactor using a NiCuAl catalyst prepared by the fusion method are presented. The influences of reaction temperature and space velocity on hydrogen concentration in the outlet gases, as well as on the properties of the carbon produced, have been investigated. Reaction temperature and the space velocity both increase the reaction rate of methane decomposition, but also cause an increase in the rate of catalyst deactivation. Under the operating conditions used, the carbon product is mainly deposited as nanofibers with textural properties highly correlated with the degree of crystallinity. (author)

  4. Optimization of two-phase thermophilic anaerobic digestion of biowaste for hydrogen and methane production through reject water recirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavinato, C; Bolzonella, D; Fatone, F; Cecchi, F; Pavan, P

    2011-09-01

    The optimization of a two-phase thermophilic anaerobic process treating biowaste for hydrogen and methane production was carried out at pilot scale using two stirred reactors (CSTRs) and without any physical/chemical pre-treatment of inoculum. During the experiment the hydrogen production at low hydraulic retention time (3d) was tested, both with and without reject water recirculation and at two organic loading rate (16 and 21 kgTVS/m3 d). The better yields were obtained with recirculation where the pH reached an optimal value (5.5) thanks to the buffering capacity of the recycle stream. The specific gas production of the first reactor was 51 l/kgVS(fed) and H2 content in biogas 37%. The mixture of gas obtained from the two reactors met the standards for the biohythane mix only when lower loading rate were applied to the first reactor, with a composition of 6.7% H2, 40.1% CO2 and 52.3% CH4 the overall SGP being 0.78 m3/kgVS(fed).

  5. Interaction between hydrogen sulfide/cystathionine γ-lyase and carbon monoxide/heme oxygenase pathways in aortic smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-fang JIN; Jun-bao DU; Xiao-hui LI; Yan-fei WANG; Yin-fang LIANG; Chao-shu TANG

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the interaction between hydrogen sulfide (H2S)/cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE) and carbon monoxide (CO)/heme oxygenase (HO) pathways in aortic smooth muscle cells (ASMC). Methods: The ASMCs were divided into the following groups: (1) the control group; (2) the zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) 20 (μmol/L group; (3) the propargylglycine (PPG) 2 mmol/L, 4 mmol/L and 10 mmol/L groups; and (4) the sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) 1×10-5 mol/L, 1×10-4 mol/L and 1×10-3 mol/L groups. Each of the groups was further divided into 6 h, 12 h, 18 h and 24 h subgroups. The CO level, represented by carboxyhemoglobin (HbCO) content was measured using a spectrophotometric method and H2S content was detected by a sensitive electrode method. CSE and HO-1 expressions were detected by Western blotting. Results: The H2S content in the medium and CSE expression by ASMC were markedly increased by ZnPP compared with the control group. HbCO content in the medium and HO-1 expression by the ASMC started strengthening following 24 h treatment with PPG at 2 mmol/L, but were further strengthened following 18 h and 24 h treatment with PPG at 4 mmol/L compared with the controls (P<0.01). PPG at 10 mmol/L increased the HbCO level in the medium following 18 h treatment and increased HO-1 expression by the ASMC following 12 h treatment. Moreover, NaHS at 1×10-5 mol/L and 1×10-4 mol/L decreased the HbCO level in the medium and HO-1 expression by the ASMC after 6 h and 12 h treatment, while NaHS at 1×10-3 mol/L decreased them at all time points of the treatments. Conclusion: The results suggested that endogenous CO/HO and H2S/CSE pathways inhibited each other in ASMC under physiological conditions.

  6. Annual hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide concentrations and surface to air exchanges in a rural area (Québec, Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constant, Philippe; Poissant, Laurier; Villemur, Richard

    The industrialization and the demographic expansion have both influenced the biogeochemical cycle of hydrogen (H 2), carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO 2). In the actual context, knowledge about the spatial distribution of the natural sources and sinks of these trace gases is then crucial to infer possible effects of climate and land use changes on their global budget. This article reports the H 2, CO and CO 2 concentrations and micrometeorological fluxes measured during 1 year in a rural area of the mixed wood ecozone of Canada. Land use represents a critical issue in the control of trace gas natural sources or sinks of that region, which is the most densely habited in Canada. On average, the site emitted CO 2 at a rate of 7.7 g m -2 d -1 and consumed H 2 and CO at 0.34 and 5.1 mg m -2 d -1, respectively. Temperature was the most important factor affecting the H 2 and CO surface to air exchanges. The strength of the soil sink was maximal at the end of the summer, while H 2 and CO emissions were observed at the snow-melting period. In winter, H 2 and CO depositions were attributed to their oxidation by photochemically active compounds within the snow cover. When soil temperature was above 10 °C, trace gas fluxes followed a well-defined diurnal cycle. H 2 and CO 2 deposition rates were positively correlated with H 2O fluxes, while CO followed the inverse trend. CO 2 diurnal variations resulted from a balance between photosynthesis and soil respiration, while some biotic and abiotic factors were proposed to explain the trend observed for H 2. In the case of CO, emissions originating from heat- and photo-induced reactions were involved in the attenuation in the strength of the soil sink during daytime. Measured fluxes were compared with the literature to show the relative importance of the rural areas in the studied trace gases budget.

  7. Operation of a two-stage continuous fermentation process producing hydrogen and methane from artificial food wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagai, Kohki; Mizuno, Shiho; Umeda, Yoshito; Sakka, Makiko [Toho Gas Co., Ltd. (Japan); Osaka, Noriko [Tokyo Gas Co. Ltd. (Japan); Sakka, Kazuo [Mie Univ. (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    An anaerobic two-stage continuous fermentation process with combined thermophilic hydrogenogenic and methanogenic stages (two-stage fermentation process) was applied to artificial food wastes on a laboratory scale. In this report, organic loading rate (OLR) conditions for hydrogen fermentation were optimized before operating the two-stage fermentation process. The OLR was set at 11.2, 24.3, 35.2, 45.6, 56.1, and 67.3 g-COD{sub cr} L{sup -1} day{sup -1} with a temperature of 60 C, pH5.5 and 5.0% total solids. As a result, approximately 1.8-2.0 mol-H{sub 2} mol-hexose{sup -1} was obtained at the OLR of 11.2-56.1 g-COD{sub cr} L{sup -1} day{sup -1}. In contrast, it was inferred that the hydrogen yield at the OLR of 67.3 g-COD{sub cr} L{sup -1} day{sup -1} decreased because of an increase in lactate concentration in the culture medium. The performance of the two-stage fermentation process was also evaluated over three months. The hydraulic retention time (HRT) of methane fermentation was able to be shortened 5.0 days (under OLR 12.4 g-COD{sub cr} L{sup -1} day{sup -1} conditions) when the OLR of hydrogen fermentation was 44.0 g-COD{sub cr} L{sup -1} day{sup -1}, and the average gasification efficiency of the two-stage fermentation process was 81% at the time. (orig.)

  8. Improved bio-hydrogen production from glucose by adding a specific methane inhibitor to microbial electrolysis cells with a double anode arrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingnan; Bai, Yanxia; Fan, Yaoting; Hou, Hongwei

    2016-10-01

    Improved hydrogen production from glucose was achieved by adding a specific methane inhibitor (such as chloroform) to repress the activity of methanogens in a single-chamber microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) with a double anode arrangement. A maximum hydrogen production of 8.4±0.2 mol H2/mol-G (G represents glucose), a hydrogen production rate of 2.39±0.3 m(3) H2/m3/d and a high energy efficiency (relative to the electrical input) of ηE=165±5% had been recorded from 1 g/L glucose at a low dosage of chloroform (5‰, v:v) and an applied voltage of 0.8 V. Almost all of the glucose was removed within 4 h, with 66% of the electrons in intermediates (mainly including acetate and ethanol), and methane gas was not detected in the MECs through 11 batch cycles. The experimental results confirmed that chloroform was an effective methane inhibitor that improved hydrogen production from glucose in the MECs. In addition, the cyclic voltammetry tests demonstrated that the electron transfer in the MECs was mainly due to the biofilm-bound redox compounds rather than soluble electron shuttles. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. In silico search for novel methane steam reforming catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Yue; Lausche, Adam C; Wang, Shengguang

    2013-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a method for screening transition metal and metal alloy catalysts based on their predicted rates and stabilities for a given catalytic reaction. This method involves combining reaction and activation energies (available to the public via a web-based application ‘Cat......App’) with a microkinetic modeling technique to predict the rates and selectivities of a prospective material. This paper illustrates this screening technique using the steam reforming of methane to carbon monoxide and hydrogen as a test reaction. While catalysts are already commercially available for this process...

  10. Methane rich gasification of wood pellets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joka Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the work there are shown the results of experimental studies on methane rich gasification of pinewood pellets in Bio-CONOx technology. The experiment was carried out on a laboratory scale gasifier (5 kW, which design features allow producing a high quality gas with a high methane content. In the results there was identified the impact of the quantity of Bio-CONOx on the amount of flammable gas compounds (methane, hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the synthesis gas and the gas calorific value. The additive was added in 10,20,30 and 50% concentrations to the gasifier chamber. It has been shown that increasing the amount of the additive has a positive effect on the calorific value of the synthesis gas (Fig.1,2. Gas with a high content of methane (and high calorific value was obtained from gasification of biomass with a 50% addition of Bio-CONOx. There was also examined the proportion of blowing air (gasifying medium for which the properties of obtained syngas were the best.

  11. Catalysis mechanism of Pd-promoted γ-alumina in the thermal decomposition of methane to hydrogen: A density functional theory study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salam, M. Abdus; Abdullah, Bawadi, E-mail: bawadi_abdullah@utp.edu.my

    2017-02-15

    Thermo-catalytic methane decomposition to elemental hydrogen mechanism in transitional metals (Pd, Ni & Mo) promoted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (001) catalyst have been studied using the density functional theory (DFT). Decomposition reactions are spontaneous and favourable above 775 K for all promoter. Pd-promoted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (001) catalyst demonstrates a breakthrough decomposition activity in hydrogen production as compared to Ni− and Mo-promoted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (001) catalysts. The activation energy (E{sub a}) range of the catalysis for Pd promoted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (001) catalysts is 0.003–0.34 eV. Whereas, Ni and Mo promoted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (001) catalysts display activation energy E{sub a} in the range of 0.63–1.15 eV and 0.04–5.98 eV, respectively. Pd-promoted catalyst also shows a higher adsorption energy (−0.68 eV) and reactivity than that of Ni and Mo promoted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (001) catalysts. The rates of successive decomposition of methane are found to be 16.15 × 10{sup 12}, 15.95 × 10{sup 12} and 16.09 × 10{sup 12} s{sup −1} for the promoter of Pd, Ni and Mo, respectively. Pd promoted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (001) catalyst reduces the methane decomposition temperature (775 K) and deactivation rate significantly. The catalytic conditions and catalyst is promising in producing hydrogen to support hydrogen economy. - Highlights: • Transition metals (Pd, Ni & Mo) promoted γ-alumina catalysts are designed successfully. • Pd-promoted catalyst showed breakthrough activity in methane decomposition to hydrogen. • DFT study explored the catalysis mechanism of methane decomposition at atomic level. • Pd-promoted catalyst reduced temperature and activation barrier of methane decomposition reaction significantly.

  12. Evidence for a hydrogen-sink mechanism of (+)catechin-mediated emission reduction of the ruminant greenhouse gas methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, P.M.; Wikselaar, van P.G.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Vos, de C.H.; Hall, R.D.; Beekwilder, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Methane formation in the rumen is a major cause of greenhouse gas emission. Plant secondary compounds in ruminant diets, such as essential oils, saponins and tannins, are known to affect methane production. However, their methane-lowering properties have generally been associated with undesired side

  13. Reaction performance of methanation of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide over supported ruthenium catalysts. ; Mainly on effects of remaining chlorine and dechlorination. Ruthenium tanji shokubaijo no issanka tanso oyobi nisanka tanso no methane ka no hanno tokusei. ; Shutoshite zanryu enso no eikyo to datsuenso shori no koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasaoka, S.; Sasaoka, E.; Okazaki, Y.; Hanaya, M. (Okayama University, Okayama (Japan). Faculty of Engineering)

    1991-07-10

    An establishment of the methanation catalytic process is desired on CO and CO {sub 2} generated in coal gasification and other various processes. In this study as one reply to this requirement, Ru catalysts supported on ZrO {sub 2}, Al {sub 2} O {sub 3} ({theta}) and SiO {sub 2} were prepared, and the relationship between the reaction condition and the catalytic reaction performance was investigated, especially from a view to the effects of remaining chlorine in catalysts and dechlorination based on raw salt of Ru. Experiments were carried out using a flow fixed-bed reactor under an atmospheric temperature at mainly 120-350 {degree}C. The results are as follows: Knowledge was obtained about the amount of remaining chlorine after a hydrogen reduction treatment or after washing with warm water at 85 {degree}C; the effect of remaining chlorine one the catalytic activity was much larger for CO {sub 2} methanation than for CO methanation; the remaining chlorine suppresses the formation of carbonaceous species on the catalyst surface and decreases the catalytic activity; and Ru/ZrO {sub 2}, dechlorinated with water washing at 85 {degree}C is most active. 10 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  14. CrCl3·6H2O/Hydrogenated Bis-Schiff Base as a New Efficient Catalyst System for Synthesis of Bis(indoly) Methane%CrCl3·6H2O/Hydrogenated Bis-Schiff Base as a New Efficient Catalyst System for Synthesis of Bis(indoly) Methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨永磊; 解正峰; 王吉德

    2011-01-01

    CrCl3·6H2O/hydrogenated bis-Schiff base is found to be an effective catalyst system for synthesis of bis(indoly) methane via electrophilic addition reaction of indoles with aldehydes using acetonitrile as the solvent. The yields of isolated products are from good to excellent.

  15. Effects of three methane mitigation agents on parameters of kinetics of total and hydrogen gas production, ruminal fermentation and hydrogen balance using in vitro technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Wang, Rong; Yang, Shan; Deng, Jin Ping; Tang, Shao Xun; Tan, Zhi Liang

    2016-02-01

    Methane (CH4 ) can be mitigated through directly inhibiting methanogen activity and starving methanogens by hydrogen (H2 ) sink. Three types of mechanism (i.e. bromoethanesulphonate (BES), nitrate and emodin) and doses of CH4 mitigation agents were employed to investigate their pathways of CH4 inhibition. Results indicated that both BES and emodin inhibited CH4 production and altered H2 balance, which could be accompanied by decreased dry matter disappearance (DMD), fractional rate of gH2 formation, volatile fatty acid (VFA) production, ability to produce and use reducing equivalences and molecular H2 , and increased final asymptotic gH2 production, time to the peak of gH2 , discrete lag time of gH2 production and fermentation efficiency. However, emodin decreased gas volume produced by rapidly fermentable components of substrate and the rate of fermentation at early stage of incubation, while BES supplementation inhibited gas volume produced by both rapidly and slowly fermentable components of substrate and the rate of fermentation at middle or late stage of incubation. The nitrate supplementation inhibited CH4 production without affecting VFA profile, because of its dual role as H2 sink and being toxic to methanogens. Nitrate supplementation had more complicated pattern of fermentation, VFA production and profile and H2 balance in comparison to BES and emodin supplementation.

  16. A simplified Probabilistic Safety Assesment of a Steam-Methane Reforming Hydrogen Production Plant coupled to a High-Temperature Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson Edelstein, Pamela; Flores Flores, Alain; Francois Lacouture, Juan Luis

    2005-01-01

    A Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) is being developed for a steam-methane reforming hydrogen production plant linked to a High-Temperature Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor (HTGR). This work is based on the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute’s (JAERI) High Temperature Test Reactor (HTTR) prototype in Japan. This study has two major objectives: calculate the risk to onsite and offsite individuals, and calculate the frequency of different types of damage to the complex. A simplified HAZOP...

  17. Non-oxidative coupling reaction of methane to ethane and hydrogen catalyzed by the silica-supported tantalum hydride: ([triple bond]SiO)2Ta-H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulivong, Daravong; Norsic, Sébastien; Taoufik, Mostafa; Copéret, Christophe; Thivolle-Cazat, Jean; Chakka, Sudhakar; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2008-04-16

    Silica-supported tantalum hydride, (SiO)2Ta-H (1), proves to be the first single-site catalyst for the direct non-oxidative coupling transformation of methane into ethane and hydrogen at moderate temperatures, with a high selectivity (>98%). The reaction likely involves the tantalum-methyl-methylidene species as a key intermediate, where the methyl ligand can migrate onto the tantalum-methylidene affording the tantalum-ethyl.

  18. Effect of aerobic pre-treatment on hydrogen and methane production in a two-stage anaerobic digestion process using food waste with different compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafieenia, Razieh; Girotto, Francesca; Peng, Wei; Cossu, Raffaello; Pivato, Alberto; Raga, Roberto; Lavagnolo, Maria Cristina

    2017-01-01

    Aerobic pre-treatment was applied prior to two-stage anaerobic digestion process. Three different food wastes samples, namely carbohydrate rich, protein rich and lipid rich, were prepared as substrates. Effect of aerobic pre-treatment on hydrogen and methane production was studied. Pre-aeration of substrates showed no positive impact on hydrogen production in the first stage. All three categories of pre-aerated food wastes produced less hydrogen compared to samples without pre-aeration. In the second stage, methane production increased for aerated protein rich and carbohydrate rich samples. In addition, the lag phase for carbohydrate rich substrate was shorter for aerated samples. Aerated protein rich substrate yielded the best results among substrates for methane production, with a cumulative production of approximately 351ml/gVS. With regard to non-aerated substrates, lipid rich was the best substrate for CH4 production (263ml/gVS). Pre-aerated P substrate was the best in terms of total energy generation which amounted to 9.64kJ/gVS. This study revealed aerobic pre-treatment to be a promising option for use in achieving enhanced substrate conversion efficiencies and CH4 production in a two-stage AD process, particularly when the substrate contains high amounts of proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Observation of Binding and Rotation of Methane and Hydrogen within a Functional Metal–Organic Framework

    KAUST Repository

    Savage, Mathew

    2016-07-27

    The key requirement for a portable store of natural gas is to maximize the amount of gas within the smallest possible space. The packing of methane (CH4) in a given storage medium at the highest possible density is, therefore, a highly desirable but challenging target. We report a microporous hydroxyl-decorated material, MFM-300(In) (MFM = Manchester Framework Material, replacing the NOTT designation), which displays a high volumetric uptake of 202 v/v at 298 K and 35 bar for CH4 and 488 v/v at 77 K and 20 bar for H2. Direct observation and quantification of the location, binding, and rotational modes of adsorbed CH4 and H2 molecules within this host have been achieved, using neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering experiments, coupled with density functional theory (DFT) modeling. These complementary techniques reveal a very efficient packing of H2 and CH4 molecules within MFM-300(In), reminiscent of the condensed gas in pure component crystalline solids. We also report here, for the first time, the experimental observation of a direct binding interaction between adsorbed CH4 molecules and the hydroxyl groups within the pore of a material. This is different from the arrangement found in CH4/water clathrates, the CH4 store of nature.

  20. Fe catalysts for methane decomposition to produce hydrogen and carbon nano materials

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Lu

    2017-02-21

    Conducting catalytic methane decomposition over Fe catalysts is a green and economic route to produce H2 without CO/CO2 contamination. Fused 65wt% and impregnated 20wt% Fe catalysts were synthesized with different additives to investigate their activity, whereas showing Fe-Al2O3 combination as the best catalyst. Al2O3 is speculated to expose more Fe00 for the selective deposition of carbon nano tubes (CNTs). A fused Fe (65wt%)-Al2O3 sample was further investigated by means of H2-TPR, in-situ XRD, HRTEM and XAS to conclude 750°C is the optimized temperature for H2 pre-reduction and reaction to obtain a high activity. Based on density functional theory (DFT) study, a reaction mechanism over Fe catalysts was proposed to explain the formation of graphite from unstable supersaturated iron carbides decomposition. A carbon deposition model was further proposed which explains the formation of different carbon nano materials.

  1. Observation of Binding and Rotation of Methane and Hydrogen within a Functional Metal-Organic Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Mathew; da Silva, Ivan; Johnson, Mark; Carter, Joseph H; Newby, Ruth; Suyetin, Mikhail; Besley, Elena; Manuel, Pascal; Rudić, Svemir; Fitch, Andrew N; Murray, Claire; David, William I F; Yang, Sihai; Schröder, Martin

    2016-07-27

    The key requirement for a portable store of natural gas is to maximize the amount of gas within the smallest possible space. The packing of methane (CH4) in a given storage medium at the highest possible density is, therefore, a highly desirable but challenging target. We report a microporous hydroxyl-decorated material, MFM-300(In) (MFM = Manchester Framework Material, replacing the NOTT designation), which displays a high volumetric uptake of 202 v/v at 298 K and 35 bar for CH4 and 488 v/v at 77 K and 20 bar for H2. Direct observation and quantification of the location, binding, and rotational modes of adsorbed CH4 and H2 molecules within this host have been achieved, using neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering experiments, coupled with density functional theory (DFT) modeling. These complementary techniques reveal a very efficient packing of H2 and CH4 molecules within MFM-300(In), reminiscent of the condensed gas in pure component crystalline solids. We also report here, for the first time, the experimental observation of a direct binding interaction between adsorbed CH4 molecules and the hydroxyl groups within the pore of a material. This is different from the arrangement found in CH4/water clathrates, the CH4 store of nature.

  2. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2003-03-31

    Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of transportation fuel from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, Energy International, the Department of Defense, and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research.

  3. Hydrogen production from biomass over steam gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rauch, R.; Potetz, A.; Hofbauer, H. [Vienna Univ. of Technology (Austria). Inst. of Chemical Engineering; Weber, G. [Bioenergy 2020+, Guessing (Austria)

    2010-12-30

    Renewable hydrogen is one option for a clean energy carrier in the future. There were several research programs in the past, to produce hydrogen on a renewable basis by electrolysis, direct conversion of water or by gasification of biomass. None of these options were developed to a stage, that they could be used on a commercial basis. At the moment almost all hydrogen is produced from fossil fuels and one main consumer of hydrogen are refineries. So a good option to demonstrate the production of renewable hydrogen and bring it later into the market is over refineries. The most economic option to produce renewable hydrogen at the moment is over gasification of biomass. In Austria an indirect gasification system was developed and is demonstrated in Guessing, Austria. The biomass CHP Guessing uses the allothermal steam dual fluidised bed gasifier and produces a high grade product gas, which is used at the moment for the CHP in a gas engine. As there is no nitrogen in the product gas and high hydrogen content, this gas can be also used as synthesis gas or for production of hydrogen. The main aim of this paper is to present the experimental and simulation work to convert biomass into renewable hydrogen. The product gas of the indirect gasification system is mainly hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and methane. Within the ERA-Net project ''OptiBtLGas'' the reforming of methane and the CO-shift reaction was investigated to convert all hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide to hydrogen. On basis of the experimental results the mass- and energy balances of a commercial 100 MW fuel input plant was done. Here 3 different cases of complexity of the overall plant were simulated. The first case was without reforming and CO-shift, only by hydrogen separation. The second case was by including steam - reforming and afterwards separation of hydrogen. The third case includes hydrocarbon reforming, CO-shift and hydrogen separation. In all cases the off-gases (CO

  4. A first-principles study of CO hydrogenation into methane on molybdenum carbides catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Ke-Zhen; Wang, Gui-Chang; Zheng, Wen-Jun

    2013-08-01

    The reaction mechanisms for the CO hydrogenation to produce CH4 on both fcc-Mo2C (100) and hcp-Mo2C (101) surfaces are investigated using density functional theory calculations with the periodic slab model. Through systematic calculations for the mechanisms of the CO hydrogenation on the two surfaces, we found that the reaction mechanisms are the same on both fcc and hcp Mo2C catalysts, that is, CO → HCO → H2CO → H2COH → CH2 → CH3 → CH4. The activation energy of the rate-determining step (CH3 + H → CH4) on fcc-Mo2C (100) (0.84 eV) is lower than that on hcp-Mo2C (101) (1.20 eV), and that is why catalytic activity of fcc-Mo2C is higher than hcp-Mo2C for CO hydrogenation. Our calculated results are consistent with the experimental observations. The activity difference of these two surfaces mainly comes from the co-adsorption energy difference between initial state (IS) and transition state (TS), that is, the co-adsorption energy difference between IS and TS is - 0.04 eV on fcc Mo2C (100), while it is as high as 0.68 eV on hcp Mo2C (101), and thus leading to the lower activation barrier for the reaction of CH3 + H → CH4 on fcc-Mo2C (100) compared to that of hcp-Mo2C (101).

  5. A crossed molecular beam and ab-initio investigation of the reaction of boron monoxide (BO; X2Σ+) with methylacetylene (CH3CCH; X1A1): competing atomic hydrogen and methyl loss pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Surajit; Parker, Dorian S N; Dangi, Beni B; Kaiser, Ralf I; Fau, Stefan; Perera, Ajith; Bartlett, Rodney J

    2013-11-21

    The gas-phase reaction of boron monoxide ((11)BO; X(2)Σ(+)) with methylacetylene (CH3CCH; X(1)A1) was investigated experimentally using crossed molecular beam technique at a collision energy of 22.7 kJ mol(-1) and theoretically using state of the art electronic structure calculation, for the first time. The scattering dynamics were found to be indirect (complex forming reaction) and the reaction proceeded through the barrier-less formation of a van-der-Waals complex ((11)BOC3H4) followed by isomerization via the addition of (11)BO(X(2)Σ(+)) to the C1 and/or C2 carbon atom of methylacetylene through submerged barriers. The resulting (11)BOC3H4 doublet radical intermediates underwent unimolecular decomposition involving three competing reaction mechanisms via two distinct atomic hydrogen losses and a methyl group elimination. Utilizing partially deuterated methylacetylene reactants (CD3CCH; CH3CCD), we revealed that the initial addition of (11)BO(X(2)Σ(+)) to the C1 carbon atom of methylacetylene was followed by hydrogen loss from the acetylenic carbon atom (C1) and from the methyl group (C3) leading to 1-propynyl boron monoxide (CH3CC(11)BO) and propadienyl boron monoxide (CH2CCH(11)BO), respectively. Addition of (11)BO(X(2)Σ(+)) to the C1 of methylacetylene followed by the migration of the boronyl group to the C2 carbon atom and/or an initial addition of (11)BO(X(2)Σ(+)) to the sterically less accessible C2 carbon atom of methylacetylene was followed by loss of a methyl group leading to the ethynyl boron monoxide product (HCC(11)BO) in an overall exoergic reaction (78 ± 23 kJ mol(-1)). The branching ratios of these channels forming CH2CCH(11)BO, CH3CC(11)BO, and HCC(11)BO were derived to be 4 ± 3%, 40 ± 5%, and 56 ± 15%, respectively; these data are in excellent agreement with the calculated branching ratios using statistical RRKM theory yielding 1%, 38%, and 61%, respectively.

  6. CFD simulation with detailed chemistry of steam reforming of methane for hydrogen production in an integrated micro-reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Xuli; Cheng, Yinhong; Jin, Yong; Cheng, Yi [Department of Chemical Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Reaction Engineering and Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Ding, Shi [Department of Chemical Engineering, Beijing Key Laboratory of Green Chemical Reaction Engineering and Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Research Institute of Petroleum Processing, SINOPEC, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2010-06-15

    micro-reactor has drawn more and more attention in recent years due to the process intensification on basic transport phenomena in micro-channels, which would often lead to the improved reactor performance. Steam reforming of methane (SRM) in micro-reactor has great potential to realize a low-cost, compact process for hydrogen production via an evident shortening of reaction time from seconds to milliseconds. This work focuses on the detailed modeling and simulation of a micro-reactor design for SRM reaction with the integration of a micro-channel for Rh-catalyzed endothermic reaction, a micro-channel for Pt-catalyzed exothermic reaction and a wall in between with Rh or Pt-catalyst coated layer. The elementary reaction kinetics for SRM process is adopted in the CFD model, while the combustion channel is described by global reaction kinetics. The model predictions were quantitatively validated by the experimental data in the literature. For the extremely fast reactions in both channels, the simulations indicated the significance of the heat conduction ability of the reactor wall as well as the interplay between the exothermic and endothermic reactions (e.g., the flow rate ratio of fuel gas to reforming gas). The characteristic width of 0.5 mm is considered to be a suitable channel size to balance the trade-off between the heat transfer behavior in micro-channels and the easy fabrication of micro-channels. (author)

  7. Carbon monoxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and smokers. Carbon monoxide can harm a fetus (unborn baby still in the womb). Symptoms of carbon ... symptoms Outlook (Prognosis) Carbon monoxide poisoning can cause death. For those who survive, recovery is slow. How ...

  8. CARBON MONOXIDE TREATMENT GUIDELINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Brvar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide is the leading cause of unintentional poisoning-related death in Slovenia. It is an odorless, colorless gas that usually remains undetectable until exposures result in injury or death. Exposure to carbon monoxide is most commonly accompanied by headache, nausea, vomiting, dizziness, confusion, drowsiness, fatigue and collapse. Carbon monoxide poisoning management includes normobaric oxygen therapy. Hyperbaric-oxygen treatments reduce the risk of cognitive sequelae after carbon monoxide poisoning. 

  9. Selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides from industrial gases by hydrogen or methane; Reduction catalytique selective des oxydes d'azote (NO{sub x}) provenant d'effluents gazeux industriels par l'hydrogene ou le methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelmann Pirez, M

    2004-12-15

    This work deals with the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), contained in the effluents of industrial plants, by hydrogen or methane. The aim is to replace ammonia, used as reducing agent, in the conventional process. The use of others reducing agents such as hydrogen or methane is interesting for different reasons: practical, economical and ecological. The catalyst has to convert selectively NO into N{sub 2}, in presence of an excess of oxygen, steam and sulfur dioxide. The developed catalyst is constituted by a support such as perovskites, particularly LaCoO{sub 3}, on which are dispersed noble metals (palladium, platinum). The interaction between the noble metal and the support, generated during the activation of the catalyst, allows to minimize the water and sulfur dioxide inhibitor phenomena on the catalytic performances, particularly in the reduction of NO by hydrogen. (O.M.)

  10. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... main content Languages 简体中文 English Bahasa Indonesia 한국어 Español ภาษาไทย Tiếng Việt Text Size: Decrease Font Increase ... Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as ...

  11. Modeling, Simulation and Optimization of Hydrogen Production Process from Glycerol using Steam Reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeongpil; Cho, Sunghyun; Kim, Tae-Ok; Shin, Dongil [Myongji University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seunghwan [JNK Heaters, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Dong Ju [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    For improved sustainability of the biorefinery industry, biorefinery-byproduct glycerol is being investigated as an alternate source for hydrogen production. This research designs and optimizes a hydrogen-production process for small hydrogen stations using steam reforming of purified glycerol as the main reaction, replacing existing processes relying on steam methane reforming. Modeling, simulation and optimization using a commercial process simulator are performed for the proposed hydrogen production process from glycerol. The mixture of glycerol and steam are used for making syngas in the reforming process. Then hydrogen are produced from carbon monoxide and steam through the water-gas shift reaction. Finally, hydrogen is separated from carbon dioxide using PSA. This study shows higher yield than former U.S.. DOE and Linde studies. Economic evaluations are performed for optimal planning of constructing domestic hydrogen energy infrastructure based on the proposed glycerol-based hydrogen station.

  12. Performance and microbial community analysis of two-stage process with extreme thermophilic hydrogen and thermophilic methane production from hydrolysate in UASB reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kongjan, Prawit; O-Thong, Sompong; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-03-01

    The two-stage process for extreme thermophilic hydrogen and thermophilic methane production from wheat straw hydrolysate was investigated in up-flow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) reactors. Specific hydrogen and methane yields of 89 ml-H(2)/g-VS (190 ml-H(2)/g-sugars) and 307 ml-CH(4)/g-VS, respectively were achieved simultaneously with the overall VS removal efficiency of 81% by operating with total hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 4 days . The energy conversion efficiency was dramatically increased from only 7.5% in the hydrogen stage to 87.5% of the potential energy from hydrolysate, corresponding to total energy of 13.4 kJ/g-VS. Dominant hydrogen-producing bacteria in the H(2)-UASB reactor were Thermoanaerobacter wiegelii, Caldanaerobacter subteraneus, and Caloramator fervidus. Meanwhile, the CH(4)-UASB reactor was dominated with methanogens of Methanosarcina mazei and Methanothermobacter defluvii. The results from this study suggest the two stage anaerobic process can be effectively used for energy recovery and for stabilization of hydrolysate at anaerobic conditions.

  13. Hydrogen production from catalytic decomposition of methane; Produccion de hidrogeno a partir de la descomposicion termica catalitica del biogas de digestion anaerobia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belsue Echevarria, M.; Etxebeste Juarez, O.; Perez Gil, S.

    2002-07-01

    The need of substitution of part of the energy obtained from fossil fuels instead of energy from renewable sources, together with the minimal emissions of CO{sub ''} and CO that are expected with these technologies, make renewable sources a very attractive predecessor for the production of hydrogen. In this situation, a usable source for hydrogen production is the biogas achieved by means of technologies like the anaerobic digestion of different kinds of biomass (MSW, sewage sludge, stc.). In this article we suggest the Thermal Catalytic Decomposition of the methane contained in this biogas, after separation of pollutants like CO{sub ''}, H{sub 2}S. steam. This technology will give hydrogen, usable in fuel cells, and nanoestructured carbon as products. (Author) 7 refs.

  14. Combined free nitrous acid and hydrogen peroxide pre-treatment of waste activated sludge enhances methane production via organic molecule breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingting; Wang, Qilin; Ye, Liu; Batstone, Damien; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-11-01

    This study presents a novel pre-treatment strategy using combined free nitrous acid (FNA i.e. HNO2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to enhance methane production from WAS, with the mechanisms investigated bio-molecularly. WAS from a full-scale plant was treated with FNA alone (1.54 mg N/L), H2O2 alone (10-80 mg/g TS), and their combinations followed by biochemical methane potential tests. Combined FNA and H2O2 pre-treatment substantially enhanced methane potential of WAS by 59-83%, compared to 13-23% and 56% with H2O2 pre-treatment alone and FNA pre-treatment alone respectively. Model-based analysis indicated the increased methane potential was mainly associated with up to 163% increase in rapidly biodegradable fraction with combined pre-treatment. The molecular weight distribution and chemical structure analyses revealed the breakdown of soluble macromolecules with the combined pre-treatment caused by the deamination and oxidation of the typical functional groups in proteins, polysaccharides and phosphodiesters. These changes likely improved the biodegradability of WAS.

  15. Role of Periodic Input Composition and Sweeping Gas for Improvement of Hydrogen Production in a Palladium Membrane Reactor by Partial Oxidation of Methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lemnouer Chibane; Brahim Djellouli

    2012-01-01

    The partial oxidation of methane under periodic operation over Ni/y/-Al2O3 catalyst was investigated in a Pd-membrane reactor. The effects of key parameters such as the inlet composition and the sweeping, gas on methane conversion and the hydrogen recovery are numerically estalallshed with two penodtc input ttmctlons. In order to analyze the effect of the inputs modulation, the reaction was performed under low steam to methane ratio at a mod-erate temperature and pressure. It was obtained that to achieve process intensification is to operate the process in a periodic way. The main results show that the periodic input functions can improve the performance of the process compared to the optimal steady state operation. Moreover, there is an optimum amplitude of manipulated inputs leads to a maximum of hydrogen recovery. It is noteworthy that the comparison between the predicted performancevia the sinusoidal and the'square ways show that the better'average performance was obtainedwith the square way.

  16. Microreactor for the Catalytic Partial Oxidation of Methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Widodo Wahyu Puwanto; Yuswan Muharam

    2006-01-01

    Fixed-bed reactors for the partial oxidation of methane to produce synthetic gas still pose hotspot problems. An alternative reactor, which is known as the shell-and-tube-typed microreactor, has been developed to resolve these problems. The microreactor consists of a 1 cm outside-diameter, 0.8 cm insidediameter and 11 cm length tube, and a 1.8 cm inside-diameter shell. The tube is made of dense alumina and the shell is made of quartz. Two different methods dip and spray coating were performed to line the tube side with the LaNixOy catalyst. Combustion and reforming reactions take place simultaneously in this reactor. Methane is oxidized in the tube side to produce flue gases (CO2 and H2O) which flow counter-currently and react with the remaining methane in the shell side to yield synthesis gas. The methane conversion using the higher-loading catalyst spray-coated tube reaches 97% at 700 ℃, whereas that using the lower-loading catalyst dip-coated tube reaches only 7.78% because of poor adhesion between the catalyst film and the alumina support. The turnover frequencies (TOFs) using the catalyst spray-and 900 ℃ provides better performance than that at 1250 ℃ because sintering reduces the surface-area. The hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio produced by the spray-coated catalyst is greater than the stoichiometric ratio, which is caused by carbon deposition through methane cracking or the Boudouard reaction.

  17. Nickel-containing catalysts for methane oxidation to synthesis gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusman Dossumov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas was studied on oxides of metals of variable valence (Mn, La, Cr and Ni, supported on a carrier – ɣ-Al2O3. Among the catalysts studied, the sample of 3% Ni/ɣ-Al2O3 showed the best characteristics by yields of hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the reaction of partial oxidation of methane. The optimal conditions of the process (the reaction temperature of 850 °C, the volume rate of 4500 h-1, and the ratio CH4: O2 = 2:1 cause the increase the concentration of hydrogen and carbon monoxide to 72.2 and 75.3%, respectively. The effect of the heat-treatment temperature and textural characteristics of the Ni/ ɣ-Al2O3 catalyst on its catalytic activity was studied. The NiCe/Al2O3 catalyst developed showed a high stability during 30 hours.

  18. Solubility of Hydrogen Sulfide and Methane in Ionic Liquids: 1-Ethy-3-methylimidazolium Trifluoromethanesulfonate and 1-Butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium Trifluoromethanesulfonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byung-Chul [Hannam University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    Solubility data of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) and methane (CH{sub 4}) in two kinds of ionic liquids with the same anion: 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([emim][TfO]) and 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([bmpyr][TfO]) are presented at pressures up to about 30 MPa and at temperatures between 303 K and 343 K. The gas solubilities in ionic liquids were determined by measuring the bubble point pressures of the gas + ionic liquid mixtures with various compositions at different temperatures using a high-pressure equilibrium apparatus equipped with a variable-volume view cell. The H{sub 2}S solubilities in ionic liquid increased with the increase of pressure and decreased with the increase of temperature. On the other hand, the CH{sub 4} solubilities in ionic liquid increased significantly with the increase of pressure, but there was little effect of temperature on the CH{sub 4} solubility. For the ionic liquds [emim][TfO] and [bmpyr][TfO] with the same anion, the solubility of H{sub 2}S as a molality basis was substantially similar, regardless of the temperature and pressure conditions as a molar concentration basis. Comparing the solubilities of H{sub 2}S and CH{sub 4} in the ionic liquid [emim][TfO], the solubilities of H{sub 2}S were much greater than those of CH{sub 4}. For the same type of ionic liquid, the solubility data of H{sub 2}S and CH{sub 4} obtained in this study were compared to the solubility data of CO2 from the literature. When compared at the same pressure and temperature conditions, the CO{sub 2} solubility was in between the solubility of H{sub 2}S and CH{sub 4}.

  19. Co-production of hydrogen and methane from herbal medicine wastewater by a combined UASB system with immobilized sludge (H2 production) and UASB system with suspended sludge (CH4 production).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Caiyu; Hao, Ping; Qin, Bida; Wang, Bing; Di, Xueying; Li, Yongfeng

    2016-01-01

    An upflow anaerobic sludge bed (UASB) system with sludge immobilized on granular activated carbon was developed for fermentative hydrogen production continuously from herbal medicine wastewater at various organic loading rates (8-40 g chemical oxygen demand (COD) L(-1) d(-1)). The maximum hydrogen production rate reached 10.0 (±0.17) mmol L(-1) hr(-1) at organic loading rate of 24 g COD L(-1) d(-1), which was 19.9% higher than that of suspended sludge system. The effluents of hydrogen fermentation were used for continuous methane production in the subsequent UASB system. At hydraulic retention time of 15 h, the maximum methane production rate of 5.49 (±0.03) mmol L(-1) hr(-1) was obtained. The total energy recovery rate by co-production of hydrogen and methane was evaluated to be 7.26 kJ L(-1) hr(-1).

  20. A comparative parametric study of a catalytic plate methane reformer coated with segmented and continuous layers of combustion catalyst for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundhwa, Mayur; Parmar, Rajesh D.; Thurgood, Christopher P.

    2017-03-01

    A parametric comparison study is carried out between segmented and conventional continuous layer configurations of the coated combustion-catalyst to investigate their influence on the performance of methane steam reforming (MSR) for hydrogen production in a catalytic plate reactor (CPR). MSR is simulated on one side of a thin plate over a continuous layer of nickel-alumina catalyst by implementing an experimentally validated surface microkinetic model. Required thermal energy for the MSR reaction is supplied by simulating catalytic methane combustion (CMC) on the opposite side of the plate over segmented and continuous layer of a platinum-alumina catalyst by implementing power law rate model. The simulation results of both coating configurations of the combustion-catalyst are compared using the following parameters: (1) co-flow and counter-flow modes between CMC and MSR, (2) gas hourly space velocity and (3) reforming-catalyst thickness. The study explains why CPR designed with the segmented combustion-catalyst and co-flow mode shows superior performance not only in terms of high hydrogen production but also in terms of minimizing the maximum reactor plate temperature and thermal hot-spots. The study shows that the segmented coating requires 7% to 8% less combustion-side feed flow and 70% less combustion-catalyst to produce the required flow of hydrogen (29.80 mol/h) on the reforming-side to feed a 1 kW fuel-cell compared to the conventional continuous coating of the combustion-catalyst.

  1. The effect of additives on the reactivity of palladium surfaces for the chemisorption and hydrogenation of carbon monoxide: A surface science and catalytic study. [LaMO/sub 3/(M = Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Rh)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rucker, T.G.

    1987-06-01

    This research studied the role of surface additives on the catalytic activity and chemisorptive properties of Pd single crystals and foils. Effects of Na, K, Si, P, S, and Cl on the bonding of CO and H and on the cyclotrimerization of acetylene on the (111), (100) and (110) faces of Pd were investigated in addition to role of TiO/sub 2/ and SiO/sub 2/ overlayers deposited on Pd foils in the CO hydrogenation reaction. On Pd, only in the presence of oxide overlayers, are methane or methanol formed from CO and H/sub 2/. The maximum rate of methane formation is attained on Pd foil where 30% of the surface is covered with titania. Methanol formation can be achieved only if the TiO/sub x//Pd surface is pretreated in 50 psi of oxygen at 550/sup 0/C prior to the reaction. The additives (Na, K, Si, P, S, Cl) affect the bonding of CO and hydrogen and the cyclotrimerization of acetylene to benzene by structural and electronic interactions. In general, the electron donating additives increase the desorption temperature of CO and increase the rate of acetylene cyclotrimerization and the electron withdrawing additives decrease the desorption temperature of CO and decrease the rate of benzene formation from acetylene.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of niobium-promoted cobalt/iron catalysts supported on carbon nanotubes for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zahra Gholami; Noor Asmawati Mohd Zabidi; Fatemeh Gholami; Mohammadtaghi Vakili

    2016-01-01

    Bimetallic Co/Fe catalysts supported on carbon nanotubes ( CNTs) were prepared, and niobium ( Nb) was added as promoter to the 70Co:30Fe/CNT catalyst. The physicochemical properties of the catalysts were characterized, and the catalytic performances were analyzed at the same operation conditions (H2:CO (volume ratio)= 2:1, p = 1 MPa, and t = 260℃) in a tubular fixed-bed microreactor system. The addition of Nb to the bimetallic catalyst decreases the average size of the oxide nanoparticles and improves the reducibility of the bimetallic catalyst. Evaluation of the catalyst performance in a Fischer-Tropsch reaction shows that the catalyst results in high selectivity to methane, and the selectivity to C5+ increased slightly in the bimetallic catalyst unlike that in the monometallic catalysts. The addition of 1% Nb to the bimetallic catalyst increases CO conversion and selectivity to C5+. Meanwhile, a decrease in methane selectivity is observed.

  3. Enhanced methane and hydrogen yields from catalytic supercritical water gasification of pine wood sawdust via pre-processing in subcritical water

    OpenAIRE

    Onwudili, JA; Williams, PT

    2013-01-01

    A two-stage batch hydrothermal process has been investigated with the aim of enhancing the yields of hydrogen and methane from sawdust. Samples of the sawdust were rapidly treated in subcritical water and with added Na2CO3 (alkaline compound) and Nb2O3 (solid acid) at 280 °C, 8 MPa. Each pre-processing route resulted in a solid recovered product (SRP), an aqueous residue and a small amount of gas composed mainly of CO2. In the second stage, the SRP and the liquid residues were gasified in sup...

  4. Testing and analysis of the impact on engine cycle parameters and control system modifications using hydrogen or methane as fuel in an industrial gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funke, H. H.-W.; Keinz, J.; Börner, S.; Hendrick, P.; Elsing, R.

    2016-07-01

    The paper highlights the modification of the engine control software of the hydrogen (H2) converted gas turbine Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) GTCP 36-300 allowing safe and accurate methane (CH4) operation achieved without mechanical changes of the metering unit. The acceleration and deceleration characteristics of the engine controller from idle to maximum load are analyzed comparing H2 and CH4. Also, the paper presents the influence on the thermodynamic cycle of gas turbine resulting from the different fuels supported by a gas turbine cycle simulation of H2 and CH4 using the software GasTurb.

  5. Experimental and modelling study of the densities of the hydrogen sulphide + methane mixtures at 253, 273 and 293 K and pressures up to 30 MPa

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez Perez, Alfonso; Valtz, Alain; Coquelet, Christophe; PARICAUD, Patrice; Chapoy, Antonin

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Densities of three binary mixtures of hydrogen sulphide and methane (xH 2 S + (1-x) CH 4), with mole fractions of 0.1315, 0.1803 and 0.2860 of acid gas, were determined experimentally at three temperatures (253, 273 and 293) K and at pressures up to 30 MPa. Densities were measured continuously using a high temperature and high pressure Vibrating Tube densitometer (VTD), Anton Paar DMA 512. The SAFT-VR Mie, PR and GERG2008 equations of state (EoS) are used to describe t...

  6. Product selectivity in plasmonic photocatalysis for carbon dioxide hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao; Li, Xueqian; Zhang, Du; Su, Neil Qiang; Yang, Weitao; Everitt, Henry O.; Liu, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Photocatalysis has not found widespread industrial adoption, in spite of decades of active research, because the challenges associated with catalyst illumination and turnover outweigh the touted advantages of replacing heat with light. A demonstration that light can control product selectivity in complex chemical reactions could prove to be transformative. Here, we show how the recently demonstrated plasmonic behaviour of rhodium nanoparticles profoundly improves their already excellent catalytic properties by simultaneously reducing the activation energy and selectively producing a desired but kinetically unfavourable product for the important carbon dioxide hydrogenation reaction. Methane is almost exclusively produced when rhodium nanoparticles are mildly illuminated as hot electrons are injected into the anti-bonding orbital of a critical intermediate, while carbon monoxide and methane are equally produced without illumination. The reduced activation energy and super-linear dependence on light intensity cause the unheated photocatalytic methane production rate to exceed the thermocatalytic rate at 350 °C. PMID:28230100

  7. Chemical Looping Combustion of Hematite Ore with Methane and Steam in a Fluidized Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Bayham

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Chemical looping combustion is considered an indirect method of oxidizing a carbonaceous fuel, utilizing a metal oxide oxygen carrier to provide oxygen to the fuel. The advantage is the significantly reduced energy penalty for separating out the CO2 for reuse or sequestration in a carbon-constrained world. One of the major issues with chemical looping combustion is the cost of the oxygen carrier. Hematite ore is a proposed oxygen carrier due to its high strength and resistance to mechanical attrition, but its reactivity is rather poor compared to tailored oxygen carriers. This problem is further exacerbated by methane cracking, the subsequent deposition of carbon and the inability to transfer oxygen at a sufficient rate from the core of the particle to the surface for fuel conversion to CO2. Oxygen needs to be readily available at the surface to prevent methane cracking. The purpose of this work was to demonstrate the use of steam to overcome this issue and improve the conversion of the natural gas to CO2, as well as to provide data for computational fluid dynamics (CFD validation. The steam will gasify the deposited carbon to promote the methane conversion. This work studies the performance of hematite ore with methane and steam mixtures in a 5 cm fluidized bed up to approximately 140 kPa. Results show an increased conversion of methane in the presence of steam (from 20–45% without steam to 60–95% up to a certain point, where performance decreases. Adding steam allows the methane conversion to carbon dioxide to be similar to the overall methane conversion; it also helped to prevent carbon accumulation from occurring on the particle. In general, the addition of steam to the feed gas increased the methane conversion. Furthermore, the addition of steam caused the steam methane reforming reaction to form more hydrogen and carbon monoxide at higher steam and methane concentrations, which was not completely converted at higher concentrations and

  8. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

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    Full Text Available ... Estimates OCTOBER 13, 2015 Incidents, Deaths, and In-Depth Investigations Associated with Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide from Engine-Driven Generators and ... Engine-Driven Tools, 2004–2014 JANUARY 08, 2015 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2011 Annual Estimates View All ... Inside CPSC Accessibility ...

  9. Structural and optical properties of ZnO nanostructures grown by aerosol spray pyrolysis: Candidates for room temperature methane and hydrogen gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motaung, D. E.; Mhlongo, G. H.; Kortidis, I.; Nkosi, S. S.; Malgas, G. F.; Mwakikunga, B. W.; Ray, S. Sinha; Kiriakidis, G.

    2013-08-01

    We report on the synthesis of ZnO films by aerosol spray pyrolysis method at different deposition times. The surface morphology, crystal structure and the cross-sectional analysis of the prepared ZnO films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). XRD analysis revealed that the ZnO films are polycrystalline in nature. Structural analysis exploiting cross-sectional TEM profile showed that the films composed of nano-particles and columnar structures growing perpendicular to the substrate. AFM revealed that the columnar structures have a higher surface roughness as compared to the nanoparticles. The effect of ZnO crystallite size and crystallinity on the gas sensing performance of hydrogen and methane gases was also evaluated. Sensing film based on ZnO nanoparticles has numerous advantages in terms of its reliability and high sensitivity. These sensing materials revealed an improved response to methane and hydrogen gases at room temperature due to their high surface area, indicating their possible application as a gas sensor.

  10. Structural and optical properties of ZnO nanostructures grown by aerosol spray pyrolysis: Candidates for room temperature methane and hydrogen gas sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motaung, D.E., E-mail: dmotaung@csir.co.za [DST/CSIR Nanotechnology Innovation Centre, National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, P. O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Mhlongo, G.H., E-mail: gmhlongo@csir.co.za [DST/CSIR Nanotechnology Innovation Centre, National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, P. O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Kortidis, I. [Transparent Conductive Materials Lab, Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, 100N. Plastira str., Vassilika Vouton, 70013 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Nkosi, S.S., E-mail: skosi@csir.co.za [CSIR-National Laser Centre, 626 Meiring Naude Rd, Brummeria, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); School of Physics, University of Witwatersrand, Private Bag X3, Johannesburg 2030 (South Africa); Malgas, G.F.; Mwakikunga, B.W.; Ray, S.Sinha [DST/CSIR Nanotechnology Innovation Centre, National Centre for Nano-Structured Materials, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, P. O. Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa); Kiriakidis, G., E-mail: kiriakid@iesl.forth.gr [Transparent Conductive Materials Lab, Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas, 100N. Plastira str., Vassilika Vouton, 70013 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); University of Crete, Department of Physics, 710 03 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2013-08-15

    We report on the synthesis of ZnO films by aerosol spray pyrolysis method at different deposition times. The surface morphology, crystal structure and the cross-sectional analysis of the prepared ZnO films were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). XRD analysis revealed that the ZnO films are polycrystalline in nature. Structural analysis exploiting cross-sectional TEM profile showed that the films composed of nano-particles and columnar structures growing perpendicular to the substrate. AFM revealed that the columnar structures have a higher surface roughness as compared to the nanoparticles. The effect of ZnO crystallite size and crystallinity on the gas sensing performance of hydrogen and methane gases was also evaluated. Sensing film based on ZnO nanoparticles has numerous advantages in terms of its reliability and high sensitivity. These sensing materials revealed an improved response to methane and hydrogen gases at room temperature due to their high surface area, indicating their possible application as a gas sensor.

  11. Enhanced methane and hydrogen production from municipal solid waste and agro-industrial by-products co-digested with crude glycerol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fountoulakis, M S; Manios, T

    2009-06-01

    The effects of crude glycerol on the performance of single-stage anaerobic reactors treating different types of organic waste were examined. A reactor treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste produced 1400 mL CH(4)/d before the addition of glycerol and 2094 mL CH(4)/d after the addition of glycerol. An enhanced methane production rate was also observed when a 1:4 mixture of olive mill wastewater and slaughterhouse wastewater was supplemented with crude glycerol. Specifically, by adding 1% v/v crude glycerol to the feed, the methane production rate increased from 479 mL/d to 1210 mL/d. The extra glycerol-COD added to the feed did not have a negative effect on the reactor performance in either case. Supplementation of the feed with crude glycerol also had a significant positive effect on anaerobic fermentation reactors. Hydrogen yield was 26 mmole H(2)/g VS added and 15 mmole H(2)/g VS added in a reactor treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste and a 1:4 mixture of olive mill and slaughterhouse wastewater. The addition of crude glycerol to the feed enhanced hydrogen yield at 2.9 mmole H(2)/g glycerol added and 0.7 mmole H(2)/g glycerol added.

  12. Thermodynamic investigation of waste cooking oil based hydrogen generation system with chemical looping process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahla Faleh

    2016-07-01

    The results show that coke formation can be thermodynamically inhibited by increasing the S/C ratio and/or the NiO/C ratio. The conditions that maximize hydrogen production, minimize methane and carbon monoxide content as well as avoid coke formation at thermoneutral conditions were found to be S/C = 5, T = 600 °C and NiO/C = 0.493. Under these conditions, a hydrogen yield of 144.3 mol/kg of soybean waste cooking oil can be obtained, which appears to be an attractive result for starting experimental research.

  13. Analysis of Potential Risk Caused by Hydrogen and Carbon Monoxide in Buildings Attached to Containment for Asco 1 and 2 and Vandellos II NPPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nos, V.; Rosa, C. de la; Lee, S. J.; Burelbach, J.; Plys, M.; Fornos, J.

    2014-07-01

    The Consejo de Seguridad Nuclear (CSN) of Spain issued a Technical Instruction encouraging nuclear power plant s to analyze the potential risk of hydrogen in the buildings attached to containment [1]. According to the Technical Instruction, the analysis should assume that all severe accident mitigation features are available, including those that are planned but not yet in place. (Author)

  14. Inhibition of hydrogen sulfide, methane, and total gas production and sulfate-reducing bacteria in in vitro swine manure by tannins, with focus on condensed quebracho tannins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Terence R; Spence, Cheryl; Cotta, Michael A

    2013-09-01

    Management practices from large-scale swine production facilities have resulted in the increased collection and storage of manure for off-season fertilization use. Odor and emissions produced during storage have increased the tension among rural neighbors and among urban and rural residents. Production of these compounds from stored manure is the result of microbial activity of the anaerobic bacteria populations during storage. In the current study, the inhibitory effects of condensed quebracho tannins on in vitro swine manure for reduction of microbial activity and reduced production of gaseous emissions, including the toxic odorant hydrogen sulfide produced by sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), was examined. Swine manure was collected from a local swine facility, diluted in anaerobic buffer, and mixed with 1 % w/v fresh feces. This slurry was combined with quebracho tannins, and total gas and hydrogen sulfide production was monitored over time. Aliquots were removed periodically for isolation of DNA to measure the SRB populations using quantitative PCR. Addition of tannins reduced overall gas, hydrogen sulfide, and methane production by greater than 90 % after 7 days of treatment and continued to at least 28 days. SRB population was also significantly decreased by tannin addition. qRT-PCR of 16S rDNA bacteria genes showed that the total bacterial population was also decreased in these incubations. These results indicate that the tannins elicited a collective effect on the bacterial population and also suggest a reduction in the population of methanogenic microorganisms as demonstrated by reduced methane production in these experiments. Such a generalized effect could be extrapolated to a reduction in other odor-associated emissions during manure storage.

  15. Continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry method for carbon and hydrogen isotope measurements on atmospheric methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brass, M.; Roeckmann, T.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a continuous-flow isotope ratio mass spectrometry (CF-IRMS) technique for high-precision δD and δ13C measurements of atmospheric methane on 40 mL air samples. CH4 is separated from other air components by utilizing purely physical processes based on temperature, time and mechanical valve

  16. N,N-二甲基羟胺辐解产生的氢气和一氧化碳的研究%Qualitative and quantitative analysis of hydrogen and carbon monoxide produced by radiation degradation of N, N-dimethyl hydroxylamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jinhua; BAO Borong; WU Minghong; SUN Xilian; ZHANG Xianye; HU Jingxin; YE Guoan

    2005-01-01

    With the development of nuclear power industry, more attentions have been paid on reprocessing power reactor spent fuel. Up to now, PUREX process is the only process available commercially. The process achieves uranium and plutonium separation by means of quick and quantitative reduction of Pu (Ⅳ) to Pu (Ⅲ). Therefore the reductant is very important in PUREX process. Preliminary experiment results[1] show that N, N-dimethyl hydroxylamine not only reduces rapidly Np (Ⅵ) and Pu (Ⅳ) to Np (V) and Pu (Ⅲ), but also stabilizes the Np (V)and Pu (Ⅲ) in acid solution. It may become a salt-free reductant with promising future for applications in the area[2]. However, organics decompose under intense radiation environment, and this affects its reduction efficiency,and products from the degradation may affect separation of the radioactive elements.This paper reports the qualitative and quantitative analysis of hydrogen and carbon monoxide produced by 60Co y-ray degradation of N, N-dimethyl hydroxylamine. The analyses of hydrogen and carbon monoxide were performed by gas chromatography, in which a 2m column packed with 5A molecular sieve and thermal conduc tivity detector[3] were used. The analysis of hydrogen employed argon as carrier gas, the column temperature was 80℃ and the detector temperature was 110℃. The analysis of carbon monoxide used hydrogen as carrier gas, the column temperature was 50℃ and the detector temperature was 80 ℃. The results show that when the concentration of N, N-dimethyl hydroxylamine was between 0.1 mol/L and 0.5 mol/L and the dose delivered by the irradiation was 10-1000 kGy, the volume fraction of hydrogen was (8.0-303.9)× 10-3; and the volume fraction of carbon monoxide is (0-1.7)× 10-3. The volume fraction of hydrogen increased with increasing dose, and it has little relationship with concentration change of N, N-dimethyl hydroxylamine when the irradiation dose was bellow 500 kGy, whereas it increased with the increasing

  17. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

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    Full Text Available ... CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION Search CPSC Search Menu Home Recalls Recall List CPSC Recall API Recall Lawsuits ... and Bans Report an Unsafe Product Consumers Businesses Home Safety Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information ...

  18. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

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    Full Text Available ... Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths ... 2011 Annual Estimates View All CO-Related Injury Statistics and Technical Reports Related Links Recalls Safety Education ...

  19. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

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    Full Text Available ... On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide ... Related Links Recalls Safety Education Regulations, Laws & Standards Research & Statistics Business & Manufacturing Small Business Resources OnSafety Blogs ...

  20. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

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    Full Text Available ... Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster Contest Pool Safely Business & Manufacturing Business & Manufacturing Business ... Featured Resources CPSC announces winners of carbon monoxide poster contest Video View the blog Clues You Can ...

  1. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Criminal Penalties Federal Court Orders & Decisions Research & Statistics Research & Statistics Technical Reports Injury Statistics NEISS Injury Data ... On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths ...

  2. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

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    Full Text Available ... Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 Annual Estimates OCTOBER 13, 2015 Incidents, Deaths, and In-Depth Investigations Associated with Non-Fire ...

  3. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

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    Full Text Available ... Unites States die every year from accidental non-fire related CO poisoning associated with consumer products, including ... CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of ...

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    Full Text Available ... Import Safety International Recall Guidance Civil and Criminal Penalties Federal Court Orders & ... 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 ...

  5. Carbon Monoxide Nonattainment Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer identifies areas in the U.S. where air pollution levels have not met the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Carbon Monoxide and have...

  6. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

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    Full Text Available ... Unites States die every year from accidental non-fire related CO poisoning associated with consumer products, including ... CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of ...

  7. Hydrogen and syngas production from two-step steam reforming of methane over CeO2-Fe2O3 oxygen carrier

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU

    2010-01-01

    Two-step steam reforming of methane(SRM)is a novel chemical looping process towards the production of pure hydrogen and syngas(synthesis gas),consisting ofa syngas production step and a water-splitting step.Renewable energy can be used to drive this process for hydrogen production,especially solar energy.CeO2-Fe2O3 complex oxide oxygen carrier was prepared by the impregnation method and characterized by means of X-ray diffractometer(XRD),Raman spectroscopy(Raman)and hydrogen programmed reduction(H2-TPR).CH4temperature programmed and isothermal reactions were adopted to test syngas production reactivity,and water splitting reaction was employed to investigate water-splitting activity.Moreover,two-step SRM performance was evaluated by a successive redox cycle.The results showed that CO-uncontaminated H2 and highly selective syngas(with H2/CO ratio close to 2)could be respectively obtained from two steps,and CeFeO3 formation was found in the first redox cycle and proved to be enhanced by the redox treatment.After 10 successive cycles,obvious CeFeO3 phase was detected,which may be responsible for favorable successive redox cycle performances.

  8. 天然气制氢反应器的研究进展%Research development in reactors for hydrogen production from methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈恒志; 郭正奎

    2012-01-01

    氢是一种理想的能源,高纯氢的制备是近年研究的一个重点,反应器的结构是制氢的关键。本文综述了固定床、流化床、膜反应器、等离子体反应器、太阳能反应器和微通道反应器在甲烷制氢研究中的应用,分析了各种反应器在制氢过程的特点以及不足之处,指出了制氢反应器的发展方向。%As a great potential clean energy,pure hydrogen produced by methane had attracted great attention,and the reactor is a key issue for the process of hydrogen production.The reactors for hydrogen production,such as fixed bed,fluidized bed,membrane reactor,plasma reactor,solar reactor and microchannel reactor were reviewed in this paper.Merits and limitations of various reactors and their development trends were also discussed.

  9. Effect of methanogenic substrates on anaerobic oxidation of methane and sulfate reduction by an anaerobic methanotrophic enrichment.

    KAUST Repository

    Meulepas, Roel J W

    2010-05-06

    Anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM) coupled to sulfate reduction (SR) is assumed to be a syntrophic process, in which methanotrophic archaea produce an interspecies electron carrier (IEC), which is subsequently utilized by sulfate-reducing bacteria. In this paper, six methanogenic substrates are tested as candidate-IECs by assessing their effect on AOM and SR by an anaerobic methanotrophic enrichment. The presence of acetate, formate or hydrogen enhanced SR, but did not inhibit AOM, nor did these substrates trigger methanogenesis. Carbon monoxide also enhanced SR but slightly inhibited AOM. Methanol did not enhance SR nor did it inhibit AOM, and methanethiol inhibited both SR and AOM completely. Subsequently, it was calculated at which candidate-IEC concentrations no more Gibbs free energy can be conserved from their production from methane at the applied conditions. These concentrations were at least 1,000 times lower can the final candidate-IEC concentration in the bulk liquid. Therefore, the tested candidate-IECs could not have been produced from methane during the incubations. Hence, acetate, formate, methanol, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen can be excluded as sole IEC in AOM coupled to SR. Methanethiol did inhibit AOM and can therefore not be excluded as IEC by this study.

  10. Multi-scale modeling of the heat and mass transfer in a monolithic methane steam-reformer for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acevedo, Luis Evelio Garcia; Oliveira, Amir Antonio Martins [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica], e-mail: evelio@labcet.ufsc.br, e-mail: amirol@emc.ufsc.br

    2006-07-01

    Here we present a heat and mass transfer analysis for the catalytic methane steam-reforming in a porous monolithic reactor. Thermodynamic analysis provides the bounds for temperature, pressure and steam-methane molar ration for optimum operation. However, the reactor operation is also constrained by chemical kinetics and heat and mass transfer limitations. Porous wash coated monoliths have been used for a long time in the automotive industry as catalytic converters for destruction of gas and particulate pollutants. Here we analyze the modeling issues related to a multi-scale porous structure and develop a model able to assess the advantages and drawbacks of using a monolith as support for a catalyst layer for steam-reforming. (author)

  11. State of Ni in catalysts for glycerol hydrogenation and methane steam reforming as studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, O. P.; Kustov, L. M.

    2013-06-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to study 1% Ni/Al2O3, 5% Ni/Al2O3, and 5% Ni/TiO2 catalysts for glycerol and methane conversion. The effect of treatment in H2 under microwave irradiation on the reduction of part of the nickel to the metallic state in the titanium oxide-supported catalyst is demonstrated.

  12. Is methane a new therapeutic gas?

    OpenAIRE

    Liu Wenwu; Wang Dong; Tao Hengyi; Sun XueJun

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Methane is an attractive fuel. Biologically, methanogens in the colon can use carbon dioxide and hydrogen to produce methane as a by-product. It was previously considered that methane is not utilized by humans. However, in a recent study, results demonstrated that methane could exert anti-inflammatory effects in a dog small intestinal ischemia-reperfusion model. Point of view Actually, the bioactivity of methane has been investigated in gastrointestinal diseases, but the e...

  13. The future of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howell, D.G.

    1995-12-31

    Natural gas, mainly methane, produces lower CO{sub 2}, CO, NO{sub x}, SO{sub 2} and particulate emissions than either oil or coal; thus further substitutions of methane for these fuels could help mitigate air pollution. Methane is, however, a potent greenhouse gas and the domestication of ruminants, cultivation of rice, mining of coal, drilling for oil, and transportation of natural gas have all contributed to a doubling of the amount of atmospheric methane since 1800. Today nearly 300,000 wells yearly produce ca. 21 trillion cubic feet of methane. Known reserves suggest about a 10 year supply at the above rates of recovery; and the potential for undiscovered resources is obscured by uncertainty involving price, new technologies, and environmental restrictions steming from the need to drill an enormous number of wells, many in ecologically sensitive areas. Until all these aspects of methane are better understood, its future role in the world`s energy mix will remain uncertain. The atomic simplicity of methane, composed of one carbon and four hydrogen atoms, may mask the complexity and importance of this, the most basic of organic molecules. Within the Earth, methane is produced through thermochemical alteration of organic materials, and by biochemical reactions mediated by metabolic processes of archaebacteria; some methane may even be primordial, a residue of planetary accretion. Methane also occurs in smaller volumes in landfills, rice paddies, termite complexes, ruminants, and even many humans. As an energy source, its full energy potential is controversial. Methane is touted by some as a viable bridge to future energy systems, fueled by the sun and uranium and carried by electricity and hydrogen.

  14. Hydrogen Purification and Recycling for an Integrated Oxygen Recovery System Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Greenwood, Zachary; Wall, Terry; Miller, Lee; Wheeler, Ray

    2016-01-01

    The United States Atmosphere Revitalization life support system on the International Space Station (ISS) performs several services for the crew including oxygen generation, trace contaminant control, carbon dioxide (CO2) removal, and oxygen recovery. Oxygen recovery is performed using a Sabatier reactor developed by Hamilton Sundstrand, wherein CO2 is reduced with hydrogen in a catalytic reactor to produce methane and water. The water product is purified in the Water Purification Assembly and recycled to the Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) to provide O2 to the crew. This architecture results in a theoretical maximum oxygen recovery from CO2 of approximately 54% due to the loss of reactant hydrogen in Sabatier-produced methane that is currently vented outside of ISS. Plasma Methane Pyrolysis technology (PPA), developed by Umpqua Research Company, provides the capability to further close the Atmosphere Revitalization oxygen loop by recovering hydrogen from Sabatier-produced methane. A key aspect of this technology approach is to purify the hydrogen from the PPA product stream which includes acetylene, unreacted methane and byproduct water and carbon monoxide. In 2015, four sub-scale hydrogen separation systems were delivered to NASA for evaluation. These included two electrolysis single-cell hydrogen purification cell stacks developed by Sustainable Innovations, LLC, a sorbent-based hydrogen purification unit using microwave power for sorbent regeneration developed by Umpqua Research Company, and a LaNi4.6Sn0.4 metal hydride produced by Hydrogen Consultants, Inc. Here we report the results of these evaluations, discuss potential architecture options, and propose future work.

  15. CO selective methanation in hydrogen-rich gas mixtures over carbon nanotube supported Ru-based catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Xiong; Xinfa Dong; Lingling Li

    2012-01-01

    Series of carbon nanotube supported Ru-based catalysts were prepared by impregnation method and applied successfully for complete removal of CO by CO selective methanation from H2-rich gas stream conducted in a fixed-bed quartz tubular reactor at ambient pressure.It was found that the metal promoter,reduction temperature and metal loading affected the catalytic properties significantly.The most excellent performance was presented by 30 wt% Ru-Zr/CNTs catalyst reduced at 350 ℃.Since it decreased CO concentration to below 10 ppm from 12000 ppm by CO selective methanation at the temperature range of 180-240 ℃,and kept CO selectivity higher than 85% at the temperature below 200 ℃.Characterization using XRD,TEM,H2-TPR and XPS suggests that Zr modification of Ru/CNTs results in the weakening of the interaction between Ru and CNTs,a higher Ru dispersion and the oxidization of surface Ru.Amorphous and high dispersed Ru particles with small size were obtained for 30 wt% Ru-Zr/CNTs catalyst reduced at 350 ℃,leading to excellent catalytic performance in CO selective methanation.

  16. Direct production of hydrogen and aromatics from methane or natural gas: Review of recent U.S. patents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lucia M. Petkovic; Daniel M. Ginosar

    2012-03-01

    Since the year 2000, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has granted a dozen patents for inventions related to methane dehydroaromatization processes. One of them was granted to UOP LLC (Des Plaines). It relates to a catalyst composition and preparation method. Two patents were granted to Conoco Phillips Company (Houston, TX). One was aimed at securing a process and operating conditions for methane aromatization. The other was aimed at securing a process that may be integrated with separation of wellhead fluids and blending of the aromatics produced from the gas with the crude. Nine patents were granted to ExxonMobil Chemical Patents Inc. (Houston, TX). Most of these were aimed at securing a dehydroaromatization process where methane-containing feedstock moves counter currently to a particulate catalyst. The coked catalyst is heated or regenerated either in the reactor, by cyclic operation, or in annex equipment, and returned to the reactor. The reactor effluent stream may be separated in its main components and used or recycled as needed. A brief summary of those inventions is presented in this review.

  17. Cobalt based catalysts prepared by Pechini method for CO{sub 2}-free hydrogen production by methane decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jana, Prabhas; de la Pena O' Shea, Victor A.; Coronado, Juan M. [Thermochemical Process Unit, Instituto IMDEA Energia, C/Tulipan s/n 28933, Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Serrano, David P. [Thermochemical Process Unit, Instituto IMDEA Energia, C/Tulipan s/n 28933, Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Department of Chemical and Environmental Technology, ESCET, Rey Juan Carlos University, c/ Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    A variety of unsupported cobalt catalysts was synthesized using the Pechini method and tested for CO{sub 2}-free H{sub 2} production via methane decomposition. In order to study the influence of the synthesis conditions on the properties of cobalt materials, the Cobalt:Citric acid (Co:CA) ratio was varied systematically (from 1:2 to 1:20). In addition, a study of the effect of the activation process on the catalyst activity was performed by activating the catalyst with H{sub 2} or CH{sub 4}. In both the activation processes, metallic cobalt with fcc structure was obtained, but the particle morphology varied with the activation treatment. The catalytic behavior was highly influenced when the reduction procedure was performed under methane atmosphere. For the Co:CA ratios, the best results were obtained with the catalyst prepared with a Co:CA 1:20 ratio reduced in presence of methane, which shows a production of 6.47 mol of H{sub 2} per mol of cobalt even without deactivation behavior for 30 min of the reaction period. (author)

  18. Photocatalytic decomposition of humic acids in anoxic aqueous solutions producing hydrogen, oxygen and light hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klauson, Deniss; Budarnaja, Olga; Beltran, Ignacio Castellanos; Krichevskaya, Marina; Preis, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    Photocatalytic water splitting for hydrogen and oxygen production requires sacrificial electron donors, for example, organic compounds. Titanium dioxide catalysts doped with platinum, cobalt, tungsten, copper and iron were experimentally tested for the production of hydrogen, oxygen and low molecular weight hydrocarbons from aqueous solutions of humic substances (HS). Platinum-doped catalyst showed the best results in hydrogen generation, also producing methane, ethene and ethane, whereas the best oxygen production was exhibited by P25, followed by copper--and cobalt-containing photocatalysts. Iron-containing photocatalyst produced carbon monoxide as a major product. HS undergoing anoxic photocatalytic degradation produce hydrogen with minor hydrocarbons, and/or oxygen. It appears that better hydrogen yield is achieved when direct HS splitting takes place, as opposed to HS acting as electron donors for water splitting.

  19. Hydrogenation of carbon monoxide over mixed catalysts. Co-Ni/MnO-ZrO sub 2 to zeolite kara naru kongo shokubai wo mochiita issankatanso no suisoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, T.; Iwakuni, H.; Eguchi, K.; Arai, H. (Graduate School of Engineering Sciences, Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Department of Materials Science and Technology)

    1990-07-10

    The mechanical mixtures of Co-Ni/MnO-ZrO {sub 2} and zeolite were used as catalysts for the selective synthesis of gasoline by CO hydrogenation. Formation of branched-paraffins was promoted but that of higher hydrocarbons than carbon number of 10 was suppressed by combination with zeolite. The product distribution strongly depended on the type of zeolite catalyst. Pentasil zeolite was active for the formation of branched-paraffins, probably because of the cracking reaction occurring on the strong acid sites. The formation of branched paraffin was further promoted by ion-exchange with Pt. The mixture of Co-Ni/MnO-ZrO {sub 2} and PtH-pentasil zeolite was very active for the formation of gasoline with high octane number. 34 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Rich methane premixed laminar flames doped by light unsaturated hydrocarbons - Part I : allene and propyne

    CERN Document Server

    Gueniche, Hadj-Ali; Dayma, Guillaume; Fournet, Ren{é}; Battin-Leclerc, Fr{é}d{é}rique

    2006-01-01

    The structure of three laminar premixed rich flames has been investigated: a pure methane flame and two methane flames doped by allene and propyne, respectively. The gases of the three flames contain 20.9% (molar) of methane and 33.4% of oxygen, corresponding to an equivalence ratio of 1.25 for the pure methane flame. In both doped flames, 2.49% of C3H4 was added, corresponding to a ratio C3H4/CH4 of 12% and an equivalence ratio of 1.55. The three flames have been stabilized on a burner at a pressure of 6.7 kPa using argon as dilutant, with a gas velocity at the burner of 36 cm/s at 333 K. The concentration profiles of stable species were measured by gas chromatography after sampling with a quartz microprobe. Quantified species included carbon monoxide and dioxide, methane, oxygen, hydrogen, ethane, ethylene, acetylene, propyne, allene, propene, propane, 1,2-butadiene, 1,3-butadiene, 1-butene, isobutene, 1-butyne, vinylacetylene, and benzene. The temperature was measured using a PtRh (6%)-PtRh (30%) thermocou...

  1. Methane emission by termites: Impacts on the self-cleansing mechanisms of the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mugedo, J.Z.A. [Maseno Univ. College (Kenya)

    1996-12-31

    Termites are reported to emit large quantities of methane, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen and dimethyl sulfide. The emission of other trace gases, namely C{sub 2} to C{sub 10} hydrocarbons, is also documented. We have carried out, both in the field and in the laboratory, measurements of methane emissions by Macrotermes subhyalinus (Macrotermitinae), Trinervitermes bettonianus (Termitinae), and unidentified Cubitermes and Microcerotermes species. Measured CH{sub 4} field flux rates ranged from 3.66 to 98.25g per m{sup 2} of termite mound per year. Laboratory measurements gave emission rates that ranged from 14.61 to 165.05 mg CH{sub 4} per termite per year. Gaseous production in all species sampled varied both within species and from species to species. Recalculated global emission of methane from termites was found to be 14.0 x 10{sup 12} g CH{sub 4}, per year. From our study, termites contribution to atmospheric methane content is between 1.11% and 4.25% per year. This study discusses the greenhouse effects as well as photochemical disposal of methane in the lower atmosphere in the tropics and the impacts on the chemistry of HO{sub x} systems and CL{sub x} cycles.

  2. 餐厨垃圾厌氧发酵制氢残留物连续沼气发酵研究%Research on Continuous Methane Fermentation of Residues of Hydrogen Production by Anaerobic Fermentation of Kitchen Waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张国华; 张志红; 黄江丽; 王东升; 丁建南

    2015-01-01

    餐厨垃圾中有机物含量高,利用餐厨垃圾厌氧发酵制备氢气后残留物中含有丰富的低级脂肪酸、醇类等. 从接种产甲烷菌和pH调节角度,利用餐厨垃圾厌氧发酵制备氢气后的残留物研究连续沼气发酵,提高餐厨垃圾资源利用率. 结果表明,在接种产甲烷菌和调节发酵体系pH>7的条件下,餐厨垃圾厌氧发酵制备氢气后的残留物能够连续沼气发酵. 接种以新鲜沼渣为产甲烷菌来源的沼气发酵比以厌氧活性污泥为产甲烷菌种来源的沼气发酵产气效果好.%Kitchen waste contents high organic matter, and abundant of low-level fatty acids, alco-hols,etc. exist in the residues after using kitchen waste preparation for hydrogen by anaerobic fer-mentation. This paper studied the feasibility of continue to produce methane by anaerobic fermenta-tion of hydrogen production residues from inoculate methane bacteria and pH,which hope to improve the utilization of kitchen waste resources. The results show that, under the conditions of pH>7 and inoculated methane bacteria in the anaerobic fermentation system,it can continue to produce methane use the hydrogen production residues by anaerobic fermentation,and it is better of produce biogas by inoculated with fresh biogas residues as methane bacteria in anaerobic fermentation than inoculated with anaerobic activated sludge as methane bacteria.

  3. Changes in microbial community during hydrogen and methane production in two-stage thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion process from biowaste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahedi, S; Solera, R; Micolucci, F; Cavinato, C; Bolzonella, D

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the microbial community in a two-phase thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion process was investigated for its role in hydrogen and methane production, treating waste activated sludge and treating the organic fraction of municipal solid waste. In the acidogenic phase, in which hydrogen is produced, Clostridium sp. clusters represented 76% of total Firmicutes. When feeding the acidogenic effluent into the methanogenic reactors, these acidic conditions negatively influenced methanogenic microorganisms: Methanosaeta sp., (Methanobacteriales, Methanomicrobiales, Methanococcales) decreased by 75%, 50%, 38% and 52%, respectively. At the same time, methanogenic digestion lowered the numbers of Clostridium sp. clusters due to both pH increasing and substrate reduction, and an increase in both Firmicutes genera (non Clostridium) and methanogenic microorganisms, especially Methanosaeta sp. (208%). This was in accordance with the observed decrease in acetic (98%) and butyric (100%) acid contents. To ensure the activity of the acetate-utilizing methanogens (AUM) and the acetogens, high ratios of H2-utilizing methanogens (HUM)/AUM (3.6) were required.

  4. The effect of mixing and changing the order of feeding oats and chopped alfalfa to horses on: glycaemic and insulinaemic responses, and breath hydrogen and methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervuert, I; Voigt, K; Hollands, T; Cuddeford, D; Coenen, M

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of feeding oats alone before or after feeding chopped alfalfa or, in admixture with the alfalfa on the glycaemic and insulinaemic responses of horses as well as post-prandial breath hydrogen and methane excretion. Horses were fed in a randomized order, chopped alfalfa as a source of dietary fibre and unprocessed oats as a source of starch. Chopped alfalfa intake was adjusted to a crude fibre intake of 0.5 g/kg bodyweight (BW) per meal and the oats intake was adjusted to a starch intake of 2 g/kg BW per meal. The feeds were offered in three different ways: (i) alfalfa followed by oats (A/O), (ii) oats followed by alfalfa (O/A) or (iii) a mixture of alfalfa and oats (A + O). Oats alone were used as a control. Blood and breath were collected after the test meal was fed at the end of a 11.5-h overnight fast following a 10-day acclimatization period. The highest glycaemic and insulinaemic responses were measured when the A/O and O/A diets orders were fed, whereas most hydrogen was produced after feeding oats alone. It was concluded that adding alfalfa chaff to a meal of oats prolonged the pre-caecal digestion of starch, but there was no evidence for any effect on pre-caecal starch digestibility.

  5. 一氧化碳对硫化氢舒张大鼠肺动脉作用的影响%THE EFFECTS OF CARBON MONOXIDE ON THE RAT PULMONARY ARTERY RELAXATION RESPONSES TO HYDROGEN SULFIDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晓静; 孟祥艳; 黄新莉; 戴鸿雁; 韦鹏; 凌亦凌

    2010-01-01

    目的 观察在脂多糖(lipopolysaccharide,LPS)诱导下,一氧化碳(carbon monoxide,CO)对硫化氢(hydrogen sulfide,H2S) 舒张肺动脉作用的影响.方法 气管内滴注生理盐水或LPS后,制备肺动脉环(pulmonary artery rings,PARs),应用血管环张力测定技术,分别在给予CO供体氯血红素(hemin,Hm) 或血红素氧合酶1抑制剂锌原卟啉9(zinc protoporphyrin-IX,ZnPP-IX)的条件下,从离体水平观察PARs对H2S供体硫氢化钠(sodium hydrosulfide,NaHS)舒张反应变化,同时检测出肺血(out-going pulmonary blood,OPB)和入肺血(in-flowing pulmonary blood,IPB)中碳氧血红蛋白(carboxyhemoglobin,COHb)含量,以其差值反映肺循环CO生成的水平.结果 滴注LPS 4 h和8 h后,用Hm孵育PARs后,PARs对NaHS的累积浓度舒张反应较孵育前显著增强(P0.05).结论 在LPS诱导下,CO可以增强H2S舒张肺动脉的作用.

  6. Electrocatalytic studies of osmium-ruthenium carbonyl cluster compounds for their application as methanol-tolerant cathodes for oxygen reduction reaction and carbon monoxide-tolerant anodes for hydrogen oxidation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borja-Arco, E.; Uribe-Godinez, J.; Castellanos, R.H. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Escobedo (Mexico); Altamirano-Gutierrez, A.; Jimenez-Sandoval, O. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Inst. Politecnico Nacional, Querataro (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    This paper provided details of an electrokinetic study of novel electrocatalytic materials capable of performing both the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR). Osmium-ruthenium carbonyl cluster compounds (Os{sub x}Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub n}) were synthesized by chemical condensation in non-polar organic solvents at different boiling points and refluxing temperatures. Three different non-polar organic solvents were used: (1) n-nonane; o-xylene; and 1,2-dichlorobenzene. The electrocatalysts were characterized by Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). A rotating disk electrode technique was used to analyze the materials. Results of the analysis showed that the materials performed ORR in both the presence and absence of carbon monoxide (CO), and that electrocatalysts were not poisoned by the presence of CO. Cyclic voltamperometry for the disk electrodes showed that the electrochemical behaviour of the compounds in the acid electrolyte was similar in the presence or absence of methanol. The Tafel slope, exchange current density and the transfer coefficient were also investigated. The electrokinetic parameters for the ORR indicated that the materials with the highest electrocatalytic activity were synthesized in 1,2-dichlorobenzene. Electrocatalytic activity during HOR were prepared in n-nonane. It was concluded that the new materials are good candidates for use as both a cathode and an anode in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). 7 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  7. Selective CO methanation over amorphous Ni-Ru-B/ZrO2 catalyst for hydrogen-rich gas purification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qihai Liu; Zili Liu; LieWen Liao; Xinfa Dong

    2010-01-01

    Amorphous Ni-Ru-B/ZrO2 catalysts were prepared by chemical reduction method.The effects of Ni-Ru-B loading and Ru/Ni mole ratio on the catalytic performance for selective CO methanation from reformed fuel were studied,and the catalysts were characterized by BET,ICE XRD and TPD.The results showed that Ru strongly affected the catalytic activity and selectivity by increasing the thermal stability of amorphous structure,promoting the dispersion of the catalyst particle,and intensifying the CO adsorption.For the catalysts with Ru/Ni mole ratio under 0.15,the CO methanation conversion and selectivity increased significantly with the increasing Ru/Ni mole ratio.Among all the catalysts investigated,the 30 wt% Ni-Ru-B loading amorphous Ni61Ru9B30/ZrO2 catalyst with 0.15 Ru/Ni mole ratio presented the best catalytic performance,over which higher than 99.9% of CO conversion was obtained in the temperature range of 230℃~250℃,and the CO2 conversion was kept under the level of 0.9%.

  8. [Conversion of acetic acid to methane by thermophiles: Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinder, S.

    1991-12-31

    The objective of this project is to provide an understanding of thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms capable of breaking down acetic acid, the precursor of two-thirds of the methane produced by anaerobic bioreactors. Recent results include: (1) the isolation of Methanothrix strain CALLS-1, which grows much more rapidly than mesophilic strains; (2) the demonstration that thermophilic cultures of Methanosarcina and Methanothrix show minimum thresholds for acetate utilization of 1--2.5 mM and 10--20{mu}m respectively, in agreement with ecological data indicating that Methanothrix is favored by low acetate concentration; (3) the demonstration of high levels of thermostable acetyl-coA synthetase and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase in cell-free extracts of Methanothrix strains CALS-1; (4) the demonstration of methanogenesis from acetate and ATP in cell free extracts of strain CALS-1. (5) the demonstration that methanogenesis from acetate required 2 ATP/methane, and, in contrast to Methanosarcina, was independent of hydrogen and other electron donors; (6) the finding that entropy effects must be considered when predicting the level of hydrogen in thermophilic syntrophic cultures. (7) the isolation and characterization of the Desulfotomaculum thermoacetoxidans. Current research is centered on factors which allow thermophilic Methanothrix to compete with Methanosarcina.

  9. (Conversion of acetic acid to methane by thermophiles: Progress report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinder, S.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this project is to provide an understanding of thermophilic anaerobic microorganisms capable of breaking down acetic acid, the precursor of two-thirds of the methane produced by anaerobic bioreactors. Recent results include: (1) the isolation of Methanothrix strain CALLS-1, which grows much more rapidly than mesophilic strains; (2) the demonstration that thermophilic cultures of Methanosarcina and Methanothrix show minimum thresholds for acetate utilization of 1--2.5 mM and 10--20{mu}m respectively, in agreement with ecological data indicating that Methanothrix is favored by low acetate concentration; (3) the demonstration of high levels of thermostable acetyl-coA synthetase and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase in cell-free extracts of Methanothrix strains CALS-1; (4) the demonstration of methanogenesis from acetate and ATP in cell free extracts of strain CALS-1. (5) the demonstration that methanogenesis from acetate required 2 ATP/methane, and, in contrast to Methanosarcina, was independent of hydrogen and other electron donors; (6) the finding that entropy effects must be considered when predicting the level of hydrogen in thermophilic syntrophic cultures. (7) the isolation and characterization of the Desulfotomaculum thermoacetoxidans. Current research is centered on factors which allow thermophilic Methanothrix to compete with Methanosarcina.

  10. Effect of dietary nitrate level on enteric methane production, hydrogen emission, rumen fermentation, and nutrient digestibility in dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olijhoek, Dana; Hellwing, Anne Louise Frydendahl; Brask, Maike

    2016-01-01

    , microbial protein synthesis, and blood methemoglobin. In a 4 × 4 Latin square design 4 lactating Danish Holstein dairy cows fitted with rumen, duodenal, and ileal cannulas were assigned to 4 calcium ammonium nitrate addition levels: control, low, medium, and high [0, 5.3, 13.6, and 21.1 g of nitrate......, but did not constitute a threat for animal health and human food safety. Microbial crude protein synthesis and efficiency were unaffected. Total volatile fatty acid concentration and molar proportions of acetate, butyrate, and propionate were unaffected, whereas molar proportions of formate increased....... Milk yield, milk composition, DMI and digestibility of DM, organic matter, crude protein, and neutral detergent fiber in rumen, small intestine, hindgut, and total tract were unaffected by addition of nitrate. In conclusion, nitrate lowered methane production linearly with minor effects on rumen...

  11. A Methane Balloon Inflation Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwinski, Curtis J.; Cordes, Tanya J.; Franek, Joe

    2005-01-01

    The various equipments, procedure and hazards in constructing the device for inflating a methane balloon using a standard methane outlet in a laboratory are described. This device is fast, safe, inexpensive, and easy to use as compared to a hydrogen gas cylinder for inflating balloons.

  12. Microbial community analysis in a long-term membrane-less microbial electrolysis cell with hydrogen and methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rago, Laura; Ruiz, Yolanda; Baeza, Juan A; Guisasola, Albert; Cortés, Pilar

    2015-12-01

    A single-chamber microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) aiming at hydrogen production with acetate as sole carbon source failed due to methanogenesis build-up despite the significant amount of 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES) dosage, 50 mM. Specific batch experiments and a thorough microbial community analysis, pyrosequencing and qPCR, of cathode, anode and medium were performed to understand these observations. The experimental data rebuts different hypothesis and shows that methanogenesis at high BES concentration was likely due to the capacity of some Archaea (hydrogen-oxidizing genus Methanobrevibacter) to resist high BES concentration up to 200 mM. Methanobrevibacter, of the Methanobacteriales order, represented almost the 98% of the total Archaea in the cathode whereas Geobacter was highly abundant in the anode (72% of bacteria). Moreover, at higher BES concentration (up to 200 mM), methanogenesis activity decreased resulting in an increase of homoacetogenic activity, which challenged the performance of the MEC for H2 production.

  13. Effect of pressure on high Karlovitz number lean turbulent premixed hydrogen-enriched methane-air flames using LES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicoria, David; Chan, C. K.

    2017-07-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) is employed to investigate the effect of pressure on lean CH4-H2-air turbulent premixed flames at high Karlovitz number for mixtures up to 60% of hydrogen in volume. The subfilter combustion term representing the interaction between turbulence and chemistry is modelled using the PaSR model, along with complex chemistry using a skeletal mechanism based on GRI-MECH3.0. The influence of pressure at high turbulence levels is studied by means of the local flame structure, and the assessment of species formation inside the flame. Results show that the ratio of turbulent flame thickness to laminar flame thickness δt/δu increases faster with pressure, and increases with the fraction of hydrogen in the mixture, leading to higher ratio of turbulent to laminar flame speed. The flame displays smaller structures and higher degree of wrinkling at higher pressure. Final species of CO2 and H2O formation is almost independent of pressure. For intermediate species CO and OH, an increase in pressure at constant volume fraction of hydrogen β leads to a decrease of emission of these species.

  14. Hydrogen Purification and Recycling for an Integrated Oxygen Recovery System Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abney, Morgan B.; Greenwood, Zachary; Wall, Terry; Nur, Mononita; Wheeler, Richard R., Jr.; Preston, Joshua; Molter, Trent

    2016-01-01

    The United States Atmosphere Revitalization life support system on the International Space Station (ISS) performs several services for the crew including oxygen generation, trace contaminant control, carbon dioxide (CO2) removal, and oxygen recovery. Oxygen recovery is performed using a Sabatier reactor developed by Hamilton Sundstrand, wherein CO2 is reduced with hydrogen in a catalytic reactor to produce methane and water. The water product is purified in the Water Purification Assembly and recycled to the Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) to provide O2 to the crew. This architecture results in a theoretical maximum oxygen recovery from CO2 of approx.54% due to the loss of reactant hydrogen in Sabatier-produced methane that is currently vented outside of ISS. Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) technology, developed by Umpqua Research Company, provides the capability to further close the Atmosphere Revitalization oxygen loop by recovering hydrogen from Sabatier-produced methane. A key aspect of this technology approach is the need to purify the hydrogen from the PPA product stream which includes acetylene, unreacted methane and byproduct water and carbon monoxide. In 2015, four sub-scale hydrogen separation systems were delivered to NASA for evaluation. These included two electrolysis single-cell hydrogen purification cell stacks developed by Sustainable Innovations, LLC, a sorbent-based hydrogen purification unit using microwave power for sorbent regeneration developed by Umpqua Research Company, and a LaNi4.6Sn0.4 metal hydride produced by Hydrogen Consultants, Inc. Here we report the results of these evaluations to-date, discuss potential architecture options, and propose future work.

  15. Methanation reaction on ruthenium thin films: a mechanistic investigation. [PhD. thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaughter, M.D.

    1979-07-01

    The kinetics of the methanation reaction were measured on thin ruthenium films in the temperature range 548 to 623K. The pressures of the reactant gases were varied over the ranges 1.5 to 1500 ..mu..m for CO and 300 to 75000 ..mu..m for H/sub 2/ to yield kinetic orders for each gas. The CO kinetic order varied from +1 at low pressures to -2 at high pressures. As the H/sub 2/ pressure was increased its kinetic order varied from +2 to -1. Both of these order plots had unusually sharp maxima. The reaction is zero order in both CH/sub 4/ and H/sub 2/O. The apparent activation energy was dependent upon temperature with a value of 21.9 kcal/mole at 573K. Auger spectroscopy (AES) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicated that the surface was always covered with carbon. This carbon could be divided into two types based upon its reactivity toward hydrogen. Type-1 was very reactive to 3.5 torr hydrogen doses at 573K and was completely removed in less than 300 seconds. Type-2 was less reactive and required about 48 hours under the same conditions for removal. No oxygen was ever detected on the surface after methanation. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and XPS indicated respectively, that neither graphite nor bulk carbide was associated with the used catalyst. The deposition of up to 0.75 monolayer of carbon enhanced the rate of methanation. More carbon caused a drop in the initial rate. Methanol could be hydrogenated to methane at about the same rate as carbon monoxide. A mechanism was developed which quantitatively fits the kinetic data and qualitatively predicts all of the other observations. This mechanism involves adsorbed hydrogen interacting with non-dissociated carbon monoxide. The rate limiting step involves the interaction of Ru--H and Ru--CH/sub 3/ to form methane. A methylene carbonyl hydride is believed to act as a reversible poison at high H/sub 2/:CO ratios.

  16. Chemistry, isotopic composition, and origin of a methane-hydrogen sulfide hydrate at the Cascadia subduction zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, M.; Kvenvolden, K.A.; Lorenson, T.D.

    1998-01-01

    Although the presence of extensive gas hydrate on the Cascadia margin, offshore from the western U.S. and Canada, has been inferred from marine seismic records and pore water chemistry, solid gas hydrate has only been found at one location. At Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 892, offshore from central Oregon, gas hydrate was recovered close to the sediment - water interface at 2-19 m below the seafloor, (mbsf) at 670 m water depth. The gas hydrate occurs as elongated platy crystals or crystal aggregates, mostly disseminated irregularly, with higher concentrations occurring in discrete zones, thin layers, and/or veinlets parallel or oblique to the bedding. A 2-to 3-cm thick massive gas hydrate layer, parallel to bedding, was recovered at ???17 mbsf. Gas from a sample of this layer was composed of both CH4 and H2S. This sample is the first mixed-gas hydrate of CH4-H2S documented in ODP; it also contains ethane and minor amounts of CO2. Measured temperature of the recovered core ranged from 2 to - 18??C and are 6 to 8 degrees lower than in-situ temperatures. These temperature anomalies were caused by the partial dissociation of the CH4-H2S hydrate during recovery without a pressure core sampler. During this dissociation, toxic levels of H2S (??34S, +27.4???) were released. The ??13C values of the CH4 in the gas hydrate, -64.5 to -67.5???(PDB), together with ??D values of - 197 to - 199???(SMOW) indicate a primarily microbial source for the CH4. The ??18O value of the hydrate H2O is +2.9???(SMOW), comparable with the experimental fractionation factor for sea-ice. The unusual composition (CH4-H2S) and depth distribution (2-19 mbsf) of this gas hydrate indicate mixing between a methane-rich fluid with a pore fluid enriched in sulfide; at this site the former is advecting along an inclined fault into the active sulfate reduction zone. The facts that the CH4-H2S hydrate is primarily confined to the present day active sulfate reduction zone (2-19 mbsf), and that from here

  17. Stability improvements of Ni/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts to obtain hydrogen from methane reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pompeo, Francisco; Nichio, Nora N. [CINDECA, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, CONICET, 47 N 257, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 1 esq. 47, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Gazzoli, Delia [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , P.le A. Moro 5, 00185 Rome (Italy)

    2009-03-15

    Ni catalysts supported on commercial {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} modified by addition of CeO{sub 2} and/or ZrO{sub 2} were prepared in the present work. Since the principal objective was to evaluate the behavior of these systems and the support effect on the stability, methane reforming reactions were studied with steam, carbon dioxide, partial oxidation and mixed reforming. Results show that catalysts supported on Ce-Zr-{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composites present better reforming activity and stability noticeably higher than in the case of the reference support. With respect to composites, the presence of mixed oxides of Ce{sub x}Zr{sub 1-x}O{sub 2} type facilitates the formation of active phases with higher interaction. This fact reduces the deactivation by sintering conferring to the system a higher contribution of adsorbed oxygen species, favoring the deposited carbon elimination. These improvements resulted in being dependent on the Ce:Zr ratio of the composite, thus obtaining more stable catalysts for Ce:Zr = 4:1 ratios. (author)

  18. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  19. Discrimination of the prochiral hydrogens at the C-2 position of n-alkanes by the methane/ammonia monooxygenase family proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaji, Akimitsu; Miyoshi, Teppei; Motokura, Ken; Baba, Toshihide

    2015-08-14

    The selectivity of ammonia monooxygenase from Nitrosomonas europaea (AMO-Ne) for the oxidation of C4-C8n-alkanes to the corresponding alcohol isomers was examined to show the ability of AMO-Ne to recognize the n-alkane orientation within the catalytic site. AMO-Ne in whole cells produces 1- and 2-alcohols from C4-C8n-alkanes, and the regioselectivity is dependent on the length of the carbon chain. 2-Alcohols produced from C4-C7n-alkanes were predominantly either the R- or S-enantiomers, while 2-octanol produced from n-octane was racemic. These results indicate that AMO-Ne can discriminate between the prochiral hydrogens at the C-2 position, with the degree of discrimination varying according to the n-alkane. Compared to the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) of Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath) and that of Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, AMO-Ne showed a distinct ability to discriminate between the orientation of n-butane and n-pentane in the catalytic site.

  20. Effect of CeO2 addition on Ni/Al2O3 catalysts for methanation of carbon dioxide with hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hezhi Liu; Xiujing Zou; Xueguang Wang; Xionggang Lu; Weizhong Ding

    2012-01-01

    The Ni-CeO2/Al2O3 catalysts with a nickel content of 15 wt% prepared via impregnating boehmite were found to be highly active and stable for methanation of carbon dioxide with hydrogen at a H2/CO2 molar ratio of 4.The effects of CeO2 content and reaction temperature on the performance of the Ni-CeO2/Al2O3 catalysts were studied in detail.The results showed that the catalytic performance was strongly dependent on the CeO2 content in Ni-CeO2/Al2O3 catalysts and that the catalysts with 2 wt% CeO2 had the highest catalytic activity among the tested ones at 350 ℃.The XRD and H2-TPR characterizations revealed that the addition of CeO2 decreased the reduction temperature by altering the interaction between Ni and Al2O3,and improved the reducibility of the catalyst.Preliminary stability test of 120 h on stream over the Ni-2CeO2/Al2O3 catalyst at 350 ℃ revealed that the catalyst was much better than the unpromoted one.

  1. Hydrogen-Permeable Tubular Membrane Reactor: Promoting Conversion and Product Selectivity for Non-Oxidative Activation of Methane over an Fe©SiO2 Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakbodin, Mann; Wu, Yiqing; Oh, Su Cheun; Wachsman, Eric D; Liu, Dongxia

    2016-12-23

    Non-oxidative methane conversion over Fe©SiO2 catalyst was studied for the first time in a hydrogen (H2 ) permeable tubular membrane reactor. The membrane reactor is composed of a mixed ionic-electronic SrCe0.7 Zr0.2 Eu0.1 O3-δ thin film (≈20 μm) supported on the outer surface of a one-end capped porous SrCe0.8 Zr0.2 O3-δ tube. Significant improvement in CH4 conversion was achieved upon H2 removal from the membrane reactor compared to that in a fixed-bed reactor. The Fe©SiO2 catalyst in the H2 permeable membrane reactor demonstrated a stable ≈30 % C2+ single-pass yield, with up to 30 % CH4 conversion and 99 % selectivity to C2 (ethylene and acetylene) and aromatic (benzene and naphthalene) products, at the tested conditions. The selectivity towards C2 or aromatics was manipulated purposely by adding H2 into or removing H2 from the membrane reactor feed and permeate gas streams. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Development of new heterogeneous catalysts for the decomposition of methanol into hydrogen and carbon monoxide applying high throughput methods; Entwicklung neuer heterogener Katalysatoren zur Spaltung von Methanol in Wasserstoff und Kohlenmonoxid mittels Hochdurchsatz-Methoden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Torsten

    2008-07-11

    The topic of this thesis has been the development of new heterogeneous catalysts for the decomposition of methanol into hydrogen and carbon monoxide. As an important constraint here, the content of noble metals of the catalysts should be as low as possible. High-throughput-methods were applied in some of the syntheses and experiments to accelerate the development, as, for example, the use of liquid based sol-gel syntheses and the examination of catalyst libraries by spatial resolution gas chromatography. This screening technique allowed to test up to 207 different substances during one single experiment. Then, different combinatorial strategies were applied. First, these methods led to a highly active and stable catalyst in the ternary system of Cu-Ni-Zn, which showed high conversion and selectivity comparable to an industrial reference catalyst. Its activity during an 18 hour long term run was constant in contrast to the reference. Second, an additional approach starting from a broader variety of elements led to a Ce- Ru- and to a Cr-Ru-catalyst. Both of them were highly active in short term experiments, but lost their outstanding performances during long term runs. (orig.) [German] Die vorliegende Arbeit befasste sich mit der Entwicklung neuer heterogener Katalysatoren fuer die Spaltung von Methanol zu Wasserstoff und Kohlenmonoxid, die einen moeglichst geringen Gehalt an Edelmetallen aufweisen sollten. Um diesen Prozess zu beschleunigen, wurden in einem Teil der Synthesen und Experimente Hochdurchsatzmethoden verwendet. Neben der Roboter gestuetzten Sol-Gel-Synthese umfasste dies die Untersuchung von Katalysatorbibliotheken mittels ortsaufgeloester Gaschromatographie, die es ermoeglichte, in einem Experiment bis zu 207 verschiedene Substanzen auf ihre katalytische Aktivitaet zu testen. Unter Anwendung verschiedener kombinatorischer Strategien wurde zunaechst ein sehr aktiver und stabiler Katalysator im ternaeren Cu-Ni-Zn-System entdeckt. Neben Umsaetzen und

  3. Methane Pyrolysis and Disposing Off Resulting Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P. K.; Rapp, D.; Rahotgi, N. K.

    1999-01-01

    Sabatier/Electrolysis (S/E) is a leading process for producing methane and oxygen for application to Mars ISPP. One significant problem with this process is that it produces an excess of methane for combustion with the amount of oxygen that is produced. Therefore, one must discard roughly half of the methane to obtain the proper stoichiometric methane/oxygen mixture for ascent from Mars. This is wasteful of hydrogen, which must be brought from Earth and is difficult to transport to Mars and store on Mars. To reduced the problem of transporting hydrogen to Mars, the S/E process can be augmented by another process which reduces overall hydrogen requirement. Three conceptual approaches for doing this are (1) recover hydrogen from the excess methane produced by the S/E process, (2) convert the methane to a higher hydrocarbon or other organic with a lower H/C ratio than methane, and (3) use a separate process (such as zirconia or reverse water gas shift reaction) to produce additional oxygen, thus utilizing all the methane produced by the Sabatier process. We report our results here on recovering hydrogen from the excess methane using pyrolysis of methane. Pyrolysis has the advantage that it produces almost pure hydrogen, and any unreacted methane can pass through the S/E process reactor. It has the disadvantage that disposing of the carbon produced by pyrolysis presents difficulties. Hydrogen may be obtained from methane by pyrolysis in the temperature range 10000-12000C. The main reaction products are hydrogen and carbon, though very small amounts of higher hydrocarbons, including aromatic hydrocarbons are formed. The conversion efficiency is about 95% at 12000C. One needs to distinguish between thermodynamic equilibrium conversion and conversion limited by kinetics in a finite reactor.

  4. Mg改性纳米线碳化钼在CO加氢反应中的应用%Preparation of Mg doped nanowireβ-Mo2C and its performance for hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘长城; 林明桂; 姜东; 房克功; 孙予罕

    2014-01-01

    以1,6-己二胺和钼酸铵为前躯体,采用有机-无机杂化法及后续的程序升温碳化法制备了纳米线β-Mo2C。通过机械混合法制备了镁改性的β-Mo2C催化剂并考察了其在CO加氢反应中的催化性能。结果表明,镁的改性对纳米线碳化钼的织构性质没有明显的影响,但在CO加氢反应中显著提高了CO转化率,且提高了烷烃的选择性及其链增长能力,表现为抑制了甲烷而促进了C2~C5烷烃的生成。但是Mg的添加对醇选择性及链增长能力影响不明显。%β-Mo2C nanowires were prepared by an organic-inorganic hybrid method with 1,6-hexamethylenediamine and ammonium molybdate as precursors, then modified with magnesium by mechanical mixing. The performances of the prepared Mg-doped nanostructuredβ-Mo2C catalysts for hydrogenation of CO were investigated. The results showed that the doping of MgO did not alter the textural properties of the catalysts, but increased CO conversation, improved the selectivity to hydrocarbons and promoted hydrocarbon chain growth, which resulted in that the formation of methane was inhibited and the yield of C2-C5 alkanes increased. However, the selectivity towards alcohols and the ability of alcohol chain growth almost unchanged.

  5. Methanogens, Methane and Gastrointestinal Motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Chang, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Anaerobic fermentation of the undigested polysaccharide fraction of carbohydrates produces hydrogen in the intestine which is the substrate for methane production by intestinal methanogens. Hydrogen and methane are excreted in the flatus and in breath giving the opportunity to indirectly measure their production using breath testing. Although methane is detected in 30%-50% of the healthy adult population worldwide, its production has been epidemiologically and clinically associated with constipation related diseases, like constipation predominant irritable bowel syndrome and chronic constipation. While a causative relation is not proven yet, there is strong evidence from animal studies that methane delays intestinal transit, possibly acting as a neuromuscular transmitter. This evidence is further supported by the universal finding that methane production (measured by breath test) is associated with delayed transit time in clinical studies. There is also preliminary evidence that antibiotic reduction of methanogens (as evidenced by reduced methane production) predicts the clinical response in terms of symptomatic improvement in patients with constipation predominant irritable bowel syndrome. However, we have not identified yet the mechanism of action of methane on intestinal motility, and since methane production does not account for all constipation associated cases, there is need for high quality clinical trials to examine methane as a biomarker for the diagnosis or as a biomarker that predicts antibiotic treatment response in patients with constipation related disorders. PMID:24466443

  6. C1 Chemistry for the Production of Ultra-Clean Liquid Transportation Fuels and Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2005-03-31

    Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of liquid transportation fuel and hydrogen from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, the Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army National Automotive Center (Tank & Automotive Command--TACOM), and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report presents results obtained in this research program during the six months of the subject contract from October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2003. The results are presented in thirteen detailed reports on research projects headed by various faculty members at each of the five CFFS Universities. Additionally, an Executive Summary has been prepared that summarizes the principal results of all of these projects during the six-month reporting period.

  7. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2004-03-31

    Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of liquid transportation fuel and hydrogen from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, the Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army National Automotive Center (Tank & Automotive Command--TACOM), and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report presents results obtained in this research program during the six months of the subject contract from October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2003. The results are presented in thirteen detailed reports on research projects headed by various faculty members at each of the five CFFS Universities. Additionally, an Executive Summary has been prepared that summarizes the principal results of all of these projects during the six-month reporting period.

  8. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  9. Is methane a new therapeutic gas?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Wenwu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methane is an attractive fuel. Biologically, methanogens in the colon can use carbon dioxide and hydrogen to produce methane as a by-product. It was previously considered that methane is not utilized by humans. However, in a recent study, results demonstrated that methane could exert anti-inflammatory effects in a dog small intestinal ischemia-reperfusion model. Point of view Actually, the bioactivity of methane has been investigated in gastrointestinal diseases, but the exact mechanism underlying the anti-inflammatory effects is required to be further elucidated. Methane can cross the membrane and is easy to collect due to its abundance in natural gas. Although methane is flammable, saline rich in methane can be prepared for clinical use. These seem to be good news in application of methane as a therapeutic gas. Conclusion Several problems should be resolved before its wide application in clinical practice.

  10. 垃圾渗滤液发酵产氢和产甲烷特性研究%Bio-production of hydrogen and methane from landfill leachate by anaerobic fermentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐乔根; 傅木星; 苏泱洲; 汪敏; 潘建国

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics of hydrogen and methane production from landfill leachate by anaerobic fermentation at 37 ℃ and pH 7. 0 was studied. The experimental results suggested that during the process of leachate anaerobic fermentation,the maximum cumulative production of hydrogen and methane was 24. 33,91. 95 mL (counted by per gram of COD) respectively; there was a lag phase a in the process of hydrogen production,while the methane production process appear no lag phase. Large amount of volatile organic acids and ethanol were found in the ultimate liquid product in hydrogen production process with the concentration of ethanol,acetate and butyrate was 487. 23,1 175. 21, 1 225. 78 mg/L respectively. Compared with hydrogen production process,ethanol,acetate and butyrate production of methane production process was relatively low,the concentration of was 256. 38,106. 73,107. 42 mg/L respectively. The ultimate mixture of hydrogen production process was strong acidic, the pH value was 4. 21. While, in methane production process,the ultimate mixture was close to neutral, the pH value was 6. 32. The removal rate of COD in methane production process was 41. 78% , which was higher than that of hydrogen production process (32. 14%). This might be the acetate in ultimate mixture of hydrogen production process could be utilized by methanogenesis and further be biodegrade.%以实际垃圾渗滤液作为厌氧发酵基质,研究了初始pH为7.0、中温(37℃)条件下的发酵产氢、产甲烷特性.结果表明,利用垃圾渗滤液作为基质发酵产氢或甲烷时,氢气的最大累积产量为24.33 mL(以每克COD计,下同),甲烷的最大累积产量为91.59 mL,产氢发酵在初期存在明显的迟滞期,但是产甲烷发酵不存在明显迟滞期;产氢发酵的液相末端产物中含有大量的挥发性有机酸和乙醇,乙醇、乙酸、丁酸质量浓度分别为487.23、1175.21、1225.78 mg/L,相比产氢发酵,产甲烷发酵的液相末端产物中乙

  11. What product might a renewal of Heavy IonFusion development offerthat competes with methane microbes and hydrogen HTGRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, Grant; Lee, Ed; Yu, Simon; Briggs, Dick; Barnard, John; Friedman, Alex; Qin, Hong; Waldron, Will; Leitner, Mattaheus; Kwan, Joe; Henestroza, Enrique; Caporaso, George; Meier, Wayne; Tabak, Max; Callahan, Debbie; Moir, Ralph; Peterson, Per

    2006-04-19

    In 1994 a Fusion Technology journal publication by Logan, Moir and Hoffman described how exploiting unusually-strong economy-of-scale for large (8 GWe-scale) multi-unit HIF plants sharing a driver and target factory among several low cost molten salt fusion chambers {at} < $40M per 2.4 GW fusion each (Fig. 1), could produce electricity below 3 cts/kWehr, even lower than similar multi-unit fission plants. The fusion electric plant could cost $12.5 B for 7.5 GWe and produce hydrogen fuel by electrolysis at prices competitive with gasoline-powered hybrids getting fuel from oil at $20$/bbl. At $60/bbl oil, the fusion plant can cost $35B and compete {at} 10% APR financing. Given massive and still-increasing world demand for transportation fuel even with oil climbing above $60/bbl, large HIF plants producing both low cost electricity and hydrogen could be more relevant to motivate new R&D funding for HIF development in the next few years. Three major challenges to get there: (1) NIF ignition in indirect drive geometry for liquid chambers, (2) a modular accelerator to enable a one-module IRE < $100 M, (3) compatible HIF target, driver and chamber allowing a small driver {at}< $500 M cost for a >100MWe net power DEMO. This scoping study, at a very preliminary conceptual level, attempts to identify how we might meet the last two great challenges taking advantage of several recent ideas and advances which motivate reconsideration of modular HIF drivers: >60X longitudinal compression of neutralized ion beams using a variable waveform induction module in NDCX down to 2 nanosecond bunches, the proof-of-principle demonstration of fast optical-gated solid state SiC switches by George Caporaso's group at LLNL (see George's RPIA06 paper), and recent work by Ed Lee, John Barnard and Hong Qin on methods for time-dependent correction of chromatic focusing errors in neutralized beams with up to 10 % {Delta}v/v velocity tilt, allowing 5 or more bunches, and shorter bunches

  12. Computational studies of reacting flows with applications to zinc selenide nanoparticle synthesis and methane/hydrogen separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsona, Maria

    This work is a numerical study of the design and operation of two reacting flow systems, each with great potential in their fields. The design of reacting flow systems by computer simulations are successfully used in science and engineering to evaluate design geometries and operation, without resorting to experimental trial and error that is expensive, time consuming and, in some cases, dangerous. The models of the two systems described in this work are based on fundamental conservation equations for momentum and mass transfer coupled with chemical reaction kinetics and particle dynamics. The first part of this work is a study aiming to elucidate the transport phenomena and chemical reactions that control the size of ZnSe nanoparticles formed by a new vapor-phase synthesis route. The nanoparticles are synthesized by reacting vapors of (CH3)2Zn:N(C2H 5)3 adduct with H2Se gas (diluted in hydrogen) fed continuously from opposite sides into a counterflow jet reactor. The nuclei of the nanocrystals are formed by a direct condensation reaction near the stagnation point. The nuclei grow into nanoparticles by coalescence/coagulation and by surface growth reactions. A 2D model of an axially symmetric reactor was developed that includes descriptions of flow, mass transfer by convection and diffusion, chemical kinetics, particle nucleation, coagulation and surface growth. The coupled nonlinear partial differential equations of the model were solved using the Galerkin Finite Element Method. The model was used to study the relative importance of the underlying physical and chemical phenomena in controlling particle size and particle size distribution. Model predictions compared well with the limited experimental data available for this system. The model was also used for model-assisted design of the experimental counterflow jet reactor, where vapor-phase synthesis of ZnSe nanoparticles was demonstrated for the first time. The second part of this work involves the development of

  13. Methane Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Methane (CH4) flux is the net rate of methane exchange between an ecosystem and the atmosphere. Data of this variable were generated by the USGS LandCarbon project...

  14. Hydrogen production from high moisture content biomass in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Xu, X. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States). Hawaii Natural Energy Inst.

    1998-08-01

    By mixing wood sawdust with a corn starch gel, a viscous paste can be produced that is easily delivered to a supercritical flow reactor by means of a cement pump. Mixtures of about 10 wt% wood sawdust with 3.65 wt% starch are employed in this work, which the authors estimate to cost about $0.043 per lb. Significant reductions in feed cost can be achieved by increasing the wood sawdust loading, but such an increase may require a more complex pump. When this feed is rapidly heated in a tubular flow reactor at pressures above the critical pressure of water (22 MPa), the sawdust paste vaporizes without the formation of char. A packed bed of carbon catalyst in the reactor operating at about 650 C causes the tarry vapors to react with water, producing hydrogen, carbon dioxide, and some methane with a trace of carbon monoxide. The temperature and history of the reactor`s wall influence the hydrogen-methane product equilibrium by catalyzing the methane steam reforming reaction. The water effluent from the reactor is clean. Other biomass feedstocks, such as the waste product of biodiesel production, behave similarly. Unfortunately, sewage sludge does not evidence favorable gasification characteristics and is not a promising feedstock for supercritical water gasification.

  15. Identification of Methanogens and Controls on Methane Production in Incubations of Natural Methane Seep Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevorkian, R.; Lloyd, K. G.

    2014-12-01

    Methane, the most abundant hydrocarbon in Earth's atmosphere, is produced in large quantities in sediments underlying the world's oceans. Very little of this methane makes it to surface sediments as it is consumed by Anaerobic Methanotrophs (ANME's) in consortia with Sulfate Reducing Bacteria (SRB). Less is known about which organisms are responsible for methane production in marine sediments, and whether that production is under thermodynamic control based on hydrogen concentrations. Although ANMEs have been found to be active in methanogenic sediments and incubations, it is currently unknown whether they are able to grow in methanogenic conditions. We demonstrated with bottle incubations of methane seep sediment taken from Cape Lookout Bight, NC, that hydrogen controls methane production. While sulfate was present the hydrogen concentration was maintained at below 2 nM. Only after the depletion of sulfate allowed hydrogen concentrations to rise above 5 nM did we see production of methane. The same sediments when spiked with methane gas demonstrated its complete removal while sulfate reduction occurred. Quantitative PCR shows that ANME-2 and ANME-1 increase in 16S copy number as methane increases. Total direct cell counts demonstrate a decline in cells with the decrease of sulfate until a recovery corresponding with production of methane. Our results strongly suggest that hydrogen concentrations influence what metabolic processes can occur in marine sediments, and that ANME-1 and ANME-2 are able to grow on the energy provided from methane production.

  16. Carbon Dioxide in Exoplanetary Atmospheres: Rarely Dominant Compared to Carbon Monoxide and Water

    CERN Document Server

    Heng, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the abundance of carbon dioxide in exoplanetary atmospheres. We construct analytical models of systems in chemical equilibrium that include carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, water, methane and acetylene and relate the equilibrium constants of the chemical reactions to temperature and pressure via the tabulated Gibbs free energies. We prove that such chemical systems may be described by a quintic equation for the mixing ratio of methane. By examining the abundances of these molecules across a broad range of temperatures (spanning equilibrium temperatures from 600 to 2500 K), pressures (via temperature-pressure profiles that explore albedo and opacity variations) and carbon-to-oxygen ratios (from 0.1 to 100), we conclude that carbon dioxide is subdominant compared to carbon monoxide and water. Atmospheric mixing does not alter this conclusion if carbon dioxide is subdominant everywhere in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide may attain comparable abundances if th...

  17. GRI methane chemistry program review meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dignon, J.; Grant, K.; Grossman, A.; Wuebles, D.; Brasseur, G.; Madronich, S.; Huang, T.; Chang, J.; Lott, B.

    1997-02-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas which affects the atmosphere directly by the absorption and re-emission of infrared radiation as well as indirectly, through chemical interactions. Emissions of several important greenhouse gases (GHGS) including methane are increasing, mainly due to human activity. Higher concentrations of these gases in the atmosphere are projected to cause a decrease in the amount of infrared radiation escaping to space, and a subsequent warming of global climate. It is therefore vital to understand not only the causes of increased production of methane and other GHGS, but the effect of higher GHG concentrations on climate, and the possibilities for reductions of these emissions. In GRI-UIUC methane project, the role of methane in climate change and greenhouse gas abatement strategies is being studied using several distinct approaches. First, a detailed treatment of the mechanisms controlling each important methane source and sink, and hence the atmospheric concentration of methane, is being developed for use with the UIUC Integrated Science Assessment Model. The focus of this study is to resolve the factors which determine methane emissions and removal, including human population, land use, energy demand, global temperature, and regional concentrations of the hydroxyl radical, carbon monoxide, nitrous oxides, non-methane hydrocarbons, water vapor, tropospheric and stratospheric ozone.

  18. 两相厌氧产氢产甲烷工艺的最新研究进展%State-of-the-Art of Two-phase Anaerobic Hydrogen and Methane Production Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张栋; 叶正祥; 陈银广; 赵建夫; 于水利

    2012-01-01

    At present, recycling and reuse of organic wastes have attracted a widespread attention. Two-phase anaerobic hydrogen and methane production process for treatment of organic wastewaters and solids can achieve innocuity, reduction, stabilization, reclamation and reuse of organic wastes, and it is research focus in the field. The current study and evolution of two-phase anaerobic hydrogen and methane production process for treatment of organic wastewaters and solids at home and abroad were introduced, including organic matters treated by two-phase anaerobic process and reactor type, kinetics model for aci-dogenic section, hydrogenogenic bacteria and methanogenic bacteria. The existing research results showed that two-phase anaerobic hydrogen and methane production reactor for treatment of organic wastewater and solids could achieve maximum hydrogen and methane production. It has good application prospect.%利用两相厌氧产氢、产甲烷方法处理各种有机废物和有机废水,可实现有机废物的无害化、减量化、稳定化及资源化,是目前该领域的研究热点.介绍了国内外有关两相厌氧产氢、产甲烷处理有机废水和固体废弃物的最新研究进展,包括两相厌氧处理的有机质及反应器类型、产酸段的动力学模型及产氢相和产甲烷相的优势菌群等.已有结果表明,采用两相厌氧产氢、产甲烷反应器处理有机废水及有机固体废弃物,可实现产氢和产甲烷最大化,具有良好的应用前景.

  19. 城市生活污水排水管道内硫化氢和甲烷产生机制综述%Generation Mechanism of Hydrogen Sulfide and Methane in City Sewage Drains: a Review

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓丰; 王镇鑫; 许伟聪; 梁文杰; 卓小华; 吴坊; 欧文杰; 萧泳珊; 方战强

    2012-01-01

    城市生活污水排水管道通常处于厌氧状态,管道内气液相物质交换频繁,可视为一个庞大的气体排放系统,排出的污染气体包括硫化氢、甲烷、氨气和二氧化碳等十几种气体。其中硫化氢和甲烷浓度较高,受到学术界重视,并已经在管道内厌氧环境中硫化氯和甲烷的生成机制、影响因素、相互作用、静态模型等方面取得了很大的进展。其中主要的影响因素包括管道内污水的pH、水力停留时间、产甲烷细菌和硫酸盐还原细菌的食物竞争、某些对生化反应起抑制作用的盐类等。%The urban sewage drainage pipes are usually in the anaerobic state, in which the gas-liquid exchange occurs frequently .So the sewage drainage pipes can be regarded as a huge gas-discharged system. The gases discharged include hydrogen sulfide, methane, ammonia and carbon dioxide and so on. Because of high concentration, hydrogen sulfide and methane got high attention by the academic circles, and scientists has already made great progress in formation mechanism of hydrogen sulfide and methane, influence factors, interaction and static model. The main factors which influence formation of hydrogen sulfide and methane include pH of sewage water, hydraulic retention time, food competition of methanogenic bacteria and sulfate-reducing bacteria, inhibition of the biochemical reactions by some kind of salts.

  20. C1 Chemistry for the Production of Ultra-Clean Liquid Transportation Fuels and Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2003-03-31

    Faculty and students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of transportation fuel from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and natural gas. An Industrial Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, Energy International, the Department of Defense, and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report presents results obtained in this research program during the first six months of the subject contract (DE-FC26-02NT-4159), from October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2003.

  1. Structural characteristics of copper/hydrogenated amorphous carbon composite films prepared by microwave plasma-assisted deposition processes from methane-argon and acetylene-argon gas mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiery, F.; Pauleau, Y.; Grob, J.J.; Babonneau, D

    2004-11-01

    Copper/hydrogenated amorphous carbon (Cu/a-C:H) composite films have been deposited on silicon substrates by a hybrid technique combining microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition and sputter-deposition from methane-argon and acetylene-argon gas mixtures. The major objective of this work was to investigate the effect of the carbon gas precursor on the structural characteristics of Cu/a-C:H composite films deposited at ambient temperature. The major characteristics of CH{sub 4}-argon and C{sub 2}H{sub 2}-argon plasmas were analyzed by Langmuir probe measurements. The composition of films was determined by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, energy recoil detection analyses and nuclear reaction analyses. The carbon content in the films was observed to vary in the range 20-77 at.% and 7.5-99 at.% as the CH{sub 4} and C{sub 2}H{sub 2} concentrations in the gas phase increased from 10 to 100%, respectively. The atom number ratio H/C in the films was scattered approximately 0.4 whatever the carbon gas precursor used. The crystallographic structure and the size of copper crystallites incorporated in the a-C were determined by X-ray diffraction techniques. The copper crystallite size decreased from 20 nm in pure copper films to less than 5 nm in Cu/a-C:H films containing more than 40 at.% of carbon. Grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering measurements were performed to investigate the size distribution and distance of copper crystallites as functions of the deposition parameters. The structural characteristics of copper crystallites were dependent on the hydrocarbon gas precursor used. The crystallite size and the width of the size distribution were homogeneous in films deposited from CH{sub 4}. Copper crystallites with an anisotropic shape were found in films deposited from C{sub 2}H{sub 2}. The major radicals formed in the plasma and condensed on the surface of growing films, namely CH and C{sub 2}H radicals for films produced from CH{sub 4} and C

  2. Anaerobic digestion of the vinasses from the fermentation of Agave tequilana Weber to tequila: The effect of pH, temperature and hydraulic retention time on the production of hydrogen and methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espinoza-Escalante, Froylan M.; Pelayo-Ortiz, Carlos; Navarro-Corona, Jose; Gonzalez-Garcia, Yolanda [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Guadalajara, Blvd. M. Garcia Barragan No. 1421, Guadalajara CP 44430 (Mexico); Bories, Andre [INRA-Unite Experimentale de Pech-Rouge, 11430 Gruissan (France); Gutierrez-Pulido, Humberto [Department of Mathematics, University of Guadalajara, Blvd. M. Garcia Barragan No. 1421, Guadalajara CP 44430 (Mexico)

    2009-01-15

    The objective of this work was to study the effect of three operational parameters (pH, hydraulic retention time (HRT) and growing temperature) on a semi-continuous bioreactor treating Tequila's vinasses by anaerobic digestion (AD). The response was measured through four response variables: total reducing sugars (TRS) consumption, VFA's, hydrogen and methane production. Trials were done according to a factorial design. The experimental results were studied through a multiple response optimization (MRO) analysis to find single and multiple optimums for the above-mentioned variables. Mathematical models that can describe the effect of the operational parameters on each response variable were found. In this study it is shown that hydrogen production is favored at thermophilic growth (55 C), operating the reactor at a slight acidic pH range and at the higher HRT in the boundaries of the experimental region. (author)

  3. Brown coal conversion by microwave plasma reactions under successive supply of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, O.; Onoe, K.; Marushima, W.; Yamaguchi, T. [Chiba institute of Technology, Chiba (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry

    1998-10-01

    To develop an innovative method for directly converting brown coal to relatively important fuels and synthesis gases in a single step, while simultaneously upgrading the carbon content of the residue, microwave plasma technology was applied to the direct conversion of brown coal (Yallourn). Methane under reduced pressure was supplied through a quartz reactor into the irradiation zone and reacted with the coal bed placed downstream. Both the coal conversion and the carbon content of the residue were increased with an increase of irradiation time. The yield of oily products showed a maximum value (18 wt.%) at 2 min irradiation, and the fuels were composed mainly of aliphatic hydrocarbons in the range from C{sub 13} to C{sub 34}. Furthermore, carbon monoxide and hydrogen accompanied by a molar fraction of {lt} 16% of acetylene were mainly produced when the irradiation time was varied from 1 to 10 min. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  4. 产氢产甲烷两相厌氧发酵的研究进展%Research advances in two-phase anaerobic fermentation for hydrogen and methane production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏勃; 刘文辉; 袁林江

    2014-01-01

    产氢/产甲烷的两相厌氧技术在国内外受到普遍关注,如何提高产氢反应器的氢气产率和系统生物能源的高效转化成为两相厌氧研究的关键问题。总结了近年来两相厌氧技术研究和应用的最新成果,介绍了两相厌氧基质利用的运行情况、相分离的优势及两相中的优势菌种。同时,就氢/甲烷两相厌氧发酵的前景提出了建议。%Extensively attention has been paid to the two-phase anaerobic process for hydrogen and methane produc-tion in China and abroad. How to improve the hydrogen productivity of hydrogen producing reactor and efficient con-version of system bio-energy sources have become the key problem of two-phase anaerobic research. Recent ad-vances in the research on two-phase anaerobic technology and application of the newest achievement are summa-rized. The running situation of the two-phase anaerobic substrate utilization ,the superiority of phase separation and the predominant strains in two phases are introduced. Furthermore ,suggestions on the prospect concerning two-phase anaerobic fermentation for hydrogen and methane production have been made.

  5. Carbon Monoxide (CO) Poisoning Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir When power outages occur after severe weather (such as winter storms, hurricanes or tornadoes), using alternative sources of power can cause carbon monoxide (CO) to build up in a ...

  6. Carbon Monoxide Mixing Ratio System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — The Southern Great Plains (SGP) Carbon Monoxide (CO) system provides high-precision atmospheric concentration measurements of CO mixing ratio (ppbv dry air) every 10...

  7. A 60-yr record of atmospheric carbon monoxide reconstructed from Greenland firn air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Petrenko

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a reconstruction of the Northern Hemisphere (NH high latitude atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO mole fraction from Greenland firn air. Firn air samples were collected at three deep ice core sites in Greenland (NGRIP in 2001, Summit in 2006 and NEEM in 2008. CO records from the three sites agree well with each other as well as with recent atmospheric measurements, indicating that CO is well preserved in the firn at these sites. CO atmospheric history was reconstructed back to the year 1950 from the measurements using a combination of two forward models of gas transport in firn and an inverse model. The reconstructed history suggests that Arctic CO was already higher in 1950 than it is today. CO mole fractions rose gradually until the 1970s and peaked in the 1970s or early 1980s, followed by a decline to today's levels. We compare the CO history with the atmospheric histories of methane, light hydrocarbons, molecular hydrogen, CO stable isotopes and hydroxyl radical (OH, as well as with published CO emission inventories and results of a historical run from a chemistry-transport model. We find that the reconstructed Greenland CO history cannot be reconciled with available emission inventories unless large changes in OH are assumed. We argue that the available CO emission inventories chronically underestimate NH emissions, and fail to capture the emission decline starting in the late 1970s, which was most likely due to reduced emissions from road transportation in North America and Europe.

  8. Synergistic effect of carbon monoxide with other biologically active injurious factors on the organism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pankow, D.; Ponsold, W.

    1974-09-01

    The combined effects on biological organisms are reported for carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sodium nitrite, hydrocyanic acid, carbon disulfide, sulfur dioxide, ammonia, hydrogen peroxide, ethanol, trichloroethylene, carbon tetrachloride, methane, benzene, iodine acetate, cholesterol, benzpyrene, hexobarbitol, zoxazolamine, nembutal, luminal, morphine, adrenalin, persantin, cytochrome c, aldrin, carbaryl, cyclodiene epoxide; and physical influences such as ambient temperature, atmospheric pressure, ionizing radiation, noise, and vibration. A literature review shows that with increasing CO/sub 2/ and decreasing oxygen concentration in the inhalation air, the toxicity of CO increased in experiments with mice and canaries. Oxides of nitrogen enhance the toxic effect of CO in an additive way and at times synergistically. At 500 m from a metallurgical plant in the USSR the maximum allowable immission concentrations for CO and SO/sub 2/ were exceeded. In children residing there a higher normal erythrocyte number, hemoglobin content, and catalase activity were found in the blood along with higher concentrations of coproporphyrin and 17-ketosteroids. All values returned to normal after an 8-week stay of these children away from the metallurgical plant.

  9. 微量元素对ABR发酵产氢产甲烷的影响%Effect of Trace Elements on Fermentative Co-production of Hydrogen and Methane in Anaerobic Baffled Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑国臣; 赵峰; 李建政; 张照韩; 昌盛; 闫志成; AJAYKumarJha

    2012-01-01

    In order to achieve fermentative co-production of hydrogen and methane in a 4-compart-ment anaerobic baffled reactor ( ABR) , the effects of trace elements on fermentative production of hydrogen in the front compartment and fermentative production of methane in the rear compartment were investigated. Under the conditions of influent COD of 6 000 mg/L and ALK of 1 900 mg/L, before addition of trace elements, the COD removal rate was 51% , the hydrogen production capacity was 0.46 m /(m ? D) , and the methane production capacity was 0.68 mV( m3 ? D), with low dehydrogenase activity of anaerobic sludge. While under the same conditions, after addition of trace elements, the COD removal rate increased to above 62% , the hydrogen production capacity decreased to 0. 37 m /( m ? D), and themethane production capacity increased to 1. 66 m /( m ? D). As a result, the addition of trace elements could effectively stimulate the activity of anaerobic sludge in fermentative co-production of hydrogen and methane in the ABR. The increase in the activity of hydrogen-consuming bacteria like methanogenic bacteria leaded to inhibition of the hydrogen production, but enhanced the methanogenic activity, which significantly improved the treatment efficient.%为构建厌氧折流板反应器(ABR)发酵联合产氢产甲烷系统,考察了微量元素对ABR系统前端格室发酵产氢、后端格室发酵产甲烷的影响.在进水COD为6 000 mg/L、碱度为1 900 mg/L的条件下,当未投加微量元素时,系统对COD的去除率为51%,产氢能力为0.46 m3/(m3·d),产甲烷能力为0.68 m3/(m3·d),四格室的厌氧污泥脱氢酶活性均较低;而在相同运行条件下,当投加微量元素后,系统对COD的去除率提高到62%以上,产氢能力为0.37 m3/(m3·d),产甲烷能力达到1.66 m3/( m3·d)..研究表明,投加微量元素可有效刺激ABR发酵联合产氢产甲烷系统中厌氧污泥的活性,由于ABR中产甲烷菌等耗氢菌群活性的增强导致发

  10. Electronic Origins of the Variable Efficiency of Room-Temperature Methane Activation by Homo- and Heteronuclear Cluster Oxide Cations [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Al, Si, Mg): Competition between Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer and Hydrogen-Atom Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jilai; Zhou, Shaodong; Zhang, Jun; Schlangen, Maria; Weiske, Thomas; Usharani, Dandamudi; Shaik, Sason; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-06-29

    The reactivity of the homo- and heteronuclear oxide clusters [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Al, Si, Mg) toward methane was studied using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry, in conjunction with high-level quantum mechanical calculations. The most reactive cluster by both experiment and theory is [Al2O2](•+). In its favorable pathway, this cluster abstracts a hydrogen atom by means of proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) instead of following the conventional hydrogen-atom transfer (HAT) route. This mechanistic choice originates in the strong Lewis acidity of the aluminum site of [Al2O2](•+), which cleaves the C-H bond heterolytically to form an Al-CH3 entity, while the proton is transferred to the bridging oxygen atom of the cluster ion. In addition, a comparison of the reactivity of heteronuclear and homonuclear oxide clusters [XYO2](+) (X, Y = Al, Si, Mg) reveals a striking doping effect by aluminum. Thus, the vacant s-p hybrid orbital on Al acts as an acceptor of the electron pair from methyl anion (CH3(-)) and is therefore eminently important for bringing about thermal methane activation by PCET. For the Al-doped cluster ions, the spin density at an oxygen atom, which is crucial for the HAT mechanism, acts here as a spectator during the course of the PCET mediated C-H bond cleavage. A diagnostic plot of the deformation energy vis-à-vis the barrier shows the different HAT/PCET reactivity map for the entire series. This is a strong connection to the recently discussed mechanism of oxidative coupling of methane on magnesium oxide surfaces proceeding through Grignard-type intermediates.

  11. The Range of 1-3 keV Electrons in Solid Oxygen and Carbon Monoxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oehlenschlæger, M.; Andersen, H.H.; Schou, Jørgen

    1985-01-01

    The range of 1-3 keV electrons in films of solid oxygen and carbon monoxide has been measured by a mirror substrate method. The technique used here is identical to the one previously used for range measurements in solid hydrogen and nitrogen. The range in oxygen is slightly shorter than...... that in nitrogen whereas the range in carbon monoxide is about 20% larger than that in the nitrogen....

  12. Methane present in an extrasolar planet atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Swain, Mark R; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2008-01-01

    Molecules present in exoplanetary atmospheres are expected to strongly influence the atmospheric radiation balance, trace dynamical and chemical processes, and indicate the presence of disequilibrium effects. Since molecules have the potential to reveal the exoplanet atmospheric conditions and chemistry, searching for them is a high priority. The rotational-vibrational transition bands of water, carbon monoxide, and methane are anticipated to be the primary sources of non-continuum opacity in hot-Jovian planets. Since these bands overlap in wavelength, and the corresponding signatures from them are weak, decisive identification requires precision infrared spectroscopy. Here we report on a near-infrared transmission spectrum of the planet HD 189733b showing the presence of methane. Additionally, a resolved water-vapour band at 1.9 microns confirms the recent claim of water in this object. On thermochemical grounds, carbon-monoxide is expected to be abundant in the upper atmosphere of hot-Jovian exoplanets; thu...

  13. Arctic methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dyupina, E.; Amstel, van A.R.

    2013-01-01

    What are the risks of a runaway greenhouse effect from methane release from hydrates in the Arctic? In January 2013, a dramatic increase of methane concentration up to 2000 ppb has been measured over the Arctic north of Norway in the Barents Sea. The global average being 1750 ppb. It has been

  14. Arctic methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dyupina, E.; Amstel, van A.R.

    2013-01-01

    What are the risks of a runaway greenhouse effect from methane release from hydrates in the Arctic? In January 2013, a dramatic increase of methane concentration up to 2000 ppb has been measured over the Arctic north of Norway in the Barents Sea. The global average being 1750 ppb. It has been sugges

  15. C1 Chemistry for the Production of Ultra-Clean Liquid Transportation Fuels and Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2006-03-30

    Professors and graduate students from five universities--the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University--are collaborating in a research program to develop C1 chemistry processes to produce ultra-clean liquid transportation fuels and hydrogen, the zero-emissions transportation fuel of the future. The feedstocks contain one carbon atom per molecular unit. They include synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. An important objective is to develop C1 technology for the production of liquid transportation fuel and hydrogen from domestically plentiful resources such as coal, coalbed methane, and hydrocarbon gases and liquids produced from coal. An Advisory Board with representatives from Chevron-Texaco, Eastman Chemical, Conoco-Phillips, the Air Force Research Laboratory, the U.S. Army National Automotive Center, and Tier Associates provides guidance on the practicality of the research. The current report summarizes the results obtained in this program during the period October 1, 2002 through March 31, 2006. The results are presented in detailed reports on 16 research projects headed by professors at each of the five CFFS Universities and an Executive Summary. Some of the highlights from these results are: (1) Small ({approx}1%) additions of acetylene or other alkynes to the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) reaction increases its yield, causes chain initiation, and promotes oxygenate formation. (2) The addition of Mo to Fe-Cu-K/AC F-T catalysts improves catalyst lifetime and activity. (3) The use of gas phase deposition to place highly dispersed metal catalysts on silica or ceria aerogels offers promise for both the F-T and the water-gas shift WGS reactions. (4) Improved activity and selectivity are exhibited by Co F-T catalysts in supercritical hexane. (5) Binary Fe

  16. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2004-09-30

    The Consortium for Fossil Fuel Science (CFFS) is a research consortium with participants from the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, West Virginia University, University of Utah, and Auburn University. The CFFS is conducting a research program to develop C1 chemistry technology for the production of clean transportation fuel from resources such as coal and natural gas, which are more plentiful domestically than petroleum. The processes under development will convert feedstocks containing one carbon atom per molecular unit into ultra clean liquid transportation fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) and hydrogen, which many believe will be the transportation fuel of the future. Feedstocks include synthesis gas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification, coalbed methane, light products produced by Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis, methanol, and natural gas.

  17. Hydrogen production from a combination of the water-gas shift and redox cycle process of methane partial oxidation via lattice oxygen over LaFeO3 perovskite catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiao Ping; Wu, Qiong; Li, Ran Jia; Yu, Chang Chun; Hao, Zheng Ping

    2006-12-28

    A redox cycle process, in which CH4 and air are periodically brought into contact with a solid oxide packed in a fixed-bed reactor, combined with the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction, is proposed for hydrogen production. The sole oxidant for partial oxidation of methane (POM) is found to be lattice oxygen instead of gaseous oxygen. A perovskite-type LaFeO3 oxide was prepared by a sol-gel method and employed as an oxygen storage material in this process. The results indicate that, under appropriate reaction conditions, methane can be oxidized to CO and H2 by the lattice oxygen of LaFeO3 perovskite oxide with a selectivity higher than 95% and the consumed lattice oxygen can be replenished in a reoxidation procedure by a redox operation. It is suggested that the POM to H2/CO by using the lattice oxygen of the oxygen storage materials instead of gaseous oxygen should be possibly applicable. The LaFeO3 perovskite oxide maintained relatively high catalytic activity and structural stability, while the carbonaceous deposits, which come from the dissociation of CH4 in the pulse reaction, occurred due to the low migration rate of lattice oxygen from the bulk toward the surface. A new dissociation-oxidation mechanism for this POM without gaseous oxygen is proposed based on the transient responses of the products checked at different surface states via both pulse reaction and switch reaction over the LaFeO3 catalyst. In the absence of gaseous-phase oxygen, the rate-determining step of methane conversion is the migration rate of lattice oxygen, but the process can be carried out in optimized cycles. The product distribution for POM over LaFeO3 catalyst in the absence of gaseous oxygen was determined by the concentration of surface oxygen, which is relevant with the migration rate of lattice oxygen from the bulk toward the surface. This process of hydrogen production via selective oxidation of methane by lattice oxygen is better in avoiding the deep oxidation (to CO2) and

  18. Acetaldehyde behavior over platinum based catalyst in hydrogen stream generated by ethanol reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Lima, Adriana F.F. [Laboratorio de Catalise, Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia, Av. Venezuela 82/507, 20081-310 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Instituto de Quimica e INOG (Instituto Nacional de Oleo Gas), UERJ-CNPq, FAPERJ, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Sao Francisco Xavier, 524, 20550-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Colman, Rita C. [Departamento de Engenharia Quimica e de Petroleo, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Passos da Patria, 156/bl E/240, 24210-240 Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Zotin, Fatima M.Z. [Instituto de Quimica e INOG (Instituto Nacional de Oleo Gas), UERJ-CNPq, FAPERJ, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Sao Francisco Xavier, 524, 20550-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); CETEM-MCT, Av. Pedro Calmon, 900, Cidade Universitaria, 21941-908 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Appel, Lucia G. [Laboratorio de Catalise, Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia, Av. Venezuela 82/507, 20081-310 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-12-15

    Due to the greenhouse effect, hydrogen production from bioethanol reforming is a very important subject in heterogeneous catalysis research. Pt based catalysts are employed in H{sub 2} purification processes and also as electrocatalysts of PEM (''Proton Exchange Membrane'') fuel cells. Hydrogen obtained from ethanol reforming may contain, as contaminants, acetaldehyde and small amounts of CO. This aldehyde can be decarbonylated on Pt based catalysts generating carbon monoxide and methane, rendering the hydrogen purification more challenging. Moreover, acetaldehyde might also change the electrocatalyst behavior. Therefore, this contribution aims at studying the acetaldehyde behavior in the presence of platinum based catalysts in hydrogen atmosphere. The Pt/SiO{sub 2}, Pt/USY catalysts and an electrocatalyst were characterized by n-butylamine, H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption, ATG/DTG measurements and cyclohexane dehydrogenation reaction. It was observed that the acid-basic properties of the supports promote condensation reactions. When in contact with Pt based catalysts, acetaldehyde undergoes C-C and C=O bond scissions. The former occurs at a wide range of temperatures, whereas the latter only at low temperatures (<200 C). The C-C bond scission (decarbonylation) produces methane and CO. The C=O bond scission generates carbon residues on the catalyst as well as oxygen species, which in turn is able to eliminate CO from the catalytic surface. The data also show that decarbonylation is not a structure-sensitive reaction. (author)

  19. Study of electrocatalytic properties of iridium carbonyl cluster and rhodium carbonyl cluster compounds for the oxygen reduction and hydrogen oxidation reactions in 0.5 MH{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in presence and absence of methanol and carbon monoxide, respectively

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uribe-Godinez, J.; Borja-Arco, E.; Castellanos, R.H. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Escobedo (Mexico); Jimenez-Sandoval, O. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Inst. Politecnico Nacional, Querataro (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    The suitability of carbonyl cluster compounds as a substitute to platinum (Pt) in fuel cell catalysts was investigated. Iridium (Ir{sub 4}(CO){sub 12} and rhodium (Rh{sub 6}(CO){sub 116}) cluster compounds were investigated as potential new electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the presence and absence of methanol at different concentrations, as well as for the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) with pure hydrogen and a hydrogen/carbon monoxide mixture. The materials were studied using room temperature rotating disk electrode (RDE) measurements and cyclic and linear sweep voltammetry techniques (LSV). Tafel slope and exchange current density were calculated using the LSV polarization curves. Cyclic voltamperometry results suggested that the electrocatalysts were tolerant to methanol. However, electrochemical behaviour of the materials altered in the presence of CO, and peaks corresponding to CO oxidation were observed in both cases. The rhodium carbonyl showed a higher current density for the ORR than the iridium carbonyl. The current potential curves in the presence of methanol were similar to those obtained without methanol. Results confirmed the tolerance properties of the materials to perform the ORR. Decreased current density values were observed during HOR, and were attributed to changes in the hydrogen solubility and diffusion coefficient due to the presence of CO. The Tafel slopes indicated that the mechanics of the HOR were Heyrovsky-Volmer. Results showed that the materials are capable of performing both ORR and HOR in an acid medium. It was noted that the iridium carbonyl cluster followed a 4-electron transfer mechanism towards the formation of water. It was concluded that the compounds are suitable for use as both cathodes and anodes in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and as cathodes in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). 3 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  20. [Levels of carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide in blood of fire victims in the autopsy material of the Department of Forensic Medicine, Medical University of Białystok].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardaszka, Zofia; Niemcunowicz-Janica, Anna; Janica, Jerzy; Koc-Zórawska, Ewa

    2005-01-01

    The authors present the results of toxicological examination of blood of fatal victims of fires in "closed" spaces. Hydrogen cyanide was present in 26 out of 64 postmortem blood samples. COHb was found in 52 cases. The hydrogen cyanide levels ranged from 0.8 to 39.2 microg/l, the COHb levels ranged from 16.0 to 85.0%. The level of hydrogen cyanide was determined by the pyrazolopyridine method modified by Nedoma, and the COHb level was determined by the Wolff method.

  1. Photocatalytic conversion of methane to methanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, C.E.; Noceti, R.P.; D`Este, J.R. [Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    A long-term goal of our research group is the exploration of novel pathways for the direct oxidation of methane to liquid fuels, chemicals, and intermediates. The use of three relatively abundant and inexpensive reactants, light, water, and methane, to produce methanol is attractive. The products of reaction, methanol and hydrogen, are both commercially desirable, methanol being used as is or converted to a variety of other chemicals, and the hydrogen could be utilized in petroleum and/or chemical manufacturing. Methane is produced as a by-product of coal gasification. Depending upon reactor design and operating conditions, up to 18% of total gasifier product may be methane. In addition, there are vast proven reserves of geologic methane in the world. Unfortunately, a large fraction of these reserves are in regions where there is little local demand for methane and it is not economically feasible to transport it to a market. There is a global research effort under way in academia, industry, and government to find methods to convert methane to useful, more readily transportable and storable materials. Methanol, the initial product of methane oxidation, is a desirable product of conversion because it retains much of the original energy of the methane while satisfying transportation and storage requirements. Investigation of direct conversion of methane to transportation fuels has been an ongoing effort at PETC for over 10 years. One of the current areas of research is the conversion of methane to methanol, under mild conditions, using light, water, and a semiconductor photocatalyst. The use of three relatively abundant and inexpensive reactants, light, water, and methane, to produce methanol, is attractive. Research in the laboratory is directed toward applying the techniques developed for the photocatalytic splitting of the water and the photochemical conversion of methane.

  2. Methane partial oxidation using Ni/Ce{sub 0.9}Zr{sub 0.1}O{sub 2} catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larrondo, S.A.; Kodjaian, A.; Amadeo, N.E. [Laboratorio de Procesos Cataliticos, Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Pabellon de Industrias, Ciudad Universitaria, 1428, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Fabregas, I.; Zimicz, M.G.; Lamas, D.G.; Walsoee de Reca, B.E. [CINSO (Centro de Investigaciones en Solidos), CONICET-CITEFA, J.B. de La Salle 4397 (1603) Villa Martelli, Pcia. de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2008-07-15

    The development of active and selective catalysts for methane partial oxidation is one of today's challenges, because these catalysts could be used either for hydrogen production purposes or as anode materials in single-chamber solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). In this work, the synthesis of ceria-zirconia solid solutions of nominal composition Ce{sub 0.9}Zr{sub 0.1}O{sub 2} through the gel-combustion route is presented. The solids obtained were impregnated with nickel solutions to achieve contents of 9% and 50% (m/m), characterized texturally and structurally, and their catalytic behavior in the methane partial oxidation reaction was assessed. The synthesis method was effective, leading to solids with good morphological properties. Likewise, the Ni/Ce{sub 0.9}Zr{sub 0.1}O{sub 2} catalysts proved to be active and showed a stable behavior during the working period, with methane conversion levels of 90% at temperatures above 550 C, being hydrogen and carbon monoxide the main products. (author)

  3. (Carbon monoxide metabolism by photosynthetic bacteria)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    Research continued on the metabolism of carbon monoxide by Rhodospirillum rubrum. This report discusses progress on the activity, induction, inhibition, and spectroscopic analysis of the enzyme Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase. (CBS)

  4. Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System (COSRS) is an innovative method that for the first time uses the strong reductant carbon monoxide to both reduce iron...

  5. Methane-free biogas for direct feeding of solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, P.; Lanzini, A.; Santarelli, M.; Cali, M. [Dipartimento di Energetica, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Turin (Italy); Sagnelli, F.; Boulanger, A.; Scaletta, A.; Zitella, P. [BioEnergy Lab, Environment Park S.p.A., Via Livorno 60, 10144 Turin (Italy)

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with the experimental analysis of the performance and degradation issues of a Ni-based anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell fed by a methane-free biogas from dark-anaerobic digestion of wastes by pastry and fruit shops. The biogas is produced by means of an innovative process where the biomass is fermented with a pre-treated bacteria inoculum (Clostridia) able to completely inhibit the methanization step during the fermentation process and to produce a H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} mixture instead of conventional CH{sub 4}/CO{sub 2} anaerobic digested gas (bio-methane). The proposed biogas production route leads to a biogas composition which avoids the need of introducing a reformer agent into or before the SOFC anode in order to reformate it. In order to analyse the complete behaviour of a SOFC with the bio-hydrogen fuel, an experimental session with several H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} synthetic mixtures was performed on an anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell with a Ni-based anode. It was found that side reactions occur with such mixtures in the typical thermodynamic conditions of SOFCs (650-800 C), which have an effect especially at high currents, due to the shift to a mixture consisting of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and water. However, cells operated with acceptable performance and carbon deposits (typical of a traditional hydrocarbon-containing biogas) were avoided after 50 h of cell operation even at 650 C. Experiments were also performed with traditional bio-methane from anaerobic digestion with 60/40 vol% of composition. It was found that the cell performance dropped after few hours of operation due to the formation of carbon deposits. A short-term test with the real as-produced biogas was also successfully performed. The cell showed an acceptable power output (at 800 C, 0.35 W cm{sup -2} with biogas, versus 0.55 W cm{sup -2} with H{sub 2}) although a huge quantity of sulphur was present in the feeding fuel (hydrogen sulphide at 103 ppm and

  6. Methane-free biogas for direct feeding of solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, P.; Lanzini, A.; Santarelli, M.; Calì, M.; Sagnelli, F.; Boulanger, A.; Scaletta, A.; Zitella, P.

    This paper deals with the experimental analysis of the performance and degradation issues of a Ni-based anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell fed by a methane-free biogas from dark-anaerobic digestion of wastes by pastry and fruit shops. The biogas is produced by means of an innovative process where the biomass is fermented with a pre-treated bacteria inoculum (Clostridia) able to completely inhibit the methanization step during the fermentation process and to produce a H 2/CO 2 mixture instead of conventional CH 4/CO 2 anaerobic digested gas (bio-methane). The proposed biogas production route leads to a biogas composition which avoids the need of introducing a reformer agent into or before the SOFC anode in order to reformate it. In order to analyse the complete behaviour of a SOFC with the bio-hydrogen fuel, an experimental session with several H 2/CO 2 synthetic mixtures was performed on an anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell with a Ni-based anode. It was found that side reactions occur with such mixtures in the typical thermodynamic conditions of SOFCs (650-800 °C), which have an effect especially at high currents, due to the shift to a mixture consisting of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and water. However, cells operated with acceptable performance and carbon deposits (typical of a traditional hydrocarbon-containing biogas) were avoided after 50 h of cell operation even at 650 °C. Experiments were also performed with traditional bio-methane from anaerobic digestion with 60/40 vol% of composition. It was found that the cell performance dropped after few hours of operation due to the formation of carbon deposits. A short-term test with the real as-produced biogas was also successfully performed. The cell showed an acceptable power output (at 800 °C, 0.35 W cm -2 with biogas, versus 0.55 W cm -2 with H 2) although a huge quantity of sulphur was present in the feeding fuel (hydrogen sulphide at 103 ppm and mercaptans up to 10 ppm). Therefore, it

  7. 基于详细反应机理的富燃多孔燃烧制氢的计算流体力学模拟%Determination of Hydrogen Production from Rich Filtration Combustion with Detailed Kinetics Based CFD Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李国能; 周昊; 钱欣平; 岑可法

    2008-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) combined with detailed chemical kinetics was employed to model the filtration combustion of a mixture of methane/air in a packed bed of uniform 3 nun diameter alumina spherical particles. The standard k-ε turbulence model and a methane oxidation mechanism with 23 species and 39 elemental reactions were used. Various equivalence ratios (1.47, 1.88, 2.12 and 2.35) were studied. The numerical results showed good agreement with the experimental data. For ultra-rich mixtures, the combustion temperature exceeds the adiabatic value by hundreds of centigrade degrees. Syngas (hydrogen and carbon monoxide) can be obtained up to a mole fraction of 23%. The numerical results also showed that the combination of CFD with detailed chemical kinetics gives good performance for modeling the pseudo-homogeneous flames of methane in porous media.

  8. Evidence for methane in Martian meteorites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blamey, Nigel J F; Parnell, John; McMahon, Sean; Mark, Darren F; Tomkinson, Tim; Lee, Martin; Shivak, Jared; Izawa, Matthew R M; Banerjee, Neil R; Flemming, Roberta L

    2015-06-16

    The putative occurrence of methane in the Martian atmosphere has had a major influence on the exploration of Mars, especially by the implication of active biology. The occurrence has not been borne out by measurements of atmosphere by the MSL rover Curiosity but, as on Earth, methane on Mars is most likely in the subsurface of the crust. Serpentinization of olivine-bearing rocks, to yield hydrogen that may further react with carbon-bearing species, has been widely invoked as a source of methane on Mars, but this possibility has not hitherto been tested. Here we show that some Martian meteorites, representing basic igneous rocks, liberate a methane-rich volatile component on crushing. The occurrence of methane in Martian rock samples adds strong weight to models whereby any life on Mars is/was likely to be resident in a subsurface habitat, where methane could be a source of energy and carbon for microbial activity.

  9. Carbon monoxide formation in tomatoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gladon, R.J.; Staby, G.L.

    1979-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is not emanated to any large extent from tomato fruits (Lycopersicon esculentum, Mill. cvs. Rutgers and Ohio MR-13), but is retained within the internal atmosphere. CO is found during all stages of fruit development, but no set pattern of CO concentration is evident.

  10. MOPITT Carbon Monoxide Over India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    MOPITT observed high levels of carbon monoxide (red and yellow pixels) over the Indian sub-continent during March. These values are associated with industrial activity in the region just south of the Himalayan Mountains. Notice that to the north, the Himalayas are characterized by low values (blue pixels).

  11. Production of hydrogen with methane decomposition using Ni-Mn/Ce-ZrO{sub 2} catalysts; Produccion de hidrogeno via descomposicion de metano mediante catalizadores de Ni-Mn/Ce-ZrO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz, C.; Hernandez-Pichardo, M.L.; Valenzuela, M. A. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional-ESIQIE, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)]. E-mail: mhernandezp@ipn.mx; Del Angel, P.; Montoya de la Fuente, J.A. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-09-15

    The catalytic decomposition of methane makes it possible to obtain CO and CO{sub 2} free hydrogen, which is a desirable characteristic for fuel cell applications. In addition, this method simultaneously obtains diverse carbon nanostructures with a large variety of applications. This work prepared catalysts with different Ni contents supported by Ce-Zr mixed oxides and doped with manganese to promote activity. The supports were synthesized with surfactant-assisted coprecipitation. The Ni and Mn deposits were performed using conventional impregnation for evaluation in the methane decomposition catalyst at 500 degrees Celsius. It was observed that with the incorporation of 1% of Mn into the Ni0 active phase, the conversion of methane into hydrogen and carbon nanostructures increased. The results of reduction at the programmed temperature indicate that the addition of Mn enables the formation of different NiO{sub x} species, increasing dispersion and the degree of reduction to Ni0. Analyses with electron and transmission microscopy show the formation of distinct species of carbon, including nanotubes, nanofibers and concentric onion-like structures, as well as a significant formation of encapsulated Ni0 particles. [Spanish] La descomposicion catalitica de metano permite la obtencion de hidrogeno libre de CO y CO{sub 2}, lo cual es una caracteristica deseable para su aplicacion en celdas de combustible. Ademas, por esta ruta, simultaneamente se obtienen diversas nanoestructuras de carbono con una gran variedad de aplicaciones. En este trabajo se prepararon catalizadores con diferentes contenidos de Ni soportados en oxidos mixtos Ce-Zr y se doparon con manganeso como promotor de actividad. Los soportes se sintetizaron por coprecipitacion asistida por surfactante y el deposito del Ni y del Mn se efectuo por impregnacion convencional para su evaluacion en la descomposicion catalitica de metano a 500 grados centigrados. Se observo que mediante la incorporacion de 1% de Mn a

  12. Hydrogen production from high-moisture content biomass in supercritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Adschiri, T.; Ekbom, T. [Univ. of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Most hydrogen is produced by steam reforming methane at elevated pressures. The goal of this research is to develop commercial processes for the catalytic steam reforming of biomass and other organic wastes at high pressures. This approach avoids the high cost of gas compression and takes advantage of the unique properties of water at high pressures. Prior to this year the authors reported the ability of carbon to catalyze the decomposition of biomass and related model compounds in supercritical water. The product gas consists of hydrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, and traces of higher hydrocarbons. During the past year the authors have: (a) developed a method to extend the catalyst life, (b) begun studies of the role of the shift reaction, (c) completed studies of carbon dioxide absorption from the product effluent by high pressure water, (d) measured the rate of carbon catalyst gasification in supercritical water, (e) discovered the pumpability of oil-biomass slurries, and (f) completed the design and begun fabrication of a flow reactor that will steam reform whole biomass feedstocks (i.e. sewage sludge) and produce a hydrogen rich synthesis gas at very high pressure (>22 MPa).

  13. The Unique Gas-Phase Chemistry of the [AuO](+) /CH4 Couple: Selective Oxygen-Atom Transfer to, Rather than Hydrogen-Atom Abstraction from, Methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shaodong; Li, Jilai; Schlangen, Maria; Schwarz, Helmut

    2016-08-26

    The thermal reaction of [AuO](+) with methane has been explored using FT-ICR mass spectrometry complemented by high-level quantum chemical calculations. In contrast to the previously studied congener [CuO](+) , and to [AgO](+) , [AuO](+) reacts with CH4 exclusively via oxygen-atom transfer to form CH3 OH, and a novel mechanistic scenario for this selective oxidation process has been revealed. Also, the origin of the inertness of the [AgO](+) /CH4 couple has been addressed computationally.

  14. Active Thermochemical Tables: Sequential Bond Dissociation Enthalpies of Methane, Ethane, and Methanol, and the Related Thermochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruscic, Branko

    2015-07-16

    Active Thermochemical Tables (ATcT) thermochemistry for the sequential bond dissociations of methane, ethane, and methanol systems were obtained by analyzing and solving a very large thermochemical network (TN). Values for all possible C–H, C–C, C–O, and O–H bond dissociation enthalpies at 298.15 K (BDE298) and bond dissociation energies at 0 K (D0) are presented. The corresponding ATcT standard gas-phase enthalpies of formation of the resulting CHn, n = 4–0 species (methane, methyl, methylene, methylidyne, and carbon atom), C2Hn, n = 6–0 species (ethane, ethyl, ethylene, ethylidene, vinyl, ethylidyne, acetylene, vinylidene, ethynyl, and ethynylene), and COHn, n = 4–0 species (methanol, hydroxymethyl, methoxy, formaldehyde, hydroxymethylene, formyl, isoformyl, and carbon monoxide) are also presented. The ATcT thermochemistry of carbon dioxide, water, hydroxyl, and carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen atoms is also included, together with the sequential BDEs of CO2 and H2O. The provenances of the ATcT enthalpies of formation, which are quite distributed and involve a large number of relevant determinations, are analyzed by variance decomposition and discussed in terms of principal contributions. The underlying reasons for periodic appearances of remarkably low and/or unusually high BDEs, alternating along the dissociation sequences, are analyzed and quantitatively rationalized. The present ATcT results are the most accurate thermochemical values currently available for these species.

  15. Numerical analysis of helium-heated methane/steam reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozdzierz, M.; Brus, G.; Kimijima, S.; Szmyd, J. S.

    2016-09-01

    One of the most promising between many high temperature nuclear reactors applications is to produce hydrogen with heat gained. The simplest and the best examined method is steam reforming of methane. The fabricated hydrogen has wide range of use, for example can be electrochemically oxidized in fuel cells. However, heat management inside methane/steam reformer is extremely important because huge temperature gradients can cause catalyst deactivation. In this work the analysis of temperature field inside helium-heated methane/steam reformer is presented. The optimal system working conditions with respect to methane conversion rate are proposed.

  16. Potential for biohydrogen and methane production from olive pulp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavala, Hariklia N.; Skiadas, Ioannis V.; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær;

    2005-01-01

    The present study investigates the potential for thermophilic biohydrogen and methane production from olive pulp, which is the semi-solid residue coming from the two-phase processing of olives. It focussed on: a) production of methane from the raw olive pulp, b) anaerobic bio-production of hydrogen...... and hydrogen-effluent was as high as 19 mmole CH4 per g TS. This suggests that olive pulp is an ideal substrate for methane production and it shows that biohydrogen production can be very efficiently coupled with a subsequent step for methane production....

  17. Catalytic activity of carbons for methane decomposition reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradov, Nazim; Smith, Franklyn; T-Raissi, Ali [Florida Solar Energy Center, University of Central Florida, 1679 Clearlake Road, Cocoa, FL 32922 (United States)

    2005-05-15

    Catalytic decomposition of methane is an environmentally attractive approach to CO{sub 2}-free production of hydrogen. The objective of this work is to evaluate catalytic activity of a wide range of carbon materials for methane decomposition reaction and determine major factors governing their activity. It was demonstrated that the catalytic activity of carbon materials for methane decomposition is mostly determined by their structural and surface properties. Kinetics of methane decomposition reaction over disordered (amorphous) carbons such as carbon black and activated carbon were determined. The mechanism of carbon-catalyzed methane decomposition reaction and the nature of active sites on the carbon surface are discussed in this paper.

  18. Direct Observation of the Kinetically Relevant Site of CO Hydrogenation on Supported Ru Catalyst at 700 K by Time-Resolved FT-IR Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frei, Heinz; Wasylenko, Walter; Frei, Heinz

    2008-06-04

    Time-resolved FT-IR spectra of carbon monoxide hydrogenation over alumina-supported ruthenium particles were recorded on themillisecond time scale at 700 K using pulsed release of CO and a continuous flow of H2/N2 (ratio 0.067 or 0.15, 1 atm total pressure). Adsorbed carbon monoxide was detected along with gas phase products methane (3016 and 1306 cm-1), water (1900 +- 1300 cm-1), and carbon dioxide (2348 cm-1). Aside from adsorbed CO, no other surface species were observed. The rate of formation of methane is 2.5 +- 0.4 s-1 and coincides with the rate of carbon dioxide growth (3.4 +- 0.6 s-1), thus indicating that CH4 and CO2 originate from a common intermediate. The broad band of adsorbed carbon monoxide has a maximum at 2010 cm-1 at early times (36 ms) that shifts gradually to 1960 cm-1 over a period of 3 s as a result of the decreasing surface concentration of CO. Kinetic analysis of the adsorbed carbon monoxide reveals that surface sites absorbing at the high frequency end of the infrared band are temporally linked to gas phase product growth. Specifically, a (linear) CO site at 2026 cm-1 decays with a rate constant of 2.9 +- 0.1 s-1, which coincides with the rise constant of CH4. This demonstrates that the linear CO site at 2026 cm-1 is the kinetically most relevant one for the rate-determining CO dissociation step under reaction conditions at 700 K.

  19. Carbon monoxide kinetics following simulated cigarette smoking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnik, A.S. (Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI); Coin, E.J.

    1980-05-01

    Carbon monoxide kinetics were measured in the blood (% carboxyhemoglobin) and alveolar phase (ppM carbon monoxide) after simulated cigarette smoking. Cigarette smoking was siumlated using the same amount of carbon monoxide that 2R1F cigarettes manufactured by the Tobacco Research Institute would contain. Ten boluses of air containing carbon monoxide equivalent to smoking one cigarette were inhaled by six healthy nonsmoker volunteers. Carbon monoxide in the air phase was measured by an Ecolyzer and carboxyhemoglobin was measured by a CO-Oximeter. The mean rise in alveolar carbon monoxide immediately and 20 min after inhaling the last bolus was 3.3 and 3.1 ppM, respectively (p<.005). The mean rise in carboxyhemoglobin immediately and 20 min after inhalation of the last bolus was 0.8 and 0.5% respectively (P<.005). The changes in carboxyhemoglobin were found to be similar to changes that occur when one cigarette is actually smoked.

  20. A 60 yr record of atmospheric carbon monoxide reconstructed from Greenland firn air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Petrenko

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We present the first reconstruction of the Northern Hemisphere (NH high latitude atmospheric carbon monoxide (CO mole fraction from Greenland firn air. Firn air samples were collected at three deep ice core sites in Greenland (NGRIP in 2001, Summit in 2006 and NEEM in 2008. CO records from the three sites agree well with each other as well as with recent atmospheric measurements, indicating that CO is well preserved in the firn at these sites. CO atmospheric history was reconstructed back to the year 1950 from the measurements using a combination of two forward models of gas transport in firn and an inverse model. The reconstructed history suggests that Arctic CO in 1950 was 140–150 nmol mol−1, which is higher than today's values. CO mole fractions rose by 10–15 nmol mol−1 from 1950 to the 1970s and peaked in the 1970s or early 1980s, followed by a ≈ 30 nmol mol−1 decline to today's levels. We compare the CO history with the atmospheric histories of methane, light hydrocarbons, molecular hydrogen, CO stable isotopes and hydroxyl radicals (OH, as well as with published CO emission inventories and results of a historical run from a chemistry-transport model. We find that the reconstructed Greenland CO history cannot be reconciled with available emission inventories unless unrealistically large changes in OH are assumed. We argue that the available CO emission inventories strongly underestimate historical NH emissions, and fail to capture the emission decline starting in the late 1970s, which was most likely due to reduced emissions from road transportation in North America and Europe.

  1. Decarbonisation of fossil energy via methane pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreysa, G.; Agar, D.W.; Schultz, I. [Technische Univ. Dortmund (Germany)

    2010-12-30

    Despite the rising consumption of energy over the last few decades, the proven reserves of fossil fuels have steadily increased. Additionally, there are potentially tremendous reserves of methane hydrates available, which remain to be exploited. The use of fossil energy sources is thus increasingly being dictated less by supply than by the environmental concerns raised by climate change. In the context of the decarbonisation of the global energy system that this has stimulated, new means must be explored for using methane as energy source. Noncatalytic thermal pyrolysis of methane is proposed here as a promising concept for utilising methane with low to zero carbon dioxide emissions. Following cracking, only the energy content of the hydrogen is used, while the carbon can be stored safely and retrievably in disused coal mines. The thermodynamics and different process engineering concepts for the technical realisation of such a carbon moratorium technology are discussed. The possible contribution of methane pyrolysis to carbon negative geoengineering is also addressed. (orig.)

  2. Cyclic process for producing methane in a tubular reactor with effective heat removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Albert C.; Yang, Chang-Lee

    1986-01-01

    Carbon monoxide-containing gas streams are converted to methane by a cyclic, essentially two-step process in which said carbon monoxide is disproportionated to form carbon dioxide and active surface carbon deposited on the surface of a catalyst, and said carbon is reacted with steam to form product methane and by-product carbon dioxide. The exothermic heat of reaction generated in each step is effectively removed during each complete cycle so as to avoid a build up of heat from cycle-to-cycle, with particularly advantageous techniques being employed for fixed bed, tubular and fluidized bed reactor operations.

  3. Potential for biohydrogen and methane production from olive pulp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavala, H.N.; Skiadas, I.V. [Patras Univ., Patras (Greece). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering and Environmental Technology]|[Denmark Technical Univ., Lyngby (Denmark). Environmental Microbiology and Biotechnology Group; Ahring, B.K. [Denmark Technical Univ., Lyngby (Denmark). Environmental Microbiology and Biotechnology Group; Lyberatos, G. [Patras Univ., Patras (Greece). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Laboratory of Biochemical Engineering and Environmental Technology

    2004-07-01

    Biomass rich in carbohydrates is a potential source of hydrogen. Fermentative hydrogen production includes the transformation of sugars into volatile fatty acids (VFA) without a major effect on the organic content. This study examined the potential for thermophilic biohydrogen and methane production from olive pulp, the semi-solid residue resulting from the two-phase processing of olives. Formation of VFA during acidogenesis of organic matter precedes methanogenesis. Therefore, anaerobic digestion can potentially be coupled with a preliminary step for hydrogen production. This study focused on production of methane from the raw olive pulp; anaerobic bio-production of hydrogen from the olive pulp; and, subsequent anaerobic treatment of the hydrogen-effluent with production of methane. Continuous and batch experiments were performed. The methane potential of the raw olive pulp and hydrogen effluent was up to 19 mmole of methane per gram of total solids. It was concluded that olive pulp is a suitable substrate for methane production and that biohydrogen can be coupled with a subsequent step for methane production. 12 refs., 7 tabs., 2 figs.

  4. Product distribution from yallourn coal by methane microwave plasma conversion; Metankaikuroha purazuma niyoru yarunsumi no tenkan hanno. Gentansochugenso no seiseibutsu heno bunpai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, Osamu; Matushima, Wataru; Kobayashi, Motoki; Onoe, Kaoru; Yamaguchi, Tatsuaki [Chiba Institute of Technologu, Chiba (Japan); Kawai, Satoshi; Ito, Yoichi

    1999-09-01

    A direct conversion technology of brown coal into relatively important fuels, raw-material gases, and residues of upgraded carbon content by use of methane microwave plasma was developed. Changes with time in the C, H, O contents of each product from Yallourn coal ware examined. The desiccated coal was packed in the middle of a cylindrical quartz tube reactor of 25.0 mm inside diameter and 400 mm length. 2.45 GHz of microwaves with desired power level controlled by a waveguide tuner was irradiated onto the upperside of the packed bed by supplying methane (4.0 kPa) successively, and the following results were obtained: (1) Both the C and H supplied from methane were converted into gaseous products (mainly of acetylene and hydrogen). (2) Within 2 minutes of reaction, C contained in the coal was converted to oily products composing mainly of aliphatic hydrocarbons in the H/C ratio range from 1.5 to 1.6; however, after 5 minutes of reaction, it was converted to carbon dioxide. (3) Almost all of the O in coal was converted to and distributed as gaseous products (finally as carbon monoxide) via disintegration of the carboxyl groups and homogeneous transformation of the carbon dioxide produced. (author)

  5. Renewable natural gas. Gasification of biofuels for production of methane or hydrogen; Foernybar Naturgas. Foergasning av biobraenslen foer framstaellning av metan eller vaetgas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlsson, Staffan; Malm, David [Halmstad Univ. (Sweden). School of Information Science, Computer and Electrical Engineering

    2005-06-01

    The natural gas grid in Sweden will get extended to give the possibility to replace oil and coal within the industry, build effective combined power heat plants and offer the transportation sector an eco-friendly alternative to diesel and petrol. Through extension of the Swedish gas grid there will also be an infrastructure for distribution of other gases than natural gas. Natural gas is a fossil fuel and in this report the possibility of gasifying biomass to produce a synthetic natural gas (SNG) that could be distributed on the existing natural gas grid. Also a combined production of SNG and Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels has been investigated. In this report the raw material potential in the south of Sweden has been investigated, gasifying technologies have been investigated, demands for distribution on the natural gas grid, proposals of suitable localization alternatives and the total gas/FT-fuels potential has been estimated. The biggest potential of raw material is within the forestry in the form of fell remains and stem wood from thinning. In the future there will also be a great potential in waste because of the law about prohibiting deposits on landfills. The future potential of biomass is estimated to 34 TWh. There are several techniques for gasification of biomass to produce SNG and FT -fuels. When producing SNG separate the indirect gasifier using steam and subsequent methanation is the best alternative due to the highest efficiency. When using combined production of SNG and FT-fuels the integrated co-production is a good choice. To be allowed to distribute SNG on the Swedish gas grid some demands has to be fulfilled. Heating value and wobbeindex must correspond to the natural gas, a similar composition of the gas has to be reached, for example a similar methane content. Another alternative are distribution in separate grids. A good location to build a gasifying plant is nearby the gas grid, with good access to raw material and somewhere to use the waste

  6. Investigation of the ignition behaviour of the noble metal catalyzed catalytic partial oxidation of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoetzel, J; Luetzenkirchen-Hecht, D; Frahm, R [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, Gaussstr. 20, D-42097 Wuppertal (Germany); Kimmerle, B; Baiker, A [Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Nachtegaal, M [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Beier, M J; Grunwaldt, J-D, E-mail: j.stoetzel@uni-wuppertal.d [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, Building 229, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2009-11-15

    Catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) of methane to hydrogen and carbon monoxide over Pt-Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was studied in-situ with a new QEXAFS setup. The structural changes of the catalysts were investigated on the subsecond timescale during two reaction steps by recording both XANES and full EXAFS spectra: (1) heating and ignition in 6%CH{sub 4}/3%O{sub 2}/He, (2) periodic changes between the reaction gas mixture and H{sub 2} atmosphere. The results showed that the ignition occurred at lower temperatures for Pt-Rh/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} while it was completed in a significant shorter time interval for Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Some structural changes during the heating phase were detectable before the reaction ignited, especially for Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, as reflected by the performed principle component analysis. However, a closer analysis of the FT-QEXAFS data did not evidence a defined intermediate. In addition, the composition of the gas atmosphere was altered between hydrogen and the reaction mixture, enabling modulation excitation spectroscopy. This technique was for the first time applied to QEXAFS data and resulted in significantly enhanced data quality.

  7. Hydrogen production via CO2 reforming of methane over ZrO2-Doped Ni/ZSM-5 nanostructured catalyst prepared by ultrasound assisted sequential impregnation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Farhad; Haghighi, Mohammad; Vafaeian, Yaser; Estifaee, Pooya

    2014-12-01

    In our continuing effort to find the proper catalyst for CO2 reforming of methane, Ni(8%)/ZSM-5-ZrO2 with various zirconium loadings (0-15%) are synthesized via sonochemical method. All samples are characterized by XRD, FESEM, TEM, EDX, BET, FTIR and TPR-H2 techniques. The XRD results confirm existence of NiO, ZrO2 and ZSM-5 as crystalline phase in catalyst structure. FESEM images reveal small particle size of active metals and low numbers of agglomerations for Ni(8%)/ZrO2(5%)-ZSM-5. BET analysis shows that addition of ZrO2 to Ni/ZSM-5 decreases the surface area but Ni/ZrO2(5%)-ZSM-5 has the highest surface area. TEM analysis demonstrates high dispersion of Ni nano particles over the support. EDX depicts the best active metal dispersion for the catalyst with 5% zirconia loading. The TPR results prove that the metal-support interaction is enhanced by zirconia addition, indicating the better Ni dispersion. Apart from characterization, activity tests are performed and parameters such as effect of temperature, CO and H2 yields and H2/CO ratio are investigated. The results show that Ni(8%)/ZrO2(5%)-ZSM-5 has the best structural properties and the highest activity and stability in comparison with the other catalysts.

  8. Using stable isotopes of hydrogen to quantify biogenic and thermogenic atmospheric methane sources: A case study from the Colorado Front Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend-Small, Amy; Botner, E. Claire; Jimenez, Kristine L.; Schroeder, Jason R.; Blake, Nicola J.; Meinardi, Simone; Blake, Donald R.; Sive, Barkley C.; Bon, Daniel; Crawford, James H.; Pfister, Gabriele; Flocke, Frank M.

    2016-11-01

    Global atmospheric concentrations of methane (CH4), a powerful greenhouse gas, are increasing, but because there are many natural and anthropogenic sources of CH4, it is difficult to assess which sources may be increasing in magnitude. Here we present a data set of δ2H-CH4 measurements of individual sources and air in the Colorado Front Range, USA. We show that δ2H-CH4, but not δ13C, signatures are consistent in air sampled downwind of landfills, cattle feedlots, and oil and gas wells in the region. Applying these source signatures to air in ground and aircraft samples indicates that at least 50% of CH4 emitted in the region is biogenic, perhaps because regulatory restrictions on leaking oil and natural gas wells are helping to reduce this source of CH4. Source apportionment tracers such as δ2H may help close the gap between CH4 observations and inventories, which may underestimate biogenic as well as thermogenic sources.

  9. Catalytic features of Ni/Ba-Ce{sub 0.9}-Y{sub 0.1} catalyst to produce hydrogen for PCFCs by methane reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frontera, P.; Modafferi, V.; Antonucci, P.L. [Dept. of Mechanics and Materials, Mediterranea University, Feo di Vito, 89060 Reggio Calabria (Italy); Frusteri, F.; Bonura, G.; Bottari, M.; Siracusano, S. [CNR-ITAE ' ' Nicola Giordano' ' , via S. Lucia sopra Contesse, 5 - 98126 Messina (Italy)

    2010-10-15

    Methane reforming in steam (SR), auto-thermal (ATR) and partial oxidation (POX) conditions over Ni/Ba-Ce{sub 0.9}-Y{sub 0.1} catalyst was investigated in the temperature range 500-700 C. Catalyst presents a satisfying activity in POX condition only. BCY carrier was not stable in the presence of CO{sub 2} and, irrespective of reaction conditions, it reacts with CO{sub 2} giving rise to the formation of BaCO{sub 3} and CeO{sub 2}. The very low activity observed in SR conditions was due to the negative role exerted by water strongly absorbed on catalyst surface, limiting so the accessibility and reduction state of Ni active sites. In POX condition catalyst is active and satisfying H{sub 2} yield can be reached by operating at T = 700 C. A significant reduction of coke formation was observed by operating in POX at 700 C. On the contrary, in ATR condition at the same reaction temperature huge amount of filamentous coke was observed. (author)

  10. Multi-objective optimisation in carbon monoxide gas management at TRONOX KXN Sands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stadler, Johan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO is a by-product of the ilmenite smelting process from which titania slag and pig iron are produced. Prior to this project, the CO at Tronox KZN Sands in South Africa was burnt to get rid of it, producing carbon dioxide (CO2. At this plant, unprocessed materials are pre-heated using methane gas from an external supplier. The price of methane gas has increased significantly; and so this research considers the possibility of recycling CO gas and using it as an energy source to reduce methane gas demand. It is not possible to eliminate the methane gas consumption completely due to the energy demand fluctuation, and sub-plants have been assigned either CO gas or methane gas over time. Switching the gas supply between CO and methane gas involves production downtime to purge supply lines. Minimising the loss of production time while maximising the use of CO arose as a multi-objective optimisation problem (MOP with seven decision variables, and computer simulation was used to evaluate scenarios. We applied computer simulation and the multi-objective optimisation cross-entropy method (MOO CEM to find good solutions while evaluating the minimum number of scenarios. The proposals in this paper, which are in the process of being implemented, could save the company operational expenditure while reducing the carbon footprint of the smelter.

  11. Abiotic production of methane in terrestrial planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Marmolejo, Andrés; Segura, Antígona; Escobar-Briones, Elva

    2013-06-01

    On Earth, methane is produced mainly by life, and it has been proposed that, under certain conditions, methane detected in an exoplanetary spectrum may be considered a biosignature. Here, we estimate how much methane may be produced in hydrothermal vent systems by serpentinization, its main geological source, using the kinetic properties of the main reactions involved in methane production by serpentinization. Hydrogen production by serpentinization was calculated as a function of the available FeO in the crust, given the current spreading rates. Carbon dioxide is the limiting reactant for methane formation because it is highly depleted in aqueous form in hydrothermal vent systems. We estimated maximum CH4 surface fluxes of 6.8×10(8) and 1.3×10(9) molecules cm(-2) s(-1) for rocky planets with 1 and 5 M⊕, respectively. Using a 1-D photochemical model, we simulated atmospheres with volume mixing ratios of 0.03 and 0.1 CO2 to calculate atmospheric methane concentrations for the maximum production of this compound by serpentinization. The resulting abundances were 2.5 and 2.1 ppmv for 1 M⊕ planets and 4.1 and 3.7 ppmv for 5 M⊕ planets. Therefore, low atmospheric concentrations of methane may be produced by serpentinization. For habitable planets around Sun-like stars with N2-CO2 atmospheres, methane concentrations larger than 10 ppmv may indicate the presence of life.

  12. Carbon monoxide conversion by anaerobic bioreactor sludges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sipma, J.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lens, P.N.L.; Lettinga, G.

    2003-01-01

    Seven different anaerobic sludges from wastewater treatment reactors were screened for their ability to convert carbon monoxide (CO) at 30 and 55degreesC
    Seven different anaerobic sludges from wastewater treatment reactors were screened for their ability to convert carbon monoxide (CO) at 30 and

  13. Solar hydrogen production: renewable hydrogen production by dry fuel reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakos, Jamie; Miyamoto, Henry K.

    2006-09-01

    SHEC LABS - Solar Hydrogen Energy Corporation constructed a pilot-plant to demonstrate a Dry Fuel Reforming (DFR) system that is heated primarily by sunlight focusing-mirrors. The pilot-plant consists of: 1) a solar mirror array and solar concentrator and shutter system; and 2) two thermo-catalytic reactors to convert Methane, Carbon Dioxide, and Water into Hydrogen. Results from the pilot study show that solar Hydrogen generation is feasible and cost-competitive with traditional Hydrogen production. More than 95% of Hydrogen commercially produced today is by the Steam Methane Reformation (SMR) of natural gas, a process that liberates Carbon Dioxide to the atmosphere. The SMR process provides a net energy loss of 30 to 35% when converting from Methane to Hydrogen. Solar Hydrogen production provides a 14% net energy gain when converting Methane into Hydrogen since the energy used to drive the process is from the sun. The environmental benefits of generating Hydrogen using renewable energy include significant greenhouse gas and criteria air contaminant reductions.

  14. Thermodynamic properties and diffusion of water + methane binary mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shvab, I.; Sadus, Richard J., E-mail: rsadus@swin.edu.au [Centre for Molecular Simulation, Swinburne University of Technology, PO Box 218 Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

    2014-03-14

    Thermodynamic and diffusion properties of water + methane mixtures in a single liquid phase are studied using NVT molecular dynamics. An extensive comparison is reported for the thermal pressure coefficient, compressibilities, expansion coefficients, heat capacities, Joule-Thomson coefficient, zero frequency speed of sound, and diffusion coefficient at methane concentrations up to 15% in the temperature range of 298–650 K. The simulations reveal a complex concentration dependence of the thermodynamic properties of water + methane mixtures. The compressibilities, heat capacities, and diffusion coefficients decrease with increasing methane concentration, whereas values of the thermal expansion coefficients and speed of sound increase. Increasing methane concentration considerably retards the self-diffusion of both water and methane in the mixture. These effects are caused by changes in hydrogen bond network, solvation shell structure, and dynamics of water molecules induced by the solvation of methane at constant volume conditions.

  15. Influence of Gas Composition on the Resisting Ability of Gunning Material for Blast Furnace to Carbon Monoxide Corrosion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lihong; LIU Liu; GUO Yanling; CAO Feng; MENG Qingmin; LONG Shigang

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the resisting ability of gunning material for blast furnace to carbon monoxide corrosion under the mixed gas condition through inletting hydrogen into pure CO.A standard for testing the resisting ability of refractory to Co corrosion with mixed gas instead of pure CO has also been discussed. The results show:the addition of hydrogen accelerates the CO corrosion on gunning material;the same results has been reached with the CO,200 hours to test the resisting ability of refractory to carbon monoxide corrosion.

  16. Methane from domestic animals: Possibilities for reduction by methane inhibitors; Methan fra husdyr: Muligheder for reduktion ved brug af metanhaemmende stoffer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weisbjerg, M.R. [Danmarks JordbrugsForskning. Afd. for Husdyrsundhed, Velfaerd og Ernaering, Tjele (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    Ruminant's enteric fermentation implies production of methane. A number of substances might have an impact on the production of methane, either through influence on the composition of rumen microbes or through hydrogen consumption. Changing the rumen micro-flora composition through biological methods might also influence the methane production. Several chemical methane inhibitors will not be acceptable for use in cattle farming, and the use of biological methods is technological immature. The most promising methods acceptable for general use are the use of bacteriocines, e.g. Nisin, and application of hydrogen consuming substances as fumarat or malat to the fodder. Furthermore, serums with the ability to further antibody production against methanogen bacteria are being developed, which would reduce the methane production. (BA)

  17. The Carbon Monoxide Tape Recorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeberl, M. R.; Duncan, B. N.; Douglass, A. R.; Waters, J.; Livesey, N.; Read, W.; Filipiak, M.

    2006-01-01

    Using Aura MLS data we have identified the stratospheric tape recorder in carbon monoxide (CO). Unlike the water vapor tape recorder, which is controlled by upper troposphere processes, the CO tape recorder is linked to seasonal biomass burning. Since CO has a lifetime of only a few months, the CO tape recorder barely extends above 20 km. The tape head for CO appears to be close to 360K near the same location as the water vapor tape head [Read et al, 20041. Both tape heads are below the equatorial cold point tropopause but above the base of the tropical tropopause layer. The tape recorder signal becomes more distinct from 360K to 380K suggesting that convective detrainment of plays a decreasingly important role with altitude. The Global Modeling Initiative chemical transport model forced by the climatology of biomass burning reproduces the CO tape recorder.

  18. Plasma catalytic reforming of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Rabinovich, A. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Alexeev, N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Baikov Inst. of Metallurgy

    1998-08-01

    Thermal plasma technology can be efficiently used in the production of hydrogen and hydrogen-rich gases from methane and a variety of fuels. This paper describes progress in plasma reforming experiments and calculations of high temperature conversion of methane using heterogeneous processes. The thermal plasma is a highly energetic state of matter that is characterized by extremely high temperatures (several thousand degrees Celsius) and high degree of dissociation and substantial degree of ionization. The high temperatures accelerate the reactions involved in the reforming process. Hydrogen-rich gas (50% H{sub 2}, 17% CO and 33% N{sub 2}, for partial oxidation/water shifting) can be efficiently made in compact plasma reformers. Experiments have been carried out in a small device (2--3 kW) and without the use of efficient heat regeneration. For partial oxidation/water shifting, it was determined that the specific energy consumption in the plasma reforming processes is 16 MJ/kg H{sub 2} with high conversion efficiencies. Larger plasmatrons, better reactor thermal insulation, efficient heat regeneration and improved plasma catalysis could also play a major role in specific energy consumption reduction and increasing the methane conversion. A system has been demonstrated for hydrogen production with low CO content ({approximately} 1.5%) with power densities of {approximately} 30 kW (H{sub 2} HHV)/liter of reactor, or {approximately} 10 m{sup 3}/hr H{sub 2} per liter of reactor. Power density should further increase with increased power and improved design.

  19. Engineering evidence for carbon monoxide toxicity cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galatsis, Kosmas

    2016-07-01

    Unintentional carbon monoxide poisonings and fatalities lead to many toxicity cases. Given the unusual physical properties of carbon monoxide-in that the gas is odorless and invisible-unorganized and erroneous methods in obtaining engineering evidence as required during the discovery process often occurs. Such evidence gathering spans domains that include building construction, appliance installation, industrial hygiene, mechanical engineering, combustion and physics. In this paper, we attempt to place a systematic framework that is relevant to key aspects in engineering evidence gathering for unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning cases. Such a framework aims to increase awareness of this process and relevant issues to help guide legal counsel and expert witnesses.

  20. Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet İbrahim Turan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide poisoning is a major cause of death following attempted suicide and accidental exposures. Although clinical presentation depends on the duration and the intensity of exposure, the assessment of the severity of intoxication is difficult. A small percentage of patients who show complete initial recovery may develop delayed neurological deficits. Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning is a rare and poor prognosis neurologic disorders and there is no specific treatment. We present a case with early onset of delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning with typical cranial imaging findings in a child with atypical history and clinical presentation.

  1. Kinetics of methane fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y. R.; Hashimoto, A. G.

    1978-01-01

    The kinetics on methane fermentation are described using published data for livestock residue, sewage sludge, and municipal refuse. Methods are presented to determine the kinetic constants and the finally attainable methane production using steady-state methane production data. The effects of temperature, loading rate, and influent substrate concentration on methane fermentation kinetics are discussed. These relationships were used to predict the rate of methane production of a pilot-scale fermentor with excellent results.

  2. Methane Steam Reforming Kinetics for a Rhodium-Based Catalyst

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jon Geest; Jakobsen, M.; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2010-01-01

    Methane steam reforming is the key reaction to produce synthesis gas and hydrogen at the industrial scale. Here the kinetics of methane steam reforming over a rhodium-based catalyst is investigated in the temperature range 500-800 A degrees C and as a function of CH4, H2O and H-2 partial pressures....... The methane steam reforming reaction cannot be modeled without taking CO and H coverages into account. This is especially important at low temperatures and higher partial pressures of CO and H-2. For methane CO2 reforming experiments, it is also necessary to consider the repulsive interaction of CO...

  3. Supported Catalysts for CO2 Methanation: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Frontera

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available CO2 methanation is a well-known reaction that is of interest as a capture and storage (CCS process and as a renewable energy storage system based on a power-to-gas conversion process by substitute or synthetic natural gas (SNG production. Integrating water electrolysis and CO2 methanation is a highly effective way to store energy produced by renewables sources. The conversion of electricity into methane takes place via two steps: hydrogen is produced by electrolysis and converted to methane by CO2 methanation. The effectiveness and efficiency of power-to-gas plants strongly depend on the CO2 methanation process. For this reason, research on CO2 methanation has intensified over the last 10 years. The rise of active, selective, and stable catalysts is the core of the CO2 methanation process. Novel, heterogeneous catalysts have been tested and tuned such that the CO2 methanation process increases their productivity. The present work aims to give a critical overview of CO2 methanation catalyst production and research carried out in the last 50 years. The fundamentals of reaction mechanism, catalyst deactivation, and catalyst promoters, as well as a discussion of current and future developments in CO2 methanation, are also included.

  4. Engineering Development of Ceramic Membrane Reactor System for Converting Natural Gas to Hydrogen and Synthesis Gas for Liquid Transportation Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Air Products and Chemicals

    2008-09-30

    An Air Products-led team successfully developed ITM Syngas technology from the concept stage to a stage where a small-scale engineering prototype was about to be built. This technology produces syngas, a gas containing carbon monoxide and hydrogen, by reacting feed gas, primarily methane and steam, with oxygen that is supplied through an ion transport membrane. An ion transport membrane operates at high temperature and oxygen ions are transported through the dense membrane's crystal lattice when an oxygen partial pressure driving force is applied. This development effort solved many significant technical challenges and successfully scaled-up key aspects of the technology to prototype scale. Throughout the project life, the technology showed significant economic benefits over conventional technologies. While there are still on-going technical challenges to overcome, the progress made under the DOE-funded development project proved that the technology was viable and continued development post the DOE agreement would be warranted.

  5. The Hydration Structure of Carbon Monoxide by Ab Initio Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Awoonor-Williams, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    The solvation of carbon monoxide (CO) in liquid water is important for understanding its toxicological effects and biochemical roles. In this paper, we use ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) and CCSD(T)-F12 calculations to assess the accuracy of the Straub and Karplus molecular mechanical (MM) model for CO(aq). The CCSD(T)-F12 CO--H2O potential energy surfaces show that the most stable structure corresponds to water donating a hydrogen bond to the C center. The MM-calculated surface it incorrectly predicts that the O atom is a stronger hydrogen bond acceptor than the C atom. The AIMD simulations indicate that CO is solvated like a hydrophobic solute, with very limited hydrogen bonding with water. The MM model tends to overestimate the degree of hydrogen bonding and overestimates the atomic radius of the C atom. The calculated Gibbs energy of hydration is in good agreement with experiment (9.3 kJ/mol calc. vs 10.7 kJ/mol exptl.). The calculated diffusivity of CO(aq) in TIP3P-model water was 5.19 x 10-5 cm2/s ...

  6. Synergistic effects of Ni 1- xCo x-YSZ and Ni 1- xCu x-YSZ alloyed cermet SOFC anodes for oxidation of hydrogen and methane fuels containing H 2S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grgicak, Catherine M.; Pakulska, Malgosia M.; O'Brien, Julie S.; Giorgi, Javier B.

    Preparation and performance of bimetallic Ni (1- x)Co x-YSZ and Ni (1- x)Cu x-YSZ anodes were tested to overcome common deficiencies of carbon and sulfur poisoning in SOFCs. Ni 1- xCo xO-YSZ and Ni (1- x)Cu xO-YSZ precursors were synthesized via co-precipitation of their respective chlorides. Single cell solid oxide fuel cells of these bimetallic anodes were tested in H 2, CH 4, and H 2S/CH 4 fuel mixtures. Addition of Cu 2+ into the NiO lattice resulted in large metal particle sizes and decreased SOFC performance. Addition of Co 2+ into the NiO lattice to form Ni 0.92Co 0.08O-YSZ anode precursor produced a cermet with a large BET surface area and active metal surface area, thus increasing the rate of hydrogen oxidation for this sample. The performance of both bimetallics was found to quickly degrade in dry CH 4 due to carbon deposition and lifting of the anode from the electrolyte. However, Ni 0.69Co 0.31-YSZ showed superior activity in a 10% (v/v) H 2S/CH 4 fuel mixture, surpassing performance with H 2 fuel, thereby demonstrating the exciting prospect of using sulfidated Ni (1- x)Co x-YSZ as SOFC anodes in sulfur containing methane streams. The active anode becomes a sulfidated alloy (Ni-Co-S) under operating conditions. This anode showed enhanced performance, which surpassed those of sulfidated Ni and Co anodes, thereby suggesting a synergistic behaviour in the Ni-Co-S anode.

  7. Lactose Malabsorption Testing in Daily Clinical Practice: A Critical Retrospective Analysis and Comparison of the Hydrogen/Methane Breath Test and Genetic Test (C/T-13910 Polymorphism Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dietmar Enko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to establish a retrospective evaluation and comparison of the hydrogen/methane (H2/CH4 breath test and genetic test (C/T−13910 polymorphism results in lactose malabsorption testing. In total 263 consecutive patients with suspected lactose malabsorption were included in this study. They underwent the H2/CH4 breath test following the ingestion of 50 g lactose and were tested for the C/T−13910 polymorphism. In total 51 patients (19.4% had a C/C−13910 genotype, indicating primary lactose malabsorption. Only 19 patients (7.2% also had a positive H2/CH4 breath test. All in all 136 patients (51.69% had a C/T−13910 and 76 patients (28.91% a T/T−13910 genotype, indicating lactase persistence. Four patients (1.5% with the C/T−13910 genotype and one patient (0.4% with the T/T−13910 genotype had a positive H2/CH4 breath test result, indicating secondary lactose malabsorption. Cohen's Kappa measuring agreement between the two methods was 0.44. Twenty patients (7.6% with a positive H2/CH4 peak within 60 minutes after lactose ingestion were classified as patients with lactose-dependent small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO. In conclusion, only moderate agreement between the breath test and the genetic test was shown. Secondary lactose malabsorption as well as preanalytical limitations of the combined H2/CH4 breath test procedure can cause discrepant results. This trial is registered with K-42-13.

  8. Shock tube measurements of growth constants in the branched chain formaldehyde-carbon monoxide-oxygen system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabbs, T. A.; Brokaw, R. S.

    1982-01-01

    Exponential free radical growth constants were measured for formaldehyde carbon monoxide-oxygen systems by monitoring the growth of oxygen atom concentration as manifested by CO flame band emission. Data were obtained over the temperature range of 1200 to 2000 K. The data were analyzed using a formaldehyde oxidation mechanism involving 12 elementary reaction steps. The computed growth constants are roughly in accord with experimental values, but are much more temperature dependent. The data was also analyzed assuming formaldehyde is rapidly decomposed to carbon monoxide and hydrogen. Growth constants computed for the resulting carbon monoxide hydrogen oxygen mixtures have a temperature dependence similar to experiments; however, for most mixtures, the computed growth constants were larger than experimental values.

  9. Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Carbon Monoxide Silicate Reduction System (COSRS) is a novel technology for producing large quantities of oxygen on the Moon. Oxygen yields of 15 kilograms per...

  10. Protect Yourself from Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-20

    Learn about carbon monoxide - a colorless, odorless gas - and how to protect yourself and your family.  Created: 11/20/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 12/4/2007.

  11. Inhibitory effects of sulfur compounds on methane oxidation by a methane-oxidizing consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Moon, Kyung-Eun; Kim, Tae Gwan; Lee, Sang-Don; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2015-12-01

    Kinetic and enzymatic inhibition experiments were performed to investigate the effects of methanethiol (MT) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) on methane oxidation by a methane-oxidizing consortium. In the coexistence of MT and H2S, the oxidation of methane was delayed until MT and H2S were completely degraded. MT and H2S could be degraded, both with and without methane. The kinetic analysis revealed that the methane-oxidizing consortium showed a maximum methane oxidation rate (Vmax) of 3.7 mmol g-dry cell weight (DCW)(-1) h(-1) and a saturation constant (Km) of 184.1 μM. MT and H2S show competitive inhibition on methane oxidation, with inhibition values (Ki) of 1504.8 and 359.8 μM, respectively. MT was primary removed by particulate methane monooxygenases (pMMO) of the consortium, while H2S was degraded by the other microorganisms or enzymes in the consortium. DNA and mRNA transcript levels of the pmoA gene expressions were decreased to ∼10(6) and 10(3)pmoA gene copy number g-DCW(-1) after MT and H2S degradation, respectively; however, both the amount of the DNA and mRNA transcript recovered their initial levels of ∼10(7) and 10(5)pmoA gene copy number g-DCW(-1) after methane oxidation, respectively. The gene expression results indicate that the pmoA gene could be rapidly reproducible after methane oxidation. This study provides comprehensive information of kinetic interactions between methane and sulfur compounds.

  12. Integrated electricity and carbon monoxide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffiths, J.

    1994-03-23

    In a process for the production of carbon monoxide and electric power in an IGCC with the removal of sulphur compounds, between the outlet of quenched gas from a partial oxidation unit and a fuel inlet to a combined cycle gas turbine there is a permeable membrane unit to separate a non-permeable stream, which is utilised as a source of carbon monoxide, and a permeate stream, which is used as fuel for the gas turbine of the combined cycle unit. (author)

  13. Hearing Loss due to Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Houshang Mehrparvar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the rare causes of hearing loss which may cause reversible or irreversible, unilateral or bilateral hearing loss after acute or chronic exposure. In this report, we present a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in a secondary smelting workshop worker after an acute exposure to carbon monoxide. This complication was diagnosed by pure-tone audiometry and confirmed by transient evoked otoacoustic emissions. Hearing loss has not improved after 3 months of followup.

  14. Combinatorial and conventional studies on new highly selective methanation catalysts for the removal of small amounts of CO from hydrogen-rich gas mixtures; Kombinatorische und konventionelle Untersuchungen zu neuen hochselektiven Methanisierungskatalysatoren zur Entfernung geringer Mengen an CO aus wasserstoffreichen Gasgemischen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraemer, Michael

    2008-04-15

    New tailor-made catalysts for the purification of hydrogen-rich reformates by the selective methanation of CO were developed using combinatorial methods. The optimization of the catalysts was achieved within 3 or 4 generations while Ni-based oxides generally proved most promising. Conventional validations confirmed the successive enhancement of the materials. All in all, a number of catalysts providing higher CO hydrogenation activities combined with a lower reactivity towards the undesired methanation of the excess CO{sub 2} in comparison to an industrial reference was discovered. The application of numerous characterization techniques to the optimization sequence Ni{sub 100} - Zr{sub 10}Ni{sub 90} - Re{sub 2}Zr{sub 10}Ni{sub 88} - Re{sub 0,6}Zr{sub 15}Ni{sub 84,4} resulted in the following model: The catalysts are present in their as-prepared state as mixed metal oxide, which is (partly) demixed during the reductive pretreatment. The resulting (Re)Ni-particles seem to represent the actual active component while ZrO{sub 2} could stabilize the dispersion. Alloying with Ni, Re seems to modify the surface of the catalyst in such a way that it only marginally interacts with CO{sub 2}. Solo methanation tests unambiguously reveal that the increase in selectivity is not connected to a competition between CO and CO{sub 2} for adsorption sites but is based on a loss of the intrinsic reactivity of the respective samples towards the methanation of CO{sub 2}. (orig.)

  15. Martian zeolites as a source of atmospheric methane

    CERN Document Server

    Mousis, Olivier; Bellat, Jean-Pierre; Schmidt, Frédéric; Bouley, Sylvain; Chassefière, Eric; Sautter, Violaine; Quesnel, Yoann; Picaud, Sylvain; Lectez, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    The origin of the martian methane is still poorly understood. A plausible explanation is that methane could have been produced either by hydrothermal alteration of basaltic crust or by serpentinization of ultramafic rocks producing hydrogen and reducing crustal carbon into methane. Once formed, methane storage on Mars is commonly associated with the presence of hidden clathrate reservoirs. Here, we alternatively suggest that chabazite and clinoptilolite, which belong to the family of zeolites, may form a plausible storage reservoir of methane in the martian subsurface. Because of the existence of many volcanic terrains, zeolites are expected to be widespread on Mars and their Global Equivalent Layer may range up to more than $\\sim$1 km, according to the most optimistic estimates. If the martian methane present in chabazite and clinoptilolite is directly sourced from an abiotic source in the subsurface, the destabilization of a localized layer of a few millimeters per year may be sufficient to explain the curr...

  16. Power from space and the hydrogen economy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Philip K. [Transformational Space Corp., Reston, VA (United States); Haynes, William E.

    2005-10-15

    Recent discoveries of methane hydrates under the Arctic permafrost and on continental shelves have revealed an immense energy resource. This has two major implications for the Solar Power Satellite (SPS). First, the SPS will not be built unless it can produce electricity at a price competitive with that generated using methane from hydrates (perhaps with sequestration of carbon dioxide). Second, steam reformation of methane is much cheaper than water electrolysis as a source of hydrogen, so there is little role for the SPS (or any other electric power technology) in the proposed hydrogen economy. On the other hand, an economy based on methane-electric hybrid vehicles offers advantages quite comparable to the hydrogen economy, without its technical problems and immense capital requirements. The methane economy also offers a transitional path to increasing direct use of electricity in transportation, a development that could create a major market for the SPS. (Author)

  17. Reactor for producing a carbon monoxide and hydrogen containing gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraamov, E.; Achmatov, I.; Berger, F.

    1982-08-10

    The reactor for the production of CO and H/sub 2/ containing gases by means of a partial oxidation of powdery or liquid high ash fuels in a carburation fluid including free oxygen, at high temperatures and increased pressure, includes a pressure vessel enclosing a gas-tight housing whereby an interspace is formed between the inner wall of the vessel and the outer surface of the housing. Within the housing is arranged a cooling wall enclosing the reaction chamber proper. The cooling wall includes a coil of cooling pipes embedded in a mass of refractory material such as silicium carbide. The pipes are partially supported on web sections projecting from the inner surface of the housing into the refractory lining. The web sections prevent propagation of leaking hot gas from the reaction chamber along the inner surface of the housing.

  18. Effect of temperature and stress on molecular structure and carbon monoxide generation of lignite from Kailuan mining area

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Cangyan; Wei Chongtao; Guo Li Wen; Shen Jian

    2016-01-01

    In order to analyze the origin of carbon monoxide (CO) in coal seams, stress–strain experiments under temperature of 50, 150 and 250 °C were conducted using lignite from Kailuan mining area. Fourier trans-form infrared spectroscopy and elemental analysis were carried out before and after deformation of the samples. The results indicated that CO generated at 150 and 250 °C;the gas component was mostly oxy-gen (O2), with small amount of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and hydrogen (H2). At 50 °C, O2 and a little CO2 were observed and no CO was found. The carbon content of the coal samples increased slightly after deformation, and the oxygen content, H/C ratio, and O/C ratio decreased. The molecular structure of coal displayed different evolution characteristics at various temperatures. At 50 and 150 °C, the falling off of side chains, broken of ether bond and directional realignment of the aliphatic chains resulting in the formation of long chains were the main performance of coal molecular structure evolution. While at 250 °C, the side chains fell off and short chains formed. Furthermore, at both 150 and 250 °C, condensed degree of aromatic ring increased. Under the action of temperature and pressure, CO forms in two ways. The first is that ether bond breaks, oxygen and carbon atoms combine together and forms CO, or O2 form-ing in the broken of ether–oxygen bond leads to the oxidation of free radicals and resulting in the forma-tion of CO. And the second is that CO derives from falling off of C=O group.

  19. Martian zeolites as a source of atmospheric methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousis, Olivier; Simon, Jean-Marc; Bellat, Jean-Pierre; Schmidt, Frédéric; Bouley, Sylvain; Chassefière, Eric; Sautter, Violaine; Quesnel, Yoann; Picaud, Sylvain; Lectez, Sébastien

    2016-11-01

    The origin of the martian methane is still poorly understood. A plausible explanation is that methane could have been produced either by hydrothermal alteration of basaltic crust or by serpentinization of ultramafic rocks producing hydrogen and reducing crustal carbon into methane. Once formed, methane storage on Mars is commonly associated with the presence of hidden clathrate reservoirs. Here, we alternatively suggest that chabazite and clinoptilolite, which belong to the family of zeolites, may form a plausible storage reservoir of methane in the martian subsurface. Because of the existence of many volcanic terrains, zeolites are expected to be widespread on Mars and their Global Equivalent Layer may range up to more than ∼1 km, according to the most optimistic estimates. If the martian methane present in chabazite and clinoptilolite is directly sourced from an abiotic source in the subsurface, the destabilization of a localized layer of a few millimeters per year may be sufficient to explain the current observations. The sporadic release of methane from these zeolites requires that they also remained isolated from the atmosphere during its evolution. The methane release over the ages could be due to several mechanisms such as impacts, seismic activity or erosion. If the methane outgassing from excavated chabazite and/or clinoptilolite prevails on Mars, then the presence of these zeolites around Gale Crater could explain the variation of methane level observed by Mars Science Laboratory.

  20. Performance assessment of a spiral methanol to hydrogen fuel processor for fuel cell applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Foad Mehri; Majid Taghizadeh

    2012-01-01

    A novel design of plate-type microchannel reactor has been developed for fuel cell-grade hydrogen production.Commercial Cu/Zn/Al2O3 was used as catalyst for the reforming reaction,and its effectiveness was evaluated on the mole fraction of products,methanol conversion,hydrogen yield and the amount of carbon monoxide under various operating conditions.Subsequently,0.5 wt% Ru/Al2O3 as methanation catalyst was prepared by impregnation method and coupled with MSR step to evaluate the capability of methanol processor for CO reduction.Based on the experimental results,the optimum conditions were obtained as feed flow rate of 5 mL/h and temperature of 250℃,leading to a low CO selectivity and high H2 yield.The designed reformer with catalyst coated layer was compared with the conventional packed bed reformer at the same operating conditions.The constructed fuel processor had a good performance and excellent capability for on-board hydrogen production.

  1. Hydrogen from biomass gas steam reforming for low temperature fuel cell: energy and exergy analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sordi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a method to analyze hydrogen production by biomass gasification, as well as electric power generation in small scale fuel cells. The proposed methodology is the thermodynamic modeling of a reaction system for the conversion of methane and carbon monoxide (steam reforming, as well as the energy balance of gaseous flow purification in PSA (Pressure Swing Adsorption is used with eight types of gasification gases in this study. The electric power is generated by electrochemical hydrogen conversion in fuel cell type PEMFC (Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell. Energy and exergy analyses are applied to evaluate the performance of the system model. The simulation demonstrates that hydrogen production varies with the operation temperature of the reforming reactor and with the composition of the gas mixture. The maximum H2 mole fraction (0.6-0.64 mol.mol-1 and exergetic efficiency of 91- 92.5% for the reforming reactor are achieved when gas mixtures of higher quality such as: GGAS2, GGAS4 and GGAS5 are used. The use of those gas mixtures for electric power generation results in lower irreversibility and higher exergetic efficiency of 30-30.5%.

  2. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations of hydrogen production from the combined processes of dimethyl ether steam reforming and partial oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semelsberger, Troy A.; Borup, Rodney L.

    Thermodynamic analyses of producing a hydrogen-rich fuel-cell feed from the combined processes of dimethyl ether (DME) partial oxidation and steam reforming were investigated as a function of oxygen-to-carbon ratio (0.00-2.80), steam-to-carbon ratio (0.00-4.00), temperature (100 °C-600 °C), pressure (1-5 atm) and product species. Thermodynamically, dimethyl ether processed with air and steam generates hydrogen-rich fuel-cell feeds; however, the hydrogen concentration is less than that for pure DME steam reforming. Results of the thermodynamic processing of dimethyl ether indicate the complete conversion of dimethyl ether to hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide for temperatures greater than 200 °C, oxygen-to-carbon ratios greater than 0.00 and steam-to-carbon ratios greater than 1.25 at atmospheric pressure (P = 1 atm). Increasing the operating pressure has negligible effects on the hydrogen content. Thermodynamically, dimethyl ether can produce concentrations of hydrogen and carbon monoxide of 52% and 2.2%, respectively, at a temperature of 300 °C, and oxygen-to-carbon ratio of 0.40, a pressure of 1 atm and a steam-to-carbon ratio of 1.50. The order of thermodynamically stable products (excluding H 2, CO, CO 2, DME, NH 3 and H 2O) in decreasing mole fraction is methane, ethane, isopropyl alcohol, acetone, n-propanol, ethylene, ethanol and methyl-ethyl ether; trace amounts of formaldehyde, formic acid and methanol are observed. Ammonia and hydrogen cyanide are also thermodynamically favored products. Ammonia is favored at low temperatures in the range of oxygen-to-carbon ratios of 0.40-2.50 regardless of the steam-to-carbon ratio employed. The maximum ammonia content (i.e., 40%) occurs at an oxygen-to-carbon ratio of 0.40, a steam-to-carbon ratio of 1.00 and a temperature of 100 °C. Hydrogen cyanide is favored at high temperatures and low oxygen-to-carbon ratios with a maximum of 3.18% occurring at an oxygen-to-carbon ratio of 0.40 and a steam

  3. Dispersion forces in methane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.; Coulon, P.; Luyckx, R.

    1977-01-01

    The coefficients of the R-6 and R-7 terms in the series representation of the dispersion interaction between two methane molecules and between methane and helium, neon and argon are calculated by a variation method.

  4. Methane in the atmosphere of the transiting hot Neptune GJ436b?

    CERN Document Server

    Beaulieu, J -P; Kipping, D M; Ribas, I; Barber, R J; Cho, J Y-K; Polichtchouk, I; Tennyson, J; Yurchenko, S N; Griffith, C A; Batista, V; Waldmann, I; Miller, S; Carey, S; Mousis, O; Fossey, S J; Aylward, A

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of seven primary transit observations of the hot Neptune GJ436b at 3.6, 4.5 and microns obtained with the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) on the Spitzer Space Telescope. After correcting for systematic effects of the instrument, we fitted the light curves - including limb darkening effects - using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique. Combining these new data with the EPOXI, HST and ground-based V, I, H and K_s observations available in the literature, the range 0.5-10 microns can be covered. The temperature distribution of the planet was estimated by using a three-dimensional, pseudo-spectral general circulation model with idealised thermal forcing. Transmission spectra of GJ436b were generated using line-by-line radiative transfer models including the opacities of the molecular species expected to be present in such planetary atmosphere, namely water vapour, methane, ammonia, carbon monoxide and dioxide, and hydrogen sulphide. In particular, a new, ab-initio calculated, linelist for ho...

  5. Electrochemical oxidation of carbon monoxide: from platinum single crystals to low temperature fuel cells catalysts. Part I: Carbon monoxide oxidation onto low index platinum single crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PHILIP N. ROSS JR

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical oxidation of carbon monoxide and the interfacial structure of the CO adlayer (COads on platinum low index single crystals, Pt(111, Pt(100 and two reconstruction of Pt(110, were examined using the rotation disk electrode method in combination with the in situ surface X-ray diffraction scattering technique. The mechanism of CO oxidation is discussed on the basis of the findings that, depending on the potential, two energetic states of COads exist on the platinum surfaces. Thus, at lower potentials, weakly bonded states (COads,w and at higher potentials strongly bonded states (COads,s are formed. The mechanism of the oxidation of hydrogen-carbon monoxide mixtures is also proposed.

  6. Hydrogen Evolution by Photocatalytic Steam Reforming of Methane over Pt/TiO2%Pt/TiO2光催化甲烷重整水气制氢

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李曹龙; 陈威; 袁坚; 上官文峰

    2012-01-01

    在室温下以太阳能替代传统的高温高压热反应条件,在固定床装置中实现连续动态光催化甲烷重整水气(PSRM)制氢反应:CH4+2H2O(g)→4H2+CO2.产物的主成分是H2和CO2,同时检测到微量或痕量的C2H6、C2H4和CO.重点考察了以光沉积法负载Pt的TiO2(p-Pt/TiO2)为光催化剂,该反应体系在不同CH4/H2O进料摩尔比、进料的总流速、光照波长、催化剂用量以及贵金属的负载方式等的实验条件对氢气产率的影响.最优化的反应条件为:CH4/H2O进料摩尔比为4;进料总流速为0.5 mL· min-1;光沉积负载要优于浸渍法;相同的负载方式Pd和NiOx为比较优异的助催化剂;最佳催化剂用量为20 mg· cm-2.最后循环实验结果表明,p-Pt/TiO2及反应体系都具有比较高的稳定性.%Photocatalytic reaction of CH4H2+CO2, which can be referred to as photocatalytic steam reforming of methane (PSRM). The reaction would be promoted by photoexcited electrons and holes, which were generated by band gap photoexcitation of the TiO2 photocatalyst. In addition, the effects of reaction parameters, such as molar ratio of CH< to H2O, total flow rate, noble-metal cocatalysts, wavelength of irradiating light, amounts of catalysts, and recycling efficiency of the p-Pt/TiOj photocatalyst via light deposition of preformed Pt nanoparticles on P25, on the hydrogen evolution were investigated.

  7. The Characteristics of a Sorption-enhanced Steam-Methane Reaction for the Production of Hydrogen Using CO2 Sorbent%采用CO2吸附剂吸附强化的甲烷水蒸汽反应制氢过程特点

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴素芳; T.H.Beum; J.I.Yang; J.N.Kim

    2005-01-01

    The objective of the present study is to characterize the production of hydrogen with a sorption enhanced steam-methane reaction process using Ca(OH)2 as the CO2 adsorbent. Theoretical equilibrium composi tions at different operation conditions were calculated using an iterative method. It was found that with Ca(OH)2 as the CO2 sorbent, the concentration of CO2 adsorption was reduced in the product stream, that gave rise to higher methane conversion and higher H2 concentration. An experimental setup was built to test the theoretical calculation. The effects of sorbents and the particle size of Ca(OH)2 on the concentration of CO2 and H2 were investigated in detail. Results showed that the reactor packed with catalyst and Ca(OH)2 particles produced H2 concentration of 94%. It was nearly 96% of the theoretical equilibrium limit, much higher than H2 equilibrium concentration of 67.5% without CO2 sorption under the same conditions of 500℃, 0.2 MPa pressure and a steam-to-methane ratio 6. In addition, the residual mole fraction of CO2 was less than 0.001.

  8. Discovery of technical methanation catalysts based on computational screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, Jens; Larsen, Kasper Emil; Kustov, Arkadii

    2007-01-01

    Methanation is a classical reaction in heterogeneous catalysis and significant effort has been put into improving the industrially preferred nickel-based catalysts. Recently, a computational screening study showed that nickel-iron alloys should be more active than the pure nickel catalyst...... and at the same time less expensive. This was previously verified experimentally for pure CO hydrogenation. In this study, the improved activity is also verified for CO2 hydrogenation as well as for simultaneous CO and CO2 hydrogenation....

  9. Production of Excited Atomic Hydrogen from Methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machacek, J. R.; Andrianarijaona, V. M.; Furst, J. E.; Gay, T. J.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Landers, A. L.; McLaughlin, K. W.

    2009-05-01

    We have measured the production of Lyα and Hα fluorescence from atomic H for the photodissociation of CH4 by linearly-polarized photons with energies between 20 and 65 eV. Comparison between our Lyα relative cross section and that previously reported [1] show different peak height ratios. This also occurs in the Hα cross section when compared to previous data [2]. We do not observe as significant a drop in either cross section above 35 eV. Our measurements were taken with pressures two orders of magnitude lower than those used in ref. [1]. We present comparisons between data sets and a discussion of possible systematic effects. [1] H. Fukuzawa et al., J. Phys. B. 38, 565 (2005). [2] M. Kato et al., J. Phys. B. 35, 4383 (2002). Support provided by the NSF (Grant PHY-0653379), DOE (LBNL/ALS) and ANSTO (Access to Major Research Facilities Programme).

  10. Pulmonary edema in acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kun Sang; Chang, Kee Hyun; Lee, Myung Uk [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1974-10-15

    Acute carbon monoxide poisoning has frequently occurred in Korean, because of the coal briquette being widely used as fuel in Korean residences. Carbon monoxide poisoning has been extensively studied, but it has been sparsely reported that pulmonary edema may develop in acute CO poisoning. We have noticed nine cases of pulmonary edema in acute CO poisoning last year. Other possible causes of pulmonary edema could be exclude in all cases but one. The purpose of this paper is to describe nine cases of pulmonary edema complicated in acute CO poisoning and discuss the pathogenesis and the prognosis.

  11. 40 CFR 60.103 - Standard for carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Refineries § 60.103 Standard for carbon monoxide. Each owner or operator of any fluid catalytic cracking unit... regenerator any gases that contain carbon monoxide (CO) in excess of 500 ppm by volume (dry basis)....

  12. [Carbon monoxide metabolism by photosynthetic bacteria]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-12-31

    Research continued on the metabolism of carbon monoxide by Rhodospirillum rubrum. This report discusses progress on the activity, induction, inhibition, and spectroscopic analysis of the enzyme Carbon Monoxide Dehydrogenase. (CBS)

  13. Carbon Monoxide Hazards from Small Gasoline Powered Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH CARBON MONOXIDE Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On this Page Recommendations NIOSH Publications Worker Notification Program Carbon Monoxide Hazards from Small Gasoline Powered Engines Many ...

  14. SCREENING TESTS FOR IMPROVED METHANE CRACKING MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, J; Jeffrey Holder, J

    2007-07-16

    Bench scale (1 to 6 gram) methane cracking tests have been performed on a variety of pure elements, some alloys, and SAES{reg_sign} commercial getters St 101, St 198, St 707, St 737, and St 909 to determine methane cracking performance (MCP) of 5% methane in a helium carrier at 700 C, 101.3 kPa (760 torr) with a 10 sccm feed. The MCP was almost absent from some materials tested while others showed varying degrees of MCP. Re, Cr, V, Gd, and Mo powders had good MCP, but limited capacities. Nickel supported on kieselguhr (Ni/k), a Zr-Ni alloy, and the SAES{reg_sign} getters had good MCP in a helium carrier. The MCP of these same materials was suppressed in a hydrogen carrier stream and the MCP of the Zr-based materials was reduced by nitride formation when tested with a nitrogen carrier gas.

  15. On the effect of coverage-dependent adsorbate-adsorbate interactions for CO methanation on transition metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lausche, Adam C.; Medford, Andrew J.; Khan, Tuhin Suvra

    2013-01-01

    Heterogeneously catalyzed reactions involving the dissociation of strongly bonded molecules typically need quite reactive catalysts with high coverages of intermediate molecules. Methanation of carbon monoxide is one example, where CO dissociation has been reported to take place on step sites wit...

  16. Assessment of carbon monoxide values in smokers: a comparison of carbon monoxide in expired air and carboxyhaemoglobin in arterial blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Mette F; Møller, Ann M

    2010-01-01

    Smoking increases perioperative complications. Carbon monoxide concentrations can estimate patients' smoking status and might be relevant in preoperative risk assessment. In smokers, we compared measurements of carbon monoxide in expired air (COexp) with measurements of carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb...

  17. Carbon Dioxide-Free Hydrogen Production with Integrated Hydrogen Separation and Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürr, Stefan; Müller, Michael; Jorschick, Holger; Helmin, Marta; Bösmann, Andreas; Palkovits, Regina; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2017-01-10

    An integration of CO2 -free hydrogen generation through methane decomposition coupled with hydrogen/methane separation and chemical hydrogen storage through liquid organic hydrogen carrier (LOHC) systems is demonstrated. A potential, very interesting application is the upgrading of stranded gas, for example, gas from a remote gas field or associated gas from off-shore oil drilling. Stranded gas can be effectively converted in a catalytic process by methane decomposition into solid carbon and a hydrogen/methane mixture that can be directly fed to a hydrogenation unit to load a LOHC with hydrogen. This allows for a straight-forward separation of hydrogen from CH4 and conversion of hydrogen to a hydrogen-rich LOHC material. Both, the hydrogen-rich LOHC material and the generated carbon on metal can easily be transported to destinations of further industrial use by established transport systems, like ships or trucks. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. The Presence of Methane in the Atmosphere of an Extrasolar Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Mark R.; Vasisht, Gautam; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2008-01-01

    Molecules present in the atmospheres of extrasolar planets are expected to influence strongly the balance of atmospheric radiation, to trace dynamical and chemical processes, and to indicate the presence of disequilibrium effects. As molecules have the potential to reveal atmospheric conditions and chemistry, searching for them is a high priority. The rotational-vibrational transition bands of water, carbon monoxide and methane are anticipated to be the primary sources of non-continuum opacity in hot-Jupiter planets. As these bands can overlap in wavelength, and the corresponding signatures from them are weak, decisive identification requires precision infrared spectroscopy. Here we report a near-infrared transmission spectrum of the planet HD 189733b that shows the presence of methane. Additionally, a resolved water vapour band at 1.9 (micro)m confirms the recent claim4 of water in this object. On thermochemical grounds, carbon monoxide is expected to be abundant in the upper atmosphere of hot-Jupiter planets, but is not identifiable here; therefore the detection of methane rather than carbon monoxide in such a hot planet could signal the presence of a horizontal chemical gradient away from the permanent dayside, or it may imply an ill-understood photochemical mechanism that leads to an enhancement of methane.

  19. The Presence of Methane in the Atmosphere of an Extrasolar Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swain, Mark R.; Vasisht, Gautam; Tinetti, Giovanna

    2008-01-01

    Molecules present in the atmospheres of extrasolar planets are expected to influence strongly the balance of atmospheric radiation, to trace dynamical and chemical processes, and to indicate the presence of disequilibrium effects. As molecules have the potential to reveal atmospheric conditions and chemistry, searching for them is a high priority. The rotational-vibrational transition bands of water, carbon monoxide and methane are anticipated to be the primary sources of non-continuum opacity in hot-Jupiter planets. As these bands can overlap in wavelength, and the corresponding signatures from them are weak, decisive identification requires precision infrared spectroscopy. Here we report a near-infrared transmission spectrum of the planet HD 189733b that shows the presence of methane. Additionally, a resolved water vapour band at 1.9 (micro)m confirms the recent claim4 of water in this object. On thermochemical grounds, carbon monoxide is expected to be abundant in the upper atmosphere of hot-Jupiter planets, but is not identifiable here; therefore the detection of methane rather than carbon monoxide in such a hot planet could signal the presence of a horizontal chemical gradient away from the permanent dayside, or it may imply an ill-understood photochemical mechanism that leads to an enhancement of methane.

  20. Hydrogen sulfide: physiological properties and therapeutic potential in ischaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Eelke M; van Goor, Harry; Joles, Jaap A; Whiteman, Matthew; Leuvenink, Henri G D

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2 S) has become a molecule of high interest in recent years, and it is now recognized as the third gasotransmitter in addition to nitric oxide and carbon monoxide. In this review, we discuss the recent literature on the physiology of endogenous and exogenous H2 S, focusing upon the protective effects of hydrogen sulfide in models of hypoxia and ischaemia.

  1. Biotechnological aspects of sulfate reduction with methane as electron donor

    OpenAIRE

    Meulepas, R.J.W.; Stams, A.J.M.; Lens, P. N L

    2010-01-01

    Biological sulfate reduction can be used for the removal and recovery of oxidized sulfur compounds and metals from waste streams. However, the costs of conventional electron donors, like hydrogen and ethanol, limit the application possibilities. Methane from natural gas or biogas would be a more attractive electron donor. Sulfate reduction with methane as electron donor prevails in marine sediments. Recently, several authors succeeded in cultivating the responsible microorganisms in vitro. In...

  2. C1 CHEMISTRY FOR THE PRODUCTION OF ULTRA-CLEAN LIQUID TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND HYDROGEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerald P. Huffman

    2003-09-30

    The Consortium for Fossil Fuel Science (CFFS) is a research consortium with participants from the University of Kentucky, University of Pittsburgh, University of Utah, West Virginia University, and Auburn University. The CFFS is conducting a research program to develop C1 chemistry technology for the production of clean transportation fuel from resources such as coal and natural gas, which are more plentiful domestically than petroleum. The processes under development will convert feedstocks containing one carbon atom per molecular unit into ultra clean liquid transportation fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) and hydrogen, which many believe will be the transportation fuel of the future. These feedstocks include synthesis gas, a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen produced by coal gasification or reforming of natural gas, methane, methanol, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide. Some highlights of the results obtained during the first year of the current research contract are summarized as: (1) Terminal alkynes are an effective chain initiator for Fischer-Tropsch (FT) reactions, producing normal paraffins with C numbers {ge} to that of the added alkyne. (2) Significant improvement in the product distribution towards heavier hydrocarbons (C{sub 5} to C{sub 19}) was achieved in supercritical fluid (SCF) FT reactions compared to that of gas-phase reactions. (3) Xerogel and aerogel silica supported cobalt catalysts were successfully employed for FT synthesis. Selectivity for diesel range products increased with increasing Co content. (4) Silicoaluminophosphate (SAPO) molecular sieve catalysts have been developed for methanol to olefin conversion, producing value-added products such as ethylene and propylene. (5) Hybrid Pt-promoted tungstated and sulfated zirconia catalysts are very effective in cracking n-C{sub 36} to jet and diesel fuel; these catalysts will be tested for cracking of FT wax. (6) Methane, ethane, and propane are readily decomposed to pure

  3. Hearing Loss due to Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Davari, Mohammad Hossein; Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl

    2013-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the rare causes of hearing loss which may cause reversible or irreversible, unilateral or bilateral hearing loss after acute or chronic exposure. In this report, we present a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in a secondary smelting workshop worker...

  4. Hydrogen sulfide and translational medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Wei; Cheng, Ze-yu; Zhu, Yi-Zhun

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) along with carbon monoxide and nitric oxide is an important signaling molecule that has undergone large numbers of fundamental investigations. H2S is involved in various physiological activities associated with the regulation of homeostasis, vascular contractility, pro- and anti-inflammatory activities, as well as pro- and anti-apoptotic activities etc. However, the actions of H2S are influenced by its concentration, reaction time, and cell/disease types. Therefore, H2S...

  5. Thermodynamics of Hydrogen Production from Dimethyl Ether Steam Reforming and Hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.A. Semelsberger

    2004-10-01

    The thermodynamic analyses of producing a hydrogen-rich fuel-cell feed from the process of dimethyl ether (DME) steam reforming were investigated as a function of steam-to-carbon ratio (0-4), temperature (100 C-600 C), pressure (1-5 atm), and product species: acetylene, ethanol, methanol, ethylene, methyl-ethyl ether, formaldehyde, formic acid, acetone, n-propanol, ethane and isopropyl alcohol. Results of the thermodynamic processing of dimethyl ether with steam indicate the complete conversion of dimethyl ether to hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide for temperatures greater than 200 C and steam-to-carbon ratios greater than 1.25 at atmospheric pressure (P = 1 atm). Increasing the operating pressure was observed to shift the equilibrium toward the reactants; increasing the pressure from 1 atm to 5 atm decreased the conversion of dimethyl ether from 99.5% to 76.2%. The order of thermodynamically stable products in decreasing mole fraction was methane, ethane, isopropyl alcohol, acetone, n-propanol, ethylene, ethanol, methyl-ethyl ether and methanol--formaldehyde, formic acid, and acetylene were not observed. The optimal processing conditions for dimethyl ether steam reforming occurred at a steam-to-carbon ratio of 1.5, a pressure of 1 atm, and a temperature of 200 C. Modeling the thermodynamics of dimethyl ether hydrolysis (with methanol as the only product considered), the equilibrium conversion of dimethyl ether is limited. The equilibrium conversion was observed to increase with temperature and steam-to-carbon ratio, resulting in a maximum dimethyl ether conversion of approximately 68% at a steam-to-carbon ratio of 4.5 and a processing temperature of 600 C. Thermodynamically, dimethyl ether processed with steam can produce hydrogen-rich fuel-cell feeds--with hydrogen concentrations exceeding 70%. This substantiates dimethyl ether as a viable source of hydrogen for PEM fuel cells.

  6. Effect of water on carbon monoxide-oxygen flame velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, Glen E

    1954-01-01

    The flame velocities were measured of 20 percent oxygen and 80 percent carbon monoxide mixtures containing either light water or heavy water. The flame velocity increased from 34.5 centimeters per second with no added water to about 104 centimeters per second for a 1.8 percent addition of light water and to 84 centimeters per second for an equal addition of heavy water. The addition of heavy water caused greater increases in flame velocity with equilibrium hydrogen-atom concentration than would be predicted by the Tanford and Pease square-root relation. The ratio of the flame velocity of a mixture containing light water to that of a mixture containing heavy water was found to be 1.4. This value is the same as the ratio of the reaction rate of hydrogen to that of deuterium and oxygen. A ratio of reaction rates of 1.4 would also be required for the square-root law to give the observed ratio of flame-velocity changes.

  7. Conversion of methane through dielectric-barrier discharge plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baowei WANG; Xiaolei CAO; Kuanhui YANG; Genhui XU

    2008-01-01

    Methane coupling to produce C2 hydrocar-bons through a dielectric-barrier discharge (DBD) plasma reaction was studied in four DBD reactors. The effects of high voltage electrode position, different discharge gap, types of inner electrode, volume ratio of hydrogen to methane and air cooling method on the conversion of methane and distribution of products were investigated. Conversion of methane is obviously lower when a high voltage electrode acts as an outer electrode than when it acts as an inner electrode. The lifting of reaction temper-ature becomes slow due to cooling of outer electrode and the temperature can be controlled in the expected range of 60℃-150℃ for ensuring better methane conversion and safe operation. The parameters of reactors have obvious effects on methane conversion, but it only slightly affects distribution of the products. The main products are ethyl-ene, ethane and propane. The selectivity of C2 hydrocar-bons can reach 74.50% when volume ratio of hydrogen to methane is 1.50.

  8. Methane Sensitivity to Perturbations in Tropospheric Oxidizing Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegorova, Elena; Duncan, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas and has a 25 times greater global warming potential than CO2 on a century timescale. Yet there are considerable uncertainties in the magnitude and variability of its sources and sinks. The response of the coupled non-linear methane-carbon monoxide-hydroxyl radical (OH) system is important in determining the tropospheric oxidizing capacity. Using the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System, Version 5 (GEOS-5) chemistry climate model, we study the response of methane to perturbations of OH and wetland emissions. We use a computationally-efficient option of the GEOS-5 CCM that includes an OH parameterization that accurately represents OH predicted by a full chemical mechanism. The OH parameterization allows for studying non-linear CH4-CO-OH feedbacks in computationally fast sensitivity experiments. We compare our results with surface observations (GMD) and discuss the range of uncertainty in OH and wetland emissions required to bring modeling results in better agreement with surface observations. Our results can be used to improve projections of methane emissions and methane growth.

  9. Prospects of solar thermal hydrogen production processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pregger, Thomas; Krewitt, Wolfram [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Technical Thermodynamics, Department of Systems Analysis and Technology Assessment, Pfaffenwaldring 38-40, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Graf, Daniela; Sattler, Christian; Roeb, Martin; Moeller, Stephan [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Technical Thermodynamics, Department of Solar Research, Linder Hoehe, D-51147 Cologne (Germany)

    2009-05-15

    This article provides a critical discussion of prospects of solar thermal hydrogen production in terms of technological and economic potentials and their possible role for a future hydrogen supply. The study focuses on solar driven steam methane reforming, thermochemical cycles, high temperature water electrolysis and solar methane cracking. Development status and technological challenges of the processes and objectives of ongoing research are described. Estimated hydrogen production costs are shown in comparison to other options. A summary of current discussions and today's scenarios of future use of hydrogen as an energy carrier and a brief overview on the development status of end-use technologies characterise uncertainties whether hydrogen could emerge as important energy carrier until 2050. Another focus is on industrial hydrogen demand in areas with high direct solar radiation which may be the main driver for the further development of solar thermal hydrogen production processes in the coming decades. (author)

  10. Hydrogen Migration and Vinylidene Pathway for Formation of Methane in the 193 nm Photodissociation of Propene: CH3CH=CH2 and CD3CD=CD2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi-Lei; Laufer, Allan H.; Halpern, Joshua B.; Fahr, Askar

    2007-01-01

    Photodissociation channels and the final product yields from the 193 nm photolysis of propene-h6 (CH2=CHCH3) and propene-d6 (CD2=CDCD3) have been investigated, employing gas chromatography, mass spectroscopy, and flame ionization (GC/MS/FID) detection methods. The yields of methane as well as butadiene relative to ethane show considerable variations when propene-h6 or propene-d6 are photolyzed. This suggests significant variances in the relative importance of primary photolytic processes and/or secondary radical reactions, occurring subsequent to the photolysis. Theoretical calculations suggest the potential occurrence of an intramolecular dissociation through a mechanism involving vinylidene formation, accompanied by an ethylenic H-migration through the pi-orbitals. This process affects the final yields of methane-h4 versus methane-d4 with respect to other products. The product yields from previous studies of the 193 nm photolysis of methyl vinyl ketone-h6 and -d6 (CH2=CHCOCH3, CD2=CDCOCD3), alternative precursors for generating methyl and vinyl radicals, are compared with the current results for propene.

  11. 可用于富氢重整气中 CO 消除的负载型 Ni 基甲烷化催化剂研究进展%Development in supported Ni-based methanation catalyst for removal of CO in hydrogen-rich reforming gases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘斌; 姚楠

    2015-01-01

    Pt electrode of the fUel cells can be permanently poisoned by trace CO in the hydrogen-rich reformed gases. CO methanation is one of the effective methods of removal of the trace CO. The recent pro-gress in the composition,preparation methods and catalytic mechanisms of Ni-based methanation catalysts were reviewed. The effects of sUpport properties,the promoters of noble metal and rare earth metal,and their preparation methods on the performance of Ni-based methanation catalysts were also introdUced. The research will be focUsed on the preparation of novel Ni-based catalysts by optimizing the carrier,the composition and the preparation methods in order to obtain CO methanation catalysts with good activity, selectivity and stability at low temperatUre and inhibit CO2 methanation reaction and the reversed water-gas shift reaction at high temperatUre.%富氢重整气中微量 CO 会引起燃料电池中 Pt 电极的永久性中毒而影响燃料电池的性能,通过 CO 甲烷化反应是消除富氢重整气中微量 CO 的有效方法。介绍了近年来在 CO 甲烷化 Ni 基催化剂组成、制备方法和催化机理等方面的研究进展。阐述了载体的性质、稀土和贵金属助剂以及制备方法对 CO 甲烷化 Ni 基催化剂性能的影响。研究重点通过优化载体、组成和制备方法制备新型Ni 基催化剂,使其在低温下对 CO 甲烷化反应有着很好的催化活性、选择性和稳定性,同时抑制高温下 CO2甲烷化反应和逆水煤气反应的发生。

  12. Thermodynamic evaluation of methanol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faungnawakij, Kajornsak; Kikuchi, Ryuji; Eguchi, Koichi

    Thermodynamic equilibrium of methanol steam reforming (MeOH SR) was studied by Gibbs free minimization for hydrogen production as a function of steam-to-carbon ratio (S/C = 0-10), reforming temperature (25-1000 °C), pressure (0.5-3 atm), and product species. The chemical species considered were methanol, water, hydrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, carbon (graphite), methane, ethane, propane, i-butane, n-butane, ethanol, propanol, i-butanol, n-butanol, and dimethyl ether (DME). Coke-formed and coke-free regions were also determined as a function of S/C ratio. Based upon a compound basis set MeOH, CO 2, CO, H 2 and H 2O, complete conversion of MeOH was attained at S/C = 1 when the temperature was higher than 200 °C at atmospheric pressure. The concentration and yield of hydrogen could be achieved at almost 75% on a dry basis and 100%, respectively. From the reforming efficiency, the operating condition was optimized for the temperature range of 100-225 °C, S/C range of 1.5-3, and pressure at 1 atm. The calculation indicated that the reforming condition required from sufficient CO concentration (<10 ppm) for polymer electrolyte fuel cell application is too severe for the existing catalysts (T r = 50 °C and S/C = 4-5). Only methane and coke thermodynamically coexist with H 2O, H 2, CO, and CO 2, while C 2H 6, C 3H 8, i-C 4H 10, n-C 4H 10, CH 3OH, C 2H 5OH, C 3H 7OH, i-C 4H 9OH, n-C 4H 9OH, and C 2H 6O were suppressed at essentially zero. The temperatures for coke-free region decreased with increase in S/C ratios. The impact of pressure was negligible upon the complete conversion of MeOH.

  13. Martian methane and stability of clathrates in the crust of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gloesener, E.; Karatekin, Ö.; Dehant, V.

    2013-09-01

    In recent years, methane was detected in the Martian atmosphere [4, 5, 6, 7, 9]. However, its origin is still unknown at present time and several mechanisms have been suggested to explain its presence on the red planet such as volcanic activity, contribution from meteorites and comets, photolysis of water in presence of carbon monoxide, hydrogeochemical processes or biological activity [1, 2]. Whatever the process of methane formation, past or present CH4 can be stored in clathrates. These chemical compounds formed by water and gas are stable in the Martian crust and could serve as methane reservoirs. A change in temperature or pressure can lead to the dissociation of clathrates and thus the release of the trapped gas. The stability zone of clathrates approach the Martian surface with increasing latitude. Seasonal and interannual thermal oscillations could therfore destabilize clathrates at high latitude and cause the release of methane.

  14. Transition metal chemistry under high carbon monoxide pressure: an infrared spectroscopic study of catalysis in the Fischer--Tropsch reaction. [7 refs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, R.B.; King, A.D. Jr.; Iqbal, M.Z.; Frazier, C.C.

    1977-01-01

    This project involves the design and construction of equipment to investigate the infrared spectra of metal carbonyl derivatives in the 1600 to 2200 cm./sup -1/ nu(CO) region at pressures up to 500 atmospheres and temperatures up to 250/sup 0/ followed by the use of this equipment to study the infrared spectra of a variety of transition metal derivatives at elevated pressures of carbon monoxide. The ultimate objective of this work is the discovery of new chemistry leading to the development of new systems which are catalytically active for the conversion of mixtures of carbon monoxide and hydrogen to hydrocarbons in connection with the conversion of coal to hydrocarbon fuels. During the initial period covered by this first progress report a high pressure infrared cell has been designed, constructed, and used for the preliminary investigations of reactions of about 15 transition metal derivatives under elevated pressure of carbon monoxide and hydrogen.

  15. Rapid solar-thermal decarbonization of methane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Jaimee Kristen

    Due to the ever-increasing demand for energy and the concern over the environmental impact of continuing to produce energy using current methods, there is interest in developing a hydrogen economy. Hydrogen is a desirable energy source because it is abundant in nature and burns cleanly. One method for producing hydrogen is to utilize a renewable energy source to obtain high enough temperatures to decompose a fossil fuel into its elements. This thesis work is directed at developing a solar-thermal aerosol flow reactor to dissociate methane to carbon black and hydrogen. The technology is intended as a "bridge" between current hydrogen production methods, such as conventional steam-methane reformers, and future "zero emission" technology for producing hydrogen, such as dissociating water using a renewable heating source. A solar furnace is used to heat a reactor to temperatures in excess of 2000 K. The final reactor design studied consists of three concentric vertical tubes---an outer quartz protection tube, a middle solid graphite heating tube, and an inner porous graphite reaction tube. A "fluid-wall" is created on the inside wall of the porous reaction tube in order to prevent deposition of the carbon black co-product on the reactor tube wall. The amorphous carbon black produced aids in heating the gas stream by absorbing radiation from the reactor wall. Conversions of 90% are obtained at a reactor wall temperature of 2100 K and an average residence time of 0.01 s. Computer modeling is also performed to study the gas flow and temperature profiles in the reactor as well as the kinetics of the methane dissociation reaction. The simulations indicate that there is little flow of the fluid-wall gas through the porous wall in the hot zone region, but this can be remedied by increasing the inlet temperature of the fluid-wall gas and/or increasing the tube permeability only in the hot zone region of the wall. The following expression describes the kinetics of methane

  16. The complex analytical method for assessment of passive smokers' exposure to carbon monoxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czogala, Jan; Goniewicz, Maciej Lukasz

    2005-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is one of the toxic constituents in tobacco smoke. The aim of the study was to evaluate a complex analytical method that allows quantification of the exposure of passive smokers to CO. The exposed volunteers were placed in the model room where portions of cigarettes (5, 10, or 15 cigarettes every 30 or 60 min over 4 h) were smoked using a homemade smoking machine. The concentrations of CO and of the ventilation marker (methane) were monitored for the duration of each experiment. CO and methane were analyzed on-line using GC-FID with methanization. Carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) was analyzed twice: just before and after the experiment. After hemolysis of a 100-microL blood sample, CO was quantitatively released by adding 10% K3[Fe(CN)6] inside a small reactor and under stable pressure transported through a microtube with an absorbing agent on a chromatography loop. The proposed analytical method allows us to quantify exposure of passive smokers by measuring the dose-effect correlation. We observed that increasing COHb levels were directly correlated with the CO concentration in the air, but were also intermediately correlated with the frequency and number of smoked cigarettes and with the ventilation coefficient.

  17. Utilization of coalbed methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gustavson, J.B. [Gustavson Associates Inc., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-02-01

    Substantial progress has been made in capturing coalbed methane (CBM gas), which constitutes a valuable source of clean burning energy. It is of importance to study the various potential uses of coalbed methane and to understand the various technologies required, as well as their economics and any institutional constraints. In industrialised countries, the uses of coalbed methane are almost solely dependent on microeconomics; coalbed methane must compete for a market against natural gas and other energy sources - and frequently, coalbed methane is not competitive against other energy sources. In developing countries, on the other hand, particularly where other sources of energy are in short supply, coalbed methane economics yield positive results. Here, constraints to development of CBM utilization are mainly lack of technology and investment capital. Sociological aspects such as attitude and cultural habits, may also have a strong negative influence. This paper outlines the economics of coalbed methane utilization, particularly its competition with natural gas, and touches upon the many different uses to which coalbed methane may be applied. 24 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Methane and Climate Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reay, D.; Smith, P.; Amstel, van A.R.

    2010-01-01

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and is estimated to be responsible for approximately one-fifth of man-made global warming. Per kilogram, it is 25 times more powerful than carbon dioxide over a 100-year time horizon -- and global warming is likely to enhance methane release from a number of sour

  19. Methane and Climate Change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reay, D.; Smith, P.; Amstel, van A.R.

    2010-01-01

    Methane is a powerful greenhouse gas and is estimated to be responsible for approximately one-fifth of man-made global warming. Per kilogram, it is 25 times more powerful than carbon dioxide over a 100-year time horizon -- and global warming is likely to enhance methane release from a number of

  20. Methane emissions from ruminants

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-02-21

    Feb 21, 2011 ... Review. Livestock-environment interactions: Methane emissions from ruminants. Aluwong, T.1* ... perception of air quality by human neighbours.The three ... on the climate; the global warming potential of methane is. 21-times that of ... has serious impact on high atmosphere ozone formation. It is important ...