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Sample records for monoterpene indole alkaloid

  1. Monoterpene Indole Alkaloids from the Fruit of Tabernaemontana litoralis and Differential Alkaloid Composition in Various Fruit Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yang; Simonescu, Razvan; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2016-12-23

    Two new monoterpene indole alkaloids, isoakuammiline (1) and 18-hydroxypseudovincadifformine (2), and five known alkaloids, coronaridine (3), heyneanine (4), 3,19-oxidocoronaridine (5), tabersonine, and strictosidine, were identified from the fruit of Tabernaemontana litoralis. The structures of the alkaloids were determined using NMR and MS data analyses. While 18-hydroxypseudovincadifformine (2) showed a new hydroxylation pattern, isoakuammiline (1) revealed a novel skeleton for monoterpene indole alkaloids. In spite of the isolation of stemmadenine from the fruit tissues in other Tabernaemontana species, this vital biosynthetic precursor of iboga, aspidosperma, and pseudoaspidosperma skeletons was not found in T. litoralis.

  2. An NPF transporter exports a central monoterpene indole alkaloid intermediate from the vacuole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Richard M E; Xu, Deyang; Foureau, Emilien; Teto Carqueijeiro, Marta Ines Soares; Oudin, Audrey; Bernonville, Thomas Dugé de; Novak, Vlastimil; Burow, Meike; Olsen, Carl-Erik; Jones, D Marc; Tatsis, Evangelos C; Pendle, Ali; Ann Halkier, Barbara; Geu-Flores, Fernando; Courdavault, Vincent; Nour-Eldin, Hussam Hassan; O'Connor, Sarah E

    2017-01-13

    Plants sequester intermediates of metabolic pathways into different cellular compartments, but the mechanisms by which these molecules are transported remain poorly understood. Monoterpene indole alkaloids, a class of specialized metabolites that includes the anticancer agent vincristine, antimalarial quinine and neurotoxin strychnine, are synthesized in several different cellular locations. However, the transporters that control the movement of these biosynthetic intermediates within cellular compartments have not been discovered. Here we present the discovery of a tonoplast localized nitrate/peptide family (NPF) transporter from Catharanthus roseus, CrNPF2.9, that exports strictosidine, the central intermediate of this pathway, into the cytosol from the vacuole. This discovery highlights the role that intracellular localization plays in specialized metabolism, and sets the stage for understanding and controlling the central branch point of this pharmacologically important group of compounds.

  3. Development of transcriptomic resources for interrogating the biosynthesis of monoterpene indole alkaloids in medicinal plant species.

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    Elsa Góngora-Castillo

    Full Text Available The natural diversity of plant metabolism has long been a source for human medicines. One group of plant-derived compounds, the monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs, includes well-documented therapeutic agents used in the treatment of cancer (vinblastine, vincristine, camptothecin, hypertension (reserpine, ajmalicine, malaria (quinine, and as analgesics (7-hydroxymitragynine. Our understanding of the biochemical pathways that synthesize these commercially relevant compounds is incomplete due in part to a lack of molecular, genetic, and genomic resources for the identification of the genes involved in these specialized metabolic pathways. To address these limitations, we generated large-scale transcriptome sequence and expression profiles for three species of Asterids that produce medicinally important MIAs: Camptotheca acuminata, Catharanthus roseus, and Rauvolfia serpentina. Using next generation sequencing technology, we sampled the transcriptomes of these species across a diverse set of developmental tissues, and in the case of C. roseus, in cultured cells and roots following elicitor treatment. Through an iterative assembly process, we generated robust transcriptome assemblies for all three species with a substantial number of the assembled transcripts being full or near-full length. The majority of transcripts had a related sequence in either UniRef100, the Arabidopsis thaliana predicted proteome, or the Pfam protein domain database; however, we also identified transcripts that lacked similarity with entries in either database and thereby lack a known function. Representation of known genes within the MIA biosynthetic pathway was robust. As a diverse set of tissues and treatments were surveyed, expression abundances of transcripts in the three species could be estimated to reveal transcripts associated with development and response to elicitor treatment. Together, these transcriptomes and expression abundance matrices provide a rich resource

  4. Marine Indole Alkaloids

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    Natalie Netz

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Marine indole alkaloids comprise a large and steadily growing group of secondary metabolites. Their diverse biological activities make many compounds of this class attractive starting points for pharmaceutical development. Several marine-derived indoles were found to possess cytotoxic, antineoplastic, antibacterial and antimicrobial activities, in addition to the action on human enzymes and receptors. The newly isolated indole alkaloids of marine origin since the last comprehensive review in 2003 are reported, and biological aspects will be discussed.

  5. Monoterpene indole alkaloid hydrazone derivatives with apoptosis inducing activity in human HCT116 colon and HepG2 liver carcinoma cells.

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    Paterna, Angela; Borralho, Pedro M; Gomes, Sofia E; Mulhovo, Silva; Rodrigues, Cecília M P; Ferreira, Maria-José U

    2015-09-01

    The derivatization of dregamine (1) and tabernaemontanine (2), two epimeric monoterpene indole alkaloids isolated from the methanol extract of the roots of Tabernaemontana elegans, with several hydrazines and hydroxylamine gave rise to ten new derivatives (3-12). Their structures were assigned by spectroscopic methods, including 2D NMR experiments. The compounds were tested for their ability to induce apoptosis in HCT116 colon and HepG2 liver cancer cells. Firstly, the cytotoxicity of all compounds (1-12) was evaluated in both cell lines by the MTS assay. The most active compounds (6, 9, 10) along with 1 and 2 were further investigated for their apoptosis induction capability by Guava ViaCount flow cytometry assays, nuclear morphology evaluation by Hoechst staining, and caspase-3/7 activity assays. Compounds 9 and 10 showed promising apoptosis induction profile, displaying higher activities than 5-fluorouracil, the mainstay in colon cancer treatment.

  6. Arborisidine and Arbornamine, Two Monoterpenoid Indole Alkaloids with New Polycyclic Carbon-Nitrogen Skeletons Derived from a Common Pericine Precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Suet-Pick; Chong, Kam-Weng; Lim, Kuan-Hon; Lim, Siew-Huah; Low, Yun-Yee; Kam, Toh-Seok

    2016-04-01

    Two new monoterpene indole alkaloids, characterized by previously unencountered natural product skeletons, viz., arborisidine (1), incorporating indolizidine and cyclohexanone moieties fused to an indole unit, and arbornamine (2), incorporating an unprecedented 6/5/6/5/6 "arbornane" skeleton (distinct from the eburnan or tacaman skeleton), were isolated from a Malayan Kopsia arborea. The structures of the alkaloids were determined based on analysis of the NMR and MS data. Possible biogenetic pathways to these alkaloids from a common pericine precursor (3) are presented.

  7. Indole alkaloids and terpenoids from Tabernaemontana markgrafiana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, H.B.; Hazell, A.; Hazell, R.

    1994-01-01

    The bark of Tabernaemontana markgrafiana yielded five acetylated pentacyclic triterpenes and 24 monoterpene indole alkaloids. The major triterpene was baurenyl acetate, which constituted ca 6% of the crude petrol extract. An X-ray study of iso-ursenyl acetate was carried out for the first time...

  8. A Concise Synthesis of Monoterpene Pyridine Alkaloid Aucubinine B

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晓霞; 赵景瑞; 贾学顺; 杨力维; 翟宏斌

    2003-01-01

    Aucubinine B (4), a monoterpene alkaloid obtained from the metabolites of aucubin in the presence of human intestinal bacteria, has been synthesized from 3-bromo-4-pyridinecarboxaldehyde (5) in four steps with 39% overall yield. The construction of the cyclopenta[c]pyridine intermediate (7) was realized by an intramolecular Heck reaction.

  9. New indole alkaloids from Sarcocephalus latifolius.

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    Abreu, P; Pereira, A

    2001-01-01

    Phytochemical investigation of the root extract of Sarcocephalus latifolius has led to the isolation of the new indole alkaloids 21-O-methylstrictosamide aglycone and 21-O-ethylstrictosamide aglycone, together with strictosamide, angustine, nauclefine, angustidine, angustoline, 19-O-ethylangustoline, naucleidinal, 19-epi-naucleidinal, quinovic acid-3 beta-O-beta-D-fucopyranoside, quinovic acid-3 beta-O-alpha-L-rhamnopyranoside, scopoletin, and beta-sitosterol. Strictosamide displayed moderate antiplasmodial activity against Plasmodium falciparum.

  10. Galanthindole: a new indole alkaloid from Galanthus plicatus ssp. byzantinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unver, Nehir; Kaya, G Irem; Werner, Christa; Verpoorte, Robert; Gözler, Belkis

    2003-09-01

    A new indole alkaloid, galanthindole, was isolated from Galanthus plicatus ssp. byzantinus (Amaryllidaceae), a plant native to northwestern Turkey. Incorporating a non-fused indole ring, galanthindole may represent the prototype of a new subgroup of the Amaryllidaceae alkaloids. Two other bases, (+)-11-hydroxyvittatine and hordenine, are also reported from the same plant.

  11. Total synthesis of the bridged indole alkaloid apparicine.

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    Bennasar, M-Lluïsa; Zulaica, Ester; Solé, Daniel; Roca, Tomàs; García-Díaz, Davinia; Alonso, Sandra

    2009-11-06

    An indole-templated ring-closing metathesis or a 2-indolylacyl radical cyclization constitute the central steps of two alternative approaches developed to assemble the tricyclic ABC substructure of the indole alkaloid apparicine. From this key intermediate, an intramolecular vinyl halide Heck reaction accomplished the closure of the strained 1-azabicyclo[4.2.2]decane framework of the alkaloid with concomitant incorporation of the exocyclic alkylidene substituents.

  12. A new indole alkaloid isolated from Tabernaemontana hystrix steud (Apocynaceae)

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    Monnerat, Cecilia Silva; Souza, Jucimar Jorgeane de; Mathias, Leda; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; Vieira, Ivo Jose C. [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacases, RJ (Brazil). Setor de Quimica de Produtos Naturais]. E-mail: curcino@uenf.br

    2005-11-15

    A new alkaloid, named hystrixnine (1), and five known indole alkaloids, ibogamine (2), olivacine (3), affinine (4), affinisine (5) and Nb-methylaffinisine (6), were isolated from the root bark of Tabernaemontana hystrix. The known triterpenes a-amyrin acetate, b-amyrin acetate and lupeol acetate were also identified. The structures of the compounds were elucidated based on spectopic studies. (author)

  13. Qualitative determination of indole alkaloids of Tabernaemontana fuchsiaefolia (Apocynaceae)

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    Zocoler, Marcos A. [Universidade do Oeste Paulista, Presidente Prudente, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Farmacos e Medicamentos; Oliveira, Arildo J.B. de [Universidade Estadual de Maringa, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Farmacia e Farmacologia; Sarragiotto, Maria H.; Grzesiuk, Viviane L.; Vidotti, Gentil J. [Universidade Estadual de Maringa, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: gjvidotti@uem.br

    2005-11-15

    This p describes a fast and efficient procedure to separate and identify indole alkaloids from the ethanolic extract of Tabernaemontana fuchsiaefolia (Apocynaceae). The alkaloidal fractions obtained from ethanolic extracts of leaves and stem barks and root barks were fractioned and analyzed by Thin-Layer Chromatography (TLC) and by Gas Chromatography coupled to Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS). The following indole alkaloids were identified: ibogamine, coronaridine, ibogaine pseudoindoxyl, voacangine hydroxyindolenine, voacangine pseudoindoxyl, tabernanthine, catharanthine, voacangine, 19-oxovoacangine, 10-hydroxycoronaridine, affinisine, 16-epi-affinine, voachalotine, ibogaline, and conopharyngine. (author)

  14. Analysis of several irdoid and indole precursors of terpenoid indole alkaloids with a single HPLC run

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dagnino, Denise; Schripsema, Jan; Verpoorte, Robert

    1996-01-01

    An isocratic HPLC system is described which allows the separation of the iridoid and indole precursors of terpenoid indole alkaloids, which are present in a single crude extract. The system consists of a column of LiChrospher 60 RP select B 5 my, 250x4 mm (Merck) with an eluent of 1 % formic acid...

  15. Analysis of several irdoid and indole precursors of terpenoid indole alkaloids with a single HPLC run

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dagnino, Denise; Schripsema, Jan; Verpoorte, Robert

    1996-01-01

    An isocratic HPLC system is described which allows the separation of the iridoid and indole precursors of terpenoid indole alkaloids, which are present in a single crude extract. The system consists of a column of LiChrospher 60 RP select B 5 my, 250x4 mm (Merck) with an eluent of 1 % formic acid...

  16. Taichunamides: Prenylated Indole Alkaloids from Aspergillus taichungensis (IBT 19404)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kagiyama, Ippei; Kato, Hikaru; Nehira, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Seven new prenylated indole alkaloids, taichunamides A–G, were isolated from the fungus Aspergillus taichungensis (IBT 19404). Taichunamides A and B contained an azetidine and 4‐pyridone units, respectively, and are likely biosynthesized from notoamide S via (+)‐6‐epi‐stephacidin A. Taichunamides C...... and D contain endoperoxide and methylsulfonyl units, respectively. This fungus produced indole alkaloids containing an anti‐bicyclo[2.2.2]diazaoctane core, whereas A. protuberus and A. amoenus produced congeners with a syn‐bicyclo[2.2.2]diazaoctane core. Plausible biosynthetic pathways to access...

  17. Indole Alkaloids from the Roots of Ervatamia hainanensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Peng HUANG; Zi Ming FENG; Chong Fei ZHENG; Pei Cheng ZHANG; Yang Min MA

    2006-01-01

    Two new indole alkaloids, named ibogamine-18-carboxylic acid, 3, 4-didehydro-7, 8-dioxo-methyl ester 1, ibogamine-18-carboxylic acid, 16, 17-didehydro-9, 17-dihydro-9-hydroxy-(2-oxopropyl)-methyl ester 2, were isolated from Ervatamia hainanensis. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic methods.

  18. Unprecedented Utilization of Pelargonidin and Indole for the Biosynthesis of Plant Indole Alkaloids.

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    Warskulat, Anne-Christin; Tatsis, Evangelos C; Dudek, Bettina; Kai, Marco; Lorenz, Sybille; Schneider, Bernd

    2016-02-15

    Nudicaulins are a group of indole alkaloid glycosides responsible for the color of yellow petals of Papaver nudicaule (Iceland poppy). The unique aglycone scaffold of these alkaloids attracted our interest as one of the most unusual flavonoid-indole hybrid structures that occur in nature. Stable isotope labeling experiments with sliced petals identified free indole, but not tryptamine or l-tryptophan, as one of the two key biosynthetic precursors of the nudicaulin aglycone. Pelargonidin was identified as the second key precursor, contributing the polyphenolic unit to the nudicaulin molecule. This finding was inferred from the temporary accumulation of pelargonidin glycosides in the petals during flower bud development and a drop at the point in time when nudicaulin levels start to increase. The precursor-directed incorporation of cyanidin into a new 3'-hydroxynudicaulin strongly supports the hypothesis that anthocyanins are involved in the biosynthesis of nudicaulins.

  19. The Double-Bond Configuration of Corynanthean Alkaloids and Its Impact on Monoterpenoid Indole Alkaloid Biosynthesis.

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    Eckermann, Ruben; Gaich, Tanja

    2016-04-11

    Experimental evidence is provided for the coherence of the double-bond geometry and the occurrence of "secondary cyclizations" in the biosynthesis of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids. Biosynthetically, akuammiline, C-mavacurine, and Strychnos alkaloids are proposed to be derived from the corynanthean alkaloid geissoschizine, a key intermediate in the biosynthetic pathway of these monoterpenoid indole alkaloids. This process occurs by so-called "secondary cyclizations" from geissoschizine or its derivatives. Although corynanthean alkaloids like geissoschizine incorporate E or Z double bonds located at C19-C20, the alkaloids downstream in the biosynthesis exclusively exhibit the E double bond. This study shows that secondary cyclizations preferentially occur with the E isomer of geissoschizine or its derivatives. This is attributed to the flexibility of the quinolizidine system of the corynanthean alkaloids, which can adopt a cis or trans conformation. For the secondary cyclization to take place, the cis-quinolizidine conformation is required. Experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that the E double bond of geissoschizine induces the cis conformation, whereas the Z double bond induces the trans conformation, which prohibits secondary cyclization of the Z compounds.

  20. Terpenoid Indole Alkaloids Biosynthesis and Metabolic Engineering in Catharanthus roseus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Catharanthus roseus L. (Madagascar periwinkle) biosynthesizes a diverse array of secondary metabolites including anticancer dimeric alkaloids (vinblastine and vincristine) and antihypertensive alkaloids (ajmalicine and serpentine). The multi-step terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) biosynthetic pathway in C. roseus is complex and is under strict molecular regulation. Many enzymes and genes involved in the TIAs biosynthesis have been studied in recent decades. Moreover,some regulatory proteins were found recently to control the production of TIAs in C. roseus. Based on mastering the rough scheme of the pathway and cloning the related genes, metabolic engineering of TIAs biosynthesis has been studied in C.roseus aiming at increasing the desired secondary metabolites in the past few years. The present article summarizes recent advances in isolation and characterization of TIAs biosynthesis genes and transcriptional regulators involved in the second metabolic control in C. roseus. Metabolic engineering applications in TIAs pathway via overexpression of these genes and regulators in C. roseus are also discussed.

  1. Biogenetically inspired synthesis and skeletal diversification of indole alkaloids

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    Mizoguchi, Haruki; Oikawa, Hideaki; Oguri, Hiroki

    2014-01-01

    To access architecturally complex natural products, chemists usually devise a customized synthetic strategy for constructing a single target skeleton. In contrast, biosynthetic assembly lines often employ divergent intramolecular cyclizations of a polyunsaturated common intermediate to produce diverse arrays of scaffolds. With the aim of integrating such biogenetic strategies, we show the development of an artificial divergent assembly line generating unprecedented numbers of scaffold variations of terpenoid indole alkaloids. This approach not only allows practical access to multipotent intermediates, but also enables systematic diversification of skeletal, stereochemical and functional group properties without structural simplification of naturally occurring alkaloids. Three distinct modes of [4+2] cyclizations and two types of redox-mediated annulations provided divergent access to five skeletally distinct scaffolds involving iboga-, aspidosperma-, andranginine- and ngouniensine-type skeletons and a non-natural variant within six to nine steps from tryptamine. The efficiency of our approach was demonstrated by successful total syntheses of (±)-vincadifformine, (±)-andranginine and (-)-catharanthine.

  2. A New Prenylated Indole Diketopiperazine Alkaloid from Eurotium cristatum

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    Xianwei Zou

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A new prenylated indole diketopiperazine alkaloid, cristatumin F (1, and four known metabolites, echinulin (2, dehydroechinulin (3, neoechinulin A (4 and variecolorin O (5, were isolated from the crude extract of the fungus Eurotium cristatum. The structure of 1 was elucidated primarily by NMR and MS methods. The absolute configuration of 1 was assigned using Marfey’s method applied to its acid hydrolyzate. Cristatumin F (1 showed modest radical scavenging activity against DPPH radicals, and exhibited marginal attenuation of 3T3L1 pre-adipocytes.

  3. A new prenylated indole diketopiperazine alkaloid from Eurotium cristatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xianwei; Li, Ying; Zhang, Xiaona; Li, Qian; Liu, Xuan; Huang, Yun; Tang, Tao; Zheng, Saijing; Wang, Weimiao; Tang, Jintian

    2014-11-03

    A new prenylated indole diketopiperazine alkaloid, cristatumin F (1), and four known metabolites, echinulin (2), dehydroechinulin (3), neoechinulin A (4) and variecolorin O (5), were isolated from the crude extract of the fungus Eurotium cristatum. The structure of 1 was elucidated primarily by NMR and MS methods. The absolute configuration of 1 was assigned using Marfey's method applied to its acid hydrolyzate. Cristatumin F (1) showed modest radical scavenging activity against DPPH radicals, and exhibited marginal attenuation of 3T3L1 pre-adipocytes.

  4. Indole Alkaloids from the Sea Anemone Heteractis aurora and Homarine from Octopus cyanea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, Kamel H; Göhl, Matthias; Müller, Tobias; Seifert, Karlheinz

    2015-11-01

    The two new indole alkaloids 2-amino-1,5-dihydro-5-(1H-indol-3-ylmethyl)-4H-imidazol-4-one (1), 2-amino-5-[(6-bromo-1H-indol-3-yl)methyl]-3,5-dihydro-3-methyl-4H-imidazol-4-one (2), and auramine (3) have been isolated from the sea anemone Heteractis aurora. Both indole alkaloids were synthesized for the confirmation of the structures. Homarine (4), along with uracil (5), hypoxanthine (6), and inosine (7) have been obtained from Octopus cyanea.

  5. Spruceanumines A and B, novel plumeran indole alkaloids from Aspidosperma spruceanum(Apocynaceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Vilma B.; Vieira, Ivo J. Curcino; Braz-Filho, R.; Mathias, Leda [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro (UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Ciencias Quimicas (LCQUI); Lopes, Norberto P. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas; Crotti, Antonio E.M. [Universidade de Franca, SP (Brazil). Nucleo de Pesquisas em Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas; Uchoa, Daniel E. de A. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Organica e Inorganica. Centro Nordestino de Aplicacao e Uso da Ressonancia Magnetica Nuclear

    2009-07-01

    Two novel indole alkaloids with plumeran skeleton, spruceanumines A (1) and B (2), and eight known indole alkaloids, aspidospermidine (3), demethoxypalosine (4), aspidocarpine (5), aspidolimine (6), fendlerine (7), aspidolimidine (8), obscurinervidine (9) and obscurinervine (10) were isolated from stem bark and seeds methanolic extracts of Aspidosperma spruceanum. Compounds structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic data, mainly those obtained by {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR (1D and 2D) and mass spectrometry. (author)

  6. Yuehchukene, a Novel Anti-implantation Indole Alkaloid from Murraya paniculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Y C; Ng, K H; Wat, K H; Wong, A; Saxena, I F; Cheng, K F; But, P P; Chang, H T

    1985-08-01

    Yuehchukene, 11beta-(3'-indolyl-7,9alpha,9beta-trimethyl-5beta,8,9,10beta-tetrahydroindano-[2,3- B]indole, a novel dimeric indole alkaloid from the roots of MURRAY A PANICULATA has potent anti-implantation activity in rats at 3 mg/kg P. O. dosing on pregnancy day 2.

  7. Binary Stress Induces an Increase in Indole Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus

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    Wei eZhu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Catharanthus roseus is an important medicinal plant, which produces a variety of indole alkaloids of significant pharmaceutical relevance. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the potential stress-induced increase of indole alkaloid biosynthesis in C. roseus using proteomic technique. The contents of the detectable alkaloids ajmalicine, vindoline, catharanthine, and strictosidine in C. roseus were significantly increased under binary stress. Proteomic analysis revealed that the abundance of proteins related to tricarboxylic acid cycle and cell wall was largely increased; while, that of proteins related to tetrapyrrole synthesis and photosynthesis was decreased. Of note, 10-hydroxygeraniol oxidoreductase, which is involved in the biosynthesis of indole alkaloid was two-fold more abundant in treated group compared to that in control. In addition, mRNA expression levels of genes involved in the indole alkaloid biosynthetic pathway indicated an up-regulation in their transcription in C. roseus under UV-B irradiation. These results suggest that binary stress might negatively affect the process of photosynthesis in C. roseus. In addition, the induction of alkaloid biosynthesis appears to be responsive to binary stress.

  8. Biosynthesis of Monoterpenoid Indole Alkaloid Ajmaline Catalyzed by Novel Reductases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Introduction One of the major root alkaloids of the Indian medicinal plant Rauvolfia serpenlina Benth. Ex Kurz is named ajmaline. The enzymatic biosynthesisof this alkaloid has been studied for a long time by our group[1].

  9. Neonaucline, a New Indole Alkaloid from the Leaves of Ochreinauclea maingayii (Hook. f. Ridsd. (Rubiaceae

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    Marc Litaudon

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A new indole alkaloid; neonaucline (1, along with six known compounds–Cadamine (2, naucledine (3, harmane, benzamide, cinnamide and blumenol A–were isolated from the leaves of Ochreinauclea maingayii (Rubiaceae. In addition to that of compound 1, 13C-NMR data of cadamine (2 and naucledine (3 were also reported. Structural elucidations of these alkaloids were performed using spectroscopic methods especially 1D- and 2D-NMR, IR, UV and LCMS-IT-TOF. The excellent vasorelaxant activity on isolated rat aorta was observed for the alkaloids 1–3 after injection of each sample at 1 × 10−5 M.

  10. Leishmanicidal, antiplasmodial and cytotoxic activity of indole alkaloids from Corynanthe pachyceras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staerk, D; Lemmich, E; Christensen, J

    2000-01-01

    Five indole alkaloids, corynantheidine, corynantheine, dihydrocorynantheine, alpha-yohimbine and corynanthine were isolated from bark of Corynanthe pachyceras K. Schum. (Rubiaceae). The structures were established by spectroscopic methods, including previously unreported assignment of all 1H......-NMR resonances by COSY and NOESY experiments. These and related alkaloids showed pronounced activity against Leishmania major promastigotes (IC50 at the micromolar level) but no significant in vitro antiplasmodial activity (against chloroquine-sensitive Plasmodium falciparum). Cytotoxicity assessed with drug...... sensitive KB-3-1 and multidrug-resistant KB-V1 cell lines was low; the alkaloids are apparently not substrates for the P-glycoprotein (P-170) efflux pump....

  11. New cytotoxic indole alkaloids from Tabernaemontana calcarea from the Madagascar rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash Chaturvedula, V S; Sprague, Shannon; Schilling, Jennifer K; Kingston, David G I

    2003-04-01

    Bioassay-directed fractionation of the alkaloid portion of a CH(2)Cl(2)-MeOH extract of Tabernaemontana calcarea resulted in the isolation of the three new cytotoxic indole alkaloids, 1-3, and the 12 known alkaloids voacangine (4), isovoacangine (5), coronaridine (6), 11-hydroxycoronaridine (7), voacristine (8), 19-epi-voacristine (9), isovoacristine (10), ibogamine (11), 10-methoxyibogamine (12), 11-methoxyibogamine (13), heyneanine (14), and 19-epi-heyneanine (15). The structures of the new compounds 1-3 were elucidated on the basis of extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic interpretation. All the compounds exhibited cytotoxic activity against the A2780 ovarian cancer cell line.

  12. [Fast analysis of indole alkaloids from Evodiae fructus by supercritical fluid chromatography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenyu; Fu, Qing; Li, Kuiyong; Liang, Tu; Jin, Yu

    2014-05-01

    A fast chromatographic separation of indole alkaloids from Evodiae fructus was developed by supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC). The initial screening of four stationary phases was investigated with a standard mixture of evodiamine and rutaecarpine, and a complex sample of indole alkaloids prepared from Evodiae fructus as probes. Later, the effects of chromatographic parameters on separation were studied including injection volume, organic modifier, additive, temperature and back pressure. The injection volume had significant impact on the peak shape. With the additives in the mobile phase, slight changes in peak shape and retention time were observed in separation. Variation in organic modifier led to dramatic change in chromatographic behavior. Both decreased temperature and increased back pressure shortened the retention time. Finally, a fast analytical method using SFC, on a Waters ACQUITY UPC2 BEH column, methanol as modifier, under 35 degrees C and 2.07 x 10(7) Pa, was developed to separate a complex sample of indole alkaloids in less than 15 min. Another rapid approach for the separation of a complex sample of indole alkaloids was developed by using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC). As a result, SFC can be used in the separation of natural products, giving high performance, good resolution and fast analysis speed. The difference in selectivity with UHPLC can be used to the development of natural product separation.

  13. Angustilobine and andranginine type indole alkaloids and an uleine-secovallesamine bisindole alkaloid from Alstonia angustiloba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, Wai-Foong; Tan, Shin-Jowl; Low, Yun-Yee; Komiyama, Kanki; Kam, Toh-Seok

    2011-12-01

    A total of 20 alkaloids were isolated from the leaf and stem-bark extracts of Alstonia angustiloba, of which two are hitherto unknown. One is an alkaloid of the angustilobine type (angustilobine C), while the other is a bisindole alkaloid angustiphylline, derived from the union of uleine and secovallesamine moieties. The structures of these alkaloids were established using NMR and MS analysis. Angustilobine C showed moderate cytotoxicity towards KB cells.

  14. Two New Koumine-Type Indole Alkaloids from Gelsemium elegans Benth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huanhuan Gao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Two new indole alkaloids, 21-oxokoumine (1 and furanokoumine (2, were isolated from the roots of Gelsemium elegans Benth together with three known compounds. The structures of the two novel compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic methods, including NMR, HR-ESI-MS, UV, IR, CD and molecular modeling. Compound 1 is the first instance of a koumine-type alkaloid with a carbonyl at the C-21 position, while compound 2 possesses a tetrahydrofuran ring located on C-20 and C-21.

  15. Asymmetric Total Synthesis of the Indole Diterpene Alkaloid Paspaline

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    An enantioselective synthesis of the indole diterpenoid natural product paspaline is disclosed. Critical to this approach was the implementation of stereoselective desymmetrization reactions to assemble key stereocenters of the molecule. The design and execution of these tactics are described in detail, and a thorough analysis of observed outcomes is presented, ultimately providing the title compound in high stereopurity. This synthesis provides a novel template for preparing key stereocenter...

  16. Enhancing terpenoid indole alkaloid production by inducible expression of mammalian Bax in Catharanthus roseus cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU MaoJun; DONG JuFang

    2007-01-01

    Bax, a mammalian pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, triggers hypersensitive reactions when expressed in plants. To investigate the effects of Bax on the biosynthesis of clinically important natural products in plant cells, we generate transgenic Catharanthus roseus cells overexpressing a mouse Bax protein under the β-estradiol-inducible promoter. The expression of Bax in transgenic Catharanthus roseus cells is highly dependent on β-estradiol concentrations applied. Contents of catharanthine and total terpenoid indole alkaloid of the transgenic cells treated with 30 μmol/L β-estradiol are 5.0- and 5.5-fold of the control cells. Northern and Western blotting results show that expression of mammalian Bax induces transcriptional activation of Tdc and Str, two key genes in terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthetic pathway of Catharanthus roseus cells, and stimulates the accumulation of defense-related protein PR1 in the cells, showing that the mouse Bax triggers the defense responses of Catharanthus roseus cells and activates the terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthetic pathway. Thus, our data suggest that the mammalian Bax might be a potential regulatory factor for secondary metabolite biosynthesis in plant cells and imply a new secondary metabolic engineering strategy for enhancing the metabolic flux to natural products by activating the whole biosynthetic pathway rather than by engineering the single structural genes within the pathways.

  17. Enhancing terpenoid indole alkaloid production by inducible expression of mammalian Bax in Catharanthus roseus cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Bax,a mammalian pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family,triggers hypersensitive reactions when expressed in plants.To investigate the effects of Bax on the biosynthesis of clinically important natural products in plant cells,we generate transgenic Catharanthus roseus cells overexpressing a mouse Bax protein under the β-estradiol-inducible promoter.The expression of Bax in transgenic Catharanthus roseus cells is highly dependent on β-estradiol concentrations applied.Contents of catharanthine and total terpenoid indole alkaloid of the transgenic cells treated with 30 μmol/L β-estradiol are 5.0-and 5.5-fold of the control cells.Northern and Western blotting results show that expression of mammalian Bax induces transcriptional activation of Tdc and Str,two key genes in terpenoid indole alkaloid bio-synthetic pathway of Catharanthus roseus cells,and stimulates the accumulation of defense-related protein PR1 in the cells,showing that the mouse Bax triggers the defense responses of Catharanthus roseus cells and activates the terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthetic pathway.Thus,our data suggest that the mammalian Bax might be a potential regulatory factor for secondary metabolite biosynthesis in plant cells and imply a new secondary metabolic engineering strategy for enhancing the metabolic flux to natural products by activating the whole biosynthetic pathway rather than by engineering the single structural genes within the pathways.

  18. Asymmetric Total Synthesis of the Indole Diterpene Alkaloid Paspaline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Robert J; Johnson, Jeffrey S

    2015-10-02

    An enantioselective synthesis of the indole diterpenoid natural product paspaline is disclosed. Critical to this approach was the implementation of stereoselective desymmetrization reactions to assemble key stereocenters of the molecule. The design and execution of these tactics are described in detail, and a thorough analysis of observed outcomes is presented, ultimately providing the title compound in high stereopurity. This synthesis provides a novel template for preparing key stereocenters in this family of molecules, and the reactions developed en route to paspaline present a series of new synthetic disconnections in preparing steroidal natural products.

  19. Phenolic dimers and an indole alkaloid from Campylospermum flavum (Ochnaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndongo, Joseph Thierry; Shaaban, Mohamed; Mbing, Joséphine Ngo; Bikobo, Dominique Ngono; Atchadé, Alex de Théodore; Pegnyemb, Dieudonné Emmanuel; Laatsch, Hartmut

    2010-11-01

    From the leaves and stem bark of Campylospermum flavum (Ochnaceae), three compounds, namely 4‴-O-methylagathisflavone, flavumchalcone, and flavumindole have been isolated together with 10 known compounds, including three flavonoids, two biflavonoids, two alkaloids, two nitrile glucosides, and glucopyranosyl-β-sistosterol. The structures of these compounds and their relative configurations were established by 1D and 2D NMR experiments. The methanolic crude extracts of leaves and stem bark of C. flavum and compounds displayed a significant cytotoxicity towards Artemia salina larvae.

  20. Naucline, a New Indole Alkaloid from the Bark of Nauclea officinalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Litaudon

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A new indole alkaloid, naucline (1 together with four known alkaloids, angustine (2, angustidine (3, nauclefine (4 and naucletine (5, were isolated from the bark of Nauclea officinalis. The structures of all isolated compounds were elucidated with various spectroscopic methods such as 1D- and 2D- NMR, IR, UV and LCMS-IT-TOF. In addition to that of alkaloid 1, the complete 13C-NMR data of naucletine (5 were also reported. Naucline (1 showed a moderate vasorelaxant activity (90% relaxation at 1 × 10−5 M whereas, angustine (2, nauclefine (4, and naucletine (5 showed potent vasorelaxant activity (more than 90% relaxation at 1 × 10−5 M on an isolated rat aorta.

  1. Stereospecific approach to the synthesis of ring-A oxygenated sarpagine indole alkaloids. Total synthesis of the dimeric indole alkaloid P-(+)-dispegatrine and six other monomeric indole alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwankar, Chitra R; Edwankar, Rahul V; Namjoshi, Ojas A; Liao, Xuebin; Cook, James M

    2013-07-05

    The first regio- and stereocontrolled total synthesis of the bisphenolic, bisquaternary alkaloid (+)-dispegatrine (1) has been accomplished in an overall yield of 8.3% (12 reaction vessels) from 5-methoxy-d-tryptophan ethyl ester (17). A crucial late-stage thallium(III) mediated intermolecular oxidative dehydrodimerization was employed in the formation of the C9-C9' biaryl axis in 1. The complete stereocontrol observed in this key biaryl coupling step is due to the asymmetric induction by the natural sarpagine configuration of the monomer lochnerine (6) and was confirmed by both the Suzuki and the oxidative dehydrodimerization model studies on the tetrahydro β-carboline (35). The axial chirality of the lochnerine dimer (40) and in turn dispegatrine (1) was established by X-ray crystallography and was determined to be P(S). Additionally, the first total synthesis of the monomeric indole alkaloids (+)-spegatrine (2), (+)-10-methoxyvellosimine (5), (+)-lochnerine (6), lochvinerine (7), (+)-sarpagine (8), and (+)-lochneram (11) were also achieved via the common pentacyclic intermediate 16.

  2. Indole Alkaloids from Catharanthus roseus: Bioproduction and Their Effect on Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Almagro

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Catharanthus roseus is a medicinal plant belonging to the family Apocynaceae which produces terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs of high medicinal importance. Indeed, a number of activities like antidiabetic, bactericide and antihypertensive are linked to C. roseus. Nevertheless, the high added value of this plant is based on its enormous pharmaceutical interest, producing more than 130 TIAs, some of which exhibit strong pharmacological activities. The most striking biological activity investigated has been the antitumour effect of dimeric alkaloids such as anhydrovinblastine, vinblastine and vincristine which are already in pre-, clinical or in use. The great pharmacological importance of these indole alkaloids, contrasts with the small amounts of them found in this plant, making their extraction a very expensive process. To overcome this problem, researches have looked for alternative sources and strategies to produce them in higher amounts. In this sense, intensive research on the biosynthesis of TIAs and the regulation of their pathways has been developed with the aim to increase by biotechnological approaches, the production of these high added value compounds. This review is focused on the different strategies which improve TIA production, and in the analysis of the beneficial effects that these compounds exert on human health.

  3. Indole Alkaloids from Plants as Potential Leads for Antidepressant Drugs: A Mini Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Hazrulrizawati A.; Ramli, Aizi N. M.; Yusoff, Mashitah M.

    2017-01-01

    Depression is the most common illness observed in the elderly, adults, and children. Antidepressants prescribed are usually synthetic drugs and these can sometimes cause a wide range of unpleasant side effects. Current research is focussed on natural products from plants as they are a rich source of potent new drug leads. Besides Hypericum perforatum (St. John’s wort), the plants studied include Passiflora incarnata L. (passion flower), Mitragyna speciosa (kratom), Piper methysticum G. Forst (kava) and Valeriana officinalis L. Harman, harmol, harmine, harmalol and harmaline are indole alkaloids isolated from P. incarnata, while mitragynine is isolated from M. speciosa. The structure of isolated compounds from P. methysticum G. Forst and V. officinalis L. contains an indole moiety. The indole moiety is related to the neurotransmitter serotonin which is widely implicated for brain function and cognition as the endogenous receptor agonist. An imbalance in serotonin levels may influence mood in a way that leads to depression. The moiety is present in a number of antidepressants already on the market. Hence, the objective of this review is to discuss bioactive compounds containing the indole moiety from plants that can serve as potent antidepressants. PMID:28293192

  4. A New Benzofuran Glycoside and Indole Alkaloids from a Sponge-Associated Rare Actinomycete, Amycolatopsis sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Kwon

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Three new secondary metabolites, amycofuran (1, amycocyclopiazonic acid (2, and amycolactam (3, were isolated from the sponge-associated rare actinomycete Amycolatopsis sp. Based on combined spectroscopic analyses, the structures of 1–3 were determined to be a new benzofuran glycoside and new indole alkaloids related to cyclopiazonic acids, a class that has previously only been reported in fungi. The absolute configurations of 1 and 3 were deduced by ECD calculations, whereas that of 2 was determined using the modified Mosher method. Amycolactam (3 displayed significant cytotoxicity against the gastric cancer cell line SNU638 and the colon cancer cell line HCT116.

  5. Indole alkaloid sulfonic acids from an aqueous extract of Isatis indigotica roots and their antiviral activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingjie Meng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Six new indole alkaloid sulfonic acids (1–6, together with two analogues (7 and 8 that were previously reported as synthetic products, were isolated from an aqueous extract of the Isatis indigotica root. Their structures including the absolute configurations were determined by spectroscopic data analysis, combined with enzyme hydrolysis and comparison of experimental circular dichroism and calculated electronic circular dichroism spectra. In the preliminary assay, compounds 2 and 4 showed antiviral activity against Coxsackie virus B3 and influenza virus A/Hanfang/359/95 (H3N2, respectively.

  6. Time course production of indole alkaloids by an endophytic strain of Penicillium brasilianum cultivated in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fill, Taicia Pacheco; Asenha, Heloísa Briganti Rodrigues; Marques, Anna Silvia; Ferreira, Antônio Gilberto; Rodrigues-Fo, Edson

    2013-01-01

    During our studies concerning endophytic fungi, two indole alkaloids were co-produced with verruculogen by Penicillium brasilianum isolated from Melia azedarach (Meliaceae). The compounds were isolated by the use of combined chromatographic procedures and identified by physical methods, mainly 1D- and 2D-NMR experiments. This article also describes the production of verruculogen TR-2, first described for this species of Penicillium, and a verruculogen TR-2C-11 epimer, that is a novel fungal natural product. The kinetic production of verruculogen and verruculogen TR-2 produced by P. brasilianum were evaluated in order to understand the involvement of verruculogen TR-2 in verruculogen biosynthesis.

  7. Chemical constituents from Tabernaemontana catharinensis root bark: a brief NMR review of indole alkaloids and in vitro cytotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Paulo Sergio; Franca, Suzelei de Castro; Oliveira, Paulo Vinicius Anderson de; Breves, Camila Moniz de Souza; Pereira, Sarazete Izidia Vaz [Universidade de Ribeirao Preto (UNAERP), SP (Brazil). Unidade de Biotecnologia]. E-mail: ppereira@unaerp.br; Sampaio, Suely Vilela; Nomizo, Auro [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas. Dept. de Analises Clinicas, Toxicologicas e Bromatologicas; Dias, Diones Aparecida [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas. Dept. de Fisica e Quimica

    2008-07-01

    This work describes the isolation and structural determination of pharmacological compounds present in the bark of roots of Tabernaemontana catharinensis (Apocynaceae). Among the 27 substances detected 12 were identified as terpenoid-indole alkaloids, 2 steroids and 13 pentacyclic triterpenes. Structures were outlined based on HMQC, COSY, DEPT, {sup 13}C, and {sup 1}H NMR data and MS. Spectral data of indole alkaloids were reviewed. An in vitro screening of the extracts and isolated compounds was carried out. Compounds ibogamine (5), 3-oxo-coronaridine (9) and 12-methoxy-4-methylvoachalotine (MMV) demonstrated effective cytotoxicity towards SKBR-3 breast adenocarcinoma and C-8161 human melanoma tumor cell lines. (author)

  8. Enzymatic and Chemo-Enzymatic Approaches Towards Natural and Non-Natural Alkaloids: Indoles, Isoquinolines, and Others

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöckigt, Joachim; Chen, Zhong; Ruppert, Martin

    The multi-step enzyme catalysed biosyntheses of monoterpenoid indole and isoquinoline alkaloids are described. Special emphasis is placed on those pathways leading to alkaloids of pharmacological and medicinal significance which have been fully elucidated at the enzyme level. The successful identification and cloning of cDNAs of single enzymes and their application provides great opportunities to develop novel strategies for both in vitro and in vivo alkaloid production in whole plants or tissue cultures, as well as in microbial systems such as Escherichia coli and yeast.

  9. Synergy Potential of Indole Alkaloids and Its Derivative against Drug-resistant Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Gaurav Raj; Gupta, Shikha; Maurya, Anupam; Tripathi, Shubhandra; Sharma, Ashok; Darokar, Mahendra P; Srivastava, Santosh K

    2015-12-01

    Antibacterial and synergy potential of naturally occurring indole alkaloids (IA): 10-methoxy tetrahydroalstonine (1), isoreserpiline (2), 10 and 11 demethoxyreserpiline (3), reserpiline (4), serpentine (5), ajmaline (6), ajmalicine (7), yohimbine (8), and α-yohimbine (9) was evaluated using microbroth dilution assay. Further, α-yohimbine (9) was chemically transformed into six semisynthetic derivatives (9A-9F), and their antibacterial and synergy potential in combination with nalidixic acid (NAL) against E. coli strains CA8000 and DH5α were also evaluated. The IA 1, 2, 4, 5, 9 and the derivative 9F showed eightfold reduction in the MIC of NAL against the DH5α and four- to eightfold reduction against CA8000. These alkaloids also reduced MIC of another antibiotic, tetracycline up to 8folds, against the MDREC-KG4, a multidrug-resistant clinical isolate of E. coli. Mode of action study of these alkaloids showed efflux pumps inhibitory potential, which was supported by their in silico binding affinity and downregulation of efflux pump genes. These results may be of great help in the development of cost-effective antibacterial combinations for treating patients infected with multidrug-resistant Gram-negative infections.

  10. An NPF transporter exports a central monoterpene indole alkaloid intermediate from the vacuole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Payne, Richard; Xu, Deyang; Foureau, Emilien

    2017-01-01

    /peptide family (NPF) transporter from Catharanthus roseus, CrNPF2.9, that exports strictosidine, the central intermediate of this pathway, into the cytosol from the vacuole. This discovery highlights the role that intracellular localization plays in specialized metabolism, and sets the stage for understanding...

  11. Indole Alkaloids of Alstonia angustifolia var. latifolia as Green Inhibitor for Mild Steel Corrosion in 1 M HCl Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Pandian Bothi; Qureshi, Ahmad Kaleem; Rahim, Afidah Abdul; Awang, Khalijah; Mukhtar, Mat Ropi; Osman, Hasnah

    2013-04-01

    The inhibition effect of mild steel (MS) corrosion in 1 M HCl was studied by the addition of indole alkaloids (crude) isolated from Alstonia angustifolia var. latifolia ( A. latifolia) leaves at 303 K. Potentiodynamic polarization, impedance spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analyses were used for this study. Results show that the isolated alkaloid extract of A. latifolia is a good inhibitor and exhibited maximum inhibition efficiency (above 80%) at concentrations between 3 and 5 mg/L. Polarization measurements indicated that the inhibitor does not alter the mechanism of either anodic or cathodic reactions and acted as mixed-type inhibitor. The inhibition efficiencies of both electrochemical techniques are found to be in good agreement and adsorption of inhibitor follows Langmuir isotherm. Adsorption of inhibitor over metal surface was well supported by the SEM studies, while FTIR studies evidenced the presence of indole alkaloids as green inhibitor that reduces the rate of corrosion.

  12. Indole alkaloids from the Marquesan plant Rauvolfia nukuhivensis and their effects on ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicolas J; Ferreiro, Sara F; Barbault, Florent; Nicolas, Mael; Lecellier, Gaël; Paetz, Christian; Gaysinski, Marc; Alonso, Eva; Thomas, Olivier P; Botana, Luis M; Raharivelomanana, Phila

    2015-01-01

    In addition to the already reported nukuhivensiums 1 and 2, 11 indole alkaloids were isolated from the bark of the plant Rauvolfia nukuhivensis, growing in the Marquesas archipelago. The known sandwicine (3), isosandwicine (4), spegatrine (8), lochneram (9), flavopereirine (13) have been found in this plant together with the norsandwicine (5), isonorsandwicine (6), Nb-methylisosandwicine (7), 10-methoxypanarine (10), nortueiaoine (11), tueiaoine (12). The structure elucidation was performed on the basis of a deep exploration of the NMR and HRESIMS data as well as comparison with literature data for similar compounds. Norsandwicine, 10-methoxypanarine, tueiaoine, and more importantly nukuhivensiums, were shown to significantly induce a reduction of IKr amplitude (HERG current). Molecular modelling through docking was performed in order to illustrate this result.

  13. Strategic patent analysis in plant biotechnology: terpenoid indole alkaloid metabolic engineering as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miralpeix, Bruna; Sabalza, Maite; Twyman, Richard M; Capell, Teresa; Christou, Paul

    2014-02-01

    The do-it-yourself patent search is a useful alternative to professional patent analysis particularly in the context of publicly funded projects where funds for IP activities may be limited. As a case study, we analysed patents related to the engineering of terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA) metabolism in plants. We developed a focused search strategy to remove redundancy and reduce the workload without missing important and relevant patents. This resulted in the identification of approximately 50 key patents associated with TIA metabolic engineering in plants, which could form the basis of a more detailed freedom-to-operate analysis. The structural elements of this search strategy could easily be transferred to other contexts, making it a useful generic model for publicly funded research projects. © 2014 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Tremorgenic indole alkaloids potently inhibit smooth muscle high-conductance calcium-activated potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaus, H G; McManus, O B; Lee, S H; Schmalhofer, W A; Garcia-Calvo, M; Helms, L M; Sanchez, M; Giangiacomo, K; Reuben, J P; Smith, A B

    1994-05-17

    Tremorgenic indole alkaloids produce neurological disorders (e.g., staggers syndromes) in ruminants. The mode of action of these fungal mycotoxins is not understood but may be related to their known effects on neurotransmitter release. To determine whether these effects could be due to inhibition of K+ channels, the interaction of various indole diterpenes with high-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K+ (maxi-K) channels was examined. Paspalitrem A, paspalitrem C, aflatrem, penitrem A, and paspalinine inhibit binding of [125I]charybdotoxin (ChTX) to maxi-K channels in bovine aortic smooth muscle sarcolemmal membranes. In contrast, three structurally related compounds, paxilline, verruculogen, and paspalicine, enhanced toxin binding. As predicted from the binding studies, covalent incorporation of [125I]ChTX into the 31-kDa subunit of the maxi-K channel was blocked by compounds that inhibit [125I]ChTX binding and enhanced by compounds that stimulate [125I]ChTX binding. Modulation of [125I]ChTX binding was due to allosteric mechanisms. Despite their different effects on binding of [125I]ChTX to maxi-K channels, all compounds potently inhibited maxi-K channels in electrophysiological experiments. Other types of voltage-dependent or Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels examined were not affected. Chemical modifications of paxilline indicate a defined structure-activity relationship for channel inhibition. Paspalicine, a deshydroxy analog of paspalinine lacking tremorgenic activity, also potently blocked maxi-K channels. Taken together, these data suggest that indole diterpenes are the most potent nonpeptidyl inhibitors of maxi-K channels identified to date. Some of their pharmacological properties could be explained by inhibition of maxi-K channels, although tremorgenicity may be unrelated to channel block.

  15. Indole Alkaloids of the Stigonematales (Cyanophyta: Chemical Diversity, Biosynthesis and Biological Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Walton

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The cyanobacteria are well recognized as producers of a wide array of bioactive metabolites including toxins, and potential drug candidates. However, a limited number of taxa are generally considered with respect to both of these aspects. That said, the order Stigonematales, although largely overlooked in this regard, has become increasingly recognized as a source of bioactive metabolites relevant to both human and environmental health. In particular, the hapalindoles and related indole alkaloids (i.e., ambiguines, fischerindoles, welwitindolinones from the order, represent a diverse, and phylogenetically characteristic, class of secondary metabolites with biological activity suggestive of potential as both environmental toxins, and promising drug discovery leads. The present review gives an overview of the chemical diversity of biologically active metabolites from the Stigonematales—and particularly the so-called hapalindole-type alkaloids—including their biosynthetic origins, and their pharmacologically and toxicologically relevant bioactivities. Taken together, the current evidence suggests that these alkaloids, and the associated cyanobacterial taxa from the order, warrant future consideration as both potentially harmful (i.e., “toxic” algae, and as promising leads for drug discovery.

  16. Analysis of Indole Alkaloids from Rhazya stricta Hairy Roots by Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Akhgari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhazya stricta Decne. (Apocynaceae contains a large number of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs. This study focused on the composition of alkaloids obtained from transformed hairy root cultures of R. stricta employing ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS. In the UPLC-MS analyses, a total of 20 TIAs were identified from crude extracts. Eburenine and vincanine were the main alkaloids followed by polar glucoalkaloids, strictosidine lactam and strictosidine. Secodine-type alkaloids, tetrahydrosecodinol, tetrahydro- and dihydrosecodine were detected too. The occurrence of tetrahydrosecodinol was confirmed for the first time for R. stricta. Furthermore, two isomers of yohimbine, serpentine and vallesiachotamine were identified. The study shows that a characteristic pattern of biosynthetically related TIAs can be monitored in Rhazya hairy root crude extract by this chromatographic method.

  17. Analysis of Indole Alkaloids from Rhazya stricta Hairy Roots by Ultra-Performance Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhgari, Amir; Laakso, Into; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Yrjönen, Teijo; Vuorela, Heikki; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja; Rischer, Heiko

    2015-12-17

    Rhazya stricta Decne. (Apocynaceae) contains a large number of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs). This study focused on the composition of alkaloids obtained from transformed hairy root cultures of R. stricta employing ultra-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS). In the UPLC-MS analyses, a total of 20 TIAs were identified from crude extracts. Eburenine and vincanine were the main alkaloids followed by polar glucoalkaloids, strictosidine lactam and strictosidine. Secodine-type alkaloids, tetrahydrosecodinol, tetrahydro- and dihydrosecodine were detected too. The occurrence of tetrahydrosecodinol was confirmed for the first time for R. stricta. Furthermore, two isomers of yohimbine, serpentine and vallesiachotamine were identified. The study shows that a characteristic pattern of biosynthetically related TIAs can be monitored in Rhazya hairy root crude extract by this chromatographic method.

  18. Profiling the indole alkaloids in yohimbe bark with ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with ion mobility quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianghao; Baker, Andrew; Chen, Pei

    2011-09-30

    An ultra-performance liquid chromatography/ion mobility quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC/IM-QTOF-MS) method was developed for profiling the indole alkaloids in yohimbe bark. Many indole alkaloids with the yohimbine or ajmalicine core structure, plus methylated, oxidized and reduced species, were characterized. Common fragments and mass differences are described. It was shown that the use of IMS could provide another molecular descriptor, i.e. molecular shape by rotationally averaged collision cross-section; this is of great value for identification of constituents when reference materials are usually not available. Using the combination of high resolution (~40000) accurate mass measurement with time-aligned parallel (TAP) fragmentation, MS(E) (where E represents collision energy), ion mobility mass spectrometry (IMS) and UPLC chromatography, a total 55 indole alkaloids were characterized and a few new indole alkaloids are reported for the first time.

  19. Dragmacidin G, a Bioactive Bis-Indole Alkaloid from a Deep-Water Sponge of the Genus Spongosorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Amy E.; Killday, K. Brian; Chakrabarti, Debopam; Guzmán, Esther A.; Harmody, Dedra; McCarthy, Peter J.; Pitts, Tara; Pomponi, Shirley A.; Reed, John K.; Roberts, Bracken F.; Rodrigues Felix, Carolina; Rohde, Kyle H.

    2017-01-01

    A deep-water sponge of the genus Spongosorites has yielded a bis-indole alkaloid which we have named dragmacidin G. Dragmacidin G was first reported by us in the patent literature and has recently been reported by Hitora et al. from a sponge of the genus Lipastrotheya. Dragmacidin G is the first in this series of compounds to have a pyrazine ring linking the two indole rings. It also has a rare N-(2-mercaptoethyl)-guanidine side chain. Dragmacidin G shows a broad spectrum of biological activity including inhibition of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Plasmodium falciparum, and a panel of pancreatic cancer cell lines. PMID:28085024

  20. Expedient preparation of nazlinine and a small library of indole alkaloids using flow electrochemistry as an enabling technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabeshov, Mikhail A; Musio, Biagia; Murray, Philip R D; Browne, Duncan L; Ley, Steven V

    2014-09-05

    An expedient synthesis of the indole alkaloid nazlinine is reported. Judicious choice of flow electrochemistry as an enabling technology has permitted the rapid generation of a small library of unnatural relatives of this biologically active molecule. Furthermore, by conducting the key electrochemical Shono oxidation in a flow cell, the loading of electrolyte can be significantly reduced to 20 mol % while maintaining a stable, broadly applicable process.

  1. Indentification of vincamine indole alkaloids producing endophytic fungi isolated from Nerium indicum, Apocynaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Ren; Jiajia, Liu; Dongliang, Yang; Yingzi, Peng; Juan, Hong; Xiong, Liu; Nana, Zhao; Jing, Zhou; Yitian, Luo

    2016-11-01

    Vincamine, a monoterpenoid indole alkaloid which had been marketed as nootropic drugs for the treatment of cerebral insufficiencies, is widely found in plants of the Apocynaceae family. Nerium indicum is a plant belonging to the Apocynaceae family. So, the purpose of this research was designed to investigate the vincamine alkaloids producing endophytic fungi from Nerium indicum, Apocynaceae. 11 strains of endophytic fungi, isolated from the stems and roots of the plant, were grouped into 5 genera on the basis of morphological characteristics. All fungal isolates were fermented and their extracts were preliminary screened by Dragendorff's reagent and thin layer chromatography (TLC). One isolated strain CH1, isolated from the stems of Nerium indicum, had the same Rf value (about 0.56) as authentic vincamine. The extracts of strain CH1 were further analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and liquid chromatograph-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), and the results showed that the strain CH1 could produce vincamine and vincamine analogues. The acetylcholinesterase (AchE) inhibitory activity assays using Ellman's method revealed that the metabolites of strain CH1 had significant AchE inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 5.16μg/mL. The isolate CH1 was identified as Geomyces sp. based on morphological and molecular identification, and has been deposited in the China Center for Type Culture Collection (CCTCCM 2014676). This study first reported the natural compounds tabersonine and ethyl-vincamine from endophytic fungi CH1, Geomyces sp. In conclusion, the fungal endophytes from Nerium indicum can be used as alternative source for the production of vincamine and vincamine analogues. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. GluCl a target of indole alkaloid okaramines: a 25 year enigma solved

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furutani, Shogo; Nakatani, Yuri; Miura, Yuka; Ihara, Makoto; Kai, Kenji; Hayashi, Hideo; Matsuda, Kazuhiko

    2014-08-01

    In 1989, indole alkaloid okaramines isolated from the fermentation products of Penicillium simplicissimum were shown to be insecticidal, yet the mechanism of their toxicity to insects remains unknown. We therefore examined the action of okaramine B on silkworm larval neurons using patch-clamp electrophysiology. Okaramine B induced inward currents which reversed close to the chloride equilibrium potential and were blocked by fipronil. Thus it was tested on the silkworm RDL (resistant-to-dieldrin) γ-aminobutyric-acid-gated chloride channel (GABACl) and a silkworm L-glutamate-gated chloride channel (GluCl) expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Okaramine B activated GluCl, but not RDL. GluCl activation by okaramines correlated with their insecticidal activity, offering a solution to a long-standing enigma concerning their insecticidal actions. Also, unlike ivermectin, okaramine B was inactive at 10 μM on human α1β2γ2 GABACl and α1β glycine-gated chloride channels and provides a new lead for the development of safe insect control chemicals.

  3. Toxic indole alkaloids avrainvillamide and stephacidin B produced by a biocide tolerant indoor mold Aspergillus westerdijkiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkola, Raimo; Andersson, Maria A; Hautaniemi, Maria; Salkinoja-Salonen, Mirja S

    2015-06-01

    Toxic Aspergillus westerdijkiae were present in house dust and indoor air fall-out from a residence and a kindergarten where the occupants suffered from building related ill health. The A. westerdijkiae isolates produced indole alkaloids avrainvillamide (445 Da) and its dimer stephacidin B (890 Da). It grew and sporulated in presence of high concentrations of boron or polyguanidine (PHMB, PHMG) based antimicrobial biocides used to remediate mold infested buildings. The boar sperm cells were used as sensor cells to purify toxins from HPLC fractions of the fungal biomass. Submicromolar concentrations (EC50 0.3-0.4 μM) blocked boar spermatozoan motility and killed porcine kidney tubular epithelial cells (PK-15). Plate grown hyphal mass of the A. westerdijkiae isolates contained 300-750 ng of avrainvillamide and 30-300 ng of stephacidin B per mg (wet weight). The toxins induced rapid (30 min) loss of boar sperm motility, followed (24 h) by loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). Apoptotic cell death was observed in PK-15 cell monolayers, prior to cessation of glucose uptake or loss of ΔΨm. Avrainvillamide and stephacidin B were 100-fold more potent towards the porcine cells than the mycotoxins stephacidin A, ochratoxin A, sterigmatocystin and citrinin. The high toxicity of stephacidin B indicates a role of nitrone group in the mechanism of toxicity. Avrainvillamide and stephacidin B represent a new class of toxins with possible a threat to human health in buildings. Furthermore, the use of biocides highly enhanced the growth of toxigenic A. westerdijkiae.

  4. Lolitrem B and Indole Diterpene Alkaloids Produced by Endophytic Fungi of the Genus Epichloë and Their Toxic Effects in Livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Guerre

    2016-02-15

    Different group of alkaloids are produced during the symbiotic development of fungal endophytes of the genus Epichloë in grass. The structure and toxicity of the compounds vary considerably in mammalian herbivores and in crop pests. Alkaloids of the indole-diterpene group, of which lolitrem B is the most toxic, were first characterized in endophyte-infected perennial ryegrass, and are responsible for "ryegrass staggers." Ergot alkaloids, of which ergovaline is the most abundant ergopeptide alkaloid produced, are also found in ryegrass, but generally at a lower rate than lolitrem B. Other alkaloids such as lolines and peramine are toxic for crop pests but have weak toxicological properties in mammals. The purpose of this review is to present indole-diterpene alkaloids produced in endophyte infected ryegrass from the first characterization of ryegrass staggers to the determination of the toxicokinetics of lolitrem B and of their mechanism of action in mammals, focusing on the different factors that could explain the worldwide distribution of the disease. Other indole diterpene alkaloids than lolitrem B that can be found in Epichloë infected ryegrass, and their tremorgenic properties, are presented in the last section of this review.

  5. Lolitrem B and Indole Diterpene Alkaloids Produced by Endophytic Fungi of the Genus Epichloë and Their Toxic Effects in Livestock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerre Philippe

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Different group of alkaloids are produced during the symbiotic development of fungal endophytes of the genus Epichloë in grass. The structure and toxicity of the compounds vary considerably in mammalian herbivores and in crop pests. Alkaloids of the indole-diterpene group, of which lolitrem B is the most toxic, were first characterized in endophyte-infected perennial ryegrass, and are responsible for “ryegrass staggers.” Ergot alkaloids, of which ergovaline is the most abundant ergopeptide alkaloid produced, are also found in ryegrass, but generally at a lower rate than lolitrem B. Other alkaloids such as lolines and peramine are toxic for crop pests but have weak toxicological properties in mammals. The purpose of this review is to present indole-diterpene alkaloids produced in endophyte infected ryegrass from the first characterization of ryegrass staggers to the determination of the toxicokinetics of lolitrem B and of their mechanism of action in mammals, focusing on the different factors that could explain the worldwide distribution of the disease. Other indole diterpene alkaloids than lolitrem B that can be found in Epichloë infected ryegrass, and their tremorgenic properties, are presented in the last section of this review.

  6. A straightforward synthetic entry to cleavamine-type indole alkaloids by a ring-closing metathesis-vinyl halide Heck cyclization strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennasar, M-Lluïsa; Solé, Daniel; Zulaica, Ester; Alonso, Sandra

    2011-04-15

    An indole-templated ring-closing metathesis has been used to create the central nine-membered ring of the cleavamine-type alkaloids. A subsequent intramolecular vinyl halide Heck reaction upon the resulting azacyclononene ring completes the assembly of the strained 1-azabicyclo[6.3.1]dodecane framework of the alkaloids. The usefulness of the approach is illustrated with the synthesis of (±)-cleavamine and (±)-dihydrocleavamine.

  7. The Diaza[5.5.6.6]fenestrane Skeleton-Synthesis of Leuconoxine Alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaffenbach, Magnus; Gaich, Tanja

    2016-03-07

    Among the Aspidosperma-derived monoterpene indole alkaloids, the leuconoxine subgroup has drawn significant attention from the synthetic community during the past few years. This Minireview summarizes the hitherto six completed total syntheses of leuconoxines emphasizing the different strategies for assembling the key structural motif, an unprecedented diaza[5.5.6.6]fenestrane skeleton. In addition, the proposed biogenetic relationships within the group of these alkaloids are described.

  8. Emerging trends in research on spatial and temporal organization of terpenoid indole alkaloid pathway in Catharanthus roseus: a literature update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Priyanka; Mathur, Ajay Kumar; Srivastava, Alka; Mathur, Archana

    2012-04-01

    Catharanthus roseus (The Madagaskar Periwinkle) plant is commercially valued for harbouring more than 130 bioactive terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs). Amongst these, two of the leaf-derived bisindole alkaloids-vinblastine and vincristine-are widely used in several anticancer chemotherapies. The great pharmacological values, low in planta occurrence, unavailability of synthetic substitutes and exorbitant market cost of these alkaloids have prompted scientists to understand the basic architecture and regulation of biosynthesis of these TIAs in C. roseus plant and its cultured tissues. The knowledge gathered over a period of 30 years suggests that the TIA biosynthesis is highly regulated by developmental and environmental factors and operates through a complex multi-step enzymatic network. Extensive spatial and temporal cross talking also occurs at inter- and intracellular levels in different plant organs during TIA biogenesis. A close association of indole, methylerythritol phosphate and secoiridoid monoterpenoid pathways and involvement of at least four cell types (epidermis, internal phloem-associated parenchyma, laticifers and idioblasts) and five intracellular compartments (chloroplast, vacuole, nucleus, endoplasmic reticulum and cytosol) have been implicated with this biosynthetic mechanism. Accordingly, the research in this area is primarily advancing today to address and resolve six major issues namely: precise localization and expression of pathway enzymes using modern in situ RNA hybridization tools, mechanisms of intra- and intercellular trafficking of pathway intermediates, cloning and functional validation of genes coding for known or hitherto unknown pathway enzymes, mechanism of global regulation of the pathway by transcription factors, control of relative diversion of metabolite flux at crucial branch points and finally, strategising the metabolic engineering approaches to improve the productivity of the desired TIAs in plant or corresponding cultured

  9. Evaluation of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Petit Havana SR1) hairy roots for the production of geraniol, the first committed step in terpenoid indole alkaloid pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritala, A.; Dong, L.; Imseng, N.; Seppanen-Laakso, T.; Vasilev, N.; Krol, van der A.R.; Rischer, H.; Maaheimo, H.; Virkki, A.; Brandli, J.; Schillberg, S.; Eibl, R.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Oksman-Caldentey, K.M.

    2014-01-01

    The terpenoid indole alkaloids are one of the major classes of plant-derived natural products and are well known for their many applications in the pharmaceutical, fragrance and cosmetics industries. Hairy root cultures are useful for the production of plant secondary metabolites because of their

  10. Evaluation of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Petit Havana SR1) hairy roots for the production of geraniol, the first committed step in terpenoid indole alkaloid pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritala, A.; Dong, L.; Imseng, N.; Seppanen-Laakso, T.; Vasilev, N.; Krol, van der A.R.; Rischer, H.; Maaheimo, H.; Virkki, A.; Brandli, J.; Schillberg, S.; Eibl, R.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Oksman-Caldentey, K.M.

    2014-01-01

    The terpenoid indole alkaloids are one of the major classes of plant-derived natural products and are well known for their many applications in the pharmaceutical, fragrance and cosmetics industries. Hairy root cultures are useful for the production of plant secondary metabolites because of their ge

  11. Prenylated indole diketopiperazine alkaloids from a mangrove rhizosphere soil derived fungus Aspergillus effuses H1-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Huquan; Zhu, Tianjiao; Li, Dehai; Gu, Qianqun; Liu, Weizhong

    2013-08-01

    One new prenylated indole diketopiperazine alkaloid, named dihydroneochinulin B (1), one known spiro-polyketide-diketopiperazine hybrid cryptoechinuline D (2) and three related known metabolites didehydroechinulin B (3), neoechinulin B (4) and auroglaucin (5) were isolated from the mangrove rhizosphere soil derived fungus, Aspergillus effuses H1-1. The structures were assigned by detailed spectroscopic analysis. The enantiomers of cryptoechinuline D (2) were separated to be (+)-cryptoechinuline D (2a) and (-)-cryptoechinuline D (2b) by chiral HPLC, and their absolute configurations were determined by ECD analysis. The cytotoxic effects of the compounds were preliminarily evaluated on P388, HL-60, BEL-7402 and A-549 cell lines by SRB or MTT methods, and compounds 2, 2a and 3 showed significant activities.

  12. Indole Diterpene Alkaloids as Novel Inhibitors of the Wnt/β-catenin Pathway in Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, Asmaa A.; Ayoub, Nehad M.; Foudah, Ahmed I.; Gissendanner, Chris R.; Meyer, Sharon A.; El Sayed, Khalid A.

    2013-01-01

    Penitrems are indole diterpene alkaloids best known for their BK channel inhibition and tremorgenic effects in mammals. In a previous study, penitrems A–F (1–5), their biosynthetic precursors, paspaline (6) and emindole SB (7), and two brominated penitrem analogs 8 and 9 demonstrated promising in vitro antiproliferative, antimigratory, and anti-invasive effects in the MTT (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231), wound-healing, and Cultrex® BME cell invasion (MDA-MB-231) assays, respectively. The study herein reports the novel ability of penitrem A to suppress total β-catenin levels in MDA-MB-231 mammary cancer cells. Nine new penitrem analogs (10–18) were semisynthetically prepared, in an attempt to identify pharmacophores correlated with BK channel inhibition and tremorgenicity of penitrems and decrease their toxicity. The degree of BK channel inhibition was assessed using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and in vivo tremorgenic EC50 was calculated using CD-1 male mice following an Up-and-Down-Procedure (UDP). Although new analogs were generally less active than parent compound 1, some showed no BK channel inhibition or tremorgenicity and retained the ability of penitrem A (1) to suppress total β-catenin levels in MDA-MB-231 cells. Paspaline (6) and emindole SB (7), both lacking BK channel inhibition and tremorgenicity, represent the simplest indole diterpene skeleton that retains the antiproliferative, antimigratory and total β-catenin suppressing effects shown by the more complex penitrem A (1). PMID:24211635

  13. Silencing the Transcriptional Repressor, ZCT1, Illustrates the Tight Regulation of Terpenoid Indole Alkaloid Biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus Hairy Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Noreen F; Weaver, Jessica D; Cram, Erin J; Lee-Parsons, Carolyn W T

    2016-01-01

    The Catharanthus roseus plant is the source of many valuable terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs), including the anticancer compounds vinblastine and vincristine. Transcription factors (TFs) are promising metabolic engineering targets due to their ability to regulate multiple biosynthetic pathway genes. To increase TIA biosynthesis, we elicited the TIA transcriptional activators (ORCAs and other unidentified TFs) with the plant hormone, methyl jasmonate (MJ), while simultaneously silencing the expression of the transcriptional repressor ZCT1. To silence ZCT1, we developed transgenic hairy root cultures of C. roseus that expressed an estrogen-inducible Zct1 hairpin for activating RNA interference. The presence of 17β-estradiol (5μM) effectively depleted Zct1 in hairy root cultures elicited with MJ dosages that either optimize or inhibit TIA production (250 or 1000μM). However, silencing Zct1 was not sufficient to increase TIA production or the expression of the TIA biosynthetic genes (G10h, Tdc, and Str), illustrating the tight regulation of TIA biosynthesis. The repression of the TIA biosynthetic genes at the inhibitory MJ dosage does not appear to be solely regulated by ZCT1. For instance, while Zct1 and Zct2 levels decreased through activating the Zct1 hairpin, Zct3 levels remained elevated. Since ZCT repressors have redundant yet distinct functions, silencing all three ZCTs may be necessary to relieve their repression of alkaloid biosynthesis.

  14. Comparison of three chromatographic techniques for the detection of mitragynine and other indole and oxindole alkaloids in Mitragyna speciosa (kratom) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei; Carrell, Emily J; Ali, Zulfiqar; Avula, Bharathi; Avonto, Cristina; Parcher, Jon F; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2014-06-01

    Leaves of the Southeast Asian plant Mitragyna speciosa are used to suppress pain and mitigate opioid withdrawal syndromes. The potential threat of abuse and ready availability of this uncontrolled psychoactive plant have led to the need for improved analytical techniques for the detection of the major active components, mitragynine and 7-hydroxymitragynine. Three independent chromatographic methods coupled to two detection systems, GC with MS, supercritical fluid chromatography with diode array detection, and HPLC with MS and diode array detection, were compared for the analysis of mitragynine and other indole and oxindole alkaloids in M. speciosa plants. The indole alkaloids included two sets of diastereoisomers: (i) paynantheine and 3-isopaynantheine and (ii) mitragynine, speciogynine, and speciociliatine. Two oxindole alkaloid diastereoisomers, corynoxine and corynoxine B, were also studied. The HPLC and supercritical fluid chromatography methods successfully resolved the major components with slightly different elution orders. The GC method was less satisfactory because it was unable to resolve mitragynine and speciociliatine. This separation was difficult by GC with a liquid stationary phase because these diastereoisomers differ only in the orientation of an interior hydrogen atom. The observed lack of resolution of the indole alkaloid diastereoisomers coupled with the likeness of the mass and tandem mass spectra, calls into question proposed GC methods for the analysis of mitragynine based on solely GC with MS separation and identification.

  15. Spiro Fused Diterpene-Indole Alkaloids from a Creek-Bottom-Derived Aspergillus terreus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Shengxin; Du, Lin; Gerea, Alexandra L.; King, Jarrod B.; You, Jianlan

    2013-01-01

    Four metabolites, teraspiridoles A–D (2–5), formed from the merger of diterpene and modified indole scaffold were obtained from an Aspergillus terreus isolate. The structures and absolute configurations of these natural products were established using NMR, mass spectrometry, Marfey’s method, VCD, and ECD data. Teraspiridole B (3) exhibited weak inhibition of planaria regeneration/survival. PMID:23924243

  16. Leishmanicidal, antiplasmodial and cytotoxic activity of indole alkaloids from Corynanthe pachyceras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staerk, D; Lemmich, E; Christensen, J;

    2000-01-01

    -NMR resonances by COSY and NOESY experiments. These and related alkaloids showed pronounced activity against Leishmania major promastigotes (IC50 at the micromolar level) but no significant in vitro antiplasmodial activity (against chloroquine-sensitive Plasmodium falciparum). Cytotoxicity assessed with drug...

  17. [Total synthesis of biologically active alkaloids using bio-inspired indole oxidation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Hayato

    2015-01-01

    Many tryptophan-based dimeric diketopiperazine (DKP) alkaloids including WIN 64821 and ditryptophenaline, which exhibit fascinating biological activities, have been isolated from fungi. These alkaloids possess a unique architecture; therefore several total syntheses of these compounds have been accomplished via bio-inspired reactions. Despite these elegant strategies, we were convinced that a more direct bio-inspired solution for the preparation of tryptophan-based DKP alkaloids was possible because in a true biosynthesis, direct dimerization of tryptophan occurs in aqueous media without incorporation of a protecting group on the substrates. Thus we developed direct bio-inspired dimerization reactions in aqueous, acidic media, along with a novel biomimetic pathway, to provide C2-symmetric and non-symmetric dimeric compounds from commercially available amine-free tryptophan derivatives using Mn(OAc)3, VOF3, and V2O5 as one-electron oxidants. In addition, concise two-pot or three-step syntheses of the naturally occurring dimeric DKP alkaloids (+)-WIN 64821, (-)-ditryptophenaline, and (+)-naseseazine B were accomplished with total yields of 20%, 13%, and 20%, respectively. The present synthesis has several noteworthy features: 1) the tryptophan-based C2-symmetric and non-symmetric dimeric key intermediates can be prepared on a multigram scale in one step; 2) the developed oxidation reaction was carried out in aqueous, acidic solution without deactivation of the metal oxidants; 3) protection of the primary amine can be avoided by salt formation in aqueous acid; 4) for the total two-pot operation, the reaction media are environmentally friendly water and ethanol; 5) satisfactory total yields are obtained compared with previously reported syntheses.

  18. Characterization of variation and quantitative trait loci related to terpenoid indole alkaloid yield in a recombinant inbred line mapping population of Catharanthus roseus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vishakha Sharma; Swati Chaudhary; Suchi Srivastava; Richa Pandey; Sushil Kumar

    2011-04-01

    Improved Catharanthus roseus cultivars are required for high yields of vinblastine, vindoline and catharanthine and/or serpentine and ajmalicine, the pharmaceutical terpenoid indole alkaloids. An approach to derive them is to map QTL for terpenoid indole alkaloids yields, identify DNA markers tightly linked to the QTL and apply marker assisted selection. Towards the end, 197 recombinant inbred lines from a cross were grown over two seasons to characterize variability for seven biomass and 23 terpenoid indole alkaloids content-traits and yield-traits. The recombinant inbred lines were genotyped for 178 DNA markers which formed a framework genetic map of eight linkage groups (LG), spanning 1786.5 cM, with 10.0 cM average intermarker distance. Estimates of correlations between traits allowed selection of seven relatively more important traits for terpenoid indole alkaloids yields. QTL analysis was performed on them using single marker (regression) analysis, simple interval mapping and composite interval mapping procedures. A total of 20 QTL were detected on five of eight LG, 10 for five traits on LG1, five for four traits on LG2, three for one trait on LG3 and one each for different traits on LG three and four. QTL for the same or different traits were found clustered on three LG. Co-location of two QTL for biomass traits was in accord of correlation between them. The QTL were validated for use in marker assisted selection by the recombinant inbred line which transgressively expressed 16 traits contributory to the yield vinblastine, vindoline and catharanthine from leaves and roots that possessed favourable alleles of 13 relevant QTL.

  19. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pyruvate kinase as a target for bis-indole alkaloids with antibacterial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoraghi, Roya; Worrall, Liam; See, Raymond H; Strangman, Wendy; Popplewell, Wendy L; Gong, Huansheng; Samaai, Toufiek; Swayze, Richard D; Kaur, Sukhbir; Vuckovic, Marija; Finlay, B Brett; Brunham, Robert C; McMaster, William R; Davies-Coleman, Michael T; Strynadka, Natalie C; Andersen, Raymond J; Reiner, Neil E

    2011-12-30

    Novel classes of antimicrobials are needed to address the emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). We have recently identified pyruvate kinase (PK) as a potential novel drug target based upon it being an essential hub in the MRSA interactome (Cherkasov, A., Hsing, M., Zoraghi, R., Foster, L. J., See, R. H., Stoynov, N., Jiang, J., Kaur, S., Lian, T., Jackson, L., Gong, H., Swayze, R., Amandoron, E., Hormozdiari, F., Dao, P., Sahinalp, C., Santos-Filho, O., Axerio-Cilies, P., Byler, K., McMaster, W. R., Brunham, R. C., Finlay, B. B., and Reiner, N. E. (2011) J. Proteome Res. 10, 1139-1150; Zoraghi, R., See, R. H., Axerio-Cilies, P., Kumar, N. S., Gong, H., Moreau, A., Hsing, M., Kaur, S., Swayze, R. D., Worrall, L., Amandoron, E., Lian, T., Jackson, L., Jiang, J., Thorson, L., Labriere, C., Foster, L., Brunham, R. C., McMaster, W. R., Finlay, B. B., Strynadka, N. C., Cherkasov, A., Young, R. N., and Reiner, N. E. (2011) Antimicrob. Agents Chemother. 55, 2042-2053). Screening of an extract library of marine invertebrates against MRSA PK resulted in the identification of bis-indole alkaloids of the spongotine (A), topsentin (B, D), and hamacanthin (C) classes isolated from the Topsentia pachastrelloides as novel bacterial PK inhibitors. These compounds potently and selectively inhibited both MRSA PK enzymatic activity and S. aureus growth in vitro. The most active compounds, cis-3,4-dihyrohyrohamacanthin B (C) and bromodeoxytopsentin (D), were identified as highly potent MRSA PK inhibitors (IC(50) values of 16-60 nM) with at least 166-fold selectivity over human PK isoforms. These novel anti-PK natural compounds exhibited significant antibacterial activities against S. aureus, including MRSA (minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 12.5 and 6.25 μg/ml, respectively) with selectivity indices (CC(50)/MIC) >4. We also report the discrete structural features of the MRSA PK tetramer as determined by x

  20. Indole diterpene alkaloids as novel inhibitors of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, Asmaa A; Ayoub, Nehad M; Foudah, Ahmed I; Gissendanner, Chris R; Meyer, Sharon A; El Sayed, Khalid A

    2013-01-01

    Penitrems are indole diterpene alkaloids best known for their BK channel inhibition and tremorgenic effects in mammals. In a previous study, penitrems A-F (1-5), their biosynthetic precursors, paspaline (6) and emindole SB (7), and two brominated penitrem analogs 8 and 9 demonstrated promising in vitro antiproliferative, antimigratory, and anti-invasive effects in the MTT (MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231), wound-healing, and Cultrex BME cell invasion (MDA-MB-231) assays, respectively. The study herein reports the novel ability of penitrem A to suppress total β-catenin levels in MDA-MB-231 mammary cancer cells. Nine new penitrem analogs (10-18) were semisynthetically prepared, in an attempt to identify pharmacophores correlated with BK channel inhibition and tremorgenicity of penitrems and decrease their toxicity. The degree of BK channel inhibition was assessed using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and in vivo tremorgenic EC₅₀ was calculated using CD-1 male mice following an Up-and-Down Procedure (UDP). Although new analogs were generally less active than parent compound 1, some showed no BK channel inhibition or tremorgenicity and retained the ability of penitrem A (1) to suppress total β-catenin levels in MDA-MB-231 cells. Paspaline (6) and emindole SB (7), both lacking BK channel inhibition and tremorgenicity, represent the simplest indole diterpene skeleton that retains the antiproliferative, antimigratory and total β-catenin suppressing effects shown by the more complex penitrem A (1). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Synthesis and study of a molecularly imprinted polymer for the specific extraction of indole alkaloids from Catharanthus roseus extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, C; Claude, B; Morin, Ph; Max, J-P; Pena, R; Ribet, J-P

    2011-01-10

    Two molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) for catharanthine and vindoline have been synthesized in order to specifically extract these natural indole alkaloids from Catharanthus roseus by solid-phase extraction (SPE). Each MIP was prepared by thermal polymerisation using catharanthine (or vindoline) as template, methacrylic acid (or itaconic acid) as functional monomer, ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EDMA) as cross-linking agent and acetonitrile (or acetone) as porogenic solvent. For catharanthine-MIP, a SPE protocol (ACN-AcOH 99/1 washing and MeOH-AcOH 90/10 elution) allows a good MIP/NIP selectivity (imprinting factor 12.6). The specificity of catharanthine-MIP versus related bisindole alkaloids was assessed by cross-reactivity study. The catharanthine-MIP specifically retained catharanthine and its N-oxide analogue but displayed a weak cross-reactivity for other Vinca alkaloids (vinorelbine, vincristine, vinblastine, vindoline, vinflunine). It appears that the catharanthine-like unit of these molecules are hardly trapped in catharanthine cavities located in the MIP, probably due to the sterical hindrance of the vindoline moiety. Finally, the MIP-SPE applied to C. roseus extract enabled quantitative recovery of catharanthine (101%) and the total removal of vindoline. Its capacity was determined and was equal to 2.43 μmol g(-1). Vindoline is a weaker base than catharanthine, so the vindoline-MIP was achieved with a strong acidic monomer (itaconic acid) to increase vindoline-monomer interactions and a modified washing solvent (ACN-HCOOH 99/1) to reduce non-specific interactions. The influence of the amount of HCOOH (protic modifier) percolated during the washing step upon the elution yield and the imprinting factor for vindoline was investigated. This preliminary optimisation of the washing step, and in particular the number of moles of acid percolated, seems useful to emphasize the use of MIP in conditions of high selectivity or high yield. A compromise was

  2. Metabolism of indole alkaloid tumor promoter, (-)-indolactam V, which has the fundamental structure of teleocidins, by rat liver microsomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagiwara, N.; Irie, K.; Tokuda, H.; Koshimizu, K.

    1987-07-01

    Metabolic activation and/or deactivation of indole alkaloid tumor promoter, (-)-indolactam V (ILV), was examined using rat liver microsomes. Reaction of ILV with the microsomes supplemented with NADPH and MgCl/sub 2/ gave three major metabolites, which were identified as (-)-N13-desmethylindolactam V and two diastereomers of (-)-2-oxyindolactam V at C-3. The tumor-promoting activities of these metabolites were evaluated by induction of Epstein-Barr virus early antigen and inhibition of specific binding of (/sup 3/H)-12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate to a mouse epidermal particulate fraction, and proved to be conspicuously lower than that of ILV. These results demonstrate that the metabolism of ILV results in detoxification, and that it itself is the tumor-promoting entity. Studies on the enzymes concerned with this metabolism suggested the involvement of cytochrome P-450-containing mixed-function oxidases. Similar deactivation seems to be possible by skin, where the mixed-function oxidases are known to exist.

  3. Bioguided discovery and pharmacophore modeling of the mycotoxic indole diterpene alkaloids penitrems as breast cancer proliferation, migration, and invasion inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallam, Asmaa A.; Houssen, Wael E.; Gissendanner, Chris R.; Orabi, Khaled Y.; Foudah, Ahmed I.; El Sayed, Khalid A.

    2013-01-01

    Marine-derived fungi have proven to be important sources of bioactive natural organohalides. The genus Penicillium is recognized as a rich source of chemically diverse bioactive secondary metabolites. This study reports the fermentation, isolation and identification of a marine-derived Penicillium species. Bioassay-guided fractionation afforded the indole diterpene alkaloids penitrems A, B, D, E and F as well as paspaline and emnidole SB (1–7). Supplementing the fermentation broth of the growing fungus with KBr afforded the new 6-bromopenitrem B (8) and the known 6-bromopenitrem E (9). These compounds showed good antiproliferative, antimigratory and anti-invasive properties against human breast cancer cells. Penitrem B also showed a good activity profile in the NCI-60 DTP human tumor cell line screen. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans was used to assess the BK channel inhibitory activity and toxicity of select compounds. A pharmacophore model was generated to explain the structural relationships of 1–9 with respect to their antiproliferative activity against the breast cancer MCF-7 cells. The structurally less complex biosynthetic precursors, paspaline (6) and emindole SB (7), were identified as potential hits suitable for future studies. PMID:24273638

  4. Monoterpenoid indole alkaloids and phenols are required antioxidants in glutathione depleted Uncaria tomentosa root cultures

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    Ileana eVera-Reyes

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Plants cells sense their environment through oxidative signaling responses and make appropriate adjustments to gene expression, physiology and metabolic defense. Root cultures of Uncaria tomentosa, a native plant of the Amazon rainforest, were exposed to stressful conditions by combined addition of the glutathione inhibitor, buthionine sulfoximine (0.8 mM and 0.2 mM jasmonic acid. This procedure induced a synchronized two-fold increase of hydrogen peroxide and guaiacol peroxidases, while the glutathione content and glutathione reductase activity were reduced. Likewise in elicited cultures, production of the antioxidant secondary metabolites, monoterpenoid oxindole and glucoindole alkaloids, were 2.1 and 5.5-fold stimulated (704.0 ± 14.9 and 845.5 ± 13.0 µg/g DW, respectively after 12 h after, while phenols were three times increased. Upon elicitation, the activities and mRNA transcript levels of two enzymes involved in the alkaloid biosynthesis, strictosidine synthase and strictosidine β-glucosidase, were also enhanced. Differential proteome analysis performed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of elicited and control root cultures showed that, after elicitation, several new protein spots appeared. Two of them were identified as thiol-related enzymes, namely cysteine synthase and methionine synthase. Proteins associated with antioxidant and stress responses, including two strictosidine synthase isoforms, were identified as well, together with others as caffeic acid O-methyltransferase. Our results propose that in U. tomentosa roots a signaling network involving hydrogen peroxide and jasmonate derivatives coordinately regulates the antioxidant response and secondary metabolic defense via transcriptional and protein activation.

  5. Detection of oxygen addition peaks for terpendole E and related indole-diterpene alkaloids in a positive-mode ESI-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Yayoi; Nakamura, Takemichi; Takahashi, Shunya; Motoyama, Takayuki; Hayashi, Toshiaki; Hirota, Hiroshi; Osada, Hiroyuki; Koshino, Hiroyuki

    2014-06-01

    This report describes that a regular positive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of terpendoles often causes unexpected oxygen additions to form [M + H + O](+) and [M + H + 2O](+), which might be a troublesome in the characterization of new natural analogues. The intensities of [M + H + O](+) and [M + H + 2O](+) among terpendoles were unpredictable and fluctuated largely. Simple electrochemical oxidation in electrospray ionization was insufficient to explain the phenomenon. So we studied factors to form [M + H + O](+) and [M + H + 2O](+) using terpendole E and natural terpendoles together with some model indole alkaloids. Similar oxygen addition was observed for 1,2,3,4-tetrahydrocyclopent[b]indole, which is corresponding to the substructure of terpendole E. In tandem MS experiments, a major fragment ion at m/z 130 from protonated terpendole E was assigned to the substructure containing indole. When the [M + H + O](+) was selected as a precursor ion, the ion shifted to m/z 146. The same 16 Da shift of fragments was also observed for 1,2,3,4-tetrahydrocyclopent[b]indole, indicating that the oxygen addition of terpendole E took place at the indole portion. However, the oxygen addition was absent for some terpendoles, even whose structure resembles terpendole E. The breakdown curves characterized the tandem MS features of terpendoles. Preferential dissociation into m/z 130 suggested the protonation tendency at the indole site. Terpendoles that are preferentially protonated at indole tend to form oxygen addition peaks, suggesting that the protonation feature contributes to the oxygen additions in some degrees.

  6. Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS Analysis of Indole Alkaloids Isolated from Catharanthus roseus (L. G. Don Cultivated Conventionally and Derived from In vitro Cultures

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    Aneta WESOŁOWSKA

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Catharanthus roseus (periwinkle is a medicinal plant commonly known for its wide biological activity. In many countries different parts of this plant are used for the treatment of diabetes, hypertension and for menstrual regulation. Due to the ability of production of alkaloids, which can be applied in cancer therapy, is still extensively investigated. Two, the most valuable alkaloids (vincristine and vinblastine are present in C. roseus in very low concentrations. Micropropagation is promising technique used to enhance the level of important secondary metabolites. The main objective of present study was alkaloids extraction from plants cultivated conventionally and derived from in vitro cultures. In this order the aerial parts of periwinkle were extracted with 96% ethanol at room temperature (method I and heated with 96% ethanol at 55 °C for 90 minutes (method II. The obtained mixtures of different indole alkaloids were analyzed by gas chromatography – mass spectrometry (GC-MS. Analysis revealed the presence of 15 alkaloids, among which vindoline, vindorosine, isovindolinine and ajmalicine were the most abundant. The obtained results indicated that the propagation method had a significant effect on the percentage content of alkaloids in C. roseus herb. Plants derived from in vitro cultures were richer in vindorosine and vindoline, while conventionally cultivated – in tetrahydroalstonine and ajmalicine. Moreover, in case of isovindolinine, vindolinine and ajmalicine, extraction at 55 °C was more effective, while for pericyclivine – maceration at room temperature. Interestingly, the pericyclivine was not detected in the mixture of alkaloids obtained from periwinkle herb by the extraction at 55 °C.

  7. Antimicrobial and selected in vitro enzyme inhibitory effects of leaf extracts, flavonols and indole alkaloids isolated from Croton menyharthii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aderogba, Mutalib A; Ndhlala, Ashwell R; Rengasamy, Kannan R R; Van Staden, Johannes

    2013-10-11

    Croton species are used in folk medicine in the management of infections, inflammation and oxidative stress-related diseases. In order to isolate, characterize and evaluate the bioactive constituents of Croton menyharthii Pax leaf extracts, repeated column fractionation of the ethyl acetate fraction from a 20% aqueous methanol crude extract afforded three flavonols identified by NMR (1D and 2D) spectroscopic methods as myricetrin-3-O-rhamnoside (myricetrin, 1), quercetin-3-O-rhamnoside (2) and quercetin (3) along with an indole alkaloid, (E)-N-(4-hydroxycinnamoyl)-5-hydroxytryptamine, [trans-N-(p-coumaroyl) serotonin, 4]. All the compounds are reported from the leaf extract of this plant for the first time. The crude extracts, four solvent fractions (hexane, DCM, ethyl acetate and butanol) and isolated compounds obtained from the leaves were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on selected bacteria, a fungus (Candida albicans), cyclooxygenase (COX-2), α-glucosidase and acetylcholinesterase (AChE). Amongst the compounds, quercetin (3) was the most active against Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans while myricetrin-3-O-rhamnoside (1) and trans-N-(p-coumaroyl) serotonin (4) were the most active compounds against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia and Staphylococcus aureus. The inhibitory activity of myricetrin-3-O-rhamnoside (1) against COX-2 was insignificant while that of the other three compounds 2-4 was low. The AChE inhibitory activity of the alkaloid, trans-N-(p-coumaroyl) serotonin was high, with a percentage inhibitory activity of 72.6% and an IC50 value of 15.0 µg/mL. The rest of the compounds only had moderate activity. Croton menyharthii leaf extracts and isolated compounds inhibit α-glucosidase at very low IC50 values compared to the synthetic drug acarbose. Structure activity relationship of the isolated flavonols 1-3 is briefly outlined. Compounds 1-4 and the leaf extracts exhibited a broad spectrum of activities. This validates the

  8. Antimicrobial and Selected In Vitro Enzyme Inhibitory Effects of Leaf Extracts, Flavonols and Indole Alkaloids Isolated from Croton menyharthii

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    Johannes Van Staden

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Croton species are used in folk medicine in the management of infections, inflammation and oxidative stress-related diseases. In order to isolate, characterize and evaluate the bioactive constituents of Croton menyharthii Pax leaf extracts, repeated column fractionation of the ethyl acetate fraction from a 20% aqueous methanol crude extract afforded three flavonols identified by NMR (1D and 2D spectroscopic methods as myricetrin-3-O-rhamnoside (myricetrin, 1, quercetin-3-O-rhamnoside (2 and quercetin (3 along with an indole alkaloid, (E-N-(4-hydroxycinnamoyl-5-hydroxytryptamine, [trans-N-(p-coumaroyl serotonin, 4]. All the compounds are reported from the leaf extract of this plant for the first time. The crude extracts, four solvent fractions (hexane, DCM, ethyl acetate and butanol and isolated compounds obtained from the leaves were evaluated for their inhibitory effects on selected bacteria, a fungus (Candida albicans, cyclooxygenase (COX-2, α-glucosidase and acetylcholinesterase (AChE. Amongst the compounds, quercetin (3 was the most active against Bacillus subtilis and Candida albicans while myricetrin-3-O-rhamnoside (1 and trans-N-(p-coumaroyl serotonin (4 were the most active compounds against Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumonia and Staphylococcus aureus. The inhibitory activity of myricetrin-3-O-rhamnoside (1 against COX-2 was insignificant while that of the other three compounds 2–4 was low. The AChE inhibitory activity of the alkaloid, trans-N-(p-coumaroyl serotonin was high, with a percentage inhibitory activity of 72.6% and an IC50 value of 15.0 µg/mL. The rest of the compounds only had moderate activity. Croton menyharthii leaf extracts and isolated compounds inhibit α-glucosidase at very low IC50 values compared to the synthetic drug acarbose. Structure activity relationship of the isolated flavonols 1–3 is briefly outlined. Compounds 1–4 and the leaf extracts exhibited a broad spectrum of activities. This validates the

  9. Effect of sodium nitroprusside on growth and terpenoid indole alkaloid production in Catharanthus roseus hairy root cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mai; Peebles, Christie A M; Shanks, Jacqueline V; San, Ka-Yiu

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is known as a signaling molecule involved in elicitor-induced defense responses of plants. Sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a donor of NO, stimulates catharanthine formation in Catharanthus roseus cells.1 Two important terpenoid indole alkaloids produced in small quantities within C. roseus are vinblastine and vincristine which are being used clinically as anticancer drugs. We are interested in engineering C. roseus hairy roots to increase the production of the TIAs. The present work investigates the effects of treating different concentrations of SNP to the hairy root cultures from line LBE-6-1. The alkaloid concentrations were analyzed 9, 14, 17, 20, 23, 26, and 30 days after treatment of SNP on day 0. We also studied the transient effects of SNP treatment during the exponential phase in C. roseus hairy roots. Analysis of the results showed that treatment of 0.1-mM SNP did not affect the growth of hairy roots, whereas 1-mM SNP suppressed the growth significantly, and 10-mM SNP almost completely inhibited the growth of hairy roots. 0.1-mM SNP treatment on day 0 caused a significant increase in the concentration of serpentine, catharanthine, ajmalicine, lochnericine and tabersonine production. SNP treatment on day 12 stimulated the formation of serpentine, catharanthine, ajmalicine, hörhammericine, lochnericine and tabersonine by day 21. After the initial stimulation, serpentine, horhammericine and lochnericine concentrations returned to the basal level by day 28. Treatment of 0.1-mM SNP on day 0 caused significant decrease in the mRNA levels for TDC, ASA, STR, ORCA3, ZCT1, and Crgbf1 on day 23. Treating 0.1-mM SNP on day 12 caused decreases in the expression levels of STR, ORCA3, ZCT1, and Crgbf1 on day 21 and day 28. Compared with day 28, the mRNA transcript of ZCT1 on day 21 is about twofold higher. Expression levels of G10H increased significantly.

  10. Jasmonic Acid Effect on the Fatty Acid and Terpenoid Indole Alkaloid Accumulation in Cell Suspension Cultures of Catharanthus roseus

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    Guitele Dalia Goldhaber-Pasillas

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The stress response after jasmonic acid (JA treatment was studied in cell suspension cultures of Catharanthus roseus. The effect of JA on the primary and secondary metabolism was based on changes in profiles of fatty acids (FA and terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIA. According to multivariate data analyses (MVDA, three major time events were observed and characterized according to the variations of specific FA and TIA: after 0–30 min of induction FA such as C18:1, C20:0, C22:0 and C24:0 were highly induced by JA; 90–360 min after treatment was characterized by variations of C14:0 and C15:0; and 1440 min after induction JA had the largest effect on both group of metabolites were C18:1, C18:2, C18:3, C16:0, C20:0, C22:0, C24:0, catharanthine, tabersonine-like 1, serpentine, tabersonine and ajmalicine-like had the most significant variations. These results unambiguously demonstrate the profound effect of JA particularly on the accumulation of its own precursor, C18:3 and the accumulation of TIA, which can be considered as late stress response events to JA since they occurred only after 1440 min. These observations show that the early events in the JA response do not involve the de novo biosynthesis of neither its own precursor nor TIA, but is due to an already present biochemical system.

  11. Involvement of nitric oxide signaling in mammalian Bax-induced terpenoid indole alkaloid production of Catharanthus roseus cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Bax, a mammalian pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family, has been demonstrated to be a potential regulatory factor for plant secondary metabolite biosynthesis recently. To investigate the molecular mechanism of Bax-induced secondary metabolite biosynthesis, we determined the contents of nitric oxide (NO) of the transgenic Catharanthus roseus cells overexpressing a mouse Bax protein and checked the effects of NO specific scavenger 2,4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1- oxyl-3-oxide (cPITO) on Bax-induced terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA) production of the cells. The data showed that overexpression of the mouse Bax in C. roseus cells triggered NO generation of the cells. Treatment of cPITO not only inhibited the Bax-triggered NO burst but also suppressed the Bax-induced TIA production. The results indicated that the mouse Bax might activate the NO signaling in C. roseus cells and induce TIA production through the NO-dependent signal pathway in the cells. Furthermore, the activities of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) were significantly increased in the transgenic Bax cells as compared to those in the control cells, showing that the mouse Bax may induce NOS of C. roseus cells. Treatment of the transgenic Bax cells with NOS inhibitor PBITU blocked both Bax-induced NO generation and TIA production, which suggested that the mouse Bax might trigger NO generation and TIA production through NOS. However, the NOS-like activities and NO generation in the transgenic Bax cells did not match kinetically and the Bax-induced NOS-like activity was much later and lower than NO production. Moreover, the Bax-induced NO generation and TIA production were only partially inhibited by PBITU. Thus, our results suggested that the Bax-induced NO production and secondary metabolite biosynthesis in C. roseus cells was not entirely dependent on NOS or NOS-like enzymes.

  12. Evaluation of Biosynthetic Pathway and Engineered Biosynthesis of Alkaloids

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    Shinji Kishimoto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Varieties of alkaloids are known to be produced by various organisms, including bacteria, fungi and plants, as secondary metabolites that exhibit useful bioactivities. However, understanding of how those metabolites are biosynthesized still remains limited, because most of these compounds are isolated from plants and at a trace level of production. In this review, we focus on recent efforts in identifying the genes responsible for the biosynthesis of those nitrogen-containing natural products and elucidating the mechanisms involved in the biosynthetic processes. The alkaloids discussed in this review are ditryptophenaline (dimeric diketopiperazine alkaloid, saframycin (tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloid, strictosidine (monoterpene indole alkaloid, ergotamine (ergot alkaloid and opiates (benzylisoquinoline and morphinan alkaloid. This review also discusses the engineered biosynthesis of these compounds, primarily through heterologous reconstitution of target biosynthetic pathways in suitable hosts, such as Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus nidulans. Those heterologous biosynthetic systems can be used to confirm the functions of the isolated genes, economically scale up the production of the alkaloids for commercial distributions and engineer the biosynthetic pathways to produce valuable analogs of the alkaloids. In particular, extensive involvement of oxidation reactions catalyzed by oxidoreductases, such as cytochrome P450s, during the secondary metabolite biosynthesis is discussed in details.

  13. Two fast screening methods (GC-MS and TLC-ChEI assay for rapid evaluation of potential anticholinesterasic indole alkaloids in complex mixtures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivo J.C. Vieira

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The pharmacotherapyfor Alzheimer's disease (AD includes the use of acetylcholinesterase inhibitors (AChEI. Recent investigations for novel AD therapeutic agents from plants suggested that Tabernaemontana genus is a promising source of novel anticholinesterasic indole alkaloids. In this work two fast screening techniques were combined in order to easily identify novel cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEI. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS of the less polar alkaloidic fractions obtained from the acid-base extraction of the stalk of T. laeta revealed thirteen monoindole alkaloids, four of them confirmed by co-injection with previously isolated alkaloids. The others were tentatively identified by mass fragmentation analysis. By gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (GC-FID and using isatin as internal standard, affinisine and voachalotine were determined as major compounds. These fractions and fourteen previously isolated alkaloids, obtained from root bark of T. laeta and T. hystrix were investigated for acetyl (AChE and butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE inhibitory activities by the modified Ellman's method in thin layer chromatography(TLC-ChEI. Results showed selective inhibition of the alkaloids heyneanine and Nb-methylvoachalotine for BuChE, and 19-epi-isovoacristine for AChE, whereas olivacine, affinisine, ibogamine, affinine, conodurine and hystrixnineinhibited both enzymes. In addition to confirming that monoterpenoid indole alkaloids can be novel therapeutic agents for AD, this is the first report of the ChEI activity of olivacine, a pyridocarbazole alkaloid.Dentre os tratamentos da doença de Alzheimer (DA está o uso de inibidores da enzima acetilcolinesterase. Pesquisas recentes visando a descoberta de novos agentes terapêuticos naturais para esta doença sugerem que o gênero Tabernaemontana é uma fonte promissora de alcalóides indólicos anticolinesterásicos. Neste trabalho, duas técnicas de análise em mistura foram

  14. Physiological Effects of Ergot Alkaloid and Indole-Diterpene Consumption on Sheep under Hot and Thermoneutral Ambient Temperature Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Michelle L E; Kemp, Stuart; Dunshea, Frank R; Leury, Brian J

    2016-06-02

    A controlled feeding study was undertaken to determine the physiological and production effects of consuming perennial ryegrass alkaloids (fed via seed) under extreme heat in sheep. Twenty-four Merino ewe weaners (6 months; initial BW 30.8 ± 1.0 kg) were selected and the treatment period lasted 21 days following a 14 day acclimatisation period. Two levels of two factors were used. The first factor was alkaloid, fed at a nil (NilAlk) or moderate level (Alk; 80 μg/kg LW ergovaline and 20.5 μg/kg·LW lolitrem B). The second factor was ambient temperature applied at two levels; thermoneutral (TN; constant 21-22 °C) or heat (Heat; 9:00 AM-5:00 PM at 38 °C; 5:00 PM-9:00 AM at 21-22 °C), resulting in four treatments, NilAlk TN, NilAlk Heat, Alk TN and Alk Heat. Alkaloid consumption reduced dry matter intake ( p = 0.008), and tended to reduce liveweight ( p = 0.07). Rectal temperature and respiration rate were increased by both alkaloid and heat ( p < 0.05 for all). Respiration rate increased to severe levels when alkaloid and heat were combined, indicating the short term effects which may be occurring in perennial ryegrass toxicosis (PRGT) areas during severe weather conditions, a novel finding. When alkaloid ingestion and heat were administered separately, similar physiological responses occurred, indicating alkaloid ingestion causes a similar heat stress response to 38 °C heat.

  15. Physiological Effects of Ergot Alkaloid and Indole-Diterpene Consumption on Sheep under Hot and Thermoneutral Ambient Temperature Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle L. E. Henry

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A controlled feeding study was undertaken to determine the physiological and production effects of consuming perennial ryegrass alkaloids (fed via seed under extreme heat in sheep. Twenty-four Merino ewe weaners (6 months; initial BW 30.8 ± 1.0 kg were selected and the treatment period lasted 21 days following a 14 day acclimatisation period. Two levels of two factors were used. The first factor was alkaloid, fed at a nil (NilAlk or moderate level (Alk; 80 μg/kg LW ergovaline and 20.5 μg/kg·LW lolitrem B. The second factor was ambient temperature applied at two levels; thermoneutral (TN; constant 21–22 °C or heat (Heat; 9:00 AM–5:00 PM at 38 °C; 5:00 PM–9:00 AM at 21–22 °C, resulting in four treatments, NilAlk TN, NilAlk Heat, Alk TN and Alk Heat. Alkaloid consumption reduced dry matter intake ( p = 0.008, and tended to reduce liveweight ( p = 0.07. Rectal temperature and respiration rate were increased by both alkaloid and heat ( p < 0.05 for all. Respiration rate increased to severe levels when alkaloid and heat were combined, indicating the short term effects which may be occurring in perennial ryegrass toxicosis (PRGT areas during severe weather conditions, a novel finding. When alkaloid ingestion and heat were administered separately, similar physiological responses occurred, indicating alkaloid ingestion causes a similar heat stress response to 38 °C heat.

  16. The miRNAome of Catharanthus roseus: identification, expression analysis, and potential roles of microRNAs in regulation of terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Ethan M.; Singh, Sanjay K.; Ghosh, Jayadri S.; Patra, Barunava; Paul, Priyanka; Yuan, Ling; Pattanaik, Sitakanta

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate numerous crucial biological processes in plants. However, information is limited on their involvement in the biosynthesis of specialized metabolites in plants, including Catharanthus roseus that produces a number of pharmaceutically valuable, bioactive terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs). Using small RNA-sequencing, we identified 181 conserved and 173 novel miRNAs (cro-miRNAs) in C. roseus seedlings. Genome-wide expression analysis revealed that a set of cro-miRNAs are differentially regulated in response to methyl jasmonate (MeJA). In silico target prediction identified 519 potential cro-miRNA targets that include several auxin response factors (ARFs). The presence of cleaved transcripts of miRNA-targeted ARFs in C. roseus cells was confirmed by Poly(A) Polymerase-Mediated Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (PPM-RACE). We showed that auxin (indole acetic acid, IAA) repressed the expression of key TIA pathway genes in C. roseus seedlings. Moreover, we demonstrated that a miRNA-regulated ARF, CrARF16, binds to the promoters of key TIA pathway genes and repress their expression. The C. roseus miRNAome reported here provides a comprehensive account of the cro-miRNA populations, as well as their abundance and expression profiles in response to MeJA. In addition, our findings underscore the importance of miRNAs in posttranscriptional control of the biosynthesis of specialized metabolites. PMID:28223695

  17. Validated RP-HPLC and HPTLC methods for determination of anti-inflammatory bis-indole alkaloid in Desmodium gangeticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Akhilesh K; Gupta, Madan M

    2014-01-01

    Here, two simple and accurate methods, namely high-performance liquid chromatography and high-performance thin-layer chromatography for the detection of gangenoid, an anti-inflammatory alkaloid, in a well-known Indian medicinal plant Desmodium gangeticum, are described. The proposed methods were successfully used for the estimation of gangenoid in D. gangeticum root.

  18. A UPLC-MS/MS method for simultaneous quantitation of three monoterpene glycosides and four alkaloids in rat plasma: application to a comparative pharmacokinetic study of Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan and single herb extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Yu; Wu, Yun; Wang, Fenrong; Ma, Wen; Bian, Qiaoxia; Lee, David Y-W; Dai, Ronghua

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a sensitive and reliable ultra performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method for simultaneous quantitation of three monoterpene glycosides (paeoniflorin, alibiflorin and oxypaeoniflorin) and four alkaloids (tetrahydropalmatine, corydaline, dehydrocorydaline and berberine), the main active ingredients of Radix Paeoniae Rubra extract (RPE) and Corydalis yanhusuo extract (CYE) in Huo Luo Xiao Ling Dan (HLXLD), and to compare the pharmacokinetics of these active ingredients in normal and arthritic rats orally administrated with HLXLD or RPE/CYE alone. The analytes and internal standard (IS) (geniposide) were separated on a XBridge C18 column (150 × 4.6 mm, 3.5 µm) using gradient elution with the mobile phase consisting of methanol and 0.01% formic acid in water at a flow rate of 0.6 ml/min. The detection of the analytes was performed on Acquity UPLC-MS/MS system with an electrospray ionization and multiple reaction monitoring mode via polarity switching between negative (for monoterpene glycosides) and positive (for alkaloids) ionization mode. The lower limits of quantification were 2.5, 1, 0.5, 0.2, 0.2, 0.02 and 0.01 ng/ml for paeoniflorin, alibiflorin, oxypaeoniflorin, tetrahydropalmatine, corydaline, dehydrocorydaline and berberine, respectively. Intra-day and inter-day precision and accuracy of analytes were well within acceptance criteria (15%). The mean extraction recoveries of analytes and IS from rat plasma were all more than 83.1%. The validated method has been successfully applied to determination of the analytes. Results showed that there were remarkable differences in pharmacokinetic properties of the analytes between herbal formula and single herb group, normal and arthritic group.

  19. Evaluation of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Petit Havana SR1) hairy roots for the production of geraniol, the first committed step in terpenoid indole alkaloid pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritala, Anneli; Dong, Lemeng; Imseng, Nicole; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; Vasilev, Nikolay; van der Krol, Sander; Rischer, Heiko; Maaheimo, Hannu; Virkki, Arho; Brändli, Johanna; Schillberg, Stefan; Eibl, Regine; Bouwmeester, Harro; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja

    2014-04-20

    The terpenoid indole alkaloids are one of the major classes of plant-derived natural products and are well known for their many applications in the pharmaceutical, fragrance and cosmetics industries. Hairy root cultures are useful for the production of plant secondary metabolites because of their genetic and biochemical stability and their rapid growth in hormone-free media. Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Petit Havana SR1) hairy roots, which do not produce geraniol naturally, were engineered to express a plastid-targeted geraniol synthase gene originally isolated from Valeriana officinalis L. (VoGES). A SPME-GC-MS screening tool was developed for the rapid evaluation of production clones. The GC-MS analysis revealed that the free geraniol content in 20 hairy root clones expressing VoGES was an average of 13.7 μg/g dry weight (DW) and a maximum of 31.3 μg/g DW. More detailed metabolic analysis revealed that geraniol derivatives were present in six major glycoside forms, namely the hexose and/or pentose conjugates of geraniol and hydroxygeraniol, resulting in total geraniol levels of up to 204.3 μg/g DW following deglycosylation. A benchtop-scale process was developed in a 20-L wave-mixed bioreactor eventually yielding hundreds of grams of biomass and milligram quantities of geraniol per cultivation bag. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Correlations among experimental and theoretical NMR data to determine the absolute stereochemistry of darcyribeirine, a pentacyclic indole alkaloid isolated from Rauvolfia grandiflora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancelieri, Náuvia Maria; Ferreira, Thiago Resende; Vieira, Ivo José Curcino; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; Piló-Veloso, Dorila; Alcântara, Antônio Flávio de Carvalho

    2015-10-01

    Darcyribeirine (1) is a pentacyclic indole alkaloid isolated from Rauvolfia grandiflora. Stereochemistry of 1 was previously proposed based on 1D (coupling constant data) and 2D (NOESY correlations) NMR techniques, having been established a configuration 3R, 15S, and 20R (isomer 1a). Stereoisomers of 1 (i.e., 1a-1h) can be grouped into four sets of enantiomers. Carbon chemical shifts and hydrogen coupling constants were calculated using BLYP/6-31G* theory level for the eight isomers of 1. Calculated NMR data of 1a-1h were correlated with the corresponding experimental data of 1. The best correlations between theoretical and experimental carbon chemical shift data were obtained for the set of enantiomers 1e/1f to structures in the gaseous phase and considering solvent effects (using PCM and explicit models). Similar results were obtained when the same procedure was performed to correlations between theoretical and experimental coupling constant data. Finally, optical rotation calculations indicate 1e as its absolute stereochemistry. Orbital population analysis indicates that the hydrogen bonding between N-H of 1e and DMSO is due to contributions of its frontier unoccupied molecular orbitals, mainly LUMO+1, LUMO+2, and LUMO+3.

  1. Production and metabolic engineering of terpenoid indole alkaloids in cell cultures of the medicinal plant Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don (Madagascar periwinkle).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mei-Liang; Shao, Ji-Rong; Tang, Yi-Xiong

    2009-04-01

    The Madagascar periwinkle [Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don] is a plant species known for its production of TIAs (terpenoid indole alkaloids), many of which are pharmaceutically important. Ajmalicine and serpentine are prescribed for the treatment of hypertension, whereas the bisindoles vinblastine, vincristine and 3',4'-anhydrovinblastine are used for their antineoplastic activity in the treatment of many cancers. However, TIAs are produced in small yields in C. roseus, which make them expensive. Cell and metabolic engineering has focused on increasing flux through the TIA pathway by various means, including optimization of medium composition, elicitation, construction of noval culture systems and introduction of genes encoding specific metabolic enzymes into the C. roseus genome. The present review will attempt to present the state-of-the-art of research in this area and provide an update on the cell and metabolic engineering of TIAs in C. roseus. We hope that this will contribute to a better understanding of the ways in which TIA production can be achieved in different C. roseus culture systems.

  2. The bHLH transcription factor BIS1 controls the iridoid branch of the monoterpenoid indole alkaloid pathway in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Moerkercke, Alex; Steensma, Priscille; Schweizer, Fabian; Pollier, Jacob; Gariboldi, Ivo; Payne, Richard; Vanden Bossche, Robin; Miettinen, Karel; Espoz, Javiera; Purnama, Purin Candra; Kellner, Franziska; Seppänen-Laakso, Tuulikki; O'Connor, Sarah E; Rischer, Heiko; Memelink, Johan; Goossens, Alain

    2015-06-30

    Plants make specialized bioactive metabolites to defend themselves against attackers. The conserved control mechanisms are based on transcriptional activation of the respective plant species-specific biosynthetic pathways by the phytohormone jasmonate. Knowledge of the transcription factors involved, particularly in terpenoid biosynthesis, remains fragmentary. By transcriptome analysis and functional screens in the medicinal plant Catharanthus roseus (Madagascar periwinkle), the unique source of the monoterpenoid indole alkaloid (MIA)-type anticancer drugs vincristine and vinblastine, we identified a jasmonate-regulated basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor from clade IVa inducing the monoterpenoid branch of the MIA pathway. The bHLH iridoid synthesis 1 (BIS1) transcription factor transactivated the expression of all of the genes encoding the enzymes that catalyze the sequential conversion of the ubiquitous terpenoid precursor geranyl diphosphate to the iridoid loganic acid. BIS1 acted in a complementary manner to the previously characterized ethylene response factor Octadecanoid derivative-Responsive Catharanthus APETALA2-domain 3 (ORCA3) that transactivates the expression of several genes encoding the enzymes catalyzing the conversion of loganic acid to the downstream MIAs. In contrast to ORCA3, overexpression of BIS1 was sufficient to boost production of high-value iridoids and MIAs in C. roseus suspension cell cultures. Hence, BIS1 might be a metabolic engineering tool to produce sustainably high-value MIAs in C. roseus plants or cultures.

  3. Indole alkaloid biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus: new enzyme activities and identification of cytochrome P450 CYP72A1 as secologanin synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irmler, S; Schröder, G; St-Pierre, B; Crouch, N P; Hotze, M; Schmidt, J; Strack, D; Matern, U; Schröder, J

    2000-12-01

    The molecular characterization of CYP72A1 from Catharanthus roseus (Madagascar periwinkle) was described nearly a decade ago, but the enzyme function remained unknown. We now show by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry that the expression in immature leaves is epidermis-specific. It thus follows the pattern previously established for early enzymes in the pathway to indole alkaloids, suggesting that CYP72A1 may be involved in their biosynthesis. The early reactions in that pathway, i.e. from geraniol to strictosidine, contain several candidates for P450 activities. We investigated in this work two reactions, the conversion of 7-deoxyloganin to loganin (deoxyloganin 7-hydroxylase, DL7H) and the oxidative ring cleavage converting loganin into secologanin (secologanin synthase, SLS). The action of DL7H has not been demonstrated in vitro previously, and SLS has only recently been identified as P450 activity in one other plant. We show for the first time that both enzyme activities are present in microsomes from C. roseus cell cultures. We then tested whether CYP72A1 expressed in E. coli as a translational fusion with the C. roseus P450 reductase (P450Red) has one or both of these activities. The results show that CYP72A1 converts loganin into secologanin.

  4. Simultaneous quantification of four indole alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus cell line C20hi by UPLC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Lihong; Yang, Li; Xiong, Aizhen; Zhao, Shujuan; Wang, Zhengtao; Hu, Zhibi

    2011-01-01

    An ultra-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry method to simultaneously quantify vindoline, catharanthine, serpentine and ajmalicine in Catharanthus roseus cell line C20hi is reported. Samples were extracted with 1% acetic acid, basified to pH 10 with ammonia, then extracted with ethyl acetate, dried, reconstituted with methanol-1% acetic acid water solution (1:1, v/v) and analyzed using an acetonitrile-0.1% formic acid gradient as the mobile phase. Detection was carried out by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry in the positive-ion mode with selective ion monitoring. The analysis of one sample was achieved in 6 min. The limits of detection were 0.46 - 0.70 ng/ml in cell samples, and 0.10 - 0.16 ng/ml in medium samples. The linearity of detection was over the wide range of 1.00 - 6250.0 ng/ml. Intra- and inter-day accuracies (recovery 88.0 - 111.8%) and precision (RSD 1.25 - 7.81%) showed the performance of the assay. This method provides a more sensitive and high-throughput technique to quantify the four alkaloids in large amount of samples, and will be helpful in high-production cultivar screening.

  5. Assessing the limitations to terpenoid indole alkaloid biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus hairy root cultures through gene expression profiling and precursor feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goklany, Sheba; Loring, Ralph H; Glick, James; Lee-Parsons, Carolyn W T

    2009-01-01

    The production of pharmaceutically important terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) from Catharanthus roseus is partly regulated at the transcriptional level. In this study, limitations in TIA biosynthesis from C. roseus hairy root cultures were assessed through gene expression profiling and precursor feeding. The transcript levels of key TIA pathway genes (G10h, Tdc, Str, and Sgd) and metabolite levels associated with the TIA pathway (tryptamine, loganin, secologanin, strictosidine, ajmalicine, serpentine, and tabersonine) were monitored using quantitative RT-PCR and HPLC, respectively. In cultures elicited with methyl jasmonate (250 microM MeJA on day 21), G10h, Tdc, Str, and Sgd expression increased by 9.1, 3.1, 6.7, and 8.3-fold, respectively, after 24 h. Up-regulation of gene expression was followed by a 160, 440, and 420% increase in strictosidine, ajmalicine, and tabersonine levels, respectively, after 5 days. Precursors loganin, tryptamine, or their combination were fed to noninduced and MeJA-induced cultures to complement the above studies. TIA production was not significantly enhanced in either noninduced or MeJA-induced cultures with precursor feeding. In noninduced cells, steps downstream of loganin and tryptamine were limiting (SLS, STR, or SGD) because either loganin or tryptamine accumulated in the cells with precursor feeding. These bottlenecks were partly overcome in MeJA-induced cultures as the expression of Str and Sgd genes and TIA production increased. However, secologanin accumulated in MeJA-induced cultures with precursor feeding, suggesting that STR was likely limiting under MeJA-induced conditions.

  6. The indole alkaloid meleagrin, from the olive tree endophytic fungus Penicillium chrysogenum, as a novel lead for the control of c-Met-dependent breast cancer proliferation, migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mady, Mohamed S; Mohyeldin, Mohamed M; Ebrahim, Hassan Y; Elsayed, Heba E; Houssen, Wael E; Haggag, Eman G; Soliman, Randa F; El Sayed, Khalid A

    2016-01-15

    Fungi of the genus Penicillium produce unique and chemically diverse biologically active secondary metabolites, including indole alkaloids. The role of dysregulated hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) and its receptor, c-Met, in the development and progression of breast carcinoma is documented. The goal of this work is to explore the chemistry and bioactivity of the secondary metabolites of the endophytic Penicillium chrysogenum cultured from the leaf of the olive tree Olea europea, collected in its natural habitat in Egypt. This fungal extract showed good inhibitory activities against the proliferation and migration of several human breast cancer lines. The CH2Cl2 extract of P. chrysogenum mycelia was subjected to bioguided chromatographic separation to afford three known indole alkaloids; meleagrin (1), roquefortine C (2) and DHTD (3). Meleagrin inhibited the growth of the human breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231, MDA-468, BT-474, SK BR-3, MCF7 and MCF7-dox, while similar treatment doses were found to have no effect on the growth and viability of the non-tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells MCF10A. Meleagrin also showed excellent ATP competitive c-Met inhibitory activity in Z-Lyte assay, which was further confirmed via molecular docking studies and Western blot analysis. In addition, meleagrin treatment caused a dose-dependent inhibition of HGF-induced cell migration, and invasion of breast cancer cell lines. Meleagrin treatment potently suppressed the invasive triple negative breast tumor cell growth in an orthotopic athymic nude mice model, promoting this unique natural product from hit to a lead rank. The indole alkaloid meleagrin is a novel lead c-Met inhibitory entity useful for the control of c-Met-dependent metastatic and invasive breast malignancies.

  7. Medicinally important secondary metabolites in recombinant microorganisms or plants: progress in alkaloid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Holger; Wink, Michael

    2009-12-01

    Plants produce a high diversity of natural products or secondary metabolites which are important for the communication of plants with other organisms. A prominent function is the protection against herbivores and/or microbial pathogens. Some natural products are also involved in defence against abiotic stress, e.g. UV-B exposure. Many of the secondary metabolites have interesting biological properties and quite a number are of medicinal importance. Because the production of the valuable natural products, such as the anticancer drugs paclitaxel, vinblastine or camptothecin in plants is a costly process, biotechnological alternatives to produce these alkaloids more economically become increasingly important. This review provides an overview of the state of art to produce alkaloids in recombinant microorganisms, such as bacteria or yeast. Some progress has been made in metabolic engineering usually employing a single recombinant alkaloid gene. More importantly, for benzylisoquinoline, monoterpene indole and diterpene alkaloids (taxanes) as well as some terpenoids and phenolics the proof of concept for production of complex alkaloids in recombinant Escherichia coli and yeast has already been achieved. In a long-term perspective, it will probably be possible to generate gene cassettes for complete pathways, which could then be used for production of valuable natural products in bioreactors or for metabolic engineering of crop plants. This will improve their resistance against herbivores and/or microbial pathogens.

  8. Fast analysis of indole alkaloids from Evodiae fructus by supercritical fluid chromatography%超临界流体色谱对吴茱萸中吲哚类生物碱的快速分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李振宇; 傅青; 李奎永; 梁图; 金郁

    2014-01-01

    建立了超临界流体色谱快速分析吴茱萸中吲哚类生物碱的方法。以标准品混合物和复杂样品为对象比较4种色谱柱的分离效果,进行色谱柱的筛选;考察了进样体积、改性剂、添加剂、温度和背压对保留行为的影响。结果表明,进样体积对峰形影响显著;添加剂对保留时间和色谱峰形影响有限;改变改性剂能使保留时间显著改变;降低温度,升高背压,保留时间减小。经过优化,确定采用 Waters ACQUITY UPC2 BEH 色谱柱,以甲醇为改性剂,在35℃柱温和2.07×107 Pa背压条件下,15 min内完成复杂样品的分析。同时采用超高效液相色谱完成复杂样品的快速分析。结果表明,超临界流体色谱可用于天然产物的高效快速分析,同时该方法与超高效液相色谱在分离选择上的差异有助于天然产物分析方法的拓展。%A fast chromatographic separation of indole alkaloids from Evodiae fructus was developed by supercritical fluid chromatography( SFC). The initial screening of four stationary phases was investigated with a standard mixture of evodiamine and rutaecarpine,and a com-plex sample of indole alkaloids prepared from Evodiae fructus as probes. Later,the effects of chromatographic parameters on separation were studied including injection volume,organic modifier,additive,temperature and back pressure. The injection volume had significant impact on the peak shape. With the additives in the mobile phase,slight changes in peak shape and retention time were observed in separation. Variation in organic modifier led to dramatic change in chromatographic behavior. Both decreased temperature and increased back pressure short-ened the retention time. Finally,a fast analytical method using SFC,on a Waters ACQUITY UPC2 BEH column,methanol as modifier,under 35 ℃ and 2. 07×107 Pa,was developed to sep-arate a complex sample of indole alkaloids in less than 15 min. Another rapid

  9. Oxidative Dearomatization of 4,5,6,7-Tetrahydro-1H-indoles Obtained by Metal- and Solvent-Free Thermal 5-endo-dig Cyclization: The Route to Erythrina and Lycorine Alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Ivan A; Ratmanova, Nina K; Novoselov, Anton M; Belov, Dmitry S; Seregina, Irina F; Kurkin, Alexander V

    2016-05-17

    A facile one-pot approach based on a thermally induced metal- and solvent-free 5-endo-dig cyclization reaction of the amino propargylic alcohols in combination with Dess-Martin periodinane-promoted oxidative dearomatization of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroindole intermediates provides an efficient and robust access to 5,6-dihydro-1H-indol-2(4H)ones. Green, relatively mild and operationally simple characteristics of the synthetic sequence are the major advantages, which greatly amplify the developed methodology. The utility of obtained indolones as unified key precursors is demonstrated by the application of these products to the formal total syntheses of a whole pleiad of Erythrina- and Lycorine-type alkaloids, namely (±)-erysotramidine, (±)-erysotrine, (±)-erythravine, (±)-γ-lycorane, and abnormal erythrinanes (±)-coccoline and (±)-coccuvinine.

  10. Alkaloids from Stems of Ervatamia yunnanensis (Ⅱ)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuang LIANG; Xin Gen LUO; Hai Sheng CHEN; Xiao Dong ZHANG; Mao HUANG; Wen Yong LIU

    2006-01-01

    Six indole alkaloids were isolated from the stems of Ervatamia yunnanensis. Among them, 10-hydroxy-19, 20-dihydroisositsirikine (Ⅰ) is new. The other five are known alkaloids,namely: matrine (Ⅱ), 19, 20-dihydroisositsuikine (Ⅲ), 19-s-voacangarine (Ⅳ), 11'-methoxyl- 19s-heyneanine (Ⅴ), conodurine (Ⅵ). The structural elucidation of the alkaloids was based on spectral means.

  11. Alkaloids from stems of Ervatamia yunnanensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin Gen Luo; Hai Sheng Chen; Shuang Liang; Mao Huang; Wei Dong Xuan; Li Jin

    2007-01-01

    Six indole alkaloids were isolated from the stems of Ervatamia yunnanensis.Among them, yunnanensine (Ⅰ) is new.The other five are known alkaloids, namely: 19,20-E-vallesamine (Ⅱ), 19s-heyneanine (Ⅲ), ibogaine (Ⅳ), ibogamine (Ⅴ), coronaridine (Ⅵ).The structural elucidation of the alkaloids was based on spectral means.

  12. 3,4-桥环吲哚类生物碱的合成研究进展%Progress in Synthesis of 3,4-Fused Indole Alkaloids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    单冬; 贾彦兴

    2013-01-01

    取代的吲哚类天然产物是自然界中普遍存在的一类杂环化合物,由于其具有广泛的生理活性,以及相当一部分作为重要的临床使用药物,100多年以来,吲哚的合成及官能团化一直是有机合成化学家关注的一个重要领域.在众多吲哚类生物碱中,含有3,4-桥环吲哚骨架的天然产物占据了相当一部分,由于其独特的结构和良好的生物活性,这些分子引起了有机合成化学家的广泛兴趣.重点概述了构建3,4-桥环骨架的主要合成方法和策略,并对一些方法在天然产物全合成中的应用作简要介绍.%The indole nucleus is one of the most important heterocycles for its presence in a vast number of bioactive natural products,pharmaceuticals,and agrochemicals.Due to their widest spectrum of biological activity and some of them have been used in clinical trials,construction and functionalization of indoles have attracted considerable interests from synthetic and medicinal chemists for over a hundred years.Among the naturally occurring indole alkaloids,those containing 3,4-fused indole skeleton possess a major part and have been especially considered attractive synthetic targets because of their unique structure and biological activities.This review emphasized on the methodologies and strategies of construction of 3,4-fused indole skeleton,and their application in total synthesis of natural products.

  13. Accumulation of Monoterpenoid Indole Alkaloids in Periwinkle Seedlings ("Catharanthus roseus") as a Model for the Study of Plant-Environment Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Ham, Maria de Lourdes; Islas-Flores, Ignacio; Vazquez-Flota, Felipe

    2007-01-01

    Alkaloids are part of the chemical arsenal designed to protect plants against an adverse environment. Therefore, their synthesis and accumulation are frequently induced in response to certain environmental conditions and are mediated by chemical signals, which are formed as the first responses to the external stimulus. A set of experiments using…

  14. Atividade biológica e alcalóides indólicos do gênero Aspidosperma (Apocynaceae: uma revisão Biological activity and indole alkaloids of the genus Aspidosperma (Apocynaceae: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.B. Oliveira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Embora sejam conhecidas principalmente como fonte de madeira nobre para aplicação na construção de móveis, as espécies do gênero Aspidosperma apresentam muitos estudos na área da fitoquímica e poucos estudos na área da farmacologia. As espécies do gênero Aspidosperma são largamente aplicadas por populares como potenciais agentes antimaláricos, no tratamento da leishmaniose, de inflamações do útero e ovário, como anticonceptiva, em diabetes e em problemas estomacais, contra câncer, febre e reumatismo. Do ponto de vista químico, a grande maioria das espécies constituintes do gênero já foi submetida a algum estudo de isolamento e identificação dos alcalóides indólicos presentes nas mais diversas partes das plantas. Já do ponto de vista farmacológico poucos testes foram realizados até então para justificar a grande aplicação das mesmas por populares e a importância dos alcalóides indólicos presentes nas representantes do gênero. Visando contribuir para um maior conhecimento sobre a importância da presença dos alcalóides indólicos no gênero Aspidosperma e sua relação com as atividades farmacológicas atribuídas ou testadas, é que apresentamos uma revisão das principais publicações envolvendo estudos químicos e biológicos do gênero Aspidosperma.Although mainly known as source of noble wood for furniture construction, species of the genus Aspidosperma have been extensively studied in Phytochemistry but scarcely investigated in Pharmacology. Aspidosperma species have been commonly used in folk medicine as potential antimalarial agents; in the treatment of leishmaniasis, and uterus and ovary inflammations; as contraceptive; in diabetes and stomach disorders; and against cancer, fever and rheumatism. From a chemical point of view, the great majority of Aspidosperma species have already been subjected to isolation and identification of indole alkaloids present in their several parts. From a

  15. Effect of salinity and different nitrogen sources on the activity of antioxidant enzymes and indole alkaloid content in Catharanthus roseus seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Neelam; Gupta, Ajay K

    2006-01-01

    The activities of antioxidant enzymes viz. glutathione reductase, GR; superoxide dismutase, SOD; peroxidase, POD; catalase, CAT and glutathione-S-transferase, GST and alkaloid accumulation were investigated in leaf pairs (apical, middle, basal) and in roots of Catharanthus roseus seedlings under the conditions of different nitrogen sources (20 mM KNO(3) and 2 mM NH(4)Cl) and salinity, in the absence (non-saline control) and in the presence of 100 mM NaCl in the nutrient solution. Salinity caused a reduction in plant biomass. The biomass production of ammonium-fed plants was lower than that of nitrate-fed plants. The antioxidant enzymes exhibited higher activity in saline-treated plants. Changes in antioxidant enzyme activity caused by different nitrogen sources differed in all leaf pairs, as well as in roots of C. roseus. Ammonium-fed plants showed higher CAT, GR and GST activity in leaf pairs as well as in roots, while POD and SOD activity were higher in nitrate-fed plants. Higher peroxidase activity concomitant with the increased accumulation of alkaloid was found in all leaf pairs, as well as in roots of C. roseus of NO(3)(-) fed plants as compared to NH(4)(+) fed plants.

  16. An indole alkaloid from a tribal folklore inhibits immediate early event in HSV-2 infected cells with therapeutic efficacy in vaginally infected mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paromita Bag

    Full Text Available Herpes genitalis, caused by HSV-2, is an incurable genital ulcerative disease transmitted by sexual intercourse. The virus establishes life-long latency in sacral root ganglia and reported to have synergistic relationship with HIV-1 transmission. Till date no effective vaccine is available, while the existing therapy frequently yielded drug resistance, toxicity and treatment failure. Thus, there is a pressing need for non-nucleotide antiviral agent from traditional source. Based on ethnomedicinal use we have isolated a compound 7-methoxy-1-methyl-4,9-dihydro-3H-pyrido[3,4-b]indole (HM from the traditional herb Ophiorrhiza nicobarica Balkr, and evaluated its efficacy on isolates of HSV-2 in vitro and in vivo. The cytotoxicity (CC50, effective concentrations (EC50 and the mode of action of HM was determined by MTT, plaque reduction, time-of-addition, immunofluorescence (IFA, Western blot, qRT-PCR, EMSA, supershift and co-immunoprecipitation assays; while the in vivo toxicity and efficacy was evaluated in BALB/c mice. The results revealed that HM possesses significant anti-HSV-2 activity with EC50 of 1.1-2.8 µg/ml, and selectivity index of >20. The time kinetics and IFA demonstrated that HM dose dependently inhibited 50-99% of HSV-2 infection at 1.5-5.0 µg/ml at 2-4 h post-infection. Further, HM was unable to inhibit viral attachment or penetration and had no synergistic interaction with acyclovir. Moreover, Western blot and qRT-PCR assays demonstrated that HM suppressed viral IE gene expression, while the EMSA and co-immunoprecipitation studies showed that HM interfered with the recruitment of LSD-1 by HCF-1. The in vivo studies revealed that HM at its virucidal concentration was nontoxic and reduced virus yield in the brain of HSV-2 infected mice in a concentration dependent manner, compared to vaginal tissues. Thus, our results suggest that HM can serve as a prototype to develop non-nucleotide antiviral lead targeting the viral IE

  17. An indole alkaloid from a tribal folklore inhibits immediate early event in HSV-2 infected cells with therapeutic efficacy in vaginally infected mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bag, Paromita; Ojha, Durbadal; Mukherjee, Hemanta; Halder, Umesh Chandra; Mondal, Supriya; Chandra, Nidhi S; Nandi, Suman; Sharon, Ashoke; Sarkar, Mamta Chawla; Chakrabarti, Sekhar; Chattopadhyay, Debprasad

    2013-01-01

    Herpes genitalis, caused by HSV-2, is an incurable genital ulcerative disease transmitted by sexual intercourse. The virus establishes life-long latency in sacral root ganglia and reported to have synergistic relationship with HIV-1 transmission. Till date no effective vaccine is available, while the existing therapy frequently yielded drug resistance, toxicity and treatment failure. Thus, there is a pressing need for non-nucleotide antiviral agent from traditional source. Based on ethnomedicinal use we have isolated a compound 7-methoxy-1-methyl-4,9-dihydro-3H-pyrido[3,4-b]indole (HM) from the traditional herb Ophiorrhiza nicobarica Balkr, and evaluated its efficacy on isolates of HSV-2 in vitro and in vivo. The cytotoxicity (CC50), effective concentrations (EC50) and the mode of action of HM was determined by MTT, plaque reduction, time-of-addition, immunofluorescence (IFA), Western blot, qRT-PCR, EMSA, supershift and co-immunoprecipitation assays; while the in vivo toxicity and efficacy was evaluated in BALB/c mice. The results revealed that HM possesses significant anti-HSV-2 activity with EC50 of 1.1-2.8 µg/ml, and selectivity index of >20. The time kinetics and IFA demonstrated that HM dose dependently inhibited 50-99% of HSV-2 infection at 1.5-5.0 µg/ml at 2-4 h post-infection. Further, HM was unable to inhibit viral attachment or penetration and had no synergistic interaction with acyclovir. Moreover, Western blot and qRT-PCR assays demonstrated that HM suppressed viral IE gene expression, while the EMSA and co-immunoprecipitation studies showed that HM interfered with the recruitment of LSD-1 by HCF-1. The in vivo studies revealed that HM at its virucidal concentration was nontoxic and reduced virus yield in the brain of HSV-2 infected mice in a concentration dependent manner, compared to vaginal tissues. Thus, our results suggest that HM can serve as a prototype to develop non-nucleotide antiviral lead targeting the viral IE transcription for the

  18. Asymmetric Friedel-Crafts Reaction of Indoles with Imines by an Organic Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong-Qiang; Song, Jun; Hong, Ran; Li, Hongming; Deng, Li

    2011-01-01

    In this communication, we report an asymmetric Friedel-Crafts reaction of indoles with imines catalyzed by a bifunctional cinchona alkaloid catalyst. This is the first efficient organocatalytic asymmetric Friedel-Crafts reaction of indoles with imines. This reaction is operationally simple and, unprecedently, affords high enantioselectivity for a wide range of indoles and both aryl and alkyl imines. This establishes a direct, convergent and versatile approach to optically active 3-indolyl-methanamines, a structural motif embedded in numerous indole alkaloids and synthetic indole derivatives. PMID:16787078

  19. Alkaloids produced by endophytic fungi: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanyan; Han, Ting; Ming, Qianliang; Wu, Lingshang; Rahman, Khalid; Qin, Luping

    2012-07-01

    In recent years, a number of alkaloids have been discovered from endophytic fungi in plants, which exhibited excellent biological properties such as antimicrobial, insecticidal, cytotoxic, and anticancer activities. This review mainly deals with the research progress on endophytic fungi for producing bioactive alkaloids such as quinoline and isoquinoline, amines and amides, indole derivatives, pyridines, and quinazolines. The biological activities and action mechanisms of these alkaloids from endophytic fungi are also introduced. Furthermore, the relationships between alkaloid-producing endophytes and their host plants, as well as their potential applications in the future are discussed.

  20. Occurrence of halogenated alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gribble, Gordon W

    2012-01-01

    Once considered to be isolation artifacts or chemical "mistakes" of nature, the number of naturally occurring organohalogen compounds has grown from a dozen in 1954 to >5000 today. Of these, at least 25% are halogenated alkaloids. This is not surprising since nitrogen-containing pyrroles, indoles, carbolines, tryptamines, tyrosines, and tyramines are excellent platforms for biohalogenation, particularly in the marine environment where both chloride and bromide are plentiful for biooxidation and subsequent incorporation into these electron-rich substrates. This review presents the occurrence of all halogenated alkaloids, with the exception of marine bromotyrosines where coverage begins where it left off in volume 61 of The Alkaloids. Whereas the biological activity of these extraordinary compounds is briefly cited for some examples, a future volume of The Alkaloids will present full coverage of this topic and will also include selected syntheses of halogenated alkaloids. Natural organohalogens of all types, especially marine and terrestrial halogenated alkaloids, comprise a rapidly expanding class of natural products, in many cases expressing powerful biological activity. This enormous proliferation has several origins: (1) a revitalization of natural product research in a search for new drugs, (2) improved compound characterization methods (multidimensional NMR, high-resolution mass spectrometry), (3) specific enzyme-based and other biological assays, (4) sophisticated collection methods (SCUBA and remote submersibles for deep ocean marine collections), (5) new separation and purification techniques (HPLC and countercurrent separation), (6) a greater appreciation of traditional folk medicine and ethobotany, and (7) marine bacteria and fungi as novel sources of natural products. Halogenated alkaloids are truly omnipresent in the environment. Indeed, one compound, Q1 (234), is ubiquitous in the marine food web and is found in the Inuit from their diet of whale

  1. Early changes in gene expression induced by acute UV exposure in leaves of Psychotria brachyceras, a bioactive alkaloid accumulating plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Naíla Cannes; Menguer, Paloma Koprovski; Sperotto, Raul Antonio; de Almeida, Márcia Rodrigues; Fett-Neto, Arthur Germano

    2013-05-01

    UV-B radiation can damage biomolecules, such as DNA, RNA, and proteins, halting essential cellular processes; this damage is partly due to ROS generation. Plant secondary metabolites may protect against UV-B. Psychotria brachyceras Müll. Arg. (Rubiaceae), a subtropical shrub, produces brachycerine, a monoterpene indole alkaloid mainly accumulated in leaf tissues, which displays antioxidant and antimutagenic activities. Exposure of P. brachyceras cuttings to UV-B radiation significantly increases leaf brachycerine concentration. It has been suggested that this alkaloid might contribute to protection against UV-B damage both through its quenching activity on ROS and as UV shield. To identify differentially expressed genes of P. brachyceras in response to UV-B and investigate a possible influence of this stimulus on putative brachycerine-related genes, suppressive subtractive hybridization was applied. Complementary DNA from UV-B-treated leaves for 24 h was used as tester, and cDNA from untreated leaves, as driver. After BLASTX alignments, 134 sequences matched plant genes. Using quantitative RT-PCR, selected genes potentially related to brachycerine showed significant increases in transcription after UV-B exposure: tryptophan decarboxylase, ACC oxidase, UDP-glucose glucosyltransferase, lipase, and serine/threonine kinase. Results suggest a possible involvement of brachycerine in acute UV-B responses and show that alkaloid accumulation seems at least partly regulated at transcriptional level.

  2. 长春花(Catharanthus roseus)中吲哚类生物碱含量的比较%Comparative Study on the Contents of Indole Alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张琳; 祖元刚; 牛卉颖; 张颜滨; 孙志强

    2008-01-01

    建立了反相高效液相法测定长春花中吲哚类生物碱文多灵、长春质碱和阿玛碱含量的方法,色谱柱为HiQ sil C18色谱柱(250 mm×4.6 mm,5 μm);流动相为1%二乙胺水溶液(磷酸调pH=7.2)-甲醇-乙腈/2:1:1(V/V);流速为1 mL·min-1;检测波长为215 nm;柱温为40℃.并采用此方法对长春花根、茎、叶、花和种子以及不同产地的长春花中的这3种生物碱进行了检测,结果表明文多灵和长春质碱主要存在于在根、茎、叶、花中,阿玛碱主要存在于种子中;并且随着地理位置的北移,长春花中的文多灵和长春质碱的含量逐渐降低,温室中人为控制长春花中的栽培条件能提高二者的含量.%A RP-HPLC quantification method was established to determine the contents of three indole alkaloids-vindoline, catharanthine and ajmalicine in Catharanthus roseus. HiQ sil C18 column(250 mm×4.6 mm,5 μm) was used. The mobile phase was 1% diethylamine(pH=7.2)-methanol-acetonitrile/2:1:1(V/V). The detection wavelength was 215 nm. The flow rate was 1 mL·min-1. The column temperature was 40℃. Different parts of C. roseus were determined and the results showed that vindoline and catharanthine mainly existed in roots, stems, leaves and flowers, while ajmalicine mainly existed in seeds. C. roseus from different habitats were also determined by this method and the results showed that the contents of vindoline and catharanthine in south habitats samples were higher than those in north habitats. For the cultured C. roseus in greenhouse, both vindoline and catharanthine contents were enhanced greatly.

  3. An indole alkaloid from Strychnos erichsonii

    OpenAIRE

    Forgacs, P.; Jehanno, A.; Provost, J.; Thal, C.; Guilhem, J.; Pascard, C.; Moretti, Christian

    1986-01-01

    Le premier alcaloïde indolique de type vobasine rencontré dans les #Loganiaceae$ a été isolé des écorces de #Strychnos erichsonii$, récoltées en Guyane Française. Sa structure confirmée par cristallographie Rx. (Résumé d'auteur)

  4. Indoles as therapeutics of interest in medicinal chemistry: Bird's eye view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadha, Navriti; Silakari, Om

    2017-07-07

    Indoles constitute extensively explored heterocyclic ring systems with wide range of applications in pathophysiological conditions that is, cancer, microbial and viral infections, inflammation, depression, migraine, emesis, hypertension, etc. Presence of indole nucleus in amino acid tryptophan makes it prominent in phytoconstituents such as perfumes, neurotransmitters, auxins (plant hormones), indole alkaloids etc. The interesting molecular architecture of indole makes them suitable candidates for the drug development. This review article provides an overview of the chemistry, biology, and toxicology of indoles focusing on their application as drugs. Our effort is to corroborate the information available on the natural indole alkaloids, indole based FDA approved drugs and clinical trial candidates having diverse therapeutic implementations. This compiled information may serve as a benchmark for the alteration of existing ligands to design novel potent molecules with lesser side effects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Vinca alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moudi, Maryam; Go, Rusea; Yien, Christina Yong Seok; Nazre, Mohd

    2013-11-01

    Vinca alkaloids are a subset of drugs obtained from the Madagascar periwinkle plant. They are naturally extracted from the pink periwinkle plant, Catharanthus roseus G. Don and have a hypoglycemic as well as cytotoxic effects. They have been used to treat diabetes, high blood pressure and have been used as disinfectants. The vinca alkaloids are also important for being cancer fighters. There are four major vinca alkaloids in clinical use: Vinblastine (VBL), vinorelbine (VRL), vincristine (VCR) and vindesine (VDS). VCR, VBL and VRL have been approved for use in the United States. Vinflunine is also a new synthetic vinca alkaloid, which has been approved in Europe for the treatment of second-line transitional cell carcinoma of the urothelium is being developed for other malignancies. Vinca alkaloids are the second-most-used class of cancer drugs and will stay among the original cancer therapies. Different researches and studies for new vinca alkaloid applications will be carried out in this regard.

  6. Comparative study of fourteen alkaloids from Uncaria rhynchophylla hooks and leaves using HPLC-diode array detection-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/MS method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Jialin; Gong, Tianxing; Ma, Bin; Zhang, Lin; Kano, Yoshihiro; Yuan, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to compare alkaloid profile of Uncaria rhynchophylla hooks and leaves. Ten oxindole alkaloids and four glycosidic indole alkaloids were identified using HPLC-diode array detection (DAD) or LC-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI)-MS method, and a HPLC-UV method for simultaneous quantification of major alkaloids was validated. The hooks are characterized by high levels of four oxindole alkaloids rhynchophylline (R), isorhynchophylline (IR), corynoxeine (C) and isocorynoxeine (IC), while the leaves contained high level of two glycosidic indole alkaloids vincoside lactam (VL) and strictosidine (S). The presented methods have proven its usefulness in chemical characterization of U. rhynchophylla hooks and leaves.

  7. Monoterpene emission from ponderosa pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerdau, Manual; Dilts, Stephen B.; Westberg, Hal; Lamb, Brian K.; Allwine, Eugene J.

    1994-01-01

    We explore the variability in monoterpene emissions from ponderosa pine beyond that which can be explained by temperature alone. Specifically, we examine the roles that photosynthesis and needle monoterpene concentrations play in controlling emissions. We measure monoterpene concentrations and emissions, photosynthesis, temperature, and light availability in the late spring and late summer in a ponderosa pine forest in central Oregon. We use a combination of measurements from cuvettes and Teflon bag enclosures to show that photosynthesis is not correlated with emissions in the short term. We also show that needle monoterpene concentrations are highly correlated with emissions for two compounds, alpha-pinene and beta-pinene, but that Delta-carene concentrations are not correlated with emissions. We suggest that direct effects of light and photosynthesis do not need to be included in emission algorithms. Our results indicate that the role of needle concentration bears further investigation; our results for alpha-pinene and beta-pinene are explainable by a Raoult's law relationship, but we cannot yet explain the cause of our results with Delta-carene.

  8. Photoreaction of indole-containing mycotoxins to fluorescent products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maragos, C M

    2009-06-01

    Photochemical reaction of the non-fluorescent mycotoxin cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) to fluorescent products was recently reported. Because CPA contains an indole moiety, believed to contribute to the fluorescence, it was of interest to determine whether the effect might be more generally applicable to indole-containing mycotoxins. Three indole-containing tremorgens (penitrem A, paxilline, verruculogen) that have not previously been reported to be fluorescent were rendered fluorescent by exposure to ultraviolet light in a photoreactor. Naturally fluorescent ergot alkaloids, which also contain an indole-moiety, exhibited a diminished response after exposure. This suggests that the phenomenon may be most useful for detection of indole-containing tremorgens that are non-fluorescent, rather than for the enhancement of materials that are already fluorescent, such as the ergot alkaloids. The extent to which fluorescence enhancement was seen was strongly influenced by the reaction environment, in particular the solvent used and whether cyclodextrins were present. In an HPLC format, placement of the photoreactor post-column allowed for the fluorescence detection of penitrem A, paxilline, and verruculogen. The ability to photoreact indole-containing tremorgens and detect them by fluorescence may open up new avenues for detection of these mycotoxins alone or in combination.

  9. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Jeremy; Stevens, Kiri

    2014-12-01

    This review covers pyrrolizidine alkaloids isolated from natural sources. Topics include: aspects of structure, isolation, and biological/pharmacological studies; total syntheses of necic acids, necine bases and closely-related non-natural analogues.

  10. Vinca Alkaloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Moudi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vinca alkaloids are a subset of drugs obtained from the Madagascar periwinkle plant. They are naturally extracted from the pink periwinkle plant, Catharanthus roseus G. Don and have a hypoglycemic as well as cytotoxic effects. They have been used to treat diabetes, high blood pressure and have been used as disinfectants. The vinca alkaloids are also important for being cancer fighters. There are four major vinca alkaloids in clinical use: Vinblastine (VBL, vinorelbine (VRL, vincristine (VCR and vindesine (VDS. VCR, VBL and VRL have been approved for use in the United States. Vinflunine is also a new synthetic vinca alkaloid, which has been approved in Europe for the treatment of second-line transitional cell carcinoma of the urothelium is being developed for other malignancies. Vinca alkaloids are the second-most-used class of cancer drugs and will stay among the original cancer therapies. Different researches and studies for new vinca alkaloid applications will be carried out in this regard.

  11. Monoterpenes in essential oils. Biosynthesis and properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loza-Tavera, H

    1999-01-01

    Monoterpenes are compounds found in the essential oils extracted from many plants, including fruits, vegetables, spices and herbs. These compounds contribute to the flavor and aroma of plant from which they are extracted. Monoterpenes are acyclic, monocyclic, or bicyclic C30 compounds synthesized by monoterpene synthases using geranyl pyrophosphate (GPP) as substrate. GPP is also the precursor in the synthesis of farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP) and geranyl-geranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP), two important compounds in cell metabolism of animals, plants and yeast. Monoterpene cyclases produce cyclic monoterpenes through a multistep mechanism involving a universal intermediate, a terpinyl cation which can be transformed to several compounds. Experimental studies, using animal cancer models, have demonstrated that some monoterpenes possess anticarcinogenic properties, acting at different cellular and molecular levels. From these discoveries it seems clear that monoterpenes could be considered as effective, nontoxic dietary antitumorigenic agents that hold promise as a novel class of anticancer drugs.

  12. Antiprotozoal alkaloids from Psychotria prunifolia (Kunth) Steyerm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Lucilia; Oliveira, Cecilia M.A. de; Faria, Emiret O.; Ribeiro, Laryssa C.; Carvalho, Brenda G., E-mail: lucilia@quimica.ufg.br [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Goias, Campus II, Samambaia, Goiania, GO (Brazil); Silva, Cleuza C. da; Santin, Silvana M.O. [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Estadual de Maringa, Maringa, PR (Brazil); Schuque, Ivania T.A.; Nakamura, Celso V.; Britta, Elisandra A.; Miranda, Nathielle [Departamento de Farmacia e Farmacologia, Universidade Estadual de Maringa, PR (Brazil); Iglesias, Amadeu H. [Waters Technologies do Brasil LTDA, Barueri, SP (Brazil); Delprete, Piero G. [VHerbier de Guyane, Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement (IRD), UMR AMAP, French Guiana (France)

    2012-07-01

    The continuity of the phyto chemical study of crude extracts of P. prunifolia's roots and branches led to the isolation of five indole-{beta}-carboline alkaloids. Among them, the 10-hydroxy-iso-deppeaninol and N-oxide-10-hydroxy-antirhine derivatives are described here for the first time. The structures were achieved through 1D and 2D NMR, IR and HRMS analyses. The branches and roots crude extracts and the alkaloids 14-oxoprunifoleine and strictosamide showed selective activity against L. amazonensis, with IC{sub 50} values of 16.0 and 40.7 {mu}g per mL, respectively. (author)

  13. Prenylindole alkaloids from Raputia praetermissa (Rutaceae) and their chemosystematic significance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosas, Lisandra V.; Veiga, Thiago Andre M.; Fernandes, Joao B.; Vieira, Paulo C.; Silva, M. Fatima das G.F. da, E-mail: dmfs@power.ufscar.b [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (DQ/UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica

    2011-07-01

    The dichloromethane extract from the stems of Raputia praetermissa afforded four new compounds, 4-deoxyraputindole C (1), raputimonoindole A-B (2, 3), and hexadecanyl 2-hydroxy- 4-methoxy-cinnamate (5), besides the alkaloids 5-(4-methoxymethylfuran-2-yl)-1H-indole (raputimonoindole C), furoquinolines maculosidine, robustine, evolitrine and dictamnine. The hexane extract yielded N-methyl-4-methoxyquinoline-2(1H)-one, skimmianine, cycloartenone, sitosterol, stigmasterol and sitostenone. The anthranilate alkaloid content indicates that the genus is strongly related to those included in Cusparieae tribe, but differs from Neoraputia by the absence of prenylindole alkaloids in the late, whose species have previously been placed in Raputia. (author)

  14. Metabolic engineering of monoterpene biosynthesis in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lücker, J.

    2002-01-01

    Monoterpenes are a large group of compounds that belong to the terpenoid family of natural compounds in plants. They are small, volatile, lipophilic substances of which around one thousand different structures have been identified. Monoterpenes are

  15. The Alkaloid Alstonine: A Review of Its Pharmacological Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Elisabetsky

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Indole compounds, related to the metabolism of tryptophan, constitute an extensive family, and are found in bacteria, plants and animals. Indolic compounds possess significant and complex physiological roles, and especially indole alkaloids have historically constituted a class of major importance in the development of new plant derived drugs. The indole alkaloid alstonine has been identified as the major component of a plant-based remedy, used in Nigeria to treat mental illnesses by traditional psychiatrists. Although it is certainly difficult to compare the very concept of mental disorders in different cultures, the traditional use of alstonine is remarkably compatible with its profile in experimental animals. Even though alstonine in mice models shows a psychopharmacological profile closer to the newer atypical antipsychotic agents, it also shows important differences and what seems to be an exclusive mechanism of action, not entirely clarified at this point. Considering the seemingly unique mode of action of alstonine and that its traditional use can be viewed as indicative of bioavailability and safety, this review focuses on the effects of alstonine in the central nervous system, particularly on its unique profile as an antipsychotic agent. We suggest that a thorough understanding of traditional medical concepts of health and disease in general and traditional medical practices in particular, can lead to true innovation in paradigms of drug action and development. Overall, the study of this unique indole alkaloid may be considered as another example of the richness of medicinal plants and traditional medical systems in the discovery of new prototypic drugs.

  16. Alkaloids Induce Programmed Cell Death in Bloodstream Forms of Trypanosomes (Trypanosoma b. brucei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Wink

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The potential induction of a programmed cell death (PCD in Trypanosoma b. brucei by 55 alkaloids of the quinoline, quinolizidine, isoquinoline, indole, terpene, tropane, steroid, and piperidine type was studied by measuring DNA fragmentation and changes in mitochondrial membrane potential. For comparison, the induction of apoptosis by the same alkaloids in human leukemia cells (Jurkat APO-S was tested. Several alkaloids of the isoquinoline, quinoline, indole and steroidal type (berberine, chelerythrine, emetine, sanguinarine, quinine, ajmalicine, ergotamine, harmine, vinblastine, vincristine, colchicine, chaconine, demissidine and veratridine induced programmed cell death, whereas quinolizidine, tropane, terpene and piperidine alkaloids were mostly inactive. Effective PCD induction (EC50 below 10 µM was caused in T. brucei by chelerythrine, emetine, sanguinarine, and chaconine. The active alkaloids can be characterized by their general property to inhibit protein biosynthesis, to intercalate DNA, to disturb membrane fluidity or to inhibit microtubule formation.

  17. Indole-3-thiouronium nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lutz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C9H10N3S+·NO3−, the indole ring system and the thiouronium group are nearly perpendicular, with a dihedral angle of 88.62 (6°. Hydrogen bonding generates two-dimensional networks which are linked to each other via π stacking interactions of the indole groups [average inter-planar ring–ring distance of 3.449 (2 Å].

  18. Crystal structure of indoline alkaloids kopsinilam, kopsinine, and the salts of the latter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adizov, Sh. M.; Tashkhodzhaev, B.; Kunafiev, R. Zh.

    2016-01-01

    N1 in the bases and the salts. Tetrahedral hybridization of the atom N1 in indoline alkaloids favors the formation of their double salts, what is unlikely for indole and indolinine alkaloids. In the halogen double salts there is an intramolecular Н bond between one of the protons of the NH2 group......Indoline alkaloids kopsinilam and kopsinine extracted from the plant Vinca erecta have been studied by X-ray crystallography; mono and double salts of the latter alkaloid also have been examined. Experimentally determined positions of Н atoms suggest sp3 hybridization of the indoline nitrogen atom...

  19. Monoterpene biosynthesis potential of plant subcellular compartments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dong, L.; Jongedijk, E.J.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Krol, van der A.R.

    2016-01-01

    Subcellular monoterpene biosynthesis capacity based on local geranyl diphosphate (GDP) availability or locally boosted GDP production was determined for plastids, cytosol and mitochondria. A geraniol synthase (GES) was targeted to plastids, cytosol, or mitochondria. Transient expression in Nicotiana

  20. Alkaloids from Delphinium pentagynum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Jesús G; Ruiz, Juan García; Herz, Werner

    2004-07-01

    Aerial parts of a collection of Delphinium pentagynum Lam. from Niebla, Southern Spain, furnished one diterpene alkaloid, 2-dehydrodeacetylheterophylloidine, two norditerpene alkaloids, 14-demethyl-14-isobutyrylanhweidelphinine and 14-demethyl-14-acetylanhweidelphinine, the known alkaloids 14-deacetylnudicauline, methyllycaconitine, 14-deacetyl-14-isobutyrylnudicauline, 14-acetylbrowniine, browniine, delcosine, lycoctonine, 18-methoxygadesine, neoline, karakoline and the aporphine alkaloid magnoflorine. Structures of the alkaloids were established by MS, 1D and 2-D NMR techniques.

  1. Microbial monoterpene transformations – A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert eMarmulla

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Isoprene and monoterpenes constitute a significant fraction of new plant biomass. Emission rates into the atmosphere alone are estimated to be over 500 Tg per year. These natural hydrocarbons are mineralized annually in similar quantities. In the atmosphere, abiotic photochemical processes cause lifetimes of minutes to hours. Microorganisms encounter isoprene, monoterpenes and other volatiles of plant origin while living in and on plants, in the soil and in aquatic habitats. Below toxic concentrations, the compounds can serve as carbon and energy source for aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms. Besides these catabolic reactions, transformations may occur as part of detoxification processes. Initial transformations of monoterpenes involve the introduction of functional groups, oxidation reactions and molecular rearrangements catalyzed by various enzymes. Pseudomonas and Rhodococcus strains and members of the genera Castellaniella and Thauera have become model organisms for the elucidation of biochemical pathways. We review here the enzymes and their genes together with microorganisms known for a monoterpene metabolism, with a strong focus on microorganisms that are taxonomically validly described and currently available from culture collections. Metagenomes of microbiomes with a monoterpene-rich diet confirmed the ecological relevance of monoterpene metabolism and raised concerns on the quality of our insights based on the limited biochemical knowledge.

  2. Indole-Diterpene Biosynthetic Capability of Epichloë Endophytes as Predicted by ltm Gene Analysis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Carolyn A.; Tapper, Brian A.; May, Kimberley; Moon, Christina D.; Schardl, Christopher L.; Scott, Barry

    2009-01-01

    Bioprotective alkaloids produced by Epichloë and closely related asexual Neotyphodium fungal endophytes protect their grass hosts from insect and mammalian herbivory. One class of these compounds, known for antimammalian toxicity, is the indole-diterpenes. The LTM locus of Neotyphodium lolii (Lp19) and Epichloë festuce (Fl1), required for the biosynthesis of the indole-diterpene lolitrem, consists of 10 ltm genes. We have used PCR and Southern analysis to screen a broad taxonomic range of 44 endophyte isolates to determine why indole-diterpenes are present in so few endophyte-grass associations in comparison to that of the other bioprotective alkaloids, which are more widespread among the endophtyes. All 10 ltm genes were present in only three epichloë endophytes. A predominance of the asexual Neotyphodium spp. examined contained 8 of the 10 ltm genes, with only one N. lolii containing the entire LTM locus and the ability to produce lolitrems. Liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry profiles of indole-diterpenes from a subset of endophyte-infected perennial ryegrass showed that endophytes that contained functional genes present in ltm clusters 1 and 2 were capable of producing simple indole-diterpenes such as paspaline, 13-desoxypaxilline, and terpendoles, compounds predicted to be precursors of lolitrem B. Analysis of toxin biosynthesis genes by PCR now enables a diagnostic method to screen endophytes for both beneficial and detrimental alkaloids and can be used as a resource for screening isolates required for forage improvement. PMID:19181837

  3. Synthesis of bicyclic alkaloids from the iridoid antirrhinoside

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Signe Maria

    The present thesis describes the isolation of the iridoid glucoside antirrhinoside from Antirrhinum majus, and the approaches made towards its transformation into analogues of biologically active compounds, with special interest in syntheses of bicyclic alkaloids.A synthetic piperidine monoterpene...... alkaloid was prepared from antirrhinoside by means of an enzymatic cleavage to afford the aglucone, followed by a double reductive amination with benzylamine hydrochloride and sodium cyanoborohydride. The resulting piperidine was modified by opening of the epoxide on the cyclopropane ring by azide...... strategy was therefore abandoned.A one-pot reaction involving ozonolysis and subsequent reduction of the 5,6-O-isopropylidene-2',3',4',6'-tetra-O-acetyl antirrhinoside yielded a diol, which was considered a potential intermediate in the preparation of enantiopure 3-azabicyclo[3.3.0]octane alkaloids...

  4. A comparison of new measurements of total monoterpene flux with improved measurements of speciated monoterpene flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lee

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Many monoterpenes have been identified in forest emissions using gas chromatography (GC. Until now, it has been impossible to determine whether all monoterpenes are appropriately measured using GC techniques. We used a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS coupled with the eddy covariance (EC technique to measure mixing ratios and fluxes of total monoterpenes above a ponderosa pine plantation. We compared PTR-MS-EC results with simultaneous measurements of eight speciated monoterpenes, β-pinene, α-pinene, 3-carene, d-limonene, β-phellandrene, α-terpinene, camphene, and terpinolene, made with an automated, in situ gas chromatograph with flame ionization detectors (GC-FID, coupled to a relaxed eddy accumulation system (REA. Monoterpene mixing ratios and fluxes measured by PTR-MS averaged 30±2.3% and 31±9.2% larger than by GC-FID, with larger differences at night than during the day. Four unidentified peaks that correlated with β-pinene were resolved in the chromatograms and completely accounted for the daytime difference and reduced the nighttime difference to 19±3.4%. Measurements of total monoterpenes by PTR-MS-EC indicated that GC-FID-REA measured the common, longer-lived monoterpenes well, but that additional monoterpenes were emitted from the ecosystem that represented an important contribution to the total mixing ratio above the forest at night, and that must have been oxidized during the day before they escaped the forest canopy.

  5. Cardiovascular effects of monoterpenes: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio R. V. Santos

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The monoterpenes are secondary metabolites of plants. They have various pharmacological properties including antifungal, antibacterial, antioxidant, anticancer, anti-spasmodic, hypotensive, and vasorelaxant. The purpose of this research was to review the cardiovascular effects of monoterpenes. The data in this resarch were collected using the Internet portals Pubmed, Scopus, and ISI Web of Knowledge between the years 1987 and 2010. In the study 33 monoterpenes were included, which were related to each of the thirteen individual words: artery, cardiovascular, heart, myocyte, vasorelaxant, vessel, hypotension, hypotensive, cardiomyocyte, ventricular, vasodilatory, aorta, and aortic. The research utilized 22 articles published mainly in the journals Phytomedicine, Fundamental Clinical Pharmacology, Planta Medica, Life Science, European Journal of Pharmacology, and Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research. Of the 33 monoterpenes studied surveyed, sixteen of them had already been studied for their effects on the cardiovascular system: carvacrol, citronellol, p-cymene, eucalyptol (1,8-cineole, linalool, menthol, myrtenal, myrtenol, α-pinene, rotundifolone (piperitenone oxide, sobrerol, thymol, α-limonene, α-terpinen-4-ol, α-terpineol, and perillyl alcohol. The main effects observed were vasorelaxation, decreased heart rate and blood pressure. This review showed that the monoterpenes may be considered promising agents for prevention or treatment of diseases of the cardiovascular system.

  6. Rituximab In Indolent Lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousou, Tarek; Friedberg, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    Indolent Non Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) comprises a group of incurable, generally slow growing lymphomas highly responsive to initial therapy with a relapsing and progressive course. Rituximab, an anti CD-20 antibody, has had a large impact on treatment of indolent NHL. Its effectiveness as a single agent and in conjunction with known chemotherapy regimens has made it a standard of care in the treatment of NHL. Analysis of data obtained from NHL clinical trials as well as data from the National Cancer Institute indicates that the overall survival of indolent NHL has improved since the discovery of rituximab. Given its effectiveness and tolerability, it is currently being investigated as a maintenance agent with encouraging results. This review summarizes several landmark trials utilizing rituximab as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy for treatment of NHL. In addition, a review of the studied rituximab maintenance dosing schedules and its impact on NHL will also be presented. Overall, rituximab has changed the landscape for treatment of indolent NHL however additional research is necessary to identify the optimal dosing schedule as well as patients most likely to respond to prolonged rituximab therapy. PMID:20350660

  7. Characterization of the plastidial geraniol synthase from Madagascar periwinkle which initiates the monoterpenoid branch of the alkaloid pathway in internal phloem associated parenchyma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkin, Andrew J; Miettinen, Karel; Claudel, Patricia; Burlat, Vincent; Guirimand, Grégory; Courdavault, Vincent; Papon, Nicolas; Meyer, Sophie; Godet, Stéphanie; St-Pierre, Benoit; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; Fischer, Marc J C; Memelink, Johan; Clastre, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus [L.] G. Don, Apocynaceae) produces monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs), secondary metabolites of high interest due to their therapeutic value. A key step in the biosynthesis is the generation of geraniol from geranyl diphosphate (GPP) in the monoterpenoid branch of the MIA pathway. Here we report on the cloning and functional characterization of C. roseus geraniol synthase (CrGES). The full-length CrGES was over-expressed in Escherichia coli and the purified recombinant protein catalyzed the conversion of GPP into geraniol with a K(m) value of 58.5 μM for GPP. In vivo CrGES activity was evaluated by heterologous expression in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain mutated in the farnesyl diphosphate synthase gene. Analysis of culture extracts by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry confirmed the excretion of geraniol into the growth medium. Transient transformation of C. roseus cells with a Yellow Fluorescent Protein-fusion construct revealed that CrGES is localized in plastid stroma and stromules. In aerial plant organs, RNA in situ hybridization showed specific labeling of CrGES transcripts in the internal phloem associated parenchyma as observed for other characterized genes involved in the early steps of MIA biosynthesis. Finally, when cultures of Catharanthus cells were treated with the alkaloid-inducing hormone methyl jasmonate, an increase in CrGES transcript levels was observed. This observation coupled with the tissue-specific expression and the subcellular compartmentalization support the idea that CrGES initiates the monoterpenoid branch of the MIA biosynthetic pathway.

  8. A comparison of new measurements of total monoterpene flux with improved measurements of speciated monoterpene flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Lee

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Many monoterpenes have been identified in forest emissions using gas chromatography (GC. Until now, it has been impossible to determine whether all monoterpenes are appropriately measured using GC techniques. We used a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS coupled with the eddy covariance (EC technique to measure mixing ratios and fluxes of total monoterpenes above a ponderosa pine plantation. We compared PTR-MS-EC results with simultaneous measurements of eight speciated monoterpenes, β-pinene, α-pinene, 3-carene, d-limonene, β-phellandrene, α-terpinene, camphene, and terpinolene, made with an automated, in situ gas chromatograph with flame ionization detectors (GC-FID, coupled to a relaxed eddy accumulation system (REA. Monoterpene mixing ratios and fluxes measured by PTR-MS averaged 30±2.3% and 31±9.2% larger than by GC-FID, with larger mixing ratio discrepancies between the two techniques at night than during the day. Two unidentified peaks that correlated with β-pinene were resolved in the chromatograms and completely accounted for the daytime difference and reduced the nighttime mixing ratio difference to 20±2.9%. Measurements of total monoterpenes by PTR-MS-EC indicated that GC-FID-REA measured the common, longer-lived monoterpenes well, but that additional terpenes were emitted from the ecosystem that represented an important contribution to the total mixing ratio above the forest at night.

  9. Antibacterial activity of indole alkaloids from Aspidosperma ramiflorum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C.A. Tanaka

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the antibacterial activities of the crude methanol extract, fractions (I-V obtained after acid-base extraction and pure compounds from the stem bark of Aspidosperma ramiflorum. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC was determined by the microdilution technique in Mueller-Hinton broth. Inoculates were prepared in this medium from 24-h broth cultures of bacteria (10(7 CFU/mL. Microtiter plates were incubated at 37ºC and the MICs were recorded after 24 h of incubation. Two susceptibility endpoints were recorded for each isolate. The crude methanol extract presented moderate activity against the Gram-positive bacteria B. subtilis (MIC = 250 µg/mL and S. aureus (MIC = 500 µg/mL, and was inactive against the Gram-negative bacteria E. coli and P. aeruginosa (MIC > 1000 µg/mL. Fractions I and II were inactive against standard strains at concentrations of 1000 µg/mL. Fractions III, IV and V were then submitted to bioassay-guided fractionation by silica gel column chromatography, yielding individual purified ramiflorines A and B. Both ramiflorines showed significant activity against S. aureus (MIC = 25 µg/mL and E. faecalis (MIC = 50 µg/mL, with EC50 of 8 and 2.5 µg/mL for ramiflorines A and B, respectively, against S. aureus. These results are promising, showing that these compounds are biologically active against Gram-positive bacteria.

  10. Inhibitory effects of monoterpenes on seed germination and seedling growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordali, Saban; Cakir, Ahmet; Sutay, Sunay

    2007-01-01

    Monoterpenes, the chemical constituents of essential oils found in plants, are known biologically active compounds. The present study was conducted to investigate the inhibitory effects of 30 monoterpenes including monoterpene hydrocarbons and oxygenated monoterpenes on seed germination and seedling growth of Amaranthus retroflexus, Chenopodium album and Rumex crispus under laboratory conditions. The monoterpenes were applied at contents of 10 and 20 microl for liquid compounds and 10 and 20 microg for solid compounds. The results show that most of the monoterpenes significantly inhibited seed germination and seedling growth of the tested plants. Oxygenated monoterpenes including beta-citronellol, nerol and terpinen-4-ol completely inhibited seed germination and seedling growth of all tested plants. Their inhibitory effects were also stronger than that of the herbicide 2,4-D. In general, monoterpenes were less effective against seed germination and seedling growth of C. album as compared with R. crispus and A. retroflexus. Phytotoxic effects of monoterpene hydrocarbons were found to be lower than those of oxygenated monoterpenes. The alcohol derivatives of oxygenated monoterpenes were also found to be more phytotoxic as compared with their acetate derivatives. Based on the present results, it can be concluded that the oxygenated monoterpenes can be used as potential bio-herbicides.

  11. Alkaloid and other chemical constituents from Psychotria stachyoides Benth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimenta, Antonia T.A.; Uchoa, Daniel E.A.; Silveira, Edilberto R.; Lima, Mary Anne S. [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Braz-Filho, Raimundo, E-mail: mary@dqoi.ufc.br [Centro de Ciencias, Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense and Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, Campos dos Goytacazes-RJ (Brazil)

    2011-09-15

    The organic extracts of leaves and roots of Psychotria stachyoides provided the new glucoside monoterpenoid indole alkaloid N-demethylcorreantoside, besides bizantionoside B, a-amyrin, alizarine methyl-ether, rubiadine, scopoletin, barbinevic acid and a mixture of b-sitosterol and stigmasterol glucosides. The structural characterization of the isolates was established based on infrared spectroscopy (IR), mass spectrometry (MS) and, particularly, 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). (author)

  12. Biologically active vallesamine, strychnan, and rhazinilam alkaloids from Alstonia: Pneumatophorine, a nor-secovallesamine with unusual incorporation of a 3-ethylpyridine moiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jun-Lee; Sim, Kae-Shin; Yong, Kien-Thai; Loong, Bi-Juin; Ting, Kang-Nee; Lim, Siew-Huah; Low, Yun-Yee; Kam, Toh-Seok

    2015-09-01

    Four alkaloids comprising two vallesamine, one strychnan, and one pyranopyridine alkaloid, in addition to 32 other known alkaloids were isolated from two Malayan Alstonia species, Alstonia pneumatophora and Alstonia rostrata. The structures of these alkaloids were determined using NMR and MS analyses, and in one instance, confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. The nor-6,7-secovallesamine alkaloid, pneumatophorine, is notable for an unusual incorporation of a 3-ethylpyridine moiety in a monoterpenoid indole. The rhazinilam-type alkaloids (rhazinicine, nor-rhazinicine, rhazinal, and rhazinilam) showed strong cytotoxicity toward human KB, HCT-116, MDA-MB-231, and MRC-5 cells, while pneumatophorine, the uleine alkaloid undulifoline, and the strychnan alkaloids, N4-demethylalstogustine and echitamidine, induced concentration dependent relaxation in phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings.

  13. Exploiting plant alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schläger, Sabrina; Dräger, Birgit

    2016-02-01

    Alkaloid-containing plants have been used for medicine since ancient times. Modern pharmaceuticals still rely on alkaloid extraction from plants, some of which grow slowly, are difficult to cultivate and produce low alkaloid yields. Microbial cells as alternative alkaloid production systems are emerging. Before industrial application of genetically engineered bacteria and yeasts, several steps have to be taken. Original alkaloid-forming enzymes have to be elucidated from plants. Their activity in the heterologous host cells, however, may be low. The exchange of individual plant enzymes for alternative catalysts with better performance and optimal fermentation parameters appear promising. The overall aim is enhancement and stabilization of alkaloid yields from microbes in order to replace the tedious extraction of low alkaloid concentrations from intact plants.

  14. 共转orca3/g10h双基因长春花毛状根生物碱量及转录差异研究%Study on content of terpenoid indole alkaloids and transcriptional differences for covalent orca3/g10h in double-gene transgenic hairy roots of Catharanthus roseus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈艺璇; 朱帅旗; 龚一富; 刘林; 王小飞; 王何瑜

    2016-01-01

    Objective In order to improve the content of terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs),orca3/g10h genes were introduced to the hairy roots in Catharanthus roseus.Methods Bivalent expression vector CAMBIA1304+ +orca3 + g10h was constructed and introduced into Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain and transformed into C.roseus to obtain transgenic hairy roots.RT-qPCR was used to study the transcriptional differences of relative genes referred to the biosynthesis pathway of TIAs.Then HPLC was used to study TIAs content in the transgenic hairy roots of C.roseus,including vinblastine,vincristine,and ajmalicine.Results The transcriptional level of genes that linked to biosynthesis of TIAs in the transgenic hairy roots ofC.roseus,asα,ggpps,g10h,str,tdc,cpr,sgd,and dat,were all expressed higher than those of the nontransgenic roots.HPLC results showed that modified hairy root of C.roseus owned more total TIAs production,58.23 mg/g,the number was larger than that of common roots in C.roseus as many as 27.5 times.On the other hand,the average content of vinblastine and vincristine was also more than the common roots in C.roseus.Among them,vinblastine content was the most.The number of production got 51.30 mg/g,which was as many as 197.3 times of the common root of C.roseus.Conclusion Orca3/g10h double-gene transgenic hairy root of C.roseus can increase TIAs content efficiently.%目的 共转orca3/g1 0h双基因于长春花毛状根,提高抗癌生物碱量.方法 通过构建pCAMBIA 1304++ orca3 +g10h表达载体,利用发根农杆菌介导获得双转orca3/g1 0h基因长春花毛状根.利用RT-qPCR研究共转orca3/g1oh基因长春花毛状根萜类吲哚生物碱(TIAs)生物合成途径中相关基因的转录差异.采用HPLC研究共转orca3/g1 0h基因长春花毛状根TIAs(包括长春碱、长春新碱和阿吗碱)量.结果 转基因长春花毛状根中与TIAs生物合成相关基因asα、ggpps、g10h、str、tdc、cpr、sgd和dat转录水平均较非转基因长春花普通

  15. Highly oxygenated monoterpenes from Chenopodium ambrosioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, A A

    2000-07-01

    Three new monoterpenes (3-5) were isolated from an organic extract of the aerial parts of Chenopodium ambrosioides. Structures were established on the basis of MS and NMR spectroscopic ((1)H, (13)C, (1)H-(1)H COSY, HMQC and HMBC) data.

  16. Structural relationships and vasorelaxant activity of monoterpenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardoso Lima Tamires

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and purpose of the study The hypotensive activity of the essential oil of Mentha x villosa and its main constituent, the monoterpene rotundifolone, have been reported. Therefore, our objective was to evaluate the vasorelaxant effect of monoterpenes found in medicinal plants and establish the structure-activity relationship of rotundifolone and its structural analogues on the rat superior mesenteric artery. Methods Contractions of the vessels were induced with 10 μM of phenylephine (Phe in rings with endothelium. During the tonic phase of the contraction, the monoterpenes (10-8 - 10-3, cumulatively were added to the organ bath. The extent of relaxation was expressed as the percentage of Phe-induced contraction. Results The results from the present study showed that both oxygenated terpenes (rotundifolone, (+-limonene epoxide, pulegone epoxide, carvone epoxide, and (+-pulegone and non-oxygenated terpene ((+-limonene exhibit relaxation activity. The absence of an oxygenated molecular structure was not a critical requirement for the molecule to be bioactive. Also it was found that the position of ketone and epoxide groups in the monoterpene structures influence the vasorelaxant potency and efficacy. Major conclusion The results suggest that the presence of functional groups in the chemical structure of rotundifolone is not essential for its vasorelaxant activity.

  17. Structural Relationships and Vasorelaxant Activity of Monoterpenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamires Cardoso Lima

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose of the study The hypotensive activity of the essential oil of Mentha x villosa and its main constituent, the monoterpene rotundifolone, have been reported. Therefore, our objective was to evaluate the vasorelaxant effect of monoterpenes found in medicinal plants and establish the structureactivity relationship of rotundifolone and its structural analogues on the rat superior mesenteric artery. Methods:Contractions of the vessels were induced with 10 muM of phenylephine (Phe in rings with endothelium. During the tonic phase of the contraction, the monoterpenes (10-8 - 10-3, cumulatively were added to the organ bath. The extent of relaxation was expressed as the percentage of Phe-induced contraction. Results:The results from the present study showed that both oxygenated terpenes (rotundifolone, (+- limonene epoxide, pulegone epoxide, carvone epoxide, and (+-pulegone and nonoxygenated terpene ((+-limonene exhibit relaxation activity. The absence of an oxygenated molecular structure was not a critical requirement for the molecule to be bioactive. Also it was found that the position of ketone and epoxide groups in the monoterpene structures influence the vasorelaxant potency and efficacy. Major conclusion The results suggest that the presence of functional groups in the chemical structure of rotundifolone is not essential for its vasorelaxant activity.

  18. Extraction and analysis of indole derivatives from fungal biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartz, J

    1994-01-01

    The occurrence and extraction of indole derivatives in six species from four genera of higher fungi were investigated. By using pure methanol for extraction of the mushrooms analysis revealed the highest concentrations of psilocybin and baeocystin. The psilocin content of the species was higher by using aqueous solutions of alcohols than with methanol alone but was an artificial phenomenon caused by enzymatic destruction of psilocybin. The extraction with dilute acetic acid yielded better results than with the water containing alcohols. The simple one-step procedure with methanol for the quantitative extraction is still the safest method to obtain the genuine alkaloids from fungal biomass.

  19. Alkaloids from Marine Invertebrates as Important Leads for Anticancer Drugs Discovery and Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta Imperatore

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The present review describes research on novel natural antitumor alkaloids isolated from marine invertebrates. The structure, origin, and confirmed cytotoxic activity of more than 130 novel alkaloids belonging to several structural families (indoles, pyrroles, pyrazines, quinolines, and pyridoacridines, together with some of their synthetic analogs, are illustrated. Recent discoveries concerning the current state of the potential and/or development of some of them as new drugs, as well as the current knowledge regarding their modes of action, are also summarized. A special emphasis is given to the role of marine invertebrate alkaloids as an important source of leads for anticancer drug discovery.

  20. Alkaloids in Marine Algae

    OpenAIRE

    Ekrem Sezik; Aline Percot; Kasım Cemal Güven

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the alkaloids found in green, brown and red marine algae. Algal chemistry has interested many researchers in order to develop new drugs, as algae include compounds with functional groups which are characteristic from this particular source. Among these compounds, alkaloids present special interest because of their pharmacological activities. Alkaloid chemistry has been widely studied in terrestrial plants, but the number of studies in algae is insignificant. In this review...

  1. A new diketopiperazine alkaloid from Aspergillus oryzae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaaban, Mohamed; El-Metwally, Mohammad Magdy; Nasr, Hamdi

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of bioactive secondary metabolites from terrestrial Aspergillus oryzae sp. MMAO1 using M2 medium afforded a new diketopiperazine alkaloid, 7,9-dihydroxy-3-(1H-indol-3-ylmethyl)-8-methoxy-2,3,11,11a-tetrahydro-6H-pyrazino[1,2-b]isoquinoline-1,4-dione (1a), containing the unusual amino acid L-6,8-dihydroxy-7-methoxyphenylalanine. This was co-isolated with ditryptophenaline (2), cyclo-(Tryp,Tyr) (4), cyclo-(Pro,Val), α-cyclopiazonic acid (3), kojic acid and uridine. Re-cultivation of the fungal strain on Dox medium led to the production of bisdethio(bismethylthio)gliotoxin (5), pseurotin A (6) along with linoleic acid, α-cyclopiazonic acid (3) and kojic acid. The chemical structure of the new diketopiperazine alkaloid including the relative configuration was determined by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and HR-ESI-MS spectrometry, and by comparison with the related literature. The new alkaloid (1a) showed no antimicrobial activity or cytotoxicity against brine shrimps.

  2. Ergot and Its Alkaloids

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Paul L Schiff Jr

    2006-01-01

      This manuscript reviews the history and pharmacognosy of ergot, and describes the isolation/preparation, chemistry, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacotherapeutics of the major ergot alkaloids and their derivatives...

  3. Highly Oxygenated Monoterpenes from Eupatorium fortunei

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    A pair of epimers of highly-oxygenated monoterpenes were isolated from the traditional Chinese medicine Eupatorium fortunei. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of the spectral analysis as (1R*, 2S*, 3R*, 4R*, 6S*)-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrehydroxy-p-menthane (1) and (1S*,2S*, 3S*, 4R*, 6R*)-1, 2, 3, 6-tetrehydroxy-p-menthane (2).

  4. Application of a Palladium-Catalyzed C-H Functionalization/Indolization Method to Syntheses of cis-Trikentrin A and Herbindole B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Raul A; Bischof, Caroline; Lee, Youjin V; Sawano, Shota; McAtee, Christopher C; Latimer, Luke N; Russ, Zachary N; Dueber, John E; Yu, Jin-Quan; Sarpong, Richmond

    2016-09-19

    We describe herein formal syntheses of the indole alkaloids cis-trikentrin A and herbindole B from a common meso-hydroquinone intermediate prepared by a ruthenium-catalyzed [2+2+1+1] cycloaddition that has not been used previously in natural product synthesis. Key steps include a sterically demanding Buchwald-Hartwig amination as well as a unique C(sp(3) )-H amination/indole formation. Studies toward a selective desymmetrization of the meso-hydroquinone are also reported.

  5. Alkaloids from Menispermum dauricum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bing-Wu; Chen, Jian-Yong; Wang, Yan-Ping; Cheng, Kin-Fin; Li, Xiao-Yu; Qin, Guo-Wei

    2002-10-01

    The alkaloids, dechloroacutumidine and 1-epidechloroacutumine, together with three known alkaloids, acutumidine, acutumine, and dechloroacutumine, were isolated from the rhizomes of Menispermum dauricum and their structures established by spectral and chemical methods. The cytotoxicity of each compound against the growth of human cell lines was studied, and acutumine selectively inhibited T-cell growth.

  6. [Alkaloids of Annonaceae. XXIX. Alkaloids of Annona muricata].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leboeuf, M; Legueut, C; Cavé, A; Desconclois, J F; Forgacs, P; Jacquemin, H

    1981-05-01

    From leaves, root - and stem - barks of Annona muricata L., seven isoquinoline alkaloids have been isolated: reticuline (main alkaloid), coclaurine, coreximine, atherosperminine, stepharine. Anomurine and anomuricine, two minor alkaloids, are new tetrahydrobenzylisoquinolines, with 5, 6, 7 substituted ring A. The phytochemical significance of these alkaloids is discussed.

  7. Currencies of Mutualisms: Sources of Alkaloid Genes in Vertically Transmitted Epichloae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L. Schardl

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The epichloae (Epichloë and Neotyphodium species, a monophyletic group of fungi in the family Clavicipitaceae, are systemic symbionts of cool-season grasses (Poaceae subfamily Poöideae. Most epichloae are vertically transmitted in seeds (endophytes, and most produce alkaloids that attack nervous systems of potential herbivores. These protective metabolites include ergot alkaloids and indole-diterpenes (tremorgens, which are active in vertebrate systems, and lolines and peramine, which are more specific against invertebrates. Several Epichloë species have been described which are sexual and capable of horizontal transmission, and most are vertically transmissible also. Asexual epichloae are mainly or exclusively vertically transmitted, and many are interspecific hybrids with genomic contributions from two or three ancestral Epichloë species. Here we employ genome-scale analyses to investigate the origins of biosynthesis gene clusters for ergot alkaloids (EAS, indole-diterpenes (IDT, and lolines (LOL in 12 hybrid species. In each hybrid, the alkaloid-gene and housekeeping-gene relationships were congruent. Interestingly, hybrids frequently had alkaloid clusters that were rare in their sexual ancestors. Also, in those hybrids that had multiple EAS, IDT or LOL clusters, one cluster lacked some genes, usually for late pathway steps. Possible implications of these findings for the alkaloid profiles and endophyte ecology are discussed.

  8. Microbial Degradation of Indole and Its Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Kumar Arora

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Indole and its derivatives, including 3-methylindole and 4-chloroindole, are environmental pollutants that are present worldwide. Microbial degradation of indole and its derivatives can occur in several aerobic and anaerobic pathways; these pathways involve different known and characterized genes. In this minireview, we summarize and explain the microbial degradation of indole, indole-3-acetic acid, 4-chloroindole, and methylindole.

  9. Genotoxic effect of alkaloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. P. Henriques

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Because of the increase use of alkaloids in general medical practice in recent years, it is of interest to determine genotoxic, mutagenic and recombinogenic response to different groups of alkaloids in prokaryotic and eucaryotic organisms. Reserpine, boldine and chelerythrine did not show genotoxicity response in the SOS-Chromotest whereas skimmianine showed genotixicity in the presence of a metabolic activation mixture. Voacristine isolated fromthe leaves of Ervatamia coronaria shows in vivo cytostatic and mutagenic effects in Saccharomyces cerevisiae hapioids cells. The Rauwolfia alkaloid (reserpine was not able to induce reverse mutation and recombinational mitotic events (crossing-over and gene conversion in yeast diploid strain XS2316.

  10. Alkaloids of Ocotea brachybotra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchietti, V; Casagrande, C; Ferrari, G

    1977-11-01

    Aporphine, proaporphine and morphinane alkaloids were isolated from the leaves of a Brazilian Lauracea, Ocotea brachybotra (Meiss.) Mez. The known alkaloids were identified through their physico-chemical properties as: (I) (+/-)-glaziovine, (II) dicentrine, (III) ocopodine, (IV) cassynthicine, (V) predicentrine, (VI) leucoxine, (IX) sinacutine and (X) pallidine. The structure of (VI) leucoxine was confirmed by a detailed analysis of the N.M.R. spectra recorded in various conditions. New morphinane alkaloids, (XI) ocobotrine and (XII) 14-espisinomenine, having the unusual B/C-trans configuration were also isolated. Their structures were determined using spectroscopic methods and chemical correlations.

  11. Strategies for transgenic manipulation of monoterpene biosynthesis in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Soheil S; Croteau, Rodney B

    2002-08-01

    Monoterpenes, the C(10) isoprenoids, are a large family of natural products that are best known as constituents of the essential oils and defensive oleoresins of aromatic plants. In addition to ecological roles in pollinator attraction, allelopathy and plant defense, monoterpenes are used extensively in the food, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries. The importance of these plant products has prompted the definition of many monoterpene biosynthetic pathways, the cloning of the relevant genes and the development of genetic transformation techniques for agronomically significant monoterpene-producing plants. Metabolic engineering of monoterpene biosynthesis in the model plant peppermint has resulted in yield increase and compositional improvement of the essential oil, and also provided strategies for manipulating flavor and fragrance production, and plant defense.

  12. Novel Euglenoid Derived Alkaloid

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Disclosed herein is a purified toxin isolated from Euglena sanguinea. More specifically the toxin, termed euglenophycin, is an alkaloid having herbicidal and...

  13. Analysis of Ergot Alkaloids

    OpenAIRE

    Colin Crews

    2015-01-01

    The principles and application of established and newer methods for the quantitative and semi-quantitative determination of ergot alkaloids in food, feed, plant materials and animal tissues are reviewed. The techniques of sampling, extraction, clean-up, detection, quantification and validation are described. The major procedures for ergot alkaloid analysis comprise liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (LC-FLD). Ot...

  14. Synthesis and Antimicrobial Characterization of Half-Calycanthaceous Alkaloid Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaojun Zheng

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A total of 29 novel tetrahydropyrroloindol-based calycanthaceous alkaloid derivatives were synthesized from indole-3-acetonitrile in good yields. The synthesized compounds were evaluated against nine strains of bacteria and a wide range of plant pathogen fungi. Bioassay results revealed that majority of the compounds displayed similar or higher in vitro antimicrobial activities than the positive control. The biological activities also indicated that substituents at R4 and R5 significantly affect the activities. Notably, compound c4 was found to be most active among the tested calycanthaceous analogues and might be a novel potential leading compound for further development as an antifungal agent. The results could pave the way for further design and structural modification of calycanthaceous alkaloids as antimicrobial agents.

  15. Antiviral alkaloids produced by the mangrove-derived fungus Cladosporium sp. PJX-41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jixing; Lin, Tao; Wang, Wei; Xin, Zhihong; Zhu, Tianjiao; Gu, Qianqun; Li, Dehai

    2013-06-28

    Six new indole alkaloids including five new glyantrypine derivatives (1, 2a, 2b, 3, 4) and a new pyrazinoquinazoline derivative (5), together with eight known alkaloids (6-13), were isolated from the culture of the mangrove-derived fungus Cladosporium sp. PJX-41. Their structures were elucidated primarily by spectroscopic and physical data. The absolute configurations of compounds 1-9 were established on the basis of CD, NOESY data, and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Compounds 2b, 5, 7-9, and 11 exhibited significant activities against influenza virus A (H1N1), with IC50 values of 82-89 μM.

  16. (--8-Oxohobartine a New İndole Alkaloid from Aristotelia chilensis (Mol. Stuntz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Paz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The fruit of Aristotelia chilensis is considered a “super fruit” due to its high concentration of polyphenols displaying exceptional antioxidant capacities ORAC. From maqui berries have been reported several anthocyanins and glycosylated flavonoids, those benefits increase the attention to restudy the plant. From the leaves of A. chilensis several indole alkaloids have been reported, we in addition to aristoteline, aristone, aristoquinoline and 3-fromylindole report the spectroscopic elucidation of 8-oxo-9-dehydromakomakine (1, hobartine (2 and a new alkaloid named 8-oxohobartine (3. Compound 1 to 3 did not show bactericidal activity against E. coli and S. aureus till 200 μg.

  17. Domain swapping of Citrus limon monoterpene synthases: impact on enzymatic activity and product specifity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamer, el M.K.; Lucker, J.; Bosch, D.; Verhoeven, H.A.; Verstappen, F.W.A.; Schwab, W.; Tunen, van A.J.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Maagd, de R.A.; Bouwmeester, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Monoterpene cyclases are the key enzymes in the monoterpene biosynthetic pathway, as they catalyze the cyclization of the ubiquitous geranyl diphosphate (GDP) to the specific monoterpene skeletons. From Citrus limon, four monoterpene synthase-encoding cDNAs for a P-pinene synthase named

  18. Domain swapping of Citrus limon monoterpene synthases: impact on enzymatic activity and product specifity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamer, el M.K.; Lucker, J.; Bosch, D.; Verhoeven, H.A.; Verstappen, F.W.A.; Schwab, W.; Tunen, van A.J.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Maagd, de R.A.; Bouwmeester, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Monoterpene cyclases are the key enzymes in the monoterpene biosynthetic pathway, as they catalyze the cyclization of the ubiquitous geranyl diphosphate (GDP) to the specific monoterpene skeletons. From Citrus limon, four monoterpene synthase-encoding cDNAs for a P-pinene synthase named Cl(-)betaPIN

  19. Monoterpenes from thyme (Thymus vulgaris) as potential mosquito repellents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byeoung-Soo; Choi, Won-Sik; Kim, Jeong-Han; Kim, Kap-Ho; Lee, Sung-Eun

    2005-03-01

    Five monoterpenes (carvacrol, p-cymene, linalool, alpha-terpinene, and thymol) derived from the essential oil of thyme (Thymus vulgaris) were examined for their repellency against the mosquito Culex pipiens pallens. All 5 monoterpenes effectively repelled mosquitoes based on a human forearm bioassay. Alpha-terpinene and carvacrol showed significantly greater repellency than a commercial formulation, N,N-diethyl-m-methylbenzamide (deet), whereas thymol showed similar repellency to that of deet. The duration of repellency after application for all these monoterpenes was equal to or higher than that of deet. These findings indicate that a spray-type solution containing 2% alpha-terpinene may serve as an alternative mosquito repellent.

  20. Ibogan, tacaman, and cytotoxic bisindole alkaloids from tabernaemontana. Cononusine, an iboga alkaloid with unusual incorporation of a pyrrolidone moiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kuan-Hon; Raja, Vijay J; Bradshaw, Tracey D; Lim, Siew-Huah; Low, Yun-Yee; Kam, Toh-Seok

    2015-05-22

    Six new indole alkaloids, viz., cononusine (1, a rare example of an iboga-pyrrolidone conjugate), ervaluteine (2), vincamajicine (3), tacamonidine (4), 6-oxoibogaine (5), and N(4)-chloromethylnorfluorocurarine chloride (6), and two new vobasinyl-iboga bisindole alkaloids, ervatensines A (7) and B (8), in addition to other known alkaloids, were isolated from the stem-bark extract of the Malayan Tabernaemontana corymbosa. The structures of these alkaloids were established on the basis of NMR and MS analyses and, in one instance (7), confirmed by X-ray diffraction analysis. Vincamajicine (3) showed appreciable activity in reversing multidrug resistance in vincristine-resistant KB cells (IC50 2.62 μM), while ervatensines A (7) and B (8) and two other known bisindoles displayed pronounced in vitro growth inhibitory activity against human KB cells (IC50 < 2 μM). Compounds 7 and 8 also showed good growth inhibitory activity against A549, MCF-7, MDA-468, HCT-116, and HT-29 cells (IC50 0.70-4.19 μM). Cell cycle and annexin V-FITC apoptosis assays indicated that compounds 7 and 8 inhibited proliferation of HCT-116 and MDA-468 cells, evoking apoptotic and necrotic cell death.

  1. Alkaloids from Hippeastrum papilio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume Bastida

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Galanthamine, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor marketed as a hydrobromide salt (Razadyne®, Reminyl® for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD, is obtained from Amaryllidaceae plants, especially those belonging to the genera Leucojum, Narcissus, Lycoris and Ungernia. The growing demand for galanthamine has prompted searches for new sources of this compound, as well as other bioactive alkaloids for the treatment of AD. In this paper we report the isolation of the new alkaloid 11β-hydroxygalanthamine, an epimer of the previously isolated alkaloid habranthine, which was identified using NMR techniques. It has been shown that 11β-hydroxygalanthamine has an important in vitro acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity. Additionally, Hippeastrum papilio yielded substantial quantities of galanthamine.

  2. Typical Monoterpenes as Insecticides and Repellents against Stored Grain Pests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suelen L. Reis

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Five monoterpenes naturally occurring in essential oils were tested for their insecticidal and repellent activities against the bruchid beetle Callosobruchus maculatus and the maize weevil Sitophilus zeamais. The monoterpenes were highly efficient as inducers of mortality or repellency against both insect species. They were more efficient in their fumigant activity against C. maculatus than against S. zeamais, while this profile of action was inverted when considering the repellent activities. Eugenol was one the most effective fumigants against both insects and one the most effective repellent against C. maculatus, while citronellal and geranial were one the most effective repellents against S. zeamais. Functional and positional isomerism of the monoterpenes pairs appears to exert little or no influence on theirs effects, especially in case of repellency. The validation of the insecticidal/repellent efficacy of isolated monoterpenes may permit a more advantageous, rapid, economic and optimized approach to the identification of promising oils for commercial formulations when combined with ethnobotanical strategies.

  3. Two New Monoterpene Diglycosides from Winchia calophylla A. DC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Ming ZHU; Bin Gui WANG; Wen Yi KANG; Xin HONG; Jun ZHOU; Xiao Jiang HAO

    2003-01-01

    Two new monoterpene diglycosides, wincaloside A (1) and wincaloside B (2), alongwith loganin (3) were isolated from the stem barks of Winchia calophylla A. DC. The structuresof 1 and 2 were established by spectroscopic and chemical methods.

  4. Analysis of Ergot Alkaloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Crews

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The principles and application of established and newer methods for the quantitative and semi-quantitative determination of ergot alkaloids in food, feed, plant materials and animal tissues are reviewed. The techniques of sampling, extraction, clean-up, detection, quantification and validation are described. The major procedures for ergot alkaloid analysis comprise liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS and liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (LC-FLD. Other methods based on immunoassays are under development and variations of these and minor techniques are available for specific purposes.

  5. Antitumor Activity of Monoterpenes Found in Essential Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianna Vieira Sobral

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a complex genetic disease that is a major public health problem worldwide, accounting for about 7 million deaths each year. Many anticancer drugs currently used clinically have been isolated from plant species or are based on such substances. Accumulating data has revealed anticancer activity in plant-derived monoterpenes. In this review the antitumor activity of 37 monoterpenes found in essential oils is discussed. Chemical structures, experimental models, and mechanisms of action for bioactive substances are presented.

  6. Simple Indolizidine and Quinolizidine Alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    This review of simple indolizidine and quinolizidine alkaloids (i.e., those in which the parent bicyclic systems are in general not embedded in polycyclic arrays) is an update of the previous coverage in Volume 55 of this series (2001). The present survey covers the literature from mid-1999 to the end of 2013; and in addition to aspects of the isolation, characterization, and biological activity of the alkaloids, much emphasis is placed on their total synthesis. A brief introduction to the topic is followed by an overview of relevant alkaloids from fungal and microbial sources, among them slaframine, cyclizidine, Steptomyces metabolites, and the pantocins. The important iminosugar alkaloids lentiginosine, steviamine, swainsonine, castanospermine, and related hydroxyindolizidines are dealt with in the subsequent section. The fourth and fifth sections cover metabolites from terrestrial plants. Pertinent plant alkaloids bearing alkyl, functionalized alkyl or alkenyl substituents include dendroprimine, anibamine, simple alkaloids belonging to the genera Prosopis, Elaeocarpus, Lycopodium, and Poranthera, and bicyclic alkaloids of the lupin family. Plant alkaloids bearing aryl or heteroaryl substituents include ipalbidine and analogs, secophenanthroindolizidine and secophenanthroquinolizidine alkaloids (among them septicine, julandine, and analogs), ficuseptine, lasubines, and other simple quinolizidines of the Lythraceae, the simple furyl-substituted Nuphar alkaloids, and a mixed quinolizidine-quinazoline alkaloid. The penultimate section of the review deals with the sizable group of simple indolizidine and quinolizidine alkaloids isolated from, or detected in, ants, mites, and terrestrial amphibians, and includes an overview of the "dietary hypothesis" for the origin of the amphibian metabolites. The final section surveys relevant alkaloids from marine sources, and includes clathryimines and analogs, stellettamides, the clavepictines and pictamine, and bis

  7. The Securinega alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirkin, Eqor; Atkatlian, William; Porée, François-Hugues

    2015-01-01

    Securinega alkaloids represent a family of plant secondary metabolites known for 50 years. Securinine (1), the most abundant and studied alkaloid of this series was isolated by Russian researchers in 1956. In the following years, French and Japanese scientists reported other Securinega compounds and extensive work was done to elucidate their intriguing structures. The homogeneity of this family relies mainly on its tetracyclic chemical backbone, which features a butenolide moiety (cycle D) and an azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane ring system (rings B and C). Interestingly, after a period of latency of 20 years, the Securinega topic reemerged as a prolific source of new natural structures and to date more than 50 compounds have been identified and characterized. The oligomeric subgroup gathering dimeric, trimeric, and tetrameric units is of particular interest. The unprecedented structure of the Securinega alkaloids was the subject of extensive synthetic efforts culminating in several efficient and elegant total syntheses. The botanical distribution of these alkaloids seems limited to the Securinega, Flueggea, Margaritaria, and Breynia genera (Phyllanthaceae). However, only a limited number of plant species have been considered for their alkaloid contents, and additional phytochemical as well as genetic studies are needed. Concerning the biosynthesis, experiments carried out with radiolabelled aminoacids allowed to identify lysine and tyrosine as the precursors of the piperidine ring A and the CD rings of securinine (1), respectively. Besides, plausible biosynthetic pathways were proposed for virosaine A (38) and B (39), flueggine A (46), and also the different oligomers flueggenine A-D (48-51), fluevirosinine A (56), and flueggedine (20). The case of nirurine (45) and secu'amamine (37) remains elusive and additional studies seem necessary to understand their mode of production. The scope of biological of activities of the Securinega alkaloids was mainly centered on the CNS

  8. Polyol monoterpenes isolated from Chenopodium ambrosioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Shu-Qun; Li, Yan-Hong; Huang, Xiang-Zhong; Li, Rong; Lu, Huai; Tian, Kai; Ruan, Rong-Sheng; Li, Yu-Kui

    2017-04-12

    Phytochemical study on the 95% ethyl alcohol extract of stems of Chenopodium ambrosioides resulted in the isolation of two new polyol monoterpenes, 4-hydroxy-4(α or β)-isopropyl-2-methyl-2-cyclohexen-1-one (1) and 1-methyl-4β- isopropyl-1-cyclohexene-4α,5α,6α-triol (2), together with five known compounds, (1S,2S,3R,4S)-1-methyl-4-(propan-2-yl)cyclohexane-1,2,3,4-tetrol (3), (1R,2S,3S,4S)- 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroxy-p-menthane (4), (1R,2S)-3-p-menthen-1,2-diol (5), (1R,4S)-p- menth-2-en-1-ol (6) and 1,4-dihydroxy-p-menth-2-ene (7). The structures of the new compounds were established on the basis of detailed spectroscopic evidence including extensive 1D and 2D NMR techniques. Compounds 1-7 were evaluated for their anti-inflammatory activity, and compound 1 showed moderate ability to inhibit NO production of LPS-stimulated RAW 264.7 macrophages with an IC50 value of 16.83 μM.

  9. Crystal structure of rac-3-[2,3-bis(phenylsulfanyl-3H-indol-3-yl]propanoic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayland E. Noland

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, C23H19NO2S2, was obtained as an unexpected regioisomer from an attempted synthesis of an intermediate for a substituent-effect study on ergot alkaloids. This is the first report of a 1H-indole monothioating at the 2- and 3-positions to give a 3H-indole. In the crystal, the acid H atom is twisted roughly 180° from the typical carboxy conformation and forms centrosymmetric O—H...N hydrogen-bonded dimers with the indole N atom of an inversion-related molecule. Together with a weak C—H...O hydrogen bond involving the carbonyl O atom, chains are formed along [100].

  10. A Facile Synthesis of Deaza-Analogues of the Bisindole Marine Alkaloid Topsentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Favi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A series of substituted ethyl 1-[(tert-butoxycarbonylamino]-2-methyl-5- (1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl-4-[(1-methyl-1H-indol-3-ylcarbonyl]-1H-pyrrole-3-carboxylates were prepared in excellent yields (82-98% by one-pot reactions between β-dicarbonyl compounds 12a–e and 1,2-diaza-1,3-diene (DD 13. Derivatives 10a,c–e, deazaanalogues of the bis-indole alkaloid topsentin, screened by the National Cancer Institute (Bethesda, MD, USA in the in vitro one dose primary anticancer assay against a panel of about 60 human tumor cell lines, showed no significant activity, with the exception of compound 9e, which showed moderate activity against the HOP-92 cell line of the non small cell lung cancer sub-panel and the SNB-75 cell line of the CNS sub-panel.

  11. A facile synthesis of deaza-analogues of the bisindole marine alkaloid topsentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, Anna; Spanò, Virginia; Parrino, Barbara; Ciancimino, Cristina; Attanasi, Orazio A; Favi, Gianfranco

    2013-02-26

    A series of substituted ethyl 1-[(tert-butoxycarbonyl)amino]-2-methyl-5- (1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)-4-[(1-methyl-1H-indol-3-yl)carbonyl]-1H-pyrrole-3-carboxylates were prepared in excellent yields (82-98%) by one-pot reactions between β-dicarbonyl compounds 12a-e and 1,2-diaza-1,3-diene (DD) 13. Derivatives 10a,c-e, deazaanalogues of the bis-indole alkaloid topsentin, screened by the National Cancer Institute (Bethesda, MD, USA) in the in vitro one dose primary anticancer assay against a panel of about 60 human tumor cell lines, showed no significant activity, with the exception of compound 9e, which showed moderate activity against the HOP-92 cell line of the non small cell lung cancer sub-panel and the SNB-75 cell line of the CNS sub-panel.

  12. Alkaloids in Bulgarian Pancratium maritimum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkov, Strahil; Evstatieva, Luba; Popov, Simeon

    2004-01-01

    A GC/MS analysis of alkaloids from leaves, bulbs and roots of Pancratium maritimum was performed. From the identified 16 alkaloids, 5 alkaloids were reported for the first time for this plant. Several compounds with pharmacological activity were found. Haemanthamine was main alkaloid in the leaves and bulbs whereas galanthane was found to be main alkaloid in roots.

  13. Determination of mycotoxins, alkaloids, phytochemicals, antioxidants and cytotoxicity in Asiatic ginseng (Ashwagandha, Dong quai, Panax ginseng).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipiak-Szok, Anna; Kurzawa, M; Szłyk, E; Twarużek, M; Błajet-Kosicka, A; Grajewski, J

    2017-01-01

    Mycotoxins and selected hazardous alkaloids in the medicinal plants (Panax ginseng, Angelica sinensis, and Withania somnifera) and dietary supplements were determined. Purine alkaloids were found in majority of samples; however, isoquinoline alkaloids were less abundant than indole. The predominant alkaloids appear to be caffeine (purine group), harman (indole group) and berberine (isoquinoline). Examined medicinal plants and dietary supplements were contaminated by mycotoxins (especially ochratoxin A 1.72-5.83 µg kg(-1)), and many species of mold (e.g. Cladosporium, Eurotium, Aspergillus, Rhizopus, Penicillium). MTT cytotoxicity tests revealed that plant and supplements extracts exhibited medium or high cytotoxicity (only Dong quai-low). Moreover, antioxidant activity, total phenolics content and selected phytochemicals were analyzed by spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods. Quercetin and rutin were predominant flavonols (1.94-9.51 and 2.20-7.28 mg 100 g(-1), respectively). Analysis of phenolic acids revealed-gallic acid, as the most abundant, except Panax ginseng, where ferulic acid was prevailing. The results were analyzed by chemometric methods (cluster analysis, ANOVA).

  14. Indolent palatal swelling: Catch 22

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Preeti; Wadhwan, Vijay; Kumar, K. V. Arun; Venkatesh, Arvind; Thapa, Timsy

    2016-01-01

    We present an interesting but intriguing case of an indolent palatal swelling. The lesion was asymptomatic causing little discomfort to the patient and thus was an incidental clinical finding. Provisional diagnosis was a benign, minor salivary gland tumor. Clinical differential diagnoses included benign lymphoepithelial lesion or mucus extravasation phenomenon. Nevertheless, we also considered malignancies such as mucoepidermoid carcinoma, lymphoma, and neoplasm of the maxillary sinus. However, the histopathology revealed a rare clinicopathologic entity prompting immediate treatment of the lesion.

  15. Simultaneous determination of alkaloids and flavonoids from aerial parts of Passiflora species and dietary supplements using UPLC-UV-MS and HPTLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    A rapid UPLC method was developed for the simultaneous analysis of five indole alkaloids (harmalol, harmol, harmane, harmaline and harmine) and four flavonoids (orientin, isoorientin, vitexin, and isovitexin) from the aerial parts of Passiflora incarnata L. (Passifloracea), different species of Pass...

  16. Monoterpene synthases from common sage (Salvia officinalis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croteau, Rodney Bruce (Pullman, WA); Wise, Mitchell Lynn (Pullman, WA); Katahira, Eva Joy (Pullman, WA); Savage, Thomas Jonathan (Christchurch 5, NZ)

    1999-01-01

    cDNAs encoding (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase from common sage (Salvia officinalis) have been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequences has been determined. Accordingly, isolated DNA sequences (SEQ ID No:1; SEQ ID No:3 and SEQ ID No:5) are provided which code for the expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase (SEQ ID No:2), 1,8-cineole synthase (SEQ ID No:4) and (+)-sabinene synthase SEQ ID No:6), respectively, from sage (Salvia officinalis). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase or (+)-sabinene synthase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant monoterpene synthases that may be used to facilitate their production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase in plants in order to enhance the production of monoterpenoids, or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, 1,8-cineole synthase and (+)-sabinene synthase, or the production of their products.

  17. Molecular Characterization of Indolent Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0480 TITLE: Molecular Characterization of Indolent Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jun...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Molecular Characterization of Indolent Prostate Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0480 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Indolent prostate cancers that pose very low risk to aged men occur frequently and may be detected

  18. Quinolizidine alkaloids from Lupinus lanatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neto, Alexandre T.; Oliveira, Carolina Q.; Ilha, Vinicius; Pedroso, Marcelo; Burrow, Robert A.; Dalcol, Ionara I.; Morel, Ademir F.

    2011-10-01

    In this study, one new quinolizidine alkaloid, lanatine A ( 1), together with three other known alkaloids, 13-α- trans-cinnamoyloxylupanine ( 2), 13-α-hydroxylupanine ( 3), and (-)-multiflorine ( 4) were isolated from the aerial parts of Lupinus lanatus (Fabaceae). The structures of alkaloids 1- 4 were elucidated by spectroscopic data analysis. The stereochemistry of 1 was determined by single crystal X-ray analysis. Bayesian statistical analysis of the Bijvoet differences suggests the absolute stereochemistry of 1. In addition, the antimicrobial potential of alkaloids 1- 4 is also reported.

  19. 3-Substituted 2-phenyl-indoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Karl Henrik; Jørgensen, T.B.; Gloriam, D.E.

    2013-01-01

    Privileged structures have been used in drug discovery targeting G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) and other protein classes for more than 20 years. Their rich activity profiles and drug-like characteristics lend themselves to increased productivity in hit identification and lead optimisation......-indoles with a variety of substituents at the indole 3-position. Herein we describe the development of optimised and efficient synthetic routes to a series of new 2-phenyl-indole building blocks 3 to 9 and show that these can be used to generate a broad variety of 3-substituted 2-phenyl-indoles of interest to medicinal...

  20. The photochemical decomposition of Indol in an aqueous solution; Descomposicion fotoquimica de Indol en solucion acuosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibarz, A.; Tejero, J.M.; Panades, R.

    1998-06-01

    The photo decomposition of Indol at different pH has been studied. The Indol photo decomposition rate in aqueous solution a maximum at pH 10. By means of a simple mechanism in three steps, it is possible to explain the kinetics behavior of the Indol photo decomposition in aqueous solution. (Author) 6 refs.

  1. Factors affecting the emission of monoterpenes from red pine (Pinus densiflora)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokouchi, Y.; Ambe, Y.

    1984-08-01

    The mechanism of monoterpene emission from Pinus densiflora was studied using an environmentally controlled gas cabinet. It was found that monoterpene emission rate increases exponentially with temperature and is also influenced by light. These observations were explained reasonably by a mechanism whereby monoterpene emission rate depends on the monoterpene amount in the leaf oil and its saturated vapor pressure. 14 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  2. Do monoterpenes released from feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) plants cause airborne Compositae dermatitis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, E.; Christensen, Lars Porskjær; Andersen, K.E.

    2002-01-01

    and parthenolide were tested with 15 selected monoterpenes and 2 sesquiterpenes. Of the 17 persons, 13 had positive and/or doubtful positive reactions to 1 or more monoterpenes. Only 1 person was allergic to several monoterpenes. Her history of gradually worsening Compositae dermatitis culminating in a probable...

  3. Alkaloids from Galanthus nivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkov, Strahil; Codina, Carles; Viladomat, Francesc; Bastida, Jaume

    2007-07-01

    Phytochemical studies on Galanthus nivalis of Bulgarian origin resulted in the isolation of five compounds: 11-O-(3'-hydroxybutanoyl)hamayne, 3,11-O-(3',3''-dihydroxybutanoyl)hamayne, 3-O-(2''-butenoyl)-11-O-(3'-hydroxybutanoyl)hamayne, 3,11,3''-O-(3',3'',3'''-trihydroxybutanoyl)hamayne, and 2-O-(3'-acetoxybutanoyl)lycorine, together with five known alkaloids: ungeremine, lycorine, tazettine, hamayne, and ismine. Their structures were determined by (1)H and (13)C NMR spectroscopy and two-dimensional (1)H-(1)H and (1)H-(13)C chemical shift correlation experiments.

  4. Alkaloid Accumulation in Catharanthus roseus Increases with Addition of Seawater Salts to the Nutrient Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jing-Yan; LIU Zhao-Pu

    2010-01-01

    A sand culture experiment was conducted to determine the effects of different seawater (5% and 10%) treatments on plant growth,inorganic ions,indole alkaloid concentrations and yields of Catharanthus roseus,in an effort to increase the alkaloid yield by artificial cultivation.The total fresh and dry weights and tissue K+ concentrations decreased,but Na+ concentrations increased in the plant roots,stems and leaves of C.roseus under seawater stress as compared to the control.The concentrations and yields of vindoline,catharanthine,vinblastine and vincristine increased under seawater stress.The concentrations and yields of these alkaloids were higher in 5% seawater-treated plants than those in the 10% seawater-treated plants.Considering the industrial production,5% seawater treatments could reduce the cost of producing alkaloid.In the control plants,the highest alkaloid concentrations reached a peak at 100 days after planting,suggesting that plant harvest must be optimized in terms of growth duration.

  5. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of alkaloids in Uncaria species by UPLC-ESI-Q-TOF/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hai-Bo; Qi, Wen; Zhang, Lin; Yuan, Dan

    2014-01-01

    An ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF/MS) method has been optimized and established for the rapid analysis of the alkaloids in 22 samples originating from five Uncaria (U.) species. The accurate mass measurement of all the protonated molecules and subsequent fragment ions offers higher quality structural information for the interpretation of fragmentation pathways of the various groups of alkaloids. A total of 19 oxindole alkaloids, 16 indole alkaloids and 1 flavone were identified by co-chromatography of the sample extract with authentic standards, comparison of the retention time, characteristic molecular ions and fragment ions, or were tentatively identified by MS/MS determination. Moreover, the method was validated for the simultaneous quantification of the 24 components within 10.5 min. The potential chemical markers were identified for classification of the U. species samples by principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least squared discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). The results demonstrate the similarity and differences in alkaloids among the five U. species, which is helpful for the standardization and quality control of the medical materials of the U. Ramulus Cum Unics (URCU). Furthermore, with multivariate statistical analysis, the determined markers are more definite and useful for chemotaxonomy of the U. genus.

  6. Monoterpene Glycosides from the Roots of Paeonia lactiflora

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Ling WANG; Wei JIAO; Xun LIAO; Shu Ling PENG; Li Sheng DING

    2006-01-01

    A new monoterpene glycoside, together with nine known ones, 3-O-methylpaeoniflorin,mudanpioside J, paeoniflorin, benzoylpaeoniflorin, oxypaeoniflorin, benzoyloxypaeoniflorin,oxybenzoylpaeoniflorin, albiflorin and lactiflorin, was isolated from the roots of Paeonia lactiflora Pall.. The structure of the new compound was elucidated as galloylalbiflorin by the spectroscopic evidence including ESI-MS, 1D- and 2D-NMR spectra.

  7. Investigation of Monoterpene Degradation in the Atmospheric Simulation Chamber SAPHIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Martin; Acir, Ismail-Hakki; Bohn, Birger; Brauers, Theo; Dorn, Hans-Peter; Fuchs, Hendrik; Haeseler, Rolf; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Li, Xin; Lutz, Anna; Nehr, Sascha; Rohrer, Franz; Tillmann, Ralf; Wegener, Robert; Wahner, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Monoterpenes are the volatile organic compound (VOC) species with the highest emission rates on a global scale beside isoprene. In the atmosphere these compounds are rapidly oxidized. Due to their high reactivity towards hydroxyl radicals (OH) they determine the radical chemistry under biogenic conditions if monoterpene concentration is higher than isoprene concentration. Recent field campaigns showed large discrepancies between measured and modeled OH concentration at low NOx conditions together with high reactivity of VOC towards OH (Hofzumahaus et al. 2009) especially in tropical forest areas (Lelieveld et al. 2008). These discrepancies were partly explained by new reaction pathways in the isoprene degradation mechanism (Whalley et al 2011). However, even an additional recycling rate of 2.7 was insufficient to explain the measured OH concentration. So other VOC species could be involved in a nonclassical OH recycling. Since the discrepancies in OH also occurred in the morning hours when the OH chemistry was mainly dominated by monoterpenes, it was assumed that also the degradation of monoterpenes may lead to OH recycling in the absence of NO. (Whalley et al 2011). The photochemical degradation of four monoterpene species was studied under high VOC reactivity and low NOx conditions in a dedicated series of experiments in the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR from August to September 2012 to overcome the lack of mechanistic information for monoterpene degradation schemes. α-Pinene, β-pinene and limonene were chosen as most prominent representatives of this substance class. Moreover the degradation of myrcene was investigated due to its structural analogy to isoprene. The SAPHIR chamber was equipped with instrumentation to measure all important OH precursors (O3, HONO, HCHO), the parent VOC and their main oxidation products, radicals (OH, HO2, RO2), the total OH reactivity, and photolysis frequencies to investigate the degradation mechanism of monoterpenes in

  8. Monoterpene biosynthesis in lemon (Citrus limon) cDNA isolation and functional analysis of four monoterpene synthases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lücker, J.; Tamer, El M.K.; Schwab, W.; Verstappen, F.W.A.; Plas, van der L.H.W.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Verhoeven, H.A.

    2002-01-01

    Citrus limon possesses a high content and large variety of monoterpenoids, especially in the glands of the fruit flavedo. The genes responsible for the production of these monoterpenes have never been isolated. By applying a random sequencing approach to a cDNA library from mRNA isolated from the

  9. Monoterpene biosynthesis in lemon (Citrus limon) cDNA isolation and functional analysis of four monoterpene synthases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lücker, J.; El Tamer, M.K.; Schwab, W.; Verstappen, F.W.A.; Plas, van der L.H.W.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Verhoeven, H.A.

    2002-01-01

    Citrus limon possesses a high content and large variety of monoterpenoids, especially in the glands of the fruit flavedo. The genes responsible for the production of these monoterpenes have never been isolated. By applying a random sequencing approach to a cDNA library from mRNA isolated from the pe

  10. Transcription factors in alkaloid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Yasuyuki; Sato, Fumihiko

    2013-01-01

    Higher plants produce a large variety of low-molecular weight secondary compounds. Among them, nitrogen-containing alkaloids are the most biologically active and are often used pharmaceutically. Whereas alkaloid chemistry has been intensively investigated, alkaloid biosynthesis, including the relevant biosynthetic enzymes, genes and their regulation, and especially transcription factors, is largely unknown, as only a limited number of plant species produce certain types of alkaloids and they are difficult to study. Recently, however, several groups have succeeded in isolating the transcription factors that are involved in the biosynthesis of several types of alkaloids, including bHLH, ERF, and WRKY. Most of them show Jasmonate (JA) responsiveness, which suggests that the JA signaling cascade plays an important role in alkaloid biosynthesis. Here, we summarize the types and functions of transcription factors that have been isolated in alkaloid biosynthesis, and characterize their similarities and differences compared to those in other secondary metabolite pathways, such as phenylpropanoid and terpenoid biosyntheses. The evolution of this biosynthetic pathway and regulatory network, as well as the application of these transcription factors to metabolic engineering, is discussed.

  11. Potential allelopathic indole diketopiperazines produced by the plant endophytic Aspergillus fumigatus using the one strain-many compounds method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Shi-Qiong; Tang, Hao-Yu; Li, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Lu; Xiao, Jian; Gao, Yu-Qi; Zhang, An-Ling; Gao, Jin-Ming

    2013-11-27

    On the basis of the OSMAC (one strain-many compounds) strategy, 14 indole diketopiperazine (DKP) alkaloids, including spirotryprostatins (1-3), tryprostatins (4-6), and cyclotryprostatins (7-14), were isolated from the endophyte Aspergillus fumigatus associated with Melia azedarach L. Their structures were identified by nuclear magnetic resonance and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry data. All the indole DKPs were evaluated for plant growth regulation using the lettuce (Lactuca sativa) seedling growth bioassay, which showed the plant growth influence of the seedling. Among these compounds tested, a tryprostatin-type compound, brevianamide F (6), was identified as a new type of natural potential plant growth inhibitor with a response index (RI) higher than that of the positive control glyphosate, a broad-spectrum systemic herbicide. 6 can also inhibit turnip (Raphanus sativus) shoot and root elongation with RIs of -0.76 and -0.70, respectively, at 120 ppm, and it strongly inhibits amaranth (Amaranthus mangostanus) seedling growth with a high RI of -0.9 at 40 ppm. The structure-allelopathic activity relationship analysis of these isolated alkaloids indicates that tryprostatin-type alkaloids without the C5 prenyl and methoxy group give the most potent inhibition of seedling growth. Brevianamide F (6) could be used to develop a natural eco-friendly herbicide.

  12. Crystal structure of rac-3-[2,3-bis-(phenyl-sulfan-yl)-3H-indol-3-yl]propanoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, Wayland E; Brown, Christopher D; Bisel, Amanda M; Schneerer, Andrew K; Tritch, Kenneth J

    2015-11-01

    The title compound, C23H19NO2S2, was obtained as an unexpected regioisomer from an attempted synthesis of an inter-mediate for a substituent-effect study on ergot alkaloids. This is the first report of a 1H-indole mono-thio-ating at the 2- and 3-positions to give a 3H-indole. In the crystal, the acid H atom is twisted roughly 180° from the typical carb-oxy conformation and forms centrosymmetric O-H⋯N hydrogen-bonded dimers with the indole N atom of an inversion-related mol-ecule. Together with a weak C-H⋯O hydrogen bond involving the carbonyl O atom, chains are formed along [100].

  13. Crystal structure of rac-3-[2,3-bis­(phenyl­sulfan­yl)-3H-indol-3-yl]propanoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, Wayland E.; Brown, Christopher D.; Bisel, Amanda M.; Schneerer, Andrew K.; Tritch, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    The title compound, C23H19NO2S2, was obtained as an unexpected regioisomer from an attempted synthesis of an inter­mediate for a substituent-effect study on ergot alkaloids. This is the first report of a 1H-indole mono­thio­ating at the 2- and 3-positions to give a 3H-indole. In the crystal, the acid H atom is twisted roughly 180° from the typical carb­oxy conformation and forms centrosymmetric O—H⋯N hydrogen-bonded dimers with the indole N atom of an inversion-related mol­ecule. Together with a weak C—H⋯O hydrogen bond involving the carbonyl O atom, chains are formed along [100]. PMID:26594523

  14. Detoxification of Indole by an Indole-Induced Flavoprotein Oxygenase from Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-Huey Lin

    Full Text Available Indole, a derivative of the amino acid tryptophan, is a toxic signaling molecule, which can inhibit bacterial growth. To overcome indole-induced toxicity, many bacteria have developed enzymatic defense systems to convert indole to non-toxic, water-insoluble indigo. We previously demonstrated that, like other aromatic compound-degrading bacteria, Acinetobacter baumannii can also convert indole to indigo. However, no work has been published investigating this mechanism. Here, we have shown that the growth of wild-type A. baumannii is severely inhibited in the presence of 3.5 mM indole. However, at lower concentrations, growth is stable, implying that the bacteria may be utilizing a survival mechanism to oxidize indole. To this end, we have identified a flavoprotein oxygenase encoded by the iifC gene of A. baumannii. Further, our results suggest that expressing this recombinant oxygenase protein in Escherichia coli can drive indole oxidation to indigo in vitro. Genome analysis shows that the iif operon is exclusively present in the genomes of A. baumannii and Pseudomonas syringae pv. actinidiae. Quantitative PCR and Western blot analysis also indicate that the iif operon is activated by indole through the AraC-like transcriptional regulator IifR. Taken together, these data suggest that this species of bacteria utilizes a novel indole-detoxification mechanism that is modulated by IifC, a protein that appears to be, at least to some extent, regulated by IifR.

  15. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids from Heliotropium indicum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Joao Sammy N.; Machado, Luciana L.; Pessoa, Otilia D.L.; Lemos, Telma L.G. [Ceara Univ., Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica Organica e Inorganica]. E-mail: tlemos@dqoi.ufc.br; Braz-Filho, Raimundo [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense (UENF), Campos dos Goytacases, RJ (Brazil). Setor de Quimica de Produtos Naturais; Overk, Cassia R.; Ping Yao; Cordell, Geoffrey A. [University of Illinois at Chicago, IL (United States). College of Pharmacy. Dept. of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy

    2005-11-15

    ndicine (1), a new pyrrolizidine alkaloid with unusual structural features, together with the known lycopsamine (2), were isolated from the roots of Heliotropium indicum (Boraginaceae). The structures were established by a combination of 1D and 2D NMR methods (COSY, HMQC, HMBC, and NOESY) and HREIMS. This is the first report of a lactone pyrrolizidine alkaloid in the genus Heliotropium. Compounds 1 and 2 were assayed for antioxidant activity and showed moderate activity. (author)

  16. Electrochemical Behavior of Biologically Important Indole Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigdem Karaaslan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Voltammetric techniques are most suitable to investigate the redox properties of a new drug. Use of electrochemistry is an important approach in drug discovery and research as well as quality control, drug stability, and determination of physiological activity. The indole nucleus is an essential element of a number of natural and synthetic products with significant biological activity. Indole derivatives are the well-known electroactive compounds that are readily oxidized at carbon-based electrodes, and thus analytical procedures, such as electrochemical detection and voltammetry, have been developed for the determination of biologically important indoles. This paper explains some of the relevant and recent achievements in the electrochemistry processes and parameters mainly related to biologically important indole derivatives in view of drug discovery and analysis.

  17. Total Synthesis of Securinega Alkaloids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T. Honda

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Naturally occurring Securinega alkaloids (1-4) (Fig. 1)[1], with their wide range of structural and stereochemical features, continue to provide challenging synthetic targets, since these alkaloids exhibit attractive biological activities. Securinine (1), isolated from Securinega suffruticosa [2], was structurally determined to contain an indolizidine skeleton with an azabicyclo[3.2.1 ]octane system together with an α, β-unsaturated γ-lactone ring. This alkaloid has been clinically used in Russia as a CNS stimulating drug[3], and has been shown to act as a stereospecific antagonist at the GABA binding site of the GABAA-receptor complex[4].Viroallosecurinine (2), a diastereoisomeric alkaloid of securinine, was also isolated from the leaves of Securinega virosa[5] as a cytotoxic alkaloid exhibiting a MIC of 0.48 μg/mL for Ps. aeruginosa and Staph.aureus[6]. This alkaloid is recognized to be bactericidal since the yields of MIC/MBC were less than 1[7].

  18. Cytotoxic Effect and Constituent Profile of Alkaloid Fractions from Ethanolic Extract of Ficus septica Burm. f. Leaves on T47D Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugroho, Agung Endro; Akbar, Fiki Fatihah; Wiyani, Anggie; Sudarsono

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the profile of alkaloids in two ethyl acetate soluble fractions, namely fractions A and B from an ethanolic extract of Ficus septica leaves and cytotoxic effect on T47D breast cancer cells. Preparation of both fractions involved maceration of leaves with 70% (v/v) ethanol, filtration with Al2O3, precipitation with 0.1 N HCl, Mayer reagent, and 0.1 N NaOH, and also partition with ethyl acetate. Qualitative thin layer chromatography (TLC) was conducted to determine the profile of alkaloids in the two fractions, using alkaloid specific reagents such as Dragendorff, sodium nitrite, and Van Urk-Salkowski. Cytotoxic effects of both fractions on T47D cells were evaluated using MTT assay with a concentration series of 1.56; 3.12; 6.25; 12.5; 25 and 50 μg/mL. The TLC test showed that fractions A and B contained alkaloids with Rx values of 0.74 and 0.80 for fraction A and 0.74, 0.84, 0.92 for fraction B with regard to yohimbine using the mobile phase of n-buthanol:glacial acetic acid:distilled water (3:1:1 v/v/v). Moreover, an indole alkaloid was detected with Rx values of 0.80 and 0.84, respectively. Fractions A and B exhibited high cytotoxic effects on T47D cells with IC50 values of 2.57 and 2.73 μg/mL, respectively. In conclusion, overall the results of this study showed that fractions of Ficus septica contain alkaloids including indole alkaloid or its derivatives and possess a cytotoxic effect on T47D cells. This research supports the idea that alkaloids in F. septica have anticancer activity.

  19. Production of aromas and fragrances through microbial oxidation of monoterpenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. F. Rozenbaum

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Aromas and fragrances can be obtained through the microbial oxidation of monoterpenes. Many microorganisms can be used to carry out extremely specific conversions using substrates of low commercial value. However, for many species, these substrates are highly toxic, consequently inhibiting their metabolism. In this work, the conversion ability of Aspergillus niger IOC-3913 for terpenic compounds was examined. This species was preselected because of its high resistance to toxic monoterpenic substrates. Though it has been grown in media containing R-limonene (one of the cheapest monoterpenic hydrocarbons, which is widely available on the market, the species has not shown the ability to metabolize it, since biotransformation products were not detected in high resolution gas chromatography analyses. For this reason, other monoterpenes (alpha-pinene, beta-pinene and camphor were used as substrates. These compounds were shown to be metabolized by the selected strain, producing oxidized compounds. Four reaction systems were used: a biotransformation in a liquid medium with cells in growth b with pre-grown cultures c with cells immobilized in a synthetic polymer network and d in a solid medium to which the substrate was added via the gas phase. The main biotransformation products were found in all the reaction systems, although the adoption of previously cultivated cells seemed to favor biotransformation. Cell immobilization seemed to be a feasible strategy for alleviating the toxic effect of the substrate. Through mass spectrometry it was possible to identify verbenone and alpha-terpineol as the biotransformation products of alpha-pinene and beta-pinene, respectively. The structures of the other oxidation products are described.

  20. A Review on Anti-Inflammatory Activity of Monoterpenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damião Pergentino de Sousa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Faced with the need to find new anti-inflammatory agents, great effort has been expended on the development of drugs for the treatment of inflammation. This disorder reduces the quality of life and overall average productivity, causing huge financial losses. In this review the anti-inflammatory activity of 32 bioactive monoterpenes found in essential oils is discussed. The data demonstrate the pharmacological potential of this group of natural chemicals to act as anti-inflammatory drugs.

  1. Biotransformations of monoterpenes by photoautotrophic micro-organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerzak, L; Lipok, J; Strub, D; Lochyński, S

    2014-12-01

    Monoterpenes are widely used in food technology, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries and as compounds of agricultural importance. It is known that compounds comprising this class can be transformed by a variety of organisms, namely by: bacteria, fungi, yeasts, plants or isolated enzymes. Biotransformations, as one of the most important tools of green chemistry, allow obtaining new products using whole cells of micro-organisms or isolated enzymes in mild reaction conditions. Therefore, biotransformations of monoterpenes, by different type of reaction such as: epoxidation, oxidation and stereoselective hydroxylation, resulted in the production of so desired, enantiomerically defined compounds that can be advised as natural seem to be interesting. Bearing in mind that such processes are carried out also by easy to maintain, photoautotrophic micro-organisms cultivated at large scale, this paper is focused on biotransformations of acyclic, monocyclic and bicyclic monoterpenes by freshwater or haliphylic cyanobacteria and microalgae on the way of mainly stereoselective hydroxylation. Moreover, aspects of potential industrial application of obtained products in medicine, perfume, cosmetics and food industry are discussed.

  2. The Antigerminative Activity of Twenty-Seven Monoterpenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura De Martino

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Monoterpenes, the main constituents of essential oils, are known for their many biological activities. The present work studied the potential biological activity of twenty-seven monoterpenes, including monoterpene hydrocarbons and oxygenated ones, against seed germination and subsequent primary radicle growth of Raphanus sativus L. (radish and Lepidium sativum L. (garden cress, under laboratory conditions. The compounds, belonging to different chemical classes, showed different potency in affecting both parameters evaluated. The assayed compounds demonstrated a good inhibitory activity in a dose-dependent way. In general, radish seed is more sensitive than garden cress and its germination appeares more inhibited by alcohols; at the highest concentration tested, the more active substances were geraniol, borneol, (±-β-citronellol and α-terpineol. Geraniol and carvone inhibited, in a significant way, the germination of garden cress, at the highest concentration tested. Radicle elongation of two test species was inhibited mainly by alcohols and ketones. Carvone inhibited the radicle elongation of both seeds, at almost all concentrations assayed, while 1,8-cineole inhibited their radicle elongation at the lowest concentrations (10−5 M, 10−6 M.

  3. The antigerminative activity of twenty-seven monoterpenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Martino, Laura; Mancini, Emilia; de Almeida, Luiz Fernando Rolim; De Feo, Vincenzo

    2010-09-21

    Monoterpenes, the main constituents of essential oils, are known for their many biological activities. The present work studied the potential biological activity of twenty-seven monoterpenes, including monoterpene hydrocarbons and oxygenated ones, against seed germination and subsequent primary radicle growth of Raphanus sativus L. (radish) and Lepidium sativum L. (garden cress), under laboratory conditions. The compounds, belonging to different chemical classes, showed different potency in affecting both parameters evaluated. The assayed compounds demonstrated a good inhibitory activity in a dose-dependent way. In general, radish seed is more sensitive than garden cress and its germination appeares more inhibited by alcohols; at the highest concentration tested, the more active substances were geraniol, borneol, (±)-β-citronellol and α-terpineol. Geraniol and carvone inhibited, in a significant way, the germination of garden cress, at the highest concentration tested. Radicle elongation of two test species was inhibited mainly by alcohols and ketones. Carvone inhibited the radicle elongation of both seeds, at almost all concentrations assayed, while 1,8-cineole inhibited their radicle elongation at the lowest concentrations (10(-5) M, 10(-6) M).

  4. Dynamics of monoterpene emissions in Pinus sylvestris during early spring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeck, J.; Hari, P.; Juurola, E. [Department of Forest Ecology, University of Helsinki (Finland); Hakola, H. [Finnish Meteorological Institute, Research and Development, Helsinki (Finland); Kulmala, M. [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2005-07-01

    The seasonal dynamics of biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) emissions, which can be related to the formation and growth of secondary organic aerosols, represent an important but at the present poorly understood linkage between vegetation activity and climate. Although a close relationship between photosynthesis and terpenoid emissions has been proposed, high monoterpene emission rates for Scots pine shoots (Pinus sylvestris) are frequently recorded during spring, in times when photosynthetic activity is strongly inhibited due to inherent seasonal restrictions. We suggest that terpenoid emissions are related to either photosynthesis or photorespiration for precursors for terpenoid biosynthesis. We developed two dynamic models describing temporal fluctuations in Scots pine monoterpene emissions, calculating the emissions by using CO{sub 2} exchange and ambient climate data. The models accurately predicted the measured monoterpene flux, and especially in March-April, during the time when photosynthesis was negligible and ambient temperatures were between -5 and +15 C, a good agreement was found with measured emissions and the model involving photorespiration. (orig.)

  5. Oxygenated VOC and monoterpene emissions from a boreal coniferous forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taipale, R.; Rantala, P.; Kajos, M. K.; Patokoski, J.; Ruuskanen, T. M.; Aalto, J.; Kolari, P.; Bäck, J.; Hari, P.; Kulmala, M.; Rinne, J.

    2012-04-01

    Compared with terpenoids, emissions of oxygenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from boreal ecosystems have been poorly characterized. We measured ecosystem scale emissions of three oxygenated compounds (methanol, acetaldehyde, and acetone) and monoterpenes from a Scots pine dominated forest in southern Finland during the summers 2006-2008. The measurements were conducted using the disjunct eddy covariance method combined with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry. The contribution of the three oxygenated compounds to the measured total emissions was 40-60 %. The highest oxygenated VOC emissions were those of methanol, comprising 20-30 % of the total, followed by acetone with a share of 10-20 %. The acetaldehyde emissions were 5-10 % of the total. This emission composition will be compared with that obtained from shoot enclosure measurements. Methanol showed deposition during some periods although its overall flux was towards the atmosphere. The monoterpene emissions had a light dependent component, suggesting that part of the emissions originated directly from monoterpene biosynthesis. Diurnal, seasonal, and inter-annual variations in the emissions, along with temperature and light dependencies, will be discussed.

  6. Synthesis and Bioactivity of Secondary Metabolites from Marine Sponges Containing Dibrominated Indolic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azzurra Stefanucci

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Marine sponges. (e.g., Hyrtios sp., Dragmacidin sp., Aglophenia pleuma, Aplidium cyaneum, Aplidium meridianum. produce bioactive secondary metabolites involved in their defence mechanisms. Recently it was demonstrated that several of those compounds show a large variety of biological activities against different human diseases with possible applications in medicinal chemistry and in pharmaceutical fields, especially related to the new drug development process. Researchers have focused their attention principally on secondary metabolites with anti-cancer and cytotoxic activities. A common target for these molecules is the cytoskeleton, which has a central role in cellular proliferation, motility, and profusion involved in the metastatic process associate with tumors. In particular, many substances containing brominated indolic rings such as 5,6-dibromotryptamine, 5,6-dibromo-N-methyltryptamine, 5,6-dibromo-N-methyltryptophan (dibromoabrine, 5,6-dibromo-N,N-dimethyltryptamine and 5,6-dibromo-L-hypaphorine isolated from different marine sources, have shown anti-cancer activity, as well as antibiotic and anti-inflammatory properties. Considering the structural correlation between endogenous monoamine serotonin with marine indolic alkaloids 5,6-dibromoabrine and 5,6-dibromotryptamine, a potential use of some dibrominated indolic metabolites in the treatment of depression-related pathologies has also been hypothesized. Due to the potential applications in the treatment of various diseases and the increasing demand of these compounds for biological assays and the difficult of their isolation from marine sources, we report in this review a series of recent syntheses of marine dibrominated indole-containing products.

  7. A virus-induced gene silencing approach to understanding alkaloid metabolism in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liscombe, David K; O'Connor, Sarah E

    2011-11-01

    The anticancer agents vinblastine and vincristine are bisindole alkaloids derived from coupling vindoline and catharanthine, monoterpenoid indole alkaloids produced exclusively by the Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus). Industrial production of vinblastine and vincristine currently relies on isolation from C. roseus leaves, a process that affords these compounds in 0.0003-0.01% yields. Metabolic engineering efforts to either improve alkaloid content or provide alternative sources of the bisindole alkaloids ultimately rely on the isolation and characterization of the genes involved. Several vindoline biosynthetic genes have been isolated, and the cellular and subcellular organization of the corresponding enzymes has been well studied. However, due to the leaf-specific localization of vindoline biosynthesis, and the lack of production of this precursor in cell suspension and hairy root cultures of C. roseus, further elucidation of this pathway demands the development of reverse genetics approaches to assay gene function in planta. The bipartite pTRV vector system is a Tobacco Rattle Virus-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) platform that has provided efficient and effective means to assay gene function in diverse plant systems. A VIGS method was developed herein to investigate gene function in C. roseus plants using the pTRV vector system. The utility of this approach in understanding gene function in C. roseus leaves is demonstrated by silencing known vindoline biosynthetic genes previously characterized in vitro.

  8. Total syntheses of indolactam alkaloids (-)-indolactam V, (-)-pendolmycin, (-)-lyngbyatoxin A, and (-)-teleocidin A-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathel, Noah F Fine; Shah, Tejas K; Bronner, Sarah M; Garg, Neil K

    2014-06-01

    We report the total syntheses of (-)-indolactam V and the C7-substituted indolactam alkaloids (-)-pendolmycin, (-)-lyngbyatoxin A, and (-)-teleocidin A-2. The strategy for preparing indolactam V relies on a distortion-controlled indolyne functionalization reaction to establish the C4-N linkage, in addition to an intramolecular conjugate addition to build the conformationally-flexible nine-membered ring. The total synthesis of indolactam V then sets the stage for the divergent synthesis of the other targeted alkaloids. Specifically, late-stage sp(2)-sp(3) cross-couplings on an indolactam V derivative are used to introduce the key C7 substituents and the necessary quaternary carbons. These challenging couplings, in addition to other delicate manipulations, all proceed in the presence of a basic tertiary amine, an unprotected secondary amide, and an unprotected indole. Thus, our approach not only enables the enantiospecific total syntheses of four indolactam alkaloids, but also serves as a platform for probing complexity-generating and chemoselective transformations in the context of alkaloid total synthesis.

  9. Genotoxicity of pyrrolizidine alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Mei, Nan; Fu, Peter P

    2010-04-01

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are common constituents of many plant species around the world. PA-containing plants are probably the most common poisonous plants affecting livestock and wildlife. They can inflict harm to humans through contaminated food sources, herbal medicines and dietary supplements. Half of the identified PAs are genotoxic and many of them are tumorigenic. The mutagenicity of PAs has been extensively studied in different biological systems. Upon metabolic activation, PAs produce DNA adducts, DNA cross-linking, DNA breaks, sister chromatid exchange, micronuclei, chromosomal aberrations, gene mutations and chromosome mutations in vivo and in vitro. PAs induced mutations in the cII gene of rat liver and in the p53 and K-ras genes of mouse liver tumors. It has been suggested that all PAs produce a set of (+/-)-6,7-dihydro-7-hydroxy-1-hydroxymethyl-5H-pyrrolizine-derived DNA adducts and similar types of gene mutations. The signature types of mutations are G : C --> T : A transversion and tandem base substitutions. Overall, PAs are mutagenic in vivo and in vitro and their mutagenicity appears to be responsible for the carcinogenesis of PAs.

  10. Copper catalysed synthesis of indolylquinazolinone alkaloid bouchardatine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mayavan Viji; Rajagopal Nagarajan

    2014-07-01

    We describe the total synthesis of indolylquinazolinone alkaloid bouchardatine and some of the quinazolinone derivatives. The aerobic oxidation induced by copper(I) bromide, followed by Vilsmeier-Haack formylation gives the natural product bouchardatine alkaloid in good yield.

  11. The effects of increasing atmospheric ozone on biogenic monoterpene profiles and the formation of secondary aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Delia M.; Tiiva, Päivi; Miettinen, Pasi; Joutsensaari, Jorma; Kokkola, Harri; Nerg, Anne-Marja; Laaksonen, Ari; Holopainen, Jarmo K.

    Monoterpenes are biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) which play an important role in plant adaptation to stresses, atmospheric chemistry, plant-plant and plant-insect interactions. In this study, we determined whether ozonolysis can influence the monoterpenes in the headspace of cabbage. The monoterpenes were mixed with an air-flow enriched with 100, 200 or 400 ppbv of ozone (O 3) in a Teflon chamber. The changes in the monoterpene and O 3 concentrations, and the formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) were determined during ozonolysis. Furthermore, the monoterpene reactions with O 3 and OH were modelled using reaction kinetics equations. The results showed that all of the monoterpenes were unequally affected: α-thujene, sabinene and D-limonene were affected to the greatest extend, whereas the 1,8-cineole concentration did not change. In addition, plant monoterpene emissions reduced the O 3 concentration by 12-24%. The SOA formation was dependent on O 3 concentration. At 100 ppbv of O 3, virtually no new particles were formed but clear SOA formation was observed at the higher ozone concentrations. The modelled results showed rather good agreements for α-pinene and 1,8-cineole, whereas the measured concentrations were clearly lower compared to modelled values for sabinene and limonene. In summary, O 3-quenching by monoterpenes occurs beyond the boundary layer of leaves and results in a decreased O 3 concentration, altered monoterpene profiles and SOA formation.

  12. Volatile and non-volatile monoterpenes produced by elicitor-stimulated Cupressus lusitanica cultured cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Alwis, Ransika; Fujita, Koki; Ashitani, Tatsuya; Kuroda, Ken'ichi

    2009-05-01

    Elicitor treatment initiates defense responses in cultured Cupressus lusitanica cells. In order to investigate the defense mechanism with a yeast extract elicitor, we carried out solid-phase microextraction coupled with gas chromatography for monoterpene analysis. Ten hydrocarbon monoterpenes, including high amounts of sabinene and limonene, were detected in the gas phase of the elicitor-treated cell cultures. Six oxidized monoterpenes including beta-thujaplicin were also detected in the ether extract of the cells and the medium. Time-course profiles of volatile monoterpenes showed that one group of hydrocarbon monoterpenes was maximized on the second day after elicitation, while the other group was maximized on the third day. There were no oxidized monoterpenes that are structurally related to sabinene and limonene in the gas phase or cell extracts, suggesting that these compounds are produced exclusively for emission. Other monoterpenes, which are produced during later stages of elicitation, are metabolized into more complex compounds such as oxidized monoterpenes, including beta-thujaplicin. Although terpinolene synthase was the principal monoterpene synthase in these cell cultures, terpinolene was detected only as a minor compound in the gas phase. The time course for terpinolene synthase activity coincided with beta-thujaplicin biosynthesis. Thus, most of the terpinolene is metabolized rapidly to oxidized terpenes such as beta-thujaplicin rather than emitted.

  13. The Chemistry of the Akuammiline Alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Gregory L; Smith, Amos B

    2016-01-01

    An update on the literature covering the akuammiline family of alkaloids is presented. This chapter begins with a summary of new akuammiline alkaloids reported since 2000 and is followed by an overview of new reported bioactivities of akuammiline alkaloids since 2000. The remainder of the chapter comprises a comprehensive review of the synthetic chemistry that has been reported in the last 50 years concerning akuammiline alkaloids and their structural motifs.

  14. Catalytic functionalization of indoles in a new dimension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandini, Marco; Eichholzer, Astrid

    2009-01-01

    140 years ago Adolf von Baeyer proposed the structure of a heteroaromatic compound which revolutionized organic and medical chemistry: indole. After more than a century, indole itself and the complexity of naturally occurring indole derivatives continue to inspire and influence developments in synthetic chemistry. In particular, the ubiquitous presence of indole rings in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and functional materials are testament to the ever increasing interest in the design of mild and efficient synthetic routes to functionalized indole derivatives. This Review emphasizes the achievements in the selective catalytic functionalization of indoles (C-C bond-forming processes) over the last four years.

  15. FIVE NEW NORDITERPENOID ALKALOIDS FROM ACONITUM SINOMONTANUM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG-PENG WANG; CHONG-SHENG PENG; XI-XIAN JIAN; DONG-LIN CHEN

    2001-01-01

    From the roots of A conitum sinomontanum, five new norditerpenoid alkaloids, sinomontanitines A (1) and B (2), sinomontanines A (3), B (4) and C (5), were isolated together with the known alkaloids lappaconitine (6) and ranaconitine (7), The structures of the new alkaloids were determined by spectral analysis.

  16. Transcriptomic insight into terpenoid and carbazole alkaloid biosynthesis, and functional characterization of two terpene synthases in curry tree (Murraya koenigii)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meena, Seema; Rajeev Kumar, Sarma; Dwivedi, Varun; Kumar Singh, Anup; Chanotiya, Chandan S.; Akhtar, Md. Qussen; Kumar, Krishna; Kumar Shasany, Ajit; Nagegowda, Dinesh A.

    2017-01-01

    Curry tree (Murraya koenigii L.) is a rich source of aromatic terpenes and pharmacologically important carbazole alkaloids. Here, M. koenigii leaf transcriptome was generated to gain insight into terpenoid and alkaloid biosynthesis. Analysis of de novo assembled contigs yielded genes for terpene backbone biosynthesis and terpene synthases. Also, gene families possibly involved in carbazole alkaloid formation were identified that included polyketide synthases, prenyltransferases, methyltransferases and cytochrome P450s. Further, two genes encoding terpene synthases (MkTPS1 and MkTPS2) with highest in silico transcript abundance were cloned and functionally characterized to determine their involvement in leaf volatile formation. Subcellular localization using GFP fusions revealed the plastidial and cytosolic localization of MkTPS1 and MkTPS2, respectively. Enzymatic characterization demonstrated the monoterpene synthase activity of recombinant MkTPS1, which produced primarily (−)-sabinene from geranyl diphosphate (GPP). Recombinant MkTPS2 exhibited sesquiterpene synthase activity and formed (E,E)-α-farnesene as the major product from farnesyl diphosphate (FPP). Moreover, mRNA expression and leaf volatile analyses indicated that MkTPS1 accounts for (−)-sabinene emitted by M. koenigii leaves. Overall, the transcriptome data generated in this study will be a great resource and the start point for characterizing genes involved in the biosynthetic pathway of medicinally important carbazole alkaloids. PMID:28272514

  17. New extraction technique for alkaloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djilani Abdelouaheb

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A method of extraction of natural products has been developed. Compared with existing methods, the new technique is rapid, more efficient and consumes less solvent. Extraction of alkaloids from natural products such as Hyoscyamus muticus, Datura stramonium and Ruta graveolens consists of the use of a sonicated solution containing a surfactant as extracting agent. The alkaloids are precipitated by Mayer reagent, dissolved in an alkaline solution, and then extracted with chloroform. This article compares the results obtained with other methods showing clearly the advantages of the new method.

  18. The alkaloid profiles of Lupinus sulphureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Daniel; Lee, Stephen T; Gardner, Dale R; Pfister, James A; Welch, Kevin D; Green, Benedict T; Davis, T Zane; Panter, Kip E

    2009-02-25

    Lupines are common plants on the rangelands in the western United States. Lupines contain alkaloids that can be toxic and teratogenic causing congenital birth defects (crooked calf disease). One such lupine, Lupinus sulphureus, occurs in parts of Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia. Specimens of L. sulphureus from field collections and herbaria were evaluated taxonomically and by chemical means. A total of seven distinct alkaloid profiles and the individual alkaloids associated with each profile were identified. Each alkaloid profile was unique in its geographical distribution and its potential risk to livestock. In conclusion, taxonomic classification is not sufficient to determine risk, as chemical characterization of the alkaloids must also be performed.

  19. Alkaloids with antioxidant activities from Aconitum handelianum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Tian-Peng; Cai, Le; Xing, Yun; Yu, Jing; Li, Xue-Jiao; Mei, Rui-Feng; Ding, Zhong-Tao

    2016-06-01

    A new C20-diterpenoid alkaloid handelidine (1) and twenty-seven known alkaloids (2-28) were isolated from the roots of Aconitum handelianum. Their structures were established on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analyses. The study indicated that denudatine-type C20-diterpenoid alkaloids with vicinal-triol system and benzyltetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloids exhibited significant antioxidant activities measured by three antioxidant test systems. The aconitine-type C19-diterpenoid alkaloids could serve as potential secondary antioxidants for their strong binding effects to metal ions.

  20. Structural and quantitative analysis of Equisetum alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Luise; Ernst, Ludger; Lubienski, Marcus; Papke, Uli; Schiebel, Hans-Martin; Jerz, Gerold; Beuerle, Till

    2015-08-01

    Equisetum palustre L. is known for its toxicity for livestock. Several studies in the past addressed the isolation and identification of the responsible alkaloids. So far, palustrine (1) and N(5)-formylpalustrine (2) are known alkaloids of E. palustre. A HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method in combination with simple sample work-up was developed to identify and quantitate Equisetum alkaloids. Besides the two known alkaloids six related alkaloids were detected in different Equisetum samples. The structure of the alkaloid palustridiene (3) was derived by comprehensive 1D and 2D NMR experiments. N(5)-Acetylpalustrine (4) was also thoroughly characterized by NMR for the first time. The structure of N(5)-formylpalustridiene (5) is proposed based on mass spectrometry results. Twenty-two E. palustre samples were screened by a HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method after development of a simple sample work-up and in most cases the set of all eight alkaloids were detected in all parts of the plant. A high variability of the alkaloid content and distribution was found depending on plant organ, plant origin and season ranging from 88 to 597mg/kg dried weight. However, palustrine (1) and the alkaloid palustridiene (3) always represented the main alkaloids. For the first time, a comprehensive identification, quantitation and distribution of Equisetum alkaloids was achieved.

  1. Process-based modelling of biogenic monoterpene emissions combining production and release from storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurgers, G.; Arneth, A.; Holzinger, R.; Goldstein, A.H.

    2009-01-01

    Monoterpenes, primarily emitted by terrestrial vegetation, can influence atmospheric ozone chemistry, and can form precursors for secondary organic aerosol. The short-term emissions of monoterpenes have been well studied and understood, but their long-term variability, which is particularly importan

  2. Monoterpene fluxes measured above a Japanese red pine forest at Oshiba plateau, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tani, A.; Nozoe, S.; Aoki, M.; Hewitt, C. N.

    Monoterpene fluxes above a Japanese red pine ( Pinus densiflora) forest in Japan were measured with a heat balance method from May to November 2000. The most abundant monoterpenes were α-pinene and limonene+ β-phellandrene. Degradation losses of the major monoterpenes by the reactions with ozone and OH during transfer between the two sampling heights were estimated to be negligibly small. The highest values of average fluxes were observed in June measurement period, with values for α-pinene and limonene+ β-phellandrene of 0.6 and 0.5 nmol m -2 s -1. Their average fluxes in September, October and November measurement periods were almost the same and lowest. Vertical profiles of monoterpene concentrations inside the forest suggest that large amounts of monoterpenes are accumulated in the aerial space in the forest and transferred to the atmosphere above. The difference between logarithms of measured and calculated total monoterpene fluxes, ln F mea-ln F cal, had positive values in many morning measurements and negative values in most late afternoon measurements, indicating that monoterpenes accumulated during the night were transported to the upper atmosphere the next morning and they began to accumulate again in the late afternoon, following a decrease of turbulent mixing. Leaf wetness effect was also considered and, finally, a simple model was proposed to explain controlling parameters for monoterpene flux above the forest.

  3. Host-tree monoterpenes and biosynthesis of aggregation pheromones in the bark beetle ips paraconfusus

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the 1970-80s, vapors of the common conifer tree monoterpenes, myrcene and a-pinene, were shown to serve as precursors of ipsenol, ipsdienol and cis-verbenol, aggregation pheromone components of Ips paraconfusus. A paradigm developed that Ips bark beetles utilize pre-formed monoterpene precursors ...

  4. Process-based modelling of biogenic monoterpene emissions combining production and release from storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurgers, G.; Arneth, A.; Holzinger, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/337989338; Goldstein, A.H.

    2009-01-01

    Monoterpenes, primarily emitted by terrestrial vegetation, can influence atmospheric ozone chemistry, and can form precursors for secondary organic aerosol. The short-term emissions of monoterpenes have been well studied and understood, but their long-term variability, which is particularly importan

  5. Monoterpene emissions from boreal tree species: Determination of de novo and pool emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghirardo, Andrea; Koch, Kristine; Taipale, Risto; Zimmer, Ina; Schnitzler, Joerg-Peter; Rinne, Janne

    2010-05-01

    Boreal forests emit a large amount of monoterpenes into the atmosphere. Traditionally these emissions are assumed to originate as evaporation from large storage pools. Thus their diurnal cycle would depend mostly on temperature. However, there is indication that a significant part of the monoterpene emission would originate directly from de novo synthesis. By applying 13CO2 fumigation and analyzing the isotope fractions with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and classical GC-MS we studied the origin of monoterpene emissions from some major Eurasian boreal and alpine tree species. We determined the fractions originating from de novo biosynthesis and from large internal monoterpene storages for three coniferous tree species with specialized monoterpene storage structures and one dicotyledon species without such structures. The emission from dicotyledon species Betula pendula originated solely from the de novo synthesis. The origin of the emissions from coniferous species was mixed with varying fraction originating from de novo synthesis (Pinus sylvestris 58 %, Picea abies 33.5 %, Larix decidua 9.8 %) and the rest from large internal monoterpene storage pools. We have also measured the ecosystem scale monoterpene emission fluxes from a boreal Pinus sylvestris forest by disjunct eddy covariance technique. Application of the observed fraction of emission originating from de novo synthesis and large storage pools in a hybrid emission algorithm resulted in a better description of ecosystem scale monoterpene emissions, as compared to the measured fluxes.

  6. Monoterpenoid indole alkaloids and phenols are required antioxidants in glutathione depleted Uncaria tomentosa root cultures

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vera-Reyes, Ileana; Huerta-Heredia, Ariana A; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Trejo-Tapia, Gabriela; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2015-01-01

    .... Root cultures of Uncaria tomentosa, a native plant of the Amazon rainforest, were exposed to stressful conditions by combined addition of the glutathione inhibitor, buthionine sulfoximine (0.8 mM) and 0.2 mM jasmonic acid...

  7. Fungal Origins of the Bicyclo[2.2.2]diazaoctane Ring System of Prenylated Indole Alkaloids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finefield, Jennifer M.; Frisvad, Jens C.; Sherman, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Over eight different families of natural products consisting of nearly 70 secondary metabolites that contain the bicyclo[2.2.2]diazaoctane ring system have been isolated from various Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Malbranchea species. Since 1968, these secondary metabolites have been the focus of ...

  8. Historical view on ergot alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, A

    1978-01-01

    A short survey of the history of ergot, of the original and, for a long time, only source of ergot alkaloids, is given. Once a dreaded poison, ergot has changed its role over the centuries to become a rich treasure house of valuable pharmaceuticals. In the Middle Ages it was the cause of epidemics of ergotism, which cost tens of thousands of people their lives. Ergot was first mentioned by the German physician Lonitzer in 1582 as a remedy used by midwives for quickening childbirth. The isolation of pharmacologically useful alkaloids started in 1906 with the discovery of ergotoxine and its adrenolytic activity by Barger, Carr and Dale. In 1918, Stoll isolated ergotamine, the first chemically pure ergot alkaloid, which found widespread therapeutic use in obstetrics and internal medicine. In 1935 the specific oxytocic principle of ergot, ergonovine, was discovered simultaneously in four separate laboratories. Since then, worldwide investigations on ergot alkaloids resulted in the elucidation of their structures and total syntheses and preparation of valuable therapeutics such as Methergine, Hydergine, Dihydergot, and others.

  9. Lycopodium alkaloids from Palhinhaea cernua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Fu-Wei [Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Luo, Ji-Feng; Wang, Yue-Hu, E-mail: wangyuehu@mail.kib.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Economic Plants and Biotechnology, Kunming Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Sun, Qian-Yun; Yang, Fu-Mei [Key Laboratory of Chemistry for Natural Products, Guizhou Province and Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Liu, Fang [College of Landscape and Horticulture, Yunnan Agricultural University (China); Long, Chun-Lin, E-mail: long@mail.kib.ac.cn [College of Life and Environmental Sciences, Minzu University of China, Beijing, (China)

    2012-07-01

    Two new Lycopodium alkaloids, acetyllycoposerramine M and palcernine A were isolated from whole plant extracts of Palhinhaea cernua L. together with ten previously identified compounds. The structures of the new compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic methods and single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses using the Flack parameter. (author)

  10. Signal transduction and metabolic flux of beta-thujaplicin and monoterpene biosynthesis in elicited Cupressus lusitanica cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Matsunaga, Yoko; Fujita, Koki; Sakai, Kokki

    2006-01-01

    beta-Thujaplicin is an antimicrobial tropolone derived from geranyl pyrophosphate(GPP) and monoterpene intermediate. Yeast elicitor-treated Cupressus lusitanica cell cultures accumulate high levels of beta-thujaplicin at early stages and other monoterpenes at later stages post-elicitation. The different regulation of beta-thujaplicin and monoterpene biosynthesis and signal transduction directing metabolic flux to beta-thujaplicin firstly and then shifting metabolic flow from beta-thujaplicin to other monoterpene biosynthesis were investigated. The earlier rapid induction of beta-thujaplicin accumulation and a later stimulation of monoterpene biosynthesis by yeast elicitor are in well agreement with elicitor-induced changes in activity of three monoterpene biosynthetic enzymes including isopentenyl pyrophosphate isomerase, GPP synthase, and monoterpene synthase. Yeast elicitor induces an earlier and stronger beta-thujaplicin production and monoterpene biosynthetic enzyme activity than methyl jasmonate (MeJA) does. Profiling all monoterpenes produced by C. lusitanica cell cultures under different conditions reveals that beta-thujaplicin biosynthesis parallels with other monoterpenes and competes for common precursor pools. Yet beta-thujaplicin is produced pre-dominantly at early stage of elicitation whereas other monoterpenes are mainly accumulated at late stage while beta-thujaplicin is metabolized. It is suggested that yeast elicitor-treated C. lusitanica cells preferentially accumulate beta-thujaplicin as a primary defense and other monoterpenes as a secondary defense. Inhibitor treatments suggest that immediate production of beta-thujaplicin post-elicitation largely depends on pre-existing enzymes and translation of pre-existing transcripts as well as recruitment of precursor pools from both the cytosol and plastids. The later beta-thujaplicin and other monoterpene accumulation strictly depends on active transcription and translation. Induction of beta

  11. Overexpression of ORCA3 and G10H in Catharanthus roseus plants regulated alkaloid biosynthesis and metabolism revealed by NMR-metabolomics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifang Pan

    Full Text Available In order to improve the production of the anticancer dimeric indole alkaloids in Catharanthuse roseus, much research has been dedicated to culturing cell lines, hairy roots, and efforts to elucidate the regulation of the monoterpenoid indole alkaloid (MIA biosynthesis. In this study, the ORCA3 (Octadecanoid-derivative Responsive Catharanthus AP2-domain gene alone or integrated with the G10H (geraniol 10-hydroxylase gene were first introduced into C. roseus plants. Transgenic C. roseus plants overexpressing ORCA3 alone (OR lines, or co-overexpressing G10H and ORCA3 (GO lines were obtained by genetic modification. ORCA3 overexpression induced an increase of AS, TDC, STR and D4H transcripts but did not affect CRMYC2 and G10H transcription. G10H transcripts showed a significant increase under G10H and ORCA3 co-overexpression. ORCA3 and G10H overexpression significantly increased the accumulation of strictosidine, vindoline, catharanthine and ajmalicine but had limited effects on anhydrovinblastine and vinblastine levels. NMR-based metabolomics confirmed the higher accumulation of monomeric indole alkaloids in OR and GO lines. Multivariate data analysis of (1H NMR spectra showed change of amino acid, organic acid, sugar and phenylpropanoid levels in both OR and GO lines compared to the controls. The result indicated that enhancement of MIA biosynthesis by ORCA3 and G10H overexpression might affect other metabolic pathways in the plant metabolism of C. roseus.

  12. Ergot alkaloid intoxication in perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne): an emerging animal health concern in Ireland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canty, Mary J; Fogarty, Ursula; Sheridan, Michael K; Ensley, Steve M; Schrunk, Dwayne E; More, Simon J

    2014-01-01

    Four primary mycotoxicosis have been reported in livestock caused by fungal infections of grasses or cereals by members of the Clavicipitaceae family. Ergotism (generally associated with grasses, rye, triticale and other grains) and fescue toxicosis (associated with tall fescue grass, Festuca arundinacea) are both caused by ergot alkaloids, and referred to as 'ergot alkaloid intoxication'. Ryegrass staggers (associated with perennial ryegrass Lolium perenne) is due to intoxication with an indole-diperpene, Lolitrem B, and metabolites. Fescue-associated oedema, recently described in Australia, may be associated with a pyrrolizidine alkaloid, N-acetyl norloline. Ergotism, caused by the fungus Claviceps purpurea, is visible and infects the outside of the plant seed. Fescue toxicosis and ryegrass staggers are caused by Neotyphodium coenophalium and N. lolii, respectively. Fescue-associated oedema has been associated with tall fescue varieties infected with a specific strain of N. coenophialum (AR542, Max P or Max Q). The name Neotyphodium refers to asexual derivatives of Epichloë spp., which have collectively been termed the epichloë fungi. These fungi exist symbiotically within the grass and are invisible to the naked eye. The primary toxicological effect of ergot alkaloid involves vasoconstriction and/or hypoprolactinaemia. Ingestion of ergot alkaloid by livestock can cause a range of effects, including poor weight gain, reduced fertility, hyperthermia, convulsions, gangrene of the extremities, and death. To date there are no published reports, either internationally or nationally, reporting ergot alkaloid intoxication specifically associated with perennial ryegrass endophytes. However, unpublished reports from the Irish Equine Centre have identified a potential emerging problem of ergot alkaloid intoxication with respect to equines and bovines, on primarily perennial ryegrass-based diets. Ergovaline has been isolated in varying concentrations in the herbage of a

  13. Global isoprene and monoterpene emissions under changing climate, vegetation, CO2 and land use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hantson, Stijn; Knorr, Wolfgang; Schurgers, Guy

    2017-01-01

    .). It is therefore necessary to know how isoprene and monoterpene emissions have changed over the past and how future changes in climate, land-use and other factors will impact them. Here we present emission estimates of isoprene and monoterpenes over the period 1901–2 100 based on the dynamic global vegetation...... model LPJ-GUESS, including the effects of all known important drivers. We find that both isoprene and monoterpene emissions at the beginning of the 20th century were higher than at present. While anthropogenic land-use change largely drives the global decreasing trend for isoprene over the 20th century......, changes in natural vegetation composition caused a decreasing trend for monoterpene emissions. Future global isoprene and monoterpene emissions depend strongly on the climate and land-use scenarios considered. Over the 21st century, global isoprene emissions are simulated to either remain stable (RCP 4...

  14. Seasonal variations of monoterpene emissions from Pinus densiflora in East Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jun-Ho; Kim, Jo-Chun; Kim, Ki-Joon; Son, Youn-Suk; Sunwoo, Young; Han, Jin-Seok

    2008-09-01

    The emission rates and compositions of monoterpene from Pinus densiflora were investigated in the Gumsung (GM) and Worak (WM) mountains. The standard emission rates (ERs: ERs is the monoterpene emission rate at standard temperature, 30 degrees C) from P. densiflora ranged from 0.817 to 1.704 (microgC/gdw-h). The ERs and beta-values of total monoterpene were measured at the two study sites (GM and WM). In the spring and summer, the ERs were the highest, while relatively low values (densiflora were alpha-pinene, myrcene, beta-phellandrene, d-limonene and alpha-terpinene. The fractional compositions of individual monoterpene compounds were significantly different between the two test sites in the summer and winter. The ERs of the older group (31-40 years) were higher than those in the younger group (21-30 years). However, the monoterpene compositions were similar between the two age groups.

  15. Monoterpene hydroperoxides with trypanocidal activity from Chenopodium ambrosioides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, Fumiyuki; Itano, Yoshiaki; Uchiyama, Nahoko; Honda, Gisho; Tsubouchi, Akiko; Nakajima-Shimada, Junko; Aoki, Takashi

    2002-04-01

    Four monoterpene hydroperoxides were isolated from aerial parts of Chenopodium ambrosioides along with ascaridole (1), the anthelmintic principle of this plant, as anti-trypanosomal compounds. The structures of these monoterpenes were determined to be (-)-(2S,4S)- and (-)-(2R,4S)-p-mentha-1(7),8-dien-2-hydroperoxide (2a and 3a) and (-)-(1R,4S)- and (-)-(1S,4S)-p-mentha-2,8-dien-1-hydroperoxide (4a and 5a) on the basis of spectroscopic methods and chemical correlations. In vitro trypanocidal activities of ascaridole (1) and these hydroperoxides (2a-5a) against epimastigotes of Trypanosoma cruzi were 23, 1.2, 1.6, 3.1, and 0.8 microM, respectively. Fresh leaves of C. ambrosioides also contained isomeric hydroperoxides 6a and 7a, and the content ratio of 2a-7a suggested that these hydroperoxides were formed through the singlet-oxygen oxidation of limonene.

  16. Do multiple herbivores maintain chemical diversity of Scots pine monoterpenes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iason, Glenn R; O'Reilly-Wapstra, Julianne M; Brewer, Mark J; Summers, Ron W; Moore, Ben D

    2011-05-12

    A central issue in our understanding of the evolution of the diversity of plant secondary metabolites (PSMs) is whether or not compounds are functional, conferring an advantage to the plant, or non-functional. We examine the hypothesis that the diversity of monoterpene PSMs within a plant species (Scots pine Pinus sylvestris) may be explained by different compounds acting as defences against high-impact herbivores operating at different life stages. We also hypothesize that pairwise coevolution, with uncorrelated interactions, is more likely to result in greater PSM diversity, than diffuse coevolution. We tested whether up to 13 different monoterpenes in Scots pine were inhibitory to herbivory by slugs (Arion ater), bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus), red deer (Cervus elaphus) and capercaillie (Tetrao urogallus), each of which attack trees at a different life stage. Plants containing more α-pinene were avoided by both slugs and capercaillie, which may act as reinforcing selective agents for this dominant defensive compound. Herbivory by red deer and capercaillie were, respectively, weakly negatively associated with δ(3)-carene, and strongly negatively correlated with the minor compound β-ocimene. Three of the four herbivores are probably contributory selective agents on some of the terpenes, and thus maintain some, but by no means all, of the phytochemical diversity in the species. The correlated defensive function of α-pinene against slugs and capercaillie is consistent with diffuse coevolutionary processes.

  17. Evaluation of light dependence of monoterpene emission and its effect on surface ozone concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Hiroshi; Shimadera, Hikari; Kondo, Akira; Bao, Hai; Shrestha, Kundan Lal; Inoue, Yoshio

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluated the effect of light intensity on monoterpene emission from the three dominant coniferous tree species in Japan (Cryptomeria japonica, Chamaecyparis obtusa and Pinus densiflora). Monoterpene emission experiments were conducted by using a growth chamber where temperature and light intensity can be controlled. In the experiments, air temperature was set at 30 °C and light intensity was set at 0, 500, 700, 850, 1200, and 1400 μmol m-2s-1. Because monoterpene emissions from the three tree species similarly increased with increasing light intensity, a new empirical equation considering light dependence was proposed to estimate monoterpene emission. In addition, monoterpene emission in the Kinki region of Japan was estimated with and without light dependence using meteorological field produced by the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF) in summer 2010. The monoterpene emissions estimated with light dependence were larger than those without light dependence in the daytime under clear sky conditions and consistently smaller in the nighttime. In order to evaluate the effect of light dependence of monoterpene emission on ozone concentration in the Kinki region, two cases of air quality simulations by the Community Multiscale Air Quality model (CMAQ) were conducted using the monoterpene emission data estimated with and without light dependence. Comparisons of the two cases showed that the monoterpene emission changes due to light dependence slightly but systematically affected ozone concentrations. Monoterpene generally played a role of reducing ozone concentration in the CMAQ simulations. Consequently, because of the light dependence, the mean daily maximum ozone concentrations decreased by 0.3 ppb on average with a maximum of 2.2 ppb, and the mean daily minimum values increased by 0.4 ppb on average with a maximum of 1.8 ppb in the Kinki region in summer 2010.

  18. Hereditary spherocytosis presenting as indolent leg ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed K

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Indolent leg ulcertation, which is the rarest manifestation of hereditary spherocytosis, started at the age of 5 years affecting a 15-year-old boy and his mother is reported. Review of literature showed very few reports from India and abroad. The response to oral folic acid was excellent

  19. Biotransformation of indole derivatives by mycelial cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, Julio; Cid, Eliseo; Lillo, Luis; Céspedesa, Carlos; Aguila, Sergio; Alderete, Joel B

    2008-01-01

    Biotransformation of tryptophan to tryptamine and 3-methyl-indole by Psilocybe coprophila was performed. On the other hand, Aspergillus niger was able to transform tryptophan to 5-hydroxy-tryptophan. P. coprophila biotransformed 5-hydroxy-tryptophan to 5-hydroxytryptamine. These results prove once more that fungi are good tools to establish hydroxyindole derivatives.

  20. Quantification of Anti-Addictive Alkaloids Ibogaine and Voacangine in In Vivo- and In Vitro-Grown Plants of Two Mexican Tabernaemontana Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krengel, Felix; Herrera Santoyo, Josefina; Olivera Flores, Teresa de Jesús; Chávez Ávila, Víctor M; Pérez Flores, Francisco J; Reyes Chilpa, Ricardo

    2016-12-01

    Tabernaemontana alba and Tabernaemontana arborea are Apocynaceae species used in Mexican traditional medicine for which little phytochemical information exists. In this study, preliminary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses of different organs obtained from wild plants of both species identified a total of 10 monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs) and one simple indole alkaloid, nine of which were reported for the first time in these species. Furthermore, callus cultures were established from T. alba leaf explants and regeneration of whole plants was accomplished via somatic embryogenesis. The anti-addictive MIAs ibogaine and voacangine were then quantified by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection in wild plants of both species, as well as greenhouse-grown plants, in vitro-grown plantlets and embryogenic callus of T. alba. Ibogaine and voacangine were present in most samples taken from the whole plants of both species, with stem and root barks showing the highest concentrations. No alkaloids were detected in callus samples. It was concluded that T. alba and T. arborea are potentially viable sources of ibogaine and voacangine, and that these MIAs can be produced through somatic embryogenesis and whole plant regeneration of T. alba. Approaches to increase MIA yields in whole plants and to achieve alkaloid production directly in cell cultures are discussed.

  1. Hydrofocusing Bioreactor Produces Anti-Cancer Alkaloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Valluri, Jagan V.

    2011-01-01

    microgravitation of an HFB do not need to maintain the same surface forces as in normal Earth gravitation, they can divert more energy sources to growth and differentiation and, perhaps, to biosynthesis of greater quantities of desired medicinal compounds. Because one can adjust the HFB to vary effective gravitation, one can also test the effects of intermediate levels of gravitation on biosynthesis of various products. The potential utility of this methodology for producing drugs was demonstrated in experiments in which sandalwood and Madagascar periwinkle cells were grown in an HFB. The conditions in the HFB were chosen to induce the cells to form into aggregate cultures that produced anti-cancer indole alkaloids in amounts greater than do comparable numbers of cells of the same species cultured according to previously known methodologies. The observations made in these experiments were interpreted as suggesting that the aggregation of the cells might be responsible for the enhancement of production of alkaloids.

  2. Metabolism of monoterpenes in cell cultures of common sage (Salvia officinalis)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, K.L.; Gershenzon, J.; Croteau, R. (Washington State Univ., Pullman (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Leaves of common sage (Salvia officinalis) accumulate monoterpenes in glandular trichomes at levels exceeding 15 milligrams per gram fresh weight at maturity, whereas sage cells in suspension culture did not accumulate detectable levels of monoterpenes (<0.3 nanograms per gram fresh weight) at any stage of the growth cycle, even in the presence of a polystyrene resin trap. Monoterpene biosynthesis from (U-{sup 14}C)sucrose was also virtually undetectable in this cell culture system. In vitro assay of each of the enzymes required for the sequential conversion of the ubiquitous isoprenoid precursor geranyl pyrophosphate to (+){minus}camphor (a major monoterpene product of sage) in soluble extracts of the cells revealed the presence of activity sufficient to produce (+){minus}camphor at a readily detectable level (>0.3 micrograms per gram fresh weight) at the late log phase of growth. Other monoterpene synthetic enzymes were present as well. In vivo measurement of the ability to catabolize (+){minus}camphor in these cells indicated that degradative capability exceeded biosynthetic capacity by at least 1,000-fold. Therefore, the lack of monoterpene accumulation in undifferentiated sage cultures could be attributed to a low level of biosynthetic activity (relative to the intact plant) coupled to a pronounced capacity for monoterpene catabolism.

  3. Changes in monoterpene mixing ratios during summer storms in rural New Hampshire (USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Haase

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Monoterpenes are an important class of biogenic hydrocarbons that influence ambient air quality and are a principle source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA. Emitted from vegetation, monoterpenes are a product of photosynthesis and act as a response to a variety of environmental factors. Most parameterizations of monoterpene emissions are based on clear weather models that do not take into account episodic conditions that can drastically change production and release rates into the atmosphere. Here, the monoterpene dataset from the rural Thompson Farm measurement site in Durham, New Hampshire is examined in the context of a set of known severe storm events. While some storm systems had a negligible influence on ambient monoterpene mixing ratios, the average storm event increased mixing ratios by 0.59 ± 0.21 ppbv, a factor of 93% above pre-storm levels. In some events, mixing ratios reached the 10's of ppbv range and persisted overnight. These mixing ratios correspond to increases in the monoterpene emission rate, ranging from 120 to 1240 g km−2 h−1 compared to an estimated clear weather rate of 116 to 193 g km−2 h−1. Considering the regularity of storm events over most forested areas, this could be an important factor to consider when modeling global monoterpene emissions and their resulting influence on the formation of organic aerosols.

  4. Changes in monoterpene mixing ratios during summer storms in rural New Hampshire (USA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, K.B.; Jordan, C.; Mentis, E.; Cottrell, L.; Mayne, H.R.; Talbot, R.; Sive, B.C.

    2011-01-01

    Monoterpenes are an important class of biogenic hydrocarbons that influence ambient air quality and are a principle source of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Emitted from vegetation, monoterpenes are a product of photosynthesis and act as a response to a variety of environmental factors. Most parameterizations of monoterpene emissions are based on clear weather models that do not take into account episodic conditions that can drastically change production and release rates into the atmosphere. Here, the ongoing monoterpene dataset from the rural Thompson Farm measurement site in Durham, New Hampshire is examined in the context of a set of known severe storm events. While some storm systems had a negligible influence on ambient monoterpene mixing ratios, the average storm event increased mixing ratios by 0.59 ?? 0.21 ppbv, a factor of 93 % above pre-storm levels. In some events, mixing ratios reached the 10's of ppbv range and persisted overnight. These mixing ratios correspond to increases in the monoterpene emission rate, ranging from 120 to 1240 g km-2 h -1 compared to an estimated clear weather rate of 116 to 193 g km-2 h-1. Considering the regularity of storm events over most forested areas, this could be an important factor to consider when modeling global monoterpene emissions and their resulting influence on the formation of organic aerosols. ?? 2011 Author(s).

  5. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids of senecio sp from Peru

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    Liliana Ruiz Vásquez and Matías Reina Artiles

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Six pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs (two saturated macrocyclic, three unsaturated macrocyclic and one unsaturated seco-macrocyclic were isolated from native Peruvian Senecio species. The structures of these alkaloids were established by a complete NMR spectroscopic analysis, chemical transformations and comparison of their NMR data with those published for similar alkaloids. Three PAs were then tested for antifungal activity against Fusarium moniliforme, F. (Sheldon, F. oxysporum fs. lycopersici (Scheldt and F. solani (Mart, no significant activity being observed.

  6. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids of senecio sp from Peru

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Six pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) (two saturated macrocyclic, three unsaturated macrocyclic and one unsaturated seco-macrocyclic) were isolated from native Peruvian Senecio species. The structures of these alkaloids were established by a complete NMR spectroscopic analysis, chemical transformations and comparison of their NMR data with those published for similar alkaloids. Three PAs were then tested for antifungal activity against Fusarium moniliforme, F. (Sheldon), F. oxysporum fs. lycopers...

  7. New aporphine alkaloids of Ocotea minarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchietti, V; Casagrande, C; Ferrari, G; Severini Ricca, G

    1979-10-01

    Fourteen aporphine alkaloids were isolated from the leaves of a Brazilian Lauracea, Ocotea minarum Nees (Mez). The known alkaloids were identified through their physico-chemical properties as: leucoxylonine (VII), dicentrine (IV), ocoteine (V), leucoxine (VI), ocopodine (VIII), predicentrine (IX), dicentrinone (XIV) and thalicminine (XV). Six new aporphine alkaloids were also isolated: ocotominarine (I), ocominarine (III), nor-leucoxylonine (XI), iso-oconovine (xii), 4-hydroxydicentrine (XIII) and ocominarone (XVI). Their structures were determined using spectroscopic methods and chemical correlations.

  8. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids of Senecio sp from Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz Vasquez, Liliana; Reina Artiles, Matias [Instituto de Productos Naturales y Agrobiologia, CSIC, Tenerife (Spain); Gonzalez Coloma, Azucena [Instituto de Ciencias Agrarias (ICA), CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Cabrera Perez, Raimundo [Universidad de La Laguna (ULL), Tenerife (Spain). Unidad de Fitopatologia, Facultad de Biologia; Ruiz Mesia, Lastenia [Universidad Nacional de la Amazonia Peruana (LIPNAA-UNAP), AA.HH. Nuevo San Lorenzo, San Juan, Iquitos (Peru). Lab. de Investigacion en Productos Naturales Antiparasitarios de la Amazonia

    2011-07-01

    Six pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) (two saturated macrocyclic, three unsaturated macrocyclic and one unsaturated seco-macrocyclic) were isolated from native Peruvian Senecio species. The structures of these alkaloids were established by a complete NMR spectroscopic analysis, chemical transformations and comparison of their NMR data with those published for similar alkaloids. Three PAs were then tested for antifungal activity against Fusarium moniliforme, F. (Sheldon), F. oxysporum fs. lycopersici (Scheldt) and F. solani (Mart), no significant activity being observed. (author)

  9. Four new fluorenone alkaloids and one new dihydroazafluoranthene alkaloid from Caulophyllum robustum Maxim.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Ling; Liu, Bing-Rui; Chen, Chien-Kuang; Wang, Jun-Ru; Lee, Shoei-Sheng

    2011-09-01

    Four new fluorenone alkaloids, caulophylline A-D (1-4), and one new dihydroazafluoranthene alkaloid, caulophylline E (5) were isolated from the roots of Caulophyllum robustum Maxim. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic analysis. Among the isolated alkaloids, Caulophylline E showed good scavenging effects against DPPH radical with IC(50) of 39 μM.

  10. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids from Onosma erecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damianakos, Harilaos; Sotiroudis, Georgios; Chinou, Ioanna

    2013-10-25

    The MeOH extract of the aerial parts of Onosma erecta afforded four new pyrrolizidine alkaloids, 7-O-acetylechinatine N-oxide (1), a viridinatine N-oxide stereoisomer (2), 7-epi-echimiplatine N-oxide (3), and onosmerectine N-oxide (4), and two additional new natural products, the acid 2,3-dimethyl-2,3,4-trihydroxypentanoic acid (5) and the acyloin 4-methyl-2-hydroxypentanone (6).

  11. Capturing of the monoterpene olefin limonene produced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongedijk, Esmer; Cankar, Katarina; Ranzijn, Jorn; van der Krol, Sander; Bouwmeester, Harro; Beekwilder, Jules

    2015-01-01

    Monoterpene olefins such as limonene are plant compounds with applications as flavouring and fragrance agents, as solvents and potentially also in polymer and fuel chemistry. We engineered baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to express a (-)-limonene synthase from Perilla frutescens and a (+)-limonene synthase from Citrus limon. Both proteins were expressed either with their native plastid targeting signal or in a truncated form in which the plastidial sorting signal was removed. The yeast host strain for expression was AE9 K197G, which expresses a mutant Erg20 enzyme. This enzyme catalyses the formation of geranyl diphosphate, which is the precursor for monoterpenes. Several methods were tested to capture limonene produced by the yeast. Extraction from the culture medium by pentane, or by the addition of CaCl2 followed by solid-phase micro-extraction, did not lead to detectable limonene, indicating that limonene is rapidly lost from the culture medium. Volatile terpenes such as limonene may also be trapped in a dodecane phase added to the medium during fermentation. This method resulted in recovery of 0.028 mg/l (+)-limonene and 0.060 mg/l (-)-limonene in strains using the truncated Citrus and Perilla synthases, respectively. Trapping the headspace during culture of the limonene synthase-expressing strains resulted in higher titres, at 0.12 mg/l (+)-limonene and 0.49 mg/l (-)-limonene. These results show that the volatile properties of the olefins produced require specific methods for efficient recovery of these molecules from biotechnological production systems.

  12. Engineering overexpression of ORCA3 and strictosidine glucosidase in Catharanthus roseus hairy roots increases alkaloid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiayi; Peebles, Christie A M

    2016-09-01

    Catharanthus roseus produces many pharmaceutically important terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) such as vinblastine, vincristine, ajmalicine, and serpentine. Past metabolic engineering efforts have pointed to the tight regulation of the TIA pathway and to multiple rate-limiting reactions. Transcriptional regulator ORCA3 (octadecanoid responsive Catharanthus AP2-domain protein), activated by jasmonic acid, plays a central role in regulating the TIA pathway. In this study, overexpressing ORCA3 under the control of a glucocorticoid-inducible promoter in C. roseus hairy roots resulted in no change in the total amount of TIAs measured. RT-qPCR results showed that ORCA3 overexpression triggered the upregulation of transcripts of most of the known TIA pathway genes. One notable exception was the decrease in strictosidine glucosidase (SGD) transcripts. These results corresponded to previously published results. In this study, ORCA3 and SGD were both engineered in hairy roots under the control of a glucocorticoid-inducible promoter. Co-overexpression of ORCA3 and SGD resulted in a significant (p < 0.05) increase in serpentine by 44 %, ajmalicine by 32 %, catharanthine by 38 %, tabersonine by 40 %, lochnericine by 60 % and hörhammericine by 56 % . The total alkaloid pool was increased significantly by 47 %. Thus, combining overexpression of a positive regulator and a pathway gene which is not controlled by this regulator provided a way to enhance alkaloid production.

  13. Phytochemical genomics of the Madagascar periwinkle: Unravelling the last twists of the alkaloid engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugé de Bernonville, Thomas; Clastre, Marc; Besseau, Sébastien; Oudin, Audrey; Burlat, Vincent; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Lanoue, Arnaud; Papon, Nicolas; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; St-Pierre, Benoit; Courdavault, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    The Madagascar periwinkle produces a large palette of Monoterpenoid Indole Alkaloids (MIAs), a class of complex alkaloids including some of the most valuable plant natural products with precious therapeutical values. Evolutionary pressure on one of the hotspots of biodiversity has obviously turned this endemic Malagasy plant into an innovative alkaloid engine. Catharanthus is a unique taxon producing vinblastine and vincristine, heterodimeric MIAs with complex stereochemistry, and also manufactures more than 100 different MIAs, some shared with the Apocynaceae, Loganiaceae and Rubiaceae members. For over 60 years, the quest for these powerful anticancer drugs has inspired biologists, chemists, and pharmacists to unravel the chemistry, biochemistry, therapeutic activity, cell and molecular biology of Catharanthus roseus. Recently, the "omics" technologies have fuelled rapid progress in deciphering the last secret of strictosidine biosynthesis, the central precursor opening biosynthetic routes to several thousand MIA compounds. Dedicated C. roseus transcriptome, proteome and metabolome databases, comprising organ-, tissue- and cell-specific libraries, and other phytogenomic resources, were developed for instance by PhytoMetaSyn, Medicinal Plant Genomic Resources and SmartCell consortium. Tissue specific library screening, orthology comparison in species with or without MIA-biochemical engines, clustering of gene expression profiles together with various functional validation strategies, largely contributed to enrich the toolbox for plant synthetic biology and metabolic engineering of MIA biosynthesis.

  14. Plant-derived acetylcholinesterase inhibitory alkaloids for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dall'Acqua S

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stefano Dall'AcquaDepartment of Pharmaceutical and Pharmacological Sciences, University of Padova, Padova, ItalyAbstract: The inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE has been one of the most used strategies for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD. The AChE inhibitors (AChE-I produce not only short-term symptomatic effects, but can also play a role in other pathological mechanisms of the disease (eg, formation of amyloid-β plaques, which has renewed interest in the discovery of such inhibitors. Four of the five currently prescribed treatments for AD are AChE-I. Natural alkaloids such as galantamine or alkaloid-related synthetic compounds (such as rivastigmine are considered beneficial for patients with mild-to-moderate AD. However, there is a need for the discovery of more effective compounds and for this reason, plants can still be a potential source of new AChE-I. Findings and advances in knowledge about natural alkaloids as potential new drugs acting as AChE-I will be summarized in this paper.Keywords: quinolizidine, steroidal, indole, isoquinoline

  15. New alkaloids from Pancratium maritimum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Sabrin R M; Mohamed, Gamal A; Shaala, Lamiaa A; Youssef, Diaa T A; El Sayed, Khalid A

    2013-10-01

    As a part of ongoing search efforts for the discovery of anticancer lead entities from natural sources, bulbs and flowers of the amaryllidaceous plant Pancratium maritimum have been investigated. Fractionation of the extracts of the fresh flowers and bulbs of P. maritimum led to the isolation of four new alkaloids, namely pancrimatines A (1) and B (2), norismine (3), and pancrimatine C (4), together with the previously reported N-methyl-8,9-methylenedioxy-6-phenanthridone (5), trispheridine (6), and N-methyl-8,9-methylenedioxyphenanthridine (7). The structures of these alkaloids were established on the basis of extensive 1D and 2D NMR and high-resolution mass spectral analyses as well as comparison with the literature. Compounds 2 and 7 showed antiproliferative and antimigratory activity against the highly metastatic human prostate cancer cell line PC-3 cells without cytotoxicity. The phenanthridine alkaloid class was identified as having potential for use to control prostate cancer proliferation and migration. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Six new alkaloids from Melodinus henryi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ke; Wang, Jun-Song; Luo, Jun; Kong, Ling-Yi

    2015-01-01

    A total of six new alkaloids, melodinhenines A-F (1-6), were isolated from Melodinus henryi. Melodinhenines A and B are new eburnan-vindolinine-type bisindole alkaloids and melodinhenines C-F are new quinolinic melodinus alkaloids. Their structures were elucidated through extensive spectroscopic methods including 2D NMR and HRESIMS analyses. The absolute configuration of 1 and 2 was determined using ECD exciton chirality method. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on the determination of the absolute configuration of eburnan-vindolinine-type bisindole alkaloid using this method.

  17. Acyclic monoterpenes in tree essential oils as a shrinking agent for waste-expanded polystyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimotori, Yasutaka; Hattori, Kazuyuki; Aoyama, Masakazu; Miyakoshi, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    We examined the dissolution of polystyrene (PS) into acyclic monoterpenes present in tree essential oils, to develop an environmentally friendly shrinking agent for waste-expanded polystyrene (EPS). The dissolving powers of geranyl acetate, geranylacetone, and geranyl formate [221.8-241.2 g PS (100 g solvent)(-1)] compared favorably with that of (R)-limonene [181.7 g PS (100 g solvent)(-1)]. Their favorable dissolving powers for PS can be explained by their flexible linear structures, which may be more accessible to the inside of bulk PS compared with cyclic monoterpenes. These acyclic monoterpenes and PS were recovered almost quantitatively by simple steam distillation of the PS solution.

  18. Indole Localization in an Explicit Bilayer Revealed via Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Kristen

    2005-11-01

    It is well known that the amino-acid tryptophan is particularly stable in the interfacial region of biological membranes, and this preference is a property of the tryptophan side-chain. Analogues of this side-chain, such as indole, strongly localize in the interfacial region, especially near the glycerol moiety of the lipids in the bilayer. Using molecular dynamics calculations, we determine the potential of mean force (PMF) for indoles in the bilayer. We compare the calculated PMF for indole with that of benzene to show that exclusion from the center of the lipid bilayer does not occur in all aromatics, but is strong in indoles. We find three minima in the PMF. Indole is most stabilized near the glycerol moiety. A weaker binding location is found near the choline groups of the lipid molecules. An even weaker binding side is found near the center of the lipid hydrocarbon core. Comparisions between uncharged, weakly charged, and highly charged indoles demonstrate that the exclusion is caused by the charge distribution on the indole rather than the ``lipo-phobic'' effect. High temperature simulations are used to determine the relative contribution of enthalpy and entropy to indole localization. The orientation of indole is found to be largely charge independent and is a strong function of depth within the bilayer. We find good agreement between simulated SCD order parameters for indole and experimentally determined order parameters.

  19. Indoles - A promising scaffold for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sravanthi, T V; Manju, S L

    2016-08-25

    Generally, heterocycles occupy a prominent place in chemistry due to their wide range of applications in the fields of drug design, photochemistry, agrochemicals, dyes and so on. Among them, indole scaffolds have been found in most of the important synthetic drug molecules and paved a faithful way to develop effective targets. Privileged structures bind to multiple receptors with high affinity, thus aiding the development of novel biologically active compounds. Among the indole class of compounds, 2-arylindoles appear to be a most promising lead for drug development. The derivatives of 2-arylindoles exhibits antibacterial, anticancer, anti-oxidants, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, antiviral, antiproliferative, antituberculosis activity, etc. This article would provide a clear knowledge on the wide-ranging biological activities of 2-arylindoles over the past two decades, which would be beneficial for the designing of more potent drug targets in order to compete with the existing drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Obinutuzumab for the treatment of indolent lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelmann, Jennifer; Gribben, John G

    2016-08-01

    Obinutuzumab is a humanized, type II anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody designed for strong induction of direct cell death and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. The Phase III GADOLIN trial tested the clinical efficacy of obinutuzumab plus bendamustine followed by obinutuzumab monotherapy in rituximab-refractory indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma versus treatment with bendamustine alone. It demonstrated significantly longer progression-free survival for the obinutuzumab-containing regimen in this difficult to treat patient group. Based on the results of this trial, US FDA approval was most recently granted for obinutuzumab in the treatment of follicular lymphoma that has relapsed after or was refractory to a rituximab-containing regimen. This article summarizes the available data on chemistry, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy and safety of obinutuzumab in the treatment of indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

  1. Marine Inspired 2-(5-Halo-1H-indol-3-yl)-N,N-dimethylethanamines as Modulators of Serotonin Receptors: An Example Illustrating the Power of Bromine as Part of the Uniquely Marine Chemical Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohamed A; El-Alfy, Abir T; Ezel, Kelly; Radwan, Mohamed O; Shilabin, Abbas G; Kochanowska-Karamyan, Anna J; Abd-Alla, Howaida I; Otsuka, Masami; Hamann, Mark T

    2017-08-09

    In previous studies, we have isolated several marine indole alkaloids and evaluated them in the forced swim test (FST) and locomotor activity test, revealing their potential as antidepressant and sedative drug leads. Amongst the reported metabolites to display such activities was 5-bromo-N,N-dimethyltryptamine. Owing to the importance of the judicious introduction of halogens into drug candidates, we synthesized two series built on a 2-(1H-indol-3-yl)-N,N-dimethylethanamine scaffold with different halogen substitutions. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their in vitro and in vivo antidepressant and sedative activities using the mouse forced swim and locomotor activity tests. Receptor binding studies of these compounds to serotonin (5-HT) receptors were conducted. Amongst the prepared compounds, 2-(1H-indol-3-yl)-N,N-dimethyl-2-oxoacetamide (1a), 2-(5-bromo-1H-indol-3-yl)-N,N-dimethyl-2-oxoacetamide (1d), 2-(1H-indol-3-yl)-N,N-dimethylethanamine (2a), 2-(5-chloro-1H-indol-3-yl)-N,N-dimethylethanamine (2c), 2-(5-bromo-1H-indol-3-yl)-N,N-dimethylethanamine (2d), and 2-(5-iodo-1H-indol-3-yl)-N,N-dimethylethanamine (2e) have been shown to possess significant antidepressant-like action, while compounds 2c, 2d, and 2e exhibited potent sedative activity. Compounds 2a, 2c, 2d, and 2e showed nanomolar affinities to serotonin receptors 5-HT1A and 5-HT₇. The in vitro data indicates that the antidepressant action exerted by these compounds in vivo is mediated, at least in part, via interaction with serotonin receptors. The data presented here shows the valuable role that bromine plays in providing novel chemical space and electrostatic interactions. Bromine is ubiquitous in the marine environment and a common element of marine natural products.

  2. Microwave spectrum and molecular constants of indole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesvadba, Radim; Studecký, Tomáš; Uhlíková, Tereza; Urban, Štěpán

    2017-09-01

    Every single person has a certain characteristic group of scent molecules. The microwave spectra of the organic compounds of scent could be useful for the identification of people, but a database of spectra of scent molecules needs to be created first. The spectrum of indole, that is among the human scent molecules, was measured in the frequency range of 7.5-19 GHz under the conditions of supersonic expansion in a pulse emission Fourier Transform Microwave Spectrometer (FTMW) with a Fabry-Perot resonator. The high resolution of the spectrometer enables the detection of rotational transitions with hyperfine splitting. A total of 37 new rotational transitions were measured and analyzed using the PGOPHER software to derive the rotational and centrifugal distortion constants, as well as the 14N nuclear quadrupole coupling constants. The molecular constants were determined with approximately two orders of magnitude greater accuracy as compared with some earlier studies of indole. The obtained data and constants of indole are the first step towards the development of a database of the human scent molecules.

  3. Biotransformation of Indole to 3-Methylindole by Lysinibacillus xylanilyticus Strain MA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Kumar Arora

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An indole-biotransforming strain MA was identified as Lysinibacillus xylanilyticus on the basis of the 16S rRNA gene sequencing. It transforms indole completely from the broth culture in the presence of an additional carbon source (i.e., sodium succinate. Gas-chromatography-mass spectrometry identified indole-3-acetamide, indole-3-acetic acid, and 3-methylindole as transformation products. Tryptophan-2-monooxygenase activity was detected in the crude extracts of indole-induced cells of strain MA, which confirms the formation of indole-3-acetamide from tryptophan in the degradation pathway of indole. On the basis of identified metabolites and enzyme assay, we have proposed a new transformation pathway for indole degradation. Indole was first transformed to indole-3-acetamide via tryptophan. Indole-3-acetamide was then transformed to indole-3-acetic acid that was decarboxylated to 3-methylindole. This is the first report of a 3-methylindole synthesis via the degradation pathway of indole.

  4. Interspecific hybridization and bioactive alkaloid variation increases diversity in endophytic Epichloë species of Bromus laevipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Nikki D; Craven, Kelly D; Afkhami, Michelle E; Hall, Bradley A; Ghimire, Sita R; Young, Carolyn A

    2014-10-01

    Studying geographic variation of microbial mutualists, especially variation in traits related to benefits they provide their host, is critical for understanding how these associations impact key ecological processes. In this study, we investigate the phylogenetic population structure of Epichloë species within Bromus laevipes, a native cool-season bunchgrass found predominantly in California. Phylogenetic classification supported inference of three distinct Epichloë taxa, of which one was nonhybrid and two were interspecific hybrids. Inheritance of mating-type idiomorphs revealed that at least one of the hybrid species arose from independent hybridization events. We further investigated the geographic variation of endophyte-encoded alkaloid genes, which is often associated with key benefits of natural enemy protection for the host. Marker diversity at the ergot alkaloid, loline, indole-diterpene, and peramine loci revealed four alkaloid genotypes across the three identified Epichloë species. Predicted chemotypes were tested using endophyte-infected plant material that represented each endophyte genotype, and 11 of the 13 predicted alkaloids were confirmed. This multifaceted approach combining phylogenetic, genotypic, and chemotypic analyses allowed us to reconstruct the diverse evolutionary histories of Epichloë species present within B. laevipes and highlight the complex and dynamic processes underlying these grass-endophyte symbioses.

  5. Intraspecific variability in the alkaloid metabolism of Galanthus elwesii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkov, Strahil; Sidjimova, Borjana; Evstatieva, Luba; Popov, Simeon

    2004-03-01

    Alkaloid pattern of individuals from 16 Bulgarian Galanthus elwesii populations was investigated by GC/MS and TLC. Twenty-one Amaryllidaceae alkaloids were detected and 14 of them were identified. Crinane type alkaloids, haemanthamine or crinine, dominated alkaloid metabolism in most of the populations. With exception of one population, where the separate individuals showed variable alkaloid profiles (dominated by crinine or haemanthamine) the individuals of the rest of populations have identical and characteristic alkaloid profiles. Some populations showed remarkable differences in respect to their alkaloid pattern-type of biosynthesis, main alkaloids and number of alkaloids. Populations dominated by galanthamine type alkaloids were found as well. These data demonstrate that like the morphological features, the alkaloid metabolism of G. elwesii is also variable.

  6. Emission of monoterpenes from European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. as a function of light and temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kesselmeier

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a dynamic branch enclosure technique European beech (Fagus sylvatica L. was characterised as a strong emitter of monoterpenes, with sabinene being the predominant compound released. Since monoterpene emission was demonstrated to be a function of light and temperature, application of light and temperature dependent algorithms resulted in reasonable agreement with the measured data. Furthermore, during high temperature periods the depression of net CO2 exchange during midday (midday depression was accompanied by a depression of monoterpene emission on one occasion. The species dependent standard emission factor and the light and temperature regulated release of monoterpenes is of crucial importance for European VOC emissions. All measurements were performed within the framework of the ECHO project (Emission and CHemical transformation of biogenic volatile Organic compounds during two intensive field campaigns in the summers of 2002 and 2003.

  7. A New Monoterpene Glucoside from the Leaves of Betula platyphylla Suk.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new monoterpene glucoside, (2E,6Z)-2,6-dimethyl-8-b-D-glucosyloxy-2,6-octadien- oic acid, was isolated from the leaves of Betula platyphylla Suk. The structure was established by spectroscopic data.

  8. Isotope ratio analysis by HRGC-MS of monoterpene hydrocarbons from citrus essential oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satake, Atsushi; Une, Akitoshi; Ueno, Takao; Ukeda, Hiroyuki; Sawamura, Masayoshi

    2003-03-01

    The isotope ratio of monoterpene hydrocarbons in citrus essential oils of different origins was measured by ordinary high-resolution gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HRGC-MS). The isotope ratio (Ir) was determined by the ratio of the isotope peak intensity (m/z 137) to the molecular mass peak intensity (m/z 136) of the monoterpene hydrocarbons. The accuracy of Ir was examined by measuring monoterpene hydrocarbon standards and 13C-labeled compounds. The isotope fingerprints based on the values of monoterpene hydrocarbons from lemon, lime and yuzu essential oils were determined. These citrus essential oils were also discriminated by a principal component analysis of their Ir data. The characteristic vectors showed that alpha-terpinene, beta-pinene and beta-phellandrene were important components for distinguishing between the citrus species. It is suggested that this technique will be applicable to evaluate the quality, genuineness and origin of citrus fruits and their products.

  9. Isolation and characterization of three new monoterpene synthases from Artemisia annua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Xin eRuan

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Artemisia annua, an annual herb used in traditional Chinese medicine, produces a wealth of monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, including the well-known sesquiterpene lactone artemisinin, an active ingredient in the treatment for malaria. Here we report three new monoterpene synthases of A. annua. From a glandular trichome cDNA library, monoterpene synthases of AaTPS2, AaTPS5 and AaTPS6, were isolated and characterized. The recombinant proteins of AaTPS5 and AaTPS6 produced multiple products with camphene and 1,8-cineole as major products, respectively, and AaTPS2 produced a single product, β-myrcene. Although both Mg2+ and Mn2+ were able to support their catalytic activities, altered product spectrum was observed in the presence of Mn2+ for AaTPS2 and AaTPS5. Analysis of extracts of aerial tissues and root of A. annua with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS detected more than 20 monoterpenes, of which the three enzymes constituted more than 1/3 of the total. Mechanical wounding induced the expression of all three monoterpene synthase genes, and transcript levels of AaTPS5 and AaTPS6 were also elevated after treatments with phytohormones of methyl jasmonate (MeJA, salicylic acid (SA and gibberellin (GA, suggesting a role of these monoterpene synthases in plant-environment interactions. The three new monoterpene synthases reported here further our understanding of molecular basis of monoterpene biosynthesis and regulation in plant.

  10. Cytotoxic oxoisoaporphine alkaloids from Menispermum dauricum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, B W; Meng, L H; Chen, J Y; Zhou, T X; Cheng, K F; Ding, J; Qin, G W

    2001-07-01

    Four new oxoisoaporphine alkaloids, daurioxoisoporphines A-D (1-4), were isolated from the rhizomes of Menispermum dauricum. The structures of these alkaloids were established by spectroscopic methods. The cytotoxic evaluation of 1 and 2 is reported against four cancer cell lines.

  11. Alkaloids of some Asian Sedum species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, JH; THart, H; Stevens, JF

    1996-01-01

    The leafy parts of 16 Asian species belonging to the three sections of Sedum were investigated for the presence of alkaloids. Only in seven species of Sedum sect. Sedum were alkaloids found. Sedum bulbiferum, S. japonicum, S. lepidopodium, S. morrisomensis, S. oryzifolium, S. polytrichoides and S. s

  12. Alkaloids of the flowers of Pancratium maritimum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, D T; Frahm, A W

    1998-10-01

    The defatted ethanolic extract of the fresh flowers of Pancratium maritimum L. yielded the four known alkaloids lycorine, maritidine, lycoramine, and galanthamine. The structures of the isolated alkaloids were determined mainly through spectroscopic studies including one- and two-dimensional NMR (COSY, NOESY, DEPT, HETCOR, and HMBC) and CD techniques. Some spectral data are newly reported or revised.

  13. New bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid from Laureliopsis philippiana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stærk, Dan; Thi, Loi Pham; Rasmussen, Hasse Bonde

    2009-01-01

    Phytochemical investigation of Laureliopsis philippiana resulted in isolation of a new bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid (1) named laureliopsine A. The structure was established by spectroscopic methods, including 2D homo- and heteronuclear NMR experiments. This finding of a bisbenzylisoquinoline...... alkaloid in Laureliopsis supports its close relationship to Atherosperma and its taxonomic segregation from Laurelia....

  14. Alkaloids from the Roots of Saccopetalum prolificum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new alkaloid, named prolifine (1), was isolated along with four known alkaloids, liriodenine (2), 6-hydroxyonychine (3), isooncodine (4) and discretamine (5) from the roots of Saccopetalum prolificum. The structure of 1 was elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic and chemical methods.

  15. Alkaloids of Nelumbo lutea (Wild.) pers. (Nymphaeaceae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelenski, S G

    1977-11-01

    A phytochemical investigation of an alcoholic extract of the petioles of Nelumbo lutea resulted in the identification of the alkaloids N-methylasimilobine, anonaine, and roemerine. The alkaloids nuciferine, armepavine, N-nornuciferine, and N-norarmepavine, previously previously reported in the whole plant, were also identified.

  16. Plant alkaloids of the polymethyleneamine series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogoza, Ludmila N; Salakhutdinov, Nariman F; Tolstikov, Genrikh A [N.N. Vorozhtsov Novosibirsk Institute of Organic Chemistry, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2005-04-30

    The published data on the structures and biological activities of the plant alkaloids of the biogenic polymethyleneamine series, viz., putrescine (1,4-diaminobutane), spermidine (1,8-diamino-4 -azaoctane), and spermine (1,12-diamino-4,9-diazadodecane), are considered and systematised. The structures and biological activities of some synthetic analogues of these alkaloids are also presented.

  17. Indole and 3-indolylacetonitrile inhibit spore maturation in Paenibacillus alvei

    OpenAIRE

    Cho Moo; Lee Jin-Hyung; Kim Yong-Guy; Lee Jintae

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Bacteria use diverse signaling molecules to ensure the survival of the species in environmental niches. A variety of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria produce large quantities of indole that functions as an intercellular signal controlling diverse aspects of bacterial physiology. Results In this study, we sought a novel role of indole in a Gram-positive bacteria Paenibacillus alvei that can produce extracellular indole at a concentration of up to 300 μM in the ...

  18. Monoterpene synthases of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) produce pinene isomers and enantiomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, M A; Savage, T J; Croteau, R

    1999-12-01

    The turpentine fraction of conifer oleoresin is a complex mixture of monoterpene olefins and plays important roles in defense and in the mediation of chemical communication between conifer hosts and insect predators. The stereochemistry of the turpentine monoterpenes is critical in these interactions, influencing host recognition, toxicity, and potency of derived pheromones, and the stereochemical composition of these compounds lends insight into their biogenetic origin, with implications for the numbers and types of enzymes responsible and their corresponding genes. Analysis of the oleoresin from several tissues of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda) showed the derived turpentine to consist mainly of (+)-(3R:5R)-alpha-pinene and (-)-(3S:5S)-beta-pinene. Cell-free extracts from xylem tissue yielded three monoterpene synthases which together account for the monoterpene isomer and enantiomer content of the turpentine of this tissue. The major products of these enzymes, produced from the universal precursor of monoterpenes, geranyl diphosphate, were shown to be (+)-alpha-pinene, (-)-alpha-pinene, and (-)-beta-pinene, respectively. In most properties (molecular mass of approximately 60 kDa, K(m) for geranyl diphosphate of 3 microM, requirement for monovalent and divalent cations), these enzymes resemble other monoterpene synthases from conifer species.

  19. Quantitative and enantioselective analysis of monoterpenes from plant chambers and in ambient air using SPME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yassaa

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available A headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS system has been developed for quantifying enantiomeric and nonenantiomeric monoterpenes in plant chamber studies and ambient air. Performance of this system was checked using a capillary diffusion system to produce monoterpene standards. The adsorption efficiency, competitive adsorption and chromatographic peak resolution of monoterpene enantiomer pairs were compared for three SPME fibre coatings: 75 μm Carboxen-PDMS (CAR-PDMS, 50/30 μm divinylbenzene-carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane (DVB-CAR-PDMS and 65 μm divinylbenzene-polydimethylsiloxane (DVB-PDMS. Key parameters such as the linearity and reproducibility of the SPME system have been investigated in this work. The best compromise between the enantiomeric separation of monoterpenes and competitive adsorption of the isoprenoids on the solid SPME fibre coating was found for DVB-PDMS fibres. The optimum conditions using DVB-PDMS fibres were applied to measure the exchange rates of monoterpenes in the emission of Quercus ilex using a laboratory whole plant enclosure under light and dark conditions, as well as in ambient air. With 592 and 223 ng m−2 s−1 respectively, β-myrcene and limonene were the predominant monoterpenes in the emission of Q. ilex. These values were closely comparable to those obtained using a zNose and cartridge GC-FID systems.

  20. Quantitative and enantioselective analysis of monoterpenes from plant chambers and in ambient air using SPME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yassaa

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS system has been developed for quantifying enantiomeric and nonenantiomeric monoterpenes in plant chamber studies and ambient air. Performance of this system was checked using a capillary diffusion system to produce monoterpene standards. The adsorption efficiency, competitive adsorption and chromatographic peak resolution of monoterpene enantiomer pairs were compared for three SPME fibre coatings: 75 μm Carboxen-PDMS (CAR-PDMS, 50/30 μm, divinylbenzene-carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane (DVB-CAR-PDMS and 65 μm divinylbenzene-polydimethyl-siloxane (DVB-PDMS. Key parameters such as the linearity and reproducibility of the SPME system have been investigated in this work. The best compromise between the enantiomeric separation of monoterpenes and competitive adsorption of the isoprenoids on the solid SPME fibre coating was found for DVB-PDMS fibres. The optimum conditions using DVB-PDMS fibres were applied to measure the exchange rates of monoterpenes in the emission of Quercus ilex using a laboratory whole plant enclosure under light and dark conditions, as well as in ambient air. With 592 and 223 ng m−2 s−1, respectively, β-myrcene and limonene were the predominant monoterpenes in the emission of Q. ilex. These values were closely comparable to those obtained using a zNose and cartridge GC-FID systems.

  1. Piperidine alkaloids: human and food animal teratogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Benedict T; Lee, Stephen T; Panter, Kip E; Brown, David R

    2012-06-01

    Piperidine alkaloids are acutely toxic to adult livestock species and produce musculoskeletal deformities in neonatal animals. These teratogenic effects include multiple congenital contracture (MCC) deformities and cleft palate in cattle, pigs, sheep, and goats. Poisonous plants containing teratogenic piperidine alkaloids include poison hemlock (Conium maculatum), lupine (Lupinus spp.), and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) [including wild tree tobacco (Nicotiana glauca)]. There is abundant epidemiological evidence in humans that link maternal tobacco use with a high incidence of oral clefting in newborns; this association may be partly attributable to the presence of piperidine alkaloids in tobacco products. In this review, we summarize the evidence for piperidine alkaloids that act as teratogens in livestock, piperidine alkaloid structure-activity relationships and their potential implications for human health.

  2. Metabolism and disposition of N,N-dimethyltryptamine and harmala alkaloids after oral administration of ayahuasca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riba, Jordi; McIlhenny, Ethan H; Valle, Marta; Bouso, José Carlos; Barker, Steven A

    2012-01-01

    Ayahuasca is an Amazonian psychotropic plant tea obtained from Banisteriopsis caapi, which contains β-carboline alkaloids, chiefly harmine, harmaline and tetrahydroharmine. The tea usually incorporates the leaves of Psychotria viridis or Diplopterys cabrerana, which are rich in N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), a psychedelic 5-HT(2A/1A/2C) agonist. The β-carbolines reversibly inhibit monoamine-oxidase (MAO), effectively preventing oxidative deamination of the orally labile DMT and allowing its absorption and access to the central nervous system. Despite increased use of the tea worldwide, the metabolism and excretion of DMT and the β-carbolines has not been studied systematically in humans following ingestion of ayahuasca. In the present work, we used an analytical method involving high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)/electrospray ionization (ESI)/selected reaction monitoring (SRM)/tandem mass spectrometry(MS/MS) to characterize the metabolism and disposition of ayahuasca alkaloids in humans. Twenty-four-hour urine samples were obtained from 10 healthy male volunteers following administration of an oral dose of encapsulated freeze-dried ayahuasca (1.0 mg DMT/kg body weight). Results showed that less than 1% of the administered DMT dose was excreted unchanged. Around 50% was recovered as indole-3-acetic acid but also as DMT-N-oxide (10%) and other MAO-independent compounds. Recovery of DMT plus metabolites reached 68%. Harmol, harmalol, and tetrahydroharmol conjugates were abundant in urine. However, recoveries of each harmala alkaloid plus its O-demethylated metabolite varied greatly between 9 and 65%. The present results show the existence in humans of alternative metabolic routes for DMT other than biotransformation by MAO. Also that O-demethylation plus conjugation is an important but probably not the only metabolic route for the harmala alkaloids in humans. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Detection of oxygen addition peaks for terpendole E and related indole–diterpene alkaloids in a positive-mode ESI-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, Yayoi; Nakamura, Takemichi; Takahashi, Shunya; Motoyama, Takayuki; Hayashi, Toshiaki; Hirota, Hiroshi; Osada, Hiroyuki; Koshino, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    This report describes that a regular positive electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (MS) analysis of terpendoles often causes unexpected oxygen additions to form [M + H + O]+ and [M + H + 2O]+, which might be a troublesome in the characterization of new natural analogues. The intensities of [M + H + O]+ and [M + H + 2O]+ among terpendoles were unpredictable and fluctuated largely. Simple electrochemical oxidation in electrospray ionization was insufficient to explain the phenomenon. So we studied factors to form [M + H + O]+ and [M + H + 2O]+ using terpendole E and natural terpendoles together with some model indole alkaloids. Similar oxygen addition was observed for 1,2,3,4-tetrahydrocyclopent[b]indole, which is corresponding to the substructure of terpendole E. In tandem MS experiments, a major fragment ion at m/z 130 from protonated terpendole E was assigned to the substructure containing indole. When the [M + H + O]+ was selected as a precursor ion, the ion shifted to m/z 146. The same 16 Da shift of fragments was also observed for 1,2,3,4-tetrahydrocyclopent[b]indole, indicating that the oxygen addition of terpendole E took place at the indole portion. However, the oxygen addition was absent for some terpendoles, even whose structure resembles terpendole E. The breakdown curves characterized the tandem MS features of terpendoles. Preferential dissociation into m/z 130 suggested the protonation tendency at the indole site. Terpendoles that are preferentially protonated at indole tend to form oxygen addition peaks, suggesting that the protonation feature contributes to the oxygen additions in some degrees. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24913406

  4. Isoprene and monoterpene emissions from an Inner Mongolia grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Jianhui; Baker, Bradly; Liang, Baosheng; Greenberg, James; Guenther, Alex

    Terpenoid emissions were measured at a grassland site in Inner Mongolia, China during four campaigns over a 2-year period. Emissions were strongly correlated with light and temperature and the variations could be simulated using a canopy emission model. Substantial seasonal and interannual variations in isoprene emissions were also observed. Area averaged isoprene emissions normalized to standard above-canopy temperature and light conditions (30 °C and 1500 μmol m -2 s -1) ranged from about 50 to 500 μg m -2 h -1. These rates are more than an order of magnitude higher than those previously reported for temperate grasslands but are lower than emission rates observed from ground cover vegetation at higher latitudes. Isoprene emissions from this Inner Mongolia grassland may be dominated by emissions from sedges, e.g. Carex appendiculata. Total monoterpene emissions normalized to a standard temperature of 30 °C were only about 3 μg m -2 h -1 and consisted primarily of carene and limonene with smaller contributions of α-pinene and β-pinene. A model sensitivity study showed that grass and other herbaceous ground cover can contribute >10% of the total isoprene emission from certain regions, such as Inner Mongolia, but are<4% on a global annual scale.

  5. Monoterpenes Released from Fruit, Plant, and Vegetable Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Mohammad Asif; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Ahn, Jeong Hyeon

    2014-01-01

    To quantify the emission rate of monoterpenes (MTs) from diverse natural sources, the sorbent tube (ST)-thermal desorption (TD) method was employed to conduct the collection and subsequent detection of MTs by gas chromatography. The calibration of MTs, when made by both mass spectrometric (MS) and flame ionization detector (FID), consistently exhibited high coefficient of determination values (R2 > 0.99). This approach was employed to measure their emission rate from different fruit/plant/vegetable (F/P/V) samples with the aid of an impinger-based dynamic headspace sampling system. The results obtained from 10 samples (consisting of carrot, pine needle (P. sylvestris), tangerine, tangerine peel, strawberry, sepals of strawberry, plum, apple, apple peel, and orange juice) marked α-pinene, β-pinene, myrcene, α-terpinene, R-limonene, γ-terpinene, and p-cymene as the most common MTs. R-limonene was the major species emitted from citrus fruits and beverages with its abundance exceeding 90%. In contrast, α-pinene was the most abundant MT (37%) for carrot, while it was myrcene (31%) for pine needle. The overall results for F/P/V samples confirmed α-pinene, β-pinene, myrcene, α-terpinene, and γ-terpinene as common MTs. Nonetheless, the types and magnitude of MTs released from fruits were distinguished from those of vegetables and plants. PMID:25268921

  6. Monoterpenes Released from Fruit, Plant, and Vegetable Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Asif Iqbal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available To quantify the emission rate of monoterpenes (MTs from diverse natural sources, the sorbent tube (ST-thermal desorption (TD method was employed to conduct the collection and subsequent detection of MTs by gas chromatography. The calibration of MTs, when made by both mass spectrometric (MS and flame ionization detector (FID, consistently exhibited high coefficient of determination values (R2 > 0.99. This approach was employed to measure their emission rate from different fruit/plant/vegetable (F/P/V samples with the aid of an impinger-based dynamic headspace sampling system. The results obtained from 10 samples (consisting of carrot, pine needle (P. sylvestris, tangerine, tangerine peel, strawberry, sepals of strawberry, plum, apple, apple peel, and orange juice marked α-pinene, β-pinene, myrcene, α-terpinene, R-limonene, γ-terpinene, and p-cymene as the most common MTs. R-limonene was the major species emitted from citrus fruits and beverages with its abundance exceeding 90%. In contrast, α-pinene was the most abundant MT (37% for carrot, while it was myrcene (31% for pine needle. The overall results for F/P/V samples confirmed α-pinene, β-pinene, myrcene, α-terpinene, and γ-terpinene as common MTs. Nonetheless, the types and magnitude of MTs released from fruits were distinguished from those of vegetables and plants.

  7. Naturally-occurring tetrahydro-β-carboline alkaloids derived from tryptophan are oxidized to bioactive β-carboline alkaloids by heme peroxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herraiz, Tomás; Galisteo, Juan

    2014-08-15

    β-Carbolines are indole alkaloids that occur in plants, foods, and endogenously in mammals and humans, and which exhibit potent biological, psychopharmacological and toxicological activities. They form from naturally-occurring tetrahydro-β-carboline alkaloids arising from tryptophan by still unknown way and mechanism. Results in this research show that heme peroxidases catalyzed the oxidation of tetrahydro-β-carbolines (i.e. 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-β-carboline-3-carboxylic acid and 1-methyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-β-carboline-3-carboxylic acid) into aromatic β-carbolines (i.e. norharman and harman, respectively). This oxidation followed a typical catalytic cycle of peroxidases through redox intermediates I, II, and ferric enzyme. Both, plant peroxidases (horseradish peroxidase, HRP) and mammalian peroxidases (myeloperoxidase, MPO and lactoperoxidase, LPO) catalyzed the oxidation in an efficient manner as determined by kinetic parameters (VMAX and KM). Oxidation of tetrahydro-β-carbolines was inhibited by peroxidase inhibitors such as sodium azide, ascorbic acid, hydroxylamine and excess of H2O2. The formation of aromatic β-carbolines by heme peroxidases can help to explain the presence and activity of these compounds in biological systems.

  8. Genetic variation in alkaloid accumulation in leaves of Nicotiana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo SUN; Fen ZHANG; Guo-jun ZHOU; Guo-hai CHU; Fang-fang HUANG; Qiao-mei WANG; Li-feng JIN; Fu-cheng LIN; Jun YANG

    2013-01-01

    Alkaloids are plant secondary metabolites that are widely distributed in Nicotiana species and contribute greatly to the quality of tobacco leaves. Some alkaloids, such as nornicotine and myosmine, have adverse effects on human health. To reduce the content of harmful alkaloids in tobacco leaves through conventional breeding, a genetic study of the alkaloid variation among different genotypes is required. In this study, alkaloid profiles in leaves of five Nicotiana tabacum cultivars and Nicotiana tomentosiformis were investigated. Six alkaloids were identified from al six genotypes via gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Significant differences in alkaloid content were ob-served both among different leaf positions and among cultivars. The contents of nornicotine and myosmine were positively and significantly correlated (R2=0.881), and were also separated from those of other alkaloids by clustering. Thus, the genotype plays a major role in alkaloid accumulation, indicating a high potential for manipulation of alkaloid content through traditional breeding.

  9. Genetic variation in alkaloid accumulation in leaves of Nicotiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Zhang, Fen; Zhou, Guo-jun; Chu, Guo-hai; Huang, Fang-fang; Wang, Qiao-mei; Jin, Li-feng; Lin, Fu-cheng; Yang, Jun

    2013-12-01

    Alkaloids are plant secondary metabolites that are widely distributed in Nicotiana species and contribute greatly to the quality of tobacco leaves. Some alkaloids, such as nornicotine and myosmine, have adverse effects on human health. To reduce the content of harmful alkaloids in tobacco leaves through conventional breeding, a genetic study of the alkaloid variation among different genotypes is required. In this study, alkaloid profiles in leaves of five Nicotiana tabacum cultivars and Nicotiana tomentosiformis were investigated. Six alkaloids were identified from all six genotypes via gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Significant differences in alkaloid content were observed both among different leaf positions and among cultivars. The contents of nornicotine and myosmine were positively and significantly correlated (R(2)=0.881), and were also separated from those of other alkaloids by clustering. Thus, the genotype plays a major role in alkaloid accumulation, indicating a high potential for manipulation of alkaloid content through traditional breeding.

  10. Comparative Study of Alkaloid Pattern of Four Bulgarian Fumaria species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doncheva, Tsvetelina; Yordanova, Gabriela; Vutov, Vassil; Kostova, Nadezhda; Philipov, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    The alkaloid pattern of four Fumaria species (Fumaria kralikii, Fumaria rostellata, Fumaria schleicherii, Fumaria thureii) growing in Bulgaria was investigated by GC-MS and twenty isoquinoline alkaloids were determined. Phytochemical investigation of the alkaloid composition on Fumaria thuretii Boiss was made for the first time. The alkaloid profile of the species was compared at two levels, between different species and within two species from different habitats. Two chemotypical groups, based on the types of isoquinoline alkaloids were suggested. To group A belong species F. kralikii, F. rostellata (F. r. 1) and F. thuretii containing more than 50% spirobenzylisoquinoline alkaloids of the crude alkaloid mixtures. To group B belong species F. rostellata (F. r. 2) and F. schleicherii containing more than 40% protopine alkaloids and relatively high percentage phthaldeisoquinoline alkaloids (11-19%). In group A phthaldeisoquinoline alkaloids were not detected.

  11. Molecular Biology and Metabolic Engineering of the Indole Pathway In Catharanthus roseus( L.) G.Don%长春花萜类吲哚生物碱的分子生物学与代谢工程研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢衍; 常凯; 郑月; 许宏宣; 杨春贤

    2012-01-01

    长春花不仅是重要抗癌药物,也是长春碱与长春新碱的唯一来源,并且还包含有其他多种药用成分.近年来,长春花次生代谢得到了广泛的研究,但仍有许多不明之处.该研究对长春花的研究进展进行了综述,详细阐述了长春花萜类吲哚生物碱合成的2大途径(莽草酸途径和萜类途径),介绍了该途径中已克隆的部分基因及相关酶,总结了近年来长春花TIAs研究中的代谢工程策略,以期为长春花萜类吲哚生物碱的后续研究提供参考依据.%Catharanthus roseus is the only source for the powerful antitumor drugs of vinblastine and vincristine, it also contains some other pharmaceutical compounds, Althrough C. roseus has been studied extensively, many details of its alkaloid pathway are still unknown. In this paper, the research advances in C. roseus were reviewed, the indole alkaloid biosynthetic pathways of C. roseus, including shikimic acid pathway and lerpenoid pathway, were expounded in details, the enzymes and genes involved in the indole alkaloid biosynthesis were intro-duced. Finally, the recent research progress of periwinkle TIAs combined with metabolic engineering strategy was summarized. The study aims to offer reference for the follow-up studies on the terpenoids indoles alkaloid of C. roseus.

  12. Envisaging the Regulation of Alkaloid Biosynthesis and Associated Growth Kinetics in Hairy Roots of Vinca minor Through the Function of Artificial Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Priyanka; Anjum, Shahin; Khan, Shamshad Ahmad; Roy, Sudeep; Odstrcilik, Jan; Mathur, Ajay Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Artificial neural network based modeling is a generic approach to understand and correlate different complex parameters of biological systems for improving the desired output. In addition, some new inferences can also be predicted in a shorter time with less cost and labor. As terpenoid indole alkaloid pathway in Vinca minor is very less investigated or elucidated, a strategy of elicitation with hydroxylase and acetyltransferase along with incorporation of various precursors from primary shikimate and secoiridoid pools via simultaneous employment of cyclooxygenase inhibitor was performed in the hairy roots of V. minor. This led to the increment in biomass accumulation, total alkaloid concentration, and vincamine production in selected treatments. The resultant experimental values were correlated with algorithm approaches of artificial neural network that assisted in finding the yield of vincamine, alkaloids, and growth kinetics using number of elicits. The inputs were the hydroxylase/acetyltransferase elicitors and cyclooxygenase inhibitor along with various precursors from shikimate and secoiridoid pools and the outputs were growth index (GI), alkaloids, and vincamine. The approach incorporates two MATLAB codes; GRNN and FFBPNN. Growth kinetic studies revealed that shikimate and tryptophan supplementation triggers biomass accumulation (GI = 440.2 to 540.5); while maximum alkaloid (3.7 % dry wt.) and vincamine production (0.017 ± 0.001 % dry wt.) was obtained on supplementation of secologanin along with tryptophan, naproxen, hydrogen peroxide, and acetic anhydride. The study shows that experimental and predicted values strongly correlate each other. The correlation coefficient for growth index (GI), alkaloids, and vincamine was found to be 0.9997, 0.9980, 0.9511 in GRNN and 0.9725, 0.9444, 0.9422 in FFBPNN, respectively. GRNN provided greater similarity between the target and predicted dataset in comparison to FFBPNN. The findings can provide future

  13. Bromopyrrole Alkaloids from Okinawan Marine Sponges Agelas spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Naonobu; Kusama, Taishi; Kashiwada, Yoshiki; Kobayashi, Jun'ichi

    2016-01-01

    In our continuing study for structurally and biogenetically interesting natural products from marine organisms, Okinawan marine sponges Agelas spp. were investigated, resulting in the isolation of 18 unique alkaloids including five dimeric bromopyrrole alkaloids (1-5), ten monomeric bromopyrrole alkaloids (6-15), and three conjugates of monomeric bromopyrrole alkaloid and hydroxykynurenine (16-18). In this mini-review, the isolation, structure elucidation, and antimicrobial activities of these alkaloids are summarized.

  14. Preparation of Ecofriendly Formulations Containing Biologically Active Monoterpenes with Their Fumigant and Residual Toxicities against Adults of Culex pipiens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed E. I. Badawy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Different mixtures of monoterpenes (ketone, alcohol, and alkene were loaded on paper discs and wax and their knockdown activities were evaluated against Culex pipiens adults. Some individual monoterpenes were also evaluated by residual toxicity technique. Citronella oil as a reference was also loaded separately or in combination with monoterpenes on paper discs and wax. The ketone monoterpenes mixture (camphor, menthone, carvone, and fenchone on paper discs was the most active (KT50 = 17.20 min followed by ketone monoterpenes with citronella oil (KT50 = 20.79 min and citronella oil alone (KT50 = 28.72 min. Wax formulations proved that the ketone and alcohol (geraniol, thymol, and menthol monoterpenes gave the most activity as knockdown (KT50 = 31.79 and 43.39 min, resp.. Alcohol monoterpenes formulation recorded KT50 = 43.39 min. Residual activity of tested individual monoterpenes reported that the menthol was more toxic than camphor and camphene. Generally, this study suggests that the monoterpenes have the properties, which make them used as eco-friendly compounds in the control programs of Cx. pipiens adult. The use of paper discs is more applicable than wax in the adulticidal formulations.

  15. Enzymic synthesis of indol-3-ylacetyl-myo-inositol galactoside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcuera, L J; Michalczuk, L; Bandurski, R S

    1982-11-01

    Extracts of immature kernels of Zea mays catalysed the synthesis of indol-3-ylacetyl-myo-inositol galactoside from indol-3-ylacetyl-myo-inositol and UDP-galactose. Addition of 2-mercaptoethanol was required for stability of the catalytic activity during dialysis. The enzyme could be fractionated with (NH4)2SO4, and 55% of the activity was recovered in the 30-60%-saturation fraction. The product of the reaction contained radioactivity from UDP-[U-14C]galactose and was identified as indol-3-ylacetyl-myo-inositol galactoside by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Therefore a UDP-galactose:indol-3-ylacetyl-myo-inositol galactosyltransferase (indol-3-ylacetyl-myo-inositol galactoside synthase) is present in developing kernels of Zea mays. The description of this enzyme, together with the enzymes described in the accompanying paper [Michalczuk & Bandurski (1982) Biochem. J. 207, 273-281] for the synthesis of indol-3-ylacetylglucose and indol-3-ylacetyl-myo-inositol, now provides mechanisms for the biosynthesis of one-half of the low-molecular-weight esters of indol-3-ylacetic acid in Zea mays.

  16. Transformation of indole and quinoline by Desulfobacterium indolicum (DSM 3383)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, D.; Johansen, S.S.; Arvin, E.

    1996-01-01

    Degradation of indole and quinoline by Desulfobacterium indolicum was studied in batch cultures. The first step in the degradation pathway of indole and quinoline was a hydroxylation at the 2 position to oxindole and 2-hydroxyquinoline respectively. These hydroxylation reactions followed saturati...

  17. Transformation of indole and quinoline by Desulfobacterium indolicum (DSM 3383)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Licht, D.; Johansen, S.S.; Arvin, E.

    1996-01-01

    Degradation of indole and quinoline by Desulfobacterium indolicum was studied in batch cultures. The first step in the degradation pathway of indole and quinoline was a hydroxylation at the 2 position to oxindole and 2-hydroxyquinoline respectively. These hydroxylation reactions followed saturati...

  18. A Facile Synthesis of Indole-based Conjugated Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI, Qian-Qian; ZHU, Zhi-Chao; LI,Zhen; QIN, Jin-Gui

    2007-01-01

    A novel synthetic method was developed for the preparation of indole-based conjugated derivatives with satisfied yields. By applying this strategy, a series of new compounds were prepared conveniently. All the obtained new indole derivatives were characterized by spectroscopic analyse s, giving satisfactory data corresponding to their expected molecular structures.

  19. Isoquinoline and isoindole alkaloids from Menispermum dauricum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoqi; Ye, Wencai; Zhao, Shouxun; Che, Chun-Tao

    2004-04-01

    Three isoquinoline alkaloids and an isoindole alkaloid, along with eight known compounds, were isolated from the roots of Menispermum dauricum (Menispermacese). The alkaloids were characterized as 7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-1(2H)-isoquinolinone, 6,7-dimethoxy-N-methyl-3,4-dioxo-1(2H)-isoquinolinone, 1-(4-hydroxybenzoyl)-7-hydroxy-6-methoxy-isoquinoline and 6-hydroxy-5-methoxy-N-methylphthalimide, on the basis of spectral evidence including 1D- and 2D-NMR and MS analyses.

  20. Polycyclic Guanidine Alkaloids from Poecilosclerida Marine Sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sfecci, Estelle; Lacour, Thierry; Amade, Philippe; Mehiri, Mohamed

    2016-04-09

    Sessile marine sponges provide an abundance of unique and diversified scaffolds. In particular, marine guanidine alkaloids display a very wide range of biological applications. A large number of cyclic guanidine alkaloids, including crambines, crambescins, crambescidins, batzelladines or netamins have been isolated from Poecilosclerida marine sponges. In this review, we will explore the chemodiversity of tri- and pentacyclic guanidine alkaloids. NMR and MS data tools will also be provided, and an overview of the wide range of bioactivities of crambescidins and batzelladines derivatives will be given.

  1. Marine Pyridoacridine Alkaloids: Biosynthesis and Biological Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Sabrin R M; Mohamed, Gamal A

    2016-01-01

    Pyridoacridines are a class of strictly marine-derived alkaloids that constitute one of the largest chemical families of marine alkaloids. During the last few years, both natural pyridoacridines and their analogues have constituted excellent targets for synthetic works. They have been the subject of intense study due to their significant biological activities; cytotoxic, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, insecticidal, anti-HIV, and anti-parasitic activities. In the present review, 95 pyridoacridine alkaloids isolated from marine organisms are discussed in term of their occurrence, biosynthesis, biological activities, and structural assignment.

  2. Norditerpenoid Alkaloids from Aconitum spicatum Stapf

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    To search for pharmacologically and structurally interesting substances from traditional Chinese medicines,we investigated the chemical compounds of Aconitum spicatum Stapf. Two new norditerpenoid alkaloids,namely spicatine A (compound 1) and spicatine B (compound 2), as well as 11 known norditerpenoid alkaloids were isolated from the CHCl3 portion of the 90% ethanol extract of the roots of A. spicatum. The structures of the alkaloids were characterized on the basis of their spectral data, One of the isolated compounds showed significant cytotoxic activities (IC50 values < 200 μmol/L) against the HL-60 cell line.

  3. Racemic alkaloids from the fungus Ganoderma cochlear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin-Long; Dou, Man; Luo, Qi; Cheng, Li-Zhi; Yan, Yong-Ming; Li, Rong-Tao; Cheng, Yong-Xian

    2017-01-01

    Seven pairs of new alkaloid enantiomers, ganocochlearines C-I (1, 3-8), and three pairs of known alkaloids were isolated from the fruiting bodies of Ganoderma cochlear. The chemical structures of new compounds were elucidated on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR data. The absolute configurations of compounds 1, 3-10 were assigned by ECD calculations. Biological activities of these isolates against renal fibrosis were accessed in rat normal or diseased renal interstitial fibroblast cells. Importantly, the plausible biosynthetic pathway for this class of alkaloids was originally proposed.

  4. RECENT REVIEW ON INDOLE: A PRIVILEGED STRUCTURE SCAFFOLD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Javed Naim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Indole is abicyclic aromatic heterocyclic organic compound comprising of a six membered benzene ring fused to a five-membered nitrogen-containing pyrrole ring. It is an excellent scaffold in drug discovery which provides numerous opportunities in the discovery of novel drugs with different mechanism of action. It has a very unique property of mimicking different structures of proteins and binding to enzymes in a reversible manner. A vast research has occurred on indole and its derivatives which resulted in many approved indole containing drugs in the world market as well as many are in the pipeline stages. This reviewfocussed on recent developments of indole derivatives having different pharmacological profiles as well as different perspectives on how this indole moiety as a privilege structure may be exploited in the near future.

  5. Desmodeleganine, a new alkaloid from the leaves of Desmodium elegans as a potential monoamine oxidase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Kang-Kang; Yang, Zhong-Duo; Shi, Dan-Feng; Yao, Xiao-Jun; Wang, Ming-Gang

    2014-10-01

    Desmodeleganine (1), a new potential monoamine oxidase inhibitor, along with three known alkaloids, bufotenin (2), hydroxy-N, N-dimethyltryptamine N(12)-oxide (3), 2-(5-methoxy-1H-indol-3-yl)-N, and N-dimethylethylamine (4) were isolated from the leaves of Desmodium elegans. Their structures were elucidated by IR, MS, 1D and 2D NMR spectra. 1 showed strong monoamine oxidase inhibitory activity with IC50 value of 13.92 ± 1.5 μM, when the IC50 value of iproniazid as a standard was 6.5 ± 0.5 μM. The molecular modeling was also performed to explore the binding mode of compounds 1, 2 at the active site of MAO-A and MAO-B.

  6. Indole and 3-indolylacetonitrile inhibit spore maturation in Paenibacillus alvei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cho Moo

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteria use diverse signaling molecules to ensure the survival of the species in environmental niches. A variety of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria produce large quantities of indole that functions as an intercellular signal controlling diverse aspects of bacterial physiology. Results In this study, we sought a novel role of indole in a Gram-positive bacteria Paenibacillus alvei that can produce extracellular indole at a concentration of up to 300 μM in the stationary phase in Luria-Bertani medium. Unlike previous studies, our data show that the production of indole in P. alvei is strictly controlled by catabolite repression since the addition of glucose and glycerol completely turns off the indole production. The addition of exogenous indole markedly inhibits the heat resistance of P. alvei without affecting cell growth. Observation of cell morphology with electron microscopy shows that indole inhibits the development of spore coats and cortex in P. alvei. As a result of the immature spore formation of P. alvei, indole also decreases P. alvei survival when exposed to antibiotics, low pH, and ethanol. Additionally, indole derivatives also influence the heat resistance; for example, a plant auxin, 3-indolylacetonitrile dramatically (2900-fold decreased the heat resistance of P. alvei, while another auxin 3-indoleacetic acid had a less significant influence on the heat resistance of P. alvei. Conclusions Together, our results demonstrate that indole and plant auxin 3-indolylacetonitrile inhibit spore maturation of P. alvei and that 3-indolylacetonitrile presents an opportunity for the control of heat and antimicrobial resistant spores of Gram-positive bacteria.

  7. Menthol: a simple monoterpene with remarkable biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamatou, Guy P P; Vermaak, Ilze; Viljoen, Alvaro M; Lawrence, Brian M

    2013-12-01

    Menthol is a cyclic monoterpene alcohol which possesses well-known cooling characteristics and a residual minty smell of the oil remnants from which it was obtained. Because of these attributes it is one of the most important flavouring additives besides vanilla and citrus. Due to this reason it is used in a variety of consumer products ranging from confections such as chocolate and chewing gum to oral-care products such as toothpaste as well as in over-the-counter medicinal products for its cooling and biological effects. Its cooling effects are not exclusive to medicinal use. Approximately one quarter of the cigarettes on the market contain menthol and small amounts of menthol are even included in non-mentholated cigarettes. Natural menthol is isolated exclusively from Mentha canadensis, but can also be synthesised on industrial scale through various processes. Although menthol exists in eight stereoisomeric forms, (-)-menthol from the natural source and synthesised menthol with the same structure is the most preferred isomer. The demand for menthol is high and it was previously estimated that the worldwide use of menthol was 30-32,000 metric tonnes per annum. Menthol is not a predominant compound of the essential oils as it can only be found as a constituent of a limited number of aromatic plants. These plants are known to exhibit biological activity in vitro and in vivo such as antibacterial, antifungal, antipruritic, anticancer and analgesic effects, and are also an effective fumigant. In addition, menthol is one of the most effective terpenes used to enhance the dermal penetration of pharmaceuticals. This review summarises the chemical and biological properties of menthol and highlights its cooling effects and toxicity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Larvicidal efficacy of monoterpenes against the larvae of Anopheles gambiae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eliningaya J.Kweka; Tamires Cardoso Lima; Chrian M.Marciale; Dami?o Pergentino de Sousa

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the larvicidal efficacy of eight volatile components of essential oils against 3rd instar larvae of Anopheles gambiae s.s.Methods:Larvicidal effects of each compound were evaluated in both laboratory and semi-field trials.Stock solution was prepared and serial dilutions were made in six concentrations for each compound.A total of 20 larvae were exposed to larvicides for each replicate and monitored at intervals of 12,24,48 and 72 h.Larvae monitoring was done on basis of dead and live larvae in all intervals.Results:All assayed compounds were larvicides and presented varying degrees of larval toxicity,with LC50 values ranging from 1.28 to 1 938.92 mg/L depending on the treatment time(12,24,48 or 72 h).(-)-Perillyl alcohol presented the strongest larvicidal activity towards Anopheles gambiae larvae,with LC50 values of 73.60,18.36,1.72 and1.28 mg/L after 12,24,48 and 72 h of exposure,respectively.The next strongest were(-)-isopulegol(LC50= 135.10,49.39,34.39 and 20.22 mg/L) and(-)-carvone epoxide(LC50= 168.86,124.74,80.84 and 23.46 mg/L).After 12,24 and 48 h of treatment,hydroxydihydrocarvone was the least toxic compound,with LC50 values of 1 938.92,1 172.18 and 401.03 mg/L,respectively.Conclusions:The data obtained in this study suggest that all evaluated monoterpenes,especially(-)-perillyl alcohol,have remarkable larvicidal effects and may be considered as potential sources for the development of suitable natural larvicides for mosquito management programs.Further small-scale field trials should be conducted.

  9. Gastroprotective Mechanisms of the Monoterpene 1,8-Cineole (Eucalyptol.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germana Freire Rocha Caldas

    Full Text Available Recently, our research group identified and reported 1,8-cineole (CIN, a monoterpene that naturally occur in many aromatic plants, as one of the major constituent of the essential oil from leaves of Hyptis martiusii (EOHM, as well as characterized the gastroprotective action of this oil. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanisms of action involved in the antiulcer and healing activity of CIN, in order to confirm its correlation with the gastroprotective effect of EOHM. Wistar rats were exposed to different protocols (acute ulceration, gastrointestinal motility and antisecretory activity. In addition, were determinated the involvement of nitric oxide and sulphydryl groups; the levels of gastric mucus, lipid peroxidation, sulphydryl groups and myeloperoxidase activity. The healing ability was evaluated by acetic acid-induced chronic ulcer and histological and immunohistochemical analysis (PCNA, Ki-67 and BrdU. The treatment with CIN inhibited ethanol-, ethanol/HCl- and indomethacin-induced gastric lesions. The highest doses of CIN inhibited gastric emptying, but did not affect intestinal transit. CIN (100 mg/kg reduced the volume of basal but not stimulated acid secretion. CIN increased levels of mucus (89.3%, prevented depletion of -SH groups (62.6% and reduced the level of lipid peroxidation (55.3% and myeloperoxidase activity (59.4% in the gastric mucosa. In chronic ulcer model, CIN reduced in 43.1% the gastric area lesion, promoted significant regeneration and restoration of the levels of mucus in glandular cells as confirmed by histological analysis; and promoted increase in cell proliferation as evidenced by reactivity for PCNA, Ki-67 and BrdU. This findings demonstrate the role of 1,8-cineole as an important ulcer healing agent and indicate the involvement of antioxidant and cytoprotective mechanisms in the gastroprotective effect of compound. This study also provides evidence that 1,8-cineole is related to the

  10. Antiviral activity of monoterpenes beta-pinene and limonene against herpes simplex virus in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Astani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils are complex mixtures containing compounds of several different functional- group classes. Depending on the structure, we can distinguish monoterpenes, phenylpropanes, and other components. Here in this study two monoterpene compounds of essential oils, i.e. β-pinene and limonene were examined for their antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 in vitro.All antiviral assays were performed using RC-37 cells. Cytotoxicity was determined in a neutral red assay, antiviral assays were performed with HSV-1 strain KOS. The mode of antiviral action was evaluated at different periods during the viral replication cycle. Acyclovir was used as positive antiviral control.Beta-pinenene and limonenen reduced viral infectivity by 100 %. The mode of antiviral action has been determined, only moderate antiviral effects were revealed by monoterpenes when these drugs were added to host cells prior infection or after entry of HSV into cells. However, both monoterpenes exhibited high anti-HSV-1 activity by direct interaction with free virus particles. Both tested drugs interacted with HSV-1 in a dose-dependent manner thereby inactivating viral infection.These results suggest that monoterpenes in essential oils exhibit antiherpetic activity in the early phase of viral multiplication and might be used as potential antiviral agents.

  11. Seasonal variability of monoterpene emission factors for a ponderosa pine plantation in California

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Holzinger

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoterpene fluxes have been measured over an 11 month period from June 2003 to April 2004. During all seasons ambient air temperature was the environmental factor most closely related to the measured emission rates. The monoterpene flux was modeled using a basal emission rate multiplied by an exponential function of a temperature, following the typical practice for modelling temperature dependent biogenic emissions. A basal emission of 1.0 μmol h−1 m−2 (at 30°C, based on leaf area and a temperature dependence (β of 0.12°C−1 reproduced measured summer emissions well but underestimated spring and winter measured emissions by 60–130%. The total annual monoterpene emission may be underestimated by ~50% when using a model optimized to reproduce monoterpene emissions in summer. The long term dataset also reveals an indirect connection between non-stomatal ozone and monoterpene flux beyond the dependence on temperature that has been shown for both fluxes.

  12. A Systematic Review of the Wound-Healing Effects of Monoterpenes and Iridoid Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana S.S. Barreto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The search for more effective and lower cost therapeutic approaches for wound healing remains a challenge for modern medicine. In the search for new therapeutic options, plants and their metabolites are a great source of novel biomolecules. Among their constituents, the monoterpenes represent 90% of essential oils, and have a variety of structures with several activities such as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and wound healing. Based on that, and also due to the lack of reviews concerning the wound-healing activity of monoterpenes, we performed this systematic review—which provides an overview of their characteristics and mechanisms of action. In this search, the terms “terpenes”, “monoterpenes”, “wound healing” and “wound closure techniques” were used to retrieve articles published in LILACS, PUBMED and EMBASE until May 2013. Seven papers were found concerning the potential wound healing effect of five compouds (three monoterpenes and two iridoid derivatives in preclinical studies. Among the products used for wound care, the films were the most studied pharmaceutical form. Monoterpenes are a class of compounds of great diversity of biological activities and therapeutic potential. The data reviewed here suggest that monoterpenes, although poorly studied in this context, are promising compounds for the treatment of chronic wound conditions.

  13. Tree water relations trigger monoterpene emissions from Scots pine stem during spring recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vanhatalo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Tree canopies are known to emit large amounts of VOCs (volatile organic compounds such as monoterpenes to the surrounding air. The main source for these is considered to be the green biomass, i.e. foliage, but emissions from the woody compartments have not been quantified. A VOC emission anomaly has been observed during transition from winter to summer activity. We analyzed if non-foliar components could partially explain the anomaly. We measured the VOC emissions from Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. stems and shoots during the dehardening phase of trees in field conditions in two consecutive springs. We observed a large, transient monoterpene burst from stems, while the shoot monoterpene emissions and transpiration remained low. The burst lasted about 12 h. Simultaneously, an unusual night-time sap flow and an anomalous diurnal pattern of tree diameter were detected. Hence, we suggest that the monoterpene burst was a consequence of the recovery of the stem from winter-time. This indicates that the dominant processes and environmental drivers triggering the monoterpene emissions are different between stems and foliage.

  14. OVIPOSITION AND OVICIDAL ACTIVITIES OF ALKALOIDAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... moderate ovicidal activity but inflict delayed effects such as high larval and low pupal and adult mortality. ... Key Words: Murraya koenigii; Rutaceae; alkaloidal extract; oviposition; ovicidal; Culex quinquefasciatus; Culex tritaeniorhynchus.

  15. Antiprotozoal and antioxidant alkaloids from Alternanthera littoralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolen, Hector H F; Pral, Elizabeth M F; Alfieri, Silvia C; Marinho, Jane V N; Serain, Alessandra F; Hernández-Tasco, Alvaro J; Andreazza, Nathalia L; Salvador, Marcos J

    2017-02-01

    Five alkaloids, in addition to hydroxytyrosol and uridine, were isolated from aerial parts of Alternanthera littoralis P. Beauv. Among the isolated compounds, alternamide A was an unusual tricyclic alkaloid with a bridged benzoazepine core. All isolated alkaloids have a catechol moiety, indicating a possible common biosynthetic route. Their structures were established by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy in combination with extensive tandem MS experiments by collisional induced dissociation (CID). The antiprotozoal activity of the isolated compounds was assayed against trypomastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi and amastigotes of Leishmania amazonensis. Alternamine A was the most active compound, reducing markedly the viability of both parasites. Antioxidant capacities evaluated by ORACFL assay showed that the isolated alkaloids (mainly alternamide B) contributed to the high activity recorded for the ethanolic crude extract; possibly, the catechol moiety present in all structures plays a central role in this result.

  16. Anxiolytic Activity of Diterpene Alkaloid Songorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterova, Yu V; Povet'eva, T N; Suslov, N I; Shults, E E; Ziuz'kov, G N; Aksinenko, S G; Afanas'eva, O G; Krapivin, A V; Kharina, T G

    2015-09-01

    Antianxiety action of diterpene alkaloid songorine was studied using Vogel conflict test. Songorine in a dose of 0.25 mg/kg demonstrated high anxiolytic activity comparable to that of phenazepam and produced no sedative effect.

  17. Steroidal alkaloid toxicity to fish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, L; Kocan, R M

    1993-02-01

    Embryos of two species of fish were evaluated for their suitability as model systems for steroidal alkaloid toxicity, the Japanese rice fish, medaka (Oryzius latipes) and the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Additionally, the equine neurotoxic sesquiterpene lactone repin, was also tested. A PROBIT program was used to evaluate the EC1, EC50 and EC99 as well as the associated confidence limits. The steroidal alkaloids tested were the Solanum potato glycoalkaloids alpha-chaconine, alpha-solanine, the aglyclones solanidine and solasodine and the Veratrum alkaloid, jervine. Embryo mortality, likely due to structural or functional abnormalities in the early development stages of the embryo, were the only response observed in both species. The rainbow trout exhibited a toxic response to chaconine, solasidine, repin and solanine but the medaka embryos were only affected by the compounds, chaconine and solanine. Rainbow trout may indeed serve as a good lower vertebrate model for studying the toxicity of steroidal alkaloids.

  18. Alkaloids from Fissistigma latifolium (Dunal Merr.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asmah Alias

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A phytochemical study of the bark of Fissistigma latifolium (Annonaceae yielded a new aporphine alkaloid, (--N-methylguattescidine (1, and eight known alkaloids: liriodenine (2, oxoxylopine (3, (--asimilobine (4, dimethyltryptamine (5, (--remerine (6, (--anonaine (7, columbamine (8 and lysicamine (9. The compounds were isolated using various chromatographic methods and structural elucidation was accomplished by means of spectroscopic methods, notably 1D-NMR (1H, 13C, DEPT, 2D-NMR (COSY, HMQC, HMBC, UV, IR and MS.

  19. Polycyclic alkaloids via transannular Mannich reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vital, Paulo; Hosseini, Masood; Shanmugham, M. S.

    2009-01-01

    The tricyclic compound 13, representing the framework of the cylindricine 4 and lepadiformine 5 alkaloids, was prepared in a single operation via the first example of a transannular Mannich reaction involving a macrocyclic diketoamine 12.......The tricyclic compound 13, representing the framework of the cylindricine 4 and lepadiformine 5 alkaloids, was prepared in a single operation via the first example of a transannular Mannich reaction involving a macrocyclic diketoamine 12....

  20. Two new diterpene alkaloids from Delphinium chrysotrichum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Qing He; Xiao Mei Wei; Yi Li Han; Li Ming Gao

    2007-01-01

    Chemical investigation on the ethanol extract from the whole plants of Delphinium chrysotrichum resulted in the isolation of two new diterpene alkaloids named delphatisine A (1) and delphatisine B (2), respectively. The structures of the new compounds were deduced on the basis of their spectral data (IR, HREIMS, EIMS, 1D, 2D-NMR). This is the first report on the isolation of diterpenoid alkaloids from the D. Chrysotrichum.

  1. Alkaloids from the Mangrove-Derived Actinomycete Jishengella endophytica 161111

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new alkaloid, 2-(furan-2-yl-6-(2S,3S,4-trihydroxybutylpyrazine (1, along with 12 known compounds, 2-(furan-2-yl-5-(2S,3S,4-trihydroxybutylpyrazine (2, (S-4-isobutyl-3-oxo-3,4-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]oxazine-6-carbaldehyde (3, (S-4-isopropyl-3-oxo-3,4-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]oxazine-6-carbaldehyde (4, (4S-4-(2-methylbutyl-3-oxo-3,4-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]oxazine-6-carbaldehyde (5, (S-4-benzyl-3-oxo-3,4-dihydro-1H-pyrrolo[2,1-c][1,4]oxazine-6-carbaldehyde (6, flazin (7, perlolyrine (8, 1-hydroxy-β-carboline (9, lumichrome (10, 1H-indole-3-carboxaldehyde (11, 2-hydroxy-1-(1H-indol-3-ylethanone (12, and 5-(methoxymethyl-1H-pyrrole-2-carbaldehyde (13, were isolated and identified from the fermentation broth of an endophytic actinomycetes, Jishengella endophytica 161111. The new structure 1 and the absolute configurations of 2–6 were determined by spectroscopic methods, J-based configuration analysis (JBCA method, lactone sector rule, and electronic circular dichroism (ECD calculations. Compounds 8–11 were active against the influenza A virus subtype H1N1 with IC50 and selectivity index (SI values of 38.3(±1.2/25.0(±3.6/ 39.7(±5.6/45.9(±2.1 μg/mL and 3.0/16.1/3.1/11.4, respectively. The IC50 and SI values of positive control, ribavirin, were 23.1(±1.7 μg/mL and 32.2, respectively. The results showed that compound 9 could be a promising new hit for anti-H1N1 drugs. The absolute configurations of 2–5, 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR data and the specific rotations of 3–6 were also reported here for the first time.

  2. Visual identification of alkaloids in some medicinal plants: common alkaloid reagents versus bromocresol green

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamsa F, Esfahani HR, Gamooshi RA

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} Background: Alkaloids are a group of nitrogenous compounds with potential effects on the physiological behavior of human and animals. Some of these compounds are considered important drugs in modern medicine, such as atropine and morphine. Plants are considered the most important source of alkaloids. Therefore, investigating the presence of alkaloids in different plants is very important. Usually, alkaloids in plants are identified by methods such as those of Dragendorf, Wagner and Meyer, among others, which require milligrams of alkaloids for identification. In the present study, a fast and sensitive procedure for detecting of alkaloids in plants is presented.   "n"nMethods: Twelve dried plants samples were investigated for the presence alkaloids. After extracting the total alkaloid into methanol using a Soxhlet extractor, a few milligrams of the extract was transferred to a separatory funnel, buffered to pH 4.7, the bromocresol green (BCG solution (10-4 M was added, mixed and extracted with CHCl3 until a yellow color was observed in the CHCl3 layer, indicating the presence of the alkaloid. The crude extracts were also investigated by the standard methods of Dragendorf, Wagner and Meyer for the presence of alkaloids.   "n"nResults: Investigation of the 12 plant samples for the presence of alkaloids by the standard reagents of Dragendorf, Wagner, and Meyer showed that only Camelia sinensis (flowers, Echium amoenum Fisch & Mey (flowers, and Stachys (aerial parts are devoid

  3. Production of beta-thujaplicin in Cupressus lusitanica suspension cultures fed with organic acids and monoterpenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J; Fujita, K; Sakai, K

    2001-05-01

    Effects of some organic acids and monoterpenes on production of beta-thujaplicin were studied in Cupressus lusitanica suspension cultures. The fungal elicitor-induced biosynthesis of beta-thujaplicin was promoted by the feedings of malate, pyruvate, fumarate, succinate, and acetate. These results suggest some relationships between acetate/pyruvate metabolism and beta-thujaplicin biosynthesis, or between tricarboxylic acid cycle and beta-thujaplicin biosynthesis. Feedings of C. lusitanica suspension cultures with some monoterpenes inhibited elicitor-triggered beta-thujaplicin biosynthesis, but 2-carene and terpinyl acetate feedings significantly improved the beta-thujaplicin production of C. lusitanica suspension cultures. These results indicate a possible involvement of terpinyl acetate and 2-carene in beta-thujaplicin biosynthesis, as well as potential uses of these monoterpenes in large-scale beta-thujaplicin production.

  4. Monoterpene derivatives with anti-allergic activity from red peony root, the root of Paeonia lactiflora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yan-Hong; Zhu, Shu; Ge, Yue-Wei; He, Yu-Min; Kazuma, Kohei; Wang, Zhengtao; Yoshimatsu, Kayo; Komatsu, Katsuko

    2016-01-01

    The methanolic extract and its subfractions from red peony root, the dried roots of Paeonia lactiflora Pallas showed potent antiallergic effects, as inhibition of immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated degranulation in rat basophil leukemia (RBL)-2H3 cells. Bioassay-guided fractionation led to the isolation of 16 monoterpene derivatives, including 3 new compounds, paeoniflorol (1), 4'-hydroxypaeoniflorigenone (2) and 4-epi-albiflorin (3), together with 13 known ones (4-16). The chemical structures of the new compounds were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic and chemical evidences. Among the isolated monoterpene derivatives, nine compounds showed potent anti-allergic effects and compound 1 was the most effective. A primary structure-activity relationship of monoterpene derivatives was discussed.

  5. Oligomerization of Indole Derivatives with Incorporation of Thiols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarl E.S. Wikberg

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Two molecules of indole derivative, e.g. indole-5-carboxylic acid, reacted with one molecule of thiol, e.g. 1,2-ethanedithiol, in the presence of trifluoroacetic acid to yield adducts such as 3-[2-(2-amino-5-carboxyphenyl-1-(2-mercaptoethylthioethyl]-1Hindole-5-carboxylic acid. Parallel formation of dimers, such as 2,3-dihydro-1H,1'H-2,3'-biindole-5,5'-dicarboxylic acid and trimers, such as 3,3'-[2-(2-amino-5-carboxyphenyl ethane-1,1-diyl]bis(1H-indole-5-carboxylic acid of the indole derivatives was also observed. Reaction of a mixture of indole and indole-5-carboxylic acid with 2-phenylethanethiol proceeded in a regioselective way, affording 3-[2-(2-aminophenyl-1-(phenethylthioethyl]-1H-indole-5-carboxylic acid. An additional product of this reaction was 3-[2-(2-aminophenyl-1-(phenethylthioethyl]-2,3-dihydro-1H,1'H-2,3'-biindole-5'-carboxylic acid, which upon standing in DMSO-d6 solution gave 3-[2-(2-aminophenyl-1-(phenethylthioethyl]-1H,1'H-2,3'-biindole-5'-carboxylic acid. Structures of all compounds were elucidated by NMR, and a mechanism for their formation was suggested.

  6. Electron attachment to indole and related molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modelli, Alberto, E-mail: alberto.modelli@unibo.it [Dipartimento di Chimica “G. Ciamician”, Universitá di Bologna, via Selmi 2, 40126 Bologna (Italy); Centro Interdipartimentale di Ricerca in Scienze Ambientali (CIRSA), Universitá di Bologna, via S. Alberto 163, 48123 Ravenna (Italy); Jones, Derek, E-mail: d.jones@isof.cnr.it [ISOF, Istituto per la Sintesi Organica e la Fotoreattività, C.N.R., via Gobetti 101, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Pshenichnyuk, Stanislav A., E-mail: sapsh@anrb.ru [Institute of Molecule and Crystal Physics, Ufa Research Centre, Russian Academy of Sciences, Prospekt Oktyabrya 151, 450075 Ufa (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-14

    Gas-phase formation of temporary negative ion states via resonance attachment of low-energy (0–6 eV) electrons into vacant molecular orbitals of indoline (I), indene (II), indole (III), 2-methylen-1,3,3-trimethylindoline (IV), and 2,3,3-trimethyl-indolenine (V) was investigated for the first time by electron transmission spectroscopy (ETS). The description of their empty-level structures was supported by density functional theory and Hartree-Fock calculations, using empirically calibrated linear equations to scale the calculated virtual orbital energies. Dissociative electron attachment spectroscopy (DEAS) was used to measure the fragment anion yields generated through dissociative decay channels of the parent molecular anions of compounds I-V, detected with a mass filter as a function of the incident electron energy in the 0–14 eV energy range. The vertical and adiabatic electron affinities were evaluated at the B3LYP/6-31+G(d) level as the anion/neutral total energy difference. The same theoretical method is also used for evaluation of the thermodynamic energy thresholds for production of the negative fragments observed in the DEA spectra. The loss of a hydrogen atom from the parent molecular anion ([M-H]{sup −}) provides the most intense signal in compounds I-IV. The gas-phase DEAS data can provide support for biochemical reaction mechanisms in vivo involving initial hydrogen abstraction from the nitrogen atom of the indole moiety, present in a variety of biologically important molecules.

  7. Monoterpene Compositions of Three Forested Ecosystems in the Central Amazon Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, A.; Fuentes, J. D.; Manzi, A. O.; Higuchi, N.; Chambers, J. Q.; Jardine, K.

    2014-12-01

    Monoterpenes play fundamental roles as secondary metabolites in forested ecosystems and as gas and liquid phase secondary organic aerosol (SOA) precursors in their surrounding atmospheres. While the chemical pathways involved in ozonolysis driven SOA formation from individual monoterpene precursors is known, local and regional chemical transport models are still lacking observations of speciated monoterpenes from forested atmospheres. Here, we present high vertically resolved mixing ratio profiles of speciated monoterpenes from the ambient air of three neighboring forested ecosystems in the central Amazon Basin. Two well-drained plateau primary forests and one seasonally flooded valley forest were sampled during the afternoon hours (13:00 - 16:30) on walkup towers from the initiation of the 2013-14 wet season through the onset of the 2014 dry season (Nov 2013 - Jul 2014). Ambient mixing ratios in all three ecosystems were greatest in the upper canopy with secondary sources of some monoterpenes within the sub-canopies. Relative vertical compositions of monoterpenes did not change significantly throughout the seasons for either ecosystem type. Both ecosystem types were dominated by d-limonene (up to 1.6 ppb) with equally strong mixing ratios of alpha-pinene in the valley compared to the much weaker a-pinene mixing ratios on the plateaus (up to 200 ppt). The highly reactive cis- and trans-beta-ocimene were consistently present in both ecosystems (up to 250 ppt) with the addition of equally high camphene mixing ratios in the valley forest (up to 200 ppt) which is present in the plateau ecosystems in low quantities (50 ppt). With respect to clean atmosphere mixing ratios of 10 ppb ozone, lifetimes are below 2 hours for camphene and below 30 minutes for ocimene, suggesting a potentially large impact on local and possibly regional ozonolysis and subsequent SOA composition.

  8. Process-based modelling of biogenic monoterpene emissions combining production and release from storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Schurgers

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Monoterpenes, primarily emitted by terrestrial vegetation, can influence atmospheric ozone chemistry, and can form precursors for secondary organic aerosol. The short-term emissions of monoterpenes have been well studied and understood, but their long-term variability, which is particularly important for atmospheric chemistry, has not. This understanding is crucial for the understanding of future changes.

    In this study, two algorithms of terrestrial biogenic monoterpene emissions, the first one based on the short-term volatilization of monoterpenes, as commonly used for temperature-dependent emissions, and the second one based on long-term production of monoterpenes (linked to photosynthesis combined with emissions from storage, were compared and evaluated with measurements from a Ponderosa pine plantation (Blodgett Forest, California. The measurements were used to parameterize the long-term storage of monoterpenes, which takes place in specific storage organs and which determines the temporal distribution of the emissions over the year. The difference in assumptions between the first (emission-based method and the second (production-based method, which causes a difference in upscaling from instantaneous to daily emissions, requires roughly a doubling of emission capacities to bridge the gap to production capacities. The sensitivities to changes in temperature and light were tested for the new methods, the temperature sensitivity was slightly higher than that of the short-term temperature dependent algorithm.

    Applied on a global scale, the first algorithm resulted in annual total emissions of 29.6 Tg C a−1, the second algorithm resulted in 31.8 Tg C a−1 when applying the correction factor 2 between emission capacities and production capacities. However, the exact magnitude of such a correction is spatially varying and hard to determine as a global average.

  9. Process-based modelling of biogenic monoterpene emissions: sensitivity to temperature and light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Schurgers

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoterpenes, primarily emitted by terrestrial vegetation, can influence atmospheric ozone chemistry, and can form precursors for secondary organic aerosol. The short-term emissions of monoterpenes have been well studied and understood, but their long-term variability, which is particularly important for atmospheric chemistry, has not. This understanding is crucial for the understanding of future changes.

    In this study, two algorithms of terrestrial biogenic monoterpene emissions, the first one based on the short-term volatilization of monoterpenes, as commonly used for temperature-dependent emissions, and the second one based on long-term production of monoterpenes (linked to photosynthesis combined with emissions from storage, were compared and evaluated with measurements from a Ponderosa pine plantation (Blodgett Forest, California. The measurements were used to parameterize the long-term storage of monoterpenes, which takes place in specific storage organs and which determines the temporal distribution of the emissions over the year. The difference in assumptions between the first (emission-based method and the second (production-based method, which causes a difference in upscaling from instantaneous to daily emissions, requires roughly a doubling of emission capacities to bridge the gap to production capacities. The sensitivities to changes in temperature and light were tested for the new methods, the temperature sensitivity was slightly higher than that of the short-term temperature dependent algorithm.

    Applied on a global scale, the first algorithm resulted in annual total emissions of 29.6 Tg C a−1, the second algorithm resulted in 31.8 Tg C a−1 when applying the correction factor 2 between emission capacities and production capacities. However, the exact magnitude of such a correction is spatially varying and hard to determine as a global average.

  10. Genetic and biochemical characterization of a novel monoterpene epsilon-lactone hydrolase from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlugt-Bergmans, van der C.J.B.; Werf, van der M.J.

    2001-01-01

    A monoterpene ε-lactone hydrolase (MLH) from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14, catalyzing the ring opening of lactones which are formed during degradation of several monocyclic monoterpenes, including carvone and menthol, was purified to apparent homogeneity. It is a monomeric enzyme of 31 kDa that is

  11. Qualitative and quantitative variation in monoterpene co-occurrence and composition in the essential oil of Thymus vulgaris chemotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, John D; Chalchat, Jean-Claude; Michet, André; Linhart, Yan B; Ehlers, Bodil

    2003-04-01

    Thymus vulgaris has a chemical polymorphism with six different chemotypes that show marked spatial segregation in nature. Although some populations have a single chemotype in majority, many have two or three chemotypes. In this study we analyze the quantitative variation among T. vulgaris populations in the percentage of oil composed of the dominant monoterpene(s) for each chemotype. In general, phenolic chemotypes (thymol and carvacrol), which occur at the end of the biosynthetic chain, have a significantly lower proportion of their oil composed of their dominant monoterpene than nonphenolic chemotypes (geraniol, alpha-terpineol, and linalool). This is due to the presence of high amounts of precursors (gamma-terpinene and paracymene) in the oil of phenolic chemotypes. The essential oil of the nonphenolic thuyanol chemotype has four characteristic monoterpenes that together make up a lower proportion of the oil than the single dominant monoterpene of the other nonphenolic chemotypes. For all chemotypes, the percentage composition of the dominant monoterpene decreased significantly at sites where the chemotype is not the majority type. This decrease is correlated with a significant increase in either the proportion of the two precursors for the thymol chemotype or the monoterpenes characteristic of the other chemotypes at the site. The latter result suggests that a plant with dominant genes is responsible for the production of different monoterpenes can produce several molecules.

  12. Toxicity of Monoterpene Structure, Diversity and Concentration to Mountain Pine Beetles, Dendroctonus ponderosae: Beetle Traits Matter More.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Mary L; Sekhon, Jagdeep K; LaFramboise, Lanielle M

    2017-03-03

    A high diversity of plant defenses may be a response to herbivore diversity or may be collectively more toxic than single compounds, either of which may be important for understanding insect-plant associations. Monoterpenes in conifers are particularly diverse. We tested the fumigant toxicity of four monoterpenes, alone and in combination, to mountain pine beetles, Dendroctonus ponderosae, in the context of the beetles' individual body traits. Chemical structures of tested monoterpene hydrocarbons had modest effects on beetle survival, mass loss, water content and fat content, with (R)-(+)-limonene tending to be more toxic than (-)-α-pinene, (-)-β-pinene, and (+)-3-carene. Monoterpene diversity (all qualitative combinations of one to four monoterpenes) did not affect toxicity. Concentration (0 to 1200 ppm) of individual monoterpenes was a strong determinant of toxicity. Beetle body size and body condition index strongly and positively affected survival during monoterpene treatments. Larger beetles in better condition lost proportionally less mass during exposure, where proportion mass loss negatively affected survivorship. Toxicity was much more associated with water loss than with fat loss, suggesting that a main cost of detoxification is excretion, a process that has received little attention. These results provide insight into the determinants of beetle success in historic and novel hosts that differ in monoterpene composition and concentration. We also suggest that water availability will affect beetle success directly through their ability to tolerate detoxification as well as indirectly through host responses to drought.

  13. Genetic and biochemical characterization of a novel monoterpene e-lactone hydrolase from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlugt-Bergmans, C.J.B. van der; Werf, M.J. van der

    2001-01-01

    A monoterpene ε-lactone hydrolase (MLH) from Rhodococcus erythropolis DCL14, catalyzing the ring opening of lactones which are formed during degradation of several monocyclic monoterpenes, including carvone and menthol, was purified to apparent homogeneity. It is a monomeric enzyme of 31 kDa that is

  14. Combined effects of fungal alkaloids on intestinal motility in an in vitro rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalziel, J E; Dunstan, K E; Finch, S C

    2013-11-01

    Diarrhea is caused by factors that alter absorption and secretion of water and ions across the intestinal epithelium and disrupt motility. Parasitic infection, stress, poor nutrition, and exposure to plant or fungal toxins predispose livestock to noninfectious diarrhea. This is more prevalent in sheep that graze pastures infected with wild-type endophytic fungus, suggesting the involvement of fungal alkaloids. These increase smooth muscle contraction: ergovaline/ergotamine (ergot alkaloid) activates serotonin (5-HT) receptors, and lolitrem B (indole diterpene) inhibits large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels. Because of their separate mechanisms of action the objective of this study was to investigate whether they act synergistically to increase smooth muscle contraction. Effects of ergotamine (1 µM) and lolitrem B (0.1 µM) on the tension and frequency of spontaneous contractions were investigated in a longitudinal preparation of isolated distal colon. The compounds were dissolved in 0.1% dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and applied separately or together for 1 h. Ergotamine increased contractile tension compared to the pretreatment control (Pergotamine alone. The increased contractile tension when both compounds were applied together indicates that ergotamine and lolitrem B acted synergistically to increase smooth muscle contraction, suggesting that they would alter motility in vivo.

  15. Gas chromatographic analysis of dimethyltryptamine and beta-carboline alkaloids in ayahuasca, an Amazonian psychoactive plant beverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Ana Paula Salum; De Oliveira, Carolina Dizioli Rodrigues; Moura, Sidnei; Dörr, Felipe Augusto; Silva, Wagner Abreu E; Yonamine, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    Ayahuasca is obtained by infusing the pounded stems of Banisteriopsis caapi in combination with the leaves of Psychotria viridis. P. viridis is rich in the psychedelic indole N,N-dimethyltryptamine, whereas B. caapi contains substantial amounts of beta-carboline alkaloids, mainly harmine, harmaline and tetrahydroharmine, which are monoamine-oxidase inhibitors. Because of differences in composition in ayahuasca preparations, a method to measure their main active constituents is needed. To develop a gas chromatographic method for the simultaneous determination of dimethyltryptamine and the main beta-carbolines found in ayahuasca preparations. The alkaloids were extracted by means of solid phase extraction (C(18)) and detected by gas chromatography with nitrogen/phosphorous detector. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) was 0.02 mg/mL for all analytes. The calibration curves were linear over a concentration range of 0.02-4.0 mg/mL (r(2 )> 0.99). The method was also precise (RSD < 10%). A simple gas chromatographic method to determine the main alkaloids found in ayahuasca was developed and validated. The method can be useful to estimate administered doses in animals and humans for further pharmacological and toxicological investigations of ayahuasca. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. The nuclear genome of Rhazya stricta and the evolution of alkaloid diversity in a medically relevant clade of Apocynaceae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabir, Jamal S. M.; Jansen, Robert K.; Arasappan, Dhivya; Calderon, Virginie; Noutahi, Emmanuel; Zheng, Chunfang; Park, Seongjun; Sabir, Meshaal J.; Baeshen, Mohammed N.; Hajrah, Nahid H.; Khiyami, Mohammad A.; Baeshen, Nabih A.; Obaid, Abdullah Y.; Al-Malki, Abdulrahman L.; Sankoff, David; El-Mabrouk, Nadia; Ruhlman, Tracey A.

    2016-01-01

    Alkaloid accumulation in plants is activated in response to stress, is limited in distribution and specific alkaloid repertoires are variable across taxa. Rauvolfioideae (Apocynaceae, Gentianales) represents a major center of structural expansion in the monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs) yielding thousands of unique molecules including highly valuable chemotherapeutics. The paucity of genome-level data for Apocynaceae precludes a deeper understanding of MIA pathway evolution hindering the elucidation of remaining pathway enzymes and the improvement of MIA availability in planta or in vitro. We sequenced the nuclear genome of Rhazya stricta (Apocynaceae, Rauvolfioideae) and present this high quality assembly in comparison with that of coffee (Rubiaceae, Coffea canephora, Gentianales) and others to investigate the evolution of genome-scale features. The annotated Rhazya genome was used to develop the community resource, RhaCyc, a metabolic pathway database. Gene family trees were constructed to identify homologs of MIA pathway genes and to examine their evolutionary history. We found that, unlike Coffea, the Rhazya lineage has experienced many structural rearrangements. Gene tree analyses suggest recent, lineage-specific expansion and diversification among homologs encoding MIA pathway genes in Gentianales and provide candidate sequences with the potential to close gaps in characterized pathways and support prospecting for new MIA production avenues. PMID:27653669

  17. Improved expression of His(6)-tagged strictosidine synthase cDNA for chemo-enzymatic alkaloid diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liuqing; Zou, Hongbin; Zhu, Huajian; Ruppert, Martin; Gong, Jingxu; Stöckigt, Joachim

    2010-04-01

    Strictosidine synthase (STR1) catalyzes the stereoselective formation of 3alpha(S)-strictosidine from tryptamine and secologanin. Strictosidine is the key intermediate in the biosynthesis of 2,000 plant monoterpenoid indole alkaloids, and it is a key precursor of enzyme-mediated synthesis of alkaloids. An improved expression system is described which leads to optimized His(6)-STR1 synthesis in Escherichia coli. Optimal production of STR1 was achieved by determining the impact of co-expression of chaperones pG-Tf2 and pG-LJE8. The amount and activity of STR1 was doubled in the presence of chaperone pG-Tf2 alone. His(6)-STR1 immobilized on Ni-NTA can be used for enzymatic synthesis of strictosidines on a preparative scale. With the newly co-expressed His(6)-STR1, novel 3alpha(S)-12-azastrictosidine was obtained by enzymatic catalysis of 7-azatryptamine and secologanin. The results obtained are of significant importance for application to chemo-enzymatic approaches leading to diversification of alkaloids with novel improved structures.

  18. Indole prevents Escherichia coli cell division by modulating membrane potential

    OpenAIRE

    Chimerel, Catalin; Field, Christopher M.; Piñero-Fernandez, Silvia; Keyser, Ulrich F.; Summers, David K.

    2012-01-01

    Indole is a bacterial signalling molecule that blocks E. coli cell division at concentrations of 3–5 mM. We have shown that indole is a proton ionophore and that this activity is key to the inhibition of division. By reducing the electrochemical potential across the cytoplasmic membrane of E. coli, indole deactivates MinCD oscillation and prevents formation of the FtsZ ring that is a prerequisite for division. This is the first example of a natural ionophore regulating a key biological proces...

  19. 2,2-Diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl as a screening tool for recombinant monoterpene biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Monoterpenes are a class of natural C10 compounds with a range of potential applications including use as fuel additives, fragrances, and chemical feedstocks. Biosynthesis of monoterpenes in heterologous systems is yet to reach commercially-viable levels, and therefore is the subject of strain engineering and fermentation optimization studies. Detection of monoterpenes typically relies on gas chromatography/mass spectrometry; this represents a significant analytical bottleneck which limits the potential to analyse combinatorial sets of conditions. To address this, we developed a high-throughput method for pre-screening monoterpene biosynthesis. Results An optimised DPPH assay was developed for detecting monoterpenes from two-phase microbial cultures using dodecane as the extraction solvent. The assay was useful for reproducible qualitative ranking of monoterpene concentrations, and detected standard preparations of myrcene and γ-terpinene dissolved in dodecane at concentrations as low as 10 and 15 μM, respectively, and limonene as low as 200 μM. The assay could not be used quantitatively due to technical difficulties in capturing the initial reaction rate in a multi-well plate and the presence of minor DPPH-reactive contaminants. Initially, limonene biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was tested using two different limonene synthase enzymes and three medium compositions. The assay indicated that limonene biosynthesis was enhanced in a supplemented YP medium and that the Citrus limon limonene synthase (CLLS) was more effective than the Mentha spicata limonene synthase (MSLS). GC-MS analysis revealed that the DPPH assay had correctly identified the best limonene synthase (CLLS) and culture medium (supplemented YP medium). Because only traces of limonene were detected in SD medium, we subsequently identified medium components that improved limonene production and developed a defined medium based on these findings. The best limonene titres obtained

  20. HPLC quantification of uncarine D and the anti-plasmodial activity of alkaloids from leaves of Mitragyna inermis (Willd.) O. Kuntze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiot, Julien; Baghdikian, Béatrice; Boyer, Laurent; Mahiou, Valérie; Azas, Nadine; Gasquet, Monique; Timon-David, Pierre; Balansard, Guy; Ollivier, Evelyne

    2005-01-01

    An efficient system for the analysis of the total alkaloids extracted from leaves of Mitragyna inermis (Willd.) O. Kuntze (Rubiaceae) by HPLC using a reversed-phase column is described. The chromatographic conditions allowed the separation of indole and oxindole alkaloids in leaf extracts, and the quantification of uncarine D in samples collected in Burkina Faso and Mali. The HPLC method described was validated for its specificity, linearity and precision using an internal standard (naphthalene). The concentrations of uncarine D in various extracts were compared with their in vitro anti-plasmodial activity. The anti-proliferative activity on chloroquine-resistant strain (W2) of Plasmodium falciparum was not correlated with the concentration of uncarine D in leaves.

  1. Translocation of radiolabeled indole-3-acetic acid and indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol from kernel to shoot of Zea mays L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisnell, J. R.; Bandurski, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Either 5-[3H]indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) or 5-[3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol was applied to the endosperm of kernels of dark-grown Zea mays seedlings. The distribution of total radioactivity, radiolabeled indole-3-acetic acid, and radiolabeled ester conjugated indole-3-acetic acid, in the shoots was then determined. Differences were found in the distribution and chemical form of the radiolabeled indole-3-acetic acid in the shoot depending upon whether 5-[3H]indole-3-acetic acid or 5-[3H]indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol was applied to the endosperm. We demonstrated that indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol applied to the endosperm provides both free and ester conjugated indole-3-acetic acid to the mesocotyl and coleoptile. Free indole-3-acetic acid applied to the endosperm supplies some of the indole-3-acetic acid in the mesocotyl but essentially no indole-3-acetic acid to the coleoptile or primary leaves. It is concluded that free IAA from the endosperm is not a source of IAA for the coleoptile. Neither radioactive indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol nor IAA accumulates in the tip of the coleoptile or the mesocotyl node and thus these studies do not explain how the coleoptile tip controls the amount of IAA in the shoot.

  2. Influence of auxins and sucrose in monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloid production by Uncaria tomentosa cell suspension cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Palencia, Gabriela R; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Rodríguez-Monroy, Mario; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2005-01-01

    Growth and alkaloid production in Uncaria tomentosa cell suspension cultures were studied in Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 10 microM 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, 10 microM kinetin, and 58 mM sucrose for maintenance and with 10 microM indole-3-acetic acid, 10 microM kinetin, and 58 mM sucrose for production. A U. tomentosa pale Uth-3 cell line, cultured in the production medium, showed a reduced lag phase and a specific growth rate (mu) of 0.27 day(-1), while cells growing in the maintenance medium showed mu = 0.20 day(-1). U. tomentosa cells growing in the production medium produced monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloids (MOA) in amounts of 10.2 +/- 1.6 microg g(-1) dry weight (DW). The chemical profile of MOA produced by in vitro cell cultures was similar to that found in the plant. After 10 subcultures, maximum MOA production decreased to 2.0 +/- 0.7 microg g(-1) DW, while tryptamine alkaloids (TA) were produced with a maximum of 6.2 +/- 0.4 microg g(-1) DW. The increase of initial sucrose concentration up to 145 mM in the production medium enhanced the cell biomass by 3.2-fold (from 10.2 +/- 0.1 to 32.8 +/- 1.1 g DW L(-1)), reduced mu from 0.27 to 0.23 day(-1), and provoked a substantial accumulation of TA (23.1 +/- 4.7 microg g(-1) DW). A high sucrose concentration stimulated MOA production in the maintenance medium (2.7 +/- 0.5 microg g(-1) DW), even in the presence of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid.

  3. Simple proxies for estimating the concentrations of monoterpenes and their oxidation products at a boreal forest site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontkanen, Jenni; Paasonen, Pauli; Aalto, Juho; Bäck, Jaana; Rantala, Pekka; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-10-01

    The oxidation products of monoterpenes likely have a crucial role in the formation and growth of aerosol particles in boreal forests. However, the continuous measurements of monoterpene concentrations are usually not available on decadal timescales, and the direct measurements of the concentrations of monoterpene oxidation product have so far been scarce. In this study we developed proxies for the concentrations of monoterpenes and their oxidation products at a boreal forest site in Hyytiälä, southern Finland. For deriving the proxies we used the monoterpene concentration measured with a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS) during 2006-2013. Our proxies for the monoterpene concentration take into account the temperature-controlled emissions from the forest ecosystem, the dilution caused by the mixing within the boundary layer and different oxidation processes. All the versions of our proxies captured the seasonal variation of the monoterpene concentration, the typical proxy-to-measurements ratios being between 0.8 and 1.3 in summer and between 0.6 and 2.6 in winter. In addition, the proxies were able to describe the diurnal variation of the monoterpene concentration rather well, especially in summer months. By utilizing one of the proxies, we calculated the concentration of oxidation products of monoterpenes by considering their production in the oxidation and their loss due to condensation on aerosol particles. The concentration of oxidation products was found to have a clear seasonal cycle, with a maximum in summer and a minimum in winter. The concentration of oxidation products was lowest in the morning or around noon and highest in the evening. In the future, our proxies for the monoterpene concentration and their oxidation products can be used, for example, in the analysis of new particle formation and growth in boreal environments.

  4. Nitrosonium (NO+) catalyzed Michael addition of indoles to unsaturated enones

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guai Li Wu; Long Min Wu

    2008-01-01

    An efficient Michael addition of indoles to unsaturated enones, such as chalcones and β-nitrostyrenes, was achieved in thepresence of a catalytic amount of nitrosoninm tetrafluoroborate in ethyl ether.

  5. Two New C19-Diterpenoid Alkaloids from Delphinium davidii Franch.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao Xia LIANG; Dong Lin CHEN; Feng Peng WANG

    2006-01-01

    Two new C19-diterpenoid alkaloids, davidisines A (1) and B (2) along with thirteen known alkaloids were isolated from the whole herb of Delphinium davidii Franch. Their structures were established by spectral methods, especially 2D NMR techniques.

  6. Biological activity of alkaloids from Solanum dulcamara L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Padma; Sharma, Bindu; Bakshi, Nidhi

    2009-01-01

    Alkaloids are well known for their antimicrobial activity. Though all natural alkaloids come from plants, not all plants produce alkaloids. Plants of the Solanaceae family are known for their high alkaloid content. Alkaloids are found in all plant parts like roots, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits and seeds. In the present study, those plant parts of Solanum dulcamara were selected which have been reported to produce a high content of a specific alkaloid: solanine (from unripe fruits), solasodine (from flowers) and beta-solamarine (from roots). These alkaloids were extracted from various parts of S. dulcamara by well-established methods and were screened for their antibacterial activity. Human pathogenic bacteria, viz., Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, were selected for the study. All three alkaloids inhibited the growth of E. coli and S. aureus. However, no significant activity was observed against E. aerogenes. Minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration were also evaluated.

  7. An Acetylenic Alkaloid from the Calcareous Sponge Leucetta sp.

    OpenAIRE

    Nicole J de Voogd; Idam Hermawan; Junichi Tanaka

    2011-01-01

    A new acetylenic alkaloid was isolated from the sponge Leucetta sp. The structure was established by analyzing spectroscopic data. The alkaloid showed cytotoxicity IC50 2.5 mg/mL against NBT-T2 cells.

  8. 2-(4-Methoxy-1H-indol-3-ylacetonitrile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Hong Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C11H10N2O, the cyanide group is twisted away from the indole-ring plane [Ccy—Cme—Car—Car = 70.7 (2°; cy = cyanide, me = methylene, ar = aromatic], whereas the methoxy C atom is almost coplanar with the ring system [displacement = 0.014 (5 Å]. In the crystal, N—H...N hydrogen bonds link the molecules into C(7 chains propagating in [100].

  9. 1-(2-Methylbenzyl-1H-indole-3-carbaldehyde

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C17H15NO, the benzene ring and the indole system are almost perpendicular, making a dihedral angle of 87.82 (6°. The crystal packing is stabilized by C—H...O and π–π stacking interactions with centroid–centroid distances of 3.592 (4 Å between the pyrrole and the benzene rings in the indole systems of neighboring molecules.

  10. The alkaloids of the madangamine group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amat, Mercedes; Pérez, Maria; Ballette, Roberto; Proto, Stefano; Bosch, Joan

    2015-01-01

    This chapter is focused on madangamines, a small group of complex diamine alkaloids isolated from marine sponges of the order Haplosclerida, and covers their isolation, characterization, biogenesis, biological activity, and synthesis. Structurally, madangamines are pentacyclic alkaloids with an unprecedented skeletal type, characterized by a common diazatricyclic core and two peripheral macrocyclic rings. The isolation of these alkaloids from Xestospongia ingens (madangamines A-E) and Pachychalina alcaloidifera (madangamine F) is described in detail. Physical and complete spectroscopic 1H and 13C NMR data are included. The proposed biogenesis of madangamines from ammonia, a functionalized three-carbon unit, and saturated or unsaturated linear long-chain dialdehydes, via partially reduced bis-alkylpyridine macrocycles, is discussed. The synthesis of alkaloids of the madangamine group has been little explored, with only one total synthesis reported so far, that of (+)-madangamine D. This review also describes several model synthetic approaches to the diazatricyclic ABC core of these alkaloids, as well as model studies on the construction of the (Z,Z)-unsaturated 11-membered E macrocycle common to madangamines A-E, the 13- and 14-membered D rings of madangamines C-E, and the all-cis-triunsaturated 15-membered D ring of madangamine A. Some members of this group have shown significant in vitro cytotoxicity against a number of cancer cell lines.

  11. Hemlock alkaloids from Socrates to poison aloes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Tom

    2005-06-01

    Hemlock (Conium maculatum L. Umbelliferae) has long been known as a poisonous plant. Toxicity is due to a group of piperidine alkaloids of which the representative members are coniine and gamma-coniceine. The latter is the more toxic and is the first formed biosynthetically. Its levels in relation to coniine vary widely according to environmental conditions and to provenance of the plants. Surprisingly, these piperidine alkaloids have turned up in quite unrelated species in the monocotyledons as well as the dicotyledons. Aloes, for instance, important medicinal plants, are not regarded as poisonous although some species are very bitter. Nevertheless a small number of mostly local species contain the alkaloids, especially gamma-coniceine and there have been records of human poisoning. The compounds are recognized by their characteristic mousy smell. Both acute and chronic symptoms have been described. The compounds are neurotoxins and death results from respiratory failure, recalling the effects of curare. Chronic non-lethal ingestion by pregnant livestock leads to foetal malformation. Both acute and chronic toxicity are seen with stock in damp meadows and have been recorded as problems especially in North America. The alkaloids derive biosynthetically from acetate units via the polyketide pathway in contrast to other piperidine alkaloids which derive from lysine.

  12. TOXIC PYRROLIZIDINE ALKALOIDS OF ECHIUM AMOENUM FISCH. & MEY.

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids are present in some species of Echium (Boraginaceae). In this study petals of Echium amoenum Fisch. & Mey. (Gol-e-Gavzaban) as a popular herbal medicine in Iran, were investigated for pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs). The alkaloids were separated and purified by preparative TLC and characterized by IR, one and two dimensional 1H and 13C-NMR and Mass spectroscopy. Four toxic alkaloids namely: echimidine I, echimidine isomer II, 7-angeloyl retronecine III and 7-ti...

  13. Simulation of the type of coralin alkaloid-DNA binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulikov, K. G.; Koshlan, T. V.

    2015-05-01

    Interaction between a synthesized coralin protoberberine alkaloid and the DNA double helix of the calf's thymus in a salt solution is studied by optical absorption spectroscopy and spectropolarimetry. The dependence of the spectral characteristics of the alkaloid on a ratio between the DNA base pair concentration and the alkaloid molecule concentration is considered. The parameters of bonds between the coralin alkaloid and the DNA double helix are determined using modified McGhee-von Hippel equations.

  14. [Study on optimum extraction conditions of alkaloids from Pinellia ternate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jianhong; Peng, Zhengsong; Mao, Zicheng; Wei, Shuhong

    2003-05-01

    The optimum extraction conditions of alkaloids from Pinellia ternate (Thunb.) Breit were studied by orthogonal test. The results showed that the highest extraction rate of the alkaloids could be obtained by smashing the material in 60 (sieve number) of fragmentation and socking the material in 2.575 mol/L ammonia water, extracting alkaloids with 18 times as much chlorolform at room temperature for 25 hours. The highest extraction rate of alkaloids was 0.0817%.

  15. Indole: An evolutionarily conserved influencer of behavior across kingdoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomberlin, Jeffery K; Crippen, Tawni L; Wu, Guoyao; Griffin, Ashleigh S; Wood, Thomas K; Kilner, Rebecca M

    2017-02-01

    Indole is a key environmental cue that is used by many organisms. Based on its biochemistry, we suggest indole is used so universally, and by such different organisms, because it derives from the metabolism of tryptophan, a resource essential for many species yet rare in nature. These properties make it a valuable, environmental cue for resources almost universally important for promoting fitness. We then describe how indole is used to coordinate actions within organisms, to influence the behavior of conspecifics and can even be used to change the behavior of species that belong to other kingdoms. Drawing on the evolutionary framework that has been developed for understanding animal communication, we show how this is diversely achieved by indole acting as a cue, a manipulative signal, and an honest signal, as well as how indole can be used synergistically to amplify information conveyed by other molecules. Clarifying these distinct functions of indole identifies patterns that transcend different kingdoms of organisms. © 2016 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Gene Coexpression Analysis Reveals Complex Metabolism of the Monoterpene Alcohol Linalool in Arabidopsis FlowersW

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginglinger, J.F.; Boachon, B.; Hofer, R.; Paetz, C.; Kollner, T.G.; Miesch, L.; Lugan, R.; Baltenweck, R.; Mutterer, J.; Ullman, P.; Verstappen, F.W.A.; Bouwmeester, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 family encompasses the largest family of enzymes in plant metabolism, and the functions of many of its members in Arabidopsis thaliana are still unknown. Gene coexpression analysis pointed to two P450s that were coexpressed with two monoterpene synthases in flowers and were thus

  17. Role of de novo biosynthesis in ecosystem scale monoterpene emissions from a boreal Scots pine forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Taipale

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Monoterpene emissions from Scots pine have traditionally been assumed to originate as evaporation from specialized storage pools. More recently, the significance of de novo emissions, originating directly from monoterpene biosynthesis, has been recognized. To study the role of biosynthesis at the ecosystem scale, we measured monoterpene emissions from a Scots pine dominated forest in southern Finland using the disjunct eddy covariance method combined with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry. The interpretation of the measurements was based on a correlation analysis and a hybrid emission algorithm describing both de novo and pool emissions. During the measurement period May–August 2007, the monthly medians of daytime emissions were 200, 290, 180, and 200 μg m−2 h−1. The emissions were partly light dependent, probably due to de novo biosynthesis. The emission potential for both de novo and pool emissions exhibited a decreasing summertime trend. The ratio of the de novo emission potential to the total emission potential varied between 30 % and 46 %. Although the monthly changes were not significant, the ratio always differed statistically from zero, suggesting that the role of de novo biosynthesis was observable. Given the uncertainties in this study, we conclude that more accurate estimates of the contribution of de novo emissions are required for improving monoterpene emission algorithms for Scots pine dominated forests.

  18. The monoterpenes of Artemisia tridentata ssp. vaseyana, Artemisia cana ssp. viscidula and Artemisia tridentata ssp. spiciformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardena, K; Rivera, S B; Epstein, W W

    2002-01-01

    Monoterpenes from three different members of the Anthemideae family, Artemisia tridentata ssp. vaseyana, Artemisia cana ssp. viscidula and Artemisia tridentata ssp. spiciformis were isolated and their structures determined using spectroscopic techniques. A total of 26 irregular and regular monoterpenes were identified. Among these, 20 had previously been identified in the Anthemideae family. Of the remaining six, four were known, but previously unidentified in this family. 2,2-Dimethyl-6-isopropenyl-2H-pyran, 2,3-dimethyl-6-isopropyl-4H-pyran and 2-isopropenyl-5-methylhexa-trans-3,5-diene-1-ol were isolated from both A. tridentata ssp. vaseyana and A. cana ssp. viscidula. The irregular monoterpene 2,2-dimethyl-6-isopropenyl-2H-pyran has a carbon skeleton analogous to the biologically important triterpene squalene. Two additional irregular monoterpenes, artemisia triene and trans-chrysanthemal were isolated from A. cana ssp. viscidula and lavandulol was isolated from A. tridentata ssp. spiciformis. This is the first time a compound possessing a lavandulyl-skeletal type has been found in the Anthemideae family.

  19. Comparative study of the antitumor effect of natural monoterpenes: relationship to cell cycle analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdeslam Jaafari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Monoterpenes have been identified as responsible of important therapeutic effects of plant-extracts. In this work, we try to compare the cytotoxic effect of six monoterpenes (carvacrol, thymol, carveol, carvone, eugenol and isopulegol as well as their molecular mechanisms. The in vitro antitumor activity of the tested products, evaluated against five tumor cell lines, show that the carvacrol is the most cytotoxic monoterpene. The investigation of an eventual synergistic effect of the six natural monoterpenes with two anticancer drugs revealed that there is a significant synergy between them (p<5%. On the other hand, the effect of the tested products on cell cycle progression was examined by flow cytometry after DNA staining in order to investigate the molecular mechanism of their cytotoxic activity. The results revealed that carvacrol and carveol stopped the cell cycle progression in S phase; however, thymol and isopulegol stopped it in G0/G1 phase. Regarding carvone and eugenol, no effect on cell cycle was observed.

  20. Gene Coexpression Analysis Reveals Complex Metabolism of the Monoterpene Alcohol Linalool in Arabidopsis FlowersW

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginglinger, J.F.; Boachon, B.; Hofer, R.; Paetz, C.; Kollner, T.G.; Miesch, L.; Lugan, R.; Baltenweck, R.; Mutterer, J.; Ullman, P.; Verstappen, F.W.A.; Bouwmeester, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 family encompasses the largest family of enzymes in plant metabolism, and the functions of many of its members in Arabidopsis thaliana are still unknown. Gene coexpression analysis pointed to two P450s that were coexpressed with two monoterpene synthases in flowers and were thus

  1. Xylem monoterpenes of some hard pines of Western North America: three studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard H. Smith

    1982-01-01

    Monoterpene composition was studied in a number of hard pine species and results were compared with earlier work. (1) Intratree measurements showed strong constancy of composition in both single-stemmed and forked trees of ponderosa, Jeffrey, Coulter, and Jeffrey x ponderosa pines. In grafts of these and other pines, the scion influenced the root stock, but not the...

  2. Enzymatic synthesis of 5-/sup 3/H-indole-3-acetic acid and 5-/sup 3/H-indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol from 5-/sup 3/H-L-trytophan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalczuk, L.; Chisnell, J.R. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA). Dept. of Botany and Plant Pathology)

    1982-01-01

    Labeled 1-tryptophan is converted to indole-3-acetamide and then to indole-3-acetic acid by enzymes from Pseudomonas savastanoi. Labeled indole-3-acetic acid can be converted to indole-3-acetyl-1-O-..beta..-D-glucose and to indole-3-acetyl-myo-inositol by enzymes from kernels of Zea mays sweet corn.

  3. Novel Preparation of Methoxy Carbamates of 1-Protected Indole- 3-methylamines as Precursor of Indole-3-methylamine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG,Hao; XIN,Jun-Guo; WANG,Yin; CHEN,Wei; YANG,Jun; QIN,Yong

    2004-01-01

    @@ Indole-3-methylamine (1) has been well demonstrated to be a very useful intermediate as a pharmaceutical building block and starting material for syntheses of phytoalexins.[1] The instability of indole-3-methylamine (1) has undoubtedly restricted its application in synthetic chemistry. Hofmann rearrangement that directly converts carboxamides to alky carbamates in the presence of alcohol required unexceptionally a strong base,[2] which devaluated the possible usefulness of Hofmann rearrangement in preparation of base sensitive amines, especially for the preparation of unstable indole-3-methylamine (1). Herein we would like to report a convenient method for the preparation of alkyl carbamates of 1-protected indole-3-methylamines (4) via the diacetoxyiodobenzene (DIB) promoted Hofmann rearrangement under neutral condition.

  4. Two new alkaloids of the crinane series from Pancratium sickenbergeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Donia, Amina H; Amer, Masouda E; Darwish, Fikria A; Kassem, Fahima F; Hammoda, Hala M; Abdel-Kader, Maged S; Zhou, Bing-Nan; Kingston, David G I

    2002-04-01

    Two new alkaloids; ent-6alpha/6beta-hydroxybuphanisine, (-)-8-demethylmaritidine and seven known alkaloids were isolated from Pancratium sickenbergeri grown in Egypt. Three of the known alkaloids were tested in the NCI cytotoxicity screen, but were found to be inactive.

  5. Pancratium canariense as an important source of amaryllidaceae alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedrón, Juan C; Oberti, Juan C; Estévez-Braun, Ana; Ravelo, Angel G; Del Arco-Aguilar, Marcelino; López, Matías

    2009-01-01

    Four new alkaloids (1-4) have been isolated from a methanolic extract of bulbs of Pancratium canariense, together with 12 known alkaloids (5-16). The structures of the new alkaloids were determined by extensive 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopic studies and X-ray diffraction.

  6. 21 CFR 119.1 - Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids... UNREASONABLE RISK § 119.1 Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids. Dietary supplements containing ephedrine alkaloids present an unreasonable risk of illness or injury under conditions of use recommended...

  7. An Unusual Pentacyclic Dinitrogenous Alkaloid from Galanthus gracilis

    OpenAIRE

    ÜNVER, Nehir; KAYA, G. İrem

    2005-01-01

    A minor alkaloid, namely gracilamine, was isolated from Galanthus gracilis. This was the first example of a pentacyclic dinitrogenous alkaloid isolated from a member of Amaryllidaceae. The structure of this alkaloid was elucidated by means of comprehensive spectroscopic methods (1D and 2D NMR, MS, UV, IR).

  8. Two New Alkaloids from Narcissus serotinus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc Viladomat

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The Amaryllidaceae family is well known for the presence of an exclusive group of alkaloids with a wide range of biological activities. Narcissus serotinus L. is a plant belonging to this family and its geographical distribution is mainly located along the Mediterranean coast. In the present work, specimens collected near Casablanca (Morocco were used to study the alkaloid content of this species. Starting with 350 g of the whole plant we used standard extraction and purification procedures to obtain fractions and compounds for GC-MS and NMR analysis. As well as five known alkaloids, we isolated two new compounds: 1-O-(3´-acetoxybutanoyllycorine and narseronine. The latter has been previously published, but with an erroneous structure.

  9. Aporphine alkaloids from Ocotea macrophylla (Lauraceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludy Cristina Pabon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Four aporphine alkaloids from the wood of Ocotea macrophylla (Lauraceae were isolated and characterized as (S-3-methoxy-nordomesticine (1, (S-N-ethoxycarbonyl-3-methoxy-nordomesticine (2, (S-N-formyl-3-methoxy-nordomesticine (3 and (S-N-methoxycarbonyl-3-methoxy-nordomesticine (4; alkaloids 2-4 are being report for the first time. The structure the isolated compounds were determined based on their spectral data and by comparison of their spectral data with values described in literature. The alkaloid fraction and compound 1 showed antifungal activity against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici and also compound 1 showed antimicrobial activity towards Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis as well.

  10. Aporphine alkaloids from Ocotea macrophylla (Lauraceae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pabon, Ludy Cristina; Cuca, Luis Enrique, E-mail: lcpabonb@unal.edu.c [Universidad Nacional de Bogota (Colombia). Facultad de Ciencias. Dept. de Quimica

    2010-07-01

    Four aporphine alkaloids from the wood of Ocotea macrophylla (Lauraceae) were isolated and characterized as (S)-3-methoxy-nordomesticine (1), (S)-N-ethoxycarbonyl-3-methoxy-nordomesticine (2), (S)-N-formyl-3-methoxy-nordomesticine (3) and (S)-N-methoxycarbonyl-3-methoxy-nordomesticine (4); alkaloids 2-4 are being report for the first time. The structure the isolated compounds were determined based on their spectral data and by comparison of their spectral data with values described in literature. The alkaloid fraction and compound 1 showed antifungal activity against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici and also compound 1 showed antimicrobial activity towards Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis as well. (author)

  11. An efficient synthesis of loline alkaloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Mesut; Mayer, Peter; Trauner, Dirk

    2011-07-01

    Loline (1) is a small alkaloid that, in spite of its simple-looking structure, has posed surprising challenges to synthetic chemists. It has been known for more than a century and has been the subject of extensive biological investigations, but only two total syntheses have been achieved to date. Here, we report an asymmetric total synthesis of loline that, with less then ten steps, is remarkably short. Our synthesis incorporates a Sharpless epoxidation, a Grubbs olefin metathesis and an unprecedented transannular aminobromination, which converts an eight-membered cyclic carbamate into a bromopyrrolizidine. The synthesis is marked by a high degree of chemo- and stereoselectivity and gives access to several members of the loline alkaloid family. It delivers sufficient material to support a programme aimed at studying the complex interactions between plants, fungi, insects and bacteria brokered by loline alkaloids.

  12. Monoterpenes produced by Cupressus lusitanica cultured cells including a novel monoterpene (1R, 2S, 6S)-(+)-1,6-epoxy-4(8)-p-menthen-2-ol [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Yoko; Fujita, Koki; Yamada, Junko; Ashitani, Tatsuya; Sakai, Kokki

    2003-12-01

    A novel monoterpene,(1R, 2S, 6S)-(+)-1,6-epoxy-4(8)-p-menthen-2-ol [corrected], was isolated from an elicitor-treated cell culture of Cupressus lusitanica (Mexican cypress). Ten known monoterpenes--limonene, myrcene, beta-ocimene, sabinene, terpinolene, 4-terpineol, alpha-terpineol, 4(8)-p-menthen-1,2-diol, 4-hydroxyphellandric acid methylester and beta-thujaplicin methylether--were also identified. Regioselective metabolisms of monoterpenes were observed in this culture.

  13. Origin of monoterpene emissions from boreal tree species: Determination of de novo and pool emissions by 13CO2 labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinne, J.; Ghirardo, A.; Koch, K.; Taipale, R.; Zimmer, I.; Schnitzler, J.

    2009-12-01

    Boreal forests emit a large amount of monoterpenes into the atmosphere. Traditionally these emissions are assumed to originate as evaporation from large storage pools. Thus their diurnal cycle would depend mostly on temperature. However, there is indication that a significant part of the monoterpene emission would originate directly from de novo synthesis. By applying 13CO2 fumigation and analyzing the isotope fractions with proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) and classical GC-MS we studied the origin of monoterpene emissions from some major Eurasian boreal and alpine tree species. We determined the fractions originating from de novo biosynthesis and from large internal monoterpene storages for three coniferous tree species with specialized monoterpene storage structures and one dicotyledon species without such structures. The emission from dicotyledon species Betula pendula originated solely from the de novo synthesis. The origin of the emissions from coniferous species was mixed with varying fraction originating from de novo synthesis (Pinus sylvestris 58%, Picea abies 33.5%, Larix decidua 9.8%) and the rest from large internal monoterpene storage pools. Application of the observed fractions of emission originating from de novo synthesis and large storage pools in a hybrid emission algorithm resulted in a better description of ecosystem scale monoterpene emissions from a boreal Scots pine forest stand.

  14. Quantifying environmental stress-induced emissions of algal isoprene and monoterpenes using laboratory measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskhidze, N.; Sabolis, A.; Reed, R.; Kamykowski, D.

    2015-02-01

    We report here production rates of isoprene and monoterpene compounds (α-pinene, β-pinene, camphene and d-limonene) from six phytoplankton monocultures as a function of irradiance and temperature. Irradiance experiments were carried out for diatom strains (Thalassiosira weissflogii and Thalassiosira pseudonana), prymnesiophyte strains (Pleurochrysis carterae), dinoflagellate strains (Karenia brevis and Prorocentrum minimum), and cryptophyte strains (Rhodomonas salina), while temperature experiments were carried out for diatom strains (Thalassiosira weissflogii and Thalassiosira pseudonana). Phytoplankton species, incubated in a climate-controlled room, were subject to variable light (90 to 900 μmol m-2 s-1) and temperature (18 to 30 °C) regimes. Compared to isoprene, monoterpene emissions were an order of magnitude lower at all light and temperature levels. Emission rates are normalized by cell count and Chlorophyll a (Chl a) content. Diatom strains were the largest emitters, with ~ 2 × 10-17 g(cell)-1h-1 (~ 35 μg (g Chl a)-1 h-1) for isoprene and ~ 5 × 10-19 g (cell)-1 h-1 (~ 1 μg (g Chl a)-1) h-1) for α-pinene. The contribution to the total monoterpene production was ~ 70% from α-pinene, ~ 20% for d-limonene, and 250 μmol m-2 s-1) irradiance. Measurements revealed different patterns for time-averaged emissions rates over two successive days. On the first day, most of the species showed a distinct increase in production rates within the first 4 h while, on the second day, the emission rates were overall higher, but less variable. The data suggest that enhanced amounts of isoprene and monoterpenes are emitted from phytoplankton as a result of perturbations in environmental conditions that cause imbalance in chloroplasts and force primary producers to acclimate physiologically. This relationship could be a valuable tool for development of dynamic ecosystem modeling approaches for global marine isoprene and monoterpene emissions based on phytoplankton

  15. Quantifying environmental stress induced emissions of algal isoprene and monoterpenes using laboratory measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskhidze, N.; Sabolis, A.; Reed, R.; Kamykowski, D.

    2014-09-01

    We report here production rates of isoprene and monoterpene compounds (α-pinene, β-pinene, camphene and d-limonene) from six phytoplankton monocultures as a function of irradiance and temperature. Irradiance experiments were carried out for diatom strains - Thalassiosira weissflogii and Thalassiosira pseudonana; prymnesiophyte strains - Pleurochrysis carterae; dinoflagellate strains - Karenia brevis and Prorocentrum minimum; cryptophyte strains - Rhodomonas salina, while temperature experiments were carried out for diatom strains - Thalassiosira weissflogii and Thalassiosira pseudonana. Phytoplankton species, incubated in a climate-controlled room, were subject to variable light (90 to 900 μmol m-2s-1) and temperature (18 to 30 °C) regimes. Compared to isoprene, monoterpene emissions were an order of magnitude lower at all light and temperature levels. Emission rates are normalized by cell count and Chlorophyll a (Chl a) content. Diatom strains were the largest emitters, with ~2x1017g (cell)-1h-1 (~35 μg (g Chl a)-1h-1) for isoprene and ~5x10-19 g (cell)-1h-1 (~1μg (g Chl a)-1) h-1) for α-pinene. The contribution to the total monoterpene production was ~70% from α-pinene, ~20% for d-limonene, and 250 μmol m-2s-1) irradiance. Measurements revealed different patterns for time-averaged emissions rates over two successive days. On the first day most of the species showed distinct increase in production rates within the first four hours, while on the second day the emission rates were overall higher, but less variable. The data suggest that enhanced amounts of isoprene and monoterpenes are emitted from phytoplankton as a result of perturbations in environmental conditions that cause disbalance in chloroplasts and forces primary producers to acclimate physiologically. This relationship could be a valuable tool for development of dynamic ecosystem modeling approaches for global marine isoprene and monoterpene emissions based on phytoplankton physiological

  16. Laboratory and field measurements of enantiomeric monoterpene emissions as a function of chemotype, light and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W.; Staudt, M.; Bourgeois, I.; Williams, J.

    2014-03-01

    Plants emit significant amounts of monoterpenes into the earth's atmosphere, where they react rapidly to form a multitude of gas phase species and particles. Many monoterpenes exist in mirror-image forms or enantiomers. In this study the enantiomeric monoterpene profile for several representative plants (Quercus ilex L., Rosmarinus officinalis L., and Pinus halepensis Mill.) was investigated as a function of chemotype, light and temperature both in the laboratory and in the field. Analysis of enantiomeric monoterpenes from 19 Quercus ilex individuals from Southern France and Spain revealed four regiospecific chemotypes (genetically fixed emission patterns). In agreement with previous work, only Quercus ilex emissions increased strongly with light. However, for all three plant species no consistent enantiomeric variation was observed as a function of light, and the enantiomeric ratio of α-pinene was found to vary by less than 20% from 100 and 1000 μmol m-2 s-1 PAR (photosynthetically active radiation). The rate of monoterpene emission increased with temperature from all three plant species, but little variation in the enantiomeric distribution of α-pinene was observed with temperature. There was more enantiomeric variability between individuals of the same species than could be induced by either light or temperature. Field measurements of α-pinene enantiomer mixing ratios in the air, taken at a Quercus ilex forest in Southern France, and several other previously reported field enantiomeric ratio diel cycle profiles are compared. All show smoothly varying diel cycles (some positive and some negative) even over changing wind directions. This is surprising in comparison with variations of enantiomeric emission patterns shown by individuals of the same species.

  17. Total Synthesis of the Zoanthamine Alkaloid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Miyashita

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction The zoanthamine alkaloids, a type of heptacyclic marine alkaloid isolated from colonial zoanthids of the genus Zoanthus sp., have attracted much attention from a wide area of science, because of their distinctive biological and pharmacological properties as well as their chemical structures with stereochemical complexity.Namely, norzoanthamine (1)[1] can suppress the loss of bone weight and strength in ovariectomized mice and has been considered a promising candidate for an antiosteoporotic drug[1], whereas zoanthamine (2)[2] has exhibited potent inhibitory activity toward phorbol myristate-induced inflammation in addition to powerful analgesic effects[2]. See Fig. 1.

  18. Chemotaxonomy and geographical distribution of tropane alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, W J; Lin, G D

    2000-03-01

    This review illustrates the distribution of tropane alkaloids within the families Solanaceae, Erythroxylaceae, Proteaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Rhizophoraceae, Convolvulaceae and Cruciferae. Whereas tropane alkaloids are characteristic of the genera Datura, Brugmansia (tree datura) and Duboisia of the Solanaceae, the distribution is more widespread with novel tropane derivatives in families not traditionally associated with these bases. The chemical nature of more recently discovered water-soluble calystegines and the di- and trimeric forms from the Convolvulaceae (e.g. schizanthines from Schizanthus spp.), truxillines from Bolivian coca leaves and moonines of Erythroxylum moonii are highlighted. Where possible and appropriate, links between the phytochemistry and taxonomy are discussed.

  19. Honatisine, a novel diterpenoid alkaloid, and six known alkaloids from Delphinium honanense and their cytotoxic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yang Qing; Ma, Zhan Ying; Wei, Xiao Mei; Liu, Dong Jie; Du, Bao Zhong; Yao, Bing Hua; Gao, Li Ming

    2011-11-01

    A novel diterpene alkaloid named honatisine (1) has been isolated from the whole plants of Delphinium honanense, along with six known alkaloids, siwanine E (2), isoatisine (3), atisine (4), delcorinine (5), uraphine (6), and nordhagenine A (7). Their structures were deduced on the basis of their spectral data. All of them were evaluated by a SRB assay for their cytotoxicity, and compound 1 showed a significant cytotoxic activity (IC(50) =3.16 μM) against the MCF-7 cell line.

  20. Alkaloid diversity in Galanthus elwesii and Galanthus nivalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkov, Strahil; Bastida, Jaume; Sidjimova, Borjana; Viladomat, Francesc; Codina, Carles

    2011-01-01

    Seventy alkaloids of galanthamine, lycorine, homolycorine, tazettine, haemanthamine, narciclasine, and tyramine types were detected by GC/MS in 25 Galanthus elwesii and seven Galanthus nivalis populations, collected from different locations in Bulgaria. Intraspecies diversity in the alkaloid profiles regarding the main alkaloid types (chemotypes) was observed. Tyramine-type protoalkaloids (namely, hordenine and its derivatives) were dominant in 19 populations of G. elwesii. In other populations of G. elwesii, the plants accumulated mainly homolycorine-, lycorine-, and galanthamine-type alkaloids. The alkaloid profiles of G. nivalis were dominated by narciclasine-, galanthamine-, lycorine-, haemanthamine-, or tazettine-type compounds. Geographical distribution of chemotypes indicated a relationship between populations, since adjacent populations often displayed similar alkaloid profiles. The results from year-to-year sampling and transplantation experiments imply genetic determination of alkaloid synthesis in the two studied species of Galanthus.

  1. Therapeutic Potential of Steroidal Alkaloids in Cancer and Other Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Qi-Wei; Chen, Mei-Wan; Cheng, Ke-Jun; Yu, Pei-Zhong; Wei, Xing; Shi, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Steroidal alkaloids are a class of secondary metabolites isolated from plants, amphibians, and marine invertebrates. Evidence accumulated in the recent two decades demonstrates that steroidal alkaloids have a wide range of bioactivities including anticancer, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antinociceptive, etc., suggesting their great potential for application. It is therefore necessary to comprehensively summarize the bioactivities, especially anticancer activities and mechanisms of steroidal alkaloids. Here we systematically highlight the anticancer profiles both in vitro and in vivo of steroidal alkaloids such as dendrogenin, solanidine, solasodine, tomatidine, cyclopamine, and their derivatives. Furthermore, other bioactivities of steroidal alkaloids are also discussed. The integrated molecular mechanisms in this review can increase our understanding on the utilization of steroidal alkaloids and contribute to the development of new drug candidates. Although the therapeutic potentials of steroidal alkaloids look promising in the preclinical and clinical studies, further pharmacokinetic and clinical studies are mandated to define their efficacy and safety in cancer and other diseases.

  2. Alkaloid production by callous tissue cultures of Cereus peruvianus (Cactaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Arildo José Braz; Machado, Maria Fátima Pires da Silva

    2003-02-01

    The morphologically undifferentiated cells of nonregenerant callous tissue of Cereus peruvianus cultured in the original medium and in medium supplemented with tyrosine were used as an alkaloid source. Comparison of alkaloid production by C. peruvianus plants and by callous tissues indicated that alkaloid levels were almost twice as high in callous tissues as in shoots of C. peruvianus plants. The ratio of alkaloid concentration between mature plant and morphologically undifferentiated cells of callous tissue was 1:1.7. A relationship between culture medium containing tyrosine and alkaloid production was also observed in the callous tissues of C. peruvianus. Since increased alkaloid production may be induced by additional factors such as tyrosine, increasing levels of tyrosine or other conditions of the culture medium may be considered factors for inducing higher alkaloid production by C. peruvianus callous tissues.

  3. The Alkaloid Profiles of Lupinus sulphureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupines are common plants found on the rangelands in the western United States. Lupines are known to contain alkaloids that can be toxic and teratogenic causing congenital birth defects (crooked calf disease). One such lupine, Lupinus sulphureus, occurs in parts of Oregon, Washington, and British ...

  4. Two New Oxoaporphine Alkaloids from Thalictrum elegans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁志远; 杨小生; 汪冶; 郝小江

    2005-01-01

    Two new oxoaporphine alkaloids, 1,2,3,10-tetramethoxy-9-(2-hydroxy-4,5-dimethoxybenzyloxy)oxoaporphine (1) and 1,2,3,10-tetramethoxy-9-(4,5-dimethoxy-2-formylphenoxy)oxoaporphine (2), were isolated from Thalictrum elegans. Their structures were elucidated based on spectroscopic analysis including 1D, 2D NMR, IR and MS.

  5. Alkaloids from Oriciopsis glaberrima Engl. (Rutaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wansi, Jean Duplex; Wandji, Jean; Kamdem Waffo, Alain François; Ngeufa, Happi Emmanuel; Ndom, Jean Claude; Fotso, Serge; Maskey, Rajendra Prasad; Njamen, Dieudonné; Fomum, Tanee Zacharias; Laatsch, Harmut

    2006-03-01

    Two alkaloid derivatives, oriciacridone A and B, were isolated from the stem bark of Oriciopsis glaberrima (Rutaceae). The structures were elucidated by a detailed spectroscopic analysis. The extract exhibited in vitro significant antimicrobial activity against a range of micro-organisms.

  6. Ergot alkaloids decrease rumen epithelial blood flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two experiments were conducted to determine if ergot alkaloids affect blood flow to the absorptive surface of the rumen of steers. Steers (n=8 total) were pair-fed alfalfa cubes at 1.5× NEM and received ground endophyte-infected tall fescue seed (E+) or endophyte-free tall fescue seed (E-) via rumen...

  7. Eremophilanes and Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids of Senecioneae Species

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The chemical study of two species of the tribe Senecioneae afforded two eremophilanes and two pyrrolizidine alkaloids from Se - necio subauriculatus and four modified eremophilanes from Roldana oaxacana . The chemistry of these species is in accord with that re - ported for species of Senecio and Roldana studied so far, and therefore, with the already described for the tribe Senecioneae.

  8. Histrionicotoxin alkaloids finally detected in an ant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Tappey H.; Adams, Rachelle Martha Marie; Spande, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    Workers of the ant Carebarella bicolor collected in Panama were found to have two major poison-frog alkaloids, cis- and trans-fused decahydroquinolines (DHQs) of the 269AB type, four minor 269AB isomers, two minor 269B isomers, and three isomers of DHQ 271D. For the first time in an ant, however......, the DHQs were accompanied by six histrionicotoxins (HTXs), viz., 283A, 285A, 285B, 285C, 287A, and 287D. This co-occurrence of the HTX and DHQ alkaloids is the usual pattern seen in dendrobatid frogs. This finding contrasts with our earlier study, where workers of a Brazilian ant, Solenopsis (Diplorhoptrum......) sp., were found to have a very similar DHQ complex but failed to show HTXs. Several new DHQ alkaloids of MW 271 (named in the frog as 271G) are reported from the above ants that have both m/z 202 and 204 as major fragment ions, unlike the spectrum seen for the poison-frog alkaloid 271D, which has...

  9. A New Quinolizidine Alkaloid from Boehmeria siamensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new quinolizidine alkaloid, 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4-(3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl)-3, 4-dehydroquinolizidine (1), was isolated from the ethanol extract of the whole plants of Boehmeria siamensis Craib. Its structure was elucidated on the analysis of 1D NMR and 2D NMR spectrum.

  10. A New Alkaloid from Sinomenium acutum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Ming CHENG; Feng QIU; Li Jun WU; Xin Sheng YAO

    2005-01-01

    Sinomenium acutum is widely used in East and South Asia for the treatment of many diseases, especially rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The chemical research on Sinomenium acutum led to the isolation of a new alkaloid compound (1). On the basis of chemical evidences and spectral analysis, 1 was identified as N-(1, 7-dimethoxylphenanthren-2-yl)acetamide.

  11. Dehydropyrrolizidine alkaloid toxicity, cytotoxicity, and carcinogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehyro-pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA)-containing plants compose about 5% of the world’s flowering plants and they commonly poison livestock, wildlife and humans. Previous work has produced considerable understanding of PA toxicity, species susceptibility, conditions and routes of exposure, toxin metab...

  12. A New Alkaloid from Isatis costata

    OpenAIRE

    Fatima, Itrat; Anis, Itrat; Ahmad, Ijaz; Malik, Abdul; Afza, Nighat

    2014-01-01

    A new alkaloid has been isolated from Isatis costata C.A.Mey. and assigned structure 1 on the basis of spectroscopic data including 1D and 2D NMR techniques. Methyl 2-acetoamidobenzoate (2), b-sitosterol (3), and ursolic acid (4) were also isolated for the first time from this species.

  13. A Novel Alkaloid from Stapelia hirsuta

    OpenAIRE

    SHABANA, Marwan; GONAID, Mariam; SALAMA, Maha Mahmoud; ABDEL-SATTAR, Essam

    2006-01-01

    A novel alkaloid (1,8,8-trimethyl-5,8-dihydro-1H-pyrano[3,4-b]pyridine-4,6-dione) was isolated from the chloroformic traction obtained from the total alcoholic extract of the aerial parts of Stapelia hirsuta L. In addition, apigenin, luteolin and b-sitosterol-3-O-b-D- glucopyranoside were also isolated.

  14. 27 CFR 21.99 - Brucine alkaloid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... dissolved by hydrochloric acid when several drops of a 1 N barium chloride solution are added to 10 ml of a... OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS FORMULAS FOR DENATURED ALCOHOL AND RUM Specifications for Denaturants § 21.99 Brucine alkaloid. (a) Identification test. Add a few drops of concentrated nitric acid to about 10 mg of...

  15. Alkaloids in the pharmaceutical industry: Structure, isolation and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolić Milan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available By the end of the 18th and the beginning of the 19th century a new era began in medicine, pharmaceutics and chemistry that was strongly connected with alkaloids and alkaloid drugs. Even before that it was known that certain drugs administered in limited doses were medicines, and toxic if taken in larger doses (opium, coke leaves, belladonna roots, monkshood tubers crocus or hemlock seeds. However, the identification, isolation and structural characterization of the active ingredients of the alkaloid drugs was only possible in the mid 20th century by the use of modern extraction equipment and instrumental methods (NMR, X-ray diffraction and others.In spite of continuing use over a long time, there is still great interest in investigating new drugs, potential raw materials for the pharmaceutical industry, as well as the more detailed investigation and definition of bio-active components and the indication of their activity range, and the partial synthesis of new alkaloid molecules based on natural alkaloids. The scope of these investigations, especially in the field of semi-synthesis is to make better use of the bio-active ingredients of alkaloid drugs, i.e. to improve the pharmacological effect (stronger and prolonged effect of the medicine, decreased toxicity and side effects, or to extend or change the applications. A combined classification of alkaloids was used, based on the chemical structure and origin, i.e. the source of their isolation to study alkaloid structure. For practical reasons, the following classification of alkaloids was used: ergot alkaloids, poppy alkaloids, tropanic alkaloids purine derivative alkaloids, carbon-cyclic alkaloids, and other alkaloids. The second part of this report presents a table of general procedures for alkaloid isolation from plant drugs (extraction by water non-miscible solvents, extraction by water-miscible solvents and extraction by diluted acid solutions. Also, methods for obtaining chelidonine and

  16. Synthesis of both enantiomers of isorobinal, a novel cyclic monoterpene isolated from the astigmatid mite, Rhizoglyphus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ting; Kuwahara, Shigefumi

    2002-11-01

    Both enantiomers of isorobinal, a cyclic monoterpene isolated from the astigmatid mite (Rhizoglyphus sp.), were synthesized from the enantiomers of perillaldehyde in four steps by using PCC-oxidation of a tertiary allylic alcohol intermediate as the key step.

  17. Limonene Synthase, the Enzyme Responsible for Monoterpene Biosynthesis in Peppermint, Is Localized to Leucoplasts of Oil Gland Secretory Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Glenn Turner; Jonathan Gershenzon; Erik E. Nielson; John E. Froehlich; Rodney Croteau

    1999-01-01

    ...)-Limonene synthase, which is responsible for the first dedicated step of monoterpene biosynthesis in mint species, appears to be translated as a preprotein bearing a long plastidial transit peptide...

  18. A review on medicinal importance, pharmacological activity and bioanalytical aspects of beta-carboline alkaloid ‘‘Harmine’’

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K Patel; M Gadewar; R Tripathi; SK Prasad; Dinesh Kumar Patel

    2012-01-01

    Harmine, a beta-carboline alkaloid, is widely distributed in the plants, marine creatures, insects, mammalians as well as in human tissues and body fluids. Harmine was originally isolated from seeds of Peganum harmal in 1847 having a core indole structure and a pyridine ring. Harmine has various types of pharmacological activities such as antimicrobial, antifungal, antitumor, cytotoxic, antiplasmodial, antioxidaant, antimutagenic, antigenotoxic and hallucinogenic properties. It acts on gamma-aminobutyric acid type A and monoamine oxidase A or B receptor, enhances insulin sensitivity and also produces vasorelaxant effect. Harmine prevents bone loss by suppressing osteoclastogenesis. The current review gives an overview on pharmacological activity and analytical techniques of harmine, which may be useful for researcheres to explore the hidden potential of harmine and and will also help in developing new drugs for the treatment of various diseases.

  19. A review on medicinal importance, pharmacological activity and bioanalytical aspects of beta-carboline alkaloid “Harmine”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Patel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Harmine, a beta-carboline alkaloid, is widely distributed in the plants, marine creatures, insects, mammalians as well as in human tissues and body fluids. Harmine was originally isolated from seeds of Peganum harmal in 1847 having a core indole structure and a pyridine ring. Harmine has various types of pharmacological activities such as antimicrobial, antifungal, antitumor, cytotoxic, antiplasmodial, antioxidaant, antimutagenic, antigenotoxic and hallucinogenic properties. It acts on gamma–aminobutyric acid type A and monoamine oxidase A or B receptor, enhances insulin sensitivity and also produces vasorelaxant effect. Harmine prevents bone loss by suppressing osteoclastogenesis. The current review gives an overview on pharmacological activity and analytical techniques of harmine, which may be useful for researcheres to explore the hidden potential of harmine and and will also help in developing new drugs for the treatment of various diseases.

  20. Drought reduced monoterpene emissions from the evergreen Mediterranean oak Quercus ilex: results from a throughfall displacement experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rambal

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of water limitations on the emission of biogenic volatile organic compounds are not well understood. Experimental approaches studying drought effects in natural conditions are still missing. To address this question, a throughfall displacement experiment was set up in a natural forest of Quercus ilex, an evergreen Mediterranean oak emitting monoterpenes. Mature trees were exposed in 2005 and 2006 either to an additional drought, to irrigation or to natural drought (untreated control. In both years, absolute monoterpene emission rates as well as the respective standard factors of the trees exposed to normal and additional drought strongly declined during the drought periods. Monoterpene emissions were lower in year 2006 than in year 2005 (factor 2 due to a more pronounced summer drought period in this respective year. We observed a significant difference between the irrigation and additional drought or control treatment: irrigated trees emitted 82% more monoterpenes during the drought period 2006 than the trees of the other treatments. However, no significant effect on monoterpene emission was observed between normal and additional drought treatments, despite a significant effect on leaf water potential and photochemical efficiency. During the development of drought, monoterpene emissions responded exponentially rather than linearly to decreasing leaf water potential. Emissions rapidly declined when the water potential dropped below −2 MPa and photosynthesis was persistently inhibited. Monoterpene synthase activities measured in vitro showed no clear reduction during the same period. From our results we conclude that drought significantly reduces monoterpene fluxes of Mediterranean Holm oak forest into the atmosphere due to a lack of primary substrates coming from photosynthetic processes.

  1. Effects of indole alkaloids on multidrug resistance and labeling of P-glycoprotein by a photoaffinity analog of vinblastine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, W T; Cirtain, M C; Glover, C J; Felsted, R L; Safa, A R

    1988-06-30

    Multidrug resistant cells are characterized by decreased drug accumulation and retention, thought to be mediated by a high molecular weight glycoprotein, P-glycoprotein (P-gp). Agents such as verapamil have been shown to increase anticancer drug cytotoxicity and increase the amount of drug accumulated and retained by such cells. We show here that in addition to verapamil, reserpine, chloroquine, quinine, quinacrine, yohimbine, vindoline, and catharanthine also enhance the cytotoxicity of vinblastine (VLB) in a multidrug resistant, human leukemic cell line, CEM/VLB1K, described here for the first time. These cells express P-gp as a doublet that is photoaffinity labeled by the analog of VLB, N(p-azido-[3-125I]salicyl)-N'-beta-aminoethylvindesine ([125I]NASV). Both reserpine and, to a lesser extent, verapamil, compete with [125I]NASV for binding to P-gp. We also found that chloroquine, quinacrine, vindoline, and catharanthine, each of which enhanced VLB cytotoxicity in CEM/VLB1K cells by 10- to 15-fold, similarly inhibited [125I]NASV labeling of P-gp. However, neither quinine nor yohimbine inhibited this labeling, and the inhibition produced by catharanthine and vindoline was the greatest or exclusively on the lower band of the P-gp doublet. Our results suggest a complex relationship between the ability of a compound to modulate MDR and its ability to compete for binding to P-gp.

  2. 云南萝芙木叶吲哚生物碱%Indole Alkaloids from the Leaves of Rauvolfia yunnanensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿长安; 刘锡葵

    2010-01-01

    从栽培云南萝芙木(Rauvolfia yunnanensis Tsiang)叶的95%乙醇提取物中分离得到11个吲哚类生物碱: Caberine(1), 19-Ethoxyl-1-demethyl-Δ1-17-acetylajmaline(2), Vellosimine(3), β-Yohimbine(4), Yohimbine(5), Vinorine(6), Picrinine(7), Nareline(8), Akuammicine(9), Strictamine(10), Reserpine(11). 采用UV, IR, MS和1D, 2D NMR方法对它们的结构进行了鉴定, 其中化合物2为新的吲哚生物碱, 化合物1, 8和9为首次从该属植物中分离得到.

  3. Indole prevents Escherichia coli cell division by modulating membrane potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimerel, Catalin; Field, Christopher M; Piñero-Fernandez, Silvia; Keyser, Ulrich F; Summers, David K

    2012-07-01

    Indole is a bacterial signalling molecule that blocks E. coli cell division at concentrations of 3-5 mM. We have shown that indole is a proton ionophore and that this activity is key to the inhibition of division. By reducing the electrochemical potential across the cytoplasmic membrane of E. coli, indole deactivates MinCD oscillation and prevents formation of the FtsZ ring that is a prerequisite for division. This is the first example of a natural ionophore regulating a key biological process. Our findings have implications for our understanding of membrane biology, bacterial cell cycle control and potentially for the design of antibiotics that target the cell membrane.

  4. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Novel Phosphatidylcholine Analogues Containing Monoterpene Acids as Potent Antiproliferative Agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Gliszczyńska

    Full Text Available The synthesis of novel phosphatidylcholines with geranic and citronellic acids in sn-1 and sn-2 positions is described. The structured phospholipids were obtained in high yields (59-87% and evaluated in vitro for their cytotoxic activity against several cancer cell lines of different origin: MV4-11, A-549, MCF-7, LOVO, LOVO/DX, HepG2 and also towards non-cancer cell line BALB/3T3 (normal mice fibroblasts. The phosphatidylcholines modified with monoterpene acid showed a significantly higher antiproliferative activity than free monoterpene acids. The highest activity was observed for the terpene-phospholipids containing the isoprenoid acids in sn-1 position of phosphatidylcholine and palmitic acid in sn-2.

  5. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Novel Phosphatidylcholine Analogues Containing Monoterpene Acids as Potent Antiproliferative Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gliszczyńska, Anna; Niezgoda, Natalia; Gładkowski, Witold; Czarnecka, Marta; Świtalska, Marta; Wietrzyk, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of novel phosphatidylcholines with geranic and citronellic acids in sn-1 and sn-2 positions is described. The structured phospholipids were obtained in high yields (59–87%) and evaluated in vitro for their cytotoxic activity against several cancer cell lines of different origin: MV4-11, A-549, MCF-7, LOVO, LOVO/DX, HepG2 and also towards non-cancer cell line BALB/3T3 (normal mice fibroblasts). The phosphatidylcholines modified with monoterpene acid showed a significantly higher antiproliferative activity than free monoterpene acids. The highest activity was observed for the terpene-phospholipids containing the isoprenoid acids in sn-1 position of phosphatidylcholine and palmitic acid in sn-2. PMID:27310666

  6. Selective removal of monoterpenes from bergamot oil by inclusion in deoxycholic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantin, Giancarlo; Fogagnolo, Marco; Maietti, Silvia; Rossetti, Stefano

    2010-05-12

    A new approach for removing monoterpenes (MTs) from bergamot oil by selective inclusion in deoxycholic acid (DCA) is proposed. The inclusion process is very efficient, the included fraction being composed mainly of limonene (71.7%) and gamma-terpinene (19.8%). On the other hand, the deterpenated bergamot oil fraction showed for the linalool and linalyl acetate derivatives significant increases from 16.6 and 21.4% to 18.3 and 42.2%, respectively. The major advantages of this methodology are its simplicity, the mild conditions employed, and the quantitative recovery of both host (DCA) and guest (monoterpenes) compounds. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermal gravimetry (TG), powder X-ray diffractometry (XRPD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and proton magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR) analysis were used to investigate and characterize the inclusion compounds.

  7. Monoterpenes in the glandular trichomes of tomato are synthesized from a neryl diphosphate precursor rather than geranyl diphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilmiller, Anthony L; Schauvinhold, Ines; Larson, Matthew; Xu, Richard; Charbonneau, Amanda L; Schmidt, Adam; Wilkerson, Curtis; Last, Robert L; Pichersky, Eran

    2009-06-30

    We identified a cis-prenyltransferase gene, neryl diphosphate synthase 1 (NDPS1), that is expressed in cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) cultivar M82 type VI glandular trichomes and encodes an enzyme that catalyzes the formation of neryl diphosphate from isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate. mRNA for a terpene synthase gene, phellandrene synthase 1 (PHS1), was also identified in these glands. It encodes an enzyme that uses neryl diphosphate to produce beta-phellandrene as the major product as well as a variety of other monoterpenes. The profile of monoterpenes produced by PHS1 is identical with the monoterpenes found in type VI glands. PHS1 and NDPS1 map to chromosome 8, and the presence of a segment of chromosome 8 derived from Solanum pennellii LA0716 causes conversion from the M82 gland monoterpene pattern to that characteristic of LA0716 plants. The data indicate that, contrary to the textbook view of geranyl diphosphate as the "universal" substrate of monoterpene synthases, in tomato glands neryl diphosphate serves as a precursor for the synthesis of monoterpenes.

  8. Insecticidal Constituents and Activity of Alkaloids from Cynanchum mongolicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yang; Liu, Pingping; Yang, Rui; Zhang, Liu; Chen, Hongxing; Camara, Ibrahima; Liu, Yiqing; Shi, Wangpeng

    2015-09-21

    Based on MS and NMR data and bioassay-guided tracing, three insecticidal alkaloids I, II and III from Cynanchum mongolicum were identified to be antofine N-oxide, antofine and tylophorine. Alkaloid I was more toxic than alkaloids II and III, but they were less active against Spodoptera litura than total alkaloids. The contact toxicity from these alkaloids against the aphid Lipaphis erysimi was significant, as the 24 h-LC50 values of alkaloids I, II, III and total alkaloids were 292.48, 367.21, 487.791 and 163.52 mg/L, respectively. The development disruption of S. litura larvae was tested, the pupation and emergence rates of S. litura decreased and the acute mortality of S. litura increased significantly by day 3 after being injected in their body cavity with 10-40 mg/L of total alkaloid. The ecdysone titer of treated S. litura larvae and prepupae declined with increasing alkaloid concentration. The alkaloids of Cynanchum mongolicum are potential insect growth inhibitors.

  9. Seasonal influence on gene expression of monoterpene synthases in Salvia officinalis (Lamiaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grausgruber-Gröger, Sabine; Schmiderer, Corinna; Steinborn, Ralf; Novak, Johannes

    2012-03-01

    Garden sage (Salvia officinalis L., Lamiaceae) is one of the most important medicinal and aromatic plants and possesses antioxidant, antimicrobial, spasmolytic, astringent, antihidrotic and specific sensorial properties. The essential oil of the plant, formed mainly in very young leaves, is in part responsible for these activities. It is mainly composed of the monoterpenes 1,8-cineole, α- and β-thujone and camphor synthesized by the 1,8-cineole synthase, the (+)-sabinene synthase and the (+)-bornyl diphosphate synthase, respectively, and is produced and stored in epidermal glands. In this study, the seasonal influence on the formation of the main monoterpenes in young, still expanding leaves of field-grown sage plants was studied in two cultivars at the level of mRNA expression, analyzed by qRT-PCR, and at the level of end-products, analyzed by gas chromatography. All monoterpene synthases and monoterpenes were significantly influenced by cultivar and season. 1,8-Cineole synthase and its end product 1,8-cineole remained constant until August and then decreased slightly. The thujones increased steadily during the vegetative period. The transcript level of their corresponding terpene synthase, however, showed its maximum in the middle of the vegetative period and declined afterwards. Camphor remained constant until August and then declined, exactly correlated with the mRNA level of the corresponding terpene synthase. In summary, terpene synthase mRNA expression and respective end product levels were concordant in the case of 1,8-cineole (r=0.51 and 0.67 for the two cultivars, respectively; p<0.05) and camphor (r=0.75 and 0.82; p<0.05) indicating basically transcriptional control, but discordant for α-/β-thujone (r=-0.05 and 0.42; p=0.87 and 0.13, respectively).

  10. Evaluating the Potential Importance of Monoterpene Degradation for Global Acetone Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelp, M. M.; Brewer, J.; Keller, C. A.; Fischer, E. V.

    2015-12-01

    Acetone is one of the most abundant volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the atmosphere, but estimates of the global source of acetone vary widely. A better understanding of acetone sources is essential because acetone serves as a source of HOx in the upper troposphere and as a precursor to the NOx reservoir species peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN). Although there are primary anthropogenic and pyrogenic sources of acetone, the dominant acetone sources are thought to be from direct biogenic emissions and photochemical production, particularly from the oxidation of iso-alkanes. Recent work suggests that the photochemical degradation of monoterpenes may also represent a significant contribution to global acetone production. We investigate that hypothesis using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model. In this work, we calculate the emissions of eight terpene species (α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene, Δ3-carene, myrcene, sabinene, trans-β-ocimene, and an 'other monoterpenes' category which contains 34 other trace species) and couple these with upper and lower bound literature yields from species-specific chamber studies. We compare the simulated acetone distributions against in situ acetone measurements from a global suite of NASA aircraft campaigns. When simulating an upper bound on yields, the model-to-measurement comparison improves for North America at both the surface and in the upper troposphere. The inclusion of acetone production from monoterpene degradation also improves the ability of the model to reproduce observations of acetone in East Asian outflow. However, in general the addition of monoterpenes degrades the model comparison for the Southern Hemisphere.

  11. European emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes from the Last Glacial Maximum to present

    OpenAIRE

    Schurgers, G.; Hickler, T.; Miller, P. A.; Arneth, A.

    2009-01-01

    Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC), such as isoprene and monoterpenes, play an important role in atmospheric processes. BVOC species are oxidized in the atmosphere and influence levels of ozone. The less volatile amongst the BVOC and their oxidation products are important for the formation and growth of secondary biogenic aerosol. In this way, the earth's radiation balance is affected.

    Geographic distribution and temporal changes in BVOC emissions are highly uncer...

  12. Improving monoterpene geraniol production through geranyl diphosphate synthesis regulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianzhi; Bao, Xiaoming; Li, Chen; Shen, Yu; Hou, Jin

    2016-05-01

    Monoterpenes have wide applications in the food, cosmetics, and medicine industries and have recently received increased attention as advanced biofuels. However, compared with sesquiterpenes, monoterpene production is still lagging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, geraniol, a valuable acyclic monoterpene alcohol, was synthesized in S. cerevisiae. We evaluated three geraniol synthases in S. cerevisiae, and the geraniol synthase Valeriana officinalis (tVoGES), which lacked a plastid-targeting peptide, yielded the highest geraniol production. To improve geraniol production, synthesis of the precursor geranyl diphosphate (GPP) was regulated by comparing three specific GPP synthase genes derived from different plants and the endogenous farnesyl diphosphate synthase gene variants ERG20 (G) (ERG20 (K197G) ) and ERG20 (WW) (ERG20 (F96W-N127W) ), and controlling endogenous ERG20 expression, coupled with increasing the expression of the mevalonate pathway by co-overexpressing IDI1, tHMG1, and UPC2-1. The results showed that overexpressing ERG20 (WW) and strengthening the mevalonate pathway significantly improved geraniol production, while expressing heterologous GPP synthase genes or down-regulating endogenous ERG20 expression did not show positive effect. In addition, we constructed an Erg20p(F96W-N127W)-tVoGES fusion protein, and geraniol production reached 66.2 mg/L after optimizing the amino acid linker and the order of the proteins. The best strain yielded 293 mg/L geraniol in a fed-batch cultivation, a sevenfold improvement over the highest titer previously reported in an engineered S. cerevisiae strain. Finally, we showed that the toxicity of geraniol limited its production. The platform developed here can be readily used to synthesize other monoterpenes.

  13. Remote sensing estimation of isoprene and monoterpene emissions generated by natural vegetation in Monterrey, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastelum, Sandra L; Mejía-Velázquez, G M; Lozano-García, D Fabián

    2016-06-01

    In addition to oxygen, hydrocarbons are the most reactive chemical compounds produced by plants into the atmosphere. These compounds are part of the family of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and are discharged in a great variety of forms. Among the VOCs produced by natural sources such as vegetation, the most studied until today are the isoprene and monoterpene. These substances can play an important role in the chemical balance of the atmosphere of a region. In this project, we develop a methodology to estimate the natural (vegetation) emission of isoprene and monoterpenes and applied it to the Monterrey Metropolitan Area, Mexico and its surrounding areas. Landsat-TM data was used to identify the dominant vegetation communities and field work to determine the foliage biomass density of key species. The studied communities were submontane scrub, oak, and pine forests and a combination of both. We carried out the estimation of emissions for isoprene and monoterpenes compounds in the different plant communities, with two different criteria: (1) taking into account the average foliage biomass density obtained from the various sample point in each vegetation community, and (2) using the foliage biomass density obtained for each transect, associated to an individual spectral class within a particular vegetation type. With this information, we obtained emission maps for each case. The results show that the main producers of isoprene are the communities that include species of the genus Quercus, located mainly on the Sierra Madre Oriental and Sierra de Picachos, with average isoprene emissions of 314.6 ton/day and 207.3 ton/day for the two methods utilized. The higher estimates of monoterpenes were found in the submontane scrub areas distributed along the valley of the metropolitan zone, with an estimated average emissions of 47.1 ton/day and 181.4 tons for the two methods respectively.

  14. Novel indole sulfides as potent HIV-1 NNRTIs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigg, Siobhan; Pribut, Nicole; Basson, Adriaan E; Avgenikos, Moscos; Venter, Reinhardt; Blackie, Margaret A; van Otterlo, Willem A L; Pelly, Stephen C

    2016-03-15

    In a previous communication we described a series of indole based NNRTIs which were potent inhibitors of HIV replication, both for the wild type and K103N strains of the virus. However, the methyl ether functionality on these compounds, which was crucial for potency, was susceptible to acid promoted indole assisted SN1 substitution. This particular problem did not bode well for an orally bioavailable drug. Here we describe bioisosteric replacement of this problematic functional group, leading to a series of compounds which are potent inhibitors of HIV replication, and are acid stable.

  15. Indole - the scent of a healthy 'inner soil'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berstad, Arnold; Raa, Jan; Valeur, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Tryptophan is an essential amino acid with an indole nucleus. Humans cannot produce this amino acid themselves, but must obtain it through their diet. Much attention is currently paid to the wide physiological and clinical implications of the tryptophan-derived substances, serotonin and kynurenines, generated by human enzymes following the intestinal absorption of tryptophan. However, even before being absorbed, several microbial metabolites of tryptophan are formed, mainly from 'malabsorbed' (incompletely digested) proteins within the colon. The normal smell of human faeces is largely due to indole, one of the major metabolites. Recent studies indicate that this foul-smelling substance is also of utmost importance for our health.

  16. The contribution of wine-derived monoterpene glycosides to retronasal odour during tasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Mango; Black, Cory A; Barker, Alice; Pearson, Wes; Hayasaka, Yoji; Francis, I Leigh

    2017-10-01

    This study investigated the sensory significance of monoterpene glycosides during tasting, by retronasal perception of odorant aglycones released in-mouth. Monoterpene glycosides were isolated from Gewürztraminer and Riesling juices and wines, chemically characterised and studied using sensory time-intensity methodology, together with a synthesised monoterpene glucoside. When assessed in model wine at five times wine-like concentration, Gewürztraminer glycosides and geranyl glucoside gave significant fruity flavour, although at wine-like concentrations, or in the presence of wine volatiles, the effect was not significant. Gewürztraminer glycosides, geranyl glucoside and guaiacyl glucoside were investigated using a sensory panel (n=39), revealing large inter-individual variability, with 77% of panellists responding to at least one glycoside. The study showed for the first time that grape-derived glycosides can contribute perceptible fruity flavour, providing a means of enhancing flavour in wines, and confirms the results of previous studies that the effect is highly variable across individuals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Product Variability of the ‘Cineole Cassette'Monoterpene Synthases of Related Nicotiana Species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anke F(a)hnrich; Katrin Krause; Birgit Piechulla

    2011-01-01

    Nicotiana species of the section Alatae characteristically emit the floral scent compounds of the ‘cineole cassere' comprising 1,8-cineole,limonene,myrcene,α-pinene,β-pinene,sabinene,and α-terpineol.We successfully isolated genes of Nicotiana alata and Nicotiana langsdorfii that encoded enzymes,which produced the characteristic monoterpenes of this ‘cineole cassette' with α-terpineol being most abundant in the volatile spectra.The amino acid sequences of both terpineol synthases were 99% identical.The enzymes cluster in a monophyletic branch together with the closely related cineole synthase of Nicotiana suaveolens and monoterpene synthase 1 of Solanum lycopersicum.The cyclization reactions (α-terpineol to 1,8-cineole) of the terpineol synthases of N.alata and N.langsdorfii were less efficient compared to the ‘cineole cassette′ monoterpene synthases of Arabidopsis thaliana,N.suaveolens,Salvia fruticosa,Salvia officinalis,and Citrus unshiu.The terpineol synthases of N.alata and N.langsdorfii were localized in pistils and in the adaxial and abaxial epidermis of the petals.The enzyme activities reached their maxima at the second day after anthesis when flowers were fully opened and the enzyme activity in N.alata was highest at the transition from day to night (diurnal rhythm).

  18. In situ measurements of isoprene and monoterpenes within a south-east Asian tropical rainforest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Jones

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs emitted from tropical rainforests comprise a substantial fraction of global atmospheric VOC emissions, however there are only relatively limited measurements of these species in tropical rainforest regions. We present observations of isoprene, α-pinene, camphene, Δ-3-carene, γ-terpinene and limonene, as well as oxygenated VOCs (OVOCs of biogenic origin such as methacrolein, in ambient air above a tropical rainforest in Malaysian Borneo during the Oxidant and Particle Photochemical Processes above a south-east Asian tropical rainforest (OP3 project in 2008. Daytime composition was dominated by isoprene, with an average mixing ratio of the order of ~1 ppb. γ-terpinene, limonene and camphene were the most abundant monoterpenes, with average daytime mixing ratios of 102, 71 and 66 ppt respectively, and with an average monoterpene toisoprene ratio of 0.3 during sunlit hours, compared to 2.0 at night. Limonene and camphene abundances were seen to be related to both temperature and light conditions. In contrast, γ-terpinene emission continued into the late afternoon/evening, under relatively low temperature and light conditions. The contributions of isoprene, monoterpenes and other classes of VOC to the volatile carbon budget and OH reactivity have been summarised for this rainforest location. We observe good agreement between surface and aircraft measurements of boundary layer isoprene and methacrolein above the natural rainforest, suggesting that the ground-level observations are broadly representative of isoprene emissions from this region.

  19. Stereochemical mechanism of two sabinene hydrate synthases forming antipodal monoterpenes in thyme (Thymus vulgaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Sandra T; Köllner, Tobias G; Asbach, Julia; Degenhardt, Jörg

    2013-01-15

    The essential oil of Thymus vulgaris consists of a complex blend of mono- and sesquiterpenes that provides the plant with its characteristic aromatic odor. Several chemotypes have been described for thyme. In this study, we identified two enzymes of the sabinene hydrate chemotype which are responsible for the biosynthesis of its major monoterpene alcohols, (1S,2R,4S)-(Z)-sabinene hydrate and (1S,2S,4R)-(E)-sabinene hydrate. Both TPS6 and TPS7 are multiproduct enzymes that formed 16 monoterpenes and thus cover almost the whole monoterpene spectrum of the chemotype. Although the product spectra of both enzymes are similar, they form opposing enantiomers of their chiral products. Incubation of the enzymes with the potential reaction intermediates revealed that the stereospecificity of TPS6 and TPS7 is determined by the formation of the first intermediate, linalyl diphosphate. Since TPS6 and TPS7 shared an amino acid sequence identity of 85%, a mutagenesis study was employed to identify the amino acids that determine the stereoselectivity. One amino acid position had a major influence on the stereochemistry of the formed products. Based on comparative models of TPS6 and TPS7 protein structures with the GPP substrate docked in the active site pocket, the influence of this amino acid residue on the reaction mechanism is discussed.

  20. Biocontrol potential of essential oil monoterpenes against housefly, Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Peeyush; Mishra, Sapna; Malik, Anushree; Satya, Santosh

    2014-02-01

    Housefly (Musca domestica L.), one of the most common insects in human settlements, has been associated as vectors for various food-borne pathogens, causing food spoilage and disease transmission. The control of housefly was attempted using plant monoterpenes; menthone, menthol, menthyl acetate, limonene, citral and 1,8-cineole, against different life stages of housefly. Bioefficacy against housefly adults revealed highest repellent activity by menthol (95.6 percent) and menthone (83.3 percent). Against housefly larvae, menthol with an LC90 of 0.02 µl/cm(2) in contact toxicity assay and menthone with a LC90 value of 5.4 µl/L in fumigation assay were found to be most effective control agent. With respect to pupicidal activity, superior performance was shown by menthol, citral and 1,8-cineole in contact toxicity assay and citral and 1,8-cineole in fumigation assay. Limonene was found to be the poorest performer in all the assays. Overall, highest efficacy observed for menthol and menthone in various bioassays was in agreement with the results of essential oil activity obtained previously. Significant activity of monoterpenes against various life stages of housefly demonstrates their potential as excellent insecticides with prospects of monoterpenes being developed into eco-friendly and acceptable products for housefly control.

  1. Emissions of isoprene, monoterpene and short-chained carbonyl compounds from Eucalyptus spp. in southern Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Anthony J.; Adams, Mark A.; Bleby, Tim M.; Rennenberg, Heinz; Steigner, Dominik; Steinbrecher, Rainer; Kreuzwieser, Jürgen

    Eucalypts are among the highest emitters of biogenic volatile organic compounds, yet there is relatively little data available from field studies of this genus. Emissions of isoprene, monoterpenes and the short-chained carbonyls formaldehyde, acetaldehyde and acetone were determined from four species ( Eucalyptus camaldulensis, Eucalyptus globulus, Eucalyptus grandis, and Eucalytpus viminalis) in Australia. A smaller comparative study was conducted on E. camaldulensis in south-eastern Australia. Carbonyl emissions, reported here for the first time from eucalypts, were generally comparable with rates reported for other species, with diurnal emissions peaking at about 4, 75 and 34 nmol m -2 min -1 for acetone, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde respectively. There was wide variation in diurnal isoprene and monoterpene emissions between species, but under standard conditions, isoprene emissions were much lower than previous reports. Conversely, standard emission rates of monoterpenes were as much as six times greater than previous reports for some species. Emission of each carbonyl was correlated with its ambient concentration across different species, but more weakly related to temperature. Acetaldehyde emission in particular was significantly correlated with transpiration, but not with sap flow or with ethanol concentrations in xylem sap, suggesting fermentation within the leaf and stomatal conductance are primary controlling processes. Differences in acetaldehyde exchange velocities between sites, in addition to transpiration differences, suggest stomata may indeed exert long term emission regulation, in contrast to compounds for which no biological sink exists.

  2. Paramagnetic nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation and molecular mechanics studies of the chloroperoxidase-indole complex: insights into the mechanism of chloroperoxidase-catalyzed regioselective oxidation of indole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; He, Qinghao; Chatfield, David; Wang, Xiaotang

    2013-05-28

    To unravel the mechanism of chloroperoxidase (CPO)-catalyzed regioselective oxidation of indole, we studied the structure of the CPO-indole complex using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation measurements and computational techniques. The dissociation constant (KD) of the CPO-indole complex was calculated to be approximately 21 mM. The distances (r) between protons of indole and the heme iron calculated via NMR relaxation measurements and molecular docking revealed that the pyrrole ring of indole is oriented toward the heme with its 2-H pointing directly at the heme iron. Both KD and r values are independent of pH in the range of 3.0-6.5. The stability and structure of the CPO-indole complex are also independent of the concentration of chloride or iodide ion. Molecular docking suggests the formation of a hydrogen bond between the NH group of indole and the carboxyl O of Glu 183 in the binding of indole to CPO. Simulated annealing of the CPO-indole complex using r values from NMR experiments as distance restraints reveals that the van der Waals interactions were much stronger than the Coulomb interactions in the binding of indole to CPO, indicating that the association of indole with CPO is primarily governed by hydrophobic rather than electrostatic interactions. This work provides the first experimental and theoretical evidence of the long-sought mechanism that leads to the "unexpected" regioselectivity of the CPO-catalyzed oxidation of indole. The structure of the CPO-indole complex will serve as a lighthouse in guiding the design of CPO mutants with tailor-made activities for biotechnological applications.

  3. Role of Indole Production on Virulence of Vibrio cholerae Using Galleria mellonella Larvae Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuidate, Taiyeebah; Tansila, Natta; Saengkerdsub, Suwat; Kongreung, Jetnaphang; Bakkiyaraj, Dhamodharan; Vuddhakul, Varaporn

    2016-09-01

    Cell to cell communication facilitated by chemical signals plays crucial roles in regulating various cellular functions in bacteria. Indole, one such signaling molecule has been demonstrated to control various bacterial phenotypes such as biofilm formation and virulence in diverse bacteria including Vibrio cholerae. The present study explores some key factors involved in indole production and the subsequent pathogenesis of V. cholerae. Indole production was higher at 37 °C than at 30 °C, although the growth at 37 °C was slightly higher. A positive correlation was observed between indole production and biofilm formation in V. cholerae. Maximum indole production was detected at pH 7. There was no significant difference in indole production between clinical and environmental V. cholerae isolates, although indole production in one environmental isolate was significantly different. Both growth and indole production showed relevant changes with differences in salinity. An indole negative mutant strain was constructed using transposon mutagenesis and the direct effect of indole on the virulence of V. cholerae was evaluated using Galleria mellonella larvae model. Comparison to the wild type strain, the mutant significantly reduced the mortality of G. mellonella larvae which regained its virulence after complementation with exogenous indole. A gene involved in indole production and the virulence of V. cholerae was identified.

  4. Controlled indole-3-acetaldoxime production through ethanol-induced expression of CYP79B2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, M.D.; Fuller, V.L.; Hansen, Bjarne Gram

    2009-01-01

    Indole-3-acetaldoxime (IAOx) is a key branching point between primary and secondary metabolism. IAOx serves as an intermediate in the biosynthesis of indole glucosinolates (I-GLSs), camalexin and the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA). The cytochrome P450s CYP79B2 and CYP79B3 catalyze the c...

  5. Regulation of Indole Signalling during the Transition of E. coli from Exponential to Stationary Phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaimster, Hannah; Summers, David

    2015-01-01

    During the transition from exponential to stationary phase E. coli produces a substantial quantity of the small, aromatic signalling molecule indole. In LB medium the supernatant indole concentration reaches a maximum of 0.5-1 mM. At this concentration indole has been implicated in many processes inducing acid resistance and the modulation of virulence. It has recently been shown that cell-associated indole transiently reaches a very high concentration (approx. 60 mM) during stationary phase entry, presumably because indole is being produced more rapidly than it can leave the cell. It is proposed that this indole pulse inhibits growth and cell division, causing the culture to enter stationary phase before nutrients are completely exhausted, with benefits for survival in long-term stationary phase. This study asks how E. coli cells rapidly upregulate indole production during stationary phase entry and why the indole pulse has a duration of only 10-15 min. We find that at the start of the pulse tryptophanase synthesis is triggered by glucose depletion and that this is correlates with the up-regulation of indole synthesis. The magnitude and duration of the resulting indole pulse are dependent upon the availability of exogenous tryptophan. Indole production stops when all the available tryptophan is depleted and the cell-associated indole equilibrates with the supernatant.

  6. Pyridinium tribromide catalyzed condensation of indoles and aldehydes to form bisindolylalkanes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Yang; Zheng Lan Yin; Ban Lai Ouyang; Yi Yuan Peng

    2011-01-01

    An efficient synthetic method for bis(indol-3-yl)alkane derivatives has been developed. In the presence of 5 mol% of pyridinium tribromide (PTB), the condensation of indoles and aldehydes proceeded smoothly under mild conditions, giving rise to the corresponding bis(indol-3-yl)alkanes in good to excellent yields.

  7. Alkaloids Isolated from Natural Herbs as the Anticancer Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Jian Lu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Alkaloids are important chemical compounds that serve as a rich reservoir for drug discovery. Several alkaloids isolated from natural herbs exhibit antiproliferation and antimetastasis effects on various types of cancers both in vitro and in vivo. Alkaloids, such as camptothecin and vinblastine, have already been successfully developed into anticancer drugs. This paper focuses on the naturally derived alkaloids with prospective anticancer properties, such as berberine, evodiamine, matrine, piperine, sanguinarine, and tetrandrine, and summarizes the mechanisms of action of these compounds. Based on the information in the literature that is summarized in this paper, the use of alkaloids as anticancer agents is very promising, but more research and clinical trials are necessary before final recommendations on specific alkaloids can be made.

  8. Chlorinated alkaloids in Menispermum dauricum DC: root culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Y; Babiker, H A; Saisho, T; Furumoto, T; Inanaga, S; Kato, M

    2001-05-18

    Feeding experiments using (36)Cl showed that Menispermum dauricum root culture produces four alkaloids containing chlorine. They included the novel alkaloids dauricumine and dauricumidine as well as the known alkaloids acutumine and acutumidine. The structures of novel alkaloids were established by spectroscopic, crystallographic, and chemical methods. These four alkaloids were labeled with (36)Cl, isolated, and fed independently to root cultures. Mutual conversion between acutumine and acutumidine, and between dauricumine and dauricumidine by N-methylation and N-demethylation, was demonstrated. Moreover, dauricumine was converted to acutumine and acutumidine. Epimerization of acutumidine to dauricumidine or vice versa was not observed. These results suggest that dauricumine is the first chlorinated alkaloid formed in cultured M. dauricum roots. Skewed distribution of radioactivity derived from labeled dauricumine is proof that epimerization at C-1 proceeds at a lower rate than N-demethylation.

  9. Recent developments in the chemistry of quinazolinone alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kshirsagar, U A

    2015-09-28

    Quinazolinones, an important class of fused heterocyclic alkaloids has attracted high attention in organic and medicinal chemistry due to their significant and wide range of biological activities. There are approximately 150 naturally occurring quinazolinone alkaloids known till 2005. Several new quinazolinone alkaloids (∼55) have been isolated in the last decade. Natural quinazolinones with exotic structural features and remarkable biological activities have incited a lot of activities in the synthetic community towards the development of new synthetic strategies and approaches for the total synthesis of quinazolinone alkaloids. This review is focused on these advances in the chemistry of quinazolinone alkaloids in the last decade. This article covers the newly isolated quinazolinone natural products with their biological activities and the recently reported total syntheses of quinazolinone alkaloids from 2006 to 2015.

  10. Toxicosis by Plant Alkaloids in Humans and Animals in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo J. Diaz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Due to its tropical location, chains of mountains, inter-Andean valleys, Amazon basin area, eastern plains and shores on both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, Colombia has many ecosystems and the second largest plant biodiversity in the world. Many plant species, both native and naturalized, are currently recognized as toxic for both animals and humans, and some of them are known to cause their toxic effects due to their alkaloid content. Among these, there are plants containing the hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids, neurotoxins such as the indolizidine alkaloid swainsonine and the piperidine alkaloids coniine and γ-coniceine and tropane alkaloids. Unfortunately, the research in toxic plants in Colombia is not nearly proportional to its plant biodiversity and the scientific information available is only very scarce. The present review aims at summarizing the scarce information about plant alkaloid toxicosis in animals and humans in Colombia.

  11. Toxicosis by Plant Alkaloids in Humans and Animals in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Gonzalo J.

    2015-01-01

    Due to its tropical location, chains of mountains, inter-Andean valleys, Amazon basin area, eastern plains and shores on both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, Colombia has many ecosystems and the second largest plant biodiversity in the world. Many plant species, both native and naturalized, are currently recognized as toxic for both animals and humans, and some of them are known to cause their toxic effects due to their alkaloid content. Among these, there are plants containing the hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids, neurotoxins such as the indolizidine alkaloid swainsonine and the piperidine alkaloids coniine and γ-coniceine and tropane alkaloids. Unfortunately, the research in toxic plants in Colombia is not nearly proportional to its plant biodiversity and the scientific information available is only very scarce. The present review aims at summarizing the scarce information about plant alkaloid toxicosis in animals and humans in Colombia. PMID:26690479

  12. Toxicosis by Plant Alkaloids in Humans and Animals in Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Gonzalo J

    2015-12-11

    Due to its tropical location, chains of mountains, inter-Andean valleys, Amazon basin area, eastern plains and shores on both the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans, Colombia has many ecosystems and the second largest plant biodiversity in the world. Many plant species, both native and naturalized, are currently recognized as toxic for both animals and humans, and some of them are known to cause their toxic effects due to their alkaloid content. Among these, there are plants containing the hepatotoxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids, neurotoxins such as the indolizidine alkaloid swainsonine and the piperidine alkaloids coniine and γ-coniceine and tropane alkaloids. Unfortunately, the research in toxic plants in Colombia is not nearly proportional to its plant biodiversity and the scientific information available is only very scarce. The present review aims at summarizing the scarce information about plant alkaloid toxicosis in animals and humans in Colombia.

  13. CCN activity and droplet growth kinetics of fresh and aged monoterpene secondary organic aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Engelhart

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability of secondary organic aerosol (SOA produced from the ozonolysis of α-pinene and monoterpene mixtures (α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene and 3-carene to become cloud droplets was investigated. Monoterpene SOA is quite active and would likely be a good source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN in the atmosphere. A static CCN counter and a Scanning Mobility CCN Analyser (a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer coupled with a Continuous Flow counter were used for the CCN measurements. A decrease in CCN activation diameter for α-pinene SOA of approximately 3 nm h−1 was observed as the aerosol continued to react with oxidants. Hydroxyl radicals further oxidize the SOA particles thereby enhancing the particle CCN activity with time. The initial concentrations of ozone and monoterpene precursor (for concentrations lower than 40 ppb do not appear to affect the activity of the resulting SOA. Köhler Theory Analysis (KTA is used to infer the molar mass of the SOA sampled online and offline from atomized filter samples. KTA suggests that the aged aerosol (both from α-pinene and the mixed monoterpene oxidation is primarily water-soluble (around 70–80%, with an estimated average molar mass of 180±55 g mol−1 (consistent with existing SOA speciation studies. CCN activity measurements of the SOA mixed with (NH42SO4 suggest that the organic can depress surface tension by as much as 10 nM m−1 (with respect to pure water. The droplet growth kinetics of SOA samples are similar to (NH42SO4, except at low supersaturation, where SOA tends to grow more slowly. The CCN activity of α-pinene and mixed monoterpene SOA can be modelled by a very simple implementation of Köhler theory, assuming complete dissolution of the particles, no dissociation into ions, molecular weight of 180 g mol−1, density of 1.5 g cm−3, and surface tension to

  14. CCN activity and droplet growth kinetics of fresh and aged monoterpene secondary organic aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Engelhart

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The ability of secondary organic aerosol (SOA produced from the ozonolysis of α-pinene and monoterpene mixtures (α-pinene, β-pinene, limonene and 3-carene to become cloud droplets was investigated. A static CCN counter and a Scanning Mobility CCN Analyser (a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer coupled with a Continuous Flow counter were used for the CCN measurements. Consistent with previous studies monoterpene SOA is quite active and would likely be a good source of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN in the atmosphere. A decrease in CCN activation diameter for α-pinene SOA of approximately 3 nm hr−1 was observed as the aerosol continued to react with oxidants. Hydroxyl radicals further oxidize the SOA particles thereby enhancing the particle CCN activity with time. The initial concentrations of ozone and monoterpene precursor (for concentrations lower than 40 ppb do not appear to affect the activity of the resulting SOA. Köhler Theory Analysis (KTA is used to infer the molar mass of the SOA sampled online and offline from atomized filter samples. The estimated average molar mass of online SOA was determined to be 180±55 g mol−1 (consistent with existing SOA speciation studies assuming complete solubility. KTA suggests that the aged aerosol (both from α-pinene and the mixed monoterpene oxidation is primarily water-soluble (around 65%. CCN activity measurements of the SOA mixed with (NH42SO4 suggest that the organic can depress surface tension by as much as 10 N m−1 (with respect to pure water. The droplet growth kinetics of SOA samples are similar to (NH42SO4, except at low supersaturation, where SOA tends to grow more slowly. The CCN activation diameter of α-pinene and mixed monoterpene SOA can be modelled to within 10–15% of experiments by a simple implementation of Köhler theory, assuming complete dissolution of the particles, no

  15. Quantifying environmental stress induced emissions of algal isoprene and monoterpenes using laboratory measurements

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    N. Meskhidze

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We report here production rates of isoprene and monoterpene compounds (α-pinene, β-pinene, camphene and d-limonene from six phytoplankton monocultures as a function of irradiance and temperature. Irradiance experiments were carried out for diatom strains – Thalassiosira weissflogii and Thalassiosira pseudonana; prymnesiophyte strains – Pleurochrysis carterae; dinoflagellate strains – Karenia brevis and Prorocentrum minimum; cryptophyte strains – Rhodomonas salina, while temperature experiments were carried out for diatom strains – Thalassiosira weissflogii and Thalassiosira pseudonana. Phytoplankton species, incubated in a climate-controlled room, were subject to variable light (90 to 900 μmol m−2s−1 and temperature (18 to 30 °C regimes. Compared to isoprene, monoterpene emissions were an order of magnitude lower at all light and temperature levels. Emission rates are normalized by cell count and Chlorophyll a (Chl a content. Diatom strains were the largest emitters, with ~2x1017g (cell−1h−1 (~35 μg (g Chl a−1h−1 for isoprene and ~5x10−19 g (cell−1h−1 (~1μg (g Chl a−1 h−1 for α-pinene. The contribution to the total monoterpene production was ~70% from α-pinene, ~20% for d-limonene, and −2s−1 and a gradual increase at high (>250 μmol m−2s−1 irradiance. Measurements revealed different patterns for time-averaged emissions rates over two successive days. On the first day most of the species showed distinct increase in production rates within the first four hours, while on the second day the emission rates were overall higher, but less variable. The data suggest that enhanced amounts of isoprene and monoterpenes are emitted from phytoplankton as a result of perturbations in environmental conditions that cause disbalance in chloroplasts and forces primary producers to acclimate physiologically. This relationship could be a valuable tool for development of dynamic ecosystem modeling approaches for global

  16. Secondary organic aerosol formation from hydroxyl radical oxidation and ozonolysis of monoterpenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, D. F.; Kaminski, M.; Schlag, P.; Fuchs, H.; Acir, I.-H.; Bohn, B.; Häseler, R.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wang, M. J.; Wegener, R.; Wildt, J.; Wahner, A.; Mentel, Th. F.

    2015-01-01

    Oxidation by hydroxyl radical (OH) and ozonolysis are the two major pathways of daytime biogenic volatile organic compound (BVOC) oxidation and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. In this study, we investigated the particle formation of several common monoterpenes (α-pinene, β-pinene and limonene) by OH-dominated oxidation, which has seldom been investigated. OH oxidation experiments were carried out in the SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction) chamber in Jülich, Germany, at low NOx (0.01 ~ 1 ppbV) and low ozone (O3) concentration (< 20 ppbV). OH concentration and total OH reactivity (kOH) were measured directly, and through this the overall reaction rate of total organics with OH in each reaction system was quantified. Multi-generation reaction process, particle growth, new particle formation (NPF), particle yield and chemical composition were analyzed and compared with that of monoterpene ozonolysis. Multi-generation products were found to be important in OH-dominated SOA formation. The relative role of functionalization and fragmentation in the reaction process of OH oxidation was analyzed by examining the particle mass and the particle size as a function of OH dose. We developed a novel method which quantitatively links particle growth to the reaction rate of OH with total organics in a reaction system. This method was also used to analyze the evolution of functionalization and fragmentation of organics in the particle formation by OH oxidation. It shows that functionalization of organics was dominant in the beginning of the reaction (within two lifetimes of the monoterpene) and fragmentation started to play an important role after that. We compared particle formation from OH oxidation with that from pure ozonolysis. In individual experiments, growth rates of the particle size did not necessarily correlate with the reaction rate of monoterpene with OH and O3. Comparing the size growth rates at the similar reaction rates

  17. Synthesis of the Marine Pyrroloiminoquinone Alkaloids, Discorhabdins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasufumi Wada

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Manynatural products with biologically interesting structures have been isolated from marine animals and plants such as sponges, corals, worms, etc. Some of them are discorhabdin alkaloids. The discorhabdin alkaloids (discorhabdin A-X, isolated from marine sponges, have a unique structure with azacarbocyclic spirocyclohexanone and pyrroloiminoquinone units. Due to their prominent potent antitumor activity, discorhabdins have attracted considerable attention. Many studies have been reported toward the synthesis of discorhabdins. We have accomplished the first total synthesis of discorhabdin A (1, having the strongest activity in vitro among discorhabdins in 2003. In 2009, we have also accomplished the first total synthesis of prianosin B (2, having the 16,17-dehydropyrroloiminoquinone moiety, by a novel dehydrogenation reaction with a catalytic amount of NaN3. These synthetic studies, as well as syntheses of the discorhabdins by various chemists to-date, are reviewed here.

  18. Total synthesis of the Daphniphyllum alkaloid daphenylline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhaoyong; Li, Yong; Deng, Jun; Li, Ang

    2013-08-01

    The Daphniphyllum alkaloids are a large class of natural products isolated from a genus of evergreen plants widely used in Chinese herbal medicine. They display a remarkable range of biological activities, including anticancer, antioxidant, and vasorelaxation properties as well as elevation of nerve growth factor. Daphenylline is a structurally unique member among the predominately aliphatic Daphniphyllum alkaloids, and contains a tetrasubstituted arene moiety mounted on a sterically compact hexacyclic scaffold. Herein, we describe the first total synthesis of daphenylline. A gold-catalysed 6-exo-dig cyclization reaction and a subsequent intramolecular Michael addition reaction, inspired by Dixon's seminal work, were exploited to construct the bridged 6,6,5-tricyclic motif of the natural product at an early stage, and the aromatic moiety was forged through a photoinduced olefin isomerization/6π-electrocyclization cascade followed by an oxidative aromatization process.

  19. Skeletal modifications of [Formula: see text]-carboline alkaloids and their antiviral activity profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Huang, Yuanqiong; Song, Hongjian; Liu, Yuxiu; Wang, Lizhong; Wang, Qingmin

    2016-11-01

    To study the effect of the variation of fused ring size and substitution on the antiviral activity of [Formula: see text]-carboline alkaloids, four types of structurally novel [Formula: see text]-carboline alkaloids analogues, with indole-fused six- to nine-membered-rings motifs, were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for the inhibition of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Bioassay results indicated that most of these analogues had significant anti-TMV activity; especially I-14 (54 [Formula: see text] 3 % at 500 [Formula: see text]g/mL in vitro; 51 [Formula: see text] 2, 45 [Formula: see text] 2, and 42 [Formula: see text] 1 % at 500 [Formula: see text]g/mL in vivo), II-4 (53 [Formula: see text] 1 % at 500 [Formula: see text]g/mL in vitro; 49 [Formula: see text] 2, 57 [Formula: see text] 2, and 48 [Formula: see text] 1 % at 500 [Formula: see text]g/mL in vivo), and II-8 (48 [Formula: see text] 1 % at 500 [Formula: see text]g/mL in vitro; 53 [Formula: see text] 2 %, 56 [Formula: see text] 2 %, and 46 [Formula: see text] 1 % at 500 [Formula: see text]g/mL in vivo), which were more potent vs. TMV than was ribavirin (36 [Formula: see text] 1 % at 500 [Formula: see text]g/mL in vitro; 37 [Formula: see text] 2, 41 [Formula: see text] 2, and 38 [Formula: see text] 1 % at 500 [Formula: see text]g/mL in vivo). The size of the fused ring has important effects on anti-TMV potency, which may be ascribed to conformational differences. The X-ray structures of I-1, I-6, II-8, and III show differing conformational preferences. The most potent compounds can be used as leads for further optimization as antiphytoviral agents.

  20. Evaluation of Aconitum diterpenoid alkaloids as antiproliferative agents

    OpenAIRE

    Wada, Koji; Ohkoshi, Emika; Zhao, Yu; Goto, Masuo; Morris-Natschke, Susan L.; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    Little information has been reported on the antitumor effects of the diterpenoid alkaloid constituents of Aconitum plants, used in the herbal drug “bushi”. This study was aimed at determining the antitumor activities of Aconitum C19-and C20-diterpenoid alkaloids and synthetic derivatives against lung (A549), prostate (DU145), nasopharyngeal (KB), and vincristine-resistant nasopharyngeal (KB-VIN) cancer cell lines. Newly synthesized C20-diterpenoid alkaloid derivatives showed substantial suppr...

  1. A new monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloid from Hamelia patens micropropagated plantlets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paniagua-Vega, David; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2012-11-01

    Chemical studies on Hamelia patens (Rubiaceae) micropropagated plantlets allowed production of a new monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloid, named (-)-hameline (7), together with eight known alkaloids, tetrahydroalstonine (1), aricine (2), pteropodine (3), isopteropodine (4), uncarine F (5), speciophylline (6), palmirine (8), and rumberine (9). The structure of the new alkaloid was assigned on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, and molecular modeling.

  2. Initial Studies on Alkaloids from Lombok Medicinal Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John B. Bremner

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Initial investigation of medicinal plants from Lombok has resulted in the collection of 100 plant species predicted to have antimicrobial, including antimalarial, properties according to local medicinal uses. These plants represent 49 families and 80 genera; 23% of the plants tested positively for alkaloids. Among the plants testing positive, five have been selected for further investigation involving structure elucidation and antimicrobial testing on the extracted alkaloids. Initial work on structural elucidation of some of the alkaloids is reported briefly.

  3. Isoprene and Monoterpene Emissions from Duke Forest: A Comparison of Ambient and Elevated CO2 Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sive, B. C.; Varner, R. K.; Neilsen, C.; Russo, R. S.; Zhou, Y.; White, M. L.; Csakai, A.; Beckman, P.; Ambrose, J.; Wingenter, O. W.; Mao, H.; Talbot, R. W.

    2005-12-01

    elevated CO2 ring. The isoprene oxidation products methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and methacrolein (MACR) followed the same trend as isoprene, with levels being enhanced at Ring 2 compared to Ring 1. Significant gradients were observed from the PTR-MS measurements for the total monoterpenes in addition to the speciated monoterpenes from the canister samples at both rings. However, in contrast to isoprene, monoterpene mixing ratios were lower in the elevated CO2 environment. Canopy fluxes calculated using the measured CO2 gradient and the eddy covariance data show that isoprene fluxes were higher in Ring 2 while monoterpene fluxes were higher in Ring 1. We returned to the FACTS-1 Research Facility in June 2005 to conduct direct branch flux measurements of isoprene and monoterpenes. Teflon bag enclosures were placed on branches of Pinus taeda (loblolly pine) and Liquidambar styraciflua (sweetgum) over two 48-hour sampling periods. Ambient and post-branch enclosure samples were collected in 2-L electropolished stainless steel canisters at both Rings 1 and 2 approximately every 2 hours for each tree species. The canister analysis revealed significantly enhanced mixing ratios of isoprene and monoterpenes from ambient to post-branch enclosure. Flux calculations based on the emission per leaf area of the branch confirm our 2004 results of enhanced isoprene and suppressed monoterpene mixing ratios in an elevated CO2 environment.

  4. Neurotoxic Alkaloids: Saxitoxin and Its Analogs

    OpenAIRE

    Mihali, Troco K; Moffitt, Michelle C.; Neilan, Brett A.; Maria Wiese; D’Agostino, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    Saxitoxin (STX) and its 57 analogs are a broad group of natural neurotoxic alkaloids, commonly known as the paralytic shellfish toxins (PSTs). PSTs are the causative agents of paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) and are mostly associated with marine dinoflagellates (eukaryotes) and freshwater cyanobacteria (prokaryotes), which form extensive blooms around the world. PST producing dinoflagellates belong to the genera Alexandrium, Gymnodinium and Pyrodinium whilst production has been identified...

  5. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids and diterpenes from Villasenoria orcuttii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arciniegas, Amira; Perez-Castorena, Ana L.; Gonzalez, Karina; Vivar, Alfonso Romo de, E-mail: alperezc@unam.mx [Instituto de Quimica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacan, DF (Mexico); Reyes-Lezama, Marisol [Centro Conjunto de Investigacion en Quimica Sustentable, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico-Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (UAEM-UNAM), Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Villasenor, Jose Luis [Instituto de Biologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacan, DF, (Mexico)

    2013-07-15

    The chemical study of Villasenoria orcuttii, the only species of the genus Villasenoria, afforded three acyclic diterpenes, two of them described for the first time. Two pyrrolizidine alkaloids, florosenine and floridanine, among other known compounds were also isolated. The absolute configuration of floridanine was determined by X-ray analysis using anomalous dispersion with Cu K{sub {alpha}} radiation, and its {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data were corrected. (author)

  6. Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids from Onosmakaheirei Teppner (Boraginaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioanna Maria Orfanou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The new pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA 3΄-O-acetylechinatine N-oxide (7, along with two more known PAs (5, 6, two known flavonoids (3, 4, one known alkannin (1, two known triterpenoids, one known sterol, and allantoin (2 were isolated from the aerial parts of Onosma kaheirei. In addition, the retention indeces of the reduced PAs 6 and 7 were determined in a DB-5 WCOT column, to aid their detection by GC/MS in the future.

  7. 2-(7-Methyl-1H-indol-3-ylacetonitrile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hua Ge

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the title compound, C11H10N2, the carbonitrile group is twisted away from the indole plane [Ccy—Cme—Car—Car = 66.6 (2°; cy = cyanide, me = methylene and ar = aromatic]. In the crystal, N—H...N hydrogen bonds link the molecules into C(7 chains propagating in the [001] direction.

  8. Prognostic Assessment in Patients with Indolent B-Cell Lymphomas

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    Luca Arcaini

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Follicular lymphoma (FL is an indolent lymphoma with long median survival. Many studies have been performed to build up prognostic scores potentially useful to identify patients with poorer outcome. In 2004, an international consortium coordinated by the International Follicular Lymphoma Prognostic Factor project was established and a new prognostic study was launched (FLIPI2 using progression-free survival (PFS as main endpoint and integrating all the modern parameters prospectively collected. Low-grade non-Hodgkin lymphomas were once considered as a heterogenous group of lymphomas characterized by an indolent clinical course. Each entity is characterized by unique clinicobiologic features. Some studies have been focused on prognostic factors in single lymphoma subtypes, with the development of specific-entity scores based on retrospective series, for instance splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL. A widely accepted prognostic tool for clinical usage for indolent non-follicular B-cell lymphomas is largely awaited. In this paper we summarized the current evidence regarding prognostic assessment of indolent follicular and non-follicular lymphomas.

  9. Tenualexin, other phytoalexins and indole glucosinolates from wild cruciferous species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedras, M Soledade C; Yaya, Estifanos E

    2014-06-01

    In general, the chemodiversity of phytoalexins, elicited metabolites involved in plant defense mechanisms against microbial pathogens, correlates with the biodiversity of their sources. In this work, the phytoalexins produced by four wild cruciferous species (Brassica tournefortii, Crambe abyssinica (crambe), Diplotaxis tenuifolia (sand rocket), and Diplotaxis tenuisiliqua (wall rocket)) were identified and quantified by HPLC with photodioarray and electrospray mass detectors. In addition, the production of indole glucosinolates, biosynthetic precursors of cruciferous phytoalexins, was evaluated. Tenualexin, (=2-(1,4-dimethoxy-1H-indol-3-yl)acetonitrile), the first cruciferous phytoalexin containing two MeO substituents in the indole ring, was isolated from D. tenuisiliqua, synthesized, and evaluated for antifungal activity. The phytoalexins cyclobrassinin and spirobrassinin were detected in B. tournefortii and C. abyssinica, whereas rutalexin and 4-methoxybrassinin were only found in B. tournefortii. D. tenuifolia, and D. tenuisiliqua produced 2-(1H-indol-3-yl)acetonitriles as phytoalexins. Because tenualexin appears to be one of the broad-range antifungals occurring in crucifers, it is suggested that D. tenuisiliqua may have disease resistance traits important to be incorporated in commercial breeding programs.

  10. Complexity generation in fungal peptidyl alkaloid biosynthesis: a two-enzyme pathway to the hexacyclic MDR export pump inhibitor ardeemin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Stuart W; Gao, Xue; Tang, Yi; Walsh, Christopher T

    2013-04-19

    Ardeemins are hexacyclic peptidyl alkaloids isolated from Aspergillus fischeri as agents that block efflux of anticancer drugs by MultiDrug Resistance (MDR) export pumps. To evaluate the biosynthetic logic and enzymatic machinery for ardeemin framework assembly, we sequenced the A. fischeri genome and identified the ardABC gene cluster. Through both genetic deletions and biochemical characterizations of purified ArdA and ArdB we show this ArdAB enzyme pair is sufficient to convert anthranilate (Ant), L-Ala, and L-Trp to ardeemin. ArdA is a 430 kDa trimodular nonribosomal peptide synthase (NRPS) that converts the three building blocks into a fumiquinazoline (FQ) regioisomer termed ardeemin FQ. ArdB is a prenyltransferase that takes tricyclic ardeemin FQ and dimethylallyl diphosphate to the hexacyclic ardeemin scaffold via prenylation at C2 of the Trp-derived indole moiety with intramolecular capture by an amide NH of the fumiquinazoline ring. The two-enzyme ArdAB pathway reveals remarkable efficiency in construction of the hexacyclic peptidyl alkaloid scaffold.

  11. Simultaneous determination of alkaloids and flavonoids from aerial parts of Passiflora species and dietary supplements using UPLC-UV-MS and HPTLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avula, Bharathi; Wang, Yan-Hong; Rumalla, Chidananda Swamy; Smillie, Troy J; Khan, Ikhlas A

    2012-09-01

    A rapid UPLC method was developed for the simultaneous analysis of five indole alkaloids (harmalol, harmol, harmane, harmaline and harmine) and four flavonoids (orientin, isoorientin, vitexin, and isovitexin) from the aerial parts of Passiflora incarnata L. (Passifloraceae), other species of Passiflora (P. violacea Veil., P. edulis Sims., P. suberosa L., P. morifolia Mast. and P. quadrangularis L.), Peganum harmala, and dietary supplements that claim to contain Passiflora. The separation was achieved within eight minutes by using C-18 column, a water/acetonitrile mobile phase, both containing formic acid, using a gradient system and a temperature of 35 degrees C. The method was validated for linearity, repeatability, limits of detection (LOD), and limits of quantification (LOQ). The wavelength used for quantification with the diode array detector was 340 nm for flavonoids and alkaloids. The developed method is simple, economic, fast and especially suitable for quality control analysis of flavonoids and alkaloids in plant samples and dietary supplements. The compounds (including isoschaftoside and schaftoside) in plant samples and commercial products of Passiflora were identified and confirmed by UPLC-MS. A HPTLC method was also developed for the chemical fingerprint analysis of Passiflora samples.

  12. Sarniensine, a mesembrine-type alkaloid isolated from Nerine sarniensis, an indigenous South African Amaryllidaceae, with larvicidal and adulticidal activities against Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, Marco; van der Westhuyzen, Alet E; Tabanca, Nurhayat; Evidente, Marco; Cimmino, Alessio; Green, Ivan R; Bernier, Ulrich R; Becnel, James J; Bloomquist, Jeffrey R; van Otterlo, Willem A L; Evidente, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    A new mesembrine-type alkaloid, named sarniensine, was isolated together with tazettine, lycorine, the main alkaloid, and 3-epimacronine from Nerine sarniensis, with the last two produced for the first time by this plant. This Amaryllidaceae, which is indigenous of South Africa, was investigated for its alkaloid content, because the organic extract of its bulbs showed strong larvicidal activity with an LC50 value of 0.008μgμL(-1) against first instar Aedes aegypti larvae and with an LD50 value 4.6μg/mosquito against adult female Ae. aegypti, which is the major vector for dengue, yellow fever and the Zika virus. The extract did not show repellency at MED value of 0.375mgcm(2) against adult Ae. aegypti. Sarniensine was characterized using spectroscopic and chiroptical methods as (3aR,4Z,6S,7aS)-6-methoxy-3a-(2'-methoxymethyl-benzo [1,3]dioxol-1'-yl)-1-methyl-2,3,3a,6,7,7a-hexahydro-1H-indole. It was less effective against larva at the lowest concentration of 0.1μgμL(-1), however it showed strong adulticidal activity with an LD50 value of 1.38±0.056μgmosquito(-1).

  13. Ergot Alkaloids (Regenerate New Leads as Antiparasitics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D Chan

    Full Text Available Praziquantel (PZQ is a key therapy for treatment of parasitic flatworm infections of humans and livestock, but the mechanism of action of this drug is unresolved. Resolving PZQ-engaged targets and effectors is important for identifying new druggable pathways that may yield novel antiparasitic agents. Here we use functional, genetic and pharmacological approaches to reveal that serotonergic signals antagonize PZQ action in vivo. Exogenous 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT rescued PZQ-evoked polarity and mobility defects in free-living planarian flatworms. In contrast, knockdown of a prevalently expressed planarian 5-HT receptor potentiated or phenocopied PZQ action in different functional assays. Subsequent screening of serotonergic ligands revealed that several ergot alkaloids possessed broad efficacy at modulating regenerative outcomes and the mobility of both free living and parasitic flatworms. Ergot alkaloids that phenocopied PZQ in regenerative assays to cause bipolar regeneration exhibited structural modifications consistent with serotonergic blockade. These data suggest that serotonergic activation blocks PZQ action in vivo, while serotonergic antagonists phenocopy PZQ action. Importantly these studies identify the ergot alkaloid scaffold as a promising structural framework for designing potent agents targeting parasitic bioaminergic G protein coupled receptors.

  14. Drug development against tuberculosis: Impact of alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Shardendu K; Tripathi, Garima; Kishore, Navneet; Singh, Rakesh K; Singh, Archana; Tiwari, Vinod K

    2017-09-08

    Despite of the advances made in the treatment and management, tuberculosis (TB) still remains one of main public health problem. The contrary effects of first and second-line anti-tuberculosis drugs have generated extended research interest in natural products in the hope of devising new antitubercular leads. Interestingly, plethoras of natural products have been discovered to exhibit activity towards various resistant strains of M. tuberculosis. Extensive applications of alkaloids in the field of therapeutics is well-established and nowday's researches being pursued to develop new potent drugs from natural sources for tuberculosis. Alkaloids are categorized in quite a few groups according to their structures and isolation from both terrestrial and marine sources. These new drugs might be a watershed in the battle against tuberculosis. This review summarizes alkaloids, which were found active against Mycobacteria since last ten years with special attention on the study of structure-activity relationship (SAR) and mode of action with their impact in drug discovery and development against tuberculosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Plant alkaloids as drug leads for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Yu Pong; Or, Terry Cho Tsun; Ip, Nancy Y

    2015-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative illness associated with dementia and is most prevalent among the elderly population. Current medications can only treat symptoms. Alkaloids are structurally diverse and have been an important source of therapeutics for various brain disorders. Two US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved acetylcholinesterase inhibitors for AD, galantamine and rivastigmine, are in fact alkaloids. In addition, clinical trials of four other extensively studied alkaloids-huperzine A, caffeine, nicotine, and indomethacin-have been conducted but do not convincingly demonstrate their clinical efficacy for AD. Interestingly, rhynchophylline, a known neuroprotective alkaloid, was recently discovered by in silico screening as an inhibitor of EphA4, a novel target for AD. Here, we review the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying AD, current treatment strategies, and therapeutic potential of several selected plant alkaloids in AD, highlighting their various drug targets and the key supportive preclinical and clinical studies. Future research should include more rigorous clinical studies of the most promising alkaloids, the further development of recently discovered candidate alkaloids, and the continual search for new alkaloids for relevant drug targets. It remains promising that an alkaloid drug candidate could significantly affect the progression of AD in addition to providing symptomatic relief.

  16. New Perspectives in the Chemistry of Marine Pyridoacridine Alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plodek, Alois; Bracher, Franz

    2016-01-26

    Secondary metabolites from marine organisms are a rich source of novel leads for drug development. Among these natural products, polycyclic aromatic alkaloids of the pyridoacridine type have attracted the highest attention as lead compounds for the development of novel anti-cancer and anti-infective drugs. Numerous sophisticated total syntheses of pyridoacridine alkaloids have been worked out, and many of them have also been extended to the synthesis of libraries of analogues of the alkaloids. This review summarizes the progress in the chemistry of pyridoacridine alkaloids that was made in the last one-and-a-half decades.

  17. TOXIC PYRROLIZIDINE ALKALOIDS OF ECHIUM AMOENUM FISCH. & MEY.

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    MITRA MEHRABANI

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Toxic pyrrolizidine alkaloids are present in some species of Echium (Boraginaceae. In this study petals of Echium amoenum Fisch. & Mey. (Gol-e-Gavzaban as a popular herbal medicine in Iran, were investigated for pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs. The alkaloids were separated and purified by preparative TLC and characterized by IR, one and two dimensional 1H and 13C-NMR and Mass spectroscopy. Four toxic alkaloids namely: echimidine I, echimidine isomer II, 7-angeloyl retronecine III and 7-tigloyl retronecine IV were identified.

  18. Binding Parameters of Alkaloids Berberine and Sanguinarine with DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Gumenyuk, V G; Kutovyy, S Yu; Yashchuk, V M; Zaika, L A

    2012-01-01

    We study the interaction of berberine and sanguinarine (plant alkaloids) with DNA in aqueous solutions, by using optical spectroscopy methods (absorption and fluorescence). The dependencies of alkaloid spectral characteristics on the concentration ratio N/c between the DNA base pairs and alkaloid molecules in the solutions are considered, and the manifestations of the alkaloid-DNA binding are revealed. The character of binding is found to depend on N/c. The parameters of the binding of berberine and sanguinarine with DNA are determined, by using the modified Scatchard and McGhee-von Hippel equations

  19. Alleviating monoterpene toxicity using a two-phase extractive fermentation for the bioproduction of jet fuel mixtures in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Timothy C R; Turner, Christopher D; Krömer, Jens O; Nielsen, Lars K

    2012-10-01

    Monoterpenes are a diverse class of compounds with applications as flavors and fragrances, pharmaceuticals and more recently, jet fuels. Engineering biosynthetic pathways for monoterpene production in microbial hosts has received increasing attention. However, monoterpenes are highly toxic to many microorganisms including Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a widely used industrial biocatalyst. In this work, the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for S. cerevisiae was determined for five monoterpenes: β-pinene, limonene, myrcene, γ-terpinene, and terpinolene (1.52, 0.44, 2.12, 0.70, 0.53 mM, respectively). Given the low MIC for all compounds tested, a liquid two-phase solvent extraction system to alleviate toxicity during fermentation was evaluated. Ten solvents were tested for biocompatibility, monoterpene distribution, phase separation, and price. The solvents dioctyl phthalate, dibutyl phthalate, isopropyl myristate, and farnesene showed greater than 100-fold increase in the MIC compared to the monoterpenes in a solvent-free system. In particular, the MIC for limonene in dibutyl phthalate showed a 702-fold (308 mM, 42.1 g L(-1) of limonene) improvement while cell viability was maintained above 90%, demonstrating that extractive fermentation is a suitable tool for the reduction of monoterpene toxicity. Finally, we estimated that a limonane to farnesane ratio of 1:9 has physicochemical properties similar to traditional Jet-A aviation fuel. Since farnesene is currently produced in S. cerevisiae, its use as a co-product and extractant for microbial terpene-based jet fuel production in a two-phase system offers an attractive bioprocessing option. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Cascade multicomponent synthesis of indoles, pyrazoles, and pyridazinones by functionalization of alkenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matcha, Kiran; Antonchick, Andrey P

    2014-10-27

    The development of multicomponent reactions for indole synthesis is demanding and has hardly been explored. The present study describes the development of a novel multicomponent, cascade approach for indole synthesis. Various substituted indole derivatives were obtained from simple reagents, such as unfunctionalized alkenes, diazonium salts, and sodium triflinate, by using an established straightforward and regioselective method. The method is based on the radical trifluoromethylation of alkenes as an entry into Fischer indole synthesis. Besides indole synthesis, the application of the multicomponent cascade reaction to the synthesis of pyrazoles and pyridazinones is described. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Dietary alkaloid sequestration in a poison frog: an experimental test of alkaloid uptake in Melanophryniscus stelzneri (Bufonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantak, Maggie M; Grant, Taran; Reinsch, Sherri; McGinnity, Dale; Loring, Marjorie; Toyooka, Naoki; Saporito, Ralph A

    2013-12-01

    Several lineages of brightly colored anurans independently evolved the ability to secrete alkaloid-containing defensive chemicals from granular glands in the skin. These species, collectively referred to as 'poison frogs,' form a polyphyletic assemblage that includes some species of Dendrobatidae, Mantellidae, Myobatrachidae, Bufonidae, and Eleutherodactylidae. The ability to sequester alkaloids from dietary arthropods has been demonstrated experimentally in most poison frog lineages but not in bufonid or eleutherodactylid poison frogs. As with other poison frogs, species of the genus Melanophryniscus (Bufonidae) consume large numbers of mites and ants, suggesting they might also sequester defensive alkaloids from dietary sources. To test this hypothesis, fruit flies dusted with alkaloid/nutritional supplement powder were fed to individual Melanophryniscus stelzneri in two experiments. In the first experiment, the alkaloids 5,8-disubstituted indolizidine 235B' and decahydroquinoline were administered to three individuals for 104 days. In the second experiment, the alkaloids 3,5-disubstituted indolizidine 239Q and decahydroquinoline were given to three frogs for 153 days. Control frogs were fed fruit flies dusted only with nutritional supplement. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses revealed that skin secretions of all experimental frogs contained alkaloids, whereas those of all control frogs lacked alkaloids. Uptake of decahydroquinoline was greater than uptake of 5,8-disubstituted indolizidine, and uptake of 3,5-disubstituted indolizidine was greater than uptake of decahydroquinoline, suggesting greater uptake efficiency of certain alkaloids. Frogs in the second experiment accumulated a greater amount of alkaloid, which corresponds to the longer duration and greater number of alkaloid-dusted fruit flies that were consumed. These findings provide the first experimental evidence that bufonid poison frogs sequester alkaloid-based defenses from dietary

  2. Regio- and chemoselective N-1 acylation of indoles: Pd-catalyzed domino cyclization to afford 1,2-fused tricyclic indole scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongxian; Huang, Yuanqiong; Song, Hongjian; Liu, Yuxiu; Wang, Qingmin

    2015-03-27

    A concise method for the synthesis of 1,2-fused tricyclic indole scaffolds by domino cyclization involving a Pd-catalyzed Sonogashira coupling, indole cyclization, regio- and chemoselective N-1 acylation, and 1,4-Michael addition is reported. This method provides straightforward access to tetrahydro[1,4]diazepino[1,2-a]indole and hexahydro[1,5]diazocino[1,2-a]indole scaffolds. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Explaining level inversion of the La and Lb States of indole and indole derivatives in polar solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisker-Klaiman, Daria; Dreuw, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    Quantum chemical methods are used to study the solvent effects on the spectra of indole and a series of methyl-substituted indoles. We focus on the low-lying L(a) and L(b) states and study their interplay. We find that the solvent mainly affects emission from the L(a) state, by stabilizing its energy in its excited-state geometry. The stabilization of the L(a) state increases with increasing solvent polarity, which accounts for the large fluorescence shift observed in indoles and leads to an inversion in the nature of the lowest emitting state, from L(b) in vacuum to L(a) in water. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first theoretical evidence for level inversion done for a series of indoles. The underlying mechanism of level inversion is analyzed in detail. The usual interpretation of level inversion in terms of their static dipole moment is criticized and an improved predictive measurement is suggested.

  4. Diversification of the monoterpene synthase gene family (TPSb) in Protium, a highly diverse genus of tropical trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Felipe; Fine, Paul V A

    2013-09-01

    Plant monoterpenes are a diverse class of secondary metabolites mediating biotic and abiotic interactions with direct effects on plant fitness. To evaluate the hypothesis that monoterpene diversity is related to functional diversification after gene duplication, we reconstructed the evolutionary history of monoterpene synthases (TPSb)--the genes underlying monoterpene synthesis--in Protium, a taxonomically and chemically diverse genus of tropical trees. We isolated multiple copies of TPSb genes from chemically divergent Protium species, reconstructed the phylogeny of this gene family, used maximum-likelihood estimation of selection coefficients, and inferred residues evolving under positive selection. We found evidence for one ancient and multiple more recent duplication events giving rise to three, and potentially five, copies of TPSb genes currently present in Protium. There was evidence for adaptive evolution in one copy with a positively selected residue likely involved in protein folding and product specificity. All other copies were inferred to be evolving under a combination of stabilizing and/or relaxed selection. Although gene copy number is consistent with the extensive phenotypic diversity in monoterpenes shown in Protium, selection analyses suggest that not all copies are undergoing divergent selection consistent with a coevolutionary arms race with enemies, but instead may be under stabilizing and relaxed selection consistent with signaling or physiological stress functionality.

  5. Process-based simulation of seasonality and drought stress in monoterpene emission models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Grote

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Canopy emissions of volatile hydrocarbons such as isoprene and monoterpenes play an important role in air chemistry. They depend on various environmental conditions, are highly species-specific and are expected to be affected by global change. In order to estimate future emissions of these isoprenoids, differently complex models are available. However, seasonal dynamics driven by phenology, enzymatic activity, or drought stress strongly modify annual ecosystem emissions. Although these impacts depend themselves on environmental conditions, they have yet received little attention in mechanistic modelling.

    In this paper we propose the application of a mechanistic method for considering the seasonal dynamics of emission potential using the ''Seasonal Isoprenoid synthase Model'' (Lehning et al., 2001. We test this approach with three different models (GUENTHER, Guenther et al., 1993; NIINEMETS, Niinemets et al., 2002a; BIM2, Grote et al., 2006 that are developed for simulating light-dependent monoterpene emission. We also suggest specific drought stress representations for each model. Additionally, the proposed model developments are compared with the approach realized in the MEGAN (Guenther et al., 2006 emission model. Models are applied to a Mediterranean Holm oak (Quercus ilex site with measured weather data.

    The simulation results demonstrate that the consideration of a dynamic emission potential has a strong effect on annual monoterpene emission estimates. The investigated models, however, show different sensitivities to the procedure for determining this seasonality impact. Considering a drought impact reduced the differences between the applied models and decreased emissions at the investigation site by approximately 33% on average over a 10 year period. Although this overall reduction was similar in all models, the sensitivity to weather conditions in specific years was different. We conclude that the proposed

  6. Gindarudine, a novel morphine alkaloid from Stephania glabra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deepak Kumar Semwal; Usha Rawat

    2009-01-01

    A novel morphine alkaloid, named gindarudine 1 has been isolated from ethanol extract of Stephania glabra tubers, together with four known alkaloids, palmatine, dehydrocorydalmine, stepharanine, and 8-(4'-methoxybenzyl)-xylopinine. Compound 1 was elucidated as 3,6-O,N-detrimethyl-10-hydroxy-1-methoxy-thebaine by means of spectroscopic data including 2D NMR studies.

  7. [A new alkaloid of Menispermum dauricum DC--dauriciline].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, X P; Chen, Y W; Li, X J; Long, J G

    1991-01-01

    A new phenolic dauricine-type alkaloid, named "dauriciline", was isolated from the rhizome of Menispermum dauricum DC. It is a pale yellow powder. Based on spectrometric analysis (UV.FAB-MS and 1HNMR) and chemical reaction the structure of the new alkaloid was elucidated as RR,7,7'-demethyldauricine (VI).

  8. Binding of quinolizidine alkaloids to nicotinic and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeller, T; Sauerwein, M; Sporer, F; Wink, M; Müller, W E

    1994-09-01

    Fourteen quinolizidine alkaloids, isolated from Lupinus albus, L. mutabilis, and Anagyris foetida, were analyzed for their affinity for nicotinic and/or muscarinic acetylcholine receptors. Of the compounds tested, the alpha-pyridones, N-methylcytisine and cytisine, showed the highest affinities at the nicotinic receptor, while several quinolizidine alkaloid types were especially active at the muscarinic receptor.

  9. Antiproliferative and Structure Activity Relationships of Amaryllidaceae Alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedrón, Juan C; Ravelo, Ángel G; León, Leticia G; Padrón, José M; Estévez-Braun, Ana

    2015-07-30

    The antiproliferative activity of a set of seven natural Amaryllidaceae alkaloids and 32 derivatives against four cancer cell lines (A2780, SW1573, T47-D and WiDr) was determined. The best antiproliferative activities were achieved with alkaloids derived from pancracine (2), haemanthamine (6) and haemantidine (7). For each skeleton, some structure-activity relationships were outlined.

  10. Studies of interaction between two alkaloids and double helix DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Yantao [Key Laboratory of Preparation and Applications of Environmentally Friendly Materials (Jilin Normal University), Ministry of Education China, Siping 136000 (China); College of Chemistry, Jilin Normal University, Siping 136000 (China); Peng, Tingting [College of Chemistry, Jilin Normal University, Siping 136000 (China); College of Chemistry, Baicheng Normal University, Baicheng, 130032 (China); Zhao, Lei [Siping Institute for Food and Drug Control, Siping 136000 (China); Jiang, Dayu [Key Laboratory of Preparation and Applications of Environmentally Friendly Materials (Jilin Normal University), Ministry of Education China, Siping 136000 (China); College of Chemistry, Jilin Normal University, Siping 136000 (China); Cui, Yuncheng, E-mail: 1979yanzi@163.com [Key Laboratory of Preparation and Applications of Environmentally Friendly Materials (Jilin Normal University), Ministry of Education China, Siping 136000 (China); College of Chemistry, Jilin Normal University, Siping 136000 (China)

    2014-12-15

    This article presents the study on the interaction of two alkaloids (matrine and evodiamine) and hs-DNA by absorption, fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD), DNA melting and viscosity experiments. The spectroscopic studies suggested that two alkaloids can bind to DNA through an intercalative mode. The viscosity measurement and thermal denaturation also indicated that two alkaloids can intercalate to DNA. The binding constants (K{sub A}) and the number of binding sites (n) were determined. At the same time, some significant thermodynamic parameters of the binding of the alkaloids to DNA were obtained. Competitive binding studies revealed that alkaloids had an effect on ethidium bromide (EB) bound DNA. In addition, it was also proved that the fluorescence quenching was influenced by ionic strength. - Highlights: • Interaction between two alkaloids and DNA is studied by spectral methods. • The binding constant and the binding sites between two alkaloids and DNA are obtained. • There are a classical intercalative mode between alkaloids and DNA. • The binding of matrine with DNA is weaker than that of evodiamine. • It is important for us to understand the alkaloids–DNA interactions at a molecular level.

  11. ALKALOIDS OF SOME EUROPEAN AND MACARONESIAN SEDOIDEAE AND SEMPERVIVOIDEAE (CRASSULACEAE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEVENS, JF; THART, H; HENDRIKS, H; MALINGRE, TM

    1992-01-01

    Some 22 pyrrolidine and piperdine alkaloids were detected in the leafy parts of Sedum acre, S. aetnense, S. anglicum, S. brissemoreti, S. farinosum, S. fusiforme, S. lancerottense, S. melanantherum, and S. nudum. In addition to the alkaloids known from S. acre, 1-(2-pyrrolidyl)-propan-2-one and 2-mo

  12. Pyrrolizidine alkaloids from Bulgarian species of the genus Senecio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NADEZHDA KOSTOVA

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Nine Bulgarian species from the genus Senecio were studied phytochemically and/or by GC-MS analysis. Senecivernine-N-oxide was isolated and identified by spectral data for the first time. Different types of pyrrolizidine alkaloids were tested for cytotoxicity on murine lymphocytes. At a concentration of 100 µg/ml, the alkaloid retroisosenine showed immunosuppressive effect.

  13. [Advance on pharmacologic actions, toxicity and pharmacokinetics of pyrrolizidine alkaloids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jiangguo; Wang, Changhong; Li, Yan; Wang, Zhengtao

    2009-03-01

    Plants containing pyrrolizidine alkaloids were widely used in traditional medicine. Its hepatotoxicity is main toxicity as well known internationally. In order to providing some foundation for the future studies, the advancement on the pharmacologic actions, toxicity, and pharmacokinetics or toxicokinetics of pyrrolizidine alkaloids was reviewed.

  14. Two New Norditerpenoid Alkaloids from Aconitum spicatum Stapf

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ming GAO; Xiao Mei WEI; Li YANG

    2005-01-01

    Two new norditerpenoid alkaloids, spicatine A (1) and spicatine B (2) were isolated from the root of Aconitum spicatum. The new compounds were deduced on the basis of their spectral data (IR, HREIMS, EIMS, 1D, 2D-NMR). This is the first whole report on the isolation of diterpenoid alkaloids from the A. spicatum Stapf.

  15. Evolution of alkaloid biosynthesis in the genus Narcissus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkov, Strahil; Martínez-Francés, Vanessa; Bastida, Jaume; Codina, Carles; Ríos, Segundo

    2014-03-01

    In an attempt to reveal the relationships between alkaloid biosynthesis and phylogeny, we investigated by GC-MS the alkaloid patterns of 22 species and 3 hybrids (from 45 locations) from seven main sections of the genus Narcissus (Amaryllidaceae). The results indicate that the first alkaloids to evolve in the genus Narcissus were of the lycorine- and homolycorine-type. The alkaloid pattern of the Nevadensis section supports its recent separation from the Pseudonarcissus section. The plants of Narcissus pallidulus (Ganymedes section) show a predominance of Sceletium-type compounds, which are quite rare in the Amaryllidaceae family. Two successful evolutionary strategies involving alkaloid biosynthesis and leading to an expansion in taxa and occupied area were determined. Firstly, a diversification of alkaloid patterns and a high alkaloid concentration in the organs of the large Narcissus species (in the Pseudonarcissus section) resulted in an improved chemical defence in diverse habitats. Secondly, both plant size and alkaloid biosynthesis were reduced (in the Bulbocodium and Apodanthi sections) relegated to dry pastures and rocky places.

  16. Leptopyrine, new alkaloid from Leptopyrum fumarioides L. (Ranunculaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doncheva, Tsvetelina; Solongo, Amgalan; Kostova, Nadezhda; Gerelt-Od, Yadamsuren; Selenge, Dangaa; Philipov, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    A new type of isoquinoline alkaloid leptopyrine was isolated from the aerial parts of Leptopyrum fumarioides L. (Ranunculaceae) of Mongolian origin. The known alkaloids protopine and thalifoline were isolated for the first time from this the species. All structures were established by physical and spectral analyses.

  17. Alkaloids and Coumarins from the Leaves of Amyris diatripa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguna, A

    1984-02-01

    The alkaloids edulinine and (+/-) isoplatydesmine were isolated from the leaves of Amyris diatripa, being the first report of the presence of alkaloids in species of this genus. The presence of coumarins in the plant was also shown by isolation of psoralen, bergapten, marmesin, ulopterol and suberenol.

  18. Alkaloids from the root barks of Goniothalamus cheliensis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Miao Jiang; Xue Zhang; Yi Dai; Hao Gao; Hong Wei Liu; Nai Li Wang; Wen Cai Ye; Xin Sheng Yao

    2008-01-01

    (3S)-2-Oxo-5,12-dimethoxy-3-hydroxy-3-methylbenz[f]indoline (1), a new benzoxindole alkaloid, along with two known alkaloids, was isolated from the root barks of Goniothalamus cheliensis Hu. The structure was elucidated by spectroscopic evidences, and the absolute configuration was determined by CD spectrum.

  19. An Acetylenic Alkaloid from the Calcareous Sponge Leucetta sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole J. de Voogd

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A new acetylenic alkaloid was isolated from the sponge Leucetta sp. The structure was established by analyzing spectroscopic data. The alkaloid showed cytotoxicity IC50 2.5 mg/mL against NBT-T2 cells.

  20. Monoterpene metabolism. Cloning, expression, and characterization of (-)-isopiperitenol/(-)-carveol dehydrogenase of peppermint and spearmint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringer, Kerry L; Davis, Edward M; Croteau, Rodney

    2005-03-01

    The essential oils of peppermint (Mentha x piperita) and spearmint (Mentha spicata) are distinguished by the oxygenation position on the p-menthane ring of the constitutive monoterpenes that is conferred by two regiospecific cytochrome P450 limonene-3- and limonene-6-hydroxylases. Following hydroxylation of limonene, an apparently similar dehydrogenase oxidizes (-)-trans-isopiperitenol to (-)-isopiperitenone in peppermint and (-)-trans-carveol to (-)-carvone in spearmint. Random sequencing of a peppermint oil gland secretory cell cDNA library revealed a large number of clones that specified redox-type enzymes, including dehydrogenases. Full-length dehydrogenase clones were screened by functional expression in Escherichia coli using a recently developed in situ assay. A single full-length acquisition encoding (-)-trans-isopiperitenol dehydrogenase (ISPD) was isolated. The (-)-ISPD cDNA has an open reading frame of 795 bp that encodes a 265-residue enzyme with a calculated molecular mass of 27,191. Nondegenerate primers were designed based on the (-)-trans-ISPD cDNA sequence and employed to screen a spearmint oil gland secretory cell cDNA library from which a 5'-truncated cDNA encoding the spearmint homolog, (-)-trans-carveol-dehydrogenase, was isolated. Reverse transcription-PCR amplification and RACE were used to acquire the remaining 5'-sequence from RNA isolated from oil gland secretory cells of spearmint leaf. The full-length spearmint dehydrogenase shares >99% amino acid identity with its peppermint homolog and both dehydrogenases are capable of utilizing (-)-trans-isopiperitenol and (-)-trans-carveol. These isopiperitenol/carveol dehydrogenases are members of the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase superfamily and are related to other plant short-chain dehydrogenases/reductases involved in secondary metabolism (lignan biosynthesis), stress responses, and phytosteroid biosynthesis, but they are quite dissimilar (approximately 13% identity) to the monoterpene