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Sample records for monopropellant hydrazine thruster

  1. Experimental Study of the Plume Characteristics of an Aged Monopropellant Hydrazine Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-04-01

    surfaces such as solar panels, thermal control coatings , and optical surfaces can degrade satellite performance. Experimental studies with regard... coated , fused silica lens onto the thruster axial centerline. The port through which the beam passed into the chamber was also made of fused silica. As...copper alone, beeswax melted onto the copper, and SEM quality Microstick ® glue dripped onto the copper and spread by moving the disks to and fro

  2. Geometrical characterization and performance optimization of monopropellant thruster injector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.R. Nada

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The function of the injector in a monopropellant thruster is to atomize the liquid hydrazine and to distribute it over the catalyst bed as uniformly as possible. A second objective is to place the maximum amount of catalyst in contact with the propellant in as short time as possible to minimize the starting transient time. Coverage by the spray is controlled mainly by cone angle and diameter of the catalyst bed, while atomization quality is measured by the Sauter Mean Diameter, SMD. These parameters are evaluated using empirical formulae. In this paper, two main types of injectors are investigated; plain orifice and full cone pressure swirl injectors. The performance of these two types is examined for use with blow down monopropellant propulsion system. A comprehensive characterization is given and design charts are introduced to facilitate optimizing the performance of the injector. Full-cone injector is a more suitable choice for monopropellant thruster and it might be available commercially.

  3. Monopropellant Thruster Development Using a Family of Micro Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-17

    SCALE IN MILES HWY 395 ROSAMOND BLVD...AVENUE E H IG H W AY 1 4 LA N C A S TE R B LV D . 14 0t h S TR E E T E A S T RESERVATION BOUNDARY 0 5 10 SCALE IN MILES HWY 395 ROSAMOND BLVD...Monopropellant Thrusters Physical Description • Small (~1-22N) Thrusters Used for Attitude Control and Maneuvering of Small Spacecraft. AF-M315E

  4. Lifetime Improvement of Large Scale Green Monopropellant Thrusters via Novel, Long-Life Catalysts Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek proposes to develop and life-test a flight-weight, 5N class green monopropellant thruster in Phase II. The most important feature that sets this thruster apart...

  5. Multidisciplinary Design Optimization and Analysis of Hydrazine Monopropellant Propulsion System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirhossein Adami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Monopropellant propulsion systems are widely used especially for low cost attitude control or orbit correction (orbit maintenance. To optimize the total propulsion system, subsystems should be optimized. Chemical decomposition, aerothermodynamics, and structure disciplines demand different optimum condition such as tank pressure, catalyst bed length and diameter, catalyst bed pressure, and nozzle geometry. Subsystem conflicts can be solved by multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO technique with simultaneous optimization of all subsystems with respect to any criteria and limitations. In this paper, monopropellant propulsion system design algorithm is presented and the results of the proposed algorithm are validated. Then, multidisciplinary design optimization of hydrazine propulsion system is proposed. The goal of optimization can be selected as minimizing the total mass (including propellant, minimizing the propellant mass (maximizing the Isp, or minimizing the dry mass. Minimum total mass, minimum propellant mass, and minimum dry mass are derived using MDO technique. It is shown that minimum total mass, minimum dry mass, and minimum propellant mass take place in different conditions. The optimum parameters include bed-loading, inlet pressure, mass flow, nozzle geometry, catalyst bed length and diameter, propellant tank mass, specific impulse (Isp, and feeding mass which are derived using genetic algorithm (GA.

  6. Propellant Grade Hydrazine in Mono/Bi-propellant Thrusters: Preparation and Performance Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Krishnamachary

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Propellant grade hydrazine was prepared with 64 per cent yield and 95.5 per cent purity. Purity of the propellant grade hydrazine was determined using wet chemical, gas chromatographic (GC and eudiometric methods. It was observed that the compositions containing blends of hydrazine-methyl alcohol-ammonium nitrate and hydrazine-methyl alcohol-ammonium perchlorate were not found to be frozen even after cooling to -65 °C for 30 minutes. Mono and bi-propellant thrusters were designed and developed to demonstrate the performance of prepared propellant grade hydrazine as a promising rocket fuel. Five static tests with 22 N thruster and one static test with 1 N thruster were performed successfully in mono-propellant mode. The hurdles of chamber pressure oscillations were overcome by compact packing of the catalyst. The desired decomposition and chamber pressure were achieved. One static test was performed successfully with 60 N bi-propellant thruster. The desired chamber pressure and thrust were achieved. The combustion was smooth and C* achieved was higher than that of UH-25, N2O4 combination. The performance of prepared propellant grade hydrazine shows it as a promising rocket fuels.Defence Science Journal, Vol. 65, No. 1, January 2015, pp.31-38, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.65.7986

  7. Lifetime Improvement of Large Scale Green Monopropellant Thrusters via Novel, Long-Life Catalysts Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek proposes to develop a high performance, non-toxic storable, "green" monopropellant thruster suitable for in-space reaction control propulsion. The engine will...

  8. High Performance Thrusters for Advanced Green Monopropellants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of an advanced green monopropellant propulsion system could have significant benefits to a wide range of NASA space missions, from deep space...

  9. Study of monopropellants for electrothermal thrusters. Evaluation test program task summary report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuenzly, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    An electrothermal thruster designed for operation with MIL-grade hydrazine is suitable for operation with propellants having lower freezing points. These propellants are 76% hydrazine - 24% hydrazine azide, Aerozine-50, 50% hydrazine - 50% monomethylydrazine, and a TRW-formulated mixture of 35% hydrazine - 50% monomethylhydrane - 15% ammonia. A steady-state specific impulse of 200 sec was exceeded by all propellants. A pulse-mode value of 175 sec specific impulse was exceeded by the azide blend for pulse widths greater than 50 ms and was met by the carbonaceous propellants for pulse widths greater than 100 ms. Longer residence times were required for the carbonaceous propellants; the original thruster design was modified by increasing the characteristic chamber length and density of screen packing. A substantial amount of thermal energy must be supplied to initiate decomposition of propellants containing unsymmetrical-dimethylhydrazine and monomethylhydrazine. The rate controlling factor appeared to be the endothermic removal of methyl radicals.

  10. Nontoxic Hydroxylammonium Nitrate (HAN) Monopropellant Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKechnie, Timothy N.

    2015-01-01

    Nontoxic monopropellants have been developed that provide better performance than toxic hydrazine. Formulations based on HAN have superior performance as compared to hydrazine with enhanced specific impulse (Isp), higher density and volumetric impulse, lower melting point, and much lower toxicity. However, HAN-based monopropellants require higher chamber temperatures (2,083 K vs. 883 K) to combust. Current hydrazine-based combustion chamber technology (Inconel® or niobium C103 and silicide coating) and catalyst (Shell 405) are inadequate. In Phase I, state-of-the-art iridium-lined rhenium chambers and innovative new foam catalysts were demonstrated in pulse and 10-second firings. Phase II developed and tested a flight-weight thruster for an environmentally green monopropellant.

  11. High-Performance Monopropellants and Catalysts Evaluated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Brian D.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center is sponsoring efforts to develop advanced monopropellant technology. The focus has been on monopropellant formulations composed of an aqueous solution of hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN) and a fuel component. HAN-based monopropellants do not have a toxic vapor and do not need the extraordinary procedures for storage, handling, and disposal required of hydrazine (N2H4). Generically, HAN-based monopropellants are denser and have lower freezing points than N2H4. The performance of HAN-based monopropellants depends on the selection of fuel, the HAN-to-fuel ratio, and the amount of water in the formulation. HAN-based monopropellants are not seen as a replacement for N2H4 per se, but rather as a propulsion option in their own right. For example, HAN-based monopropellants would prove beneficial to the orbit insertion of small, power-limited satellites because of this propellant's high performance (reduced system mass), high density (reduced system volume), and low freezing point (elimination of tank and line heaters). Under a Glenn-contracted effort, Aerojet Redmond Rocket Center conducted testing to provide the foundation for the development of monopropellant thrusters with an I(sub sp) goal of 250 sec. A modular, workhorse reactor (representative of a 1-lbf thruster) was used to evaluate HAN formulations with catalyst materials. Stoichiometric, oxygen-rich, and fuelrich formulations of HAN-methanol and HAN-tris(aminoethyl)amine trinitrate were tested to investigate the effects of stoichiometry on combustion behavior. Aerojet found that fuelrich formulations degrade the catalyst and reactor faster than oxygen-rich and stoichiometric formulations do. A HAN-methanol formulation with a theoretical Isp of 269 sec (designated HAN269MEO) was selected as the baseline. With a combustion efficiency of at least 93 percent demonstrated for HAN-based monopropellants, HAN269MEO will meet the I(sub sp) 250 sec goal.

  12. Integrated Advanced Monopropellant CMC Thruster / Thermal Stand-Off Assembly Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High performance non-toxic monopropellants offer significant benefits relative to the current state-of-the-art. The benefits of these advanced monopropellants (AMP)...

  13. Non-Catalytic Ignition System for High Performance Advanced Monopropellant Thrusters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Systima Technologies, Inc. is developing a non-catalytic ignition technology for advanced green ionic salt monopropellants such as HAN-based monopropellant AF-M315E....

  14. Nitrous Oxide as a Green Monopropellant for Small Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallbank, J.; Sermon, P.; Baker, A.; Courtney, L.; Sambrook, R.

    2004-10-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O), has been suggested as a green monopropellant for hydrazine replacement [1,2]. It has extremely low toxicity and has a higher theoretical specific impulse (ISP) than 90% hydrogen peroxide (HTP): N2O ISP(t)~206s, HTP ISP(t)~180s [3]. It has largely been overlooked though due to the difficulty involved in maintaining reproducible catalytic decomposition. The authors are developing N2O thruster technology to prove its viability as a monopropellant alternative to hydrazine. Towards this purpose the authors have developed a novel catalyst for the decomposition of N2O, that has high activity and is thermally stable in oxidising conditions. The catalyst is being engineered into a form to be used efficiently within the thruster housing. This paper reports on the development of this catalyst.

  15. Non-Toxic HAN Monopropellant Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Non-toxic monopropellants have been developed that provide better performance than toxic hydrazine. Formulations based on hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN) have...

  16. Non-Toxic HAN Monopropellant Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Non-toxic monopropellants have been developed that provide better performance than toxic hydrazine. Formulations based on hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN) have...

  17. Experimental investigation of the catalytic decomposition and combustion characteristics of a non-toxic ammonium dinitramide (ADN)-based monopropellant thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Li, Guoxiu; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Meng; Yu, Yusong

    2016-12-01

    Low toxicity ammonium dinitramide (ADN)-based aerospace propulsion systems currently show promise with regard to applications such as controlling satellite attitude. In the present work, the decomposition and combustion processes of an ADN-based monopropellant thruster were systematically studied, using a thermally stable catalyst to promote the decomposition reaction. The performance of the ADN propulsion system was investigated using a ground test system under vacuum, and the physical properties of the ADN-based propellant were also examined. Using this system, the effects of the preheating temperature and feed pressure on the combustion characteristics and thruster performance during steady state operation were observed. The results indicate that the propellant and catalyst employed during this work, as well as the design and manufacture of the thruster, met performance requirements. Moreover, the 1 N ADN thruster generated a specific impulse of 223 s, demonstrating the efficacy of the new catalyst. The thruster operational parameters (specifically, the preheating temperature and feed pressure) were found to have a significant effect on the decomposition and combustion processes within the thruster, and the performance of the thruster was demonstrated to improve at higher feed pressures and elevated preheating temperatures. A lower temperature of 140 °C was determined to activate the catalytic decomposition and combustion processes more effectively compared with the results obtained using other conditions. The data obtained in this study should be beneficial to future systematic and in-depth investigations of the combustion mechanism and characteristics within an ADN thruster.

  18. Technology status of HNF-based monopropellants for satellite propulsion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marée, A.G.M.; Moerel, J.L.P.A.; Weiland-Veltmans, W.H.M.; Wierkx, F.J.M.; Zevenbergen, J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports on significant technological progress made over the last few years in determining the feasibility of HNF-based monopropellants. An HNF-based monopropellant is an interesting alternative for hydrazine as monopropellant for satellite propulsion. New non-toxic monopropellants based o

  19. Technology status of HNF-based monopropellants for satellite propulsion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marée, A.G.M.; Moerel, J.L.P.A.; Weiland-Veltmans, W.H.M.; Wierkx, F.J.M.; Zevenbergen, J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports on significant technological progress made over the last few years in determining the feasibility of HNF-based monopropellants. An HNF-based monopropellant is an interesting alternative for hydrazine as monopropellant for satellite propulsion. New non-toxic monopropellants based o

  20. Advanced High Efficiency Durable DACS Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Systima is developing a high performance 25 lbf DACS thruster that operates with a novel non-toxic monopropellant. The monopropellant has a 30% higher...

  1. Advanced Ionic Liquid Monopropellant for Payload Ascent Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a monopropellant replacement for hydrazine using eutectic mixtures of ionic liquids (EILs). These liquids offer us the ability to tailor fluid...

  2. Hot-Fire Testing of a 1N AF-M315E Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnside, Christopher G.; Pedersen, Kevin; Pierce, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    This hot-fire test continues NASA investigation of green propellant technologies for future missions. To show the potential for green propellants to replace some hydrazine systems in future spacecraft, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is continuing to embark on hot-fire test campaigns with various green propellant blends. NASA completed a hot-fire test of a 1N AF-M315E monopropellant thruster at the Marshall Space Flight Center in the small altitude test stand located in building 4205. The thruster is a ground test article used for basic performance determination and catalyst studies. The purpose of the hot-fire testing was for performance determination of a 1N size thruster and form a baseline from which to study catalyst performance and life with follow-on testing to be conducted at a later date. The thruster performed as expected. The result of the hot-fire testing are presented in this paper and presentation.

  3. Formulation and Characterization of ADN-Based Liquid Monopropellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingborg, N.; Eldsäter, C.; Skifs, H.

    2004-10-01

    Ternary ionic solutions are promising green propellants to replace monopropellant hydrazine. Ammonium dinitramide, ADN, is well suited as oxidizer in these propellants due to its high solubility. This paper presents the formulation of different ADN-based liquid monopropellants and the characterization of their properties such as stability, density, viscosity and sensitivity. To be able to use ADN-based monopropellants for propulsion applications, ADN must be produced in a way to minimize the effect on the environment and in sufficient quantities. This paper thus also briefly presents the industrial production of ADN in Sweden and the efforts made to optimize the process.

  4. Combustion of Han-Based Monopropellant Droplets in Reduced Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, B. D.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this research is to study combustion of monopropellant droplets and monopropellant droplet components in reduced-gravity environments so that spherical symmetry is strongly promoted. The experiments will use hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN, chemical formula NH3OHNO3) based monopropellants. This class of monopropellant is selected for study because of its current relevance and also because it is relatively benign and safe to work with. The experimental studies will allow for accurate determination of fundamental data on deflagration rates, gas-phase temperature profiles, transient gas-phase flame behaviors, the onset of bubbling in droplets at lower pressures, and the low-pressure deflagration limit. The theoretical studies will provide rational models of deflagration mechanisms of HAN-based liquid propellants. Besides advancing fundamental knowledge, the proposed research should aid in applications (e.g., spacecraft thrusters and liquid propellant guns) of this unique class of monopropellants.

  5. The Decomposition of Hydrazine in the Gas Phase and over an Iridium Catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Michael W. [Ames Laboratory; Gordon, Mark S. [Ames Laboratory

    2013-09-30

    Hydrazine is an important rocket fuel, used as both a monopropellant and a bipropellant. This paper presents theoretical results to complement the extensive experimental studies of the gas phase and Ir catalyzed decompositions involved in the monopropellant applications of hydrazine. Gas phase electronic structure theory calculations that include electron correlation predict that numerous molecular and free radical reactions occur within the same energy range as the basic free radical pathways: NN bond breaking around 65 kcal/mol and NH bond breaking around 81 kcal/mol. The data suggest that a revision to existing kinetics modeling is desirable, based on the energetics and the new elementary steps reported herein. A supported Ir-6 octahedron model for the Shell 405 Iridium catalyst used in thrusters was developed. Self-Consistent Field and electron correlation calculations (with core potentials and associated basis sets) find a rich chemistry for hydrazine on this catalyst model. The model catalyst provides dramatically lower NN and NH bond cleavage energies and an even smaller barrier to breaking the NH bond by NH2 abstractions. Thus, the low temperature decomposition over the catalyst is interpreted in terms of consecutive NH2 abstractions to produce ammonia and nitrogen. The higher temperature channel, which has hydrogen and nitrogen products, may be due to a mixture of two mechanisms. These two mechanisms are successive NH cleavages with surface H + H recombinations, and the same type of assisted H-2 eliminations found to occur in the gas phase part of this study.

  6. Influence of structural parameters on performance of monopropellant pulse thruster with high chamber pressure%结构参数对单组元高室压脉冲推力器的性能影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    覃粒子; 郭志海; 娄德全; 梁树强

    2012-01-01

    高室压脉冲火箭发动机由于使用差动式可移动喷注器,能够得到比供给压强高得多的燃烧室压强.为了分析其工作特性,建立了单组元脉冲火箭发动机挤压喷注、燃烧、排气过程的集总参数模型,以硝酸羟铵(HAN)基作为单组元推进剂,采用四阶龙格-库塔法对模型进行求解.分别从喷注器喷孔面积、喷注器差动面积比、喷管喉部面积、喷注器行程等方面分析并总结了结构参数对单组元高室压脉冲发动机性能的影响规律及影响程度.结果表明:计算模型能反映发动机的实际工作过程,其中,喷注器行程对燃烧室平均压强和平均比冲的影响最大,平均推力则对喷管喉部面积的变化最为敏感,上述两个结构参数是发动机优化设计时的首要考虑因素;其他结构参数对发动机也存在不同程度的影响,可以作为次要因素来考虑.%Due to the movable injector which can be regarded as a differential piston with some spray holes,the pulse thruster can provide much higher chamber pressure than the supply pressure of propellant.In order to analyze the operating characteristics of this type of pulse thruster adopting the monopropellant of HAN(hydroxylammonium nitrate),a lumped parameter model was established and the fourth-order Runge-Kutta method was applied to get its numerical solution which reflected the unique pulsating characteristics.The influence of the structural parameters on the thruster performance such as the area of injection holes,nozzle throat area,displacement and differential area ratio of the movable injector was analyzed and summarized.Though the pulsating operation would come to change when any of the above parameters is altered,the displacement and the nozzle throat area are the most influential and should be optimized firstly in the design progress of the new type of pulse thruster.The average pressure in the combustion chamber and the average specific

  7. Mars to orbit with pumped hydrazine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, J C

    1999-04-27

    A propulsion point design is presented for lifting geological samples from Mars. Vehicle complexity is kept low by choosing a monopropellant single stage. Little new development is needed, as miniature pump fed hydrazine has been demonstrated. Loading the propellant just prior to operation avoids structural, thermal, and safety constraints otherwise imposed by earlier mission phases. Hardware mass and engineering effort are thereby diminished. The Mars liftoff mass is 7/8 hydrazine, <5% propulsion hardware, and >3% each for the payload and guidance.

  8. Verification of Contamination Predictions for Monopropellant Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-10-01

    No. 573003AW, which was monitored by Lt Lee Witbracht (AFRPL/DYSP) . Acknowledgements are extended to the Hamilton Standard Company of Windsor Locks ...aspects of the testing procedure and data. The assistance of Dr. J. Daniel Stewart, Capt John L. Williams and Lt Eric G. Lund (AFRPL/DYSP) in cri- tiquing...considers the empiricism used to model wall cooling (see Section 3. 2). Figure 6 compares several NZH4 predicted wall temperature profiles with JPL

  9. DEPSCOR06: A Dispersed Monopropellant Microslug Approach for Discrete Satellite Micropropulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    be correspondingly reduced. In parallel, microfabrication efforts have produced a novel catalytic micro- reactor prototype for the monopropellant...characteristics of supersonic micro-nozzles Task #3 - Experimental design and fabrication of a catalytic micro- reactor using ruthenium-oxide...thruster. This system will make use of the steady, periodic formation of microslugs at a microchannel junction to allow finer resolution of impulse

  10. Analysis of the Ignition Delay Effects on Monopropellant Self-Excited Pulse Thruster%点火延迟对单组元自激式脉冲推力器的性能影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邵永勇; 覃粒子; 刘兵; 玉龙

    2013-01-01

    The ignition delay is an important factor which needs to be considered carefully in the pulse thruster design.To investigate the effects of ignition delay on the self-excited pulse thruster,a mathematical model was set up to describe the pulsating process adopting HAN (Hydroxylammonium Nitrate)-based mon opropellant.The impact on the pressure,mass flow,thrust and specific impulse of the thruster was analyzed when the ignition delay was changed.For the self-excited thruster,the ignition delay strengthens the extru sion,injection and combustion process.With the delay increasing,the duration of the combustion in a cycle and the whole cycle period become much shorter,and the magnitude of the pressure peak both in the extru sion room and in the combustion chamber ascend obviously at the same time.Few influence of the delay on the average specific impulse in a cycle period is observed though the longer delay would result in the higher average thrust.The ignition delay may be a possible approach to adjust the pulsating characteristics of the self-excited pulse thruster.Thus,the relative study is important to explore and apply this novel rocket en gine.%点火延迟是脉冲推力器设计中需要考虑的重要因素之一.为研究点火延迟对自激式脉冲推力器的性能影响,以HAN基(Hydroxylammonium Nitrate)单组元推进剂为例,建立自激式脉冲推力器工作过程的仿真模型,分析了点火延迟时间的变化对推力器的压强、流量、推力及平均比冲的影响规律.结果表明,点火延迟会强化脉冲推力器的压强爬升过程,随着点火延迟时间的增大,一个脉冲循环中的推进剂燃烧持续时间和整个脉冲周期均会明显缩短,同时挤压腔压强峰值和燃烧室压强峰值以及推力器的平均推力水平也会显著升高,但点火延迟的变化基本不会影响脉冲周期内的平均比冲.点火延迟提供了一条调节脉冲工作特性的可能途径,研究点火延迟特性对自

  11. Pickup ion processes associated with spacecraft thrusters: Implications for solar probe plus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemens, Adam, E-mail: a.j.clemens@qmul.ac.uk; Burgess, David [School of Physics and Astronomy, Queen Mary University of London, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    Chemical thrusters are widely used in spacecraft for attitude control and orbital manoeuvres. They create an exhaust plume of neutral gas which produces ions via photoionization and charge exchange. Measurements of local plasma properties will be affected by perturbations caused by the coupling between the newborn ions and the plasma. A model of neutral expansion has been used in conjunction with a fully three-dimensional hybrid code to study the evolution and ionization over time of the neutral cloud produced by the firing of a mono-propellant hydrazine thruster as well as the interactions of the resulting ion cloud with the ambient solar wind. Results are presented which show that the plasma in the region near to the spacecraft will be perturbed for an extended period of time with the formation of an interaction region around the spacecraft, a moderate amplitude density bow wave bounding the interaction region and evidence of an instability at the forefront of the interaction region which causes clumps of ions to be ejected from the main ion cloud quasi-periodically.

  12. Pickup ion processes associated with spacecraft thrusters: Implications for solar probe plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Adam; Burgess, David

    2016-03-01

    Chemical thrusters are widely used in spacecraft for attitude control and orbital manoeuvres. They create an exhaust plume of neutral gas which produces ions via photoionization and charge exchange. Measurements of local plasma properties will be affected by perturbations caused by the coupling between the newborn ions and the plasma. A model of neutral expansion has been used in conjunction with a fully three-dimensional hybrid code to study the evolution and ionization over time of the neutral cloud produced by the firing of a mono-propellant hydrazine thruster as well as the interactions of the resulting ion cloud with the ambient solar wind. Results are presented which show that the plasma in the region near to the spacecraft will be perturbed for an extended period of time with the formation of an interaction region around the spacecraft, a moderate amplitude density bow wave bounding the interaction region and evidence of an instability at the forefront of the interaction region which causes clumps of ions to be ejected from the main ion cloud quasi-periodically.

  13. Ionic Monopropellant Compatibility Study Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Candidate hydrazine alternatives have been developed for spacecraft propulsion. The U.S. Air Force AF-M315E and the Swedish ammonium dinitramide propellants have...

  14. Performance of high area ratio nozzles for a small rocket thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushida, R. O.; Hermel, J.; Apfel, S.; Zydowicz, M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical estimates of supersonic nozzle performance have been compared to experimental test data for nozzles with an area ratio of 100:1 conical and 300:1 optimum contour, and 300:1 nozzles cut off at 200:1 and 100:1. These tests were done on a Hughes Aircraft Company 5 lbf monopropellant hydrazine thruster with chamber pressures ranging from 25 to 135 psia. The analytic method used is the conventional inviscid method of characteristic with correction for laminar boundary layer displacement and drag. Replacing the 100:1 conical nozzle with the 300:1 contoured nozzle resulted in an improvement in thrust performance of 0.74 percent at chamber pressure of 25 psia to 2.14 percent at chamber pressure of 135 psia. The data is significant because it is experimental verification that conventional nozzle design techniques are applicable even where the boundary layer is laminar and displaces as much as 35 percent of the flow at the nozzle exit plane.

  15. Green Liquid Monopropellant Thruster for In-space Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. and AMPAC In-space Propulsion propose to develop a unique chemical propulsion system for the next generation NASA science spacecraft and...

  16. Green Liquid Monopropellant Thruster for In-space Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. (PSI) and Orbitec Inc. propose to develop a unique chemical propulsion system for the next generation NASA science spacecraft and missions...

  17. High Performance Monopropellants for Future Planetary Ascent Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Physical Sciences Inc. proposes to design, develop, and demonstrate, a novel high performance monopropellant for application in future planetary ascent vehicles. Our...

  18. Thermal-Catalytic Ignition Source for Ionic Liquid Monopropellants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ultramet recently demonstrated rapid, reliable, and repeated ignition of hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN)-hydroxyethylhydrazinium nitrate (HEHN) monopropellant...

  19. Highly Durable Catalysts for Ignition of Advanced Monopropellants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposed SBIR Phase I addresses the development of catalysts and technology for the ignition of advanced monopropellants consisting of mixtures of...

  20. Monomethylhydrazine versus hydrazine fuels - Test results using a 100 pound thrust bipropellant rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. A.; Stechman, R. C.

    1981-01-01

    A test program was performed to evaluate hydrazine (N2H4) as a fuel for a 445 Newton (100 lbf) thrust bipropellant rocket engine. Results of testing with an identical thruster utilizing monomethylhydrazine (MMH) are included for comparison. Engine performance with hydrazine fuel was essentially identical to that experienced with monomethylhydrazine although higher combustor wall temperatures (approximately 400 F) were obtained with hydrazine. Results are presented which indicate that hydrazine as a fuel is compatible with Marquardt bipropellant rocket engines which use monomethylhydrazine as a baseline fuel.

  1. Gliding arc plasma assisted N2O dissociation for monopropellant propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosi, Franco J.; Dobrynin, Danil

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we address the capability of gliding arc (GA) discharges to promote plasma assisted combustion of nitrous oxide gas (N2O) for spacecraft monopropellant thruster applications. N2O is a ‘green’ propellant with interesting properties, but highly inert when used as monopropellant. Higher vibrational temperatures {{T}\\text{v}}>T , and hot spot localized dissociation, achieved within the GA reactor, are able to promote combustion of the gas. The vibrational temperature of the N2 second positive system is estimated by means of optical emission spectroscopy and reaches 5000 K, while the gas temperature reaches 1500 K the degree of N2O decomposition, estimated by FTIR measurements, ranged from 25 to 85%. A kinetic model for N2O dissociation is developed; the model shows that simply heating the gas in the same conditions is not enough to produce appreciable dissociation, providing further evidence of the catalytic action of the plasma. Results allow us to predict the propulsive efficiencies to be about 43%, with a thrust level of 37 mN; this result compares positively with the existing N2O resistojet technology.

  2. Flight demonstration of new thruster and green propellant technology on the PRISMA satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anflo, K.; Möllerberg, R.

    2009-11-01

    The concept of a storable liquid monopropellant blend for space applications based on ammonium dinitramide (ADN) was invented in 1997, within a co-operation between the Swedish Space Corporation (SSC) and the Swedish Defense Research Agency (FOI). The objective was to develop a propellant which has higher performance and is safer than hydrazine. The work has been performed under contract from the Swedish National Space Board and ESA. The progress of the development has been presented in several papers since 2000. ECAPS, a subsidiary of the Swedish Space Corporation was established in 2000 with the aim to develop and market the novel "high performance green propellant" (HPGP) technology for space applications. The new technology is based on several innovations and patents w.r.t. propellant formulation and thruster design, including a high temperature resistant catalyst and thrust chamber. The first flight demonstration of the HPGP propulsion system will be performed on PRISMA. PRISMA is an international technology demonstration program with Swedish Space Corporation as the Prime Contractor. This paper describes the performance, characteristics, design and verification of the HPGP propulsion system for PRISMA. Compatibility issues related to using a new propellant with COTS components is also discussed. The PRISMA mission includes two satellites in LEO orbit were the focus is on rendezvous and formation flying. One of the satellites will act as a "target" and the main spacecraft performs rendezvous and formation flying maneuvers, where the ECAPS HPGP propulsion system will provide delta-V capability. The PRISMA CDR was held in January 2007. Integration of the flight propulsion system is about to be finalized. The flight opportunity on PRISMA represents a unique opportunity to demonstrate the HPGP propulsion system in space, and thus take a significant step towards its use in future space applications. The launch of PRISMA scheduled to 2009.

  3. Sensitivity of Liquid Monopropellants to Compression Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    contains a Silicon Rubber Septum through which a Gas Ullage Syringe,i.e., hypodermic needle , passes to introduce a precise loading of air ullage (volume...dumbbell by use of a hypodermic needle during the pre-fill procedure. Both head and rear of the dumbbell are fitted with "O"-ring seals. Thus, should...ignition tests support this theory . Again, returning to Figure 29, the response of a rapid-load pre-pressurized NOS-365 liquid monopropellant nharge (p

  4. The catalysis of hydrazines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanatar, S.

    1987-01-01

    Hydrazine sulfate in a hot aqueous solution can be catalyzed in the direction of 3 N2H4 = 4 NH3 + N2. Free hydrazine in a hot aqueous solution dissociates in the presence of platinum in the following direction: 2 N2H4 = 2 NH3 + N2 + H2. In the presence of sodium hydroxide, the catalytic dissociation of hydrazine takes a third direction: 3 N2H4 = 2 NH3 + 2 N3 + 3 H2.

  5. Highly Durable Catalysts for Ignition of Advanced Monopropellants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Monopropellants are readily ignited or decomposed over a bed of solid catalyst. A serious limitation of existing catalysts in the ignition of advanced...

  6. Lightweight Pump Technology for Advanced Green Monopropellants Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Systima will develop an innovative light weight self-pressurizing pump (SPP) technology to provide a constant-pressure supply of monopropellant to a spacecraft or...

  7. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Tri-gas Thruster Performance Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorado, Vanessa; Grunder, Zachary; Schaefer, Bryce; Sung, Meagan; Pedersen, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Historically, spacecraft reaction control systems have primarily utilized cold gas thrusters because of their inherent simplicity and reliability. However, cold gas thrusters typically have a low specific impulse. It has been determined that a higher specific impulse can be achieved by passing a monopropellant fluid mixture through a catalyst bed prior to expulsion through the thruster nozzle. This research analyzes the potential efficiency improvements from using tri-gas, a mixture of hydrogen, oxygen, and an inert gas, which in this case is helium. Passing tri-gas through a catalyst causes the hydrogen and oxygen to react and form water vapor, ultimately heating the exiting fluid and generating a higher specific impulse. The goal of this project was to optimize the thruster performance by characterizing the effects of varying several system components including catalyst types, catalyst lengths, and initial catalyst temperatures.

  8. Hydrazine inactivates bacillus spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Wayne; Plett, G. A.; Yavrouian, A. H.; Barengoltz, J.

    2005-01-01

    Planetary Protection places requirements on the maximum number of viable bacterial spores that may be delivered by a spacecraft to another solar system body. Therefore, for such space missions, the spores that may be found in hydrazine are of concern. A proposed change in processing procedures that eliminated a 0.2 um filtration step propmpted this study to ensure microbial contamination issue existed, especially since no information was found in the literature to substantiate bacterial spore inactivation by hydrazine.

  9. Thermal Modeling for Pulsed Inductive FRC Plasmoid Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, Michael

    Due to the rising importance of space based infrastructure, long-range robotic space missions, and the need for active attitude control for spacecraft, research into Electric Propulsion is becoming increasingly important. Electric Propulsion (EP) systems utilize electric power to accelerate ions in order to produce thrust. Unlike traditional chemical propulsion, this means that thrust levels are relatively low. The trade-off is that EP thrusters have very high specific impulses (Isp), and can therefore make do with far less onboard propellant than cold gas, monopropellant, or bipropellant engines. As a consequence of the high power levels used to accelerate the ionized propellant, there is a mass and cost penalty in terms of solar panels and a power processing unit. Due to the large power consumption (and waste heat) from electric propulsion thrusters, accurate measurements and predictions of thermal losses are needed. Excessive heating in sensitive locations within a thruster may lead to premature failure of vital components. Between the fixed cost required to purchase these components, as well as the man-hours needed to assemble (or replace) them, attempting to build a high-power thruster without reliable thermal modeling can be expensive. This paper will explain the usage of FEM modeling and experimental tests in characterizing the ElectroMagnetic Plasmoid Thruster (EMPT) and the Electrodeless Lorentz Force (ELF) thruster at the MSNW LLC facility in Redmond, Washington. The EMPT thruster model is validated using an experimental setup, and steady state temperatures are predicted for vacuum conditions. Preliminary analysis of the ELF thruster indicates possible material failure in absence of an active cooling system for driving electronics and for certain power levels.

  10. Thruster Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, G.

    2015-09-01

    The thruster module described in this paper provides a low but controlled acceleration in a mission which would normally be labelled “microgravity”. The first mission was Cryofenix, where tanks containing liquid hydrogen were used in the experiment. The experiment utilizing the low acceleration is using liquids and requires a precise acceleration profile throughout the mission. Acceleration obtained by payload rotation is not feasible due to that the transversal forces required to change the acceleration will cause undesired liquid turbulence. In order to satisfy the experiment requirements a thruster module was developed by SSC for the Cryofenix mission funded by CNES. The Cryofenix mission had a payload weight of 380 kg and an apogee of about 260 km. The module produces a controlled thrust in flight direction by means of a cold gas system.

  11. COMPLEXES CONTAINING HYDRAZINE AND BENZYL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    In previous reports, anhydrous hydrazine and substituted hydrazine were ... DRX 250 spectrometer while that of 3 was recorded on a Bruker 300 MHz instrument at ... The hydrazine complex was prepared from the polymer [{RuCl2(COD)}x] by the ... solution and the acetone was removed under reduced pressure and a white ...

  12. Industrial benefits of applying HNF in monopropellant satellite propulsion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fick, M.; Schiebener, P.; Moerel, J.L.P.A.; Berg, R.P. van den; Sanders, H.M.; Welland-Veltmans, W.H.M.

    2001-01-01

    The benefits of advanced HNF monopropellants are discussed. The areas of consideration comprise the operational and performance aspects, the general handling, the benign less-toxic characteristics and the envisaged reduction of manufacturing, test and operational costs. The recently proposed develop

  13. Industrial benefits of applying HNF in monopropellant satellite propulsion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fick, M.; Schiebener, P.; Moerel, J.L.P.A.; Berg, R.P. van den; Sanders, H.M.; Welland-Veltmans, W.H.M.

    2001-01-01

    The benefits of advanced HNF monopropellants are discussed. The areas of consideration comprise the operational and performance aspects, the general handling, the benign less-toxic characteristics and the envisaged reduction of manufacturing, test and operational costs. The recently proposed develop

  14. Great Market Potential of Hydrazine Hydrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shi Yuying

    2007-01-01

    @@ Stable consumption growth worldwide Hydrazine hydrate is an organic chemical raw material with extensive applications. The world's capacity to produce hydrazine hydrate has reached more than 200 thousand t/atoday (based on 100% hydrazine content).

  15. Toxicity assessment of hydrazine fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keller, W.C.

    1988-11-01

    The major health aspects of exposure to hydrazine propellants are reviewed. Toxic effects of hydrazine fuels on humans and animals as well as in vitro studies are discussed with emphasis on recent findings and USAF studies. Propellant hydrazines have been found to be genotoxic in in vitro studies and oncogenic in animal studies. Embryotoxicity has been demonstrated at very high exposures but not at occupationally encountered levels for hydrazine and unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine. Epidemiologic evidence to support these findings is lacking; however, the results of animal and in vitro studies have resulted in lowering both the time-weighted average-threshold limit values and short-term exposure limits for these propellants.

  16. Development and Testing of a Green Monopropellant Ignition System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Merkley, Daniel P.; Eilers, Shannon D.; Judson, Michael I.; Taylor, Terry L.

    2013-01-01

    This paper will detail the development and testing of a "green" monopropellant booster ignition system. The proposed booster ignition technology eliminates the need for a pre-heated catalyst bed, a high wattage power source, toxic pyrophoric ignition fluids, or a bi-propellant spark ignitor. The design offers the simplicity of a monopropellant feed system features non-hazardous gaseous oxygen (GOX) as the working fluid. The approach is fundamentally different from all other "green propellant" solutions in the aerospace in the industry. Although the proposed system is more correctly a "hybrid" rocket technology, since only a single propellant feed path is required, it retains all the simple features of a monopropellant system. The technology is based on the principle of seeding an oxidizing flow with a small amount of hydrocarbon.1 The ignition is initiated electrostatically with a low-wattage inductive spark. Combustion gas byproducts from the hydrocarbon-seeding ignition process can exceed 2400 C and the high exhaust temperature ensures reliable main propellant ignition. The system design is described in detail in the Hydrocarbon-Seeded Ignition System Design subsection.

  17. Design and development of the Army KE ASAT ACS thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Jeff; Janeski, Bruce

    1993-06-01

    Increasingly ambitious missions for advanced kinetic energy (KE) weapons have necessitated the development of a lightweight storable-propellant attitude control system (ACS) thruster capable of very fast response and long duration firings. This paper summarizes the results of a ACS thruster design and development test effort, performed for the U.S. Army Space and Strategic Defense Command (USASSDC) on the KE Anti Satellite (KE ASAT) weapon system program. Design approaches used to achieve long-duration continuous firing with a composite combustion chamber are detailed. This design effort culminated in a 6.7 lbf. thruster assembly weighing less than 0.2 pounds, approximately one-sixth that of a conventional satellite ACS thruster. Results of tests of flightweight engines with nitrogen tetroxide and monomethyl hydrazine hypergolic propellants are included. The test series culminated in what is believed to be the industry's longest continuous firing of a composite combustion chamber. This thruster will be integrated into the KE ASAT kinetic vehicle for its first free-flight hover test in early FY94. The demonstrated fast response, high pulse performance, and long-duration capabilities of this engine suggest that this thruster can significantly increase the capability of other spacecraft.

  18. Sensitized Liquid Hydrazine Detonation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathgeber, K. A.; Keddy, C. P.; Bunker, R. L.

    1999-01-01

    Vapor-phase hydrazine (N2H4) is known to be very sensitive to detonation while liquid hydrazine is very insensitive to detonation, theoretically requiring extremely high pressures to induce initiation. A review of literature on solid and liquid explosives shows that when pure explosive substances are infiltrated with gas cavities, voids, and/or different phase contaminants, the energy or shock pressure necessary to induce detonation can decrease by an order of magnitude. Tests were conducted with liquid hydrazine in a modified card-gap configuration. Sensitization was attempted by bubbling helium gas through and/or suspending ceramic microspheres in the liquid. The hydrazine was subjected to the shock pressure from a 2 lb (0.9 kg) Composition C-4 explosive charge. The hydrazine was contained in a 4 in. (10.2 cm) diameter stainless steel cylinder with a 122 in(sup 3) (2 L) volume and sealed with a polyethylene cap. Blast pressures from the events were recorded by 63 high speed pressure transducers located on three radial legs extending from 4 to 115 ft (1.2 to 35.1 in) from ground zero. Comparison of the neat hydrazine and water baseline tests with the "sensitized" hydrazine tests indicates the liquid hydrazine did not detonate under these conditions.

  19. Environmental Fate of Hydrazines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    v/v. The absorbent cartridges removed trace gas contaminants , including remaining water and CO2 . Gas outlet-valves after each unit provided for air...largest kbkg was observed in Run A, presumably due to the interaction of hydrazine vapor with contamination on the chamber walls accumulated during its...64 UDMH Dry Air 2.8 19 13 1.1 a Ambirnt temperature, 50-75 ppm v/v initial concentrationb 24 m of added FEP c 14,700 ppm v/v water vapor Of these

  20. Overview of NASA GRCs Green Propellant Infusion Mission Thruster Testing and Plume Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Matthew C.; Reed, Brian D.; Yim, John T.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Williams, George J.; Kojima, Jun J.; McLean, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) is sponsored by NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) office. The goal of GPIM is to advance the technology readiness level of a green propulsion system, specifically, one using the monopropellant, AF-M315E, by demonstrating ground handling, spacecraft processing, and on-orbit operations. One of the risks identified for GPIM is potential contamination of sensitive spacecraft surfaces from the effluents in the plumes of AF-M315E thrusters. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is conducting activities to characterize the effects of AF-M315E plume impingement and deposition. GRC has established individual plume models of the 22-N and 1-N thrusters that will be used on the GPIM spacecraft. The models describe the pressure, temperature, density, Mach number, and species concentration of the AF-M315E thruster exhaust plumes. The models are being used to assess the impingement effects of the AF-M315E thrusters on the GPIM spacecraft. The model simulations will be correlated with plume measurement data from Laboratory and Engineering Model 22-N, AF-M315E thrusters. The thrusters will be tested in a small rocket, altitude facility at NASA GRC. The GRC thruster testing will be conducted at duty cycles representatives of the planned GPIM maneuvers. A suite of laser-based diagnostics, including Raman spectroscopy, Rayleigh spectroscopy, Schlieren imaging, and physical probes will be used to acquire plume measurements of AFM315E thrusters. Plume data will include temperature, velocity, relative density, and species concentration. The plume measurement data will be compared to the corresponding simulations of the plume model. The GRC effort will establish a data set of AF-M315E plume measurements and a plume model that can be used for future AF-M315E applications.

  1. The Green Propellant Infusion Mission Thruster Performance Testing for Plume Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deans, Matthew C.; Reed, Brian D.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Williams, George J.; Kojima, Jun J.; Kinzbach, McKenzie I.; McLean, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) is sponsored by NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) Technology Demonstration Mission (TDM) office. The goal of GPIM is to advance the technology readiness level of a green propulsion system, specifically, one using the monopropellant, AF-M315E, by demonstrating ground handling, spacecraft processing, and on-orbit operations. One of the risks identified for GPIM is potential contamination of sensitive spacecraft surfaces from the effluents in the plumes of AF-M315E thrusters. NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is conducting activities to characterize the effects of AF-M315E plume impingement and deposition. GRC has established individual plume models of the 22-N and 1-N thrusters that will be used on the GPIM spacecraft. The model simulations will be correlated with plume measurement data from Laboratory and Engineering Model 22-N, AF-M315E thrusters. The thrusters are currently being tested in a small rocket, altitude facility at NASA GRC. A suite of diagnostics, including Raman spectroscopy, Rayleigh spectroscopy, and Schlieren imaging are being used to acquire plume measurements of AF-M315E thrusters. Plume data will include temperature, velocity, relative density, and species concentration. The plume measurement data will be compared to the corresponding simulations of the plume model. The GRC effort will establish a data set of AF-M315E plume measurements and a plume model that can be used for future AF-M315E applications.

  2. Cylindrical geometry hall thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for thrusting plasma, utilizing a Hall thruster with a cylindrical geometry, wherein ions are accelerated in substantially the axial direction. The apparatus is suitable for operation at low power. It employs small size thruster components, including a ceramic channel, with the center pole piece of the conventional annular design thruster eliminated or greatly reduced. Efficient operation is accomplished through magnetic fields with a substantial radial component. The propellant gas is ionized at an optimal location in the thruster. A further improvement is accomplished by segmented electrodes, which produce localized voltage drops within the thruster at optimally prescribed locations. The apparatus differs from a conventional Hall thruster, which has an annular geometry, not well suited to scaling to small size, because the small size for an annular design has a great deal of surface area relative to the volume.

  3. Cassini Spacecraft In-Flight Swap to Backup Attitude Control Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, David M.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Cassini Spacecraft, launched on October 15th, 1997 and arrived at Saturn on June 30th, 2004, is the largest and most ambitious interplanetary spacecraft in history. In order to meet the challenging attitude control and navigation requirements of the orbit profile at Saturn, Cassini is equipped with a monopropellant thruster based Reaction Control System (RCS), a bipropellant Main Engine Assembly (MEA) and a Reaction Wheel Assembly (RWA). In 2008, after 11 years of reliable service, several RCS thrusters began to show signs of end of life degradation, which led the operations team to successfully perform the swap to the backup RCS system, the details and challenges of which are described in this paper. With some modifications, it is hoped that similar techniques and design strategies could be used to benefit other spacecraft.

  4. Cassini Spacecraft In-Flight Swap to Backup Attitude Control Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, David M.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Cassini Spacecraft, launched on October 15th, 1997 and arrived at Saturn on June 30th, 2004, is the largest and most ambitious interplanetary spacecraft in history. In order to meet the challenging attitude control and navigation requirements of the orbit profile at Saturn, Cassini is equipped with a monopropellant thruster based Reaction Control System (RCS), a bipropellant Main Engine Assembly (MEA) and a Reaction Wheel Assembly (RWA). In 2008, after 11 years of reliable service, several RCS thrusters began to show signs of end of life degradation, which led the operations team to successfully perform the swap to the backup RCS system, the details and challenges of which are described in this paper. With some modifications, it is hoped that similar techniques and design strategies could be used to benefit other spacecraft.

  5. Conducting Wall Hall Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Hofer, Richard R.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Polk, James E.; Dotson, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    A unique configuration of the magnetic field near the wall of Hall thrusters, called Magnetic Shielding, has recently demonstrated the ability to significantly reduce the erosion of the boron nitride (BN) walls and extend the life of Hall thrusters by orders of magnitude. The ability of magnetic shielding to minimize interactions between the plasma and the discharge chamber walls has for the first time enabled the replacement of insulating walls with conducting materials without loss in thruster performance. The boron nitride rings in the 6 kW H6 Hall thruster were replaced with graphite that self-biased to near the anode potential. The thruster efficiency remained over 60% (within two percent of the baseline BN configuration) with a small decrease in thrust and increase in Isp typical of magnetically shielded Hall thrusters. The graphite wall temperatures decreased significantly compared to both shielded and unshielded BN configurations, leading to the potential for higher power operation. Eliminating ceramic walls makes it simpler and less expensive to fabricate a thruster to survive launch loads, and the graphite discharge chamber radiates more efficiently which increases the power capability of the thruster compared to conventional Hall thruster designs.

  6. Oxygen-Methane Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickens, Tim

    2012-01-01

    An oxygen-methane thruster was conceived with integrated igniter/injector capable of nominal operation on either gaseous or liquid propellants. The thruster was designed to develop 100 lbf (approximately 445 N) thrust at vacuum conditions and use oxygen and methane as propellants. This continued development included refining the design of the thruster to minimize part count and manufacturing difficulties/cost, refining the modeling tools and capabilities that support system design and analysis, demonstrating the performance of the igniter and full thruster assembly with both gaseous and liquid propellants, and acquiring data from this testing in order to verify the design and operational parameters of the thruster. Thruster testing was conducted with gaseous propellants used for the igniter and thruster. The thruster was demonstrated to work with all types of propellant conditions, and provided the desired performance. Both the thruster and igniter were tested, as well as gaseous propellants, and found to provide the desired performance using the various propellant conditions. The engine also served as an injector testbed for MSFC-designed refractory combustion chambers made of rhenium.

  7. Hydrazine vapor inactivates Bacillus spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schubert, Wayne W.; Engler, Diane L.; Beaudet, Robert A.

    2016-05-01

    NASA policy restricts the total number of bacterial spores that can remain on a spacecraft traveling to any planetary body which might harbor life or have evidence of past life. Hydrazine, N2H4, is commonly used as a propellant on spacecraft. Hydrazine as a liquid is known to inactivate bacterial spores. We have now verified that hydrazine vapor also inactivates bacterial spores. After Bacillus atrophaeus ATCC 9372 spores deposited on stainless steel coupons were exposed to saturated hydrazine vapor in closed containers, the spores were recovered from the coupons, serially diluted, pour plated and the surviving bacterial colonies were counted. The exposure times required to reduce the spore population by a factor of ten, known as the D-value, were 4.70 ± 0.50 h at 25 °C and 2.85 ± 0.13 h at 35 °C. These inactivation rates are short enough to ensure that the bioburden of the surfaces and volumes would be negligible after prolonged exposure to hydrazine vapor. Thus, all the propellant tubing and internal tank surfaces exposed to hydrazine vapor do not contribute to the total spore count.

  8. Plume Characterization of a Laboratory Model 22 N GPIM Thruster via High-Frequency Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, George J.; Kojima, Jun J.; Arrington, Lynn A.; Deans, Matthew C.; Reed, Brian D.; Kinzbach, McKenzie I.; McLean, Christopher H.

    2015-01-01

    The Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) will demonstrate the capability of a green propulsion system, specifically, one using the monopropellant, AF-M315E. One of the risks identified for GPIM is potential contamination of sensitive areas of the spacecraft from the effluents in the plumes of AF-M315E thrusters. Plume characterization of a laboratory-model 22 N thruster via optical diagnostics was conducted at NASA GRC in a space-simulated environment. A high-frequency pulsed laser was coupled with an electron-multiplied ICCD camera to perform Raman spectroscopy in the near-field, low-pressure plume. The Raman data yielded plume constituents and temperatures over a range of thruster chamber pressures and as a function of thruster (catalyst) operating time. Schlieren images of the near-field plume enabled calculation of plume velocities and revealed general plume structure of the otherwise invisible plume. The measured velocities are compared to those predicted by a two-dimensional, kinetic model. Trends in data and numerical results are presented from catalyst mid-life to end-of-life. The results of this investigation were coupled with the Raman and Schlieren data to provide an anchor for plume impingement analysis presented in a companion paper. The results of both analyses will be used to improve understanding of the nature of AF-M315E plumes and their impacts to GPIM and other future missions.

  9. Electrochemical Disposal of Hydrazines in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinseong; Gonzalez-Mar, Anuncia; Salinas, Carlos; Rutherford, Larris; Jeng, King-Tsai; Andrews, Craig; Yalamanchili, Ratlaya

    2007-01-01

    An electrochemical method of disposal of hydrazines dissolved in water has been devised. The method is applicable to hydrazine (N2H4), to monomethyl hydrazine [also denoted by MMH or by its chemical formula, (CH3)HNNH2], and to unsymmetrical dimethyl hydrazine [also denoted UDMH or by its chemical formula, (CH3)2NNH2]. The method involves a room-temperature process that converts the hydrazine to the harmless products N2, H2O, and, in some cases, CO2

  10. Occupational safety considerations with hydrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clewell, Harvey J., III; Mcdougal, James N.; George, Marilyn E.; Andersen, Melvin E.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrazine is a reducing agent that is most commonly used as a propellant and as an oxygen scavenger in boilers. Hydrazine is extremely irritating and has been demonstrated to produce both acute and chronic toxicity. As a result, the established permissible inhalation exposure limits are very low, and respiration protection is required whenever vapors are present. Liquid hydrazine penetrates the skin and produces a chemical burn; therefore, some protective measures must also be taken to protect the skin from liquid contact. Often, however, a cumbersome, whole-body protective suit is worn to protect against skin contact with vapor as well. To what extent it is actually necessary to protect skin from vapor penetration had not previously been demonstrated. In an attempt to answer this question, we conducted a study with rats to compare the dermal penetration of hydrazine vapor with inhalation. Pharmacokinetic modeling was used to compare body burdens resulting from these different routes of exposure. The analysis concluded that the vapor concentration during a skin-only exposure would have to be at least 200 times higher than that during inhalation to achieve the same body burden. This type of estimation illustrates the use of predictive toxicology in occupational exposures.

  11. Oxygen-Methane Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Orion Propulsion, Inc. proposes to develop an Oxygen and Methane RCS Thruster to advance the technology of alternate fuels. A successful Oxygen/CH4 RCS Thruster will...

  12. Iodine Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, James

    2015-01-01

    Iodine enables dramatic mass and cost savings for lunar and Mars cargo missions, including Earth escape and near-Earth space maneuvers. The demonstrated throttling ability of iodine is important for a singular thruster that might be called upon to propel a spacecraft from Earth to Mars or Venus. The ability to throttle efficiently is even more important for missions beyond Mars. In the Phase I project, Busek Company, Inc., tested an existing Hall thruster, the BHT-8000, on iodine propellant. The thruster was fed by a high-flow iodine feed system and supported by an existing Busek hollow cathode flowing xenon gas. The Phase I propellant feed system was evolved from a previously demonstrated laboratory feed system. Throttling of the thruster between 2 and 11 kW at 200 to 600 V was demonstrated. Testing showed that the efficiency of iodine fueled BHT-8000 is the same as with xenon, with iodine delivering a slightly higher thrust-to-power (T/P) ratio. In Phase II, a complete iodine-fueled system was developed, including the thruster, hollow cathode, and iodine propellant feed system. The nominal power of the Phase II system is 8 kW; however, it can be deeply throttled as well as clustered to much higher power levels. The technology also can be scaled to greater than 100 kW per thruster to support megawatt-class missions. The target thruster efficiency for the full-scale system is 65 percent at high specific impulse (Isp) (approximately 3,000 s) and 60 percent at high thrust (Isp approximately 2,000 s).

  13. Active Hydrazine Vapor Sampler (AHVS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Rebecca C.; Mcbrearty, Charles F.; Curran, Daniel J.

    1993-01-01

    The Active Hydrazine Vapor Sampler (AHVS) was developed to detect vapors of hydrazine (HZ) and monomethylhydrazine (MMH) in air at parts-per-billion (ppb) concentration levels. The sampler consists of a commercial personal pump that draws ambient air through paper tape treated with vanillin (4-hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde). The paper tape is sandwiched in a thin cardboard housing inserted in one of the two specially designed holders to facilitate sampling. Contaminated air reacts with vanillin to develop a yellow color. The density of the color is proportional to the concentration of HZ or MMH. The AHVS can detect 10 ppb in less than 5 minutes. The sampler is easy to use, low cost, and intrinsically safe and contains no toxic material. It is most beneficial for use in locations with no laboratory capabilities for instrumentation calibration. This paper reviews the development, laboratory test, and field test of the device.

  14. The Oxidation of Hydrazine by Nitric Acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karraker, D.G.

    2001-07-02

    Hydrazine nitrate-nitric acid solutions are used in the ion exchange process for separating Pu-238 and Np-237 and have been found to dissolve plutonium metal in a manner advantageous to SRP metal recovery operations. Laboratory tests on the stability of hydrazine in nitric acid solutions were performed to obtain accurate data, and the results of these tests are reported here. These tests provide sufficient information to specify temperature control for hydrazine-nitric acid solutions in plant processes.

  15. Endurance and failure of an alumina-based monopropellant microthruster with integrated heater, catalytic bed and temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaji, Zahra; Klintberg, Lena; Barbade, Dhananjay; Palmer, Kristoffer; Thornell, Greger

    2017-05-01

    Monopropellant ceramic microthrusters with an integrated heater, catalytic bed and two temperature sensors, but of various designs, were manufactured by milling a fluidic channel and chamber, and a nozzle, and screen printing platinum patterns on green tapes of alumina that were stacked and laminated before sintering. In order to increase the surface area of the catalytic bed, the platinum paste was mixed with a sacrificial paste that disappeared during sintering, to leave behind a porous and rough layer. As an early development level in manufacturing robust and high-temperature tolerant microthrusters, the influence of design on the temperature gradients and dry temperature tolerance of the devices was studied. On average, the small reaction chambers showed a more than 1.5 times higher dry temperature tolerance (in centigrade) compared to devices with larger chambers, independent of the heater and device size. However, for a given temperature, big devices consumed on average 2.9 times more power than the small ones. It was also found that over the same area and under the same heating conditions, devices with small chambers were subjected to approximately 40% smaller temperature differences. A pressure test done on two small devices with small chambers revealed that pressures of at least 26.3 bar could be tolerated. Above this pressure, the interfaces failed but the devices were not damaged. To investigate the cooling effect of the micropropellant, the endurance of a full thruster was also studied under wet testing where it was fed with 31 wt.% hydrogen peroxide. The thruster demonstrated complete evaporation and/or full decomposition at a power above 3.7 W for a propellant flow of 50 µl min-1. At this power, the catalytic bed locally reached a temperature of 147 °C. The component was successfully heated to an operating temperature of 307 °C, where it cracked. Under these firing conditions, and assuming complete decomposition, calculations give a thrust and

  16. Magnesium Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, James J.

    2015-01-01

    This Phase II project is developing a magnesium (Mg) Hall effect thruster system that would open the door for in situ resource utilization (ISRU)-based solar system exploration. Magnesium is light and easy to ionize. For a Mars- Earth transfer, the propellant mass savings with respect to a xenon Hall effect thruster (HET) system are enormous. Magnesium also can be combusted in a rocket with carbon dioxide (CO2) or water (H2O), enabling a multimode propulsion system with propellant sharing and ISRU. In the near term, CO2 and H2O would be collected in situ on Mars or the moon. In the far term, Mg itself would be collected from Martian and lunar regolith. In Phase I, an integrated, medium-power (1- to 3-kW) Mg HET system was developed and tested. Controlled, steady operation at constant voltage and power was demonstrated. Preliminary measurements indicate a specific impulse (Isp) greater than 4,000 s was achieved at a discharge potential of 400 V. The feasibility of delivering fluidized Mg powder to a medium- or high-power thruster also was demonstrated. Phase II of the project evaluated the performance of an integrated, highpower Mg Hall thruster system in a relevant space environment. Researchers improved the medium power thruster system and characterized it in detail. Researchers also designed and built a high-power (8- to 20-kW) Mg HET. A fluidized powder feed system supporting the high-power thruster was built and delivered to Busek Company, Inc.

  17. Final Report on the Detection of Green Monopropellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Tracy L.; DeVor, Robert W.; Bauer, Brint M.; Captain, James; Coutts, Janelle L.; Surma, Jan M.

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC) funded a project titled "Familiarization and Detection of Green Monopropellants" utilizing Independent Research and Technology Development (IR&TD) and Center Innovation Fund (CIF) funding. The purpose of the project was to evaluate methods of detection for ammonium dinitramide (ADN) and hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN). An Engineering Services Contract (ESC) task order was created with the scope of evaluation of several methods of detecting ADN- and HAN-based propellants, as well as development of methods for detection. Detection methods include developed methods such as colorimetric indicating absorbent socks, and commercial-off-the- shelf (COTS) units for ammonia detection. An additional goal of the task order was for ESC to become familiar with ADN's and HAN's material properties and material compatibility. Two approaches were initially investigated as possible methods for the detection of HAN (or AFM315E) and ADN (or LMP-103S). These approaches were colorimetric analysis and instrumentation-based COTS vapor sensors utilization. Initial testing showed that the relatively non-existent vapor pressure of the AF-M315E (of which HAN is a major component) propellant would make the use of COTS sensors difficult for real-time area monitoring of HAN; a small response was detected through the use of active COTS sensors, including the RAE Systems MultiRAE Lite and Drager X-act (registered) 5000, but the levels detected were below the threshold limit value for the toxic gas ammonia. Therefore, a detection system ased upon a colorimetric indicator impregnated into an absorbent material was developed. Preliminary analysis (ESC-245-FDG-001) identified a particularly outstanding candidate as a colorimetric indicator for the detection of the presence of AF-M315E in the form of a Methyl Red (Basic) indicator. Materials impregnated with this indicator exhibit significant color change and the

  18. First results of PRECISE—Development of a MEMS-based monopropellant micro chemical propulsion system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gauer, Markus; Telitschkin, Dimitri; Gotzig, Ulrich; Batonneau, Yann; Johansson, Hakan; Ivanov, Mikhail; Palmer, Phil; Wiegerink, Remco J.

    2014-01-01

    PRECISE focuses on the research and development of a MEMS-based monopropellant micro chemical propulsion system for highly accurate attitude control of satellites. The availability of such propulsion systems forms the basis for defining new mission concepts such as formation flying and rendezvous ma

  19. First results of PRECISE—Development of a MEMS-based monopropellant micro chemical propulsion system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gauer, Markus; Telitschkin, Dimitri; Gotzig, Ulrich; Batonneau, Yann; Johansson, Hakan; Ivanov, Mikhail; Palmer, Phil; Wiegerink, Remco J.

    PRECISE focuses on the research and development of a MEMS-based monopropellant micro chemical propulsion system for highly accurate attitude control of satellites. The availability of such propulsion systems forms the basis for defining new mission concepts such as formation flying and rendezvous

  20. Liquid micro pulsed plasma thruster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szelecka Agnieszka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A new type of pulsed plasma thruster (PPT for small satellite propulsion is investigated, of which the most innovative aspect is the use of a non-volatile liquid propellant. The thruster is based on an open capillary design. The thruster achieved a thrust-to-power ratio above 45 μN/W, which constitutes a 5-fold improvement over the water-propelled pulsed plasma thruster, and which is also slightly above the performance of a similarly sized PPT with a solid propellant.

  1. Helical plasma thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beklemishev, A. D., E-mail: bekl@bk.ru [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    A new scheme of plasma thruster is proposed. It is based on axial acceleration of rotating magnetized plasmas in magnetic field with helical corrugation. The idea is that the propellant ionization zone can be placed into the local magnetic well, so that initially the ions are trapped. The E × B rotation is provided by an applied radial electric field that makes the setup similar to a magnetron discharge. Then, from the rotating plasma viewpoint, the magnetic wells of the helically corrugated field look like axially moving mirror traps. Specific shaping of the corrugation can allow continuous acceleration of trapped plasma ions along the magnetic field by diamagnetic forces. The accelerated propellant is expelled through the expanding field of magnetic nozzle. By features of the acceleration principle, the helical plasma thruster may operate at high energy densities but requires a rather high axial magnetic field, which places it in the same class as the VASIMR{sup ®} rocket engine.

  2. Arcjet space thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefer, Dennis; Rhodes, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Electrically powered arc jets which produce thrust at high specific impulse could provide a substantial cost reduction for orbital transfer and station keeping missions. There is currently a limited understanding of the complex, nonlinear interactions in the plasma propellant which has hindered the development of high efficiency arc jet thrusters by making it difficult to predict the effect of design changes and to interpret experimental results. A computational model developed at the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) to study laser powered thrusters and radio frequency gas heaters has been adapted to provide a tool to help understand the physical processes in arc jet thrusters. The approach is to include in the model those physical and chemical processes which appear to be important, and then to evaluate our judgement by the comparison of numerical simulations with experimental data. The results of this study have been presented at four technical conferences. The details of the work accomplished in this project are covered in the individual papers included in the appendix of this report. We present a brief description of the model covering its most important features followed by a summary of the effort.

  3. Investigation of a catalytic gas generator for the Space Shuttle APU. [hydrazine Auxiliary Propulsion Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, D. L.; Huxtable, D. D.; Blevins, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to establish the capability of a monopropellant hydrazine catalytic gas generator to meet the requirements specified for the Space Shuttle APU. Detailed analytical and experimental studies were conducted on potential problem areas including long-term nitriding effects on materials, design variables affecting catalyst life, vehicle vibration effects, and catalyst oxidation/contamination. A full-scale gas generator, designed to operate at a chamber pressure of 750 psia and a flow rate of 0.36 lbm/sec, was fabricated and subjected to three separate life test series. The objective of the first test series was to demonstrate the capability of the gas generator to successfully complete 20 simulated Space Shuttle missions in steady-state operation. The gas generator was then refurbished and subjected to a second series of tests to demonstrate the pulse-mode capability of the gas generator during 20 simulated missions. The third series of tests was conducted with a refurbished reactor to further demonstrate pulse-mode capability with a modified catalyst bed.

  4. Occupational safety considerations with hydrazine fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clewell, H. J.; Haddad, T. S.; George, M. E.; Mcdougal, J. N.; Andersen, M. E.

    1992-01-01

    A simple pharmacokinetic model and a specially designed dermal vapor exposure chamber which provides respiratory protection were used to determine the rate of penetration of hydrazine and 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (UDMH) vapor through the skin of rats. Parameters for the pharmacokinetic model were determined from intravenous and inhalation exposure data. The model was then used to estimate the skin permeation coefficient for hydrazine or UDMH vapor from the dermal-vapor exposure data. This analysis indicates that UDMH vapor has a relatively high permeability through skin (0.7 cm/hr), a value somewhat higher than was obtained for hydrazine by the same procedure (0.09 cm/hr). Based on these skin permeability results, a skin-only vapor exposure limit giving protection equivalent to the inhalation Threshold Limit Value (TLV) could be calculated. The current TLV's for UDMH and hydrazine are 0.5 and 0.1 ppm, respectively. The corresponding skin-only TLV equivalents, for personnel wearing respiratory protection, are 32 ppm for UDMH and 48 ppm for hydrazine. Should the proposed lowering to the TLV's for these compounds to 0.01 ppm be adopted, the equivalent skin-only TLV's would become 0.64 ppm for UDMH and 4.8 for hydrazine.

  5. Destruction of Hydrazine and Corrosion Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, H. J.; Park, S. Y.; Kim, S. B.; Jung, J. Y.; Choi, W. K.; Moon, J. K. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    KAERI The agent uses Cu ion and hydrazine in an inorganic acid solution. This agent is used for the dissolution of Fe and Ni ions in a spinel type nickel chromium ferrite. After decontamination, the generation of the secondary waste can be reduced by the destruction of hydrazine. Wellman et al. reported that hydrazine is decomposed to water and nitrogen by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of Cu{sup 2+} ion. N{sub 2}H{sub 4}+2H{sub 2}0{sub 2} (Cu{sup 2+} →) N{sub 2} +4H{sub 2}0 As the decrease of the hydrazine concentration, the solution pH also becomes to decrease. The decrease of solution pH can affect the integrity of structural metal. The objective of the study is to investigate the decomposition characteristics of hydrazine by hydrogen peroxide. The corrosion compatibility of metal after the decomposition of hydrazine is also investigated. The application of a decontamination solution to the primary coolant system before decommissioning is necessary to minimize the personnel dose rates. In foreign countries, system decontaminations have been performed several times by applying the dilute organic chemical decontamination process. To prepare against the decommissioning of the nuclear power plant, it is necessary to develop the unique domestic chemical decontamination process.

  6. A novel electrolytic ignition monopropellant microthruster based on low temperature co-fired ceramic tape technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Hsun; Yetter, Richard A

    2009-04-07

    A planar 2-D liquid monopropellant microthruster fabricated from low temperature co-fired ceramic tapes and ignited by electrolysis is reported. The volume of the combustion chamber was 820 nL (0.82 mm(3)). Silver electrodes were screen printed and positioned on the top and bottom surfaces of the combustion chamber. A DC voltage potential applied across the electrodes was used to initiate decomposition of hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN) based liquid monopropellants. A thrust output of 150 mN was obtained using a voltage input of 45 V. Measured ignition energies were as small as 1.9 J. Ignition delays, as short as a few hundred milliseconds, were found dependent on the type of HAN-based propellant and the voltage potential.

  7. Temperature Gradient in Hall Thrusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Staack; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2003-11-24

    Plasma potentials and electron temperatures were deduced from emissive and cold floating probe measurements in a 2 kW Hall thruster, operated in the discharge voltage range of 200-400 V. An almost linear dependence of the electron temperature on the plasma potential was observed in the acceleration region of the thruster both inside and outside the thruster. This result calls into question whether secondary electron emission from the ceramic channel walls plays a significant role in electron energy balance. The proportionality factor between the axial electron temperature gradient and the electric field is significantly smaller than might be expected by models employing Ohmic heating of electrons.

  8. Ionic Liquids to Replace Hydrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelfgen, Syri; Sims, Joe; Forton, Melissa; Allan, Barry; Rogers, Robin; Shamshina, Julia

    2011-01-01

    A method for developing safe, easy-to-handle propellants has been developed based upon ionic liquids (ILs) or their eutectic mixtures. An IL is a binary combination of a typically organic cation and anion, which generally produces an ionic salt with a melting point below 100 deg C. Many ILs have melting points near, or even below, room temperature (room temperature ionic liquids, RTILs). More importantly, a number of ILs have a positive enthalpy of formation. This means the thermal energy released during decomposition reactions makes energetic ILs ideal for use as propellants. In this specific work, to date, a baseline set of energetic ILs has been identified, synthesized, and characterized. Many of the ILs in this set have excellent performance potential in their own right. In all, ten ILs were characterized for their enthalpy of formation, density, melting point, glass transition point (if applicable), and decomposition temperature. Enthalpy of formation was measured using a microcalorimeter designed specifically to test milligram amounts of energetic materials. Of the ten ILs characterized, five offer higher Isp performance than hydrazine, ranging between 10 and 113 seconds higher than the state-of-the-art propellant. To achieve this level of performance, the energetic cations 4- amino-l,2,4-triazolium and 3-amino-1,2,4-triazolium were paired with various anions in the nitrate, dicyanamide, chloride, and 3-nitro-l,2,4-triazole families. Protonation, alkylation, and butylation synthesis routes were used for creation of the different salts.

  9. NEXT Ion Thruster Performance Dispersion Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulas, George C.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The NEXT ion thruster is a low specific mass, high performance thruster with a nominal throttling range of 0.5 to 7 kW. Numerous engineering model and one prototype model thrusters have been manufactured and tested. Of significant importance to propulsion system performance is thruster-to-thruster performance dispersions. This type of information can provide a bandwidth of expected performance variations both on a thruster and a component level. Knowledge of these dispersions can be used to more conservatively predict thruster service life capability and thruster performance for mission planning, facilitate future thruster performance comparisons, and verify power processor capabilities are compatible with the thruster design. This study compiles the test results of five engineering model thrusters and one flight-like thruster to determine unit-to-unit dispersions in thruster performance. Component level performance dispersion analyses will include discharge chamber voltages, currents, and losses; accelerator currents, electron backstreaming limits, and perveance limits; and neutralizer keeper and coupling voltages and the spot-to-plume mode transition flow rates. Thruster level performance dispersion analyses will include thrust efficiency.

  10. Shared Magnetics Hall Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the proposed Phase II program, Busek Co. will demonstrate an innovative methodology for clustering Hall thrusters into a high performance, very high power...

  11. Oxygen-Methane Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Two main innovations will be developed in the Phase II effort that are fundamentally associated with our gaseous oxygen/gaseous methane RCS thruster. The first...

  12. Shared Magnetics Hall Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the proposed Phase I program, Busek Co. will demonstrate an innovative methodology for clustering Hall thrusters into a high performance, very high power...

  13. Treatment for hydrazine-containing waste water solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yade, N.

    1986-01-01

    The treatment for waste solutions containing hydrazine is presented. The invention attempts oxidation and decomposition of hydrazine in waste water in a simple and effective processing. The method adds activated charcoal to waste solutions containing hydrazine while maintaining a pH value higher than 8, and adding iron salts if necessary. Then, the solution is aerated.

  14. Iodine Hall Thruster for Space Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the Phase I program, Busek Co. Inc. tested an existing Hall thruster, the BHT-8000, on iodine propellant. The thruster was fed by a high flow iodine feed system,...

  15. Hydrazine in the Ugi Tetrazole Reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patil, Pravin; Zhang, Ji; Kurpiewska, Katarzyna; Kalinowska-Tłuścik, Justyna; Dömling, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    We describe the hitherto unknown use of N-Boc-protected hydrazine in the Ugi tetrazole reaction to access a library of highly substituted 5-(hydrazinomethyl)-1-methyl-1H-tetrazoles. The reaction is very versatile and good to high yielding. A one-pot, two-step procedure is given.

  16. Helicon plasma thruster discharge model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafleur, T., E-mail: trevor.lafleur@lpp.polytechnique.fr [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, CNRS, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Univ Paris-Sud, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau, France and ONERA - The French Aerospace Lab, 91120 Palaiseau (France)

    2014-04-15

    By considering particle, momentum, and energy balance equations, we develop a semi-empirical quasi one-dimensional analytical discharge model of radio-frequency and helicon plasma thrusters. The model, which includes both the upstream plasma source region as well as the downstream diverging magnetic nozzle region, is compared with experimental measurements and confirms current performance levels. Analysis of the discharge model identifies plasma power losses on the radial and back wall of the thruster as the major performance reduction factors. These losses serve as sinks for the input power which do not contribute to the thrust, and which reduce the maximum plasma density and hence propellant utilization. With significant radial plasma losses eliminated, the discharge model (with argon) predicts specific impulses in excess of 3000 s, propellant utilizations above 90%, and thruster efficiencies of about 30%.

  17. Electron dynamics in Hall thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, Samuel; Pakter, Renato

    2015-11-01

    Hall thrusters are plasma engines those use an electromagnetic fields combination to confine electrons, generate and accelerate ions. Widely used by aerospace industries those thrusters stand out for its simple geometry, high specific impulse and low demand for electric power. Propulsion generated by those systems is due to acceleration of ions produced in an acceleration channel. The ions are generated by collision of electrons with propellant gas atoms. In this context, we can realize how important is characterizing the electronic dynamics. Using Hamiltonian formalism, we derive the electron motion equation in a simplified electromagnetic fields configuration observed in hall thrusters. We found conditions those must be satisfied by electromagnetic fields to have electronic confinement in acceleration channel. We present configurations of electromagnetic fields those maximize propellant gas ionization and thus make propulsion more efficient. This work was supported by CNPq.

  18. Crystal structure of hydrazine iron(III) phosphate, the first transition metal phosphate containing hydrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Renald

    2015-12-01

    The title compound, poly[(μ2-hydrazine)(μ4-phosphato)iron(III)], [Fe(PO4)(N2H4)] n , was prepared under hydro-thermal conditions. Its asymmetric unit contains one Fe(III) atom located on an inversion centre, one P atom located on a twofold rotation axis, and two O, one N and two H atoms located on general positions. The Fe(III) atom is bound to four O atoms of symmetry-related PO4 tetra-hedra and to two N atoms of two symmetry-related hydrazine ligands, resulting in a slightly distorted FeO4N2 octa-hedron. The crystal structure consists of a three-dimensional hydrazine/iron phoshate framework whereby each PO4 tetra-hedron bridges four Fe(III) atoms and each hydrazine ligand bridges two Fe(III) atoms. The H atoms of the hydrazine ligands are also involved in moderate N-H⋯O hydrogen bonding with phosphate O atoms. The crystal structure is isotypic with the sulfates [Co(SO4)(N2H4)] and [Mn(SO4)(N2H4)].

  19. Crystal structure of hydrazine iron(III phosphate, the first transition metal phosphate containing hydrazine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renald David

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, poly[(μ2-hydrazine(μ4-phosphatoiron(III], [Fe(PO4(N2H4]n, was prepared under hydrothermal conditions. Its asymmetric unit contains one FeIII atom located on an inversion centre, one P atom located on a twofold rotation axis, and two O, one N and two H atoms located on general positions. The FeIII atom is bound to four O atoms of symmetry-related PO4 tetrahedra and to two N atoms of two symmetry-related hydrazine ligands, resulting in a slightly distorted FeO4N2 octahedron. The crystal structure consists of a three-dimensional hydrazine/iron phoshate framework whereby each PO4 tetrahedron bridges four FeIII atoms and each hydrazine ligand bridges two FeIII atoms. The H atoms of the hydrazine ligands are also involved in moderate N—H...O hydrogen bonding with phosphate O atoms. The crystal structure is isotypic with the sulfates [Co(SO4(N2H4] and [Mn(SO4(N2H4].

  20. Hot-Fire Testing of 5N and 22N HPGP Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnside, Christopher G.; Pedersen, Kevin W.; Pierce, Charles W.

    2015-01-01

    This hot-fire test continues NASA investigation of green propellant technologies for future missions. To show the potential for green propellants to replace some hydrazine systems in future spacecraft, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is continuing to embark on hot-fire test campaigns with various green propellant blends.NASA completed hot-fire testing of 5N and 22N HPGP thrusters at the Marshall Space Flight Center’s Component Development Area altitude test stand in April 2015. Both thrusters are ground test articles and not flight ready units, but are representative of potential flight hardware with a known path towards flight application. The purpose of the 5N testing was to perform facility check-outs and generate a small set of data for comparison to ECAPS and Orbital ATK data sets. The 5N thruster performed as expected with thrust and propellant flow-rate data generated that are similar to previous testing at Orbital ATK. Immediately following the 5N testing, and using the same facility, the 22N testing was conducted on the same test stand with the purpose of demonstrating the 22N performance. The results of 22N testing indicate it performed as expected.The results of the hot-fire testing are presented in this paper and presentation.

  1. Chronic Inhalation Toxicity of Hydrazine: Oncogenic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    showed signs of anorexia and general fatigue. Changing diets and forced feedings resulted in the survival of the remaining two dogs. A 6-month chronic...Esophagus Bladder Stomach Seminal vesicles Duodenum Prostate Jejunum Testes Ileum Ovaries Cecum Uterus Colon Nasal cavity Rectum Brain Mesenteric lymph... malnutrition during chronic exposure. Based upon these studies, the current OSHA Threshold Limit Value of 1.0 ppm for hydrazine is unsatisfactory while the

  2. Miniature Bipolar Electrostatic Ion Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartley, Frank T.

    2006-01-01

    The figure presents a concept of a bipolar miniature electrostatic ion thruster for maneuvering a small spacecraft. The ionization device in the proposed thruster would be a 0.1-micron-thick dielectric membrane with metal electrodes on both sides. Small conical holes would be micromachined through the membrane and electrodes. An electric potential of the order of a volt applied between the membrane electrodes would give rise to an electric field of the order of several mega-volts per meter in the submicron gap between the electrodes. An electric field of this magnitude would be sufficient to ionize all the molecules that enter the holes. In a thruster-based on this concept, one or more propellant gases would be introduced into such a membrane ionizer. Unlike in larger prior ion thrusters, all of the propellant molecules would be ionized. This thruster would be capable of bipolar operation. There would be two accelerator grids - one located forward and one located aft of the membrane ionizer. In one mode of operation, which one could denote the forward mode, positive ions leaving the ionizer on the backside would be accelerated to high momentum by an electric field between the ionizer and an accelerator grid. Electrons leaving the ionizer on the front side would be ejected into free space by a smaller accelerating field. The equality of the ion and electron currents would eliminate the need for an additional electron- or ion-emitting device to keep the spacecraft charge-neutral. In another mode of operation, which could denote the reverse mode, the polarities of the voltages applied to the accelerator grids and to the electrodes of the membrane ionizer would be the reverse of those of the forward mode. The reversal of electric fields would cause the ion and electrons to be ejected in the reverse of their forward mode directions, thereby giving rise to thrust in the direction opposite that of the forward mode.

  3. Pulsed Electrogasdynamic Thruster for Attitude Control and Orbit Maneuver Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A new pulsed electric thruster, named "pulsed electrogasdynamic thruster," for attitude control and orbit maneuver is proposed. In this thruster, propellant gas is...

  4. A Microwave Thruster for Spacecraft Propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiravalle, Vincent P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-23

    This presentation describes how a microwave thruster can be used for spacecraft propulsion. A microwave thruster is part of a larger class of electric propulsion devices that have higher specific impulse and lower thrust than conventional chemical rocket engines. Examples of electric propulsion devices are given in this presentation and it is shown how these devices have been used to accomplish two recent space missions. The microwave thruster is then described and it is explained how the thrust and specific impulse of the thruster can be measured. Calculations of the gas temperature and plasma properties in the microwave thruster are discussed. In addition a potential mission for the microwave thruster involving the orbit raising of a space station is explored.

  5. J series thruster thermal test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtel, R. T.; Dulgeroff, C. R.

    1982-01-01

    Test experience with J series ion thrusters have indicated that the present thruster design may result in excessive temperatures in areas which utilize organic materials such as wire insulation, with the resultant outgassing and potential contamination of insulating materials. Further, it appears that thermal data obtained with earlier thruster designs, such as the 700 series thruster, may not be directly applicable to the J series design. Two J series thrusters were fitted with thermocouples and critical temperatures measured for a variety of configurations and operating parameters. Completely enclosing the thruster to reduce facility contamination significantly increased temperatures prompting the selection of a compromise geometry for life testing. The operating parameter having the largest effect on temperatures was discharge power, while beam power affected little else than extraction system temperatures. Several off-normal operating modes were also investigated. Data believed to be sufficient to effectively modify existing thermal models were obtained from the tests.

  6. Low Mass Electromagnetic Plasmoid Thruster with Integrated PPU Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Electromagnetic Plasmoid Thruster (EMPT) is a revolutionary electric propulsion thruster and power processing (PPU) system that will allow a dramatic decrease...

  7. Electron-wall Interaction in Hall Thrusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Raitses; D. Staack; M. Keidar; N.J. Fisch

    2005-02-11

    Electron-wall interaction effects in Hall thrusters are studied through measurements of the plasma response to variations of the thruster channel width and the discharge voltage. The discharge voltage threshold is shown to separate two thruster regimes. Below this threshold, the electron energy gain is constant in the acceleration region and therefore, secondary electron emission (SEE) from the channel walls is insufficient to enhance electron energy losses at the channel walls. Above this voltage threshold, the maximum electron temperature saturates.

  8. Low-Voltage Hall Thruster Mode Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Technical Paper 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) June 2014- July 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-House Low-Voltage Hall Thruster Mode...ABSTRACT Past investigations of the 6kW-class H6 Hall thruster during low-voltage operation revealed two operating modes, corresponding to the...topologies were characterized for the H6 Hall thruster from 100V to 200V discharge, with variation in cathode flow fraction, cathode position inside and

  9. Advanced Microwave Electrothermal Thruster (AMET) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Orbital Technologies Corporation (ORBITEC) and the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH) propose to develop the Advanced Microwave Electrothermal Thruster...

  10. Electrodeless plasma thrusters for spacecraft: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bathgate, S. N.; Bilek, M. M. M.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2017-08-01

    The physics of electrodeless electric thrusters that use directed plasma to propel spacecraft without employing electrodes subject to plasma erosion is reviewed. Electrodeless plasma thrusters are potentially more durable than presently deployed thrusters that use electrodes such as gridded ion, Hall thrusters, arcjets and resistojets. Like other plasma thrusters, electrodeless thrusters have the advantage of reduced fuel mass compared to chemical thrusters that produce the same thrust. The status of electrodeless plasma thrusters that could be used in communications satellites and in spacecraft for interplanetary missions is examined. Electrodeless thrusters under development or planned for deployment include devices that use a rotating magnetic field; devices that use a rotating electric field; pulsed inductive devices that exploit the Lorentz force on an induced current loop in a plasma; devices that use radiofrequency fields to heat plasmas and have magnetic nozzles to accelerate the hot plasma and other devices that exploit the Lorentz force. Using metrics of specific impulse and thrust efficiency, we find that the most promising designs are those that use Lorentz forces directly to expel plasma and those that use magnetic nozzles to accelerate plasma.

  11. Development of ion thruster IT-500

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroteev, Anatoly S.; Lovtsov, Alexander S.; Muravlev, Vyacheslav A.; Selivanov, Mikhail Y.; Shagayda, Andrey A.

    2017-05-01

    A high-power ion thruster IT-500 was designed, manufactured and tested at Keldysh Research Center within a transport-power module project. This module is being designed to perform near-Earth space and interplanetary transport missions. In its nominal operation mode, IT-500 provides thrust in the range from 375 to 750 mN at specific impulse of 70 000 m/s and thrust efficiency of 0.75. Due to a high cost of the experimental testing of a large thruster, the emphasis was placed on the numerical optimization of the thruster design. The thruster completed performance tests and a 300 h wear test. The output characteristics of the thruster, obtained during the tests, confirmed the correctness of the provisional numerical optimization. IT-500 design, performance, and validation of the design approaches are discussed in this paper. Contribution to the Topical Issue: "Physics of Ion Beam Sources", edited by Holger Kersten and Horst Neumann.

  12. Developing A New Sampling and Analysis Method for Hydrazine and Monomethyl Hydrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, John R.

    2002-01-01

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) will be used to develop a method for detecting monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) and hydrazine (Hz). A derivatizing agent, pentafluorobenzoyl chloride (PFBCl), is known to react readily with MMH and Hz. The SPME fiber can either be coated with PFBCl and introduced into a gaseous stream containing MMH, or PFBCl and MMH can react first in a syringe barrel and after a short equilibration period a SPME is used to sample the resulting solution. These methods were optimized and compared. Because Hz and MMH can degrade the SPME, letting the reaction occur first gave better results. Only MMH could be detected using either of these methods. Future research will concentrate on constructing calibration curves and determining the detection limit.

  13. Developing A New Sampling and Analysis Method for Hydrazine and Monomethyl Hydrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, John R.

    2002-01-01

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) will be used to develop a method for detecting monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) and hydrazine (Hz). A derivatizing agent, pentafluorobenzoyl chloride (PFBCl), is known to react readily with MMH and Hz. The SPME fiber can either be coated with PFBCl and introduced into a gaseous stream containing MMH, or PFBCl and MMH can react first in a syringe barrel and after a short equilibration period a SPME is used to sample the resulting solution. These methods were optimized and compared. Because Hz and MMH can degrade the SPME, letting the reaction occur first gave better results. Only MMH could be detected using either of these methods. Future research will concentrate on constructing calibration curves and determining the detection limit.

  14. Coil system for plasmoid thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskridge, Richard H. (Inventor); Lee, Michael H. (Inventor); Martin, Adam K. (Inventor); Fimognari, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A coil system for a plasmoid thruster includes a bias coil, a drive coil and field coils. The bias and drive coils are interleaved with one another as they are helically wound about a conical region. A first field coil defines a first passage at one end of the conical region, and is connected in series with the bias coil. A second field coil defines a second passage at an opposing end of the conical region, and is connected in series with the bias coil.

  15. Bacterial Toxicity and Metabolism of Three Hydrazine Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    zine fuels have toxic effects on developing frog embryos and/or larvae. Hydrazine sulphate proved teratogenic at 40 milligrams per liter. MMH was...and for photographic developing . Hydrazine is also used as a surface active agent in plasticizer manufacturing (Reference 1). As of 1978, most...hour LC50 ranges for the common guppy of 0.6 to 4.6, 2.6 to 6.7, and 10.1 to 26.5 for hydrazine, MMH and UDMH, respectively. The range variation for

  16. Mechanical design of SERT 2 thruster system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavesky, R. J.; Hurst, E. B.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical design of the mercury bombardment thruster that was tested on SERT is described. The report shows how the structural, thermal, electrical, material compatibility, and neutral mercury coating considerations affected the design and integration of the subsystems and components. The SERT 2 spacecraft with two thrusters was launched on February 3, 1970. One thruster operated for 3782 hours and the other for 2011 hours. A high voltage short resulting from buildup of loose eroded material was believed to be the cause of failure.

  17. Synthesis and Free Radical Scavenging Activity of New Hydroxybenzylidene Hydrazines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Frantisek Sersen; Fridrich Gregan; Peter Kotora; Jarmila Kmetova; Juraj Filo; Dusan Loos; Juraj Gregan

    2017-01-01

    Hydroxybenzylidene hydrazines exhibit a wide spectrum of biological activities. Here, we report synthesis and free radical scavenging activity of nine new N-(hydroxybenzylidene)-N′-[2,6-dinitro-4-(trifluoromethyl)]phenylhydrazines...

  18. Enthalpy of Formation of N2H4 (Hydrazine) Revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feller, David; Bross, David H.; Ruscic, Branko

    2017-08-17

    In order to address the accuracy of the long-standing experimental enthalpy of formation of gas-phase hydrazine, fully confirmed in earlier versions of Active Thermochemical Tables (ATcT), the provenance of that value is re-examined in light of new high-end calculations of the Feller-Peterson-Dixon (FPD) variety. An overly optimistic determination of the vaporization enthalpy of hydrazine, which created an unrealistically strong connection between the gas phase thermochemistry and the calorimetric results defining the thermochemistry of liquid hydrazine was identified as the probable culprit. The new enthalpy of formation of gas-phase hydrazine, based on balancing all available knowledge, was determined to be 111.57 ± 0.47 kJ/mol at 0 K (97.41 kJ/mol at 298.15 K). Close agreement was found between the ATcT (even excluding the latest theoretical result) and FPD enthalpies.

  19. Mobility Spectrometer Studies on Hydrazine and Ammonia Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, William; Eiceman, Gary; Szumlas, Andrew; Lewis, John

    2011-01-01

    An airborne vapor analyzer for detecting sub- to low- parts-per-million (ppm) hydrazine in the presence of higher concentration levels of ammonia has been under development for the Orion program. The detector is based on ambient pressure ionization and ion mobility characterization. The detector encompasses: 1) a membrane inlet to exclude particulate and aerosols from the analyzer inlet; 2) a method to separate hydrazine from ammonia which would otherwise lead to loss of calibration and quantitative accuracy for the hydrazine determination; and 3) response and quantitative determinations for both hydrazine and ammonia. Laboratory studies were made to explore some of these features including mobility measurements mindful of power, size, and weight issues. The study recommended the use of a mobility spectrometer of traditional design with a reagent gas and equipped with an inlet transfer line of bonded phase fused silica tube. The inlet transfer line provided gas phase separation of neutrals of ammonia from hydrazine at 50 C simplifying significantly the ionization chemistry that underlies response in a mobility spectrometer. Performance of the analyzer was acceptable between ranges of 30 to 80 C for both the pre-fractionation column and the drift tube. An inlet comprised of a combined membrane with valve-less injector allowed high speed quantitative determination of ammonia and hydrazine without cross reactivity from common metabolites such as alcohols, esters, and aldehydes. Preliminary test results and some of the design features are discussed.

  20. Light Metal Propellant Hall Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek proposes to develop light metal Hall Effect thrusters that will help reduce the travel time, mass, and cost of SMD spacecraft. Busek has identified three...

  1. Precision Electrospray Thruster Assembly (PETA) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New low cost, low volume, low power, rugged electrospray thrusters will be ideal as actuators for precision thrusting, if provided with precision high voltage power...

  2. T6 Ion Thruster Technology Development Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Provide discharge chamber and grid modeling for the new T6 based on JPL expertise on ion thruster performance and life; Enable/guide the T6 upgrade development to...

  3. Dual Mode Low Power Hall Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sample and return missions desire and missions like Saturn Observer require a low power Hall thruster that can operate at high thrust to power as well as high...

  4. Q-thruster Breadboard Campaign Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Q-thruster technology is a mission enabling form of electric propulsion and is already being traded by NASA's Concept Architecture Team (CAT) & Human Space...

  5. Iodine Hall Thruster for Space Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek Co. Inc. proposes to develop a high power (high thrust) electric propulsion system featuring an iodine fueled Hall Effect Thruster (HET). The system to be...

  6. High Thrust Efficiency MPD Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters can provide the high-specific impulse, high-power propulsion required to support human and robotic exploration missions to the...

  7. Optimized Magnetic Nozzles for MPD Thrusters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thrusters can provide the high-specific impulse, high-power propulsion required to enable ambitious human and robotic exploration missions...

  8. Acoustic Resonance Reaction Control Thruster (ARCTIC) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop and demonstrate the innovative Acoustic Resonance Reaction Control Thruster (ARCTIC) to provide rapid and reliable in-space impulse...

  9. Multiscale Modeling of Hall Thrusters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New multiscale modeling capability for analyzing advanced Hall thrusters is proposed. This technology offers NASA the ability to reduce development effort of new...

  10. Additive Manufacturing of Ion Thruster Optics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Plasma Controls will manufacture and test a set of ion optics for electric propulsion ion thrusters using additive manufacturing technology, also known as 3D...

  11. MPD thruster research issues, activities, strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    The following activities and plans in the MPD thruster development are summarized: (1) experimental and theoretical research (magnetic nozzles at present and high power levels, MPD thrusters with applied fields extending into the thrust chamber, and improved electrode performance); and (2) tools (MACH2 code for MPD and nozzle flow calculation, laser diagnostics and spectroscopy for non-intrusive measurements of flow conditions, and extension to higher power). National strategies are also outlined.

  12. Colloid Thrusters, Physics, Fabrication and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-11-17

    response, including the time for reviewing in. tata needed, and completing and reviewing this collection of information. Send comments regarding this...a discussion with colleagues during the 2nd Colloid Thruster/ Nano Electrojet Workshop (MIT, April 14- 15, 2005, Ref. [11]) an agreement was reached...23 Jul 2003. 11. Second Colloid Thruster/ Nano Electrojet Workshop, CD with a collection of presentations by attendees to this Workshop. MIT, April 14

  13. Flame speed enhancement of solid nitrocellulose monopropellant coupled with graphite at microscales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, S.; Yehia, O.; Qiao, L.

    2016-03-01

    The flame-speed-enhancement phenomenon of a solid monopropellant (nitrocellulose) using a highly conductive thermal base (graphite sheet) was demonstrated and studied both experimentally and theoretically. A propellant layer ranging from 20 μm to 170 μm was deposited on the top of a 20-μm thick graphite sheet. Self-propagating oscillatory combustion waves were observed, with average flame speed enhancements up to 14 times the bulk value. The ratio of the fuel-to-graphite layer thickness affects not only the average reaction front velocities but also the period and the amplitude of the combustion wave oscillations. To better understand the flame-speed enhancement and the oscillatory nature of the combustion waves, the coupled nitrocellulose-graphite system was modeled using one-dimensional energy conservation equations along with simple one-step chemistry. The period and the amplitude of the oscillatory combustion waves were predicted as a function of the ratio of the fuel-to-graphite thickness (R), the ratio of the graphite-to-fuel thermal diffusivity (α0), and the non-dimensional inverse adiabatic temperature rise (β). The predicted flame speeds and the characteristics of the oscillations agree well with the experimental data. The new concept of using a highly conductive thermal base such as carbon-based nano- and microstructures to enhance flame propagation speed or burning rate of propellants and fuels could lead to improved performance of solid and liquid rocket motors, as well as of the alternative energy conversion microelectromechanical devices.

  14. Control capability analysis for complex spacecraft thruster configurations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The set of forces and moments that can be generated by thrusters of a spacecraft is called the"control capability"with respect to the thruster configuration.If the control capability of a thruster configuration is adequate to fulfill a given space mission,we say this configuration is a feasible one with respect to the task.This study proposed a new way to analyze the control capability of the complex thruster configuration.Precise mathematical definitions of feasibility were proposed,based on which a criterion to judge the feasibility of the thruster configuration was presented through calculating the shortest distance to the boundary of the controllable region as a function of the thruster configuration.Finally,control capability analysis for the complex thruster configuration based on its feasibility with respect to the space mission was given followed by a 2-D thruster configuration example to demonstrate its validity.

  15. Low Mass Electromagnetic Plasmoid Thruster with Integrated PPU Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Electromagnetic Plasmoid Thruster (EMPT) is a revolutionary electric propulsion thruster and power processing (PPU) system that will allow a dramatic decrease in...

  16. Hydrazine Borane and Hydrazinidoboranes as Chemical Hydrogen Storage Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romain Moury

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrazine borane N2H4BH3 and alkali derivatives (i.e., lithium, sodium and potassium hydrazinidoboranes MN2H3BH3 with M = Li, Na and K have been considered as potential chemical hydrogen storage materials. They belong to the family of boron- and nitrogen-based materials and the present article aims at providing a timely review while focusing on fundamentals so that their effective potential in the field could be appreciated. It stands out that, on the one hand, hydrazine borane, in aqueous solution, would be suitable for full dehydrogenation in hydrolytic conditions; the most attractive feature is the possibility to dehydrogenate, in addition to the BH3 group, the N2H4 moiety in the presence of an active and selective metal-based catalyst but for which further improvements are still necessary. However, the thermolytic dehydrogenation of hydrazine borane should be avoided because of the evolution of significant amounts of hydrazine and the formation of a shock-sensitive solid residue upon heating at >300 °C. On the other hand, the alkali hydrazinidoboranes, obtained by reaction of hydrazine borane with alkali hydrides, would be more suitable to thermolytic dehydrogenation, with improved properties in comparison to the parent borane. All of these aspects are surveyed herein and put into perspective.

  17. Performance Characterization of a Three-Axis Hall Effect Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    here represents the first efforts to operate and quantify the performance of a three-axis Hall effect thruster. This thruster is based on the Busek BHT ...thruster were developed and thrust and current density measurements were performed and compared with the baseline BHT -200. The three-axis thruster was...efficiencies than the BHT -200. Beam current density measurements conducted using a guarded Faraday probe showed significant differences in plume divergence

  18. Design and operations of Hall thruster with segmented electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisch, N.J.; Raitses, Y.; Dorf, L.A.; Litvak, A.A.

    1999-12-10

    Principles of the Hall thruster with segmented electrodes are explored. A suitable vacuum facility was put into service. For purposes of comparison between segmented and conventional thruster approaches, a modular laboratory prototype thruster was designed and built. Under conventional operation, the thruster achieves state-of-the-art efficiencies (56% at 300 V and 890 W). Very preliminary results under operation with segmented electrodes are also described.

  19. Design and Operation of Hall Thruster with Segmented Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.A. Litvak; L.A. Dorf; N.J. Fisch; Y. Raitses

    1999-07-01

    Principles of the Hall thruster with segmented electrodes are explored. A suitable vacuum facility was put into service. For purposes of comparison between segmented and conventional thruster approaches, a modular laboratory prototype thruster was designed and built. Under conventional operation, the thruster achieves state-of-the-art efficiencies (56% at 300 V and 890 W). Very preliminary results under operation with segmented electrodes are also described.

  20. Investigations of Probe Induced Perturbations in a Hall Thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Staack; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2002-08-12

    An electrostatic probe used to measure spatial plasma parameters in a Hall thruster generates perturbations of the plasma. These perturbations are examined by varying the probe material, penetration distance, residence time, and the nominal thruster conditions. The study leads us to recommendations for probe design and thruster operating conditions to reduce discharge perturbations, including metal shielding of the probe insulator and operation of the thruster at lower densities.

  1. Coaxial plasma thrusters for high specific impulse propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenberg, Kurt F.; Gerwin, Richard A.; Barnes, Cris W.; Henins, Ivars; Mayo, Robert; Moses, Ronald, Jr.; Scarberry, Richard; Wurden, Glen

    1991-01-01

    A fundamental basis for coaxial plasma thruster performance is presented and the steady-state, ideal MHD properties of a coaxial thruster using an annular magnetic nozzle are discussed. Formulas for power usage, thrust, mass flow rate, and specific impulse are acquired and employed to assess thruster performance. The performance estimates are compared with the observed properties of an unoptimized coaxial plasma gun. These comparisons support the hypothesis that ideal MHD has an important role in coaxial plasma thruster dynamics.

  2. Parametric Investigations of Non-Conventional Hall Thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2001-01-12

    Hall thrusters might better scale to low power with non-conventional geometry. A 9 cm cylindrical, ceramic-channel, Hall thruster with a cusp-type magnetic field distribution has been investigated. It exhibits discharge characteristics similar to conventional coaxial Hall thrusters, but does not expose as much channel surface. Significantly, its operation is not accompanied by large amplitude discharge low frequency oscillations.

  3. OL-AC Phillips Laboratory MPD thruster research program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Dennis L.

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: facility construction; quadruple langmuir probe measurements; hollow/porous anode magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster; the measurement of the ionization fraction inside of the MPD thruster; and the experimental investigation of the effects of microturbulence on MPD thruster performance.

  4. Diagnostics Systems for Permanent Hall Thrusters Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Jose Leonardo; Soares Ferreira, Ivan; Santos, Jean; Miranda, Rodrigo; Possa, M. Gabriela

    This work describes the development of Permanent Magnet Hall Effect Plasma Thruster (PHALL) and its diagnostic systems at The Plasma Physics Laboratory of University of Brasilia. The project consists on the construction and characterization of plasma propulsion engines based on the Hall Effect. Electric thrusters have been employed in over 220 successful space missions. Two types stand out: the Hall-Effect Thruster (HET) and the Gridded Ion Engine (GIE). The first, which we deal with in this project, has the advantage of greater simplicity of operation, a smaller weight for the propulsion subsystem and a longer shelf life. It can operate in two configurations: magnetic layer and anode layer, the difference between the two lying in the positioning of the anode inside the plasma channel. A Hall-Effect Thruster-HET is a type of plasma thruster in which the propellant gas is ionized and accelerated by a magneto hydrodynamic effect combined with electrostatic ion acceleration. So the essential operating principle of the HET is that it uses a J x B force and an electrostatic potential to accelerate ions up to high speeds. In a HET, the attractive negative charge is provided by electrons at the open end of the Thruster instead of a grid, as in the case of the electrostatic ion thrusters. A strong radial magnetic field is used to hold the electrons in place, with the combination of the magnetic field and the electrostatic potential force generating a fast circulating electron current, the Hall current, around the axis of the Thruster, mainly composed by drifting electrons in an ion plasma background. Only a slow axial drift towards the anode occurs. The main attractive features of the Hall-Effect Thruster are its simple design and operating principles. Most of the Hall-Effect Thrusters use electromagnet coils to produce the main magnetic field responsible for plasma generation and acceleration. In this paper we present a different new concept, a Permanent Magnet Hall

  5. Electrostatic ion thrusters - towards predictive modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalentev, O.; Matyash, K.; Duras, J.; Lueskow, K.F.; Schneider, R. [Ernst-Moritz-Arndt Universitaet Greifswald, D-17489 (Germany); Koch, N. [Technische Hochschule Nuernberg Georg Simon Ohm, Kesslerplatz 12, D-90489 Nuernberg (Germany); Schirra, M. [Thales Electronic Systems GmbH, Soeflinger Strasse 100, D-89077 Ulm (Germany)

    2014-02-15

    The development of electrostatic ion thrusters so far has mainly been based on empirical and qualitative know-how, and on evolutionary iteration steps. This resulted in considerable effort regarding prototype design, construction and testing and therefore in significant development and qualification costs and high time demands. For future developments it is anticipated to implement simulation tools which allow for quantitative prediction of ion thruster performance, long-term behavior and space craft interaction prior to hardware design and construction. Based on integrated numerical models combining self-consistent kinetic plasma models with plasma-wall interaction modules a new quality in the description of electrostatic thrusters can be reached. These open the perspective for predictive modeling in this field. This paper reviews the application of a set of predictive numerical modeling tools on an ion thruster model of the HEMP-T (High Efficiency Multi-stage Plasma Thruster) type patented by Thales Electron Devices GmbH. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Research on the Reaction Between Technetium and Hydrazine in Nitric Acid Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The reaction between technetium and hydrazine in nitric acid medium was studied by the titration ofthe concentration of hydrazine and pursuing the concentration of heptavalent technetium along with time.It is approved that the reaction between technetium and hydrazine includes an inducing period, a fast

  7. Bi-directional thruster development and test report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacot, A. D.; Bushnell, G. S.; Anderson, T. M.

    1990-01-01

    The design, calibration and testing of a cold gas, bi-directional throttlable thruster are discussed. The thruster consists of an electro-pneumatic servovalve exhausting through opposite nozzles with a high gain pressure feedback loop to optimize performance. The thruster force was measured to determine hysteresis and linearity. Integral gain was used to maximize performance for linearity, hysteresis, and minimum thrust requirements. Proportional gain provided high dynamic response (bandwidth and phase lag). Thruster performance is very important since the thrusters are intended to be used for active control.

  8. Mode Transitions in Hall Effect Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekerak, Michael J.; Longmier, Benjamin W.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Brown, Daniel L.; Hofer, Richard R.; Polk, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Mode transitions have been commonly observed in Hall Effect Thruster (HET) operation where a small change in a thruster operating parameter such as discharge voltage, magnetic field or mass flow rate causes the thruster discharge current mean value and oscillation amplitude to increase significantly. Mode transitions in a 6-kW-class HET called the H6 are induced by varying the magnetic field intensity while holding all other operating parameters constant and measurements are acquired with ion saturation probes and ultra-fast imaging. Global and local oscillation modes are identified. In the global mode, the entire discharge channel oscillates in unison and azimuthal perturbations (spokes) are either absent or negligible. Downstream azimuthally spaced probes show no signal delay between each other and are very well correlated to the discharge current signal. In the local mode, signals from the azimuthally spaced probes exhibit a clear delay indicating the passage of "spokes" and are not well correlated to the discharge current. These spokes are localized oscillations propagating in the ExB direction that are typically 10-20% of the mean value. In contrast, the oscillations in the global mode can be 100% of the mean value. The transition between global and local modes occurs at higher relative magnetic field strengths for higher mass flow rates or higher discharge voltages. The thrust is constant through mode transition but the thrust-to-power decreased by 25% due to increasing discharge current. The plume shows significant differences between modes with the global mode significantly brighter in the channel and the near-field plasma plume as well as exhibiting a luminous spike on thruster centerline. Mode transitions provide valuable insight to thruster operation and suggest improved methods for thruster performance characterization.

  9. Space vehicles propulsion; La propulsion des vehicules spatiaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cadiou, A. [Centre National d' Etudes Spatiales (CNES), 75 - Paris (France)

    2000-09-01

    Various types of propulsion systems are used depending on the mission characteristics, mono-propellant, bi-propellant and electric. Mono-propellant is mainly used for low Earth orbit applications such as earth observation (SPOT program) or for mini-satellites carrying scientific payloads (PROTEUS platform). Bi-propellant systems which are more efficient are used for geostationary telecommunications satellites (TELECOM2, STENTOR) and can be associated to electrical propulsion for the station keeping of these platforms (STENTOR). The use of electric propulsion allows an important launch mass reduction. The future developments are mainly dedicated to the use of electric propulsion for the orbit raising of telecommunication satellites which leads to the development of thrusters with higher thrust than those existing today, the study of new propellants safer than the existing propellants (hydrazine, mono-methyl-hydrazine,...) and the study of new systems to pressurize the propellants. (authors)

  10. Measurements of Plasma Potential Distribution in Segmented Electrode Hall Thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Raitses; D. Staack; N.J. Fisch

    2001-10-16

    Use of a segmented electrode placed at the Hall thruster exit can substantially reduce the voltage potential drop in the fringing magnetic field outside the thruster channel. In this paper, we investigate the dependence of this effect on thruster operating conditions and segmented electrode configuration. A fast movable emissive probe is used to measure plasma potential in a 1 kW laboratory Hall thruster with semented electrodes made of a graphite material. Relatively small probe-induced perturbations of the thruster discharge in the vicinity of the thruster exit allow a reasonable comparison of the measured results for different thruster configurations. It is shown that the plasma potential distribution is almost not sensitive to changes of the electrode potential, but depends on the magnetic field distribution and the electrode placement.

  11. A Numerical Study on Hydrodynamic Interactions between Dynamic Positioning Thrusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Doo Hwa; Lee, Sang Wook [University of Ulsan, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    In this study, we conducted computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for the unsteady hydrodynamic interaction of multiple thrusters by solving Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. A commercial CFD software, STAR-CCM+ was used for all simulations by employing a ducted thruster model with combination of a propeller and No. 19a duct. A sliding mesh technique was used to treat dynamic motion of propeller rotation and non-conformal hexahedral grid system was considered. Four different combinations in tilting and azimuth angles of the thrusters were considered to investigate the effects on the propulsion performance. We could find that thruster-hull and thruster-thruster interactions has significant effect on propulsion performance and further study will be required for the optimal configurations with the best tilting and relative azimuth angle between thrusters.

  12. Advanced laboratory for testing plasma thrusters and Hall thruster measurement campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szelecka Agnieszka

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Plasma engines are used for space propulsion as an alternative to chemical thrusters. Due to the high exhaust velocity of the propellant, they are more efficient for long-distance interplanetary space missions than their conventional counterparts. An advanced laboratory of plasma space propulsion (PlaNS at the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IPPLM specializes in designing and testing various electric propulsion devices. Inside of a special vacuum chamber with three performance pumps, an environment similar to the one that prevails in space is created. An innovative Micro Pulsed Plasma Thruster (LμPPT with liquid propellant was built at the laboratory. Now it is used to test the second prototype of Hall effect thruster (HET operating on krypton propellant. Meantime, an improved prototype of krypton Hall thruster is constructed.

  13. Pulsed Plasma Thruster plume analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, K. [Washington Univ., Aerospace and Energetics Research Program, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2003-11-01

    Micro-Pulsed Plasma Thrusters ({mu}PPTs) are a promising method for precision attitude control for small spacecraft in formation flying. They create an ionized plasma plume, which may interfere with other spacecraft in the formation. To characterize the ions in the plume, a diagnostic has been built that couples a drift tube with an energy analyzer. The drift tube provides time of flight measurements to determine the exhaust velocity, and the energy analyzer discriminates the ion energies. The energy analyzer measures the current on a collector plate downstream of four grids that repel electrons and ions below a specified energy. The first grid lowers the density of the plasma, therefore increasing Debye length. The second and fourth grids have a negative potential applied to them so they repel the electrons, while the third grid's voltage can be varied to repel lower energy ions. The ion energies can be computed by differentiating the data. Combining the information of the ion energies and their velocities identifies the ion masses in the PPT plume. The PPT used for this diagnostic is the micro-PPT developed for the Dawgstar satellite. This PPT uses 5.2 Joules per pulse and has a 2.3 cm{sup 2} propellant area, a 1.3 cm electrode length, and an estimated thrust of 85 {mu}N [C. Rayburn et al., AIAA-2000-3256]. This paper will describe the development and design of the time of flight/gridded energy analyzer diagnostic and present recent experimental results. (Author)

  14. Ultraviolet surface plasmon-mediated low temperature hydrazine decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Siying; Sheldon, Matthew T.; Atwater, Harry A. [Thomas J. Watson Laboratories of Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Liu, Wei-Guang; Jaramillo-Botero, Andres; Goddard, William Andrew [Materials and Process Simulation Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2015-01-12

    Conventional methods require elevated temperatures in order to dissociate high-energy nitrogen bonds in precursor molecules such as ammonia or hydrazine used for nitride film growth. We report enhanced photodissociation of surface-absorbed hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}) molecules at low temperature by using ultraviolet surface plasmons to concentrate the exciting radiation. Plasmonic nanostructured aluminum substrates were designed to provide resonant near field concentration at λ = 248 nm (5 eV), corresponding to the maximum optical cross section for hydrogen abstraction from N{sub 2}H{sub 4}. We employed nanoimprint lithography to fabricate 1 mm × 1 mm arrays of the resonant plasmonic structures, and ultraviolet reflectance spectroscopy confirmed resonant extinction at 248 nm. Hydrazine was cryogenically adsorbed to the plasmonic substrate in a low-pressure ambient, and 5 eV surface plasmons were resonantly excited using a pulsed KrF laser. Mass spectrometry was used to characterize the photodissociation products and indicated a 6.2× overall enhancement in photodissociation yield for hydrazine adsorbed on plasmonic substrates compared with control substrates. The ultraviolet surface plasmon enhanced photodissociation demonstrated here may provide a valuable method to generate reactive precursors for deposition of nitride thin film materials at low temperatures.

  15. Adsorption and decomposition of monopropellant molecule HAN on Pd(100) and Ir(100) surfaces: A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sourav; Shetty, Sharath A.; Gowrav, M. N.; Oommen, Charlie; Bhattacharya, Atanu

    2016-11-01

    We have performed density functional theory calculations with the generalized gradient approximation to investigate the catalytic decomposition reactions of one of the most promising monopropellants, hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN), on two catalytically active single crystal Pd(100) and Ir(100) surfaces, aiming at exploring different reaction pathways and reactivities of these two surfaces towards the catalytic decomposition of HAN. We find that the HAN molecule binds both the Pd(100) and Ir(100) surfaces molecularly in different orientations with respect to the surface. The HONO elimination is found to possess the lowest activation energy on the Pd(100) surface; whereas, NO2 elimination is predicted to show the lowest activation energy on the Ir(100) surface. Exothermicities associated with different reaction steps are also discussed. This is the first theoretical report on the catalytic decomposition reactions of the HAN molecule on the single crystal Pd(100) and the Ir(100) surfaces using the periodic DFT calculations.

  16. The electrodeless Lorentz force thruster experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Thomas E.

    The Electrodeless Lorentz Force (ELF) thruster is a novel type of plasma thruster, which utilizes Rotating Magnetic Field current drive within a diverging magnetic field to form, accelerate, and eject a Field Reversed Configuration plasmoid. The ELF program is a result of a Small Business Technology Transfer grant awarded to MSNW LLC by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research for the research of the revolutionary space propulsion concept represented by ELF. These grants are awarded to small businesses working in collaboration with a university, in this case, the University of Washington. The program was split into two concurrent research efforts; a numerical modeling study undertaken at the UW branch of the Plasma Science and Innovation Center, and an experimental effort taking place at the UW Plasma Dynamics Laboratory with additional support from MSNW (the latter being the subject of this dissertation). It is the aim of this dissertation is to present to the reader the necessary background information needed to understand the operation of the ELF thruster, an overview of the experimental setup, a review of the significant experimental findings, and a discussion regarding the operation and performance of the thruster.

  17. Hall Effect Thruster Ground Testing Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-18

    conditional stability of the inverted pendulum thrust stand provides improved measurement sensitivity.5 With the displacement of the inverted pendulum...July 2005. 12Samiento, C., “RHETT2/ EPDM Hall Thruster Propulsion System Electromagnetic Compatability Evaluation,” Proceed- ings of the 25th

  18. Microdischarge plasma thrusters for small satellite propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Laxminarayan

    2009-10-01

    Small satellites weighing less than 100 kg are gaining importance in the defense and commercial satellite community owing to advantages of low costs to build and operate, simplicity of design, rapid integration and testing, formation flying, and multi-vehicle operations. The principal challenge in the design and development of small satellite subsystems is the severe mass, volume, and power constraints posed by the overall size of the satellite. The propulsion system in particular is hard to down scale and as such poses a major stumbling block for small satellite technology. Microdischarge-based miniaturized plasma thrusters are potentially a novel solution to this problem. In its most basic form a microdischarge plasma thruster is a simple extension of a cold gas micronozzle propulsion device, where a direct or alternating current microdischarge is used to preheat the gas stream to improve to specific impulse of the device. We study a prototypical thruster device using a detailed, self-consistent coupled plasma and fluid flow computational model. The model describes the microdischarge power deposition, plasma dynamics, gas-phase chemical kinetics, coupling of the plasma phenomena with high-speed flow, and overall propulsion system performance. Unique computational challenges associated with microdischarge modeling in the presence of high-speed flows are addressed. Compared to a cold gas micronozzle, a significant increase in specific impulse (50 to 100 %) is obtained from the power deposition in the diverging supersonic section of the thruster nozzle. The microdischarge remains mostly confined inside the micronozzle and operates in an abnormal glow discharge regime. Gas heating, primarily due to ion Joule heating, is found to have a strong influence on the overall discharge behavior. The study provides a validation of the concept as simple and effective approach to realizing a relatively high-specific impulse thruster device at small geometric scales.

  19. Nitrous Oxide Fuel Blend-Continuous Operation Lunar Thruster (NOFB-COLT) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Firestar Engineering has developed a set of Nitrous Oxide Fuel Blend monopropellants that are: 1) Non-toxic, 2) Specific Impulse> 310 s, 3) Freezing point <...

  20. Plasma Diagnostic and Performance of a Permanent Magnet Hall Thruster

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, J L; Rego, I D S; Ferreira, I S; Ferreira, Jose Leonardo; Souza, Joao Henrique Campos De; Rego, Israel Da Silveira; Ferreira, Ivan Soares

    2004-01-01

    Electric propulsion is now a sucessfull method for primary propulsion of deep space long duration missions and for geosyncronous satellite attitude control. Closed Drift Plasma Thruster, so called Hall Thruster or SPT (stationary plasma thruster) were primarily conceived in USSR (the ancient Soviet Union) and now it is been developed by space agencies, space research institutes and industries in several countries such as France, USA, Israel, Russian Federation and Brazil. In this work, we show plasma characteristics and performance of a Hall Thruster designed with an innovative concept which uses an array of permanent magnets, instead of an eletromagnet, to produce a radial magnetic field inside its cylindrical plasma drift channel. Within this new concept, we expect to develop a Hall Thruster within power consuption that will scale up to small and medium size satellites. A plasma density and temperature space profiles inside and outside the thruster channel will be shown. Space plasma potential, ion temperat...

  1. Los Alamos NEP research in advanced plasma thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenberg, Kurt; Gerwin, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Research was initiated in advanced plasma thrusters that capitalizes on lab capabilities in plasma science and technology. The goal of the program was to examine the scaling issues of magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster performance in support of NASA's MPD thruster development program. The objective was to address multi-megawatt, large scale, quasi-steady state MPD thruster performance. Results to date include a new quasi-steady state operating regime which was obtained at space exploration initiative relevant power levels, that enables direct coaxial gun-MPD comparisons of thruster physics and performance. The radiative losses are neglible. Operation with an applied axial magnetic field shows the same operational stability and exhaust plume uniformity benefits seen in MPD thrusters. Observed gun impedance is in close agreement with the magnetic Bernoulli model predictions. Spatial and temporal measurements of magnetic field, electric field, plasma density, electron temperature, and ion/neutral energy distribution are underway. Model applications to advanced mission logistics are also underway.

  2. High-Pressure Lightweight Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Richard; McKechnie, Timothy; Shchetkovskiy, Anatoliy; Smirnov, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    interface realizes pseudo-plastic behavior with significant increase in the tensile strength. The investigation of high-temperature strength of C/Cs under high-rate heating (critical for thrust chambers) shows that tensile and compression strength increases from 70 MPa at room temperature to 110 MPa at 1,773 K, and up to 125 MPa at 2,473 K. Despite these unique properties, the use of C/Cs is limited by its high oxidation rate at elevated temperatures. Lining carbon/carbon chambers with a thin layer of iridium or iridium and rhenium is an innovative way to use proven refractory metals and provide the oxidation barrier necessary to enable the use of carbon/ carbon composites. Due to the lower density of C/Cs as compared to SiC/SiC composites, an iridium liner can be added to the C/C structure and still be below the overall thruster weight. Weight calculations show that C/C, C/C with 50 microns of Ir, and C/C with 100 microns of Ir are of less weight than alternative materials for the same construction.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Based Electric Propulsion Thruster with Low Power Consumption Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR project is to develop field emission electric propulsion (FEEP) thruster using carbon nanotubes (CNT) integrated anode. FEEP thrusters have gained...

  4. Pseudospectral Model for Hybrid PIC Hall-effect Thruster Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    1149. 8Goebel, D. M. and Katz, I., Fundamentals of Electric Propulsion : Ion and Hall Thrusters, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2008. 9Martin, R., J.W., K...Bilyeu, D., and Tran, J., “Dynamic Particle Weight Remapping in Hybrid PIC Hall -effect Thruster Simulation,” 34th Int. Electric Propulsion Conf...Paper 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) July 2015-July 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Pseudospectral model for hybrid PIC Hall -effect thruster simulationect

  5. Thermo-mechanical design aspects of mercury bombardment ion thrusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnelker, D. E.; Kami, S.

    1972-01-01

    The mechanical design criteria are presented as background considerations for solving problems associated with the thermomechanical design of mercury ion bombardment thrusters. Various analytical procedures are used to aid in the development of thruster subassemblies and components in the fields of heat transfer, vibration, and stress analysis. Examples of these techniques which provide computer solutions to predict and control stress levels encountered during launch and operation of thruster systems are discussed. Computer models of specific examples are presented.

  6. Thermal Management of Superconducting Electromagnets in VASIMR Thrusters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future manned space exploration missions will require high power electric propulsion. VASIMR thrusters are the most attractive option because they offer short...

  7. High Throughput 600 Watt Hall Effect Thruster for Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabo, James; Pote, Bruce; Tedrake, Rachel; Paintal, Surjeet; Byrne, Lawrence; Hruby, Vlad; Kamhawi, Hani; Smith, Tim

    2016-01-01

    A nominal 600-Watt Hall Effect Thruster was developed to propel unmanned space vehicles. Both xenon and iodine compatible versions were demonstrated. With xenon, peak measured thruster efficiency is 46-48% at 600-W, with specific impulse from 1400 s to 1700 s. Evolution of the thruster channel due to ion erosion was predicted through numerical models and calibrated with experimental measurements. Estimated xenon throughput is greater than 100 kg. The thruster is well sized for satellite station keeping and orbit maneuvering, either by itself or within a cluster.

  8. Control Valve for Miniature Xenon Ion Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is continuing its development of electric propulsion engines for various applications. Efforts have been directed toward both large and small thrusters,...

  9. High Efficiency Hall Thruster Discharge Power Converter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek leveraged previous, internally sponsored, high power, Hall thruster discharge converter development which allowed it to design, build, and test new printed...

  10. NASA HERMeS Hall Thruster Electrical Configuration Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Peter Y.; Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Yim, John; Herman, Daniel; Williams, George; Gilland, James; Hofer, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS) 12.5 kW Technology Demonstration Unit-1 (TDU-1) Hall thruster has been the subject of extensive technology maturation in preparation for development into a flight ready propulsion system. Part of the technology maturation was to test the TDU-1 thruster in several ground based electrical configurations to assess the thruster robustness and suitability to successful in-space operation. The ground based electrical configuration testing has recently been demonstrated as an important step in understanding and assessing how a Hall thruster may operate differently in-space compared to ground based testing, and to determine the best configuration to conduct development and qualification testing. This paper describes the electrical configuration testing of the HERMeS TDU-1 Hall thruster in NASA Glenn Research Center's Vacuum Facility 5. The three electrical configurations examined were 1) thruster body tied to facility ground, 2) thruster floating, and 3) thruster body electrically tied to cathode common. The HERMeS TDU-1 Hall thruster was also configured with two different exit plane boundary conditions, dielectric and conducting, to examine the influence on the electrical configuration characterization.

  11. Studies of Non-Conventional Configuration Closed Electron Drift Thrusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Raitses; D. Staack; A. Smirnov; A.A. Litvak; L.A. Dorf; T. Graves; and N.J. Fisch

    2001-09-10

    In this paper, we review recent results obtained for segmented electrode and cylindrical Hall thrusters. A low sputtering graphite segmented electrode, placed at the exit of the annular thruster, is shown to affect the plasma potential distribution in the ceramic channel. This effect appears to be correlated with an observed plume reduction compared to a conventional, nonsegmented thruster. In preliminary experiments a 3-cm thruster was operated in the 50-200 W power range. Two operating regimes, stable and oscillating, were observed and investigated.

  12. Conducting wall Hall thrusters in magnetic shielding and standard configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaud, Lou; Mazouffre, Stéphane

    2017-07-01

    Traditional Hall thrusters are fitted with boron nitride dielectric discharge channels that confine the plasma discharge. Wall properties have significant effects on the performances and stability of the thrusters. In magnetically shielded thrusters, interactions between the plasma and the walls are greatly reduced, and the potential drop responsible for ion acceleration is situated outside the channel. This opens the way to the utilization of alternative materials for the discharge channel. In this work, graphite walls are compared to BN-SiO2 walls in the 200 W magnetically shielded ISCT200-MS and the unshielded ISCT200-US Hall thrusters. The magnetically shielded thruster shows no significant change in the discharge current mean value and oscillations, while the unshielded thruster's discharge current increases by 25% and becomes noticeably less stable. The electric field profile is also investigated through laser spectroscopy, and no significant difference is recorded between the ceramic and graphite cases for the shielded thruster. The unshielded thruster, on the other hand, has its acceleration region shifted 15% of the channel length downstream. Lastly, the plume profile is measured with planar probes fitted with guard rings. Once again the material wall has little influence on the plume characteristics in the shielded thruster, while the unshielded one is significantly affected.

  13. A collisionless plasma thruster plume expansion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Mario; Cichocki, Filippo; Ahedo, Eduardo

    2015-06-01

    A two-fluid model of the unmagnetized, collisionless far region expansion of the plasma plume for gridded ion thrusters and Hall effect thrusters is presented. The model is integrated into two semi-analytical solutions valid in the hypersonic case. These solutions are discussed and compared against the results from the (exact) method of characteristics; the relative errors in density and velocity increase slowly axially and radially and are of the order of 10-2-10-3 in the cases studied. The plasma density, ion flux and ambipolar electric field are investigated. A sensitivity analysis of the problem parameters and initial conditions is carried out in order to characterize the far plume divergence angle in the range of interest for space electric propulsion. A qualitative discussion of the physics of the secondary plasma plume is also provided.

  14. Thermal Characterization of a Hall Effect Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Material Curie Temperature Iron 770 °C Nickel 358 °C Cobalt 1130 °C Gadolinium 20 °C Terfenol 380-430 °C Alnico 850 °C Hard Ferrites 400-700...C Barium Ferrite 450 °C Hall Effect thrusters generally use iron magnets with a Curie temperature of 770 °C. Decreasing the magnetic strength

  15. ELECTROSTATIC ION THRUSTERS - TOWARDS PREDICTIVE MODELING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Duras

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available For satellite missions, thrusters have to be qualified in large vacuum vessels to simulate space environment. One caveat of these experiments is the possible  modification of the beam properties due to the interaction of the energetic ions with the  vessel walls. Impinging ions can produce sputtered impurities or secondary  electrons from the wall. These can stream back into the acceleration channel of the  thruster and produce co-deposited layers. Over the long operation time of thousands  of hours, such layers can modify the optimized geometry and induce changes of the ion beam properties, e.g. broadening of the angular distribution and thrust reduction. To study such effects, a Monte Carlo code for the simulation of the interaction of ion thruster beams with vessel  walls was developed. Strategies to overcome sputter limitations by additional baffles are  studied with the help of this Monte-Carlo erosion code.

  16. Multi-Scale Modeling of Plasma Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batishchev, Oleg

    2004-11-01

    Plasma thrusters are characterized with multiple spatial and temporal scales, which are due to the intrinsic physical processes such as gas ionization, wall effects and plasma acceleration. Characteristic times for hot plasma and cold gas are differing by 6-7 orders of magnitude. The typical collisional mean-free-paths vary by 3-5 orders along the devices. These make questionable a true self-consistent modeling of the thrusters. The latter is vital to the understanding of complex physics, non-linear dynamics and optimization of the performance. To overcome this problem we propose the following approach. All processes are divided into two groups: fast and slow. The slow ones include gas evolution with known sources and ionization sink. The ionization rate, transport coefficients, energy sources are defined during "fast step". Both processes are linked through external iterations. Multiple spatial scales are handled using moving adaptive mesh. Development and application of this method to the VASIMR helicon plasma source and other thrusters will be discussed. Supported by NASA.

  17. Plume Comparisons between Segmented Channel Hall Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemack, Michael; Staack, David; Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2001-10-01

    Angular ion flux plume measurements were taken in several configurations of segmented channel Hall thrusters. The configurations differed by the placement of relatively short rings made from materials with different conductive and secondary electron emission properties along the boron nitride ceramic channel of the thrusters (these have been shown to affect the plume [1]). The ion fluxes are compared with ion trajectory simulations based on plasma potential data acquired with a high speed emissive probe [2]. Preliminary results indicate that in addition to the physical properties of the segments, the plume angle can be strongly affected by the placement of segmented rings relative to the external and internal walls of the channel. [1] Y. Raitses, L. Dorf, A. Litvak and N. J. Fisch, Journal of Applied Physics 88, 1263, 2000 [2] D. Staack, Y. Raitses, N. J. Fisch, Parametric Investigations of Langmuir Probe Induced Perturbations in a Hall Thruster, DPP01 Poster Presentation This work was supported by the U.S. DOE Contract No. DE-ACO2-76-CHO3073.

  18. Developing a New Sampling And Analysis Method For Hydrazine And Monomethyl Hydrazine: Using a Derivatizing Agent With Solid Phase Microextraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, John

    2001-01-01

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) will be used to develop a method for detecting monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) and hydrazine (Hz). A derivatizing agent, pentafluorobenzoyl chloride (PFBCI), is known to react readily with MMH and Hz. The SPME fiber can either be coated with PFBCl and introduced into a gaseous stream containing MMH, or PFBCl and MMH can react first in a syringe barrel and after a short equilibration period a SPME is used to sample the resulting solution. These methods were optimized and compared. Because Hz and MMH can degrade the SPME, letting the reaction occur first gave better results. Only MMH could be detected using either of these methods. Future research will concentrate on constructing calibration curves and determining the detection limit.

  19. Developing a New Sampling And Analysis Method For Hydrazine And Monomethyl Hydrazine: Using a Derivatizing Agent With Solid Phase Microextraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, John

    2001-01-01

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) will be used to develop a method for detecting monomethyl hydrazine (MMH) and hydrazine (Hz). A derivatizing agent, pentafluorobenzoyl chloride (PFBCI), is known to react readily with MMH and Hz. The SPME fiber can either be coated with PFBCl and introduced into a gaseous stream containing MMH, or PFBCl and MMH can react first in a syringe barrel and after a short equilibration period a SPME is used to sample the resulting solution. These methods were optimized and compared. Because Hz and MMH can degrade the SPME, letting the reaction occur first gave better results. Only MMH could be detected using either of these methods. Future research will concentrate on constructing calibration curves and determining the detection limit.

  20. Evaluation of hydrazine reduction by cellulose acetate filters using infrared tunable diode laser spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harward, Charles N; Parrish, Milton E; Plunkett, Susan E; Banyasz, Joseph L; Shafer, Kenneth H

    2002-11-15

    Cellulose acetate (CA) filters have been investigated to determine their hydrazine (N2H4) breakthrough characteristics using a system based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDIAS). The breakthrough mass loading sorption curves for hydrazine were dependent on both the flow rate and the concentration. In experiments using a 4.5 ppmv hydrazine standard, the amounts of hydrazine retained by the CA filter were 4.25 microg at a flow rate of 2.82 L/min and 65 microg at a flow rate of 0.28 L/min. These loadings are much greater than the 31.5 ng/cigarette of hydrazine reported in smoke for unfiltered cigarettes. Further, CA filters exposed to four and eight puffs of smoke actually made the filter more efficient in retaining hydrazine compared to CA filters that had not been exposed to smoke. Therefore, if hydrazine is present in smoke at the levels reported in unfiltered cigarettes, all of the hydrazine would be trapped by the CA filter, and would be unable to break through during smoking. A unique feature of this analytical method is that the instrument does not require calibration after molecular parameters have been determined, in this case from previously acquired quantitative hydrazine FT-IR reference spectra.

  1. Fabrication of liquid crystal based sensor for detection of hydrazine vapours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Rajib; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Singh, Hemant Kumar; Singh, Bachcha; Singh, Ranjan K.

    2014-10-01

    A novel liquid crystal (LC) based sensor to detect trace level amount of hydrazine vapour has been developed. The LC 4‧-pentyl-4-biphenylcarbonitrile (5CB) doped with 0.5 wt% 4-decyloxy benzaldehyde (DBA) shows dark to bright optical texture upon exposure of hydrazine vapours as revealed by polarizing optical microscopy under crossed polarizers. The hydrazine interacts with the doped DBA and form diimine compound which disrupt the orientation of aligned 5CB. The interaction between DBA and hydrazine has been also studied by Raman spectroscopy.

  2. A high power ion thruster for deep space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polk, James E.; Goebel, Dan M.; Snyder, John S.; Schneider, Analyn C.; Johnson, Lee K.; Sengupta, Anita

    2012-07-01

    The Nuclear Electric Xenon Ion System ion thruster was developed for potential outer planet robotic missions using nuclear electric propulsion (NEP). This engine was designed to operate at power levels ranging from 13 to 28 kW at specific impulses of 6000-8500 s and for burn times of up to 10 years. State-of-the-art performance and life assessment tools were used to design the thruster, which featured 57-cm-diameter carbon-carbon composite grids operating at voltages of 3.5-6.5 kV. Preliminary validation of the thruster performance was accomplished with a laboratory model thruster, while in parallel, a flight-like development model (DM) thruster was completed and two DM thrusters fabricated. The first thruster completed full performance testing and a 2000-h wear test. The second successfully completed vibration tests at the full protoflight levels defined for this NEP program and then passed performance validation testing. The thruster design, performance, and the experimental validation of the design tools are discussed in this paper.

  3. An Investigation into the Spectral Imaging of Hall Thruster Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    zone shifting to a more upstream location in the discharge channel as observed in Ref. 14 for the BHT -600 thruster likely due to increased electron...to a more upstream location in the discharge channel as observed in Ref. 14 for the BHT -600 thruster likely due to increased electron mobility from

  4. NASA HERMeS Hall Thruster Electrical Configuration Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Peter; Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Yim, John; Herman, Daniel; Williams, George; Gilland, James; Hofer, Richard

    2016-01-01

    NASAs Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS) 12.5 kW Technology Demonstration Unit-1 (TDU-1) Hall thruster has been the subject of extensive technology maturation in preparation for development into a flight ready propulsion system. Part of the technology maturation was to test the TDU-1 thruster in several ground based electrical configurations to assess the thruster robustness and suitability to successful in-space operation. The ground based electrical configuration testing has recently been demonstrated as an important step in understanding and assessing how a Hall thruster may operate differently in space compared to ground based testing, and to determine the best configuration to conduct development and qualification testing. This presentation will cover the electrical configuration testing of the TDU-1 HERMeS Hall thruster in NASA Glenn Research Centers Vacuum Facility 5. The three electrical configurations examined are the thruster body tied to facility ground, thruster floating, and finally the thruster body electrically tied to cathode common. The TDU-1 HERMeS was configured with two different exit plane boundary conditions, dielectric and conducting, to examine the influence on the electrical configuration characterization.

  5. Molecular dynamics simulations of flame propagation along a monopropellant PETN coupled with multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, S.; Mo, G.; Qiao, L.

    2017-02-01

    Reactive molecular dynamics simulations were conducted to study the flame speed enhancement phenomenon of a solid mono-propellant, Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN), when coupled to highly conductive multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The simulations were based on the first-principles derived reactive force field, ReaxFF, which includes both the physical changes such as thermal transport and the chemical changes such as bond breaking and forming. An annular deposition of a PETN layer around the MWCNTs was considered. The thickness of the PETN layer and the diameter of the MWCNT were varied to understand the effect of the MWCNT loading ratio on the flame propagation. Flame speed enhancements up to 3 times the bulk value were observed. An optimal MWCNT loading ratio was determined. The enhancement was attributed to the layering of the PETN molecules around the MWCNT, which increased the heat transport among the PETN molecules near the MWCNT surface, thus causing the flame to travel faster. Furthermore, a stronger ignition source was required for the MWCNT-PETN complex because of the higher thermal transport among the PETN molecules along the MWCNT, which makes the ignition energy dissipate more quickly. Lastly, the MWCNT remained unburned during the PETN combustion process.

  6. Development and Testing of a Green-Propellant Micro-Hybrid Thruster with Electrostatic Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Judson, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    As early as 1937 German scientists at Peenemunde experimented with highly unstable fuel blends of nitrous oxide (N2O) and ethanol. These early tests mostly resulted in explosions and destroyed rocket engines. More recently several companies have developed experimental nitrous oxide fuel blends (NOFB) with Isp exceeding 300 sec. Although NOFBx has recently been cleared for tests on the International Space Station, this propellant remains highly experimental and has not been cleared for commercial transport by the US DOT. Recent work by Karabeyoglu et al. has raised concerns about the safety risks of mixing hydrocarbons with N2O. Liquid oxidizer/fuel blends are highly explosive and require extreme care in transport and servicing. By adding small amounts of a liquid organic fuel such as alcohol or a hydrocarbon, the odds of an explosive decomposition event are significantly increased.iv The proposed solution mitigates the explosion hazards of NOFB by separating the oxidizer from the hydrocarbon fuel formed as of a small cylindrical section of ABS thermoplastic. As N2O vapor flows across the grain segment, current enters a 1000 VDC high-tension lead in the ABS fuel grain and produces an inductive spark that vaporizes a small amount of the material. The ablated fuel vapor plus residual energy from the spark seed a localized exothermic N2O dissociation that produces sufficient heat to initiate combustion. The process is also effective when gaseous oxygen is used. A low TRL (2-3) prototype demonstrating the feasibility of controlled hydrocarbon-seeding was recently tested at Utah State University.v The unit features a miniature 2.5 cm ABS fuel grain fabricated using a Stratasys Dimension 3-D printer. The 9-N thruster was pulse-fired up to 27 consecutive times on a single ABS grain segment. Ignition was achieved by as little as 12-15 Joules energy input. This value is contrasted with the typical 30-minute pre-heat requirement for the ECAPS LMP-103S ADN-based monopropellant

  7. Azimuthal Spoke Propagation in Hall Effect Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekerak, Michael J.; Longmier, Benjamin W.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Brown, Daniel L.; Hofer, Richard R.; Polk, James E.

    2013-01-01

    Spokes are azimuthally propagating perturbations in the plasma discharge of Hall Effect Thrusters (HETs) that travel in the E x B direction and have been observed in many different systems. The propagation of azimuthal spokes are investigated in a 6 kW HET known as the H6 using ultra-fast imaging and azimuthally spaced probes. A spoke surface is a 2-D plot of azimuthal light intensity evolution over time calculated from 87,500 frames/s videos. The spoke velocity has been determined using three methods with similar results: manual fitting of diagonal lines on the spoke surface, linear cross-correlation between azimuthal locations and an approximated dispersion relation. The spoke velocity for three discharge voltages (300, 400 and 450 V) and three anode mass flow rates (14.7, 19.5 and 25.2 mg/s) yielded spoke velocities between 1500 and 2200 m/s across a range of normalized magnetic field settings. The spoke velocity was inversely dependent on magnetic field strength for low B-field settings and asymptoted at B-field higher values. The velocities and frequencies are compared to standard drifts and plasma waves such as E x B drift, electrostatic ion cyclotron, magnetosonic and various drift waves. The empirically approximated dispersion relation yielded a characteristic velocity that matched the ion acoustic speed for 5 eV electrons that exist in the near-anode and near-field plume regions of the discharge channel based on internal measurements. Thruster performance has been linked to operating mode where thrust-to-power is maximized when azimuthal spokes are present so investigating the underlying mechanism of spokes will benefit thruster operation.

  8. Chemosensitive nanocomposite for conductometric detection of hydrazine and NADH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, Ulrich [Institute of Analytical Chemistry, Chemo- and Biosensors, University of Regensburg, 93047 Regensburg (Germany); Mirsky, Vladimir M., E-mail: vmirsky@hs-lausitz.d [Department of Nanobiotechnology, Lausitz University of Applied Sciences, 01968 Senftenberg (Germany)

    2011-04-01

    A new chemosensitive material based on palladium nanoparticles and PEDOT-PSS is described. The composite was characterized by transmission electron microscopy, cyclic voltammetry and in situ resistance measurements. The material was applied for conductometric detection of hydrazine and NADH. Upon exposure to these analytes PEDOT is reduced leading to an increase in its conductance. This process is catalyzed by palladium. A model for description of the potential dependence of polymer conductivity was suggested, tested and applied for the development of new calibration procedure of chemiresistors based on electroactive polymers.

  9. Performance of a capillary propellant management device with hydrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegart, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    The propellant management device that was successfully used in the Viking Orbiter spacecraft was selected for the main propulsion system of the Teleoperator Retrieval System (TRS). Due to differences in the missions and different propellants, the operation of this sheet metal vane device required reverification for the TRS application. An analytical investigation was performed considering the adverse acceleration environment and the high contract angle of the hydrazine propellant. Drop tower tests demonstrated that the device would provide propellant acquisition while the TRS was docked with Skylab, but its operation would have to be supplemented through propellant settling when free-flying.

  10. 60-WATT HYDRAZINE-AIR FUEL CELL SYSTEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    fuel cell system as presented in our Design Plan. Prior to preparation of the Design Plan, a systems analysis of the basic electrochemical system was made. From the results of this analysis, the operating parameters of the support equipment were defined and an initial selection of components made. System components defined were: the cell stack, electrolyte tank, hydrazine feed system, cooling and chemical air blowers, voltage regulator, and thermal control system. A package design was then made for these components and the final detail design completed.

  11. Micro-Discharge Micro-Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    breakdown at the maximum applied voltage (900 V) in Argon. The back side of the Paschen curve for Ar occurs at a pressure-length (P·d) product of less than...significant capacitance to ground from either lead (~ 100 nF). As small as this is, it had a profound effect on the discharge (see next section). A more space... effect in most thrusters even in the 100 Watt class. For a micro-discharge, even a stray coupling capacitance 50 pF observed for the power leads

  12. A rhodol-based fluorescent chemosensor for hydrazine and its application in live cell bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiensomjitr, Khomsan; Noorat, Rattha; Wechakorn, Kanokorn; Prabpai, Samran; Suksen, Kanoknetr; Kanjanasirirat, Phongthon; Pewkliang, Yongyut; Borwornpinyo, Suparerk; Kongsaeree, Palangpon

    2017-10-01

    A rhodol cinnamate fluorescent chemosensor (RC) has been developed for selective detection of hydrazine (N2H4). In aqueous medium, the rhodol-based probe exhibited high selectivity for hydrazine among other molecules. The addition of hydrazine triggered a fluorescence emission with 48-fold enhancement based on hydrazinolysis and a subsequent ring-opening process. The chemical probe also displayed a selective colorimetric response toward N2H4 from colorless solution to pink, readily observed by the naked eye. The detection limit of RC for hydrazine was calculated to be 300 nM (9.6 ppb). RC is membrane permeable and was successfully demonstrated to detect hydrazine in live HepG2 cells by confocal fluorescence microscopy.

  13. Cassini Thruster Calibration Algorithm Using Reaction Wheel Biasing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Farheen

    2012-01-01

    Thrust force estimates for the reaction control thrusters on-board Cassini spacecraft are presented in this paper. Cassini consists of two thruster branches (A and B) each with eight thrusters. The four Z-thrusters control the X and Y-axes, while the four Y-thrusters control the Z-axis. It is important to track the thrust force estimates in order to detect any thruster degradation and for supporting various activities in spacecraft operations (Titan flyby, spacecraft maneuvers). The Euler equation, which describes the rotational motion of the spacecraft during a reaction wheel bias event, is used to develop the algorithm. The thrust estimates are obtained from the pseudo inverse solution using flight telemetry during the bias. Results show that the A-branch Z3A and Z4A thrusters exhibited degraded thrust in November 2008. Due to the degraded thrust performance of Z3A and Z4A, A-branch usage was discontinued and prime branch was swapped to B-branch in March 2009. The thrust estimates from the B-branch do not show any degradation to date. The algorithm is used to trend the B-branch thrust force estimates as the mission continues.

  14. Global model of an iodine gridded plasma thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondein, P.; Lafleur, T.; Chabert, P.; Aanesland, A.

    2016-03-01

    Most state-of-the-art electric space propulsion systems such as gridded and Hall effect thrusters use xenon as the propellant gas. However, xenon is very rare, expensive to produce, and used in a number of competing industrial applications. Alternatives to xenon are currently being investigated, and iodine has emerged as a potential candidate. Its lower cost and larger availability, its solid state at standard temperature and pressure, its low vapour pressure and its low ionization potential make it an attractive option. In this work, we compare the performances of a gridded ion thruster operating separately with iodine and xenon, under otherwise identical conditions using a global model. The thruster discharge properties such as neutral, ion, and electron densities and electron temperature are calculated, as well as the thruster performance parameters such as thrust, specific impulse, and system efficiencies. For similar operating conditions, representative of realistic thrusters, the model predicts similar thrust levels and performances for both iodine and xenon. The thruster efficiency is however slightly higher for iodine compared with xenon, due to its lower ionization potential. This demonstrates that iodine could be a viable alternative propellant for gridded plasma thrusters.

  15. High-Power, High-Thrust Ion Thruster (HPHTion)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Peter Y.

    2015-01-01

    Advances in high-power photovoltaic technology have enabled the possibility of reasonably sized, high-specific power solar arrays. At high specific powers, power levels ranging from 50 to several hundred kilowatts are feasible. Ion thrusters offer long life and overall high efficiency (typically greater than 70 percent efficiency). In Phase I, the team at ElectroDynamic Applications, Inc., built a 25-kW, 50-cm ion thruster discharge chamber and fabricated a laboratory model. This was in response to the need for a single, high-powered engine to fill the gulf between the 7-kW NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) system and a notional 25-kW engine. The Phase II project matured the laboratory model into a protoengineering model ion thruster. This involved the evolution of the discharge chamber to a high-performance thruster by performance testing and characterization via simulated and full beam extraction testing. Through such testing, the team optimized the design and built a protoengineering model thruster. Coupled with gridded ion thruster technology, this technology can enable a wide range of missions, including ambitious near-Earth NASA missions, Department of Defense missions, and commercial satellite activities.

  16. Performance and flow characteristics of MHD seawater thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doss, E.D.

    1990-01-01

    The main goal of the research is to investigate the effects of strong magnetic fields on the electrical and flow fields inside MHD thrusters. The results of this study is important in the assessment of the feasibility of MHD seawater propulsion for the Navy. To accomplish this goal a three-dimensional fluid flow computer model has been developed and applied to study the concept of MHD seawater propulsion. The effects of strong magnetic fields on the current and electric fields inside the MHD thruster and their interaction with the flow fields, particularly those in the boundary layers, have been investigated. The results of the three-dimensional computations indicate that the velocity profiles are flatter over the sidewalls of the thruster walls in comparison to the velocity profiles over the electrode walls. These nonuniformities in the flow fields give rise to nonuniform distribution of the skin friction along the walls of the thrusters, where higher values are predicted over the sidewalls relative to those over the electrode walls. Also, a parametric study has been performed using the three-dimensional MHD flow model to analyze the performance of continuous electrode seawater thrusters under different operating parameters. The effects of these parameters on the fluid flow characteristics, and on the thruster efficiency have been investigated. Those parameters include the magnetic field (10--20 T), thruster diameter, surface roughness, flow velocity, and the electric load factor. The results show also that the thruster performance improves with the strength of the magnetic field and thruster diameter, and the efficiency decreases with the flow velocity and surface roughness.

  17. Transient tests on an MHD thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierson, E.S. (Purdue Univ., Hammond, IN (United States). Dept. of Engineering); Libera, J.; Petrick, M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Systems Div.)

    1993-01-01

    Three different types of transient tests were made -- coast downs to zero voltage and current under open circuit and short circuit conditions, reverses where the applied voltage was reversed to the same or a different value, and jumps where the voltage applied to the thruster was increased without a change in polarity. Most except the coast downs were dons both quickly (voltage changes as fast as possible) and slowly (6 s to complete the voltage change). A few slower (12 s) transients were done. Transient runs were made for water conductivities of 16.2 and 5.09 S/m. In all cases steady-state conditions were established and several seconds of data taken before initiating the transients. Data were measured every 0.75 to 1 .5 second over the time interval of interest. Particular attention was paid to looking for evidence of gas bubbles, and to the chance of the voltage profiles between the electrodes. The data are interpreted based on the behavior of the power supply and the thruster.

  18. Optimisation of a quantum pair space thruster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriu DRAGAN

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper addresses the problem of propulsion for long term space missions. Traditionally a space propulsion unit has a propellant mass which is ejected trough a nozzle to generate thrust; this is also the case with inert gases energized by an on-board power unit. Unconventional methods for propulsion include high energy LASERs that rely on the momentum of photons to generate thrust. Anti-matter has also been proposed for energy storage. Although the momentum of ejected gas is significantly higher, the LASER propulsion offers the perspective of unlimited operational time – provided there is a power source. The paper will propose the use of the quantum pair formation for generating a working mass, this is different than conventional anti-matter thrusters since the material particles generated are used as propellant not as energy storage.Two methods will be compared: LASER and positron-electron, quantum pair formation. The latter will be shown to offer better momentum above certain energy levels.For the demonstrations an analytical solution is obtained and provided in the form of various coefficients. The implications are, for now, theoretical however the practicality of an optimized thruster using such particles is not to be neglected for long term space missions.

  19. Dihydropyrimidine based hydrazine dihydrochloride derivatives as potent urease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Ajmal; Hashim, Jamshed; Arshad, Nuzhat; Khan, Ijaz; Siddiqui, Naureen; Wadood, Abdul; Ali, Muzaffar; Arshad, Fiza; Khan, Khalid Mohammed; Choudhary, M Iqbal

    2016-02-01

    Four series of heterocyclic compounds 4-dihydropyrimidine-2-thiones 7-12 (series A), N,S-dimethyl-dihydropyrimidines 13-18 (series B), hydrazine derivatives of dihydropyrimidine 19-24 (series C), and tetrazolo dihydropyrimidine derivatives 25-30 (series D), were synthesized and evaluated for in vitro urease inhibitory activity. The series B-D were first time examined for urease inhibition. Series A and C were found to be significantly active with IC50 values between 34.7-42.9 and 15.0-26.0 μM, respectively. The structure-activity relationship showed that the free S atom and hydrazine moiety are the key pharmacophores against urease enzyme. The kinetic studies of the active series A (7-12) and C (19-24) were carried out to determine their modes of inhibition and dissociation constants Ki. Compounds of series A (7-12) and series C (19-24) showed a mixed-type of inhibition with Ki values ranging between 15.76-25.66 and 14.63-29.42 μM, respectively. The molecular docking results showed that all the active compounds of both series have significant binding interactions with the active sites specially Ni-ion of the urease enzyme. Cytotoxicity of all series A-D was also evaluated against mammalian mouse fibroblast 3T3 cell lines, and no toxicity was observed in cellular model.

  20. Complexes with Mercaptosuccinic Acid and Hydrazine as Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Devipriya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Reaction of hydrazine and mercaptosuccinic acid with metal ions forms\tcomplexes with general formula [Ln(N2H42CH2(COOCH(SH(COO1.5]·(H2O, where Ln = La(III, Pr(III, Nd(III, Sm(III, and Gd(III at pH 5. The complexes have been characterized by elemental analysis, IR and UV-visible spectroscopic, thermal and X-ray diffraction studies. The IR data reveal that the acid moiety in the complexes is present as dianion due to the deprotonation of COOH groups by lanthanides in these complexes, leaving –SH group unionized and hydrazine as bidental neutral ligand showing absorptions in the range of 945–948 cm−1. The thermoanalytical data evince that the complexes are stable up to 103°C and undergo complete decomposition in the range of 550–594°C resulting in metal oxides. SEM images of La2O3 and Gd2O3 residues show their nano sized clusters suggesting that the complexes may be used as precursors for nano La2O3 and Gd2O3, respectively. X-ray powder diffraction patterns show isomorphism among the complexes. The kinetic parameters of the decomposition of the complexes have been computed by Coats-Redfern equation.

  1. Digital computer control of a 30-cm mercury ion thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, C. A., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The major objective was to define the exact role of an onboard spacecraft computer in the control of ion thrusters. An initial computer control system with accurate high speed capability was designed, programmed, and tested with the computer as the sole control element for an operating ion thruster. The command functions and a code format for a spacecraft digital control system were established. A second computer control system was constructed to operate with these functions and format. A throttle program sequence was established and tested. A two thruster array was tested with these computer control systems and the results reported.

  2. Self consistent kinetic simulations of SPT and HEMP thrusters including the near-field plume region

    CERN Document Server

    Matyash, K; Mutzke, A; Kalentev, O; Taccogna, F; Koch, N; Schirra, M

    2009-01-01

    The Particle-in-Cell (PIC) method was used to study two different ion thruster concepts - Stationary Plasma Thrusters (SPT) and High Efficiency Multistage Plasma Thrusters (HEMP-T), in particular the plasma properties in the discharge chamber due to the different magnetic field configurations. Special attention was paid to the simulation of plasma particle fluxes on the thrusters channel surfaces. In both cases, PIC proved itself as a powerful tool, delivering important insight into the basic physics of the different thruster concepts. The simulations demonstrated that the new HEMP thruster concept allows for a high thermal efficiency due to both minimal energy dissipation and high acceleration efficiency. In the HEMP thruster the plasma contact to the wall is limited only to very small areas of the magnetic field cusps, which results in much smaller ion energy flux to the thruster channel surface as compared to SPT. The erosion yields for dielectric discharge channel walls of SPT and HEMP thrusters were calc...

  3. 20mN, Variable Specific Impulse Colloid Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During Phase I, Busek designed and manufactured an electrospray emitter capable of generating 20 mN in a 7" x 7" x 1.7" package. The thruster consists of nine...

  4. 20mN, Variable Specific Impulse Colloid Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Colloid thrusters have long been known for their exceptional thrust efficiency and ability to operate over a range of specific impulse due to easily variable...

  5. A High Performance Cathode Heater for Hall Thrusters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High current hollow cathodes are the baseline electron source for next generation high power Hall thrusters. Currently for electron sources providing current levels...

  6. High Throughput Hall Thruster for Small Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek Co. Inc. proposes to develop a high throughput, nominal 100 W Hall Effect Thruster (HET). This HET will be sized for small spacecraft (< 180 kg), including...

  7. Magnesium Hall Thruster for Solar System Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The innovation being developed in this program is a Mg Hall Effect Thruster system that would open the door for In-Situ Resource Utilization based solar system...

  8. Plume Characterization of Busek 600W Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-09

    Dr. William A. Hargus Jr. (Member) Date iv Abstract The BHT -600W thruster has a high potential to place on various commercial and...Thrust Measurement ........................................................................................71 A. BHT -200W...71 B. BHT -600W’s Performance

  9. Radio Frequency Micro Ion Thruster for Precision Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek proposes to develop radio frequency discharge, gridded micro-ion thruster that produces sub-mN thrust precisely adjustable over a wide dynamic thrust range....

  10. Radio Frequency Micro Ion Thruster for Precision Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek proposes to continue development of an engineering model radio frequency discharge, gridded micro ion thruster that produces sub-mN to mN thrust precisely...

  11. Pulsed Electrogasdynamic Thruster for Attitude Control and Orbit Maneuver Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the Phase I program we successfully demonstrated the feasibility of the Pulsed ElectroGasdynamic (PEG) thruster for attitude control and orbital maneuvering. In...

  12. Thruster Modelling for Underwater Vehicle Using System Identification Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Shahrieel Mohd Aras

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a study of thruster modelling for a remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV by system identification using Microbox 2000/2000C. Microbox 2000/2000C is an XPC target machine device to interface between an ROV thruster with the MATLAB 2009 software. In this project, a model of the thruster will be developed first so that the system identification toolbox in MATLAB can be used. This project also presents a comparison of mathematical and empirical modelling. The experiments were carried out by using a mini compressor as a dummy depth pressure applied to a pressure sensor. The thruster model will thrust and submerge until it reaches a set point and maintain the set point depth. The depth was based on pressure sensor measurement. A conventional proportional controller was used in this project and the results gathered justified its selection.

  13. High Input Voltage Hall Thruster Discharge Converter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall scope of this Phase I/II effort is the development of a high efficiency 15kW (nominal) Hall thruster discharge converter. In Phase I, Busek Co. Inc. will...

  14. High Throughput Hall Thruster for Small Spacecraft Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek is developing a high throughput nominal 100-W Hall Effect Thruster. This device is well sized for spacecraft ranging in size from several tens of kilograms to...

  15. Modeling Common Cause Failures of Thrusters on ISS Visiting Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haught, Megan

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the methodology used to model common cause failures of thrusters on the International Space Station (ISS) Visiting Vehicles. The ISS Visiting Vehicles each have as many as 32 thrusters, whose redundancy makes them susceptible to common cause failures. The Global Alpha Model (as described in NUREG/CR-5485) can be used to represent the system common cause contribution, but NUREG/CR-5496 supplies global alpha parameters for groups only up to size six. Because of the large number of redundant thrusters on each vehicle, regression is used to determine parameter values for groups of size larger than six. An additional challenge is that Visiting Vehicle thruster failures must occur in specific combinations in order to fail the propulsion system; not all failure groups of a certain size are critical.

  16. Three Phase Resonant DC Power Converter for Ion Thrusters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The new generation of, high performance electric propulsion missions will require high mass throughput and most likely the use of grided ion thruster equipped with...

  17. Magnesium Hall Thruster for Solar System Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek proposes to prove the feasibility of a Mg Hall effect thruster system that would open the door for In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) based solar system...

  18. Long Life Cold Cathodes for Hall effect Thrusters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An electron source incorporating long life, high current density cold cathodes inside a microchannel plate for use with ion thrusters is proposed. Cathode lifetime...

  19. Thruster Modelling for Underwater Vehicle Using System Identification Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd Shahrieel Mohd Aras

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper describes a study of thruster modelling for a remotely operated underwater vehicle (ROV by system identification using Microbox 2000/2000C. Microbox 2000/2000C is an XPC target machine device to interface between an ROV thruster with the MATLAB 2009 software. In this project, a model of the thruster will be developed first so that the system identification toolbox in MATLAB can be used. This project also presents a comparison of mathematical and empirical modelling. The experiments were carried out by using a mini compressor as a dummy depth pressure applied to a pressure sensor. The thruster model will thrust and submerge until it reaches a set point and maintain the set point depth. The depth was based on pressure sensor measurement. A conventional proportional controller was used in this project and the results gathered justified its selection.

  20. Near-Term Laser Launch Capability: The Heat Exchanger Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kare, Jordin T.

    2003-05-01

    The heat exchanger (HX) thruster concept uses a lightweight (up to 1 MW/kg) flat-plate heat exchanger to couple laser energy into flowing hydrogen. Hot gas is exhausted via a conventional nozzle to generate thrust. The HX thruster has several advantages over ablative thrusters, including high efficiency, design flexibility, and operation with any type of laser. Operating the heat exchanger at a modest exhaust temperature, nominally 1000 C, allows it to be fabricated cheaply, while providing sufficient specific impulse (~600 seconds) for a single-stage vehicle to reach orbit with a useful payload; a nominal vehicle design is described. The HX thruster is also comparatively easy to develop and test, and offers an extremely promising route to near-term demonstration of laser launch.

  1. Four Thruster Microfluidic Electrospray Propulsion (MEP) Cubesat Board Demonstration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cubesat Microfluidic Electrospray Propulsion (MEP) system module prototype will be designed, built and tested to demonstrate that a four MEP thruster system can...

  2. Antisymmetric Amino-Wagging Band of Hydrazine up to K' = 13 Levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulaczyk; Kr; Valentin

    1997-12-01

    A newly recorded high-resolution infrared spectrum of hydrazine has been studied in the 729-1198 cm-1 region (the nu12 antisymmetric wagging band) with a resolution of 0.002 cm-1. About 1350 transitions with K' from 7 to 13 have been newly assigned and about 2350 transitions with lower values of K' reanalyzed with the improved precision. The effective parameters have been calculated separately for each value of K' using the Hougen-Ohashi hamiltonian for hydrazine. The extended assignment completes the analysis of the nu12 band of hydrazine. Copyright 1997 Academic Press. Copyright 1997Academic Press

  3. Capillary Discharge Thruster Experiments and Modeling (Briefing Charts)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    PROPULSION MODELS & EXPERIMENTS Spacecraft Propulsion Relevant Plasma: From hall thrusters to plumes and fluxes on components Complex reaction physics i.e...PROPULSION MODELS & EXPERIMENTS Spacecraft Propulsion Relevant Plasma: From hall thrusters to plumes and fluxes on components Complex reaction ...Conductivity h is the Enthalpy Cs is the Sound Speed Θ is the Wall Energy Flux Pekker, 40th AIAA Plasmadynamics and Laser Conference, 2009. R.S. MARTIN (ERC INC

  4. Preliminary Results of Plasma Flow Measurements in a 2 KW Segmented Hall Thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Raitses; D. Staack; A. Dunaevsky; L. Dorf; N.J. Fisch

    2003-03-01

    A 2-kW Hall thruster was developed, built, and operated in an upgraded vacuum facility. The thruster performance and parameters of the plasma flow were measured by new diagnostics for plume measurements and plasma measurements inside the thruster channel. The thruster demonstrated efficient operation in terms of propellant and current utilization efficiencies in the input power range of 0.5-3.5 kW. Preliminary measurements of the ion energy spectra from the thruster axis region and the distribution of plasma parameters in the vicinity of the thruster exit are reported.

  5. Laser-Driven Mini-Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterling, Enrique; Lin, Jun; Sinko, John; Kodgis, Lisa; Porter, Simon; Pakhomov, Andrew V.; Larson, C. William; Mead, Franklin B.

    2006-05-01

    Laser-driven mini-thrusters were studied using Delrin® and PVC (Delrin® is a registered trademark of DuPont) as propellants. TEA CO2 laser (λ = 10.6 μm) was used as a driving laser. Coupling coefficients were deduced from two independent techniques: force-time curves measured with a piezoelectric sensor and ballistic pendulum. Time-resolved ICCD images of the expanding plasma and combustion products were analyzed in order to determine the main process that generates the thrust. The measurements were also performed in a nitrogen atmosphere in order to test the combustion effects on thrust. A pinhole transmission experiment was performed for the study of the cut-off time when the ablation/air breakdown plasma becomes opaque to the incoming laser pulse.

  6. Low Power, Low Cost Igniter for Nonhypergolic Mars Ascent Vehicle Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Decomposing monopropellant hydrazine across a spontaneous catalyst bed is the gold standard for small propulsion systems responsible for attitude control on...

  7. Low-Mass, Low-Power Hall Thruster System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pote, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    NASA is developing an electric propulsion system capable of producing 20 mN thrust with input power up to 1,000 W and specific impulse ranging from 1,600 to 3,500 seconds. The key technical challenge is the target mass of 1 kg for the thruster and 2 kg for the power processing unit (PPU). In Phase I, Busek Company, Inc., developed an overall subsystem design for the thruster/cathode, PPU, and xenon feed system. This project demonstrated the feasibility of a low-mass power processing architecture that replaces four of the DC-DC converters of a typical PPU with a single multifunctional converter and a low-mass Hall thruster design employing permanent magnets. In Phase II, the team developed an engineering prototype model of its low-mass BHT-600 Hall thruster system, with the primary focus on the low-mass PPU and thruster. The goal was to develop an electric propulsion thruster with the appropriate specific impulse and propellant throughput to enable radioisotope electric propulsion (REP). This is important because REP offers the benefits of nuclear electric propulsion without the need for an excessively large spacecraft and power system.

  8. Performance Evaluation of the Prototype Model NEXT Ion Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Daniel A.; Soulas, George C.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The performance testing results of the first prototype model NEXT ion engine, PM1, are presented. The NEXT program has developed the next generation ion propulsion system to enhance and enable Discovery, New Frontiers, and Flagship-type NASA missions. The PM1 thruster exhibits operational behavior consistent with its predecessors, the engineering model thrusters, with substantial mass savings, enhanced thermal margins, and design improvements for environmental testing compliance. The dry mass of PM1 is 12.7 kg. Modifications made in the thruster design have resulted in improved performance and operating margins, as anticipated. PM1 beginning-of-life performance satisfies all of the electric propulsion thruster mission-derived technical requirements. It demonstrates a wide range of throttleability by processing input power levels from 0.5 to 6.9 kW. At 6.9 kW, the PM1 thruster demonstrates specific impulse of 4190 s, 237 mN of thrust, and a thrust efficiency of 0.71. The flat beam profile, flatness parameters vary from 0.66 at low-power to 0.88 at full-power, and advanced ion optics reduce localized accelerator grid erosion and increases margins for electron backstreaming, impingement-limited voltage, and screen grid ion transparency. The thruster throughput capability is predicted to exceed 750 kg of xenon, an equivalent of 36,500 hr of continuous operation at the full-power operating condition.

  9. Thrust Stand Measurements of a Conical Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.

    2013-01-01

    Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thrusters (iPPT) spacecraft propulsion devices in which electrical energy is capacitively stored and then discharged through an inductive coil. The thruster is electrodeless, with a time-varying current in the coil interacting with a plasma covering the face of the coil to induce a plasma current Propellant is accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity (O(10 -- 100 km/s)) by the Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the magnetic field and the induced plasma current. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, inductive pulsed plasma thrusters can suffer from both high pulse energy requirements imposed by the voltage demands of inductive propellant ionization, and low propellant utilization efficiencies. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, inductive pulsed plasma thrusters can suffer from both high pulse energy requirements imposed by the voltage demands of inductive propellant ionization, and low propellant utilization efficiencies. A conical coil geometry may offer higher propellant utilization efficiency over that of a at inductive coil, however an increase in propellant utilization may be met with a decrease in axial electromagnetic acceleration, and in turn, a decrease in the total axially-directed kinetic energy imparted to the propellant.

  10. NASA Brief: Q-Thruster Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Harold

    2013-01-01

    Q-thrusters are a low-TRL form of electric propulsion that operates on the principle of pushing off of the quantum vacuum. A terrestrial analog to this is to consider how a submarine uses its propeller to push a column of water in one direction, while the sub recoils in the other to conserve momentum -the submarine does not carry a "tank" of sea water to be used as propellant. In our case, we use the tools of Magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) to show how the thruster pushes off of the quantum vacuum which can be thought of as a sea of virtual particles -principally electrons and positrons that pop into and out of existence, and where fields are stronger, there are more virtual particles. The idea of pushing off the quantum vacuum has been in the technical literature for a few decades, but to date, the obstacle has been the magnitude of the predicted thrust which has been derived analytically to be very small, and therefore not likely to be useful for human spaceflight. Our recent theoretical model development and test data suggests that we can greatly increase the magnitude of the negative pressure of the quantum vacuum and generate a specific force such that technology based on this approach can be competitive for in-space propulsion approx. 0.1N/kW), and possibly for terrestrial applications (approx. 10N/kW). As an additional validation of the approach, the theory allows calculation of physics constants from first principles: Gravitational constant, Planck constant, Bohr radius, dark energy fraction, electron mass.

  11. Design and model experiments on thruster assisted mooring system; Futaishiki kaiyo kozobutsu no thruster ni yoru choshuki doyo seigyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, M.; Koterayama, W. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Kajiwara, H. [Kyushu Institute of Technology, Kitakyushu (Japan). Faculty of Computer Science and System Engineering; Hyakudome, T. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Described herein are dynamics and model experiments of the system in which positioning of a floating marine structure by mooring is combined with thruster-controlled positioning. Coefficients of dynamic forces acting on a floating structure model are determined experimentally and by the three-dimensional singularity distribution method, and the controller is designed by the PID, LQI and H{infinity} control theories. A model having a scale ratio of 1/100 was used for the experiments, where 2 thrusters were arranged in a diagonal line, one on the X-axis. It is found that the LQI and H{infinity} controllers of the thruster can control long-cycle rolling of the floating structure. They allow thruster control which is insensitive to wave cycle motion, and efficiently reduce positioning energy. The H{infinity} control regulates frequency characteristics of a closed loop more finely than the LQI control, and exhibits better controllability. 25 refs., 25 figs.

  12. Design and model experiments on thruster assisted mooring system; Futaishiki kaiyo kozobutsu no thruster ni yoru choshuki doyo seigyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, M.; Koterayama, W. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Kajiwara, H. [Kyushu Institute of Technology, Kitakyushu (Japan). Faculty of Computer Science and System Engineering; Hyakudome, T. [Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Described herein are dynamics and model experiments of the system in which positioning of a floating marine structure by mooring is combined with thruster-controlled positioning. Coefficients of dynamic forces acting on a floating structure model are determined experimentally and by the three-dimensional singularity distribution method, and the controller is designed by the PID, LQI and H{infinity} control theories. A model having a scale ratio of 1/100 was used for the experiments, where 2 thrusters were arranged in a diagonal line, one on the X-axis. It is found that the LQI and H{infinity} controllers of the thruster can control long-cycle rolling of the floating structure. They allow thruster control which is insensitive to wave cycle motion, and efficiently reduce positioning energy. The H{infinity} control regulates frequency characteristics of a closed loop more finely than the LQI control, and exhibits better controllability. 25 refs., 25 figs.

  13. Remediation of Cr(VI)-Contaminated Soil Using the Acidified Hydrazine Hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yameng; Li, Fangfang; Jiang, Yuling; Yang, Weihua; Lv, Lv; Xue, Haotian; Wang, Yangyang

    2016-09-01

    Acidified hydrazine hydrate was used to remediate Cr(VI)-contaminated soil. The content of water-soluble Cr(VI) in contaminated soil was 4977.53 mg/kg. The optimal initial pH of hydrazine hydrate solution, soil to solution ratio and molar ratio of Cr(VI) to hydrazine hydrate for remediation of Cr(VI)-contaminated soil were 5.0, 3:1 and 1:3, respectively. Over 99.50 % of water-soluble Cr(VI) in the contaminated soil was reduced at the optimal condition within 30 min. The remediated soil can keep stable within 4 months. Meanwhile the total phosphorus increased from 0.47 to 4.29 g/kg, indicating that using of acidified hydrazine hydrate is an effective method to remediate Cr(VI)-contaminated soil.

  14. Au(I)-Catalyzted Synthesis of 5-Bromodifluoromethyl Pyrazoles from Fluorinated Alkynyl Ketones and Hydrazine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李珊; 李正珂; 彭东杰; 李亚军; 祝江涛; 解海波; 袁雅芬; 陈资衔; 吴永明

    2011-01-01

    Fluorinated alkynyl ketones react with hydrazine to give fluorinated pyrazols in good to excellent yields with Au(I) as catalyst. All the reactions were carried out at room temperature with excellent regioselectivity.

  15. Fixation and loss of hydrazine-induced premutational damage in Haemophilus influenzae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimball, R.F.; Hirsch, B.F.

    1976-01-01

    Premutational damage induced in Haemophilus influenzae by hydrazine appears to be fixed as final mutation only at replication as judged by the transformation assay. Fixation at replication is independent of the rec 1 gene, unlike the case with nitrosocarbaryl. Prior to replication premutational damage induced by hydrazine disappears by an unknown process that is not dependent on the presence of a pyrimidine dimer excision system nor on the rec 1 gene. Hydrazine does not produce detectable single-strand breaks or alkali-labile sites in the treated DNA nor gaps in DNA newly synthesized after treatment. In these respects it also differs from nitroso compounds. It is concluded that hydrazine acts to produce an altered base, possibly N(4)-aminocytosine, that produces mutations by mispairing at replication rather than by error-prone repair.

  16. Initial Thrust Measurements of Marshall's Ion-ioN Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Natalie R. S.; Scogin, Tyler; Liu, Thomas M.; Walker, Mitchell L. R.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Dankanich, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Electronegative ion thrusters are a variation of traditional gridded ion thruster technology differentiated by the production and acceleration of both positive and negative ions. Benefits of electronegative ion thrusters include the elimination of lifetime-limiting cathodes from the thruster architecture and the ability to generate appreciable thrust from both charge species. While much progress has been made in the development of electronegative ion thruster technology, direct thrust measurements are required to unambiguously demonstrate the efficacy of the concept and support continued development. In the present work, direct thrust measurements of the thrust produced by the MINT (Marshall's Ion-ioN Thruster) are performed using an inverted-pendulum thrust stand in the High-Power Electric Propulsion Laboratory's Vacuum Test Facility-1 at the Georgia Institute of Technology with operating pressures ranging from 4.8 x 10(exp -5) and 5.7 x 10(exp -5) torr. Thrust is recorded while operating with a propellant volumetric mixture ratio of 5:1 argon to nitrogen with total volumetric flow rates of 6, 12, and 24 sccm (0.17, 0.34, and 0.68 mg/s). Plasma is generated using a helical antenna at 13.56 MHz and radio frequency (RF) power levels of 150 and 350 W. The acceleration grid assembly is operated using both sinusoidal and square waveform biases of +/-350 V at frequencies of 4, 10, 25, 125, and 225 kHz. Thrust is recorded for two separate thruster configurations: with and without the magnetic filter. No thrust is discernable during thruster operation without the magnetic filter for any volumetric flow rate, RF forward Power level, or acceleration grid biasing scheme. For the full thruster configuration, with the magnetic filter installed, a brief burst of thrust of approximately 3.75 mN +/- 3 mN of error is observed at the start of grid operation for a volumetric flow rate of 24 sccm at 350 W RF power using a sinusoidal waveform grid bias at 125 kHz and +/- 350 V

  17. U.S. experience with hydrazine and flow-accelerated corrosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merilo, M.; Munson, D.; Horowitz, J.S. [EPRI US (United States); Bouchacourt, M. [EDF France (France)

    2002-07-01

    Flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) has been studied intensely for the last 30 years. In most regards, the parametric behavior of FAC has been well understood since the eighties. However, recent experience showing the impact of hydrazine has challenged this understanding. Until the early 1990's, hydrazine levels at most U.S. PWRs had been low, typically around 20 ppb. Since the mid 1990's the U.S. trend has been to increase hydrazine concentration (> 100 ppb) to provide further protection the steam generators tubes from stress corrosion cracking. In the last five years, high concentrations of hydrazine have been shown in the laboratory to affect the rate of FAC. These experiments have demonstrated this effect although there remains considerable scatter in the data supporting this conclusion. It is believed that the impact of hydrazine is due to the change in the oxidizing-reducing potential of the solution, but there is no generally accepted theory to completely describe its behavior. Recently, plant experience has begun to support the laboratory data that high hydrazine does increase the rate of FAC. It should be noted that there are several factors affecting the rate of FAC. Since most plants have changed their water chemistry in recent years, it has been difficult to ''back-out'' the influence of hydrazine. But now, plant experience has clearly shown the impact of high hydrazine especially in the high temperature portions of the feedwater piping. This has been seen at two PWRs, discussed below, and perhaps at several others. This accelerated thinning of the feedwater piping is especially significant since feedwater piping is particularly expensive to inspect and to replace. In addition to the experience with piping, there has also been degradation reported in steam generators, particularly at Gravelines in France, possibly linked to high hydrazine. In order to deal with this issue, the EPRI computer program CHECWORKS was modified in

  18. High Performance Plasma Channel Insulators for High Power Hall Thrusters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA missions for planetary exploration require high power, long-life Hall thrusters. However, thruster power and lifetime are limited by the erosion of plasma...

  19. Micro Pulsed Inductive Thruster with Solid Fuel Option (uPIT_SF) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Micro Pulsed Inductive Thruster with Solid Fuel Option (5PIT_SF) is a high-precision impulse bit electromagnetic plasma micro-thruster. The 5PIT prototype is a...

  20. Hall Effect Thruster for High Power Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek proposes to develop a flight version of a high power Hall Effect thruster. While numerous high power Hall Effect thrusters have been demonstrated in the...

  1. High Performance Plasma Channel Insulators for High Power Hall Thrusters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA missions for planetary exploration require high power, long-life Hall thrusters. However, thruster power and lifetime are limited by the erosion of plasma...

  2. Hydrazine selective dual signaling chemodosimetric probe in physiological conditions and its application in live cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nandi, Sandip; Sahana, Animesh; Mandal, Sandip [Department of Chemistry, The University of Burdwan, Burdwan, 713104 West Bengal (India); Sengupta, Archya; Chatterjee, Ansuman [Department of Zoology, Visva Bharati University, Santiniketan, West Bengal (India); Safin, Damir A., E-mail: damir.a.safin@gmail.com [Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, Molecules, Solids and Reactivity (IMCN/MOST), Université catholique de Louvain, Place L. Pasteur 1, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Babashkina, Maria G.; Tumanov, Nikolay A.; Filinchuk, Yaroslav [Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences, Molecules, Solids and Reactivity (IMCN/MOST), Université catholique de Louvain, Place L. Pasteur 1, 1348 Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Das, Debasis, E-mail: ddas100in@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, The University of Burdwan, Burdwan, 713104 West Bengal (India)

    2015-09-17

    A rhodamine–cyanobenzene conjugate, (E)-4-((2-(3′,6′-bis(diethylamino)-3-oxospiro[isoindoline-1,9′-xanthene] -2-yl)ethylimino)methyl)benzonitrile (1), which structure has been elucidated by single crystal X-ray diffraction, was synthesized for selective fluorescent “turn-on” and colorimetric recognition of hydrazine at physiological pH 7.4. It was established that 1 detects hydrazine up to 58 nM. The probe is useful for the detection of intracellular hydrazine in the human breast cancer cells MCF-7 using a fluorescence microscope. Spirolactam ring opening of 1, followed by its hydrolysis, was established as a probable mechanism for the selective sensing of hydrazine. - Highlights: • A selective rhodamine–cyanobenzene conjugate is synthesized. • The conjugate is a selective dual signaling chemodosimetric probe towards hydrazine. • Spirolactam ring opening of the probe, followed by its hydrolysis, is the sensing mechanism. • The probe detects hydrazine in the human breast cancer cells MCF-7 imaging.

  3. Preparation of hydrazine functionalized polymer brushes hybrid magnetic nanoparticles for highly specific enrichment of glycopeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guang; Sun, Zhen; Qin, Hongqiang; Zhao, Liang; Xiong, Zhichao; Peng, Xiaojun; Ou, Junjie; Zou, Hanfa

    2014-05-07

    Hydrazide chemistry is a powerful technique in glycopeptides enrichment. However, the low density of the monolayer hydrazine groups on the conventional hydrazine-functionalized magnetic nanoparticles limits the efficiency of glycopeptides enrichment. Herein, a novel magnetic nanoparticle grafted with poly(glycidyl methacrylate) (GMA) brushes was fabricated via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization, and a large amount of hydrazine groups were further introduced to the GMA brushes by ring-opening the epoxy groups with hydrazine hydrate. The resulting magnetic nanoparticles (denoted as Fe3O4@SiO2@GMA-NHNH2) demonstrated the high specificity of capturing glycopeptides from a tryptic digest of the sample comprising a standard non-glycosylated protein bovine serum albumin (BSA) and four standard glycoproteins with a weight ratio of 50 : 1, and the detection limit was as low as 130 fmol. In the analysis of a real complex biological sample, the tryptic digest of hepatocellular carcinoma, 179 glycosites were identified by the Fe3O4@SiO2@GMA-NHNH2 nanoparticles, surpassing that of 68 glycosites by Fe3O4@SiO2-single-NHNH2 (with monolayer hydrazine groups on the surface). It can be expected that the magnetic nanoparticles modified with hydrazine functionalized polymer brushes via RAFT technique will improve the specificity and the binding capacity of glycopeptides from complex samples, and show great potential in the analysis of protein glycosylation in biological samples.

  4. Miniaturised Prandtl tube with integrated pressure sensors for micro-thruster plume characterisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Marcel; Ma, Kechun; de Boer, Meint J.; Groenesteijn, Jarno; Lötters, Joost Conrad; Wiegerink, Remco J.

    2014-01-01

    A miniaturised Prandtl-tube sensor incorporating a 6 mm long 40 μm diameter microchannel with integrated pressure sensors has been realised. The sensor has been designed for the characterisation of rarefied plume flow from a MEMS-based monopropellant propulsion system for high-accuracy attitude

  5. Global Linear Stability Analysis of the Spoke Oscillation in Hall Effect Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-15

    characterize the spoke in a wide range of HETs, including both conventional and non-conventional designs (the H6 thruster, the NASA 173Mv1, the Busek BHT -600...near plume of the thruster[126]. Similarly, Liu [127, 128] also finds azimuthal oscillations in the BHT -200 and BHT -600 thrusters via high speed-imaging

  6. Magnetic Field Tailored Annular Hall Thruster with Anode Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghun; Kim, Holak; Kim, Junbum; Lim, Youbong; Choe, Wonho; Korea Institute of Materials Science Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Plasma propulsion system is one of the key components for advanced missions of satellites as well as deep space exploration. A typical plasma propulsion system is Hall effect thruster that uses crossed electric and magnetic fields to ionize a propellant gas and to accelerate the ionized gas to generate momentum. In Hall thruster plasmas, magnetic field configuration is important due to the fact that electron confinement in the electromagnetic fields affects both plasma and ion beam characteristics as well as thruster performance parameters including thrust, specific impulse, power efficiency, and life time. In this work, development of an anode layer Hall thruster (TAL) with magnetic field tailoring has been attempted. The TAL is possible to keep discharge in 1 to 2 kilovolts of anode voltage, which is useful to obtain high specific impulse. The magnetic field tailoring is used to minimize undesirable heat dissipation and secondary electron emission from the wall surrounding the plasma. We will report 3 W and 200 W thrusters performances measured by a pendulum thrust stand according to the magnetic field configuration. Also, the measured result will be compared with the plasma diagnostics conducted by an angular Faraday probe, a retarding potential analyzer, and a ExB probe.

  7. 20-mN Variable Specific Impulse (Isp) Colloid Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmons, Nathaniel

    2015-01-01

    Busek Company, Inc., has designed and manufactured an electrospray emitter capable of generating 20 mN in a compact package (7x7x1.7 in). The thruster consists of nine porous-surface emitters operating in parallel from a common propellant supply. Each emitter is capable of supporting over 70,000 electrospray emission sites with the plume from each emitter being accelerated through a single aperture, eliminating the need for individual emission site alignment to an extraction grid. The total number of emission sites during operation is expected to approach 700,000. This Phase II project optimized and characterized the thruster fabricated during the Phase I effort. Additional porous emitters also were fabricated for full-scale testing. Propellant is supplied to the thruster via existing feed-system and microvalve technology previously developed by Busek, under the NASA Space Technology 7's Disturbance Reduction System (ST7-DRS) mission and via follow-on electric propulsion programs. This project investigated methods for extending thruster life beyond the previously demonstrated 450 hours. The life-extending capabilities will be demonstrated on a subscale version of the thruster.

  8. Evaluation of externally heated pulsed MPD thruster cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Roger M.; Domonkos, Matthew; Gallimore, Alec D.

    1993-01-01

    Recent interest in solar electric orbit transfer vehicles (SEOTV's) has prompted a reevaluation of pulsed magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster systems due to their ease of power scaling and reduced test facility requirements. In this work the use of externally heated cathodes was examined in order to extend the lifetime of these thrusters to the 1000 to 3000 hours required for SEOTV missions. A pulsed MPD thruster test facility was assembled, including a pulse-forming network (PFN), ignitor supply and propellant feed system. Results of cold cathode tests used to validate the facility, PFN, and propellant feed system design are presented, as well as a preliminary evaluation of externally heated impregnated tungsten cathodes. The cold cathode thruster was operated on both argon and nitrogen propellants at peak discharge power levels up to 300 kW. The results confirmed proper operation of the pulsed thruster test facility, and indicated that large amounts of gas were evolved from the BaO-CaO-Al2O3 cathodes during activation. Comparison of the expected space charge limited current with the measured vacuum current when using the heated cathode indicate that either that a large temperature difference existed between the heater and the cathode or that the surface work function was higher than expected.

  9. Thrust Stand Measurements of a Conical Pulsed Inductive Plasma Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Emsellem, Gregory D.

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed inductive plasma thrusters [1-3] are spacecraft propulsion devices in which electrical energy is capacitively stored and then discharged through an inductive coil. The thruster is electrodeless, with a time-varying current in the coil interacting with a plasma covering the face of the coil to induce a plasma current. Propellant is accelerated and expelled at a high exhaust velocity (O(10-100 km/s)) by the Lorentz body force arising from the interaction of the magnetic field and the induced plasma current. While this class of thruster mitigates the life-limiting issues associated with electrode erosion, pulsed inductive plasma thrusters can su er from both high pulse energy requirements imposed by the voltage demands of inductive propellant ionization, and low propellant utilization efficiencies. The Microwave Assisted Discharge Inductive Plasma Accelerator (MAD-IPA)[4], shown in Fig. 1 is a pulsed inductive plasma thruster that is able to operate at lower pulse energies by partially ionizing propellant with an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge inside a conical inductive coil whose geometry serves to potentially increase propellant and plasma plume containment relative to at coil geometries. The ECR plasma is created with the use of permanent mag- nets arranged to produce a thin resonance region along the inner surface of the coil, restricting plasma formation and, in turn, current sheet formation to areas of high magnetic coupling to the driving coil.

  10. Hydrazine borane-induced destabilization of ammonia borane, and vice versa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, Jean-Fabien; Moussa, Georges [IEM (Institut Europeen des Membranes), UMR 5635 (CNRS-ENSCM-UM2), Universite Montpellier 2, Place E. Bataillon, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Demirci, Umit B., E-mail: umit.demirci@um2.fr [IEM (Institut Europeen des Membranes), UMR 5635 (CNRS-ENSCM-UM2), Universite Montpellier 2, Place E. Bataillon, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Toche, François; Chiriac, Rodica [Université Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR 5615, Laboratoire des Multimatériaux et Interfaces, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Miele, Philippe [IEM (Institut Europeen des Membranes), UMR 5635 (CNRS-ENSCM-UM2), Universite Montpellier 2, Place E. Bataillon, F-34095 Montpellier (France)

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Hydrazine borane and ammoniaborane (mole ratio 1:1) destabilize each other. • This is characterized by a melting point at ∼30 °C and decomposition into hydrazine. • Also, some hydrogen H{sub 2} is “explosively” liberated at around 90 °C. • The mixture can be however stabilized into a potential hydrogen storage material. • This hydrogen storage material dehydrogenates up to 300 °C to form boron nitride. - Abstract: In the field of solid-state chemical hydrogen storage, ammonia borane NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3} has been widely studied while hydrazine borane N{sub 2}H{sub 4}BH{sub 3} can be considered as a “novel” material. In the present work, we investigated the behaviour of these boranes when mixed together in a mole ratio of 1:1. Hydrazine borane and ammonia borane destabilize each other. Though stable at 20–25 °C, the mixture melts at ∼30 °C and then undergoes significant decomposition, with desorption of hydrogen H{sub 2} and hydrazine N{sub 2}H{sub 4} from 67 °C. This is explained by the fact that the presence of hydrazine borane disrupts the H{sup δ+}⋯H{sup δ−} network of ammonia borane, and vice versa; the mixture is then much less stable than the pristine boranes. The mixture can nevertheless be stabilized (by heat- or vacuum-treatment and thus extraction of evolving hydrogen and hydrazine), making the as-obtained solid a potential chemical hydrogen storage material. Over the range 25–300 °C, it is able to release ca. 11.4 wt% of almost pure H{sub 2}. Furthermore forms boron nitride as the solid residue, at temperatures as low as 300 °C.

  11. Continuous Wheel Momentum Dumping Using Magnetic Torquers and Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hwa-Suk; Choi, Wan-Sik; Eun, Jong-Won

    1996-12-01

    Two momentum management schemes using magnetic torquers and thrusters are sug-gested. The stability of the momentum dumping logic is proved at a general attitude equilibrium. Both momentum dumping control laws are implemented with Pulse-Width- Pulse-Frequency Modulated on-off control, and shown working equally well with the original continuous and variable strength control law. Thrusters are assummed to be asymmetrically configured as a contingency case. Each thruster is fired following separated control laws rather than paired thrusting. Null torque thrusting control is added on the thrust control calculated from the momentum control law for the gener-ation of positive thrusting force. Both magnetic and thrusting control laws guarantee the momentum dumping, however, the wheel inner loop control is needed for the "wheel speed" dumping, The control laws are simulated on the KOrea Multi-Purpose SATellite (KOMPSAT) model.

  12. Thermal Environmental Testing of NSTAR Engineering Model Ion Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlin, Vincent K.; Patterson, Michael J.; Becker, Raymond A.

    1999-01-01

    NASA's New Millenium program will fly a xenon ion propulsion system on the Deep Space 1 Mission. Tests were conducted under NASA's Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Applications Readiness (NSTAR) Program with 3 different engineering model ion thrusters to determine thruster thermal characteristics over the NSTAR operating range in a variety of thermal environments. A liquid nitrogen-cooled shroud was used to cold-soak the thruster to -120 C. Initial tests were performed prior to a mature spacecraft design. Those results and the final, severe, requirements mandated by the spacecraft led to several changes to the basic thermal design. These changes were incorporated into a final design and tested over a wide range of environmental conditions.

  13. The electrodeless Lorentz force (ELF) thruster experimental facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, T. E.; Slough, J. T.; Kirtley, D.

    2012-11-01

    An innovative facility for testing high-power, pulsed plasmoid thrusters has been constructed to develop the electrodeless Lorentz force (ELF) thruster concept. It is equipped with a suite of diagnostics optimized to study the physical processes taking place within ELF and evaluate its propulsive utility including magnetic field, neutral gas, and plasma flux diagnostics, a method to determine energy flow into the plasma from the pulsed power systems, and a new type of ballistic pendulum, which enables thrust to be measured without the need for installing the entire propulsion system on a thrust stand. Variable magnetic fields allow controlled studies of plume expansion in a small-scale experiment and dielectric chamber walls reduce electromagnetic influences on plasma behavior and thruster operation. The unique capabilities of this facility enable novel concept development to take place at greatly reduced cost and increased accessibility compared to testing at large user-facilities.

  14. 2-D Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of A Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, J. T.; Wu, S. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Experiments are being performed on the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) MK-1 pulsed plasma thruster. Data produced from the experiments provide an opportunity to further understand the plasma dynamics in these thrusters via detailed computational modeling. The detailed and accurate understanding of the plasma dynamics in these devices holds the key towards extending their capabilities in a number of applications, including their applications as high power (greater than 1 MW) thrusters, and their use for producing high-velocity, uniform plasma jets for experimental purposes. For this study, the 2-D MHD modeling code, MACH2, is used to provide detailed interpretation of the experimental data. At the same time, a 0-D physics model of the plasma initial phase is developed to guide our 2-D modeling studies.

  15. Potentiation of cardiovascular responses to hydralazine by diverse hydrazine derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidrio, H

    1994-10-01

    After the observation that in anesthetized rats the antitubercular agent isoniazid potentiates the hypotensive effect of the vasodilator hydralazine (H) and transforms the accompanying reflex tachycardia to bradycardia, a number of hydrazine (HYD) derivatives were tested for this interaction in pentobarbital-anesthetized rats. All HYDs studied elicited this response in varying degrees, isoniazid, thiosemicarbazide and thiocarbohydrazide being the most active. Experiments were then carried out to explore the possibility of an influence of the HYDs on reflex reactions to H due to interaction with pyridoxal, inhibition of glutamic acid decarboxylase and decreased levels of brain gamma-aminobutyric acid. Although the H-HYDs interaction was prevented by vagotomy, it was unaffected by exogenous pyridoxal, did not occur with the alpha adrenergic antagonist prazosin and was not mimicked by non-HYD pyridoxal reactors. In other experiments, pharmacokinetic interactions and monoamine oxidase inhibition were ruled out as alternative explanations for this phenomenon. It was concluded that the H-HYDs interaction is not related to a possible influence of these drugs on central gamma-aminobutyric acid cardiovascular regulation and that other presently unknown mechanisms are involved.

  16. Experimental characterization of radio frequency microthermal thruster performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Shae E.

    Microsatellite (cold gas thrusters. Design constraints rule out much of traditional propulsion, requiring new and nonobvious technologies to advance the state of the art and enable longer and more flexible missions. The radio frequency microthermal thruster is shown to be worth thorough study for this application. A basic analytical model is constructed to look at expected performance, and the theory behind that model is explained. Calibration and the challenges in working with extremely low forces and displacements are also examined. The results of extensive testing on this thruster type are presented. Important trends are confirmed and validated, such as a linearity of specific impulse with power, and consistent nonlinearities with frequency and mass flow rate. Additionally, tests indicate a nonlinear relationship between applied frequency and thruster internal geometry that can more than triple the heating occurring in the thruster. Further tests focus on this relationship, and find more information about how these parameters couple are found to be primarily due to induced inefficiencies in stochastic heating and the inability of a vibrating voltage sheath to transfer energy into the flow. Additionally, first steps towards optimizing a design for performance are taken, such as analyzing the effect of adding a converging/diverging nozzle and finding an optimal length of inner electrode to be exposed to plasma. Overall, specific impulses of up to 85 seconds are found with argon as the propellant, doubling cold gas specific impulse, and an error on specific impulse is calculated to be less than 3% in either direction. These results after only slight efforts at design optimization indicate much more improvement is possible with this technology that would make an RF microthermal thruster viable as a commercial product.

  17. Power Electronics Development for the SPT-100 Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamley, John A.; Hill, Gerald M.; Sankovic, John M.

    1994-01-01

    Russian electric propulsion technologies have recently become available on the world market. Of significant interest is the Stationary Plasma Thruster (SPT) which has a significant flight heritage in the former Soviet space program. The SPT has performance levels of up to 1600 seconds of specific impulse at a thrust efficiency of 0.50. Studies have shown that this level of performance is well suited for stationkeeping applications, and the SPT-100, with a 1.35 kW input power level, is presently being evaluated for use on Western commercial satellites. Under a program sponsored by the Innovative Science and Technology Division of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization, a team of U.S. electric propulsion specialists observed the operation of the SPT-100 in Russia. Under this same program, power electronics were developed to operate the SPT-100 to characterize thruster performance and operation in the U.S. The power electronics consisted of a discharge, cathode heater, and pulse igniter power supplies to operate the thruster with manual flow control. A Russian designed matching network was incorporated in the discharge supply to ensure proper operation with the thruster. The cathode heater power supply and igniter were derived from ongoing development projects. No attempts were made to augment thruster electromagnet current in this effort. The power electronics successfully started and operated the SPT-100 thruster in performance tests at NASA Lewis, with minimal oscillations in the discharge current. The efficiency of the main discharge supply was measured at 0.92, and straightforward modifications were identified which could increase the efficiency to 0.94.

  18. Plasma Thruster Development: Magnetoplasmadynamic Propulsion, Status and Basic Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-02-01

    Closed Drift Hall-Ion Thruster Flown on the Russian Satellite Meteor I, 1971, from Reference 13 12 4 Flat Coil Induction Thruster Schematic from...the Russian Satellite Meteor 1, 1971. from Ref. 1-3. 13 COIL Br PLASMA SWITCH0 0 FZ jeBr 0 CAPACITOR 0 Fig.- 4:Fa olInuto huse ceai fromRef-22 40 14 is...minute crater (on the order of 10- 4 cm diameter). High pressures, on the order of 100 bar, and vaporization rates in these craters have been

  19. An approach to the parametric design of ion thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, Paul J.; Beattie, John R.; Hyman, Jay, Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A methodology that can be used to determine which of several physical constraints can limit ion thruster power and thrust, under various design and operating conditions, is presented. The methodology is exercised to demonstrate typical limitations imposed by grid system span-to-gap ratio, intragrid electric field, discharge chamber power per unit beam area, screen grid lifetime and accelerator grid lifetime constraints. Limitations on power and thrust for a thruster defined by typical discharge chamber and grid system parameters when it is operated at maximum thrust-to-power are discussed.

  20. Physics and Dynamics of Current Sheets in Pulsed Plasma Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    pulsed plasma thruster. A simple experiment would involve measuring the impulse bit of a coaxial gas-fed pulsed plasma thruster operated in both positive...Princeton, NJ, 2002. [2] J. Marshal. Performance of a hydromagnetic plasma gun . The Physics of Fluids, 3(1):134–135, January-February 1960. [3] R.G. Jahn...Jahn and K.E. Clark. A large dielecteic vacuum facility. AIAA Jour- nal, 1966. [16] L.C. Burkhardt and R.H. Lovberg. Current sheet in a coaxial plasma

  1. Optimization of a coaxial electron cyclotron resonance plasma thruster with an analytical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannat, F.; Lafleur, T.; Jarrige, J.; Chabert, P.; Elias, P.-Q.; Packan, D.

    2015-05-01

    A new cathodeless plasma thruster currently under development at Onera is presented and characterized experimentally and analytically. The coaxial thruster consists of a microwave antenna immersed in a magnetic field, which allows electron heating via cyclotron resonance. The magnetic field diverges at the thruster exit and forms a nozzle that accelerates the quasi-neutral plasma to generate a thrust. Different thruster configurations are tested, and in particular, the influence of the source diameter on the thruster performance is investigated. At microwave powers of about 30 W and a xenon flow rate of 0.1 mg/s (1 SCCM), a mass utilization of 60% and a thrust of 1 mN are estimated based on angular electrostatic probe measurements performed downstream of the thruster in the exhaust plume. Results are found to be in fair agreement with a recent analytical helicon thruster model that has been adapted for the coaxial geometry used here.

  2. Optimization of a coaxial electron cyclotron resonance plasma thruster with an analytical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cannat, F., E-mail: felix.cannat@onera.fr, E-mail: felix.cannat@gmail.com; Lafleur, T. [Physics and Instrumentation Department, Onera -The French Aerospace Lab, Palaiseau, Cedex 91123 (France); Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, CNRS, Sorbonne Universites, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Univ Paris-Sud, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Jarrige, J.; Elias, P.-Q.; Packan, D. [Physics and Instrumentation Department, Onera -The French Aerospace Lab, Palaiseau, Cedex 91123 (France); Chabert, P. [Laboratoire de Physique des Plasmas, CNRS, Sorbonne Universites, UPMC Univ Paris 06, Univ Paris-Sud, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2015-05-15

    A new cathodeless plasma thruster currently under development at Onera is presented and characterized experimentally and analytically. The coaxial thruster consists of a microwave antenna immersed in a magnetic field, which allows electron heating via cyclotron resonance. The magnetic field diverges at the thruster exit and forms a nozzle that accelerates the quasi-neutral plasma to generate a thrust. Different thruster configurations are tested, and in particular, the influence of the source diameter on the thruster performance is investigated. At microwave powers of about 30 W and a xenon flow rate of 0.1 mg/s (1 SCCM), a mass utilization of 60% and a thrust of 1 mN are estimated based on angular electrostatic probe measurements performed downstream of the thruster in the exhaust plume. Results are found to be in fair agreement with a recent analytical helicon thruster model that has been adapted for the coaxial geometry used here.

  3. Fault-Tolerant Region-Based Control of an Underwater Vehicle with Kinematically Redundant Thrusters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zool H. Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new control approach for an underwater vehicle with a kinematically redundant thruster system. This control scheme is derived based on a fault-tolerant decomposition for thruster force allocation and a region control scheme for the tracking objective. Given a redundant thruster system, that is, six or more pairs of thrusters are used, the proposed redundancy resolution and region control scheme determine the number of thruster faults, as well as providing the reference thruster forces in order to keep the underwater vehicle within the desired region. The stability of the presented control law is proven in the sense of a Lyapunov function. Numerical simulations are performed with an omnidirectional underwater vehicle and the results of the proposed scheme illustrate the effectiveness in terms of optimizing the thruster forces.

  4. Adjustable hydrazine modulation of single-wall carbon nanotube network field effect transistors from p-type to n-type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Ruixuan; Xie, Dan; Xu, Jianlong; Sun, Yilin; Sun, MengXing; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Xian

    2016-11-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) network field effect transistors (FETs), which show decent p-type electronic properties, have been fabricated. The use of hydrazine as an aqueous solution and a strong n-type dopant for the SWCNTs is demonstrated in this paper. The electrical properties are obviously tuned by hydrazine treatment at different concentrations on the surface of the SWCNT network FETs. The transport behavior of SWCNTs can be modulated from p-type to n-type, demonstrating the controllable and adjustable doping effect of hydrazine. With a higher concentration of hydrazine, more electrons can be transferred from the hydrazine molecules to the SWCNT network films, thus resulting in a change of threshold voltage, carrier mobility and on-current. By cleaning the device, the hydrazine doping effects vanish, which indicates that the doping effects of hydrazine are reversible. Through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization, the doping effects of hydrazine have also been studied.

  5. Flow injection chemiluminescence determination of hydrazine by oxidation with chlorinated isocyanurates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safavi, Afsaneh; Karimi, Mohammad Ali

    2002-10-16

    A rapid and sensitive flow injection chemiluminescence (CL) method is described for the determination of hydrazine based on the CL generated during its reaction with either sodium dichloroisocyanurate (SDCC) or trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCCA) in alkaline medium. The emission intensity is greatly enhanced if dichlorofluorescein (DCF) as sensitizer is present in the reaction medium. The presence of citrate prevents the precipitation of some cations in the reaction medium and also causes an enhancement in emission intensity. The effect of analytical and flow injection variables on these CL systems and determination of hydrazine are discussed. The optimum parameters for the determination of hydrazine were studied and were found to be the following: SDCC and TCCA both 1x10(-3) M; NaOH, 2x10(-1) M; DCF, 5x10(-6) M; citrate, 1x10(-3) M and flow rate, 3.8 ml min(-1). The optimized method yielded 3sigma detection limits of 2x10(-7) and 3x10(-7) M for hydrazine with SDCC and TCCA oxidants, respectively. The method is simple, fast, sensitive, and precise and was applied to the determination of hydrazine in water samples.

  6. Preparation of fine nickel powders via reduction of nickel hydrazine complex precursors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Guo-yong; XU Sheng-ming; XU Gang; LI Lin-yan; ZHANG Li-feng

    2009-01-01

    Fine nickel(Ni) powders with controllable particle sizes were synthesized via the reduction of nickel hydrazine complex precursors of pure [Ni(N2H4)2]Cl2 and a mixture of [Ni(N2H4)2]Cl2 and [Ni(N2H4)3]Cl2 in aqueous solution. The mechanism of the formation of metallic Ni powders experiences the reduction of nickel hydroxide by hydrazine released from the ligand exchange reaction between nickel hydrazine complex and NaOH. In comparison with the method of preparing Ni powders from nickel salts, the method of making Ni powders via the reduction of nickel hydrazine complex precursors shows the advantages of using half dosage of hydrazine for complete reduction of nickel ions in solution, and the obtained Ni particles show less agglomeration and better dispersibility. Moreover, the average particle size of nickel powders can be controlled from 180 to 260 nm by adjusting the reaction molar ratio and concentration.

  7. Coaxial microwave electrothermal thruster performance in hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, W.; Asmussen, J.; Hawley, M.

    1994-01-01

    The microwave electro thermal thruster (MET) is an electric propulsion concept that offers the promise of high performance combined with a long lifetime. A unique feature of this electric propulsion concept is its ability to create a microwave plasma discharge separated or floating away from any electrodes or enclosing walls. This allows propellant temperatures that are higher than those in resistojets and reduces electrode and wall erosion. It has been demonstrated that microwave energy is coupled into discharges very efficiently at high input power levels. As a result of these advantages, the MET concept has been identified as a future high power electric propulsion possibility. Recently, two additional improvements have been made to the coaxial MET. The first was concerned with improving the microwave matching. Previous experiments were conducted with 10-30 percent reflected power when incident power was in excess of 600 W(exp 6). Power was reflected back to the generator because the impedance of the MET did not match the 50 ohm impedance of the microwave circuit. To solve this problem, a double stub tuning system has been inserted between the MET and the microwave power supply. The addition of the double stub tuners reduces the reflected power below 1 percent. The other improvement has prepared the coaxial MET for hydrogen experiments. To operate with hydrogen, the vacuum window which separates the coaxial line from the discharge chamber has been changed from teflon to boron nitride. All the microwave energy delivered to the plasma discharge passes through this vacuum window. This material change had caused problems in the past because of the increased microwave reflection coefficients associated with the electrical properties of boron nitride. However, by making the boron nitride window electrically one-half of a wavelength long, power reflection in the window has been eliminated. This technical note summarizes the experimental performance of the improved

  8. Theoretical performance of liquid ammonia, hydrazine and mixture of liquid ammonia and hydrazine as fuels with liquid oxygen biflouride as oxidant for rocket engines : I-mixture of liquid ammonia and hydrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Vearl N; Gordon, Sanford

    1952-01-01

    Theoretical performance for mixture of 36.3 percent liquid ammonia and 63.7 percent hydrazine with liquid oxygen bifluoride as rocket propellant was calculated on assumption of equilibrium composition during expansion for a wide range of fuel-oxidant and expansios ratios. Parameters included were specific impulse, combustion-chamber temperature, nozzle exit temperature, composition mean molecular weight, characteristic velocity, coefficient of thrust and ratio of nozzle-exit area to throat area. For chamber pressure of 300 pounds per square inch absolute and expansion to 1 atmosphere, maximum specific impulse was 295.8 pound-seconds per pound. Five percent by weight of water in the hydrazine lowered specific impulse from about one to three units over a wide range of weight-percent fuel.

  9. Formulation & Storage Studies on Hydrazine-Based Gelled Propellants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Verma

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available The current trend in the area of high energy storable liquid rocket propellant research is to develop gelled/metallized systems and to explore the feasibility of their application in rocket motors. The idea stems from the fact that the conversion of a conventional liquid propellant to a gelled state and its subsequent metallization has the potential to significantly enhance the performance and density specific impulse. However, it is mandatory that the gelation of the liquid propellant be brought about with a minimum concentration of gellant and the gel formed should show a shear-thinning behaviour and good storage life. Keeping this in view, an experimental program to prepare thixotropic gels of hydrazine and its methyl substitutedderivatives like monomethyl hydrazineand unsymmetrical dimethyl hydrazinewas conducted under ambient conditions. The gellants investigated included particulate, chemical and synthetic materials. The gelation of the liquid fuels ..ould be brought about with gellant concentration as low as I wt per cent in some cases. Metallized gels using up to 40 wt per cent of AlIMg metal powders could be formulated. These heterogeneous systems showed a reduction in critical gellant concentration with degree of metallization. Further, less gelation time is observed if the gellant concentration is kept fixed and metal content is increased. The storage studies on gelled systems conducted over a period of three months showed good stability. The metallized systems, however, showed the settling of metal powders in meagre concentration which does not pose a major problem as these gels could be re-homogenized with stirring.

  10. Arrays of TiO2 Nanowires as Photoelectrochemical Sensors for Hydrazine Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Ongaro

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrodes based on arrays of TiO2 nanowires were prepared by template sol-gel synthesis with the goal of developing a hydrazine photoelectrochemical sensor. Experimental conditions were chosen so that the gelation reaction occurred inside the nanopores of track-etched polycarbonate membranes, with consequent filling with TiO2 nanowires. Different procedures for the removal of the template were examined, in order to obtain arrays of self-standing TiO2 nanowires. The nanowire arrays were bound to fluorine doped tin oxide substrates to produce handy photoelectrodes. The photocurrent recorded with the photoelectrodes in the presence of hydrazine showed significant dependence on the pollutant concentration. The development of a photoelectrochemical sensor for hydrazine detection in water samples, based on this principle, is presented.

  11. Efficient hydrogen evolution in transition metal dichalcogenides via a simple one-step hydrazine reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Dustin R.; Martinez, Ulises; Sherehiy, Andriy; Kappera, Rajesh; Martinez-Garcia, Alejandro; Schulze, Roland K.; Jasinski, Jacek; Zhang, Jing; Gupta, Ram K.; Lou, Jun; Chhowalla, Manish; Sumanasekera, Gamini; Mohite, Aditya D.; Sunkara, Mahendra K.; Gupta, Gautam

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen evolution reaction is catalysed efficiently with precious metals, such as platinum; however, transition metal dichalcogenides have recently emerged as a promising class of materials for electrocatalysis, but these materials still have low activity and durability when compared with precious metals. Here we report a simple one-step scalable approach, where MoOx/MoS2 core-shell nanowires and molybdenum disulfide sheets are exposed to dilute aqueous hydrazine at room temperature, which results in marked improvement in electrocatalytic performance. The nanowires exhibit ∼100 mV improvement in overpotential following exposure to dilute hydrazine, while also showing a 10-fold increase in current density and a significant change in Tafel slope. In situ electrical, gate-dependent measurements and spectroscopic investigations reveal that hydrazine acts as an electron dopant in molybdenum disulfide, increasing its conductivity, while also reducing the MoOx core in the core-shell nanowires, which leads to improved electrocatalytic performance. PMID:27282871

  12. Surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of hydrazines: Tubular reactor studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilduff, Jan E.; Davis, Dennis D.; Koontz, Steven L.

    1988-01-01

    The surface-catalyzed air oxidation reactions of hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine, unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine, symmetrical dimethylhydrazine, trimethylhydrazine and tetramethylhydrazine were investigated in a metal-powder packed turbular flow reactor at 55 plus or minus 3 C. Hydrazine was completely reacted on all surfaces studied. The major products of monomethylhydrazine (MMH) oxidation were methanol, methane and methyldiazene. The di-, tri- and tetra-methyl hydrazines were essentially unreactive under these conditions. The relative catalytic reactivities toward MMH are: Fe greater than Al2O3 greater than Ti greater than Zn greater than 316 SS greater than Cr greater than Ni greater than Al greater than 304L SS. A kinetic scheme and mechanism involving adsorption, oxidative dehydrogenation and reductive elimination reactions on a metal oxide surface are proposed.

  13. NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) Ion Propulsion System Information Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pencil, Eirc S.; Benson, Scott W.

    2008-01-01

    This document is a guide to New Frontiers mission proposal teams. The document describes the development and status of the NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion propulsion system (IPS) technology, its application to planetary missions, and the process anticipated to transition NEXT to the first flight mission.

  14. Mission and System Advantages of Iodine Hall Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankanich, John W.; Szabo, James; Pote, Bruce; Oleson, Steve; Kamhawi, Hani

    2014-01-01

    The exploration of alternative propellants for Hall thrusters continues to be of interest to the community. Investments have been made and continue for the maturation of iodine based Hall thrusters. Iodine testing has shown comparable performance to xenon. However, iodine has a higher storage density and resulting higher ?V capability for volume constrained systems. Iodine's vapor pressure is low enough to permit low-pressure storage, but high enough to minimize potential adverse spacecraft-thruster interactions. The low vapor pressure also means that iodine does not condense inside the thruster at ordinary operating temperatures. Iodine is safe, it stores at sub-atmospheric pressure, and can be stored unregulated for years on end; whether on the ground or on orbit. Iodine fills a niche for both low power (10kW) electric propulsion regimes. A range of missions have been evaluated for direct comparison of Iodine and Xenon options. The results show advantages of iodine Hall systems for both small and microsatellite application and for very large exploration class missions.

  15. Experimental results of an iodine plasma in PEGASES gridded thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondein, Pascaline; Aanesland, Ane

    2015-09-01

    In the electric gridded thruster PEGASES, both positive and negative ions are expelled after extraction from an ion-ion plasma. This ion-ion plasma is formed downstream a localized magnetic field placed a few centimeters from the ionization region, trapping and cooling down the electron to allow a better attachment to an electronegative gas. For this thruster concept, iodine has emerged as the most attractive option. Heavy, under diatomic form and therefore good for high thrust, its low ionization threshold and high electronegativity lead to high ion-ion densities and low RF power. After the proof-of-concept of PEGASES using SF6 as propellant, we present here experimental results of an iodine plasma studied inside PEGASES thruster. At solid state at standard temperature and pressure, iodine is heated to sublimate, then injected inside the chamber where the neutral gas is heated and ionized. The whole injection system is heated to avoid deposition on surfaces and a mass flow controller allows a fine control on the neutral gas mass flow. A 3D translation stage inside the vacuum chamber allows volumetric plasma studies using electrostatic probes. The results are also compared with the global model dedicated to iodine as propellant for electric gridded thrusters. This work has been done within the LABEX Plas@par project, and received financial state aid managed by the Agence Nationale de la Recherche, as part of the programme ``Investissements d'avenir.''

  16. Thruster direction controlling of assembled spacecraft based on gimbal suspension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongliang Xu; Hai Huang

    2016-01-01

    The attitude control system design and its control effect are affected considerably by the mass-property pa-rameters of the spacecraft. In the mission of on-orbit servicing, as fuel is expended, or the payloads are added or removed, the center of mass wil be changed in certain axe; conse-quently, some thrusters' directions are deviated from the center of mass (CM) in certain plane. The CM of assembled spacecraft estimation and thruster direction control are studied. Firstly, the attitude dynamics of the assembled spacecraft is established based on the Newton-Euler method. Secondly, the estimation can be identified by the least recursive squares algorithm. Then, a scheme to control the thrusters’ directions is proposed. By using the gimbal instaled at the end of the boom, the angle of the thruster is controled by driving the gimbal; therefore, thrusters can be directed to the CM again. Finaly, numerical simulations are used to verify this scheme. Results of the numerical simulations clearly show that this control scheme is rational and feasible.

  17. Rapid evaluation of ion thruster lifetime using optical emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, B. A.; Parsons, M. L.; Mantenieks, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    A major life-limiting phenomenon of electric thrusters is the sputter erosion of discharge chamber components. Thrusters for space propulsion are required to operate for extended periods of time, usually in excess of 10,000 hr. Lengthy and very costly life-tests in high-vacuum facilities have been required in the past to determine the erosion rates of thruster components. Alternative methods for determining erosion rates which can be performed in relatively short periods of time at considerably lower costs are studied. An attempt to relate optical emission intensity from an ion bombarded surface (screen grid) to the sputtering rate of that surface is made. The model used a kinetic steady-state (KSS) approach, balancing the rates of population and depopulation of ten low-lying excited states of the sputtered molybdenum atom (MoI) with those of the ground state to relate the spectral intensities of the various transitions of the MoI to the population densities. Once this is accomplished, the population density can be related to the sputting rate of the target. Radiative and collisional modes of excitation and decay are considered. Since actual data has not been published for MoI excitation rate and decay constants, semiempirical equations are used. The calculated sputtering rate and intensity is compared to the measured intensity and sputtering rates of the 8 and 30 cm ion thrusters.

  18. Mode Transitions in Magnetically Shielded Hall Effect Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekerak, Michael J.; Longmier, Benjamin W.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani; Hofer, Richard R.; Jorns, Benjamin A.; Polk, James E.

    2014-01-01

    A mode transition study is conducted in magnetically shielded thrusters where the magnetic field magnitude is varied to induce mode transitions. Three different oscillatory modes are identified with the 20-kW NASA-300MS-2 and the 6-kW H6MS: Mode 1) global mode similar to unshielded thrusters at low magnetic fields, Mode 2) cathode oscillations at nominal magnetic fields, and Mode 3) combined spoke, cathode and breathing mode oscillations at high magnetic fields. Mode 1 exhibits large amplitude, low frequency (1-10 kHz), breathing mode type oscillations where discharge current mean value and oscillation amplitude peak. The mean discharge current is minimized while thrust-to-power and anode efficiency are maximized in Mode 2, where higher frequency (50-90 kHz), low amplitude, cathode oscillations dominate. Thrust is maximized in Mode 3 and decreases by 5-6% with decreasing magnetic field strength. The presence or absence of spokes and strong cathode oscillations do not affect each other or discharge current. Similar to unshielded thrusters, mode transitions and plasma oscillations affect magnetically shielded thruster performance and should be characterized during system development.

  19. STS-39: OMS Pod Thruster Removal/Replace

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Shown is the removal and replacement of the Discovery's orbital maneuvering systems (OMS) pod thruster. The OMS engine will be used to propel Discovery north, off of its previous orbital groundtrack, without changing the spacecraft's altitude. A burn with this lateral effect is known as "out-of-plane."

  20. Thermal stability of the krypton Hall effect thruster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szelecka Agnieszka

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Krypton Large IMpulse Thruster (KLIMT ESA/PECS project, which has been implemented in the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion (IPPLM and now is approaching its final phase, was aimed at incremental development of a ~500 W class Hall effect thruster (HET. Xenon, predominantly used as a propellant in the state-of-the-art HETs, is extremely expensive. Krypton has been considered as a cheaper alternative since more than fifteen years; however, to the best knowledge of the authors, there has not been a HET model especially designed for this noble gas. To address this issue, KLIMT has been geared towards operation primarily with krypton. During the project, three subsequent prototype versions of the thruster were designed, manufactured and tested, aimed at gradual improvement of each next exemplar. In the current paper, the heat loads in new engine have been discussed. It has been shown that thermal equilibrium of the thruster is gained within the safety limits of the materials used. Extensive testing with both gases was performed to compare KLIMT’s thermal behaviour when supplied with krypton and xenon propellants.

  1. Simulations of a Plasma Thruster Utilizing the FRC Configuration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rognlien, T. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cohen, B. I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-10

    This report describes work performed by LLNL to model the behavior and performance of a reverse-field configuration (FRC) type of plasma device as a plasma thruster as summarized by Razin et al. [1], which also describes the MNX device at PPPL used to study this concept.

  2. Electroless plating of Ni-B film as a binder-free highly efficient electrocatalyst for hydrazine oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiao-Ping; Dai, Hong-Bin; Wu, Lin-Song; Wang, Ping

    2017-07-01

    Hydrazine is a promising energy carrier for fuel cells owing to its combined advantages of high theoretical cell voltage, high-power density, and no greenhouse gas emission. By using an electroless plating process, we have prepared a robust Ni-B film grown on Ni foam that is highly effective for hydrazine electrooxidation in alkaline media. The effects of reaction temperature, concentrations of hydrous hydrazine and sodium hydroxide in the fuel solution on performance of hydrazine electrooxidation reaction are investigated. The mechanistic reason for the property advantage of as-prepared Ni-B/Ni foam catalyst over the relevant catalysts is discussed based on careful kinetics studies and characterization. The facile synthesis of Ni-based catalyst with high activity and good stability is of clear significance for the development of hydrous hydrazine as a viable energy carrier.

  3. Concentric-Electrode Organic Electrochemical Transistors: Case Study for Selective Hydrazine Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sébastien Pecqueur

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on hydrazine-sensing organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs with a design consisting of concentric annular electrodes. The design engineering of these OECTs was motivated by the great potential of using OECT sensing arrays in fields such as bioelectronics. In this work, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene:poly(styrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS-based OECTs have been studied as aqueous sensors that are specifically sensitive to the lethal hydrazine molecule. These amperometric sensors have many relevant features for the development of hydrazine sensors, such as a sensitivity down to 10−5 M of hydrazine in water, an order of magnitude higher selectivity for hydrazine than for nine other water-soluble common analytes, the capability to entirely recover its base signal after water flushing, and a very low operation voltage. The specificity for hydrazine to be sensed by our OECTs is caused by its catalytic oxidation at the gate electrode, and enables an increase in the output current modulation of the devices. This has permitted the device-geometry study of the whole series of 80 micrometric OECT devices with sub-20-nm PEDOT:PSS layers, channel lengths down to 1 µm, and a specific device geometry of coplanar and concentric electrodes. The numerous geometries unravel new aspects of the OECT mechanisms governing the electrochemical sensing behaviours of the device—more particularly the effect of the contacts which are inherent at the micro-scale. By lowering the device cross-talk, micrometric gate-integrated radial OECTs shall contribute to the diminishing of the readout invasiveness and therefore further promote the development of OECT biosensors.

  4. Concentric-Electrode Organic Electrochemical Transistors: Case Study for Selective Hydrazine Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecqueur, Sébastien; Lenfant, Stéphane; Guérin, David; Alibart, Fabien; Vuillaume, Dominique

    2017-01-01

    We report on hydrazine-sensing organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) with a design consisting of concentric annular electrodes. The design engineering of these OECTs was motivated by the great potential of using OECT sensing arrays in fields such as bioelectronics. In this work, poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS)-based OECTs have been studied as aqueous sensors that are specifically sensitive to the lethal hydrazine molecule. These amperometric sensors have many relevant features for the development of hydrazine sensors, such as a sensitivity down to 10−5 M of hydrazine in water, an order of magnitude higher selectivity for hydrazine than for nine other water-soluble common analytes, the capability to entirely recover its base signal after water flushing, and a very low operation voltage. The specificity for hydrazine to be sensed by our OECTs is caused by its catalytic oxidation at the gate electrode, and enables an increase in the output current modulation of the devices. This has permitted the device-geometry study of the whole series of 80 micrometric OECT devices with sub-20-nm PEDOT:PSS layers, channel lengths down to 1 µm, and a specific device geometry of coplanar and concentric electrodes. The numerous geometries unravel new aspects of the OECT mechanisms governing the electrochemical sensing behaviours of the device—more particularly the effect of the contacts which are inherent at the micro-scale. By lowering the device cross-talk, micrometric gate-integrated radial OECTs shall contribute to the diminishing of the readout invasiveness and therefore further promote the development of OECT biosensors. PMID:28287475

  5. Synthesis, characterization and antioxidant study of N,N’-bis(2-chlorobenzamidothiocarbonyl)hydrazine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firdausiah, Syadza; Hasbullah, Siti Aishah; Yamin, Bohari M. [School of Chemical Science and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    N,N’-bis(2-chlorobenzamidothiocarbonyl)hydrazine was synthesized from 2-chlorobenzoylisothiocyanate and hydrazine in acetone. The compound was characterized by infrared, {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR, and UV-Vis spectroscopies. X-ray crystallography study showed the molecule adopt trans configuration at both N-N and C-N bonds. The compound showed high antioxidant activity, EC{sub 50} of 374.89 µM, compared to ascorbic acid (EC{sub 50} of 561.36 µM)

  6. Selective fluorescent detection of aspartic acid and glutamic acid employing dansyl hydrazine dextran conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasomphan, Weerachai; Tangboriboonrat, Pramuan; Tanapongpipat, Sutipa; Smanmoo, Srung

    2014-01-01

    Highly water soluble polymer (DD) was prepared and evaluated for its fluorescence response towards various amino acids. The polymer consists of dansyl hydrazine unit conjugated into dextran template. The conjugation enhances higher water solubility of dansyl hydrazine moiety. Of screened amino acids, DD exhibited selective fluorescence quenching in the presence of aspartic acid (Asp) and glutamic acid (Glu). A plot of fluorescence intensity change of DD against the concentration of corresponding amino acids gave a good linear relationship in the range of 1 × 10(-4) M to 25 × 10(-3) M. This establishes DD as a potential polymeric sensor for selective sensing of Asp and Glu.

  7. Kinetic Study of Np(Ⅵ) Reduction With Tert-butyl Hydrazine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Tert-butyl hydrazine(TBH) is a new salt free reductant, it can effectively reduce Np(Ⅵ) to Np(Ⅴ) but reduce Pu(Ⅳ)very slowly. Further more, it has the highest ratio of rate constant for Np(Ⅵ) reduction to the rate constant for Pu(Ⅳ) reduction in hydrazine derivatives, so it’s a promising reductant to separate Np, Pu effectively,Reduction kinetic study of the reaction in nitric acid is performed by spectrophotometry. The effect of some factors such as concentration of TBH, HNO3, Np(Ⅵ) and temperature on the redox

  8. The effect of hydrazine intercalation on the structure and capacitance of 2D titanium carbide (MXene).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashtalir, O; Lukatskaya, M R; Kolesnikov, A I; Raymundo-Piñero, E; Naguib, M; Barsoum, M W; Gogotsi, Y

    2016-04-28

    Herein we show that hydrazine intercalation into 2D titanium carbide (Ti3C2-based MXene) results in changes in its surface chemistry by decreasing the amounts of fluorine, OH surface groups and intercalated water. It also creates a pillaring effect between Ti3C2Tx layers pre-opening the structure and improving the accessability to active sites. The hydrazine treated material has demonstrated a greatly improved capacitance of 250 F g(-1) in acidic electrolytes with an excellent cycling ability for electrodes as thick as 75 μm.

  9. Transformation of Hydrazine Fuels in Soil%肼类燃料在土壤中迁移转化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任向红

    2001-01-01

    Adsorption, degradation, transformation of hydrazines, methyl hydrazines and unsymmetrical dimethyl hydrazines in soil and their toxicity to microorganisms in soil are evaluated in the present investigation. It may be concluded that principal reactions between the hydrazine fuels and clay are physical absorption and chemical degradation. It has also been found that ion- exchange can only occur at low pH level, the unsolvable hydroxides may be formed on surface of the soil, suggesting that those could combine lots of hydrazine fuels by hydrogen- bond and ionization at the high pH level. The order of toxicity of the hydrazine fuels to microorganisms is hydrazines>methyl hydrazines> unsymmetrical dimethyl hydrazines. It has been indicated that some microorganisms in the soil can degrade the hydrazine fuels.%论述了对肼、甲基肼和偏二甲肼在土壤环境中的吸附、降解、迁移转化模型及对土壤中的微生物的毒性。肼类燃料在土壤环境中与粘土的作用最强,主要存在着物理吸附与化学降解两个方面。pH值较低时,在粘土中主要是可逆离子交换;pH值较高时,在土壤表面形成不溶的氢氧化物,通过氢键和离子作用结合大量肼类燃料。肼类燃料对土壤中的微生物的毒性大小是肼>甲基肼>偏二甲肼,土壤中的某些微生物也可促进肼类燃料的降解。

  10. Magnetoplasmadynamic electric propulsion thruster behavior at the hundred megawatt level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Darin William

    Characteristic measurements were made of a hundred megawatt modified helium inverse pinch switch and compared against numerical modeling and theoretically expected behavior. Thruster voltage was measured for currents between three and three hundred kilo amps and for mass flow rates between 0.96 and 40 grams per second. From that, characteristic voltage, power, and resistance curves were generated. Electron temperature measurements made inside the plasma flow using triple Langmuir probes were found to be between three and thirty electron volts. General expected MPD thruster behavior, such as decreasing resistance with increasing mass flow rate, were confirmed. The quasi steady assumption was studied between 1.5 and 1.7 milliseconds and found to be appropriate. A theoretical model, based on integrating the magnetic field to determine thrust, as for an MPD thruster, was used to estimate fall voltages, pumping coefficients, and specific impulse. An empirical model for thruster voltage was then created to estimate the behavior of voltage as a function of the similarity parameter. The two models were then put together and found to be self consistent with the experimental data. Three sources of power loss were estimated given the experimental and theoretical model. The power lost due to fall voltage mechanisms was calculated from the theoretical model and the input current as a function of time. The ionization losses were estimated using a worst case scenario of complete double ionization of the input helium mass flow rate as a function of time. Thermal losses were calculated from the electron temperature and the input mass flow rate. Total temperature, specific impulse, and efficiency measurements were all presented as a function of a similarity parameter in line with MPD theory. Basic MPD thruster behavior was confirmed. Suggestions were made for future continuation of the project.

  11. Carbon Back Sputter Modeling for Hall Thruster Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilland, James H.; Williams, George J.; Burt, Jonathan M.; Yim, John Tamin

    2016-01-01

    Lifetime requirements for electric propulsion devices, including Hall Effect thrusters, are continually increasing, driven in part by NASA's inclusion of this technology in it's exploration architecture. NASA will demonstrate high-power electric propulsion system on the Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission (SEP TDM). The Asteroid Redirect Robotic mission is one candidate SEP TDM, which is projected to require tens of thousands of thruster life. As thruster life is increased, for example through the use of improved magnetic field designs, the relative influence of facility effects increases. One such effect is the sputtering and redeposition, or back sputter, of facility materials by the high energy thruster plumes. In support of wear testing for the Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS) project, the back sputter from a Hall effect thruster plume has been modeled for the NASA Glenn Research Center's Vacuum Facility 5. The predicted wear at a near-worst case condition of 600 V, 12.5 kW was found to be on the order of 1 micron/kh in a fully carbon-lined chamber. A more detailed numerical Monte Carlo code was also modified to estimate back sputter for a detailed facility and pumping configuration. This code demonstrated similar back sputter rate distributions, but is not yet accurately modeling the magnitudes. The modeling has been benchmarked to recent HERMeS wear testing, using multiple microbalance measurements. These recent measurements have yielded values on the order of 1.5 - 2 micron/kh at 600 V and 12.5 kW.

  12. Comparisons in Performance of Electromagnet and Permanent-Magnet Cylindrical Hall-Effect Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, K. A.; Raitses, Y.; Gayoso, J. C.; Fisch, N. J.

    2010-01-01

    Three different low-power cylindrical Hall thrusters, which more readily lend themselves to miniaturization and low-power operation than a conventional (annular) Hall thruster, are compared to evaluate the propulsive performance of each. One thruster uses electromagnet coils to produce the magnetic field within the discharge channel while the others use permanent magnets, promising power reduction relative to the electromagnet thruster. A magnetic screen is added to the permanent magnet thruster to improve performance by keeping the magnetic field from expanding into space beyond the exit of the thruster. The combined dataset spans a power range from 50-350 W. The thrust levels over this range were 1.3-7.3 mN, with thruster efficiencies and specific impulses spanning 3.5-28.7% and 400-1940 s, respectively. The efficiency is generally higher for the permanent magnet thruster with the magnetic screen, while That thruster s specific impulse as a function of discharge voltage is comparable to the electromagnet thruster.

  13. Feasibility Study of Two Candidate Reaction Wheel/thruster Hybrid Control Architecture Designs for the Cassini Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macala, Glenn A.; Lee, Allan Y.; Wang, Eric K.

    2012-01-01

    As the first spacecraft to achieve orbit at Saturn in 2004, Cassini has collected science data throughout its four-year prime mission (2004-08), and has since been approved for a first and second extended mission through 2017. Cassini carries a set of three "fixed" reaction wheels and a backup reaction wheel (reaction wheel #4) is mounted on top of an articulable platform. If necessary, this platform could be articulated to orient the backup reaction wheel with the degraded wheel. The reaction wheels are used primarily for attitude control when precise and stable pointing of a science instrument such as the narrow angle camera is required. In 2001-02, reaction wheel #3 exhibited signs of bearing cage instability. As a result, reaction wheel #4 was articulated to align with reaction wheel #3. Beginning in July 2003, Cassini was controlled using wheel #1, #2, and #4. From their first use in the spring of 2000 until today, reaction wheels #1 and #2 have accumulated more than3.5 billions revolutions each. As such, in spite of very carefully management of the wheel spin rates by the mission operation team, there are some observed increases in the drag torque of the wheels' bearings. Hence, the mission operations team must prepare for the contingency scenario in which the reaction wheel #1 (in addition to wheel #3) had degraded. In this hypothetical fault scenario, the two remaining reaction wheels (#2 and #4) will not be able to provide precise and stable three-axis control of the spacecraft. In this study, we evaluate the feasibility of controlling Cassini using the two remaining reaction wheels and four thrusters to meet the science pointing requirements for two key science operational modes: the Optical Remote Sensing and Downlink, Fields, Particles, & Waves operation modes. The performance (e.g., pointing control error, pointing stability, hydrazine consumption rate, etc.) of the hybrid controllers in both operations scenarios will be compared with those achieved

  14. Feasibility Study of Two Candidate Reaction Wheel/thruster Hybrid Control Architecture Designs for the Cassini Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macala, Glenn A.; Lee, Allan Y.; Wang, Eric K.

    2012-01-01

    As the first spacecraft to achieve orbit at Saturn in 2004, Cassini has collected science data throughout its four-year prime mission (2004-08), and has since been approved for a first and second extended mission through 2017. Cassini carries a set of three "fixed" reaction wheels and a backup reaction wheel (reaction wheel #4) is mounted on top of an articulable platform. If necessary, this platform could be articulated to orient the backup reaction wheel with the degraded wheel. The reaction wheels are used primarily for attitude control when precise and stable pointing of a science instrument such as the narrow angle camera is required. In 2001-02, reaction wheel #3 exhibited signs of bearing cage instability. As a result, reaction wheel #4 was articulated to align with reaction wheel #3. Beginning in July 2003, Cassini was controlled using wheel #1, #2, and #4. From their first use in the spring of 2000 until today, reaction wheels #1 and #2 have accumulated more than3.5 billions revolutions each. As such, in spite of very carefully management of the wheel spin rates by the mission operation team, there are some observed increases in the drag torque of the wheels' bearings. Hence, the mission operations team must prepare for the contingency scenario in which the reaction wheel #1 (in addition to wheel #3) had degraded. In this hypothetical fault scenario, the two remaining reaction wheels (#2 and #4) will not be able to provide precise and stable three-axis control of the spacecraft. In this study, we evaluate the feasibility of controlling Cassini using the two remaining reaction wheels and four thrusters to meet the science pointing requirements for two key science operational modes: the Optical Remote Sensing and Downlink, Fields, Particles, & Waves operation modes. The performance (e.g., pointing control error, pointing stability, hydrazine consumption rate, etc.) of the hybrid controllers in both operations scenarios will be compared with those achieved

  15. Thermal-environmental testing of a 30-cm engineering model thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtich, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental test program was carried out to document all 30-cm electron bombardment Hg ion bombardment thruster functions and characteristics over the thermal environment of several proposed missions. An engineering model thruster was placed in a thermal test facility equipped with -196 C walls and solar simulation. The thruster was cold soaked and exposed to simulated eclipses lasting in duration from 17 to 72 minutes. The thruster was operated at quarter, to full beam power in various thermal configurations which simulated multiple thruster operation, and was also exposed to 1 and 2 suns solar simulation. Thruster control characteristics and constraints; performance, including thrust magnitude and direction; and structural integrity were evaluated over the range of thermal environments tested.

  16. Thermal-environment testing of a 30-cm engineering model thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtich, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental test program was carried out to document all 30-cm electron bombardment Hg ion bombardment thruster functions and characteristics over the thermal environment of several proposed missions. An engineering model thruster was placed in a thermal test facility equipped with -196 C walls and solar simulation. The thruster was cold soaked and exposed to simulated eclipses lasting in duration from 17 to 72 minutes. The thruster was operated at quarter, to full beam power in various thermal configurations which simulated multiple thruster operation, and was also exposed to 1 and 2 suns solar simulation. Thruster control characteristics and constraints; performance, including thrust magnitude and direction; and structural integrity were evaluated over the range of thermal environments tested.

  17. Microwave ECR Ion Thruster Development Activities at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, John E.; Patterson, Michael J.

    2002-01-01

    Outer solar system missions will have propulsion system lifetime requirements well in excess of that which can be satisfied by ion thrusters utilizing conventional hollow cathode technology. To satisfy such mission requirements, other technologies must be investigated. One possible approach is to utilize electrodeless plasma production schemes. Such an approach has seen low power application less than 1 kW on earth-space spacecraft such as ARTEMIS which uses the rf thruster the RIT 10 and deep space missions such as MUSES-C which will use a microwave ion thruster. Microwave and rf thruster technologies are compared. A microwave-based ion thruster is investigated for potential high power ion thruster systems requiring very long lifetimes.

  18. Cathode-less gridded ion thrusters for small satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aanesland, Ane

    2016-10-01

    Electric space propulsion is now a mature technology for commercial satellites and space missions that requires thrust in the order of hundreds of mN, and with available electric power in the order of kW. Developing electric propulsion for SmallSats (1 to 500 kg satellites) are challenging due to the small space and limited available electric power (in the worst case close to 10 W). One of the challenges in downscaling ion and Hall thrusters is the need to neutralize the positive ion beam to prevent beam stalling. This neutralization is achieved by feeding electrons into the downstream space. In most cases hollow cathodes are used for this purpose, but they are fragile and difficult to implement, and in particular for small systems they are difficult to downscale, both in size and electron current. We describe here a new alternative ion thruster that can provide thrust and specific impulse suitable for mission control of satellites as small as 3 kg. The originality of our thruster lies in the acceleration principles and propellant handling. Continuous ion acceleration is achieved by biasing a set of grids with Radio Frequency voltages (RF) via a blocking capacitor. Due to the different mobility of ions and electrons, the blocking capacitor charges up and rectifies the RF voltage. Thus, the ions are accelerated by the self-bias DC voltage. Moreover, due to the RF oscillations, the electrons escape the thruster across the grids during brief instants in the RF period ensuring a full space charge neutralization of the positive ion beam. Due to the RF nature of this system, the space charge limited current increases by almost a factor of 2 compared to classical DC biased grids, which translates into a specific thrust two times higher than for a similar DC system. This new thruster is called Neptune and operates with only one RF power supply for plasma generation, ion acceleration and electron neutralization. We will present the downscaling of this thruster to a 3cm

  19. A Hydrazine-Free Wolff-Kishner Reaction Suitable for an Undergraduate Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranwell, Philippa B.; Russell, Andrew T.

    2016-01-01

    A Wolff-Kishner reaction that does not require hydrazine has been developed. The reaction sequence has two steps: formation of a carbomethoxyhydrazone from methyl hydrazinocarboxylate and acetophenone, then decomposition of this intermediate by treatment with potassium hydroxide in triethylene glycol. Purification is by filtration through a plug…

  20. Hydrazine Blending and Storage Facility Wastewater Treatment and Decommissioning Assessment. Version 3.1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    concrete pads and dikes; a drum storage I 6764a 1-5 05 -- iti kwij 1-6a pad; a storage shed; a tool shed; an office shed, and associated Ipiping . Two... Oceanic and Atnospheric Administration). 1983. Local climatological data, Denver, CO. Neumann, E.J., and B. Jody. 1986. Neutralization of hydrazine

  1. X-ray absorption spectroscopy study on the thermal and hydrazine reduction of graphene oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Xianqing, E-mail: lxq@gxu.edu.cn [The Colleague of Physics Science and Technology, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Wang, Yu [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China); Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201204 (China); Zheng, Huiyuan [The Colleague of Physics Science and Technology, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China); Wu, Ziyu, E-mail: wuzy@ustc.edu.cn [National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • XAS study of GO and reduced GO was performed. • Detailed evolution of the electronic structures and chemical bonding of GO was revealed. • A new efficient route for the reduction of GO is proposed. - Abstract: X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was applied to systemically investigate the deoxygenation of graphene oxide (GO) via annealing and hydrazine treatment. Detailed evolution of the electronic structures and chemical bonding of GO was presented. The enhanced intensity of π{sup *} resonance and the appearance of splitting σ{sup *} resonance in C K-edge XAS spectra suggest high extents of recoveries of π-conjugation upon reduction using thermal annealing or hydrazine. Experimental results revealed that the carboxyl as well as epoxide and hydroxyl groups on the surface of GO were thermally reduced first, followed by the more difficult removal of carbonyl and cyclic ether groups at higher temperatures. The hydrazine reduction could remove epoxide, hydroxyl and carboxyl groups effectively, whereas the carbonyl groups were partially reduced with the incorporation of nitrogen species simultaneously. The residual oxygen functional groups on hydrazine-reduced GO could be further removed after modest thermal annealing. It was proposed that a combination of both types of reductions would give the best deoxygenation efficiency for the production of graphene.

  2. Kinetic Study of the Reaction between Tert-butyl Hydrazine and Nitrous Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The kinetic study of the reaction between tert-butyl hydrazine(TBH)and nitrous acid in nitric acid system is performed by spectrophotometry. The effect of some factors such as the concentration of TBH, the concentration of nitric acid, ionic strength, temperature and the

  3. The effect of hydrazine intercalation on the structure and capacitance of 2D titanium carbide (MXene)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashtalir, O.; Lukatskaya, M. R.; Kolesnikov, A. I.; Raymundo-Piñero, E.; Naguib, M.; Barsoum, M. W.; Gogotsi, Y.

    2016-04-01

    Herein we show that hydrazine intercalation into 2D titanium carbide (Ti3C2-based MXene) results in changes in its surface chemistry by decreasing the amounts of fluorine, OH surface groups and intercalated water. It also creates a pillaring effect between Ti3C2Tx layers pre-opening the structure and improving the accessability to active sites. The hydrazine treated material has demonstrated a greatly improved capacitance of 250 F g-1 in acidic electrolytes with an excellent cycling ability for electrodes as thick as 75 μm.Herein we show that hydrazine intercalation into 2D titanium carbide (Ti3C2-based MXene) results in changes in its surface chemistry by decreasing the amounts of fluorine, OH surface groups and intercalated water. It also creates a pillaring effect between Ti3C2Tx layers pre-opening the structure and improving the accessability to active sites. The hydrazine treated material has demonstrated a greatly improved capacitance of 250 F g-1 in acidic electrolytes with an excellent cycling ability for electrodes as thick as 75 μm. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Characterization methods, additional XRD patterns (Fig. S1) and INS spectra (Fig. S2-S4). See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01462c

  4. Redox conditions effect on flow accelerated corrosion: Influence of hydrazine and oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouvier, O. de [EDF, R and D Div., Moret sur Loing (France); Bouchacourt, M. [EDF, Engineering and Service Div., Villeurbanne (France); Fruzzetti, K. [EPRI, Science and Technology Div., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    Flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) of carbon steels has been studied world-wide for more than twenty years and is now fairly well understood. The influence of several parameters like water chemistry (i.e. pH and oxygen content), temperature, hydrodynamic or mass transfer conditions (i.e. flow velocity, geometry, steam quality..) and steel composition on the corrosion kinetics has been demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally. However, the effect of a reducing environment and variable redox conditions have not yet been fully explored. It's well known that a reducing environment is effective in increasing the resistance of steam generator tubing to intergranular attack / stress corrosion cracking (IGA/SCC) and pitting. In that way, secondary water chemistry specifications have been modified from low hydrazine to high hydrazine chemistry in the steam-water circuit. Nevertheless, increasing hydrazine levels up to 200 {mu}g/kg could have a detrimental effect by potentially enhancing the FAC process. Moreover, in order to have a complete understanding of the possible impact of the water chemistry environment it is also important to consider the impact of redox conditions during shutdowns (cold and/or hot shutdowns) and start up periods when aerated water injections are made to maintain a constant water level in the Steam Generators from the auxiliary feedwater circuit. Therefore, a common EDF and EPRI R and D effort has been recently carried out to study the effects of hydrazine and oxygen on FAC. The results are presented as follows. (authors)

  5. Hydrazine reduction of transition metal oxides - In situ characterization using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littrell, D. M.; Tatarchuk, B. J.

    1986-01-01

    The transition metal oxides (TMOs) V2O5, FeO3, Co3O4, NiO, CuO, and ZnO were exposed to hydrazine at various pressures. The metallic surfaces were surveyed by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to determine the irrelative rate of reduction by hydrazine. The most easily reducible oxide, CuO, could be reduced to the metallic state at room temperature and 10 to the -6th torr. The reaction is first order with respect to CuO, with an activation energy of about 35 kJ/mol. Two types of adsorption were seen to occur at 295 K: (1) a reversible component in which the measured N:Cu ratio increased to 0.60 at hydrazine pressures up to 0.5 torr, and (2) an irreversible component, with a N:Cu ratio of 0.28, which could not be removed by extended vacuum pumping. The results of this study are useful for the identification of TMO's that can be used as solid neatallizers of hydrazine spills, and for the preparation of metal surfaces for electroplating and evaporative thin-film coating.

  6. Highly selective amperometric sensor for the trace level detection of hydrazine at bismuth nanoparticles decorated graphene nanosheets modified electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devasenathipathy, Rajkumar; Mani, Veerappan; Chen, Shen-Ming

    2014-06-01

    A highly selective amperometric sensor was developed for the trace level determination of hydrazine at bismuth nanoparticles (Bi) decorated graphene nanosheets (GR) composite film modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). GR-Bi nanocomposite has been successfully prepared via simple and facile chemical reduction approach and its structure was characterized by various techniques. Surface morphological and X-ray diffraction studies revealed the formation and high loading of Bi nanoparticles on graphene sheets. GR-Bi nanocomposite modified GCE exhibited greatly enhanced electrocatalytic performance towards electro-oxidation of hydrazine in terms of decrease in overpotential and increase in oxidation peak current (Ip). The kinetic parameters such as electron transfer coefficient (α) and diffusion coefficient (Do) of the hydrazine oxidation were determined to be 0.70 and 2.65×10(-5) cm(2) s(-1), respectively. An amperometric sensor has been fabricated which detects trace level concentration of hydrazine. The sensor exhibited a wide linear range from 20 nM to 0.28 mM and a very low detection limit (LOD) of 5 nM. Remarkably, this is the lowest LOD achieved for the determination of hydrazine in neutral pH among other reported electrochemical hydrazine sensors. In addition, the sensor selectively detects hydrazine even in the presence of 1000 fold excess quantity of common interferrants. The practical feasibility of the sensor has been assessed in water and urine samples with good recoveries. Furthermore, the sensor exhibited appreciable stability, repeatability and reproducibility results.

  7. New Modified-Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes Paste Electrode for Electrocatalytic Oxidation and Determination of Hydrazine Using Square Wave Voltammetry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali A. ENSAF; Mahsa LOTFI; Hassan KARIMI-MALEH

    2012-01-01

    The application of p-aminophenol as a suitable mediator, as a sensitive and selective voltammetric sensor for the determination of hydrazine using square wave voltammetric method were described. The modified multiwall carbon nanotubes paste electrode exhibited a good electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of hydrazine at pH = 7.0. The catalytic oxidation peak currents showed a linear dependence of the peaks current to the hydrazine concentrations in the range of 0.5–175 μmol/L with a correlation coefficient of 0.9975. The detection limit (S/N = 3) was estimated to be 0.3 μmol/L of hydrazine. The relative standard deviations for 0.7 and 5.0 μmol/L hydrazine were 1.7 and 1.1%, respectively. The modified electrode showed good sensitivity and selectivity. The diffusion coefficient (D = 9.5 × 10–4 cm2/s) and the kinetic parameters such as the electron transfer coefficient (α = 0.7) of hydrazine at the surface of the modified electrode were determined using electrochemical approaches. The electrode was successfully applied for the determination of hydrazine in real samples with satisfactory results.

  8. Cyclic voltammetry deposition of copper nanostructure on MWCNTs modified pencil graphite electrode: An ultra-sensitive hydrazine sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Hamid; Gholivand, Mohammad B; Abdolmaleki, Abbas

    2016-09-01

    In this study, Copper (Cu) nanostructures (CuNS) were electrochemically deposited on a film of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified pencil graphite electrode (MWCNTs/PGE) by cyclic voltammetry method to fabricate a CuNS-MWCNTs composite sensor (CuNS-MWCNT/PGE) for hydrazine detection. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were used for the characterization of CuNS on the MWCNTs matrix. The composite of CuNS-MWCNTs was characterized with cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The preliminary studies showed that the proposed sensor have a synergistic electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of hydrazine in phosphate buffer. The catalytic currents of square wave voltammetry had a linear correlation with the hydrazine concentration in the range of 0.1 to 800μM with a low detection limit of 70nM. Moreover, the amperometric oxidation current exhibited a linear correlation with hydrazine concentration in the concentration range of 50-800μM with the detection limit of 4.3μM. The proposed electrode was used for the determination of hydrazine in real samples and the results were promising. Empirical results also indicated that the sensor had good reproducibility, long-term stability, and the response of the sensor to hydrazine was free from interferences. Moreover, the proposed sensor benefits from simple preparation, low cost, outstanding sensitivity, selectivity, and reproducibility for hydrazine determination. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Development, Vibration, and Thermal Characterization of a Steady Operating Pulsed Power System for FRC Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Field (RMF) to produce large plasma currents inside a conical thruster creating a field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmoid that is magnetically...in turn charges a high-Q capacitor. Connected in series with the thruster antenna, the resonant RLC circuit oscillates at high frequency with a...Field (RMF) to produce large plasma currents inside a conical thruster creating a field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasmoid that is magnetically

  10. Cyclic voltammetry deposition of copper nanostructure on MWCNTs modified pencil graphite electrode: An ultra-sensitive hydrazine sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heydari, Hamid [Faculty of Sciences, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gholivand, Mohammad B., E-mail: mbgholivand@razi.ac.ir [Faculty of Sciences, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdolmaleki, Abbas [Department of Chemistry, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-09-01

    In this study, Copper (Cu) nanostructures (CuNS) were electrochemically deposited on a film of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified pencil graphite electrode (MWCNTs/PGE) by cyclic voltammetry method to fabricate a CuNS–MWCNTs composite sensor (CuNS–MWCNT/PGE) for hydrazine detection. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) were used for the characterization of CuNS on the MWCNTs matrix. The composite of CuNS-MWCNTs was characterized with cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The preliminary studies showed that the proposed sensor have a synergistic electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of hydrazine in phosphate buffer. The catalytic currents of square wave voltammetry had a linear correlation with the hydrazine concentration in the range of 0.1 to 800 μM with a low detection limit of 70 nM. Moreover, the amperometric oxidation current exhibited a linear correlation with hydrazine concentration in the concentration range of 50–800 μM with the detection limit of 4.3 μM. The proposed electrode was used for the determination of hydrazine in real samples and the results were promising. Empirical results also indicated that the sensor had good reproducibility, long-term stability, and the response of the sensor to hydrazine was free from interferences. Moreover, the proposed sensor benefits from simple preparation, low cost, outstanding sensitivity, selectivity, and reproducibility for hydrazine determination. - Highlights: • The Copper nanostructures (CuNS) were prepared by cyclic voltammetry deposition. • The CuNS-MWCNT/PGE sensor shows high activity toward hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}). • The proposed sensor exhibits a wide linear range (0.1 to 800 μM), low detection limit (70 nM), high sensitivity and stability for hydrazine.

  11. Effect of hydrazine on general corrosion of carbon and low-alloyed steels in pressurized water reactor secondary side water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Järvimäki, Sari [Fortum Ltd, Loviisa Power Plant, Loviisa (Finland); Saario, Timo; Sipilä, Konsta [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd., Nuclear Safety, P.O. Box 1000, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland); Bojinov, Martin, E-mail: martin@uctm.edu [Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, Kl. Ohridski Blvd, 8, 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • The effect of hydrazine on the corrosion of steel in secondary side water investigated by in situ and ex situ techniques. • Oxide grown on steel in 100 ppb hydrazine shows weaker protective properties – higher corrosion rates. • Possible explanation of the accelerating effect of higher concentrations of hydrazine on flow assisted corrosion offered. - Abstract: The effect of hydrazine on corrosion rate of low-alloyed steel (LAS) and carbon steel (CS) was studied by in situ and ex situ techniques under pressurized water reactor secondary side water chemistry conditions at T = 228 °C and pH{sub RT} = 9.2 (adjusted by NH{sub 3}). It is found that hydrazine injection to a maximum level of 5.06 μmol l{sup −1} onto surfaces previously oxidized in ammonia does not affect the corrosion rate of LAS or CS. This is confirmed also by plant measurements at Loviisa NPP. On the other hand, hydrazine at the level of 3.1 μmol l{sup −1} decreases markedly the amount and the size of deposited oxide crystals on LAS and CS surface. In addition, the oxide grown in the presence of 3.1 μmol l{sup −1} hydrazine is somewhat less protective and sustains a higher corrosion rate compared to an oxide film grown without hydrazine. These observations could explain the accelerating effect of higher concentrations of hydrazine found in corrosion studies of LAS and CS.

  12. Colloid Thruster for Attitude Control Systems (ACS) and Tip-off Control Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek proposes to develop and deliver a complete engineering model colloid thruster system, capable of thrust levels and lifetimes required for spacecraft...

  13. Low-Cost High-Performance Hall Thruster Support System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Colorado Power Electronics (CPE) has built an innovative modular power processing unit (PPU) for Hall Thrusters, including discharge, magnet, heater and keeper...

  14. Carbon Nanotube Based Electric Propulsion Thruster with Low Power Consumption Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Field emission electric propulsion (FEEP) thrusters have gained considerable attention for spacecrafts disturbance compensation because of excellent characteristics....

  15. Plasma Characterization of Hall Thruster with Active and Passive Segmented Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raitses, Y.; Staack, D.; Fisch, N.J.

    2002-09-04

    Non-emissive electrodes and ceramic spacers placed along the Hall thruster channel are shown to affect the plasma potential distribution and the thruster operation. These effects are associated with physical properties of the electrode material and depend on the electrode configuration, geometry and the magnetic field distribution. An emissive segmented electrode was able to maintain thruster operation by supplying an additional electron flux to sustain the plasma discharge between the anode and cathode neutralizer. These results indicate the possibility of new configurations for segmented electrode Hall thruster.

  16. Low Frequency Plasma Oscillations in a 6-kW Magnetically Shielded Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorns, Benjamin A.; Hofery, Richard R.

    2013-01-01

    The oscillations from 0-100 kHz in a 6-kW magnetically shielded thruster are experimen- tally characterized. Changes in plasma parameters that result from the magnetic shielding of Hall thrusters have the potential to significantly alter thruster transients. A detailed investigation of the resulting oscillations is necessary both for the purpose of determin- ing the underlying physical processes governing time-dependent behavior in magnetically shielded thrusters as well as for improving thruster models. In this investigation, a high speed camera and a translating ion saturation probe are employed to examine the spatial extent and nature of oscillations from 0-100 kHz in the H6MS thruster. Two modes are identified at 8 kHz and 75-90 kHz. The low frequency mode is azimuthally uniform across the thruster face while the high frequency oscillation is concentrated close to the thruster centerline with an m = 1 azimuthal dependence. These experimental results are discussed in the context of wave theory as well as published observations from an unshielded variant of the H6MS thruster.

  17. Design of a Laboratory Hall Thruster with Magnetically Shielded Channel Walls, Phase I: Numerical Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Hofer, Richard R.

    2011-01-01

    In a proof-of-principle effort to demonstrate the feasibility of magnetically shielded (MS) Hall thrusters, an existing laboratory thruster has been modified with the guidance of physics-based numerical simulation. When operated at a discharge power of 6-kilowatts the modified thruster has been designed to reduce the total energy and flux of ions to the channel insulators by greater than 1 and greater than 3 orders of magnitude, respectively. The erosion rates in this MS thruster configuration are predicted to be at least 2-4 orders of magnitude lower than those in the baseline (BL) configuration. At such rates no detectable erosion is expected to occur.

  18. Understanding CO2 capture mechanisms in aqueous hydrazine via combined NMR and first-principles studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byeongno; Stowe, Haley M; Lee, Kyu Hyung; Hur, Nam Hwi; Hwang, Son-Jong; Paek, Eunsu; Hwang, Gyeong S

    2017-09-13

    Aqueous amines are currently the most promising solution for large-scale CO2 capture from industrial sources. However, molecular design and optimization of amine-based solvents have proceeded slowly due to a lack of understanding of the underlying reaction mechanisms. Unique and unexpected reaction mechanisms involved in CO2 absorption into aqueous hydrazine are identified using (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N NMR spectroscopy combined with first-principles quantum-mechanical simulations. We find production of both hydrazine mono-carbamate (NH2-NH-COO(-)) and hydrazine di-carbamate ((-)OOC-NH-NH-COO(-)), with the latter becoming more populated with increasing CO2 loading. Exchange NMR spectroscopy also demonstrates that the reaction products are in dynamic equilibrium under ambient conditions due to CO2 exchange between mono-carbamate and di-carbamate as well as fast proton transfer between un-protonated free hydrazine and mono-carbamate. The exchange rate rises steeply at high CO2 loadings, enhancing CO2 release, which appears to be a unique property of hydrazine in aqueous solution. The underlying mechanisms of these processes are further evaluated using quantum mechanical calculations. We also analyze and discuss reversible precipitation of carbamate and conversion of bicarbonate to carbamates. The comprehensive mechanistic study provides useful guidance for optimal design of amine-based solvents and processes to reduce the cost of carbon capture. Moreover, this work demonstrates the value of a combined experimental and computational approach for exploring the complex reaction dynamics of CO2 in aqueous amines.

  19. Morpho-functional Blood Changes Under the Influence of Hydrazine and Correction with “Salsokollin” Drug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marat R. Khanturin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrazine derivatives are used in different areas: airspace industry, healthcare, laboratory-diagnostic activity, that’s why the environment is subjected to contamination by hydrazines. For Kazakhstan, which houses the "Baikonur" Cosmodrome, the problem of environmental pollution by rocket fuel and its components is a burning issue nowadays. This article deals with the impacts by industrial hydrazines on biochemical data of the blood and its correction with the “Salsokollin” Drug. The samples of bilirubin, the whole protein, urea, creatinine, cholesterol, glucose, aminotransferase a-amylases, α-amylase were taken. The thymol test was carried out.

  20. Convective heat flux in a laser-heated thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, P. K. S.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis is performed to estimate the convective heating to the wall in a laser-heated thruster on the basis of a solution of the laminar boundary-layer equations with variable transport properties. A local similiarity approximation is used, and it is assumed that the gas phase is in equilibrium. For the thruster described by Wu (1976), the temperature and pressure distributions along the nozzle are obtained from the core calculation. The similarity solutions and heat flux are obtained from the freestream conditions of the boundary layer, in order to determine if it is necessary to couple the boundary losses directly to the core calculation. In addition, the effects of mass injection on the convective heat transfer across the boundary layer with large density-viscosity product gradient are examined.

  1. Controllability of an underactuated spacecraft with one thruster under disturbance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Xia Wang; Ying-Hong Jia; Lei Jin; Hai-Chao Gui; Shi-Jie Xu

    2012-01-01

    For an underactuated spacecraft using only one thruster,the attitude controllability with respect to the orbit frame is studied in the presence of periodical oscillation disturbance,which provides a preconditional guide on designing control law for underactuated attitude control system.Firstly,attitude dynamic model was established for an underactuated spacecraft,and attitude motion was described using the special orthogonal group (SO (3)).Secondly,Liouville theorem was used to confirm that the flow generated by the drift vector of the underactuated attitude control system is volume-preserving.Furthermore,according to Poincaré's recurrence theorem,we draw conclusions that this drift field is weakly positively poisson stable (WPPS).Thirdly,the sufficient and necessary condition of controllability was obtained on the basis of lie algebra rank condition (LARC).Finally,the controllable conditions were analyzed and simulated in different cases of inertia matrix with the installed position of thruster.

  2. The BMDO Thruster-on-a-Pallet Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caveny, Leonard H.; Curran, Francis M.; Sankovic, John M.; Allen, Douglas M.; Brophy, John R.; Garner, Charles

    1995-01-01

    The Ballistic Missile Defense Organization sponsors an aggressive program to develop and demonstrate electric propulsion and space power technologies for future missions. This program supports a focused effort to design, fabricate, and space qualify a Russian Hall thruster system-on-a-pallet ready to take advantage of a near-term flight opportunity. The Russian Hall Effect Thruster Technology (RHETT) program will demonstrate an integrated pallet design in late FY95. The program also includes a parallel effort to develop advanced Solar Concentrator Arrays with Refractive Linear Element Technology (SCARLET). This synergistic technology will be demonstrated in a flight experiment this summer on the Comet satellite. This paper provides an overview of the RHETT and SCARLET programs with an emphasis on electric propulsion, recent progress, and near-term program plans.

  3. Thrusters Pairing Guidelines for Trajectory Corrections of Projectiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    Gill, J., “Experimental Investigation of Super- and Hypersonic Jet Interaction on Missile Configurations,” Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets, Vol. 35...Thrusters Pairing Guidelines for Trajectory Corrections of Projectiles Daniel Corriveau∗ Canadian Department of National Defence , Quebec City, Quebec...course correction process for a 30-mm fin-stabilized air- defense projectile and a standard 105-mm spin-stabilized artillery shell are presented

  4. Investigation of Hall Effect Thruster Channel Wall Erosion Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    mentorship, humor, and amazing barbecue parties. I would also like to thank my thesis committee, Dr. Yim, Prof Simon, and Dr. Ready for taking the...indicate that BN is depleted relative to silica in the highly eroded region of the thruster. This surprising result mirrors that obtained by Garnier...predict the decrease in BN in the HE region. Grain ejection provides a plausible mechanism that could explain this surprising observation. 3.6. Summary

  5. Hall Effect Thruster Plume Contamination and Erosion Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of the Hall effect thruster plume contamination and erosion study was to evaluate the impact of a xenon ion plume on various samples placed in the vicinity of a Hall effect thruster for a continuous 100 hour exposure. NASA Glenn Research Center was responsible for the pre- and post-test evaluation of three sample types placed around the thruster: solar cell cover glass, RTV silicone, and Kapton(R). Mass and profilometer), were used to identify the degree of deposition and/or erosion on the solar cell cover glass, RTV silicone, and Kapton@ samples. Transmittance, reflectance, solar absorptance, and room temperature emittance were used to identify the degree of performance degradation of the solar cell cover glass samples alone. Auger spectroscopy was used to identify the chemical constituents found on the surface of the exposed solar cell cover glass samples. Chemical analysis indicated some boron nitride contamination on the samples, from boron nitride insulators used in the body of the thruster. However, erosion outweighted contamination. All samples exhibited some degree of erosion. with the most erosion occurring near the centerline of the plume and the least occurring at the +/- 90 deg positions. For the solar cell cover glass samples, erosion progressed through the antireflective coating and into the microsheet glass itself. Erosion occurred in the solar cell cover glass, RTV silicone and Kapton(R) at different rates. All optical properties changed with the degree of erosion, with solar absorptance and room temperature emittance increasing with erosion. The transmittance of some samples decreased while the reflectance of some samples increased and others decreased. All results are consistent with an energetic plume of xenon ions serving as a source for erosion.

  6. Vacuum arc plasma thrusters with inductive energy storage driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Mahadevan (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A plasma thruster with a cylindrical inner and cylindrical outer electrode generates plasma particles from the application of energy stored in an inductor to a surface suitable for the formation of a plasma and expansion of plasma particles. The plasma production results in the generation of charged particles suitable for generating a reaction force, and the charged particles are guided by a magnetic field produced by the same inductor used to store the energy used to form the plasma.

  7. Iodine Plasma Species Measurements in a Hall Effect Thruster Plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    60 90 0 2 4 6 8 Current (mA/cm^2) A n g l e ( d e g ) Xenon Iodine 500 V, 2 A, I2 Presented at 2012 JPC 33 Distribution A: Approved for public...Over 1 hour of operation on iodine – Additional 1/2 hour with thruster flowing Xe – Current up to ~50 A into anode Presented at 2012 JPC

  8. Estimating Thruster Impulses From IMU and Doppler Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisano, Michael E.; Kruizinga, Gerhard L.

    2009-01-01

    A computer program implements a thrust impulse measurement (TIM) filter, which processes data on changes in velocity and attitude of a spacecraft to estimate the small impulsive forces and torques exerted by the thrusters of the spacecraft reaction control system (RCS). The velocity-change data are obtained from line-of-sight-velocity data from Doppler measurements made from the Earth. The attitude-change data are the telemetered from an inertial measurement unit (IMU) aboard the spacecraft. The TIM filter estimates the threeaxis thrust vector for each RCS thruster, thereby enabling reduction of cumulative navigation error attributable to inaccurate prediction of thrust vectors. The filter has been augmented with a simple mathematical model to compensate for large temperature fluctuations in the spacecraft thruster catalyst bed in order to estimate thrust more accurately at deadbanding cold-firing levels. Also, rigorous consider-covariance estimation is applied in the TIM to account for the expected uncertainty in the moment of inertia and the location of the center of gravity of the spacecraft. The TIM filter was built with, and depends upon, a sigma-point consider-filter algorithm implemented in a Python-language computer program.

  9. Performance characterization of a permanent-magnet helicon plasma thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod

    2012-10-01

    Helicon plasma thrusters operated at a few kWs of rf power is an active area of an international research. Recent experiments have clarified part of the thrust-generation mechanisms. Thrust components which have been identified include an electron pressure inside the source region and a Lorentz force due to an electron diamagnetic drift current and a radial component of the applied magnetic field. The use of permanent magnets (PMs) instead of solenoids is one of the solutions for improving the thruster efficiency because it does not require electricity for the magnetic nozzle formation. Here the thrust imparted from a permanent-magnet helicon plasma thruster is directly measured using a pendulum thrust balance. The source consists of permanent magnet (PM) arrays, a double turn rf loop antenna powered by a 13.56 MHz rf generator and a glass source tube. The PM arrays provide a magnetic nozzle near the open exit of the source and two configurations, which have maximum field strengths of about 100 and 270 G, are tested. A thrust of 15 mN, specific impulse of 2000 sec and a thrust efficiency of 8 percent are presently obtained for 2 kW of input power, 24 sccm flow rate of argon and the stronger magnetic field configuration.

  10. Two-dimensional model of stationary plasma thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitchford, L.C.; Boeuf, J.P. [Universite Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France)

    1995-12-31

    A stationary plasma thruster, SPT, (also called closed-drift thrusters or Hall thrusters) is an electromagnetic propulseur design which has been developed over the past thirty years in the former USSR. SPT`s are small devices with a thrust greater than 1000 s{sup -1}, and a lifetime of several 1000 hours or more. These properties make the SPT of interest for applications such as satellite station-keeping or orbit transfer. The geometry of the SPT is shown; it consists of a hollow, cylindrical dielectric (typically of several centimeters length and diameter) with a central dielectric rod. A voltage on the order of several 100`s of V is applied at the anode (at one end of the cylinder). The cathode is an externally powered hollow cathode or a hot filament positioned slightly past the exit of the dielectric cylinder. Gas, typically xenon, flows in from around the anode and is ionized by the electrons which are emitted from the cathode. A magnetic field is applied which is mainly in the radial direction. The magnetic strength is such that the electrons tend to be trapped along the magnetic field lines, but the ion trajectories are not significantly influenced by the magnetic field. For these conditions, the current at the anode is several amps. At the exit plane, the xenon is almost fully ionized. The ion flux at the exhaust provides the thrust.

  11. High-Efficiency Hall Thruster Discharge Power Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaquish, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Busek Company, Inc., is designing, building, and testing a new printed circuit board converter. The new converter consists of two series or parallel boards (slices) intended to power a high-voltage Hall accelerator (HiVHAC) thruster or other similarly sized electric propulsion devices. The converter accepts 80- to 160-V input and generates 200- to 700-V isolated output while delivering continually adjustable 300-W to 3.5-kW power. Busek built and demonstrated one board that achieved nearly 94 percent efficiency the first time it was turned on, with projected efficiency exceeding 97 percent following timing software optimization. The board has a projected specific mass of 1.2 kg/kW, achieved through high-frequency switching. In Phase II, Busek optimized to exceed 97 percent efficiency and built a second prototype in a form factor more appropriate for flight. This converter then was integrated with a set of upgraded existing boards for powering magnets and the cathode. The program culminated with integrating the entire power processing unit and testing it on a Busek thruster and on NASA's HiVHAC thruster.

  12. A novel laser ablation plasma thruster with electromagnetic acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Daixian; Wu, Jianjun; He, Zhen; Zhang, Hua

    2016-10-01

    A novel laser ablation plasma thruster accelerated by electromagnetic means was proposed and investigated. The discharge characteristics and thrust performance were tested with different charged energy, structural parameters and propellants. The thrust performance was proven to be improved by electromagnetic acceleration. In contrast with the pure laser propulsion mode, the thrust performance in electromagnetic acceleration modes was much better. The effects of electrodes distance and the off-axis distance between ceramic tube and cathode were tested, and it's found that there were optimal structural parameters for achieving optimal thrust performance. It's indicated that the impulse bit and specific impulse increased with increasing charged energy. In our experiments, the thrust performance of the thruster was optimal in large charged energy modes. With the charged energy 25 J and the use of metal aluminum, a maximal impulse bit of 600 μNs, a specific impulse of approximate 8000 s and thrust efficiency of about 90% were obtained. For the PTFE propellant, a maximal impulse bit of about 350 μNs, a specific impulse of about 2400 s, and thrust efficiency of about 16% were obtained. Besides, the metal aluminum was proven to be the better propellant than PTFE for the thruster.

  13. Experimental studies of anode sheath phenomena in a hall thruster.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorf, L. A. (Leonid A.); Fisch, N. J.; Raitses, Yevgeny F.

    2004-01-01

    Both electron-repelling (negative anode fall) and electron-attracting (positive anode fall) anode sheaths in a Hall thruster were identified experimentally by performing accurate, non-disturbing near-anode measurements with biased and emissive probes. An interesting new phenomenon revealed by the probe measurements is that the anode fall changes from positive to negative upon removal of the dielectric coating, which appears on the anode surface during the course of Hall thruster operation. Probe measurements in a Hall thruster with three different magnetic field configurations show that an anode fall at the clean anode is a function of the radial magnetic field profile inside the channel. A positive anode fall formation mechanism suggested in this work is that: (1) when the anode front surface is coated with dielectric, a discharge current closes to the anode at the surfaces that remain conductive, (2) a total thermal electron current toward the conductive area is significantly smaller than the discharge current, therefore an additional electron flux needs to be attracted toward the conductive surfaces by the electronattracting sheath that appears at these surfaces.

  14. Oral stereognostic ability among tongue thrusters with interdental lisp, tongue thrusters without interdental lisp and normal children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colletti, E A; Geffner, D; Schlanger, P

    1976-02-01

    30 children, i.e., 10 children per group, 8 yr. of age, were given an oral stereognostic test. This test of 10 geometric forms varying in shape were developed by NIDR. 47 stimuli pairs were used and 10 pairs were repeated to measure test reliability. Subjects were blindfolded and asked to respond whether Items 1 and 2, presented consecutively, were the same or different. Results indicated that both groups of tongue thrusters with and without interdental lisp scored significantly more poorly than did normal children (t = 4.68, P less than .001; t = 5.00, P less than .001), respectively. There were no significant differences, however, between tongue thrusters with and without interdental lisp (t = .33, P greater than .05). Observations indicated that normal children used the tongue tip more frequently and accurately when discriminating the geometric forms than did the other groups.

  15. Simultaneous determination of hydrazine and phenyl hydrazine using 4′-(4-carboxyphenyl)-2,2′:6′,2″ terpyridine diacetonitrile triphenylphosphine ruthenium(II) tetrafluoroborate complex functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes modified electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Ida, E-mail: idatiwari_2001@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry (Center of Advanced Study), Faculty of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India); Gupta, Mandakini; Sinha, Preeti [Department of Chemistry (Center of Advanced Study), Faculty of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (India); Banks, Craig E. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Science and the Environment, Division of Chemistry and Environmental Science, Manchester Metropolitan University, Chester Street, Manchester M1 5GD (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • A nanocomposite of ruthenium(II) terpyridine, triphenylphosphine based complex and multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been used first time for simultaneous detection of hydrazine and phenyl hydrazine. • The detection limit reported is lower as compared to other reported works. • The paper also focuses towards effect of ligand variation attached to ruthenium(II) terpyridine based complexes complex for the hydrazine and phenyl hydrazine detection. • Nanocomposite does not involve any biological entity hence high stability. - Abstract: A nanocomposite based on the incorporation of the complex 4′-(4-carboxyphenyl)-2,2′:6′,2″ terpyridine triphenylphosphine diacetonitrile ruthenium(II) tetrafluoroborate with multiwalled carbon nanotubes and ionomer supported upon a glassy carbon electrode substrate is reported and characterized with scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and infrared spectroscopy. The electrochemical behavior and stability of the composite electrode was investigated via cyclic voltammetry. The modified electrode exhibits an electro-catalytic activity towards the oxidation of both hydrazine and phenyl hydrazine in 0.1 M phosphate buffer solution (PBS, pH 7.4). The oxidation of hydrazine and phenyl hydrazine occurs at 0.81 V and 0.32 V with limit of detection found to be 3.7 × 10{sup −7} M and 1.15 × 10{sup −7} M and having a linear range from 5 × 10{sup −6} M to 6.5 × 10{sup −3} M, and 5 × 10{sup −6} M to 0.2 × 10{sup −3} M, respectively.

  16. Kinetic Study of the Electro-Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrazine on Cobalt Hydroxide Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HASANZADEH,Mohammad; KARIM-NEZHAD,Ghasem; SHADJOU,Nasrin; KHALILZADEH,Balal; SAGHATFOROUSH,Lotali; ERSHAD,Sohrab; KAZEMAN,Isa

    2009-01-01

    Electrocatalytic oxidation of hydrazine was investigated on a cobalt hydroxide modified glassy carbon (CHM-GC) electrode in alkaline solution.The process of oxidation involved and its kinetics were established by using cyclic voltammetry,chronoamperometry techniques as well as steady state polarization measurements.In cyclic voltammetry (CV) studies,in the presence of hydrazine the peak current increase of the oxidation of cobalt hydroxide is followed by a decrease in the corresponding cathodic current.This indicates that hydrazine is oxidized on the redox mediator that is immobilized on the electrode surface via an electrocatalytic mechanism.A mechanism based on the electrochemical generation of Co(IV) active sites and their subsequent consumption by the hydrazine in question was also investigated.

  17. New practical synthesis of indazoles via condensation of o-fluorobenzaldehydes and their O-methyloximes with hydrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, Kirill; Hsu, Margaret C; Fernando, Dilinie; Leanna, M Robert

    2006-10-13

    The reaction of o-fluorobenzaldehydes and their O-methyloximes with hydrazine has been developed as a new practical synthesis of indazoles. Utilization of the methyloxime derivatives of benzaldehydes (in the form of the major E-isomers) in this condensation effectively eliminated a competitive Wolf-Kishner reduction to fluorotoluenes, which was observed in the direct preparations of indazoles from aldehydes. Reaction of Z-isomers of methyloximes with hydrazine resulted in the formation of 3-aminoindazoles via a benzonitrile intermediate.

  18. Performance of a Permanent-Magnet Cylindrical Hall-Effect Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, K. A.; Sooby, E. S.; Kimberlin, A. C.; Raites, Y.; Merino, E.; Fisch, N. J.

    2009-01-01

    The performance of a low-power cylindrical Hall thruster, which more readily lends itself to miniaturization and low-power operation than a conventional (annular) Hall thruster, was measured using a planar plasma probe and a thrust stand. The field in the cylindrical thruster was produced using permanent magnets, promising a power reduction over previous cylindrical thruster iterations that employed electromagnets to generate the required magnetic field topology. Two sets of ring-shaped permanent magnets are used, and two different field configurations can be produced by reorienting the poles of one magnet relative to the other. A plasma probe measuring ion flux in the plume is used to estimate the current utilization for the two magnetic topologies. The measurements indicate that electron transport is impeded much more effectively in one configuration, implying higher thrust efficiency. Thruster performance measurements on this configuration were obtained over a power range of 70-350 W and with the cathode orifice located at three different axial positions relative to the thruster exit plane. The thrust levels over this power range were 1.25-6.5 mN, with anode efficiencies and specific impulses spanning 4-21% and 400-1950 s, respectively. The anode efficiency of the permanent-magnet thruster compares favorable with the efficiency of the electromagnet thruster when the power consumed by the electromagnets is taken into account.

  19. DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT OF AUTO DEPTH CONTROL OF REMOTELY OPERATED VEHICLE USING THRUSTER SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.A. Ali

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Remotely Operated Vehicles are underwater robots designed specifically for surveillance, monitoring and collecting data for underwater activities. In the underwater vehicle industries, the thruster is an important part in controlling the direction, depth and speed of the ROV. However, there are some ROVs that cannot be maintained at the specified depth for a long time because of disturbance. This paper proposes an auto depth control using a thruster system. A prototype of a thruster with an auto depth control is developed and attached to the previously fabricated UTeM ROV. This paper presents the operation of auto depth control as well as thrusters for submerging and emerging purposes and maintaining the specified depth. The thruster system utilizes a microcontroller as its brain, a piezoresistive strain gauge pressure sensor and a DC brushless motor to run the propeller. Performance analysis of the auto depth control system is conducted to identify the sensitivity of the pressure sensor, and the accuracy and stability of the system. The results show that the thruster system performs well in maintaining a specified depth as well as stabilizing itself when a disturbanceoccurs even with a simple proportional controller used to control the thruster, where the thruster is an important component of the ROV.

  20. Investigation of Low Discharge Voltage Hall Thruster Operating Modes and Ionization Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-14

    a null-type, inverted pendulum thrust stand based on the NASA GRC design.11 The thruster is shown mounted to the thrust stand in Figure 3... cloud of neutral propellant. This thruster operation was studied in detail using the far-field diagnostics and characterized with variations in

  1. A Robust Digital Autopilot for Spacecraft Equipped with Pulse-Operated Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, S. W.; Flashner, H.

    1996-01-01

    The analysis and design of attitude control systems for spacecraft employing pulse-operated (on-off) thrusters is usually accomplished through a combination of modeling approximations and empirical techniques. In this paper a new thruster pulse-modulation scheme for pointing and tracking applications is developed from nonlinear control theory.

  2. Ion behavior in low-power magnetically shielded and unshielded Hall thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaud, L.; Mazouffre, S.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetically shielded Hall thrusters achieve a longer lifespan than traditional Hall thrusters by reducing wall erosion. The lower erosion rate is attributed to a reduction of the high energy ion population impacting the walls. To investigate this phenomenon, the ion velocity distribution functions are measured with laser induced fluorescence at several points of interest in the magnetically shielded ISCT200-MS and the unshielded ISCT200-US Hall thrusters. The center of the discharge channel is probed to highlight the difference in plasma positioning between the shielded and unshielded thrusters. Erosion phenomena are investigated by taking measurements of the ion velocity distribution near the inner and outer wall as well as above the magnetic poles where some erosion is observed. The resulting distribution functions show a displacement of the acceleration region from inside the channel in the unshielded thruster to downstream of the exit plane in the ISCT200-MS. Near the walls, the unshielded thruster displays both a higher relative ion density as well as a significant fraction of the ions with velocities toward the walls compared to the shielded thruster. Higher proportions of high velocity ions are also observed. Those results are in accordance with the reduced erosion observed. Both shielded and unshielded thrusters have large populations of ions impacting the magnetic poles. The mechanism through which those ions are accelerated toward the magnetic poles has so far not been explained.

  3. Ascorbic Acid Assisted Synthesis of Cobalt Oxide Nanostructures, Their Electrochemical Sensing Application for the Sensitive Determination of Hydrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahira, Aneela; Nafady, Ayman; Baloach, Quarratulain; Sirajuddin; Sherazi, Syed Tufail Hussain; Shaikh, Tayyaba; Arain, Munazza; Willander, Magnus; Ibupoto, Zafar Hussain

    2016-07-01

    This study describes, the synthesis of cobalt oxide nanostructures using ascorbic acid as a growth directing agent by the hydrothermal method. Ascorbic acid is used for the first time for the synthesis of cobalt oxide nanostructures and a unique morphology is prepared in the present study. The cobalt oxide nanostructures were characterized by scanning electron microcopy, x-ray diffraction, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques. These analytical techniques demonstrated well defined morphology, good crystalline quality, and high purity of as prepared cobalt oxide nanostructures. The glassy carbon electrode was modified with cobalt oxide nanostructures for the development of a sensitive and selective electrochemical hydrazine sensor. The developed hydrazine sensor exhibits a linear range of 2-24 μM. The sensitivity and limit of detection of presented hydrazine sensors are 12,734 μA/mM/cm2 and 0.1 μM respectively. The developed hydrazine sensor is highly selective, stable, and reproducible. The proposed sensor is successfully applied for the detection of hydrazine from different water samples. The present study provides the development of an alternative tool for the reliable monitoring of hydrazine from environmental and biological samples.

  4. Operation of a Segmented Hall Thruster with Low-sputtering Carbon-velvet Electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raitses, Y.; Staack, D.; Dunaevsky, A.; Fisch, N.J.

    2005-12-01

    Carbon fiber velvet material provides exceptional sputtering resistance properties exceeding those for graphite and carbon composite materials. A 2 kW Hall thruster with segmented electrodes made of this material was operated in the discharge voltage range of 200–700 V. The arcing between the floating velvet electrodes and the plasma was visually observed, especially, during the initial conditioning time, which lasted for about 1 h. The comparison of voltage versus current and plume characteristics of the Hall thruster with and without segmented electrodes indicates that the magnetic insulation of the segmented thruster improves with the discharge voltage at a fixed magnetic field. The observations reported here also extend the regimes wherein the segmented Hall thruster can have a narrower plume than that of the conventional nonsegmented thruster.

  5. Electron Cross-field Transport in a Low Power Cylindrical Hall Thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Smirnov; Y. Raitses; N.J. Fisch

    2004-06-24

    Conventional annular Hall thrusters become inefficient when scaled to low power. Cylindrical Hall thrusters, which have lower surface-to-volume ratio, are therefore more promising for scaling down. They presently exhibit performance comparable with conventional annular Hall thrusters. Electron cross-field transport in a 2.6 cm miniaturized cylindrical Hall thruster (100 W power level) has been studied through the analysis of experimental data and Monte Carlo simulations of electron dynamics in the thruster channel. The numerical model takes into account elastic and inelastic electron collisions with atoms, electron-wall collisions, including secondary electron emission, and Bohm diffusion. We show that in order to explain the observed discharge current, the electron anomalous collision frequency {nu}{sub B} has to be on the order of the Bohm value, {nu}{sub B} {approx} {omega}{sub c}/16. The contribution of electron-wall collisions to cross-field transport is found to be insignificant.

  6. Performance Evaluation of an Expanded Range XIPS Ion Thruster System for NASA Science Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, David Y.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the benefit that a solar electric propulsion (SEP) system based on the 5 kW Xenon Ion Propulsion System (XIPS) could have for NASA's Discovery class deep space missions. The relative cost and performance of the commercial heritage XIPS system is compared to NSTAR ion thruster based systems on three Discovery class reference missions: 1) a Near Earth Asteroid Sample Return, 2) a Comet Rendezvous and 3) a Main Belt Asteroid Rendezvous. It is found that systems utilizing a single operating XIPS thruster provides significant performance advantages over a single operating NSTAR thruster. In fact, XIPS performs as well as systems utilizing two operating NSTAR thrusters, and still costs less than the NSTAR system with a single operating thruster. This makes XIPS based SEP a competitive and attractive candidate for Discovery class science missions.

  7. Self-regulating heater application to Shuttle/Centaur hydrazine fuel line thermal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unkrich, David B.

    1987-01-01

    The Shuttle/Centaur high energy upper stage vehicle thermal environments were more severe than previous Centaur vehicle thermal environments, creating need for a new hydrazine fuel line thermal control technique. Constant power heaters did not satisfy power dissipation requirements, because the power required to maintain fuel line thermal control during cold conditions exceeded the maximum power allowable during hot conditions. Therefore, a Raychem Thermolimit self-regulating heater was selected for this application, and was attached to the hydrazine fuel line with Kapton and aluminum foil tapes. Fuel line/heater thermal modeling and subsequent thermal vacuum chamber testing simulated heater thermal performance during all worst-case Shuttle/Centaur thermal environmental conditions. Fuel line temperatures were maintained between the 4C to 71C limits during all analytical and test cases. Finally, the thermal model predictions were correlated with the test data, thereby ensuring that the model would provide satisfactory predictions for future missions and/or vehicles.

  8. 2-(Hetero(aryl)methylene)hydrazine-1-carbothioamides as potent urease inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Aamer; Imran, Aqeel; Channar, Pervaiz A; Shahid, Mohammad; Mahmood, Wajahat; Iqbal, Jamshed

    2015-02-01

    A small series of 2-(hetero(aryl)methylene) hydrazine-1-carbothioamides including two aryl derivatives was synthesized and tested for their inhibitory activity against urease. Compound (E)-2-(Furan-2-ylmethylene) hydrazine-1-carbothioamide (3f), having a furan ring, was the most potent inhibitor of urease with an IC50 value of 0.58 μM. Molecular modeling was carried out through docking the designed compounds into the urease binding site to predict whether these derivatives have analogous binding mode to the urease inhibitors. The study revealed that all of the tested compounds bind with both metal atoms at the active site of the enzyme. The aromatic ring of the compounds forms ionic interactions with the residues, Ala(440), Asp(494), Ala(636), and Met(637).

  9. Towards Safer Rocket Fuels: Hypergolic Imidazolylidene-Borane Compounds as Replacements for Hydrazine Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shi; Qi, Xiujuan; Liu, Tianlin; Wang, Kangcai; Zhang, Wenquan; Li, Jianlin; Zhang, Qinghua

    2016-07-11

    Currently, toxic and volatile hydrazine derivatives are still the main fuel choices for liquid bipropellants, especially in some traditional rocket propulsion systems. Therefore, the search for safer hypergolic fuels as replacements for hydrazine derivatives has been one of the most challenging tasks. In this study, six imidazolylidene-borane compounds with zwitterionic structure have been synthesized and characterized, and their hypergolic reactivity has been studied. As expected, these compounds exhibited fast spontaneous combustion upon contact with white fuming nitric acid (WFNA). Among them, compound 5 showed excellent integrated properties including wide liquid operating range (-70-160 °C), superior loading density (0.99 g cm(-3) ), ultrafast ignition delay times with WFNA (15 ms), and high specific impulse (303.5 s), suggesting promising application potential as safer hypergolic fuels in liquid bipropellant formulations.

  10. Formation of raspberry like cobalt particles with hydrazine reduction in a polyol route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khe, Cheng Seong; Aziz, Azizan; Lockman, Zainovia; Rajalingam, Sokkalingam; Merican, Zulkifli; Vasant, Pandian

    2016-11-01

    This work describes the effect of hydrazine hydrate on the formation of the raspberry-like morphology of the cobalt nanomaterials in a polyol route. In the synthesis, the molar ratio of N2H4 to Co2+was varied from 2.5 to 10. At the beginning with low molar ratio, spherical microspheres were formed. When the molar ratio was increased to 5 and above, final morphology of the cobalt nanomaterials became raspberry-like. This might be attributed to the absorption of the hydrazine complex of cobalt nanoparticles at certain facets during their growth stage and later self-assembled into the raspberry shaped microparticles. The plausible formation mechanism were proposed.

  11. Microwave-assisted synthesis of carbon-supported carbides catalysts for hydrous hydrazine decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mnatsakanyan, Raman; Zhurnachyan, Alina R.; Matyshak, Valery A.; Manukyan, Khachatur V.; Mukasyan, Alexander S.

    2016-09-01

    Microwave-assisted synthesis of carbon-supported Mo2C and WC nanomaterials was studied. Two different routes were utilized to prepare MoO3 (WO3) - C precursors that were then subjected to microwave irradiation in an inert atmosphere. The effect of synthesis conditions, such as irradiation time and gas environment, was investigated. The structure and formation mechanism of the carbide phases were explored. As-synthesized nanomaterials exhibited catalytic activity for hydrous hydrazine (N2H4·H2O) decomposition at 30-70 °C. It was shown that the catalyst activity significantly increases if microwave irradiation is applied during the decomposition process. Such conditions permit complete conversion of hydrazine to ammonia and nitrogen within minutes. This effect can be attributed to the unique nanostructure of the catalysts that includes microwave absorbing carbon and active carbide constituents.

  12. The Effects of Hydrazines and Related Compounds on Calcium Calmodulin Regulated Synaptic Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-07-01

    4F -631 0 1984 E IS. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse side if necessary and identify by block nunmber) Calmodulin, protein kinase, adenylate cyclase...hydrazines, organophosphates, C) calcium, synaptic processes, protein phosphorylation. 20. BSTRACT (Continue an reverse side it necessary mid Identify...Date Entered) %. % V -*> ~ * - Unclassified SECURITY CLASIFICATION OF THIS PAGE(Vhun Dots tn er@Q 20. A BWT&CT continued, nmembrane fractions and

  13. Dimethyl hydrazine-1,2-dicarboxylate–triphenylphosphine oxide (1/1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Doboszewski

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In the crystal structure of the title compound, C4H8N2O4·C18H15OP, two triphenylphosphine oxide molecules and two dimethyl hydrazine-1,2-dicarboxylate molecules are connected via N—H...O hydrogen bonds of moderate strength and are related via a twofold rotational axis. Weak Car—H... O contacts strengthen the crystal structure.

  14. Preparation of Peptide p-Nitroanilides using an Aryl Hydrazine Solid Support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Y; Welsh, K; Mitchell, A R; Camarero, J A

    2004-08-05

    Peptide p-nitroanilides are useful compounds for studying protease activity, however the poor nucleophilicity of p-nitroaniline makes their preparation difficult. We describe a new efficient approach for the Fmoc-based synthesis of peptide p-nitroanilides using an aryl hydrazine resin. Mild oxidation of the peptide hydrazide resin yields a highly reactive acyl diazene, which efficiently reacts with weak nucleophiles. We have prepared several peptide p-nitroanilides, including substrates for the Lethal Factor protease from B. anthracis.

  15. Nanostructured SnO2 encapsulated guar-gum hybrid nanocomposites for electrocatalytic determination of hydrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Priya; Srivastava, Manish; Verma, Ranjana; Kumar, Manish; Kumar, D; Singh, Jay

    2016-01-01

    The present article deals with synthesis of sol-gel derived tin dioxide (SnO2) nanoparticles encapsulated in to guar gum (GG) biopolymer as the organic-inorganic hybrid materials for the determination of hydrazine. The organic-inorganic hybrid combines the perfunctory strength offered by the inorganic SnO2 nanoparticles with flexible binding sites provided by the organic biopolymer (GG) solution by the ultrasonication. The phase identification, crystalline size, surface morphology and optical properties of prepared SnO2 and SnO2-GG nanocomposites has been investigated through FT-IR, XRD, SEM, AFM, TEM, UV-Vis, and PL techniques. The colloidal solution of SnO2 and GG is electrophoretically deposited (EPD) onto the indium tin-oxide (ITO) glass substrate and studied for the electrooxidation of hydrazine. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the linearity between the current response and the hydrazine concentration has been obtained in the range of 2-22 mM, with a low detection limit of 2.76 mM and a high sensitivity of 5.72 μA cm(-2). Based on the linear increase in amperometric current, a sensitive hydrazine electrochemical sensor is constructed. The proposed SnO2-GG/ITO electrode shows a good response time (35s), reproducibility, and long-term stability. The obtained results suggest that SnO2-GG nanocomposites electrode provides a favorable sensing platform for the electrochemical studies. In addition, the cyclic voltammetry (CV) studies are used to evaluate the kinetic parameters.

  16. Design, Synthesis and Biological Activities of Novel Benzoyl Hydrazines Containing Pyrazole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫涛; 于淑晶; 刘鹏飞; 刘卓; 王宝雷; 熊丽霞; 李正名

    2012-01-01

    In search of environmentally benign compounds with high biological activity, low toxicity and low resistance, 8 novel benzoyl hydrazines containing pyrazole were designed and synthesized. All compounds were characterized by I H NMR spectra and HRMS. The preliminary results of biological activity assessment indicated that most of title compounds exhibited certain insecticidal activities against M),thimna separata Walker at 200 mg L-1 but excellent fungicidal activities against six fungus at 50 mg L-1, which were better than the control.

  17. Dose response of hydrazine - Deproteinated tooth enamel under blue light stimulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuece, Ulkue Rabia, E-mail: ulkuyuce@hotmail.co [Ankara University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Engineering Physics, 06100, Tandogan - Ankara (Turkey); Meric, Niyazi, E-mail: meric@ankara.edu.t [Ankara University, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Engineering Physics, 06100, Tandogan - Ankara (Turkey); Atakol, Orhan, E-mail: atakol@science.ankara.edu.t [Ankara University, Science Faculty, Department of Chemistry, 06100, Tandogan - Ankara (Turkey); Yasar, Fusun, E-mail: ab121310@adalet.gov.t [Council of Forensic Medicine, Ankara Branch, Ankara (Turkey)

    2010-08-15

    The beta dose response and Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) signal stability characteristics of human tooth enamel deproteinated by hydrazine reagent under blue photon stimulation are reported. Removal of the protein organic component of tooth enamel resulted in a higher OSL sensitivity and slower fading of OSL signals. The effect of chemical sample preparation on the enamel sample sensitivity is discussed and further steps to make this deproteinization treatment suitable for in vitro dose reconstruction studies are suggested.

  18. Highly Sensitive Hydrazine Chemical Sensor Based on CNT-PdPt Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Phil Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bimetallic PdPt nanoparticles were prepared using the chemical reduction method. The PdPt nanoparticles were successfully deposited on thiolated carbon nanotubes (CNTs to form a CNT-PdPt nanocomposite as an electron mediator for the fabrication of a hydrazine sensor. The PdPt nanoparticles had an average particle size of 2.3 nm and were well dispersed on the surfaces of the CNTs in the prepared CNT-PdPt nanocomposite, as demonstrated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, and X-ray diffraction (XRD. Based on X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS results, the estimated proportions of Pd and Pt in the CNT-PdPt nanocomposite were approximately 3.0% and 3.2%, respectively. A fabricated chemical sensor based on CNT-PdPt was found to exhibit better amperometric activity with respect to the hydrazine oxidation reaction than CNT-Pd, CNT-Pt, and commercial Pd/C and Pt/C catalysts. This sensor exhibited a linear range of 0.55–1,200 μM and a detection limit of 0.28 μM (S/N = 3 with a fast response time (within 5 s. Furthermore, the sensor could be used repeatedly for the consecutive detection of hydrazine with good reusability and storage stability. These properties demonstrate that the CNT-PdPt nanocomposite is a promising electron mediator for the fabrication of amperometric hydrazine sensors.

  19. Reactivity of 4-tert-Butyldimethylsiloxy-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridines with Hydrazines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Medarde

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The reactivity of 6-(nitrophenyl or trimethoxyphenyl-4-tert-butyldimethyl- siloxy-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine derivatives with hydrazines under acid conditions is described. The structure of the products isolated − hydrazones, pyrazolines or pyridazinones − depended on the conditions used. In addition, a systematic study of the reaction outcomes was carried out by introducing variations on the substituents of the tetrahydropyridine ring.

  20. Study on the Reaction Between Methyl Hydrazine and Formaldehyde in Nitric Acid Medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Chuan-bo; CAO; Zhi; BIAN; Xiao-yan; XIAN; Liang; YAN; Tai-hong; ZHENG; Wei-fang

    2012-01-01

    <正>To make sure whether the reaction between formaldehyde and methyl hydrazine (MMH) could happen in dilute nitric acid solution, the condensation reaction between the two ones was investigated at 16 ℃. The reaction was slow and it took over 5 hours to reach the balance and the solution turned yellow at last. The maximum absorption peaks of the product existed at 340 nm and 400-450 nm, respectively.

  1. (E)-1-Benzyl-idene-2,2-diphenyl-hydrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Angel; Meléndrez-Luevano, Ruth; Cabrera-Vivas, Blanca M; Lozano-Márquez, Claudia D; Carranza, Vladimir

    2012-02-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C(19)H(16)N(2), contains two independent mol-ecules, both of which show an E configuration with respect to the C=N bond. The dihedral angles between the phenyl rings bonded to the hydrazine group are 81.00 (10) and 88.34 (8)° in the two mol-ecules. Inter-molecular C-H⋯π inter-actions are observed in the crystal structure.

  2. Alkalization of steam and condensate with 2-amino-1-butanol and hydrazine; Alkalisering av aanga och kondensat med butanolamin och hydrazin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falk, I. [Studsvik Material AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1996-04-01

    To maintain a low corrosion level in steam- and condensate systems at power and industrial plants, an alkalization of the steam is needed. A low corrosion level lowers the risk of operation disturbances and reduces the cost of the condensate clean up. A better knowledge in the behavior of the alkalis will improve the possibilities to avoid the corrosion attacks. In this work experimental measurements have been carried out during steam boiler conditions as temperature, continuous steam generation and condensation. It has been found that the volatility of 2-amino-1-butanol is very low during stationary dynamic conditions at 250 deg C and 120 deg C. To achieve a high ph-value in the final condensate a very high concentration of 2-amino-1-butanol is thus needed especially when the steam contains acidic compounds. The alkalization effect is obtained from ammonia which is created by thermal decomposition of hydrazine in the boiler water. It is necessary to carry out experimental investigations showing the thermal stability of organic compounds in boiler water before it is possible to recommend them as better volatile alkalis than ammonia and hydrazine. 6 refs, 13 figs

  3. Human Outer Solar System Exploration via Q-Thruster Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joosten, B. Kent; White, Harold G.

    2014-01-01

    Propulsion technology development efforts at the NASA Johnson Space Center continue to advance the understanding of the quantum vacuum plasma thruster (QThruster), a form of electric propulsion. Through the use of electric and magnetic fields, a Q-thruster pushes quantum particles (electrons/positrons) in one direction, while the Qthruster recoils to conserve momentum. This principle is similar to how a submarine uses its propeller to push water in one direction, while the submarine recoils to conserve momentum. Based on laboratory results, it appears that continuous specific thrust levels of 0.4 - 4.0 N/kWe are achievable with essentially no onboard propellant consumption. To evaluate the potential of this technology, a mission analysis tool was developed utilizing the Generalized Reduced Gradient non-linear parameter optimization engine contained in the Microsoft Excel® platform. This tool allowed very rapid assessments of "Q-Ship" minimum time transfers from earth to the outer planets and back utilizing parametric variations in thrust acceleration while enforcing constraints on planetary phase angles and minimum heliocentric distances. A conservative Q-Thruster specific thrust assumption (0.4 N/kWe) combined with "moderate" levels of space nuclear power (1 - 2 MWe) and vehicle specific mass (45 - 55 kg/kWe) results in continuous milli-g thrust acceleration, opening up realms of human spaceflight performance completely unattainable by any current systems or near-term proposed technologies. Minimum flight times to Mars are predicted to be as low as 75 days, but perhaps more importantly new "retro-phase" and "gravity-augmented" trajectory shaping techniques were revealed which overcome adverse planetary phasing and allow virtually unrestricted departure and return opportunities. Even more impressively, the Jovian and Saturnian systems would be opened up to human exploration with round-trip times of 21 and 32 months respectively including 6 to 12 months of

  4. Background Pressure Effects on Krypton Hall Effect Thruster Internal Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    krypton operation of the BHT -600 at the conditions in Table 2 yields a thrust of 22.4 mN corresponding to an anode efficiency of approximately 31...measurement volume is ap- proximately 500 µm diameter by 1 mm length.   Measurement Domain Figure 3 shows a cross-section of the BHT -600 Hall effect...of the BHT -600 Hall effect thruster with measurement volume shown in red. All dimensions are given in mm.     tion of the transition

  5. Design of automatic thruster assisted mooring systems for ships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan P. Strand

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the mathematical modelling and controller design of an automatic thruster assisted position mooring system. Such control systems are applied to anchored floating production offloading and storage vessels and semi-subs. The controller is designed using model based control with a LQG feedback controller in conjunction with a Kalman filter. The controller design is in addition to the environmental loads accounting for the mooring forces acting on the vessel. This is reflected in the model structure and in the inclusion of new functionality.

  6. Intramolecular Electron Transfer in Bis(tetraalkyl Hydrazine) and Bis(hydrazyl) Radical Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hao

    A series of multicyclic bis(hydrazine) and bis(diazenium) compounds connected by relatively rigid hydrocarbon frameworks were prepared for the study of intramolecular electron transfer. The thermodynamics of electron removal of these compounds was investigated by cyclic voltammetry. The difference between the first and second oxidation potentials for the 4 sigma-bonded species was found to be larger for the bis(hydrazyl) radical systems than for the bis(hydrazines) by ca. 0.2 V (4.6 kcal/mol). This indicates a greater degree of interaction between the two nitrogen moieties for the hydrazyl systems, which is consistent with a greater degree of electronic coupling (H _{rm AB}) in these systems. The ESR spectra of the 4 sigma -bonded bis(hydrazine) radical cations indicate localized radical cations, which corresponds to slow intramolecular electron transfer on the ESR timescale. Conversely, the ESR spectra of the corresponding bis(hydrazyl) radical cation systems show nitrogen hyperfine splittings of a(4N) of ca. 4.5 G. This indicates that intramolecular electron transfer between the two nitrogen moieties is fast on the ESR timescale; the rate of exchange, k_ {rm ex} was estimated to be well above 1.9 times 10^8 s^{-1}. The contrast in exchange rates is consistent with the large geometry change upon oxidation which is characteristic of hydrazines. The hydrazyls undergo a smaller geometry change upon oxidation, and thus are expected to exhibit smaller inner-sphere reorganization energies. The optical spectra of these radical species was investigated in hopes of observing absorption bands corresponding to intramolecular electron transfer, as predicted by Hush theory. A broad absorption band was observed in the near IR region for the saturated bis(hydrazyl) radical cation system at 1060 nm (9420 cm^{-1} ) in acetonitrile at room temperature, and was accompanied by a narrower band at 1430 nm (6993 cm^ {-1}). The width of this band was estimated to be 545 nm (6496 cm^{-1

  7. Effect of Inductive Coil Geometry on the Operating Characteristics of an Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallock, Ashley K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Kimberlin, Adam C.; Perdue, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    Operational characteristics of two separate inductive thrusters with conical theta pinch coils of different cone angles are explored through thrust stand measurements and time- integrated, unfiltered photography. Trends in impulse bit measurements indicate that, in the present experimental configuration, the thruster with the inductive coil possessing a smaller cone angle produced larger values of thrust, in apparent contradiction to results of a previous thruster acceleration model. Areas of greater light intensity in photographs of thruster operation are assumed to qualitatively represent locations of increased current density. Light intensity is generally greater in images of the thruster with the smaller cone angle when compared to those of the thruster with the larger half cone angle for the same operating conditions. The intensity generally decreases in both thrusters for decreasing mass flow rate and capacitor voltage. The location of brightest light intensity shifts upstream for decreasing mass flow rate of propellant and downstream for decreasing applied voltage. Recognizing that there typically exists an optimum ratio of applied electric field to gas pressure with respect to breakdown efficiency, this result may indicate that the optimum ratio was not achieved uniformly over the coil face, leading to non-uniform and incomplete current sheet formation in violation of the model assumption of immediate formation where all the injected propellant is contained in a magnetically-impermeable current sheet.

  8. Space Shuttle reaction control system thruster metal nitrate removal and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulsberry, R. L.; Mccartney, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    The Space Shuttle hypergolic primary reaction control system (PRCS) thrusters continue to fail-leak or fail-off at a rate of approximately 1.5 per flight, attributed primarily to metal nitrate formation in the nitrogen tetroxide (N2O4) pilot operated valves (POV's). The failures have continued despite ground support equipment (GSE) and subsystem operational improvements. As a result, the Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) performed a study to characterize the contamination in the N204 valves. This study prompted the development and implementation of a highly successful flushing technique using deionized (DI) water and gaseous nitrogen (GN2) to remove the contamination while minimizing Teflon seat damage. Following flushing a comprehensive acceptance test is performed before the thruster is deemed recovered. Between the time WSTF was certified to process flight thrusters (March 1992) and September 1993, a 68 percent thruster recovery rate was achieved. The contamination flushed from these thrusters was analyzed and has provided insight into the corrosion process, which is reported in this publication. Additionally, the long-term performance of 24 flushed thrusters installed in the WSTF Fleet Leader Shuttle reaction control subsystem (RCS) test articles is being assessed. WSTF continues to flush flight and test article thrusters and compile data to investigate metal nitrate formation characteristics in leaking and nonleaking valves.

  9. Elementary scaling laws for the design of low and high power hall effect thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannenmayer, K.; Mazouffre, S.

    2011-10-01

    An advanced set of scaling laws for Hall effect thrusters running with Xenon as propellant is established on the basis of the existence of an optimum atom number density that warrants a high efficiency thruster operation. A set of general relationships between macroscopic quantities, like thrust and input power, dimensions, including the channel length, the channel width and the channel mean diameter, and magnetic field strength are inferred from the main physical processes at work in a Hall thruster discharge. The "atom density constraint" of which the nature is here critically interpreted allows simplifying those relationships as it leads to a linear dependency between the channel length and mean diameter. Scaling laws which represent an essential tool for sizing up and down Hall thrusters are eventually obtained after proportionnality coefficients are determined. This last step is realized by means of a vast database that presently encompasses 33 single-stage Hall thrusters. In order to illustrate the usefulness of this new set of scaling laws, two practical applications are given and discussed. The scaling laws are first employed to calculate the dimensions and the operating parameters for a 20-kilowatt Hall thruster capable of producing 1 N of thrust. Such an electrical engine would permit orbit transfer of large communication satellites. Finally, the geometry of a Hall thruster is determined for tolerating 100 kW, an interesting power level for interplanetary trips.

  10. Design of a cusped field thruster for drag-free flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H.; Chen, P. B.; Sun, Q. Q.; Hu, P.; Meng, Y. C.; Mao, W.; Yu, D. R.

    2016-09-01

    Drag-free flight has played a more and more important role in many space missions. The thrust control system is the key unit to achieve drag-free flight by providing a precise compensation for the disturbing force except gravity. The cusped field thruster has shown a significant potential to be capable of the function due to its long life, high efficiency, and simplicity. This paper demonstrates a cusped field thruster's feasibility in drag-free flight based on its instinctive characteristics and describes a detailed design of a cusped field thruster made by Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT). Furthermore, the performance test is conducted, which shows that the cusped field thruster can achieve a continuously variable thrust from 1 to 20 mN with a low noise and high resolution below 650 W, and the specific impulse can achieve 1800 s under a thrust of 18 mN and discharge voltage of 1000 V. The thruster's overall performance indicates that the cusped field thruster is quite capable of achieving drag-free flight. With the further optimization, the cusped field thruster will exhibit a more extensive application value.

  11. Ion angular distribution simulation of the HEMP Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duras, Julia; Koch, Norbert; Kahnfeld, Daniel; Bandelow, Gunnar; Matthias, Paul; Lüskow, Karl Felix; Schneider, Ralf; Kemnitz, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Ion angular current and energy distributions are important parameters for ion thrusters, which are typically measured at a few tens of centimetres to a few meters distance from thruster exit. However, fully kinetic Particle-in-Cell simulations are not able to simulate such domain sizes, due to high computational costs. Therefore, a parallelisation strategy of the code is presented to reduce computational time. To map diagnostics information from the domain boundary of the calculational domain to the positions of experimental diagnostics the concept of transfer functions is introduced. The calculated ion beam angular distributions in the plume region are quite sensitive to boundary conditions of the potential, possible additional source contributions, e.g. from secondary electron emission at vessel walls, and charge exchange collisions. This work was supported by the Bavarian State Ministry of Education Science and the Arts and the German Space Agency DLR. We also like to thank R. Heidemann from THALES Electron Devices GmbH, for interesting and stimulating discussions.

  12. Assessment of Pole Erosion in a Magnetically Shielded Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Ortega, Alejandro L.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations of a 6-kW laboratory Hall thruster called H6 have been performed to quantify the erosion rate at the inner pole. The assessments have been made in two versions of the thruster, namely the unshielded (H6US) and magnetically shielded (H6MS) configurations. The simulations have been performed with the 2-D axisymmetric code Hall2De which employs a new multi-fluid ion algorithm to capture the presence of low-energy ions in the vicinity of the poles. It is found that the maximum computed erosion rate at the inner pole of the H6MS exceeds the measured rate of back-sputtered deposits by 4.5 times. This explains only part of the surface roughening that was observed after a 150-h wear test, which covered most of the pole area exposed to the plasma. For the majority of the pole surface the computed erosion rates are found to be below the back-sputter rate and comparable to those in the H6US which exhibited little to no sputtering in previous tests. Possible explanations for the discrepancy are discussed.

  13. Engineering Risk Assessment of Space Thruster Challenge Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Donovan L.; Mattenberger, Christopher J.; Go, Susie

    2014-01-01

    The Engineering Risk Assessment (ERA) team at NASA Ames Research Center utilizes dynamic models with linked physics-of-failure analyses to produce quantitative risk assessments of space exploration missions. This paper applies the ERA approach to the baseline and extended versions of the PSAM Space Thruster Challenge Problem, which investigates mission risk for a deep space ion propulsion system with time-varying thruster requirements and operations schedules. The dynamic mission is modeled using a combination of discrete and continuous-time reliability elements within the commercially available GoldSim software. Loss-of-mission (LOM) probability results are generated via Monte Carlo sampling performed by the integrated model. Model convergence studies are presented to illustrate the sensitivity of integrated LOM results to the number of Monte Carlo trials. A deterministic risk model was also built for the three baseline and extended missions using the Ames Reliability Tool (ART), and results are compared to the simulation results to evaluate the relative importance of mission dynamics. The ART model did a reasonable job of matching the simulation models for the baseline case, while a hybrid approach using offline dynamic models was required for the extended missions. This study highlighted that state-of-the-art techniques can adequately adapt to a range of dynamic problems.

  14. Experimental Study of the Microdischarge Plasma Thruster (MDPT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kc, Utsav; Varghese, Philip; Raja, Laxminarayan

    2008-10-01

    Small satellite propulsion requirements dictate the need for a scaled down propulsion device capable of providing low thrust with small impulse bits. We have designed and studied a simple miniaturized thruster called Microdischarge Plasma Thruster (MDPT). It comprises a tri-layer sandwich structure with a dielectric layer sandwiched between two electrode layers, and a contoured through hollow drilled into the structure. Each layer is 100's microns in thickness and the hole diameter of the same order. Argon is used as the propellant gas with flow rates of ˜ 1 SCCM. The pressure is adequate to produce a stable microdischarge between the electrodes even with modest voltages (˜1000 V). The microdischarge adds heat to the supersonic portion of the flowing gas which is shown to produce additional thrust over the baseline cold gas flow. The studies have also demonstrated that the MDPT exhaust plume is composed of ions albeit at low concentrations, suggesting possibility of MDPT to be operated in a mixed electrothermal/electrostatic mode. We present discussion of multiple discharge operating modes and electrical characteristics of the MDPT. Spectral measurements of the plume are used to determine its composition and calculate its temperature. The momentum thrust of the MDPT is measured with a torsion balance.

  15. Assessment of Pole Erosion in a Magnetically Shielded Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Ortega, Alejandro L.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations of a 6-kW laboratory Hall thruster called H6 have been performed to quantify the erosion rate at the inner pole. The assessments have been made in two versions of the thruster, namely the unshielded (H6US) and magnetically shielded (H6MS) configurations. The simulations have been performed with the 2-D axisymmetric code Hall2De which employs a new multi-fluid ion algorithm to capture the presence of low-energy ions in the vicinity of the poles. It is found that the maximum computed erosion rate at the inner pole of the H6MS exceeds the measured rate of back-sputtered deposits by 4.5 times. This explains only part of the surface roughening that was observed after a 150-h wear test, which covered most of the pole area exposed to the plasma. For the majority of the pole surface the computed erosion rates are found to be below the back-sputter rate and comparable to those in the H6US which exhibited little to no sputtering in previous tests. Possible explanations for the discrepancy are discussed.

  16. Space Shuttle vernier thruster long-life chamber development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, Douglas D.

    1990-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Reaction Control Subsystem (RCS) vernier thruster is a pressure fed engine that utilizes storable propellants to provide precise attitude control for the Orbiter. The current vernier thruster is life limited due to its chamber material. By developing an iridium-lined rhenium chamber for the vernier, substantial gains could be achieved in the operational life of the chamber. The present RCS vernier, its requirements, operating characteristics, and life limitations are described. The current technology status of iridium-lined rhenium is presented along with a description of the operational life capabilities to be gained from implementing this material into the design of a long life vernier chamber. Discussion of the proposed demonstration program to be performed by the NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center to attain additional insight into the application of this technology to the RCS vernier, includes the technical objectives, approach, and program schedule. The plans for further development and integration with the Orbiter and the Shuttle system are also presented.

  17. MEMS-Based Solid Propellant Rocket Array Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shuji; Hosokawa, Ryuichiro; Tokudome, Shin-Ichiro; Hori, Keiichi; Saito, Hirobumi; Watanabe, Masashi; Esashi, Masayoshi

    The prototype of a solid propellant rocket array thruster for simple attitude control of a 10 kg class micro-spacecraft was completed and tested. The prototype has 10×10 φ0.8 mm solid propellant micro-rockets arrayed at a pitch of 1.2 mm on a 20×22 mm substrate. To realize such a dense array of micro-rockets, each ignition heater is powered from the backside of the thruster through an electrical feedthrough which passes along a propellant cylinder wall. Boron/potassium nitrate propellant (NAB) is used with/without lead rhodanide/potassium chlorate/nitrocellulose ignition aid (RK). Impulse thrust was measured by a pendulum method in air. Ignition required electric power of at least 3 4 W with RK and 4 6 W without RK. Measured impulse thrusts were from 2×10-5 Ns to 3×10-4 Ns after the calculation of compensation for air dumping.

  18. Optimization of energy transfer in microwave electrothermal thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, D. J.; Micci, M. M.

    1993-01-01

    Results are presented from preliminary tests conducted to evaluate the performance of a prototype microwave electrothermal thruster. The primary component of the device is a microwave resonant cavity. The device produces stable axial plasmas within a pressurized section of the cavity with the plasma positioned in the inlet region of the nozzle. Plasma stability is enhanced by axial power coupling, an optimal distribution of electric power density within the cavity, and a propellant gas flow which has a large vortical velocity component. The thruster has been operated with a number of propellant gases: helium, nitrogen, ammonia, and hydrogen. Plasmas can be formed in a reliable manner at cavity pressures of 1 kPa and incident power levels ranging from 50 W to 350 W, depending on the gas used, and can be operated at pressures up to 300 kPa at power levels up to 2200 W. Ideal performance results of vacuum Isp and thermal efficiency vs. specific power are presented for each gas. Representative results of this preliminary work are: He - Isp = 625 s, eta-thermal = 90 percent; N2 - Isp = 270 s, eta-thermal = 41 percent; NH3 - Isp = 475 s, eta-thermal= 55 percent; H2 - Isp = 1040 s, eta-thermal = 53 percent.

  19. Erosion Measurements in a Diverging Cusped-Field Thruster (Pre Print)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    3,000 3,000∗ BHT -200 [15] 200 43.5% 1,287-1,519 >1,700 HT-100 [16] 175 25% [4] 300 [17] 1,500 [17]∗∗ SPT-30 [18] 150 26% [19] 600∗ - SPT-20M [20] ...provide longer lifetimes to low-power thrusters with performance capabilities similar to Hall thrusters. Performance similar to the BHT -200, a...only the DCF and BHT -200 thrusters have the reported capability of operating past 1000 h without exposing components of their magnetic circuit. The

  20. Comparison of Numerical and Experimental Time-Resolved Near-Field Hall Thruster Plasma Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-06

    RESOLVED NEAR-FIELD HALL THRUSTER PLASMA PROPERTIES 807 TABLE I BHT -600 HALL THRUSTER AT NOMINAL XENON OPERATING CONDITIONS AND PERFORMANCE [21] 1.2-m...is a 600 W BHT -600 with a 3.2-mm hollow cathode manufactured by the Busek Company (Natick, MA). This thruster has been studied previously using both...electrostatic probes and various opti- cal diagnostics [17]–[20]. The BHT -600 has an acceleration channel outer radius of 32 mm, inner radius of 24 mm

  1. Effects of Anode Temperature on Working Characteristics and Performance of a Low Power Arcjet Thruster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Wen-Xia; LI Teng; WU Cheng-Kang

    2009-01-01

    An arc-heated thruster of 130-800 W input power is tested in a vacuum chamber at pressures lower than 20 Pa with argon or H_2-N_2 gas mixture as propellant.The time-dependent arc voltage-current curve,outside-surface temperature of the anode nozzle and the produced thrust of the firing arcjet thruster are measured in situ simultaneously,in order to analyze and evaluate the dependence of thruster working characteristics and output properties,such as specific impulse and thrust efficiency,on nozzle temperature.

  2. Satellite Microwave Communication Signal Degradation Due To Hall Thruster Plasma Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, J. C.; Hallock, G. A.; Spencer, E. A.; Meyer, J. W.; Loane, J. T.

    2001-10-01

    We have developed a geometric optics vector ray-tracing code, BeamServer, for analyzing the effects of Hall thruster plasma plumes on satellite microwave communication signals. The possible effects include main beam attenuation and squinting, side lobe degradation, and induced cross-polarization. We report on a study of Hall current thruster (HCT) mounting positions on a realistic satellite configuration and a study with a highly shaped reflector. Results indicate HCT signal degradation can occur and should be considered in the satellite design process. Initial results of antenna pattern perturbations due to low frequency plume oscillations driven by thruster instabilities are also given.

  3. Carcinogenicity and chronic toxicity of hydrazine monohydrate in rats and mice by two-year drinking water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Michiharu; Kano, Hirokazu; Suzuki, Masaaki; Katagiri, Taku; Umeda, Yumi; Fukushima, Shoji

    2016-04-01

    The carcinogenicity and chronic toxicity of hydrazine monohydrate was examined by administrating hydrazine monohydrate in drinking water to groups of 50 F344/DuCrj rats and 50 Crj:BDF1 mice of both sexes for two years. The drinking water concentration of hydrazine monohydrate was 0, 20, 40 or 80 ppm (wt/wt) for male and female rats and male mice; and 0, 40, 80 or 160 ppm for female mice. Survival rates of each group of males and females rats and mice were similar to the respective controls, except female rats administered 80 ppm. Two-year administration of hydrazine monohydrate produced an increase in the incidences of hepatocellular adenomas and carcinomas in rats of both sexes along with hepatic foci. In mice, the incidences of hepatocellular adenomas and carcinomas were increased in females, and significantly increased incidences of hepatocellular adenomas in females administered 160 ppm were observed. Thus, hydrazine monohydrate is carcinogenic in two species, rats and mice. Additionally, non-neoplastic renal lesions in rats and mice and non-neoplastic nasal lesions in mice were observed.

  4. An Improved Calibration Method for Hydrazine Monitors for the United States Air Force

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsah, K

    2003-07-07

    This report documents the results of Phase 1 of the ''Air Force Hydrazine Detector Characterization and Calibration Project''. A method for calibrating model MDA 7100 hydrazine detectors in the United States Air Force (AF) inventory has been developed. The calibration system consists of a Kintek 491 reference gas generation system, a humidifier/mixer system which combines the dry reference hydrazine gas with humidified diluent or carrier gas to generate the required humidified reference for calibrations, and a gas sampling interface. The Kintek reference gas generation system itself is periodically calibrated using an ORNL-constructed coulometric titration system to verify the hydrazine concentration of the sample atmosphere in the interface module. The Kintek reference gas is then used to calibrate the hydrazine monitors. Thus, coulometric titration is only used to periodically assess the performance of the Kintek reference gas generation system, and is not required for hydrazine monitor calibrations. One advantage of using coulometric titration for verifying the concentration of the reference gas is that it is a primary standard (if used for simple solutions), thereby guaranteeing, in principle, that measurements will be traceable to SI units (i.e., to the mole). The effect of humidity of the reference gas was characterized by using the results of concentrations determined by coulometric titration to develop a humidity correction graph for the Kintek 491 reference gas generation system. Using this calibration method, calibration uncertainty has been reduced by 50% compared to the current method used to calibrate hydrazine monitors in the Air Force inventory and calibration time has also been reduced by more than 20%. Significant findings from studies documented in this report are the following: (1) The Kintek 491 reference gas generation system (generator, humidifier and interface module) can be used to calibrate hydrazine detectors. (2) The

  5. Spectral, thermal and X-ray studies on some new bis-hydrazine metal glyoxylates and bis-hydrazine mixed metal glyoxylates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikram, L. [Department of Chemistry, Government Arts College, Ooty, The Nilgiris, Udhagamandalam 643002 (India); Sivasankar, B.N. [Department of Chemistry, Government Arts College, Ooty, The Nilgiris, Udhagamandalam 643002 (India)]. E-mail: sivabickol@yahoo.com

    2007-01-01

    Bis-hydrazine complexes of metal glyoxylates and mixed metal glyoxylates of 3d-metal ions of the formula M(OOCCHO){sub 2}(N{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}, where M = Mg, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn or Cd and M{sub 1/3}Co{sub 2/3}(OOCCHO){sub 2}(N{sub 2}H{sub 4}){sub 2}, where M = Mg, Mn, Ni, Zn or Cd, respectively, have been prepared and studied. The compositions of the complexes have been determined by chemical analyses. The magnetic moments and electronic spectra suggest a high-spin octahedral geometry for the metal complexes. Infrared spectral data indicate the bidentate bridging by hydrazine molecules and monodentate coordination by glyoxylate ions in both the metal and mixed metal compounds. Thermogravimetry and differential thermal analyses in air have been used to study the thermal behaviour of the complexes. The simultaneous TG-DTA traces of all the complexes show multi-step deg.radation and the final products are found to be the respective metal oxides in the case of metal complexes and metal cobaltites in the case of mixed metal complexes. The final residues were identified by their X-ray powder diffraction patterns. X-ray powder diffraction patterns of the complexes including mixed metal complexes are almost superimposable with in each of the series indicating isomorphism. The metal cobaltites MCo{sub 2}O{sub 4}, where M = Mg, Mn, Ni, Zn or Cd were also prepared by decomposing the respective mixed metal complex in a pre-heated silica crucible at about 300 deg. C, and their identities were confirmed by chemical analyses, infrared spectra and X-ray powder diffraction.

  6. Ammonia and hydrazine. Transition-metal-catalyzed hydroamination and metal-free catalyzed functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, Guy [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-06-29

    The efficient and selective preparation of organic molecules is critical for mankind. For the future, it is of paramount importance to find catalysts able to transform abundant and cheap feedstocks into useful compounds. Acyclic and heterocyclic nitrogen-containing derivatives are common components of naturally occurring compounds, agrochemicals, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals; they are also useful intermediates in a number of industrial processes. One of the most widely used synthetic strategies, allowing the formation of an N-C bond, is the addition of an N-H bond across a carbon-carbon multiple bond, the so-called hydroamination reaction. This chemical transformation fulfills the principle of “green chemistry” since it ideally occurs with 100% atom economy. Various catalysts have been found to promote this reaction, although many limitations remain; one of the most prominent is the lack of methods that permit the use of NH3 and NH2NH2 as the amine partners. In fact, ammonia and hydrazine have rarely succumbed to homogeneous catalytic transformations. Considering the low cost and abundance of ammonia (136 million metric tons produced in 2011) and hydrazine, catalysts able to improve the reactivity and selectivity of the NH3- and NH2NH2-hydroamination reaction, and more broadly speaking the functionalization of these chemicals, are highly desirable. In the last funded period, we discovered the first homogeneous catalysts able to promote the hydroamination of alkynes and allenes with ammonia and the parent hydrazine. The key feature of our catalytic systems is that the formation of catalytically inactive Werner complexes is reversible, in marked contrast to most of the known ammonia and hydrazine transition metal complexes. This is due to the peculiar electronic properties of our neutral ancillary ligands, especially their strong donating capabilities. However, our catalysts currently require

  7. Electrocatalytic oxidation of hydrazine with alizarin red S as a homogenous mediator on the glassy carbon electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad; Mazloum-Ardakani; Roya; Mazidi; Mohammad; Hossein; Mashhadizadeh; Parvanah; Rahimi; Mohammad; Ali; Karimi

    2010-01-01

    Electro-catalytic oxidation and detection of hydrazine on a glassy carbon electrode,at pH 6.0,was studied by using alizarin red S as a homogeneous mediator.The overall number of electrons involved in the catalytic oxidation of hydrazine and that involved in the rate-determining step were four and one,respectively.The interfering effect of some cations,anions and organic compounds were examined.Peak current for this process varied linearly with the square root of the scan rate.The kinetic parameters,such as the electron transfer coefficient(α) and catalytic rate constant(k) ,were determined using cyclic voltammetry,linear sweep voltammetry and chronoamperometry.The electro-catalytic response was optimized with regards to the pH,scan rate,hydrazine concentration and other variables.

  8. Synthesis of the row of new functional derivatives of 7-arylalkyl-8-hydrazine theophyllines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmytro Korobko

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrazine functional derivatives are widely used in medical practice as remedies applied for pharmacotherapy of depression, infection diseases, hypertension, diabetes, etc. It is worth mentioning that among obtained 7-R-8-hydrazine derivatives of 1,3-dimethylxantine promising substances have been identified. Due to the fact that literature sources display only results of occasional studies of the reactions between 7-R-8-hydrazine theophyllines and mono- or dicarbonyle substances, the use of other keto reagents for xanthine bicycle at 8th position functionalization will allow to explore synthetic potential of the last one, and with high probability may lead to obtaining original biologically active substances.Aim. To study types of reaction between 8-hydrazinyl-1,3-dimethyl-7-aryl alkyl-1H-purine-2,6(3H,7H-diones and a number of carbonyl containing reagents.Methods. A nucleophilic addition reaction followed by dehydration or ethanol splitting was used, as well as the complex of the modern analysis methods to confirm the structure and individuality of the synthesized substances.Results. Different directions of 8-hydrazinyl-1,3,-dimethyl-7(fenetyl-, 3-phenylpropyl-, 3-phenylalyl-1H-purine-2,6(3H,7H-diones chemical transformations in reactions with the appropriate carbonyl containing compounds have been studied experimentally. The structure of synthesized substances was confirmed by chromatography/mass and 1H NMR spectroscopy.Conclusion. The group of 7-arylalkyl-8-(3,5-R,R1-pyrazole-1-yltheophyllines, consisting of two functionally substituted bioactive heterocycles, has been synthesized by reaction between initial substances and selected mono- and dicarbonyl compounds

  9. Design and Testing of a Small Inductive Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Adam K.; Eskridge, Richard H.; Dominguez, Alexandra; Polzin, Kurt A.; Riley, Daniel P.; Kimberlin, Adam C.

    2015-01-01

    The design and testing of a small inductive pulsed plasma thruster (IPPT), shown in Fig. 1 with all the major subsystems required for a thruster of this kind are described. Thrust measurements and imaging of the device operated in rep-rated mode are presented to quantify the performance envelope of the device. The small IPPT described in this paper was designed to serve as a test-bed for the pulsed gas-valves and solid-state switches required for a IPPTs. A modular design approach was used to permit future modifications and upgrades. The thruster consists of the following sub-systems: a) a multi-turn, spiral-wound acceleration coil (27 cm o.d., 10 cm i.d.) driven by a 10 microFarad capacitor and switched with a high-voltage thyristor, b) a fast pulsed gas-valve, and c.) a glow-discharge pre-ionizer (PI) circuit. The acceleration-coil circuit may be operated at voltages up to 4 kV (the thyristor limit is 4.5 kV). The device may be operated at rep-rates up to 30 Hz with the present gas-valve. Thrust measurements and imaging of the device operated in rep-rated mode will be presented. The pre-ionizer consists of a 0.3 microFarad capacitor charged to 4 kV and connected to two annular stainless-steel electrodes bounding the area of the coil-face. The 4 kV potential is held across them and when the gas is puffed in over the coil, the PI circuit is completed, and a plasma is formed. Even at the less than optimal base-pressure in the chamber (approximately 5 × 10(exp -4) torr), the PI held-off the applied voltage, and only discharged upon command. For a capacitor charge of 2 kV the peak coil current is 4.1 kA, and during this pulse a very bright discharge (much brighter than from the PI alone) was observed (see Fig. 2). Interestingly, for discharges at this charge voltage the PI was not required as the current rise rate, dI/dt, of the coil itself was sufficient to ionize the gas.

  10. HIGH ENERGY REPLACEMENT FOR TEFLON PROPELLANT IN PULSED PLASMA THRUSTERS Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This program will utilize a well-characterized Pulsed Plasma Thruster (PPT) to test experimental high-energy extinguishable solid propellants (HE), instead of...

  11. Colloid Thruster for Attitude Control Systems (ACS) and Tip-off Control Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop and test key technologies needed for an integrated, high thrust colloid thruster system with no moving parts, for spacecraft attitude control...

  12. Feasibility of a 5mN Laser-Driven Mini-Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We have developed a next-generation thruster under a Phase II SBIR which we believe can meet NASA requirements after some modifications and improvements. It is the...

  13. Kinetic Molecular Dynamic Model of Hall Thruster Channel Wall Erosion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hall thrusters are being considered for many space missions because their high specific impulse delivers a larger payload mass fraction than chemical rockets. With a...

  14. Modelling and Simulation of Variable Speed Thruster Drives with Full-Scale Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan F. Hansen

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper considerations about modelling and simulation of variable speed thruster drives are made with comparison to full scale measurements from Varg FPSO. For special purpose vessels with electric propulsion operating in DP (Dynamic Positioning mode the thruster drives are essential for the vessel operation. Different model strategies of thruster drives are discussed. An advanced thruster drive model with a dynamic motor model and field vector control principle is shown. Simulations are performed with both the advanced model and a simplified model. These are compared with full-scale measurements from Varg FPSO. The simulation results correspond well with the measurements, for both the simplified model and the advanced model.

  15. On the microscopic mechanism of ion-extraction of a gridded ion propulsion thruster

    CERN Document Server

    Kirmse, Danny

    2013-01-01

    The following paper includes a physical microscopic particle-description of the phenomena and mechanisms that lead to the extraction of ions with the aim to generate thrust. This theoretical treatise arose from the intention to visualize the behavior of the involved particles under effect of the involved electrical fields. By this way, an underlying basis for experimental investigations of the work of an ion thruster should be formed. So a foundation was created, which explains the ion extracting and so thrust generating function of an ion thruster. The theoretical work was related to the Radio-frequency Ion Thruster (RIT). But the model worked out can be generalized for all thruster types that use electrostatic fields to extract positively charged ions.

  16. Hall Effect Thruster for High Power Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Phase I Busek matured the design of an existing 15-kW laboratory thruster. Magnetic modeling was performed to generate a circuit incorporating magnetic shielding....

  17. Simulation of a Cold Gas Thruster System and Test Data Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Daniel M.; Quinn, Frank D.

    2012-01-01

    During developmental testing of the Ascent Abort 1 (AA-1) cold gas thruster system, unexpected behavior was detected. Upon further review the design as it existed may not have met the requirements. To determine the best approach for modifying the design, the system was modeled with a dynamic fluid analysis tool (EASY5). The system model consisted of the nitrogen storage tank, pressure regulator, thruster valve, nozzle, and the associated interconnecting line lengths. The regulator and thruster valves were modeled using a combination of the fluid and mechanical modules available in EASY5. The simulation results were then compared against actual system test data. The simulation results exhibited behaviors similar to the test results, such as the pressure regulators response to thruster firings. Potential design solutions were investigated using the analytical model parameters, including increasing the volume downstream of the regulator and increasing the orifice area. Both were shown to improve the regulator response.

  18. Effect of Ambipolar Potential on the Propulsive Performance of the GDM Plasma Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The gasdynamic mirror (GDM) plasma thruster has the ability to confine high-density plasma for the length of time required to heat it to the temperatures...

  19. Effect of Ambipolar Potential on the Propulsive Performance of the GDM Plasma Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Gasdynamic Mirror (GDM) thruster is an electric propulsion device, without electrodes, that will magnetically confine a plasma with such density and temperature...

  20. Wide Throttling, High Throughput Hall Thruster for Science and Exploration Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In response to Topic S3.04 "Propulsion Systems," Busek Co. Inc. will develop a high throughput Hall effect thruster with a nominal peak power of 1-kW and wide...

  1. Wide Throttling, High Throughput Hall Thruster for Science and Exploration Missions Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In response to Topic S3-04 "Propulsion Systems," Busek proposes to develop a high throughput Hall effect thruster with a nominal peak power of 1-kW and wide...

  2. Low Cost Refractory Matrix Composite Thruster for Mars Ascent Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The long-term goal for this effort is to develop a low-cost, high-temperature thruster. Within the attitude control propulsion community, many efforts have focused...

  3. Propellantless Spacecraft Formation-Flying and Maneuvering with Photonic Laser Thrusters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Until the former NIAC was closed, we had investigated a nano-meter accuracy formation flight method based on photon thrusters and tethers, Photon Tether Formation...

  4. The synthesis and molecular recognization of the polyamine transporter of hydrazine-modified diamine conjugates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Jun Zhou; Hao Huang; Song Qiang Xie; Yu Xia Wang; Jin Zhao; Chao Jie Wang

    2008-01-01

    A series of four novel hydrazine-modified diamine conjugates (7a-b, 8a-b) were synthesized and evaluated for cytotoxicityagainst Melanoma B 16, α-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO)-treated B 16, spermidine (SPD)-treated B 16, Mouse leukemia L 1210and Hela cell lines. Both the DFMO-B 16 and SPD-B 16 experiments indicated that conjugates 7a-b and 8a-b could recognize thepolyamine transporter (PAT) and enter the cells in part or in whole via PAT, although they were not as efficient as the reference, 9-anthracenemethyl homospermidine (1).

  5. Hydrazine Blending and Storage Facility, Interim Response Action, Final Implementation Document for Decommissioning, Phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-18

    PRIMARY OBJECTIVES OF THE IRA 2. SITE INVENTORY - TANKS, PIPING, BUILDINGS, ASBEST , DEBRIS, DRUMS 3. PLAN OF ACTION - TRANSFER OF UNTREATED WASTEWATER...Response Action (IRA) H at thte Hydrazine Blending and Storage Facility (HBSF) located at Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) in Commerce City , Colorado. It was...LOCATION MAP Commerce CIty , Colorado 1A U) Cl)) zr LU .i I 0< 9< z (’ICM ..w co ai >. r 0) IC., Z C’) ________________0 W jl cor cliB destruction of

  6. Hydrogenation of liquid natural rubber via diimide reduction in hydrazine hydrate/hydrogen peroxide system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusof, Muhammad Jefri Mohd; Jamaluddin, Naharullah; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Yusoff, Siti Fairus M. [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    Liquid natural rubber (LNR) with molecular weight of lower than 10{sup 5} and shorter polymeric chain than natural rubber was prepared. LNR was then hydrogenated via diimide reduction by oxidation of hydrazine hydrate with hydrogen peroxide. The unsaturated units of the rubber were converted into saturated hydrocarbon to strengthen the backbone of the polymer so it was able to resist thermal degradation. The results indicated that hydrogenation degree of the product (HLNR) could be extended to 91.2% conversion under appropriate conditions. The hydrogenated LNR (HLNR) was characterized using Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The physical characteristics of HLNR were analyzed with Termogravimetric Analysis (TGA)

  7. Alternatives to hydrazine in steam and hot water systems. Pt. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehenberger, L.

    1989-04-01

    Ever since hydrazine was classified among the carcinogenics, users were confronted with a number of alternatives. The most common of these, i.e. ascorbate, carbohydrazide, diethyl hydroxylamine (DEHA), hydrochinine, hyposulfite, methyl ethylketoxime (MEKO), sulfite and tannines, are compared in a table with a view to their oxygen binding efficiency and other important characteristics. So far, there is no substitute with a simple reaction mechanism and optimum corrosion protection efficiency. Established physical methods are favoured for oxygen removal. Corrosion protection by passivation and inhibition are gone into. (orig.).

  8. Structure and Quantum Chemistry Study on Hexaacetyl D-Mannose Hydrazine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Rui; LIU Xiao-Hong; CHENG Chang-Mei; WANG Ru-Ji; ZHAO Yu-Fen; WANG Lai-Xi

    2007-01-01

    Hexaacetyl D-mannose hydrazine is one type of important intermediates in saccharide chemistry. In this paper, its single crystal was obtained and furthermore, X-ray diffraction and quantum chemistry calculation were performed. It belongs to orthorhombic system, space group P212121, with a=16.267(3), b=19.263(3), c=7.1948(12)(A), Mr=446.41, Dc=1.315 g/cm3, V=2254.5(6)(A)3 and Z=4. Meanwhile, the experimental results also provide information for designing a kind of molecular switch based on the mannose nitrogenous derivatives.

  9. Effect of kaempferol on lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status in 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine induced colorectal carcinoma in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmala, Parthasarathy; Ramanathan, Manickam

    2011-03-01

    Colorectal cancer, a common cause of cancer related deaths in both sexes in western population is often due to persistent oxidative stress leading to DNA damage. Antioxidants scavenge free radicals and inhibit neoplastic process. Kaempferol, a flavonol widely distributed in tea, broccoli, grape fruit, brussels sprouts and apple, is claimed to have chemopreventive action in colon cancer. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of kaempferol on tissue lipid peroxidation and antioxidant status in 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine induced colorectal cancer in male Wistar rats and to compare its efficacy with irinotecan. Experimental colon cancer induced by 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine in rats mimic human colon cancer and therefore is an ideal model for chemoprevention studies. The rats were divided into six groups. Group 1 served as control. Group 2 received 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine (20 mg/kg body weight) subcutaneously once a week for four weeks. Group 3 received irinotecan (100 mg/kg body weight) intravenously once a week for four weeks with 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine. Groups 4 to 6 were given a daily oral dose of 50, 100, 200 mg/kg body weight of kaempferol with 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine. The total study period was 16 weeks. Kaempferol supplementation lowered 1,2-dimethyl hydrazine induced erythrocyte lysate and liver thiobarbituric acid reactive substances level and rejuvenated anti oxidant enzymes catalase, super oxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase. The recovery of enzyme status was maximum at the dose of 200 mg/kg body weight and was comparable to irinotecan. Our study reveals that kaempferol could be safely used as a chemopreventive agent in colorectal cancer.

  10. Sensitive amperometric determination of hydrazine using a carbon paste electrode modified with silver-doped zeolite L nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    NEDA SALEK GILANI; SEYED NASER AZIZI; SHAHRAM GHASEMI

    2017-02-01

    Silver-loaded nanozeolite-L-modified carbon paste electrode (Ag/L–CPE) was used as a novel sensing platform for enhanced electrocatalytic oxidation and determination of hydrazine. Zeolite L nanoparticles were synthesized via hydrothermal approach and then characterized using various techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET). Silver-exchanged nanozeolite L (Ag/L) was prepared and mixed with carbon paste to prepare the modified electrode. Cyclic voltammetry studies revealed the high performance of Ag/L–CPE for electrocatalytic oxidation of hydrazine. Two linear ranges were detected in the amperometric detection of hydrazine. The first range was from10 $\\mu$M to 0.4 mM with sensitivity of 103.13 $\\mu$A mM$^{−1}$ and the second one was from 0.4 to 4mM with sensitivity of 58.131 $\\mu$A mM$^{−1}$. The response time and detection limit ($S/N = 3$) of this sensor were determined to be 2 s and 1.5 $\\mu$M, respectively. The unique porous structure of nanozeolite L offers a promising catalyst support candidate for efficient electrochemical sensing of hydrazine. The sensor exhibited appreciable repeatability, reproducibility and stability, and was able to detect hydrazine in the presence of even 500-fold excess concentrations of interfering species. Also, the sensor was used to determine hydrazine concentration in water samples with satisfactory results.

  11. Space Charge Saturated Sheath Regime and Electron Temperature Saturation in Hall Thrusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Raitses; D. Staack; A. Smirnov; N.J. Fisch

    2005-03-16

    Secondary electron emission in Hall thrusters is predicted to lead to space charge saturated wall sheaths resulting in enhanced power losses in the thruster channel. Analysis of experimentally obtained electron-wall collision frequency suggests that the electron temperature saturation, which occurs at high discharge voltages, appears to be caused by a decrease of the Joule heating rather than by the enhancement of the electron energy loss at the walls due to a strong secondary electron emission.

  12. Plasma Reactors and Plasma Thrusters Modeling by Ar Complete Global Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chloe Berenguer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A complete global model for argon was developed and adapted to plasma reactor and plasma thruster modeling. It takes into consideration ground level and excited Ar and Ar+ species and the reactor and thruster form factors. The electronic temperature, the species densities, and the ionization percentage, depending mainly on the pressure and the absorbed power, have been obtained and commented for various physical conditions.

  13. Experimental Investigation of Two Interacting Thruster-Plumes Downstream of the Nozzles

    OpenAIRE

    Holz, André; Dettleff, Georg; Hannemann, Klaus; Ziegenhagen, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    The plume-plume interaction of two small cold gas thrusters is investigated under high vacuum conditions in the DLR high vacuum plume test facility STG-CT. In this paper we concentrate on the interaction downstream of the nozzles. After introducing the experimental equipment, characteristics of shock interaction are presented. Furthermore the appropriateness of the Penetration Knudsen Number for predicting the type of interaction also for thruster plumes is investigated.

  14. Preheating Cold Gas Thruster Flow Through a Thermal Energy Storage Conversion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Journal Article 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) January 2013- October 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Preheating Cold Gas Thruster Flow Through a Thermal Energy... Gas Thruster Flow through a Thermal Energy Storage Conversion System Michael R. Reid1 United States Air Force, Colorado Springs, CO, 80840 David B...specific impulse relative to a cold gas flow. Electric propulsion systems, the primary competitor to solar thermal propulsion systems, rely on the rather

  15. Dynamic Particle Weight Remapping in Hybrid PIC Hall-effect Thruster Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    International Electric Propulsion Conference and 6th Nano-satellite Symposium Hyogo-Kobe, Japan July 410, 2015 Robert Martin∗ ERC Incorporated, Huntsville...Algorithms, . 8Koo, J. and Martin, R., Pseudospectral model for hybrid PIC Hall -eect thruster simulation, 34th Int. Electric Propul- sion Conf...Paper 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) May 2015-July 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Dynamic Particle Weight Remapping in Hybrid PIC Hall -effect Thruster

  16. Performance and Thermal Characterization of the NASA-300MS 20 kW Hall Effect Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng; Haag, Thomas; Shastry, Rohit; Soulas, George; Smith, Timothy; Mikellides, Ioannis; Hofer, Richard

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Space Technology Mission Directorate is sponsoring the development of a high fidelity 15 kW-class long-life high performance Hall thruster for candidate NASA technology demonstration missions. An essential element of the development process is demonstration that incorporation of magnetic shielding on a 20 kW-class Hall thruster will yield significant improvements in the throughput capability of the thruster without any significant reduction in thruster performance. As such, NASA Glenn Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory collaborated on modifying the NASA-300M 20 kW Hall thruster to improve its propellant throughput capability. JPL and NASA Glenn researchers performed plasma numerical simulations with JPL's Hall2De and a commercially available magnetic modeling code that indicated significant enhancement in the throughput capability of the NASA-300M can be attained by modifying the thruster's magnetic circuit. This led to modifying the NASA-300M magnetic topology to a magnetically shielded topology. This paper presents performance evaluation results of the two NASA-300M magnetically shielded thruster configurations, designated 300MS and 300MS-2. The 300MS and 300MS-2 were operated at power levels between 2.5 and 20 kW at discharge voltages between 200 and 700 V. Discharge channel deposition from back-sputtered facility wall flux, and plasma potential and electron temperature measurements made on the inner and outer discharge channel surfaces confirmed that magnetic shielding was achieved. Peak total thrust efficiency of 64% and total specific impulse of 3,050 sec were demonstrated with the 300MS-2 at 20 kW. Thermal characterization results indicate that the boron nitride discharge chamber walls temperatures are approximately 100 C lower for the 300MS when compared to the NASA- 300M at the same thruster operating discharge power.

  17. Performance of a Cylindrical Hall-Effect Thruster with Magnetic Field Generated by Permanent Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Raitses, Yevgeny; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2008-01-01

    While Hall thrusters can operate at high efficiency at kW power levels, it is difficult to construct one that operates over a broad envelope down to 100W while maintaining an efficiency of 45- 55%. Scaling to low power while holding the main dimensionless parameters constant requires a decrease in the thruster channel size and an increase in the magnetic field strength. Increasing the magnetic field becomes technically challenging since the field can saturate the miniaturized inner components of the magnetic circuit and scaling down the magnetic circuit leaves very little room for magnetic pole pieces and heat shields. An alternative approach is to employ a cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) geometry. Laboratory model CHTs have operated at power levels ranging from the order of 50 Watts up to 1 kW. These thrusters exhibit performance characteristics which are comparable to conventional, annular Hall thrusters of similar size. Compared to the annular Hall thruster, the CHT has a lower insulator surface area to discharge chamber volume ratio. Consequently, there is the potential for reduced wall losses in the channel of a CHT, and any reduction in wall losses should translate into lower channel heating rates and reduced erosion. This makes the CHT geometry promising for low-power applications. Recently, a CHT that uses permanent magnets to produce the magnetic field topology was tested. This thruster has the promise of reduced power consumption over previous CHT iterations that employed electromagnets. Data are presented for two purposes: to expose the effect different controllable parameters have on the discharge and to summarize performance measurements (thrust, Isp, efficiency) obtained using a thrust stand. These data are used to gain insight into the thruster's operation and to allow for quantitative comparisons between the permanent magnet CHT and the electromagnet CHT.

  18. The development of a non-cryogenic nitrogen/oxygen supply system. [using hydrazine/water electrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenough, B. M.; Mahan, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    A hydrazine/water electrolysis process system module design was fabricated and tested to demonstrate component and module performance. This module is capable of providing both the metabolic oxygen for crew needs and the oxygen and nitrogen for spacecraft leak makeup. The component designs evolved through previous R and D efforts, and were fabricated and tested individually and then were assembled into a complete module which was successfully tested for 1000 hours to demonstrate integration of the individual components. A survey was made of hydrazine sensor technology and a cell math model was derived.

  19. Ultrathin willow-like CuO nanoflakes as an efficient catalyst for electro-oxidation of hydrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuanyuan; Li, Hao; Wang, Rongfang; Wang, Hui; Lv, Weizhong; Ji, Shan

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, preparation of ultrathin willow-like CuO nanoflakes via a one-step process was reported. X-ray diffraction pattern showed the formation of monoclinic CuO crystal, which was also confirmed by result of high resolution transmission electron microscopy. Scanning electron microscopy showed that ultrathin willow-like CuO nanoflakes were formed. Catalytic testing indicated that the ultrathin willow-like CuO nanoflakes exhibited high electrocatalytic activity and durability toward the electro-oxidation of hydrazine in alkaline medium. The results suggested that the as-prepared CuO nanoflakes were potential electrode materials for hydrazine fuel cell.

  20. Elimination of Lifetime Limiting Mechanism of Hall Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, David T. (Inventor); Manzella, David H. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A Hall thruster includes inner and outer electromagnets, with the outer electromagnet circumferentially surrounding the inner electromagnet along a centerline axis and separated therefrom, inner and outer poles, in physical connection with their respective inner and outer electromagnets, with the inner pole having a mostly circular shape and the outer pole having a mostly annular shape, a discharge chamber separating the inner and outer poles, a combined anode electrode/gaseous propellant distributor, located at an upstream portion of the discharge chamber and supplying propellant gas and an actuator, in contact with a sleeve portion of the discharge chamber. The actuator is configured to extend the sleeve portion or portions of the discharge chamber along the centerline axis with respect to the inner and outer poles.

  1. Study of Plume Characteristics of a Stationary Plasma Thruster

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAN Zhong; WANG Pingyang; DU Zhaohui; KANG Xiaolu

    2008-01-01

    Electron density and temperature of the plume are measured by a double Langmuir probe in an experimental chamber.A numerical model based on both particle-in-cell scheme and direct simulation Monte Carlo hybrid method is developed to simulate the flow field of plume.The equation for plasma potential is solved by alternative direction implicit technique. The simulation is verified by comparing the computational results with the measured data.The study indicates that the electron temperature of flow field is about 2 eV and the electron density is about 2.5 × 1016 ~ 5 × 1015 m-3 at the central line with a distance of 0.3 ~ 1.0 m downstream of the thruster exit.The model can well predict the flow field parameters of the steady plume.The efforts of this paper are referable for further investigation.

  2. Electric Propulsion Cables For Milli-Newton Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakob, Manfred; Bertrand, Arnaud; El-Idrissi, Mohamed; Schaper, Wolfgang, , Dr.

    2011-10-01

    AXON' Kabel GmbH, is developing and manufacturing cables and connectors up to complete interconnect systems for all types of applications needed in Space. As a request from ESA, AXON has developed a new generation of cables suitable for current and future applications to feed electric propulsion thruster systems in spacecraft with electric power. Under this project the main objectives were to find and select materials for the composition to produce a cable withstanding quite strongrequirements for operating temperature, radiation resistance, high voltage application and in variants to various current ratings (A); the cable construction will also include ESD immunisation. The paper will summarise the specification achieved and will give an overview on the test results with the prototype cables.

  3. Overview of NASA Iodine Hall Thruster Propulsion System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Timothy D.; Kamhawi, Hani; Hickman, Tyler; Haag, Thomas; Dankanich, John; Polzin, Kurt; Byrne, Lawrence; Szabo, James

    2016-01-01

    NASA is continuing to invest in advancing Hall thruster technologies for implementation in commercial and government missions. The most recent focus has been on increasing the power level for large-scale exploration applications. However, there has also been a similar push to examine applications of electric propulsion for small spacecraft in the range of 300 kg or less. There have been several recent iodine Hall propulsion system development activities performed by the team of the NASA Glenn Research Center, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and Busek Co. Inc. In particular, the work focused on qualification of the Busek 200-W BHT-200-I and development of the 600-W BHT-600-I systems. This paper discusses the current status of iodine Hall propulsion system developments along with supporting technology development efforts.

  4. Optimal electric potential profile in a collisional magnetized thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruchtman, Amnon; Makrinich, Gennady

    2016-10-01

    A major figure of merit in propulsion in general and in electric propulsion in particular is the thrust per unit of deposited power, the ratio of thrust over power. We have recently demonstrated experimentally and theoretically that for a fixed deposited power in the ions, the momentum delivered by the electric force is larger if the accelerated ions collide with neutrals during the acceleration. As expected, the higher thrust for given power is achieved for a collisional plasma at the expense of a lower thrust per unit mass flow rate. Operation in the collisional regime can be advantageous for certain space missions. We analyze a Hall thruster configuration in which the flow is only weakly ionized but there are frequent ion-neutral collisions. With a variational method we seek an electric potential profile that maximizes thrust over power. We then examine what radial magnetic field profile should determine such a potential profile. Supported by the Israel Science Foundation Grant 765/11.

  5. Power electronics for a 1-kilowatt arcjet thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, R. P.

    1986-01-01

    After more than two decades, new space mission requirements have revived interest in arcjet systems. The preliminary development and demonstration of new, high efficiency, power electronic concepts for start up and steady state control of dc arcjets is reported. The design comprises a pulse width modulated power converter which is closed loop configured to give fast current control. An inductor, in series with the arcjet, serves the dual role of providing instantaneous current control, as well as a high voltage arc ignition pulse. Benchmark efficiency, transient response, regulation, and ripple data are presented. Tests with arcjets demonstrate that the power electronics breadboard can start thrusters consistently with no apparent damage and transfer reliably to the nondestructive high voltage arc mode in less than a second.

  6. Micropulsed Plasma Thrusters for Attitude Control of a Low-Earth-Orbiting CubeSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatsonis, Nikolaos A.; Lu, Ye; Blandino, John; Demetriou, Michael A.; Paschalidis, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a 3-Unit CubeSat design with commercial-off-the-shelf hardware, Teflon-fueled micropulsed plasma thrusters, and an attitude determination and control approach. The micropulsed plasma thruster is sized by the impulse bit and pulse frequency required for continuous compensation of expected maximum disturbance torques at altitudes between 400 and 1000 km, as well as to perform stabilization of up to 20 deg /s and slew maneuvers of up to 180 deg. The study involves realistic power constraints anticipated on the 3-Unit CubeSat. Attitude estimation is implemented using the q method for static attitude determination of the quaternion using pairs of the spacecraft-sun and magnetic-field vectors. The quaternion estimate and the gyroscope measurements are used with an extended Kalman filter to obtain the attitude estimates. Proportional-derivative control algorithms use the static attitude estimates in order to calculate the torque required to compensate for the disturbance torques and to achieve specified stabilization and slewing maneuvers or combinations. The controller includes a thruster-allocation method, which determines the optimal utilization of the available thrusters and introduces redundancy in case of failure. Simulation results are presented for a 3-Unit CubeSat under detumbling, pointing, and pointing and spinning scenarios, as well as comparisons between the thruster-allocation and the paired-firing methods under thruster failure.

  7. Magnetic Field Effects on the Plume of a Diverging Cusped-Field Thruster

    KAUST Repository

    Matlock, Taylor

    2010-07-25

    The Diverging Cusped-Field Thruster (DCFT) uses three permanent ring magnets of alternating polarity to create a unique magnetic topology intended to reduce plasma losses to the discharge chamber surfaces. The magnetic field strength within the DCFT discharge chamber (up to 4 kG on axis) is much higher than in thrusters of similar geometry, which is believed to be a driving factor in the high measured anode efficiencies. The field strength in the near plume region is large as well, which may bear on the high beam divergences measured, with peaks in ion current found at angles of around 30-35 from the thruster axis. Characterization of the DCFT has heretofore involved only one magnetic topology. It is then the purpose of this study to investigate changes to the near-field plume caused by altering the shape and strength of the magnetic field. A thick magnetic collar, encircling the thruster body, is used to lower the field strength outside of the discharge chamber and thus lessen any effects caused by the external field. Changes in the thruster plume with field topology are monitored by the use of normal Langmuir and emissive probes interrogating the near-field plasma. Results are related to other observations that suggest a unified conceptual framework for the important near-exit region of the thruster.

  8. Hybrid-PIC Modeling of a High-Voltage, High-Specific-Impulse Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brandon D.; Boyd, Iain D.; Kamhawi, Hani; Huang, Wensheng

    2013-01-01

    The primary life-limiting mechanism of Hall thrusters is the sputter erosion of the discharge channel walls by high-energy propellant ions. Because of the difficulty involved in characterizing this erosion experimentally, many past efforts have focused on numerical modeling to predict erosion rates and thruster lifespan, but those analyses were limited to Hall thrusters operating in the 200-400V discharge voltage range. Thrusters operating at higher discharge voltages (V(sub d) >= 500 V) present an erosion environment that may differ greatly from that of the lower-voltage thrusters modeled in the past. In this work, HPHall, a well-established hybrid-PIC code, is used to simulate NASA's High-Voltage Hall Accelerator (HiVHAc) at discharge voltages of 300, 400, and 500V as a first step towards modeling the discharge channel erosion. It is found that the model accurately predicts the thruster performance at all operating conditions to within 6%. The model predicts a normalized plasma potential profile that is consistent between all three operating points, with the acceleration zone appearing in the same approximate location. The expected trend of increasing electron temperature with increasing discharge voltage is observed. An analysis of the discharge current oscillations shows that the model predicts oscillations that are much greater in amplitude than those measured experimentally at all operating points, suggesting that the differences in oscillation amplitude are not strongly associated with discharge voltage.

  9. Meiotic changes in Vicia faba L. subsequent to treatments of hydrazine hydrate and maleic hydrazide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheen Husain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Assessing the impact of mutagens for creating variations in crops like faba bean (Vicia faba L. is an important criterion in the contemporary world where food insecurity and malnutrition is alarming at the doors of various nations. Impact of two chemical mutagens viz. hydrazine hydrate (HZ and maleic hydrazide (MH on the two varieties (NDF-1 and HB-405 of Vicia faba were analysed in terms of meiotic behavior and pollen sterility. Since there are not enough data about the effect of these mutagens on the chromosomal behaviors of Vicia faba, this study presents the role of hydrazine hydrate and maleic hydrazide as well as various types of chromosomal aberrations in crop improvement. The lower concentration of mutagens showed less pollen sterility compared to the higher concentrations. Manipulation of plant structural component to induce desirable alternations provides valuable material for the breeders and could be used favorably for increasing mutation rate and obtaining a desirable spectrum of mutation in faba beans based on preliminary studies of cell division.

  10. Crystal structures of nitrato-(2-[2-(1-pyridine-2-ylethylidene)hydrazine]-1,3-benzothiazolo) aquacopper and chloro-(2-[2-phenyl(pyridine-2-ylethylidene)hydrazine]-1,3-benzothiazolo) copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chumakov, Yu. M. [Academy of Sciences of Moldova, Institute of Applied Physics (Moldova, Republic of); Paholnitcaia, A. Yu. [State University of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Petrenko, P. A. [Academy of Sciences of Moldova, Institute of Applied Physics (Moldova, Republic of); Tsapkov, V. I., E-mail: vtsapkov@gmail.com [State University of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); Poirier, D. [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Quebec (Canada); Gulea, A. P. [State University of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Two crystal modifications of nitrato-(2-[2-(1-pyridine-2-ylethylidene)hydrazine]-1,3-benzothiazolo) aquacopper (I and II) and two modifications of chloro-(2-[2-phenyl(pyridine-2-ylethylidene)hydrazine]-1,3-benzothiazolo) copper (III and IV) have been synthesized and studied by X-ray diffraction. In structures I and II, the copper atoms coordinate a monodeprotonated molecule of the organic ligand, nitrate ions, and a water molecule. In crystals of I, the complexes are monomeric, whereas complexes II are linked via nitrate ions to form polymeric chains. In both structures the coordination polyhedron of the copper atom can be described as a distorted tetragonal bipyramid—(4 + 1 + 1) in I and (4 + 2) in II. These coordination polyherdra have different compositions. In structures III and IV, the metal atoms coordinate a monodeprotonated (2-[2-phenyl(pyridine-2-ylethylidene)hydrazine]-1,3-benzothiazole molecule and chloride ions. In III the complex-forming ion has square-planar coordination geometry, whereas structure IV consists of centrosymmetric dimers with two bridging chlorine atoms. It was found that nitrato-(2-[2-(1-pyridine-2-ylethylidene)hydrazine]-1,3-benzothiazolo) aquacopper possesses antitumor activity.

  11. Sol-gel process preparation and evaluation of the analytical performances of an hydrazine specific chemical sensor; Preparation par procede sol-gel et evaluation des performances analytiques d`un capteur chimique specifique de l`hydrazine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gojon, C

    1996-12-01

    The realisation of optical fibers active chemical collector to analyze hydrazine in line, in the spent fuel reprocessing process is the subject of this work. The p.dimethyl-amino-benzaldehyde has been chosen as reagent for its chemical and optical properties. 186 refs.

  12. Crystal structures of nitrato-{2-[2-(1-pyridine-2-ylethylidene)hydrazine]-1,3-benzothiazolo}aquacopper and chloro-{2-[2-phenyl(pyridine-2-ylethylidene)hydrazine]-1,3-benzothiazolo}copper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumakov, Yu. M.; Paholnitcaia, A. Yu.; Petrenko, P. A.; Tsapkov, V. I.; Poirier, D.; Gulea, A. P.

    2015-01-01

    Two crystal modifications of nitrato-{2-[2-(1-pyridine-2-ylethylidene)hydrazine]-1,3-benzothiazolo}aquacopper ( I and II) and two modifications of chloro-{2-[2-phenyl(pyridine-2-ylethylidene)hydrazine]-1,3-benzothiazolo}copper ( III and IV) have been synthesized and studied by X-ray diffraction. In structures I and II, the copper atoms coordinate a monodeprotonated molecule of the organic ligand, nitrate ions, and a water molecule. In crystals of I, the complexes are monomeric, whereas complexes II are linked via nitrate ions to form polymeric chains. In both structures the coordination polyhedron of the copper atom can be described as a distorted tetragonal bipyramid—(4 + 1 + 1) in I and (4 + 2) in II. These coordination polyherdra have different compositions. In structures III and IV, the metal atoms coordinate a monodeprotonated {2-[2-phenyl(pyridine-2-ylethylidene)hydrazine]-1,3-benzothiazole molecule and chloride ions. In III the complex-forming ion has square-planar coordination geometry, whereas structure IV consists of centrosymmetric dimers with two bridging chlorine atoms. It was found that nitrato-{2-[2-(1-pyridine-2-ylethylidene)hydrazine]-1,3-benzothiazolo}aquacopper possesses antitumor activity.

  13. In-Situ Measurement of Hall Thruster Erosion Using a Fiber Optic Regression Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt; Korman, Valentin

    2009-01-01

    One potential life-limiting mechanism in a Hall thruster is the erosion of the ceramic material comprising the discharge channel. This is especially true for missions that require long thrusting periods and can be problematic for lifetime qualification, especially when attempting to qualify a thruster by analysis rather than a test lasting the full duration of the mission. In addition to lifetime, several analytical and numerical models include electrode erosion as a mechanism contributing to enhanced transport properties. However, there is still a great deal of dispute over the importance of erosion to transport in Hall thrusters. The capability to perform an in-situ measurement of discharge channel erosion is useful in addressing both the lifetime and transport concerns. An in-situ measurement would allow for real-time data regarding the erosion rates at different operating points, providing a quick method for empirically anchoring any analysis geared towards lifetime qualification. Erosion rate data over a thruster s operating envelope would also be useful in the modeling of the detailed physics inside the discharge chamber. There are many different sensors and techniques that have been employed to quantify discharge channel erosion in Hall thrusters. Snapshots of the wear pattern can be obtained at regular shutdown intervals using laser profilometry. Many non-intrusive techniques of varying complexity and sensitivity have been employed to detect the time-varying presence of erosion products in the thruster plume. These include the use quartz crystal microbalances, emission spectroscopy, laser induced flourescence, and cavity ring-down spectroscopy. While these techniques can provide a very accurate picture of the level of eroded material in the thruster plume, it is more difficult to use them to determine the location from which the material was eroded. Furthermore, none of the methods cited provide a true in-situ measure of erosion at the channel surface while

  14. Investigation of the direct and indirect electrochemical oxidation of hydrazine in nitric acid medium on platinum; Etude de l`oxydation electrochimique directe et indirecte de l`hydrazine en milieu acide nitrique sur platine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cames, B

    1997-12-31

    In nuclear fuel processing by the PUREX process, the purification of plutonium in nitric acid medium requires the oxidation of Pu(III) to Pu(IV), and of hydrazinium nitrate to nitrogen. The study helped to characterize the electrochemical behavior of the oxidation of hydrazinium nitrate and the reduction of nitric acid to nitrous acid, a compound which can chemically oxidize hydrazinium nitrate and Pu(III). Electro-analytical studies on polycrystalline platinum showed that hydrazine is oxidized in two potential zones, which depend on the surface texture of the platinum anode. Electrolysis in separate compartments, carried out in medium-acid media (2 and 4 mo/l) in the potential zone where these processes take place, showed that, at 0.9 V/ECS, the hydrazine oxidation reactions involved are: a four-electron process (75 %) with nitrogen formation and a one-electron process (25 %) with formation of nitrogen and ammonium ion. By contrast, electrolysis carried out at 0.65 V/ECS (with reactivation of the electrode at - 0.2 V/ECS to remove the poison from the platinum) allowed the selective oxidation of hydrazine to nitrogen by the four-electron reaction. Nitric acid can only be reduced to nitrous acid in the absence of hydrazine. For medium-acid media ({<=} 6 mol/l), this reaction takes place at potentials below - 0.2 V/ECS. However, the production rate of nitrous acid (partial order 0 with respect to nitric acid) is very low compared with the values obtained for strongly-acid media (6 to 10 mol/l) at the potential of - 0.1 V/ECS. Note that, in concentrated nitric medium, the selectivity of the reduction reaction is 47 to 85 % for nitrous acid, depending on the nitric acid concentration (6 to 10 mol/l) and the potential imposed (- 0.1 {<=} E {<=} 0.6 V/ECS). A kinetic study helped to determine the hydrazine oxidation rates as a function of the operating conditions. In all cases, the reaction rate is of partial order 0 with respect to hydrazine. These studies accordingly

  15. Catalytic Decomposition of Hydroxylammonium Nitrate Ionic Liquid: Enhancement of NO Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambreau, Steven D; Popolan-Vaida, Denisia M; Vaghjiani, Ghanshyam L; Leone, Stephen R

    2017-05-18

    Hydroxylammonium nitrate (HAN) is a promising candidate to replace highly toxic hydrazine in monopropellant thruster space applications. The reactivity of HAN aerosols on heated copper and iridium targets was investigated using tunable vacuum ultraviolet photoionization time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometry. The reaction products were identified by their mass-to-charge ratios and their ionization energies. Products include NH3, H2O, NO, hydroxylamine (HA), HNO3, and a small amount of NO2 at high temperature. No N2O was detected under these experimental conditions, despite the fact that N2O is one of the expected products according to the generally accepted thermal decomposition mechanism of HAN. Upon introduction of iridium catalyst, a significant enhancement of the NO/HA ratio was observed. This observation indicates that the formation of NO via decomposition of HA is an important pathway in the catalytic decomposition of HAN.

  16. Effects of facility backpressure on the performance and plume of a Hall thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Mitchell Louis Ronald

    2005-07-01

    This dissertation presents research aimed at understanding the relationship between facility background pressure, Hall thruster performance, and plume characteristics. Due to the wide range of facilities used in Hall thruster testing, it is difficult for researchers to make adequate comparisons between data sets because of both dissimilar instrumentation and backpressures. The differences in the data sets are due to the ingestion of background gas into the Hall thruster discharge channel and charge-exchange collisions in the plume. Thus, this research aims to understand facility effects and to develop the tools needed to allow researchers to obtain relevant plume and performance data for a variety of chambers and backpressures. The first portion of this work develops a technique for calibrating a vacuum chamber in terms of pressure to account for elevated backpressures while testing Hall thrusters. Neutral gas background pressure maps of the Large Vacuum Test Facility are created at a series of cold anode flow rates and one hot flow rate at two UM/AFRL P5 5 kW Hall thruster operating conditions. These data show that a cold flow pressure map can be used to approximate the neutral background pressure in the chamber with the thruster in operation. In addition, the data are used to calibrate a numerical model that accurately predicts facility backpressure within a vacuum chamber of specified geometry and pumping speed. The second portion of this work investigates how facility backpressure influences the plume, plume diagnostics, and performance of the P5 Hall thruster. Measurements of the plume and performance characteristics over a wide range of pressures show that ingestion, a decrease in the downstream plasma potential, and broadening of the ion energy distribution function cause the increase in thrust with backpressure. Furthermore, a magnetically-filtered Faraday probe accurately measures ion current density at elevated operating pressures. The third portion of

  17. Assessment of Cost Impacts of Using Non-Toxic Propulsion in Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiebener, P. J.; Gies, O.; Stuhlberger, J.; Schmitz, H.-D.

    2002-01-01

    The growing costs of space missions, the need for increased mission performance, and concerns associated with environmental issues deeply influence propulsion system design and propellant selection criteria. A propellant's performance was defined in the past exclusively in terms of specific impulse and density, but now high-performance, non-toxic, non-sophisticated mono- propellant systems are key drivers, and are considered for development to replace the traditional hydrazine (N2H4) mono-propellant thrusters. The mono-propellants under consideration are propellant formulations, which should be environmentally friendly, should have a high density, equal or better performance and better thermal characteristics than hydrazine. These considerations raised interest specially in the candidates of Hydroxylammonium Nitrate (HAN)-based propellants, Ammoniumdinitramide (ADN)-based propellants, Tri-ethanol (TEAN)-based propellants, Hydrazinium Nitroformate (HNF)-based propellants, Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2)-based propellants. A near-term objective in consideration of satellite related process optimisation is to significantly reduce on-ground operations costs and at the same time improve mission performance. A far-term objective is to obtain a system presenting a very high performance, illustrated by a high specific impulse. Moving to a "non-toxic" propulsion system seems to be a solution to these two goals. The sought after benefits for non-toxic spacecraft mono-propellant propulsion are under investigation taking into account the four main parameters which are mandatory for customer satisfaction while meeting the price constraints: - Reliability, availability, maintainability and safety, - Manufacturing, assembly, integration and test, - Launch preparation and support, - Ground support equipment. These benefits of non-toxic mono-propellants can be proven by various examples, like an expected reduction of development costs due the non-toxicity of propellants which might allow

  18. Adsorption of hydrazine on the perfect and defective copper (111) surface: A dispersion-corrected DFT study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tafreshi, Saeedeh S.; Roldan, Alberto; Dzade, Nelson Y.; de Leeuw, Nora H.

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the adsorption of hydrazine (N2H4) on perfect and defect-containing copper (111) surfaces by first-principles calculations. The long-range interactions are included in the geometry optimization through the application of the generalised gradient approximation with dispersion cor

  19. In situ synthesis of ceria nanoparticles in the ordered mesoporous carbon as a novel electrochemical sensor for the determination of hydrazine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yue [College of Chemistry, Nankai University, 94 WeiJin Road, Tianjin 300071 (China); Li, Yijun, E-mail: yijunli@nankai.edu.cn [Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin 300071 (China); College of Chemistry, Nankai University, 94 WeiJin Road, Tianjin 300071 (China); He, Xiwen [College of Chemistry, Nankai University, 94 WeiJin Road, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • CeO{sub 2}–OMC composites were prepared via a hydrothermal method. • CeO{sub 2}–OMC had electrocatalytic ability to oxidation of hydrazine. • The sensor had high sensitivity, excellent stability and reproducibility. • The sensor was successfully employed to detect hydrazine in real water samples. - Abstract: A novel ceria (CeO{sub 2})–ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) modified electrode for the sensitive amperometric determination of hydrazine was reported. CeO{sub 2}–OMC composites were synthesized via a hydrothermal method at a relatively low temperature (180 °C) and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microcopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The CeO{sub 2}–OMC modified glassy carbon electrode was characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV) and indicated good electrocatalytic effect to the oxidation of hydrazine. Under the optimized conditions, the present sensor could be used to measure hydrazine in wide linear range from 40 nM to 192 μM (R{sup 2} = 0.999) with a low detection limit of 12 nM (S/N = 3). Additionally, the sensor has been successfully applied to detect hydrazine in real water samples and the recoveries were between 98.2% and 105.6%. Eventually, the sensor exhibited an excellent stability and reproducibility as a promising method for determination of hydrazine.

  20. Astrium Approach For Plume Flow And Impingement Of 10 N Bipropellant Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theroude, Christophe; Scremin, G.; Wartelski, Matias

    2011-05-01

    Plume impingement on spacecraft surfaces due to chemical propulsion is a major concern during satellite operations. Indeed, thrusters plume induces disturbing forces and torques, contamination as well as thermal fluxes on sensitive surfaces. These effects, that have to be accurately predicted, influence the satellite design: thrusters orientation, MLI design, instruments protections, etc. In order to implement an efficient process of analysis, Astrium uses a two steps approach: first the thruster undisturbed flow field is computed, then the impingement on spacecraft surfaces is evaluated. In this paper, Plumflow, the Astrium Satellites software for undisturbed thrusters’ plume computation, is presented. This software is made of several modules in order to accurately compute the flow field in the different parts of the plume. A first module computes the chemistry in the chamber, then Navier-Stokes equations are solved inside the nozzle where the flow is continuous. After that a DSMC code is used for the transitional regime near the thruster lip and finally an hybrid TPMC/source-flow method computes the free molecular far flow field. The studied case is the Astrium GmbH 10 N bipropellant thruster. Some comparisons are presented between Plumflow and Professor G.A. Bird DSMC software DS2V and with DLR experimental data. These comparisons have shown very satisfactory results. Finally, aiming at computing plume impingement, the plume flow field generated with Plumflow has been interfaced with Professor G.A. Bird 3D DSMC software DS3V. The plume impingement simulation is performed by introducing the undisturbed flow field at a boundary of DS3V computational domain. It allows us to evaluate thermal flux distribution due to Astrium 10 N thruster on a plate adjacent to the thruster and to compare with the Astrium plume impingement software.

  1. Recent activities in the development of the MOA thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frischauf, Norbert; Hettmer, Manfred; Grassauer, Andreas; Bartusch, Tobias; Koudelka, Otto

    2008-07-01

    More than 60 years after the later Nobel laureate Hannes Alfvén had published a letter stating that oscillating magnetic fields can accelerate ionised matter via magneto-hydrodynamic interactions in a wave like fashion, the technical implementation of Alfvén waves for propulsive purposes has been proposed, patented and examined for the first time by a group of inventors. The name of the concept, utilising Alfvén waves to accelerate ionised matter for propulsive purposes, is MOA-magnetic field oscillating amplified thruster. Alfvén waves are generated by making use of two coils, one being permanently powered and serving also as magnetic nozzle, the other one being switched on and off in a cyclic way, deforming the field lines of the overall system. It is this deformation that generates Alfvén waves, which are in the next step used to transport and compress the propulsive medium, in theory leading to a propulsion system with a much higher performance than any other electric propulsion system. Based on computer simulations, which were conducted to get a first estimate on the performance of the system, MOA is a corrosion free and highly flexible propulsion system, whose performance parameters might easily be adapted in flight, by changing the mass flow and/or the power level. As such the system is capable to deliver a maximum specific impulse of 13 116 s (12.87 mN) at a power level of 11.16 kW, using Xe as propellant, but can also be attuned to provide a thrust of 236.5 mN (2411 s) at 6.15 kW of power. First tests-that are further described in this paper-have been conducted successfully and underline the feasibility of the concept. While space propulsion is expected to be the prime application for MOA and is supported by numerous applications such as Solar and/or Nuclear Electric Propulsion or even as an "afterburner system" for nuclear thermal propulsion, other terrestrial applications can be thought of as well, making the system highly suited for a common space

  2. Performance Test Results of the NASA-457M v2 Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulas, George C.; Haag, Thomas W.; Herman, Daniel A.; Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani; Shastry, Rohit

    2012-01-01

    Performance testing of a second generation, 50 kW-class Hall thruster labeled NASA-457M v2 was conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center. This NASA-designed thruster is an excellent candidate for a solar electric propulsion system that supports human exploration missions. Thruster discharge power was varied from 5 to 50 kW over discharge voltage and current ranges of 200 to 500 V and 15 to 100 A, respectively. Anode efficiencies varied from 0.56 to 0.71. The peak efficiency was similar to that of other state-of-the-art high power Hall thrusters, but outperformed these thrusters at lower discharge voltages. The 0.05 to 0.18 higher anode efficiencies of this thruster compared to its predecessor were primarily due to which of two stable discharge modes the thruster was operated. One stable mode was at low magnetic field strengths, which produced high anode efficiencies, and the other at high magnetic fields where its predecessor was operated. Cathode keeper voltages were always within 2.1 to 6.2 V and cathode voltages were within 13 V of tank ground during high anode efficiency operation. However, during operation at high magnetic fields, cathode-to-ground voltage magnitudes increased dramatically, exceeding 30 V, due to the high axial magnetic field strengths in the immediate vicinity of the centrally-mounted cathode. The peak thrust was 2.3 N and this occurred at a total thruster input power of 50.0 kW at a 500 V discharge voltage. The thruster demonstrated a thrust-to-power range of 76.4 mN/kW at low power to 46.1 mN/kW at full power, and a specific impulse range of 1420 to 2740 s. For a discharge voltage of 300 V, where specific impulses would be about 2000 s, thrust efficiencies varied from 0.57 to 0.63.

  3. Performance of a Cylindrical Hall-Effect Thruster Using Permanent Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Raitses, Y.; Merino, E.; Fisch, N. J.

    2009-01-01

    While annular Hall thrusters can operate at high efficiency at kW power levels, it is difficult to construct one that operates over a broad envelope from 1 kW down to 100 W while maintaining an efficiency of 45-55%. Scaling to low power while holding the main dimensionless parameters constant requires a decrease in the thruster channel size and an increase in the magnetic field strength. Increasing the magnetic field becomes technically challenging since the field can saturate the miniaturized inner components of the magnetic circuit and scaling down the magnetic circuit leaves very little room for magnetic pole pieces and heat shields. In addition, the central magnetic pole piece defining the interior wall of the annular channel can experience excessive heat loads in a miniaturized Hall thruster, with the temperature eventually exceeding the Curie temperature of the material and in extreme circumstances leading to accelerated erosion of the channel wall. An alternative approach is to employ a cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) geometry. Laboratory model CHTs have operated at power levels ranging from 50 W up to 1 kW. These thrusters exhibit performance characteristics that are comparable to conventional, annular Hall thrusters of similar size. Compared to the annular Hall thruster, the CHTs insulator surface area to discharge chamber volume ratio is lower. Consequently, there is the potential for reduced wall losses in the channel of a CHT, and any reduction in wall losses should translate into lower channel heating rates and reduced erosion, making the CHT geometry promising for low-power applications. This potential for high performance in the low-power regime has served as the impetus for research and development efforts aimed at understanding and improving CHT performance. Recently, a 2.6 cm channel diameter permanent magnet CHT (shown in Fig. 1) was tested. This thruster has the promise of reduced power consumption over previous CHT iterations that employed

  4. Iodine Hall Thruster Propellant Feed System for a CubeSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, Kurt A.

    2014-01-01

    There has been significant work recently in the development of iodine-fed Hall thrusters for in-space propulsion applications.1 The use of iodine as a propellant provides many advantages over present xenon-gas-fed Hall thruster systems. Iodine is a solid at ambient temperature (no pressurization required) and has no special handling requirements, making it safe for secondary flight opportunities. It has exceptionally high ?I sp (density times specific impulse), making it an enabling technology for small satellite near-term applications and providing system level advantages over mid-term high power electric propulsion options. Iodine provides thrust and efficiency that are comparable to xenonfed Hall thrusters while operating in the same discharge current and voltage regime, making it possible to leverage the development of flight-qualified xenon Hall thruster power processing units for the iodine application. Work at MSFC is presently aimed at designing, integrating, and demonstrating a flight-like iodine feed system suitable for the Hall thruster application. This effort represents a significant advancement in state-of-the-art. Though Iodine thrusters have demonstrated high performance with mission enabling potential, a flight-like feed system has never been demonstrated and iodine compatible components do not yet exist. Presented in this paper is the end-to-end integrated feed system demonstration. The system includes a propellant tank with active feedback-control heating, fill and drain interfaces, latching and proportional flow control valves (PFCV), flow resistors, and flight-like CubeSat power and control electronics. Hardware is integrated into a CubeSat-sized structure, calibrated and tested under vacuum conditions, and operated under under hot-fire conditions using a Busek BHT-200 thruster designed for iodine. Performance of the system is evaluated thorugh accurate measurement of thrust and a calibrated of mass flow rate measurement, which is a function of

  5. Spatiotemporal study of gas heating mechanisms in a radio-frequency electrothermal plasma micro-thruster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia eGreig

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A spatiotemporal study of neutral gas temperature during the first 100 s of operation for a radio-frequency electrothermal plasma micro-thruster operating on nitrogen at 60 W and 1.5 Torr is performed to identify the heating mechanisms involved. Neutral gas temperature is estimated from rovibrational band fitting of the nitrogen second positive system. A set of baffles are used to restrict the optical image and separate the heating mechanisms occurring in the central bulk discharge region and near the thruster walls.For each spatial region there are three distinct gas heating mechanisms being fast heating from ion-neutral collisions with timescales of tens of milliseconds, intermediate heating with timescales of 10 s from ion bombardment on the inner thruster tube surface creating wall heating, and slow heating with timescales of 100 s from gradual warming of the entire thruster housing. The results are discussed in relation to optimising the thermal properties of future thruster designs.

  6. Measurements of neutral and ion velocity distribution functions in a Hall thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svarnas, Panagiotis; Romadanov, Iavn; Diallo, Ahmed; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2015-11-01

    Hall thruster is a plasma device for space propulsion. It utilizes a cross-field discharge to generate a partially ionized weakly collisional plasma with magnetized electrons and non-magnetized ions. The ions are accelerated by the electric field to produce the thrust. There is a relatively large number of studies devoted to characterization of accelerated ions, including measurements of ion velocity distribution function using laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic. Interactions of these accelerated ions with neutral atoms in the thruster and the thruster plume is a subject of on-going studies, which require combined monitoring of ion and neutral velocity distributions. Herein, laser-induced fluorescence technique has been employed to study neutral and single-charged ion velocity distribution functions in a 200 W cylindrical Hall thruster operating with xenon propellant. An optical system is installed in the vacuum chamber enabling spatially resolved axial velocity measurements. The fluorescence signals are well separated from the plasma background emission by modulating the laser beam and using lock-in detectors. Measured velocity distribution functions of neutral atoms and ions at different operating parameters of the thruster are reported and analyzed. This work was supported by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  7. Non-Contact Thermal Characterization of NASA's HERMeS Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani; Meyers, James L.; Yim, John T.; Neff, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    The Thermal Characterization Test of NASAs 12.5-kW Hall thruster is being completed. This thruster is being developed to support of a number of potential Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission concepts, including the Asteroid Redirect Robotic Mission concept. As a part of this test, an infrared-based, non-contact thermal imaging system was developed to measure Hall thruster surfaces that are exposed to high voltage or harsh environment. To increase the accuracy of the measurement, a calibration array was implemented, and a pilot test was performed to determine key design parameters for the calibration array. The raw data is analyzed in conjunction with a simplified thermal model of the channel to account for reflection. The reduced data will be used to refine the thruster thermal model, which is critical to the verification of the thruster thermal specifications. The present paper will give an overview of the decision process that led to identification of the need for a non-contact temperature diagnostic, the development of said diagnostic, the measurement results, and the simplified thermal model of the channel.

  8. Research of the Fault Diagnosis Method for the Thruster of AUV Based on Information Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Jia; Zhang, Ming-Jun; Wu, Juan

    Aiming at the problem of thruster fault diagnosis of AUV, the motion condition model of AUV based on the improved dynamic recursive Elman neural network, and the performance model of thruster based on the Radial Basis Function network were established. And the fault fusion diagnosis method was proposed according to the overall and local fault detection. Through comparing the output value of motion condition model with the measured value of actual speed and angle, it obtained the overall fault information. Also, it obtained the direct fault information through analyzing the residual which was produced by comparing the output of the performance model with the measured value of the actual voltage and current of the each thruster. According to the decision level information fusion of two kinds of information, it realized the fault diagnosis of thrusters and analyzed the fault degree and reliability. The results of the fault-simulation experiment show that the proposed fault fusion diagnosis method for the thruster of AUV is feasible and effective.

  9. Development of a Micro-Thruster Test Facility which fulfils the LISA requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hey, Franz Georg; Keller, A.; Johann, U.; Braxmaier, C.; Tajmar, M.; Fitzsimons, E.; Weise, D.

    2015-05-01

    In the context of investigations for a sufficient attitude control thruster for LISA, we have developed a thruster test facility which consists of a highly precise thrust balance coupled with plasma diagnostics. In parallel to the test facility development, investigations to downscale a High Efficiency Multistage Plasma Thruster (HEMP-T) are also being carried out. The thruster has been used to demonstrate the measurement capabilities of the facility. The setup allows a parallel operation of all instruments and can also be used for other types of μN propulsion systems including cold gas thrusters. The thrust balance consists of two pendulums. As read out a heterodyne laser interferometer is used. Differential wave front sensing (DWS) enables the measurement of the pendulum tilt which, via suitable calibration using an electrostatic comb, can be converted to a thrust. The whole setup is a symmetric configuration enabling a common-mode rejection of the dominant noise sources (e.g. seismic noise etc.). The thrust balance has a demonstrated precision of 0.1 μN. Based on our unique design, this precision can be attained down to 10-3 Hz. Thus, the measurement setup is especially suitable for characterising the thrust noise of potential eLISA propulsion candidates. We give an overview of the design, the present performance and the future plans.

  10. Liquid phase synthesis: preparation of co microspheres by hydrazine reducing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Y.; Lu, Z. Q.; Xie, F.; Liang, H.; Wang, Y. J.; Du, X. H.

    2017-01-01

    The study synthesizes Co microspheres with perfect spherical shape by use hydrazine hydrate as reducing agent to reduce CoCl2 in alkaline conditions at room temperature, the influence of NaOH addition amount on crystal morphology and structure of cobalt particle were studied. The results show that, under the condition of concentration of NaOH, 0.030g ml-1 and having ethylene glycol as solvent, are the best choice to synthesize Co microspheres, and the grain is smaller, suitable for industrial production. At the condition of less amount of NaOH, cobalt particle's surface is smooth spherical, and with the increase of NaOH, particles will deviate from the spherical morphology and the surface become rough. The first section in your paper

  11. A simple hydrazine based molecule for selective detection of Fluoride ion in DMSO

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ADDITI ROY CHOWDHURY; PRIYABRATA BANERJEE

    2017-04-01

    A newly synthesized hydrazine-functionalized Schiff base chemoreceptor [N¹N³−bis(4-cyanobenzylidene) isophthalahydrazide], NBCBIH has been prepared and successfully utilized for selective detection of Fluoride ion. Herein, NH and C=N-like functional units have been incorporated which providebetter colorimetric response compared to systems where such kind of units are absent. On exposure to F⁻, NBCBIH turns from almost colorless to yellow. The recognition is well-supported by UV-Vis, fluorescence and ¹H-NMR in DMSO. The fluorescence quenching is well-explained by photoinduced electron transfer mechanism (PET). The limit of detection of F− with NBCBIH is 0.7 × 10⁻⁴M.

  12. Theoretical Studies of Structure, Spectroscopy, and Properties of a New Hydrazine Derivative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajar Sahebalzamani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We will report a combined experimental and theoretical study on molecular structure, vibrational spectra, and energies of (E-1-(2,4-dinitrophenyl-2-[(4-methylphenylmethylidene]hydrazine (1. The molecular geometry and vibrational frequencies and energies in the ground state are calculated by using HF and DFT levels of theory with 6-311G basis sets. The calculated HOMO and LUMO energies also confirm that charge transfer occurs within the molecule. The harmonic vibrational frequencies were calculated, and the scaled values have been compared with experimental FTIR and FT-Raman spectra. The observed and the calculated frequencies are found to be in good agreement. The experimental spectra also coincide satisfactorily with those of theoretically constructed bar-type spectrograms.

  13. Cubic Copper Hexacyanoferrates Nanoparticles: Facile Template-Free Deposition and Electrocatalytic Sensing Towards Hydrazine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingxing Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cubic copper hexacyanoferrate (CuHCF nanoparticles prepared via electrolytic deposition are presented with their morphology and crystalline structure characterized with SEM and XRD. The advantage of this methodology is that it allows the fabrication of uniform cubic nanoparticles with permeable structures onto the desired underlying electrode substrate. It was observed that the CuHCF film acts as a permeable membrane for cations such as K+, Na+, Li+, and NH4+ with a selection order of K+> Li+>NH4+> Na+. Furthermore, the analytical utility of these cubic-like CuHCF morphologies supported on a glassy carbon electrode was evaluated towards the electrochemical oxidation of hydrazine which was found to exhibit a linear response over the range 66 M to 17 mM with a detection limit corresponding to 16.5 M.

  14. Superior supercapacitor electrode material from hydrazine hydrate modified porous polyacrylonitrile fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Lu, Chunxiang; Wang, Junzhong; Yan, Hua; Zhang, Shouchun

    2016-03-01

    A hierarchical porous carbon fiber with high nitrogen doping was fabricated for high-performance supercapacitor. For the purpose of high nitrogen retention, the porous polyacrylonitrile fiber was treated by hydrazine hydrate, and then underwent pre-oxidation, carbonization, and activation in sequence. The resulted material exhibited high nitrogen content of 7.82 at.%, large specific surface area of 1963.3m2 g-1, total pore volume of 1.523cm3 g-1, and the pores with size range of 1-4nm were account for 49.1%. Due to these features, the high reversible capacitance of 415F g-1 and the good performance in heavy load discharge were obtained. In addition, the amazing cyclability was observed after 10,000 circles without capacitance fading.

  15. Local charge transport properties of hydrazine reduced monolayer graphene oxide sheets prepared under pressure condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryuzaki, Sou; Meyer, Jakob Abild Stengaard; Petersen, Søren Vermehren

    2014-01-01

    Charge transport properties of chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets prepared by treatment with hydrazine were examined using conductive atomic force microscopy. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of monolayer RGO sheets prepared under atmospheric pressure followed an exponentially...... increase due to 2D variable-range hopping conduction through small graphene domains in an RGO sheet containing defect regions of residual sp3carbon clusters bonded to oxygen groups, whereas RGO sheets prepared in a closed container under moderate pressure showed linear I-V characteristics...... with a conductivity of 267.2-537.5S/m. It was found that the chemical reduction under pressure results in larger graphene domains (sp2networks) in the RGO sheets when compared to that prepared under atmospheric pressure, indicating that the present reduction of GO sheets under the pressure is one of the effective...

  16. Template-free Synthesis of One-dimensional Cobalt Nanostructures by Hydrazine Reduction Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Tianmin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One-dimensional cobalt nanostructures with large aspect ratio up to 450 have been prepared via a template-free hydrazine reduction route under external magnetic field assistance. The morphology and properties of cobalt nanostructures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometer, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The roles of the reaction conditions such as temperature, concentration, and pH value on morphology and magnetic properties of fabricated Co nanostructures were investigated. This work presents a simple, low-cost, environment-friendly, and large-scale production approach to fabricate one-dimensional magnetic Co materials. The resulting materials may have potential applications in nanodevice, catalytic agent, and magnetic recording.

  17. Chemosensing ability of hydroxynaphthylidene derivatives of hydrazine towards Cu2+: Experimental and computational studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jayaraman Dessingiou; Jayshree K Khedkar; Chebrolu P Rao

    2014-07-01

    2-Hydroxynaphthylidene derivatives of hydrazine, namely L1, L2 and L3, were synthesized by going through two-step reactions and the products were characterized. The ion recognition properties of these receptors were studied using fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy. The receptors were found to be sensitive and selective towards Cu2+ in methanol solution among the 13 metal ions studied, namely Mn2+, Fe2+, Co2+, Ni2+, Cu2+, Zn2+, Cd2+, Hg2+, Pb2+, Na+, K+, Ca2+ and Mg2+, by exhibiting switch off fluorescence. The stoichiometry of the complexed species was found to be 2:1. The fluorescence quenching with Cu2+ is in the order of L1 > L2 > L3. These conjugates were also found to act as colorimetric sensors for Cu2+ in solution by exhibiting visual colour change. The 2:1 complex shows a centrosymmetric structure based on DFT computations.

  18. Precursor combustion synthesis of nanocrystalline cobalt substituted nickel zinc ferrites from hydrazinated mixed metal fumarates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gawas, S.G.; Verenkar, V.M.S., E-mail: vmsv@rediffmail.com

    2015-04-10

    Highlights: • Convenient synthesis of hydrazinated mixed metal fumarates under nitrogen atmosphere. • Six hydrazine molecules in precursor provide high exothermicity for the decomposition. • Autocatalytic decomposition of precursors helps in ferritization at 410 °C. • Single domain-superparamagnetic particles of uniform size in the range of 15–30 nm. - Abstract: In present investigation, a systematic approach towards synthesis of nanocrystalline ferrites, Co{sub x}Ni{sub 0.6−x}Zn{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} (x = 0.1 and 0.4) has been reported by room temperature decomposition of precursors, Co{sub x}Ni{sub 0.6−x}Zn{sub 0.4}Fe{sub 2} (C{sub 4}H{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 3}·6N{sub 2}H{sub 4} (x = 0.1 and 0.4). The precursor complexes were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), chemical analysis and thermal studies like isothermal mass loss, total mass loss, thermogravimetry (TG), derivative of thermogravimetry (DTG) and differential thermal analysis (DTA). The TG–DTG–DTA patterns of both precursors reveal multistep decomposition with complete ferritization at 410 °C. The thermally decomposed products were characterized by X-ray diffractometry (XRD) for phase purity. The FT-IR spectroscopy studies of the same shows complete removal of all organic moieties from decomposed precursors. The nanophasic nature of synthesized ferrites was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis as well as from broadening of XRD peaks. The AC magnetization studies show the existence of single domain and superparamagnetic particles, which supports nanosize particles distribution in the ferrite system under study.

  19. The ISR Asymmetrical Capacitor Thruster: Experimental Results and Improved Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Francis X.; Cole, John; Campbell, Jonathan; Winet, Edwin

    2004-01-01

    A variety of Asymmetrical Capacitor Thrusters has been built and tested at the Institute for Scientific Research (ISR). The thrust produced for various voltages has been measured, along with the current flowing, both between the plates and to ground through the air (or other gas). VHF radiation due to Trichel pulses has been measured and correlated over short time scales to the current flowing through the capacitor. A series of designs were tested, which were increasingly efficient. Sharp features on the leading capacitor surface (e.g., a disk) were found to increase the thrust. Surprisingly, combining that with sharp wires on the trailing edge of the device produced the largest thrust. Tests were performed for both polarizations of the applied voltage, and for grounding one or the other capacitor plate. In general (but not always) it was found that the direction of the thrust depended on the asymmetry of the capacitor rather than on the polarization of the voltage. While no force was measured in a vacuum, some suggested design changes are given for operation in reduced pressures.

  20. A low power pulsed arcjet thruster for spacecraft propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmes, Gary Francis

    1997-11-01

    An electrothermal thruster that operates in a pulsed mode at low power (pendulum-type thrust stand, and input power levels from 24 to 119 watts are determined from measurements of pulse rate and breakdown voltage. A maximum specific impulse of 305 seconds is achieved with 38% efficiency. A time-dependent, quasi-1D numerical model is developed to evaluate energy losses in the pulsed arcjet. The numerical model uses a time-marching procedure and the MacCormack predictor-corrector algorithm. Viscous and heat transfer effects are incorporated though a friction factor and an average heat transfer coefficient. A numerical study of nozzle parameters, capillary geometry, wall temperature, and pulse energy shows that the performance is insensitive to capillary and nozzle geometry and that thermal characteristics are the dominant factor affecting performance. The specific impulse and efficiency of the pulsed arcjet are found to be sensitive to wall temperature due to heat transfer losses in the subsonic region. A pulse-forming electrical circuit is developed to reduce energy losses in the storage capacitor, and greater than 85% of the initial stored energy is transferred to the arc in a unipolar pulse. A high current diode installed across the capacitor terminals is used to eliminate voltage reversals in the current. The experimental breakdown voltage of the helium gas between the electrodes is found to follow a Paschen relationship where the minimum electrode separation distance is used in evaluating the data.

  1. Characteristics of plasma properties in an ablative pulsed plasma thruster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenherr, Tony; Nees, Frank; Arakawa, Yoshihiro [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Komurasaki, Kimiya [Department of Advanced Energy, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan); Herdrich, Georg [Institute of Space Systems (IRS), University of Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart, Baden-Wuerttemberg (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    Pulsed plasma thrusters are electric space propulsion devices which create a highly transient plasma bulk in a short-time arc discharge that is expelled to create thrust. The transitional character and the dependency on the discharge properties are yet to be elucidated. In this study, optical emission spectroscopy and Mach-Zehnder interferometry are applied to investigate the plasma properties in variation of time, space, and discharge energy. Electron temperature, electron density, and Knudsen numbers are derived for the plasma bulk and discussed. Temperatures were found to be in the order of 1.7 to 3.1 eV, whereas electron densities showed maximum values of more than 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}. Both values showed strong dependency on the discharge voltage and were typically higher closer to the electrodes. Capacitance and time showed less influence. Knudsen numbers were derived to be in the order of 10{sup -3}-10{sup -2}, thus, indicating a continuum flow behavior in the main plasma bulk.

  2. Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) Material Applications for Thruster Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elam, Sandra; Holmes, Richard; Hickman, Robert

    2006-01-01

    A variety of vacuum plasma spray (VPS) material systems have been successfully applied to injector and thrust chamber components. VPS offers a versatile fabrication process with relatively low costs to produce near net shape parts. The materials available with VPS increase operating margins and improve component life by providing superior thermal and oxidation protection in specific engine environments. Functional gradient materials (FGM) formed with VPS allow thrust chamber liners to be fabricated with GRCop-84 (an alloy of copper, chrome, and niobium) and a protective layer of NiCrAlY on the hot wall. A variety of thrust chamber liner designs have been fabricated to demonstrate the versatility of the process. Hot-fire test results have confined the improved durability and high temperature performance of the material systems for thrust chamber liners. Similar FGM s have been applied to provide superior thermal protection on injector faceplates with NiCrAlY and zirconia coatings. The durability of the applied materials has been demonstrated with hot-fire cycle testing on injector faceplates in high temperature environments. The material systems can benefit the components used in booster and main engine propulsion systems. More recent VPS efforts are focused on producing rhenium based material systems for high temperature applications to benefit in-space engines like reaction control system (RCS) thrusters.

  3. Kinetic models for the VASIMR thruster helicon plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batishchev, Oleg; Molvig, Kim

    2001-10-01

    Helicon gas discharge [1] is widely used by industry because of its remarkable efficiency [2]. High energy and fuel efficiencies make it very attractive for space electrical propulsion applications. For example, helicon plasma source is used in the high specific impulse VASIMR [3] plasma thruster, including experimental prototypes VX-3 and upgraded VX-10 [4] configurations, which operate with hydrogen (deuterium) and helium plasmas. We have developed a set of models for the VASIMR helicon discharge. Firstly, we use zero-dimensional energy and mass balance equations to characterize partially ionized gas condition/composition. Next, we couple it to one-dimensional hybrid model [6] for gas flow in the quartz tube of the helicon. We compare hybrid model results to a purely kinetic simulation of propellant flow in gas feed + helicon source subsystem. Some of the experimental data [3-4] are explained. Lastly, we discuss full-scale kinetic modeling of coupled gas and plasmas [5-6] in the helicon discharge. [1] M.A.Lieberman, A.J.Lihtenberg, 'Principles of ..', Wiley, 1994; [2] F.F.Chen, Plas. Phys. Contr. Fus. 33, 339, 1991; [3] F.Chang-Diaz et al, Bull. APS 45 (7) 129, 2000; [4] J.Squire et al., Bull. APS 45 (7) 130, 2000; [5] O.Batishchev et al, J. Plasma Phys. 61, part II, 347, 1999; [6] O.Batishchev, K.Molvig, AIAA technical paper 2000-3754, -14p, 2001.

  4. Thrust Stand Characterization of the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamant, Kevin D.; Pollard, James E.; Crofton, Mark W.; Patterson, Michael J.; Soulas, George C.

    2010-01-01

    Direct thrust measurements have been made on the NASA Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) ion engine using a standard pendulum style thrust stand constructed specifically for this application. Values have been obtained for the full 40-level throttle table, as well as for a few off-nominal operating conditions. Measurements differ from the nominal NASA throttle table 10 (TT10) values by 3.1 percent at most, while at 30 throttle levels (TLs) the difference is less than 2.0 percent. When measurements are compared to TT10 values that have been corrected using ion beam current density and charge state data obtained at The Aerospace Corporation, they differ by 1.2 percent at most, and by 1.0 percent or less at 37 TLs. Thrust correction factors calculated from direct thrust measurements and from The Aerospace Corporation s plume data agree to within measurement error for all but one TL. Thrust due to cold flow and "discharge only" operation has been measured, and analytical expressions are presented which accurately predict thrust based on thermal thrust generation mechanisms.

  5. Oxygen-hydrogen thrusters for Space Station auxiliary propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkman, D. K.

    1984-01-01

    The feasibility and technology requirements of a low-thrust, high-performance, long-life, gaseous oxygen (GO2)/gaseous hydrogen (GH2) thruster were examined. Candidate engine concepts for auxiliary propulsion systems for space station applications were identified. The low-thrust engine (5 to 100 lb sub f) requires significant departure from current applications of oxygen/hydrogen propulsion technology. Selection of the thrust chamber material and cooling method needed or long life poses a major challenge. The use of a chamber material requiring a minimum amount of cooling or the incorporation of regenerative cooling were the only choices available with the potential of achieving very high performance. The design selection for the injector/igniter, the design and fabrication of a regeneratively cooled copper chamber, and the design of a high-temperature rhenium chamber were documented and the performance and heat transfer results obtained from the test program conducted at JPL using the above engine components presented. Approximately 115 engine firings were conducted in the JPL vacuum test facility, using 100:1 expansion ratio nozzles. Engine mixture ratio and fuel-film cooling percentages were parametrically investigated for each test configuration.

  6. MHD seawater thruster performance: A comparison of predictions with experimental results from a two Tesla test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Picologlou, B.F.; Doss, E.D.; Geyer, H.K. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Sikes, W.C.; Ranellone, R.F. (Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., VA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    A two Tesla test facility was designed, built, and operated to investigate the performance of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) seawater thrusters. The results of this investigation are used to validate a design oriented MHD thruster performance computer code. The thruster performance code consists of a one-dimensional MHD hydrodynamic model coupled to a two-dimensional electrical model. The code includes major loss mechanisms affecting the performance of the thruster. Among these losses are the joule dissipation losses, frictional losses, electrical end losses, and single electrode potential losses. The facility test loop, its components, and their design are presented in detail. Additionally, the test matrix and its rationale are discussed. Representative experimental results of the test program are presented, and are compared to pretest computer model predictions. Good agreement between predicted and measured data has served to validate the thruster performance computer models.

  7. Hydrocarbon-Seeded Ignition System for Small Spacecraft Thrusters Using Ionic Liquid Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Merkley, Daniel P.; Eilers, Shannon D.; Taylor, Terry L.

    2013-01-01

    "Green" propellants based on Ionic-liquids (ILs) like Ammonium DiNitramide and Hydroxyl Ammonium Nitrate have recently been developed as reduced-hazard replacements for hydrazine. Compared to hydrazine, ILs offer up to a 50% improvement in available density-specific impulse. These materials present minimal vapor hazard at room temperature, and this property makes IL's potentially advantageous for "ride-share" launch opportunities where hazards introduced by hydrazine servicing are cost-prohibitive. Even though ILs present a reduced hazard compared to hydrazine, in crystalline form they are potentially explosive and are mixed in aqueous solutions to buffer against explosion. Unfortunately, the high water content makes IL-propellants difficult to ignite and currently a reliable "coldstart" capability does not exist. For reliable ignition, IL-propellants catalyst beds must be pre-heated to greater than 350 C before firing. The required preheat power source is substantial and presents a significant disadvantage for SmallSats where power budgets are extremely limited. Design and development of a "micro-hybrid" igniter designed to act as a "drop-in" replacement for existing IL catalyst beds is presented. The design requires significantly lower input energy and offers a smaller overall form factor. Unlike single-use "squib" pyrotechnic igniters, the system allows the gas generation cycle to be terminated and reinitiated on demand.

  8. AQUEOUS N-HETEROCYCLIZATION OF PRIMARY AMINES AND HYDRAZINES WITH DIHALIDES: MICROWAVE-ASSISTED SYNTHESES OF N-AZACYCLOALKANES, ISOINDOLE, PYRAZOLE, PYRAZOLIDINE AND PHTHALAZINE DERIVATIVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The synthesis of nitrogen-containing heterocycles from alkyl dihalides (ditosylates) and primary amines and hydrazines via a simple and efficient cyclocondensation in alkaline aqueous medium that occurs under microwave irradiation is described. This improved greener synthetic met...

  9. Reduced power processor requirements for the 30-cm diameter HG ion thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlin, V. K.

    1979-01-01

    The characteristics of power processors strongly impact the overall performance and cost of electric propulsion systems. A program was initiated to evaluate simplifications of the thruster-power processor interface requirements. The power processor requirements are mission dependent with major differences arising for those missions which require a nearly constant thruster operating point (typical of geocentric and some inbound planetary missions) and those requiring operation over a large range of input power (such as outbound planetary missions). This paper describes the results of tests which have indicated that as many as seven of the twelve power supplies may be eliminated from the present Functional Model Power Processor used with 30-cm diameter Hg ion thrusters.

  10. Description of the Prometheus Program Alternator/Thruster Integration Laboratory (ATIL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baez, Anastacio N.; Birchenough, Arthur G.; Lebron-Velilla, Ramon C.; Gonzalez, Marcelo C.

    2005-01-01

    The Project Prometheus Alternator Electric Thruster Integration Laboratory's (ATIL) primary two objectives are to obtain test data to influence the power conversion and electric propulsion systems design, and to assist in developing the primary power quality specifications prior to system Preliminary Design Review (PDR). ATIL is being developed in stages or configurations of increasing fidelity and complexity in order to support the various phases of the Prometheus program. ATIL provides a timely insight of the electrical interactions between a representative Permanent Magnet Generator, its associated control schemes, realistic electric system loads, and an operating electric propulsion thruster. The ATIL main elements are an electrically driven 100 kWe Alternator Test Unit (ATU), an alternator controller using parasitic loads, and a thruster Power Processing Unit (PPU) breadboard. This paper describes the ATIL components, its development approach, preliminary integration test results, and current status.

  11. Estimate of Lifetime of Ion Thruster Optics Based on Particle Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chang; TANG Haibin; ZHANG Zhenpeng; GU Zuo; LIU Yu

    2008-01-01

    A three-dimensional particle simulation of ion thruster optics with charge-exchange collision was developed in this study. The simulation code was based on tracking ions using the particle-in-cell method, and the Monte Carlo technique was used to model the charge-exchange collision. Simulations were performed for a 20 cm ion thruster optics. The results were compared with the corresponding experimental data from a test of the ion thruster optics for a duration of 800 hours. The Depth-From-Focus (DFF) method was used to measure the erosion depth of the downstream surface of the accelerator grid. The predicted erosion depth of the accelerator grid was consistent reasonably with the corresponding experimental data. The simulation results showed that the accelerator grid would be burned through after 1333 hours.

  12. Effect of Background Pressure on the Performance and Plume of the HiVHAc Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani; Haag, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    During the Single String Integration Test of the NASA HiVHAc Hall thruster, a number of plasma diagnostics were implemented to study the effect of varying facility background pressure on thruster operation. These diagnostics include thrust stand, Faraday probe, ExB probe, and retarding potential analyzer. The test results indicated a rise in thrust and discharge current with background pressure. There was also a decrease in ion energy per charge, an increase in multiply-charged species production, a decrease in plume divergence, and a decrease in ion beam current with increasing background pressure. A simplified ingestion model was applied to determine the maximum acceptable background pressure for thrust measurement. The maximum acceptable ingestion percentage was found to be around 1%. Examination of the diagnostics results suggest the ionization and acceleration zones of the thruster were shifting upstream with increasing background pressure.

  13. Prediction and experimental measurement of the electromagnetic thrust generated by a microwave thruster system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Juan; Wang Yu-Quan; Ma Yan-Jie; Li Peng-Fei; Yang Le; Wang Yang; He Guo-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    A microwave thruster system that can convert microwave power directly to thrust without a gas propellant is developed.In the system,a cylindrical tapered resonance cavity and a magnetron microwave source are used respectively as the thruster cavity and the energy source to generate the electromagnetic wave.The wave is radiated into and then reflected from the cavity to form a pure standing wave with non-uniform electromagnetic pressure distribution.Consequently,a net electromagnetic thrust exerted on the axis of the thruster cavity appears,which is demonstrated through theoretical calculation based on the electromagnetic theory.The net electromagnetic thrust is also experimentally measured in the range from 70 mN to 720 mN when the microwave output power is from 80 W to 2500 W.

  14. Characterization of ion accelerating systems on NASA LeRC's ion thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlin, Vincent K.

    1992-01-01

    An investigation is conducted regarding ion-accelerating systems for two NASA thrusters to study the limits of ion-extraction capability or perveance. A total of nine two-grid ion-accelerating systems are tested with the 30- and 50-cm-diam ring-cusp inert-gas ion thrusters emphasizing the extension of ion-extraction. The vacuum-tank testing is described using xenon, krypton, and argon propellants, and thruster performance is computed with attention given to theoretical design considerations. Reductions in perveance are noted with decreasing accelerator-hole-to-screen-hole diameter ratios. Perveance values vary indirectly with the ratio of discharge voltage to total accelerating voltage, and screen/accelerator electrode hole-pair alignment is also found to contribute to perveance values.

  15. Nanostructured SnO{sub 2} encapsulated guar-gum hybrid nanocomposites for electrocatalytic determination of hydrazine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Priya [Department of Applied Chemistry & Polymer Technology, Delhi Technological University, Shahbad Daulatpur, Main Bawana Road, Delhi 110042 (India); Srivastava, Manish [Department of Physics & Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Verma, Ranjana [Solar Energy Material Laboratory, Department of Energy, Tezpur University, Tezpur, Assam 784 028 (India); Kumar, Manish [Department of Applied Chemistry & Polymer Technology, Delhi Technological University, Shahbad Daulatpur, Main Bawana Road, Delhi 110042 (India); Kumar, D., E-mail: dkumar@dce.ac.in [Department of Applied Chemistry & Polymer Technology, Delhi Technological University, Shahbad Daulatpur, Main Bawana Road, Delhi 110042 (India); Singh, Jay, E-mail: jay_singh143@yahoo.co.in [Department of Applied Chemistry & Polymer Technology, Delhi Technological University, Shahbad Daulatpur, Main Bawana Road, Delhi 110042 (India)

    2016-01-01

    The present article deals with synthesis of sol–gel derived tin dioxide (SnO{sub 2}) nanoparticles encapsulated in to guar gum (GG) biopolymer as the organic–inorganic hybrid materials for the determination of hydrazine. The organic–inorganic hybrid combines the perfunctory strength offered by the inorganic SnO{sub 2} nanoparticles with flexible binding sites provided by the organic biopolymer (GG) solution by the ultrasonication. The phase identification, crystalline size, surface morphology and optical properties of prepared SnO{sub 2} and SnO{sub 2}-GG nanocomposites has been investigated through FT-IR, XRD, SEM, AFM, TEM, UV–Vis, and PL techniques. The colloidal solution of SnO{sub 2} and GG is electrophoretically deposited (EPD) onto the indium tin-oxide (ITO) glass substrate and studied for the electrooxidation of hydrazine. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the linearity between the current response and the hydrazine concentration has been obtained in the range of 2–22 mM, with a low detection limit of 2.76 mM and a high sensitivity of 5.72 μA cm{sup −2}. Based on the linear increase in amperometric current, a sensitive hydrazine electrochemical sensor is constructed. The proposed SnO{sub 2}-GG/ITO electrode shows a good response time (35 s), reproducibility, and long-term stability. The obtained results suggest that SnO{sub 2}-GG nanocomposites electrode provides a favorable sensing platform for the electrochemical studies. In addition, the cyclic voltammetry (CV) studies are used to evaluate the kinetic parameters. - Graphical abstract: Synthesis of sol–gel derived tin dioxide (SnO{sub 2}) nanoparticles grafted in to gaur gum (GG) organic–inorganic hybrid nanocomposite for determination of hydrazine (HZ). Under optimized experimental conditions, SnO{sub 2}-GG/ITO electrode shows, linearity 2–22 mM, and detection limit 2.769 mM with high sensitivity of 5.72 μA cm{sup −2}. The results clearly suggest that SnO{sub 2}-GG

  16. Ion Current Density Study of the NASA-300M and NASA-457Mv2 Hall Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wensheng; Shastry, Rohit; Herman, Daniel A.; Soulas, George C.; Kamhawi, Hani

    2012-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center is developing a Hall thruster in the 15-50 kW range to support future NASA missions. As a part of the process, the performance and plume characteristics of the NASA-300M, a 20-kW Hall thruster, and the NASA-457Mv2, a 50-kW Hall thruster, were evaluated. The collected data will be used to improve the fidelity of the JPL modeling tool, Hall2De, which will then be used to aid the design of the 15-50 kW Hall thruster. This paper gives a detailed overview of the Faraday probe portion of the plume characterization study. The Faraday probe in this study is a near-field probe swept radially at many axial locations downstream of the thruster exit plane. Threshold-based integration limits with threshold values of 1/e, 1/e(sup 2), and 1/e(sup 3) times the local peak current density are tried for the purpose of ion current integration and divergence angle calculation. The NASA-300M is operated at 7 conditions and the NASA-457Mv2 at 14 conditions. These conditions span discharge voltages of 200 to 500 V and discharge power of 10 to 50 kW. The ion current density profiles of the near-field plume originating from the discharge channel are discovered to strongly resemble Gaussian distributions. A novel analysis approach involving a form of ray tracing is used to determine an effective point of origin for the near-field plume. In the process of performing this analysis, definitive evidence is discovered that showed the near-field plume is bending towards the thruster centerline.

  17. Implementation and Initial Validation of a 100-Kilowatt Class Nested-Channel Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Scott J.; Florenz, Roland E.; Gallimore, Alec D.; Kamhawi, Hani; Brown, Daniel L.; Polk, James E.; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard R.

    2014-01-01

    The X3 is a 100-kilowatt class nested-channel Hall thruster developed by the Plasmadynamics and Electric Propulsion Laboratory at the University of Michigan in collaboration with the Air Force Research Laboratory and NASA. The cathode, magnetic circuit, boron nitride channel rings, and anodes all required specific design considerations during thruster development, and thermal modeling was used to properly account for thermal growth in material selection and component design. A number of facility upgrades were required at the University of Michigan to facilitate operation of the X3. These upgrades included a re-worked propellant feed system, a completely redesigned power and telemetry break-out box, and numerous updates to thruster handling equipment. The X3 was tested on xenon propellant at two current densities, 37% and 73% of the nominal design value. It was operated to a maximum steady-state discharge power of 60.8 kilowatts. The tests presented here served as an initial validation of thruster operation. Thruster behavior was monitored with telemetry, photography and high-speed current probes. The photography showed a uniform plume throughout testing. At constant current density, reductions in mass flow rate of 18% and 26% were observed in the three-channel operating configuration as compared to the superposition of each channel running individually. The high-speed current probes showed that the thruster was stable at all operating points and that the channels influence each other when more than one is operating simultaneously. Additionally, the ratio of peak-to-peak AC-coupled discharge current oscillations to mean discharge current did not exceed 51% for any operating points reported here, and did not exceed 17% at the higher current density.

  18. Restudy of the Ground Vibrational State of Hydrazine Using the Generalized IAM-like Treatment for the Amino-Wagging Tunneling Motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyka, Jan; Ohashi, Nobukimi

    2001-05-01

    The amino-wagging tunneling process in hydrazine was treated using the generalized IAM-like method developed by Hougen and Coudert, and Hamiltonian matrix elements were derived for each symmetry species in the combined group-theoretical and IAM-like treatment. Ground state microwave absorption transition data of hydrazine were least squares analyzed again in this treatment to determine axis switching angles for the amino-wagging tunneling process. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  19. Effect of Background Pressure on the Plasma Oscillation Characteristics of the HiVHAc Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wensheng; Kamhawi, Hani; Lobbia, Robert B.; Brown, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    During a component compatibility test of the NASA HiVHAc Hall thruster, a high-speed camera and a set of high-speed Langmuir probes were implemented to study the effect of varying facility background pressure on thruster operation. The results show a rise in the oscillation frequency of the breathing mode with rising background pressure, which is hypothesized to be due to a shortening accelerationionization zone. An attempt is made to apply a simplified ingestion model to the data. The combined results are used to estimate the maximum acceptable background pressure for performance and wear testing.

  20. Experimental study of a low-thrust measurement system for thruster ground tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Jingsong; Hou, Lingyun; Zhao, Wenhua

    2014-03-01

    The development of thrusters used for the control of position and orbit of micro-satellites requires thrust stands that can measure low thrust. A new method to measure low thrust is presented, and the measuring device is described. The test results show that the thrust range is up to 1000 mN, the measurement error of the device is lower than ±1% of full scale, and the drift of the zero offset is less than ±1% of full scale. Its response rise time is less than 15 ms. It is employed to measure the working process of a model chemical thruster with repeatability.

  1. NASA's Evolutionary Xenon Thruster (NEXT) Prototype Model 1R (PM1R) Ion Thruster and Propellant Management System Wear Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanNoord, Jonathan L.; Soulas, George C.; Sovey, James S.

    2010-01-01

    The results of the NEXT wear test are presented. This test was conducted with a 36-cm ion engine (designated PM1R) and an engineering model propellant management system. The thruster operated with beam extraction for a total of 1680 hr and processed 30.5 kg of xenon during the wear test, which included performance testing and some operation with an engineering model power processing unit. A total of 1312 hr was accumulated at full power, 277 hr at low power, and the remainder was at intermediate throttle levels. Overall ion engine performance, which includes thrust, thruster input power, specific impulse, and thrust efficiency, was steady with no indications of performance degradation. The propellant management system performed without incident during the wear test. The ion engine and propellant management system were also inspected following the test with no indication of anomalous hardware degradation from operation.

  2. Use of activated enol ethers in the synthesis of pyrazoles: reactions with hydrazine and a study of pyrazole tautomerism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denisa Tarabová

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Activated enol ethers derived from esters or the dinitrile of malonic acid, or from pentane-2,4-dione were treated with hydrazine hydrate. The structures of the obtained products – pyrazoles 5 – were studied with a focus on tautomerism and supramolecular structure. A reverse addition of the reagents led to the isolation of two novel products, namely bis-enehydrazines 6 with an unsymmetrical arrangement of the formally equivalent subunits.

  3. Effects of Methanol, Methylamine, Formate, N, N-Dimethylhydroxylamine and Formaldehyde on Determining the Methyl Hydrazine Concentration Using Paradime Thylaminobenzaldehyde

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Chuan-bo; CAO; Zhi; BIAN; Xiao-yan; XIAN; Liang; YAN; Tai-hong; ZHENG; Wei-fang

    2012-01-01

    <正>To make sure the feasibility of determining the concentrations of methyl hydrazine (MMH) in 1BP and 2BP using paradime thylaminobenzaldehyde. Researches were done to measure the effects of methanol, methylamine, formate, N, N-dimethylhydroxylamine (DMHAN) and formaldehyde on the method. Though paradime thylaminobenzaldehyde took place condensation reaction with methanol and methylamine, the resultant’s absorbance was zero in 470 nm. So methanol and methylamine did not affect the method of determing the MMH by paradime thylaminobenzaldehyde.

  4. Three-dimensionally grown thorn-like Cu nanowire arrays by fully electrochemical nanoengineering for highly enhanced hydrazine oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianfei; Zhao, Shunan; Chen, Wei; Zhou, Ying; Yang, Xiaoling; Zhu, Yihua; Li, Chunzhong

    2016-03-01

    This communication reports fully electrochemical nanoengineering toward three-dimensionally grown thorn-like Cu nanowire arrays (CNWAs) as a highly efficient and durable electrocatalyst for hydrazine oxidation. Characterized by substantial negative shifting of the onset potential and an enlarged catalytic current density, the CNWAs afforded greatly enhanced hydrazine oxidation activity, even transcending that of the Pt/C catalyst at a higher reaction rate. The parameters of the electrochemical engineering and metallization methods were found to be essentially influential on the microstructure, and thus the electrocatalytic activity of the CNWAs. The present work typifies a flexible and expandible route toward integrated electrodes of metallic 1D nanostructures which are of interest in advancing the performance of cutting-edge electrochemical applications.This communication reports fully electrochemical nanoengineering toward three-dimensionally grown thorn-like Cu nanowire arrays (CNWAs) as a highly efficient and durable electrocatalyst for hydrazine oxidation. Characterized by substantial negative shifting of the onset potential and an enlarged catalytic current density, the CNWAs afforded greatly enhanced hydrazine oxidation activity, even transcending that of the Pt/C catalyst at a higher reaction rate. The parameters of the electrochemical engineering and metallization methods were found to be essentially influential on the microstructure, and thus the electrocatalytic activity of the CNWAs. The present work typifies a flexible and expandible route toward integrated electrodes of metallic 1D nanostructures which are of interest in advancing the performance of cutting-edge electrochemical applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, additional figures and table. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06512g

  5. N'-[5-(4-Nitro-phen-yl)furan-2-yl-methyl-idene]-N,N-diphenyl-hydrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Angel; Cabrera-Vivas, Blanca M; Meléndrez-Luevano, Ruth; Pacheco-Álvarez, Teresa; Carranza, Vladimir

    2010-07-17

    The title compound, C(23)H(17)N(3)O(3), has an E configuration with respect to the C=N bond. The dihedral angle between the two phenyl rings bonded to the hydrazine group is 86.45 (13)°. The furan ring makes dihedral angles of 3.4 (2) and 7.06 (13)°, respectively, with the methyl-idenehydrazine C=N-N plane and the benzene ring.

  6. Reduction of Sulphur-containing Aromatic Nitro Compounds with Hydrazine Hydrate over Iron(Ⅲ) Oxide-MgO Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Sulphur-containing aromatic amines were prepared efficiently in good to excellent yields by reduction of the corresponding sulphur-containing aromatic nitro compounds with hydrazine hydrate in the presence of iron(Ⅲ) oxide-MgO catalyst. The catalyst exhibited high activity and stability for the reduction of sulphur-containing aromatic nitro compounds. The yields of sulphur-containing aromatic amines were up to 91-99 % at 355 K after reduction for 1-4 h over this catalyst.

  7. An advanced electric propulsion diagnostic (AEPD) platform for in-situ characterization of electric propulsion thrusters and ion beam sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundesmann, Carsten; Eichhorn, Christoph; Scholze, Frank; Spemann, Daniel; Neumann, Horst; Pagano, Damiano; Scaranzin, Simone; Scortecci, Fabrizio; Leiter, Hans J.; Gauter, Sven; Wiese, Ruben; Kersten, Holger; Holste, Kristof; Köhler, Peter; Klar, Peter J.; Mazouffre, Stéphane; Blott, Richard; Bulit, Alexandra; Dannenmayer, Käthe

    2016-10-01

    Experimental characterization is an essential task in development, qualification and optimization process of electric propulsion thrusters or ion beam sources for material processing, because it can verify that the thruster or ion beam source fulfills the requested mission or application requirements, and it can provide parameters for thruster and plasma modeling. Moreover, there is a need for standardizing electric propulsion thruster diagnostics in order to make characterization results of different thrusters and also from measurements performed in different vacuum facilities reliable and comparable. Therefore, we have developed an advanced electric propulsion diagnostic (AEPD) platform, which allows a comprehensive in-situ characterization of electric propulsion thrusters (or ion beam sources) and could serve as a standard on-ground tool in the future. The AEPD platform uses a five-axis positioning system and provides the option to use diagnostic tools for beam characterization (Faraday probe, retarding potential analyzer, ExB probe, active thermal probe), for optical inspection (telemicroscope, triangular laser head), and for thermal characterization (pyrometer, thermocamera). Here we describe the capabilities of the diagnostic platform and provide first experimental results of the characterization of a gridded ion thruster RIT- μX.

  8. Preliminary Results of Performance Measurements on a Cylindrical Hall-Effect Thruster with Magnetic Field Generated by Permanent Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polzin, K. A.; Raitses, Y.; Merino, E.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-01-01

    The performance of a low-power cylindrical Hall thruster, which more readily lends itself to miniaturization and low-power operation than a conventional (annular) Hall thruster, was measured using a planar plasma probe and a thrust stand. The field in the cylindrical thruster was produced using permanent magnets, promising a power reduction over previous cylindrical thruster iterations that employed electromagnets to generate the required magnetic field topology. Two sets of ring-shaped permanent magnets are used, and two different field configurations can be produced by reorienting the poles of one magnet relative to the other. A plasma probe measuring ion flux in the plume is used to estimate the current utilization for the two magnetic configurations. The measurements indicate that electron transport is impeded much more effectively in one configuration, implying a higher thrust efficiency. Preliminary thruster performance measurements on this configuration were obtained over a power range of 100-250 W. The thrust levels over this power range were 3.5-6.5 mN, with anode efficiencies and specific impulses spanning 14-19% and 875- 1425 s, respectively. The magnetic field in the thruster was lower for the thrust measurements than the plasma probe measurements due to heating and weakening of the permanent magnets, reducing the maximum field strength from 2 kG to roughly 750-800 G. The discharge current levels observed during thrust stand testing were anomalously high compared to those levels measured in previous experiments with this thruster.

  9. Noble metal-free hydrazine fuel cell catalysts: EPOC effect in competing chemical and electrochemical reaction pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria-Chinchilla, Jean; Asazawa, Koichiro; Sakamoto, Tomokazu; Yamada, Koji; Tanaka, Hirohisa; Strasser, Peter

    2011-04-13

    We report the discovery of a highly active Ni-Co alloy electrocatalyst for the oxidation of hydrazine (N(2)H(4)) and provide evidence for competing electrochemical (faradaic) and chemical (nonfaradaic) reaction pathways. The electrochemical conversion of hydrazine on catalytic surfaces in fuel cells is of great scientific and technological interest, because it offers multiple redox states, complex reaction pathways, and significantly more favorable energy and power densities compared to hydrogen fuel. Structure-reactivity relations of a Ni(60)Co(40) alloy electrocatalyst are presented with a 6-fold increase in catalytic N(2)H(4) oxidation activity over today's benchmark catalysts. We further study the mechanistic pathways of the catalytic N(2)H(4) conversion as function of the applied electrode potential using differentially pumped electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS). At positive overpotentials, N(2)H(4) is electrooxidized into nitrogen consuming hydroxide ions, which is the fuel cell-relevant faradaic reaction pathway. In parallel, N(2)H(4) decomposes chemically into molecular nitrogen and hydrogen over a broad range of electrode potentials. The electroless chemical decomposition rate was controlled by the electrode potential, suggesting a rare example of a liquid-phase electrochemical promotion effect of a chemical catalytic reaction ("EPOC"). The coexisting electrocatalytic (faradaic) and heterogeneous catalytic (electroless, nonfaradaic) reaction pathways have important implications for the efficiency of hydrazine fuel cells. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  10. Comparative studies on single-layer reduced graphene oxide films obtained by electrochemical reduction and hydrazine vapor reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhijuan; Wu, Shixin; Zhang, Juan; Chen, Peng; Yang, Guocheng; Zhou, Xiaozhu; Zhang, Qichun; Yan, Qingyu; Zhang, Hua

    2012-02-01

    The comparison between two kinds of single-layer reduced graphene oxide (rGO) sheets, obtained by reduction of graphene oxide (GO) with the electrochemical method and hydrazine vapor reduction, referred to as E-rGO and C-rGO, respectively, is systematically studied. Although there is no morphology difference between the E-rGO and C-rGO films adsorbed on solid substrates observed by AFM, the reduction process to obtain the E-rGO and C-rGO films is quite different. In the hydrazine vapor reduction, the nitrogen element is incorporated into the obtained C-rGO film, while no additional element is introduced to the E-rGO film during the electrochemical reduction. Moreover, Raman spectra show that the electrochemical method is more effective than the hydrazine vapor reduction method to reduce the GO films. In addition, E-rGO shows better electrocatalysis towards dopamine than does C-rGO. This study is helpful for researchers to understand these two different reduction methods and choose a suitable one to reduce GO based on their experimental requirements.

  11. Enzyme-free electrochemical immunosensor based on methylene blue and the electro-oxidation of hydrazine on Pt nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Gorachand; Nagarajan, Sureshbabu; Lapidus, Lisa J; Lillehoj, Peter B

    2017-06-15

    Enzyme-free electrochemical sensors enable rapid, high sensitivity measurements without the limitations associated with enzyme reporters. However, the performance of non-enzymatic electrochemical sensors tends to suffer from slow electrode kinetics and poor signal stability. We report a new enzyme-free electrochemical immunosensor based on a unique competitive detection scheme using methylene blue (MB), hydrazine and platinum nanoparticles (Pt NPs). This scheme is coupled with a robust immunosandwich format employing a MB-labelled detection antibody as a non-enzymatic reporter. In the presence of the target antigen, surface-immobilized MB consumes interfacial hydrazine thereby diminishing the electro-oxidation of hydrazine on Pt NPs. Thus, the concentration of the antigen is directly proportional to the reduction in the electrochemical signal. For proof-of-concept, this sensor was used to detect Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2 (PfHRP2), an important malaria biomarker, in unadulterated human saliva samples. Chronocoulometric measurements showed that this platform exhibits pM-range sensitivity, high specificity and good reproducibility, making it well suited for many biosensing applications including noninvasive diagnostic testing.

  12. Silver nanoparticles sensitized C60(Ag@C60) as efficient electrocatalysts for hydrazine oxidation: Implication for hydrogen generation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narwade, Shankar S.; Mulik, Balaji B.; Mali, Shivsharan M.; Sathe, Bhaskar R.

    2017-02-01

    Herein, we report the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs; 10 ± 0.5 nm) sensitized Fullerene (C60; 15 ±2 nm) nanocatalysts (Ag@C60) for the first time showing efficient electroatalytic activity for the oxidation of hydrazine demonstrating activity comparable to that of Pt in acidic, neutral and basic media. The performance is comparable with the best available electrocatalytic system and plays a vital role in the overall hydrogen generation reactions from hydrazine as a one of the fuel cell reaction. The materials are synthesized by a simple and scalable synthetic route involving acid functionalization of C60 followed by chemical reduction of Ag+ ions in ethylene glycol at high temperature. The distributation of Silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) (morphological information) on C60, bonding, its crystal structure, along with activity towards hydrazine oxidation (electrocatalytic) is studied using TEM, XRD, UV-vis, XPS, FTIR and electrochemical (cyclic voltammetry) studies, respectively. The observed efficient electrocatalytic activity of the as-synthesized electrode is attributed to the co-operative response and associated structural defects due to their oxidative functionalization along with thier cooperative functioning at nanodimensions.

  13. Derivatization Ion Chromatography for the Determination of Monoethanolamine in Presence of Hydrazine in PHWR Steam-Water Circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayushi D.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple, rapid and accurate method for the determination of monoethanolamine (MEA in PHWR steam-water circuits has been developed. MEA is added in the feed water to provide protection against corrosion while hydrazine is added to scavenge dissolved oxygen. The quantitative determination of MEA in presence of hydrazine was accomplished using derivatization ion chromatography with conductometric detection in nonsuppressed mode. A Metrosep cation 1-2 analytical column and a Metrosep cartridge were used for cation separation. A mixture of 4 mM tartaric acid, 20% acetone and 0.05 mM HNO3 was used as eluent. Acetone in the mobile phase leads to the formation of different derivatives with MEA and hydrazine. The interferences due Na+ and NH4 + were eliminated by adopting a simple pretreatment procedure employing OnGuard-H cartridge. The limit of detection limit of MEA was 0.1 μg mL−1 and the relative standard deviation was 2% for the overall method. The recovery of MEA added was in the range 95%–102%. The method was applied to the determination of MEA in steam generator water samples.

  14. Space Technology: Game Changing Development Deep Space Engine (DSE) 100 lbf and 5 lbf Thruster Development and Qualification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Science mission studies require spacecraft propulsion systems that are high-performance, lightweight, and compact. Highly matured technology and low-cost, short development time of the propulsion system are also very desirable. The Deep Space Engine (DSE) 100-lbf thruster is being developed to meet these needs. The overall goal of this game changing technology project is to qualify the DSE thrusters along with 5-lbf attitude control thrusters for space flight and for inclusion in science and exploration missions. The aim is to perform qualification tests representative of mission duty cycles. Most exploration missions are constrained by mass, power and cost. As major propulsion components, thrusters are identified as high-risk, long-lead development items. NASA spacecraft primarily rely on 1960s' heritage in-space thruster designs and opportunities exist for reducing size, weight, power, and cost through the utilization of modern materials and advanced manufacturing techniques. Advancements in MON-25/MMH hypergolic bipropellant thrusters represent a promising avenue for addressing these deficiencies with tremendous mission enhancing benefits. DSE is much lighter and costs less than currently available thrusters in comparable thrust classes. Because MON-25 propellants operate at lower temperatures, less power is needed for propellant conditioning for in-space propulsion applications, especially long duration and/or deep-space missions. Reduced power results in reduced mass for batteries and solar panels. DSE is capable of operating at a wide propellant temperature range (between -22 F and 122 F) while a similar existing thruster operates between 45 F and 70 F. Such a capability offers robust propulsion operation as well as flexibility in design. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center evaluated available operational Missile Defense Agency heritage thrusters suitable for the science and lunar lander propulsion systems.

  15. Failure Investigation of an Intra-Manifold Explosion in a Horizontally-Mounted 870 lbf Reaction Control Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durning, Joseph G., III; Westover, Shayne C.; Cone, Darren M.

    2011-01-01

    In June 2010, an 870 lbf Space Shuttle Orbiter Reaction Control System Primary Thruster experienced an unintended shutdown during a test being performed at the NASA White Sands Test Facility. Subsequent removal and inspection of the thruster revealed permanent deformation and misalignment of the thruster valve mounting plate. Destructive evaluation determined that after three nominal firing sequences, the thruster had experienced an energetic event within the fuel (monomethylhydrazine) manifold at the start of the fourth firing sequence. The current understanding of the phenomenon of intra-manifold explosions in hypergolic bipropellant thrusters is documented in literature where it is colloquially referred to as a ZOT. The typical ZOT scenario involves operation of a thruster in a gravitational field with environmental pressures above the triple point pressure of the propellants. Post-firing, when the thruster valves are commanded closed, there remains a residual quantity of propellant in both the fuel and oxidizer (nitrogen tetroxide) injector manifolds known as the "dribble volume". In an ambient ground test configuration, these propellant volumes will drain from the injector manifolds but are impeded by the local atmospheric pressure. The evacuation of propellants from the thruster injector manifolds relies on the fluids vapor pressure to expel the liquid. The higher vapor pressure oxidizer will evacuate from the manifold before the lower vapor pressure fuel. The localized cooling resulting from the oxidizer boiling during manifold draining can result in fuel vapor migration and condensation in the oxidizer passage. The liquid fuel will then react with the oxidizer that enters the manifold during the next firing and may produce a localized high pressure reaction or explosion within the confines of the oxidizer injector manifold. The typical ZOT scenario was considered during this failure investigation, but was ultimately ruled out as a cause of the explosion

  16. Testing of an Arcjet Thruster with Capability of Direct-Drive Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Adam K.; Polzin, Kurt A.; Eskridge, Richard H.; Smith, James W.; Schoenfeld, Michael P.; Riley, Daniel P.

    2015-01-01

    Electric thrusters typically require a power processing unit (PPU) to convert the spacecraft provided power to the voltage-current that a thruster needs for operation. Testing has been initiated to study whether an arcjet thruster can be operated directly with the power produced by solar arrays without any additional conversion. Elimination of the PPU significantly reduces system-level complexity of the propulsion system, and lowers developmental cost and risk. The work aims to identify and address technical questions related to power conditioning and noise suppression in the system and heating of the thruster in long-duration operation. The apparatus under investigation has a target power level from 400-1,000 W. However, the proposed direct-drive arcjet is potentially a highly scalable concept, applicable to solar-electric spacecraft with up to 100's of kW and beyond. A direct-drive electric propulsion system would be comprised of a thruster that operates with the power supplied directly from the power source (typically solar arrays) with no further power conditioning needed between those two components. Arcjet thrusters are electric propulsion devices, with the power supplied as a high current at low voltage; of all the different types of electric thruster, they are best suited for direct drive from solar arrays. One advantage of an arcjet over Hall or gridded ion thrusters is that for comparable power the arcjet is a much smaller device and can provide more thrust and orders of magnitude higher thrust density (approximately 1-10 N/sq m), albeit at lower I(sub sp) (approximately 800-1000 s). In addition, arcjets are capable of operating on a wide range of propellant options, having been demonstrated on H2, ammonia, N2, Ar, Kr, Xe, while present SOA Hall and ion thrusters are primarily limited to Xe propellant. Direct-drive is often discussed in terms of Hall thrusters, but they require 250-300 V for operation, which is difficult even with high-voltage solar

  17. Experimental Demonstration of Microwave Signal/Electric Thruster Plasma Interaction Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Afroz J.; Lambert, Kevin M.; Curran, Frank M.

    1995-01-01

    An experiment was designed and conducted in the Electric Propulsion Laboratory of NASA Lewis Research Center to assess the impact of ion thruster exhaust plasma plume on electromagnetic signal propagation. A microwave transmission experiment was set up inside the propulsion test bed using a pair of broadband horn antennas and a 30 cm 2.3 kW ion thruster. Frequency of signal propagation covered from 6.5 to 18 GHz range. The stainless steel test bed when enclosed can be depressurized to simulate a near vacuum environment. A pulsed CW system with gating hardware was utilized to eliminate multiple chamber reflections from the test signal. Microwave signal was transmitted and received between the two hours when the thruster was operating at a given power level in such a way that the signal propagation path crossed directly through the plume volume. Signal attenuation and phase shift due to the plume was measured for the entire frequency band. Results for this worst case configuration simulation indicate that the effects of the ion thruster plume on microwave signals is a negligible attenuation (within 0.15 dB) and a small phase shift (within 8 deg.). This paper describes the detailed experiment and presents some of the results.

  18. Power Dependence of the Electron Mobility Profile in a Hall Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorns, Benjamin A.; Hofery, Richard H.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.

    2014-01-01

    The electron mobility profile is estimated in a 4.5 kW commercial Hall thruster as a function of discharge power. Internal measurements of plasma potential and electron temperature are made in the thruster channel with a high-speed translating probe. These measurements are presented for a range of throttling conditions from 150 - 400 V and 0.6 - 4.5 kW. The fluid-based solver, Hall2De, is used in conjunction with these internal plasma parameters to estimate the anomalous collision frequency profile at fixed voltage, 300 V, and three power levels. It is found that the anomalous collision frequency profile does not change significantly upstream of the location of the magnetic field peak but that the extent and magnitude of the anomalous collision frequency downstream of the magnetic peak does change with thruster power. These results are discussed in the context of developing phenomenological models for how the collision frequency profile depends on thruster operating conditions.

  19. Revolutionizing Space Propulsion Through the Characterization of Iodine as Fuel for Hall-Effect Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    propellant was successfully operated through a BHT -200 thruster in the T6 vacuum facility at Busek Co. Inc. A feed system for the iodine was developed...15  Figure 4: Overall experimental setup of the vacuum ........................................................ 26  Figure 5: BHT -200...and BHC-1500, side view ................................................................. 27  Figure 6: Busek BHT -200 and BHC-1500, front view

  20. A Strategy to Characterize the LISA-Pathfinder Cold Gas Thruster System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; Gallegos, J.; Garcia Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L. I.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Lloro, I.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Martin, V.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Moroni, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2015-05-01

    The cold gas micro-propulsion system that will be used during the LISA-Pathfinder mission will be one of the most important component used to ensure the "free-fall" of the enclosed test masses. In this paper we present a possible strategy to characterize the effective direction and amplitude gain of each of the 6 thrusters of this system.