WorldWideScience

Sample records for monoxide hydrogen cyanide

  1. Toxicity of carbon monoxide hydrogen cyanide gas mixtures : exposure concentration, time to incapacitation, carboxyhemoglobin and blood cyanide parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-01

    During aircraft interior fires, carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) are produced in sufficient amounts to cause incapacitation and death. Time-to-incapacitation (ti) is a practical parameter for estimating escape time in fire environments...

  2. On Estimation of Contamination from Hydrogen Cyanide in Carbon Monoxide Line-intensity Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Dongwoo T.; Li, Tony Y.; Viero, Marco P.; Church, Sarah E.; Wechsler, Risa H., E-mail: dongwooc@stanford.edu [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Physics Department, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Line-intensity mapping surveys probe large-scale structure through spatial variations in molecular line emission from a population of unresolved cosmological sources. Future such surveys of carbon monoxide line emission, specifically the CO(1-0) line, face potential contamination from a disjointed population of sources emitting in a hydrogen cyanide emission line, HCN(1-0). This paper explores the potential range of the strength of HCN emission and its effect on the CO auto power spectrum, using simulations with an empirical model of the CO/HCN–halo connection. We find that effects on the observed CO power spectrum depend on modeling assumptions but are very small for our fiducial model, which is based on current understanding of the galaxy–halo connection. Given the fiducial model, we expect the bias in overall CO detection significance due to HCN to be less than 1%.

  3. In Vitro Absorption of Atmospheric Carbon Monoxide and Hydrogen Cyanide in Undisturbed Pooled Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    are analyzed for carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and cyanide ion (CN¯) in blood. Such victims quite often suffer large open wounds near the autopsy blood...could.lead.investigators.to.erroneously.conclude.that.the. presence.of. carboxyhemoglobin . (COHb).and.cyanide. ion.(CN

  4. In Vitro Absorption of Atmospheric Carbon Monoxide and Hydrogen Cyanide in Undisturbed Pooled Blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Biological samples from victims of aircraft accidents are analyzed for carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and cyanide ion : (CN) in blood. Such victims quite often suffer large open wounds near the autopsy blood collection sites. Many : aircraft crashes resu...

  5. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on whole blood cyanide concentrations in carbon monoxide intoxicated patients from fire accidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson-Smith, Pia; Jansen, Erik C; Hilsted, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and carbon monoxide (CO) may be important components of smoke from fire accidents. Accordingly, patients admitted to hospital from fire accidents may have been exposed to both HCN and CO. Cyanide (CN) intoxication results in cytotoxic hypoxia leading to organ dysfunction...... and animal experiments have shown that in rats exposed to CN intoxication, HBO can increase the concentration of CN in whole blood....

  6. 40 CFR 180.130 - Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for... § 180.130 Hydrogen Cyanide; tolerances for residues. (a) General. A tolerance for residues of the insecticide hydrogen cyanide from postharvest fumigation as a result of application of sodium cyanide is...

  7. Hydrogen Cyanide In Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ashley L.; Oberg, Karin; Cleeves, L. Ilsedore

    2018-01-01

    The chemistry behind star and planet formation is extremely complex and important in the formation of habitable planets. Life requires molecules containing carbon, oxygen, and importantly, nitrogen. Hydrogen cyanide, or HCN, one of the main interstellar nitrogen carriers, is extremely dangerous here on Earth. However, it could be used as a vital tool for tracking the chemistry of potentially habitable planets. As we get closer to identifying other habitable planets, we must understand the beginnings of how those planets are formed in the early protoplanetary disk. This project investigates HCN chemistry in different locations in the disk, and what this might mean for forming planets at different distances from the star. HCN is a chemically diverse molecule. It is connected to the formation for other more complex molecules and is commonly used as a nitrogen tracer. Using computational chemical models we look at how the HCN abundance changes at different locations. We use realistic and physically motivated conditions for the gas in the protoplanetary disk: temperature, density, and radiation (UV flux). We analyze the reaction network, formation, and destruction of HCN molecules in the disk environment. The disk environment informs us about stability of habitable planets that are created based on HCN molecules. We reviewed and compared the difference in the molecules with a variety of locations in the disk and ultimately giving us a better understanding on how we view protoplanetary disks.

  8. Effect of hyperbaric oxygen therapy on whole blood cyanide concentrations in carbon monoxide intoxicated patients from fire accidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson-Smith, Pia; Jansen, Erik C; Hilsted, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) and carbon monoxide (CO) may be important components of smoke from fire accidents. Accordingly, patients admitted to hospital from fire accidents may have been exposed to both HCN and CO. Cyanide (CN) intoxication results in cytotoxic hypoxia leading to organ dysfunction...... and possibly death. While several reports support the use of hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBO) for the treatment of severe CO poisoning, limited data exist on the effect of HBO during CN poisoning. HBO increases the elimination rate of CO haemoglobin in proportion to the increased oxygen partial pressure...

  9. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hydrogen Cyanide and Cyanide Salts (Interagency Science Discussion Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is releasing the draft report, Toxicological Review of Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) and Cyanide Salts, that was distributed to Federal agencies and White House Offices for comment during the Science Discussion step of the IRIS As...

  10. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hydrogen Cyanide (External Review Draft)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of hydrogen cyanide and cyanide salts that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  11. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wayland, B.B.

    1993-12-01

    Focus of this project is on developing new approaches for hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. The strategies to accomplish CO reduction are based on favorable thermodynamics manifested by rhodium macrocycles for producing a series of intermediates implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Metalloformyl complexes from reactions of H 2 and CO, and CO reductive coupling to form metallo α-diketone species provide alternate routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics are promising candidates for future development

  12. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayland, B.B.

    1992-12-01

    This project is focused on developing strategies to accomplish the reduction and hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. Our approaches to this issue are based on the recognition that rhodium macrocycles have unusually favorable thermodynamic values for producing a series of intermediate implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Observations of metalloformyl complexes produced by reactions of H{sub 2} and CO, and reductive coupling of CO to form metallo {alpha}-diketone species have suggested a multiplicity of routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in constructing energy profiles for a variety of potential pathways, and these schemes are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Variation of the electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Emerging knowledge of the factors that contribute to M-H, M-C and M-O bond enthalpies is directing the search for ligand arrays that will expand the range of metal species that have favorable thermodynamic parameters to produce the primary intermediates for CO hydrogenation. Studies of rhodium complexes are being extended to non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics. Multifunctional catalyst systems designed to couple the ability of rhodium complexes to produce formyl and diketone intermediates with a second catalyst that hydrogenates these imtermediates are promising approaches to accomplish CO hydrogenation at mild conditions.

  13. HYDROGEN CYANIDE IN THE MURCHISON METEORITE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pizzarello, Sandra, E-mail: pizzar@asu.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85018-1604 (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Carbonaceous chondrites are meteorites that may contain abundant organic materials, including soluble compounds as diverse as amino acids and hydrocarbons. We report here the finding of hydrogen cyanide in the Murchison meteorite in amounts {<=} 10 ppm. HCN was never searched for in meteorites and its detection in sizeable amount is surprising in view of the extensive water phase that is recorded by the petrology of this type of meteorites and could have exhausted their HCN content through multiple reactions. The finding adds to the inventory of simple volatile molecules found in both comets and meteorites.

  14. IRIS Toxicological Review of Hydrogen Cyanide and Cyanide Salts (Final Report)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA has finalized the Toxicological Review of Hydrogen Cyanide and Cyanide Salts: in support of the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS). Now final, this assessment may be used by EPA’s program and regional offices to inform decisions to protect human health.

  15. Chemical evolution. XXIX - Pyrimidines from hydrogen cyanide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, J. P.; Joshi, P. C.; Lawless, J. G.

    1978-01-01

    Compounds obtained by hydrolysis of HCN oligomers formed by allowing pH 9.2, 0.1 M cyanide to stand at room temperature for 4 to 12 months were analyzed. Hydrolysis of HCN oligomers yielded 4,5-dihydroxypyrimidine and 5-hydroxyuracil; orotic acid was detected after hydrolysis at pH 8.5. A unified pathway from diaminofumaronitrile to the pyrimidines observed is suggested. As purines, pyrimidines and amino acids are released by hydrolysis of HCN oligomers in either acidic or mildly basic aqueous solutions, they could have been formed on the primitive earth in spite of fluctuations in pH. 4,5-dihydroxypyrimidines appear to be likely candidates for incorporation into primitive nucleic acids, as they should undergo Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding with adenine.

  16. Is Hydrogen Cyanide a Marker of Burkholderia cepacia Complex?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gilchrist, F. J.; Sims, H.; Alcock, A.; Jones, A.M.; Bright-Thomas, R. J.; Smith, D.; Španěl, Patrik; Webb, A. K.; Lenney, W.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 11 (2013), s. 3849-3851 ISSN 0095-1137 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : acetone * alcohol * hydrogen cyanide Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.232, year: 2013

  17. 49 CFR 173.195 - Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized... Hazardous Materials Other Than Class 1 and Class 7 § 173.195 Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized (hydrocyanic acid, aqueous solution). (a) Hydrogen cyanide, anhydrous, stabilized, must be packed in...

  18. 40 CFR 415.420 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. 415.420 Section 415.420 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Cyanide Production Subcategory § 415.420 Applicability; description of the hydrogen cyanide production subcategory. This subpart applies to discharges to waters of the United States...

  19. Cyanide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cyanide is Cyanide is a rapidly acting, potentially deadly chemical that can exist in various forms. Cyanide ... natural substances in some foods and in certain plants such as cassava, lima beans and almonds. Pits ...

  20. The oxidation of hydrogen cyanide and related chemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dagaut, Philippe; Glarborg, Peter; Alzueta, Maria U.

    2008-01-01

    For modeling the formation of nitrogen oxides in combustion via both the prompt-NO and the fuel-NO mechanisms, as well as for modeling the reduction of nitrogen oxides via reburning, a good knowledge of the kinetics of oxidation of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is required. The formation routes to HCN a...

  1. Computation of diatomic molecular spectra for selected transitions of aluminum monoxide, cyanide, diatomic carbon, and titanium monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parigger, Christian G., E-mail: cparigge@tennessee.edu [The University of Tennessee/University of Tennessee Space Institute, Center for Laser Applications, 411 B.H. Goethert Parkway, Tullahoma, TN 37388-9700 (United States); Woods, Alexander C.; Surmick, David M.; Gautam, Ghaneshwar; Witte, Michael J. [The University of Tennessee/University of Tennessee Space Institute, Center for Laser Applications, 411 B.H. Goethert Parkway, Tullahoma, TN 37388-9700 (United States); Hornkohl, James O. [Hornkohl Consulting, Tullahoma, TN 37388 (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Laser ablation studies with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) typically emphasize atomic species yet fingerprints from molecular species can occur subsequently or concurrently. In this work, selected molecular transitions of aluminum monixide (AlO), diatomic carbon (C{sub 2}), cyanide (CN), and titanium monoxide (TiO) are accurately computed. Line strength tables are used to describe the radiative transitions of diatomic molecules primarily in the visible, optical region. Details are elaborated of the computational procedure that allows one to utilize diatomic spectra as a predictive and as a diagnostic tool. In order to create a computed spectrum, the procedure requires information regarding the temperature of the diatomic transitions along with other input such as the spectral resolution. When combined with a fitting algorithm to optimize such parameters, this procedure is used to infer information from an experimentally obtained spectrum. Furthermore, the programs and data files are provided for LIBS investigations that also reveal AlO, C{sub 2}, CN, and TiO diatomic spectra. - Highlights: • We present a program for fitting of molecular spectra. • This includes data base for AlO, C{sub 2}, CN, and TiO. • We discuss the details of the program including fitting. • We show computed examples and reference current work.

  2. Development of CuxFe/Al2O3 catalysts for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide guided by magnetic methods, Moessbauer and infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boellaard, E.; Geus, J.W.; Bruggen, J.M. van; Kraan, A.M. van der

    1993-01-01

    A copper-iron catalyst for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide has been prepared using a supported stoichiometric cyanide complex. Conversion of the cyanide precursor to a metallic catalyst appeared to be a precious process. Copper and iron in the bimetallic particles easily separate by thermal treatment and upon exposure to carbon monoxide, as revealed from Moessbauer and infrared spectroscopy. During Fischer-Tropsch reaction the catalyst exhibits a rapid decline of activity. Magnetisation measurements on spent catalysts indicate that the deactivation is caused by a fast conversion of metallic iron to initially unstable carbides which transform ultimately to more stable carbides. (orig.)

  3. Hydrogen bonding of formamide, urea, urea monoxide and their thio

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ab initio and DFT methods have been employed to study the hydrogen bonding ability of formamide, urea, urea monoxide, thioformamide, thiourea and thiourea monoxide with one water molecule and the homodimers of the selected molecules. The stabilization energies associated with themonohydrated adducts and ...

  4. Glycine metabolism by Pseudomonas aeruginosa: hydrogen cyanide biosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castric, P.A.

    1977-01-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a synthetic medium is stimulated by the presence of glycine. Methionine enhances this stimulation but will not substitute for glycine as a stimulator of cyanogenesis. Threonine and phenylalanine are effective substitutes for glycine in the stimulation of HCN production. Glycine, threonine, and serine are good radioisotope precursors of HCN, but methionine and phenylalanine are not. Cell extracts of P. aeruginosa convert [ 14 C]threonine to [ 14 C]glycine. H14CN is produced with low dilution of label from either [1- 14 C]glycine or [2- 14 C]glycine, indicating a randomization of label either in the primary or secondary metabolism of glycine. When whole cells were fed [1,2- 14 C]glycine, cyanide and bicarbonate were the only radioactive extracellular products observed

  5. Carbon Monoxide Hydrogenation on Ice Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahata, Kazuaki; Ohno, Kaoru

    2018-03-14

    We have performed density functional calculations to investigate the carbon monoxide hydrogenation reaction (H+CO→HCO), which is important in interstellar clouds. We found that the activation energy of the reaction on amorphous ice is lower than that on crystalline ice. In the course of this study, we demonstrated that it is roughly possible to use the excitation energy of the reactant molecule (CO) in place of the activation energy. This relationship holds also for small water clusters at the CCSD level of calculation and the two-layer-level ONIOM (CCSD : X3LYP) calculation. Generally, since it is computationally demanding to estimate activation energies of chemical reactions in a circumstance of many water molecules, this relationship enables one to determine the activation energy of this reaction on ice surfaces from the knowledge of the excitation energy of CO only. Incorporating quantum-tunneling effects, we discuss the reaction rate on ice surfaces. Our estimate that the reaction rate on amorphous ice is almost twice as large as that on crystalline ice is qualitatively consistent with the experimental evidence reported by Hidaka et al. [Chem. Phys. Lett., 2008, 456, 36.]. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Hydrogenation of carbon monoxide over supported palladium catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimoto, K.; Hashimoto, H.; Kunugi, T.

    1978-03-01

    An alumina-supported 2% palladium catalyst had higher activity for carbon monoxide hydrogenation than a silica-supported 2% palladium catalyst, at 250/sup 0/-400/sup 0/C and 1 atm. The addition of lanthanum oxide or thorium oxide, but not of potassium oxide, to the silica-supported catalyst increased the conversion at 350/sup 0/C from 1.1% to 81.0% with a selectivity of 56.1% for methane, 1.4% for C/sub 2/ compounds, 0.1% for C/sub 3/ compounds, and 42.5% for carbon dioxide. Temperature-programed desorption of carbon monoxide in a hydrogen stream showed that of two desorption peaks observed for carbon monoxide, the one at higher temperature corresponded to the carbon monoxide species which hydrogenates to methane and that the area of this peak increased with increasing thorium content of the catalyst. Graphs, tables, and 12 references.

  7. Importance of the Hydrogen Isocyanide Isomer in Modeling Hydrogen Cyanide Oxidation in Combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glarborg, Peter; Marshall, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen isocyanide (HNC) has been proposed as an important intermediate in oxidation of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in combustion, but details of its chemistry are still in discussion. At higher temperatures, HCN and HNC equilibrate rapidly, and being more reactive than HCN, HNC offers a fast alterna...... HNCO is the major consumption path for HCN. Under lean conditions, HNC is shown to be less important than indicated by the early work by Lin and co-workers, but it acts to accelerate HCN oxidation and promotes the formation of HNCO.......Hydrogen isocyanide (HNC) has been proposed as an important intermediate in oxidation of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in combustion, but details of its chemistry are still in discussion. At higher temperatures, HCN and HNC equilibrate rapidly, and being more reactive than HCN, HNC offers a fast...

  8. Spectroscopy of vibrationally hot molecules: Hydrogen cyanide and acetylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonas, D.M.

    1992-01-01

    An efficient formula for calculating nuclear spin statistical weights is presented. New experimental methods to distinguish electric and magnetic multipole transitions are proposed and used to prove that the formaldehyde A - X 0-0 transition is a magnetic dipole transition. HIgh resolution vacuum ultraviolet studies of the A → X fluorescence excitation spectrum of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) have: (i) determined that only the (0,1,0) vibrational level of the HCN A-state has a sufficiently long fluorescence lifetime to be suitable for Stimulated Emission Pumping (SEP) studies; and (ii) measured the electric dipole moment of the A-state. Several transitions in the hydrogen cyanide A → X SEP spectrum are shown to be due to the axis-switching mechanism. From a Franck-Condon plot of the intensities and a comparison between sums of predicted rotational constants and sums of observed rotational constants, all of the remaining transitions in the SEP spectrum can be securly assigned. Two weak resonances; a 2:3 CH:CN stretch Fermi resonance and a 6:2 bend:CN stretch resonance appear in the SEP spectrum. Excitation of the CH stretching vibration is predicted and shown to be entirely absent, apart from resonances, in the HCN SEP spectrum. A → X SEP spectra of acetylene (HCCH) near E VIB = 7,000 cm -1 display a wealth of strong and fully assignable anharmonic resonances and forbidden rotational transitions. It is proved that Darling-Dennison resonance between the cis and trans bending vibrations is the crucial first step in a series of anharmonic resonances which can transfer nearly all the vibrational energy out of the initial CC stretch/trans-bend excitation at high vibrational energy. Secondary steps in the vibrational energy flow are vibrational-l-resonance and the '2345' Fermi resonance. For short times, the vibrational energy redistribution obeys very restrictive rules

  9. Isotopic studies on ligand exchange between complex and simple cyanides in aqueous medium and in liquid hydrogen cyanide. Part 1. Rate law and temperature dependence study of the radiocyanide exchange between hydrogen cyanide and octacyanotungstate(4) in aque us medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, M.

    1978-01-01

    Dark radiocyanide ligand exchange in the closed system consisting of K 4 W(CN) 8 , hydrogen cyanide and water have been investigated. It has been found that the reaction is first order in respect to the complex cyanide and zero order in respect to the free hydrogen cyanide. Arrhenius activation energy within the temperature interval of 20-100 0 C equals to 32.373 kcal/mole. Enthalpy and entropy of activation are correspondingly ΔH not equal to Λ31.716kcal/mole and ΔS not equal to =5.45 e.u. A preliminary discussion of the above findings is presented. (author)

  10. Isotopic studies on ligand exchange between complex and simple cyanides in water medium and in liquid hydrogen cyanide. Part 2. Radiocyanide ligand exchange study between hydrogen cyanide and octacyanotungstate(4) in water solutions of mineral acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, M.

    1979-01-01

    Radiocyanide ligand exchange between potassium octacyanotungstate(4) and hydrogen cyanide in aqueous solutions of sulfuric acid and between octacyanotungstic(4) acid and hydrogen cyanide in aqueous solutions have been investigated experimentally. The observed enhancement of the rate of ligand exchange in acidic medium has been rationalized in terms of the proposed new general reaction scheme taking into account the reversible decomposition of complex cyanide at low pH, and irreversible one at high pH. The discussion on the results obtained has been carried out within the framework of derived formal kinetic equations. (author)

  11. MLS/Aura L2 Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) Mixing Ratio V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HCN is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for hydrogen cyanide derived from radiances measured primarily by the 190 GHz radiometer. The...

  12. MLS/Aura L2 Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN) Mixing Ratio V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ML2HCN is the EOS Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) standard product for hydrogen cyanide derived from radiances measured primarily by the 190 GHz radiometer. The...

  13. Passivation of defects in polycrystalline Cu2O thin films by hydrogen or cyanide treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishizuka, S.; Kato, S.; Okamoto, Y.; Sakurai, T.; Akimoto, K.; Fujiwara, N.; Kobayashi, H.

    2003-01-01

    The effects of the passivation of defects in polycrystalline nitrogen-doped cuprous oxide (Cu 2 O) thin films with hydrogen or cyanide treatment were studied. In the photoluminescence (PL) measurements, although the emission was not observed before treatment, luminescence of Cu 2 O at around 680 nm was observed after each treatment. This improvement in the luminescence property may be due to the passivation of non-radiative recombination centers by H or CN. The hole carrier concentration increased from the order of 10 16 to 10 17 cm -3 with hydrogen or cyanide treatment. From these results, both the hydrogen and cyanide treatments were found to be very effective to passivate defects and improve the optical and electrical properties of polycrystalline Cu 2 O thin films. The thermal stability of the passivation effects by the cyanide treatment is, however, superior to that by the hydrogen treatment

  14. Improving the Corrosion Inhibitive Strength of Sodium Sulphite in Hydrogen Cyanide Solution Using Sodium Benzoate

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammed Olawale Hakeem AMUDA; Olusegun Olusoji SOREMEKUN; Olakunle Wasiu SUBAIR; Atinuke OLADOYE

    2008-01-01

    The improvement in the inhibitive strength of sodium sulphite on corrosion of mild steel in hydrogen cyanide by adding sodium benzoate in regulated volume was investigated using the fundamental weight loss measurement.500 ppm concentration inhibitive mixtures of sodium benzoate and sodium sulphite in three different volume ratios (5/15, 10/10, 15/5) were formulated and studied for corrosion rate in 200ml hydrogen cyanide fluid. Result obtained indicates that the corrosion rate of mild steel i...

  15. Towards quantitative SERS detection of hydrogen cyanide at ppb level for human breath analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Rikke Kragh; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Molin, Søren

    2015-01-01

    Lung infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Due to its ready adaptation to the dehydrated mucosa of CF airways, PA infections tend to become chronic, eventually killing the patient. Hydrogen cyanide (HCN......) at ppb level has been reported to be a PA biomarker. For early PA detection in CF children not yet chronically lung infected a non-invasive Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS)-based breath nanosensor is being developed. The triple bond between C and N in cyanide, with its characteristic band...... substrate can be consistently detected under different experimental conditions and up to 9 days after exposure. For detection of lower cyanide concentrations serial dilution experiments using potassium cyanide (KCN) demonstrated cyanide quantification down to 1 μM in solution (corresponding to 18 ppb...

  16. Carbon monoxide hydrogenation over ruthenium zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, P.A.; Nijs, H.H.; Verdonck, J.J.; Uytterhoeven, J.B.

    1978-03-01

    Ru zeolites are active and stable methanation catalysts. Under Fischer--Tropsch conditions they show a narrow product distribution. Further work is needed to assign this to a possible effect exerted by the zeolite cages. When the size of the Ru particles enclosed in the zeolite cages is increased, a lower methanation activity is found and a higher amount of C/sub 2/ and C/sub 3/ products are formed under Fischer--Tropsch conditions. This effect has not been reported until now on other supports. The less acidic zeolites act as promoters of the CO hydrogenation: under methanation conditions the activity is increased; under Fischer--Tropsch conditions, the selectivity is shifted toward higher hydrocarbons. This is explained by the particular zeolite property that electron deficient metal agglomerates seem to be formed on the acidic zeolites. With respect to kinetic behavior, relative activity of different metals, influence of reaction temperature on product distribution, the zeolite behaves in the same way a conventional alumina support. 4 figs., 4 tables.

  17. On the Hydrogen Cyanide Removal from Air using Metal loaded Polyacrylonitrile Composite Nanofibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozorgmehr Maddah

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study highlights the potential application of electrospun polyacrylonitrile/metal salts (CrO3, CuCO3 nanofibrous filter media impregnated with TEDA (PAN-M-TEDA as an efficient adsorbent for hydrogen cyanide removal from air. The PAN-M-TEDA nanofiber before and after adsorption of hydrogen cyanide was characterized with Fourier transform infrared microscopy (FTIR. The concentration of hydrogen cyanide passes through the samples was determined by measuring the absorption of hydrogen cyanide in the solution containing indicator via UV-Vis spectroscopy. The results showed that introducing metal salts to PAN nanofiber along with their impregnation with TEDA, significantly increases the adsorption capacity of nanofibrous filter media. The adsorption of hydrogen cyanide over PAN-M-TEDA nanofiber was also studied as a function of thickness, PAN concentration and TEDA concentration by response surface methodology (RSM based on central composite design. It is found that the highest adsorption capacity can be achieved at thickness 28.42 mm, PAN concentration 16.19 w/v % and TEDA concentration 14.80 w/v %.

  18. An uncommon case of a suicide with inhalation of hydrogen cyanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musshoff, F; Kirschbaum, K M; Madea, B

    2011-01-30

    An uncommon suicide by oral ingestion of potassium cyanide salts and contemporaneous inhalation of hydrogen cyanide is presented. A 48-year-old tradesman was found dead sitting in his car. A penetrating odor of bitter almonds was noticed when opening the doors. A camping stove and a cooking pot containing large amounts of dark blue crystals were found in the footwell of the car. White powder adhered to his fingers and to the area around the mouth. Furthermore bottles containing potassium ferrocyanide and different kinds of acid and leach were found in the car together with internet information about, e.g. potassium ferrocyanide and potassium cyanide. At autopsy hemorrhages and erosions of the mucosa of the respiratory tract, esophagus and stomach were found. Concentrations of cyanide were 0.2mg/l in stomach contents, 0.96mg/kg in brain tissue, 2.79mg/kg in lungs, and 5.3mg/l in blood. The white and toxic powder potassium cyanide was formed by heating of the yellow crystals of potassium ferrocyanide on the camping stove. This powder was probably ingested orally. Addition of acid converted the salt into the highly toxic gas hydrogen cyanide. Oxidation with atmospheric oxygen built the dark blue ferrous compound Prussian blue. This case report of a person who was not familiar with chemicals demonstrates the acquisition of professional information via the internet, enabling a suicide with a complex procedure. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Hydrogen cyanide formation in selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides over Cu/ZSM-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radtke, F; Koeppel, R; Baiker, A [Department of Chemical Engineering and Industrial Chemistry, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, (Switzerland)

    1994-01-06

    Hydrogen cyanide is formed over Cu/ZSM-5 during the selective catalytic reduction of NO[sub x] by either propylene or ethylene in the temperature range 450-600 K. Under the reaction conditions used (reactant feed: 973 ppm NO, 907 ppm propene or 1448 ppm ethylene, 2% oxygen, W/F=0.1 g s cm[sup -3]), the concentration of hydrogen cyanide reaches 20, respectively, 30 ppm, depending on whether ethylene or propene are used as hydrocarbons. In addition, significant N[sub 2]O formation is observed at temperatures lower than 700 K, independent of the hydrocarbon used

  20. Towards quantitative SERS detection of hydrogen cyanide at ppb level for human breath analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikke Kragh Lauridsen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Lung infections with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in cystic fibrosis (CF patients. Due to its ready adaptation to the dehydrated mucosa of CF airways, PA infections tend to become chronic, eventually killing the patient. Hydrogen cyanide (HCN at ppb level has been reported to be a PA biomarker. For early PA detection in CF children not yet chronically lung infected a non-invasive Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS-based breath nanosensor is being developed. The triple bond between C and N in cyanide, with its characteristic band at ∼2133 cm−1, is an excellent case for the SERS-based detection due to the infrequent occurrence of triple bonds in nature. For demonstration of direct HCN detection in the gas phase, a gold-coated silicon nanopillar substrate was exposed to 5 ppm HCN in N2. Results showed that HCN adsorbed on the SERS substrate can be consistently detected under different experimental conditions and up to 9 days after exposure. For detection of lower cyanide concentrations serial dilution experiments using potassium cyanide (KCN demonstrated cyanide quantification down to 1 μM in solution (corresponding to 18 ppb. Lower KCN concentrations of 10 and 100 nM (corresponding to 0.18 and 1.8 ppb produced SERS intensities that were relatively similar to the reference signal. Since HCN concentration in the breath of PA colonized CF children is reported to be ∼13.5 ppb, the detection of cyanide is within the required range. Keywords: Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy, Hydrogen cyanide, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Cystic fibrosis, Breath analysis

  1. studies on solvent extraction of free hydrogen cyanide from river water

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A method for free and strongly complexed cyanide measurement in river water was developed. Recovery tests from solution with and without river water, using various solvent combinations and background control were investigated to obtain an accurate and precise extraction method for the measurement of hydrogen ...

  2. Improving the Corrosion Inhibitive Strength of Sodium Sulphite in Hydrogen Cyanide Solution Using Sodium Benzoate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Olawale Hakeem AMUDA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The improvement in the inhibitive strength of sodium sulphite on corrosion of mild steel in hydrogen cyanide by adding sodium benzoate in regulated volume was investigated using the fundamental weight loss measurement.500 ppm concentration inhibitive mixtures of sodium benzoate and sodium sulphite in three different volume ratios (5/15, 10/10, 15/5 were formulated and studied for corrosion rate in 200ml hydrogen cyanide fluid. Result obtained indicates that the corrosion rate of mild steel in hydrogen cyanide in the presence of sodium benzoate/sodium sulphite inhibitive mixtures range 0.322mmpy to 1.1269mmpy across the three volumetric ratios considered. The 15ml5ml sodium benzoatesodium sulphite mixture had the best average corrosion rate of 0.5123mmpy.The corrosion rate followed reducing pattern after the first 200 hours of immersion. The average corrosion rate in the sodium benzoate / sodium sulphite mixture is less than the rate in sodium sulphite and the mixture is only effective after long time exposure.It is concluded that adding sodium benzoate to sodium sulphite in the volumetric ratio 155ml improves the inhibitive strength of sodium sulphite on the corrosion of mild steel in hydrogen cyanide environment.

  3. SERS detection of the biomarker hydrogen cyanide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultures isolated from cystic fibrosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Rikke Kragh; Madsen Sommer, Lea Mette; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2017-01-01

    . The P. aeruginosa biomarker hydrogen cyanide (HCN) contains a triple bond, which is utilized in this study because of the resulting characteristic C≡N peak at 2135 cm-1 in a Raman spectrum. The Raman signal was enhanced by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) on a Au-coated SERS substrate. After...

  4. Kinetics of Natural Detoxification of Hydrogen Cyanide Contained In Retted Cassava Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the kinetics of natural detoxification of hydrogen cyanide contained in retted cassava roots. Retting is traditional fermentation of cassava, performed to soften the roots. During retting, cyanide diffuses into water used for the retting. The fresh cassava roots (bitter and sweet varieties used for this experiment were separately retted at ambient 0 temperature of 30 C. The cyanide content and pH were monitored daily. From the analysis of the experimental results, a first order consecutive rate equation is an adequate tool for explaining the mechanism of HCN reduction (or decay in retted cassava roots. The detoxification constants for the bound cyanide in the bitter and sweet cassava roots were 0.378/day and 0.438/day respectively, while that of the free hydrogen cyanide were 0.63/day and 0.74/day for the bitter and sweet varieties respectively. Cassava tubers from different species cannot be fermented with the same retting condition unless they have same or close functional properties.

  5. 40 CFR 415.330 - Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. 415.330 Section 415.330 Protection of... MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Carbon Monoxide and By-Product Hydrogen Production Subcategory § 415.330 Applicability; description of the carbon monoxide and by-product hydrogen production subcategory. The provisions...

  6. Mechanism of obtaining carbon monoxide and hydrogen during brown coal radiolysis. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rustamov, V R; Kurbanov, M A; Dzantiev, B T; Kerimov, V K; Musaeva, P F

    1982-05-01

    This article analyzes effects of gamma radiation on the yield of products of coal gasification: hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Samples of brown coal from the Kansk-Achins basin were treated by gamma radiation with cobalt 60 radiation source. Analyses show that accumulation of hydrogen and carbon monoxide in brown coal under influence of gamma radiation is characterized by a constant rate. Yields of carbon monoxide and hydrogen amount to 0.16 molecule/100 electro volt and 0.21 molecule/electro volt respectively. Reducing radiation dose from 2.5 to 0.7 millirad/h reduces yields of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Increasing temperature of vacuum brown coal pyrolysis from 200 to 600 C causes decrease of hydrogen yield. Hydrogen yield decrease during temperature increase is caused by a high content of aromatic nuclei in the samples used in the radiolysis. (5 refs.)

  7. Hydrogen Cyanide Produced by Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6 Exhibits Nematicidal Activity against Meloidogyne hapla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beom Ryong Kang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp. are parasites that attack many field crops and orchard trees, and affect both the quantity and quality of the products. A root-colonizing bacterium, Pseudomonas chlororaphis O6, possesses beneficial traits including strong nematicidal activity. To determine the molecular mechanisms involved in the nematicidal activity of P. chlororaphis O6, we constructed two mutants; one lacking hydrogen cyanide production, and a second lacking an insecticidal toxin, FitD. Root drenching with wild-type P. chlororaphis O6 cells caused juvenile mortality in vitro and in planta. Efficacy was not altered in the fitD mutant compared to the wild-type but was reduced in both bioassays for the mutant lacking hydrogen cyanide production. The reduced number of galls on tomato plants caused by the wild-type strain was comparable to that of a standard chemical nematicide. These findings suggest that hydrogen cyanide-producing root colonizers, such as P. chlororaphis O6, could be formulated as “green” nematicides that are compatible with many crops and offer agricultural sustainability.

  8. Airborne hydrogen cyanide measurements using a chemical ionisation mass spectrometer for the plume identification of biomass burning forest fires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Le Breton

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A chemical ionisation mass spectrometer (CIMS was developed for measuring hydrogen cyanide (HCN from biomass burning events in Canada using I− reagent ions on board the FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft during the BORTAS campaign in 2011. The ionisation scheme enabled highly sensitive measurements at 1 Hz frequency through biomass burning plumes in the troposphere. A strong correlation between the HCN, carbon monoxide (CO and acetonitrile (CH3CN was observed, indicating the potential of HCN as a biomass burning (BB marker. A plume was defined as being 6 standard deviations above background for the flights. This method was compared with a number of alternative plume-defining techniques employing CO and CH3CN measurements. The 6-sigma technique produced the highest R2 values for correlations with CO. A normalised excess mixing ratio (NEMR of 3.68 ± 0.149 pptv ppbv−1 was calculated, which is within the range quoted in previous research (Hornbrook et al., 2011. The global tropospheric model STOCHEM-CRI incorporated both the observed ratio and extreme ratios derived from other studies to generate global emission totals of HCN via biomass burning. Using the ratio derived from this work, the emission total for HCN from BB was 0.92 Tg (N yr−1.

  9. The Use of Sonochemical Technology for Cyanide Removal from Aqueous Solutions in the Presence of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Shokoohi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyanide is a highly toxic species that found mostly in industrial effluents such as electroplating, metal mining, metallurgy and metal cleaning processes. Discharge of it into the enviroment causes very health impact. Purpose of this study was, determination of sonochemical technology for cyanide removal from aqueous solutions in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. In this study, a productive set of 500w power ultresoun waves with two frequencies 35 kHz and 130 kHz were used. Experiments were performed using different initial ratio CN-/H2O2 1/1, 1/3 and 1/5 and at initial cyanide concentrations varying from 2.5 to 75 mg/L. The effects of parameters such as pH, time and initial cyanide concentration on the sonochemical degradation have been studied. The results of the study showed that the maximom removal efficiency of cyanide was achieved 85% by sonochemical technology at frequency of 130 kHz, during of 90 min, at pH of 11, at initial cyanide concentration of  2.5 mg/l and with initial ratio of CN-/H2O2 1/5. it was also found the rates of cyanide degradation under different conditions were quite low, and also the rate of cyanide degradation was high at first but later substantially reduced. The efficiency of cyanide removal had direct relationship with pH, frequency, hydrogen peroxide concentration and time ,and it had reverse relationship with cyanide concentration.

  10. Performance simulation of planar SOFC using mixed hydrogen and carbon monoxide gases as fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inui, Y. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan)]. E-mail: inui@eee.tut.ac.jp; Urata, A. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan); Ito, N. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan); Nakajima, T. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan); Tanaka, T. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi 441-8580 (Japan)

    2006-08-15

    The authors investigate in detail the influence of the mixing ratio of hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the fuel on the cell performance of the SOFC through numerical simulations for a single cell plate of the co-flow type planar cell. It is made clear that the cell performance is almost the same and excellent, independent of the mixing ratio of hydrogen and carbon monoxide under the nominal operating condition. The electromotive force of the hydrogen rich fuel gas is a little higher than that of the carbon monoxide rich fuel gas. The internal voltage drop in the cell decreases as the fraction of carbon monoxide becomes high. Since the value of the single cell voltage is determined by the balance of these two phenomena, the lowering of the electromotive force is dominant and the single cell voltage of the hydrogen rich fuel gas is higher when the inlet gas temperature is high, whereas the voltage drop reduction is dominant and the single cell voltage of the carbon monoxide rich fuel gas is higher when the temperature is low. The effect of the additional gases of water vapor and carbon dioxide is restricted to the single cell voltage shift, and the qualitative dependence of the single cell voltage on the inlet gas temperature is determined by the mixing ratio of hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  11. Performance simulation of planar SOFC using mixed hydrogen and carbon monoxide gases as fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inui, Y.; Urata, A.; Ito, N.; Nakajima, T.; Tanaka, T.

    2006-01-01

    The authors investigate in detail the influence of the mixing ratio of hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the fuel on the cell performance of the SOFC through numerical simulations for a single cell plate of the co-flow type planar cell. It is made clear that the cell performance is almost the same and excellent, independent of the mixing ratio of hydrogen and carbon monoxide under the nominal operating condition. The electromotive force of the hydrogen rich fuel gas is a little higher than that of the carbon monoxide rich fuel gas. The internal voltage drop in the cell decreases as the fraction of carbon monoxide becomes high. Since the value of the single cell voltage is determined by the balance of these two phenomena, the lowering of the electromotive force is dominant and the single cell voltage of the hydrogen rich fuel gas is higher when the inlet gas temperature is high, whereas the voltage drop reduction is dominant and the single cell voltage of the carbon monoxide rich fuel gas is higher when the temperature is low. The effect of the additional gases of water vapor and carbon dioxide is restricted to the single cell voltage shift, and the qualitative dependence of the single cell voltage on the inlet gas temperature is determined by the mixing ratio of hydrogen and carbon monoxide

  12. Limitations of the removal of cyanide from coking wastewater by ozonation and by the hydrogen peroxide-ozone process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pueyo, N; Miguel, N; Ovelleiro, J L; Ormad, M P

    The purpose of this study is to compare the efficiency of ozonation and the hydrogen peroxide-ozone process for the removal of cyanide from coking wastewater. The most efficient oxidation process is combined with coagulation-flocculation-decantation and lime-soda ash softening pretreatments. The oxidation in aqueous solution and industrial wastewater (at pH 9.5-12.3) by O3 was carried out using a range of concentration of consumed O3 from 10 to 290 mg/L. A molar ratio of H2O2/O3 from 0.1 to 5.2 with different concentrations of O3 constants was used for the H2O2-O3 process. The maximum cyanide removal obtained in coking wastewater was 90% using a mass ratio of O3/CN(-) of 9.5. Using lower concentrations of O3, cyanide is not removed and can even be generated due to the presence of other cyanide precursor organic micropollutants in the industrial matrix. The concentration of O3 is reduced to half for the same cyanide removal efficiency if the pretreatments are applied to reduce the carbonate and bicarbonate ions. The cyanide removal efficiency in coking wastewater is not improved if the O3 is combined with the H2O2. However, the preliminary cyanide removal treatment in aqueous solution showed an increase in the cyanide removal efficiency for the H2O2-O3 process.

  13. Conversion of carbon monoxide intensities tomolecular hydrogen abundances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutner, M.L.; Leung, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    We present results of theoretical models (static spherical clouds with a microturbulent velocity field) to study the conversion of carbon monoxide (CO) line parameters into molecular hydrogen (H 2 ) column densities, N2. The three potential H 2 tracers that we investigate are the integrated 12 CO and 13 CO intensities, I 12 and I 13 , and the 13 CO LTE column density, N( 13 . We find that I 12 may be a reasonable tracer of N2 under conditions appropriate to the envelopes of giant molecular clouds and for studies involving cloud ensembles of different cloud sizes and velocity dispersions. However, it saturates under higher density conditions. It is important that empirical conversion factors be set using the types of objects to which they will be applied. For this reason, our analysis suggests that the conversion factor N2/I 12 for giant molecular clouds in the molecular ring of our galaxy may be a factor of 2 lower than the average used by many observers. This lower value is supported by some recent empirical determinations. The quantity I 13 is a good tracer of N2 over a wide range of densities but it is more sensitive to the actual 13 CO abundance. The quantity N( 13 is similar to I 13 as a good tracer of N2 except at low densities and temperatures. The ratio I 12 /I 13 may be used to delineate temperature and column density effects. Finally, we find a strong temperature dependence in the various conversion factors, with N2/I 12 scaling with gas temperature (T/sub k/ approximately as (T/sub k/)/sup -1.3/

  14. SERS spectroscopy for detection of hydrogen cyanide in breath from children colonised with P. aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Rikke Kragh; Skou, Peter Bæk; Rindzevicius, Tomas

    2017-01-01

    ) nanochip optimised for detection of trace amounts of the P. aeruginosa biomarker hydrogen cyanide (HCN) was mounted inside a Tedlar bag, which the patient breathed into. The SERS chip was then analysed in a Raman spectrometer, investigating the C≡N peak at 2131 cm-1 and correlated with sputum cultures. One...... new P. aeruginosa colonisation occurred during the trial period. The C≡N peak intensity was enhanced in this sample in contrast to the subject's 3 other samples. Three additional patients had intense C≡N SERS signals from their breath, but no P. aeruginosa was cultured from their sputum...

  15. The Addition of Several Mineral Sources on Growing Media of Fluorescent Pseudomonad for the Biosynthesis of Hydrogen Cyanide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advinda, L.; Fifendy, M.; Anhar, A.

    2018-04-01

    All Fluorescent pseudomonad is a group of rhyzobacteria which these days often utilized on plant disease control. The growing media is an absolute requirement which needs to be considered for the growth and cultivation of bacteria. The mineral source contained in growing media of bacteria may affect the production of hydrogen cyanide compound. The objectives of the research were to obtain the best source of minerals for biosynthesis of cyanide acid compounds by fluorescent pseudomonad isolates PfPj1, PfPb1, PfPj2, Kd7, Cas, Cas3, and LAHp2. This research is a qualitative experimental research including observation of hydrogen cyanide compound produced after the growing media of fluorescent pseudomonad bacteria added with several mineral sources. The treatments were given: A = ZnSO4.7H2O 0.5 mM addition, B = CoCl2.6H2O 0.5 mM addition, and C = Fe2SO4.7H2O 0.5 mM addition. From the result of the research, it was concluded that the addition of ZnSO4.7H2O mineral resources on the growing media of fluorescent pseudomonad isolate Cas and Cas3 produced the best hydrogen cyanide. Whereas addition of CoCl2.6H2O mineral source on the growing media showed poor hydrogen cyanide production for all fluorescent pseudomonad isolates

  16. Carbon monoxide and cyanide as intrinsic ligands to iron in the active site of [NiFe]-hydrogenases. NiFe(CN)2CO, biology's way to activate H2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, A.J.; Roseboom, W.; Happe, R.P.; Bagley, K.A.; Albracht, S.P.J.

    1999-01-01

    Infrared-spectroscopic studies on the [NiFe]-hydrogenase of Chromatium vinosum-enriched in 15N or 13C, as well as chemical analyses, show that this enzyme contains three non-exchangeable, intrinsic, diatomic molecules as ligands to the active site, one carbon monoxide molecule and two cyanide

  17. Ammonia, nitrous oxide and hydrogen cyanide emissions from five passenger vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karlsson, Hua Lu

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, three unregulated components, ammonia, nitrous oxide and hydrogen cyanide, emitted from five passenger vehicles are investigated. With focus upon emission factors from existing production technology, vehicles produced between 1989 and 1998 with considerable mileage (7000 to 280,000) are chosen. Among the five vehicles, four were sold in the European market, whereas one was sold in the US market. The vehicles are tested on a chassis dynamometer. An EU2000 Driving Cycle (NEDC) and a US Urban Driving Cycle (UDC) of the Federal Test Procedure 75 (FTP-75) are used in the study. The regulated emissions are measured using a Horiba Mexa series. Unregulated emissions, ammonia (NH 3 ), nitrous oxide (N 2 O) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) are analysed by mass spectrometer, gas chromatography and CNT-NA, TIM315-74W method, respectively. Both the unregulated emissions and the regulated emissions show driving cycle dependency; and they are also improved with newer vehicle and emission control technology. However, a gasoline direct injection vehicle (relatively new technology in this study) has rather high regulated emissions, whereas the NH 3 , N 2 O and HCN emissions are low

  18. Ammonia, nitrous oxide and hydrogen cyanide emissions from five passenger vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Hua Lu

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, three unregulated components, ammonia, nitrous oxide and hydrogen cyanide, emitted from five passenger vehicles are investigated. With focus upon emission factors from existing production technology, vehicles produced between 1989 and 1998 with considerable mileage (7000 to 280,000) are chosen. Among the five vehicles, four were sold in the European market, whereas one was sold in the US market. The vehicles are tested on a chassis dynamometer. An EU2000 Driving Cycle (NEDC) and a US Urban Driving Cycle (UDC) of the Federal Test Procedure 75 (FTP-75) are used in the study. The regulated emissions are measured using a Horiba Mexa series. Unregulated emissions, ammonia (NH(3)), nitrous oxide (N(2)O) and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) are analysed by mass spectrometer, gas chromatography and CNT-NA, TIM315-74W method, respectively. Both the unregulated emissions and the regulated emissions show driving cycle dependency; and they are also improved with newer vehicle and emission control technology. However, a gasoline direct injection vehicle (relatively new technology in this study) has rather high regulated emissions, whereas the NH(3), N(2)O and HCN emissions are low.

  19. Relation of Hydrogen and Methane to Carbon Monoxide in Exhaust Gases from Internal-Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrish, Harold C; Tessmann, Arthur M

    1935-01-01

    The relation of hydrogen and methane to carbon monoxide in the exhaust gases from internal-combustion engines operating on standard-grade aviation gasoline, fighting-grade aviation gasoline, hydrogenated safety fuel, laboratory diesel fuel, and auto diesel fuel was determined by analysis of the exhaust gases. Two liquid-cooled single-cylinder spark-ignition, one 9-cylinder radial air-cooled spark-ignition, and two liquid-cooled single-cylinder compression-ignition engines were used.

  20. Formation of highly toxic hydrogen cyanide upon ruby laser irradiation of the tattoo pigment phthalocyanine blue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiver, Ines; Hutzler, Christoph; Laux, Peter; Berlien, Hans-Peter; Luch, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Since laser treatment of tattoos is the favored method for the removing of no longer wanted permanent skin paintings, analytical, biokinetics and toxicological data on the fragmentation pattern of commonly used pigments are urgently required for health safety reasons. Applying dynamic headspace—gas chromatography with mass spectrometric detection (DHS—GC/MS) and comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC—ToF-MS), we identified 1,2-benzene dicarbonitrile, benzonitrile, benzene, and the poisonous gas hydrogen cyanide (HCN) as main fragmentation products emerging dose-dependently upon ruby laser irradiation of the popular blue pigment copper phthalocyanine in suspension. Skin cell viability was found to be significantly compromised at cyanide levels of ≥1 mM liberated during ruby laser irradiation of >1.5 mg/ml phthalocyanine blue. Further, for the first time we introduce pyrolysis-GC/MS as method suitable to simulate pigment fragmentation that may occur spontaneously or during laser removal of organic pigments in the living skin of tattooed people. According to the literature such regular tattoos hold up to 9 mg pigment/cm2 skin.

  1. Storage and release of hydrogen cyanide in a chelicerate (Oribatula tibialis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brückner, Adrian; Raspotnig, Günther; Wehner, Katja; Meusinger, Reinhard; Norton, Roy A.; Heethoff, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Cyanogenesis denotes a chemical defensive strategy where hydrogen cyanide (HCN, hydrocyanic or prussic acid) is produced, stored, and released toward an attacking enemy. The high toxicity and volatility of HCN requires both chemical stabilization for storage and prevention of accidental self-poisoning. The few known cyanogenic animals are exclusively mandibulate arthropods (certain myriapods and insects) that store HCN as cyanogenic glycosides, lipids, or cyanohydrins. Here, we show that cyanogenesis has also evolved in the speciose Chelicerata. The oribatid mite Oribatula tibialis uses the cyanogenic aromatic ester mandelonitrile hexanoate (MNH) for HCN storage, which degrades via two different pathways, both of which release HCN. MNH is emitted from exocrine opisthonotal oil glands, which are potent organs for chemical defense in most oribatid mites. PMID:28289203

  2. Formation of amino acids by cobalt-60 irradiation of hydrogen cyanide solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, M. A.; Toste, A. P.; Ponnamperuma, C.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study the pathway for the prebiotic origin of amino acids from hydrogen cyanide (HCN) under the action of ionizing radiation considered as an effective source of energy on the primitive earth. The irradiations were performed in a cobalt-60 source with a dose rate of 200,000 rad/hr. Seven naturally occurring amino acids are identified among the products formed by the hydrolysis of gamma-irradiated solutions of HCN: glycine, alanine, valine, serine, threonine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid. The identity of these amino acids is established by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Control experiments provided evidence that the amino acids are not the result of contamination.

  3. Method for near-real-time continuous air monitoring of phosgene, hydrogen cyanide, and cyanogen chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattin, Frank G.; Paul, Donald G.

    1996-11-01

    A sorbent-based gas chromatographic method provides continuous quantitative measurement of phosgene, hydrogen cyanide, and cyanogen chloride in ambient air. These compounds are subject to workplace exposure limits as well as regulation under terms of the Chemical Arms Treaty and Title III of the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments. The method was developed for on-sit use in a mobile laboratory during remediation operations. Incorporated into the method are automated multi-level calibrations at time weighted average concentrations, or lower. Gaseous standards are prepared in fused silica lined air sampling canisters, then transferred to the analytical system through dynamic spiking. Precision and accuracy studies performed to validate the method are described. Also described are system deactivation and passivation techniques critical to optimum method performance.

  4. Range measurements of keV hydrogen ions in solid oxygen and carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schou, J.; Soerensen, H.; Andersen, H.H.; Nielsen, M.; Rune, J.

    1984-01-01

    Ranges of 1.3-3.5 keV/atom hydrogen and deuterium molecular ions have been measured by a thin-film reflection method. The technique, used here for range measurements in solid oxygen and carbon monoxide targets, is identical to the one used previously for range measurements in hydrogen and nitrogen. The main aim was to look for phase-effects, i.e. gas-solid differences in the stopping processes. While measured ranges in solid oxygen were in agreement with known gas data, the ranges in solid carbon monoxide were up to 50% larger than those calculated from gas-stopping data. The latter result agrees with that previously found for solid nitrogen. (orig.)

  5. Hydrogen Oxidation on Gas Diffusion Electrodes for Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cells in the Presence of Carbon Monoxide and Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gang, Xiao; Li, Qingfeng; Hjuler, Hans Aage

    1995-01-01

    Hydrogen oxidation has been studied on a carbon-supported platinum gas diffusion electrode in a phosphoric acidelectrolyte in the presence of carbon monoxide and oxygen in the feed gas. The poisoning effect of carbon monoxide presentin the feed gas was measured in the temperature range from 80...... to 150°C. It was found that throughout the temperaturerange, the potential loss due to the CO poisoning can be reduced to a great extent by the injection of small amounts ofgaseous oxygen into the hydrogen gas containing carbon monoxide. By adding 5 volume percent (v/o) oxygen, an almost...

  6. The use of tristimulus colorimetry for the determination of hydrogen cyanide in air by a modified König method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMÍR PITSCHMANN

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A simple visual and tristimulus colorimetric method (three-dimensional system CIE-L*a*b* for the determination of trace amounts of hydrogen cyanide in air has been developed. The method is based on the suction of hydrogen cyanide through a chlorinating cartridge where cyanogen chloride is formed, which is further driven to an indicator disc made of a modified cotton fabric. This indicator disc is placed into an adapter. Prior to analysis, the disc is saturated with a chromogenic reagent, a solution of 5,5-dimethyl-1,3-cyclohexanedione (dimedone and 4-benzylpyridine in ethanol. In the presence of hydrogen cyanide (cyanogen chloride, a pink coloration emerges on the indicator disc, the intensity of which is evaluated either visually or by use of a tristimulus colorimeter. The detection limit is 0.1 mg m-3. The method is mainly suitable for mobile field analyses. It was applied for the CHP-5 chemical agent detector introduced into the equipment of the Czech Army corps.

  7. SERS detection of the biomarker hydrogen cyanide from Pseudomonas aeruginosa cultures isolated from cystic fibrosis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauridsen, Rikke Kragh; Sommer, Lea M.; Johansen, Helle Krogh; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Molin, Søren; Jelsbak, Lars; Engelsen, Søren Balling; Boisen, Anja

    2017-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is the primary cause of chronic airway infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Persistent infections are seen from the first P. aeruginosa culture in about 75% of young CF patients, and it is important to discover new ways to detect P. aeruginosa at an earlier stage. The P. aeruginosa biomarker hydrogen cyanide (HCN) contains a triple bond, which is utilized in this study because of the resulting characteristic C≡N peak at 2135 cm-1 in a Raman spectrum. The Raman signal was enhanced by surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) on a Au-coated SERS substrate. After long-term infection, a mutation in the patho-adaptive lasR gene can alter the expression of HCN, which is why it is sometimes not possible to detect HCN in the breath of chronically infected patients. Four P. aeruginosa reference strains and 12 clinical P. aeruginosa strains isolated from CF children were evaluated, and HCN was clearly detected from overnight cultures of all wild type-like isolates and half of the later isolates from the same patients. The clinical impact could be that P. aeruginosa infections could be detected at an earlier stage, because daily breath sampling with an immediate output could be possible with a point-of-care SERS device.

  8. Emissions of hydrogen cyanide from on-road gasoline and diesel vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussa, Samar G.; Leithead, Amy; Li, Shao-Meng; Chan, Tak W.; Wentzell, Jeremy J. B.; Stroud, Craig; Zhang, Junhua; Lee, Patrick; Lu, Gang; Brook, Jeffery R.; Hayden, Katherine; Narayan, Julie; Liggio, John

    2016-04-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is considered a marker for biomass burning emissions and is a component of vehicle exhaust. Despite its potential health impacts, vehicular HCN emissions estimates and their contribution to regional budgets are highly uncertain. In the current study, Proton Transfer Reaction-Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) was used to measure HCN emission factors from the exhaust of individual diesel, biodiesel and gasoline vehicles. Laboratory emissions data as a function of fuel type and driving mode were combined with ambient measurement data and model predictions. The results indicate that gasoline vehicles have the highest emissions of HCN (relative to diesel fuel) and that biodiesel fuel has the potential to significantly reduce HCN emissions even at realistic 5% blend levels. The data further demonstrate that gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines emit more HCN than their port fuel injection (PFI) counterparts, suggesting that the expected full transition of vehicle fleets to GDI will increase HCN emissions. Ambient measurements of HCN in a traffic dominated area of Toronto, Canada were strongly correlated to vehicle emission markers and consistent with regional air quality model predictions of ambient air HCN, indicating that vehicle emissions of HCN are the dominant source of exposure in urban areas. The results further indicate that additional work is required to quantify HCN emissions from the modern vehicle fleet, particularly in light of continuously changing engine, fuel and after-treatment technologies.

  9. Analysis of Hydrogen Cyanide Hyperfine Spectral Components towards Star Forming Cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loughnane R. M.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Although hydrogen cyanide has become quite a common molecular tracing species for a variety of astrophysical sources, it, however, exhibits dramatic non-LTE behaviour in its hyperfine line structure. Individual hyperfine components can be strongly boosted or suppressed. If these so-called hyperfine line anomalies are present in the HCN rotational spectra towards low or high mass cores, this will affect the interpretation of various physical properties such as the line opacity and excitation temperature in the case of low mass objects and infall velocities in the case of their higher mass counterparts. Anomalous line ratios are present either through the relative strengths of neighboring hyperfine lines or through the varying widths of hyperfine lines belonging to a particular rotational line. This work involves the first observational investigation of these anomalies in two HCN rotational transitions, J=1→0 and J=3→2, towards both low mass starless cores and high mass protostellar objects. The degree of anomaly in these two rotational transitions is considered by computing the ratios of neighboring hyperfine lines in individual spectra. Results indicate some degree of anomaly is present in all cores considered in our survey, the most likely cause being line overlap effects among hyperfine components in higher rotational transitions.

  10. Detection of hydrogen cyanide from oral anaerobes by cavity ring down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen; Roslund, Kajsa; Fogarty, Christopher L.; Pussinen, Pirkko J.; Halonen, Lauri; Groop, Per-Henrik; Metsälä, Markus; Lehto, Markku

    2016-03-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) has been recognized as a potential biomarker for non-invasive diagnosis of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in the lung. However, the oral cavity is a dominant production site for exhaled HCN and this contribution can mask the HCN generated in the lung. It is thus important to understand the sources of HCN production in the oral cavity. By screening of oral anaerobes for HCN production, we observed that the genus of Porphyromonas, Prevotella and Fusobacterium generated low levels of HCN in vitro. This is the first study to show that oral anaerobes are capable of producing HCN in vitro. Further investigations were conducted on the species of P. gingivalis and we successfully detected HCN production (0.9-10.9 ppb) in the headspace of three P. gingivalis reference strains (ATCC 33277, W50 and OMG 434) and one clinical isolate. From P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 and W50, a strong correlation between HCN and CO2 concentrations (rs = 0.89, p < 0.001) was observed, indicating that the HCN production of P. gingivalis might be connected with the bacterial metabolic activity. These results indicate that our setup could be widely applied to the screening of in vitro HCN production by both aerobic and anaerobic bacteria.

  11. Adsorption and desorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide were studied on alumina-supported iridium catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etherton, B.P.

    1980-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of hydrogen and carbon monoxide were studied on alumina-supported iridium catalysts which were examined by a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). The metal particle size and number of particles per area of catalyst increased with increasing metal loading. The particles were approx. 10 A. in diameter, cubo-octahedral shaped, and approx. 80-90% disperse. The STEM electron beam caused negligible damage to the samples. Hydrogen adsorption measurements showed that the hydrogen-iridium atom ratio was 1.2:1-1.3:1 and increased with decreasing metal loading. Temperature-programed desorption showed four types of adsorbed hydrogen desorbing at -90/sup 0/C (I), 15/sup 0/C (IV), 115/sup 0/C (II), and 245/sup 0/C (III). Types II and IV desorb from single atom sites and Types I and III from multiple atom sites. Type I is in rapid equilibrium with the gas phase. All desorption processes appear to be first order. Carbon monoxide adsorbed nondissociatively at 25/sup 0/C with approx. 0.7:1 CO/Ir atom ratio. It adsorbed primarily in linear forms at low coverage, but a bridged form appeared at high coverage.

  12. Carbon monoxide - hydrogen combustion characteristics in severe accident containment conditions. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-03-01

    Carbon monoxide can be produced in severe accidents from interaction of ex-vessel molten core with concrete. Depending on the particular core-melt scenario, the type of concrete and geometric factors affecting the interaction, the quantities of carbon monoxide produced can vary widely, up to several volume percent in the containment. Carbon monoxide is a combustible gas. The carbon monoxide thus produced is in addition to the hydrogen produced by metal-water reactions and by radiolysis, and represents a possibly significant contribution to the combustible gas inventory in the containment. Assessment of possible accident loads to containment thus requires knowledge of the combustion properties of both CO and H 2 in the containment atmosphere. Extensive studies have been carried out and are still continuing in the nuclear industry to assess the threat of hydrogen in a severe reactor accident. However the contribution of carbon monoxide to the combustion threat has received less attention. Assessment of scenarios involving ex-vessel interactions require additional attention to the potential contribution of carbon monoxide to combustion loads in containment, as well as the effectiveness of mitigation measures designed for hydrogen to effectively deal with particular aspects of carbon monoxide. The topic of core-concrete interactions has been extensively studied; for more complete background on the issue and on the physical/thermal-hydraulics phenomena involved, the reader is referred to Proceedings of CSNI Specialists Meetings (Ritzman, 1987; Alsmeyer, 1992) and a State-of-Art Report (European Commission, 1995). The exact amount of carbon monoxide present in a reactor pit or in various compartments (or rooms) in a containment building is specific to the type of concrete and the accident scenario considered. Generally, concrete containing limestone and sand have a high percentage of CaCO 3 . Appendix A provides an example of results of estimates of CO and CO 2

  13. Alkali cyanides; destructive distillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clancy, J C

    1925-12-02

    The destructive distillation of carbonaceous substances can be accomplished by heating them in a bath of molten alkali and cyanide. Liquid hydrocarbons are produced. The separation of the cyanide from the coke or carbonaceous residues by filtration leaves a substantial quantity of cyanide absorbed by the carbon. A feasible method for removal has been developed by mixing the mixture of cyanide and coke with sodium carbonate or other alkali in the molten state, then treating this substance with nitrogen with or without ammonia to convert most of the carbon to cyanide. The carbonaceous material may be mixed with a liquid hydrocarbon such as petroleum, shale oil, or heavy tar oil, heated, and introduced below the surface of the liquid cyanide which partially decomposes and hydrogenates the coal to increase the yield of hydrocarbons. Dry ammonia may be bubbled through the reaction mixture to effect agitation and to form more cyanide.

  14. Atomic hydrogen and diatomic titanium-monoxide molecular spectroscopy in laser-induced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parigger, Christian G.; Woods, Alexander C.

    2017-03-01

    This article gives a brief review of experimental studies of hydrogen Balmer series emission spectra. Ongoing research aims to evaluate early plasma evolution following optical breakdown in laboratory air. Of interest is as well laser ablation of metallic titanium and characterization of plasma evolution. Emission of titanium monoxide is discussed together with modeling of diatomic spectra to infer temperature. The behavior of titanium particles in plasma draws research interests ranging from the modeling of stellar atmospheres to the enhancement of thin film production via pulsed laser deposition.

  15. Deep Conversion of Carbon Monoxide to Hydrogen and Formation of Acetate by the Anaerobic Thermophile Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans

    OpenAIRE

    Henstra, Anne M.; Stams, Alfons J. M.

    2011-01-01

    Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans is a thermophilic strictly anaerobic bacterium that catalyses the water gas shift reaction, the conversion of carbon monoxide with water to molecular hydrogen and carbon dioxide. The thermodynamically favorable growth temperature, compared to existing industrial catalytic processes, makes this organism an interesting alternative for production of cheap hydrogen gas suitable to fuel CO-sensitive fuel cells in a future hydrogen economy, provided sufficiently lo...

  16. Characteristics of autoignited laminar lifted flames in heated coflow jets of carbon monoxide/hydrogen mixtures

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Byungchul

    2012-06-01

    The characteristics of autoignited lifted flames in laminar jets of carbon monoxide/hydrogen fuels have been investigated experimentally in heated coflow air. In result, as the jet velocity increased, the blowoff was directly occurred from the nozzle-attached flame without experiencing a stabilized lifted flame, in the non-autoignited regime. In the autoignited regime, the autoignited lifted flame of carbon monoxide diluted by nitrogen was affected by the water vapor content in the compressed air oxidizer, as evidenced by the variation of the ignition delay time estimated by numerical calculation. In particular, in the autoignition regime at low temperatures with added hydrogen, the liftoff height of the autoignited lifted flames decreased and then increased as the jet velocity increased. Based on the mechanism in which the autoignited laminar lifted flame is stabilized by ignition delay time, the liftoff height can be influenced not only by the heat loss, but also by the preferential diffusion between momentum and mass diffusion in fuel jets during the autoignition process. © 2012 The Korean Society of Mechanical Engineers.

  17. Ratio of carbon monoxide to molecular hydrogen in interstellar dark clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickman, R.L.; Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; and The Ivan A. Getting Laboratories, The Aerospace Corporation)

    1978-01-01

    Carbon monoxide and molecular hydrogen column densities are compared at various locations within 38 interstellar dark clouds. CO column densities were obtained from radio observations of the J=1→0 transitions of the 12 C 16 O and 13 C 16 O isotopic species of the molecule. Corresponding H 2 column densities were inferred by means of visual extinctions derived from star counts, since it is argued that the standard gas-to-extinction ratio can be expected to remain valid in the clouds studied. For locations in the sources possessing line-of-sight visual extinctions in the approximate range 1.5 -2 ) = (5.0 +- 2.5) x 10 5 N 13 between molecular hydrogen and 13 CO LTE column densities. The carbon monoxide molecule can therefore be used as a quantitative ''tracer'' for the (directly unobservable) H 2 content of dark clouds. The above relationship implies that at least approx.12% of the gas-phase carbon in the clouds studied is in the form of CO, provided that the clouds are assumed to be chemically homogeneous. Langer's ion-molecule chemistry for dark clouds appears to agree well with the present work if the fractionation channel of Watson, Anicich, and Huntress is included

  18. Assessment of carboxyhemoglobin, hydrogen cyanide and methemoglobin in fire victims: a novel approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Luis A; Giannuzzi, Leda

    2015-11-01

    To establish the cause of death, carboxyhemoglobin (COHb), total hemoglobin (tHb), methemoglobin (MetHb), and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) were quantified in the blood of fire victims. We analyzed 32 out of 33 blood samples from forensic autopsy cases in a disastrous polyurethane mattress fire, which caused the deaths of 33 inmates at a prison in Argentina in 2006. The cadaveric blood samples were collected by femoral vein puncture. These samples were analyzed using the IL80 CO-oximeter system for tHb, MetHb, and COHb levels and by microdiffusion for HCN and COHb levels. Blood alcohol (ethanol) and drugs were examined by headspace gas chromatography-flame ionization detection (HS-GC-FID) and GC-mass spectrometry (MS), respectively. Polyurethane mattress samples were analyzed according to the California 117 protocol. The saturation of COHb ranged from 10% to 43%, tHb from 2% to 19.7%, MetHb from 0.10% to 35.7%, and HCN from 0.24 to 15mg/L. These HCN values are higher than the lethal levels reported in the literature. Other toxic components routinely measured (ethanol, methanol, aldehydes, and other volatile compounds) gave negative results in the 32 cases. Neither drugs of abuse nor psychotropic drugs were detected. The results indicate that death in the 32 fire victims was probably caused in part by HCN, generated during the extensive polyurethane decomposition stimulated by a rapid increase in temperature. We also considered the influence of oxygen depletion and the formation of other volatile compounds such as NOx in this disaster, as well as pathological evidence demonstrating that heat was not the cause of death in all victims. Furthermore, statistical analysis showed that the percentage values of COHb and MetHb in the blood were not independent variables, with χ(2)=11.12 (theoretical χ(2)=4.09, degrees of freedom=12, and α=0.05). However, no correlation was found between HCN and MetHb in the blood of the victims. This is the first report to assess the

  19. Effect of Harvesting Frequency, Variety and Leaf Maturity on Nutrient Composition, Hydrogen Cyanide Content and Cassava Foliage Yield

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khuc Thi Hue

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The experiment studied the effect of harvesting frequencies and varieties on yield, chemical composition and hydrogen cyanide content in cassava foliage. Foliage from three cassava varieties, K94 (very bitter, K98-7 (medium bitter and a local (sweet, were harvested in three different cutting cycles, at 3, 6 and 9 months; 6 and 9 months and 9 months after planting, in a 2-yr experiment carried out in Hanoi, Vietnam. Increasing the harvesting frequency increased dry matter (DM and crude protein (CP production in cassava foliage. The K94 variety produced higher foliage yields than the other two varieties. Dry matter, neutral detergent fibre (NDF, acid detergent fibre (ADF and total tannin content increased with months to the first harvest, whereas CP content decreased. Hydrogen cyanide (HCN content was lower at the first harvest than at later harvests for all cutting cycles. At subsequent harvests the content of total tannins tended to decline, while HCN content increased (p<0.05. Chemical composition differed somewhat across varieties except for total tannins and ash. Dry matter, NDF, ADF and total tannins were higher in fully matured leaves, while CP and HCN were lower in developing leaves.

  20. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide. Progress report, December 15, 1991--December 14, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayland, B.B.

    1992-12-01

    This project is focused on developing strategies to accomplish the reduction and hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. Our approaches to this issue are based on the recognition that rhodium macrocycles have unusually favorable thermodynamic values for producing a series of intermediate implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Observations of metalloformyl complexes produced by reactions of H{sub 2} and CO, and reductive coupling of CO to form metallo {alpha}-diketone species have suggested a multiplicity of routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in constructing energy profiles for a variety of potential pathways, and these schemes are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Variation of the electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Emerging knowledge of the factors that contribute to M-H, M-C and M-O bond enthalpies is directing the search for ligand arrays that will expand the range of metal species that have favorable thermodynamic parameters to produce the primary intermediates for CO hydrogenation. Studies of rhodium complexes are being extended to non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics. Multifunctional catalyst systems designed to couple the ability of rhodium complexes to produce formyl and diketone intermediates with a second catalyst that hydrogenates these imtermediates are promising approaches to accomplish CO hydrogenation at mild conditions.

  1. A Review on Preferential Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide in Hydrogen Rich Gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mishra

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In this review, recent works on the preferential oxidation of carbon monoxide in hydrogen rich gases for fuel cell applications are summarized. H2 is used as a fuel for polymer-electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC. It is produced by reforming of natural gas or liquid fuels followed by water gas shift reaction. The produced gas consists of H2, CO, and CO2. In which CO content is around 1%, which is highly poisonous for the Pt anode of the PEMFC so that further removal of CO is needed. Catalytic preferential oxidation of CO (CO-PROX is one of the most suitable methods of purification of H2 because of high CO conversion rate at low temperature range, which is preferable for PEMFC operating conditions. Catalysts used for COPROX are mainly noble metal based; gold based and base metal oxide catalysts among them Copper-Ceria based catalysts are the most appropriate due to its low cost, easy availability and result obtained by these catalysts are comparable with the conventional noble metal catalysts. Copyright © 2011 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 22nd October 2010, Revised: 12nd January 2011, Accepted: 19th January 2011[How to Cite: A. Mishra, R. Prasad. (2011. A Review on Preferential Oxidation of Carbon Monoxide in Hydrogen Rich Gases. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 6 (1: 1-14. doi:10.9767/bcrec.6.1.191.1-14][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.6.1.191.1-14 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/191] | View in 

  2. A widely tunable, near-infrared laser-based trace gas sensor for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) detection in exhaled breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, M.; Mandon, J.; Neerincx, A. H.; Liu, Z.; Mink, J.; Merkus, P. J. F. M.; Cristescu, S. M.; Harren, F. J. M.

    2017-11-01

    A compact, cost-effective sensor is developed for detection of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in exhaled breath within seconds. For this, an off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy setup is combined with a widely tunable compact near-infrared laser (tunability 1527-1564 nm). For HCN a detection sensitivity has been obtained of 8 ppbv in nitrogen (within 1 s), equal to a noise equivalent absorption sensitivity of 1.9 × 10-9 cm-1 Hz-1/2. With this sensor we demonstrated the presence of HCN in exhaled breath; its detection could be a good indicator for bacterial lung infection. Due to its compact, cost-effective and user-friendly design, this laser-based sensor has the potential to be implemented in future clinical applications.

  3. Actinide-carbon bonds: insertion reactions of carbon monoxide, tert-butyl isocyanide, and tert-butyl cyanide into [(Me3Si)2N]2MCH2Si(Me)2NSiMe3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, S.J.; Andersen, R.A.

    1981-01-01

    The thorium or uranium metallacycles [(Me 2 Si) 2 N] 2 MCH 2 Si(Me) 2 NSiMe 3 (I) react with tert-butyl cyanide to give the six-membered ring compounds [(Me 3 Si) 2 N] 2 MN = C(t-Bu)CH 2 Si(Me) 2 NSiMe 3 . The metallacycles (I) also react with the isoelectronic molecules tert-butyl isocyanide and carbon monoxide to give the unique five-membered ring compounds with exocyclic carbon-carbon double bonds, [(Me 3 Si) 2 N] 2 MXC(=CH 2 )Si(Me) 2 NSiMe 3 , where X is t-BuN or oxygen. The four-membered ring metallacycles (I) give simple coordination complexes of the type [(Me 3 Si) 2 N] 2 MCH 2 Si-(Me) 2 NSiMe 3 (N 3 SiMe 3 ) with trimethylsilyl azide

  4. Factors determining the activity of catalysts of various chemical types in the oxidation of hydrogen. I. Oxidation and isotope exchange of hydrogen on cobalt monoxide-oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polgikh, L.Y.; Golodets, G.I.; Il'chenko, N.I.

    1985-01-01

    On the basis of data on the kinetics of the reaction 2H 2 + O 2 = 2H 2 O isotope exchange H 2 + D 2 = 2HD under the conditions of oxidative catalysis, and the kinetic isotope effect, a mechanism is proposed for the oxidation of hydrogen on cobalt monoxide-oxide. At low temperatures the reaction proceeds according to a mechanism of alternating reduction-reoxidation of the surface with the participation of hydrogen adsorbed in molecular form; at increased temperature and low P 02 /P /SUB H2/ ratios, a significant contribution to the observed rate is made by a mechanism including dissociative chemisorption of hydrogen

  5. Acetal Resins, Acrylic & Modacrylic Fibers, Carbon Black, Hydrogen Fluoride, Polycarbonate, Ethylene, Spandex & Cyanide Chemical Manufacturing: NESHAP for Source Categories, Generic Maximum Achievable Control Technology Standards (40 CFR 63, Subpart YY)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about the NESHAP for GMACT for acetal resins, hydrogen fluoride, polycarbonate, ethylene production and cyanide chemicals. Find the rule history information, federal register citations, legal authority, rule summary, and additional resources

  6. Use of carbon monoxide and hydrogen by a bacteria–animal symbiosis from seagrass sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holler, Thomas; Lavik, Gaute; Harder, Jens; Lott, Christian; Littmann, Sten; Kuypers, Marcel M. M.; Dubilier, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Summary The gutless marine worm O lavius algarvensis lives in symbiosis with chemosynthetic bacteria that provide nutrition by fixing carbon dioxide (CO 2) into biomass using reduced sulfur compounds as energy sources. A recent metaproteomic analysis of the O . algarvensis symbiosis indicated that carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen (H 2) might also be used as energy sources. We provide direct evidence that the O . algarvensis symbiosis consumes CO and H 2. Single cell imaging using nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry revealed that one of the symbionts, the γ3‐symbiont, uses the energy from CO oxidation to fix CO 2. Pore water analysis revealed considerable in‐situ concentrations of CO and H 2 in the O . algarvensis environment, Mediterranean seagrass sediments. Pore water H 2 concentrations (89–2147 nM) were up to two orders of magnitude higher than in seawater, and up to 36‐fold higher than previously known from shallow‐water marine sediments. Pore water CO concentrations (17–51 nM) were twice as high as in the overlying seawater (no literature data from other shallow‐water sediments are available for comparison). Ex‐situ incubation experiments showed that dead seagrass rhizomes produced large amounts of CO. CO production from decaying plant material could thus be a significant energy source for microbial primary production in seagrass sediments. PMID:26013766

  7. Influence of carbon monoxide additions on the sensitivity of the dry hydrogen-air mixtures to detonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magzumov, A.E.; Kirillov, I.A.; Fridman, A.A.; Rusanov, V.D.

    1995-01-01

    Under severe accident conditions of water cooled nuclear reactors the hydrogen-air detonation represents one of the most hazardous events which can result in the reactor containment damage. An important factor related with the measure of gas mixture detonability is the detonation cell size which correlates with the critical tube diameter and detonation initiation energy. A numerical kinetic study is presented of the influence of carbon monoxide admixtures (from 0 vol.% to 40 vol.%) upon the sensitivity (detonation cell size) of the dry hydrogen-air gas mixtures to detonation in post-accident containment atmosphere. (author). 3 refs., 3 figs

  8. A Novel Cyanide-Bridged Thulium-Nickel Heterobimetallic Polymeric Complex (H2O)2(DMF)10Tm2[Ni(CN)4]2[Ni(CN)4] including O-H···N Hydrogen Bond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Janghoon; Park, Daeyoung; Song, Mina; Ha, Sungin; Kang, Ansoo; Moon, Sangbong; Ryu, Cheolhwi

    2012-01-01

    The experimental section lists the observed infrared absorption frequencies for the complex. Typically bridging CN ligands have higher stretching frequencies than the terminal CN ligands. Accordingly, cyanide stretching bands (2170, 2156, 2139 cm -1 . at higher frequencies than the stretching band (2127 cm -1 ) of K 2 [Ni(CN) 4 ] are assigned to bridging cyanide ligands. The band at 2128 cm -1 is assigned to terminal cyanide ligands because their location in the cyanide stretching region compares with the absorption observed for the nonbridging cyanide ligands in K 2 [Ni(CN) 4 ]. Array (H 2 O) 2 (DMF) 10 Tm 2 [Ni(CN) 4 ] 2 [Ni(CN) 4 ] and other lanthanide metal-Ni systems display similar CN stretching patterns in their spectra. A broad absorption band at 2950-3550 cm -1 was observed in the spectrum. This supports the presence of O-H···N intermolecular hydrogen bond interactions between the polymers

  9. Study on radiation degradation of hydroxylamine derivatives. Pt.3: Qualitative and quantitative analyses of hydrogen and carbon monoxide produced by radiation degradation of N,N-diethyl hydroxylamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jinhua; Bao Borong; Wu Minghong; Sun Xilian

    2004-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative analysis of hydrogen and carbon monoxide produced by radiation degradation of N,N-diethyl hydroxylamine is performed on a 2 m column packed with 5 Angstrom molecular sieve and equipped with a thermal conductivity detector. The analysis of hydrogen employs argon as a carrier gas, the column temperature is 85 degree C and the detector temperature is 110 degree C; the analysis of carbon monoxide employs hydrogen as a carrier gas, the column temperature is 50 degree C and the detector temperature is 80 degree C. The results show that the volume fraction of hydrogen is increased with the increase of dose, but has little relationship with the concentration of N,N-diethyl hydroxylamine. Carbon monoxide is only produced when the absorption dose is very high and the volume fraction is very low

  10. Hydrogen Activation by Biomimetic [NiFe]-Hydrogenase Model Containing Protected Cyanide Cofactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manor, Brian C.; Rauchfuss, Thomas B.

    2013-01-01

    Described are experiments that allow incorporation of cyanide cofactors and hydride substrate into active site models [NiFe]-hydrogenases (H2ases). Complexes of the type (CO)2(CN)2Fe(pdt)Ni(dxpe), (dxpe = dppe, 1; dxpe = dcpe, 2) bind the Lewis acid B(C6F5)3 (BArF3) to give the adducts (CO)2(CNBArF3)2Fe(pdt)Ni(dxpe), (1(BArF3)2, 2(BArF3)2). Upon decarbonylation using amine oxides, these adducts react with H2 to give hydrido derivatives Et4N[(CO)(CNBArF3)2Fe(H)(pdt)Ni(dxpe)], (dxpe = dppe, Et4N[H3(BArF3)2]; dxpe = dcpe, Et4N[H4(BArF3)2]). Crystallographic analysis shows that Et4N[H3(BArF3)2] generally resembles the active site of the enzyme in the reduced, hydride-containing states (Ni-C/R). The Fe-H…Ni center is unsymmetrical with rFe-H = 1.51(3) and rNi-H = 1.71(3) Å. Both crystallographic and 19F NMR analysis show that the CNBArF3− ligands occupy basal and apical sites. Unlike cationic Ni-Fe hydrides, [H3(BArF3)2]− and [H4(BArF3)2]− oxidize at mild potentials, near the Fc+/0 couple. Electrochemical measurements indicate that in the presence of base, [H3(BArF3)2]− catalyzes the oxidation of H2. NMR evidence indicates dihydrogen bonding between these anionic hydrides and ammonium salts, which is relevant to the mechanism of hydrogenogenesis. In the case of Et4N[H3(BArF3)2], strong acids such as HCl induce H2 release to give the chloride Et4N[(CO)(CNBArF3)2Fe(pdt)(Cl)Ni(dppe)]. PMID:23899049

  11. Investigation of the formation of hydrogen cyanide in the coking of kuzbass coal. [Magnitogorsk Integrated Iron and Steel Works-USSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigorev, N.P.; Zhilyaev, Yu.A.; Akulov, P.V.

    1981-01-01

    The experiments were performed using equipment which practically excluded deep pyrolysis of the vapor gas products. The hydrogen cyanide was recovered with 0.1 N caustic soda solution in the temperature range of 500 to 1000/sup 0/C. The HCN concentration was measured photometrically by the acid derivative formed as a result of the reaction of the cyanide radical with the barbituric acid amines. The dynamics of the HCN yield were investigated as a function of the heating rate, the degree of comminuition of the coal types and the charge. 2/3 of the HCN is formed as a result of pyrolysis of the vapor-gas products and 1/3 is attributed to the thermochemical conversion of organic matter.

  12. MLS measurements of stratospheric hydrogen cyanide during the 2015-2016 El Niño event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumphrey, Hugh C.; Glatthor, Norbert; Bernath, Peter F.; Boone, Christopher D.; Hannigan, James W.; Ortega, Ivan; Livesey, Nathaniel J.; Read, William G.

    2018-01-01

    It is known from ground-based measurements made during the 1982-1983 and 1997-1998 El Niño events that atmospheric hydrogen cyanide (HCN) tends to be higher during such years than at other times. The Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) on the Aura satellite has been measuring HCN mixing ratios since launch in 2004; the measurements are ongoing at the time of writing. The winter of 2015-2016 saw the largest El Niño event since 1997-1998. We present MLS measurements of HCN in the lower stratosphere for the Aura mission to date, comparing the 2015-2016 El Niño period to the rest of the mission. HCN in 2015-2016 is higher than at any other time during the mission, but ground-based measurements suggest that it may have been even more elevated in 1997-1998. As the MLS HCN data are essentially unvalidated, we show them alongside data from the MIPAS and ACE-FTS instruments; the three instruments agree reasonably well in the tropical lower stratosphere. Global HCN emissions calculated from the Global Fire Emissions Database (GFED v4.1) database are much greater during large El Niño events and are greater in 1997-1998 than in 2015-2016, thereby showing good qualitative agreement with the measurements. Correlation between El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) indices, measured HCN, and GFED HCN emissions is less clear if the 2015-2016 event is excluded. In particular, the 2009-2010 winter had fairly strong El Niño conditions and fairly large GFED HCN emissions, but very little effect is observed in the MLS HCN.

  13. London atmospheric Hydrogen and Carbon Monoxide: 12 year record, fluxes, and diurnal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanoisellé, M.; Fisher, R. E.; Sriskantharajah, S.; Lowry, D.; Fowler, C. M. R.; Nisbet, E. G.

    2009-04-01

    Atmospheric hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) have been measured at the Royal Holloway site, 30km WSW of London, for 12 years. This site receives air that has passed over London when there are easterly winds and cleaner, background air when the wind comes from the SW. H2 and CO mixing ratios are measured continuously at 30 minute intervals on a Trace Analytical Reduction Gas Detector coupled to a HP5890 GC since September 1996, and on a Peak Performer I (or PP1) since July 2007 at 5 minute intervals. Both instruments use 2 1/8" packed columns in series: a Unibeads 1S and a Molecular Sieve 5A. The PP1 detector (Reduced Compound Photometer) is an updated version of the old RGD2, and both use zero air as the carrier gas. CO is calibrated twice a month against NOAA-CMDL standards (mixing ratios range: 186 to 300 ppb). H2 was uncalibrated until 2006, but is now calibrated monthly against internal standards (range 530 to 750 ppb) measured at MPI-Jena as part of the Eurohydros project. A linearity correction is applied to each instrument, based on the standard measurements. A secondary standard is measured before each sample on the GC-RGD and another one is measured 4 to 6 times in a row twice a day on the PP1. A target gas is measured daily on both instruments since September 2008. The secondary standards and the target gas are dry ambient air in 70L stainless steel tanks filled to a pressure of 8 bars. Comparison of results from the two instruments suggests that for the most part the data are in good agreement, but an interlaboratory round robin comparison exercise for the Eurohydros project showed that the RGD is not linear at low values of CO. This is particularly noticeable for CO levels below 150 ppb. The long-term record of CO at Royal Holloway shows a significant decline since the start of the record: the annual mean CO mixing ratio in 2008 was three times lower than in 1997. Flux calculations, by ratio against 222Rn, CH4 and CO2, suggest CO emissions

  14. Pyrrolnitrin and Hydrogen Cyanide Production by Pseudomonas chlororaphis Strain PA23 Exhibits Nematicidal and Repellent Activity against Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munmun Nandi

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain PA23 is a biocontrol agent able to suppress growth of the fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. This bacterium produces an arsenal of exometabolites including pyrrolnitrin (PRN, phenazine (PHZ, hydrogen cyanide (HCN, and degradative enzymes. Production of these compounds is controlled at both the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels by the Gac-Rsm system, RpoS, PsrA, and the Phz quorum-sensing system. Beyond pathogen-suppression, the success of a biocontrol agent is dependent upon its ability to establish itself in the environment where predation by bacterivorous organisms, including nematodes, may threaten persistence. The focus of this study was to investigate whether PA23 is able to resist grazing by Caenorhabditis elegans and to define the role played by exoproducts in the bacterial-nematode interaction. We discovered that both PRN and HCN contribute to fast- and slow-killing of C. elegans. HCN is well-established as having lethal effects on C. elegans; however, PRN has not been reported to be nematicidal. Exposure of L4 stage nematodes to purified PRN reduced nematode viability in a dose-dependent fashion and led to reduced hatching of eggs laid by gravid adults. Because bacterial metabolites can act as chemoattractants or repellents, we analyzed whether PA23 exhibited attractant or repulsive properties towards C. elegans. Both PRN and HCN were found to be potent repellents. Next we investigated whether the presence of C. elegans would elicit changes in PA23 gene activity. Co-culturing the two organisms increased expression of a number of genes associated with biocontrol, including phzA, hcnA, phzR, phzI, rpoS and gacS. Exoproduct analysis showed that PHZ and autoinducer signals were upregulated, consistent with the gene expression profiles. Collectively, these findings indicate that PA23 is able to sense the presence of C. elegans and it is able to both repel and kill the nematodes, which

  15. Hydrogen Cyanide in the Upper Troposphere: GEM-AQ Simulation and Comparison with ACE-FTS Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupu, A.; Kaminski, J. W.; Neary, L.; McConnell, J. C.; Toyota, K.; Rinsland, C. P.; Bernath, P. F.; Walker, K. A.; Boone, C. D.; Nagahama, Y.; hide

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the spatial and temporal distribution of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in the upper troposphere through numerical simulations and comparison with observations from a space-based instrument. To perform the simulations, we used the Global Environmental Multiscale Air Quality model (GEM-AQ), which is based on the threedimensional Gobal multiscale model developed by the Meteorological Service of Canada for operational weather forecasting. The model was run for the period 2004-2006 on a 1.5deg x 1.5deg global grid with 28 hybrid vertical levels from the surface up to 10 hPa. Objective analysis data from the Canadian Meteorological Centre were used to update the meteorological fields every 24 h. Fire emission fluxes of gas species were generated by using year-specific inventories of carbon emissions with 8-day temporal resolution from the Global Fire Emission Database (GFED) version 2. The model output is compared with HCN profiles measured by the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS) instrument onboard the Canadian SCISAT-1 satellite. High values of up to a few ppbv are observed in the tropics in the Southern Hemisphere; the enhancement in HCN volume mixing ratios in the upper troposphere is most prominent in October. Low upper-tropospheric mixing ratios of less than 100 pptv are mostly recorded at middle and high latitudes in the Southern Hemisphere in May-July. Mixing ratios in Northern Hemisphere peak in the boreal summer. The amplitude of the seasonal variation is less pronounced than in the Southern Hemisphere. The comparison with the satellite data shows that in the upper troposphere GEM-AQ perform7s well globally for all seasons, except at northern hi gh and middle latitudes in surnmer, where the model has a large negative bias, and in the tropics in winter and spring, where it exhibits large positive bias. This may reflect inaccurate emissions or possible inaccuracies in the emission profile. The model is able to

  16. A comparison of hydrogen-bonded and van der Waals isomers of phenolṡṡnitrogen and phenolṡṡcarbon monoxide: An ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Darren M.; Müller-Dethlefs, Klaus; Peel, J. Barrie

    1999-08-01

    The hydrogen-bonded and van der Waals isomers of phenolṡṡnitrogen and phenolṡṡcarbon monoxide in their neutral electronic (S0) and cation ground state (D0) were studied using ab initio HF/6-31G*, MP2/6-31G*, and B3LYP/6-31G* methods. The hydrogen-bonded isomers have the ligand bound via the hydroxyl group of the phenol ring, while the van der Waals isomers studied have the ligand located above the aromatic ring. For both complexes, the hydrogen-bonded isomer was found to be the most stable form for both the S0 and the D0 states. For phenolṡṡcarbon monoxide, twice as many isomers as compared to phenolṡṡnitrogen were found. The hydrogen-bonded isomer with the carbon end bonded to the hydroxyl group was the most stable structure for both the S0 and the D0 states.

  17. Estimation of the molecular hydrogen soil uptake and traffic emissions at a suburban site near Paris through hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and radon-222 semicontinuous measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yver, C.; Schmidt, M.; Bousquet, P.; Ramonet, M.; Bousquet, P.; Zahorowski, W.

    2009-01-01

    Since June 2006, simultaneous semicontinuous measurements of tropospheric molecular hydrogen (H 2 ), carbon monoxide (CO), and radon-222 ( 222 Rn) have been performed at Gif-sur-Yvette (Paris region), a suburban atmospheric measurement site in France. Molecular hydrogen mixing ratios range from 500 to 1000 ppb, CO mixing ratios vary from 100 to 1400 ppb, and 222 Rn concentrations fluctuate from 0 to 20 Bq m -3 . The H 2 seasonal cycle shows the expected pattern for the Northern Hemisphere with a maximum in spring and a minimum in autumn. We inferred a mean baseline value of 533 ppb with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 30 ppb. Carbon monoxide exhibits a seasonal cycle with a maximum in winter and a minimum in summer. The mean baseline value reaches 132 ppb with a peak-to-peak amplitude of 40 ppb. Radon-222 presents weak seasonal variations with a maximum in autumn/winter and a minimum in spring/summer. The diurnal cycles of H 2 and CO are dominated by emissions from nearby traffic with two peaks during morning and evening rush hours. The typical H 2 /CO emission ratio from traffic is found to be 0.47 ± 0.08 on a molar basis (ppb/ppb). The radon tracer method is applied to nighttime H 2 observations to estimate the H 2 soil uptake of the nocturnal catchment area of our sampling site. The influences from nocturnal local anthropogenic combustion sources are estimated by parallel measurements of CO at 0.14 * 10 -5 g(H 2 ) m -2 h -1 . The mean inferred dry deposition velocity is 0.024 ± 0.013 cm s -1 with a seasonal amplitude of 40% at Gif-sur-Yvette.

  18. Metal cyanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, A.F.

    1988-01-01

    From the biewpoint of general crystal T chemistry principles and on the basis of modern data the structural chemistry of metal cyanites is presented. The features of the structure of the following compounds are considered: simple ionic alkali cyanides (Li-Cs) containing CN - ions; molybdenum (4,5), tungsten (4,5), rhenium (5,6) complexes etc, where-CN group is only connected with one metal atom; covalent cyanides of cadmium and other elements in which the CN-group serves as a bridge

  19. Kinetics, isotope effects, and mechanism for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide on supported nickel catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, T.; Masuda, H.; Imai, H.; Miyamoto, A.; Baba, S.; Murakami, Y.

    1982-01-01

    Kinetics and hydrogen-deuterium isotope effects in the methanation of adsorbed CO molecules on a Ni/SiO 2 catalyst were precisely measured by using pulse surface reaction rate analysis (PSRA). When a CO pulse was injected into flowing hydrogen, it was immediately adsorbed on the catalyst and gradually hydrogenated to CH 4 and H 2 O. The amounts of CH 4 and H 2 O produced by the hydrogenation of the adsorbed CO were determined up to various times, and it was found that CH 4 and H 2 O were produced at the same rate. When O 2 instead of CO was injected, H 2 O was immediately produced. From these results, the rate-determining step of the reaction was found to be C-O bond dissociation of an adsorbed CO molecule or a partially hydrogenated CO species. By PSRA, the rate constant for the C-O bond dissocition process per adsorbed CO molecule (k/sub H/) was determined at various temperatures, and the Arrhenius parameters of the rate constant were obtained. The rate constant in flowing deuterium (k/sub D/) was also determined. it was found that k/sub D/ is considerably larger than k/sub H/, indicating an inverse isotope effect. The average value of k/sub H//k/sub D/ was 0.75. From these results, it was concluded that adsorbed CO is not directly dissociated to surface carbon and oxygen atoms but it is partially hydrogenated before C-O bond dissociation under the conditions of the PSRA experiment. 8 figures

  20. Conditions determining the oxidation of carbon monoxide and of hydrogen by Hydrogenomonas carboxydovorans. [Hydogenomonas carboxydovorans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kistner, A

    1954-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Hydrogenomonas, which are widely distributed in soil, have in common the ability to grow autotrophically by oxidizing hydrogen with simultaneous reduction of carbon dioxide, and heterotrophically on common nutrient media. A survey of the literature shows that this ability is due to a specific hydrogen activating enzyme system, a hydrogenase. Apparently in most species this enzyme has a typically adaptive character to such a degree that cells grown in the absence of hydrogen as a rule do not produce it in measurable quantities. Also the ability to produce the hydrogenase under suitable conditions may be lost. Experimental studies were conducted to investigate the behavior of Hydrogenomonas carboxydovorans in this respect, and in addition, to determine whether or not the ability to oxidize CO should be considered an adaptive property. The stock culture was maintained in a mineral medium with an atmosphere of 80% CO and 20% O/sub 2/. Ways in which the culture conditions influenced the behavior of resting cells of H. carboxydovorans in the presence of H, CO, and lactate were investigated. Also studied was what would happen, if either H or CO were offered to the bacteria simultaneously with lactate.

  1. Determination of cyanide by an indirect spectrophotometric method using 5-Br-PADAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu-Sheng, W; Yu-Qin, L; Fang, Y; Nai-Kui, S

    1981-09-01

    Complexation of Ni(2+) with cyanide inhibits its colour reaction with 5-Br-PADAP and this reaction is used in the spectrophotometric determination of cyanide at the ug level. Cyanide in industrial waste waters is determined after an initial transfer as hydrogen cyanide from the sample into sodium hydroxide solution with a stream of air.

  2. Hydrogenation of carbon monoxide on WO/sub 3/-Supported ruthenium catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshinari, Tomohiro; Suganuma, Fujio; Sera, Chikara

    1988-01-01

    In this study, a WO/sub 3/-supported catalyst was prepared to conduct hydrogenation of CO for examining the product distribution and composition of hydrocarbons, using a gamma-alumina-supported catalyst for comparison. These catalysts were used under pressure to conduct a distributive reaction and the desorbing behavior of CO or H/sub 2/ at elevated temperature was measured to examine the influence of the type of carrier or the method of preparation on the activity and the distribution of products formed. The WO/sub 3/-supported catalyst gave a carbon chain length distribution that did not comply with the rule of Schulz-Flory, giving a composition richer in the isomers. Carbon number distribution is affected by Ru-dispersion, and the selectivity of isomers depends on the acidity of the carrier. Formed products distribution of the WO/sub 3/-supported reaction is attributable to the secondary reaction, which relates to the acidic point of the carrier, of the primary product formed on the metal. (7 figs, 4 tabs, 18 refs)

  3. Poisoning by carbon monoxide in the hydrogen exchange reaction between deuterium gas and water preadsorbed on a platinum--alumina catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, I.; Tamaru, K.

    1979-01-01

    Poisoning by carbon monoxide in the exchange reaction between deuterium and the water preadsorbed on a platinum--alumina catalyst was studied, by measuring not only the rate of reaction but also its kinetic behavior and the adsorption of reactants on the catalyst surface. The shape of the poisoning curve is closely associated with the kinetic behavior and exhibited an abrupt change on freezing the adsorbed water below 273 0 K. When the rate is proportional to deuterium pressure and independent of the amount of water adsorbed, the exchange rate dropped sharply by carbon monoxide adsorbed of a few percent coverage without any marked changes in the amount and the rate of hydrogen adsorption on the platinum surface. However, at temperatures lower than 273 0 K and at higher deuterium pressures, the rate depends not on the deuterium pressure but on the amount of water adsorbed. The migration of hydrogen in or through the adsorbed water is seemingly sufficiently suppressed by freezing to control the overall reaction rate. In this case, a small amount of adsorption of carbon monoxide did not show any toxicity, but then a steep poisoning started accompanying a change in the kinetic behavior. It was accordingly demonstrated that the mechanism of the reaction may be better understood by studying poisoning and measuring adsorption, overall rate, and kinetic behavior

  4. Dual Gas Treatment With Hydrogen and Carbon Monoxide Attenuates Oxidative Stress and Protects From Renal Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, T; Hayashi, T; Inamoto, T; Kato, R; Ibuki, N; Takahara, K; Takai, T; Yoshikawa, Y; Uchimoto, T; Saito, K; Tanda, N; Kouno, J; Minami, K; Uehara, H; Hirano, H; Nomi, H; Okada, Y; Azuma, H

    Hydrogen (H 2 ) and carbon monoxide (CO) gas are both reported to reduce reactive oxygen species and alleviate tissue ischemia-reperfusion (I-R) injury. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of a mixture of H 2 gas and CO gas (dual gas) in comparison with hydrogen gas (H 2 : 2%) alone on I-R renal injury (composition of dual gas; N 2 : 77.8%; O 2 : 20.9%; H 2 : 1.30%; CO: 250 parts per million). Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (body weight 250-280 g) were divided into 5 groups: (1) sham operation control, (2) dual gas inhalation (dual treatment) without I-R treatment, (3) I-R renal injury, (4) H 2 gas alone inhalation (H 2 treatment) with I-R renal injury, and (5) dual treatment with I-R renal injury. I-R renal injury was induced by clamping the left renal artery and vein for 45 minutes followed by reperfusion, and then contralateral nephrectomy was performed 2 weeks later. Renal function was markedly decreased at 24 hours after reperfusion, and thereafter the effects of dual gas were assessed by histologic examination and determination of the superoxide radical, together with functional and molecular analyses. Pathologic examination of the kidney of I-R rats revealed severe renal damage. Importantly, cytoprotective effects of the dual treatment in comparison with H 2 treatment and I-R renal injury were observed in terms of superoxide radical scavenging activity and histochemical features. Rats given dual treatment and I-R renal injury showed significant decreases in blood urea nitrogen. Increased expression of several inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-6, intracellular adhesion molecule-1, nuclear factor-κB, hypoxia inducible factor-1α, and heme oxygenase-1) was attenuated by the dual treatment. Dual gas inhalation decreases oxidative stress and markedly improves I-R-induced renal injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Diversified glucosinolate metabolism: biosynthesis of hydrogen cyanide and of the hydroxynitrile glucoside alliarinoside in relation to sinigrin metabolism in Alliaria petiolata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina eFrisch

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Alliaria petiolata (garlic mustard, Brassicaceae contains the glucosinolate sinigrin as well as alliarinoside, a γ-hydroxynitrile glucoside structurally related to cyanogenic glucosides. sinigrin may defend this plant against a broad range of enemies, while alliarinoside confers resistance to specialized (glucosinolate-adapted herbivores. Hydroxynitrile glucosides and glucosinolates are two classes of specialized metabolites, which generally do not occur in the same plant species. Administration of [UL-14C]-methionine to excised leaves of A. petiolata showed that both alliarinoside and sinigrin were biosynthesized from methionine. The biosynthesis of alliarinoside was shown not to bifurcate from sinigrin biosynthesis at the oxime level in contrast to the general scheme for hydroxynitrile glucoside biosynthesis. Instead, the aglucon of alliarinoside was formed from metabolism of sinigrin in experiments with crude extracts, suggesting a possible biosynthetic pathway in intact cells. Hence, the alliarinoside pathway may represent a route to hydroxynitrile glucoside biosynthesis resulting from convergent evolution. Metabolite profiling by LC-MS showed no evidence of the presence of cyanogenic glucosides in A. petiolata. However, we detected hydrogen cyanide (HCN release from sinigrin and added thiocyanate ion and benzyl thiocyanate in A. petiolata indicating an enzymatic pathway from glucosinolates via allyl thiocyanate and indole glucosinolate derived thiocyanate ion to HCN. Alliarinoside biosynthesis and HCN release from glucosinolate-derived metabolites expand the range of glucosinolate-related defences and can be viewed as a third line of defence, with glucosinolates and thiocyanate forming protein being the first and second lines, respectively.

  6. Cyanide leaching of Au/CeO2: highly active gold clusters for 1,3-butadiene hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Y; Hensen, E J M

    2009-11-07

    Ceria-supported gold catalysts before and after leaching by NaCN were investigated by X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the Au L(III) edge. After gold leaching, isolated gold cations remain in close interaction with the support. These ions form an ideal precursor to very small clusters of a few gold atoms upon reduction. The resulting gold clusters exhibit a very high intrinsic activity in the hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene, which is at least one order of magnitude higher than that of the nanometre-sized gold particles in the non-leached parent catalyst. These findings point to a very strong structure sensitivity of the gold-catalyzed hydrogenation of dienes.

  7. A novel cyanide ion sensing approach based on Raman scattering for the detection of environmental cyanides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; Gopal Reddy, C V; Zhang, Yan; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes a direct optical approach based on Raman scattering for selective and sensitive detection of cyanide ions in aqueous environment without requiring time-consuming sample pretreatment and the formation of hydrogen cyanide. Due to the strong affinity between copper (I) and cyanide ion, evaporated copper (I) iodide (CuI) thin films are shown to be excellent substrates for selective recognition of free cyanide ions in aqueous matrices. The amount of cyanide ion retained by the copper (I) in the CuI thin films reflects its actual concentration in tested samples, and the subsequent Raman measurements of the substrate are shown to be capable of detecting toxic cyanide content at levels under international drinking water standard and environmental regulatory concentrations. Measurements obtained from the same batch of evaporated CuI thin films (approximately 100-nm thickness) show excellent linearity over a variety of cyanide concentrations ranging from 1.5 microM to 0.15 mM. This detection method offers the advantage of selectively detecting cyanides causing a health hazard while avoiding detection of other common interfering anions such as Cl-, Br-, PO4(3-), SO4(2-), NO2-, S2- and SCN-. Coupled with portable Raman systems that are commercially available, our detection approach will provide on-site monitoring capability with little sample preparation or instrument supervision, which will greatly expedite the assessment of potential environmental cyanide risks. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. On the nature of gallium species in gallium-modified mordenite and MFI zeolites. A comparative DRIFT study of carbon monoxide adsorption and hydrogen dissociation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serykh, Alexander I; Kolesnikov, Stanislav P

    2011-04-21

    The results of a DRIFT study of carbon monoxide molecular adsorption and hydrogen dissociative adsorption on gallium-modified mordenite and MFI (ZSM-5) zeolites are presented. It was found that in the reduced gallium-modified mordenite (Ga-MOR) both Ga(3+) and Ga(+) exchanged cations are present and can be detected by CO adsorption. Ga(3+) cations in Ga-MOR dissociatively adsorb molecular hydrogen at elevated temperatures, resulting in the formation of gallium hydride species and acidic hydroxyl groups. In the reduced Ga-MFI evacuated at 823 K under medium vacuum conditions only Ga(+) exchanged intrazeolite cations were detected. It was found, however, that Ga(3+) intrazeolite exchanged cations which form upon high-temperature disproportionation of Ga(+) cations in the reduced Ga-MFI and Ga-MOR can be stabilized by high-temperature oxidation of these zeolites.

  9. Three Gaseous Neurotransmitters, Nitric oxide, Carbon Monoxide, and Hydrogen Sulfide, Are Involved in the Neurogenic Relaxation Responses of the Porcine Internal Anal Sphincter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folasire, Oladayo; Mills, Kylie A; Sellers, Donna J; Chess-Williams, Russ

    2016-01-31

    The internal anal sphincter (IAS) plays an important role in maintaining continence and a number of neurotransmitters are known to regulate IAS tone. The aim of this study was to determine the relative importance of the neurotransmitters involved in the relaxant and contractile responses of the porcine IAS. Responses of isolated strips of IAS to electrical field stimulation (EFS) were obtained in the absence and presence of inhibitors of neurotransmitter systems. Contractile responses of the sphincter to EFS were unaffected by the muscarinic receptor antagonist, atropine (1 μM), but were almost completely abolished by the adrenergic neuron blocker guanethidine (10 μM). Contractile responses were also reduced (by 45% at 5 Hz, P 40-50% reduction), zinc protoprophyrin IX (10 μM), an inhibitor of carbon monoxide synthesis (20-40% reduction), and also propargylglycine (30 μM) and aminooxyacetic acid (30 μM), inhibitors of hydrogen sulphide synthesis (15-20% reduction). Stimulation of IAS efferent nerves releases excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters: noradrenaline is the predominant contractile transmitter with a smaller component from ATP, whilst 3 gases mediate relaxation responses to EFS, with the combined contributions being nitric oxide > carbon monoxide > hydrogen sulfide.

  10. Experimental investigation of aminoacetonitrile formation through the Strecker synthesis in astrophysical-like conditions: reactivity of methanimine (CH2NH), ammonia (NH3), and hydrogen cyanide (HCN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danger, G.; Borget, F.; Chomat, M.; Duvernay, F.; Theulé, P.; Guillemin, J.-C.; Le Sergeant D'Hendecourt, L.; Chiavassa, T.

    2011-11-01

    Context. Studing chemical reactivity in astrophysical environments is an important means for improving our understanding of the origin of the organic matter in molecular clouds, in protoplanetary disks, and possibly, as a final destination, in our solar system. Laboratory simulations of the reactivity of ice analogs provide important insight into the reactivity in these environments. Here, we use these experimental simulations to investigate the Strecker synthesis leading to the formation of aminoacetonitrile in astrophysical-like conditions. The aminoacetonitrile is an interesting compound because it was detected in SgrB2, hence could be a precursor of the smallest amino acid molecule, glycine, in astrophysical environments. Aims: We present the first experimental investigation of the formation of aminoacetonitrile NH2CH2CN from the thermal processing of ices including methanimine (CH2NH), ammonia (NH3), and hydrogen cyanide (HCN) in interstellar-like conditions without VUV photons or particules. Methods: We use Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy to monitor the ice evolution during its warming. Infrared spectroscopy and mass spectroscopy are then used to identify the aminoacetonitrile formation. Results: We demonstrate that methanimine can react with -CN during the warming of ice analogs containing at 20 K methanimine, ammonia, and [NH4+ -CN] salt. During the ice warming, this reaction leads to the formation of poly(methylene-imine) polymers. The polymer length depend on the initial ratio of mass contained in methanimine to that in the [NH4+ -CN] salt. In a methanimine excess, long polymers are formed. As the methanimine is progressively diluted in the [NH4+ -CN] salt, the polymer length decreases until the aminoacetonitrile formation at 135 K. Therefore, these results demonstrate that aminoacetonitrile can be formed through the second step of the Strecker synthesis in astrophysical-like conditions.

  11. Muonium addition to cyanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadlbauer, J.M.; Ng, B.W.; Jean, Y.C.; Walker, D.C.

    1982-10-01

    Muonium, the light radioactive isotope of hydrogen, was found to add to the CN triple bond of acetonitrile, cyanoacetate, cyanide and tetracyanocadmate(II) with room temperature rate constants, K sub(M), of 5.1 x 10 7 , 7.7 x l0 7 , 3.0 x 10 9 , and 1.7 x 10 10 (all M -1 s -1 ), respectively. While Cd(CN) 4 -2 is diffusion controlled with an activation energy of approximately 15 kJ/mole the others appear to be activation controlled as with cyanoacetate's activation barrier of approximately 35 kJ/mole. Kinetic isotope effects range from 0.7 to 24

  12. Physiologically available cyanide (PAC) in manufactured gas plant waste and soil samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magee, B.; Taft, A.; Ratliff, W.; Kelley, J.; Sullivan, J.; Pancorbo, O.

    1995-01-01

    Iron-complexed cyanide compounds, such as ferri-ferrocyanide (Prussian Blue), are wastes associated with former manufactured gas plant (MGP) facilities. When tested for total cyanide, these wastes often show a high total cyanide content. Because simple cyanide salts are acutely toxic, cyanide compounds can be the subject of concern. However, Prussian Blue and related species are known to have a low order of human and animal toxicity. Toxicology data on complexed cyanides will be presented. Another issue regarding Prussian Blue and related species is that the total cyanide method does not accurately represent the amount of free cyanide released from these cyanide species. The method involves boiling the sample in an acidic solution under vacuum to force the formation of HCN gas. Thus, Prussian Blue, which is known to be low in toxicity, cannot be properly evaluated with current methods. The Massachusetts Natural Gas Council initiated a program with the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection to develop a method that would define the amount of cyanide that is able to be converted into hydrogen cyanide under the pH conditions of the stomach. It is demonstrated that less than 1% of the cyanide present in Prussian Blue samples and soils from MGP sites can be converted to HCN under the conditions of the human stomach. The physiologically available cyanide method has been designed to be executed at a higher temperature for one hour. It is shown that physiologically available cyanide in MGP samples is < 5--15% of total cyanide

  13. Unconventional hydrogen bonding to organic ions in the gas phase: Stepwise association of hydrogen cyanide with the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations and protonated pyridine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamid, Ahmed M.; El-Shall, M. Samy, E-mail: mselshal@vcu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23284 (United States); Hilal, Rifaat; Elroby, Shaaban; Aziz, Saadullah G. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-08-07

    Equilibrium thermochemical measurements using the ion mobility drift cell technique have been utilized to investigate the binding energies and entropy changes for the stepwise association of HCN molecules with the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations forming the C{sub 5}H{sub 5}N{sup +·}(HCN){sub n} and C{sub 4}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}{sup +·}(HCN){sub n} clusters, respectively, with n = 1–4. For comparison, the binding of 1–4 HCN molecules to the protonated pyridine C{sub 5}H{sub 5}NH{sup +}(HCN){sub n} has also been investigated. The binding energies of HCN to the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations are nearly equal (11.4 and 12.0 kcal/mol, respectively) but weaker than the HCN binding to the protonated pyridine (14.0 kcal/mol). The pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations form unconventional carbon-based ionic hydrogen bonds with HCN (CH{sup δ+}⋯NCH). Protonated pyridine forms a stronger ionic hydrogen bond with HCN (NH{sup +}⋯NCH) which can be extended to a linear chain with the clustering of additional HCN molecules (NH{sup +}⋯NCH··NCH⋯NCH) leading to a rapid decrease in the bond strength as the length of the chain increases. The lowest energy structures of the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cation clusters containing 3-4 HCN molecules show a strong tendency for the internal solvation of the radical cation by the HCN molecules where bifurcated structures involving multiple hydrogen bonding sites with the ring hydrogen atoms are formed. The unconventional H-bonds (CH{sup δ+}⋯NCH) formed between the pyridine or the pyrimidine radical cations and HCN molecules (11–12 kcal/mol) are stronger than the similar (CH{sup δ+}⋯NCH) bonds formed between the benzene radical cation and HCN molecules (9 kcal/mol) indicating that the CH{sup δ+} centers in the pyridine and pyrimidine radical cations have more effective charges than in the benzene radical cation.

  14. Cyanide binding to hexacoordinate cyanobacterial hemoglobins: hydrogen-bonding network and heme pocket rearrangement in ferric H117A Synechocystis hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, B Christie; Nothnagel, Henry J; Vuletich, David A; Falzone, Christopher J; Lecomte, Juliette T J

    2004-10-05

    The truncated hemoglobin (Hb) from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is a bis-histidyl hexacoordinate complex in the absence of exogenous ligands. This protein can form a covalent cross-link between His117 in the H-helix and the heme 2-vinyl group. Cross-linking, the physiological importance of which has not been established, is avoided with the His117Ala substitution. In the present work, H117A Hb was used to explore exogenous ligand binding to the heme group. NMR and thermal denaturation data showed that the replacement was of little consequence to the structural and thermodynamic properties of ferric Synechocystis Hb. It did, however, decelerate the association of cyanide ions with the heme iron. Full complexation required hours, instead of minutes, of incubation at optical and NMR concentrations. At neutral pH and in the presence of excess cyanide, binding occurred with a first-order dependence on cyanide concentration, eliminating distal histidine decoordination as the rate-limiting step. The cyanide complex of the H117A variant was characterized for the conformational changes occurring as the histidine on the distal side, His46 (E10), was displaced. Extensive rearrangement allowed Tyr22 (B10) to insert in the heme pocket and Gln43 (E7) and Gln47 (E11) to come in contact with it. H-bond formation to the bound cyanide was identified in solution with the use of (1)H(2)O/(2)H(2)O mixtures. Cyanide binding also resulted in a change in the ratio of heme orientational isomers, in a likely manifestation of heme environment reshaping. Similar observations were made with the related Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 H117A Hb, except that cyanide binding was rapid in this protein. In both cases, the (15)N chemical shift of bound cyanide was reminiscent of that in peroxidases and the orientation of the proximal histidine was as in other truncated Hbs. The ensemble of the data provided insight into the structural cooperativity of the heme pocket scaffold and pointed

  15. Carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The document identifies the main sources of carbon monoxide (CO) in the general outdoor atmosphere, describes methods of measuring and monitoring its concentration levels in the United Kingdom, and discusses the effects of carbon monoxide on human health. Following its review, the Panel has put forward a recommendation for an air quality standard for carbon monoxide in the United Kingdom of 10 ppm, measured as a running 8-hour average. The document includes tables and graphs of emissions of CO, in total and by emission source, and on the increase in blood levels of carboxyhaemoglobin with continuing exposure to CO. 11 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. determination of free cyanide and total cyanide concentrations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bogoso Gold Limited (BGL), have adopted the use of cyanide solution in ... cyanide compounds, cyanide spillages into nearby water bodies and limitations in ..... 1. Amegbey, N.A.; Adimado, A.A. Min. Extract. Metallurgy 2003, 112, 126. 2.

  17. Rhodium based clusters for oxygen reduction and hydrogen oxidation in 0.5 M H2SO4, tolerant to methanol and carbon monoxide, respectively

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uribe-Godinez, J.; Jimenez-Sandoval, O.; Borja-Arco, E.; Altamirano-Gutierrez, A. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Queritaro (Mexico); Castellanos, R.H. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada-Queretaro, Queretaro (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    Rhodium (Rh6(CO)16) and novel Rh-based clusters were prepared using thermolysis techniques under different conditions in N2 and H2 reaction media, as well as in n-nonane, o-xylene, 1,2-dichlorobenzene and dimethylsulfoxide. The clusters were used as novel electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the absence and presence of 1.0 and 2.0 M methanol solutions. The catalysts were also used for hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) with pure hydrogen (H2) and in the presence of carbon monoxide (CO). Rotating disk electrode measurements were used to analyze the materials. The study showed that the electrocatalyst support ratio plays a significant role in the electrochemical behaviour of the materials. Rh6(CO)16 and Rh2(1,2-DCB) presented the best electrocatalytic behaviour for ORR and HOR in the absence and presence of methanol and CO. The study demonstrated that the rhodium-based materials are capable of performing ORR and HOR while being tolerant of both methanol and CO. 3 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Recovery of cyanide in gold leach waste solution by volatilization and absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gönen, N; Kabasakal, O S; Ozdil, G

    2004-09-10

    In this study, the effects of pH, time and temperature in regeneration of cyanide in the leaching waste solution of gold production from disseminated gold ore by cyanidation process were investigated and the optimum conditions, consumptions and cyanide recovery values were determined. The sample of waste solution containing 156 mg/l free CN- and 358 mg/l total CN-, that was obtained from Gümüşhane-Mastra/Turkey disseminated gold ores by cyanidation and carbon-in-pulp (CIP) process under laboratory conditions was used in the experiments. Acidification with H2SO4, volatilization of hydrogen cyanide (HCN) with air stripping and absorption of HCN in a basic solution stages were applied and under optimum conditions, 100% of free cyanide and 48% of complex cyanide and consequently 70% of the total cyanide in the liquid phase of gold leach effluent are recovered.

  19. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratios of sodium and potassium cyanide as a forensic signature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzer, Helen W; Horita, Juske; Moran, James J; Tomkins, Bruce A; Janszen, Derek B; Carman, April

    2012-01-01

    Sodium and potassium cyanide are highly toxic, produced in large amounts by the chemical industry, and linked to numerous high-profile crimes. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has identified cyanide as one of the most probable agents to be used in a chemical terrorism event. We investigated whether stable C and N isotopic content of sodium and potassium cyanide could serve as a forensic signature for sample matching, using a collection of 65 cyanide samples. Upon analysis, a few of the cyanide samples displayed nonhomogeneous isotopic content associated with degradation to a carbonate salt and loss of hydrogen cyanide. Most samples had highly reproducible isotope content. Of the 65 cyanide samples, >95% could be properly matched based on C and N isotope ratios, with a false match rate <3%. These results suggest that stable C and N isotope ratios are a useful forensic signature for matching cyanide samples. © 2011 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  20. Apolar Distal Pocket Mutants of Yeast Cytochrome c Peroxidase: Hydrogen Peroxide Reactivity and Cyanide Binding of the TriAla, TriVal, and TriLeu Variants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidwai, Anil K.; Meyen, Cassandra; Kilheeney, Heather; Wroblewski, Damian; Vitello, Lidia B.; Erman, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Three yeast cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) variants with apolar distal heme pockets have been constructed. The CcP variants have Arg48, Trp51, and His52 mutated to either all alanines, CcP(triAla), all valines, CcP(triVal), or all leucines, CcP(triLeu). The triple mutants have detectable enzymatic activity at pH 6 but the activity is less than 0.02% that of wild-type CcP. The activity loss is primarily due to the decreased rate of reaction between the triple mutants and H2O2 compared to wild-type CcP. Spectroscopic properties and cyanide binding characteristics of the triple mutants have been investigated over the pH stability region of CcP, pH 4 to 8. The absorption spectra indicate that the CcP triple mutants have hemes that are predominantly five-coordinate, high-spin at pH 5 and six-coordinate, low-spin at pH 8. Cyanide binding to the triple mutants is biphasic indicating that the triple mutants have two slowly-exchanging conformational states with different cyanide affinities. The binding affinity for cyanide is reduced at least two orders of magnitude in the triple mutants compared to wild-type CcP and the rate of cyanide binding is reduced by four to five orders of magnitude. Correlation of the reaction rates of CcP and 12 distal pocket mutants with H2O2 and HCN suggests that both reactions require ionization of the reactants within the distal heme pocket allowing the anion to bind the heme iron. Distal pocket features that promote substrate ionization (basic residues involved in base-catalyzed substrate ionization or polar residues that can stabilize substrate anions) increase the overall rate of reaction with H2O2 and HCN while features that inhibit substrate ionization slow the reactions. PMID:23022490

  1. Hydrogen-Induced Adsorption of Carbon Monoxide on the Gold Dimer Cation: A Joint Experimental and DFT Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vojkovic, Marin; Rayane, Driss; Antoine, Rodolphe; Broyer, Michel; Allouche, Abdul-Rahman; Mignon, Pierre; Dugourd, Philippe

    2017-06-15

    It is demonstrated, using tandem mass spectrometry and radio frequency ion trap, that the adsorption of a H atom on the gold dimer cation, Au 2 H + , prevents its dissociation and allows for adsorption of CO. Reaction kinetics are measured by employing a radio frequency ion trap, where Au 2 + and CO interact for a given reaction time. The effect of a hydrogen atom is evaluated by comparing reaction rate constants measured for Au 2 + and Au 2 H + . The theoretical results for the adsorption of CO molecules and their reaction characteristics with Au 2 + and Au 2 H + are found to agree with the experimental findings. The joint investigations provide insights into hydrogen atom adsorption effects and consequent reaction mechanisms.

  2. Cyanide intoxication as part of smoke inhalation--a review on diagnosis and treatment from the emergency perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson-Smith, Pia; Jansen, Erik C; Hyldegaard, Ole

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the current literature on smoke inhalation injuries with special attention to the effects of hydrogen cyanide. It is assumed that cyanide poisoning is still an overlooked diagnosis in fire victims. Treatment against cyanide poisoning in the emergency setting should be given based...

  3. Coumarin amide derivatives as fluorescence chemosensors for cyanide anions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qianqian [School of Material Science and Engineering, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022, Shandong (China); Liu, Zhiqiang [State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100, Shandong (China); Cao, Duxia, E-mail: duxiacao@ujn.edu.cn [School of Material Science and Engineering, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022, Shandong (China); Guan, Ruifang, E-mail: mse_guanrf@ujn.edu.cn [School of Material Science and Engineering, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022, Shandong (China); Wang, Kangnan; Shan, Yanyan; Xu, Yongxiao; Ma, Lin [School of Material Science and Engineering, Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Preparation and Measurement of Building Materials, University of Jinan, Jinan 250022, Shandong (China)

    2015-07-01

    Four coumarin amide derivatives with 4-methyl coumarin or pyrene as terminal group have been synthesized. Their photophysical properties and recognition properties for cyanide anions have been examined. The results indicate that the compounds can recognize cyanide anions with obvious absorption and fluorescence spectra change, at the same time, obvious color and fluorescence change can be observed by naked eye. The in situ hydrogen nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and photophysical properties change confirm that Michael additions between the chemosensors and cyanide anions take place at the 4-position of coumarin. - Highlights: • Four coumarin amide derivatives with 4-methyl coumarin or pyrene as terminal group were synthesized. • The compounds can recognize cyanide anions with obvious absorption and fluorescence spectra change. • Michael additions between the chemosensors and cyanide anions take place at the 4-position of coumarin.

  4. Effects of Tai Chi exercise on blood pressure and plasma levels of nitric oxide, carbon monoxide and hydrogen sulfide in real-world patients with essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaogui; Zhang, Yi; Tao, Sai

    2015-01-01

    Objective was to investigate the effects of Tai Chi exercise on nitric oxide (NO), carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrogen sulfide (H2S) levels, and blood pressure (BP) in patients with essential hypertension (EH). EH patients were assigned to the Tai Chi exercise group (HTC, n = 24), and hypertension group (HP, n = 16) by patients' willingness. Healthy volunteers matched for age and gender were recruited as control (NP, n = 16). HTC group performed Tai Chi (60 min/d, 6 d/week) for 12 weeks. Measurements (blood glucose, cholesterol, NO, CO, H2S and BP) were obtained at week 0, 6, and 12. SBP, MAP, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels decreased, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels increased by week 12 in the HTC group (all p exercise seems to have beneficial effects on BP and gaseous signaling molecules in EH patients. However, further investigation is required to understand the exact mechanisms underlying these observations, and to confirm these results in a larger cohort.

  5. Cyanides: decomposition and determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilath, I.; Cohen, L.

    1977-08-01

    Different cyanide destruction methods such as electrolysis (with and without the addition of salt), hypochlorite treatment and ion exchange detoxication were evaluated on a laboratory scale using model solutions. Parameters were determined for the optimal operation of the investigated processes. Analytical methods were adapted for concentrations and compositions of interest. An easy and rapid method of complex cyanide breakdown by ion exchange treatment was developed for analytical purposes. (author)

  6. Antidotes for Cyanide Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    treatment, six task forces formulated recom- mendations for a national structure of prehospital EM by family physicians, ambulance nurses , and hospital...competencies between ambulance nurses and prehospital physicians. Eur J Emerg Med 2011; 18:322 327. Antidotes for cyanide poisoning Vikhyat S. Bebarta...the study model (limited to 60 min after the start of cyanide infusion) and the hemodynamic parameters as end points, instead of long-term sequelae

  7. Millimeter wave spectra of carbonyl cyanide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bteich, S.B.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Motiyenko, R.A.; Margulès, L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2016-01-01

    Context More than 30 cyanide derivatives of simple organic molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium, but only one dicarbonitrile has been found and that very recently. There is still a lack of high-resolution spectroscopic data particularly for dinitriles derivatives. The carbonyl cyanide molecule is a new and interesting candidate for astrophysical detection. It could be formed by the reaction of CO and CN radicals, or by substitution of the hydrogen atom by a cyano group in cyanoformaldehyde, HC(=O)CN, that has already been detected in the interstellar medium. Aims The available data on the rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide is limited in terms of quantum number values and frequency range, and does not allow accurate extrapolation of the spectrum into the millimeter-wave range. To provide a firm basis for astrophysical detection of carbonyl cyanide we studied its millimeter-wave spectrum. Methods The rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide was measured in the frequency range 152 - 308 GHz and analyzed using Watson’s A- and S-reduction Hamiltonians. Results The ground and first excited state of v5 vibrational mode were assigned and analyzed. More than 1100 distinct frequency lines of the ground state were fitted to produce an accurate set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants up to the eighth order. The frequency predictions based on these constants should be accurate enough for astrophysical searches in the frequency range up to 500 GHz and for transition involving energy levels with J ≤ 100 and Ka ≤ 42. Based on the results we searched for interstellar carbonyl cyanide in available observational data without success. Thus, we derived upper limits to its column density in different sources. PMID:27738349

  8. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, ... Install one and check its batteries regularly. View Information About CO Alarms Other CO Topics Safety Tips ...

  9. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the " ...

  10. The fate of cyanide in leach wastes at gold mines: An environmental perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This paper reviews the fate of cyanide in mineral processing wastes at gold mines. • Ore leaching produces numerous cyanide-containing species besides the gold complex. • Many cyanide species are eliminated or sequestered naturally over time. • Sequestered cyanide can be remobilized if conditions change. • Toxicity of released solutions can be reduced by photolytic reactions or offgassing. - Abstract: This paper reviews the basic chemistry of cyanide, methods by which cyanide can be analyzed, and aspects of cyanide behavior that are most relevant to environmental considerations at mineral processing operations associated with gold mines. The emphasis is on research results reported since 1999 and on data gathered for a series of U.S. Geological Survey studies that began in the late 1990s. Cyanide is added to process solutions as the CN − anion, but ore leaching produces numerous other cyanide-containing and cyanide-related species in addition to the desired cyanocomplex of gold. These can include hydrogen cyanide (HCN); cyanometallic complexes of iron, copper, zinc, nickel, and many other metals; cyanate (CNO − ); and thiocyanate (SCN − ). The fate of these species in solid wastes and residual process solutions that remain once gold recovery activities are terminated and in any water that moves beyond the ore processing facility dictates the degree to which cyanide poses a risk to aquatic organisms and aquatic-dependent organisms in the local environment. Cyanide-containing and cyanide-related species are subject to attenuation mechanisms that lead to dispersal to the atmosphere, chemical transformation to other carbon and nitrogen species, or sequestration as cyanometallic precipitates or adsorbed species on mineral surfaces. Dispersal to the atmosphere and chemical transformation amount to permanent elimination of cyanide, whereas sequestration amounts to storage of cyanide in locations from which it can potentially be remobilized by

  11. Vertical observation of molecular hydrogen and carbon monoxide: Implication for non-photochemical H2 production at ocean surface and subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawagucci, S.; Narita, T.; Obata, H.; Ogawa, H.; Gamo, T.

    2009-12-01

    Biological nitrogen fixation is a key metabolism controlling marine N-cycling and also known as a main H2 source. Recently, it was proposed that a monitoring of surface H2 concentration could be used quickly to figure out the spatial extent of biological nitrogen fixation activity without onboard incubation required for currently used methods for detecting the activity. However, H2 behavior in ocean water was still unresolved. This study carried out vertical observation of H2 and CO concentrations in south of Japan, western North Pacific. Because carbon monoxide, CO, in seawater has no relation with nitrogen fixation metabolism and is produced dominantly by the photochemical reaction, which is an altanative H2 source, simultaneous observation and comparison of H2 and CO concentration is helpful to investigate H2 behavior in ocean water. Reductive gases in seawater were observed during the R/V Tansei-maru KT-08-14 cruise by using a wired CTD-CMS (CTD-carousel multiple sampling) system to conduct vertical sampling (at most 200 m depth) and by using a plastic bucket for sampling surface seawater. The sample in the Niskin-X bottle was directed to the bottom of a 120 mL brown-colored glass vial allowed to overflow by 2 volumes before the tube was slowly withdrawn. After the addition of 0.5 mL HgCl2-saturated solution for poisoning, the PTFE-lined butyl-gum septum was used to cap the vials. Molecular hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) were analyzed at an onboard laboratory within 6 hours after subsampling. 20 mL of sample water was substituted by 20 mL of H2- and CO-free air using a gas-tight syringe; then the vial was put on an automatic shaker and shaken upside down for 6 minutes to achieve a complete equilibrium between the dissolved and head space gases in the vial. The equilibrated headspace was taken by another gas-tight syringe and then injected into a gas chromatograph equipped with a trace reduced gas detector. Vertical distribution of dissolved H2 and CO

  12. Chemical analysis of cyanide in cyanidation process: review of methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nova-Alonso, F.; Elorza-Rodriguez, E.; Uribe-Salas, A.; Perez-Garibay, R.

    2007-01-01

    Cyanidation, the world wide method for precious metals recovery, the chemical analysis of cyanide, is a very important, but complex operation. Cyanide can be present forming different species, each of them with different stability, toxicity, analysis method and elimination technique. For cyanide analysis, there exists a wide selection of analytical methods but most of them present difficulties because of the interference of species present in the solution. This paper presents the different available methods for chemical analysis of cyanide: titration, specific electrode and distillation, giving special emphasis on the interferences problem, with the aim of helping in the interpretation of the results. (Author)

  13. The first actinyl cyanide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthet, J.C.; Thuery, P.; Ephritikhine, M.

    2007-01-01

    Reaction of UO 2 (OTf) 2 with 5 molar equivalents of NEt 4 CN in acetonitrile led to the formation of the penta-cyano uranyl complex [NEt 4 ] 3 [UO 2 (CN) 5 ] which is monomeric in the solid state with the five C-coordinated cyanide ions lying in the equatorial plane perpendicular to the linear { UO 2 } axis. (authors)

  14. Electroplating and Cyanide Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torpy, Michael F.; Runke, Henry M.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastes from electroplating industry, covering publications of 1977. This review covers studies such as: (1) ion exchange treatment process; (2) use of reverse osmosis; and (3) cyanide removal and detection. A list of 75 references is also presented. (HM)

  15. Regioselective Acylation of Diols and Triols: The Cyanide Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Peng; Linseis, Michael; Winter, Rainer F; Schmidt, Richard R

    2016-05-11

    Central topics of carbohydrate chemistry embrace structural modifications of carbohydrates and oligosaccharide synthesis. Both require regioselectively protected building blocks that are mainly available via indirect multistep procedures. Hence, direct protection methods targeting a specific hydroxy group are demanded. Dual hydrogen bonding will eventually differentiate between differently positioned hydroxy groups. As cyanide is capable of various kinds of hydrogen bonding and as it is a quite strong sterically nondemanding base, regioselective O-acylations should be possible at low temperatures even at sterically congested positions, thus permitting formation and also isolation of the kinetic product. Indeed, 1,2-cis-diols, having an equatorial and an axial hydroxy group, benzoyl cyanide or acetyl cyanide as an acylating agent, and DMAP as a catalyst yield at -78 °C the thermodynamically unfavorable axial O-acylation product; acyl migration is not observed under these conditions. This phenomenon was substantiated with 3,4-O-unproteced galacto- and fucopyranosides and 2,3-O-unprotected mannopyranosides. Even for 3,4,6-O-unprotected galactopyranosides as triols, axial 4-O-acylation is appreciably faster than O-acylation of the primary 6-hydroxy group. The importance of hydrogen bonding for this unusual regioselectivity could be confirmed by NMR studies and DFT calculations, which indicate favorable hydrogen bonding of cyanide to the most acidic axial hydroxy group supported by hydrogen bonding of the equatorial hydroxy group to the axial oxygen. Thus, the "cyanide effect" is due to dual hydrogen bonding of the axial hydroxy group which enhances the nucleophilicity of the respective oxygen atom, permitting an even faster reaction for diols than for mono-ols. In contrast, fluoride as a counterion favors dual hydrogen bonding to both hydroxy groups leading to equatorial O-acylation.

  16. Effects of acetylene and carbon monoxide on long-term hydrogen production by Mastigocladus laminosus, a thermophilic blue-green alga

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Y; Yokoyama, H; Takahara, K; Miyamoto, K

    1982-01-01

    Long-term H/sub 2/ production by a thermophilic and heterocystous blue-green alga (cyanobacterium) Mastigocladus laminosus was studied under the conditions when acetylene and carbon monoxide were supplemented to the gas phase of the culture vessel. The addition of both gases enhanced H/sub 2/ evolution by nitrogen-starved cells. The concentrations of acetylene and carbon monoxide in the gas phase of argon/CO/sub 2/ (97.5/2.5) were 10% and 0.2 to 1%, respectively, for the maximum H/sub 2/ production. Renewals of the gas phase, in addition to the addition of acetylene and carbon monoxide, were necessary for durable H/sub 2/ production. Since the concentrations of both H/sub 2/ and O/sub 2/ accumulated in the gas phase were minimized after the renewals, the H/sub 2/ uptake activity, which was not completely inhibited by acetylene and carbon monoxide, was reduced and thereby H/sub 2/ evolution was restored. Under such conditions, H/sub 2/ production for up to 20 days was observed under argon and N/sub 2/ atmospheres with average rats of 3.9 and 3.3..mu..l/mg dry wt/h, respectively. H/sub 2/ evolution for 15 days was observed even under an air atmosphere containing acetylene and carbon monoxide. It was thus shown that prolonged production of H/sub 2/ was possible by the use of a blue-green alga which exhibits a high activity of H/sub 2/ uptake under nitrogen-starved conditions.

  17. Análise dos teores de ácidos cianídrico e fítico em suplemento alimentar: multimistura Analysis of hydrogen cyanide and phytic acid contents in feeding supplements: multimixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabete Helbig

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Este estudo objetivou quantificar o teor de ácido cianídrico em folhas de mandioca, que receberam tratamento prévio antes da secagem, e a concentração de ácido fítico na multimistura submetida à cocção úmida. MÉTODOS: Utilizou-se a multimistura produzida pela Pastoral da Criança da cidade de Pelotas (RS, constituída por: farelos de trigo (30% e arroz (30%: farinhas de milho (15% e trigo (10%; pós de casca de ovo (5%, de folha de mandioca (5% e de sementes (5%, abóbora ou girassol. Foi realizada orientação ao fornecedor da folha de mandioca sobre a forma recomendada de preparo antes da secagem. RESULTADOS: O conteúdo de ácidos cianídrico e fitatos no suplemento alimentar foram respectivamente de 85mg.kg-1 e 35.90mg.100-1. CONCLUSÃO: Verificou-se que a mudança na forma de secagem das folhas de mandioca foi eficiente para a redução de glicosídeos cianogênicos, e que o processo de torrefação dos ingredientes foi suficiente para produzir a redução de ácido fítico da multimistura aos níveis preconizados pela legislação, não sendo observadas diferenças estatisticamente significantes quando comparadas as amostras que também foram tratadas com calor úmido.OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to quantify the amount of hydrogen cyanide in cassava leaves that were treated before drying and the concentration of phytic acid in a multimixture submitted to wet cooking. METHODS: The multimixture produced by the Pastoral da Criança of the city of Pelotas (RS consisting of wheat flour (30%, rice flour (30%, corn flour (15%, wheat (10%, egg shell powder (5%, cassava leaves (5% and pumpkin or sunflower seeds (5% was used. The supplier was advised on how to process the cassava leaves before drying them. RESULTS: The hydrogen cyanide and phytic acid contents of the feeding supplement are 85mg.kg-1 and 35.90mg.100-1 respectively. CONCLUSION: Changing the way the cassava leaves were dried was efficient to reduce

  18. Millimeter wave spectra of carbonyl cyanide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bteich, S. B.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2016-07-01

    Context. More than 30 cyanide derivatives of simple organic molecules have been detected in the interstellar medium, but only one dicarbonitrile has been found and that very recently. There is still a lack of high-resolution spectroscopic data particularly for dinitriles derivatives. The carbonyl cyanide molecule is a new and interesting candidate for astrophysical detection. It could be formed by the reaction of CO and CN radicals, or by substitution of the hydrogen atom by a cyano group in cyanoformaldehyde, HC(=O)CN, that has already been detected in the interstellar medium. Aims: The available data on the rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide is limited in terms of quantum number values and frequency range, and does not allow accurate extrapolation of the spectrum into the millimeter-wave range. To provide a firm basis for astrophysical detection of carbonyl cyanide we studied its millimeter-wave spectrum. Methods: The rotational spectrum of carbonyl cyanide was measured in the frequency range 152-308 GHz and analyzed using Watson's A- and S-reduction Hamiltonians. Results: The ground and first excited state of v5 vibrational mode were assigned and analyzed. More than 1100 distinct frequency lines of the ground state were fitted to produce an accurate set of rotational and centrifugal distortion constants up to the eighth order. The frequency predictions based on these constants should be accurate enough for astrophysical searches in the frequency range up to 500 GHz and for transition involving energy levels with J ≤ 100 and Ka ≤ 42. Based on the results we searched for interstellar carbonyl cyanide in available observational data without success. Thus, we derived upper limits to its column density in different sources. This paper makes use of the following ALMA data: ADS/JAO.ALMA#2011.0.00009.SV. ALMA is a partnership of ESO (representing its member states), NSF (USA), and NINS (Japan) with NRC (Canada), NSC, and ASIAA (Taiwan), and KASI (Republic of

  19. Carbon Monoxide Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with the Media Fire Protection Technology Carbon monoxide safety outreach materials Keep your community informed about the ... KB | Spanish PDF 592 KB Handout: carbon monoxide safety Download this handout and add your organization's logo ...

  20. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... main content Languages 简体中文 English Bahasa Indonesia 한국어 Español ภาษาไทย Tiếng Việt Text Size: Decrease Font Increase ... Monoxide Information Center Carbon Monoxide Information Center En Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as ...

  1. Improving the cyanide toxicity tolerance of anaerobic reactor: Microbial interactions and toxin reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Pragya; Ahammad, S.Z.; Sreekrishnan, T.R.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Anaerobic batch study of 110 days. • Acclimatization for cyanide biodegradation. • Understanding inhibitory effects of cyanide on methane generation and VFA production. • Identification of microorganisms tolerant to cyanide. • Community analysis using DGGE and qPCR analyses. - Abstract: Anaerobic biological treatment of high organics containing wastewater is amongst the preferred treatment options but poor tolerance to toxins makes its use prohibitive. In this study, efforts have been made to understand the key parameters for developing anaerobic reactor, resilient to cyanide toxicity. A laboratory scale anaerobic batch reactor was set up to treat cyanide containing wastewater. The reactor was inoculated with anaerobic sludge obtained from a wastewater treatment plant and fresh cow dung in the ratio of 3:1. The focus was on acclimatization and development of cyanide-degrading biomass and to understand the toxic effects of cyanide on the dynamic equilibrium between various microbial groups. The sludge exposed to cyanide was found to have higher bacterial diversity than the control. It was observed that certain hydrogenotrophic methanogens and bacterial groups were able to grow and produce methane in the presence of cyanide. Also, it was found that hydrogen utilizing methanogens were more cyanide tolerant than acetate utilizing methanogens. So, effluents from various industries like electroplating, coke oven plant, petroleum refining, explosive manufacturing, and pesticides industries which are having high concentrations of cyanide can be treated by favoring the growth of the tolerant microbes in the reactors. It will provide much better treatment efficiency by overcoming the inhibitory effects of cyanide to certain extent.

  2. Improving the cyanide toxicity tolerance of anaerobic reactor: Microbial interactions and toxin reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Pragya; Ahammad, S.Z.; Sreekrishnan, T.R., E-mail: sree@iitd.ac.in

    2016-09-05

    Highlights: • Anaerobic batch study of 110 days. • Acclimatization for cyanide biodegradation. • Understanding inhibitory effects of cyanide on methane generation and VFA production. • Identification of microorganisms tolerant to cyanide. • Community analysis using DGGE and qPCR analyses. - Abstract: Anaerobic biological treatment of high organics containing wastewater is amongst the preferred treatment options but poor tolerance to toxins makes its use prohibitive. In this study, efforts have been made to understand the key parameters for developing anaerobic reactor, resilient to cyanide toxicity. A laboratory scale anaerobic batch reactor was set up to treat cyanide containing wastewater. The reactor was inoculated with anaerobic sludge obtained from a wastewater treatment plant and fresh cow dung in the ratio of 3:1. The focus was on acclimatization and development of cyanide-degrading biomass and to understand the toxic effects of cyanide on the dynamic equilibrium between various microbial groups. The sludge exposed to cyanide was found to have higher bacterial diversity than the control. It was observed that certain hydrogenotrophic methanogens and bacterial groups were able to grow and produce methane in the presence of cyanide. Also, it was found that hydrogen utilizing methanogens were more cyanide tolerant than acetate utilizing methanogens. So, effluents from various industries like electroplating, coke oven plant, petroleum refining, explosive manufacturing, and pesticides industries which are having high concentrations of cyanide can be treated by favoring the growth of the tolerant microbes in the reactors. It will provide much better treatment efficiency by overcoming the inhibitory effects of cyanide to certain extent.

  3. Hydriding of steel in cyanide electrolytes of cadmium plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokol'skaya, N.B.; Maksimchuk, V.P.

    1977-01-01

    Hydrogenation of steel in cyanide electrolytes for cadmium deposition has been studied in a wide range of compositions. Also investigated have been the scattering capacity and polarization parameters of these electrolytes. The basic components are Cd 2+ and CH - ; besides that, Na 2 SO 4 x10H 2 O, NaOH and NiSO 4 x7H 2 O have been added to the electrolytes. Hydrogenation upon cadmium electrolytic deposition has been determined by the rate of hydrogen penetration through a steel membrane 0.5 mm thick. At the NaCN/Cd(CN) 2 ratio more than 2 the increase in sodium cyanide concentration in the electrolyte appreciably increases neither its hydrogenating and scattering capacity, nor cathodic polarization. The greatest scattering capacity and the highest hydrogenation is exhibited by diluted cadmium deposition elecctrolytes (CdO concentration 9-12 g/1), which prove particularly effective for deposition of regular coatings on complex shape articles. Cadmium deposition on high strength steels, however, should rather involve cyanide electrolytes with high cadmium concentration (50-60 g/1) in order to reduce hydrogenation

  4. Less sensitive electrocatalysts towards carbon monoxide for PEMFC fed by hydrogen produced from reforming gas; Recherche de catalyseurs peu sensibles a la presence de monoxyde de carbone pour piles a combustible PEMFC alimentees en gaz de reformage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucher, A.C.

    2002-11-15

    The aim of this work was to prepare bimetallic catalysts based on platinum to elaborate anodes for fuel cells fed by hydrogen produced from reforming gas and containing thus some ppm of carbon monoxide. In order to avoid platinum poisoning, another metal, such as tin, was added. This leads to a more tolerant material to CO. A Pt-Sn catalyst supported on Vulcan XC-72 carbon was prepared by a chemical route, using a platinum carbonyl complex. This material was characterized by physical and chemical methods which indicate that it is formed by nano-structured Pt{sub 3}Sn particles. These particles have a narrow size distribution with a mean diameter of approximately 2 nm. Its activity towards CO, particularly under fuel cell conditions, was compared with a similar commercial E-TEK catalyst. This study shows that the catalyst prepared from the carbonyl precursor is less sensitive to CO than the commercial one. (author)

  5. Aufnahme von Cyanid in Pflanzen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Stefan; Koch, Ines; Christiansen, Helle

    2001-01-01

    Cyanides are waste products from the pyrolysis of coal and are frequent soil pollutants in cities nowadays. Prussic acid (HCN) is a fast acting, highly toxic poison, but iron-complexed cyanides in soil are far less toxic. The phytotoxicity of free CN to basket willows (Salix viminalis) was determ...

  6. Cyanide hydratases and cyanide dihydratases: emerging tools in the biodegradation and biodetection of cyanide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martínková, Ludmila; Veselá, Alicja Barbara; Rinágelová, Anna; Chmátal, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 21 (2015), s. 8875-8882 ISSN 0175-7598 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01021368; GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/11/0394 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Cyanide hydratase * Cyanide dihydratase * Enzyme production Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.376, year: 2015

  7. Recovery of Copper from Cyanidation Tailing by Flotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Tingsheng; Huang, Xiong; Yang, Xiuli

    2016-02-01

    In this work, sodium hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, sodium metabisulfite and copper sulfate as activators were investigated to lessen the depression effect of cyanide for deep-depressing chalcopyrite. The experimental results indicate that the copper recovery exceeded 94%, 84% and 97% at the dosage: sodium hypochlorite 3 mL/L, hydrogen peroxide 2 mL/L, sodium metabisulfite 2 × 10-3 mol/L and copper sulfate 1.67 × 10-4 mol/L, respectively. According to the results of zeta potential and Fourier transform infrared spectrum, it is suggested that chalcopyrite was depressed because of the chemical adsorption of cyanide on the chalcopyrite surfaces. Sodium hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide and sodium metabisulfite can destroy Cu-C bond on the deep-depressing chalcopyrite surface by chemical reaction. Copper sulfate can activate deep-depressing chalcopyrite by copper ion adsorption.

  8. Behaviour of cyanides in soil and groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, P.

    1999-01-01

    contamination in soils and groundwater are discussed. Toxicological and analytical aspects of cyanide containing compounds are briefly touched. The behaviour of cyanide compounds in soil and groundwater is governed by many interacting chemical and microbial processes. Redox conditions and pH are of importance...... is evaluated. At gas work sites, where cyanide is mainly present as iron cyanide complexes, the risk for effects on humans from exposure to cyanide compounds seems to be of minor relevance....

  9. The fate of cyanide in leach wastes at gold mines: an environmental perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews the basic chemistry of cyanide, methods by which cyanide can be analyzed, and aspects of cyanide behavior that are most relevant to environmental considerations at mineral processing operations associated with gold mines. The emphasis is on research results reported since 1999 and on data gathered for a series of U.S. Geological Survey studies that began in the late 1990s. Cyanide is added to process solutions as the CN− anion, but ore leaching produces numerous other cyanide-containing and cyanide-related species in addition to the desired cyanocomplex of gold. These can include hydrogen cyanide (HCN); cyanometallic complexes of iron, copper, zinc, nickel, and many other metals; cyanate (CNO−); and thiocyanate (SCN−). The fate of these species in solid wastes and residual process solutions that remain once gold recovery activities are terminated and in any water that moves beyond the ore processing facility dictates the degree to which cyanide poses a risk to aquatic organisms and aquatic-dependent organisms in the local environment.

  10. determination of free cyanide and total cyanide concentrations

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    permissible levels set by US Environmental Protection Agency and the World Health Organization reveals that ... means that, the resident in and around Bogoso are at risk. ... Several methods exist for treating cyanide-contaminated solutions.

  11. The oxidative disposition of potassium cyanide in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.D.; Isom, G.E.

    1986-01-01

    The role of oxidative metabolism in the disposition of potassium cyanide (KCN), was investigated in mice administered KCN (4.6 mg/kg, s.c.) containing 4.5 uCi ( 14 C)KCN. The expired pulmonary metabolites, ( 14 C) hydrocyanic acid (HCN) and 14 CO 2 , were collected and analyzed. Approximately 1% and 2% of the KCN dose was expired as ( 14 C)HCN and 14 CO 2 , respectively. Expiration of the pulmonary metabolites was decreased following pretreatment with sodium nitrite, sodium thiosulfate, oxygen, or a combination of cyanide antidotes. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide lowered the amount of ( 14 C)HCN expired and did not alter the expiration of 14 CO 2 . Treatment with 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (catalase inhibitor), superoxide dismutase, or diethyldithiocarbamic acid (superoxide dismutase inhibitor) did not change the amount of ( 14 C)HCN expired. However, superoxide dismutase significantly increased the amount of 14 CO 2 expired, whereas diethyldithiocarbamic acid decreased 14 CO 2 expiration. The results from these studies suggest that in vivo cyanide can be oxidized to CO 2 and treatment with agents that alter the availability of endogenous superoxide and/or hydrogen peroxide can alter the rate of cyanide oxidation. (author)

  12. Cyanide binding to ferrous and ferric microperoxidase-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascenzi, Paolo; Sbardella, Diego; Santucci, Roberto; Coletta, Massimo

    2016-07-01

    Microperoxidase-11 (MP11) is an undecapeptide derived from horse heart cytochrome c (cytc). MP11 is characterized by a covalently linked solvent-exposed heme group, the heme-Fe atom being axially coordinated by a histidyl residue. Here, the reactions of ferrous and ferric MP11 (MP11-Fe(II) and MP11-Fe(III), respectively) with cyanide have been investigated from the kinetic and thermodynamic viewpoints, at pH 7.0 and 20.0 °C. Values of the second-order rate constant for cyanide binding to MP11-Fe(II) and MP11-Fe(III) are 4.5 M(-1) s(-1) and 8.9 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1), respectively. Values of the first-order rate constant for cyanide dissociation from ligated MP11-Fe(II) and MP11-Fe(III) are 1.8 × 10(-1) s(-1) and 1.5 × 10(-3) s(-1), respectively. Values of the dissociation equilibrium constant for cyanide binding to MP11-Fe(II) and MP11-Fe(III) are 3.7 × 10(-2) and 1.7 × 10(-7) M, respectively, matching very well with those calculated from kinetic parameters so that no intermediate species seem to be involved in the ligand-binding process. The pH-dependence of cyanide binding to MP11-Fe(III) indicates that CN(-) is the only binding species. Present results have been analyzed in parallel with those of several heme-proteins, suggesting that (1) the ligand accessibility to the metal center and cyanide ionization may modulate the formation of heme-Fe-cyanide complexes, and (2) the general polarity of the heme pocket and/or hydrogen bonding of the heme-bound ligand may affect cyanide exit from the protein matrix. Microperoxidase-11 (MP11) is an undecapeptide derived from horse heart cytochrome c. Penta-coordinated MP11 displays a very high reactivity towards cyanide, whereas the reactivity of hexa-coordinated horse heart cytochrome c is very low.

  13. Cyanide utilization and degradation by microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowles, C J

    1988-01-01

    Various microorganisms can produce (cyanogenesis) or degrade cyanide. They degrade cyanide either to detoxify it, or to use it as a source of nitrogen for growth. Significant amounts of cyanide are formed as a secondary metabolite by a wide range of fungi and a few bacteria by decarboxylation of glycine. When cyanide has been formed by the snow mould fungus it is degraded by conversion to carbon dioxide and ammonia via an unknown pathway. In contrast, cyanogenic bacteria either do not further catabolize cyanide or they convert it into beta-cyanoalanine by addition to cysteine or O-acetylserine. Several non-cyanogenic fungi that are pathogens of cyanogenic plants are known to degrade cyanide by hydration to formamide by the enzyme cyanide hydratase. Such fungi can be immobilized and used in packed-cell columns to continuously detoxify cyanide. ICI Biological Products Business market a preparation of spray-dried fungal mycelia, 'CYCLEAR', to detoxify industrial wastes. Novo Industri have also introduced a cyanidase preparation to convert cyanide directly into formate and ammonia. Bacteria have been isolated that use cyanide as a source of nitrogen for growth. Because cyanide, as KCN or NaCN, is toxic for growth, the bacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens) have to be grown in fed-batch culture with cyanide as the limiting nutrient. Cyanide is converted to carbon dioxide and ammonia (which is then assimilated) by an NADH-linked cyanide oxygenase system.

  14. Radiation-induced polymerization of hydrogen cyanide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mozhaev, P.S.; Kichigina, G.A.; Kiryukhin, D.P.

    1995-01-01

    The chain reaction of HCN polymerization in a γ-radiation field does not occur at 77 K. When irradiated HCN is warmed up to ambient temperature, a polymer is formed. The heat of polymerization of HCN is 44.0±6.0 kJ/mol and the polymer yield reaches 2.5% for a dose of 725 kGy. Amorphous polymer products (with yields increasing up to 33.5%) and needle crystals (presumably HCN tetramer) are formed upon storage of irradiated HCN at room temperature. The polymer is stable below 700 K, has a conductivity of 3x10 -5 Ω -1 cm -f1 , and displays an EPR spectrum typical of polyconjugated systems. A radical mechanism of the formation of conjugated chain -C=N-C=N- is suggested. The tetramer is produced by a combination of aminocyanocarbene biradicals

  15. Cryocopolimerization of hydrogen cyanide with acetaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiryukhin, D.P.; Kichigina, G.A.; Mozhaev, P.S.; Barkalov, I.M.

    1997-01-01

    Calorimetric technique was used to study in detail the phase state of the HCN-acetaldehyde system. The initiation of copolymerization occurs throughout the whole range of initial concentrations of monomers in the process of defrosting the system radiolyzed at 77 K in the regions of enhanced molecular mobility. The HCN component in the copolymer monotonously increases with an increase in the concentration of this comonomer in the starting mixture. The system passes completely to a glassy state with ∼25% molar of HCN. The completely soluble copolymer is formed only if the process is carried out in the system of this kind. The copolymerization in the glassy system occurs by cationic and radical mechanism

  16. Cyanide wastes treatment by bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deloya Martinez, Alma

    2012-01-01

    The results of the development of an autochthonous consortium of degrader microorganisms of the cyanide for the application in the biological treatment of the dangerous wastes of cyanide, were presented. The autochthonous microorganisms obtained were lyophilized in different protective environments, such as gelatin and lactose broth at different temperatures (-35, -45, -55 and -65). A pretreatment method in slurry was applied for the preliminary treatment of the cyanide wastes: for the preliminary leaching of the waste, with periods between 3 and 5 days and a posterior treatment, by aerated lagoons, applying the consortium of lyophilized microorganisms. Eight different lyophilized were obtained in different temperature conditions and with two lyophilization protective media that have presented excellent recovery at six months of lyophilization. The consortium of lyophilized microorganisms has presented 70 to 80 percent of viability, with cyanide removal percentages higher than 95% and it can be conserved active for a prolonged time (for years). The lyophilized microorganisms can be applied in the biodegradation of the cyanide wastes from the gold mines or any other cyanide waste such as metal electroplanting baths, as well as from jewelry manufacturing. (author) [es

  17. Carbon monoxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Animals can also be poisoned by carbon monoxide. People who have pets at home may notice that their animals become ... or unresponsive from carbon monoxide exposure. Often the pets will ... these conditions. This can lead to a delay in getting help.

  18. Cyanide hydratases and cyanide dihydratases: emerging tools in the biodegradation and biodetection of cyanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínková, Ludmila; Veselá, Alicja Barbara; Rinágelová, Anna; Chmátal, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to summarize the current knowledge of the enzymes which are involved in the hydrolysis of cyanide, i.e., cyanide hydratases (CHTs; EC 4.2.1.66) and cyanide dihydratases (CynD; EC 3.5.5.1). CHTs are probably exclusively produced by filamentous fungi and widely occur in these organisms; in contrast, CynDs were only found in a few bacterial genera. CHTs differ from CynDs in their reaction products (formamide vs. formic acid and ammonia, respectively). Several CHTs were also found to transform nitriles but with lower relative activities compared to HCN. Mutants of CynDs and CHTs were constructed to study the structure-activity relationships in these enzymes or to improve their catalytic properties. The effect of the C-terminal part of the protein on the enzyme activity was determined by constructing the corresponding deletion mutants. CynDs are less active at alkaline pH than CHTs. To improve its bioremediation potential, CynD from Bacillus pumilus was engineered by directed evolution combined with site-directed mutagenesis, and its operation at pH 10 was thus enabled. Some of the enzymes have been tested for their potential to eliminate cyanide from cyanide-containing wastewaters. CynDs were also used to construct cyanide biosensors.

  19. Enzymic oxidation of carbon monoxide. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagi, T

    1959-01-01

    An enzyme which catalyzes the oxidation of carbon monoxide into carbon dioxide was obtained in a cell free state from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. The enzyme activity was assayed manometrically by measuring the rate of gas uptake under the atmosphere of carbon monoxide in the presence of benzyl-viologen as an oxidant. The optimum pH range was 7 to 8. The activity was slightly suppressed by illumination. The enzyme was more stable than hydrogenase or formate dehydrogenase against the heat treatment, suggesting that it is a different entity from these enzymes. In the absence of an added oxidant, the enzyme preparation produced hydrogen gas under the atmosphere of carbon monoxide. The phenomenon can be explained assuming the reductive decomposition of water. 17 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  20. Synthesis and x-ray crystallographic analysis of 4,6-di-O-acetyl-2,3-dideoxy-α-D-threo-hexopyranosyl cyanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotella, Madeline; Giovine, Matthew; Dougherty, William; Boyko, Walter; Kassel, Scott; Giuliano, Robert

    2016-04-29

    The glycopyranosyl cyanide 4,6-di-O-acetyl-2,3-dideoxy-α-D-threo-hexopyranosyl cyanide has been synthesized from tri-O-acetyl-D-galactal by reaction with trimethylsilyl cyanide in the presence of boron trifluoride diethyl etherate followed by catalytic hydrogenation. The synthesis provides the α-anomer stereoselectively, the structure of which was assigned based on 2D NMR techniques and x-ray crystallography. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Reactivity of a reduced metal oxide surface: hydrogen, water and carbon monoxide adsorption on oxygen defective rutile TiO 2( 1 1 0 )

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menetrey, M.; Markovits, A.; Minot, C.

    2003-02-01

    The reactivity at reduced surface differs from that on the stoichiometric perfect surfaces. This does not originate uniquely from the modification of the coordination; electron count also is determining. The general trend is a decrease of the heat of adsorption on the metal cations. The reactivity decreases at sites in the vicinity of the defects due to the reduction induced by the O vacancies. At the defect site the decrease is less pronounced for H, H 2, CO and molecular H 2O. In the case of H 2O dissociative adsorption, the defect site is more reactive than the perfect surface. Thus, a hydration converting the defective-reduced TiO 2 to the hydrogenated non-defective-reduced surface is easy. The resulting structure possesses surface hydroxyl groups. It is probably the easiest way to form the hydrogenated non-defective surface. On TiO 2, the defective surface requires very anhydrous conditions.

  2. Bioavailability of cyanide and metal-cyanide mixtures to aquatic life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Aaron; Santore, Robert

    2012-08-01

    Cyanide can be toxic to aquatic organisms, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has developed ambient water-quality criteria to protect aquatic life. Recent work suggests that considering free, rather than total, cyanide provides a more accurate measure of the biological effects of cyanides and provides a basis for water-quality criteria. Aquatic organisms are sensitive to free cyanide, although certain metals can form stable complexes and reduce the amount of free cyanide. As a result, total cyanide is less toxic when complexing metals are present. Cyanide is often present in complex effluents, which requires understanding how other components within these complex effluents can affect cyanide speciation and bioavailability. The authors have developed a model to predict the aqueous speciation of cyanide and have shown that this model can predict the toxicity of metal-cyanide complexes in terms of free cyanide in solutions with varying water chemistry. Toxicity endpoints based on total cyanide ranged over several orders of magnitude for various metal-cyanide mixtures. However, predicted free cyanide concentrations among these same tests described the observed toxicity data to within a factor of 2. Aquatic toxicity can be well-described using free cyanide, and under certain conditions the toxicity was jointly described by free cyanide and elevated levels of bioavailable metals. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  3. CYANIDE HEAP BILOGICAL DETOXIFICATION - PHASE II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many active mine sites, mines in closure stage and some abandoned mines are and have utilized cyanidation to remove and recover precious metals. Discharges from these sites normally contain significant amounts of metal cyanide complexes and concentrations of thiocyanate, soluble...

  4. Aposematism in Archips cerasivoranus not linked to the sequestration of host-derived cyanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, T D; Stevens, M A; Miller, S; Jeffers, P

    2008-10-01

    This study addressed the question of how caterpillars of Archips cerasivoranus feeding upon Prunus virginiana cope with the cyanogenic compounds of their food. Analysis by ion chromatography showed that young and aged leaves of P. virginiana consumed by the caterpillars during spring have hydrogen cyanide potentials (HCN-ps) of 2,473 +/- 130 ppm and 1,058 +/- 98 ppm, respectively. Although less than 3% of the cyanide released as the caterpillars feed escapes into the atmosphere, the larva's bright-yellow aposematic coloration and conspicuous activity can not be attributed to the sequestration of cyanide. Only six of 25 samples of the caterpillars' defensive regurgitants collected from 12 field colonies contained cyanide (17.6 +/- 6.54 ppm), less than 5% of the quantity previously reported to occur in the regurgitant of the tent caterpillar M. americanum. Only seven of 13 caterpillars assayed had detectable quantities of cyanide in their bodies (3.9 +/- 0.9 ppm). The fecal pellets that encase the cocoon contained no cyanide, nor did the frass that litters the leaf shelters. The small quantities of cyanide that occur in the caterpillar compared to the HCN-p of ingested plant material appear attributable to paced bouts of feeding and the maintenance of a highly alkaline foregut that inhibits cyanogenesis.

  5. Biological Remediation of Cyanide: a Review

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, Karamba Kabiru; Syed, Mohd Arif; Shukor, Mohd Yunus; Ahmad, Siti Aqlima

    2015-01-01

    Cyanide and its complexes are produced by industries all over the world as waste or effluents. Biodegradation is considered to be the cheapest and the most effective method to get rid of cyanide in the environment. Several studies on different types of microorganisms that can degrade cyanide in the environment have been carried out. Hydrolytic, oxidative, reductive, and substitutive/transfer reactions are some of the common pathways used by microorganisms in cyanide degradation. Biodegradatio...

  6. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Unites States die every year from accidental non-fire related CO poisoning associated with consumer products, including ... CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of ...

  7. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... On Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide ... Related Links Recalls Safety Education Regulations, Laws & Standards Research & Statistics Business & Manufacturing Small Business Resources OnSafety Blogs ...

  8. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Community Outreach Resource Center Toy Recall Statistics CO Poster Contest Pool Safely Business & Manufacturing Business & Manufacturing Business ... Featured Resources CPSC announces winners of carbon monoxide poster contest Video View the blog Clues You Can ...

  9. Occult carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, J N

    1987-01-01

    A syndrome of headache, fatigue, dizziness, paresthesias, chest pain, palpitations and visual disturbances was associated with chronic occult carbon monoxide exposure in 26 patients in a primary care setting. A causal association was supported by finding a source of carbon monoxide in a patient's home, workplace or vehicle; results of screening tests that ruled out other illnesses; an abnormally high carboxyhemoglobin level in 11 of 14 patients tested, and abatement or resolution of symptoms when the source of carbon monoxide was removed. Exposed household pets provided an important clue to the diagnosis in some cases. Recurrent occult carbon monoxide poisoning may be a frequently overlooked cause of persistent or recurrent headache, fatigue, dizziness, paresthesias, abdominal pain, diarrhea and unusual spells.

  10. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Import Surveillance International Recall Guidance Civil and Criminal Penalties Federal Court Orders & ... 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 ...

  11. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths Associated with the Use of Consumer Products 2012 Annual Estimates OCTOBER 13, 2015 Incidents, Deaths, and In-Depth Investigations Associated with Non-Fire ...

  12. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Safety Blogs: CO Safety More CO Blogs Research & Statistics JANUARY 07, 2016 Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide Deaths ... 2011 Annual Estimates View All CO-Related Injury Statistics and Technical Reports Related Links Recalls Safety Education ...

  13. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION Search CPSC Search Menu Home Recalls Recall List CPSC Recall API Recall Lawsuits ... and Bans Report an Unsafe Product Consumers Businesses Home Safety Education Safety Education Centers Carbon Monoxide Information ...

  14. Carbon Monoxide Nonattainment Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer identifies areas in the U.S. where air pollution levels have not met the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Carbon Monoxide and have...

  15. Occult Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkpatrick, John N.

    1987-01-01

    A syndrome of headache, fatigue, dizziness, paresthesias, chest pain, palpitations and visual disturbances was associated with chronic occult carbon monoxide exposure in 26 patients in a primary care setting. A causal association was supported by finding a source of carbon monoxide in a patient's home, workplace or vehicle; results of screening tests that ruled out other illnesses; an abnormally high carboxyhemoglobin level in 11 of 14 patients tested, and abatement or resolution of symptoms ...

  16. Transport of complexed cyanide in soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meeussen, J.C.L.; Zee, S.E.A.T.M. van der; Bosma, W.J.P.; Keizer, M.G.

    1994-01-01

    Contamination of the soil with cyanide is common at sites of several types of industries. Risks for adverse effects of this cyanide for human health or for the environment are largely determined by the behaviour of this cyanide in soil. In acidic soils this behaviour is probably dominated by precipitation and dissolution of prussian blue, Fe 4 (Fe(CN) 6 ) 3 (s), an iron cyanide precipitate. Calculations of multi-component cyanide transport, including equilibrium with this solid phase, iron hydroxide and several redox reactions, are compared with cyanide concentrations observed in contaminated soils. The calculated cyanide concentrations, as well as the pH and redox potentials, agree well with the field situations

  17. Exciton emissions in alkali cyanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weid, J.P. von der.

    1979-10-01

    The emissions of Alkali Cyanides X irradiated at low temperature were measured. In addition to the molecular (Frenkel Type) exciton emissions, another emitting centre was found and tentatively assigned to a charge transfer self trapped exciton. The nature of the molecular exciton emitting state is discussed. (Author) [pt

  18. Therapeutic problems in cyanide poisoning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heijst, A. N.; Douze, J. M.; van Kesteren, R. G.; van Bergen, J. E.; van Dijk, A.

    1987-01-01

    In three patients with severe acute cyanide poisoning, a cyanosis was observed instead of the bright pink skin coloration often mentioned as a sign in textbooks. Treatment of cardiopulmonary insufficiency is as essential as antidotal therapy and the use of sodium nitrite and 4-DMAP is not without

  19. A detailed chemistry model for transient hydrogen and carbon monoxide catalytic recombination on parallel flat Pt surfaces implemented in an integral code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, Miguel A.; Martin-Valdepenas, Juan M.; Martin-Fuertes, Francisco; Fernandez, Jose A.

    2007-01-01

    A detailed chemistry model has been adapted and developed for surface chemistry, heat and mass transfer between H 2 /CO/air/steam/CO 2 mixtures and vertical parallel Pt-coated surfaces. This model is based onto a simplified Deutschmann reaction scheme for methane surface combustion and the analysis by Elenbaas for buoyancy-induced heat transfer between parallel plates. Mass transfer is treated by the heat and mass transfer analogy. The proposed model is able to simulate the H 2 /CO recombination phenomena characteristic of parallel-plate Passive Autocatalytic Recombiners (PARs), which have been proposed and implemented as a promising hydrogen-control strategy in the safety of nuclear power stations or other industries. The transient model is able to approach the warm-up phase of the PAR and its shut-down as well as the dynamic changes within the surrounding atmosphere. The model has been implemented within the MELCOR code and assessed against results of the Battelle Model Containment tests of the Zx series. Results show accurate predictions and a better performance than traditional methods in integral codes, i.e. empirical correlations, which are also much case-specific. Influence of CO present in the mixture on the PAR performance is also addressed in this paper

  20. The visual pigment cyanide effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescitelli, F; Karvaly, B

    1989-12-01

    The visual pigment of the Tokay gecko (Gekko gekko) with its in situ absorption maximum at 521 nm has its spectral position at 500 to 505 nm when chloride-deficient digitonin is used for the extraction. In this case the addition of chloride or bromide to the extract restores the maximum to 521 nm. This property, characteristic of gecko pigments in general, does not occur with any of the rhodopsins that have been tested. Simple salts of cyanide, a pseudohalogenoid with an ionic radius close to those of chloride and bromide and/or its hydrolysis product attacks both this gecko pigment and rhodopsins in the dark. This is seen as a slow thermal loss of photopigment if (sodium) cyanide is present at concentrations above 40 mM for the gecko pigment and 150 mM for the rhodopsins of the midshipman (Porichthys notatus) and of the frog (Rana pipiens). In all cases the loss of the photopigment is accompanied by the appearance of a spectral product with maximum absorption at about 340 nm. Cyanide addition has no effect on the photosensitivity of the native pigments and neither does it alter, as do chloride, bromide and other anions, the spectral absorbance curve. The spectral product at 340 nm also appears when the visual pigments are photolyzed in the presence of cyanide salts below the threshold concentrations given above. Incubation of digitonin-solubilized all-trans-retinal with (sodium) cyanide leads to a reaction product with absorption spectrum similar to that obtained with visual pigments under comparable conditions.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal Mishra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Carbon monoxide is known as the silent killer, being colorless, odourless, and tasteless. Initially non-irritating, it is very difficult for people to detect Carbon monoxide is a product of incomplete combustion of organic matter due to insufficient oxygen supply that prevents complete oxidation of carbon to C02. During World War II, Nazis used gas vans to kill an estimated over 700,000 prisoners by carbon monoxide poisoning. This method was also used in the gas chambers ofseveral death camps. The true number of incidents of carbon monoxide poisoning is unknown, since many non-lethal exposures go undetected From the available data, carbon monoxide poisoning is the most common cause of injury and death due to poisoning worldwide. Clinical features and management: The signs of carbon monoxide poisoning vary with concentration and length of exposure. Subtle cardiovascular or neurobehavioural effects occur at low concentration. The onset of chronic poisoning is usually insidious and easily mistaken for viral prodrome, depression, or gastroenteritis in children. The classic sign of carbon monoxide poisoning which is actually more often seen in the dead than the living is appearing red-cheeked and healthy. Cherry pink colour develops in nails, skin and mucosa. In acute poisoning, common abnormalities of posture and tone are cogwheel rigidity, opisthotonus, spasticity or flaccidity and seizures. Retinal haemorrhages and the classic cherry red skin colour are seldom seen. Different people andpopulations may have different carbon monoxide tolerance levels. On average, exposures at 100ppm or greater is dangerous to human health. Treatment and prevention: The mainstay of treatment is 100% oxygen administration until the COHb level is normal When the patient is stable enough to be transported, hyperbaric oxygen (HBOT should be considered This treatment is safe and well tolerated Public education about the danger of carbon monoxide, with

  2. Revealing the relationship between the photocatalytic property and structure characteristic of reduced TiO2 by hydrogen and carbon monoxide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunpeng; Li, Yuhang; Yang, Siyuan; Lin, Yuan; Zuo, Jianliang; Liang, Hong; Peng, Feng

    2018-06-04

    The hydrogenation (reduction) has been considered as an effective method to improve the photocatalytic activity of TiO2, however, the underlying relationship between structure and photocatalytic performance has still not been adequately unveiled so far. Herein, to obtain insight into the effect of structure on photocatalytic activity, two types of reduced TiO2 were prepared by CO (CO-TiO2) and H2 (H-TiO2), respectively. For H-TiO2, Ti-H bonds and oxygen vacancies are formed on the surface of H-TiO2, resulting in a more disorder surface lattice. However, for CO-TiO2, the more Ti-OH bonds are formed on the surface and the more bulk oxygen vacancies are introduced, the disorder layer of CO-TiO2 is relatively thin owing to the most of surface vacancies repaired by Ti-OH bonds. Under the simulated solar irradiation, the photocatalytic H2 evolution rate of CO-TiO2 reaches 7.17 mmol g-1 h-1, which is 4.14 and 1.50 times those of TiO2 and H-TiO2, respectively. The photocatalytic degradation rate constant of methyl orange on CO-TiO2 is 2.45 and 6.39 times those on H-TiO2 and TiO2. The superior photocatalytic activity of CO-TiO2 is attributed to the effective separation and transfer of the photo-generated electron-hole pairs, due to the synergistic effects of oxygen vacancies and surface Ti-OH bonds. This study reveals the relation between the photocatalytic property and structure, and provides a new method to prepare highly active TiO2 for H2 production and environmental treatment. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Hydrogenation of carbon monoxide on Co/MgAl2O4 and Ce-Co/MgAl2O4 catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondoh, S.; Muraki, H.; Fujitani

    1986-01-01

    It is well known that various hydrocarbons are obtained by hydrogenation of CO on Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, the products depending on the catalyst components such as Co, Ni, Fe and Ru: and the reaction conditions, particularly, temperature, pressure, space velocity and H 2 /CO ratio. Further, both reactivity and selectivity of catalysts may be improved by suitable selection of support and an additive. The main program of the present work is to develop a catalyst for producing C 5 + liquid hydrocarbons, as an automobile fuel, by the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The authors have studied unique CO catalyst systems consisting of various supports - such as Al 2 O 3 (γ, β, α), MgAl 2 O 4 (alumina magnesia spinel), MgO and additives selected from the lanthanoid elements (LE). The composition of spinel-based supports was altered in a range from 28 mol % excess Al 2 O 3 to 28 mol % excess MgO. Particularly, they found that a MgAl 2 O 4 support with 15-18 mol % excess Al 2 O 3 is the most preferable for our purpose and CeO 2 as the additive for Co/spinel catalyst remarkably improves C 5 + yield. Further, it was confirmed that the catalytic activity of Co-base catalysts agree with the oxidation state of Co-oxides on Co and Co-Ce/spinel catalysts. The performance of Co-based catalysts for the production of higher hydrocarbons from syn-gas were described elsewhere. The items described in this report include (a) selection of supports, (b) selection of optimum reaction conditions for Co-Ce/spinel catalyst, (c) redox characteristics of Co-oxides on a spinel surface, and (d) experimental observation of TPD profiles, adsorption capacities and IR spectra relating to adsorbed CO

  4. Electrocatalytic studies of osmium-ruthenium carbonyl cluster compounds for their application as methanol-tolerant cathodes for oxygen reduction reaction and carbon monoxide-tolerant anodes for hydrogen oxidation reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borja-Arco, E.; Uribe-Godinez, J.; Castellanos, R.H. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Escobedo (Mexico); Altamirano-Gutierrez, A.; Jimenez-Sandoval, O. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Inst. Politecnico Nacional, Querataro (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    This paper provided details of an electrokinetic study of novel electrocatalytic materials capable of performing both the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR). Osmium-ruthenium carbonyl cluster compounds (Os{sub x}Ru{sub 3}(CO){sub n}) were synthesized by chemical condensation in non-polar organic solvents at different boiling points and refluxing temperatures. Three different non-polar organic solvents were used: (1) n-nonane; o-xylene; and 1,2-dichlorobenzene. The electrocatalysts were characterized by Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). A rotating disk electrode technique was used to analyze the materials. Results of the analysis showed that the materials performed ORR in both the presence and absence of carbon monoxide (CO), and that electrocatalysts were not poisoned by the presence of CO. Cyclic voltamperometry for the disk electrodes showed that the electrochemical behaviour of the compounds in the acid electrolyte was similar in the presence or absence of methanol. The Tafel slope, exchange current density and the transfer coefficient were also investigated. The electrokinetic parameters for the ORR indicated that the materials with the highest electrocatalytic activity were synthesized in 1,2-dichlorobenzene. Electrocatalytic activity during HOR were prepared in n-nonane. It was concluded that the new materials are good candidates for use as both a cathode and an anode in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). 7 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs.

  5. Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisa Wray

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This oral boards case is appropriate for all emergency medicine learners (residents, interns, and medical students. Introduction: Carbon monoxide (CO is a colorless and odorless gas that typically results from combustion. It binds hemoglobin, dissociating oxygen, causing headache, weakness, confusion and possible seizure or coma. Pulse oxygen levels may be falsely elevated. Practitioners should maintain a high index of suspicion for carbon monoxide poisoning. If caught early CO poisoning is reversible with oxygen or hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Objectives: The learner will assess a patient with altered mental status and weakness, ultimately identifying that the patient has carbon monoxide poisoning. The learner will treat the patient with oxygen and admit/transfer the patient for hyperbaric oxygenation. Method: Oral boards case

  6. In situ treatment of cyanide-contaminated groundwater by iron cyanide precipitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, R.S.; Dzombak, D.A.; Luthy, R.G.; Smith, J.R.

    1999-01-01

    Groundwater contamination with cyanide is common at many former or active industrial sites. Metal-cyanide complexes typically dominate aqueous speciation of cyanide in groundwater systems, with iron-cyanide complexes often most abundant. Typically, metal-cyanide complexes behave as nonadsorbing solutes in sand-gravel aquifer systems in the neutral pH range, rendering cyanide relatively mobile in groundwater systems. Groundwater pump-and-treat systems have often been used to manage cyanide contamination in groundwater. This study examined the feasibility of using in situ precipitation of iron cyanide in a reactive barrier to attenuate the movement of cyanide in groundwater. Laboratory column experiments were performed in which cyanide solutions were passed through mixtures of sand and elemental iron filings. Removal of dissolved cyanide was evaluated in a variety of cyanide-containing influents under various flow rates and sand-to-iron weight ratios. Long-term column tests performed with various cyanide-containing influents under both oxic and anoxic conditions, at neutral pH and at flow rates typical of sand-gravel porous media, yielded effluent concentrations of total cyanide as low as 0.5 mg/L. Effluent cyanide concentrations achieved were close to the solubilities of Turnbull's blue-hydrous ferric oxide solid solutions, indicating co-precipitation of the two solids. Maximum cyanide removal efficiency was achieved with approximately 10% by weight of iron in the sand-iron mixtures; higher iron contents did not increase removal efficiency significantly. Results obtained indicate that in situ precipitation is a promising passive treatment approach for cyanide in groundwater

  7. Ultraviolet optical absorption of alkali cyanides and alkali halide cyanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Camargo Junior, S.A. de.

    1982-09-01

    The ultraviolet absorption spectra of alkali cyanide and mixed alkali halide cyanide crystals were measured at temperatures ranging from 300K down to 4.2K. A set of small absorption peaks was observed at energies near 6 eV and assigned to parity forbidden X 1 Σ + →a' 3 Σ + transitions of the CN - molecular ions. It was observed that the peak position depends on the alkali atom while the absorption cross section strongly depends on the halogen and on the CN - concentration of the mixed crystals. These effects are explained in terms of an interaction between the triplet molecular excitons and charge transfer excitons. The experimental data were fit with a coupling energy of a few meV. The coupling mechanism is discussed and it is found to be due to the overlap between the wave functions of the two excitations. (Author) [pt

  8. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  9. Assay development status report for total cyanide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, B.C.; Jones, T.E.; Pool, K.H.

    1993-02-01

    A validated cyanide assay that is applicable to a variety of tank waste matrices is necessary to resolve certain waste tank safety issues and for purposes of overall waste characterization. The target for this effort is an assay with an applicable range of greater than 1,000 ppM (0.10 wt%) total cyanide and a confidence level greater than 80%. Figure 1 illustrates the operating regime of the proposed cyanide assay method. The Assay Development Status Report for Total Cyanide will summarize the past experience with cyanide analyses on-tank waste matrices and will rate the status of the analytical methods used to assay total cyanide (CN - ion) in the tank waste matrices as acceptable or unacceptable. This paper will also briefly describe the current efforts for improving analytical resolution of the assays and the attempts at speciation

  10. A gene horizontally transferred from bacteria protects arthropods from host plant cyanide poisoning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wybouw, N.; Dermauw, W.; Tirry, L.; Stevens, C.; Grbić, M.; Feyereisen, R.; Van Leeuwen, T.

    2014-01-01

    Cyanogenic glucosides are among the most widespread defense chemicals of plants. Upon plant tissue disruption, these glucosides are hydrolyzed to a reactive hydroxynitrile that releases toxic hydrogen cyanide (HCN). Yet many mite and lepidopteran species can thrive on plants defended by cyanogenic

  11. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Investigations Associated with Non-Fire Carbon Monoxide from Engine-Driven Generators and Other Engine-Driven Tools, 2004–2014 JANUARY 08, 2015 Non- ... outside of the Federal Government. CPSC does not control this external site or its privacy policy and ...

  12. Carbon Monoxide Information Center

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Español The Invisible Killer Carbon monoxide, also known as CO, is called the "Invisible Killer" because it's ... used or incorrectly-vented fuel-burning appliances such as furnaces, stoves, water heaters and fireplaces. Watch This ...

  13. Cyanide bioremediation: the potential of engineered nitrilases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jason M; Trevor Sewell, B; Benedik, Michael J

    2017-04-01

    The cyanide-degrading nitrilases are of notable interest for their potential to remediate cyanide contaminated waste streams, especially as generated in the gold mining, pharmaceutical, and electroplating industries. This review provides a brief overview of cyanide remediation in general but with a particular focus on the cyanide-degrading nitrilases. These are of special interest as the hydrolysis reaction does not require secondary substrates or cofactors, making these enzymes particularly good candidates for industrial remediation processes. The genetic approaches that have been used to date for engineering improved enzymes are described; however, recent structural insights provide a promising new approach.

  14. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  15. Carbon monoxide activation by organoactinides: a comparative synthetic, thermodynamic, kinetic, and mechanistic investigation of migratory CO insertion into actinide-carbon and actinide-hydrogen bonds to yield eta2-acyls and eta2-formyls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moloy, K.G.; Marks, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    Reported are results of the synthesis, characterization, and carbon monoxide chemistry of a series of sterically hindered thorium alkyls and hydrides of the type Cp' 2 Th(R)(X) (Cp' = eta 5 -C 5 Me 5 ) where R = H, D, methyl, eta-butyl, and CH 2 -t-Bu and X = OCH-t-Bu 2 , OC 6 H 3 -2,6-t-Bu 2 , and O-t-Bu. In addition, improved syntheses of the known complexes [Cp' 2 Th(μ-H)(H)] 2 , Cp' 2 Th(O-t-Bu)(Cl) and Cp' 2 Th(CH 2 -t-Bu)(Cl) are presented. The alkyl complexes undergo facile, irreversible carbonylation to yield eta 2 -acyls that were characterized by a variety of methods. Infrared Ir and 13 C NMR spectra of these complexes demonstrate that strong meta-(acyl)oxygen bonding takes place, fostering a pronounced carbene-like character. Thus, these complexes are characterized by low C-O Ir infrared stretching frequencies (nu/sub CO/ = 1450-1480 cm -1 ) and low-field 13 C NMR chemical shifts (delta/sub 13 C/ 355-370). The hydrides undergo a rapid, reversible, migratory CO insertion to yield formyls that have been characterized spectroscopically at low temperature. Infrared Ir and 13 C NMR spectra of these species are similar to the corresponding acyls, suggesting an analogous eta 2 structure. Variable-temperature equilibrium data show that the insertion of CO into thorium-hydrogen bonds is exothermic by ca. 5 kcal/mol, and this value is compared to that for the analogous alkyls. The equilibrium was also found to exhibit a distinct equilibrium isotope effect upon deuterium substitution, K/sub H//K/sub D/ = 0.31 at -78 0 C. The carbonylation of the complex Cp' 2 Th(n-Bu)(OCH-t-Bu 2 ) was found to obey a second-order rate law where rate = kP/sub CO/ [complex]. The insertion of CO into the Th-H bond of Cp' 2 Th(H)(OCH-t-Bu 2 ) was found by NMR methods to be first order in metal hydride. 55 references, 3 figures, 6 tables

  16. Development of new heterogeneous catalysts for the decomposition of methanol into hydrogen and carbon monoxide applying high throughput methods; Entwicklung neuer heterogener Katalysatoren zur Spaltung von Methanol in Wasserstoff und Kohlenmonoxid mittels Hochdurchsatz-Methoden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, Torsten

    2008-07-11

    The topic of this thesis has been the development of new heterogeneous catalysts for the decomposition of methanol into hydrogen and carbon monoxide. As an important constraint here, the content of noble metals of the catalysts should be as low as possible. High-throughput-methods were applied in some of the syntheses and experiments to accelerate the development, as, for example, the use of liquid based sol-gel syntheses and the examination of catalyst libraries by spatial resolution gas chromatography. This screening technique allowed to test up to 207 different substances during one single experiment. Then, different combinatorial strategies were applied. First, these methods led to a highly active and stable catalyst in the ternary system of Cu-Ni-Zn, which showed high conversion and selectivity comparable to an industrial reference catalyst. Its activity during an 18 hour long term run was constant in contrast to the reference. Second, an additional approach starting from a broader variety of elements led to a Ce- Ru- and to a Cr-Ru-catalyst. Both of them were highly active in short term experiments, but lost their outstanding performances during long term runs. (orig.) [German] Die vorliegende Arbeit befasste sich mit der Entwicklung neuer heterogener Katalysatoren fuer die Spaltung von Methanol zu Wasserstoff und Kohlenmonoxid, die einen moeglichst geringen Gehalt an Edelmetallen aufweisen sollten. Um diesen Prozess zu beschleunigen, wurden in einem Teil der Synthesen und Experimente Hochdurchsatzmethoden verwendet. Neben der Roboter gestuetzten Sol-Gel-Synthese umfasste dies die Untersuchung von Katalysatorbibliotheken mittels ortsaufgeloester Gaschromatographie, die es ermoeglichte, in einem Experiment bis zu 207 verschiedene Substanzen auf ihre katalytische Aktivitaet zu testen. Unter Anwendung verschiedener kombinatorischer Strategien wurde zunaechst ein sehr aktiver und stabiler Katalysator im ternaeren Cu-Ni-Zn-System entdeckt. Neben Umsaetzen und

  17. Pathology of carbon monoxide poisoning in two cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhakumari, Arya; Poppenga, Robert H; Pesavento, J Brad; Uzal, Francisco A

    2018-03-05

    Carbon monoxide (CO), a common cause of poisoning in human beings has also been implicated in the death of animals. Though there are multiple studies on CO poisoning and relevant lethal blood COHb concentrations in humans, there are no reliable reports of diagnostic lethal carboxyhemoglobin percentage of saturation (COHb%) in cats. Additionally, due to shared housing environments, exposures to companion animals can be a surrogate for lethal exposures in human beings and provide valuable information in concurrent forensic investigations. Two adult Singapura brown ticked cats were submitted to the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratory (CAHFS) for necropsy and diagnostic work-up. These animals were found dead along with their two deceased owners. Similar lesions were observed in both cats. At necropsy, gross lesions consisted of multifocal, large, irregular, bright red spots on the skin of the abdomen and the inner surface of ear pinnae, bright red muscles and blood. The carcasses, and tissues fixed in formalin retained the bright red discoloration for up to two weeks. Microscopic lesions included diffuse pulmonary congestion and edema, and multifocal intense basophilia of cardiomyocytes mostly affecting whole fibers or occasionally a portion of the fiber. Based on the clinical history,gross and microscopic changes, cyanide or carbon monoxide poisoning was suspected. Blood samples analyzed for carbon monoxide showed 57 and 41% carboxyhemoglobin COHb%. Muscle samples were negative for cyanide. There are no established reference values for lethal COHb concentration in cats. The COHb % values detected in this case which fell within the lethal range reported for other species, along with the gross lesions and unique histological findings in the heart suggest a helpful criteria for diagnosis of CO intoxication associated death in cats. This case demonstrates that since pets share the same environment as human beings and often are a part of their activities

  18. Leaching of cyanogenic glucosides and cyanide from white clover green manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnholt, Nanna; Lægdsmand, Mette; Hansen, Hans Chr. Bruun

    2008-01-01

    Use of crops for green manure as a substitute for chemical fertilizers and pesticides is an important approach towards more sustainable agricultural practices. Green manure from white clover is rich in nitrogen but white clover also produces the cyanogenic glucosides (CGs) linamarin...... and lotaustralin; CGs release toxic hydrogen cyanide (HCN) upon hydrolysis which may be utilized for pest control. We demonstrate that applying CGs in the form of a liquid extract of white clover to large columns of intact agricultural soils can result in leaching of toxic cyanide species to a depth of at least 1...

  19. Bacterium oxidizing carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kistner, A

    1953-01-01

    Present-day knowledge of the microbiological oxidation of carbon monoxide is based on doubtful observations and imperfect experimental procedures. By making use of shake cultures in contact with gas mixtures containing high concentrations of CO and by employing liquid enrichment media with a low content of organic matter and solid media of the same composition with not more than 1.2% agar, it proved possible to isolate a co-oxidizing bacterium of the genus hydrogenomonas from sewage sludge. For the first time irrefutable proof has been given of the oxidation of carbon monoxide by a pure culture of a bacterium, both in growing cultures and in resting cell suspensions. 12 references.

  20. CYANIDE HEAP BIOLOGICAL DETOXIFICATION - PHASE II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many active mine sites, mines in the closure stage and some abandoned mines are and have utilized cyanidation to remove and recover precious metals. Discharges from these sites normally contain significant amounts of metal cyanide complexes and concentrations of thiocyanate, solu...

  1. Anaerobic biodegradation of cyanide under methanogenic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallon, R D; Cooper, D A; Speece, R; Henson, M

    1991-01-01

    Upflow, anaerobic, fixed-bed, activated charcoal biotreatment columns capable of operating at free cyanide concentrations of greater than 100 mg liter-1 with a hydraulic retention time of less than 48 h were developed. Methanogenesis was maintained under a variety of feed medium conditions which included ethanol, phenol, or methanol as the primary reduced carbon source. Under optimal conditions, greater than 70% of the inflow free cyanide was removed in the first 30% of the column height. Strongly complexed cyanides were resistant to removal. Ammonia was the nitrogen end product of cyanide transformation. In cell material removed from the charcoal columns, [14C]bicarbonate was the major carbon end product of [14C]cyanide transformation. PMID:1872600

  2. Non-cyanide silver plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dini, J.W.

    1995-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Technic, Inc. have entered into a CRADA (Cooperative Research and Development Agreement) with the goal of providing industry with an environmentally benign alternative to the presently used silver cyanide plating process. This project has been in place for about six months and results are quite promising. The main objective, that of deposition of deposits as thick as 125 um (5 mils), has been met. Property data such as stress and hardness have been obtained and the structure of the deposit has been analyzed via metallography and x-ray diffraction. These results will be presented in this paper, along with plans for future work

  3. Cytotoxic mechanisms of hydrosulfide anion and cyanide anion in primary rat hepatocyte cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, Rodney W.; Valentine, Holly L.; Valentine, William M.

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen cyanide are known to compromise mitochondrial respiration through inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase and this is generally considered to be their primary mechanism of toxicity. Experimental studies and the efficiency of current treatment protocols suggest that H 2 S may exert adverse physiological effects through additional mechanisms. To evaluate the role of alternative mechanisms in H 2 S toxicity, the relative contributions of electron transport inhibition, uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration, and opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP) to hydrosulfide and cyanide anion cytotoxicity in primary hepatocyte cultures were examined. Supplementation of hepatocytes with the glycolytic substrate, fructose, rescued hepatocytes from cyanide anion induced toxicity, whereas fructose supplementation increased hydrosulfide anion toxicity suggesting that hydrosulfide anion may compromise glycolysis in hepatocytes. Although inhibitors of the MPTP opening were protective for hydrosulfide anion, they had no effect on cyanide anion toxicity, consistent with an involvement of the permeability transition pore in hydrosulfide anion toxicity but not cyanide anion toxicity. Exposure of isolated rat liver mitochondria to hydrosulfide did not result in large amplitude swelling suggesting that if H 2 S induces the permeability transition it does so indirectly through a mechanism requiring other cellular components. Hydrosulfide anion did not appear to be an uncoupler of mitochondrial respiration in hepatocytes based upon the inability of oligomycin and fructose to protect hepatocytes from hydrosulfide anion toxicity. These findings support mechanisms additional to inhibition of cytochrome c oxidase in hydrogen sulfide toxicity. Further investigations are required to assess the role of the permeability transition in H 2 S toxicity, determine whether similar affects occur in other cell types or in vivo and evaluate whether this may

  4. Characterization and treatment of cyanide in MGP purifier wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theis, T.L. [Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    1995-12-31

    Purifier wastes were generated from the clean-up gaseous impurities, principally hydrogen sulfide and hydrogen cyanide, contained in raw gas from MGP operations through retention by iron oxide solids. These materials were generated at a rate of about 10-20 kg/1000 m{sup 3} of gas produced, and although regeneration was sometimes practised, eventual disposal as fill material, usually on site, was eventually necessary. The remediation of MGP sites generally requires that the disposition of these waste solids be addressed. The effective treatment of purifier wastes presents special problems due to the acid-base properties of the material, its elevated sulfur content, and the significant quantities of carbon both added as wood shavings and present as compounds generated as a result of gas manufacture. In broad terms, treatment approaches can be divided into two classes, those aimed at destroying the cyanide and objectionable carbon compounds and otherwise disposing of the residual, and those which attempt to isolate the waste from its surroundings. The latter approach attempts to take advantage of the natural insolubility of most of the constituents of concern found in purifier wastes, while destructive technologies limit potential liability. 9 refs.

  5. Prophylaxis and Treatment of Cyanide Intoxication Cyanide - Mechanism of Prophylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-15

    concentrations of cyanide (C ) and plasma concentrations of thiocyanate (Ce) to obtain esti- mates of K1 3, K3 1 , K3 0 , and V3: dCCN K 2 1 CON(4)C - (K12 + K...the following equations were used for this model: LdyN - K31CcC N - ( K3 1 + KI0)CpCN (7) dt dCcCN .K21CON(4)CC + CpCNK13 - (K12 + K13)CcCN (8) dt V2...manifestation of vitamin -Bl2 deficiency. Lancet. 2, 286-290. Herrington, M. D., Elliott, R. C. and Brown, J. E. (1971). Diagnosis and treatment of

  6. Refractory concentrate gold leaching: Cyanide vs. bromine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadgar, Ahmad

    1989-12-01

    Gold extraction, recovery and economics for two refractory concentrates were investigated using cyanide and bromine reagents. Gold extractions for cyanide leaching (24-48 hours) and bromine leaching (six hours) were the same and ranged from 94 to 96%. Gold recoveries from bromine pregnant solutions using carbon adsorption, ion exchange, solvent extraction, and zinc and aluminum precipitation methods were better than 99.9%. A preliminary economic analysis indicates that chemical costs for cyanidation and bromine process are 11.70 and 11.60 respectively, per tonne of calcine processed.

  7. Modification of the SERS spectrum of cyanide traces due to complex formation between cyanide and silver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao Dao, Tran; Kieu, Ngoc Minh; Quynh Ngan Luong, Truc; Cao, Tuan Anh; Hai Nguyen, Ngoc; Le, Van Vu

    2018-06-01

    It is well known that cyanide is an extremely toxic lethal poison with human death within minutes after exposure to only 300 ppm cyanide. On the other hand, cyanide is released into the environment (mainly through waste water) every day from various human activities. Therefore, rapid, sensitive and cost-effective cyanide trace detection is an urgent need. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a method that meets these requirements. It should be noted, however, that in this technique SERS substrates, which are usually made of gold or silver, will be leached with aqueous cyanide by the formation of complexes between gold or silver with cyanide. This will cause the SERS spectrum of cyanide to be modified. When determining cyanide concentrations by SERS analysis, this spectral modification should be taken into account. This report presents the SERS spectral modification of aqueous cyanide traces (in ppm and lower concentration range) when the SERS substrates used are flower-like silver micro-structures.

  8. CAPSULE REPORT - MANAGING CYANIDE IN METAL FINISHING

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this document is to provide guidance to surface finishing manufacturers, metal finishing decision maker and regulators on management practices and control technologies for managing cyanide in the workplace. This information can benefit key industry stakeholder gro...

  9. Alkaline cyanide degradation by Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 in a batch reactor. Influence of pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huertas, M.J.; Saez, L.P.; Roldan, M.D.; Luque-Almagro, V.M.; Martinez-Luque, M.; Blasco, R.; Castillo, F.; Moreno-Vivian, C.; Garcia-Garcia, I.

    2010-01-01

    Water containing cyanide was biologically detoxified with the bacterial strain Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 in a batch reactor. Volatilization of toxic hydrogen cyanide (HCN) was avoided by using an alkaline medium for the treatment. The operational procedure was optimized to assess cyanide biodegradation at variable pH values and dissolved oxygen concentrations. Using an initial pH of 10 without subsequent adjustment allowed total cyanide to be consumed at a mean rate of approximately 2.81 mg CN - L -1 O.D. -1 h -1 ; however, these conditions posed a high risk of HCN formation. Cyanide consumption was found to be pH-dependent. Thus, no bacterial growth was observed with a controlled pH of 10; on the other hand, pH 9.5 allowed up to 2.31 mg CN - L -1 O.D. -1 h -1 to be converted. The combination of a high pH and a low dissolved oxygen saturation (10%) minimized the release of HCN. This study contributes new basic knowledge about this biological treatment, which constitutes an effective alternative to available physico-chemical methods for the purification of wastewater containing cyanide or cyano-metal complexes.

  10. Alkaline cyanide degradation by Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 in a batch reactor. Influence of pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huertas, M.J., E-mail: mjhuertas@us.es [Instituto de Bioquimica Vegetal y Fotosintesis, CSIC-Universidad de Sevilla Avda Americo Vespucio, 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Saez, L.P.; Roldan, M.D.; Luque-Almagro, V.M.; Martinez-Luque, M. [Departamento de Bioquimica y Biologia Molecular, Edificio Severo Ochoa, 1a Planta, Campus de Rabanales, Universidad de Cordoba, 14071 Cordoba (Spain); Blasco, R. [Departamento de Bioquimica y Biologia Molecular y Genetica, Facultad de Veterinaria, Universidad de Extremadura, 11071 Caceres (Spain); Castillo, F.; Moreno-Vivian, C. [Departamento de Bioquimica y Biologia Molecular, Edificio Severo Ochoa, 1a Planta, Campus de Rabanales, Universidad de Cordoba, 14071 Cordoba (Spain); Garcia-Garcia, I. [Departamento de Ingenieria Quimica, Edificio Marie Curie, Campus de Rabanales, Universidad de Cordoba, 14071 Cordoba (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    Water containing cyanide was biologically detoxified with the bacterial strain Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 in a batch reactor. Volatilization of toxic hydrogen cyanide (HCN) was avoided by using an alkaline medium for the treatment. The operational procedure was optimized to assess cyanide biodegradation at variable pH values and dissolved oxygen concentrations. Using an initial pH of 10 without subsequent adjustment allowed total cyanide to be consumed at a mean rate of approximately 2.81 mg CN{sup -} L{sup -1} O.D.{sup -1} h{sup -1}; however, these conditions posed a high risk of HCN formation. Cyanide consumption was found to be pH-dependent. Thus, no bacterial growth was observed with a controlled pH of 10; on the other hand, pH 9.5 allowed up to 2.31 mg CN{sup -} L{sup -1} O.D.{sup -1} h{sup -1} to be converted. The combination of a high pH and a low dissolved oxygen saturation (10%) minimized the release of HCN. This study contributes new basic knowledge about this biological treatment, which constitutes an effective alternative to available physico-chemical methods for the purification of wastewater containing cyanide or cyano-metal complexes.

  11. Heap leach cyanide irrigation and risk to wildlife: Ramifications for the international cyanide management code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donato, D B; Madden-Hallett, D M; Smith, G B; Gursansky, W

    2017-06-01

    Exposed cyanide-bearing solutions associated with gold and silver recovery processes in the mining industry pose a risk to wildlife that interact with these solutions. This has been documented with cyanide-bearing tailings storage facilities, however risks associated with heap leach facilities are poorly documented, monitored and audited. Gold and silver leaching heap leach facilities use cyanide, pH-stabilised, at concentrations deemed toxic to wildlife. Their design and management are known to result in exposed cyanide-bearing solutions that are accessible to and present a risk to wildlife. Monitoring of the presence of exposed solutions, wildlife interaction, interpretation of risks and associated wildlife deaths are poorly documented. This paper provides a list of critical monitoring criteria and attempts to predict wildlife guilds most at risk. Understanding the significance of risks to wildlife from exposed cyanide solutions is complex, involving seasonality, relative position of ponding, temporal nature of ponding, solution palatability, environmental conditions, in situ wildlife species inventory and provision of alternative drinking sources for wildlife. Although a number of heap leach operations are certified as complaint with the International Cyanide Management Code (Cyanide Code), these criteria are not considered by auditors nor has systematic monitoring regime data been published. Without systematic monitoring and further knowledge, wildlife deaths on heap leach facilities are likely to remain largely unrecorded. This has ramifications for those operations certified as compliance with the Cyanide Code. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Treatment of cyanide containing wastewater using cavitation based approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawale, Rajashree H; Gogate, Parag R; Pandit, Aniruddha B

    2014-07-01

    Industrial wastewater streams containing high concentrations of biorefractory materials like cyanides should ideally be treated at source. In the present work, degradation of potassium ferrocyanide (K4Fe(CN)6) as a model pollutant has been investigated using cavitational reactors with possible intensification studies using different approaches. Effect of different operating parameters such as initial concentration, temperature and pH on the extent of degradation using acoustic cavitation has been investigated. For the case of hydrodynamic cavitation, flow characteristics of cavitating device (venturi) have been established initially followed by the effect of inlet pressure and pH on the extent of degradation. Under the optimized set of operating parameters, the addition of hydrogen peroxide (ratio of K4Fe(CN)6:H2O2 varied from 1:1 to 1:30 mol basis) as process intensifying approach has been investigated. The present work has conclusively established that under the set of optimized operating parameters, cavitation can be effectively used for degradation of potassium ferrocyanide. The comparative study of hydrodynamic cavitation and acoustic cavitation suggested that hydrodynamic cavitation is more energy efficient and gives higher degradation as compared to acoustic cavitation for equivalent power/energy dissipation. The present work is the first one to report comparison of cavitation based treatment schemes for degradation of cyanide containing wastewaters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Application of AOPs for Removal of Stable Cyanide Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsybikova, B.

    2017-11-01

    The main kinetic regularities of the photochemical oxidation of stable cyanide compounds (exemplified by hexacyanoferrates) by combined treatments involving direct photolysis and persulfate (oxidative system UV/S2O8 2-) and direct photolysis and hydrogen peroxide (oxidative system UV/H2O2) were studied. The possibility to perform oxidation processes within a wide pH range was shown. Based on to the energy efficiency, the rate of reaction and duration of the treatment, the considered oxidative systems can be arranged in the following order: {UV/S2O8 2-}>{UV/H2O2}>{UV}. The enhanced efficiency of hexacyanoferrates’ degradation by the combined system {UV/S2O8 2-} is due to the high oxidative capacity of sulfate anion radicals SO4 -· formed as a result of persulfate photolysis and its further disproportionation by Fe3+ and Fe2+ released through the decomposition of [Fe(CN)6]3-. Furthermore, the formation of ·OH radicals as a result of SO4 -· reacting with water also contributes to the enhanced oxidation efficiency. The combined method of {UV/S2O8 2-} treatment could be applied for the treatment of cyanide-containing wastewater and recycled water of different industries.

  14. Radiation purification of water from cyanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piskarev, I.M.; Rylova, A.E.; Sevast'yanov, A.I.

    1994-01-01

    Attempts at performing the process of radiation purification of water from cyanides have been described in the literature and were briefly reviewed earlier. Sodium cyanide solutions were examined in a concentration range from 26 mg/l to 80 g/l. The data given in various publications often disagree. Radiation yields of cyanide decay vary from 0.48 to 28 molecule/100 eV for equal dose rates, according to the data presented by various authors, and the maximum yield of 1200 was attained at a low dose rate (0.18 kGy/h) in a neutral solution. Chain decomposition of cyanides was observed in some studies, but not in others; the acidity of the solution examined was not necessarily reported. It was specified that complete decomposition of cyanides occurs; however, no detection limits for the analytical procedures of cyanide determination were reported. The authors performed experiments on the purification of actual industrial waste waters (solution and slurry), which were preliminarily preserved with sodium hydroxide (pH 9; the cyanide content was 90 mg/1). Solutions in dishes 40 mm in diameter and 20 or 40 mm in height were exposed to X-rays with a maximum energy of bremsstrahlung spectrum of 70 keV. Volumes of the solutions were 20 and 40 ml. With consideration for angular divergence and beam attenuation by solution, the average absorbed-dose rates were 1.5 and 3.1 kGy/h for dishes of V equal to 40 and 20 ml, respectively. Measurements of the absorbed dose were made with a ferrosulfate dosimeter

  15. C-11 cyanide production system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dohyun; Alexoff, David; Kim, Sung Won; Hooker, Jacob M.; Ferrieri, Richard A.

    2017-11-21

    A method for providing .sup.11C-labeled cyanides from .sup.11C labeled oxides in a target gas stream retrieved from an irradiated high pressure gaseous target containing O.sub.2, wherein .sup.11C labeled oxides are reduced with H.sub.2 in the presence of a nickel catalyst under a pressure and a temperature sufficient to form a product stream comprising at least about 95% .sup.11CH.sub.4, the .sup.11CH.sub.4 is then combined with an excess of NH.sub.3 in a carrier/reaction stream flowing at an accelerated velocity and the combined .sup.11CH4 carrier/reaction stream is then contacted with a platinum (Pt) catalyst particulate supported on a substantially-chemically-nonreactive heat-stable support at a temperature of at least about 900.degree. C., whereby a product stream comprising at least about 60% H.sup.11CN is provided in less than 10 minutes from retrieval of the .sup.11C labeled oxide.

  16. SUBSTITUTION OF CADMIUM CYANIDE ELECTROPLATING WITH ZINC CHLORIDE ELECTROPLATING

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study evaluated the zinc chloride electroplating process as a substitute for cadmium cyanide electroplating in the manufacture of industrial connectors and fittings at Aeroquip Corporation. The process substitution eliminates certain wastes, specifically cadmium and cyanide, ...

  17. Beyond toxicity: a regulatory role for mitochondrial cyanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Irene; Gotor, Cecilia; Romero, Luis C

    2014-01-01

    In non-cyanogenic plants, cyanide is a co-product of ethylene and camalexin biosynthesis. To maintain cyanide at non-toxic levels, Arabidopsis plants express the mitochondrial β-cyanoalanine synthase CYS-C1. CYS-C1 knockout leads to an increased level of cyanide in the roots and leaves and a severe defect in root hair morphogenesis, suggesting that cyanide acts as a signaling factor in root development. During compatible and incompatible plant-bacteria interactions, cyanide accumulation and CYS-C1 gene expression are negatively correlated. Moreover, CYS-C1 mutation increases both plant tolerance to biotrophic pathogens and their susceptibility to necrotrophic fungi, indicating that cyanide could stimulate the salicylic acid-dependent signaling pathway of the plant immune system. We hypothesize that CYS-C1 is essential for maintaining non-toxic concentrations of cyanide in the mitochondria to facilitate cyanide's role in signaling.

  18. Influence of cyanide on diauxic oscillations in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Bjørn Olav; Smrcinova, Miroslava; Sørensen, Preben Graae

    2012-01-01

    Coherent glycolytic oscillations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are a multicellular property induced by addition of glucose to a starved cell population of sufficient density. However, initiation of oscillations requires an additional perturbation, usually addition of cyanide. The fate of cyanide...... during glycolytic oscillations has not previously been studied, and is the subject of the present paper. Using a cyanide electrode, a substantial decrease in cyanide concentration was observed. In the pH range 6-7, we found experimentally that the electrode behaves reasonably well, provided changes in p......H are taken into account. To our knowledge, use of a cyanide electrode to study cyanide dynamics in living biological systems is new. Cyanide was found to enter starving yeast cells in only negligible amounts, and did not react significantly with glucose. Thus, cyanide consumption must be explained...

  19. heavy metals and cyanide distribution in the villages surrounding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    detection limit) were higher in the wells closest to the Tailing Storage Facility ... Key Words: Heavy metals pollution, Total cyanide, ground water pollution and ..... cyanide, heavy metals and probably other hazardous substances, leakage of.

  20. Electrophoretic analysis of cyanide depletion by Pseudomonas alcaligenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaugg, S E; Davidson, R A; Walker, J C; Walker, E B

    1997-02-01

    Bacterial-facilitated depletion of cyanide is under development for remediation of heap leach operations in the gold mining industry. Capillary electrophoresis was found to be a powerful tool for quantifying cyanide depletion. Changes in cyanide concentration in aqueous suspensions of Pseudomonas alcaligenes bacteria and cyanide at elevated pH were easily monitored by capillary electrophoresis. The resulting data can be used to study rates of cyanide depletion by this strain of bacteria. Concentrations of these bacteria at 10(5) cells/mL were found to reduce cyanide from 100 ppm to less than 8 ppm in four days. In addition, other ions of interest in cyanide metabolism, such as formate, can be simultaneously analyzed. Direct UV detection of cyanide at 192 nm further simplifies the analytical method for these ions.

  1. Recent developments in cyanide detection: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Jian; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.

    2010-01-01

    The extreme toxicity of cyanide and environmental concerns from its continued industrial use continue to generate interest in facile and sensitive methods for cyanide detection. In recent years, there is also additional recognition of HCN toxicity from smoke inhalation and potential use of cyanide as a weapon of terrorism. This review summarizes the literature since 2005 on cyanide measurement in different matrices ranging from drinking water and wastewater, to cigarette smoke and exhaled breath to biological fluids like blood, urine and saliva. The dramatic increase in the number of publications on cyanide measurement is indicative of the great interest in this field not only from analytical chemists, but also researchers from diverse environmental, medical, forensic and clinical arena. The recent methods cover both established and emerging analytical disciplines and include naked eye visual detection, spectrophotometry/colorimetry, capillary electrophoresis with optical absorbance detection, fluorometry, chemiluminescence, near-infrared cavity ring down spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry, electrochemical methods (potentiometry/amperometry/ion chromatography-pulsed amperometry), mass spectrometry (selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry), gas chromatography (nitrogen phosphorus detector, electron capture detector) and quartz crystal mass monitors.

  2. Recent developments in cyanide detection: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Jian [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas, 700 Planetarium Place, Arlington, TX 76019-0065 (United States); Dasgupta, Purnendu K., E-mail: Dasgupta@uta.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas, 700 Planetarium Place, Arlington, TX 76019-0065 (United States)

    2010-07-19

    The extreme toxicity of cyanide and environmental concerns from its continued industrial use continue to generate interest in facile and sensitive methods for cyanide detection. In recent years, there is also additional recognition of HCN toxicity from smoke inhalation and potential use of cyanide as a weapon of terrorism. This review summarizes the literature since 2005 on cyanide measurement in different matrices ranging from drinking water and wastewater, to cigarette smoke and exhaled breath to biological fluids like blood, urine and saliva. The dramatic increase in the number of publications on cyanide measurement is indicative of the great interest in this field not only from analytical chemists, but also researchers from diverse environmental, medical, forensic and clinical arena. The recent methods cover both established and emerging analytical disciplines and include naked eye visual detection, spectrophotometry/colorimetry, capillary electrophoresis with optical absorbance detection, fluorometry, chemiluminescence, near-infrared cavity ring down spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry, electrochemical methods (potentiometry/amperometry/ion chromatography-pulsed amperometry), mass spectrometry (selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry), gas chromatography (nitrogen phosphorus detector, electron capture detector) and quartz crystal mass monitors.

  3. Recent developments in cyanide detection: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jian; Dasgupta, Purnendu K.

    2010-01-01

    The extreme toxicity of cyanide and environmental concerns from its continued industrial use continue to generate interest in facile and sensitive methods for cyanide detection. In recent years there is also additional recognition of HCN toxicity from smoke inhalation and potential use of cyanide as a weapon of terrorism. This review summarizes the literature since 2005 on cyanide measurement in different matrices ranging from drinking water and wastewater, to cigarette smoke and exhaled breath to biological fluids like blood, urine and saliva. The dramatic increase in the number of publications on cyanide measurement is indicative of the great interest in this field not only from analytical chemists, but also researchers from diverse environmental, medical, forensic and clinical arena. The recent methods cover both established and emerging analytical disciplines and include naked eye visual detection, spectrophotometry/colorimetry, capillary electrophoresis with optical absorbance detection, fluorometry, chemiluminescence, near-infrared cavity ring down spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry, electrochemical methods (potentiometry/amperometry/ion chromatography-pulsed amperometry), mass spectrometry (selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry), gas chromatography (nitrogen phosphorus detector, electron capture detector) and quartz crystal mass monitors. PMID:20599024

  4. Iron monoxide photodissociation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chestakov, D. A.; Parker, D. H.; Baklanov, A. V.

    2005-02-01

    The photodissociation of Fe56O was studied by means of the velocity map imaging technique. A molecular beam of iron atoms and iron monoxide molecules was created using an electrical discharge with an iron electrode in a supersonic expansion of molecular oxygen. The ground state iron atom Fe(D45) and FeO concentrations in the molecular beam have been estimated. The dissociation energy of the FeO XΔ5 ground electronic state was found to be D00(FeO )=4.18±0.01eV. The effective absorption cross section of FeO at 252.39nm (vac), leading to the Fe(D45)+O(P3) dissociation channel, is ˜1.2×10-18cm2. A (1+1) resonantly enhanced multiphoton ionization spectrum of Fe56O in the region 39550-39580 cm-1 with rotational structure has been observed, but not assigned. Angular distributions of Fe(D45) and Fe(D35) products for the channel FeO →Fe(D4,35)+O(P3) have been measured at several points in the 210-260nm laser light wavelength region. The anisotropy parameter varies strongly with wavelength for both channels.

  5. Cyanide speciation at four gold leach operations undergoing remediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Craig A; Grimes, David J; Leinz, Reinhard W; Rye, Robert O

    2008-02-15

    Analyses have been made of 81 effluents from four gold leach operations in various stages of remediation to identify the most -persistent cyanide species. Total cyanide and weak acid-dissociable (WAD) cyanide were measured using improved methods, and metals known to form stable cyanocomplexes were also measured. Typically, total cyanide greatly exceeded WAD indicating that cyanide was predominantly in strong cyanometallic complexes. Iron was generally too low to accommodate the strongly complexed cyanide as Fe(CN)6s3- or Fe(CN)6(4-), but cobalt was abundant enough to implicate Co(CN)6(3-) or its dissociation products (Co(CN)(6-x)(H2O)x((3-x)-)). Supporting evidenceforcobalt-cyanide complexationwas found in tight correlations between cobalt and cyanide in some sample suites. Also, abundant free cyanide was produced upon UV illumination. Iron and cobalt cyanocomplexes both photodissociate; however, the iron concentration was insufficient to have carried the liberated cyanide, while the cobalt concentration was sufficient. Cobalt cyanocomplexes have not previously been recognized in cyanidation wastes. Their identification atfour separate operations, which had treated ores that were not especially rich in cobalt, suggests that cobalt complexation may be a common source of cyanide persistence. There is a need for more information on the importance and behavior of cobalt cyanocomplexes in ore-processing wastes at gold mines.

  6. Determination of cyanide by a highly sensitive indirect spectrophotometric method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, M; Maspoch, S

    1984-01-01

    Complexation of Pd(2+) with cyanide inhibits the extraction of the palladium complex of 5-phenylazo-8-aminoquinoline. This effect is used for the indirect spectrophotometric determination of cyanide at the mug level. Cyanide in industrial waste water and in sea-water is determined after distillation as HCN from the sample and collection in sodium hydroxide solution.

  7. Rhodanese is a Possible Enzyme Marker for Cyanide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rhodanese is a cyanide detoxifying enzyme. The role of man through his anthropogenic activities in and around water bodies have increased in recent times. These have led to constant exposure of water body to cyanide and cyanide compounds with increase to loss of many aquatic lives. There are limited methods ...

  8. Induction by ethylene of cyanide-resistant respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomos, T.; Laties, G.G.

    1976-05-17

    Ethylene and cyanide induce an increase in respiration in a variety of plant tissues, whereas ethylene has no effect on tissues whose respiration is strongly inhibited by cyanide. It is suggested that the existence of a cyanide-insensitive electron transport path is a prerequisite for stimulation of respiration by ethylene.

  9. Study of electrocatalytic properties of iridium carbonyl cluster and rhodium carbonyl cluster compounds for the oxygen reduction and hydrogen oxidation reactions in 0.5 MH{sub 2}SO{sub 4} in presence and absence of methanol and carbon monoxide, respectively

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uribe-Godinez, J.; Borja-Arco, E.; Castellanos, R.H. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Escobedo (Mexico); Jimenez-Sandoval, O. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Inst. Politecnico Nacional, Querataro (Mexico)

    2006-07-01

    The suitability of carbonyl cluster compounds as a substitute to platinum (Pt) in fuel cell catalysts was investigated. Iridium (Ir{sub 4}(CO){sub 12} and rhodium (Rh{sub 6}(CO){sub 116}) cluster compounds were investigated as potential new electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the presence and absence of methanol at different concentrations, as well as for the hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) with pure hydrogen and a hydrogen/carbon monoxide mixture. The materials were studied using room temperature rotating disk electrode (RDE) measurements and cyclic and linear sweep voltammetry techniques (LSV). Tafel slope and exchange current density were calculated using the LSV polarization curves. Cyclic voltamperometry results suggested that the electrocatalysts were tolerant to methanol. However, electrochemical behaviour of the materials altered in the presence of CO, and peaks corresponding to CO oxidation were observed in both cases. The rhodium carbonyl showed a higher current density for the ORR than the iridium carbonyl. The current potential curves in the presence of methanol were similar to those obtained without methanol. Results confirmed the tolerance properties of the materials to perform the ORR. Decreased current density values were observed during HOR, and were attributed to changes in the hydrogen solubility and diffusion coefficient due to the presence of CO. The Tafel slopes indicated that the mechanics of the HOR were Heyrovsky-Volmer. Results showed that the materials are capable of performing both ORR and HOR in an acid medium. It was noted that the iridium carbonyl cluster followed a 4-electron transfer mechanism towards the formation of water. It was concluded that the compounds are suitable for use as both cathodes and anodes in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and as cathodes in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). 3 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs.

  10. A kinetic study of the redox reactions of complex cyanides of iron, molybdenum and tungsten with compounds of the group VI A elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennis, C.R.

    1981-01-01

    The kinetic study arises out of the fact that few is known about redox kinetics of complex cyanides of molybdenum and tungsten. The redox kinetics of the complex cyanides of iron with organic and inorganic compounds are well known in organic chemistry. This comparitive study is done to obtain more information on redox reactions of complex cyanides of molybdenum and tungsten considering its greater applicability in organic and inorganic chemistry because of the propitious reduction potential of this complex cyanide in acidic and alkaline mediums. Various redox systems are kinetically investigated regarding the influence of the oxidising agent, reducing agent hydrogen ions and alkaline-metal ions on the reaction rate. A reaction mechanism is proposed for every system

  11. Treatment of cyanide-contained Waste Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheglov, M.Y.

    1999-01-01

    This work contains results of theoretical and experimental investigations of possibility to apply industrial ionites of different kinds for recovering complex cyanide of some d-elements (Cu, Zn, an dso on) and free CN-ions with purpose to develop technology and unit for plating plant waste water treatment. Finally, on basis of experimental data about equilibrium kinetic and dynamic characteristic of the sorption in model solutions, strong base anionite in CN- and OH-forms was chosen. This anionite has the best values of operational sorption uptake. Recommendations of using the anionite have been developed for real cyanide-contained wastewater treatment

  12. TREATMENT OF CYANIDE SOLUTIONS AND SLURRIES USING AIR-SPARGED HYDROCYCLONE (ASH) TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jan D. Miller; Terrence Chatwin; Jan Hupka; Doug Halbe; Tao Jiang; Bartosz Dabrowski; Lukasz Hupka

    2003-03-31

    The two-year Department of Energy (DOE) project ''Treatment of Cyanide Solutions and Slurries Using Air-Sparged Hydrocyclone (ASH) Technology'' (ASH/CN) has been completed. This project was also sponsored by industrial partners, ZPM Inc., Elbow Creek Engineering, Solvay Minerals, EIMCO-Baker Process, Newmont Mining Corporation, Cherokee Chemical Co., Placer Dome Inc., Earthworks Technology, Dawson Laboratories and Kennecott Minerals. Development of a new technology using the air-sparged hydrocyclone (ASH) as a reactor for either cyanide recovery or destruction was the research objective. It was expected that the ASH could potentially replace the conventional stripping tower presently used for HCN stripping and absorption with reduced power costs. The project was carried out in two phases. The first phase included calculation of basic processing parameters for ASH technology, development of the flowsheet, and design/adaptation of the ASH mobile system for hydrogen cyanide (HCN) recovery from cyanide solutions. This was necessary because the ASH was previously used for volatile organics removal from contaminated water. The design and modification of the ASH were performed with the help from ZPM Inc. personnel. Among the modifications, the system was adapted for operation under negative pressure to assure safe operating conditions. The research staff was trained in the safe use of cyanide and in hazardous material regulations. Cyanide chemistry was reviewed resulting in identification of proper chemical dosages for cyanide destruction, after completion of each pilot plant run. The second phase of the research consisted of three field tests that were performed at the Newmont Mining Corporation gold cyanidation plant near Midas, Nevada. The first field test was run between July 26 and August 2, 2002, and the objective was to demonstrate continuous operation of the modified ASH mobile system. ASH units were applied for both stripping and absorption

  13. Toxicity of potassium cyanide to trout. [Salmo gairdneri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbert, D W.M.; Merkens, J C

    1952-01-01

    The toxicity of KCN was tested on 50 rainbow trout using a flow through bioassay system. The system was designed to allow water conditions to remain constant throughout the test rather than change through metabolic activities of the fish. Results show: cyanide causes fish to loose equilibrium; cyanide resistance increases if the trout are allowed to acclimate to test temperatures before cyanides is added; young trout are more resistant to cyanide; and the distribution of trout survival times to cyanide concentration approximates a normal distribution. (14 references, 5 figures, 6 tables.

  14. Reduction of cyanide levels in sweet cassava leaves grown in Busia County, Kenya based on different processing methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ojiambo, O.C.

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz, is the third most important carbohydrate food source around the world and in particular in sub-Sahara Africa. Both the roots and leaves have dual antagonistic contribution of which; one being nutritional value and secondly, contain cyanogenic glycosides. The latter when hydrolyzed by linamarase produces poisonous hydrogen cyanide attributed to among other factors, the methods of processing. Little has been reported on processing methods and information downstream will be great given the toxicity. This report assessed the variation of cyanide levels following different processing methods of leaves of sweet cassava varieties. A number of conditions were varied to mimic affordable and as well sustainable processing methods. Processing prior to boiling for up to 25 minutes involved leaves being pounded and pounded then soaked in water. Determination of cyanide was done using picrate papers and UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The cyanide levels ranged from 576.30 ± 0.32 - 128.34 ± 0.34 mg HCN Equivalence/Kg in raw cassava leaves that significantly reduced up to 88.45% with the processing’s (P< 0.001. Longer duration of boiling cassava leaves with prior processings’ of pounding and that of pounding and soaking is promoted to minimize the risks associated with cyanide poisoning.

  15. Detection of cyanide anion by zinc porphyrin-spiropyran dyad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kho, Young Min; Hur, Dae Young; Shin, Eun Ju

    2016-01-01

    Versatile methods of the sensitive and selective detection for cyanide anion to monitor toxic cyanide have been developed. These include colorimetric, colorimetric, chromatographic, and electrochemical analyses. Among those methods for cyanide detection, optical methods based on absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy are relatively simple, inexpensive, and sensitive. A number of organic sensors for cyanide anion have been designed and synthesized. Absorption and/or fluorescence spectra of these sensors are changed by forming coordination complex or bonding covalently with cyanide. Compared with other anions, cyanide anion has some characteristic properties, such as its strong nucleophilicity and high binding affinity toward metal ions, and is superior and useful for the development of the sensors. Both covalent bond-based sensors and coordination complex-based sensors have been developed for cyanide detection. The results indicate that ZnP-SP plays a role as a CN"- selective, colorimetric sensor either without or with UV irradiation

  16. Detection of cyanide anion by zinc porphyrin-spiropyran dyad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kho, Young Min; Hur, Dae Young; Shin, Eun Ju [Dept. of Chemistry, Sunchon National University, Suncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Versatile methods of the sensitive and selective detection for cyanide anion to monitor toxic cyanide have been developed. These include colorimetric, colorimetric, chromatographic, and electrochemical analyses. Among those methods for cyanide detection, optical methods based on absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy are relatively simple, inexpensive, and sensitive. A number of organic sensors for cyanide anion have been designed and synthesized. Absorption and/or fluorescence spectra of these sensors are changed by forming coordination complex or bonding covalently with cyanide. Compared with other anions, cyanide anion has some characteristic properties, such as its strong nucleophilicity and high binding affinity toward metal ions, and is superior and useful for the development of the sensors. Both covalent bond-based sensors and coordination complex-based sensors have been developed for cyanide detection. The results indicate that ZnP-SP plays a role as a CN{sup -} selective, colorimetric sensor either without or with UV irradiation.

  17. Ferrate(VI) and ferrate(V) oxidation of cyanide, thiocyanate, and copper(I) cyanide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Virender K.; Yngard, Ria A.; Cabelli, Diane E.; Clayton Baum, J.

    2008-01-01

    Cyanide (CN - ), thiocyanate (SCN - ), and copper(I) cyanide (Cu(CN) 4 3- ) are common constituents in the wastes of many industrial processes such as metal finishing and gold mining, and their treatment is required before the safe discharge of effluent. The oxidation of CN - , SCN - , and Cu(CN) 4 3- by ferrate(VI) (Fe VI O 4 2- ; Fe(VI)) and ferrate(V) (Fe V O 4 3- ; Fe(V)) has been studied using stopped-flow and premix pulse radiolysis techniques. The rate laws for the oxidation of cyanides were found to be first-order with respect to each reactant. The second-order rate constants decreased with increasing pH because the deprotonated species, FeO 4 2- , is less reactive than the protonated Fe(VI) species, HFeO 4 - . Cyanides react 10 3 -10 5 times faster with Fe(V) than with Fe(VI). The Fe(V) reaction with CN - proceeds by sequential one-electron reductions from Fe(V) to Fe(IV) to Fe(III). However, a two-electron transfer process from Fe(V) to Fe(III) occurs in the reaction of Fe(V) with SCN - and Cu(CN) 4 3- . The toxic CN - species of cyanide wastes is converted into relatively non-toxic cyanate (NCO - ). Results indicate that Fe(VI) is highly efficient in removing cyanides from electroplating rinse water and gold mill effluent

  18. Excretion of 14C-labeled cyanide in rats exposed to chronic intake of potassium cyanide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okoh, P.N.

    1983-01-01

    The excretion of an acute dose of 14C-labeled cyanide in urine, feces, and expired air was studied in rats exposed to daily intake of unlabeled KCN in the diet for 6 weeks. Urinary excretion was the main route of elimination of cyanide carbon in these rats, accounting for 83% of the total excreted radioactivity in 12 hr and 89% of the total excreted radioactivity in 24 hr. The major excretion metabolite of cyanide in urine was thiocyanate, and this metabolite accounted for 71 and 79% of the total urinary activity in 12 hr and 24 hr, respectively. The mean total activity excreted in expired air after 12 hr was only 4%, and this value did not change after 24 hr. Of the total activity in expired air in 24 hr, 90% was present as carbon dioxide and 9% as cyanide. When these results were compared with those observed for control rats, it was clear that the mode of elimination of cyanide carbon in both urine and breath was not altered by the chronic intake of cyanide

  19. Cyanide ion complexation by a cationic borane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ching-Wen; Gabbaï, François P

    2008-02-14

    While we have previously reported that [1-(Mes2B)-8-(Me3NCH2)-C10H6]+ ([2]+) complexes fluoride ions to form [1-(Mes2FB)-8-(Me3NCH2)-C10H6] (2-F), we now show that this cationic borane also complexes cyanide to form [1-(Mes2(NC)B)-8-(Me3NCH2)-C10H6] (2-CN). This reaction also occurs under biphasic conditions (H2O-CHCl3) and may serve to transport cyanide in organic phases. The zwitterionic cyanoborate 2-CN has been fully characterized and its crystal structure determined. UV-vis titration experiments carried out in THF indicate that [2]+ has a higher affinity for fluoride (K > 10(8) M(-1)) than cyanide (K = 8.0 (+/-0.5) x 10(5) M(-1)). Steric effects which impede cyanide binding to the sterically congested boron center of [2]+ are most likely at the origin of this selectivity. Finally, electrochemical studies indicate that [2]+ is significantly more electrophilic than its neutral precursor 1-(Mes2B)-8-(Me2NCH2)-(C10H6) (1). These studies also show that reduction of [2]+ is irreversible, possibly because of elimination of the NMe3 moiety under reductive conditions. In fact, [2]OTf reacts with NaBH4 to afford 1-(Mes2B)-8-(CH3)-(C10H6) (4) which has also been fully characterized.

  20. The Range of 1-3 keV Electrons in Solid Oxygen and Carbon Monoxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oehlenschlæger, M.; Andersen, H.H.; Schou, Jørgen

    1985-01-01

    The range of 1-3 keV electrons in films of solid oxygen and carbon monoxide has been measured by a mirror substrate method. The technique used here is identical to the one previously used for range measurements in solid hydrogen and nitrogen. The range in oxygen is slightly shorter than that in n......The range of 1-3 keV electrons in films of solid oxygen and carbon monoxide has been measured by a mirror substrate method. The technique used here is identical to the one previously used for range measurements in solid hydrogen and nitrogen. The range in oxygen is slightly shorter than...

  1. Aerobic cyanide degradation by bacterial isolates from cassava factory wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandasamy, Sujatha; Dananjeyan, Balachandar; Krishnamurthy, Kumar; Benckiser, Gero

    2015-01-01

    Ten bacterial strains that utilize cyanide (CN) as a nitrogen source were isolated from cassava factory wastewater after enrichment in a liquid media containing sodium cyanide (1 mM) and glucose (0.2% w/v). The strains could tolerate and grow in cyanide concentrations of up to 5 mM. Increased cyanide levels in the media caused an extension of lag phase in the bacterial growth indicating that they need some period of acclimatisation. The rate of cyanide removal by the strains depends on the initial cyanide and glucose concentrations. When initial cyanide and glucose concentrations were increased up to 5 mM, cyanide removal rate increased up to 63 and 61 per cent by Bacillus pumilus and Pseudomonas putida. Metabolic products such as ammonia and formate were detected in culture supernatants, suggesting a direct hydrolytic pathway without an intermediate formamide. The study clearly demonstrates the potential of aerobic treatment with cyanide degrading bacteria for cyanide removal in cassava factory wastewaters.

  2. Hydrogen cyanide, a volatile biomarker of Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smith, D.; Španěl, Patrik; Gilchrist, F. J.; Lenney, W.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2013), 044001 ISSN 1752-7155 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : TUBE MASS-SPECTROMETRY * ION MOBILITY SPECTROMETRY * EXHALED NITRIC-OXIDE Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.590, year: 2013

  3. Recovery of copper and cyanide from waste cyanide solutions using emulsion liquid membrane with LIX 7950 as the carrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Feng; Wang, Wei

    2017-08-01

    The feasibility of using emulsion liquid membranes (ELMs) with the guanidine extractant LIX 7950 as the mobile carrier for detoxifying copper-containing waste cyanide solutions has been determined. Relatively stable ELMs can be maintained under suitable stirring speed during mixing ELMs and the external solution. Effective extraction of copper cyanides by ELMs only occurs at pH below 11. High copper concentration in the external phase and high volume ratio of the external phase to ELMs result in high transport rates of copper and cyanide. High molar ratio of cyanide to copper tends to suppress copper extraction. The presence of thiocyanate ion significantly depresses the transport of copper and cyanide through the membrane while the thiosulfate ion produces less impact on copper removal by ELMs. Zinc and nickel cyanides can also be effectively extracted by ELMs. More than 90% copper and cyanide can be effectively removed from alkaline cyanide solutions by ELMs under suitable experimental conditions, indicating the effectiveness of using the designed ELM for recovering copper and cyanide from waste cyanide solutions.

  4. Technetium cyanide chemistry: synthesis and characterization of technetium(III) and -(V) cyanide complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trop, H.S.; Jones, A.G.; Davison, A.

    1980-01-01

    Several new technetium cyanide complexes have been prepared and characterized. The reaction of ammonium hexaiodotechnetate(IV) with potassium cyanide in refluxing aqueous methanol under nitrogen yields potassium heptacyanotechnetate(III) dihydrate, K 4 Tc(CN) 7 .2H 2 O (1). Infrared and Raman measurements indicate that 1 has a pentagonal bipyramidal structure (D/sub 5h/) in both solid and solution. Aqueous solutions of 1 are air sensitive, decomposing to potassium oxopentacyanotechnetate(V) tetrahydrate, K 2 TcO(CN) 5 .4H 2 O (2). This species can also be prepared from the reaction of TcO 2 .xH 2 O with hot aqueous potassium cyanide solutions. Hydrolysis of 2 in water yields potassium trans-dioxo-tetracyanotechnetate(V), K 3 TcO 2 (CN) 4 (3). Preparation of 3 can also be achieved from the treatment of [TcO 2 (Py) 4 ]ClO 4 .2H 2 O with aqueous potassium cyanide. Infrared and Raman measurements on 3 are consistent with the proposed trans-dioxo (D/sub 4h/) structure. Reaction of the oxotetrachlorotechnetate(V) anion, TcOCl 4 , with potassium cyanide in methanol produces trans-oxomethoxytetracyanotechnetate(V). [TcO(OMe)(CN) 4 ] (4). The full details of the synthesis and characterization of these interesting technetium(III) and -(V) complexes, as well as observations on the infrared and Raman spectra of trans-dioxo metal complexes and the hydrolysis of species 2, are presented

  5. Determination of the Cyanide Metabolite 2-Aminothiazoline-4-Carboxylic Acid in Urine and Plasma by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Logue, Brian A; Kirschten, Nicholas P; Petrikovics, Ilona; Moser, Matthew A; Rockwood, Gary A; Baskin, Steven I

    2005-01-01

    The cyanide metabolite 2-aminothiazoline.4-carboxylic acid (ATCA) is a promising biomarker for cyanide exposure because of its stability and the limitations of direct determination of cyanide and more abundant cyanide metabolites...

  6. Survival of fish upon removal of cyanide from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gacsi, Mariann; Czegeny, Ildiko; Nagy, Gabor; Banfalvi, Gaspar

    2005-01-01

    The effects of potassium cyanide and the removal of cyanide from water in vivo on the survival of fish were investigated. This research was initiated because of the catastrophe that took place at the end of January 2000 in the Carpathian basin, when an enormous amount of cyanide pollution swept through the Samos and Tisza rivers, and then to the Danube. Since nothing was done against the disaster, we have suggested a chemical solution to remove cyanide from waterways (Chem. Innovat. 30 (2000b) 53). Based on experiments, we describe that the most effective and harmless way to remove cyanide and to save the lives of fish from 40 to 160x the lethal doses of cyanide is to use carbogen gas containing 5% carbon dioxide and 95% oxygen followed by aeration with air

  7. Cyanides in the environment-analysis-problems and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaszczak, Ewa; Polkowska, Żaneta; Narkowicz, Sylwia; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2017-07-01

    Cyanide toxicity and their environmental impact are well known. Nevertheless, they are still used in the mining, galvanic and chemical industries. As a result of industrial activities, cyanides are released in various forms to all elements of the environment. In a natural environment, cyanide exists as cyanogenic glycosides in plants seeds. Too much consumption can cause unpleasant side effects. However, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) is the most common source of cyanide. Live organisms have the ability to convert cyanide into less toxic compounds excreted with physiological fluids. The aim of this paper is to review the current state of knowledge on the behaviour of cyanide in the environment and its impact on the health and human life.

  8. SYNTHESES AND CHARACTERIZATIONS OF THE CYANIDE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-10-28

    (Received October 28, 2015; revised June 25, 2016) ... suggest that the Ni(II) ion is four coordinate with four cyanide-carbon atoms in ... However, there have been many studies on octahedral [M(CN)6]n- but little ... were synthesized and investigated by vibrational spectral (FT-IR and ..... Karaağaç, D.; Kürkçüoğlu, G.S. Bull.

  9. Supramolecular Ferric Porphyrins as Cyanide Receptors in Aqueous Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    All fundamental data about binding of the cyanide to a supramolecular complex composed of a per-O-methylated β-cyclodextrin dimer having an imidazole linker (Im3CD) and an anionic ferric porphyrin (Fe(III)TPPS) indicate that the Fe(III)TPPS/Im3CD complex is much better as an cyanide receptor in vivo than hydroxocobalamin, whose cyanide binding ability is lowered by its strong binding to serum proteins in the blood. PMID:24900285

  10. Inhibitory effect of cyanide on wastewater nitrification ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of CN- (CN-) on nitrification was examined with samples from nitrifying wastewater enrichments using two different approaches: by measuring substrate (ammonia) specific oxygen uptake rates (SOUR), and by using RT-qPCR to quantify the transcripts of functional genes involved in nitrification. The nitrifying bioreactor was operated as a continuous reactor with a 24 h hydraulic retention time. The samples were exposed in batch vessels to cyanide for a period of 12 h. The concentrations of CN- used in the batch assays were 0.03, 0.06, 0.1 and 1.0 mg/L. There was considerable decrease in SOUR with increasing dosages of CN-. A decrease of more than 50% in nitrification activity was observed at 0.1 mg/L CN-. Based on the RT-qPCR data, there was notable reduction in the transcript levels of amoA and hao for increasing CN- dosage, which corresponded well with the ammonia oxidation activity measured via SOUR. The inhibitory effect of cyanide may be attributed to the affinity of cyanide to bind ferric heme proteins, which disrupt protein structure and function. The correspondence between the relative expression of functional genes and SOUR shown in this study demonstrates the efficacy of RNA based function-specific assays for better understanding of the effect of toxic compounds on nitrification activity in wastewater. Nitrification is the first step of nitrogen removal is wastewater, and it is susceptible to inhibition by many industrial chemical. We looked at

  11. Cyanide toxicity to Burkholderia cenocepacia is modulated by polymicrobial communities and environmental factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve P. Bernier

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Microbes within polymicrobial communities can establish positive and negative interactions that have the potential to influence the overall behaviour of the community. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and species of the Burkholderia cepacia complex (Bcc can co-exist in the lower airways, however several studies have shown that P. aeruginosa can effectively kill the Bcc in vitro, for which hydrogen cyanide was recently proposed to play a critical role. Here we show that modification of the environment (i.e. culture medium, long-term genetic adaptation of P. aeruginosa to the cystic fibrosis (CF lung, or the addition of another bacterial species to the community can alter the sensitivity of Burkholderia cenocepacia to P. aeruginosa toxins. We specifically demonstrate that undefined rich media leads to higher susceptibility of B. cenocepacia to P. aeruginosa toxins like cyanide as compared to a synthetic medium (SCFM, that mimics the CF lung nutritional content. Overall, our study shows that the polymicrobial environment can have profound effects on negative interactions mediated by P. aeruginosa against B. cenocepacia. In fact, evolved P. aeruginosa or the presence of other species such as Staphylococcus aureus can directly abolish the direct competition mediated by cyanide and consequently maintaining a higher level of species diversity within the community.

  12. Cyanide metallocenes of trivalent f-elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maynadie, J.; Berthet, J.C.; Thuery, P.; Ephritikhine, M.

    2007-01-01

    Addition of N n Bu 4 CN to (C 5 Me 5 ) 2 UI(py), (C 5 Me 5 ) 2 CeI, or (C 5 Me 5 ) 2 M(OTf) (M = U, Ce) in acetonitrile led to the precipitation of the neutral mono-cyanide species [(C 5 Me 5 ) 2 M(μ-CN)] n [M = U (1), Ce (2)], which likely have an oligomeric structure, as shown by the tri-meric cyanide-bridged complex [(C 5 Me 5 ) 2 Ce(μ-CN)(CN t Bu)] 3 (3) obtained by addition of excess t BuNC into a suspension of 2 in acetonitrile. The structure of the U(III,IV) mixed valence compound [{(C 5 Me 5 ) 2 U} 2 (μ-CN){(μ-CN) 2 Na(thf)} 2 ] ∞ (4), which crystallized from a thf solution of (C 5 Me 5 ) 2 UI(py) in the presence of excess NaCN, reveals a unique example of an f-element-(μ-CN)-M interaction (M = main group or d transition metal). The anionic poly-cyanides [(C 5 Me 5 ) 2 M(CN) 3 ][N n Bu 4 ] 2 [M = U (5), Ce (6)] were synthesized by treatment of 1 and 2 with 2 equiv or an excess of N n Bu 4 CN in acetonitrile; they were also prepared in a one-pot procedure by stepwise addition of 1 equiv of KCN and 2 equiv of N n Bu 4 CN to the parent iodides in acetonitrile. The bent metallocenes 5 and 6 are unique low-valent molecular poly-cyanide compounds of an f-element that have been structurally identified, while 5 is the first fully characterized actinide(III) cyanide. Comparison of the crystal structures of 5 and 6 shows that the M-C(C 5 Me 5 ) and M-C(CN) distances are 0.02-0.03 Angstroms shorter for M = U than for M Ce, while the ionic radius of uranium(III) is 0.02 Angstroms larger than that of cerium(III). (authors)

  13. Cyanide toxicokinetics: the behavior of cyanide, thiocyanate and 2-amino-2-thiazoline-4-carboxylic acid in multiple animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Raj K; Oda, Robert P; Petrikovics, Ilona; Thompson, David E; Brenner, Matthew; Mahon, Sari B; Bebarta, Vikhyat S; Rockwood, Gary A; Logue, Brian A

    2014-05-01

    Cyanide causes toxic effects by inhibiting cytochrome c oxidase, resulting in cellular hypoxia and cytotoxic anoxia, and can eventually lead to death. Cyanide exposure can be verified by direct analysis of cyanide concentrations or analyzing its metabolites, including thiocyanate (SCN(-)) and 2-amino-2-thiazoline-4-carboxylic acid (ATCA) in blood. To determine the behavior of these markers following cyanide exposure, a toxicokinetics study was performed in three animal models: (i) rats (250-300 g), (ii) rabbits (3.5-4.2 kg) and (iii) swine (47-54 kg). Cyanide reached a maximum in blood and declined rapidly in each animal model as it was absorbed, distributed, metabolized and eliminated. Thiocyanate concentrations rose more slowly as cyanide was enzymatically converted to SCN(-). Concentrations of ATCA did not rise significantly above the baseline in the rat model, but rose quickly in rabbits (up to a 40-fold increase) and swine (up to a 3-fold increase) and then fell rapidly, generally following the relative behavior of cyanide. Rats were administered cyanide subcutaneously and the apparent half-life (t1/2) was determined to be 1,510 min. Rabbits were administered cyanide intravenously and the t1/2 was determined to be 177 min. Swine were administered cyanide intravenously and the t1/2 was determined to be 26.9 min. The SCN(-) t1/2 in rats was 3,010 min, but was not calculated in rabbits and swine because SCN(-) concentrations did not reach a maximum. The t1/2 of ATCA was 40.7 and 13.9 min in rabbits and swine, respectively, while it could not be determined in rats with confidence. The current study suggests that cyanide exposure may be verified shortly after exposure by determining significantly elevated cyanide and SCN(-) in each animal model and ATCA may be used when the ATCA detoxification pathway is significant.

  14. Acquisition Practices Used at United States Marine Corps Program Executive Officer Land Systems: Program Manager Medium and Heavy Tactical Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-22

    review, the excessive concentrations of carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, hydrogen cyanide , and the acid gases experienced during the Molotov...excessive concentration levels of carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, hydrogen cyanide , and the acid gases were identified during the Molotov cocktail live...employees about prohibitions on retaliation, and rights and remedies against retaliation for protected disclosures. The designated ombudsman is the DoD

  15. A turn-on fluorescent sensor for detection of cyanide in aqueous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shan-Teng; Chir, Jiun-Ly; Jhong, Yi; Wu, An-Tai, E-mail: antai@cc.ncue.edu.tw

    2015-11-15

    2-Hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde oxime (receptor 1) serves as a selective chemosensor for cyanide anion (CN{sup −}). In the presence of CN{sup −}, an enhanced fluorescent intensity and red-shift were observed. The observed complexation between receptor 1 and CN{sup −} may cause by a hydrogen bonding interaction between the OH group of receptor 1 and CN{sup −}. - Highlights: • 2-Hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde oxime serves as a selective chemosensor for CN{sup −}. • In the presence of CN{sup −}, an enhanced fluorescent and red-shift were observed.

  16. Potential Toxic Levels of Cyanide in Almonds (Prunus amygdalus), Apricot Kernels (Prunus armeniaca), and Almond Syrup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaouali, Nadia; Dorra, Amira; Khelifi, Fathia; Nouioui, Anouer; Masri, Wafa; Belwaer, Ines; Ghorbel, Hayet; Hedhili, Abderazzek

    2013-01-01

    Under normal environmental conditions, many plants synthesize cyanogenic glycosides, which are able to release hydrogen cyanide upon hydrolysis. Each year, there are frequent livestock and occasional human victims of cyanogenic plants consumption. The present work aims to determine the hydrocyanic acid content in different samples of cyanogenic plants, selected from the Tunisian flora, and in the almond syrup. In order to evaluate their toxicity and their impact on the consumer health in the short term as well as in the long term, using the ISO 2164-1975 NT standard, relating to the determination of cyanogenic heterosides in leguminous plants. PMID:24171123

  17. Pathways and bioenergetics of anaerobic carbon monoxide fermentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martijn eDiender

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide can act as a substrate for different modes of fermentative anaerobic metabolism. The trait of utilizing CO is spread among a diverse group of microorganisms, including members of bacteria as well as archaea. Over the last decade this metabolism has gained interest due to the potential of converting CO rich gas, such as synthesis gas, into bio-based products. Three main types of fermentative CO metabolism can be distinguished: hydrogenogenesis, methanogenesis and acetogenesis, generating hydrogen, methane and acetate, respectively. Here, we review the current knowledge on these three variants of microbial CO metabolism with an emphasis on the potential enzymatic routes and bio-energetics involved.

  18. Pathways and Bioenergetics of Anaerobic Carbon Monoxide Fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diender, Martijn; Stams, Alfons J M; Sousa, Diana Z

    2015-01-01

    Carbon monoxide can act as a substrate for different modes of fermentative anaerobic metabolism. The trait of utilizing CO is spread among a diverse group of microorganisms, including members of bacteria as well as archaea. Over the last decade this metabolism has gained interest due to the potential of converting CO-rich gas, such as synthesis gas, into bio-based products. Three main types of fermentative CO metabolism can be distinguished: hydrogenogenesis, methanogenesis, and acetogenesis, generating hydrogen, methane and acetate, respectively. Here, we review the current knowledge on these three variants of microbial CO metabolism with an emphasis on the potential enzymatic routes and bio-energetics involved.

  19. Histomorphometric studies on the effect of cyanide consumption of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The density and size of the Purkinje cells were the same in both the control and experimental groups (P>0.05). Conclusion: Maternal consumption of 500 ppm cyanide in rats does not significantly affect light microscopic prenatal cerebellar development, but causes mild changes in the post-natal life. Maternal cyanide ...

  20. Simple picrate method for the determination of cyanide in cassava ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The red coloured complex on the strips was extracted with 50% ethanol solution and the absorbance of the extract was measured at 510nm using a spectrophotometer. The method was reproducible and cyanide as low as 1 microgram could be determined. Cyanide levels of all the cassava varieties tested were higher than ...

  1. Mechanism of the adsorption of gold cyanide on activated carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDougall, G. (University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa). Dept. of Chemistry); Hancock, R.D. (Klipfontein Organic Products, Kempton Park (South Africa)); Wellington, O.L.; Nicol, M.J. (National Inst. for Metallurgy, Johannesburg (South Africa)); Copperthwaite, R.G. (Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria (South Africa). National Chemical Research Lab.)

    1981-12-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that the adsorption of gold cyanide on carbon in the presence or absence of electrolytes and acids proceeds by the same mechanism. The first detailed investigation of the fundamentals of the adsorption and elution of gold and silver cyanide on carbon, theories to state the results and the experimental method are discussed.

  2. Chemical speciation and behaviour of cyanide in contaminated soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meeussen, J.C.L.

    1992-01-01

    Cyanide is present as a contaminant of the soil on several hundred (former) industrial sites in the Netherlands. The risk for the occurrence of adverse effects on human health and the environment strongly depends on the chemical form in which cyanide is present and on the behaviour of this

  3. Hydroxocobalamin: improved public health readiness for cyanide disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, S W; Keim, M E

    2001-06-01

    The United States is under the constant threat of a mass casualty cyanide disaster from industrial accidents, hazardous material transportation incidents, and deliberate terrorist attacks. The current readiness for cyanide disaster by the emergency medical system in the United States is abysmal. We, as a nation, are simply not prepared for a significant cyanide-related event. The standard of care for cyanide intoxication is the cyanide antidote kit, which is based on the use of nitrites to induce methemoglobinemia. This kit is both expensive and ill suited for out-of-hospital use. It also has its own inherent toxicity that prevents rapid administration. Furthermore, our hospitals frequently fail to stock this life-saving antidote or decline to stock more than one. Hydroxocobalamin is well recognized as an efficacious, safe, and easily administered cyanide antidote. Because of its extremely low adverse effect profile, it is ideal for out-of-hospital use in suspected cyanide intoxication. To effectively prepare for a cyanide disaster, the United States must investigate, adopt, manufacture, and stockpile hydroxocobalamin to prevent needless morbidity and mortality.

  4. Blood carboxyhaemoglobin and cyanide levels in fire survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, C.J.; Campbell, D.; Reid, W.H.

    1981-06-20

    Blood carboxyhaemoglobin and cyanide concentrations were measured in 53 fire survivors, 36 of whom had clinical evidence of smoke inhalation. Carboxyhaemoglobin and cyanide levels were raised only in patients with smoke inhalation. Blood carboxyhaemoglobin measurement can be used to confirm the diagnosis of severe smoke inhalation in cases in which the clinical data are inconclusive, provided that the time of sampling after exposure is taken into account. A nomogram has been constructed for this purpose. There is no quick method of measuring blood cyanide levels, but the close relation between cyanide and carboxyhaemoglobin levels suggests that carboxyhaemoglobin concentrations, which can be rapidly and easily measured, could be used to identify those who might benefit from treatment with cyanide antidotes.

  5. Competing hydrostatic compression mechanisms in nickel cyanide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamson, J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); National Institute of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Akadeemia tee 23, 12618 Tallinn (Estonia); Lucas, T.C. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Cairns, A.B.; Funnell, N.P. [Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QR (United Kingdom); Tucker, M.G. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Diamond Light Source, Chilton, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Kleppe, A.K. [Diamond Light Source, Chilton, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Hriljac, J.A. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Goodwin, A.L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford, Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QR (United Kingdom)

    2015-12-15

    We use variable-pressure neutron and X-ray diffraction measurements to determine the uniaxial and bulk compressibilities of nickel(II) cyanide, Ni(CN){sub 2}. Whereas other layered molecular framework materials are known to exhibit negative area compressibility, we find that Ni(CN){sub 2} does not. We attribute this difference to the existence of low-energy in-plane tilt modes that provide a pressure-activated mechanism for layer contraction. The experimental bulk modulus we measure is about four times lower than that reported elsewhere on the basis of density functional theory methods [Phys. Rev. B 83 (2011) 024301].

  6. Spatial separation of the cyanogenic β-glucosidase ZfBGD2 and cyanogenic glucosides in the haemolymph of Zygaena larvae facilitates cyanide release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pentzold, Stefan; Jensen, Mikael Kryger; Matthes, Annemarie

    2017-01-01

    . Cyanogenic plants contain cyanogenic glucosides and release hydrogen cyanide due to such a well-characterized two-component system. Some arthropods are also cyanogenic, but comparatively little is known about their system. Here, we identify a specific β-glucosidase (ZfBGD2) involved in cyanogenesis from...... larvae of Zygaena filipendulae (Lepidoptera, Zygaenidae), and analyse the spatial organization of cyanide release in this specialized insect. High levels of ZfBGD2 mRNA and protein were found in haemocytes by transcriptomic and proteomic profiling. Heterologous expression in insect cells showed that Zf......BGD2 hydrolyses linamarin and lotaustralin, the two cyanogenic glucosides present in Z. filipendulae. Linamarin and lotaustralin as well as cyanide release were found exclusively in the haemoplasma. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that ZfBGD2 clusters with other insect β...

  7. Effect of acute and delayed hyperbaric oxygen therapy on cyanide whole blood levels during acute cyanide intoxication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lawson-Smith, P; Jansen, E C; Hilsted, Linda Maria

    2011-01-01

    and the subsequent formation of cyanocobalamin measured by a spectrophotometer. Results showed that whole-blood-cyanide concentration in Group 1 controls and acute HBO2 initially rose and then fell towards zero. In rats treated with delayed HBO2, the reduction in whole-blood-cyanide concentration was significantly...

  8. The integration of cyanide hydratase and tyrosinase catalysts enables effective degradation of cyanide and phenol in coking wastewaters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martínková, Ludmila; Chmátal, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 102, October (2016), s. 90-95 ISSN 0043-1354 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01021368; GA TA ČR(CZ) TA04021212; GA MŠk(CZ) LD12049 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Cyanide hydratase * Tyrosinase * Cyanide Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 6.942, year: 2016

  9. Synthesis of [11C]cyanoalkyltriphenylphosphoranes via [11C]cyanide substitution on haloalkylphosphonium salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoernfeldt, K.

    1994-01-01

    The synthesis of the 11 C-labelled bifunctional precursors 3-[ 11 C]cyanoethyltriphenylphosphonium bromide (1'), 4-[ 11 C]cyanopropyltriphenylphosphonium bromide (2'), 5-[ 11 C]cyanobutyltriphenylphosphonium bromide (3'), 4-[ 11 C]cyanopropyltriphenylphosphonium iodide (4') and 5-[ 11 C]cyanobutyltriphenylphosphonium iodide (5') is presented. The label was introduced using [ 11 C]cyanide in a substitution reaction on the ω-halo-alkyltriphenylphosphonium salt (bromide or iodide salt). The phosphonium salts 1'-5' were formed in 33-99% radiochemical yield in 5-10 min reaction time. After addition of epichlorohydrin as generator of base, the precursors 1-3 were formed. The potential of the intermediates 1-3 in Wittig reactions was shown in model reactions with aromatic and aliphatic aldehydes. The aromatic olefins obtained from 1'-5' were formed in 85-96% radiochemical yield, with Z/E ratios between 67/33-75/25. The aliphatic olefins were obtained in 60-78% radiochemical yield from 4' and 5'. In the reaction with 1' and an aliphatic aldehyde, the yield decreased to 5-10%. The Z/E ratios were 100/0 for the aliphatic olefins. In an experiment starting with 2,7 GBq (73 mCi) hydrogen [ 11 C]cyanide, 451 MBq (12.2 mCi) olefin from 3' and 4-nitrobenzaldehyde was obtained in 44 min from hydrogen [ 11 C]cyanide production, with a 55% decay corrected radiochemical yield, the radiochemical purity was 96%. (Author)

  10. A Cyanide-Induced 3-Cyanoalanine Nitrilase in the Cyanide-Assimilating Bacterium Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes Strain CECT 5344.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acera, Felipe; Carmona, María Isabel; Castillo, Francisco; Quesada, Alberto; Blasco, Rafael

    2017-05-01

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT 5344 is a bacterium able to assimilate cyanide as a sole nitrogen source. Under this growth condition, a 3-cyanoalanine nitrilase enzymatic activity was induced. This activity was encoded by nit4 , one of the four nitrilase genes detected in the genome of this bacterium, and its expression in Escherichia coli enabled the recombinant strain to fully assimilate 3-cyanoalanine. P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT 5344 showed a weak growth level with 3-cyanoalanine as the N source, unless KCN was also added. Moreover, a nit4 knockout mutant of P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT 5344 became severely impaired in its ability to grow with 3-cyanoalanine and cyanide as nitrogen sources. The native enzyme expressed in E. coli was purified up to electrophoretic homogeneity and biochemically characterized. Nit4 seems to be specific for 3-cyanoalanine, and the amount of ammonium derived from the enzymatic activity doubled in the presence of exogenously added asparaginase activity, which demonstrated that the Nit4 enzyme had both 3-cyanoalanine nitrilase and hydratase activities. The nit4 gene is located downstream of the cyanide resistance transcriptional unit containing cio1 genes, whose expression levels are under the positive control of cyanide. Real-time PCR experiments revealed that nit4 expression was also positively regulated by cyanide in both minimal and LB media. These results suggest that this gene cluster including cio1 and nit4 could be involved both in cyanide resistance and in its assimilation by P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT 5344. IMPORTANCE Cyanide is a highly toxic molecule present in some industrial wastes due to its application in several manufacturing processes, such as gold mining and the electroplating industry. The biodegradation of cyanide from contaminated wastes could be an attractive alternative to physicochemical treatment. P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT 5344 is a bacterial strain able to assimilate cyanide under alkaline conditions, thus

  11. DESIGN AND ANALYSIS OF AN EXPERIMENT FOR ASSESSING CYANIDE IN GOLD MINING WASTES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold mining wastes treated by heap leaching cyanidization typically contain several metallo-cyanide species. Accurate measurement of total cyanide by the most common methods in such a case may be hampered by the inadequate recoveries that occur for certain cyanide compounds (e.g....

  12. Carbon monoxide, smoking, and atherosclerosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astrup, P

    1973-10-01

    Studies on the effects of carbon monoxide and smoking on atherosclerosis are reviewed. Nonsmokers do not run the risk of getting significantly elevated carboxyhemoglobin levels from automobile exhaust in the streets, however, they do run the risk of getting elevated carboxyhemoglobin levels from exposure to CO in closed areas such as garages and tunnels. Carboxyhemoglobin levels up to 20 percent may also be found in smokers. The central nervous system seems to be influenced by carboxyhemoglobin concentrations up to 20 percent. The myocardium may also be affected. Experimental work with rabbits exposed to carbon monoxide and cholesterol is described which proved that CO has a damaging effect on arterial walls, leading to increased permeability for various plasma components, to the formation of subendothelial edema, and to increased atheromatosis. The results indicate that the much higher risk of smokers of developing arterial disease in comparison to nonsmokers is mainly due to the inhaled CO in the tobacco smoke and not to nicotine. (Air Pollut. Abstr.)

  13. [11C]copper(I) cyanide: a new radioactive precursor or 11C-cyanation and functionalization of haloarenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponchant, M.; Hinnen, F.; Demphel, S.; Crouzel, C.

    1997-01-01

    Radiosyntheses of [cyano- 11 C]benzonitriles, [carboyxyl- 11 C]benzoic acids, [carbonyl- 11 C]benzamides and [tetrazoyl- 11 C]5-biphenyl-1H-tetrazoles are described. [Cyano- 11 C]benzonitriles were prepared using the Rosenmund-von Braun reaction in one step from [ 11 C]hydrogen cyanide via [ 11 C]copper(1) cyanide in 2 min. [Carboxyl- 11 C]benzoic acids and [carbonyl- 11 C]benzamides were prepared from [cyano- 11 C]benzonitrile-complexes using basic hydrogen peroxide for 3 min in N,N-dimethylformamide at 180 and 80 o C, respectively. [Tetrazoyl- 11 C]5-biphenyl-1H-tetrazoles were obtained from [cyano- 11 C]benzonitrile-complexes in 7 min by cyclization with trimethyltin azide followed by acid hydrolysis at 180 o C. These labelled compounds were obtained in a one-pot procedure with good average specific radioactivities [500 mCi/μmol) at the end of synthesis] and in satisfactory average radiochemical yields (24-69%) at 40 min from the end of radionuclide production. This new radioactive precursor, [ 11 C]copper(I) cyanide, should give access to new 11 C-labelled ligands for positron emission tomography. (author)

  14. Microbial degradation of cyanide from gold metallurgical plants utilizing P. fluorecens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo, Oscar Jaime; Montoya, Carlos Arturo; Munoz, Nury Alexandra

    2005-01-01

    Sodium cyanide is traditionally used in chemical metallurgy to obtain precious metals (gold and silver). Cyanide produces damages because of its toxicity and breath cell inhibition. Here we try a biotechnological process to degrade cyanide with P. fluorescens obtained by cyanide heap leaching process in gold metallurgy in Segovia, Colombia. In Colombia cyanide heap-leaching process in gold metallurgy is not controlled and cyanide is used excessively. It means that great quantities of sodium cyanide are lost in sands and in wastewater. Toxicity tests made by D. pulex show less than 54 ppm of cyanide is enough to kill them. Traditional treatments to cyanide degradation are useful and normal but they are expensive. Microbiological process eliminates cyanide successfully and cheap

  15. Protection against cyanide-induced convulsions with alpha-ketoglutarate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, H

    1990-04-30

    Protection against convulsions induced by cyanide was observed after treatment with alpha-ketoglutarate, either alone or in combination with sodium thiosulfate, a classical antagonist for cyanide intoxication. However, sodium thiosulfate alone did not protect against cyanide (30 mg/kg)-induced convulsions. gamma-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels in brain were decreased by 31% in KCN-treated mice exhibiting convulsions. The combined administration of alpha-ketoglutarate and sodium thiosulfate completely abolished the decrease of GABA levels induced by cyanide. Furthermore, sodium thiosulfate alone also completely abolished the decrease of GABA levels. These results suggest that the depletion of brain GABA levels may not directly contribute to the development of convulsions induced by cyanide. On the other hand, cyanide increased calcium levels by 32% in brain crude mitochondrial fractions in mice with convulsions. The increased calcium levels were completely abolished by the combined administration of alpha-ketoglutarate and sodium thiosulfate, but not affected by sodium thiosulfate alone. These findings support the hypothesis proposed by Johnson et al. (Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol., 84 (1986) 464) and Robinson et al. (Toxicology, 35 (1985) 59) that calcium may play an important role in mediating cyanide neurotoxicity.

  16. Development and Evaluation of a Hyperbaric Toxic Gas Monitor (SubTox) for Disabled Submarines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    air near the CO2 scrubbers was sampled, the common amine/ ammonia smell was present. And while no NH3 sensor was installed in the SubTox, no monitored...under pressure, the eight gases — ammonia , carbon monoxide, chlorine, hydrogen chloride, hydrogen cyanide, hydrogen sulfide, nitrogen dioxide, and...gases for which SEALs have been defined: ammonia (NH3), carbon monoxide (CO), chlorine (Cl2), hydrogen chloride (HCl), hydrogen cyanide (HCN

  17. Biogenic production of cyanide and its application to gold recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, S C; Olson, G J; Clark, T R; McFeters, G

    2001-03-01

    Chromobacterium violaceum is a cyanogenic (cyanide-producing) microorganism. Cyanide is used on an industrial scale to complex and recover gold from ores or concentrates of ores bearing the precious metal. A potentially useful approach in gold mining operations could be to produce cyanide biologically in relatively small quantities at the ore surface. In this study, C. violaceum grown in nutrient broth formed a biofilm and could complex and solubilize 100% of the gold on glass test slides within 4-7 days. Approximately 50% of the cyanide- recoverable gold could be mobilized from a biooxidized sulfidic-ore concentrate. Complexation of cyanide in solution by gold appeared to have a beneficial effect on cell growth--viable cell counts were nearly two orders of magnitude greater in the presence of gold-coated slides or biooxidized ore substrates than in their absence. C. violaceum was cyanogenic when grown in alternative feedstocks. When grown in a mineral salt solution supplemented with 13.3% v/v swine fecal material (SFM), cells exhibited pigmentation and suspended cell concentrations comparable to cultures grown in nutrient broth. Glycine supplements stimulated production of cyanide in 13.3% v/v SFM. In contrast, glycine was inhibitory when added at the time of inoculation in the more concentrated SFM, decreasing cell numbers and reducing ultimate bulk-solution cyanide concentrations. However, aeration and addition of glycine to stationary phase cells grown on 13.3% v/v SFM anaerobically resulted in rapid production and high concentrations (up to 38 mg l(-1)) of cyanide. This indicates that biogenesis of cyanide may be supported in remote areas using locally produced and inexpensive agricultural feedstocks in place of commercial media.

  18. Enrichment of copper and recycling of cyanide from copper-cyanide waste by solvent extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Teng-yue; Liu, Kui-ren; Han, Qing; Xu, Bin-shi

    2016-11-01

    The enrichment of copper from copper-cyanide wastewater by solvent extraction was investigated using a quaternary ammonium salt as an extractant. The influences of important parameters, e.g., organic-phase components, aqueous pH values, temperature, inorganic anion impurities, CN/Cu molar ratio, and stripping reagents, were examined systematically, and the optimal conditions were determined. The results indicated that copper was effectively concentrated from low-concentration solutions using Aliquat 336 and that the extraction efficiency increased linearly with increasing temperature. The aqueous pH value and concentrations of inorganic anion impurities only weakly affected the extraction process when varied in appropriate ranges. The CN/Cu molar ratio affected the extraction efficiency by changing the distribution of copper-cyanide complexes. The difference in gold leaching efficiency between using raffinate and fresh water was negligible.

  19. Investigation of alkaline-cyanide electrolytes of zinc plating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaburova, V.P.; Kolotij, O.Yu.

    1993-01-01

    Current values in their maxima on anodic potential curves of Cd, Sn and Zn in galvanizing electrolytes with equilibrium concentrations of free cyanide and hydroxide ions were compared. Anode signal of Cd in the presence of Zn complexes intensifies due to their lability and, therefore, it reflects not only the presence of free cyanide, but zinc complex ions, as well, in the solution mentioned. This is one of the reasons for a high information content of the signal in case of multicomponent analysis of cyanide galvanizing electrolytes

  20. Removal of cadmium and cyanide from aqueous solutions through electrodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marder Luciano

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The discharge of galvanic industry wastewaters containing heavy metals and cyanide is one of the largest sources of water pollution. The use of the electrodialysis technique for the treatment of a synthetic wastewater containing approximately 0.0089 mol L-1 cadmium and 0.081 mol L-1 cyanide was studied using a five-compartment electrodialysis cell. The results demonstrate that the removal of cadmium and cyanide depends on the applied current density and it is limited by the precipitation of cadmium on the cation-exchange membrane in the diluate central cell compartment.

  1. A new PANI biosensor based on catalase for cyanide determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özcan, Hakkı Mevlüt; Aydin, Tuba

    2016-01-01

    Cyanide is one of the most widespread of compounds measured in environmental analysis due to their toxic effects on environment and health. We report a highly sensitive, reliable, selective amperometric sensor for determination of cyanide, using a polyaniline conductive polymer. The enzyme catalase was immobilized by electropolymerization. The steps during the immobilization were controlled by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Optimum pH, temperature, aniline concentration, enzyme concentration, and the number of scans obtained during electropolymerization, were investigated. In addition, the cyanide present in artificial waste water samples was determined. In the characterization studies of the biosensor, some parameters such as reproducibility and storage stability, were analyzed.

  2. Performance Evaluation of Electro-Fenton Process (EFP in Removal of Hexavalent Chromium in the Presence of Cyanide, as an Interfering Agent, from Synthetic Wastewaters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Rahmani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chromium (VI is a hazardous pollutant that enters into the environment through different industrial wastewater. Therefore, Choice a suitable method for removal of the pollutant before discharging into the environment is necessary. The aim of this work was performance evaluation of Electro-Fenton process (EFP in removal of hexavalent chromium in the presence of cyanide, as an interfering agent, from synthetic wastewaters. Methods: In this experimental study, a reactor with 1 L useful volume and 4 electrodes made ​​of iron was used. pH, initial concentration of  chromium (VI, voltage, hydrogen peroxide and cyanide concentration, as an interfering agent, were investigated in order to determine the process efficiency. Results: Results reveals that the considered parameters were affected on the efficiency of the process. In optimum condition, pH=3 and voltage=20 V, initial concentration=100 mg/L, concentration of hydrogen peroxide=50 mL/L the maximum efficiency was reached up to 97%. Cyanide Presence, in the same condition, reduced the efficiency under 50 % and also, the efficiency was decreased by changing the parameters level from optimum condition. Conclusion: Results indicate the proper efficiency of chromium (VI by EFP process; however presence of other pollutants such as cyanide can cause efficiency decrease which must be considered in the process application.

  3. AN ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION (ETV) PERFORMANCE TESTING OF THE INDUSTRIAL TEST SYSTEM, INC. CYANIDE REAGENTSTRIP™ TEST KIT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyanide can be present in various forms in water. The cyanide test kit evaluated in this verification study (Industrial Test System, Inc. Cyanide Regent Strip ™ Test Kit) was designed to detect free cyanide in water. This is done by converting cyanide in water to cyanogen...

  4. Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet İbrahim Turan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide poisoning is a major cause of death following attempted suicide and accidental exposures. Although clinical presentation depends on the duration and the intensity of exposure, the assessment of the severity of intoxication is difficult. A small percentage of patients who show complete initial recovery may develop delayed neurological deficits. Delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning is a rare and poor prognosis neurologic disorders and there is no specific treatment. We present a case with early onset of delayed encephalopathy after acute carbon monoxide poisoning with typical cranial imaging findings in a child with atypical history and clinical presentation.

  5. Determination of the Concentration of Total Cyanide in Waste Water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    Department of Chemical Sciences, Faculty of science, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ago-Iwoye Nigeria. ABSTRACT: Cyanide has been listed as one of the toxic pollutants that is usually ... environment have been attributed to industrial.

  6. In Vivo Metabolism in Rats of Cyanide -Containing Compounds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Iayer chromatography indicated the presence of novel cyanide-containing compounds, which were shown chemically to be cyanohydrin (Rf, 0.25) ands nitrile (Rf, 0.645). Administration of the eluates of those chromatographically identified CN- ...

  7. cyanide cassava genotypes in acid ultisols of south eastern Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ENGR C.J

    2014-01-29

    Jan 29, 2014 ... Thirty-eight high and low cyanide cassava genotypes were evaluated for growth and .... sium (K) and sodium (Na) were determined by Flamephoto-metory .... outlined for randomized complete block design (Steel et al., 1997).

  8. Uptake, metabolism, accumulation and toxicity of cyanide in willow trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Morten; Ucisik, Ahmed Süheyl; Trapp, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Chemicals taken up into plants may be accumulated so leading to toxic effects. Uptake and phytotoxicity of free cyanide was determined with the willow-tree transpiration test. Willow sets were grown in sand and irrigated with varying levels of cyanide (CN). Toxicity was determined by measuring...... transpiration. At CN concentrations below 10 mg/L, no toxic effects were observed. At 20 mg/L, transpiration was reduced to approximately 50% after 96 h. With 30, 40 and 50 mg/L, the transpiration decreased with a similar rate to cyanide in plant...... tissue was observed at 40 and 50 mg/L. The kinetics of metabolism of cyanide by roots, stems and leaves of willows was determined by the closed-bottle metabolism test. The Michaelis−Menten parameters vmax and KM (maximal metabolic velocity and half-saturation constant, respectively) were determined...

  9. Cyanide Suicide After Deep Web Shopping: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Garff, Erwan; Delannoy, Yann; Mesli, Vadim; Allorge, Delphine; Hédouin, Valéry; Tournel, Gilles

    2016-09-01

    Cyanide is a product that is known for its use in industrial or laboratory processes, as well as for intentional intoxication. The toxicity of cyanide is well described in humans with rapid inhibition of cellular aerobic metabolism after ingestion or inhalation, leading to severe clinical effects that are frequently lethal. We report the case of a young white man found dead in a hotel room after self-poisoning with cyanide ordered in the deep Web. This case shows a probable complex suicide kit use including cyanide, as a lethal tool, and dextromethorphan, as a sedative and anxiolytic substance. This case is an original example of the emerging deep Web shopping in illegal drug procurement.

  10. Inhibition of photosynthesis by carbon monoxide and suspension of the carbon monoxide inhibition by light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gewitz, H S; Voelker, W

    1963-08-01

    The experimental subject was the autotroph Chlorella pyrenoidosa. It was found that growth conditions determine whether the alga is inhibited by carbon monoxide or not. Respiration and photosynthesis are inhibited by carbon monoxide if the cells have grown rapidly under high light intensities. The inhibition of respiration and photosynthesis found in such cells is completely reversible. The inhibition depends not only on carbon monoxide pressure, but also on the oxygen pressure prevailing at the same time. 5 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.

  11. Effect of chemical pretreatment on the biodegradation of cyanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronstein, B.N.; Paterek, J.R.; Rice, L.E.; Srivastava, V.J.

    1995-01-01

    The application of Fenton's reagent (H 2 O 2 ; Fe 2+ ) as a chemical pretreatment for acceleration of biological degradation of cyanides in soil-containing systems has been studied. In slurries of topsoil freshly amended with radiolabeled free cyanide (K 14 CN) at pH 7.2, about 100% of the compound was removed from the system by the combination of chemical oxidation and biodegradation. In slurry of manufactured gas plant (MGP) soil, the extent of combined chemical-biological treatment was 50%. At the same time, approximately 15% of the cyanide was lost from the system by protonation and evolution of formed HCN. In slurries of both topsoil and MGP soil amended with radiolabeled K 4 [Fe(CN) 6 ], less than 20% was degraded. In soils previously equilibrated with free and complex cyanide, the highest extent of degradation resulted from chemical-biological treatment did not exceed 15%. To avoid massive evolution of HCN, the cyanide-amended topsoil was maintained at a pH of 10.0. At this pH, nearly 35% of the cyanides were removed from the system by combined chemical-biological treatment

  12. Biological Treatment of Cyanide by Using Klebsiella pneumoniae Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isil Seyis Bilkay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, optimization conditions for cyanide biodegradation by Klebsiella pneumoniae strain were determined to be 25 °C, pH=7 and 150 rpm at the concentration of 0.5 mM potassium cyanide in the medium. Additionally, it was found that K. pneumoniae strain is not only able to degrade potassium cyanide, but also to degrade potassium hexacyanoferrate(II trihydrate and sodium ferrocyanide decahydrate with the efficiencies of 85 and 87.5 %, respectively. Furthermore, this strain degraded potassium cyanide in the presence of different ions such as magnesium, nickel, cobalt, iron, chromium, arsenic and zinc, in variable concentrations (0.1, 0.25 and 0.5 mM and as a result the amount of the bacteria in the biodegradation media decreased with the increase of ion concentration. Lastly, it was also observed that sterile crude extract of K. pneumoniae strain degraded potassium cyanide on the fifth day of incubation. Based on these results, it is concluded that both culture and sterile crude extract of K. pnemoniae will be used in cyanide removal from different wastes.

  13. Intensification Behavior of Mercury Ions on Gold Cyanide Leaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhong

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyanidation is the main method used to extract gold from gold raw materials; however, a serious problem with this method is the low leaching rate. In order to improve gold leaching, the intensification behavior of mercury ions on gold cyanide leaching, for two types of materials, sulphide gold concentrate and oxide gold ore, was investigated. The results showed that mercury ions, with only a 10−5 M dosage, could significantly intensify leaching and gold recovery. The dissolution behavior of gold plate was also intensified by 10−5 M mercury ions. Microstructure analysis showed that mercury ions intensified the cyanidation corrosion of the gold surface, resulting in a loose structure, where a large number of deep ravines and raised particles were evident across the whole gold surface. The loose structure added contact surface between the gold and cyanide, and accelerated gold dissolution. Moreover, mercury ions obstructed the formation of insoluble products, such as AuCN, Au(OHCN, and Au(OHx, that lead to a passivation membrane on the gold surface, reducing contact between the gold and cyanide. These effects, brought about by mercury ions, change the structure and product of the gold surface during gold cyanidation and promote gold leaching.

  14. Protect Yourself from Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2007-11-20

    Learn about carbon monoxide - a colorless, odorless gas - and how to protect yourself and your family.  Created: 11/20/2007 by CDC National Center for Environmental Health.   Date Released: 12/4/2007.

  15. Hydrogen uptake by Azolla-Anabaena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruschel, A.P.; Freitas, J.R. de; Silva, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrogen uptake in the Azolla-Anabaena system is studied. Tritium is used as tracer. Plants are incubated under different atmosphere composition: a) Air + 3 H 2 ; b) Air + CO 2 + 3 H 2 + CO; c) Air + 3 H 2 + CO; d) Air + CO 2 + 3 H 2 + CO to study the pathway of absorbed hydrogen in the Azolla - Anabaena system. Azolla-Anabaena showed greater hydrogen uptake under argonium atmosphere than under air. Carbon monoxide decreased hydrogen uptake. There are evidences of recycling of the hydrogen evolved through notrogenease. (Author) [pt

  16. Polyketones as alternating copolymers of carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belov, Gennady P; Novikova, Elena V

    2004-01-01

    Characteristic features of the catalytic synthesis of alternating copolymers of carbon monoxide with various olefins, dienes, styrene and its derivatives are considered. The diversity of catalyst systems used for the copolymerisation of carbon monoxide is demonstrated and their influence on the structure and the molecular mass of the resulting copolymers is analysed. The data on the structure and physicochemical and mechanical properties of this new generation of functional copolymers are generalised and described systematically for the first time.

  17. Hearing Loss due to Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Davari, Mohammad Hossein; Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl

    2013-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the rare causes of hearing loss which may cause reversible or irreversible, unilateral or bilateral hearing loss after acute or chronic exposure. In this report, we present a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in a secondary smelting workshop worker...... after an acute exposure to carbon monoxide. This complication was diagnosed by pure-tone audiometry and confirmed by transient evoked otoacoustic emissions. Hearing loss has not improved after 3 months of followup....

  18. Dispersive oxidation of rhodium clusters in Na-Y by the combined action of zeolite protons and carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, T.T.T.; Sachtler, W.M.H.; Stakheev, A.Yu.

    1992-01-01

    This paper uses x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and temperature programmed mass-spectrometric analysis to study the interaction of Na-Y supported rhodium with hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and zeolite protons. This report attempts to clarify the mechanism of dispersive oxidation of reduced Rh particles in the presence of CO, leading to the formation of Rh + (CO) 2 cations

  19. An unusual case of carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, P L; Levesque, B; Martel, R; Prud'homme, H; Bellemare, D; Barbeau, C; Lachance, P; Rhainds, M

    1999-01-01

    Carbon monoxide, a gas originating from incomplete combustion of carbon-based fuels, is an important cause of human deaths. In this paper, we describe an unusual carbon monoxide poisoning in a dwelling without obvious sources of combustion gases, for which two adults had to be treated in a hyperbaric chamber. Carbon monoxide readings were taken in the house and in the neighboring homes. Methane gas and nitrogen oxide levels were also monitored in the house air. Soil samples were collected around the house and tested for hydrocarbon residues. The investigation revealed the presence of a pocket of carbon monoxide under the foundation of the house. The first readings revealed carbon monoxide levels of 500 ppm in the basement. The contamination lasted for a week. The investigation indicated that the probable source of contamination was the use of explosives at a nearby rain sewer construction site. The use of explosives in a residential area can constitute a major source of carbon monoxide for the neighboring populations. This must be investigated, and public health authorities, primary-care physicians, governmental authorities, and users and manufacturers of explosives must be made aware of this problem. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:10379009

  20. An unusual case of carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, P L; Levesque, B; Martel, R; Prud'homme, H; Bellemare, D; Barbeau, C; Lachance, P; Rhainds, M

    1999-07-01

    Carbon monoxide, a gas originating from incomplete combustion of carbon-based fuels, is an important cause of human deaths. In this paper, we describe an unusual carbon monoxide poisoning in a dwelling without obvious sources of combustion gases, for which two adults had to be treated in a hyperbaric chamber. Carbon monoxide readings were taken in the house and in the neighboring homes. Methane gas and nitrogen oxide levels were also monitored in the house air. Soil samples were collected around the house and tested for hydrocarbon residues. The investigation revealed the presence of a pocket of carbon monoxide under the foundation of the house. The first readings revealed carbon monoxide levels of 500 ppm in the basement. The contamination lasted for a week. The investigation indicated that the probable source of contamination was the use of explosives at a nearby rain sewer construction site. The use of explosives in a residential area can constitute a major source of carbon monoxide for the neighboring populations. This must be investigated, and public health authorities, primary-care physicians, governmental authorities, and users and manufacturers of explosives must be made aware of this problem.

  1. Radiation induced chemical reaction of carbon monoxide and hydrogen mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Shun-ichi; Nishii, Masanobu

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies of radiation induced chemical reactions of CO-H 2 mixture have revealed that the yields of oxygen containing products were larger than those of hydrocarbons. In the present study, methane was added to CO-H 2 mixture in order to increase further the yields of the oxygen containing products. The yields of most products except a few products such as formaldehyde increased with the addition of small amount of methane. Especially, the yields of trioxane and tetraoxane gave the maximum values when CO-H 2 mixture containing 1 mol% methane was irradiated. When large amounts of methane were added to the mixture, the yields of aldehydes and carboxylic acids having more than two carbon atoms increased, whereas those of trioxane and tetraoxane decreased. From the study at reaction temperature over the range of 200 to 473 K, it was found that the yields of aldehydes and carboxylic acids showed maxima at 323 K. The studies on the effects of addition of cationic scavenger (NH 3 ) and radical scavenger (O 2 ) on the products yields were also carried out on the CO-H 2 -CH 4 mixture. (author)

  2. A critical evaluation of methods applicable to the determination of cyanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohlandt, C.; Jones, E.A.; Lee, A.F.

    1983-01-01

    A literature survey of methods suitable for the determination of cyanides in process streams and effluents is presented. Of the large number of methods published, 92 are examined in detail, emphasis being placed on the selectivity of the methods, i.e. the extent to which they enable one to distinguish between ionic cyanide and metal-cyanide complexes. Methods designed for the determination of 'total cyanide' (i.e. ionic cyanide as well as coordinated cyanide) are evaluated critically. Other aspects of the methods are also considered, such as sensitivity, accuracy, speed, and freedom from interferences

  3. Electrocatalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel de Jesus Santiago Farias

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho discute alguns aspectos importantes relacionados à reação de eletrooxidação do monóxido de carbono sobre monocristais de platina, em meio ácido. Aspectos mecanísticos são discutidos em termos da formação das estruturas compactas que o CO forma quando este é adsorvido. As principais idéias aqui apresentadas, levam em consideração as existências dessas estruturas. Os clássicos mecanismos Lagmuir-Hinshelwood e Eley-Rideal são aqui discutidos, especialmente o primeiro considerando a mobilidade do CO e também a nucleação e crescimento de ilhas formadas por espécies adsorvidas contendo oxigênio.////////// This work discusses some important aspects related to the carbon monoxide electrooxidation reaction on Pt single crystal electrodes in acidic media. The mechanistic aspects are discussed in terms of the formation of compact structures developed when CO is adsorbed. The main ideas presented here are focused on the mechanistic aspects that take into account the existence of such structures. The classical kinetic mechanisms of Lagmuir-Hinshelwood and Eley-Rideal are discussed considering the superficial mobility of CO or nucleation-growing of islands formed by oxygen-containing adsorbates.

  4. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Iso-propyl cyanide rotational study (Kolesnikova+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesnikova, L.; Alonso, E. R.; Mata, S.; Cernicharo, J.; Alonso, J. L.

    2018-02-01

    A detailed analysis of the rotational spectra of the interstellar iso-propyl cyanide has been carried out up to 480GHz using three different high-resolution spectroscopic techniques. Jet-cooled broadband chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy from 6 to 18GHz allowed us to measure and analyze the ground-state rotational transitions of all singly substituted 13C and 15N isotopic species in their natural abundances. The monohydrate of iso-propyl cyanide, in which the water molecule bounds through a stronger O-H...N and weaker bifurcated (C-H)2...O hydrogen bonds in a Cs configuration, has also been detected in the supersonic expansion. Stark-modulation spectroscopy in the microwave and millimeter wave range from 18 to 75GHz allowed us to analyze the vibrational satellite pattern arising from pure rotational transitions in the low-lying vibrational excited states. Finally, assignments and measurements were extended through the millimeter and submillimeter wave region. The room temperature rotational spectra made possible the assignment and analysis of pure rotational transitions in 19 vibrationally excited states. Significant perturbations were found above 100GHz in most of the observed excited states. Due to the complexity of the interactions and importance of this astrophysical region for future radioastronomical detection, both a graphical plot approach and a coupled fit have been used to assign and measure almost 10000 new lines. (1 data file).

  5. A Comprehensive Rotational Study of Interstellar Iso-propyl Cyanide up to 480 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolesniková, L.; Alonso, E. R.; Mata, S.; Cernicharo, J.; Alonso, J. L.

    2017-12-01

    A detailed analysis of the rotational spectra of the interstellar iso-propyl cyanide has been carried out up to 480 GHz using three different high-resolution spectroscopic techniques. Jet-cooled broadband chirped pulse Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy from 6 to 18 GHz allowed us to measure and analyze the ground-state rotational transitions of all singly substituted 13C and 15N isotopic species in their natural abundances. The monohydrate of iso-propyl cyanide, in which the water molecule bounds through a stronger O-H⋯N and weaker bifurcated (C-H)2⋯O hydrogen bonds in a C s configuration, has also been detected in the supersonic expansion. Stark-modulation spectroscopy in the microwave and millimeter wave range from 18 to 75 GHz allowed us to analyze the vibrational satellite pattern arising from pure rotational transitions in the low-lying vibrational excited states. Finally, assignments and measurements were extended through the millimeter and submillimeter wave region. The room temperature rotational spectra made possible the assignment and analysis of pure rotational transitions in 19 vibrationally excited states. Significant perturbations were found above 100 GHz in most of the observed excited states. Due to the complexity of the interactions and importance of this astrophysical region for future radioastronomical detection, both a graphical plot approach and a coupled fit have been used to assign and measure almost 10,000 new lines.

  6. Investigations on the mechanism of oxygen-dependent plant processes: ethylene biosynthesis and cyanide-resistant respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stegink, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    Two oxygen-dependent plant processes were investigated. A cell-free preparation from pea (Pisum sativum L., cv. Alaska) was used to study ethylene biosynthesis from 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid. Mitochondrial cyanide-resistant respiration was investigated in studies with 14 C-butyl gallate and other respiratory effectors. Ethylene biosynthesis was not due to a specific enzyme, or oxygen radicals. Rather, hydrogen peroxide, generated at low levels, coupled with endogenous manganese produced ethylene. 14 C-butyl gallate bound specifically to mitochondria from cyanide-sensitive and -resistant higher plants and Neurospora crassa mitochondria. The amount of gallate bound was similar for all higher plant mitochondria. Rat liver mitochondria bound very little 14 C-butyl gallate. Plant mitochondria in which cyanide-resistance was induced bound as much 14 C-butyl gallate as before induction. However mitochondria from recently harvested white potato tubers did not bind the gallate. The observations suggest that an engaging factor couples with a gallate binding site in the mitochondrial membrane. With skunk cabbage spadix mitochondria the I 5 0 for antimycin A inhibition of oxygen uptake was decreased by salicylhydroxamic acid pretreatment; this was also true for reverse order additions. No shift was observed with mung bean hypocotyl or Jerusalem artichoke tuber mitochondria

  7. Precious metal recovery from waste printed circuit boards using cyanide and non-cyanide lixiviants--A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcil, Ata; Erust, Ceren; Gahan, Chandra Sekhar; Ozgun, Mehmet; Sahin, Merve; Tuncuk, Aysenur

    2015-11-01

    Waste generated by the electrical and electronic devices is huge concern worldwide. With decreasing life cycle of most electronic devices and unavailability of the suitable recycling technologies it is expected to have huge electronic and electrical wastes to be generated in the coming years. The environmental threats caused by the disposal and incineration of electronic waste starting from the atmosphere to the aquatic and terrestrial living system have raised high alerts and concerns on the gases produced (dioxins, furans, polybrominated organic pollutants, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) by thermal treatments and can cause serious health problems if the flue gas cleaning systems are not developed and implemented. Apart from that there can be also dissolution of heavy metals released to the ground water from the landfill sites. As all these electronic and electrical waste do posses richness in the metal values it would be worth recovering the metal content and protect the environmental from the pollution. Cyanide leaching has been a successful technology worldwide for the recovery of precious metals (especially Au and Ag) from ores/concentrates/waste materials. Nevertheless, cyanide is always preferred over others because of its potential to deliver high recovery with a cheaper cost. Cyanidation process also increases the additional work of effluent treatment prior to disposal. Several non-cyanide leaching processes have been developed considering toxic nature and handling problems of cyanide with non-toxic lixiviants such as thiourea, thiosulphate, aqua regia and iodine. Therefore, several recycling technologies have been developed using cyanide or non-cyanide leaching methods to recover precious and valuable metals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Biodegradation of free cyanide by bacterial species isolated from cyanide-contaminated artisanal gold mining catchment area in Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razanamahandry, Lovasoa Christine; Andrianisa, Harinaivo Anderson; Karoui, Hela; Kouakou, Koffi Marcelin; Yacouba, Hamma

    2016-08-01

    Soil and water samples were collected from a watershed in Burkina Faso where illegal artisanal gold extraction using cyanidation occurs. The samples were used to evaluate cyanide contamination and the presence of cyanide degrading bacteria (CDB). Free cyanide (F-CN) was detected in all samples, with concentrations varying from 0.023 to 0.9 mg kg(-1), and 0.7-23 μg L(-1) in the soil and water samples, respectively. Potential CDB also were present in the samples. To test the effective F-CN degradation capacity of the isolated CDB species, the species were cultivated in growth media containing 40, 60 or 80 mg F-CN L(-1), with or without nutrients, at pH 9.5 and at room temperature. More than 95% of F-CN was degraded within 25 h, and F-CN degradation was associated with bacterial growth and ammonium production. However, initial concentrations of F-CN higher than 100 mg L(-1) inhibited bacterial growth and cyanide degradation. Abiotic tests showed that less than 3% of F-CN was removed by volatilization. Thus, the degradation of F-CN occurred predominately by biological mechanisms, and such mechanisms are recommended for remediation of contaminated soil and water. The bacteria consortium used in the experiment described above exist in a Sahelian climate, which is characterized by a long hot and dry season. Because the bacteria are already adapted to the local climate conditions and show the potential for cyanide biodegradation, further applicability to other contaminated areas in West Africa, where illegal gold cyanidation is widespread, should be explored. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Indirect spectrophotometric determination of trace cyanide with cationic porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, H; Kohata, K

    1991-05-01

    Three highly sensitive methods for the determination of cyanide have been developed, based on the fact that the complexation of silver ions with three cationic porphyrins, 5,10,15,20-tetrakis-(1-methyl-2-pyridinio)porphine [T(2-MPy)P], 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-methyl-3-pyridinio)porphine [T(3-MPy)P] and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridinio)porphine [T(4-MPy)P], in alkaline media is inhibited by cyanide and the decrease in absorbance of the silver(II) complex is proportional to the cyanide concentration. Sensitivities of the procedures developed are 0.133, 0.126 and 0.234 ng/cm(2), respectively for an absorbance of 0.001. Cadmium(II), copper(II), mercury(II), zinc(II), iodide and sulfide interfere with the cyanide determination. One of the proposed methods was applied to the determination of cyanide in waste-water samples, with satisfactory results.

  10. Effects of cyanide on selenium metabolism in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beilstein, M.A.; Whanger, P.D.

    1984-01-01

    Adult male rats were given drinking water containing either 0 or 150 ppm cyanide for 2 weeks. They were then injected with 5 microCi 75 Se-selenite, and excretion of radioactivity in urine and feces was determined. No difference in excretion of 75 Se occurred during the rapid phase, but the cyanide-treated rats (T1/2 28 days) excreted significantly more 75 Se in urine than control (T1/2 38 days) rats. Cyanide had no effect on excretion of 75 Se in feces or on the distribution of 75 Se in cytosolic proteins in liver, kidney, muscle or testes. In a second experiment weanling male rats were given water with either 0 or 150 ppm cyanide and were killed for glutathione peroxidase assay and selenium analysis in blood, kidney, liver, muscle and testes after 3, 6 or 9 weeks of treatment. Glutathione peroxidase activity and selenium concentrations were significantly reduced by cyanide in all tissues except testes

  11. Intramuscular Cobinamide Sulfite in a Rabbit Model of Sub-Lethal Cyanide Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Matthew; Kim, Jae G.; Mahon, Sari B.; Lee, Jangwoen; Kreuter, Kelly A.; Blackledge, William; Mukai, David; Patterson, Steve; Mohammad, Othman; Sharma, Vijay S.; Boss, Gerry R.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To determine the ability of an intramuscular cobinamide sulfite injection to rapidly reverse the physiologic effects of cyanide toxicity. Background Exposure to cyanide in fires and industrial exposures and intentional cyanide poisoning by terrorists leading to mass casualties is an ongoing threat. Current treatments for cyanide poisoning must be administered intravenously, and no rapid treatment methods are available for mass casualty cyanide exposures. Cobinamide is a cobalamin (vitamin B12) analog with an extraordinarily high affinity for cyanide that is more water-soluble than cobalamin. We investigated the use of intramuscular cobinamide sulfite to reverse cyanide toxicity induced physiologic changes in a sublethal cyanide exposure animal model. Methods New Zealand white rabbits were given 10 mg sodium cyanide intravenously over 60 minutes. Quantitative diffuse optical spectroscopy and continuous wave near infrared spectroscopy monitoring of tissue oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin concentrations were performed concurrently with blood cyanide level measurements and cobinamide levels. Immediately after completion of the cyanide infusion, the rabbits were injected intramuscularly with cobinamide sulfite (n=6) or inactive vehicle (controls, n=5). Results Intramuscular administration led to rapid mobilization of cobinamide and was extremely effective at reversing the physiologic effects of cyanide on oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin extraction. Recovery time to 63% of their baseline values in the central nervous system was in a mean of 1032 minutes in the control group and 9 minutes in the cobinamide group with a difference of 1023 minutes (95% confidence interval [CI] 116, 1874 minutes). In muscle tissue, recovery times were 76 and 24 minutes with a difference of 52 minutes (95% CI 7, 98min). Red blood cell cyanide levels returned towards normal significantly faster in cobinamide sulfite-treated animals than in control animals. Conclusions Intramuscular

  12. Acute Cyanide Poisoning: Hydroxocobalamin and Sodium Thiosulfate Treatments with Two Outcomes following One Exposure Event.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meillier, Andrew; Heller, Cara

    2015-01-01

    Cyanide is rapidly reacting and causes arrest of aerobic metabolism. The symptoms are diffuse and lethal and require high clinical suspicion. Remediation of symptoms and mortality is highly dependent on quick treatment with a cyanide antidote. Presently, there are two widely accepted antidotes: sodium thiosulfate and hydroxocobalamin. These treatments act on different components of cyanide's metabolism. Here, we present two cases resulting from the same source of cyanide poisoning and the use of both antidotes separately used with differing outcomes.

  13. Transport and Fate of Cyanide in Soil : Case Study of Mooteh Valley

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Taebi; Ali Reza Zade Bafqi; Majid Sartaj

    2006-01-01

    Cyanide, a generic term referring to all compounds containing the cyanide group –CN, is a highly potent and fast-acting poison to humans and other living organisms when exposed to high levels. Cyanide is a widely and essential chemical used in mining and minerals processing industries and many other industries such as metal processing and production of organic chemicals. While some industrial cyanide-containing wastes are treated or recovered, there are cases such as certain gold extraction p...

  14. Effect of GarriI processing effluents [waste water] on the cyanide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Numerous studies have described environmental exposure of humans to cyanide in African populations. Little is known about exposure to cyanide toxins from processed or unprocessed root tubers commonly consumed in Africa; and data on the food concentration of cyanide which is a potential poison and systemic toxicant ...

  15. Effect of temperature on the uptake and metabolism of cyanide by weeping willows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, X.-Z.; Trapp, Stefan; Zhou, P.-H.

    2007-01-01

    Plants’ uptake and metabolism of cyanide in response to changes in temperature was investigated. Pre-rooted weeping willows (Salix babylonica L.) were exposed to hydroponic solution spiked with potassium cyanide for 2–3 d. Ten different temperatures were used, ranging from 11◦C to 32◦C. Cyanide...

  16. INTEGRATED BIOREACTOR SYSTEM FOR THE TREATMENT OF CYANIDE, METALS AND NITRATES IN MINE PROCESS WATER

    Science.gov (United States)

    An innovative biological process is described for the tratment of cyanide-, metals- and nitrate-contaminated mine process water. The technology was tested for its ability to detoxify cyanide and nitrate and to immobilize metals in wastewater from agitation cyanide leaching. A pil...

  17. The integration of cyanide hydratase and tyrosinase catalysts enables effective degradation of cyanide and phenol in coking wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínková, Ludmila; Chmátal, Martin

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to design an effective method for the bioremediation of coking wastewaters, specifically for the concurrent elimination of their highly toxic components - cyanide and phenols. Almost full degradation of free cyanide (0.32-20 mM; 8.3-520 mg L(-1)) in the model and the real coking wastewaters was achieved by using a recombinant cyanide hydratase in the first step. The removal of cyanide, a strong inhibitor of tyrosinase, enabled an effective degradation of phenols by this enzyme in the second step. Phenol (16.5 mM, 1,552 mg L(-1)) was completely removed from a real coking wastewater within 20 h and cresols (5.0 mM, 540 mg L(-1)) were removed by 66% under the same conditions. The integration of cyanide hydratase and tyrosinase open up new possibilities for the bioremediation of wastewaters with complex pollution. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of vegetation in reducing carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, J C

    1977-01-01

    Carbon monoxide is a product of incomplete combustion. Because almost all of this gas is produced by motor vehicles, it is considered to have a line rather than a stationary point source. Greatest concentrations of this lethal gas correspond to periods of peak traffic volume and congestion; therefore, there are two daily periods of maxima and minima. Carbon monoxide cannot be detected by sight or smell. For this reason, this gas is especially deadly. During the summer of 1975, a study involving carbon monoxide concentrations at selected sites in Sendai was undertaken in conjunction with an ongoing investigation of urban pollution under the directorship of Professor Toshio Noh of Tohoku University. This study was made possible by a grant from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. 5 references, 5 figures, 1 table.

  19. Pulmonary edema in acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kun Sang; Chang, Kee Hyun; Lee, Myung Uk

    1974-01-01

    Acute carbon monoxide poisoning has frequently occurred in Korean, because of the coal briquette being widely used as fuel in Korean residences. Carbon monoxide poisoning has been extensively studied, but it has been sparsely reported that pulmonary edema may develop in acute CO poisoning. We have noticed nine cases of pulmonary edema in acute CO poisoning last year. Other possible causes of pulmonary edema could be exclude in all cases but one. The purpose of this paper is to describe nine cases of pulmonary edema complicated in acute CO poisoning and discuss the pathogenesis and the prognosis

  20. Occupational medicine effects of carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coombs, W.M. [South African Society of Occupational Medicine (South Africa)

    1998-10-01

    Carbon monoxide can affect the body if it is inhaled or if liquid carbon monoxide comes in contact with the eyes or skin. The effects of overexposure are discussed and a brief explanation of the toxicological effects of CO given. Methods of control of CO from common operations (exhaust fumes of internal combustion engines, the chemical industry and foundries, welding, mines or tunnels, fire damp explosions, industrial heating) are by local exhaust ventilation or use of a respiratory protective device. The South African hazardous chemical substance regulation NO. R. 1179 of 25 August 1995 stipulates maximum safe levels of CO concentration. 4 refs., 1 photo.

  1. Pulmonary edema in acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kun Sang; Chang, Kee Hyun; Lee, Myung Uk [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1974-10-15

    Acute carbon monoxide poisoning has frequently occurred in Korean, because of the coal briquette being widely used as fuel in Korean residences. Carbon monoxide poisoning has been extensively studied, but it has been sparsely reported that pulmonary edema may develop in acute CO poisoning. We have noticed nine cases of pulmonary edema in acute CO poisoning last year. Other possible causes of pulmonary edema could be exclude in all cases but one. The purpose of this paper is to describe nine cases of pulmonary edema complicated in acute CO poisoning and discuss the pathogenesis and the prognosis.

  2. Quantitative measurement of cyanide species in simulated ferrocyanide Hanford waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, S.A.; Pool, K.H.; Matheson, J.D.

    1993-02-01

    Analytical methods for the quantification of cyanide species in Hanford simulated high-level radioactive waste were pursued in this work. Methods studied include infrared spectroscopy (solid state and solution), Raman spectroscopy, Moessbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy-electron dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), and ion chromatography. Of these, infrared, Raman, X-ray diffraction, and ion chromatography techniques show promise in the concentration range of interest. Quantitation limits for these latter four techniques were demonstrated to be approximately 0.1 wt% (as cyanide) using simulated Hanford wastes

  3. Mineral-like clathrate of cadmium cyanide with benzene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitazava, T.; Nishimura, A.

    1999-01-01

    A new mineral-like clathrate of cadmium cyanide with benzene Cd(CN) 2 ·C 6 H 6 is prepared. Data of x-ray diffraction analysis show that benzene molecule is incorporated in cadmium cyanide lattice and a new mineral-like lattice of Cd(CN) 2 belongs to structures of cristobalite type. Clathrate Cd(CN) 2 ·C 6 H 6 crystallizes in trigonal space group R3m, a=8.953(4), c=21929(6) A [ru

  4. Evaluation of non cyanide methods for hemoglobin estimation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinaya B Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The hemoglobincyanide method (HiCN method for measuring hemoglobin is used extensively worldwide; its advantages are the ready availability of a stable and internationally accepted reference standard calibrator. However, its use may create a problem, as the waste disposal of large volumes of reagent containing cyanide constitutes a potential toxic hazard. Aims and Objective: As an alternative to drabkin`s method of Hb estimation, we attempted to estimate hemoglobin by other non-cyanide methods: alkaline hematin detergent (AHD-575 using Triton X-100 as lyser and alkaline- borax method using quarternary ammonium detergents as lyser. Materials and Methods: The hemoglobin (Hb results on 200 samples of varying Hb concentrations obtained by these two cyanide free methods were compared with a cyanmethemoglobin method on a colorimeter which is light emitting diode (LED based. Hemoglobin was also estimated in one hundred blood donors and 25 blood samples of infants and compared by these methods. Statistical analysis used was Pearson`s correlation coefficient. Results: The response of the non cyanide method is linear for serially diluted blood samples over the Hb concentration range from 3gm/dl -20 gm/dl. The non cyanide methods has a precision of + 0.25g/dl (coefficient of variation= (2.34% and is suitable for use with fixed wavelength or with colorimeters at wavelength- 530 nm and 580 nm. Correlation of these two methods was excellent (r=0.98. The evaluation has shown it to be as reliable and reproducible as HiCN for measuring hemoglobin at all concentrations. The reagents used in non cyanide methods are non-biohazardous and did not affect the reliability of data determination and also the cost was less than HiCN method. Conclusions: Thus, non cyanide methods of Hb estimation offer possibility of safe and quality Hb estimation and should prove useful for routine laboratory use. Non cyanide methods is easily incorporated in hemobloginometers

  5. Low-cost process for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Chang Y.; Bauer, Hans F.; Grimes, Robert W.

    1993-01-01

    A method is provided for producing hydrogen and carbon black from hydrocarbon gases comprising mixing the hydrocarbon gases with a source of carbon and applying radiofrequency energy to the mixture. The hydrocarbon gases and the carbon can both be the products of gasification of coal, particularly the mild gasification of coal. A method is also provided for producing hydrogen an carbon monoxide by treating a mixture of hydrocarbon gases and steam with radio-frequency energy.

  6. Chemical and metabolomic screens identify novel biomarkers and antidotes for cyanide exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Anjali K.; Roberts, Lee D.; Liu, Yan; Mahon, Sari B.; Kim, Sonia; Ryu, Justine H.; Werdich, Andreas; Januzzi, James L.; Boss, Gerry R.; Rockwood, Gary A.; MacRae, Calum A.; Brenner, Matthew; Gerszten, Robert E.; Peterson, Randall T.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to cyanide causes a spectrum of cardiac, neurological, and metabolic dysfunctions that can be fatal. Improved cyanide antidotes are needed, but the ideal biological pathways to target are not known. To understand better the metabolic effects of cyanide and to discover novel cyanide antidotes, we developed a zebrafish model of cyanide exposure and scaled it for high-throughput chemical screening. In a screen of 3120 small molecules, we discovered 4 novel antidotes that block cyanide toxicity. The most potent antidote was riboflavin. Metabolomic profiling of cyanide-treated zebrafish revealed changes in bile acid and purine metabolism, most notably by an increase in inosine levels. Riboflavin normalizes many of the cyanide-induced neurological and metabolic perturbations in zebrafish. The metabolic effects of cyanide observed in zebrafish were conserved in a rabbit model of cyanide toxicity. Further, humans treated with nitroprusside, a drug that releases nitric oxide and cyanide ions, display increased circulating bile acids and inosine. In summary, riboflavin may be a novel treatment for cyanide toxicity and prophylactic measure during nitroprusside treatment, inosine may serve as a biomarker of cyanide exposure, and metabolites in the bile acid and purine metabolism pathways may shed light on the pathways critical to reversing cyanide toxicity.—Nath, A. K., Roberts, L. D., Liu, Y., Mahon, S. B., Kim, S., Ryu, J. H., Werdich, A., Januzzi, J. L., Boss, G. R., Rockwood, G. A., MacRae, C. A., Brenner, M., Gerszten, R. E., Peterson, R. T. Chemical and metabolomic screens identify novel biomarkers and antidotes for cyanide exposure. PMID:23345455

  7. New syntheses with carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falbe, J.

    1980-01-01

    In the chapter of hydroformulation, oxosynthesis ans Roelen reaction the effect of reaction conditions on conversion, selectivity and operation of the oxo synthesis, hydroformulation of particular structures, parallel and consecutive reactions under hydroformulation conditions and process variants and economic background of the industrial oxo synthesis are discussed. The chapter of homologation of alcohols describes reaction mechanism and parallel and secondary reactions. The chapter of Reppe reactions deals with carbonylation of various structures. The chapter of hydrogenation of CO treats methanol, glycol, methane, the Fischer-Tropsch hydrocarbon and polymethylene synthesis. The chapter of Koch reactions treats reaction mechanism and carbonlylation at particular compounds. The last chapter presents ring closure reactions with CO. Separate abstracts were prepared for one chapter in this book.

  8. Observations of interstellar silicon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickinson, D.F.; Gottlieb, C.A.; Gottlieb, E.W.; Litvak, M.M.

    1976-01-01

    We report observations of rotational transitions of SiO in the ground vibrational state at 86.8 GHz (J=2→1) and 130.3 GHz (J=3→2). At 86.8 GHz, SiO emission in Orion A peaks in the direction of the Kleinmann-Low nebula. A possible secondary maximum occurs about 80'' southward. The 130.3 GHz line was also detected in Orion A. Mapping of the 86.8 GHz line in Sgr B2 shows the presence of two velocity components and a north-south extent of about 4'. Comparison of the data with radiative-transport calculations implies that if the hydrogen density is approximately 10 5 cm -3 then the SiO column density is approximately 10 15 cm -2 for Orion A at 60 K.Upper limits to the total HO 2 column density in Orion A and Sgr B2 are reported

  9. Life in Hot Carbon Monoxide: The Complete Genome Sequence of Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans Z-2901.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available We report here the sequencing and analysis of the genome of the thermophilic bacterium Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans Z-2901. This species is a model for studies of hydrogenogens, which are diverse bacteria and archaea that grow anaerobically utilizing carbon monoxide (CO as their sole carbon source and water as an electron acceptor, producing carbon dioxide and hydrogen as waste products. Organisms that make use of CO do so through carbon monoxide dehydrogenase complexes. Remarkably, analysis of the genome of C. hydrogenoformans reveals the presence of at least five highly differentiated anaerobic carbon monoxide dehydrogenase complexes, which may in part explain how this species is able to grow so much more rapidly on CO than many other species. Analysis of the genome also has provided many general insights into the metabolism of this organism which should make it easier to use it as a source of biologically produced hydrogen gas. One surprising finding is the presence of many genes previously found only in sporulating species in the Firmicutes Phylum. Although this species is also a Firmicutes, it was not known to sporulate previously. Here we show that it does sporulate and because it is missing many of the genes involved in sporulation in other species, this organism may serve as a "minimal" model for sporulation studies. In addition, using phylogenetic profile analysis, we have identified many uncharacterized gene families found in all known sporulating Firmicutes, but not in any non-sporulating bacteria, including a sigma factor not known to be involved in sporulation previously.

  10. Life in hot carbon monoxide: the complete genome sequence of Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans Z-2901.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Wu

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available We report here the sequencing and analysis of the genome of the thermophilic bacterium Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans Z-2901. This species is a model for studies of hydrogenogens, which are diverse bacteria and archaea that grow anaerobically utilizing carbon monoxide (CO as their sole carbon source and water as an electron acceptor, producing carbon dioxide and hydrogen as waste products. Organisms that make use of CO do so through carbon monoxide dehydrogenase complexes. Remarkably, analysis of the genome of C. hydrogenoformans reveals the presence of at least five highly differentiated anaerobic carbon monoxide dehydrogenase complexes, which may in part explain how this species is able to grow so much more rapidly on CO than many other species. Analysis of the genome also has provided many general insights into the metabolism of this organism which should make it easier to use it as a source of biologically produced hydrogen gas. One surprising finding is the presence of many genes previously found only in sporulating species in the Firmicutes Phylum. Although this species is also a Firmicutes, it was not known to sporulate previously. Here we show that it does sporulate and because it is missing many of the genes involved in sporulation in other species, this organism may serve as a "minimal" model for sporulation studies. In addition, using phylogenetic profile analysis, we have identified many uncharacterized gene families found in all known sporulating Firmicutes, but not in any non-sporulating bacteria, including a sigma factor not known to be involved in sporulation previously.

  11. Life in hot carbon monoxide: the complete genome sequence of Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans Z-2901.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Martin; Ren, Qinghu; Durkin, A Scott; Daugherty, Sean C; Brinkac, Lauren M; Dodson, Robert J; Madupu, Ramana; Sullivan, Steven A; Kolonay, James F; Haft, Daniel H; Nelson, William C; Tallon, Luke J; Jones, Kristine M; Ulrich, Luke E; Gonzalez, Juan M; Zhulin, Igor B; Robb, Frank T; Eisen, Jonathan A

    2005-11-01

    We report here the sequencing and analysis of the genome of the thermophilic bacterium Carboxydothermus hydrogenoformans Z-2901. This species is a model for studies of hydrogenogens, which are diverse bacteria and archaea that grow anaerobically utilizing carbon monoxide (CO) as their sole carbon source and water as an electron acceptor, producing carbon dioxide and hydrogen as waste products. Organisms that make use of CO do so through carbon monoxide dehydrogenase complexes. Remarkably, analysis of the genome of C. hydrogenoformans reveals the presence of at least five highly differentiated anaerobic carbon monoxide dehydrogenase complexes, which may in part explain how this species is able to grow so much more rapidly on CO than many other species. Analysis of the genome also has provided many general insights into the metabolism of this organism which should make it easier to use it as a source of biologically produced hydrogen gas. One surprising finding is the presence of many genes previously found only in sporulating species in the Firmicutes Phylum. Although this species is also a Firmicutes, it was not known to sporulate previously. Here we show that it does sporulate and because it is missing many of the genes involved in sporulation in other species, this organism may serve as a "minimal" model for sporulation studies. In addition, using phylogenetic profile analysis, we have identified many uncharacterized gene families found in all known sporulating Firmicutes, but not in any non-sporulating bacteria, including a sigma factor not known to be involved in sporulation previously.

  12. 21 CFR 177.1312 - Ethylene-carbon monoxide copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ethylene-carbon monoxide copolymers. 177.1312... Basic Components of Single and Repeated Use Food Contact Surfaces § 177.1312 Ethylene-carbon monoxide copolymers. The ethylene-carbon monoxide copolymers identified in paragraph (a) of this section may be safely...

  13. Assessment of carbon monoxide values in smokers: a comparison of carbon monoxide in expired air and carboxyhaemoglobin in arterial blood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Mette F; Møller, Ann M

    2010-01-01

    Smoking increases perioperative complications. Carbon monoxide concentrations can estimate patients' smoking status and might be relevant in preoperative risk assessment. In smokers, we compared measurements of carbon monoxide in expired air (COexp) with measurements of carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb) ...

  14. Catalytic production of hydrogen from methanol for mobile, stationary and portable fuel-cell power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukyanov, Boris N

    2008-01-01

    Main catalytic processes for hydrogen production from methanol are considered. Various schemes of fuel processors for hydrogen production in stationary, mobile and portable power plants based on fuel cells are analysed. The attention is focussed on the design of catalytic reactors of fuel processors and on the state-of-the-art in the design of catalysts for methanol conversion, carbon monoxide steam conversion and carbon monoxide selective oxidation. Prospects for the use of methanol in on-board fuel processors are discussed.

  15. Hearing Loss due to Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehrparvar, Amir Houshang; Davari, Mohammad Hossein; Mollasadeghi, Abolfazl

    2013-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is one of the rare causes of hearing loss which may cause reversible or irreversible, unilateral or bilateral hearing loss after acute or chronic exposure. In this report, we present a case of bilateral sensorineural hearing loss in a secondary smelting workshop worker a...

  16. CARBON MONOXIDE AND THE NERVOUS SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, tasteless, odorless, and non-irritating gas formed when carbon in fuel is not burned completely. It enters the bloodstream through the lungs and attaches to hemoglobin (Hb), the body's oxygen carrier, forming carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) and there...

  17. Development of a fluorescence-based sensor for rapid diagnosis of cyanide exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Randy; Oda, Robert P; Bhandari, Raj K; Mahon, Sari B; Brenner, Matthew; Rockwood, Gary A; Logue, Brian A

    2014-02-04

    Although commonly known as a highly toxic chemical, cyanide is also an essential reagent for many industrial processes in areas such as mining, electroplating, and synthetic fiber production. The "heavy" use of cyanide in these industries, along with its necessary transportation, increases the possibility of human exposure. Because the onset of cyanide toxicity is fast, a rapid, sensitive, and accurate method for the diagnosis of cyanide exposure is necessary. Therefore, a field sensor for the diagnosis of cyanide exposure was developed based on the reaction of naphthalene dialdehyde, taurine, and cyanide, yielding a fluorescent β-isoindole. An integrated cyanide capture "apparatus", consisting of sample and cyanide capture chambers, allowed rapid separation of cyanide from blood samples. Rabbit whole blood was added to the sample chamber, acidified, and the HCN gas evolved was actively transferred through a stainless steel channel to the capture chamber containing a basic solution of naphthalene dialdehyde (NDA) and taurine. The overall analysis time (including the addition of the sample) was cyanide exposure. Most importantly, the sensor was 100% accurate in diagnosing cyanide poisoning for acutely exposed rabbits.

  18. A direct and rapid method to determine cyanide in urine by capillary electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiyang; Maddukuri, Naveen; Gong, Maojun

    2015-10-02

    Cyanides are poisonous chemicals that widely exist in nature and industrial processes as well as accidental fires. Rapid and accurate determination of cyanide exposure would facilitate forensic investigation, medical diagnosis, and chronic cyanide monitoring. Here, a rapid and direct method was developed for the determination of cyanide ions in urinary samples. This technique was based on an integrated capillary electrophoresis system coupled with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detection. Cyanide ions were derivatized with naphthalene-2,3-dicarboxaldehyde (NDA) and a primary amine (glycine) for LIF detection. Three separate reagents, NDA, glycine, and cyanide sample, were mixed online, which secured uniform conditions between samples for cyanide derivatization and reduced the risk of precipitation formation of mixtures. Conditions were optimized; the derivatization was completed in 2-4min, and the separation was observed in 25s. The limit of detection (LOD) was 4.0nM at 3-fold signal-to-noise ratio for standard cyanide in buffer. The cyanide levels in urine samples from smokers and non-smokers were determined by using the method of standard addition, which demonstrated significant difference of cyanide levels in urinary samples from the two groups of people. The developed method was rapid and accurate, and is anticipated to be applicable to cyanide detection in waste water with appropriate modification. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Measurements on high temperature fuel cells with carbon monoxide-containing fuel gases; Messungen an Hochtemperatur-Brennstoffzellen mit kohlenmonoxidhaltigen Brenngasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apfel, Holger

    2012-10-10

    In the present work the different power density of anode-supported high-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (ASC-SOFCs) were examined for carbon monoxide-containing fuels. In addition to wet hydrogen / carbon monoxide mixtures the cells were run with synthetic gas mixtures resembling the products of an autothermal reformer, and actual reformate generated by a 2 kW autothermal reformer. It was found that the power-voltage characteristics of an ASC depends primarily on the open circuit voltages of different gas mixtures, but is nearly independent of the hydrogen concentration of the fuel, although the reaction rates of other potential fuels within the gas mixture, namely carbon monoxide and methane, are much lower that the hydrogen reaction rate. The probable reason is that the main fuel for the electrochemical oxidation within the cell is hydrogen, while the nickel in the base layer of the anode acts as a reformer which replenishes the hydrogen by water reduction via carbon monoxide and methane oxidation.

  20. Vacancy distribution in nonstoichiometric vanadium monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, A.I.; Davydov, D.A.; Valeeva, A.A.

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Research highlights: → A certain fraction of vanadium atoms in disordered cubic vanadium monoxide VO y and ordered tetragonal phase V 52 O 64 is located in tetrahedral positions of a basic cubic lattice. → These positions are never occupied by any atoms in other strongly nonstoichiometric carbides, nitrides and oxides. → Both disordered and ordered structures of vanadium monoxide are characterized by the presence of short-range order of displacements in the oxygen sublattice and short-range order of substitution in the metal sublattice. → The short-range order of displacement is caused by the local displacements of O atoms from V (t) atoms occupying tetrahedral positions. The short-range order of substitution appears because V (t) atoms in the tetrahedral positions are always in the environment of four vacancies □ of the vanadium sublattice. - Abstract: Structural vacancy distribution in the crystal lattice of the tetragonal V 52 O 64 superstructure which is formed on the basis of disordered superstoichiometric cubic vanadium monoxide VO y ≡V x O z is experimentally determined and the presence of significant local atomic displacements and large local microstrains in a crystal lattice of real ordered phase is established. It is shown that the relaxation of local microstrains takes place owing to the basic disordered cubic phase grain refinement and a formation of ordered phase domains. The ordered phase domains grow in the direction from the boundaries to the centre of grains of the disordered basic cubic phase. Isothermal evolution at 970 K of the average domain size in ordered VO 1.29 vanadium monoxide is established. It is shown that the short-range order presents in a metal sublattice of disordered cubic VO y vanadium monoxide. The character of the short-range order is such that vanadium atoms occupying tetrahedral positions are in the environment of four vacant sites of the vanadium sublattice. This means that the

  1. Cyanide and Copper Recovery from Barren Solution of the Merrill Crowe Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parga, José R.; Valenzuela, Jesús L.; Díaz, J. A.

    This paper is a brief overview of the role of inducing the nucleated precipitation of copper and cyanide in a flashtube serpentine reactor, using sodium sulfide as the precipitate and sulfuric acid as pH control. The results showed that pH had a great effect on copper cyanide removal efficiency and the optimum pH was about 3 to 3.5. At this pH value copper cyanide removal efficiency could be achieved above 97 and 99 %, when influent copper concentration ions were 650 and 900 ppm respectively. In this process the cyanide associated with the copper, zinc, iron cyanide complexes are released as HCN gas under strong acidic conditions, allowing it to be recycled back to the cyanidation process as free cyanide.

  2. An enzymatic method for determination of azide and cyanide in aqueous phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Nan-Wei; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Xue, Feng; Zheng, Yu-Guo

    2015-11-20

    A halohydrin dehalogenase (HHDH-PL) from Parvibaculum lavamentivorans DS-1 was characterized and applied to determine azide and cyanide in the water. In this methodology, HHDH-PL catalysed azide and cyanide to react with butylene oxide and form corresponding β-substituted alcohols 1-azidobutan-2-ol (ABO) and 3-hydroxypentanenitrile (HPN) that could be quantitatively detected by gas chromatograph. The detection calibration curves for azide (R(2)=0.997) and cyanide (R(2)=0.995) were linear and the lower limits of detection for azide and cyanide were 0.1 and 0.3mM, respectively. Several other nucleophiles were identified having no effect on the analysis of azide and cyanide, excepting nitrite which influenced the detection of cyanide. This was the first report of a biological method to determine the inorganic azide and cyanide by converting them to the measurable organics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of cyanide exposure markers in the biofluids of smokers and non-smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinnakota, Chakravarthy V; Peetha, Naga S; Perrizo, Mitch G; Ferris, David G; Oda, Robert P; Rockwood, Gary A; Logue, Brian A

    2012-11-01

    Cyanide is highly toxic and is present in many foods, combustion products (e.g. cigarette smoke), industrial processes, and has been used as a terrorist weapon. In this study, cyanide and its major metabolites, thiocyanate and 2-amino-2-thiazoline-4-carboxylic acid (ATCA), were analyzed from various human biofluids of smokers (low-level chronic cyanide exposure group) and non-smokers to gain insight into the relationship of these biomarkers to cyanide exposure. The concentrations of each biomarker tested were elevated for smokers in each biofluid. Significant differences (p cyanide exposure, and other statistical methods were performed to better understand the relationship between cyanide and its metabolites. Of the markers studied, the results indicate plasma ATCA, in particular, showed excellent promise as a biomarker for chronic low-level cyanide exposure.

  4. Protonation/reduction dynamics at the [4Fe-4S] cluster of the hydrogen-forming cofactor in [FeFe]-hydrogenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senger, Moritz; Mebs, Stefan; Duan, Jifu; Shulenina, Olga; Laun, Konstantin; Kertess, Leonie; Wittkamp, Florian; Apfel, Ulf-Peter; Happe, Thomas; Winkler, Martin; Haumann, Michael; Stripp, Sven T

    2018-01-31

    The [FeFe]-hydrogenases of bacteria and algae are the most efficient hydrogen conversion catalysts in nature. Their active-site cofactor (H-cluster) comprises a [4Fe-4S] cluster linked to a unique diiron site that binds three carbon monoxide (CO) and two cyanide (CN - ) ligands. Understanding microbial hydrogen conversion requires elucidation of the interplay of proton and electron transfer events at the H-cluster. We performed real-time spectroscopy on [FeFe]-hydrogenase protein films under controlled variation of atmospheric gas composition, sample pH, and reductant concentration. Attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy was used to monitor shifts of the CO/CN - vibrational bands in response to redox and protonation changes. Three different [FeFe]-hydrogenases and several protein and cofactor variants were compared, including element and isotopic exchange studies. A protonated equivalent (HoxH) of the oxidized state (Hox) was found, which preferentially accumulated at acidic pH and under reducing conditions. We show that the one-electron reduced state Hred' represents an intrinsically protonated species. Interestingly, the formation of HoxH and Hred' was independent of the established proton pathway to the diiron site. Quantum chemical calculations of the respective CO/CN - infrared band patterns favored a cysteine ligand of the [4Fe-4S] cluster as the protonation site in HoxH and Hred'. We propose that proton-coupled electron transfer facilitates reduction of the [4Fe-4S] cluster and prevents premature formation of a hydride at the catalytic diiron site. Our findings imply that protonation events both at the [4Fe-4S] cluster and at the diiron site of the H-cluster are important in the hydrogen conversion reaction of [FeFe]-hydrogenases.

  5. Ferrocyanide Safety Program cyanide speciation studies. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, S.A.; Pool, K.H.; Bryan, S.L.

    1995-07-01

    This report summarizes Pacific Northwest Laboratory's fiscal year (FY) 1995 progress toward developing and implementing methods to identify and quantify cyanide species in ferrocyanide tank waste. This work was conducted for Westinghouse Hanfbrd Company's (WHC's) Ferrocyanide Safety Program. Currently, there are 18 high-level waste storage tanks at the US Department of Energy's Hanford Site that are on a Ferrocyanide Tank Watchlist because they contain an estimated 1000 g-moles or more of precipitated ferrocyanide. In the presence of oxidizing material such as sodium nitrate or nitrite, ferrocyanide can be made to react exothermally by heating it to high temperatures or by applying an electrical spark of sufficient energy (Cady 1993). However, fuel, oxidizers, and temperature are all important parameters. If fuel, oxidizers, or high temperatures (initiators) are not present in sufficient amounts, then a runaway or propagating reaction cannot occur. To bound the safety concern, methods are needed to definitively measure and quantitate ferrocyanide concentration present within the actual waste. The target analyte concentration for cyanide in waste is approximately 0.1 to 15 wt % (as cyanide) in the original undiluted sample. After dissolution of the original sample and appropriate dilutions, the concentration range of interest in the analytical solutions can vary between 0.001 to 0.1 wt % (as cyanide). In FY 1992, 1993, and 1994, two solution (wet) methods were developed based on Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and ion chromatography (IC); these methods were chosen for further development activities. The results of these activities are described

  6. Metallization of cyanide-modified Pt(111) electrodes with copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Escribano, Maria Escudero; Wildi, Christopher; Mwanda, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    -cyanide-copper sandwich configuration. STM also shows that the Cu deposit consists of isolated bidimensional nanoislands, which slowly grow through an Ostwald ripening mechanism if the potential is kept negative of the reduction peak. Metallization is not possible in perchloric acid solutions, which implies...

  7. Integrated self-powered microchip biosensor for endogenous biological cyanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Liu; Chen, Chaogui; Zhou, Ming; Guo, Shaojun; Wang, Erkang; Dong, Shaojun

    2010-05-15

    In this work we developed a fully integrated biofuel cell on a microchip, which consisted of glucose dehydrogenase supported (carbon nanotubes/thionine/gold nanoparticles)(8) multilayer as the anode, and the (carbon nanotubes/polylysine/laccase)(15) multilayer as the cathode. The as-obtained biofuel cell produced open circuit potential 620 mV and power density 302 microW cm(-2), showing great potential as a small power resource of portable electronics. Most importantly, for the first time we demonstrated the feasibility of developing a self-powered biosensor based on the inhibitive effect on microchip enzyme biofuel cell. With cyanide employed as the model analyte, this method showed a linear range of 3.0 x 10(-7) to 5.0 x 10(-4) M and a detection limit with 1.0 x 10(-7) M under the optimal conditions. The detection limit was lower than the acceptable cyanide concentration in drinking water (1.9 x 10(-6) M) according to the World Health Organization (WHO). This self-powered sensor was successfully used to detect the cyanide concentration in a real sample, cassava, which is the main carbohydrate resource in South America and Africa. This presented biosensor combined with a resistor and a multimeter demonstrated the general applicability as a fast and simple detection method in the determination of endogenous biological cyanide.

  8. Electrochemical Oxidation of Cyanide Using Platinized Ti Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aušra VALIŪNIENĖ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The cyanide-containing effluents are dangerous ecological hazards and must be treated before discharging into the environment. Anodic oxidation is one of the best ways to degrade cyanides. Pt anodes as the most efficient material for the cyanide electrochemical degradation are widely used. However, these electrodes are too expensive for industrial purposes. In this work Ti electrodes covered with nano-sized Pt particle layer were prepared and used for the anodic oxidation of cyanide ions. Surface images of Ti electrodes and Ti electrodes covered with different thickness layer of Pt were compared and characterized by the atomic force microscopy (AFM. The products formed in the solution during the CN- ions electrooxidation were examined by the Raman spectroscopy. An electrochemical Fast Fourier transformation (FFT impedance spectroscopy was used to estimate the parameters that reflect real surface roughness of Pt-modified Ti electrodes.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.19.4.2514

  9. Cyanide, gold and environment in the mining of antioqueno northeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montoya Ochoa, Carlos Arturo

    2001-01-01

    For 50 years cyanide of sodium has been used in the process of extraction of gold associated to minerals exploited in the Municipality of Segovia, Department of Antioquia. The extraction of the gold is made by leaching percolation in 72 of the 76 plants, and for agitation in 4. The sands are discharged to the floor in urban areas or to the gulches directly, with contents of sodium cyanide (NaCN) that overcome up to one thousand (1.000) times the quantity settled down by law of one (I) part by million (ppm); without any previous treatment, this generates a problem of contamination of the floor and the gulches. In this article an analysis of the problem is made, the methods are presented to determine content of cyanide of sodium (NaCN) in the sands, differentiating the three cyanide forms that are presented, a summary of the toxicity study in aquatic species and a proposal of detoxification of the sands by chemical and biological methods, is presented and a summary of a biological application

  10. Solid, double-metal cyanide catalysts for synthesis of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sci. Vol. 126, No. 2, March 2014, pp. 499–509. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Solid, double-metal cyanide catalysts for ... drimers, HPs have a highly branched structural design ... geneous catalysts and corrosion of the reactor lin- ... Carbon dioxide is a greenhouse gas. .... polymer product was reprecipitated from the liquid.

  11. Detoxification of cyanides in cassava flour by linamarase of Bacillus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enoh

    2012-04-05

    Apr 5, 2012 ... Full Length Research Paper. Detoxification of ... utilizing indigenous bacteria from cyanide rich cassava peel waste and exploited their potential for ... Figure 1. Enzyme catalyzed degradation of cyanogenic glycosides. pains ..... Linamarin - the toxic compound of cassava. J. Venom. Anim. Toxins. 2(1): 6-12.

  12. The aquatic toxicity and chemical forms of coke plant effluent cyanide -- Implications for discharge limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garibay, R.; Rupnow, M.; Godwin-Saad, E.; Hall, S.

    1995-01-01

    Cyanide is present in treated cokemaking process waters at concentrations as high as 8.0 mg/L. In assessing options for managing the discharge of a treated effluent, the development and implementation of discharge limits for cyanide became a critical issue. A study was initiated to evaluate possible alternatives to cyanide permit limits at the US Steel Gary Works Facility. The objectives of the study were to: (1) evaluation the forms of cyanide present in coke plant effluent; (2) determine whether these forms of cyanide are toxic to selected aquatic organisms; (3) compare the aquatic toxicity of various chemical forms of cyanide; (4) identify if the receiving water modifies cyanide bioavailability; and (5) confirm, with respect to water quality-based effluent limits, an appropriate analytical method for monitoring cyanide in a coke plant effluent. The results of aquatic toxicity tests and corresponding analytical data are presented. Toxicity tests were conducted with various pure chemical forms of cyanide as well as whole coke plant effluent (generated from a pilot-scale treatment system). Test species included the fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), Ceriodaphnia dubia (C. dubia) and Daphnia magna (D. magna). Analytical measurements for cyanide included total, weak acid dissociable, diffusible cyanide and selected metal species of cyanide. The findings presented by the paper are relevant with respect to the application of cyanide water quality criteria for a coke plant effluent discharge, the translation of these water quality-based effluent limits to permit limits, and methods for compliance monitoring for cyanide

  13. Carbon monoxide: The 21st century poison that goes unnoticed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoskins, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    This editorial article describes the effects of carbon monoxide poisoning on human beings and the mechanisms involving carbon monoxide saturation of haemoglobin that are responsible for it. The initial research done in the mid-1800s by Claude Bernard is presented. Methods of treatment for persons poisoned by carbon monoxide are discussed and the experiments made by J.B.S. Haldane on himself by breathing in carbon monoxide are described. Acclimatisation effects observed by Haldane and his co-workers and concerning persons occupationally exposed to carbon monoxide emissions are described

  14. Carbon monoxide: The 21st century poison that goes unnoticed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoskins, J.A. [Reigate, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    1999-07-01

    This editorial article describes the effects of carbon monoxide poisoning on human beings and the mechanisms involving carbon monoxide saturation of haemoglobin that are responsible for it. The initial research done in the mid-1800s by Claude Bernard is presented. Methods of treatment for persons poisoned by carbon monoxide are discussed and the experiments made by J.B.S. Haldane on himself by breathing in carbon monoxide are described. Acclimatisation effects observed by Haldane and his co-workers and concerning persons occupationally exposed to carbon monoxide emissions are described.

  15. Microfabricated hydrogen sensitive membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naddaf, A.; Kraetz, L. [Lehrstuhl fuer Thermische Verfahrenstechnik, Technische Universitaet Kaiserslautern (Germany); Detemple, P.; Schmitt, S.; Hessel, V. [Institut fuer Mikrotechnik Mainz GmbH, Mainz (Germany); Faqir, N. [University of Jordan, Amman (Jordan); Bart, H.J.

    2009-01-15

    Thin, defect-free palladium, palladium/copper and palladium/silver hydrogen absorbing membranes were microfabricated. A dual sputtering technique was used to deposit the palladium alloy membranes of only 1 {mu}m thickness on a nonporous silicon substrate. Advanced silicon etching (ASE) was applied on the backside to create a mechanically stable support structure for the thin films. Performance evaluation was carried out for different gases in a temperature range of 20 C to 298 C at a constant differential pressure of 110 kPa at the two sides of the membrane. The composite membranes show an excellent permeation rate of hydrogen, which appears to be 0.05 Pa m{sup 3} s{sup -1} and 0.01.10{sup -3} Pa m{sup 3} s{sup -1} at 20 C for the microfabricated 23 % silver and the 53 % copper composite membranes, respectively. The selectivity to hydrogen over a gas mixture containing, in addition to hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and nitrogen was measured. The mass spectrometer did not detect any CO{sub 2} or CO, showing that the membrane is completely hydrogen selective. The microfabricated membranes exhibit both high mechanical strength (they easily withstand pressures up to 4 bar) and high thermal stability (up to 650 C). (Abstract Copyright [2009], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. Cyanide hydratase from Aspergillus niger K10: Overproduction in Escherichia coli, purification, characterization and use in continuous cyanide degradation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rinágelová, Anna; Kaplan, Ondřej; Veselá, Alicja Barbara; Chmátal, Martin; Křenková, Alena; Plíhal, Ondřej; Pasquarelli, Fabrizia; Cantarella, M.; Martínková, Ludmila

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 3 (2014), s. 445-450 ISSN 1359-5113 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP504/11/0394; GA TA ČR TA01021368 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Cyanide hydratase * Nitrilase * Aspergillus niger Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.516, year: 2014

  17. Effect of long-term cyanide exposure on cyanide-sensitive respiration and phosphate metabolism in the fungus Phycomyces blakesleeanus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanić Marina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of long-term exposure (5 h of Phycomyces blakesleeanus mycelium to 5 mM KCN on respiration and phosphate metabolites were tested. Exposure to cyanide, antimycin A and azide lead to a decrease in the activity of cyanide-sensitive respiration (CSR, and the ratio of core polyphosphates (PPc and inorganic phosphates (Pi, which is a good indicator of the metabolic state of a cell. After 5 h of incubation, the activity of CSR returned to control values. For this, the recovery of cytochrome c oxidase (COX was required. In addition, the PPc/Pi ratio started to recover shortly after initiation of COX recovery, but never reached control values. This led us to conclude that the regulation of polyphosphate (PPn levels in the cell is tightly coupled to respiratory chain functioning. In addition, acutely applied cyanide caused two different responses, observed by 31P NMR spectroscopy, that were probably mediated through the mechanism of glycolytic oscillations, triggered by the effect of cyanide on mitochondria. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173040

  18. Three-Dimensional Cadmium(II Cyanide Coordination Polymers with Ethoxy-, Butoxy- and Hexyloxy-ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Kawasaki

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The three novel cadmium(II cyanide coordination polymers with alkoxyethanols, [Cd(CN2(C2H5OCH2CH2OH]n (I, [{Cd(CN2(C4H9OCH2CH2OH}3{Cd(CN2}]n (II and [{Cd(CN2(H2O2}{Cd(CN2}3·2(C6H13OCH2CH2OH]n (III, were synthesized and charcterized by structural determination. Three complexes have three-dimensional Cd(CN2 frameworks; I has distorted tridymite-like structure, and, II and III have zeolite-like structures. The cavities of Cd(CN2 frameworks of the complexes are occupied by the alkoxyethanol molecules. In I and II, hydroxyl oxygen atoms of alkoxyethanol molecules coordinate to the Cd(II ions, and the Cd(II ions exhibit slightly distort trigonal-bipyramidal coordination geometry. In II, there is also tetrahedral Cd(II ion which is coordinated by only the four cyanides. The hydroxyl oxygen atoms of alkoxyethanol connects etheric oxygen atoms of the neighboring alkoxyethanol by hydrogen bond in I and II. In III, hexyloxyethanol molecules do not coordinate to the Cd(II ions, and two water molecules coordnate to the octahedral Cd(II ions. The framework in III contains octahedral Cd(II and tetrahedral Cd(II in a 1:3 ratio. The Cd(CN2 framework structures depended on the difference of alkyl chain for alkoxyethanol molecules.

  19. Mechanistic study of the isotopic-exchange reaction between gaseous hydrogen and palladium hydride powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Outka, D.A.; Foltz, G.W.

    1991-01-01

    A detailed mechanism for the isotopic-exchange reaction between gaseous hydrogen and solid palladium hydride is developed which extends previous model for this reaction by specifically including surface reactions. The modeling indicates that there are two surface-related processes that contribute to the overall rate of exchange: the desorption of hydrogen from the surface and the exchange between surface hydrogen and bulk hydrogen. This conclusion is based upon measurements examining the effect of small concentrations of carbon monoxide were helpful in elucidating the mechanism. Carbon monoxide reversibly inhibits certain steps in the exchange; this slows the overall rate of exchange and changes the distribution of products from the reactor

  20. Hydrogen energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    This book consists of seven chapters, which deals with hydrogen energy with discover and using of hydrogen, Korean plan for hydrogen economy and background, manufacturing technique on hydrogen like classification and hydrogen manufacture by water splitting, hydrogen storage technique with need and method, hydrogen using technique like fuel cell, hydrogen engine, international trend on involving hydrogen economy, technical current for infrastructure such as hydrogen station and price, regulation, standard, prospect and education for hydrogen safety and system. It has an appendix on related organization with hydrogen and fuel cell.

  1. The post-depositional accumulation of metal-rich cyanide phases in submerged tailings deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jambor, J.L.; Martin, A.J.; Gerits, J.

    2009-01-01

    The characterization and accumulation pathway of metal-rich cyanide phases in mine-contaminated Balmer Lake (Ontario, Canada) were assessed through detailed examination of sediment mineralogy and porewater composition. The near-surface deposits in the lake consist of fine-grained calcareous tailings intermixed with natural organic-rich lake sediments. The tailings contain blue to greenish Fe-dominant cyanide that has formed in situ within the tailings. X-ray diffraction confirmed the presence of a mixed ferri/ferrocyanide [Fe 4 III (Fe II (CN) 6 ) 3 ], commonly referred to as 'Prussian Blue' but it is likely other metal-cyanide complexes are present as evidenced by the distinct colour variations. The cyanide phases occur in up to 1 wt.% as discrete particles and as bedded layers, where the cyanide phases act to cement other siliceous tailings components into a heterogeneous blend. Energy Dispersion X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analyses indicate that the authigenic cyanide precipitates contain variable amounts of Ni, Cu and Zn. Quantitatively, the cyanide compounds represent the dominant repository for Cu in Balmer Lake sediments. For Ni and Zn, cyanide associations are secondary in importance to Fe oxyhydroxides. High-resolution porewater profiles and solubility considerations suggest that the formation of the cyanide complexes is a feature of historical (pre-1990) conditions when aqueous cyanide concentrations were higher in the lake.

  2. The post-depositional accumulation of metal-rich cyanide phases in submerged tailings deposits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jambor, J.L. [Leslie Research and Consulting, 316 Rosehill Wynd, Tsawwassen, BC, V4M 3L9 (Canada); Martin, A.J., E-mail: ajm@lorax.ca [Lorax Environmental Services, 2289 Burrard St., Vancouver, BC, V6J 3H9 (Canada); Gerits, J. [Lorax Environmental Services, 2289 Burrard St., Vancouver, BC, V6J 3H9 (Canada)

    2009-12-15

    The characterization and accumulation pathway of metal-rich cyanide phases in mine-contaminated Balmer Lake (Ontario, Canada) were assessed through detailed examination of sediment mineralogy and porewater composition. The near-surface deposits in the lake consist of fine-grained calcareous tailings intermixed with natural organic-rich lake sediments. The tailings contain blue to greenish Fe-dominant cyanide that has formed in situ within the tailings. X-ray diffraction confirmed the presence of a mixed ferri/ferrocyanide [Fe{sub 4}{sup III}(Fe{sup II}(CN){sub 6}){sub 3}], commonly referred to as 'Prussian Blue' but it is likely other metal-cyanide complexes are present as evidenced by the distinct colour variations. The cyanide phases occur in up to 1 wt.% as discrete particles and as bedded layers, where the cyanide phases act to cement other siliceous tailings components into a heterogeneous blend. Energy Dispersion X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) analyses indicate that the authigenic cyanide precipitates contain variable amounts of Ni, Cu and Zn. Quantitatively, the cyanide compounds represent the dominant repository for Cu in Balmer Lake sediments. For Ni and Zn, cyanide associations are secondary in importance to Fe oxyhydroxides. High-resolution porewater profiles and solubility considerations suggest that the formation of the cyanide complexes is a feature of historical (pre-1990) conditions when aqueous cyanide concentrations were higher in the lake.

  3. The Combination of Cobinamide and Sulfanegen Is Highly Effective in Mouse Models of Cyanide Poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Adriano; Crankshaw, Daune L.; Monteil, Alexandre; Patterson, Steven E.; Nagasawa, Herbert T.; Briggs, Jackie E.; Kozocas, Joseph A.; Mahon, Sari B.; Brenner, Matthew; Pilz, Renate B.; Bigby, Timothy D.; Boss, Gerry R.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Context Cyanide poisoning is a major contributor to death in smoke inhalation victims and accidental exposure to cyanide occurs in a variety of industries. Moreover, cyanide has the potential to be used by terrorists, particularly in a closed space such as an airport or train station. Current therapies for cyanide poisoning must be given by intravenous administration, limiting their use in treating mass casualties. Objective We are developing two new cyanide antidotes—cobinamide, a vitamin B12 analog, and sulfanegen, a 3-mercaptopyruvate prodrug. Both drugs can be given by intramuscular administration, and therefore could be used to treat a large number of people quickly. We now asked if the two drugs would have an augmented effect when combined. Materials and Methods We used a non-lethal and two different lethal models of cyanide poisoning in mice. The non-lethal model assesses neurologic recovery by quantitatively evaluating the innate righting reflex time of a mouse. The two lethal models are a cyanide injection and a cyanide inhalation model. Results We found that the two drugs are at least additive when used together in both the non-lethal and lethal models: at doses where all animals died with either drug alone, the combination yielded 80 and 40% survival in the injection and inhalation models, respectively. Similarly, drug doses that yielded 40% survival with either drug alone yielded 80 and 100% survival in the injection and inhalatiion models, respectively. As part of the inhalation model, we developed a new paradigm in which animals are exposed to cyanide gas, injected intramuscularly with antidote, and then re-exposed to cyanide gas. This simulates cyanide exposure of a large number of people in a closed space, because people would remain exposed to cyanide, even after receiving an antidote. Conclusion The combination of cobinamide and sulfanegen shows great promise as a new approach to treating cyanide poisoning. PMID:21740135

  4. Monitoring of river water for free cyanide pollution from mining activity in Papua New Guinea and attenuation of cyanide by biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaraba, Ian; Rao, B K Rajashekhar

    2015-01-01

    Cyanide (CN) pollution was reported in the downstream areas of Watut and Markham Rivers due to effluent discharges from gold mining and processing activities of Hidden Valley mines in Morobe province of Papua New Guinea. We monitored free cyanide levels in Watut and Markham River waters randomly three times in years for 2 years (2012 and 2013). Besides, a short-term static laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the potential of river sediment to attenuate externally added cyanide, with and without the presence of biochar material. Results indicated that the free cyanide content ranged between 0.17 and 1.32 μg L(-1) in the river waters. The free cyanide content were found to be significantly (p cyanide levels in all four monitoring sites across three sampling intervals were lower than 0.20 mg L(-1) which is the maximum contaminant level (MCL) permitted according to US Environmental Protection Agency. Under laboratory conditions, the biochar-impregnated sediment showed ∼3 times more attenuation capacity for cyanide than non-amended sediment, thus indicating possibility of using biochar to cleanse cyanide from spills or other sources of pollution.

  5. An efficient probe for rapid detection of cyanide in water at parts per billion levels and naked-eye detection of endogenous cyanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Namita; Jha, Satadru; Bhattacharya, Santanu

    2014-03-01

    A new molecular probe based on an oxidized bis-indolyl skeleton has been developed for rapid and sensitive visual detection of cyanide ions in water and also for the detection of endogenously bound cyanide. The probe allows the "naked-eye" detection of cyanide ions in water with a visual color change from red to yellow (Δλmax =80 nm) with the immediate addition of the probe. It shows high selectivity towards the cyanide ion without any interference from other anions. The detection of cyanide by the probe is ratiometric, thus making the detection quantitative. A Michael-type addition reaction of the probe with the cyanide ion takes place during this chemodosimetric process. In water, the detection limit was found to be at the parts per million level, which improved drastically when a neutral micellar medium was employed, and it showed a parts-per-billion-level detection, which is even 25-fold lower than the permitted limits of cyanide in water. The probe could also efficiently detect the endogenously bound cyanide in cassava (a staple food) with a clear visual color change without requiring any sample pretreatment and/or any special reaction conditions such as pH or temperature. Thus the probe could serve as a practical naked-eye probe for "in-field" experiments without requiring any sophisticated instruments. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. On the composition of nonstoichiometric europium monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ignat'eva, N.I.

    1990-01-01

    Consideration is given to results of of investigation into chemical composition, homogeneity region, type of disordering of nonstoichiometric europium monoxide. Precision methods of X-ray diffraction, electron-microscopic, atomic-absorption chemical analysis were used. It is shown that lattice volume reduces with increase of oxygen content in the oxide. For monocrystal of EuO 1.01 composition a=5.146 A. All samples of europium monoxide are characterized by low conductivity. Conductivity value changes by two orders (from 10 -8 to 10 -6 Θ -1 ·cm -1 ) when passing from the sample of stoichiometric composition to maximally disordered one. The disordering is considered according to the type of charged cation vacancies, leading to occurrence of equivalent number of electron defects of positive holes. 4 refs.; 1 tab

  7. Tobacco and chemicals (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Some of the chemicals associated with tobacco smoke include ammonia, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, propane, methane, acetone, hydrogen cyanide and various carcinogens. Other chemicals that are associated with chewing ...

  8. Sensorineural Hearing Loss following Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph P. Pillion

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A case study is presented of a 17-year-old male who sustained an anoxic brain injury and sensorineural hearing loss secondary to carbon monoxide poisoning. Audiological data is presented showing a slightly asymmetrical hearing loss of sensorineural origin and mild-to-severe degree for both ears. Word recognition performance was fair to poor bilaterally for speech presented at normal conversational levels in quiet. Management considerations of the hearing loss are discussed.

  9. Relative Propensities of Cytochrome c Oxidase and Cobalt Corrins for Reaction with Cyanide and Oxygen: Implications for Amelioration of Cyanide Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Quan; Pearce, Linda L; Peterson, Jim

    2017-12-18

    In aqueous media at neutral pH, the binding of two cyanide molecules per cobinamide can be described by two formation constants, K f1 = 1.1 (±0.6) × 10 5 M -1 and K f2 = 8.5 (±0.1) × 10 4 M -1 , or an overall cyanide binding constant of ∼1 × 10 10 M -2 . In comparison, the cyanide binding constants for cobalamin and a fully oxidized form of cytochrome c oxidase, each binding a single cyanide anion, were found to be 7.9 (±0.5) × 10 4 M -1 and 1.6 (±0.2) × 10 7 M -1 , respectively. An examination of the cyanide-binding properties of cobinamide at neutral pH by stopped-flow spectrophotometry revealed two kinetic phases, rapid and slow, with apparent second-order rate constants of 3.2 (±0.5) × 10 3 M -1 s -1 and 45 (±1) M -1 s -1 , respectively. Under the same conditions, cobalamin exhibited a single slow cyanide-binding kinetic phase with a second-order rate constant of 35 (±1) M -1 s -1 . All three of these processes are significantly slower than the rate at which cyanide is bound by complex IV during enzyme turnover (>10 6 M -1 s -1 ). Overall, it can be understood from these findings why cobinamide is a measurably better cyanide scavenger than cobalamin, but it is unclear how either cobalt corrin can be antidotal toward cyanide intoxication as neither compound, by itself, appears able to out-compete cytochrome c oxidase for available cyanide. Furthermore, it has also been possible to unequivocally show in head-to-head comparison assays that the enzyme does indeed have greater affinity for cyanide than both cobalamin and cobinamide. A plausible resolution of the paradox that both cobalamin and cobinamide clearly are antidotal toward cyanide intoxication, involving the endogenous auxiliary agent nitric oxide, is suggested. Additionally, the catalytic consumption of oxygen by the cobalt corrins is demonstrated and, in the case of cobinamide, the involvement of cytochrome c when present. Particularly in the case of cobinamide, these oxygen

  10. Carbon Monoxide Exposure in Youth Ice Hockey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macnow, Theodore; Mannix, Rebekah; Meehan, William P

    2017-11-01

    To examine the effect of ice resurfacer type on carboxyhemoglobin levels in youth hockey players. We hypothesized that players in arenas with electric resurfacers would have normal, stable carboxyhemoglobin levels during games, whereas those in arenas with internal combustion engine (IC) resurfacers would have an increase in carboxyhemoglobin levels. Prospective cohort study. Enclosed ice arenas in the northeastern United States. Convenience sample of players aged 8 to 18 years old in 16 games at different arenas. Eight arenas (37 players) used an IC ice resurfacer and 8 arenas (36 players) an electric resurfacer. Carboxyhemoglobin levels (SpCO) were measured using a pulse CO-oximeter before and after the game. Arena air was tested for carbon monoxide (CO) using a metered gas detector. Players completed symptom questionnaires. The change in SpCO from pregame to postgame was compared between players at arenas with electric versus IC resurfacers. Carbon monoxide was present at 6 of 8 arenas using IC resurfacers, levels ranged from 4 to 42 parts per million. Carbon monoxide was not found at arenas with electric resurfacers. Players at arenas with IC resurfacers had higher median pregame SpCO levels compared with those at electric arenas (4.3% vs 1%, P carboxyhemoglobin during games and have elevated baseline carboxyhemoglobin levels compared with players at arenas with electric resurfacers. Electric resurfacers decrease the risk of CO exposure.

  11. Determination of free cyanide and total cyanide concentrations in surface and underground waters in Bogoso and its surrounding areas in Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Obiri

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Concentrations of free cyanide and total cyanide in water samples in Bogoso and its surrounding areas in Ghana have been measured in this study. Concentrations of free cyanide and total cyanide were found to be above the maximum permissible discharge limit of effluent from mining companies into natural waters set by Environmental Protection Agency, Ghana (GEPA. A comparison of the results obtained in this study with permissible levels set by US Environmental Protection Agency and the World Health Organization reveals that surface waters in the study areas are highly polluted with cyanide and it's not safe for human consumptions. This means that, the resident in and around Bogoso are at risk.

  12. Reaction of hydrogen atoms with acrylaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koda, Seiichiro; Nakamura, Kazumoto; Hoshino, Takashi; Hikita, Tsutomu

    1978-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen atoms with acrylaldehyde was investigated in a fast flow reactor equipped with a time-of-flight type mass spectrometer under reduced pressure. Main reaction products were carbon monoxide, ethylene, ethane, methane, and propanal. Consideration of the distributions of the reaction products under various reaction conditions showed that hydrogen atoms attacked the C=C double bond, especially its inner carbon side under reduced pressure. Resulting hot radicals caused subsequent reactions. The relative value of the apparent bimolecular rate constant of the reaction against that of trans-2-butene with hydrogen atoms was 1.6+-0.2, which supported the above-mentioned initial reaction. (auth.)

  13. Biodegradation of cyanide using Serratia sp. isolated from contaminated soil of gold mine in Takab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Mohseni

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available   Introduction : Cyanide is a toxic and hazardous compound for all organisms which is produced enormously by human being and causes the environment pollution. Biodegradation is the best method for cyanide elimination in industrial wastewater. The aims of this study were isolation of cyanide degrading bacteria from contaminated soil and investigation of their ability for cyanide degradation.   Materials and methods: After soil samples collection, enrichment of cyanide degrading bacteria was performed in a minimal medium containing 0.5 mM potassium cyanide. The ability of isolated bacterium to utilize the cyanide as sole carbon and nitrogen source was investigated. Cyanide degradation and ammonium production was determined in growth medium using picric acid and Nessler’s regent methods. Toxicity effect of different cyanide compounds on bacterial growth was determined using minimum inhibitory concentration. In addition, the ability of the isolated bacterium to utilize different cyanide compounds was investigated . Identification of the isolate was undertaken using morphological, physiological and biochemical characteristics and molecular analysis .   Results : A bacterium with ability to degrade cyanide as sole carbon and nitrogen source was isolated from soil. This bacterium named as isolate MF1. MF1 degraded cyanide in growth medium in alkaline condition after 40 hours. Moreover this isolate tolerated more than 7 mM potassium cyanide. The results showed that there was a direct relation between decreasing of cyanide concentration, increasing of ammonia concentration and growth of MF1. In addition, the isolated bacterium demonstrated the ability to utilize different cyanide compounds as sole carbon and nitrogen source. The results of morphological and physiological characteristics showed that this bacterium belonged to the Serratia sp. Moreover, 16S rDNA sequencing and phylogenetic analyses exhibited that MF1 strain was similar to Serratia

  14. Eliminating Cyanide, Reducing Heavy Metals, and Harvesting Gold from Mining Waste with Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    : All plants (as far as known) have an enzyme to detoxify cyanide by binding it to an amino acid. Cyanide in the appropriate dose can be used by plants as nitrogen source. Compared to other organisms, plants can tolerate high doses of free and complexed cyanidess. Using plants for detoxifying mining......Large amounts of cyanides are used in gold mining. The application is open and generates environmental problems. Regulators therefore insist on detoxifying cyanide-contaminated wastewater. There are existing technologies to remove cyanides, but none uses plants. Here, a new technology is introduced...... wastewater combines several benefits: cyanide is removed, plants are irrigated and fertilised. Heavy metals (including gold) are extracted by plants. Plants can be harvested and used, e.g., for energy production by burning. The ash of the plants is probaly rich in gold and a resource for further gold...

  15. [Biooxidation of gold-bearing sulfide ore and subsequent biological treatment of cyanidation residues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaev, A T; Bulaev, A G; Semenchenko, G V; Kanaeva, Z K; Shilmanova, A A

    2016-01-01

    The percolation biooxidation parameters of ore from the Bakyrchik deposit were studied. An investigation of the technological parameters (such as the concentration of leaching agents, irrigation intensity, and pauses at various stages of the leaching) revealed the optimal mode for precious metal extraction. The stages of the ore processing were biooxidation, gold extraction by cyanidation or thiosulfate leaching, and biological destruction of cyanide. The gold and silver recovery rates by cyanidation were 64.0 and 57.3%, respectively. The gold and silver recovery rates by thiosulfate leaching were 64.0 and 57.3%, respectively. Gold and silver recovery rates from unoxidized ore (control experiment) by cyanidation were 20.9 and 26.8%, respectively. Thiosulfate leaching of unoxidized ore allowed the extraction of 38.8 and 24.2% of the gold and silver, respectively. Cyanidation residues were treated with bacteria of the genus Alcaligenes in order to destruct cyanide.

  16. Cyanide Containing Wastewater Treatment by Ozone Enhanced Catalytic Oxidation over Diatomite Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Mingguo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyanide containing wastewater that discharged from gold mining process creates environmental problems due to the toxicity of cyanide. As one of the promising advanced oxidation process, catalytic oxidation with ozone is considered to be effective on the purification of cyanide. Diatomite, a natural mineral, was used as catalyst in this study. The effect of O3 dosage, salinity, initial cyanide concentration and initial pH condition were investigated. It was observed that the removal rate of cyanide was much higher in the catalytic oxidation with ozone process than the one in zone alone process. Alkaline condition was especially favorable for cyanide in catalytic oxidation with ozone. The ozone and catalytic oxidation with ozone were simulated by pseudo-first-order kinetics model. The apparent first-order rate constant contribution of the diatomite catalyst was 0.0757 min-1, and the contribution percentage was 65.77%.

  17. Acute cyanide poisoning in prehospital care: new challenges, new tools for intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidotti, Tee

    2006-01-01

    Effective management of cyanide poisoning from chemical terrorism, inhalation of fire smoke, and other causes constitutes a critical challenge for the prehospital care provider. The ability to meet the challenge of managing cyanide poisoning in the prehospital setting may be enhanced by the availability of the cyanide antidote hydroxocobalamin, currently under development for potential introduction in the United States. This paper discusses the causes, recognition, and management of acute cyanide poisoning in the prehospital setting with emphasis on the emerging profile of hydroxocobalamin, an antidote that may have a risk:benefit ratio suitable for empiric, out-of-hospital treatment of the range of causes of cyanide poisoning. If introduced in the U.S., hydroxocobalamin may enhance the role of the U.S. prehospital responder in providing emergency care in a cyanide incident.

  18. Determination of boron, silica, fluoride, MBAS, phenols, cyanide and sulphide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.

    1982-01-01

    This study forms part of the NIWR's series of interlaboratory comparison studies involving southern African laboratories engaged in water and wastewater analysis, and is concerned with the analysis of synthetic water samples by 31 laboratories for boron, silica, fluoride, methylene blue active substances (MBAS), phenols, cyanide and sulphide. The results obtained are evaluated and discussed. Recognised standard methods, or modifications of these methods, were used for most of the determinations. Results from the boron, silica and fluoride determinations showed, in general, acceptable accuracy and precision. Results from the MBAS, phenols, cyanide and sulphide determinations were, however, somewhat widespread, and illustrated the difficulty in obtaining reliable results from the measurement of relatively low levels of these determinands

  19. A rectangular Ni-Fe cluster with unusual cyanide bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Christoph; Sato, Hiroki; Matsumoto, Takuto; Shiga, Takuya; Newton, Graham N; Renz, Franz; Oshio, Hiroki

    2012-10-07

    An asymmetric polycyanide iron complex, K(2)[Fe(III)(L1)(CN)(4)](MeOH) (HL1 = 2,2'-(1H-pyrazole-3,5-diyl)bis-pyridine), was synthesized and its complexation compatibility with nickel ions was examined. Two kinds of enantiomeric nickel-iron squares were obtained in the presence of a chiral bidentate capping ligand. The compounds display unusual cyanide bridge geometry and have ferromagnetic interactions between nickel and iron ions.

  20. Syntheses and characterizations of the cyanide-bridged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The spectral features of the complexes suggest that the Ni(II) ion is four coordinate with four cyanide-carbon atoms in a square planar geometry, whereas the Cu(II) and the Zn(II) ions of the Cu–Ni–etim and the Zn–Ni–etim complexes are completed by nitrogen atoms of two cyano groups of [Ni(CN)4]2- coordinated to the ...

  1. Determination of nitrate, nitrite, N- nitrosamines, cyanide and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nitrate, nitrite, N- nitrosamines and ascorbic acid content as well as the levels of cyanide in eight brands of fruit juices and twelve brands of sachet water commonly marketed and consumed in Nigeria were estimated. The mean values of nitrate ranged from 2.29±0.05 to 16.50±1.21 mg/L for the juices and 0.64±0.21 to ...

  2. Using mineralogy to optimize gold recovery by direct cyanidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venter, D.; Chryssoulis, S. L.; Mulpeter, T.

    2004-08-01

    The complete and accurate gold deportments of direct cyanide leach residues provide a clear picture of the occurrence of unrecovered gold and identify causes for poor extraction. Based on the independent measurement of each form and carrier of unleached gold, opportunities for recovery optimization can be assessed more accurately by providing meaningful targets and can help identify the means to achieve such targets. In ten of 14 leach plants surveyed, 23% of the unrecovered gold could be extracted without finer grinding.

  3. Dietary resources shape the adaptive changes of cyanide detoxification function in giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

    OpenAIRE

    He Huang; Shangmian Yie; Yuliang Liu; Chengdong Wang; Zhigang Cai; Wenping Zhang; Jingchao Lan; Xiangming Huang; Li Luo; Kailai Cai; Rong Hou; Zhihe Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The functional adaptive changes in cyanide detoxification in giant panda appear to be response to dietary transition from typical carnivore to herbivorous bear. We tested the absorption of cyanide contained in bamboo/bamboo shoots with a feeding trial in 20 adult giant pandas. We determined total cyanide content in bamboo shoots and giant panda?s feces, levels of urinary thiocyanate and tissue rhodanese activity using color reactions with a spectrophotometer. Rhodanese expression in liver and...

  4. Acute Cyanide Poisoning: Hydroxocobalamin and Sodium Thiosulfate Treatments with Two Outcomes following One Exposure Event

    OpenAIRE

    Meillier, Andrew; Heller, Cara

    2015-01-01

    Cyanide is rapidly reacting and causes arrest of aerobic metabolism. The symptoms are diffuse and lethal and require high clinical suspicion. Remediation of symptoms and mortality is highly dependent on quick treatment with a cyanide antidote. Presently, there are two widely accepted antidotes: sodium thiosulfate and hydroxocobalamin. These treatments act on different components of cyanide’s metabolism. Here, we present two cases resulting from the same source of cyanide poisoning and the use...

  5. Coumarin benzothiazole derivatives as chemosensors for cyanide anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kangnan; Liu, Zhiqiang; Guan, Ruifang; Cao, Duxia; Chen, Hongyu; Shan, Yanyan; Wu, Qianqian; Xu, Yongxiao

    2015-06-01

    Four coumarin benzothiazole derivatives, N-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carboxamide (1), (Z)-N-(3-methylbenzo[d]thiazol-2(3H)-ylidene)-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carboxamide (2), 7-(diethylamino)-N-(benzo[d]thiazol-2-yl)-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carboxamide (3) and (Z)-7-(diethylamino)-N-(3-methylbenzo[d]thiazol-2(3H)-ylidene)-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carboxamide) (4), have been synthesized. Their crystal structures, photophysical properties in acetonitrile and recognition properties for cyanide anions have been investigated. All the compounds are generally planar, especially compound 1 exhibits perfect planarity with dihedral angle between benzothiazolyl group and coumarin group being only 3.63°. Coumarin benzothiazole compounds 1 and 3 can recognize cyanide anions by Michael addition reaction and compound 3 exhibits color change from yellow to colorless and green fluorescence was quenched completely, which can be observed by naked eye. Coumarin benzothiazolyliden compound 4 can recognize cyanide anions with fluorescence turn-on response based on the copper complex ensemble displacement mechanism.

  6. Kinetics and equilibria of cyanide binding to prostaglandin H synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, I D; Dunford, H B

    1989-09-01

    Cyanide binding to prostaglandin H (PGH) synthase results in a spectral shift in the Soret region. This shift was exploited to determine equilibrium and kinetic parameters of the cyanide binding process. At pH 8.0, ionic strength 0.22 M, 4 degrees C, the cyanide dissociation constant, determined from equilibrium experiments, is (65 +/- 10) microM. The binding rate constant is (2.8 +/- 0.2) x 10(3) M-1 s-1, and the dissociation rate constant is zero within experimental error. Through a kinetic study of the binding process as a function of pH, from pH 3.96 to 8.00, it was possible to determine the pKa of a heme-linked acid group on the enzyme of 4.15 +/- 0.10 with citrate buffer. An apparent pKa of 4.75 +/- 0.03 was determined with acetate buffer; this different value is attributed to complexation of the enzyme with one of the components of the acetate buffer.

  7. Smoke Inhalation and Cyanide Poisoning: 20 Years of Paris Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baud, F. J.

    2007-01-01

    Hydroxocobalamin has been used as a cyanide poisoning antidote for many years in France. It has recently been approved by the US FDA. In Paris, hydroxocobalamin is carried by the Brigade de Sapeurs Pompiers (Paris Fire Brigade) in mobile intensive care vehicles and has been administered empirically to victims of enclosed-space fire smoke inhalation who meet the criteria of having soot in the nose, mouth, or throat, any alteration in mental status or disturbance in consciousness, and especially if any degree of hypotension is present (BP less than or equal to 100 mmHg systolic). The administration of hydroxocobalamin at the scene was shown to be safe. Hydroxocobalamin has also been efficacious and safe in 'pure' cyanide poisoning, as long as brain death has not already occurred. A 'toxidrome' of cyanide poisoning has been developed in our institution in Paris, and its application can assist in making the diagnosis of this life-threatening poisoning which cannot be emergent diagnosed by currently-available laboratory methods.(author)

  8. Mechanistic study on exchange between labeled cyanide and nitriles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, Munir; Chaney, J.E.; Digenis, G.A.; Layton, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    The potential of a clean, rapid exchange between the nitrile function of mandelonitrile and cyanide was examined for the preparation of labeled mandelonitrile which could be subsequently rapidly reduced with borane to labeled phenylethanolamine (PEOH). The mandelonitrile exchange (CN-CN) was studied using [ 13 C]-NaCN with crown ethers in THF, monitoring the results with 13 C-NMR. A large increase in the intensity of the signal due to [ 13 C]-nitrile was observed. The exchange was also carried out using [ 14 C]-NaCN, and the exchanged nitrile was reduced to [ 14 C]-PEOH. The chemical yield for the reduction of [ 14 C]-mandelonitrile to [ 14 C]-PEOH was 60% and the overall radio-chemical yield of the cyanide-exchange and borane reduction (based on [ 14 C]-NaCN used) was 20%. Mechanisms are proposed which were found to be consistent with results of cyanide exchange of appropriately selected nitriles. (author)

  9. Quantitative measurement of cyanide complexes in simulated and actual Hanford ferrocyanide wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, S.A.; Pool, K.H.; Sell, R.L.; Bryan, S.L.

    1994-01-01

    Cyanide-containing radioactive waste from radiocesium scavenging processes conducted during the 1950's at Hanford is currently stored in 24 single shell tanks. As part of ongoing tank characterization efforts, the quantity and chemical form of cyanide in these tanks need to be determined. This report summarizes the results of studies conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under contract to Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) to develop methods for the quantification of total cyanide and identification of major cyanide-containing species in Ferrocyanide Tank Waste. Results from the application of FTIR, IC, and microdistillation procedures to simulated and actual Hanford waste are presented and compared where applicable

  10. Complexation of intracellular cyanide by hydroxocobalamin using a human cellular model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astier, A; Baud, F J

    1996-01-01

    1. The rational for administering hydroxocobalamin (OHCbl) as an antidote to cyanide poisoning is based on the high affinity of CN ion for cobalt compounds. However, only few data are available on the influence of OHCbl on the intracellular cyanide pool. 2. In human fibroblasts incubated for 10 min with 500 microM of [14C] cyanide, the accumulation ratio was 25 at 37 degrees C (10.45 +/- 1.51 mM) and 11.9 at 4 degrees C. 3. Using the monoblastic U-937 cell line, a rapid uptake of radioactive cyanide was observed with a maximum accumulation ratio of 1.97 at 5 min. 4. A linear relationship between cyanide uptake by U-937 cells and cyanide concentration in incubation medium (10-500 microM; 5 min) was found suggesting a first order process (k = 0.25 min-1). 5. After incubation of fibroblasts with 500 microM of OHCbl, a 75% decrease of intracellular cyanide was observed, with concomittant formation of intracellular cyanocobalamin CNCbl (intracellular/extracellular ratio: 158). 6. These findings suggest that OHCbl is able to penetrate into heavily cyanide loaded cells and to complex cyanide to the non-toxic CNCbl form.

  11. Subsurface fate and transport of cyanide species at a manufactured-gas plant site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, R.S.; Dzombak, D.A.; Luthy, R.G.; Nakles, D.V.

    1999-01-01

    Cyanide is present at manufactured-gas plant (MGP) sites in oxide-box residuals, which were often managed on-site as fill during active operations. Cyanide can leach from these materials, causing groundwater contamination. Speciation, fate, and transport of cyanide in a sand-gravel aquifer underlying an MGP site in the upper Midwest region of the US were studied through characterization, monitoring, and modeling of a plume of cyanide-contaminated groundwater emanating from the site. Results indicate that cyanide in the groundwater is primarily in the form of iron-cyanide complexes (>98%), that these complexes are stable under the conditions of the aquifer, and that they are transported as nonreactive solutes in the sand-gravel aquifer material. Weak-acid-dissociable cyanide, which represents a minute fraction of total cyanide in the site groundwater, may undergo chemical-biological degradation in the sand-gravel aquifer. It seems that dilution may be the only natural attenuation mechanism for iron-cyanide complexes in sand-gravel aquifers at MGP sites

  12. A radiochemical study of gold electrodeposition kinetics in alkaline cyanide solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poshkus, D.; Agafonovas, G.; Zhebrauskas, A.

    1995-01-01

    Kinetics of gold electrodeposition from alkaline cyanide solutions was investigated by the use of labelled gold 195 atoms. The absorption of cyanide containing species from alkaline cyanide and dicyanoaurate solutions on a gold electrode by the use of labelled carbon atoms was investigated. Polarization curves of anodic dissolution and cathodic deposition of gold in alkaline cyanide solutions were obtained. The values of standard potential, exchange current density, transfer coefficient and standard polarization rate were determined from polarization curves. The errors in current density caused by the nuclear disintegration statistics were evaluated. 28 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs

  13. Packed bed reactor for degradation of simulated cyanide-containing wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Virender; Kumar, Vijay; Bhalla, Tek Chand

    2014-01-01

    The discharge of cyanide-containing effluents into the environment contaminates water bodies and soil. Effective methods of treatment which can detoxify cyanide are the need of the hour. The aim of the present study is to develop a bioreactor for complete degradation of cyanide using immobilized cells of Serratia marcescens RL2b. Alginate-entrapped cells of S. marcescens RL2b were used for complete degradation of cyanide in a packed bed reactor (PBR). Cells grown in minimal salt medium (pH 6....

  14. The Effect of Storage Longtime on Cyanide Production in Postmortem Stored Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeeid Gholamzadeh

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objective: Acute cyanide poisoning happens intentionally as suicide attempt or in accidental use. Interpretation of cyanide analysis results in postmortem samples is important in forensic medicine. Material & Methods: In this case-control study, the liver and the lung of 100 autopsy cases were collected during six months in Shiraz Forensic Medicine Department. Samples were divided into three parts and were examined as follow: one part of the liver and the lung was analyzed qualitatively to detect cyanide with Prussian blue test at first day of admission, the second and the third parts of the samples were stored at 0-4°C for one and two months, respectively. Then, liver and lung samples were analyzed to measure the amount of cyanide. Results: Cyanide was detected in only six cases in all three parts of the liver samples. Screening results for cyanide were negative for the remaining 94 liver samples. Conclusion: Endogenous cyanide production was not detected in liver and lung samples in this study. Therefore, cyanide detection was not affected by the time of the storage of the samples. The cyanide level changes in mentioned tissues were not significant. More importantly, our results would be more advantageous if we studied quantitatively on more samples to pave the way for future studies.

  15. Study of solid phase kinetics during cyanidation using the 198 Au radioactive tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbus, A.; Pop, I.I.; Gaspar, E.

    1995-01-01

    During cyanidation, the various gold bearing pyrite sorts exhibit different behaviour, that sometimes cause increased cyanidation times influencing the reagent and power consumption, in the same time generating fluctuations in the recovery efficiencies. The introduction of the 198 Au radioactive tracer into the cyanidation circuit enabled us to follow several parameters of the cyanidation kinetics: the average residence time of the gold bearing pyrite in the technological equipment, information about the homogenization process, dispersion of solids and gold dissolution efficiency on each technological stage. (author)

  16. ''In sutu'' radiation cleaning of underground water contaminated with cyanides - six years of experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastuszek, F.; Vacek, K.; Vondruska, V.

    1993-01-01

    Underground water, contaminated with cyanides, has been successfully cleaned using the hydraulic barrier method (assembly of pumped wells) since 1986. The average cyanide concentrations in the outflow exceeded 35 mg per litre. Contamination had to be eliminated before the discharge into the sewer system. The radiation approach ''in situ'' i.e. decomposition of cyanides by barrier, was applied and is still being used today. The cyanide concentration was lowered more than one order of magnitude. This process was approved by the Czechoslovak radiation security authorities and further applications of ''in situ'' regeneration of underground water contamination is anticipated. (author)

  17. Cyanide Degradation by Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes Strain W_2 Isolated from Mining Effluent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belinda Tiong; Zaratulnur Mohd Bahari; Nor Sahslin Irwan Shah Lee; Jafariah Jaafar; Zaharah Ibrahim; Shafinaz Shahir

    2015-01-01

    Cyanide is highly toxic to the living organisms as it inhibits respiration system in the cell mitochondria. Cyanide is commonly used in gold extraction process and its discharge into the environment not only causes pollution but it also brings harm to the surrounding population. Chemical treatment is expensive and the use of hazardous compound can exacerbate the problem. Biodegradation offers cheap and safe alternative as it overcomes the problems faced by chemical treatment. In this study, indigenous bacteria from mining wastewater were isolated. Cyanide degradation was done via shake flask method. A bacterium, designated W2 was found able to grow in the mining wastewater. 16S rRNA analysis identified the strain as Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes which could tolerate up to 39 mg/L cyanide concentration and growth was depleted at 52 mg/L. 60 % cyanide degradation was achieved in wastewater containing medium. End-product analysis from high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) detected formamide implicating the role of cyanide hydratase in cyanide degradation. It can be concluded that P. pseudoalcaligenes is capable of biodegrading cyanide and its potential in wastewater treatment containing cyanide is feasible. (author)

  18. Gene expression in rat striatum following carbon monoxide poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuichi Hara

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO poisoning causes brain damage, which is attenuated by treatment with hydrogen [1,2], a scavenger selective to hydroxyl radical (·≡OH [3]. This suggests a role of ·≡OH in brain damage due to CO poisoning. Studies have shown strong enhancement of ·≡OH production in rat striatum by severe CO poisoning with a blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb level >70% due to 3000 ppm CO, but not less severe CO poisoning with a blood COHb level at approximately 50% due to 1000 ppm CO [4]. Interestingly, 5% O2 causes hypoxia comparable with that by 3000 ppm CO and produces much less •OH than 3000 ppm CO does [4]. In addition, cAMP production in parallel with ·≡OH production [5] might contribute to ·≡OH production [6]. It is likely that mechanisms other than hypoxia contribute to brain damage due to CO poisoning [7]. To search for the mechanisms, we examined the effects of 1000 ppm CO, 3000 ppm CO and 5% O2 on gene expression in rat striatum. All array data have been deposited in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO database under accession number GSE94780.

  19. A multi-pumping flow-based procedure with improved sensitivity for the spectrophotometric determination of acid-dissociable cyanide in natural waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizzarin, Rejane M; Rocha, Fábio R P

    2013-01-03

    An analytical procedure with improved sensitivity was developed for cyanide determination in natural waters, exploiting the reaction with the complex of Cu(I) with 2,2'-biquinoline 4,4'-dicarboxylic acid (BCA). The flow system was based on the multi-pumping approach and long pathlength spectrophotometry with a flow cell based on a Teflon AF 2400(®) liquid core waveguide was exploited to increase sensitivity. A linear response was achieved from 5 to 200μg L(-1), with coefficient of variation of 1.5% (n=10). The detection limit and the sampling rate were 2μg L(-1) (99.7% confidence level), and 22h(-1), respectively. Per determination, 48ng of Cu(II), 5μg of ascorbic acid and 0.9μg of BCA were consumed. As high as 100mg L(-1) thiocyanate, nitrite or sulfite did not affect cyanide determination. Sulfide did not interfere at concentrations lower than 40 and 200μg L(-1) before or after sample pretreatment with hydrogen peroxide. The results for natural waters samples agreed with those obtained by a fluorimetric flow-based procedure at the 95% confidence level. The proposed procedure is then a reliable, fast and environmentally friendly alternative for cyanide determination in natural waters. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Selective carbon monoxide oxidation over Ag-based composite oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guldur, C. [Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey). Chemical Engineering Department; Balikci, F. [Gazi University, Ankara (Turkey). Institute of Science and Technology, Environmental Science Department

    2002-02-01

    We report our results of the synthesis of 1 : 1 molar ratio of the silver cobalt and silver manganese composite oxide catalysts to remove carbon monoxide from hydrogen-rich fuels by the catalytic oxidation reaction. Catalysts were synthesized by the co-precipitation method. XRD, BET, TGA, catalytic activity and catalyst deactivation studies were used to identify active catalysts. Both CO oxidation and selective CO oxidation were carried out in a microreactor using a reaction gas mixture of 1 vol% CO in air and another gas mixture was prepared by mixing 1 vol% CO, 2 vol% O{sub 2}, 84 vol% H{sub 2}, the balance being He. 15 vol% CO{sub 2} was added to the reactant gas mixture in order to determine the effect of CO{sub 2}, reaction gases were passed through the humidifier to determine the effect of the water vapor on the oxidation reaction. It was demonstrated that metal oxide base was decomposed to the metallic phase and surface areas of the catalysts were decreased when the calcination temperature increased from 200{sup o}C to 500{sup o}C. Ag/Co composite oxide catalyst calcined at 200{sup o}C gave good activity at low temperatures and 90% of CO conversion at 180{sup o}C was obtained for the selective CO oxidation reaction. The addition of the impurities (CO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}O) decreased the activity of catalyst for selective CO oxidation in order to get highly rich hydrogen fuels. (author)

  1. Total cyanide mass measurement with micro-ion selective electrode for determination of specific activity of carbon-11 cyanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Colleen; Alexoff, David L; Kim, Dohyun; Hoque, Ruma; Schueller, Michael J; Fowler, Joanna S; Qu, Wenchao

    2015-08-01

    In this research, we aim to directly measure the specific activity (SA) of the carbon-11 cyanide ([(11)C]CN¯) produced by our in-house built automated [(11)C]HCN production system and to identify the major sources of (12)C-cyanide ((12)CN¯). The [(11)C]CN¯ is produced from [(11)C]CO2, which is generated by the (14)N(p,α)(11)C nuclear reaction using a cyclotron. Direct measurement of cyanide concentrations was accomplished using a relatively inexpensive, and easy to use ion selective electrode (ISE) which offered an appropriate range of sensitivity for detecting mass. Multiple components of the [(11)C]HCN production system were isolated in order to determine their relative contributions to (12)CN¯ mass. It was determined that the system gases were responsible for approximately 30% of the mass, and that the molecular sieve/nickel furnace unit contributed approximately 70% of the mass. Beam on target (33µA for 1 and 10min) did not contribute significantly to the mass. Additionally, we compared the SA of our [(11)C]HCN precursor determined using the ISE to the SA of our current [(11)C]CN¯ derived radiotracers determined by HPLC to assure there was no significant difference between the two methods. These results are the first reported use of an ion selective electrode to determine the SA of no-carrier-added cyanide ion, and clearly show that it is a valuable, inexpensive and readily available tool suitable for this purpose. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The effects of fermentation and boiling on the level of hydrogen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of fermentation and boiling on the level of hydrogen cyanide in Mucuna pruriens (velvet bean) were investigated. Qualitative phytochemical analysis of Mucuna pruriens revealed the presence that tannins, saponins, cardiac glycosides and cyanogenic glycosides. Quantitative analysis revealed that raw Mucuna ...

  3. Determination of the Michaelis-Menten kinetics and the genes expression involved in phyto-degradation of cyanide and ferri-cyanide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Zhang; Zhang, Xue-Hong

    2016-07-01

    Hydroponic experiments were conducted with different species of plants (rice, maize, soybean and willow) exposed to ferri-cyanide to investigate the half-saturation constant (K M ) and the maximal metabolic capacity (v max ) involved in phyto-assimilation. Three varieties for each testing species were collected from different origins. Measured concentrations show that the uptake rates responded biphasically to ferri-cyanide treatments by showing increases linearly at low and almost constant at high concentrations from all treatments, indicating that phyto-assimilation of ferri-cyanide followed the Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Using non-linear regression, the highest v max was by rice, followed by willows. The lowest v max was found for soybean. All plants, except maize (DY26) and rice (XJ12), had a similar K M value, suggesting the same enzyme was active in phyto-assimilation of ferri-cyanide. Transcript level, by real-time quantitative PCR, of enzymes involved in degradation of cyanides showed that the analyzed genes were differently expressed during different cyanides exposure. The expression of CAS and ST genes responded positively to KCN exposure, suggesting that β-CAS and ST pathways were two possible pathways for cyanide detoxification in rice. The transcript level of NIT and ASPNASE genes also showed a remarkable up-regulation to KCN, implying the contribution to the pool of amino acid aspartate, which is an end product of CN metabolism. Up-regulation of GS genes suggests that acquisition of ammonium released from cyanide degradation may be an additional nitrogen source for plant nutrition. Results also revealed that the expressions of these genes, except for GS, were relatively constant during iron cyanide exposure, suggesting that they are likely metabolized by plants through a non-defined pathway rather than the β-CAS pathway.

  4. Characteristics of exogenous carbon monoxide deliveries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-jun Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO has long been considered an environmental pollutant and a poison. Exogenous exposure to amounts of CO beyond the physiologic level of the body can result in a protective or adaptive response. However, as a gasotransmitter, endogenous CO is important for multiple physiologic functions. To date, at least seven distinct methods of delivering CO have been utilized in animal and clinical studies. In this mini-review, we summarize the exogenous CO delivery methods and compare their advantages and disadvantages.

  5. Room temperature phosphorimetric determination of cyanide based on triplet state energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Argueelles, Maria Teresa; Costa-Fernandez, Jose M.; Pereiro, Rosario; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2003-01-01

    The determination of cyanide ions in water samples by room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) detection is described. The method is based on the measurement of the RTP emission of α-bromonaphthalene (BrN). The principle of the RTP cyanide determination involves the energy transfer (ET) from the BrN phosphor molecule insensitive to the presence of cyanide (acting as a donor) to a cyanide-sensitive dye (acceptor). The RTP emission spectrum of BrN overlaps significantly with the absorption spectrum of the complex formed between copper and Cadion 2B, giving rise to a non-radiative ET from the phosphor molecules to the metal complex. The sensing of cyanide ions is based on the displacement by cyanide of the copper ions from its complex with Cadion 2B (the free chelating molecule presents a low absorbance in the region of maximum emission of the BrN phosphor). An increase in the concentration of cyanide causes a decrease on the concentration of the Cadion 2B-copper complex (acceptor) with the subsequent decrease of the absorbance in the overlapping region with the RTP spectra, resulting in higher RTP emission signals measured. Both, RTP intensities and triplet lifetimes of the BrN increased with the increase of the cyanide concentration. The calibration graphs were linear up to a concentration of 500 mg l -1 cyanide and a precision of ±2 and ±0.5% for five replicates of 50 μg l -1 of cyanide has been obtained when measuring intensities and triplet lifetimes values, respectively. A detection limit of 3 μg l -1 of cyanide was achieved under optimal reaction conditions and pH 11. The use of phosphorescence measurements (low background noise signals) resulted in an important improvement on the sensitivity of the cyanide detection higher than eight times as compared to the molecular absorption spectrophotometric method for cyanide detection based on the use of Cadion 2B-copper as cyanide-indicator. Interference studies were performed with cations and anions present in

  6. Sulfanegen sodium treatment in a rabbit model of sub-lethal cyanide toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, Matthew; Kim, Jae G.; Lee, Jangwoen; Mahon, Sari B.; Lemor, Daniel; Ahdout, Rebecca; Boss, Gerry R.; Blackledge, William; Jann, Lauren; Nagasawa, Herbert T.; Patterson, Steven E.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the ability of intramuscular and intravenous sulfanegen sodium treatment to reverse cyanide effects in a rabbit model as a potential treatment for mass casualty resulting from cyanide exposure. Cyanide poisoning is a serious chemical threat from accidental or intentional exposures. Current cyanide exposure treatments, including direct binding agents, methemoglobin donors, and sulfur donors, have several limitations. Non-rhodanese mediated sulfur transferase pathways, including 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MPST) catalyze the transfer of sulfur from 3-MP to cyanide, forming pyruvate and less toxic thiocyanate. We developed a water-soluble 3-MP prodrug, 3-mercaptopyruvatedithiane (sulfanegen sodium), with the potential to provide a continuous supply of substrate for CN detoxification. In addition to developing a mass casualty cyanide reversal agent, methods are needed to rapidly and reliably diagnose and monitor cyanide poisoning and reversal. We use non-invasive technology, diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and continuous wave near infrared spectroscopy (CWNIRS) to monitor physiologic changes associated with cyanide exposure and reversal. A total of 35 animals were studied. Sulfanegen sodium was shown to reverse the effects of cyanide exposure on oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin rapidly, significantly faster than control animals when administered by intravenous or intramuscular routes. RBC cyanide levels also returned to normal faster following both intramuscular and intravenous sulfanegen sodium treatment than controls. These studies demonstrate the clinical potential for the novel approach of supplying substrate for non-rhodanese mediated sulfur transferase pathways for cyanide detoxification. DOS and CWNIRS demonstrated their usefulness in optimizing the dose of sulfanegen sodium treatment.

  7. Degradation of soil cyanide by single and mixed cultures of Pseudomonas stutzeri and Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwokoro, Ogbonnaya; Dibua, Marie Esther Uju

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study whether certain bacteria could be used for cyanide degradation in soil. The bacteria Pseudomonas stutzeri and Bacillus subtilis were selected based on their good growth in a minimal medium containing 0.8 mg mL-1 potassium cyanide (KCN). In this study we tested their ability to reduce cyanide levels in a medium containing 1.5 mg mL-1 of KCN. Although both microorganisms reduced cyanide levels, Pseudomonas stutzeri was the more effective test organism. Later on, the selected cultures were grown, diluted and their various cell concentrations were used individually and in combination to test their ability of cyanide degradation in soil samples collected around a cassava processing mill. Bacillus subtilis caused degradation of soil cyanide from 0.218 mg g-1 soil immediately with an inoculum concentration of 0.1 (OD600nm) to 0.072 mg g-1 soil after 10 days with an inoculum concentration of 0.6 (OD600nm) implying a 66.9 % reduction. Pseudomonas stutzeri cell concentration of 0.1 (OD600nm) decreased soil cyanide from 0.218 mg g-1 soil initially to 0.061 mg g-1 soil after 10 days with an inoculum concentration of 0.6 (OD600nm) (72 % reduction). The mixed culture of the two bacteria produced the best degradation of soil cyanide from 0.218 mg g-1 soil sample with a combined inoculum concentration of 0.1 (OD600nm) initially to 0.025 mg g-1 soil with a combined inoculum concentration of 0.6 (OD600nm) after 10 days incubation resulting in an 88.5 % degradation of soil cyanide. The analysed bacteria displayed high cyanide degradation potential and may be useful for efficient decontamination of cyanide contaminated sites.

  8. Liquefaction of lignohemicellulosic waste by processing with carbon monoxide and water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Saied, H

    1977-09-01

    The liquefaction of lignohemicellulosic waste by processing with carbon monoxide and water for 10 minutes at 250/sup 0/-440/sup 0/C and 40 to 70 atm initial pressure in a rocking autoclave produced benzene-soluble heavy oil in yields up to 80%. High conversion and yields were favored by high thermal stress, short reaction times, and sufficient hydrogen to prevent radical recombination in the critical liquefaction stages. The addition of sodium or calcium hydroxide, sodium carbonate, iron oxide, etc. in small amounts gave good oil yields under less severe conditions. Lignins from rice straw, bagasse, and other grasses gave higher yields than the woody lignin obtained from cotton stalks. In products obtained by liquefying black liquor lignohemicellulose from an Eyptian rice straw pulping plant, the hydrogen-carbon atomic ratio was 1.0 to 1.3:1.

  9. Hydrogen enriched gas production in a multi-stage downdraft gasification process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, A.; Jarungthammachote, S.

    2009-01-01

    To achieve hydrogen enriched and low-tar producer gas, multi-stage air-blown and air-steam gasification were studied in this research. Results showed that the tar content from multi-stage air-blown and air-steam gasification was lower compared to the average value of that from downdraft gasification. It was also seen that an air-steam gasification process could potentially increase the hydrogen concentration in the producer gas in the expense of carbon monoxide; however, the summation of hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the producer gas was increased. (author)

  10. Hydrogenating gaseous hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolardot, P L.F.

    1930-08-06

    Gaseous hydrocarbons obtained by the destructive distillation of carbonaceous materials are simultaneously desulfurized and hydrogenated by passing them at 350 to 500/sup 0/C, mixed with carbon monoxide and water vapor over lime mixed with metallic oxides present in sufficient amount to absorb the carbon dioxide as it is formed. Oxides of iron, copper, silver, cobalt, and metals of the rare earths may be used and are mixed with the lime to form a filling material of small pieces filling the reaction vessel which may have walls metallized with copper and zinc dust. The products are condensed and fixed with absorbents, e.g. oils, activated carbon, silica gels. The metallic masses may be regenerated by a hot air stream and by heating in inert gases.

  11. [Carbon monoxide poisoning by a heating system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Eric; Gehl, Axel; Friedrich, Peter; Kappus, Stefan; Petter, Franz; Maurer, Klaus; Püschel, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    A case of accidental carbon monoxide poisoning in several occupants of two neighboring residential buildings in Hamburg-Harburg (Germany) caused by a defective gas central heating system is described. Because of leaks in one of the residential buildings and the directly adjacent wall of the neighboring house, the gas could spread and accumulated in both residential buildings, which resulted in a highly dangerous situation. Exposure to the toxic gas caused mild to severe intoxication in 15 persons. Three victims died still at the site of the accident. Measures to protect the occupants were taken only with a great delay. As symptoms were unspecific, it was not realized that the various alarms given by persons involved in the accident were related to the same cause. In order to take appropriate measures in time it is indispensible to recognize, assess and check potential risks, which can be done by using carbon monoxide warning devices and performing immediate COHb measurements with special pulse oximeters on site. Moreover, the COHb content in the blood should be routinely determined in all patients admitted to an emergency department with unspecific symptoms.

  12. Cardiological aspects of carbon monoxide poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchewka, Jakub; Gawlik, Iwona; Dębski, Grzegorz; Popiołek, Lech; Marchewka, Wojciech; Hydzik, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess cardiological manifestations of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. Background/introduction: Carbon monoxide intoxication is one of the most important toxicological causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Early clinical manifestation of CO poisoning is cardiotoxicity. We enrolled 75 patients (34 males and 41 females, mean age 37.6 ± 17.7 y/o) hospitalized due to CO poisoning. Laboratory tests including troponin I, blood pressure measurements, HR and electrocardiograms (ECG) were collected. Pach's scale scoring and grading system was used to establish severity of poisoning. Grade of poisoning is positively correlated with troponin I levels and systolic blood pressure. Moreover, troponin levels are significantly correlated with exposition time, lactates and are higher in tachycardiac, hypertensive and positive ECG subpopulations. COHb levels are indicative of exposure but do not correlate with grade of poisoning. The main cause of CO poisoning were bathroom heaters - 83%, only 11% of examined intoxicated population were equipped with CO detectors. Complex cardiological screening covering troponin levels, ECG, blood pressure and heart rate measurements as well as complete blood count with particular attention to platelet parameters should be performed in each case where CO intoxication is suspected. More emphasis on education on CO poisoning is needed.

  13. 40 CFR 86.1322-84 - Carbon monoxide analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... be used. (2) Zero the carbon monoxide analyzer with either zero-grade air or zero-grade nitrogen. (3... columns is one form of corrective action which may be taken.) (b) Initial and periodic calibration. Prior... calibrated. (1) Adjust the analyzer to optimize performance. (2) Zero the carbon monoxide analyzer with...

  14. EVALUATING HYDROGEN PRODUCTION IN BIOGAS REFORMING IN A MEMBRANE REACTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. S. A. Silva

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Syngas and hydrogen production by methane reforming of a biogas (CH4/CO2 = 2.85 using carbon dioxide was evaluated in a fixed bed reactor with a Pd-Ag membrane in the presence of a nickel catalyst (Ni 3.31% weight/γ-Al2O3 at 773 K, 823 K, and 873 K and 1.01×105 Pa. Operation with hydrogen permeation at 873 K increased the methane conversion to approximately 83% and doubled the hydrogen yield relative to operation without hydrogen permeation. A mathematical model was formulated to predict the evolution of the effluent concentrations. Predictions based on the model showed similar evolutions for yields of hydrogen and carbon monoxide at temperatures below 823 K for operations with and without the hydrogen permeation. The hydrogen yield reached approximately 21% at 823 K and 47% at 873 K under hydrogen permeation conditions.

  15. Effect of cyanide on the distribution of 60Co in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankenberg, L.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of cyanide on the distribution of cobalt was studied by injecting mice i.p. with potassium cyanide 61.4 μmoles/kg, followed 1 min later by 60 CoCl 2 38.5 μmoles/kg i.v. Blood and tissue concentrations of 60 Co were then determined up to 48 h after injection and the results were compared with those obtained from control animals receiving 60 CoCl 2 only. In animals treated with cobalt plus cyanide, considerably higher concentrations of 60 Co were found in the spleen in comparison with controls during the whole observation period, whereas the 60 Co concentration in the pancreas was lower than that of controls during the first 4 h. In other tissues no significant differences between cyanide-treated animals and controls were noticed. Determination of complex-bound cyanide demonstrated that the increased uptake of cobalt in the spleen observed in cyanide-treated animals was due to cobalt-cyanide complex(es). Cyanide did not affect the plasma protein binding of cobalt. (orig.)

  16. The determination of cyanide in hydrometallurgical process solutions and effluents by ion chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohlandt, C.

    1984-01-01

    Three methods are described for the determination of cyanide species in hydrometallurgical process solutions and in effluents. The determination of excess cyanide in the presence of weak metal cyanide complexes was achieved by the use of a flow-injection system with 0,05mM sodium chloride as the carrier stream. The procedure was found to be fast, precise (S(sub r)0,0142), and reasonably accurate. Free cyanide and cyanide derived from weak metal cyanide complexes were determined by ion chromatography. This method is free from interferences and precise (s(sub r)0,0112), and has a limit of determination of 10μg0l. The 'total' cyanide content of solutions was determined by ion chromatography after the strong metal cyanide complexes had been dissociated in hypophosphorous acid by ultraviolet irradiation. The procedure (of 10 minutes duration) is faster than conventional distillation methods, and is accurate and precise (S(sub r)0,027)

  17. Selective determination of cyanide complexes of copper, zinc and cadmium in electrolytes by spectrophotometric titration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, V.V.; Korchagina, O.A.; Samorukova, O.L.

    1986-01-01

    Selective, sensitive and rapid method for determining Cd, Zn, Cu and their mixtures in cyanide electrolytes of galvanic bathes has been developed. Analysis is performed by means of indicator spectrophotometric titration with barium and strontium salts of cadmium cyanide complexes in organic-aqueous solvents

  18. Hydrocyanation of sulfonylimines using potassium hexacyanoferrate(II) as an eco-friendly cyanide source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zheng; Li, Rongzhi; Zheng, Huanhuan; Wen, Fei; Li, Hongbo; Yin, Junjun; Yang, Jingya

    2013-01-01

    An efficient and eco-friendly method for hydrocyanation of sulfonylimines via one-pot two-step procedure using potassium hexacyanoferrate)II) as cyanide source, benzoyl chloride as a promoter, and potassium carbonate as a base is described. This protocol has the features of using nontoxic, nonvolatile and inexpensive cyanide source, high yield, and simple work-up procedure. (author)

  19. Analysis of Cyanide in Blood by Headspace-Isotope-Dilution-GC-MS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løbger, Lise Lotte; Petersen, Henning Willads; Andersen, Jens Enevold Thaulov

    2008-01-01

    An uncomplicated, rapid, automated procedure for the analysis of low cyanide concentrations in whole blood is reported. The analysis was performed by headspace gas chromatography and mass spectrometry in the (1H12C14N) and m/z 29 (1H13C15N). Carryover from cyanide adsorption onto the surface...

  20. Hydrocyanation of sulfonylimines using potassium hexacyanoferrate(II) as an eco-friendly cyanide source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Zheng; Li, Rongzhi; Zheng, Huanhuan; Wen, Fei; Li, Hongbo; Yin, Junjun; Yang, Jingya, E-mail: lizheng@nwnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Eco-Environment-Related Polymer Materials for Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Gansu (China)

    2013-11-15

    An efficient and eco-friendly method for hydrocyanation of sulfonylimines via one-pot two-step procedure using potassium hexacyanoferrate)II) as cyanide source, benzoyl chloride as a promoter, and potassium carbonate as a base is described. This protocol has the features of using nontoxic, nonvolatile and inexpensive cyanide source, high yield, and simple work-up procedure. (author)

  1. High proton conductivity in cyanide-bridged metal-organic frameworks: understanding the role of water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Y.; Broersen, R.; Hageman, W.; Yan, N.; Mittelmeijer-Hazeleger, M.; Rothenberg, G.; Tanase, S.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate and discuss the proton conductivity properties of the cyanide-bridged metal–organic framework (MOF) [Nd(mpca)2Nd(H2O)6Mo(CN)8]·nH2O (where mpca is 5-methyl-2-pyrazinecarboxylate). This MOF is one of an exciting class of cyanide-bridged materials that can combine porosity with

  2. Predicting Cyanide Consumption in Gold Leaching: A Kinetic and Thermodynamic Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaser Kianinia

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The consumption of cyanide during processing operations is a major economic cost in the extraction of gold from its ores, while the discharge of cyanide wastes may result in significant environmental pollution. Many factors influence the levels of consumption and discharge of cyanide, including ore mineralogy and lixiviant solution chemistry. This paper proposes a robust methodology to estimate leaching cyanide consumption due to oxidation and reactions with gold, chalcopyrite and pyrite minerals forming various cyanide complexes, cyanate, thiocyanate and hydroxide precipitates of copper and iron. The method involves concurrent modelling of both the oxidation and leaching kinetics of minerals and the chemical speciation of the lixiviant solutions. The model was calibrated by conducting cyanide leaching experiments on pyrite, chalcopyrite, pyrite + chalcopyrite, pyrite + chalcopyrite + gold and pyrite + chalcopyrite + gold + quartz systems and determining the total Cu, Fe, Au and CN− concentrations in solution. We show that this model can successfully estimate the formation of cyanide complexes and, hence, the consumption of cyanide.

  3. Cyanide and the human brain: perspectives from a model of food (cassava) poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshala-Katumbay, Desire D; Ngombe, Nadege N; Okitundu, Daniel; David, Larry; Westaway, Shawn K; Boivin, Michael J; Mumba, Ngoyi D; Banea, Jean-Pierre

    2016-08-01

    Threats by fundamentalist leaders to use chemical weapons have resulted in renewed interest in cyanide toxicity. Relevant insights may be gained from studies on cyanide mass intoxication in populations relying on cyanogenic cassava as the main source of food. In these populations, sublethal concentrations (up to 80 μmol/l) of cyanide in the blood are commonplace and lead to signs of acute toxicity. Long-term toxicity signs include a distinct and irreversible spastic paralysis, known as konzo, and cognition deficits, mainly in sequential processing (visual-spatial analysis) domains. Toxic culprits include cyanide (mitochondrial toxicant), thiocyanate (AMPA-receptor chaotropic cyanide metabolite), cyanate (protein-carbamoylating cyanide metabolite), and 2-iminothiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid (seizure inducer). Factors of susceptibility include younger age, female gender, protein-deficient diet, and, possibly, the gut functional metagenome. The existence of uniquely exposed and neurologically affected populations offers invaluable research opportunities to develop a comprehensive understanding of cyanide toxicity and test or validate point-of-care diagnostic tools and treatment options to be included in preparedness kits in response to cyanide-related threats. © 2016 New York Academy of Sciences.

  4. Fluorescence intensity and lifetime-based cyanide sensitive probes for physiological safeguard

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badugu, Ramachandram; Lakowicz, Joseph R.; Geddes, Chris D.

    2004-01-01

    We characterize six new fluorescent probes that show both intensity and lifetime changes in the presence of free uncomplexed aqueous cyanide, allowing for fluorescence based cyanide sensing up to physiological safeguard levels, i.e. 2 to the anionic R-B - (CN) 3 form, a new cyanide binding mechanism which we have recently reported. The presence of an electron deficient quaternary heterocyclic nitrogen nucleus, and the electron rich cyanide bound form, provides for the intensity changes observed. We have determined the disassociation constants of the probes to be in the range ∼15-84 μM 3 . In addition we have synthesized control compounds which do not contain the boronic acid moiety, allowing for a rationale of the cyanide responses between the probe isomers to be made. The lifetime of the cyanide bound probes are significantly shorter than the free R-B(OH) 2 probe forms, providing for the opportunity of lifetime based cyanide sensing up to physiologically lethal levels. Finally, while fluorescent probes containing the boronic acid moiety have earned a well-deserved reputation for monosaccharide sensing, we show that strong bases such as CN - and OH - preferentially bind as compared to glucose, enabling the potential use of these probes for cyanide safeguard and determination in physiological fluids, especially given that physiologies do not experience any notable changes in pH

  5. Hydroxocobalamin as a Cyanide Antidote: Empirical use , Safety, Efficacy, and Considerations for Stockpiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, A. H.

    2007-01-01

    Cyanide is a well-known toxic terrorism agent and is a major cause of mortality and morbidity in smoke inhalation victims. Terrorist attacks could start enclosed-space fires with cyanide-poisoned victims, even if cyanide itself was not utilized. Cyanide poisoning cannot be emergent confirmed by laboratory analysis and treatment with safe and efficacious antidotes must be administered empirically. Hydroxocobalamin has been recently approved by the US FDA and is a safe and efficacious antidote. Its efficacy is comparable to that of other, more toxic, cyanide antidotes. Its mechanism of action involves both direct cyanide chelation (forming non-toxic cyanocobalamin which is excreted in the urine) and nitric oxide scavenging. Adverse effects are usually limited to transient dark red-brown discoloration of urine, skin, sclera, and mucous membranes. Antidotal doses have not caused allergic reactions in cyanide-poisoned patients and only minor and easily-treated allergic reactions occurred in 2 of 136 normal volunteers. Transient, asymptomatic hypertension and reflex bradycardia have occurred in some normal volunteers, but not in seriously ill smoke inhalation victims not having significant cyanide poisoning. Hydroxocobalamin is a safe and efficacious antidote and can be empirically administered in pre-hospital or emergency department settings. It is therefore suitable for inclusion in national or multinational medication stockpiles and is already included in some national programs in the European Union.(author)

  6. Investigation of Cyanide Removal from Aqueous Solution Using Precipitation Process (FeCl3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Jonidi Jafari

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Cyanide is a toxic pollutant that is can be discharged from different industries such as iron and steel industry, coal mining and metal plating. Presence of this toxin in water and wastewater is a serious hazard and lead to undesirable effects on both the environment and human. Thus, its concentration control is essential for human health. The aim of this study was investigation of Cyanide Removal from aqueous solution using precipitation process (FeCl3. Material and Methods: This study is an experimental study in lab scale that was carried out in a batch system by jartest. Variations of this study including pH, FeCl3 concentration, reaction time and desired concentration of cyanide were investigated. Data were analyzed using Excel (version 2007 software. Results: The results of this research were showed that Cyanide with initial concentration of 10 mg/l in precipitation process was removed by 40% (conditions pH=90, FeCl3=0.4 g/l and the time 60 minutes. Also, the precipitation process efficiency to cyanide removal decreased of 40 to 23%, by increasing of the initial cyanide concentration of 10 to 15 mg/l. Conclusion: Precipitation process can be considered as a suitable alternative for recovery of cyanide to be re-used. Although, this process has limitations for treat total cyanide to environmental standards level. So, it is better be used in combination with other processes of these contaminants removal.

  7. The formation of nitrogeneous compounds in the γ-radiolyses of liquid nitrogen solutions of hydrogen, methane, and ethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horigome, Keiichi; Hirokami, Shun-ichi; Sato, Shin

    1978-01-01

    The γ-radiolyses of liquid nitrogen solutions of hydrogen, methane, and ethane have been reinvestigated. A complete survey of nitrogen-containing products has been attempted. The nitrogeneous compounds observed were ammonia (0.7) and hydrogen azide (0.02) in the case of hydrogen, ammonia (0.3), hydrogen cyanide (0.1), methyl azide (0.01), and a polymer in the case of methane, and ammonia (0.3), hydrogen cyanide (0.05), acetonitrile (0.04), ethyl azide (0.01), and a polymer in the case of ethane. The values in parentheses are the G-values obtained at optimum conditions. The hydrolysis of the polymer obtained with methane gave formaldehyde in amounts which correspond to the fact that the G-value of the nitrogen atoms which were converted into the polymer is about 1.0. In order to explain these results, possible reaction mechanisms are discussed. (auth.)

  8. Search of medical literature for indoor carbon monoxide exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brennan, T.; Ivanovich, M.

    1995-12-01

    This report documents a literature search on carbon monoxide. The search was limited to the medical and toxicological databases at the National Library of Medicine (MEDLARS). The databases searched were Medline, Toxline and TOXNET. Searches were performed using a variety of strategies. Combinations of the following keywords were used: carbon, monoxide, accidental, residential, occult, diagnosis, misdiagnosis, heating, furnace, and indoor. The literature was searched from 1966 to the present. Over 1000 references were identified and summarized using the following abbreviations: The major findings of the search are: (1) Acute and subacute carbon monoxide exposures result in a large number of symptoms affecting the brain, kidneys, respiratory system, retina, and motor functions. (2) Acute and subacute carbon monoxide (CO) poisonings have been misdiagnosed on many occasions. (3) Very few systematic investigations have been made into the frequency and consequences of carbon monoxide poisonings.

  9. Hydrogen sulfide prodrugs—a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueqin Zheng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S is recognized as one of three gasotransmitters together with nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO. As a signaling molecule, H2S plays an important role in physiology and shows great potential in pharmaceutical applications. Along this line, there is a need for the development of H2S prodrugs for various reasons. In this review, we summarize different H2S prodrugs, their chemical properties, and some of their potential therapeutic applications.

  10. Bepaling van vrij- en totaal-cyanide in grond en water met een doorstroomanalysesysteem: evaluatie van ontwerp NEN-6655

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staden JJ van; Moayeri-Mirck MWG; Cleven RFMJ; Wiel HJ van de; LAC; LBA

    1994-01-01

    De ontwerp-methode voor de fotometrische bepaling van het totale gehalte aan cyanide (totaal-cyanide) en het gehalte aan vrij-cyanide in water en bodem met een doorstroomanalysesysteem (Ontwerp NEN 6655) is onderzocht en zonodig gewijzigd. De ontwerp-methode is gemodificeerd om de

  11. Differential sensing of fluoride and cyanide ions by using Dicyano substituted benzimidazole probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Akul Sen; Garg, Aparna; Paul, Kamaldeep; Luxami, Vijay, E-mail: vluxami@thapar.edu

    2016-05-15

    Excited State Intramolecular Proton Transfer based benzimidazole derivative having push–pull effect has been synthesized and investigated their photophysical behavior towards various anions. The probe 2 has been used for selective estimation of F{sup −} and CN{sup −} anions and signaled the binding event through formation of new absorption band at 465 nm. The probe 2 opens different emission channels at 425 nm in the presence of CN{sup −} ions and two new emission bands at 435 nm and 365 nm in case of F{sup −} ions. The probe 2 behaved as chemodosimeter for CN{sup −} ions which have been proved by {sup 1}H NMR and whereas fluoride caused hydrogen bonding interactions with probe 2 and restricted the ESIPT emission at 505 nm from OH to nitrogen of benzimidazole moiety to release its enol emission. The differential behavior of F{sup −} ions and CN{sup −} have been confirmed through DFT calculations. - Graphical abstract: The probe 2 binds chemodosimetrically with cyanide ions and act as chemosensor for fluoride ion.

  12. Differential sensing of fluoride and cyanide ions by using Dicyano substituted benzimidazole probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Akul Sen; Garg, Aparna; Paul, Kamaldeep; Luxami, Vijay

    2016-01-01

    Excited State Intramolecular Proton Transfer based benzimidazole derivative having push–pull effect has been synthesized and investigated their photophysical behavior towards various anions. The probe 2 has been used for selective estimation of F − and CN − anions and signaled the binding event through formation of new absorption band at 465 nm. The probe 2 opens different emission channels at 425 nm in the presence of CN − ions and two new emission bands at 435 nm and 365 nm in case of F − ions. The probe 2 behaved as chemodosimeter for CN − ions which have been proved by 1 H NMR and whereas fluoride caused hydrogen bonding interactions with probe 2 and restricted the ESIPT emission at 505 nm from OH to nitrogen of benzimidazole moiety to release its enol emission. The differential behavior of F − ions and CN − have been confirmed through DFT calculations. - Graphical abstract: The probe 2 binds chemodosimetrically with cyanide ions and act as chemosensor for fluoride ion.

  13. Spectroscopic detection and mapping of vinyl cyanide on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordiner, Martin; Yukiko Palmer, Maureen; Lai, James; Nixon, Conor A.; Teanby, Nicholas; Charnley, Steven B.; Vuitton, Veronique; Kisiel, Zbigniew; Irwin, Patrick; Molter, Ned; Mumma, Michael J.

    2017-10-01

    The first spectroscopic detection of vinyl cyanide (otherwise known as acrylonitrile; C2H3CN) on Titan was obtained by Palmer et al. (2017), based on three rotational emission lines observed with ALMA at millimeter wavelengths (in receiver band 6). The astrobiological significance of this detection was highlighted due to the theorized ability of C2H3CN molecules to combine into cell membrane-like structures under the cold conditions found in Titan's hydrocarbon lakes. Here we report the detection of three additional C2H3CN transitions at higher frequencies (from ALMA band 7 flux calibration data). We present the first emission maps for this gas on Titan, and compare the molecular distribution with that of other nitriles observed with ALMA including HC3N, CH3CN, C2H5CN and HNC. The molecular abundance patterns are interpreted based on our understanding of Titan's high-altitude photochemistry and time-variable global circulation. Similar to the short-lived HC3N molecule, vinyl cyanide is found to be most abundant in the vicinity of the southern (winter) pole, whereas the longer-lived CH3CN is more concentrated in the north. The vertical abundance profile of C2H3CN (from radiative transfer modeling), as well as its latitudinal distribution, are consistent with a short photochemical lifetime for this species. Complementary results from our more recent (2017) nitrile mapping studies at higher spatial resolution will also be discussed.REFERENCES:Palmer, M. Y., Cordiner, M. A., Nixon, C. A. et al. "ALMA detection and astrobiological potential of vinyl cyanide on Titan", Sci. Adv. 2017, 3, e1700022

  14. TiO2 Photocatalyzed Oxidation of Free and Complex Metallic Cyanides.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valladares, J. E.; Esteghamatdarsthad, B.; Renteria, J.

    2006-07-01

    The TiO2 photo catalyzed oxidation of free cyanide and transition metal cyanide complexes often found in industrial mining wastes were studied. The photoreactor system used was a UV illuminated and stirred tank with suspended particles of TiO2. After to determine the optimization parameters such as light intensity, concentration of complex and free cyanides, in ideal conditions, the effect of the presence of different type of anions was also studied. The model substances chosen were potassium cyanide and cyanides complexes of Iron, Cobalt and Copper in a strong alkaline solution (pH = 11.0 - 12.0). The experimental results indicate that in the case of the hexaferricyanide complex Fe(CN)6 3, the reaction occur in two steps. The first step is the breakdown of the metal-cyanide bond (photo-dissociation) forming free cyanide (CN-) and Fe3+ ions. The second step is the photo-oxidation of the free cyanides formed before. The ions Fe3+ and OH- present in the alkaline solution, precipitate as iron hydroxide Fe(OH)3. During the photo-dissociation step of the iron complex, free CN- ions produced reaches a maximum concentration before it is eliminated by photo-oxidation. The free cyanide produced from the hexaferricyanide complex disappears rapidly at a velocity of 64.6 + - 5.0 ?M/min. This rate of photo-oxidation is comparable with the experiments using just alkaline solutions of potassium cyanide ('free cyanides'). In contrast, in alkaline solutions of cyanide complexes of Cu and Co the rate of photo-oxidation was substantially reduced (6.17+ - 0.80 ?M/min and 0.04 + - 0.010 ?M/min, respectively) and do not show any initial increase of free cyanides in the suspension. The slower rate of photo-oxidation suggests the formation of very stable hydroxyl-cyanide polymeric metallic complexes in the reaction mix. The photo-oxidation pathway of the nitrogen oxide products was also investigated and found that the final product consists mainly of nitrate ions. (Author)

  15. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  16. Behaviour of Au(I,III) cyanides on anion exchangers in the presence of Pd compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knothe, M.

    1985-01-01

    The behaviour of low concentrations of [Au(I)(CN) 2 ] - and [Au(III)(CN) 4 ] - in the presence of [Pd(NH 3 ) 4 ](NO 3 ) 2 when adsorbed by anionites has been studied with the aid of labelled Au compounds. The adsorption rate of Au decreased with increasing ageing of the feed solution, which was due to the conversion of gold cyanides into species not capable of being adsorbed. This conversion proceeded at a considerably lower rate when the cyanides of gold had been fixed on the ionite. Au(I) cyanides were always converted at a higher rate than Au(III) cyanides. Thus, an effective separation of Au cyanides by anionites is possible only in the Au(III) system. (author)

  17. Silica nanoparticles doped with an iridium(III) complex for rapid and fluorometric detection of cyanide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mu, Juanjuan; Feng, Qingyue; Chen, Xiudan; Li, Jing; Wang, Huili; Li, Mei-Jin

    2015-01-01

    We describe a nanosensor for sensitive and selective detection of cyanide anions. The Ir(III) chlorine bridge complex [Ir(C N ) 2 -m-Cl] 2 (Irpq, where pq is C N = 2-phenyl quinoline) was doped into silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) with a typical size of about 30 nm. The intensity of the yellow emission of the doped SiNPs (under 410 nm exCitation) was strongly enhanced on addition of cyanide ions due to the replacement of chloride by cyanide. The method can detect cyanide ions in the 12.5 to 113 μM concentration range, and the limit of detection is 1.66 μM (at an S/N ratio of 3). The method is simple, sensitive and fast, and this makes it a candidate probe for the fast optical determination of cyanide. (author)

  18. Gold-copper ores processing-Case study: optimization of flotation residue cyanidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMullen, J.; Pelletier, P.; Breau, Y.; Pelletier, D.

    1999-01-01

    Typically, economic optimization of Gold-Copper ore processing presents challenges. Barrick's Bousquet II ore is a good example where many processing units such as gravity, flotation and cyanidation are required to efficiently recover the metals from the ore. Flowsheet criterion, operating strategy selections, cyanidation process optimization and its inter-dependence with flotation are discussed in detail. Real-time conservation integration of the cyanide control strategy has allowed a reduction of cyanide consumption of over 40% since 1994, while maintaining or improving metals recovery. A detailed analysis of the cyanidation control strategy such as key process sensor reliability and accuracy, process monitoring and fault detection is presented. This robust and efficient control strategy is a key building block that enhances the overall economic return of the process plant. (author)

  19. Role of algae and higher aquatic plants in decontamination of cyanide-containing waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timofeeva, S.S.; Kraeva, V.Z.; Men'shikova, O.A.

    1986-01-01

    Cyanide compounds and especially free cyanides stand out among components of wastewaters of hydrometallurgy, electroforming, and other such enterprises with respect to toxicity and danger for man and fauna of water bodies. In this article data on a study of the regularities of decontamination of cyanide-containing wastewaters by hydrophytes are given, the mechanisms of this process are examined, and the results of testing the hydrobotanical method of treating wastewaters of a goldrecovery plant are examined. The experiments were carried out with hydrophytes from the Angara River, Lake Baikal, and small lakes and ponds in the vicinity of Irkutsk and Tashkent. The series of experiments established that algae and higher aquatic plants are resistant to cyanides. A table shows the kinetic parameters of the removal of cyanide by algae and higher aquatic plants collected in Baikal. Of the multitude of species investigated for detoxifying ability, the most resistant were detected in the experimental basins and the most suitable were charophytes

  20. Cyanide levels found in infected cystic fibrosis sputum inhibit airway ciliary function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Chandrika; Shoemark, Amelia; Chan, Mario; Ollosson, Sarah; Dixon, Mellissa; Hogg, Claire; Alton, Eric W F W; Davies, Jane C; Williams, Huw D

    2014-11-01

    We have previously reported cyanide at concentrations of up to 150 μM in the sputum of cystic fibrosis patients infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa and a negative correlation with lung function. Our aim was to investigate possible mechanisms for this association, focusing on the effect of pathophysiologically relevant cyanide levels on human respiratory cell function. Ciliary beat frequency measurements were performed on nasal brushings and nasal air-liquid interface (ALI) cultures obtained from healthy volunteers and cystic fibrosis patients. Potassium cyanide decreased ciliary beat frequency in healthy nasal brushings (n = 6) after 60 min (150 μM: 47% fall, pcyanide as a key component inhibiting the ciliary beat frequency. If cyanide production similarly impairs mucocilliary clearance in vivo, it could explain the link with increased disease severity observed in cystic fibrosis patients with detectable cyanide in their airway. ©ERS 2014.

  1. Research on the compressive strength of basic magnesium salts and cyanide slag solidified body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yubo; Han, Peiwei; Ye, Shufeng; Wei, Lianqi; Zhang, Xiaomeng; Fu, Guoyan; Yu, Bo

    2018-02-01

    The solidification of cyanide slag by using basic magnesium salts could reduce pollution and protect the environment. Experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of age, mixing amount of cyanide slag, water cement ratio and molar ratio of MgO to MgSO4 on the compressive strength of basic magnesium salts and cyanide slag solidified body in the present paper. It was found that compressive strength of solidified body increased with the increase of age, and decreased with the increase of mixing amount of cyanide slag and water cement ratio. The molar ratio of MgO to MgSO4 should be controlled in the range from 9 to 11 when the mixing amount of cyanide slag was larger than 80 mass%.

  2. Nitrocobinamide, a New Cyanide Antidote That Can Be Administered by Intramuscular Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Adriano; Jiang, Jingjing; Fridman, Alla; Guo, Ling T.; Shelton, G. Diane; Liu, Ming-Tao; Green, Carol; Haushalter, Kristofer J.; Patel, Hemal H.; Lee, Jangwoen; Yoon, David; Burney, Tanya; Mukai, David; Mahon, Sari B.; Brenner, Matthew; Pilz, Renate B.; Boss, Gerry R.

    2015-01-01

    Currently available cyanide antidotes must be given by intravenous injection over 5–10 min, making them illsuited for treating many people in the field, as could occur in a major fire, an industrial accident, or a terrorist attack. These scenarios call for a drug that can be given quickly, e.g., by intramuscular injection. We have shown that aquohydroxocobinamide is a potent cyanide antidote in animal models of cyanide poisoning, but it is unstable in solution and poorly absorbed after intramuscular injection. Here we show that adding sodium nitrite to cobinamide yields a stable derivative (referred to as nitrocobinamide) that rescues cyanide-poisoned mice and rabbits when given by intramuscular injection. We also show that the efficacy of nitrocobinamide is markedly enhanced by coadministering sodium thiosulfate (reducing the total injected volume), and we calculate that ∼1.4 mL each of nitrocobinamide and sodium thiosulfate should rescue a human from a lethal cyanide exposure. PMID:25650735

  3. Ferrycyanide Safety Program cyanide speciation studies FY 1994 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, S.A.; Pool, K.H.; Bryan, S.L.; Sell, R.L.; Thomas, L.M.P.; Lerner, B.D.

    1994-09-01

    This report summarizes Pacific Northwest Laboratories FY 1994 progress toward developing and implementing methods to identify and quantify cyanide species in ferrocyanide tank waste. Currently, there are 24 high-level waste storage tanks at the the US DOE's Hanford Site that have been placed on a Ferrocyanide Tank Watch list because they contain an estimated 1000 g-moles or more of precipitated ferrocyanide. This amount of ferrocyanide is of concern because the consequences of a potential explosion may exceed those reported previously

  4. A rectangular Ni-Fe cluster with unusual cyanide bridges

    OpenAIRE

    Krüger, Christoph; Sato, Hiroki; Matsumoto, Takuto; Shiga, Takuya; Newton, Graham N.; Renz, Franz; Oshio, Hiroki

    2012-01-01

    An asymmetric polycyanide iron complex, K2[Fe III(L1)(CN)4](MeOH) (HL1 = 2,2′-(1H-pyrazole-3,5- diyl)bis-pyridine), was synthesized and its complexation compatibility with nickel ions was examined. Two kinds of enantiomeric nickel-iron squares were obtained in the presence of a chiral bidentate capping ligand. The compounds display unusual cyanide bridge geometry and have ferromagnetic interactions between nickel and iron ions. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  5. Preparation and Characterization of Double Metal Cyanide Complex Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weilin Guo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of double metal cyanide (DMC complex catalysts were prepared in two different methods by using ß-cyclodextrin, PEG-1000 and Tween-60 as an additional complex ligands respectively. It was showed that a mixture of crystalline and amorphous DMC was synthesized by using traditional method in which the additional complex ligand was added after the precipitation of DMC. Amorphous and dispersed DMC with higher activity could be obtained when the additional complex ligand was added in the reactant solution before reaction. The effect of additional complex ligand and preparation method on the crystalline state and catalytic property of DMC were also investigated.

  6. Cyanide removal by combined adsorption and biodegradation process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Roshan Dash, Ch. Balomajumder, A. Kumar

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of the effectiveness of simultaneous adsorption and biodegradation (SAB process over individual processes by using microbes Rhizopus oryzae and Stemphylium loti with granular activated carbon (GAC as adsorbent was carried out. The maximum removal efficiency of cyanide had been achieved by biodegradation alone was 83% by R. oryzae, while it was 90% by S. loti at initial pH of 5.6 and 7.2 respectively and at initial CN- concentration of 150 mg/L. In the combined process efficiency of R. oryzae closer to S. loti (95.3% and 98.6% respectively

  7. Cyanide poisoning of a Cooper’s hawk (Accipiter cooperii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franson, J. Christian

    2017-01-01

    A Cooper’s hawk (Accipiter cooperii) was found dead in a ditch leading from a heap leach pad at a gold mine in Nevada. Observations at autopsy included an absence of external lesions, traces of subcutaneous and coronary fat, no food in the upper gastrointestinal tract, and no lesions in the viscera. Cyanide concentrations (µg/g ww) were 5.04 in blood, 3.88 in liver, and 1.79 in brain. No bacteria or viruses were isolated from tissues, and brain cholinesterase activity was within the normal range for a Cooper’s hawk.

  8. Syntheses with isotopically labelled carbon. Methyl iodide, formaldehyde and cyanide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, R.D.; Boothe, T.E.; Vora, M.M.; Hildner, J.C.; Emran, A.M.; Kothari, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    Many of the uniquely labelled synthetic precursors currently employed in the design of sophisticated radiolabelled compounds have their origins in the field of hot atom chemistry. Particularly, the development during the past few years of automated, on-line synthetic procedures which combine the nuclear reaction, hot atom and classical chemistry, and rapid purification methods has allowed the incorporation of useful radionuclides into suitable compounds of chemical and biochemical interest. The application of isotopically labelled methyl iodide, formaldehyde, and cyanide anion as synthetic intermediates in research involving human physiology and nuclear medicine, as well as their contributions to other scientific methodology, is reviewed. (author)

  9. Biochemical characteristics of a free cyanide and total nitrogen assimilating Fusarium oxysporum EKT01/02 isolate from cyanide contaminated soil

    OpenAIRE

    Akinpelu, Enoch A.; Adetunji, Adewole T.; Ntwampe, Seteno K.O.; Nchu, Felix; Mekuto, Lukhanyo

    2017-01-01

    Sustainability of nutrient requirements for microbial proliferation on a large scale is a challenge in bioremediation processes. This article presents data on biochemical properties of a free cyanide resistant and total nitrogen assimilating fungal isolate from the rhizosphere of Zea mays (maize) growing in soil contaminated with a cyanide-based pesticide. DNA extracted from this isolate were PCR amplified using universal primers; TEF1-α and ITS. The raw sequence files are available on the NC...

  10. Cyanide and Amygdalin as Indicators of the Presence of Bitter Almonds in Imported Raw Almonds: CYANIDE AND AMYGDALIN AS INDICATORS OF BITTER ALMONDS

    OpenAIRE

    Toomey, Valerie M.; Nickum, Elisa A.; Flurer, Cheryl L.

    2012-01-01

    Consumer complaints received by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in August 2010 about raw organic almonds tasting "bitter" opened an investigation into the presence of bitter almonds in the imported product. Bitter almonds (Prunus amygdalus) contain the cyanogenic glucoside amygdalin, which hydrolyzes to produce cyanide. Ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometry was used to detect and quantitate cyanide, and liquid chromatography‐mass spectrometry was utilized to detect amygdalin in the subm...

  11. Thermal Reactions in Mixtures of Micron-sized Silicon Monoxide and Titanium Monoxide - Redox Paths Overcoming Passivation Shells.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jandová, Věra; Pokorná, Dana; Kupčík, Jaroslav; Bezdička, Petr; Křenek, T.; Netrvalová, M.; Cuřínová, Petra; Pola, Josef

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 1 (2018), s. 503-516 ISSN 0922-6168 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA04010169 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : silicon monoxide * titanium monoxide * hifh-temperature Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 1.369, year: 2016

  12. Thermal reactions in mixtures of micron-sized silicon monoxide and titanium monoxide: redox paths overcoming passivation shells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jandová, V.; Pokorná, D.; Kupčík, Jaroslav; Bezdička, Petr; Křenek, T.; Netrvalová, M.; Cuřínová, P.; Pola, J.

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 1 (2018), s. 503-516 ISSN 0922-6168 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Silicon monoxide * Titanium monoxide * High-temperature * Oxygen-transfer reactions * Titanium suboxides * Titanium silicide * Methylene blue depletion Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry OBOR OECD: Inorganic and nuclear chemistry Impact factor: 1.369, year: 2016

  13. Packed bed reactor for degradation of simulated cyanide-containing wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Virender; Kumar, Vijay; Bhalla, Tek Chand

    2015-10-01

    The discharge of cyanide-containing effluents into the environment contaminates water bodies and soil. Effective methods of treatment which can detoxify cyanide are the need of the hour. The aim of the present study is to develop a bioreactor for complete degradation of cyanide using immobilized cells of Serratia marcescens RL2b. Alginate-entrapped cells of S. marcescens RL2b were used for complete degradation of cyanide in a packed bed reactor (PBR). Cells grown in minimal salt medium (pH 6.0) were harvested after 20 h and exhibited 0.4 U mg -1  dcw activity and 99 % cyanide degradation in 10 h. These resting cells were entrapped using 3 % alginate beads and packed in a column reactor (20 × 1.7 cm). Simulated cyanide (12 mmol l -1 )-containing wastewater was loaded and fractions were collected after different time intervals at various flow rates. Complete degradation of 12 m mmol l -1 (780 mg l -1 ) cyanide in 10 h was observed at a flow rate of 1.5 ml h -1 . The degradation of cyanide in PBR showed direct dependence on retention time. The retention time of cyanide in the reactor was 9.27 h. The PBR can degrade 1.2 g of cyanide completely in 1 day.

  14. Transport and Fate of Cyanide in Soil : Case Study of Mooteh Valley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Taebi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyanide, a generic term referring to all compounds containing the cyanide group –CN, is a highly potent and fast-acting poison to humans and other living organisms when exposed to high levels. Cyanide is a widely and essential chemical used in mining and minerals processing industries and many other industries such as metal processing and production of organic chemicals. While some industrial cyanide-containing wastes are treated or recovered, there are cases such as certain gold extraction plants where wastes are released in the environment. The objective of this research is to study the transport and fate of cyanide in soil in vicinity of a specific pollution source. For the purpose of this study, Mooteh valley, in the vicinity of Mooteh gold mine and factory, in the north of Isfahan province, Iran, was investigated. In Mooteh's Plant, the cyanide-containing waste (slurry tailings is discharged to tailings ponds and there is potential for cyanide to migrate from them. Eight boreholes with 6 m depth were dug and from every 0.5 m a soil sample was taken. Statistical analysis of the results show that soil cyanide concentration decreases with distance from the tailings ponds (as a pollution source and increases with depth. A regression model consisting of a power term for distance and an exponential term for soil depth can appropriately predict the soil cyanide concentration in the vicinity of a pollution source. As soil depth decreases, the rate of natural cyanide fate processes considerably increases. So, soil turn over practices is recommended to improve remediation of polluted sites

  15. Biodegradation of cyanide by acetonitrile-induced cells of Rhodococcus sp. UKMP-5M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallapan Maniyam, Maegala; Sjahrir, Fridelina; Ibrahim, Abdul Latif; Cass, Anthony E G

    2013-01-01

    A Rhodococcus sp. UKMP-5M isolate was shown to detoxify cyanide successfully, suggesting the presence of an intrinsic property in the bacterium which required no prior cyanide exposure for induction of this property. However, in order to promote growth, Rhodococcus sp. UKMP-5M was fully acclimatized to cyanide after 7 successive subcultures in 0.1 mM KCN for 30 days. To further shorten the lag phase and simultaneously increase the tolerance towards higher cyanide concentrations, the bacterium was induced with various nitrile compounds sharing a similar degradatory pathway to cyanide. Acetonitrile emerged as the most favored inducer and the induced cells were able to degrade 0.1 mM KCN almost completely within 18 h. With the addition of subsequent aliquots of 0.1 mM KCN a shorter period for complete removal of cyanide was required, which proved to be advantageous economically. Both resting cells and crude enzyme of Rhodococcus sp. UKMP-5M were able to biodegrade cyanide to ammonia and formate without the formation of formamide, implying the identification of a simple hydrolytic cyanide degradation pathway involving the enzyme cyanidase. Further verification with SDS-PAGE revealed that the molecular weight of the active enzyme was estimated to be 38 kDa, which is consistent with previously reported cyanidases. Since the recent advancement in the application of biological methods in treating cyanide-bearing wastewater has been promising, the discovery of this new bacterium will add value by diversifying the existing microbial populations capable of cyanide detoxification.

  16. Protection from cyanide-induced brain injury by the Nrf2 transcriptional activator carnosic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongxian; Lee, Brian; Nutter, Anthony; Song, Paul; Dolatabadi, Nima; Parker, James; Sanz-Blasco, Sara; Newmeyer, Traci; Ambasudhan, Rajesh; McKercher, Scott R; Masliah, Eliezer; Lipton, Stuart A

    2015-06-01

    Cyanide is a life-threatening, bioterrorist agent, preventing cellular respiration by inhibiting cytochrome c oxidase, resulting in cardiopulmonary failure, hypoxic brain injury, and death within minutes. However, even after treatment with various antidotes to protect cytochrome oxidase, cyanide intoxication in humans can induce a delayed-onset neurological syndrome that includes symptoms of Parkinsonism. Additional mechanisms are thought to underlie cyanide-induced neuronal damage, including generation of reactive oxygen species. This may account for the fact that antioxidants prevent some aspects of cyanide-induced neuronal damage. Here, as a potential preemptive countermeasure against a bioterrorist attack with cyanide, we tested the CNS protective effect of carnosic acid (CA), a pro-electrophilic compound found in the herb rosemary. CA crosses the blood-brain barrier to up-regulate endogenous antioxidant enzymes via activation of the Nrf2 transcriptional pathway. We demonstrate that CA exerts neuroprotective effects on cyanide-induced brain damage in cultured rodent and human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons in vitro, and in vivo in various brain areas of a non-Swiss albino mouse model of cyanide poisoning that simulates damage observed in the human brain. Cyanide, a potential bioterrorist agent, can produce a chronic delayed-onset neurological syndrome that includes symptoms of Parkinsonism. Here, cyanide poisoning treated with the proelectrophillic compound carnosic acid, results in reduced neuronal cell death in both in vitro and in vivo models through activation of the Nrf2/ARE transcriptional pathway. Carnosic acid is therefore a potential treatment for the toxic central nervous system (CNS) effects of cyanide poisoning. ARE, antioxidant responsive element; Nrf2 (NFE2L2, Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2). © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  17. Hydrogen system (hydrogen fuels feasibility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guarna, S.

    1991-07-01

    This feasibility study on the production and use of hydrogen fuels for industry and domestic purposes includes the following aspects: physical and chemical properties of hydrogen; production methods steam reforming of natural gas, hydrolysis of water; liquid and gaseous hydrogen transportation and storage (hydrogen-hydride technology); environmental impacts, safety and economics of hydrogen fuel cells for power generation and hydrogen automotive fuels; relevant international research programs

  18. Residential indoor air quality guideline : carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a tasteless, odourless, and colourless gas that can be produced by both natural and anthropogenic processes, but is most often formed during the incomplete combustion of organic materials. In the indoor environment, CO occurs directly as a result of emissions from indoor sources or as a result of infiltration from outdoor air containing CO. Studies have shown that the use of specific sources can lead to increased concentrations of CO indoors. This residential indoor air quality guideline examined the factors influencing the introduction, dispersion and removal of CO indoors. The health effects of exposure to low and higher concentrations of CO were discussed. Residential maximum exposure limits for CO were presented. Sources and concentrations in indoor environments were also examined. 17 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. Recent changes in atmospheric carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novelli, P.C.; Masarie, K.A. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)); Tans, P.P.; Lang, P.M. (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States))

    1994-03-18

    Measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) in air samples collected from 27 locations between 71[degrees]N and 41[degrees]S show that atmospheric levels of this gas have decreased worldwide over the past 2 to 5 years. During this period, CO decreased at nearly a constant rate in the high northern latitudes. In contrast, in the tropics an abrupt decrease occurred beginning at the end of 1991. In the Northern Hemisphere, CO decreased at a spatially and temporally averaged rate of 7.3 ([+-]0.9) parts per billion per year (6.1 percent per year) from June 1990 to June 1993, whereas in the Southern Hemisphere, CO decreased 4.2 ([+-]0.5) parts per billion per year (7.0 percent per year). This recent change is opposite a long-term trend of a 1 to 2 percent per year increase inferred from measurements made in the Northern Hemisphere during the past 30 years.

  20. Carbon monoxide budget in the northern hemisphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakwin, P.S.; Tans, P.P. (Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Lab., Boulder, CO (United States)); Novelli, P.C. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States))

    1994-03-15

    To improve urban air quality the major industrialized nations of the West took steps during the 1970s and 1980s to reduce carbon monoxide (CO) emissions from automobiles and other industrial sources. Overall, CO/CO[sub 2] emission ratios from the mix of fossil fuel combustion sources have been reduced by about half during 1976-1990. Also, the tropospheric abundance of hydroxyl radical (OH), which is the main sink for CO, is proposed to have increased globally by about 1.0 [+-] 0.8% yr[sup [minus]1]. The authors use a simple two-box model to examine the impact of shrinking emissions and increasing OH on the global abundance of CO. They find that these factors contribute about equally in reducing CO levels in the Northern Hemisphere troposphere by about 1.8 [+-] 0.8 ppb yr[sup [minus]1] on average. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Health effects of carbon monoxide environmental pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-01-01

    Carbon monoxide's (CO) chronic effects on man, its sources, and measuring methods are reviewed, and guidelines to determine health criteria are considered. The European data exchange included CO measuring methods in air and blood and their use in survey and experimental work, atmospheric CO pollution and sampling methods in urban thoroughfares and road tunnels in the European countries, a population survey of carboxyhemoglobin levels from cigarette smoking and atmospheric exposure, and physiological kinetics (uptake, distribution, and elimination) of CO inhalation. Additional topics are CO and the central nervous system, effects of moderate CO exposure on the cardiovascular system and on fetal development, and the current views on existing air quality criteria for CO.

  2. Cross section data for ionization of important cyanides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Jaspreet; Antony, Bobby

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Multi centre spherical complex optical potential formalism used to find the CS. • Effective method (CSP-ic) to derive ionization contribution from inelastic CS. • Result shows excellent accord with previous results and consistent behaviour. • Maiden attempt to find CS for many cyanide molecules. • Strong correlation observed between peak of ionization with target properties. - Abstract: This article presents cross section calculations for interactions of important cyanides with electrons possessing energies beginning from ionization threshold of the target molecule to 5 keV. These data are pursued to meet the ever increasing demand for cross sections by the relevant atomic and molecular community for modelling astrophysical, atmospheric and technological domains. The calculations have been executed using an amalgam of multi centre spherical complex optical potential (MSCOP) formalism and complex scattering potential-ionization contribution (CSP-ic) method. Cross sections are compared with experimental and theoretical data wherever available. Strong correlations are observed for the cross sections which affirms consistent and reliable cross sections. Isomeric effect has been interpreted using variation of cross section with structure and target properties. Our cross sections will be tabulated in atomic collision database for use in modelling various statistical and dynamical quantities.

  3. Ferrocyanide safety program cyanide speciation studies FY 1993 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryan, S.A.; Pool, K.H.; Bryan, S.L.; Sell, R.L.; Thomas, L.M.P.

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes Pacific Northwest Laboratory's (PNL) FY 1993 progress toward developing and implementing methods to identify and quantify cyanide species in ferrocyanide tank waste. Currently, there are 24 high-level waste storage tanks at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site that have been placed on a Ferrocyanide Tank Watchlist because they contain an estimated 1000 g-moles or more of precipitated ferrocyanide. This amount of ferrocyanide is of concern because the consequences of a potential explosion may exceed those reported previously in safety analyses. To bound the safety concern, methods are needed to definitively measure and quantitate the amount of ferrocyanides present within actual waste tanks to a lower limit of at least 0.1 wt % up to approximately 15 wt %. The target analyte concentration for cyanide in waste is approximately 0.1 to 15 wt % (as CN) in the original undiluted sample. After dissolution of the original sample and appropriate dilutions, the concentration range of interest in the analytical solutions can vary between 0.001 to 0.1 wt % (as CN)

  4. Cross section data for ionization of important cyanides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Jaspreet; Antony, Bobby, E-mail: bka.ism@gmail.com

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Multi centre spherical complex optical potential formalism used to find the CS. • Effective method (CSP-ic) to derive ionization contribution from inelastic CS. • Result shows excellent accord with previous results and consistent behaviour. • Maiden attempt to find CS for many cyanide molecules. • Strong correlation observed between peak of ionization with target properties. - Abstract: This article presents cross section calculations for interactions of important cyanides with electrons possessing energies beginning from ionization threshold of the target molecule to 5 keV. These data are pursued to meet the ever increasing demand for cross sections by the relevant atomic and molecular community for modelling astrophysical, atmospheric and technological domains. The calculations have been executed using an amalgam of multi centre spherical complex optical potential (MSCOP) formalism and complex scattering potential-ionization contribution (CSP-ic) method. Cross sections are compared with experimental and theoretical data wherever available. Strong correlations are observed for the cross sections which affirms consistent and reliable cross sections. Isomeric effect has been interpreted using variation of cross section with structure and target properties. Our cross sections will be tabulated in atomic collision database for use in modelling various statistical and dynamical quantities.

  5. Mechanism of the flame ionization detector. II. Isotope effects and heteroatom effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Torkil

    1997-01-01

    reactions in the hydrogen flame of compounds added to the hydrogen gas in low concentrations were followed. Alcohols, ethers, ketones, and esters all produced methane and carbon monoxide, while amines produced methane and hydrogen cyanide, halogen compounds methane and hydrogen halide, etc. The FID response...

  6. Hail hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hairston, D.

    1996-01-01

    After years of being scorned and maligned, hydrogen is finding favor in environmental and process applications. There is enormous demand for the industrial gas from petroleum refiners, who need in creasing amounts of hydrogen to remove sulfur and other contaminants from crude oil. In pulp and paper mills, hydrogen is turning up as hydrogen peroxide, displacing bleaching agents based on chlorine. Now, new technologies for making hydrogen have the industry abuzz. With better capabilities of being generated onsite at higher purity levels, recycled and reused, hydrogen is being prepped for a range of applications, from waste reduction to purification of Nylon 6 and hydrogenation of specialty chemicals. The paper discusses the strong market demand for hydrogen, easier routes being developed for hydrogen production, and the use of hydrogen in the future

  7. Inhibitory effect of cyanide on nitrification process and its eliminating method in a suspended activated sludge process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yuanyuan; Jin, Xibiao; Wang, Yuan; Liu, Yongdi; Chen, Xiurong

    2014-02-01

    Inhibition of nitrification by four typical pollutants (acrylonitrile, acrylic acid, acetonitrile and cyanide) in acrylonitrile wastewater was investigated. The inhibitory effect of cyanide on nitrification was strongest, with a 50% inhibitory concentration of 0.218 mg·gVSS-1 being observed in a municipal activated sludge system. However, the performance of nitrification was recovered when cyanide was completely degraded. The nitrification, which had been inhibited by 4.17 mg·gVSS-1 of free cyanide for 24 h, was recovered to greater than 95% of that without cyanide after 10 days of recovery. To overcome cyanide inhibition, cyanide-degrading bacteria were cultivated in a batch reactor by increasing the influent cyanide concentration in a stepwise manner, which resulted in an increase in the average cyanide degradation rate from 0.14 to 1.01 mg CN-·gVSS-1·h-1 over 20 days. The cultured cyanide-degrading bacteria were shaped like short rods, and the dominant cyanide-degrading bacteria strain was identified as Pseudomonas fluorescens NCIMB by PCR.

  8. Technical activities of the Project Surata River for the handling of mercury and cyanide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinzon, Juan Manuel; Ruiz, Jorge Nelson; Jaimes, Cristian Libardo

    2004-01-01

    The technical works executed by the project have been framed in the philosophy of reducing the contamination for mercury and cyanide in the operations of auriferous benefit, without causing detriment in the economic revenues of the miners, on the contrary, trying to carry out a better use of the auriferous mineral. In this sense, the project has toasted from simple solutions that allow to reduce the use of the pollutants mentioned a little until solutions more complex than they require introduction of gravimetric teams in pro of reducing the quantity of minerals amalgamated y/o cyanidates. This way an action plan was developed that contemplates a diagnosis stage, followed by a stage of executions in which has been worked in the modification of the systems of gravimetric concentration, process of amalgamation and in the cyanidation process. Particular emphasis has noticed to the cyanidation process for percolation, given its importance in the benefit and its degree of environmental affectation. Through a revision of the method used by the miners, it was possible to modify the technique and to reduce in 40% the global consumption of cyanide in the companies of the District Mining Vetas - California. Metallurgic studies in the advised companies allowed to verify that strengthening the gravimetric concentration is possible to gather 80% of the gold (heavy minerals) in 15% of the processed global material. Under these conditions the introduction of the cyanidation is facilitated by agitation, allowing to reduce the contamination for cyanide and to make a bigger use of the auriferous mineral

  9. TIE for cyanides in groundwater at a former coal gasification plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLeay, M.; Cameron, M. [Hemmeram, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Elphick, J. [Nautilus Environmental Co., Burnaby, BC (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    Groundwater remediation efforts are underway at a former coal gasification plant site in British Columbia because the concentrations of cyanide and other substances were found to exceed aquatic life guidelines. Hemmera and Nautilus Environmental examined whether that groundwater was toxic to a variety of sensitive marine aquatic life species, and whether cyanide was the primary toxicant. Untreated groundwater containing cyanide, weak acid dissociable cyanide and free cyanide was tested for toxicity on bivalve larval survival, kelp zoospore germination, sea urchin gamete fertilization, and larval topsmelt survival and growth. The untreated groundwater was found to be toxic to kelp zoospores and sea urchin gametes, but relatively non-toxic to bivalve larvae and topsmelt. The following 4 toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) treatments were conducted on site groundwater: (1) acidification/aeration of the sample, (2) filtration of the sample through anion exchange media, (3) filtration of the sample through activated carbon, and (4) exposure of the sample to UV light. Both the cyanide concentration and the toxicity to kelp decreased considerably when the anion exchange treatment was applied. The results suggest that the toxicity may be attributed to cyanides in the groundwater. The information obtained from this study will be used to plan excavation water treatment strategies during site remediation as part of an ecological risk assessment for the site.

  10. Cyanide and sulfide interact with nitrogenous compounds to influence the relaxation of various smooth muscles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kruszyna, H.; Kruszyna, R.; Smith, R.P.

    1985-05-01

    Sodium nitroprusside relaxed guinea pig ileum after the segment had been submaximally contracted by either histamine or acetylcholine, intact isolated rabbit gall bladder after submaximal contraction by either acetylcholine or cholecystokinin octapeptide, and rat pulmonary artery helical strips after submaximal contraction with norepinephrine. In each of these cases the relaxation produced by nitroprusside was at least partially reversed by the subsequent addition of excess sodium cyanide. Cyanide, however, in nontoxic concentrations did not reverse the spasmolytic effects of hydroxylamine hydrochloride, sodium azide, nitroglycerin, sodium nitrite, or nitric oxide hemoglobin on guinea pig ileum, nor did cyanide alone in the same concentrations have any effect. The similar interaction between nitroprusside and cyanide on rabbit aortic strips is not dependent on the presence of an intact endothelia cell layer. Also, on rabbit aortic strips and like cyanide, sodium sulfide reversed the spasmolytic effects of azide and hydroxylamine, but it had little or no effect on the relaxation induced by papaverine. Unlike cyanide, however, sulfide augmented the relaxation induced by nitroprusside, and it reversed the effects of nitric oxide hemoglobin, nitroglycerin, and nitrite. A direct chemical reaction between sulfide and nitroprusside may account for the difference between it and cyanide. Although evidence was obtained also for a direct chemical reaction between sulfide and norepinephrine, that reaction does not seem to have played a role in these results.

  11. Effect of Organic Matter on Cyanide Removal by Illuminated Titanium Dioxide or Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Shirzad-Siboni

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Effect of different type of organic compounds (humic acid, oxalate, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, nitrilotriacetic acid, phenol on the photocatalytic removal of cyanide with TiO2 or ZnO was studied in this work with variation of the solution pH, contact time, initial cyanide concentration and type of organic compounds. Photocatalytic oxidation efficiency of cyanide with TiO2 was greatly affected by the solution pH. It increased as the solution pH decreased. Also maximum removal of cyanide by ZnO was observed near at neutral pH because of the reduced photocatalytic activity of ZnO at exceedingly low and high pH values originated from either acidic/photochemical corrosion of the catalyst and/or surface passivation with Zn(OH2. Removal efficiency of cyanide greatly decreased in the presence of humic acid, ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, nitrilotriacetic acid compared to that without presence of organic compound because of the competitive oxidation as well as surface blocking by relatively large organic compounds. The oxidation pattern of cyanide was better described by first-order kinetic model. Finally photocatalytic reaction with TiO2 or ZnO can be effectively applied to treat synthetic wastewater contaminated with cyanide.

  12. Behaviour of solid phase ethyl cyanide in simulated conditions of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couturier-Tamburelli, I.; Toumi, A.; Piétri, N.; Chiavassa, T.

    2018-01-01

    In order to simulate different altitudes in the atmosphere of Titan, we investigated using infrared spectrometry and mass spectrometry the photochemistry of ethyl cyanide (CH3CH2CN) ices at different temperatures. Heating experiments of the solid phase until complete desorption showed up three phase transitions with a first one appearing to be approximately at the temperature of Titan's surface (94 K), measured by the Huygens probe. Ethyl cyanide, whose presence has been suggested in solid phase in Titan, can be considered as another nitrile for photochemical models of the Titan atmosphere after our first study (Toumi et al., 2016) concerning vinyl cyanide (CH2CHCN). The desorption energy of ethyl cyanide has been calculated to be 36.75 ( ± 0.55) kJ mol-1 using IRTF and mass spectroscopical techniques. High energetic photolysis (λ > 120 nm) have been performed and we identified ethyl isocyanide, vinyl cyanide, cyanoacetylene, ethylene, acetylene, cyanhydric acid and a methylketenimine form as photoproducts from ethyl cyanide. The branching ratios of the primary products were determined at characteristic temperatures of Titan thanks to the value of the νCN stretching band strength of ethyl cyanide that has been calculated to be 4.12 × 10-18 cm molecule-1. We also report here for the first time the values of the photodissociation cross sections of C2H5CN for different temperatures.

  13. Paper Strip-based Fluorometric Determination of Cyanide with an Internal Reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong-Nam; Hong, Jong-In [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Hyejin; Shin, Ik-Soo [Soongsil University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    The rapid, selective, and sensitive determination of cyanide anion (CN{sup -}) using a simple paper strip is highly attractive because cyanide is acutely lethal to living organisms via all routes of administration, including alcohol consumption and inhaling cigarette smoke. Here, a synthetic probe (1) was designed for the selective determination of cyanide. The probe displays rapid and large blue spectral change (Δλ{sub abs}=148 nm, Δλ{sub em}= 165 nm) with respect to target recognition. Probe 1 exhibits a strong push-pull electronic effect and comprises a dimethylaminoaryl group as a donor and malononitrile as an acceptor; the π-conjugation system can be destroyed by the Michael-type addition of cyanide at the electrophilic β-positions of the nitrile groups, resulting in the marked emergence of a peak at λ{sub em}= 515 nm. The developed probe was successfully applied to a paper test strip because of its noticeable optical changes upon reaction with cyanide. The fabricated dumbbell-shaped paper strip with an internal reference allowed the cyanide detection, which is indispensable for quantitative analysis in point-of-care testing. The paper strip test showed selective response to cyanide, with a linear correlation in the range of 0-25 mM in a simple and cost-effective manner.

  14. Paper Strip-based Fluorometric Determination of Cyanide with an Internal Reference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong-Nam; Hong, Jong-In; Seo, Hyejin; Shin, Ik-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The rapid, selective, and sensitive determination of cyanide anion (CN"-) using a simple paper strip is highly attractive because cyanide is acutely lethal to living organisms via all routes of administration, including alcohol consumption and inhaling cigarette smoke. Here, a synthetic probe (1) was designed for the selective determination of cyanide. The probe displays rapid and large blue spectral change (Δλ_a_b_s=148 nm, Δλ_e_m= 165 nm) with respect to target recognition. Probe 1 exhibits a strong push-pull electronic effect and comprises a dimethylaminoaryl group as a donor and malononitrile as an acceptor; the π-conjugation system can be destroyed by the Michael-type addition of cyanide at the electrophilic β-positions of the nitrile groups, resulting in the marked emergence of a peak at λ_e_m= 515 nm. The developed probe was successfully applied to a paper test strip because of its noticeable optical changes upon reaction with cyanide. The fabricated dumbbell-shaped paper strip with an internal reference allowed the cyanide detection, which is indispensable for quantitative analysis in point-of-care testing. The paper strip test showed selective response to cyanide, with a linear correlation in the range of 0-25 mM in a simple and cost-effective manner.

  15. Optimization of cyanide extraction from wastewater using emulsion liquid membrane system by response surface methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Juan Qin; Liu, Ni Na; Li, Guo Ping; Dang, Long Tao

    To solve the disposal problem of cyanide wastewater, removal of cyanide from wastewater using a water-in-oil emulsion type of emulsion liquid membrane (ELM) was studied in this work. Specifically, the effects of surfactant Span-80, carrier trioctylamine (TOA), stripping agent NaOH solution and the emulsion-to-external-phase-volume ratio on removal of cyanide were investigated. Removal of total cyanide was determined using the silver nitrate titration method. Regression analysis and optimization of the conditions were conducted using the Design-Expert software and response surface methodology (RSM). The actual cyanide removals and the removals predicted using RSM analysis were in close agreement, and the optimal conditions were determined to be as follows: the volume fraction of Span-80, 4% (v/v); the volume fraction of TOA, 4% (v/v); the concentration of NaOH, 1% (w/v); and the emulsion-to-external-phase volume ratio, 1:7. Under the optimum conditions, the removal of total cyanide was 95.07%, and the RSM predicted removal was 94.90%, with a small exception. The treatment of cyanide wastewater using an ELM is an effective technique for application in industry.

  16. Biodegradation of cyanide in groundwater and soils from gasworks sites in south-eastern Australia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meehan, S.M.E.; Weaver, T.R.; Lawrence, C.R. [University of Melbourne, Parkvills, Vic. (Australia). School of Earth Sciences

    1999-07-01

    Groundwater from a gasworks site in south-eastern Australia has been found to contain high concentrations of cyanide (total), sulphate, and ammonia (1400 mg L{sup -1}, 6500 mg L{sup -1}, and 580 mg L{sup -1} respectively). Soil from another gasworks site has been found to contain 587 mg kg{sup -1} of cyanide (total), with concentrations of cyanide in the groundwater at this site being relatively low ({lt} 21 mgL{sup -1} CN(Total)). Experiments were conducted to determine the biodegradation rates of cyanide in groundwater and soils using samples from both sites. Column experiments and bioreactors were constructed to produce both aerobic and anaerobic conditions for the groundwater containing high concentrations of cyanide. Samples of water were taken periodically to analyse the pH, redox potential, temperature, and concentrations of cyanide (free and total), sulphate, ammonia, nitrate and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Initial results indicate that concentrations of cyanide are declining in both aerobic and anaerobic conditions, with biodegradation one process producing degradation. 9 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. TIE for cyanides in groundwater at a former coal gasification plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLeay, M.; Cameron, M.; Elphick, J.

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater remediation efforts are underway at a former coal gasification plant site in British Columbia because the concentrations of cyanide and other substances were found to exceed aquatic life guidelines. Hemmera and Nautilus Environmental examined whether that groundwater was toxic to a variety of sensitive marine aquatic life species, and whether cyanide was the primary toxicant. Untreated groundwater containing cyanide, weak acid dissociable cyanide and free cyanide was tested for toxicity on bivalve larval survival, kelp zoospore germination, sea urchin gamete fertilization, and larval topsmelt survival and growth. The untreated groundwater was found to be toxic to kelp zoospores and sea urchin gametes, but relatively non-toxic to bivalve larvae and topsmelt. The following 4 toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) treatments were conducted on site groundwater: (1) acidification/aeration of the sample, (2) filtration of the sample through anion exchange media, (3) filtration of the sample through activated carbon, and (4) exposure of the sample to UV light. Both the cyanide concentration and the toxicity to kelp decreased considerably when the anion exchange treatment was applied. The results suggest that the toxicity may be attributed to cyanides in the groundwater. The information obtained from this study will be used to plan excavation water treatment strategies during site remediation as part of an ecological risk assessment for the site.

  18. Cyanide Removal Efficiency of Photocatalytic Nanoparticles Stabilized on Glass Microbeads Under Sun Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Masoudipour

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates cyanide photodestruction (at pH 9 using the S, N-TiO2 photocatalyst synthesized by the sol-gel method and stabilized on glass microbeads. The main raw materials were thiourea, as a source of N and S, and tetra butyl ortho titanate. The effects of S and N doses, visible light (a 400W light, sunlight, irradiation time, and different initial cyanide concentrations (50, 100, 200, and 300 ppm were studied on cyanide photodestruction. Cyanide concentration was measured by the titration method and the photocatalyst film was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, UV-Vis diffuse reflection spectroscopy (DRS, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, and Energy dispersive X-ray (EDX analysis. XRD patterns and SEM images were used to determine the nanoparticle size of the photocatalyst on glass microbeads. EDX and DRS analyses confirmed the presence of S and N as well as the activity of the photocatalyst in the visible region, respectively. The S, N-TiO2 film with 0.25 g Thiuourea proved to be the best cyanide photodestruction agent in the visible light. Based on the results obtained, S, N-TiO2/ glass microbead was capable of destroying cyanide (50 ppm by up to 94% in the visible light and by approximately 100% in the sunlight. The results also indicated that S, N-Tio2/scoria stone was capable of destroying cyanide by 85% in the visible light and by 94% in the sunlight within 4 h.  The reaction kinetic for all cyanide concentrations and two photocatalyst substrates were described by a first order equation. Finally, it was concluded that the S, N-TiO2 stabilized on glass microbeads could be effectively used as a new method for treating wastewater containing free cyanide under the sunlight.

  19. Enzymatic cyanide degradation by cell-free extract of Rhodococcus UKMP-5M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallapan Maniyam, Maegala; Sjahrir, Fridelina; Latif Ibrahim, Abdul; Cass, Anthony E G

    2015-01-01

    The cell-free extract of locally isolated Rhodococcus UKMP-5M strain was used as an alternative to develop greener and cost effective cyanide removal technology. The present study aims to assess the viability of the cell-free extract to detoxify high concentrations of cyanide which is measured through the monitoring of protein concentration and specific cyanide-degrading activity. When cyanide-grown cells were subjected to grinding in liquid nitrogen which is relatively an inexpressive and fast cell disruption method, highest cyanide-degrading activity of 0.63 mM min(-1) mg(-1) protein was obtained in comparison to enzymatic lysis and agitation with fine glass beads. The cell-free extracts managed to degrade 80% of 20 mM KCN within 80 min and the rate of cyanide consumption increased linearly as the concentration of protein was raised. In both cases, the addition of co-factor was not required which proved to be advantageous economically. The successful formation of ammonia and formate as endproducts indicated that the degradation of cyanide by Rhodococcus UKMP-5M proceeded via the activity of cyanidase and the resulting non-toxic products are safe for disposal into the environment. Further verification with SDS-PAGE revealed that the molecular weight of the active enzyme was estimated to be 38 kDa, which is consistent with previously reported cyanidases. Thus, the utilization of cell-free extracts as an alternative to live microbial in cyanide degradation offers numerous advantageous such as the potential to tolerate and degrade higher concentration of cyanide and total reduction in the overall cost of operation since the requirement for nutrient support is irrelevant.

  20. Lanthanide complexes that respond to changes in cyanide concentration in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Routledge, Jack D.; Zhang, Xuejian; Connolly, Michael; Tropiano, Manuel; Blackburn, Octavia A.; Beer, Paul D.; Aldridge, Simon; Faulkner, Stephen; Kenwright, Alan M.

    2017-01-01

    Cyanide ions are shown to interact with lanthanide complexes of phenacylDO3A derivatives in aqueous solution, giving rise to changes in the luminescence and NMR spectra. These changes are the consequence of cyanohydrin formation, which is favored by the coordination of the phenacyl carbonyl group to the lanthanide center. These complexes display minimal affinity for fluoride and can detect cyanide at concentrations less than 1 μm. By contrast, lanthanide complexes with DOTAM derivatives display no affinity for cyanide in water, but respond to changes in fluoride concentration. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Lanthanide complexes that respond to changes in cyanide concentration in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Routledge, Jack D.; Zhang, Xuejian; Connolly, Michael; Tropiano, Manuel; Blackburn, Octavia A.; Beer, Paul D.; Aldridge, Simon; Faulkner, Stephen [Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Kenwright, Alan M. [Department of Chemistry, Durham University (United Kingdom)

    2017-06-26

    Cyanide ions are shown to interact with lanthanide complexes of phenacylDO3A derivatives in aqueous solution, giving rise to changes in the luminescence and NMR spectra. These changes are the consequence of cyanohydrin formation, which is favored by the coordination of the phenacyl carbonyl group to the lanthanide center. These complexes display minimal affinity for fluoride and can detect cyanide at concentrations less than 1 μm. By contrast, lanthanide complexes with DOTAM derivatives display no affinity for cyanide in water, but respond to changes in fluoride concentration. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Selection of a Commercial Anode Oxide Coating for Electro-oxidation of Cyanide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanza Marcos Roberto V.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of the performance of two commercial dimensionally stable anode (DSA® oxide coatings in the electrochemical process for cyanide oxidation. The coatings studied were 70TiO2/30RuO2 and 55Ta2O5/45IrO2, on Ti substrate. The efficiency of both materials in the electro-oxidation of free cyanide was compared using linear voltammetry and electrolysis at constant potential. The 70TiO2/30RuO2 electrode shows a better performance in the electro-oxidation of free cyanide.

  3. Cerebral energy metabolism during mitochondrial dysfunction induced by cyanide in piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Troels Halfeld; Olsen, N.V.; Toft, P

    2013-01-01

    and immediate enzymatic analysis. Mitochondrial function was blocked by unilateral infusion of NaCN/KCN (0.5 mol/L) through the microdialysis catheter (N = 5). As a reference, NaCl (0.5 mol/L) was infused by intracerebral microdialysis in one group of animals (N = 3). RESULTS: PbtO2 increased during cyanide...... infusion and returned to baseline afterwards. The lactate/pyruvate (LP) ratio increased significantly following cyanide infusion because of a marked increase in lactate level while pyruvate remained within normal limits. Glutamate and glycerol increased after cyanide infusion indicating insufficient energy...

  4. Acute Cyanide Poisoning: Hydroxocobalamin and Sodium Thiosulfate Treatments with Two Outcomes following One Exposure Event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Meillier

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyanide is rapidly reacting and causes arrest of aerobic metabolism. The symptoms are diffuse and lethal and require high clinical suspicion. Remediation of symptoms and mortality is highly dependent on quick treatment with a cyanide antidote. Presently, there are two widely accepted antidotes: sodium thiosulfate and hydroxocobalamin. These treatments act on different components of cyanide’s metabolism. Here, we present two cases resulting from the same source of cyanide poisoning and the use of both antidotes separately used with differing outcomes.

  5. CT and clinical patterns in suicidal carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grobovschek, M.; Geretsegger, C.; Weinberger, R.; Fartacek, R.

    1988-01-01

    Cranial CT is important to exclude the presence of a mass in the cavum cranii in case of an unclear suicide attempt, particularly a traumatic mass. It can be helpful also in cases of carbon monoxide intoxications. (orig.) [de

  6. Atmospheric analyzer, carbon monoxide monitor and toluene diisocyanate monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, A. V.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of the atmospheric analyzer and the carbon monoxide and toluene diisocyanate monitors is to analyze the atmospheric volatiles and to monitor carbon monoxide and toluene diisocyanate levels in the cabin atmosphere of Skylab. The carbon monoxide monitor was used on Skylab 2, 3, and 4 to detect any carbon monoxide levels above 25 ppm. Air samples were taken once each week. The toluene diisocyanate monitor was used only on Skylab 2. The loss of a micrometeoroid shield following the launch of Skylab 1 resulted in overheating of the interior walls of the Orbital Workshop. A potential hazard existed from outgassing of an isocyanate derivative resulting from heat-decomposition of the rigid polyurethane wall insulation. The toluene diisocyanate monitor was used to detect any polymer decomposition. The atmospheric analyzer was used on Skylab 4 because of a suspected leak in the Skylab cabin. An air sample was taken at the beginning, middle, and the end of the mission.

  7. Carbon Monoxide Hazards from Small Gasoline Powered Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DHHS (NIOSH) Publication No. 96-118 (1996) Describes health effects and current standards and guidelines relating to carbon monoxide, as well as recommendations for workers, employers, and manufacturers regarding small gasoline powered engine ...

  8. An interesting cause of pulmonary emboli: Acute carbon monoxide poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevinc, A.; Savli, H.; Atmaca, H. [Gaziantep University, Gaziantep (Turkey). School of Medicine

    2005-07-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning, a public health problem of considerable significance, is a relatively frequent event today, resulting in thousands of hospitalizations annually. A 70-year-old lady was seen in the emergency department with a provisional diagnosis of carbon monoxide poisoning. The previous night, she slept in a tightly closed room heated with coal ember. She was found unconscious in the morning with poor ventilation. She had a rare presentation of popliteal vein thrombosis, pulmonary emboli, and possible tissue necrosis with carbon monoxide poisoning. Oxygen treatment with low-molecular-weight heparin (nadroparine) and warfarin therapy resulted in an improvement in both popliteal and pulmonary circulations. In conclusion, the presence of pulmonary emboli should be sought in patients with carbon monoxide poisoning.

  9. CT and clinical patterns in suicidal carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grobovschek, M.; Geretsegger, C.; Weinberger, R.; Fartacek, R.

    1988-12-01

    Cranial CT is important to exclude the presence of a mass in the cavum cranii in case of an unclear suicide attempt, particularly a traumatic mass. It can be helpful also in cases of carbon monoxide intoxications.

  10. Hydrogen detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagaya, Hiromichi; Yoshida, Kazuo; Sanada, Kazuo; Chigira, Sadao.

    1994-01-01

    The present invention concerns a hydrogen detector for detecting water-sodium reaction. The hydrogen detector comprises a sensor portion having coiled optical fibers and detects hydrogen on the basis of the increase of light transmission loss upon hydrogen absorption. In the hydrogen detector, optical fibers are wound around and welded to the outer circumference of a quartz rod, as well as the thickness of the clad layer of the optical fiber is reduced by etching. With such procedures, size of the hydrogen detecting sensor portion can be decreased easily. Further, since it can be used at high temperature, diffusion rate is improved to shorten the detection time. (N.H.)

  11. Catalytic Copolymerization of Ethene and Carbon Monoxide on Nickel Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domhöver, Bernd; Kläui, Wolfgang; Kremer-Aach, Andreas; Bell, Ralf; Mootz, Dietrich

    1998-11-16

    Can palladium be replaced by nickel? For the industrial copolymerization of carbon monoxide and ethene a palladium catalyst is used which cannot be recovered-a cheaper procedure would be desirable. The presented complex 1 is the first structurally characterized nickel compound which does not polymerize ethene but a mixture from carbon monoxide and ethene unter mild conditions to give a perfectly alternating polyketone. © 1998 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH, Weinheim, Fed. Rep. of Germany.

  12. Metabolism of allylnitrile to cyanide: in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooqui, M Y; Ybarra, B; Piper, J

    1993-09-01

    In liver fractions from male Sprague-Dawley rats, the metabolism of allylnitrile (ALN) to cyanide (CN-) was localized in the microsomal fraction and required NADPH and oxygen for maximal activity. The biotransformation of ALN to CN- was characterized with respect to time, microsomal protein concentration, pH and temperature. Metabolism of ALN was increased in microsomes obtained from phenobarbital-treated rats (160% of control) and decreased with cobaltous chloride and beta-diethyl aminoethyl-2,2-diphenyl pentanoate (SKF 525-A) treatments (48% of control). Addition of SKF 525-A to the incubation mixtures inhibited ALN metabolism to CN-. Addition of the epoxide hydrolase inhibitor, 1,1,1-trichloropropane 2,3-oxide, decreased the formation of CN- from ALN. Addition of glutathione, cysteine, D-penicillamine, and 2-mercaptoethanol enhanced the release of CN- from ALN. These findings indicate that ALN is metabolized to CN- via a cytochrome P-450-dependent mixed-function oxidase system.

  13. Metagenomic data of free cyanide and thiocyanate degrading bacterial communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukhanyo Mekuto

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article contains the bacterial community structure of the free cyanide (CN- and thiocyanate (SCN- degrading organisms that were isolated from electroplating wastewater and synthetic SCN- containing wastewater. PCR amplification of the 16S rRNA V1-V3 regions was undertaken using the 27F and 518R oligonucleotide primers following the metacommunity DNA extraction procedure. The PCR amplicons were processed using the illumina® reaction kits as per manufacturer׳s instruction and sequenced using the illumina® MiSeq-2000, using the MiSeq V3 kit. The data was processed using bioinformatics tools such as QIIME and the raw sequence files are available via NCBI׳s Sequence Read Archive (SRA database.

  14. Carbon monoxide and coronary heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheidemandel, V

    1974-01-01

    Studies on the relationship between increased carboxyhemoglobin levels in the blood and coronary heart disease in smokers and city dwellers are reviewed. The evidence of myocardial infarction is significantly higher in smokers than in nonsmokers which is due, apart from nicotine which promotes coronary arteriosclerosis, to inhaled carbon monoxide which leads to increased carboxyhemoglobin levels and most likely plays a role in the risk of arteriosclerosis and the coronary heart disease. Apart from combining with hemoglobin, CO increases the circulation rate and the coronary blood flow, and reduces the coronary arteriovenous oxygen difference, which is indicative of a reduced rate of oxygen extraction by the myocardium against an increased myocardial oxygen demand. The reduction of the oxygen extraction correlates with the increased COHb level. Inhaled CO lowers the threshold of angina pectoris due to the reduced myocardial oxygen tension. Also, considerable reduction of the oxygen diffusion from the capillaries toward the mitochondria due to the combination of CO with myoglobin is observed. Chronically increased CO levels in the blood and tissues not only accelerate the development of arteriosclerosis, but also induce a process directly injurious to the myocardial metabolism. (Air Pollut. Abstr.)

  15. First-Principles Investigations on Europium Monoxide

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hao

    2011-05-01

    Europium monoxide is both an insulator and a Heisenberg ferromagnet (Tc=69 K). In the present thesis, the author has investigated the electronic structure of different types of EuO by density functional theory. The on-site Coulomb interaction of the localized Eu 4f and 5d electrons, which is wrongly treated in the standard generalized gradient approximation method, is found to be crucial to obtain the correct insulating ground state as observed in experiments. Our results show that the ferromagnetism is stable under pressure, both hydrostatic and uniaxial. For both types of pressure an insulator-metal transition is demonstrated. Moreover, the experimentally observed insulator-metal transition in oxygen deficient and gadolinium-doped EuO is reproduced in our calculations for impurity concentrations of 6.25% and 25%. Furthermore, a 10- layer EuO thin film is theoretically predicted to be an insulator with a narrow band gap of around 0.08 eV, while the Si/EuO interface shows metallic properties with the Si and O 2p as well as Eu 5d bands crossing the Fermi level.

  16. Review: hemodynamic response to carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penney, D.G.

    1988-04-01

    Historically, and at present, carbon monoxide is a major gaseous poison responsible for widespread morbidity and mortality. From threshold to maximal nonlethal levels, a variety of cardiovascular changes occur, both immediately and in the long term, whose homeostatic function it is to renormalize tissue oxygen delivery. However, notwithstanding numerous studies over the past century, the literature remains equivocal regarding the hemodynamic responses in animals and humans, although CO hypoxia is clearly different in several respects from hypoxic hypoxia. Factors complicating interpretation of experimental findings include species, CO dose level and rate, route of CO delivery, duration, level of exertion, state of consciousness, and anesthetic agent used. Augmented cardiac output usually observed with moderate COHb may be compromised in more sever poisoning for the same reasons, such that regional or global ischemia result. The hypotension usually seen in most animal studies is thought to be a primary cause of CNS damage resulting from acute CO poisoning, yet the exact mechanism(s) remains unproven in both animals and humans, as does the way in which CO produces hypotension. This review briefly summarizes the literature relevant to the short- and long-term hemodynamic responses reported in animals and humans. It concludes by presenting an overview using data from a single species in which the most complete work has been done to date.

  17. Carbon monoxide measurements at Mace Head, Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doddridge, Bruce G.; Dickerson, Russell R.; Spain, T. Gerard; Oltmans, Samuel J.; Novelli, Paul C.

    1994-01-01

    The North Atlantic Ocean is bordered by continents which may each, under the influence of seasonal weather patterns, act as sources of natural and anthropogenic trace gas and particulate species. Photochemically active species such as carbon monoxide (CO) react to form ozone (O3), a species of critical importance in global climate change. CO is sparingly soluble in water, and the relatively long lifetime of CO in the troposphere makes this species an ideal tracer of air masses with origin over land. We have measured CO using a nondispersive infrared gas filter correlation analyzer at Mace Head on the west coast of Ireland nearly continuously since August 9, 1991. Measurements of CO were acquired at 20-sec resolution and recorded as 60-sec averages. Daily, monthly, and diurnal variation data characteristics of CO mixing ratios observed at this site are reported. Depending on source regions of air parcels passing over this site, 60-min concentrations of CO range from clean air values of approximately 90 ppbv to values in excess of 300 ppbv. Data characterizing the correlation between 60-min CO and O3 mixing ratio data observed at this site are reported also.

  18. Residential carbon monoxide poisoning from motor vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampson, Neil B

    2011-01-01

    Although morbidity and mortality from accidental carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning are high in the United States, identification of common but poorly recognized sources should help prevention efforts. The study aimed to describe CO poisoning of home occupants due to a vehicle left running in an attached garage. News stories reporting incidents of US CO poisoning were collected daily from March 2007 to September 2009 via a news.Google.com search and data extracted. Patients were individuals reported in the media to have been poisoned with CO in their home by a vehicle running in the attached garage. Main outcome measures were frequency of occurrence, geographic distribution, patient demographics, and mortality. Of 837 CO poisoning incidents reported in US news media over 2 and a half years, 59 (8%) were the result of a vehicle left running in the garage. The elderly were disproportionately affected, with incidents most common in states with larger elderly populations and 29% of cases with age specified occurring in individuals older than 80 years. Among those older than 80 years, 15 of 17 were found dead at the scene. Residential CO poisoning from a vehicle running in the garage is common, disproportionately affects the elderly, has a high mortality rate, and should be preventable with a residential CO alarm. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Carbon Monoxide: An Essential Signalling Molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Brian E.

    Carbon monoxide (CO), like nitric oxide (NO), is an essential signalling molecule in humans. It is active in the cardiovascular system as a vasodilator. In addition, CO possesses anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and anti-proliferative properties and protects tissues from hypoxia and reperfusion injury. Some of its applications in animal models include suppression of organ graft rejection and safeguarding the heart during reperfusion after cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. CO also suppresses arteriosclerotic lesions following angioplasty, reverses established pulmonary hypertension and mitigates the development of post-operative ileus in the murine small intestine and the development of cerebral malaria in mice as well as graft-induced intimal hyperplasia in pigs. There have been several clinical trials using air-CO mixtures for the treatment of lung-, heart-, kidney- and abdominal-related diseases. This review examines the research involving the development of classes of compounds (with particular emphasis on metal carbonyls) that release CO, which could be used in clinically relevant conditions. The review is drawn not only from published papers in the chemical literature but also from the extensive biological literature and patents on CO-releasing molecules (CO-RMs).

  20. Elevated carboxyhemoglobin: sources of carbon monoxide exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchelli Ramirez, Herminia; Fernández Alvarez, Ramón; Rubinos Cuadrado, Gemma; Martinez Gonzalez, Cristina; Rodriguez Jerez, Francisco; Casan Clara, Pere

    2014-11-01

    Inhalation of carbon monoxide (CO) can result in poisoning, with symptoms ranging from mild and nonspecific to severe, or even death. CO poisoning is often underdiagnosed because exposure to low concentrations goes unnoticed, and threshold values for normal carboxyhemoglobin vary according to different authors. The aim of our study was to analyze carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) levels in an unselected population and detect sources of CO exposure In a cross-sectional descriptive study, we analyzed consecutive arterial blood gas levels processed in our laboratory. We selected those with COHb≥2.5% in nonsmokers and ≥5% in smokers. In these cases a structured telephone interview was conducted. Elevated levels of COHb were found in 64 (20%) of 306 initial determinations. Of these, data from 51 subjects aged 65±12 years, 31 (60%) of which were men, were obtained. Mean COHb was 4.0%. Forty patients (78%) were non-smokers with mean COHb of 3.2%, and 11 were smokers with COHb of 6.7%. In 45 patients (88.2%) we detected exposure to at least one source of ambient CO other than cigarette smoke. A significant proportion of individuals from an unselected sample had elevated levels of COHb. The main sources of CO exposure were probably the home, so this possibility should be explored. The population should be warned about the risks and encouraged to take preventive measures. Copyright © 2013 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.