WorldWideScience

Sample records for monopole detectors based

  1. Sierpinski-Based Conical Monopole Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vsetula

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Planar Sierpinski monopole exhibits a multi-band behavior, but its parameters in operation frequency bands are not optimal. By mapping the Sierpinski monopole on a conical surface, a symmetrical three-dimensional (3-D structure is obtained. In this way, a larger bandwidth and a better radiation pattern is achieved. The symmetrical 3D Sierpinski-based monopole is an original contribution of this paper. In the paper, different versions of the conical Sierpinski-based monopole are designed, and results of simulations performed in CST Microwave Studio are mutually compared. Then, the simulated versions of the conical monopole are optimized according to specified criteria. The optimized conical Sierpinski-based monopole is manufactured and its properties are experimentally verified. Results of measuring the Sierpinski-based conical monopole antenna are published here for the first time.

  2. Search for Dirac Magnetic Monopoles in $e^{+}e^{-}$ Collisions with the OPAL Detector at LEP2

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, K.W.; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, R.M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Cozzi, M.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.M.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, J.W.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giunta, M.; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krasznahorkay Jr., A.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Letts, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, P.; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, N.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; O'Neale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, D.E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Rossi, A.M.; Rozen, Y.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, M.; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, D.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2008-01-01

    This letter describes a direct search for pair produced magnetic monopoles in e+e- collisions. The analysis is based on 62.7 pb^-1 of data collected with the OPAL detector at an average centre-of-mass energy of sqrt(s)= 206.3GeV. The monopole signal was assumed to be characterized by two back-to-back particles with an anomalously high ionization energy loss de/dx in the tracking chambers. No evidence for production of monopoles was observed. Upper limits were obtained on the magnetic monopole pair-production cross-section (sigma) in the mass range 45 GeV/c^2monopole mass. The cross-section limit is derived at the 95% confidence level and is valid for spin-1/2 magnetic monopoles.

  3. Magnetic monopole search with the MoEDAL test trapping detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katre Akshay

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available IMoEDAL is designed to search for monopoles produced in high-energy Large Hadron Collider (LHC collisions, based on two complementary techniques: nucleartrack detectors for high-ionisation signatures and other highly ionising avatars of new physics, and trapping volumes for direct magnetic charge measurements with a superconducting magnetometer. The MoEDAL test trapping detector array deployed in 2012, consisting of over 600 aluminium samples, was analysed and found to be consistent with zero trapped magnetic charge. Stopping acceptances are obtained from a simulation of monopole propagation in matter for a range of charges and masses, allowing to set modelindependent and model-dependent limits on monopole production cross sections. Multiples of the fundamental Dirac magnetic charge are probed for the first time at the LHC.

  4. Search for relativistic magnetic monopoles with the AMANDA-II detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wissing, Henrike

    2009-02-25

    Cherenkov emissions of magnetically charged particles passing through a transparent medium will exceed those of electrically charged particles by several orders of magnitude. The Antarctic Muon And Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA), a neutrino telescope utilizing the glacial ice at the geographic South Pole as Cherenkov medium, is capable of efficiently detecting relativistic magnetic monopoles that may pass through its sensitive volume. This thesis presents the search for Cherenkov signatures from relativistic magnetic monopoles in data taken with AMANDA during the 2000. No such signal is observed in the data, and the analysis allows to place upper limits on the flux of relativistic magnetic monopoles. The limit obtained for monopoles reaching the detector from below the horizon, i.e., those monopoles that are capable of crossing the Earth, is the most stringent experimental constraint on the flux of magnetic monopoles to date: Dependent on the monopole speed, the flux limit (at 90% confidence level) varies between 3.8 x 10{sup -17} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}sr{sup -1} (for monopoles moving at the vacuum speed of light) and 8.8 x 10{sup -16} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}sr{sup -1} (for monopoles moving at a speed just above the Cherenkov threshold). The limit obtained for monopoles reaching the detector from above the horizon is less stringent by roughly an order of magnitude, owing to the much larger background from down-going atmospheric muons. This looser limit is valid for a larger class of magnetic monopoles, since the monopole's capability to pass through the Earth is not a requirement. (orig.)

  5. The Search for Highly Ionizing Particles in e$^{+}$e$^{-}$ Collisions at LEP using (MODAL) (MOnopole Detector At Lep)

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The experiment is designed to search for highly ionizing particles such as the monopole and the dyon. On the assumption that monopole-antimonopole pairs are produced via a virtual photon intermediate state, and have a mass in the range 0-100~GeV, a direct search for Dirac monopoles using e$^+$e$^-$ annihilation carries a distinct cross-sectional advantage over a search using hadron colliders.\\\\ \\\\ The MODAL detector is formed from Lexan/CR-39 dielectric track detector modules arranged in a polyhedral configuration outside of the vacuum pipe and around the intersection region, as shown on the opposite page. Etchable track detectors are more sensitive to particles at normal incidence, the shape of the detector was chosen with this fact in mind to allow for maximum acceptance of monopoles which leave the beam pipe. These dielectric track detectors will enable us to detect particles with magnetic charge: 20e$<$g$ _{d}

  6. Search for magnetic monopoles in $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV pp collisions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abbott, Brad; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdel Khalek, Samah; Abdelalim, Ahmed Ali; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abi, Babak; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Acerbi, Emilio; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Addy, Tetteh; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adragna, Paolo; Adye, Tim; Aefsky, Scott; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Agustoni, Marco; Aharrouche, Mohamed; Ahlen, Steven; Ahles, Florian; Ahmad, Ashfaq; Ahsan, Mahsana; Aielli, Giulio; Akdogan, Taylan; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimoto, Ginga; Akimov, Andrei; Alam, Mohammad; Alam, Muhammad Aftab; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alessandria, Franco; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexandre, Gauthier; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Aliev, Malik; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alison, John; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Allwood-Spiers, Sarah; Almond, John; Aloisio, Alberto; Alon, Raz; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amako, Katsuya; Amelung, Christoph; Ammosov, Vladimir; Amorim, Antonio; Amram, Nir; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Anduaga, Xabier; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonaki, Ariadni; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aoun, Sahar; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Apolle, Rudi; Arabidze, Giorgi; Aracena, Ignacio; Arai, Yasuo; Arce, Ayana; Arfaoui, Samir; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Arik, Engin; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnault, Christian; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Arutinov, David; Asai, Shoji; Asfandiyarov, Ruslan; Ask, Stefan; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astbury, Alan; Atkinson, Markus; Aubert, Bernard; Auge, Etienne; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Avramidou, Rachel Maria; Axen, David; Azuelos, Georges; Azuma, Yuya; Baak, Max; Baccaglioni, Giuseppe; Bacci, Cesare; Bach, Andre; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Badescu, Elisabeta; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bahinipati, Seema; Bai, Yu; Bailey, David; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baker, Mark; Baker, Sarah; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Piyali; Banerjee, Swagato; Banfi, Danilo; Bangert, Andrea Michelle; Bansal, Vikas; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Baranov, Sergei; Barbaro Galtieri, Angela; Barber, Tom; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Bardin, Dmitri; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Barrillon, Pierre; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartsch, Valeria; Bates, Richard; Batkova, Lucia; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Andreas; Battistin, Michele; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beale, Steven; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becks, Karl-Heinz; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bedikian, Sourpouhi; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Begel, Michael; Behar Harpaz, Silvia; Beimforde, Michael; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, Paul; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellina, Francesco; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belloni, Alberto; Beloborodova, Olga; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Benoit, Mathieu; Bensinger, James; Benslama, Kamal; Bentvelsen, Stan; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Berglund, Elina; Beringer, Jürg; Bernat, Pauline; Bernhard, Ralf; Bernius, Catrin; Berry, Tracey; Bertella, Claudia; Bertin, Antonio; Bertolucci, Federico; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Besson, Nathalie; Bethke, Siegfried; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Bierwagen, Katharina; Biesiada, Jed; Biglietti, Michela; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biscarat, Catherine; Bitenc, Urban; Black, Kevin; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanchot, Georges; Blazek, Tomas

    2012-01-01

    This Letter presents a search for magnetic monopoles with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider using an integrated luminosity of 2.0 fb$^{-1}$ of pp collisions recorded at a center-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV. No event is found in the signal region, leading to an upper limit on the production cross section at 95% confidence level of 2 fb for Dirac magnetic monopoles with the minimum unit magnetic charge and with mass between 200 GeV and 1500 GeV. No assumption about the production mechanism is made for this result, which is valid in the fiducial region given by pseudorapidity |$\\eta$| < 1.37 and transverse kinetic energy 600-700 < $E^{kin} sin\\theta$ < 1400 GeV. The minimum value of 700 GeV is for monopoles of mass 200 GeV, whereas the minimum value of 600 GeV is applicable for higher mass monopoles. Assuming the kinematic distributions from Drell-Yan pair production of spin-1/2 Dirac magnetic monopoles, the upper limit on the cross section at 95% confidence level varies from...

  7. Search for magnetic monopoles with the MoEDAL prototype trapping detector in 8 TeV proton-proton collisions at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acharya, B. [Theoretical Particle Physics & Cosmology Group, Physics Dept., King’s College London (United Kingdom); International Centre for Theoretical Physics, Trieste (Italy); Alexandre, J. [Theoretical Particle Physics & Cosmology Group, Physics Dept., King’s College London (United Kingdom); Bendtz, K. [Physics Department, Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Benes, P. [IEAP, Czech Technical University in Prague (Czech Republic); Collaboration: The MoEDAL collaboration; and others

    2016-08-10

    The MoEDAL experiment is designed to search for magnetic monopoles and other highly-ionising particles produced in high-energy collisions at the LHC. The largely passive MoEDAL detector, deployed at Interaction Point 8 on the LHC ring, relies on two dedicated direct detection techniques. The first technique is based on stacks of nuclear-track detectors with surface area ∼18 m{sup 2}, sensitive to particle ionisation exceeding a high threshold. These detectors are analysed offline by optical scanning microscopes. The second technique is based on the trapping of charged particles in an array of roughly 800 kg of aluminium samples. These samples are monitored offline for the presence of trapped magnetic charge at a remote superconducting magnetometer facility. We present here the results of a search for magnetic monopoles using a 160 kg prototype MoEDAL trapping detector exposed to 8 TeV proton-proton collisions at the LHC, for an integrated luminosity of 0.75 fb{sup −1}. No magnetic charge exceeding 0.5g{sub D} (where g{sub D} is the Dirac magnetic charge) is measured in any of the exposed samples, allowing limits to be placed on monopole production in the mass range 100 GeV≤m≤ 3500 GeV. Model-independent cross-section limits are presented in fiducial regions of monopole energy and direction for 1g{sub D}≤|g|≤6g{sub D}, and model-dependent cross-section limits are obtained for Drell-Yan pair production of spin-1/2 and spin-0 monopoles for 1g{sub D}≤|g|≤4g{sub D}. Under the assumption of Drell-Yan cross sections, mass limits are derived for |g|=2g{sub D} and |g|=3g{sub D} for the first time at the LHC, surpassing the results from previous collider experiments.

  8. Search for magnetic monopoles with the MoEDAL prototype trapping detector in 8 TeV proton-proton collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, B.

    2016-08-10

    The MoEDAL experiment is designed to search for magnetic monopoles and other highly-ionising particles produced in high-energy collisions at the LHC. The largely passive MoEDAL detector, deployed at Interaction Point 8 on the LHC ring, relies on two dedicated direct detection techniques. The first technique is based on stacks of nuclear-track detectors with surface area $\\sim$18 m$^2$, sensitive to particle ionisation exceeding a high threshold. These detectors are analysed offline by optical scanning microscopes. The second technique is based on the trapping of charged particles in an array of roughly 800 kg of aluminium samples. These samples are monitored offline for the presence of trapped magnetic charge at a remote superconducting magnetometer facility. We present here the results of a search for magnetic monopoles using a 160 kg prototype MoEDAL trapping detector exposed to 8 TeV proton-proton collisions at the LHC, for an integrated luminosity of 0.75 fb$^{-1}$. No magnetic charge exceeding $0.5g_{\\rm...

  9. Search for magnetic monopoles with the MoEDAL prototype trapping detector in 8 TeV proton-proton collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The MoEDAL experiment is designed to search for magnetic monopoles and other highly-ionising particles produced in high-energy collisions at the LHC. The largely passive MoEDAL detector, deployed at Interaction Point 8 on the LHC ring, relies on two dedicated direct detection techniques. The first technique is based on stacks of nuclear-track detectors with surface area ∼18 m2, sensitive to particle ionisation exceeding a high threshold. These detectors are analysed offline by optical scanning microscopes. The second technique is based on the trapping of charged particles in an array of roughly 800 kg of aluminium samples. These samples are monitored offline for the presence of trapped magnetic charge at a remote superconducting magnetometer facility. We present here the results of a search for magnetic monopoles using a 160 kg prototype MoEDAL trapping detector exposed to 8 TeV proton-proton collisions at the LHC, for an integrated luminosity of 0.75 fb−1. No magnetic charge exceeding 0.5gD (where gD is ...

  10. Search for magnetic monopoles with the MoEDAL prototype trapping detector in 8 TeV proton-proton collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, B.

    2016-01-01

    The MoEDAL experiment is designed to search for magnetic monopoles and other highly-ionising particles produced in high-energy collisions at the LHC. The largely passive MoEDAL detector, deployed at Interaction Point 8 on the LHC ring, relies on two dedicated direct detection techniques. The first technique is based on stacks of nuclear-track detectors with surface area $\\sim$18 m$^2$, sensitive to particle ionisation exceeding a high threshold. These detectors are analysed offline by optical scanning microscopes. The second technique is based on the trapping of charged particles in an array of roughly 800 kg of aluminium samples. These samples are monitored offline for the presence of trapped magnetic charge at a remote superconducting magnetometer facility. We present here the results of a search for magnetic monopoles using a 160 kg prototype MoEDAL trapping detector exposed to 8 TeV proton-proton collisions at the LHC, for an integrated luminosity of 0.75 fb$^{-1}$. No magnetic charge exceeding $0.5g_{\\rm...

  11. Possible detection of super massive very slow GUTS monopole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, A. E.

    A conceptual design idea for a detector of super massive very slow grand unified theories (GUTS) monopoles is discussed. The idea is based on the total stopping power due to the field energy generated by the supercurrents when a slowly moving monopole β ≍ 10-4 passes through a superconductor. The detector incorporates a superconducting Al disc with dimensions chosen for maximum phonon thermalization energy, surrounded by an array of plastic scintillators to provide a monopole trigger and cosmic ray veto. The integrated system acts as a velocity filter for very slow Dirac galactic monopoles.

  12. Searches for monopoles and quarks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matis, H.S.

    1986-07-01

    Within the last year, several sensitive searches for monopoles and quarks have been done. Recent experiments at the Tevatron and at the CERN p anti p collider have detected no evidence for free fractional charge. An experiment in a iron refinery, which searched for GUT monopoles trapped in iron ore with two SQUID detectors, found no monopole candidate. However, an experiment looking for monopoles in cosmic rays has measured an interesting event which could be interpreted as a monopole. Several detectors are being built to achieve significant improvements in sensitivity for detection of quarks and monopoles. 21 refs.

  13. Design of Monopole Antenna Based on Fractal Geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Yuanqing

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a circular disc monopole antenna based on fractal geometry. The antenna is designed to be applied in UWB systems. So it is essential to ensure that the bandwidth of the antenna ranges from 3.1 GHz to 10.6 GHz, that is, IEEE 802.15.3a. However, the proposed antenna has achieved working in the required bandwidth. Compared to the antennas illustrated in most similar literatures, the proposed antenna has a much smaller size, which makes the antenna possible to be integrated with portable devices. Firstly, the antenna was designed through CST Microwave Studio. Then, the antenna was fabricated according to the simulated results. At last, the comparison between the simulated results and measured results was carried out which demonstrated good consistency.

  14. Theoretical and Experimental Status of Magnetic Monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Milton, K A; Luo, W; Gamberg, L P; Milton, Kimball A.; Kalbfleisch, George R.; Luo, Wei; Gamberg, Leonard

    2002-01-01

    The Tevatron has inspired new interest in the subject of magnetic monopoles. First there was the 1998 D0 limit on the virtual production of monopoles, based on the theory of Ginzberg and collaborators. In 2000 the first results from an experiment (Fermilab E882) searching for real magnetically charged particles bound to elements from the CDF and D0 detectors were reported. This also required new developments in theory. The status of the experimental limits on monopole masses will be discussed, as well as the limitation of the theory of magnetic charge at present.

  15. A combined analysis technique for the search for fast magnetic monopoles with the MACRO detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosio, M; Auriemma, G; Bakari, D; Baldini, A; Barbarino, G C; Barish, B C; Battistoni, G; Becherini, Y; Bellotti, R; Bemporad, C; Bernardini, P; Bilokon, H; Bloise, C; Bower, C; Brigida, M; Bussino, S; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Campana, D; Carboni, M; Caruso, R; Cecchini, S; Cei, F; Chiarella, V; Choudhary, B C; Coutu, S; De Cataldo, G; Dekhissi, H; De Marzo, C; De Mitri, I; Derkaoui, J E; De Vincenzi, M; Di Credico, A; Erriquez, O; Favuzzi, C; Forti, C; Fusco, P; Giacomelli, G; Giannini, G; Giglietto, N; Giorgini, M; Grassi, M; Grillo, A; Guarino, F; Gustavino, C; Habig, A; Heinz, R; Iarocci, E; Katsavounidis, E; Katsavounidis, I; Kearns, E; Kim, H; Kyriazopoulou, S; Lamanna, E; Lane, C; Levin, D S; Lipari, P; Longley, N P; Longo, M J; Loparco, F; Maaroufi, F; Mancarella, G; Mandrioli, G; Manzoor, S; Margiotta, A; Marini, A; Martello, D; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Mazziotta, M N; Michael, D G; Monacelli, P; Montaruli, T; Monteno, M; Mufson, S L; Musser, J; Nicolò, D; Nolty, R; Orth, C; Osteria, G; Palamara, O; Patera, V; Patrizii, L; Pazzi, R; Peck, C W; Perrone, L; Petrera, S; Popa, V; Reynoldson, J; Ronga, F; Rrhioua, A; Satriano, C; Scapparone, E; Scholberg, K; Sciubba, A; Serra, P; Sioli, M; Sirri, G; Sitta, M; Spinelli, P; Spinetti, M; Spurio, M; Steinberg, R; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Surdo, A; Tarle, G; Togo, V; Vakili, M; Walter, C W; Webb, R

    2002-01-01

    We describe a search method for fast moving ( beta = v/c > 5 * 10/sup -3/) magnetic monopoles using simultaneously the scintillator, streamer tube and track-etch subdetectors of the MACRO apparatus. The first two subdetectors are used primarily for the identification of candidates while the track-etch one is used as the final tool for their rejection or confirmation. Using this technique, a first sample of more than two years of data has been analyzed without any evidence of a magnetic monopole. We set a 90% CL upper limit to the local monopole flux of 1.5 * 10/sup -15/ cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/sr/sup -1/ in the velocity range 5 * 10/sup -3/

  16. Tri-band small monopole antenna based on SRR units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehan Shehata

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a novel design for a tri-band monopole antenna coupled with metamaterial units is introduced. The proposed antenna was designed to cover WiMAX (2.5, 3.5 and WLAN (5.2 bands. In our proposal, a coplanar waveguide (CPW fed circular-disk monopole antenna is coupled with three split ring resonator (SRR units which exist on its back side. In our design a monopole antenna and SRR units are designed first to resonate at 5.2 GHz and 2.5 GHz respectively. In addition, antenna is loaded with post to force resonance at 3.5 GHz. SRR units are used for 2.5 GHz resonance to miniaturize antenna size, and our proposed antenna considered an electrically small antenna (ESA at its first resonance frequency. Simulated and measured results exhibit a good agreement that validate our design.

  17. Tri-band small monopole antenna based on SRR units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shehata, Gehan; Mohanna, Mahmoud; Rabeh, Mohammed Lotfy

    2015-12-01

    In this paper a novel design for a tri-band monopole antenna coupled with metamaterial units is introduced. The proposed antenna was designed to cover WiMAX (2.5, 3.5) and WLAN (5.2) bands. In our proposal, a coplanar waveguide (CPW) fed circular-disk monopole antenna is coupled with three split ring resonator (SRR) units which exist on its back side. In our design a monopole antenna and SRR units are designed first to resonate at 5.2 GHz and 2.5 GHz respectively. In addition, antenna is loaded with post to force resonance at 3.5 GHz. SRR units are used for 2.5 GHz resonance to miniaturize antenna size, and our proposed antenna considered an electrically small antenna (ESA) at its first resonance frequency. Simulated and measured results exhibit a good agreement that validate our design.

  18. Highly Omnidirectional and Frequency Controllable Carbon/Polyaniline-based 2D and 3D Monopole Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Keun-Young; Kim, Minkyu; Lee, James S.; Jang, Jyongsik

    2015-09-01

    Highly omnidirectional and frequency controllable carbon/polyaniline (C/PANI)-based, two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) monopole antennas were fabricated using screen-printing and a one-step, dimensionally confined hydrothermal strategy, respectively. Solvated C/PANI was synthesized by low-temperature interfacial polymerization, during which strong π-π interactions between graphene and the quinoid rings of PANI resulted in an expanded PANI conformation with enhanced crystallinity and improved mechanical and electrical properties. Compared to antennas composed of pristine carbon or PANI-based 2D monopole structures, 2D monopole antennas composed of this enhanced hybrid material were highly efficient and amenable to high-frequency, omnidirectional electromagnetic waves. The mean frequency of C/PANI fiber-based 3D monopole antennas could be controlled by simply cutting and stretching the antenna. These antennas attained high peak gain (3.60 dBi), high directivity (3.91 dBi) and radiation efficiency (92.12%) relative to 2D monopole antenna. These improvements were attributed the high packing density and aspect ratios of C/PANI fibers and the removal of the flexible substrate. This approach offers a valuable and promising tool for producing highly omnidirectional and frequency-controllable, carbon-based monopole antennas for use in wireless networking communications on industrial, scientific, and medical (ISM) bands.

  19. Search For Magnetic Monopoles Possibly Produced By Proton-antiproton Collisions At The Tevatron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, W

    2002-01-01

    Magnetic monopoles can be used to explain the quantization of electric charge, and are predicted by gauge field theory. If monopoles exist, they could have been produced by the proton-antiproton collisions at the Tevatron collider—the highest energy accelerator existing in the world, and trapped in the CDF and DØ detectors. We took Al, Be, and Pb samples from the Tevatron and used the induction technique with SQUIDs (Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices) to detect monopoles in the samples. We did not find monopoles, but we have set new limits for the monopole mass and the relavant cross section based on a Drell-Yan model and Monte Carlo calculation.

  20. Software Trigger Algorithms to Search for Magnetic Monopoles with the NO$\

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Z. [Virginia U.; Dukes, E. [Virginia U.; Ehrlich, R. [Virginia U.; Frank, M. [Virginia U.; Group, C. [Fermilab; Norman, A. [Fermilab

    2014-01-01

    The NOvA far detector, due to its surface proximity, large size, good timing resolution, large energy dynamic range, and continuous readout, is sensitive to the detection of magnetic monopoles over a large range of velocities and masses. In order to record candidate magnetic monopole events with high efficiency we have designed a software-based trigger to make decisions based on the data recorded by the detector. The decisions must be fast, have high efficiency, and a large rejection factor for the over 100,000 cosmic rays that course through the detector every second. In this paper we briefly describe the simulation of magnetic monopoles, including the detector response, and then discuss the algorithms applied to identify magnetic monopole candidates. We also present the results of trigger efficiency and purity tests using simulated samples of magnetic monopoles with overlaid cosmic backgrounds and electronic noise.

  1. Towards a unified realistic shell-model Hamiltonian with the monopole-based universal force

    CERN Document Server

    Kaneko, K; Sun, Y; Tazaki, S

    2013-01-01

    We propose a unified realistic shell-model Hamiltonian employing the pairing plus multipole Hamiltonian combined with the monopole interaction constructed starting from the monopole-based universal force by Otsuka it et al. (Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 012501 (2010)). It is demonstrated that the proposed PMMU model can consistently describe a large amount of spectroscopic data as well as binding energies in the pf and pf5/2g9/2 shell spaces, and could serve as a practical shell model for even heavier mass regions.

  2. Magnetic monopole searches with the MoEDAL experiment at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Pinfold, J; Lacarrère, D; Mermod, P; Katre, A

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic monopole appears in theories of spontaneous ga uge symmetry breaking and its existence would explain the quantisation of electric charg e. MoEDAL is the latest approved LHC experiment, designed to search directly for monopoles. It h as now taken data for the first time. The MoEDAL detectors are based on two complementary techniq ues: nuclear-track detectors are sensitive to the high-ionisation signature expected fr om a monopole, and the new magnetic monopole trapper (MMT) relies on the stopping and trapping o f monopoles inside an aluminium array which is then analysed with a superconducting magneto meter. Preliminary results obtained with a subset of the MoEDAL MMT test array deployed in 2012 are presented, where monopoles with charge above the fundamental unit magnetic charge or ma ss above 1.5 TeV are probed for the first time at the LHC

  3. Search for Magnetic Monopoles

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    This experiment is proposed to investigate the possible production of magnetic monopoles at the ISR. Very different values are in principle possible for the magnetic charge of such objects, and the present experiment intends to cover a range of magnetic charges from g, to 12 g, where g is the classical minimum charge of the Dirac theory, .ce g = 1/2e The detector consists of three double layers of solid track detector, which are only sensitive to highly ionizing particles, such as monopoles should be. The detector is placed directly in the vacuum chamber, to avoid the large energy losses that a monopole would suffer in a solid wall. A solenoidal magnet is placed between the intersection region and the detector and around the detector itself, in order to accelerate monopoles to an energy such that they are able to traverse the successive sensitive layers of the detector. The thickness of the sensitive layers is chosen to avoid confusion with possible background arising from highly ionizing ions. The experiment...

  4. Search for magnetic monopoles trapped in matter

    CERN Document Server

    Jeon, H

    1995-01-01

    There have been many searches for magnetic monopoles in flight, but few for monopoles in matter. We have searched for magnetic monopoles in meteorites, schists, ferromanganese nodules, iron ores and other materials. The detector was a superconducting induction coil connected to a SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) with a room temperature bore 15 cm in diameter. We tested a total of more than 331 kg of material including 112 kg of meteorites. We found no monopole and conclude the overall monopole/nucleon ratio in the samples is <1.2 \\times 10^{-29} with a 90\\% confidence level.

  5. Search for GUT monopoles at Super-Kamiokande

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, K., E-mail: ueno@suketto.icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Kamioka Observatory, ICRR, Univ. of Tokyo, Higashi-Mozumi, Kamioka, Hida, Gifu 506-1205 (Japan)

    2012-08-15

    GUT monopole-induced neutrinos from the Sun have been searched for using a 50000 ton water Cherenkov detector, Super-Kamiokande. The greatly improved limit on the monopole flux in the local universe is shown.

  6. Search for magnetic monopoles with the MoEDAL forward trapping detector in 13 TeV proton-proton collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, B.; Baines, S.; Benes, P.; Bergmann, B.; Bernabéu, J.; Branzas, H.; Campbell, M.; Caramete, L.; Cecchini, S.; de Montigny, M.; De Roeck, A.; Ellis, J.R.; Fairbairn, M.; Felea, D.; Flores, J.; Frank, M.; Frekers, D.; Garcia, C.; Hirt, A.M.; Janecek, J.; Kalliokoski, M.; Katre, A.; Kim, D.-W.; Kinoshita, K.; Korzenev, A.; Lacarrère, D.H.; Lee, S.C.; Leroy, C.; Lionti, A.; Mamuzic, J.; Margiotta, A.; Mauri, N.; Mavromatos, N.E.; Mermod, P.; Mitsou, V.A.; Orava, R.; Parker, B.; Pasqualini, L.; Patrizii, L.; Păvălaş, G.E.; Pinfold, J.L.; Popa, V.; Pozzato, M.; Pospisil, S.; Rajantie, A.; Ruiz de Austri, R.; Sahnoun, Z.; Sakellariadou, M.; Sarkar, S.; Semenoff, G.; Shaa, A.; Sirri, G.; Sliwa, K.; Soluk, R.; Spurio, M.; Srivastava, Y.N.; Suk, M.; Swain, J.; Tenti, M.; Togo, V.; Tuszyński, J.A.; Vento, V.; Vives, O.; Vykydal, Z.; Whyntie, T.; Widom, A.; Willems, G.; Yoon, J.H.; Zgura, I.S.

    2017-02-10

    MoEDAL is designed to identify new physics in the form of long-lived highly-ionising particles produced in high-energy LHC collisions. Its arrays of plastic nuclear-track detectors and aluminium trapping volumes provide two independent passive detection techniques. We present here the results of a search for magnetic monopole production in 13 TeV proton-proton collisions using the trapping technique, extending a previous publication with 8~TeV data during LHC run-1. A total of 222~kg of MoEDAL trapping detector samples were exposed in the forward region and analysed by searching for induced persistent currents after passage through a superconducting magnetometer. Magnetic charges exceeding half the Dirac charge are excluded in all samples and limits are placed for the first time on the production of magnetic monopoles in 13 TeV collisions. The search probes mass ranges previously inaccessible to collider experiments for up to five times the Dirac charge.

  7. Search for Magnetic Monopoles with the MoEDAL Forward Trapping Detector in 13 TeV Proton-Proton Collisions at the LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, B.; Alexandre, J.; Baines, S.; Benes, P.; Bergmann, B.; Bernabéu, J.; Branzas, H.; Campbell, M.; Caramete, L.; Cecchini, S.; de Montigny, M.; De Roeck, A.; Ellis, J. R.; Fairbairn, M.; Felea, D.; Flores, J.; Frank, M.; Frekers, D.; Garcia, C.; Hirt, A. M.; Janecek, J.; Kalliokoski, M.; Katre, A.; Kim, D.-W.; Kinoshita, K.; Korzenev, A.; Lacarrère, D. H.; Lee, S. C.; Leroy, C.; Lionti, A.; Mamuzic, J.; Margiotta, A.; Mauri, N.; Mavromatos, N. E.; Mermod, P.; Mitsou, V. A.; Orava, R.; Parker, B.; Pasqualini, L.; Patrizii, L.; Pǎvǎlaş, G. E.; Pinfold, J. L.; Popa, V.; Pozzato, M.; Pospisil, S.; Rajantie, A.; Ruiz de Austri, R.; Sahnoun, Z.; Sakellariadou, M.; Sarkar, S.; Semenoff, G.; Shaa, A.; Sirri, G.; Sliwa, K.; Soluk, R.; Spurio, M.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Suk, M.; Swain, J.; Tenti, M.; Togo, V.; Tuszyński, J. A.; Vento, V.; Vives, O.; Vykydal, Z.; Whyntie, T.; Widom, A.; Willems, G.; Yoon, J. H.; Zgura, I. S.; MoEDAL Collaboration

    2017-02-01

    MoEDAL is designed to identify new physics in the form of long-lived highly ionizing particles produced in high-energy LHC collisions. Its arrays of plastic nuclear-track detectors and aluminium trapping volumes provide two independent passive detection techniques. We present here the results of a first search for magnetic monopole production in 13 TeV proton-proton collisions using the trapping technique, extending a previous publication with 8 TeV data during LHC Run 1. A total of 222 kg of MoEDAL trapping detector samples was exposed in the forward region and analyzed by searching for induced persistent currents after passage through a superconducting magnetometer. Magnetic charges exceeding half the Dirac charge are excluded in all samples and limits are placed for the first time on the production of magnetic monopoles in 13 TeV p p collisions. The search probes mass ranges previously inaccessible to collider experiments for up to five times the Dirac charge.

  8. Search for Magnetic Monopoles with the MoEDAL Forward Trapping Detector in 13 TeV Proton-Proton Collisions at the LHC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, B; Alexandre, J; Baines, S; Benes, P; Bergmann, B; Bernabéu, J; Branzas, H; Campbell, M; Caramete, L; Cecchini, S; de Montigny, M; De Roeck, A; Ellis, J R; Fairbairn, M; Felea, D; Flores, J; Frank, M; Frekers, D; Garcia, C; Hirt, A M; Janecek, J; Kalliokoski, M; Katre, A; Kim, D-W; Kinoshita, K; Korzenev, A; Lacarrère, D H; Lee, S C; Leroy, C; Lionti, A; Mamuzic, J; Margiotta, A; Mauri, N; Mavromatos, N E; Mermod, P; Mitsou, V A; Orava, R; Parker, B; Pasqualini, L; Patrizii, L; Păvălaş, G E; Pinfold, J L; Popa, V; Pozzato, M; Pospisil, S; Rajantie, A; Ruiz de Austri, R; Sahnoun, Z; Sakellariadou, M; Sarkar, S; Semenoff, G; Shaa, A; Sirri, G; Sliwa, K; Soluk, R; Spurio, M; Srivastava, Y N; Suk, M; Swain, J; Tenti, M; Togo, V; Tuszyński, J A; Vento, V; Vives, O; Vykydal, Z; Whyntie, T; Widom, A; Willems, G; Yoon, J H; Zgura, I S

    2017-02-10

    MoEDAL is designed to identify new physics in the form of long-lived highly ionizing particles produced in high-energy LHC collisions. Its arrays of plastic nuclear-track detectors and aluminium trapping volumes provide two independent passive detection techniques. We present here the results of a first search for magnetic monopole production in 13 TeV proton-proton collisions using the trapping technique, extending a previous publication with 8 TeV data during LHC Run 1. A total of 222 kg of MoEDAL trapping detector samples was exposed in the forward region and analyzed by searching for induced persistent currents after passage through a superconducting magnetometer. Magnetic charges exceeding half the Dirac charge are excluded in all samples and limits are placed for the first time on the production of magnetic monopoles in 13 TeV pp collisions. The search probes mass ranges previously inaccessible to collider experiments for up to five times the Dirac charge.

  9. Space-based detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesana, A.; Weber, W. J.; Killow, C. J.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Robertson, D. I.; Ward, H.; Fitzsimons, E. D.; Bryant, J.; Cruise, A. M.; Dixon, G.; Hoyland, D.; Smith, D.; Bogenstahl, J.; McNamara, P. W.; Gerndt, R.; Flatscher, R.; Hechenblaikner, G.; Hewitson, M.; Gerberding, O.; Barke, S.; Brause, N.; Bykov, I.; Danzmann, K.; Enggaard, A.; Gianolio, A.; Vendt Hansen, T.; Heinzel, G.; Hornstrup, A.; Jennrich, O.; Kullmann, J.; Møller-Pedersen, S.; Rasmussen, T.; Reiche, J.; Sodnik, Z.; Suess, M.; Armano, M.; Sumner, T.; Bender, P. L.; Akutsu, T.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    The parallel session C5 on Space-Based Detectors gave a broad overview over the planned space missions related to gravitational wave detection. Overviews of the revolutionary science to be expected from LISA was given by Alberto Sesana and Sasha Buchman. The launch of LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is planned for 2015. This mission and its payload "LISA Technology Package" will demonstrate key technologies for LISA. In this context, reference masses in free fall for LISA, and gravitational physics in general, was described by William Weber, laser interferometry at the pico-metre level and the optical bench of LPF was presented by Christian Killow and the performance of the LPF optical metrology system by Paul McNamara. While LPF will not yet be sensitive to gravitational waves, it may nevertheless be used to explore fundamental physics questions, which was discussed by Michele Armano. Some parts of the LISA technology that are not going to be demonstrated by LPF, but under intensive development at the moment, were presented by Oliver Jennrich and Oliver Gerberding. Looking into the future, Japan is studying the design of a mid-frequency detector called DECIGO, which was discussed by Tomotada Akutsu. Using atom interferometry for gravitational wave detection has also been recently proposed, and it was critically reviewed by Peter Bender. In the nearer future, the launch of GRACE Follow-On (for Earth gravity observation) is scheduled for 2017, and it will include a Laser Ranging Interferometer as technology demonstrator. This will be the first inter-spacecraft laser interferometer and has many aspects in common with the LISA long arm, as discussed by Andrew Sutton.

  10. Magnetic Monopole Search at the SPS

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    A target made of fine grains of tungsten-iron powder will be exposed to the 400 GeV proton beam in front of the narrow-band neutrino beam dump. Magnetic monopoles if produced by the proton interactions will be trapped in the target. After exposure, the target will be placed in the centre of a pulse magnetic coil with nuclear emulsions acting as monopole detectors. .sp \\\\ \\\\ A monopole mass sensitivity up to 18 GeV is expected in this experiment.

  11. Experimental model of topological defects in Minkowski spacetime based on disordered ferrofluid: magnetic monopoles, cosmic strings and the spacetime cloak

    CERN Document Server

    Smolyaninov, Igor I; Smolyaninov, Alexei I

    2014-01-01

    Cobalt nanoparticle-based ferrofluid in the presence of external magnetic field forms a self-assembled hyperbolic metamaterial. Wave equation describing propagation of extraordinary light inside the ferrofluid exhibits 2+1 dimensional Lorentz symmetry. The role of time in the corresponding effective 3D Minkowski spacetime is played by the spatial coordinate directed along the periodic nanoparticle chains aligned by the magnetic field. Here we present a microscopic study of point, linear and volume defects of the nanoparticle chain structure and demonstrate that they may exhibit strong similarities with such Minkowski spacetime defects as magnetic monopoles, cosmic strings and the recently proposed spacetime cloaks. Experimental observations of such defects are described.

  12. Platonic hyperbolic monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Manton, Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    We construct a number of explicit examples of hyperbolic monopoles, with various charges and often with some platonic symmetry. The fields are obtained from instanton data in four-dimensional Euclidean space that are invariant under a circle action, and the monopole charge is equal to the instanton charge. A key ingredient is the identification of a new set of constraints on ADHM instanton data that are sufficient to ensure the circle invariance. Algebraic formulae for the Higgs field magnitude are given and from these we compute and illustrate the energy density of the monopoles. For particular monopoles, the explicit formulae provide a proof that the number of zeros of the Higgs field is greater than the monopole charge. We also present some one-parameter families of monopoles analogous to known scattering events for Euclidean monopoles within the geodesic approximation.

  13. Magnetic Monopole Search with the SLIM Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Medinaceli, E

    2008-01-01

    The SLIM experiment was an array of 427 m^2 of nuclear track detectors, exposed at a high altitude laboratory (Chacaltaya, Bolivia, 5230 m a.s.l.), for ~4.22 years. SLIM was sensitive to downgoing intermediate mass magnetic monopoles with masses in the range 10^5 to 10^12 GeV. The analysis of the full detector gives a flux upper limit of 1.3x10^{-15} 1/(cm^2*s*sr) (90% C.L.) for downgoing fast intermediate magnetic monopoles.

  14. Magnetic monopoles at the LHC and in the Cosmos

    CERN Document Server

    Mermod, P

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic monopole was postulated in 1931 by Dirac to explain electric charge quantisation. Searches for pair-produced monopoles are performed at accelerator facilities whenever a new energy regime is made available. In addition, monopoles with masses too high to be accessible at colliders would still have been produced in the early Universe and such relics can be searched for either in flight or trapped in matter. Here we discuss recent results and future prospects at the LHC and in bulk matter searches, with emphasis on the complementarity between the various techniques. Significant improvements of the results from the ATLAS experiment are expected with the development of new triggers. Dedicated LHC experiments will allow to probe wider ranges of monopole charges and masses: the MoEDAL experiment using both nuclear-track detectors and absorbing arrays, and searches for trapped monopoles in accelerator material. Finally, it is highlighted how the first search for monopoles trapped in polar volcanic rocks ...

  15. Searches for Relativistic Magnetic Monopoles in IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Anderson, T; Ansseau, I; Archinger, M; Arguelles, C; Arlen, T C; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Beiser, E; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Börner, M; Bos, F; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Braun, J; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H -P; Buzinsky, N; Casey, J; Casier, M; Cheung, E; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Clark, K; Classen, L; Coenders, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; de André, J P A M; De Clercq, C; Rosendo, E del Pino; Dembinski, H; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de Wasseige, G; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; di Lorenzo, V; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eberhardt, B; Ehrhardt, T; Eichmann, B; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fahey, S; Fazely, A R; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Fösig, C -C; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gaior, R; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Ghorbani, K; Gier, D; Gladstone, L; Glagla, M; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Góra, D; Grant, D; Griffith, Z; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haack, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hansen, E; Hansmann, B; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hignight, J; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Holzapfel, K; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huber, M; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; In, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Japaridze, G S; Jeong, M; Jero, K; Jurkovic, M; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kemp, J; Kheirandish, A; Kiryluk, J; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Kohnen, G; Koirala, R; Kolanoski, H; Konietz, R; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kroll, M; Krückl, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lanfranchi, J L; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Leuner, J; Lu, L; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Mahn, K B M; Mandelartz, M; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Maunu, R; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Medici, M; Meli, A; Menne, T; Merino, G; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Neer, G; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Pollmann, A Obertacke; Olivas, A; Omairat, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Pandya, H; Pankova, D V; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Pütz, J; Quinnan, M; Raab, C; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Reimann, R; Relich, M; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Richman, M; Richter, S; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rongen, M; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ryckbosch, D; Sabbatini, L; Sander, H -G; Sandrock, A; Sandroos, J; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheriau, F; Schimp, M; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schulte, L; Schumacher, L; Seckel, D; Seunarine, S; Soldin, D; Song, M; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stahlberg, M; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Steuer, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Sutherland, M; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tatar, J; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terliuk, A; Tešić, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; Tselengidou, M; Turcati, A; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vallecorsa, S; Vandenbroucke, J; van Eijndhoven, N; Vanheule, S; van Santen, J; Veenkamp, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallace, A; Wallraff, M; Wandkowsky, N; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Wille, L; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Xu, Y; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zoll, M

    2015-01-01

    Various extensions of the Standard Model motivate the existence of stable magnetic monopoles that could have been created during an early high-energy epoch of the Universe. These primordial magnetic monopoles would be gradually accelerated by cosmic magnetic fields and could reach high velocities that make them visible in Cherenkov detectors such as IceCube. Equivalently to electrically charged particles, magnetic monopoles produce direct and indirect Cherenkov light while traversing through matter at relativistic velocities. This paper describes searches for relativistic (v>0.76c) and mildly relativistic (v>0.51c) monopoles, each using one year of data taken in 2008/09 and 2011/12 respectively. No monopole candidate was detected. For a velocity above 0.51c the monopole flux is constrained down to a level of 1.55x10^-18 cm-2 s-1 sr-1. This is an improvement of almost two orders of magnitude over previous limits.

  16. Shell-model study of boron, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen isotopes based on monopole-based-universal interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, Cenxi; Otsuka, Takaharu; Xu, Furong; Tsunoda, Naofumi; 10.1103/PhysRevC.85.064324

    2012-01-01

    We study boron, carbon, nitrogen and oxygen isotopes with a newly constructed shell-model Hamiltonian developed from monopole-based-universal interaction ($V_{MU}$). The present Hamiltonian can reproduce well the ground-state energies, energy levels, electric quadrupole properties and spin properties of these nuclei in full psd model space including $(0-3)\\hbar\\omega$ excitations. Especially, it correctly describes the drip lines of carbon and oxygen isotopes and the spins of the ground states of $^{10}$B and $^{18}$N while some former interactions such as WBP and WBT fail. We point out that the inclusion of $2\\hbar\\omega$ excitations is important in reproducing some of these properties. In the present $(0+2)\\hbar\\omega$ calculations small but constant E2 effective charges appear to work quite well. As the inclusion of the $2\\hbar\\omega$ model space makes rather minor change, this seems to be related to the smallness of $^{4}$He core. Similarly, the spin g factors are very close to free values. The applicabil...

  17. Electric Monopole Transition Strengths in 62Ni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evitts, L. J.; Garnsworthy, A. B.; Kibédi, T.; Moukaddam, M.; Alshahrani, B.; Eriksen, T. K.; Holt, J. D.; Hota, S. S.; Lane, G. J.; Lee, B. Q.; McCormick, B. P.; Palalani, N.; Reed, M. W.; Stroberg, S. R.; Stuchbery, A. E.

    2016-09-01

    Excited states in 62Ni were populated with a (p, p') reaction using the 14UD Pelletron accelerator at the Australian National University. Electric monopole transition strengths, ρ2(E0), were measured through simultaneous detection of the internal conversion electrons and γ rays emitted from the de-excitation of populated states, using the Super-e spectrometer coupled with a germanium detector. The strength of the 02+ to 01+ transition has been measured to be 77-34+23 × 10-3 and agrees with previously reported values. Upper limits have been placed on the 03+ to 01+ and 03+ to 02+ transitions. The measured ρ2(E0) value of the 22+ to 21+ transition in 62Ni has been measured for the first time and found to be one of the largest ρ2(E0) values measured to date in nuclei heavier than Ca. The low-lying states of 62Ni have previously been classified as one- and two-phonon vibrational states based on level energies. The measured electric quadrupole transition strengths are consistent with this interpretation. However as electric monopole transitions are forbidden between states which differ by one phonon number, the simple harmonic quadrupole vibrational picture is not suffcient to explain the large ρ2(E0) value for the 22+ to 21+ transition.

  18. Electric Monopole Transition Strengths in 62Ni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evitts L. J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Excited states in 62Ni were populated with a (p, p’ reaction using the 14UD Pelletron accelerator at the Australian National University. Electric monopole transition strengths, ρ2(E0, were measured through simultaneous detection of the internal conversion electrons and γ rays emitted from the de-excitation of populated states, using the Super-e spectrometer coupled with a germanium detector. The strength of the 02+ to 01+ transition has been measured to be 77−34+23 × 10−3 and agrees with previously reported values. Upper limits have been placed on the 03+ to 01+ and 03+ to 02+ transitions. The measured ρ2(E0 value of the 22+ to 21+ transition in 62Ni has been measured for the first time and found to be one of the largest ρ2(E0 values measured to date in nuclei heavier than Ca. The low-lying states of 62Ni have previously been classified as one- and two-phonon vibrational states based on level energies. The measured electric quadrupole transition strengths are consistent with this interpretation. However as electric monopole transitions are forbidden between states which differ by one phonon number, the simple harmonic quadrupole vibrational picture is not suffcient to explain the large ρ2(E0 value for the 22+ to 21+ transition.

  19. Monopole black hole skyrmions

    OpenAIRE

    Moss, I. G.; Shiiki, N.; Winstanley, E.

    2000-01-01

    Charged black hole solutions with pion hair are discussed. These can be\\ud used to study monopole black hole catalysis of proton decay.\\ud There also exist\\ud multi-black hole skyrmion solutions with BPS monopole behaviour.

  20. Monopole Black Hole Skyrmions

    OpenAIRE

    Moss, I. G.; Shiiki, N.; Winstanley, E.

    2000-01-01

    Charged black hole solutions with pion hair are discussed. These can be\\ud used to study monopole black hole catalysis of proton decay.\\ud There also exist\\ud multi-black hole skyrmion solutions with BPS monopole behaviour.

  1. Superluminal Neutrinos and Monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Peng; Yang, Haitang

    2011-01-01

    In this letter, we show that superluminal neutrinos announced by OPERA could be explained by the existence of a monopole, which is left behind after the spontaneous symmetry braking (SSB) phase transition of some scalar fields in the universe. We assume the 't Hooft-Polyakov monopole couples to the neutrinos but not photon fields. The monopole causes effective metric to the neutrinos, different from the Minkovski one. We find that the monopoles have influences on neutrinos only within the range about $10^3$ cm. Neutrinos always arrive earlier than photons by the same amount of time, once there exists a monopole on or close to their trajectories. This result reconciles the contradiction between OPERA and supernova neutrinos.

  2. Effects of virtual monopoles;

    CERN Document Server

    De Rújula, Alvaro

    1995-01-01

    Electromagnetism would be a ``more unified'' theory if there were elementary magnetic monopoles and/or particles with both electric and magnetic charges (dyons). I discuss the simplest possibilities for the addition of these entities onto the Standard Model, and their empirical consequences. Lower limits on the masses of monopoles and dyons stemming from their quantum effects on current observables turn out to be much stronger than the existing limits from direct searches. Anomalies in the three-photon decay of the Z constitute good specific signatures for monopoles or dyons. T-odd observables in the e^+e^-\\!\\rightarrow\\! W^+W^- process are signatures for dyons, but they are severely constrained by existing data. The subjects of monopolium, monopole cosmology and non-elementary monopoles are also discussed.

  3. Search for Heavy Pointlike Dirac Monopoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adam, I.; Adams, D. L.; Adams, M.; Ahn, S.; Aihara, H.; Alves, G. A.; Amos, N.; Anderson, E. W.; Astur, R.; Baarmand, M. M.; Babukhadia, L.; Baden, A.; Balamurali, V.; Balderston, J.; Baldin, B.; Banerjee, S.; Bantly, J.; Barberis, E.; Bartlett, J. F.; Belyaev, A.; Beri, S. B.; Bertram, I.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhattacharjee, M.; Biswas, N.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, P.; Boehnlein, A.; Bojko, N. I.; Borcherding, F.; Boswell, C.; Brandt, A.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Buchholz, D.; Burtovoi, V. S.; Butler, J. M.; Carvalho, W.; Casey, D.; Casilum, Z.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Chakraborty, D.; Chang, S.-M.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chen, L.-P.; Chen, W.; Choi, S.; Chopra, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Christenson, J. H.; Chung, M.; Claes, D.; Clark, A. R.; Cobau, W. G.; Cochran, J.; Coney, L.; Cooper, W. E.; Cretsinger, C.; Cullen-Vidal, D.; Cummings, M. A.; Cutts, D.; Dahl, O. I.; Davis, K.; de, K.; del Signore, K.; Demarteau, M.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; di Loreto, G.; Draper, P.; Ducros, Y.; Dudko, L. V.; Dugad, S. R.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Engelmann, R.; Eno, S.; Eppley, G.; Ermolov, P.; Eroshin, O. V.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fahland, T.; Fatyga, M. K.; Feher, S.; Fein, D.; Ferbel, T.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fisk, H. E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flattum, E.; Forden, G. E.; Fortner, M.; Frame, K. C.; Fuess, S.; Gallas, E.; Galyaev, A. N.; Gartung, P.; Gavrilov, V.; Geld, T. L.; Genik, R. J.; Genser, K.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Gibbard, B.; Glenn, S.; Gobbi, B.; Goldschmidt, A.; Gómez, B.; Gómez, G.; Goncharov, P. I.; González Solís, J. L.; Gordon, H.; Goss, L. T.; Gounder, K.; Goussiou, A.; Graf, N.; Grannis, P. D.; Green, D. R.; Greenlee, H.; Grinstein, S.; Grudberg, P.; Grünendahl, S.; Guglielmo, G.; Guida, J. A.; Guida, J. M.; Gupta, A.; Gurzhiev, S. N.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Hadley, N. J.; Haggerty, H.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Hahn, K. S.; Hall, R. E.; Hanlet, P.; Hansen, S.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hedin, D.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hernández-Montoya, R.; Heuring, T.; Hirosky, R.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hoftun, J. S.; Hsieh, F.; Hu, Ting; Hu, Tong; Huehn, T.; Ito, A. S.; James, E.; Jaques, J.; Jerger, S. A.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, J. Z.-Y.; Joffe-Minor, T.; Johns, K.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jones, M.; Jöstlein, H.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, C. K.; Kahn, S.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kang, J. S.; Karmanov, D.; Karmgard, D.; Kehoe, R.; Kelly, M. L.; Kim, C. L.; Kim, S. K.; Klima, B.; Klopfenstein, C.; Kohli, J. M.; Koltick, D.; Kostritskiy, A. V.; Kotcher, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kourlas, J.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kozlovsky, E. A.; Krane, J.; Krishnaswamy, M. R.; Krzywdzinski, S.; Kuleshov, S.; Kunori, S.; Landry, F.; Landsberg, G.; Lauer, B.; Leflat, A.; Li, H.; Li, J.; Li-Demarteau, Q. Z.; Lima, J. G.; Lincoln, D.; Linn, S. L.; Linnemann, J.; Lipton, R.; Liu, Y. C.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loken, S. C.; Lökös, S.; Lueking, L.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K.; Madaras, R. J.; Madden, R.; Magaña-Mendoza, L.; Manankov, V.; Mani, S.; Mao, H. S.; Markeloff, R.; Marshall, T.; Martin, M. I.; Mauritz, K. M.; May, B.; Mayorov, A. A.; McCarthy, R.; McDonald, J.; McKibben, T.; McKinley, J.; McMahon, T.; Melanson, H. L.; Merkin, M.; Merritt, K. W.; Miettinen, H.; Mincer, A.; Mishra, C. S.; Mokhov, N.; Mondal, N. K.; Montgomery, H. E.; Mooney, P.; da Motta, H.; Murphy, C.; Nang, F.; Narain, M.; Narasimham, V. S.; Narayanan, A.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Nemethy, P.; Norman, D.; Oesch, L.; Oguri, V.; Oliveira, E.; Oltman, E.; Oshima, N.; Owen, D.; Padley, P.; Para, A.; Park, Y. M.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Paterno, M.; Pawlik, B.; Perkins, J.; Peters, M.; Piegaia, R.; Piekarz, H.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Pope, B. G.; Prosper, H. B.; Protopopescu, S.; Qian, J.; Quintas, P. Z.; Raja, R.; Rajagopalan, S.; Ramirez, O.; Rasmussen, L.; Reucroft, S.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rockwell, T.; Roco, M.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Rutherfoord, J.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Santoro, A.; Sawyer, L.; Schamberger, R. D.; Schellman, H.; Sculli, J.; Shabalina, E.; Shaffer, C.; Shankar, H. C.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Shupe, M.; Singh, H.; Singh, J. B.; Sirotenko, V.; Smart, W.; Smith, E.; Smith, R. P.; Snihur, R.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Solomon, J.; Sosebee, M.; Sotnikova, N.; Souza, M.; Spadafora, A. L.; Steinbrück, G.; Stephens, R. W.; Stevenson, M. L.; Stewart, D.; Stichelbaut, F.; Stoker, D.; Stolin, V.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Streets, K.; Strovink, M.; Sznajder, A.; Tamburello, P.; Tarazi, J.; Tartaglia, M.; Thomas, T. L.; Thompson, J.; Trippe, T. G.; Tuts, P. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vititoe, D.; Volkov, A. A.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, G.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weerts, H.; White, A.; White, J. T.; Wightman, J. A.; Willis, S.; Wimpenny, S. J.; Wirjawan, J. V.; Womersley, J.; Won, E.; Wood, D. R.; Xu, H.; Yamada, R.; Yamin, P.; Yang, J.; Yasuda, T.; Yepes, P.; Yoshikawa, C.; Youssef, S.; Yu, J.; Yu, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, Z. H.; Zieminska, D.; Zieminski, A.; Zverev, E. G.; Zylberstejn, A.

    1998-07-01

    We have searched for central production of a pair of photons with high transverse energies in pp¯ collisions at s = 1.8 TeV using 70 pb-1 of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron in 1994-1996. If they exist, virtual heavy pointlike Dirac monopoles could rescatter pairs of nearly real photons into this final state via a box diagram. We observe no excess of events above background, and set lower 95% C.L. limits of 610, 870, or 1580 GeV/c2 on the mass of a spin 0, 1/2, or 1 Dirac monopole.

  4. Monopole-Based Scenarios of Confinement and Deconfinement in 3D and 4D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Antonov

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses confinement, as well as the topological and critical phenomena, in the gauge theories which provide the condensation of magnetic monopoles. These theories include the 3D SU(N Georgi-Glashow model, the 4D [U(1] N - 1 -invariant compact QED , and the [U(1] N - 1 -invariant dual Abelian Higgs model. After a general introduction to the string models of confinement, an analytic description of this penomenon is provided at the example of the 3D SU(N Georgi-Glashow model, with a special emphasis placed on the so-called Casimir scaling of k-string tensions in that model. We further discuss the string representation of the 3D [U(1] N - 1 -invariant compact QED, as well as of its 4D generalization with the inclusion of the Θ -term. We compare topological effects, which appear in the latter case, with those that take place in the 3D QED extended by the Chern-Simons term. We further discuss the string representation of the ’t Hooft-loop average in the [U(1] N - 1 -invariant dual Abelian Higgs model extended by the Θ -term, along with the topological effects caused by this term. These topological effects are compared with those occurring in the 3D dual Abelian Higgs model (i.e., the dual Landau-Ginzburg theory extended by the Chern-Simons term. In the second part of the review, we discuss critical properties of the weakly-coupled 3D confining theories. These theories include the 3D compact QED, along with its fermionic extension, and the 3D Georgi-Glashow model.

  5. Physics potential of the ICAL detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A KUMAR; A M VINOD KUMAR; ABHIK JASH; AJIT K MOHANTY; ALEENA CHACKO; ALI AJMI; AMBAR GHOSAL; AMINA KHATUN; AMITAVA RAYCHAUDHURI; AMOL DIGHE; ANIMESH CHATTERJEE; ANKIT GAUR; ANUSHREE GHOSH; ASHOK KUMAR; ASMITA REDIJ; B SATYANARAYANA; B S ACHARYA; BRAJESH C CHOUDHARY; C RANGANATHAIAH; C D RAVIKUMAR; CHANDAN GUPTA; D INDUMATHI; DALJEET KAUR; DEBASISH MAJUMDAR; DEEPAK SAMUEL; DEEPAK TIWARI; G RAJASEKARAN; GAUTAM GANGOPADHYAY; GOBINDA MAJUMDER; H B RAVIKUMAR; J B SINGH; J S SHAHI; JAMES LIBBY; JYOTSNA SINGH; K RAVEENDRABABU; K K MEGHNA; K R REBIN; KAMALESH KAR; KOLAHAL BHATTACHARYA; LALIT M PANT; M SAJJAD ATHAR; M V N MURTHY; MANZOOR A MALIK; MD NAIMUDDIN; MOHAMMAD SALIM; MONOJIT GHOSH; MOON MOON DEVI; NABA K MONDAL; NAYANA MAJUMDAR; NITA SINHA; NITALI DASH; POMITA GHOSHAL; POONAM MEHTA; PRAFULLA BEHERA; R KANISHKA; RAJ GANDHI; RAJESH GANAI; RASHID HASAN; S KRISHNAVENI; S M LAKSHMI; S K SINGH; S S R INBANATHAN; S UMA SANKAR; SADIQ JAFER; SAIKAT BISWAS; SANJEEV KUMAR; SANJIB KUMAR AGARWALLA; SANDHYA CHOUBEY; SATYAJIT SAHA; SHAKEEL AHMED; SHIBA PRASAD BEHERA; SRUBABATI GOSWAMI; SUBHASIS CHATTOPADHYAY; SUDEB BHATTACHARYA; SUDESHNA BANERJEE; SUDESHNA DASGUPTA; SUMANTA PAL; SUPRATIK MUKHOPADHYAY; SUSHANT RAUT; SUVENDU BOSE; SWAPNA MAHAPATRA; TAPASI GHOSH; TARAK THAKORE; V K S KASHYAP; V S SUBRAHMANYAM; VENKTESH SINGH; VINAY B CHANDRATRE; VIPIN BHATNAGAR; VIVEK M DATAR; WASEEM BARI; Y P VIYOGI

    2017-05-01

    The upcoming 50 kt magnetized iron calorimeter (ICAL) detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is designed to study the atmospheric neutrinos and antineutrinos separately over a wide range of energies andpath lengths. The primary focus of this experiment is to explore the Earth matter effects by observing the energy and zenith angle dependence of the atmospheric neutrinos in the multi-GeV range. This study will be crucial toaddress some of the outstanding issues in neutrino oscillation physics, including the fundamental issue of neutrino mass hierarchy. In this document, we present the physics potential of the detector as obtained from realistic detector simulations.We describe the simulation framework, the neutrino interactions in the detector, and the expected responseof the detector to particles traversing it. The ICAL detector can determine the energy and direction of the muons to a high precision, and in addition, its sensitivity to multi-GeV hadrons increases its physics reach substantially. Itscharge identification capability, and hence its ability to distinguish neutrinos from antineutrinos, makes it an efficient detector for determining the neutrino mass hierarchy. In this report, we outline the analyses carried out for the determination of neutrino mass hierarchy and precision measurements of atmospheric neutrino mixing parameters at ICAL, and give the expected physics reach of the detector with 10 years of runtime. We also explore the potential of ICAL for probing new physics scenarios like CPT violation and the presence of magnetic monopoles.

  6. Invited review: Physics potential of the ICAL detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, A.; Vinod Kumar, A. M.; Jash, Abhik; Mohanty, Ajit K.; Chacko, Aleena; Ajmi, Ali; Ghosal, Ambar; Khatun, Amina; Raychaudhuri, Amitava; Dighe, Amol; Chatterjee, Animesh; Gaur, Ankit; Ghosh, Anushree; Kumar, Ashok; Redij, Asmita; Satyanarayana, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Choudhary, Brajesh C.; Ranganathaiah, C.; Ravikumar, C. D.; Gupta, Chandan; Indumathi, D.; Kaur, Daljeet; Majumdar, Debasish; Samuel, Deepak; Tiwari, Deepak; Rajasekaran, G.; Gangopadhyay, Gautam; Majumder, Gobinda; Ravikumar, H. B.; Singh, J. B.; Shahi, J. S.; Libby, James; Singh, Jyotsna; Raveendrababu, K.; Meghna, K. K.; Rebin, K. R.; Kar, Kamalesh; Bhattacharya, Kolahal; Pant, Lalit M.; Athar, M. Sajjad; N Murthy, M. V.; Malik, Manzoor A.; Naimuddin, Md; Salim, Mohammad; Ghosh, Monojit; Devi, Moon Moon; Mondal, Naba K.; Majumdar, Nayana; Sinha, Nita; Dash, Nitali; Ghoshal, Pomita; Mehta, Poonam; Behera, Prafulla; Kanishka, R.; Gandhi, Raj; Ganai, Rajesh; Hasan, Rashid; Krishnaveni, S.; Lakshmi, S. M.; Singh, S. K.; R Inbanathan, S. S.; Sankar, S. Uma; Jafer, Sadiq; Biswas, Saikat; Kumar, Sanjeev; Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar; Choubey, Sandhya; Saha, Satyajit; Ahmed, Shakeel; Behera, Shiba Prasad; Goswami, Srubabati; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Bhattacharya, Sudeb; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dasgupta, Sudeshna; Pal, Sumanta; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Raut, Sushant; Bose, Suvendu; Mahapatra, Swapna; Ghosh, Tapasi; Thakore, Tarak; S Kashyap, V. K.; Subrahmanyam, V. S.; Singh, Venktesh; Chandratre, Vinay B.; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Datar, Vivek M.; Bari, Waseem; Viyogi, Y. P.

    2017-05-01

    The upcoming 50 kt magnetized iron calorimeter (ICAL) detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is designed to study the atmospheric neutrinos and antineutrinos separately over a wide range of energies and path lengths. The primary focus of this experiment is to explore the Earth matter effects by observing the energy and zenith angle dependence of the atmospheric neutrinos in the multi-GeV range. This study will be crucial to address some of the outstanding issues in neutrino oscillation physics, including the fundamental issue of neutrino mass hierarchy. In this document, we present the physics potential of the detector as obtained from realistic detector simulations. We describe the simulation framework, the neutrino interactions in the detector, and the expected response of the detector to particles traversing it. The ICAL detector can determine the energy and direction of the muons to a high precision, and in addition, its sensitivity to multi-GeV hadrons increases its physics reach substantially. Its charge identification capability, and hence its ability to distinguish neutrinos from antineutrinos, makes it an efficient detector for determining the neutrino mass hierarchy. In this report, we outline the analyses carried out for the determination of neutrino mass hierarchy and precision measurements of atmospheric neutrino mixing parameters at ICAL, and give the expected physics reach of the detector with 10 years of runtime. We also explore the potential of ICAL for probing new physics scenarios like CPT violation and the presence of magnetic monopoles.

  7. Monopoles in the milky way

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein-Schabes, J.; Barrow, J.D. (Sussex Univ., Brighton (UK). Astronomy Centre)

    1983-02-24

    We generalize previous analyses to consider the behaviour of magnetic monopoles with mass exceeding 7 x 10/sup 18/ GeV in the galaxy. The maximum allowed monopole density compatible with the existence and persistence of the galactic magnetic field is calculated when the monopole populated contains monopoles with mass both greater and less than 7 x 10/sup 18/ GeV.

  8. Immune Based Intrusion Detector Generating Algorithm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DONG Xiao-mei; YU Ge; XIANG Guang

    2005-01-01

    Immune-based intrusion detection approaches are studied. The methods of constructing self set and generating mature detectors are researched and improved. A binary encoding based self set construction method is applied. First,the traditional mature detector generating algorithm is improved to generate mature detectors and detect intrusions faster. Then, a novel mature detector generating algorithm is proposed based on the negative selection mechanism. Accord ing to the algorithm, less mature detectors are needed to detect the abnormal activities in the network. Therefore, the speed of generating mature detectors and intrusion detection is improved. By comparing with those based on existing algo rithms, the intrusion detection system based on the algorithm has higher speed and accuracy.

  9. Magnetic Monopole Search at high altitude with the SLIM experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Balestra, S; Cozzi, M; Errico, M; Fabbri, F; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, R; Giorgini, M; Kumar, A; Manzoor, S; McDonald, J; Mandrioli, G; Marcellini, S; Margiotta, A; Medinaceli, E; Patrizii, L; Pinfold, J L; Popa, V; Qureshi, I E; Saavedra, O; Sahnoun, Z; Sirri, G; Spurio, M; Togo, V; Velarde, A; Zanini, A

    2008-01-01

    The SLIM experiment was a large array of nuclear track detectors located at the Chacaltaya high altitude Laboratory (5230 m a.s.l.). The detector was in particular sensitive to Intermediate Mass Magnetic Monopoles, with masses 10^5 < M <10^{12} GeV. From the analysis of the full detector exposed for more than 4 years a flux upper limit of 1.3 x 10^{-15} cm^{-2} s^{-1} sr^{-1} for downgoing fast Intermediate Mass Monopoles was established at the 90% C.L.

  10. Asymptotic Dynamics of Monopole Walls

    CERN Document Server

    Cross, R

    2015-01-01

    We determine the asymptotic dynamics of the U(N) doubly periodic BPS monopole in Yang-Mills-Higgs theory, called a monopole wall, by exploring its Higgs curve using the Newton polytope and amoeba. In particular, we show that the monopole wall splits into subwalls when any of its moduli become large. The long-distance gauge and Higgs field interactions of these subwalls are abelian, allowing us to derive an asymptotic metric for the monopole wall moduli space.

  11. Search for GUT magnetic monopoles and nuclearites with the MACRO experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosio, M; Auriemma, G; Bakari, D; Baldini, A; Barbarino, G C; Barish, B C; Battistoni, G; Becherini, Y; Bellotti, R; Bemporad, C; Bernardini, P; Bilokon, H; Bloise, C; Bower, C; Brigida, M; Bussino, S; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Campana, D; Carboni, M; Caruso, R; Cecchini, S; Cei, F; Chiarella, V; Chiarusi, T; Choudhary, B C; Coutu, S; Cozzi, M; De Cataldo, G; De Marzo, C; De Mitri, I; De Vincenzi, M; Dekhissi, H; Derkaoui, J; Di Credico, A; Erriquez, O; Favuzzi, C; Forti, C; Fusco, P; Giacomelli, G; Giannini, G; Giglietto, N; Giorgini, M; Grassi, M; Grillo, A; Guarino, F; Gustavino, C; Habig, A; Hanson, K; Heinz, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katsavounidis, I; Kearns, E; Kim, H; Kumar, A; Kyriazopoulou, S; Lamanna, E; Lane, C; Larocci, E; Levin, D S; Lipari, P; Longley, N P; Longo, M J; Loparco, F; Maarou, F; Mancarella, G; Mandrioli, G; Manzoor, S; Margiotta, A; Marini, A; Martello, D; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Matteuzzi, D; Mazziotta, M N; Michael, D G; Monacelli, P; Montaruli, T; Monteno, M; Mufson, S; Musser, J; Nicolò, D; Nolty, R; Orth, C; Osteria, G; Palamara, O; Patera, V; Patrizii, L; Pazzi, R; Peck, C W; Perrone, L; Petrera, S; Pistilli, P; Popa, V; Rainó, A; Reynoldson, J; Ronga, F; Rrhioua, A; Satriano, C; Scapparone, E; Scholberg, K; Sciubba, A; Serra, P; Sioli, M; Sirri, G; Sitta, M; Spinelli, P; Spinetti, M; Spurio, M; Steinberg, R; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Surdo, A; Tarle, G; Togo, V; Vakili, M; Walter, C W; Webb, R; 10.1016/S1350-4487(03)00140-9

    2003-01-01

    We present the final results obtained by the MACRO experiment in the search for GUT magnetic monopoles and nuclearites. Several searches were performed with different subdetectors, i.e. scintillation counters, limited streamer tubes and nuclear track detectors. No magnetic monopole or nuclearite candidates were found. The MACRO upper limit to the local flux of GUT magnetic monopoles is at the level of 1.4*10/sup -16/ cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/sr/sup -1/.

  12. Ultrafast graphene-based broadband THz detector

    CERN Document Server

    Mittendorff, Martin; Kamann, Josef; Eroms, Jonathan; Weiss, Dieter; Schneider, Harald; Helm, Manfred

    2013-01-01

    We present an ultrafast graphene-based detector, working in the THz range at room temperature. A logarithmic-periodic antenna is coupled to a graphene flake that is produced by exfoliation on SiO2. The detector was characterized with the free-electron laser FELBE for wavelengths from 8 um to 220 um. The detector rise time is 50 ps in the wavelength range from 30 um to 220 um. Autocorrelation measurements exploiting the nonlinear photocurrent response at high intensities reveal an intrinsic response time below 10 ps. This detector has a high potential for characterizing temporal overlaps, e. g. in two-color pump-probe experiments.

  13. Econometric Methodology of Monopolization Process Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitrijs Skoruks

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The research “Econometric Methodology of Monopolization Process Evaluation” gives a perspective description of monopolization process’ nature, occurrence source, development procedure and internal conjuncture specifics, as well as providing an example of modern econometrical method application within a unified framework of market competition analysis for the purpose of conducting a quantitative competition evaluation on an industry level for practical use in both private and public sectors. The main question of the aforementioned research is the definition and quantitative analysis of monopolization effects in modern day globalized markets, while con- structing an empirical model of the econometric analysis, based on the use of in- ternational historical experience of monopoly formations standings, with the goal of introducing a further development scheme for the use of both econometrical and statistical instruments in line with the forecasting and business research need of enterprises and regulatory functions of the public sector. The current research uses a vast variety of monopolization evaluation ratios and their econometrical updates on companies that are involved in the study procedure in order to detect and scallar measure their market monopolizing potential, based on the implemented acquired market positions, turnover shares and competition policies.

  14. Search for magnetic monopoles and stable particles with high electric charges in 8 TeV $pp$ collisions with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; 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Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Bjergaard, David Martin; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanco, Jacobo Ezequiel; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; 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Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Shion; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Cirotto, Francesco; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cúth, Jakub; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Benedetti, Abraham; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Mora, Jennifer; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; do Vale, Maria Aline Barros; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; 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Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Gradin, Per Olov Joakim; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Grefe, Christian; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; 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Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henkelmann, Steffen; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohlfeld, Marc; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Kato, Chikuma; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kido, Shogo; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kukla, Romain; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Xingguo; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loew, Kevin Michael; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Maček, Boštjan; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeda, Junpei; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Meyer Zu Theenhausen, Hanno; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mistry, Khilesh; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Monden, Ryutaro; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Mori, Daniel; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morton, Alexander; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Narrias Villar, Daniel Isaac; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Noordeh, Emil; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onogi, Kouta; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pires, Sylvestre; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reichert, Joseph; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rifki, Othmane; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Jonatan; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Sahinsoy, Merve; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Salazar Loyola, Javier Esteban; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sammel, Dirk; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schwegler, Philipp; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyedruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Sokhrannyi, Grygorii; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sosebee, Mark; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spangenberg, Martin; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; St Denis, Richard Dante; Stabile, Alberto; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Pierre Thor Elliot; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Temple, Darren; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turra, Ruggero; Turvey, Andrew John; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Velz, Thomas; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Tingting; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, Alan; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Daiki; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yuen, Stephanie P; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zeng, Qi; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Mingliang; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2016-01-01

    A search for highly ionizing particles produced in proton-proton collisions at 8 TeV center-of-mass energy is performed by the ATLAS collaboration at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The dataset used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 7.0 fb$^{-1}$. A customized trigger significantly increases the sensitivity, permitting a search for such particles with charges and energies beyond what was previously accessible. No event is found in the signal region, leading to production cross-section upper limits in the mass range 200--2500 GeV for magnetic monopoles with magnetic charge in the range $0.5g_{D}<|g|<2.0g_{D}$, where $g_{D}$ is the Dirac charge, and for stable particles with electric charge in the range $10<|z|<60$. Model-dependent limits are presented in given pair-production scenarios, and model-independent limits are presented in fiducial regions of particle energy and pseudorapidity.

  15. Search for relativistic magnetic monopoles with the AMANDA-II neutrino telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J.A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M.; BenZvi, S.; Berghaus, P.; Braun, J.; Chirkin, D.; Desiati, P.; Diaz-Velez, J.C.; Dumm, J.P.; Eisch, J.; Gladstone, L.; Grullon, S.; Halzen, F.; Hill, G.C.; Hoshina, K.; Jacobsen, J.; Karle, A.; Kelley, J.L.; Krasberg, M.; Landsman, H.; Maruyama, R.; Merck, M.; Morse, R.; O' Murchadha, A.; Rodrigues, J.P.; Santander, M.; Toscano, S.; Santen, J. van; Weaver, C.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N. [University of Wisconsin, Dept. of Physics, Madison, WI (United States); Abdou, Y.; Carson, M.; Descamps, F.; Vries-Uiterweerd, G. de; Feusels, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Overloop, A. van [University of Gent, Dept. of Subatomic and Radiation Physics, Gent (Belgium); Abu-Zayyad, T.; Madsen, J.; Spiczak, G.M.; Tamburro, A. [University of Wisconsin, Dept. of Physics, River Falls, WI (United States); Adams, J.; Han, K.; Hickford, S. [University of Canterbury, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Ahlers, M.; Sarkar, S. [University of Oxford, Dept. of Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Auffenberg, J.; Becker, K.H.; Gurtner, M.; Helbing, K.; Kampert, K.H.; Karg, T.; Matusik, M.; Naumann, U.; Posselt, J.; Schultes, A.; Semburg, B. [University of Wuppertal, Dept. of Physics, Wuppertal (Germany); Bai, X.; Clem, J.; Evenson, P.A.; Gaisser, T.K.; Hussain, S.; Kuwabara, T.; Niessen, P.; Ruzybayev, B.; Seckel, D.; Stanev, T.; Stoyanov, S.; Tilav, S.; Xu, C. [University of Delaware, Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Newark, DE (United States); Barwick, S.W.; Nam, J.W.; Silvestri, A.; Yodh, G. [Univ. of California, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Irvine, CA (United States); Bay, R.; D' Agostino, M.V.; Filimonov, K.; Porrata, R.; Price, P.B.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Woschnagg, K. [Univ. of California, Dept. of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Bazo Alba, J.L.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Berdermann, J.; Bernardini, E.; Franke, R.; Kislat, F.; Lauer, R. [and others

    2010-10-15

    We present the search for Cherenkov signatures from relativistic magnetic monopoles in data taken with the AMANDA-II detector, a neutrino telescope deployed in the Antarctic ice cap at the Geographic South Pole. The non-observation of a monopole signal in data collected during the year 2000 improves present experimental limits on the flux of relativistic magnetic monopoles: Our flux limit varies between 3.8 x 10{sup -17} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} (for monopoles moving at the vacuum speed of light) and 8.8 x 10{sup -16} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} (for monopoles moving at a speed {beta}=v/c=0.76, just above the Cherenkov threshold in ice). These limits apply to monopoles that are energetic enough to penetrate the Earth and enter the detector from below the horizon. The limit obtained for monopoles reaching the detector from above the horizon is less stringent by roughly an order of magnitude, due to the much larger background from down-going atmospheric muons. This looser limit is however valid for a larger class of magnetic monopoles, since the monopoles are not required to pass through the Earth. (orig.)

  16. Search for relativistic magnetic monopoles with the AMANDA-II neutrino telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K.-H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Benzvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Bradley, L.; Braun, J.; Buitink, S.; Carson, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clem, J.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Colnard, C.; Cowen, D. F.; D'Agostino, M. V.; Danninger, M.; Davis, J. C.; de Clercq, C.; Demirörs, L.; Depaepe, O.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; Deyoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dierckxsens, M.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Duvoort, M. R.; Ehrlich, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engdegård, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Foerster, M. M.; Fox, B. D.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Geisler, M.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Grant, D.; Griesel, T.; Groß, A.; Grullon, S.; Gurtner, M.; Ha, C.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Han, K.; Hanson, K.; Helbing, K.; Herquet, P.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Hubert, D.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hülß, J.-P.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Johansson, H.; Joseph, J. M.; Kampert, K.-H.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemming, N.; Kenny, P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kislat, F.; Klein, S. R.; Knops, S.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Kowarik, T.; Krasberg, M.; Krings, T.; Kroll, G.; Kuehn, K.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lafebre, S.; Laihem, K.; Landsman, H.; Lauer, R.; Lehmann, R.; Lennarz, D.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Majumdar, P.; Marotta, A.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Matusik, M.; Meagher, K.; Merck, M.; Mészáros, P.; Meures, T.; Middell, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Nahnhauer, R.; Nam, J. W.; Naumann, U.; Nießen, P.; Nygren, D. R.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Olivo, M.; O'Murchadha, A.; Ono, M.; Panknin, S.; Paul, L.; Pérez de Los Heros, C.; Petrovic, J.; Piegsa, A.; Pieloth, D.; Porrata, R.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Prikockis, M.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Roth, P.; Rothmaier, F.; Rott, C.; Roucelle, C.; Ruhe, T.; Rutledge, D.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sander, H.-G.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Schlenstedt, S.; Schmidt, T.; Schukraft, A.; Schultes, A.; Schulz, O.; Schunck, M.; Seckel, D.; Semburg, B.; Seo, S. H.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Silvestri, A.; Slipak, A.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stephens, G.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stoyanov, S.; Strahler, E. A.; Straszheim, T.; Sullivan, G. W.; Swillens, Q.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Tarasova, O.; Tepe, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Turčan, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Overloop, A.; van Santen, J.; Voge, M.; Voigt, B.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Wallraff, M.; Walter, M.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wikström, G.; Williams, D. R.; Wischnewski, R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, C.; Xu, X. W.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.

    2010-10-01

    We present the search for Cherenkov signatures from relativistic magnetic monopoles in data taken with the AMANDA-II detector, a neutrino telescope deployed in the Antarctic ice cap at the Geographic South Pole. The non-observation of a monopole signal in data collected during the year 2000 improves present experimental limits on the flux of relativistic magnetic monopoles: Our flux limit varies between 3.8×10-17 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 (for monopoles moving at the vacuum speed of light) and 8.8×10-16 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 (for monopoles moving at a speed β= v/ c=0.76, just above the Cherenkov threshold in ice). These limits apply to monopoles that are energetic enough to penetrate the Earth and enter the detector from below the horizon. The limit obtained for monopoles reaching the detector from above the horizon is less stringent by roughly an order of magnitude, due to the much larger background from down-going atmospheric muons. This looser limit is however valid for a larger class of magnetic monopoles, since the monopoles are not required to pass through the Earth.

  17. Static Gravitational Global Monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Liebling, S L

    2000-01-01

    Static solutions in spherical symmetry are found for gravitating global monopoles. Regular solutions lacking a horizon are found for $\\eta \\sqrt{3/8\\pi} \\approx 0.3455$ is consistent with findings that topological inflation begins at $\\eta \\approx 0.33$.

  18. Search for magnetic monopoles in polar volcanic rocks

    CERN Document Server

    Bendtz, K; Hächler, H -P; Hirt, A M; Mermod, P; Michael, P; Sloan, T; Tegner, C; Thorarinsson, S B

    2013-01-01

    For a broad range of values of magnetic monopole mass and charge, the abundance of monopoles trapped inside the Earth would be expected to be enhanced in the mantle beneath the geomagnetic poles. A search for magnetic monopoles was conducted using the signature of an induced persistent current following the passage of igneous rock samples through a SQUID-based magnetometer. A total of 24.6 kg of rocks from various selected sites, among which 23.4 kg are mantle-derived rocks from the Arctic and Antarctic areas, was analysed. No monopoles were found and a 90% confidence level upper limit of $1.6\\cdot 10^{-28}$ is set on the monopole to nucleon ratio in the search samples.

  19. Search for Magnetic Monopoles in Polar Volcanic Rocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtz, K.; Milstead, D.; Hächler, H. -P.

    2013-01-01

    For a broad range of values of magnetic monopole mass and charge, the abundance of monopoles trapped inside Earth would be expected to be enhanced in the mantle beneath the geomagnetic poles. A search for magnetic monopoles was conducted using the signature of an induced persistent current...... following the passage of igneous rock samples through a SQUID-based magnetometer. A total of 24.6 kg of rocks from various selected sites, among which 23.4 kg are mantle-derived rocks from the Arctic and Antarctic areas, was analyzed. No monopoles were found, and a 90% confidence level upper limit of 9.8 x...... 10(-5)/g is set on the monopole density in the search samples. DOI:10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.121803...

  20. Search for nucleon decays induced by GUT magnetic monopoles with the MACRO experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosio, M; Auriemma, G; Bakari, D; Baldini, A; Barbarino, G C; Barish, B C; Battistoni, G; Becherini, Y; Bellotti, R; Bemporad, C; Bernardini, P; Bilokon, H; Bloise, C; Bower, C; Brigida, M; Bussino, S; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Campana, D; Carboni, M; Caruso, R; Cecchini, S; Cei, F; Chiarella, V; Choudhary, B C; Coutu, S; Cozzi, M; De Cataldo, G; Dekhissi, H; De Marzo, C; De Mitri, I; Derkaoui, J E; De Vincenzi, M; Di Credico, A; Erriquez, O; Favuzzi, C; Forti, C; Fusco, P; Giacomelli, G; Giannini, G; Giglietto, N; Giorgini, M; Grassi, M; Grillo, A; Guarino, F; Gustavino, C; Habig, A; Hanson, K; Heinz, R; Iarocci, E; Katsavounidis, E; Katsavounidis, I; Kearns, E; Kim, H; Kyriazopoulou, S; Lamanna, E; Lane, C; Levin, D S; Lipari, P; Longley, N P; Longo, M J; Loparco, F; Maaroufi, F; Mancarella, G; Mandrioli, G; Manzoor, S; Margiotta, A; Marini, A; Martello, D; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Mazziotta, M N; Michael, D G; Monacelli, P; Montaruli, T; Monteno, M; Mufson, S L; Musser, J; Nicolò, D; Nolty, R; Orth, C; Osteria, G; Palamara, O; Patera, V; Patrizii, L; Pazzi, R; Peck, C W; Perrone, L; Petrera, S; Pistilli, P; Popa, V; Rainó, A; Reynoldson, J; Ronga, F; Rrhioua, A; Satriano, C; Scapparone, E; Scholberg, K; Sciubba, A; Serra, P; Sioli, M; Sirri, G; Sitta, M; Spinelli, P; Spinetti, M; Spurio, M; Steinberg, R; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Surdo, A; Tarle, G; Togo, V; Vakili, M; Walter, C W; Webb, R

    2002-01-01

    The interaction of a grand unification magnetic monopole with a nucleon can lead to a baryon-number violating process in which the nucleon decays into a lepton and one or more mesons (catalysis of nucleon decay). In this paper we report an experimental study of the effects of a catalysis process in the MACRO detector. Using a dedicated analysis we obtain new magnetic monopole (MM) flux upper limits at the level of ~3.10/sup -16/ cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/ sr/sup -1/ for 1.1.10/sup -4/ based on the search for catalysis events in the MACRO data. We also analyze the dependence of the MM flux limit on the catalysis cross section. (27 refs).

  1. Final results of magnetic monopole searches with the MACRO experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosio, M; Auriemma, G; Bakari, D; Baldini, A; Barbarino, G C; Barish, B C; Battistoni, G; Becherini, Y; Bellotti, R; Bemporad, C; Bernardini, P; Bilokon, H; Bloise, C; Bower, C; Brigida, M; Bussino, S; Cafagna, F; Calicchio, M; Campana, D; Carboni, M; Caruso, R; Cecchini, S; Cei, F; Chiarella, V; Chiarusi, T; Choudhary, B C; Coutu, S; Cozzi, M; De Cataldo, G; Dekhissi, H; De Marzo, C; De Mitri, I; Derkaoui, J E; De Vincenzi, M; Di Credico, A; Erriquez, O; Favuzzi, C; Forti, C; Fusco, P; Giacomelli, G; Giannini, G; Giglietto, N; Giorgini, M; Grassi, M; Grillo, A; Guarino, F; Gustavino, C; Habig, A; Hanson, K; Heinz, R; Iarocci, E; Katsavounidis, E; Katsavounidis, I; Kearns, E; Kim, H; Kyriazopoulou, S; Kumar, A; Lamanna, E; Lane, C; Levin, D S; Lipari, P; Longley, N P; Longo, M J; Loparco, F; Maaroufi, F; Mancarella, G; Mandrioli, G; Manzoor, S; Margiotta, A; Marini, A; Martello, D; Marzari-Chiesa, A; Matteuzzi, D; Mazziotta, M N; Michael, D G; Monacelli, P; Montaruli, T; Monteno, M; Mufson, S L; Musser, J; Nicolò, D; Nolty, R; Orth, C; Osteria, G; Palamara, O; Patera, V; Patrizii, L; Pazzi, R; Peck, C W; Perrone, L; Petrera, S; Pistilli, P; Popa, V; Rainó, A; Reynoldson, J; Ronga, F; Rrhioua, A; Satriano, C; Scapparone, E; Scholberg, K; Sciubba, A; Serra, P; Sioli, M; Sirri, G; Sitta, M; Spinelli, P; Spinetti, M; Spurio, M; Steinberg, R; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Surdo, A; Tarle, G; Togo, V; Vakili, M; Walter, C W; Webb, R

    2002-01-01

    We present the final results obtained by the MACRO experiment in the search for GUT magnetic monopoles in the penetrating cosmic radiation, for the range 4*10/sup -5/< beta <1. Several searches with all the MACRO sub-detectors (i.e. scintillation counters, limited streamer tubes and nuclear track detectors) were performed, both in stand alone and combined ways. No candidates were detected and a 90% Confidence Level (C.L.) upper limit to the local magnetic monopole flux was set at the level of 1.4*10/sup -16/ cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/ sr /sup -1/. This result is the first experimental limit obtained in direct searches which is well below the Parker bound in the whole beta range in which GUT magnetic monopoles are expected. (37 refs).

  2. Global monopoles in dilaton gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dando, Owen; Gregory, Ruth

    1998-04-01

    We analyse the gravitational field of a global monopole within the context of low-energy string gravity, allowing for an arbitrary coupling of the monopole fields to the dilaton. Both massive and massless dilatons are considered. We find that, for a massless dilaton, the spacetime is generically singular, whereas when the dilaton is massive, the monopole generically induces a long-range dilaton cloud. We compare and contrast these results with the literature.

  3. Global Monopoles in Dilaton Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Dando, O; Dando, Owen; Gregory, Ruth

    1998-01-01

    We analyse the gravitational field of a global monopole within the context of low energy string gravity, allowing for an arbitrary coupling of the monopole fields to the dilaton. Both massive and massless dilatons are considered. We find that, for a massless dilaton, the spacetime is generically singular, whereas when the dilaton is massive, the monopole generically induces a long range dilaton cloud. We compare and contrast these results with the literature.

  4. Searches for relativistic magnetic monopoles in IceCube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aartsen, M.G.; Hill, G.C.; Robertson, S.; Wallace, A.; Whelan, B.J. [University of Adelaide, Department of Physics, Adelaide (Australia); Abraham, K.; Bernhard, A.; Coenders, S.; Gross, A.; Holzapfel, K.; Huber, M.; Jurkovic, M.; Krings, K.; Resconi, E.; Turcati, A.; Veenkamp, J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Ackermann, M.; Berghaus, P.; Bernardini, E.; Bretz, H.P.; Cruz Silva, A.H.; Gluesenkamp, T.; Gora, D.; Jacobi, E.; Karg, T.; Middell, E.; Mohrmann, L.; Nahnhauer, R.; Schoenwald, A.; Spiering, C.; Stasik, A.; Stoessl, A.; Strotjohann, N.L.; Terliuk, A.; Usner, M.; Santen, J. van; Yanez, J.P. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J. [University of Canterbury, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Christchurch (New Zealand); Aguilar, J.A.; Ansseau, I.; Heereman, D.; Meagher, K.; Meures, T.; O' Murchadha, A.; Pinat, E.; Raab, C. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels (Belgium); Ahlers, M.; Arguelles, C.; Beiser, E.; Braun, J.; Chirkin, D.; Day, M.; Desiati, P.; Diaz-Velez, J.C.; Fahey, S.; Feintzeig, J.; Ghorbani, K.; Gladstone, L.; Griffith, Z.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Hoshina, K.; Jero, K.; Karle, A.; Kelley, J.L.; Kheirandish, A.; McNally, F.; Merino, G.; Morse, R.; Richter, S.; Sabbatini, L.; Tobin, M.N.; Tosi, D.; Vandenbroucke, J.; Wandkowsky, N.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Wille, L.; Xu, D.L. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Physics and Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, Madison, WI (United States); Ahrens, M.; Bohm, C.; Dumm, J.P.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Hulth, P.O.; Hultqvist, K.; Walck, C.; Wolf, M.; Zoll, M. [Stockholm University, Department of Physics, Oskar Klein Centre, Stockholm (Sweden); Altmann, D.; Classen, L.; Kappes, A.; Tselengidou, M. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Anderson, T.; Arlen, T.C.; Dunkman, M.; Huang, F.; Keivani, A.; Lanfranchi, J.L.; Pankova, D.V.; Quinnan, M.; Tesic, G. [Pennsylvania State University, Department of Physics, University Park, PA (United States); Archinger, M.; Baum, V.; Boeser, S.; Del Pino Rosendo, E.; Di Lorenzo, V.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Foesig, C.C.; Koepke, L.; Kroll, G.; Krueckl, G.; Sander, H.G.; Sandroos, J.; Schatto, K.; Steuer, A.; Wiebe, K. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics, Mainz (Germany); Auffenberg, J.; Bissok, M.; Blumenthal, J.; Gier, D.; Glagla, M.; Haack, C.; Hansmann, B.; Kemp, J.; Konietz, R.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Paul, L.; Puetz, J.; Raedel, L.; Reimann, R.; Rongen, M.; Schimp, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schumacher, L.; Stahlberg, M.; Vehring, M.; Wallraff, M.; Wiebusch, C.H. [RWTH Aachen University, III. Physikalisches Institut, Aachen (Germany); Bai, X. [South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Physics Department, Rapid City, SD (United States); Barwick, S.W.; Yodh, G. [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Irvine, CA (United States); Bay, R.; Filimonov, K.; Price, P.B.; Woschnagg, K. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Beatty, J.J. [Ohio State University, Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Columbus, OH (United States); Ohio State University, Department of Astronomy, Columbus, OH (United States); Tjus, J.B.; Bos, F.; Eichmann, B.; Kroll, M.; Mandelartz, M.; Schoeneberg, S. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Bochum (Germany); Becker, K.H.; Bindig, D.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Helbing, K.; Hickford, S.; Hoffmann, R.; Klaes, J.; Kopper, S.; Naumann, U.; Obertacke Pollmann, A.; Omairat, A.; Posselt, J.; Soldin, D. [University of Wuppertal, Department of Physics, Wuppertal (Germany); Benabderrahmane, M.L. [New York University Abu Dhabi, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Berley, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Cheung, E.; Felde, J.; Hellauer, R.; Hoffman, K.D.; Huelsnitz, W.; Maunu, R.; Olivas, A.; Schmidt, T.; Song, M.; Sullivan, G.W.; Wissing, H. [University of Maryland, Department of Physics, College Park, MD (United States); Besson, D.Z. [University of Kansas, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lawrence, KS (United States); Binder, G.; Gerhardt, L.; Ha, C.; Klein, S.R.; Miarecki, S.; Tatar, J. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Boersma, D.J.; Botner, O.; Euler, S.; Hallgren, A.; Perez de los Heros, C.; Stroem, R.; Taavola, H.; Unger, E. [Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Box 516, Uppsala (Sweden); and others

    2016-03-15

    Various extensions of the Standard Model motivate the existence of stable magnetic monopoles that could have been created during an early high-energy epoch of the Universe. These primordial magnetic monopoles would be gradually accelerated by cosmic magnetic fields and could reach high velocities that make them visible in Cherenkov detectors such as IceCube. Equivalently to electrically charged particles, magnetic monopoles produce direct and indirect Cherenkov light while traversing through matter at relativistic velocities. This paper describes searches for relativistic (v ≥ 0.76 c) and mildly relativistic (v ≥ 0.51 c) monopoles, each using one year of data taken in 2008/2009 and 2011/2012, respectively. No monopole candidate was detected. For a velocity above 0.51 c the monopole flux is constrained down to a level of 1.55 x 10{sup -18} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1}. This is an improvement of almost two orders of magnitude over previous limits. (orig.)

  5. Searches for relativistic magnetic monopoles in IceCube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aartsen, M. G.; Abraham, K.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Ahrens, M.; Altmann, D.; Anderson, T.; Ansseau, I.; Archinger, M.; Arguelles, C.; Arlen, T. C.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beatty, J. J.; Tjus, J. Becker; Becker, K.-H.; Beiser, E.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bernhard, A.; Besson, D. Z.; Binder, G.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Börner, M.; Bos, F.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Braun, J.; Brayeur, L.; Bretz, H.-P.; Buzinsky, N.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Cheung, E.; Chirkin, D.; Christov, A.; Clark, K.; Classen, L.; Coenders, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; Day, M.; de André, J. P. A. M.; De Clercq, C.; del Pino Rosendo, E.; Dembinski, H.; De Ridder, S.; Desiati, P.; de Vries, K. D.; de Wasseige, G.; de With, M.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; di Lorenzo, V.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eberhardt, B.; Ehrhardt, T.; Eichmann, B.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fahey, S.; Fazely, A. R.; Feintzeig, J.; Felde, J.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Fösig, C.-C.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gaior, R.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Ghorbani, K.; Gier, D.; Gladstone, L.; Glagla, M.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Golup, G.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Griffith, Z.; Groß, A.; Ha, C.; Haack, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hansen, E.; Hansmann, B.; Hanson, K.; Hebecker, D.; Heereman, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hignight, J.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Holzapfel, K.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huang, F.; Huber, M.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; In, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jeong, M.; Jero, K.; Jurkovic, M.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Keivani, A.; Kelley, J. L.; Kemp, J.; Kheirandish, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Kohnen, G.; Koirala, R.; Kolanoski, H.; Konietz, R.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krings, K.; Kroll, G.; Kroll, M.; Krückl, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Lanfranchi, J. L.; Larson, M. J.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Leuermann, M.; Leuner, J.; Lu, L.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maggi, G.; Mahn, K. B. M.; Mandelartz, M.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; Maunu, R.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Medici, M.; Meli, A.; Menne, T.; Merino, G.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Neer, G.; Niederhausen, H.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke Pollmann, A.; Olivas, A.; Omairat, A.; O'Murchadha, A.; Palczewski, T.; Pandya, H.; Pankova, D. V.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pfendner, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pinat, E.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Pütz, J.; Quinnan, M.; Raab, C.; Rädel, L.; Rameez, M.; Rawlins, K.; Reimann, R.; Relich, M.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Richman, M.; Richter, S.; Riedel, B.; Robertson, S.; Rongen, M.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ryckbosch, D.; Sabbatini, L.; Sander, H.-G.; Sandrock, A.; Sandroos, J.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheriau, F.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitz, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönwald, A.; Schulte, L.; Schumacher, L.; Seckel, D.; Seunarine, S.; Soldin, D.; Song, M.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stahlberg, M.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Steuer, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Ström, R.; Strotjohann, N. L.; Sullivan, G. W.; Sutherland, M.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tatar, J.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Terliuk, A.; Tešić, G.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Tobin, M. N.; Toscano, S.; Tosi, D.; Tselengidou, M.; Turcati, A.; Unger, E.; Usner, M.; Vallecorsa, S.; Vandenbroucke, J.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vanheule, S.; van Santen, J.; Veenkamp, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Vraeghe, M.; Walck, C.; Wallace, A.; Wallraff, M.; Wandkowsky, N.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whelan, B. J.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Wille, L.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Xu, Y.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zoll, M.

    2016-03-01

    Various extensions of the Standard Model motivate the existence of stable magnetic monopoles that could have been created during an early high-energy epoch of the Universe. These primordial magnetic monopoles would be gradually accelerated by cosmic magnetic fields and could reach high velocities that make them visible in Cherenkov detectors such as IceCube. Equivalently to electrically charged particles, magnetic monopoles produce direct and indirect Cherenkov light while traversing through matter at relativistic velocities. This paper describes searches for relativistic (vge 0.76c) and mildly relativistic (vge 0.51c) monopoles, each using one year of data taken in 2008/2009 and 2011/2012, respectively. No monopole candidate was detected. For a velocity above 0.51 c the monopole flux is constrained down to a level of 1.55 × 10^{-18} text {cm}^{-2} text {s}^{-1} text {sr}^{-1}. This is an improvement of almost two orders of magnitude over previous limits.

  6. Magnetic monopoles: a status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrigan, R.A. Jr.; Trower, W.P.

    1983-03-01

    A solitary, uncorroborated Stanford candidate event is the only evidence that magnetic monpoles derives from Dirac's assertion that monopoles could explain charge quantization and the 't Hooft-Polyakov demonstration that monopoles are an inevitable consequence of many gauge theories currently being used to unify the electroweak (photon-lepton) and nuclear (quark) interactions. The monopole abundance implied by the Stanford event is in clear contradiction to bounds on their number from astronomical data. Fortunately, the already considerable and expanding arsenal of detection techniques are being fashioned to experimentally test the many open questions surrounding monopoles.

  7. Magnetic Half-Monopole Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Rosy; Lim, Kok-Geng; Koh, Pin-Wai

    2009-07-01

    We present exact SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs monopole solutions of one half topological charge. These non-Abelian solutions possess gauge potentials which are singular along either the positive or the negative z-axis and common magnetic fields that are singular only at the origin where the half-monopole is located. These half-monopoles are actually a half Wu-Yang monopole and they can possess a finite point electric charge and become half-dyons. They do not necessarily satisfy the first order Bogomol'nyi equations and they possess infinite energy density at r = 0.

  8. Ion chamber based neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derzon, Mark S; Galambos, Paul C; Renzi, Ronald F

    2014-12-16

    A neutron detector with monolithically integrated readout circuitry, including: a bonded semiconductor die; an ion chamber formed in the bonded semiconductor die; a first electrode and a second electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; and the readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the first and second electrodes. The bonded semiconductor die includes an etched semiconductor substrate bonded to an active semiconductor substrate. The readout circuitry is formed in a portion of the active semiconductor substrate. The ion chamber has a substantially planar first surface on which the first electrode is formed and a substantially planar second surface, parallel to the first surface, on which the second electrode is formed. The distance between the first electrode and the second electrode may be equal to or less than the 50% attenuation length for neutrons in the neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber.

  9. Paper-based inkjet-printed tri-band U-slot monopole antenna for wireless applications

    KAUST Repository

    Abutarboush, Hattan

    2012-01-01

    Realization of a U-slot tri-band monopole antenna on a low-cost paper substrate using inkjet-printed technology is presented for the first time. The U-shaped slot is optimized to enhance the bandwidth and to achieve tri-band operation of 1.57, 3.2, and 5 GHz with measured impedance bandwidths of 3.21%, 28.1%, and 36%, respectively. The antenna is fabricated through a metallic nanoparticle ink on a standard commercial paper. Thus, the antenna can be used to cover the GPS, WiMAX, HiperLAN/2, and WLAN. The antenna has a compact size of 12 × 37.3 × 0.44 mm3 , leaving enough space for the driving electronics on the paper substrate. The impedance bandwidth, current distributions, radiation patterns, gain, and efficiency of the antenna have been studied through computer simulations and measurements. © 2002-2011 IEEE.

  10. Generalized BPS magnetic monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Casana, R; da Hora, E

    2012-01-01

    We show the existence of Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) magnetic monopoles in a generalized Yang-Mills-Higgs model which is controlled by two positive functions. This effective model, in principle, would describe the dynamics of the nonabelian fields in a chromoelectric media. We check the consistency of our generalized construction by analyzing an explicit case ruled by a real parameter. We also use the well-known spherically symmetric Ansatz to attain the corresponding self-dual equations describing the topological solutions. The overall conclusion is that the new solutions behave around the canonical one, with smaller or greater characteristic length.

  11. Polyhedral Scattering of Fundamental Monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Battye, R; Rychenkova, P; Sutcliffe, P; Battye, Richard; Gibbons, Gary; Rychenkova, Paulina; Sutcliffe, Paul

    2003-01-01

    The dynamics of n slowly moving fundamental monopoles in the SU(n+1) BPS Yang-Mills-Higgs theory can be approximated by geodesic motion on the 4n-dimensional hyperkahler Lee-Weinberg-Yi manifold. In this paper we apply a variational method to construct some scaling geodesics on this manifold. These geodesics describe the scattering of n monopoles which lie on the vertices of a bouncing polyhedron; the polyhedron contracts from infinity to a point, representing the spherically symmetric n-monopole, and then expands back out to infinity. For different monopole masses the solutions generalize to form bouncing nested polyhedra. The relevance of these results to the dynamics of well separated SU(2) monopoles is also discussed.

  12. PET detector modules based on novel detector technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.; Budinger, T.F.

    1994-05-01

    A successful PET detector module must identify 511 keV photons with: high efficiency (>85%), high spatial resolution (<5 mm fwhm), low cost (<$600 / in{sup 2}), low dead time (<4 {mu}s in{sup 2}), good timing resolution (<5 ns fwhm for conventional PET, <200 ps fwhm for time of flight), and good energy resolution (<100 keV fwhm), where these requirements are listed in decreasing order of importance. The ``high efficiency`` requirement also implies that the detector modules must pack together without inactive gaps. Several novel and emerging radiation detector technologies could improve the performance of PET detectors. Avalanche photodiodes, PIN photodiodes, metal channel dynode photomultiplier tubes, and new scintillators all have the potential to improve PET detectors significantly.

  13. Searches for Magnetic Monopoles and Anomalously Charged Objects with ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Katre, Akshay; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    Results of searches for highly ionising particles and particles with anomalously high electric charge produced in proton-proton collisions in the ATLAS detector are presented. Such signatures, encompassing particles with charges from 10 to 60 times the electron charge, involve high levels of ionization in the ATLAS detector and can arise from magnetic monopoles or models involving technicolor, doubly charged Higgs bosons or composite dark matter models.

  14. Multiuser detector based on wavelet networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伶; 焦李成; 陶海红; 刘芳

    2004-01-01

    Multiple access interference (MAI) and near-far problem are two major obstacles in DS-CDMA systems.Combining wavelet neural networks and two matched filters, the novel multiuser detector, which is based on multiple variable function estimation wavelet networks over single path asynchronous channel and space-time channel respectively is presented. Excellent localization characteristics of wavelet functions in both time and frequency domains allowed hierarchical multiple resolution learning of input-output data mapping. The mathematic frame of the neural networks and error back ward propagation algorithm are introduced. The complexity of the multiuser detector only depends on that of wavelet networks. With numerical simulations and performance analysis, it indicates that the multiuser detector has excellent performance in eliminating MAI and near-far resistance.

  15. Chiral symmetry breaking and monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Di Giacomo, Adriano; Pucci, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    To understand the relation between the chiral symmetry breaking and monopoles, the chiral condensate which is the order parameter of the chiral symmetry breaking is calculated in the $\\overline{\\mbox{MS}}$ scheme at 2 [GeV]. First, we add one pair of monopoles, varying the monopole charges $m_{c}$ from zero to four, to SU(3) quenched configurations by a monopole creation operator. The low-lying eigenvalues of the Overlap Dirac operator are computed from the gauge links of the normal configurations and the configurations with additional monopoles. Next, we compare the distributions of the nearest-neighbor spacing of the low-lying eigenvalues with the prediction of the random matrix theory. The low-lying eigenvalues not depending on the scale parameter $\\Sigma$ are compared to the prediction of the random matrix theory. The results show the consistency with the random matrix theory. Thus, the additional monopoles do not affect the low-lying eigenvalues. Moreover, we discover that the additional monopoles increa...

  16. Magnetic monopoles and relativistic cosmological models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein-Schabes, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    A dissertation is presented on magnetic monopoles and relativistic cosmological models. The maximum number density of monopoles in various astrophysical scenarios was investigated along with: the monopole flux in the galaxy, the allowed monopole abundance, and the formation of stable monopole orbits. Limits on the mass and lifetime of monopolonium were calculated. Boltzmann's equation was used to calculate the monopole abundance in a magnetic axisymmetric Bianchi I cosmological model, and a solution was found describing an axisymmetric Bianchi I magnetic cosmology with monopoles. New inhomogeneous solutions to Einstein's equations were found. Finally, stability and inflation in Kaluza-Klein cosmologies in d + D + 1 dimensions was studied.

  17. Magnetic monopoles and strange matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sañudo, J.; Seguí, A.

    1986-01-01

    We show that if the density of grand unified monopoles at T⋍200 MeV id of the order of or greater than 4.4×1021 cm-3 they annihilate all of the strange matter produced in the quagma-hadron phase transition which of the unverse undergoes at this temperature. We also study gravitational capture of monopoles by lumps of strange matter. This yield upper limits on the density of monopoles for different sizes of strange ball. On leave of absence from Departamento de Física Atómica y Nuclear, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain.

  18. Generalized BPS magnetic monopoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casana, R.; Ferreira, M. M., Jr.; da Hora, E.

    2012-10-01

    We show the existence of Bogomol’nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) magnetic monopoles in a generalized Yang-Mills-Higgs model which is controlled by two positive functions, g(ϕaϕa) and f(ϕaϕa). This effective model, in principle, would describe the dynamics of the nonabelian fields in a chromoelectric media. We check the consistency of our generalized construction by analyzing an explicit case ruled by a parameter β. We also use the well-known spherically symmetric Ansatz to attain the corresponding self-dual equations describing the topological solutions. The overall conclusion is that the new solutions behave around the canonical one, with smaller or greater characteristic length depending on the values of β.

  19. MoEDAL: Seeking magnetic monopoles and more at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2074312

    2015-01-01

    The MoEDAL experiment (Monopole and Exotics Detector at the LHC) is designed to directly search for magnetic monopoles and other highly ionising stable or metastable particles arising in various theoretical scenarios beyond the Standard Model. Its physics goals --largely complementary to the multi-purpose LHC detectors ATLAS and CMS-- are accomplished by the deployment of plastic nuclear track detectors combined with trapping volumes for capturing charged highly ionising particles and TimePix pixel devices for monitoring. This paper focuses on the status of the detectors and the prospects for LHC Run II.

  20. Direct search for Dirac magnetic monopoles in pp collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abulencia, A; Acosta, D; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Carter, A; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cruz, A; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J; DiTuro, P; Dörr, C; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garcia Sciverez, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz-Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecci, C; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O

    2006-05-26

    We search for pair-produced Dirac magnetic monopoles in 35.7 pb(-1) of proton-antiproton collisions at square root s = 1.96 TeV with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). We find no monopole candidates corresponding to a 95% confidence-level cross-section limit sigma 360 GeV/c2.

  1. Compact, Frequency Reconfigurable, Printed Monopole Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Gonçalves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a possible implementation of a compact printed monopole antenna, useful to operate in UMTS and WLAN bands. In order to accomplish that, a miniaturization technique based on the application of chip inductors is used in conjunction with frequency reconfiguration capability. The chip inductors change the impedance response of the monopole, allowing to reduce the resonant frequency. In order to be able to operate the antenna in these two different frequencies, an antenna reconfiguration technique based on PIN diodes is applied. This procedure allows the change of the active form of the antenna leading to a shift in the resonant frequency. The prototype measurements show good agreement with the simulation results.

  2. Axion Isocurvature and Magnetic Monopoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yasunori; Rajendran, Surjeet; Sanches, Fabio

    2016-04-08

    We propose a simple mechanism to suppress axion isocurvature fluctuations using hidden sector magnetic monopoles. This allows for the Peccei-Quinn scale to be of the order of the unification scale consistently with high scale inflation.

  3. Monopolium: the key to monopoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epele, L.N.; Fanchiotti, H.; Garcia Canal, C.A. [Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Laboratorio de Fisica Teorica, Departamento de Fisica, IFLP, La Plata (Argentina); Vento, V. [Universidad de Valencia, Departamento de Fisica Teorica and Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, Burjassot (Valencia) (Spain); CERN, TH-Division, PH Department, Geneve (Switzerland)

    2008-07-15

    Dirac showed that the existence of one magnetic pole in the universe could offer an explanation for the discrete nature of the electric charge. Magnetic poles appear naturally in most grand unified theories. Their discovery would be of the greatest importance for particle physics and cosmology. The intense experimental search carried out thus far has not met with success. Moreover, if the monopoles are very massive their production is outside the range of present day facilities. A way out of this impasse would be if the monopoles bind to form monopolium, a monopole-antimonopole bound state, which is so strongly bound that it has a relatively small mass. Under these circumstances it could be produced with present day facilities and the existence of monopoles could be indirectly proven. We study the feasibility of detecting monopolium in present and future accelerators. (orig.)

  4. Gravitational Global Monopoles with Horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Maison, D

    1999-01-01

    We give arguments for the existence of ``radial excitations'' of gravitational global monopoles with any number of zeros of the Higgs field and present numerical results for solutions with up to two zeros. All these solutions possess a de Sitter like cosmological horizon, outside of which they become singular. In addition we study corresponding static ``hairy'' black hole solutions, representing black holes sitting inside a global monopole core. In particular, we determine their existence domains as a function of their horizon radius rh.

  5. Dielectric Analysis for Torque of a Solute Ion Coulomb Force Monopole Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresco, Anthony N.

    ASME Technical Paper ES2010-90396 "Solute Ion Coulomb Force Monopole Motor and Solute Ion Linear Alignment Propulsion" by the author describes a motor that is based on an arrangement of solute ion electric field monopoles.[1] That is, through a process called capacitive deionization, sodium and chlorine ions in salt water are captured and confined by an electrically conductive material to form electric field monopoles. At least four of the like charged monopoles (all negative or all positive) can be arranged on a disc. At least one stationary monopole of the same charge is placed adjacent to the disc and positioned so that a repulsive electric field is formed between the stationary monopole and at least one of the monopoles positioned on the disc so that the disc is then forced to rotate a shaft at the center of the disc. This paper analyzes the behavior of the dielectric materials forming part of the monopoles to show that the net torque on the motor is greater than zero and also illustrates a novel effect of polarization of a dielectric material positioned between two like-charged monopoles as occurs in the configuration of the monopole motor and a deficiency in the conventional closed path analysis for work performed during movement of electric charges that emit electrostatic fields by failing to consider the effects of dielectric materials in shielding the electrostatic fields. The monopole motor connected to an to electrical generator can provide continuous on-board electrical power to electrical loads for local and deep space applications including power to electrode assemblies designed for linear alignment of like-charged solute ions as a means of propulsion and particle acceleration as described in the ES2010-90396 paper. Details of the monopole motor and the propulsion are available in WO 2008/024927 A2 (and US2010/0199632 A1) "Solute Ion Coulomb Force Acceleration and Electric Field Monopole Passive Voltage Source" by the author Ref.[2].

  6. Monopoles in AdS

    CERN Document Server

    Sutcliffe, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Applications to holographic theories have led to some recent interest in magnetic monopoles in four-dimensional Anti-de Sitter spacetime. This paper is concerned with a study of these monopoles, using both analytic and numerical methods. An approximation is introduced in which the fields of a charge N monopole are explicitly given in terms of a degree N rational map. Within this approximation, it is shown that the minimal energy monopole of charge N has the same symmetry as the minimal energy Skyrmion with baryon number N in Minkowski spacetime. Beyond charge two the minimal energy monopole has only a discrete symmetry, which is often Platonic. The rational map approximation provides an upper bound on the monopole energy and may be viewed as a smooth non-abelian refinement of the magnetic bag approximation, to which it reverts under some additional approximations. The analytic results are supported by numerical solutions obtained from simulations of the non-abelian field theory. A similar analysis is performe...

  7. Illustrated cosmic monopole

    CERN Document Server

    Seagrave, Wyken

    2015-01-01

    Truly bizarre, utterly unique I've never read a novel quite like this before. The author takes you on an exciting adventure full of unforgettable and vivid imagery. Solidly written with each character's personality shining through. If you find physics fascinating you will not be disappointed by the author's keen intellect and clear understanding of this most challenging (for me anyway) scientific subject. This is not a novel I will forget anytime soon, I would highly recommend it. Andrewly Very imaginative tale Anybody interested in a very imaginative and engrossing sci fi story needs to check this one out. I have been reading sci fi for decades and this story has elements that surprise me which is very unusual considering the number of novels and stories I have over the years. ric freeman Summary of the story The cosmic monopole has been wandering the Universe since it was created in the Big Bang. Its existence is fundamental to the way the Universe works. It is finally trapped by the powerful magnetic f...

  8. Search for Relativistic Magnetic Monopoles with IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Buitink, S; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Groß, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heimann, P; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jlelati, O; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pieloth, D; Pirk, N; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rädel, L; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönherr, L; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Smith, M W E; Soiron, M; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Usner, M; van der Drift, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zilles, A; Zoll, M

    2012-01-01

    We present the first results in the search for relativistic magnetic monopoles with the IceCube detector, a subsurface neutrino telescope located in the South Polar ice cap containing a volume of 1 km$^{3}$. This analysis searches data taken on the partially completed detector during 2007 when roughly 0.2 km$^{3}$ of ice was instrumented. The lack of candidate events leads to an upper limit on the flux of relativistic magnetic monopoles of $\\Phi_{\\mathrm{90%C.L.}}\\sim 3\\e{-18}\\fluxunits$ for $\\beta\\geq0.8$. This is a factor of 4 improvement over the previous best experimental flux limits up to a Lorentz boost $\\gamma$ below $10^{7}$. This result is then interpreted for a wide range of mass and kinetic energy values.

  9. Search for relativistic magnetic monopoles with IceCube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Baum, V.; Bay, R.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker Tjus, J.; Becker, K.-H.; Bell, M.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; BenZvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Berghaus, P.; Berley, D.; Bernardini, E.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D. Z.; Bindig, D.; Bissok, M.; Blaufuss, E.; Blumenthal, J.; Boersma, D. J.; Bohm, C.; Bose, D.; Böser, S.; Botner, O.; Brayeur, L.; Brown, A. M.; Bruijn, R.; Brunner, J.; Buitink, S.; Carson, M.; Casey, J.; Casier, M.; Chirkin, D.; Christy, B.; Clevermann, F.; Cohen, S.; Cowen, D. F.; Cruz Silva, A. H.; Danninger, M.; Daughhetee, J.; Davis, J. C.; De Clercq, C.; Descamps, F.; Desiati, P.; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G.; DeYoung, T.; Díaz-Vélez, J. C.; Dreyer, J.; Dumm, J. P.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Eisch, J.; Ellsworth, R. W.; Engdegård, O.; Euler, S.; Evenson, P. A.; Fadiran, O.; Fazely, A. R.; Fedynitch, A.; Feintzeig, J.; Feusels, T.; Filimonov, K.; Finley, C.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Flis, S.; Franckowiak, A.; Franke, R.; Frantzen, K.; Fuchs, T.; Gaisser, T. K.; Gallagher, J.; Gerhardt, L.; Gladstone, L.; Glüsenkamp, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goodman, J. A.; Góra, D.; Grant, D.; Groß, A.; Grullon, S.; Gurtner, M.; Ha, C.; Haj Ismail, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hanson, K.; Heereman, D.; Heimann, P.; Heinen, D.; Helbing, K.; Hellauer, R.; Hickford, S.; Hill, G. C.; Hoffman, K. D.; Hoffmann, R.; Homeier, A.; Hoshina, K.; Huelsnitz, W.; Hulth, P. O.; Hultqvist, K.; Hussain, S.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobi, E.; Jacobsen, J.; Japaridze, G. S.; Jlelati, O.; Kappes, A.; Karg, T.; Karle, A.; Kiryluk, J.; Kislat, F.; Kläs, J.; Klein, S. R.; Köhne, J.-H.; Kohnen, G.; Kolanoski, H.; Köpke, L.; Kopper, C.; Kopper, S.; Koskinen, D. J.; Kowalski, M.; Krasberg, M.; Kroll, G.; Kunnen, J.; Kurahashi, N.; Kuwabara, T.; Labare, M.; Laihem, K.; Landsman, H.; Larson, M. J.; Lauer, R.; Lesiak-Bzdak, M.; Lünemann, J.; Madsen, J.; Maruyama, R.; Mase, K.; Matis, H. S.; McNally, F.; Meagher, K.; Merck, M.; Mészáros, P.; Meures, T.; Miarecki, S.; Middell, E.; Milke, N.; Miller, J.; Mohrmann, L.; Montaruli, T.; Morse, R.; Movit, S. M.; Nahnhauer, R.; Naumann, U.; Nowicki, S. C.; Nygren, D. R.; Obertacke, A.; Odrowski, S.; Olivas, A.; Olivo, M.; O'Murchadha, A.; Panknin, S.; Paul, L.; Pepper, J. A.; Pérez de los Heros, C.; Pieloth, D.; Pirk, N.; Posselt, J.; Price, P. B.; Przybylski, G. T.; Rädel, L.; Rawlins, K.; Redl, P.; Resconi, E.; Rhode, W.; Ribordy, M.; Richman, M.; Riedel, B.; Rodrigues, J. P.; Rothmaier, F.; Rott, C.; Ruhe, T.; Ruzybayev, B.; Ryckbosch, D.; Saba, S. M.; Salameh, T.; Sander, H.-G.; Santander, M.; Sarkar, S.; Schatto, K.; Scheel, M.; Scheriau, F.; Schmidt, T.; Schmitz, M.; Schoenen, S.; Schöneberg, S.; Schönherr, L.; Schönwald, A.; Schukraft, A.; Schulte, L.; Schulz, O.; Seckel, D.; Seo, S. H.; Sestayo, Y.; Seunarine, S.; Smith, M. W. E.; Soiron, M.; Soldin, D.; Spiczak, G. M.; Spiering, C.; Stamatikos, M.; Stanev, T.; Stasik, A.; Stezelberger, T.; Stokstad, R. G.; Stößl, A.; Strahler, E. A.; Ström, R.; Sullivan, G. W.; Taavola, H.; Taboada, I.; Tamburro, A.; Ter-Antonyan, S.; Tilav, S.; Toale, P. A.; Toscano, S.; Usner, M.; van der Drift, D.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Van Overloop, A.; van Santen, J.; Vehring, M.; Voge, M.; Walck, C.; Waldenmaier, T.; Wallraff, M.; Walter, M.; Wasserman, R.; Weaver, Ch.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N.; Wiebe, K.; Wiebusch, C. H.; Williams, D. R.; Wissing, H.; Wolf, M.; Wood, T. R.; Woschnagg, K.; Xu, C.; Xu, D. L.; Xu, X. W.; Yanez, J. P.; Yodh, G.; Yoshida, S.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Ziemann, J.; Zilles, A.; Zoll, M.

    2013-01-01

    We present the first results in the search for relativistic magnetic monopoles with the IceCube detector, a subsurface neutrino telescope located in the South Polar ice cap containing a volume of 1km3. This analysis searches data taken on the partially completed detector during 2007 when roughly 0.2km3 of ice was instrumented. The lack of candidate events leads to an upper limit on the flux of relativistic magnetic monopoles of Φ90%C.L.˜3×10-18cm-2sr-1s-1 for β≥0.8. This is a factor of 4 improvement over the previous best experimental flux limits up to a Lorentz boost γ below 107. This result is then interpreted for a wide range of mass and kinetic energy values.

  10. QCD monopole and sigma meson coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Iwazaki, Aiichi

    2016-01-01

    Under the assumption of the Abelian dominance in QCD, we show that chiral condensate is locally present around a QCD monopole. The appearance of the chiral condensate around a GUT monopole was shown in the previous analysis of the Rubakov effect. We apply a similar analysis to the QCD monopole. It follows that the condensation of the monopole carrying the chiral condensate leads to the chiral symmetry breaking as well as quark confinement. To realize the result explicitly, we present a phenomenological linear sigma model coupled with the monopoles, in which the monopole condensation causes the chiral symmetry breaking as well as confinement. The monopoles are assumed to be described by a model of dual superconductor. We identify the monopoles with scalar isoscalar $f_0$ mesons with masses $1400\\sim 1700$ MeV as well as dual gauge fields with $h_1$ vector mesons with masses $\\sim 1500$MeV.

  11. Some Remarks on Gravitational Global Monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Maison, D; Maison, Dieter; Liebling, Steven L.

    1999-01-01

    Using mainly analytical arguments, we derive the exact relation static gravitational global monopoles. For this value, the global monopole bifurcates with the de Sitter solution obtained for vanishing Higgs field. In addition, we analyze the stability properties of the solutions.

  12. Black holes in magnetic monopoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kimyeong; Nair, V. P.; Weinberg, Erick J.

    1992-04-01

    We study magnetically charged classical solutions of a spontaneously broken gauge theory interacting with gravity. We show that nonsingular monopole solutions exist only if the Higgs-field vacuum expectation value v is less than or equal to a critical value vcr, which is of the order of the Planck mass. In the limiting case, the monopole becomes a black hole, with the region outside the horizon described by the critical Reissner-Nordström solution. For vsolutions which are singular at r=0, but which have this singularity hidden within a horizon. These have nontrivial matter fields outside the horizon, and may be interpreted as small black holes lying within a magnetic monopole. The nature of these solutions as a function of v and of the total mass M and their relation to the Reissner-Nordström solutions are discussed.

  13. Black Holes in Magnetic Monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, K; Weinberg, Erick J; Weinberg, Erick J.

    1992-01-01

    We study magnetically charged classical solutions of a spontaneously broken gauge theory interacting with gravity. We show that nonsingular monopole solutions exist only if the Higgs vacuum expectation value $v$ is less than or equal to a critical value $v_{cr}$, which is of the order of the Planck mass. In the limiting case the monopole becomes a black hole, with the region outside the horizon described by the critical Reissner-Nordstrom solution. For $v

  14. Dynamics of slender monopoles and anti-monopoles in non-Abelian superconductor

    CERN Document Server

    Arai, Masato; Eto, Minoru; Sakai, Norisuke

    2014-01-01

    Low energy dynamics of magnetic monopoles and anti-monopoles in the U(2) gauge theory is studied in the Higgs (non-Abelian superconducting) phase. The monopoles in this superconducting phase are not spherical but are of slender ellipsoid which are pierced by a vortex string. We investigate scattering of the slender monopole and anti-monopole, and find that they do not always decay into radiation, contrary to our naive intuition. They can repel, make bound states (magnetic mesons) or resonances. Analytical solutions including any number of monopoles and anti-monopoles are obtained in the first non-trivial order of rigid-body approximation. We point out that some part of solutions of slender monopole system in 1+3 dimensions can be mapped exactly onto the sine-Gordon system in 1+1 dimensions. This observation allows us to visualize dynamics of monopole and anti-monopole scattering easily.

  15. Moduli of monopole walls and amoebas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherkis, Sergey A.; Ward, Richard S.

    2012-05-01

    We study doubly-periodic monopoles, also called monopole walls, determining their spectral data and computing the dimensions of their moduli spaces. Using spectral data we identify the moduli, and compare our results with a perturbative analysis. We also identify an SL(2, {Z}) action on monopole walls, in which the S transformation corresponds to the Nahm transform.

  16. Moduli of Monopole Walls and Amoebas

    CERN Document Server

    Cherkis, Sergey A

    2012-01-01

    We study doubly-periodic monopoles, also called monopole walls, determining their spectral data and computing the dimensions of their moduli spaces. Using spectral data we identify the moduli, and compare our results with a perturbative analysis. We also identify an SL(2,Z) action on monopole walls, in which the S transformation corresponds to the Nahm transform.

  17. Magnetic Monopole Content of Hot Instantons

    CERN Document Server

    Brower, R C; Negele, John W; Orginos, K; Tan, C I

    1999-01-01

    We study the Abelian projection of an instanton in $R^3 \\times S^1$ as a function of temperature (T) and non-trivial holonomic twist ($\\omega$) of the Polyakov loop at infinity. These parameters interpolate between the circular monopole loop solution at T=0 and the static 't Hooft-Polyakov monopole/anti-monopole pair at high temperature.

  18. DUAL BAND MONOPOLE ANTENNA DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Jithu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The WLAN and Bluetooth applications become popular in mobile devices, integrating GSM and ISM bands operation in one compact antenna, can reduce the size of mobile devices. Recently, lot many investigations are carried out in designing a dual band antennas with operating frequencies in GSM band and in ISM band for mobile devices. Printed monopoles are under this investigation. In this paper, dual-band printed monopoles are presented to operate at GSM band i.e. 900 MHz and ISM band i.e. 2.4 GHz. We intend to observe the antenna characteristics on the network analyzer and verify the theoretical results with the practical ones.

  19. Magnetic monopole field exposed by electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Béché, A; Van Tendeloo, G; Verbeeck, J

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic monopoles have provided a rich field of study, leading to a wide area of research in particle physics, solid state physics, ultra-cold gases, superconductors, cosmology, and gauge theory. So far, no true magnetic monopoles were found experimentally. Using the Aharonov-Bohm effect, one of the central results of quantum physics, shows however, that an effective monopole field can be produced. Understanding the effects of such a monopole field on its surroundings is crucial to its observation and provides a better grasp of fundamental physical theory. We realize the diffraction of fast electrons at a magnetic monopole field generated by a nanoscopic magnetized ferromagnetic needle. Previous studies have been limited to theoretical semiclassical optical calculations of the motion of electrons in such a monopole field. Solid state systems like the recently studied 'spin ice' provide a constrained system to study similar fields, but make it impossible to separate the monopole from the material. Free space ...

  20. Experimental Realization of a Dirac Monopole through the Decay of an Isolated Monopole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ollikainen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We experimentally observe the decay dynamics of deterministically created isolated monopoles in spin-1 Bose-Einstein condensates. As the condensate undergoes a change between magnetic phases, the isolated monopole gradually evolves into a spin configuration hosting a Dirac monopole in its synthetic magnetic field. We characterize in detail the Dirac monopole by measuring the particle densities of the spin states projected along different quantization axes. Importantly, we observe the spontaneous emergence of nodal lines in the condensate density that accompany the Dirac monopole. We also demonstrate that the monopole decay accelerates in weaker magnetic field gradients.

  1. Direct Search for Dirac Magnetic Monopoles in p-pbar Collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Ben-Haim, E; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bölla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, Yu A; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Carter, A; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chapman, J; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chu, P H; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciljak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Connolly, A; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cruz, A; Cuevas-Maestro, J; Culbertson, R; Cyr, D; Da Ronco, S; D'Auria, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dagenhart, D; De Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J; Di Turo, P; Dorr, C; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; Donega, M; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Efron, J; Ehlers, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernández, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gajjar, A; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; García, J E; García-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D A; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Gómez, G; Gómez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Yu; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Griffiths, M; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimarães da Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Hahn, K; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Höcker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J R; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jeon, E J; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz-Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreps, M; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecci, C; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Liss, T M; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Loverre, P F; Lu, R S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Manca, G; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Von der Mey, M; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla-Fernández, P A; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Müller, T; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Naumov, D; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Ogawa, T; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Österberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Papikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, Aldo L; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Van Remortel, N; Renton, P B; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Sabik, S; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Salto, O; Saltzberg, D; Sánchez, C; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schieferdecker, P; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T G; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakian, A; Sjölin, J; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smirnov, D; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Söderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; Saint-Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Tonnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, A W; Vallecorsa, S; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vollrath, I; Volobuev, I P; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, Y; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2006-01-01

    We search for pair-produced Dirac magnetic monopoles in 35.7 pb^-1 of proton-antiproton collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1.96 TeV with the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF). We find no monopole candidates corresponding to a 95% confidence-level cross-section limit sigma 360 GeV/c^2.

  2. Eikonal Scattering of Monopoles and Dyons in Dual QED

    CERN Document Server

    Gamberg, L P; Gamberg, Leonard; Milton, Kimball A.

    2000-01-01

    The quantum field theory of electron-point magnetic monopole interactions and dyon-dyon interactions, based on the string-dependent ``nonlocal'' action of Dirac and Schwinger is developed. We demonstrate that a nonperturbative quantum field theoretic formulation can be constructed resulting in a string {\\em independent} cross section for monopole-electron and dyon-dyon scattering. Such calculations can be done only by using nonperturbative approximations such as the eikonal and not by some mutilation of lowest-order perturbation theory.

  3. Dual Mode Slotted Monopole Antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-05

    of 15 DUAL MODE SLOTTED MONOPOLE ANTENNA STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described herein may be manufactured and used by...REFERENCE TO OTHER PATENT APPLICATIONS [0002] None. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION (1) Field of the Invention [0003] The present invention is directed...such as this that is capable of radiating at a different frequency below this cutoff. The present invention provides a means by which the overall

  4. Polarimetric Edge Detector Based on the Complex Wishart Distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Henning; Schou, Jesper; Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg

    2001-01-01

    A new edge detector for polarimetric SAR data has been developed. The edge detector is based on a newly developed test statistic for equality of two complex covariance matrices following the complex Wishart distribution and an associated asymptotic probability for the test statistic. The new...... polarimetric edge detector provides a constant false alarm rate and it utilizes the full polarimetric information. The edge detector has been applied to polarimetric SAR data from the Danish dual-frequency, airborne polarimetric SAR, EMISAR. The results show clearly an improved edge detection performance...

  5. A Direct Search for Dirac Magnetic Monopoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulhearn, Michael James

    2004-10-01

    Magnetic monopoles are highly ionizing and curve in the direction of the magnetic field. A new dedicated magnetic monopole trigger at CDF, which requires large light pulses in the scintillators of the time-of-flight system, remains highly efficient to monopoles while consuming a tiny fraction of the available trigger bandwidth. A specialized offline reconstruction checks the central drift chamber for large dE/dx tracks which do not curve in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. We observed zero monopole candidate events in 35.7 pb{sup -1} of proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. This implies a monopole production cross section limit {sigma} < 0.2 pb for monopoles with mass between 100 and 700 GeV, and, for a Drell-Yan like pair production mechanism, a mass limit m > 360 GeV.

  6. A Direct Search for Dirac Magnetic Monopoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulhearn, Michael James [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2004-10-01

    Magnetic monopoles are highly ionizing and curve in the direction of the magnetic field. A new dedicated magnetic monopole trigger at CDF, which requires large light pulses in the scintillators of the time-of-flight system, remains highly efficient to monopoles while consuming a tiny fraction of the available trigger bandwidth. A specialized offline reconstruction checks the central drift chamber for large dE/dx tracks which do not curve in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field. We observed zero monopole candidate events in 35.7 pb-1 of proton-antiproton collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV. This implies a monopole production cross section limit σ < 0.2 pb for monopoles with mass between 100 and 700 GeV, and, for a Drell-Yan like pair production mechanism, a mass limit m > 360 GeV.

  7. Time-based position estimation in monolithic scintillator detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabacchini, V.; Borghi, G.; Schaart, D.R.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray detectors based on bright monolithic scintillation crystals coupled to pixelated photodetectors are currently being considered for several applications in the medical imaging field. In a typical monolithic detector, both the light intensity and the time of arrival of the earliest

  8. Time-based position estimation in monolithic scintillator detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabacchini, V.; Borghi, G.; Schaart, D.R.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray detectors based on bright monolithic scintillation crystals coupled to pixelated photodetectors are currently being considered for several applications in the medical imaging field. In a typical monolithic detector, both the light intensity and the time of arrival of the earliest scintilla

  9. Time-based position estimation in monolithic scintillator detectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabacchini, V.; Borghi, G.; Schaart, D.R.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-ray detectors based on bright monolithic scintillation crystals coupled to pixelated photodetectors are currently being considered for several applications in the medical imaging field. In a typical monolithic detector, both the light intensity and the time of arrival of the earliest scintilla

  10. TOF-PET detector concept based on organic scintillators

    CERN Document Server

    Moskal, P; Białas, P; Ciszewska, M; Czerwiński, E; Heczko, A; Kajetanowicz, M; Kapłon, Ł; Kochanowski, A; Konopka-Cupiał, G; Korcyl, G; Krzemień, W; Łojek, K; Majewski, J; Migdał, W; Molenda, M; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Rudy, Z; Salabura, P; Silarski, M; Słomski, A; Smyrski, J; Zdebik, J; Zieliński, M

    2013-01-01

    In this contribution we present a new concept of the large acceptance detector systems based on organic scintillators which may allow for simultaneous diagnostic of large fraction of the human body. Novelty of the concept lies in employing large blocks of polymer scintillators instead of crystals as detectors of annihilation quanta, and in using predominantly the timing of signals instead of their amplitudes.

  11. Branch Processes of Regular Magnetic Monopole

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MO Shu-Fan; REN Ji-Rong; ZHU Tao

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, by making use of Duan's topological current theory, the branch process of regular magnetic monopoles is discussed in detail Regular magnetic monopoles are found generating or annihilating at the limit point and encountering, splitting, or merging at the bifurcation point and the degenerate point systematically of the vector order parameter field φ(x).Furthermore, it is also shown that when regular magnetic monopoles split or merge at the degenerate point of field function φ, the total topological charges of the regular magnetic monopoles axe still unchanged.

  12. Correlations between Abelian monopoles and center vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini Nejad, Seyed Mohsen; Deldar, Sedigheh

    2017-04-01

    We study the correlations between center vortices and Abelian monopoles for SU(3) gauge group. Combining fractional fluxes of monopoles, center vortex fluxes are constructed in the thick center vortex model. Calculating the potentials induced by fractional fluxes constructing the center vortex flux in a thick center vortex-like model and comparing with the potential induced by center vortices, we observe an attraction between fractional fluxes of monopoles constructing the center vortex flux. We conclude that the center vortex flux is stable, as expected. In addition, we show that adding a contribution of the monopole-antimonopole pairs in the potentials induced by center vortices ruins the Casimir scaling at intermediate regime.

  13. Ultra-Wideband Coplanar-Fed Monopoles: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jilkova

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper provides an experimental comparison of four types of ultra-wideband coplanar-fed planar monopole antennas. Parameters of the open stub completed by an L-shaped monopole and the cross monopole were adopted from the literature. The forked monopole and the coplanar monopole were fabricated and measured. Monopoles were compared from the viewpoint of the impedance bandwidth, gain, directivity patterns and dimensions.

  14. Search for ultrarelativistic magnetic monopoles with the Pierre Auger observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anastasi, G. A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andrada, B.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Balaceanu, A.; Barreira Luz, R. J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Biteau, J.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Botti, A. M.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Briechle, F. L.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, L.; Cancio, A.; Canfora, F.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; D'Amico, S.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Jong, S. J.; De Mauro, G.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; Debatin, J.; Deligny, O.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, R. C.; Dova, M. T.; Dundovic, A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filipčič, A.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; Fuster, A.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gaté, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Głas, D.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Hasankiadeh, Q.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huege, T.; Hulsman, J.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kemp, J.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Kukec Mezek, G.; Kunka, N.; Kuotb Awad, A.; LaHurd, D.; Lauscher, M.; Lebrun, P.; Legumina, R.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopes, L.; López, R.; López Casado, A.; Luce, Q.; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Mockler, D.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Müller, G.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, S.; Naranjo, I.; Nellen, L.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, H.; Núñez, L. A.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pedreira, F.; PÈ©kala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Peña-Rodriguez, J.; Pereira, L. A. S.; Perrone, L.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Ramos-Pollan, R.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravignani, D.; Reinert, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rogozin, D.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sanabria Gomez, J. D.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E. M.; Santos, E.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sarmiento, C. A.; Sato, R.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schovánek, P.; Schröder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sigl, G.; Silli, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sonntag, S.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Stanca, D.; Stanič, S.; Stasielak, J.; Stassi, P.; Strafella, F.; Suarez, F.; Suarez Durán, M.; Sudholz, T.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taboada, A.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Torri, M.; Travnicek, P.; Trini, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Vergara Quispe, I. D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Villaseñor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weindl, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyński, H.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yang, L.; Yelos, D.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zong, Z.; Zuccarello, F.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    We present a search for ultrarelativistic magnetic monopoles with the Pierre Auger observatory. Such particles, possibly a relic of phase transitions in the early Universe, would deposit a large amount of energy along their path through the atmosphere, comparable to that of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). The air-shower profile of a magnetic monopole can be effectively distinguished by the fluorescence detector from that of standard UHECRs. No candidate was found in the data collected between 2004 and 2012, with an expected background of less than 0.1 event from UHECRs. The corresponding 90% confidence level (C.L.) upper limits on the flux of ultrarelativistic magnetic monopoles range from 10-19(cm2 sr s )-1 for a Lorentz factor γ =1 09 to 2.5 ×10-21(cm2 sr s )-1 for γ =1 012. These results—the first obtained with a UHECR detector—improve previously published limits by up to an order of magnitude.

  15. Search for non-relativistic Magnetic Monopoles with IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Arguelles, C; Arlen, T C; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H -P; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Classen, L; Clevermann, F; Coenders, S; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; de André, J P A M; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Eichmann, B; Eisch, J; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grandmont, D T; Grant, D; Gretskov, P; Groh, J C; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haack, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallen, P; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Jagielski, K; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Kelley, J L; Kiryluk, J; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Kriesten, A; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Leute, J; Lünemann, J; Macías, O; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Meli, A; Merck, M; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Omairat, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Quinnan, M; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Reimann, R; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rodrigues, J P; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Shanidze, R; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stanisha, N A; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tešić, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Toscano, S; Tselengidou, M; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vallecorsa, S; van Eijndhoven, N; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallraff, M; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zoll, M

    2014-01-01

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory is a large Cherenkov detector instrumenting $1\\,\\mathrm{km}^3$ of Antarctic ice. The detector can be used to search for signatures of particle physics beyond the Standard Model. Here, we describe the search for non-relativistic, magnetic monopoles as remnants of the GUT (Grand Unified Theory) era shortly after the Big Bang. These monopoles may catalyze the decay of nucleons via the Rubakov-Callan effect with a cross section suggested to be in the range of $10^{-27}\\,\\mathrm{cm^2}$ to $10^{-21}\\,\\mathrm{cm^2}$. In IceCube, the Cherenkov light from nucleon decays along the monopole trajectory would produce a characteristic hit pattern. This paper presents the results of an analysis of first data taken from May 2011 until May 2012 with a dedicated slow-particle trigger for DeepCore, a subdetector of IceCube. A second analysis provides better sensitivity for the brightest non-relativistic monopoles using data taken from May 2009 until May 2010. In both analyses no monopole signal ...

  16. Towards graphene-based detectors for dark matter directional detection

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Shang-Yung

    2015-01-01

    Dark matter detectors with directional sensitivity have the capability to distinguish dark matter induced nuclear recoils from isotropic backgrounds, thus providing a smoking gun signature for dark matter in the Galactic halo. Here we propose a conceptually novel class of high directional sensitivity dark matter detectors utilizing graphene-based van der Waals heterostructures. The advantages over conventional low pressure gas time projection chamber-based directional detectors are discussed in detail. A practical implementation using graphene/hexagonal boron nitride and graphene/molybdenum disulfide heterostructures is presented together with an overwhelming amount of experimental evidence in strong support of its feasibility.

  17. Absolute efficiency measurements with the 10B based Jalousie detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modzel, G.; Henske, M.; Houben, A.; Klein, M.; Köhli, M.; Lennert, P.; Meven, M.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schmidt, U.; Schweika, W.

    2014-04-01

    The 10B based Jalousie detector is a replacement for 3He counter tubes, which are nowadays less affordable for large area detectors due to the 3He crisis. In this paper we investigate and verify the performance of the new 10B based detector concept and its adoption for the POWTEX diffractometer, which is designed for the detection of thermal neutrons with predicted detection efficiencies of 75-50% for neutron energies of 10-100 meV, respectively. The predicted detection efficiency has been verified by absolute measurements using neutrons with a wavelength of 1.17 Å (59 meV).

  18. User Identification Detector Based on Power of R Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Chun-jiang; YU Quan; LIU Yuan-an

    2005-01-01

    To avoid the inaccurate estimation of the active user's number and the corresponding performance degradation, a novel POR-based User Identification Detector (UID) is proposed for the Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) systems. The new detector adopts the Power of R (POR) technique and the Multiple Signal Classification (MUSIC) method, which does not require the estimation of active users' number, and obtains lower false alarm probability than the subspace-based UID in the multipath channels. However, from our analysis, increasing the order m does not improve the performance. Therefore, when m is one, the performance of the new detector is maximal.

  19. Resonant mode for gravitational wave detectors based on atom interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Peter W.; Hogan, Jason M.; Kasevich, Mark A.; Rajendran, Surjeet

    2016-11-01

    We describe an atom interferometric gravitational wave detector design that can operate in a resonant mode for increased sensitivity. By oscillating the positions of the atomic wave packets, this resonant detection mode allows for coherently enhanced, narrow-band sensitivity at target frequencies. The proposed detector is flexible and can be rapidly switched between broadband and narrow-band detection modes. For instance, a binary discovered in broadband mode can subsequently be studied further as the inspiral evolves by using a tailored narrow-band detector response. In addition to functioning like a lock-in amplifier for astrophysical events, the enhanced sensitivity of the resonant approach also opens up the possibility of searching for important cosmological signals, including the stochastic gravitational wave background produced by inflation. We give an example of detector parameters which would allow detection of inflationary gravitational waves down to ΩGW˜10-14 for a two-satellite space-based detector.

  20. A compensated fission detector based on photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petit, M. [CEA/DAM Ile-de-France, DPTA/Service de Physique Nucleaire, BP 12, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Ethvignot, T. [CEA/DAM Ile-de-France, DPTA/Service de Physique Nucleaire, BP 12, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Granier, T. [CEA/DAM Ile-de-France, DPTA/Service de Physique Nucleaire, BP 12, 91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France)]. E-mail: thierry.granier@cea.fr; Haight, R.C. [LANSCE-3, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS H855, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); O' Donnell, J.M. [LANSCE-3, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS H855, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Rochman, D. [LANSCE-3, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS H855, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wender, S.A. [LANSCE-3, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS H855, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bond, E.M. [C-INC, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS J514, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Bredeweg, T.A. [C-INC, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS J514, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Vieira, D.J. [C-INC, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS J514, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Wilhelmy, J.B. [C-INC, Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS J514, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Danon, Y. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

    2005-12-01

    Standard techniques of event-by-event detection of fission may fail when operated in high {gamma}-ray or particle radiation environments. This is the case within the 800MeV proton-driven lead slowing-down neutron spectrometer at LANSCE where standard fission detectors are found to be inoperable for microseconds to milliseconds after each proton pulse. To overcome this problem, a simple fission fragment detector based on compensated photovoltaic cells has been developed. The compensated detector has lower susceptibility to the strong {gamma}-flash and can recover much faster than an uncompensated detector. This detector is well adapted to applications involving the detection of fission in regions where high intensity {gamma}-ray and/or particle radiation fields exist.

  1. A compensated fission detector based on photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, M.; Ethvignot, T.; Granier, T.; Haight, R. C.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rochman, D.; Wender, S. A.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Danon, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Standard techniques of event-by-event detection of fission may fail when operated in high γ-ray or particle radiation environments. This is the case within the 800 MeV proton-driven lead slowing-down neutron spectrometer at LANSCE where standard fission detectors are found to be inoperable for microseconds to milliseconds after each proton pulse. To overcome this problem, a simple fission fragment detector based on compensated photovoltaic cells has been developed. The compensated detector has lower susceptibility to the strong γ-flash and can recover much faster than an uncompensated detector. This detector is well adapted to applications involving the detection of fission in regions where high intensity γ-ray and/or particle radiation fields exist.

  2. A passive FPAA based RF scatter meteor detector

    CERN Document Server

    Popowicz, Adam; Bernacki, Krzysztof; Fietkiewicz, Karol

    2015-01-01

    In the article we present a hardware meteor detector. The detection principle is based on the electromagnetic wave reflection from the ionized meteor trail in the atmosphere. The detector uses the ANADIGM field programmable analogue array (FPAA), which is an attractive alternative for a typically used detecting equipment - a PC computer with dedicated software. We implement an analog signal path using most of available FPAA resources to obtain precise audio signal detection. Our new detector was verified in collaboration with the Polish Fireball Network - the organization which monitors meteor activity in Poland. When compared with currently used signal processing PC software employing real radio meteor scatter signals, our low-cost detector proved to be more precise and reliable. Due to its cost and efficiency superiority over the current solution, the presented module is going to be implemented in the planned distributed detectors system.

  3. Primordial monopoles, proton decay, gravity waves and GUT inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Şenoğuz, Vedat Nefer

    2016-01-01

    We consider non-supersymmetric GUT inflation models in which intermediate mass monopoles may survive inflation because of the restricted number of e-foldings experienced by the accompanying symmetry breaking. Thus, an observable flux of primordial magnetic monopoles, comparable to or a few orders below the Parker limit, may be present in the galaxy. The mass scale associated with the intermediate symmetry breaking is $10^{13}$ GeV for an observable flux level, with the corresponding monopoles an order of magnitude or so heavier. Examples based on $SO(10)$ and $E_6$ yield such intermediate mass monopoles carrying respectively two and three units of Dirac magnetic charge. For GUT inflation driven by a gauge singlet scalar field with a Coleman-Weinberg or Higgs potential, compatibility with the Planck measurement of the scalar spectral index yields a Hubble constant (during horizon exit of cosmological scales) $H \\sim 7$--$9\\times10^{13}$ GeV, with the tensor to scalar ratio $r$ predicted to be $\\gtrsim0.02$. Pr...

  4. Primordial monopoles, proton decay, gravity waves and GUT inflation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedat Nefer Şenoğuz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider non-supersymmetric GUT inflation models in which intermediate mass monopoles may survive inflation because of the restricted number of e-foldings experienced by the accompanying symmetry breaking. Thus, an observable flux of primordial magnetic monopoles, comparable to or a few orders below the Parker limit may be present in the galaxy. The mass scale associated with the intermediate symmetry breaking is 1013 GeV for an observable flux level, with the corresponding monopoles an order of magnitude or so heavier. Examples based on SO(10 and E6 yield such intermediate mass monopoles carrying respectively two and three units of Dirac magnetic charge. For GUT inflation driven by a gauge singlet scalar field with a Coleman–Weinberg or Higgs potential, compatibility with the Planck measurement of the scalar spectral index yields a Hubble constant (during horizon exit of cosmological scales H∼7–9×1013 GeV, with the tensor to scalar ratio r predicted to be ≳0.02. Proton lifetime estimates for decays mediated by the superheavy gauge bosons are also provided.

  5. BRST formulation of 4-monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Gianvittorio, R; Restuccia, A

    1996-01-01

    A supersymmetric gauge invariant action is constructed over any 4-dimensional Riemannian manifold describing Witten's theory of 4-monopoles. The topological supersymmetric algebra closes off-shell. The multiplets include the auxiliary fields and the Wess-Zumino fields in an unusual way, arising naturally from BRST gauge fixing. A new canonical approach over Riemann manifolds is followed, using a Morse function as an euclidean time and taking into account the BRST boundary conditions that come from the BFV formulation. This allows a construction of the effective action starting from gauge principles.

  6. Monopole transitions in hot nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sujkowski, Z. [Soltan Inst. for Nuclear Studies, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    Monopole transitions can be a signature of shape changing in a hot, pulsating nucleus (the low energy E0 mode) and/or a measure of the compressibility of finite nuclei (GMR, the breathing mode). Experimental information pertaining to GMR is reviewed. Recipes for deducing the incompressibility modules for infinite nuclear matter from data on GMR are discussed. Astrophysical implications are outlined. The first attempts at locating the GMR strength in moderately hot nuclei are described. Prospects for improving the experimental techniques to make an observation of this strength in selected nuclei unambiguous are discussed. (author). 46 refs, 8 figs.

  7. Monopole in the dilatonic gauge field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Karczewska, D

    2000-01-01

    A numerical study of coupled to the dilaton field, static, spherically symmetric monopole solutions inspired by the Kaluza-Klein theory with large extra dimensions are presented. The generalized Prasad-Sommerfield solution is obtained. We show that monopole may have also the dilaton cloud configurations.

  8. Measuring global monopole velocities, one by one

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Eiguren, Asier; Urrestilla, Jon; Achúcarro, Ana

    2017-01-01

    We present an estimation of the average velocity of a network of global monopoles in a cosmological setting using large numerical simulations. In order to obtain the value of the velocity, we improve some already known methods, and present a new one. This new method estimates individual global monopole velocities in a network, by means of detecting each monopole position in the lattice and following the path described by each one of them. Using our new estimate we can settle an open question previously posed in the literature: velocity-dependent one-scale (VOS) models for global monopoles predict two branches of scaling solutions, one with monopoles moving at subluminal speeds and one with monopoles moving at luminal speeds. Previous attempts to estimate monopole velocities had large uncertainties and were not able to settle that question. Our simulations find no evidence of a luminal branch. We also estimate the values of the parameters of the VOS model. With our new method we can also study the microphysics of the complicated dynamics of individual monopoles. Finally we use our large simulation volume to compare the results from the different estimator methods, as well as to asses the validity of the numerical approximations made.

  9. The massive Kaluza-Klein monopole

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E; Eyras, E; Lozano, Y

    1998-01-01

    We construct the (bosonic) effective worldvolume action of an M-theory Kaluza-Klein monopole in a background given by the bosonic sector of eleven-dimensional massive supergravity, i.e, a "massive Kaluza-Klein monopole". As a consistency check we show that the direct dimensional reduction along the

  10. Monopole correlations in holographically flavored liquids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iqbal, N.

    2015-01-01

    Many-body systems with a conserved U(1) current in (2+1) dimensions may be probed by weakly gauging this current and studying correlation functions of magnetic monopole operators in the resulting dynamical gauge theory. We study such monopole correlations in holographic liquids with fundamental flav

  11. Search for Magnetic Monopoles with the NO$\

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zukai [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The magnetic monopole is a hypothetical particle, which is an important field configuration in many Grand Unified Theories, and whose mass may vary from 104 to 1018 GeV. The quantization of magnetic charge derived by Dirac in 1931 suggests the heavy ionization nature of magnetic monopoles. The NO$\

  12. Plasma panel-based radiation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Peter; Beene, James; Benhammou, Yan; Ben-Moshe, Meny; Bentefour, Hassan; Chapman, J W; Etzion, Erez; Ferretti, Claudio; Levin, Daniel; Silver, Yiftah; Varner, Robert; Weaverdyck, Curtis; Zhou, Bing; 10.1002/jsid.151

    2013-01-01

    The plasma panel sensor (PPS) is a gaseous micropattern radiation detector under current development. It has many operational and fabrication principles common to plasma display panels. It comprises a dense matrix of small, gas plasma discharge cells within a hermetically sealed panel. As in plasma display panels, it uses nonreactive, intrinsically radiation-hard materials such as glass substrates, refractory metal electrodes, and mostly inert gas mixtures. We are developing these devices primarily as thin, low-mass detectors with gas gaps from a few hundred microns to a few millimeters. The PPS is a high gain, inherently digital device with the potential for fast response times, fine position resolution (<50-mm RMS) and low cost. In this paper, we report on prototype PPS experimental results in detecting betas, protons, and cosmic muons, and we extrapolate on the PPS potential for applications including the detection of alphas, heavy ions at low-to-medium energy, thermal neutrons, and X-rays.

  13. The STACEE-32 Ground Based Gamma-ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hanna, D S; Boone, L M; Chantell, M C; Conner, Z; Covault, C E; Dragovan, M; Fortin, P; Gregorich, D T; Hinton, J A; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Oser, S; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Schütte, D R; Theoret, C G; Tümer, T O; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J A

    2002-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment detector in its initial configuration (STACEE-32). STACEE is a new ground-based gamma ray detector using the atmospheric Cherenkov technique. In STACEE, the heliostats of a solar energy research array are used to collect and focus the Cherenkov photons produced in gamma-ray induced air showers. The large Cherenkov photon collection area of STACEE results in a gamma-ray energy threshold below that of previous detectors.

  14. Search for exotic stable charged particles and magnetic monopoles at ALICE

    CERN Document Server

    Bader, Maria Karolina Margit

    2014-01-01

    The report describes an exploratory study of beyond the standard model particles like exotic stable charged particles and magnetic monopoles at ALICE. These particles typically posses very high masses and are reconstructable in high energy and high momentum regions. A procedure to obtain the mass spectra from the Time-of-Flight detector (TOF) and the Time-Projection Chamber (TPC) is described as well as a analysis of the TOF background signal. In addition the possibility to search for magnetic monopoles in the data and expected structures of free quarks are investigated.

  15. Results of a search for monopoles and tachyons in horizontal cosmic ray flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashitkov, V. D.; Kirina, T. M.; Klimakov, A. P.; Kokoulin, R. P.; Petrukhin, A. A.

    1985-01-01

    A search for monopoles and tachyons at ground level was carried out using an arrangement consisting of an ionization calorimeter and two hodoscope detectors. No clear evidence for these particles was obtained. The flux of monopoles with velocities beta approximately 0.01 is found to be less than 5.1 x 10 to the minus 13th power square centimeters s(-1) sr(-1) (95% cl.). The upper limit on the tachyon flux density is set as a 6 x 10 the minus 9th power particle/square centimeter event.

  16. Magnetic-Moment Fragmentation and Monopole Crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Brooks-Bartlett

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Coulomb phase, with its dipolar correlations and pinch-point–scattering patterns, is central to discussions of geometrically frustrated systems, from water ice to binary and mixed-valence alloys, as well as numerous examples of frustrated magnets. The emergent Coulomb phase of lattice-based systems has been associated with divergence-free fields and the absence of long-range order. Here, we go beyond this paradigm, demonstrating that a Coulomb phase can emerge naturally as a persistent fluctuating background in an otherwise ordered system. To explain this behavior, we introduce the concept of the fragmentation of the field of magnetic moments into two parts, one giving rise to a magnetic monopole crystal, the other a magnetic fluid with all the characteristics of an emergent Coulomb phase. Our theory is backed up by numerical simulations, and we discuss its importance with regard to the interpretation of a number of experimental results.

  17. Alpha-particle detection based on the BJT detector and simple, IC-based readout electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rovati, L; Bonaiuti, M [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Informazione, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Modena (Italy); Bettarini, S [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa and INFN Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Bosisio, L [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trieste and INFN Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Dalla Betta, G-F; Tyzhnevyi, V [Dipartimento di Ingegneria e Scienza dell' Informazione, Universita di Trento e INFN Trento, Trento (Italy); Verzellesi, G [Dipartimento di Scienze e Metodi dell' Ingegneria, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia and INFN Trento, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Zorzi, N, E-mail: giovanni.verzellesi@unimore.i [Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), Trento (Italy)

    2009-11-15

    In this paper we propose a portable instrument for alpha-particle detection based on a previously-developed BJT detector and a simple, IC-based readout electronics. Experimental tests of the BJT detector and readout electronics are reported. Numerical simulations are adopted to predict the performance enhancement achievable with optimized BJT detectors.

  18. Correlation based rotation-invariant corner detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzaferri, Javier; Ledesma, Silvia

    2008-04-01

    In this work we introduce a new approach for corner extraction. The method that allows the corner extraction with rotation invariance is composed by a spiral phase function and a binary amplitude. The designed function can be easily implemented as a filter for a Vander Lugt-like optical correlator. A final image obtained with the detector presents intensity peaks in each corner location. Numerical simulation has been performed on a set of synthetic scenes, modulated either in amplitude or phase. Results that show the very good performance of the method are shown.

  19. Scintillation Particle Detectors Based on Plastic Optical Fibres and Microfluidics

    CERN Document Server

    Mapelli, Alessandro; Renaud, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents the design, development, and experimental validation of two types of scintillation particle detectors with high spatial resolution. The first one is based on the well established scintillating fibre technology. It will complement the ATLAS (A Toroidal Large ApparatuS) detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The second detector consists in a microfabricated device used to demonstrate the principle of operation of a novel type of scintillation detector based on microfluidics. The first part of the thesis presents the work performed on a scintillating fibre tracking system for the ATLAS experiment. It will measure the trajectory of protons elastically scattered at very small angles to determine the absolute luminosity of the CERN LHC collider at the ATLAS interaction point. The luminosity of an accelerator characterizes its performance. It is a process-independent parameter that is completely determined by the properties of the colliding beams and it relates the cross section of a ...

  20. Novel Boron Based Multilayer Thermal Neutron Detector

    CERN Document Server

    SCHIEBER, M

    2010-01-01

    The detector contains four or more layers of natural Boron absorbing thermal neutrons. Thickness of a layer is 0.4 - 1.2 mg/cm2. The layers are deposited on one or on both sides of a metal surface used as contacts. Between the absorbing layers there are gas-filled gaps 3 - 6 mm thick. Electric field of 100 - 200 V/cm is applied to the gas-filled gaps. Natural Boron contains almost 20% of 10B isotope. When atoms of 10B capture a thermal neutron, nuclear reaction occurs, as a result of which two heavy particles - alpha particle and ion 7Li - from the thin absorber layer are emitted in opposing sides. One of the two particles penetrates into gas-filled gap between Boron layers and ionizes the gas. An impulse of electric current is created in the gas-filled gap actuated by the applied electric field. The impulse is registered by an electronic circuit. We have made and tested detectors containing from two to sixteen layers of natural Boron with an efficiency of thermal neutron registration from 2.9% to 12.5% accor...

  1. The Kaluza-Klein monopole in a massive IIA background

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eyras, E; Lozano, Y

    1999-01-01

    We construct the effective action of the KK monopole in a massive Spe IIA background. We follow two approaches. First we construct a massive M-theory KK monopole from which the IIA monopole is obtained by double dimensional reduction. This eleven-dimensional monopole contains two isometries: one und

  2. Asymptotically Non-Singular Extended Non-Dyonic Solutions of 't Hooft-Polyakov Monopole Violates Equations of Motion

    CERN Document Server

    Qandalji, K Rasem

    2011-01-01

    We show that based on the general solution, given by Corrigan, Olive, Fairlie and Nuyts, in the region outside the monopole's core; the equations of motion in the Higgs vacuum (i.e. outside the monopole's core) will not allow asymptotically non-singular extended non-trivial non-Dyonic (including, also, all static) solutions of the 't Hooft-Polyakov monopole. In other words, unless the monopole's magnetic charge is shielded (by some mechanism), the Dirac string is inevitable asymptotically, in the region outside the monopole's core, for all non-Dyonic solutions that are admissible by the equations of motion. That we show that the non-dyonic solutions (based on Corrigan et al) will include all "admissible" static solutions and their gauge transform might be interpreted as that all admissible dyonic solutions (based on Corrigan et al) are composite solutions.

  3. Measuring Global Monopole Velocities, one by one

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez-Eiguren, Asier; Achúcarro, Ana

    2016-01-01

    We present an estimation of the average velocity of a network of global monopoles in a cosmological setting using large numerical simulations. In order to obtain the value of the velocity, we improve some already known methods, and present a new one. This new method estimates individual global monopole velocities in a network, by means of detecting each monopole position in the lattice and following the path described by each one of them. Using our new estimate we can settle an open question previously posed in the literature: velocity-dependent one-scale (VOS) models for global monopoles predict two branches of scaling solutions, one with monopoles moving at subluminal speeds and one with monopoles moving at luminal speeds. Previous attempts to estimate monopole velocities had large uncertainties and were not able to settle that question. Our simulations find no evidence of a luminal branch. We also estimate the values of the parameters of the VOS model. With our new method we can also study the microphysics...

  4. Dark matter monopoles, vectors and photons

    CERN Document Server

    Khoze, Valentin V

    2014-01-01

    In a secluded dark sector which is coupled to the Standard Model via a Higgs portal interaction we arrange for the existence of 't Hooft-Polyakov magnetic monopoles and study their implications for cosmology. We point out that a dark sector which can accommodate stable monopoles will also contain massless dark photons gamma' as well as charged massive vector bosons W'. The dark matter in this scenario will be a combination of magnetically and electrically charged species under the unbroken U(1) subgroup of the dark sector. We estimate the cosmological production rate of monopoles and the rate of monopole-anti-monopole annihilation and conclude that monopoles with masses of few hundred TeV or greater, can produce sizeable contributions to the observed dark matter relic density. We scan over the parameter space and compute the relic density for monopoles and vector bosons. Turning to the dark photon radiation, we compute their contribution to the measured density of relativistic particles Neff and also apply ob...

  5. Monopole-antimonopole and vortex rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Rosy; Wong, Khai-Ming

    2005-08-01

    The SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs theory supports the existence of monopoles, antimonopoles, and vortex rings. In this paper, we would like to present new exact static antimonopole-monopole-antimonopole (A-M-A) configurations. The net magnetic charge of these configurations is always -1, while the net magnetic charge at the origin is always +1 for all positive integer values of the solution's parameter m. However, when m increases beyond 1, vortex rings appear coexisting with these AMA configurations. The number of vortex rings increases proportionally with the value of m. They are located in space where the Higgs field vanishes along rings. We also show that a single-point singularity in the Higgs field does not necessarily correspond to a structureless 1-monopole at the origin but to a zero-size monopole-antimonopole-monopole (MAM) structure when the solution's parameter m is odd. This monopole is the Wu-Yang-type monopole and it possesses the Dirac string potential in the Abelian gauge. These exact solutions are a different kind of Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) solutions as they satisfy the first-order Bogomol'nyi equation but possess infinite energy due to a point singularity at the origin of the coordinate axes. They are all axially symmetrical about the z-axis.

  6. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel E; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfectly all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean and, as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources' right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO's observations and electromagnetic follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over $80\\%$ of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to $70\\%$. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can obser...

  7. Design and simulations for the detector based on DSSSD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yan-Bing; ZHAO Xiao-Yun; WU Feng; WANG Huan-Yu; MENG Xiang-Cheng; WANG Hui; LU Hong; MA Yu-Qian; LI Xin-Qiao; SHI Feng; WANG Ping

    2010-01-01

    The present paper describes the design and simulation results of a position-sensitive charged particle detector based on the Double Sided Silicon Strip Detector (DSSSD). Also, the characteristics of the DSSSD and its testing result were are discussed. With the application of the DSSSD, the position-sensitive charged particle detector can not only give particle flux and energy spectra information and identify different types of charged particles, but also measure the location and angle of incident particles. As the detector can make multi-parameter measurements of charged particles, it is widely used in space detection and exploration missions, such as charged particle detection related to earthquakes, space environment monitoring and solar activity inspection.

  8. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfectly all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean and, as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources' right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO's observations and electromagnetic follow-up. These effects can inform electromagnetic follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  9. Central Tracking Detector Based on Scintillating Fibres

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Scintillating fibres form a reasonable compromise for central tracking detectors in terms of price, resolution, response time, occupancy and heat production. \\\\ \\\\ New fluorescents with large Stokes shifts have been produced, capable of working without wavelength shifters. Coherent multibundles have been developed to achieve high packing fractions. Small segments of tracker shell have been assembled and beam tests have confirmed expectations on spatial resolution. An opto-electronic delay line has been designed to delay the track patterns and enable coincidences with a first level trigger. Replacement of the conventional phosphor screen anode with a Si pixel chip is achieved. This tube is called ISPA-tube and has already been operated in beam tests with a scintillating fibres tracker. \\\\ \\\\ The aim of the proposal is to improve hit densities for small diameter fibres by increasing the fraction of trapped light, by reducing absorption and reflection losses, by reflecting light at the free fibre end, and by inc...

  10. Avalanche photodiode based detector for beam emission spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunai, D; Zoletnik, S; Sárközi, J; Field, A R

    2010-10-01

    An avalanche photodiode based (APD) detector for the visible wavelength range was developed for low light level, high frequency beam emission spectroscopy (BES) experiments in fusion plasmas. This solid state detector has higher quantum efficiency than photomultiplier tubes, and unlike normal photodiodes, it has internal gain. This paper describes the developed detector as well as the noise model of the electronic circuit. By understanding the noise sources and the amplification process, the optimal amplifier and APD reverse voltage setting can be determined, where the signal-to-noise ratio is the highest for a given photon flux. The calculations are compared to the absolute calibration results of the implemented circuit. It was found that for a certain photon flux range, relevant for BES measurements (≈10(8)-10(10) photons/s), the new detector is superior to both photomultipliers and photodiodes, although it does not require cryogenic cooling of any component. The position of this photon flux window sensitively depends on the parameters of the actual experimental implementation (desired bandwidth, detector size, etc.) Several detector units based on these developments have been built and installed in various tokamaks. Some illustrative results are presented from the 8-channel trial BES system installed at Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) and the 16-channel BES system installed at the Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR).

  11. Monopole annihilation at the electroweak scale

    CERN Document Server

    Terning, J

    1992-01-01

    We examine the issue of monopole annihilation at the electroweak scale induced by flux tube confinement, concentrating first on the simplest possibility---one which requires no new physics beyond the standard model. Monopoles existing at the time of the electroweak phase transition may trigger $W$ condensation which can confine magnetic flux into flux tubes. However we show on very general grounds, using several independent estimates, that such a mechanism is impotent. We then present several general dynamical arguments constraining the possibility of monopole annihilation through any confining phase near the electroweak scale.

  12. ADHMN boundary conditions from removing monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, X; Chen, Xingang; Weinberg, Erick J.

    2003-01-01

    Boundary conditions play an important role in the ADHMN construction of BPS monopole solutions. In this paper we show how different types of boundary conditions can be related to each other by removing monopoles to spatial infinity. In particular, we use this method to show how the jumping data naturally emerge. The results can be interpreted in the D-brane picture and provide a better understanding of the derivation of the ADHMN construction from D-branes. We comment briefly on the cases with non-Abelian unbroken symmetry and massless monopoles.

  13. Global Monopole in General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Bronnikov, K A; Podolyak, E R; Bronnikov, Kirill A.; Meierovich, Boris E.; Podolyak, Evgeny R.

    2002-01-01

    We consider the gravitational properties of a global monopole on the basis of the simplest Higgs scalar triplet model in general relativity. We begin with establishing some common features of hedgehog-type solutions with a regular center, independent of the choice of the symmetry-breaking potential. There are six types of qualitative behavior of the solutions; we show, in particular, that the metric can contain at most one simple horizon. For the standard Mexican hat potential, the previously known properties of the solutions are confirmed and some new results are obtained. Thus, we show analytically that solutions with monotonically growing Higgs field and finite energy in the static region exist only in the interval $1<\\gamma <3$, $\\gamma $ being the squared energy of spontaneous symmetry breaking in Planck units. The cosmological properties of these globally regular solutions apparently favor the idea that the standard Big Bang might be replaced with a nonsingular static core and a horizon appearing ...

  14. Search for non-relativistic magnetic monopoles with IceCube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aartsen, M.G.; Hill, G.C.; Robertson, S.; Whelan, B.J. [University of Adelaide, School of Chemistry and Physics, Adelaide, SA (Australia); Abbasi, R.; Ahlers, M.; Arguelles, C.; Baker, M.; BenZvi, S.; Chirkin, D.; Day, M.; Desiati, P.; Diaz-Velez, J.C.; Eisch, J.; Fadiran, O.; Feintzeig, J.; Gladstone, L.; Halzen, F.; Hoshina, K.; Jacobsen, J.; Jero, K.; Karle, A.; Kauer, M.; Kelley, J.L.; Kopper, C.; Krasberg, M.; Kurahashi, N.; Landsman, H.; Maruyama, R.; McNally, F.; Merck, M.; Morse, R.; Riedel, B.; Rodrigues, J.P.; Santander, M.; Tobin, M.N.; Toscano, S.; Van Santen, J.; Weaver, C.; Wellons, M.; Wendt, C.; Westerhoff, S.; Whitehorn, N. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Physics and Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, Madison, WI (United States); Ackermann, M.; Benabderrahmane, M.L.; Berghaus, P.; Bernardini, E.; Bretz, H.P.; Cruz Silva, A.H.; Gluesenkamp, T.; Jacobi, E.; Kaminsky, B.; Karg, T.; Middell, E.; Mohrmann, L.; Nahnhauer, R.; Schoenwald, A.; Shanidze, R.; Spiering, C.; Stoessl, A.; Yanez, J.P. [DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J.; Brown, A.M.; Hickford, S.; Macias, O. [University of Canterbury, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Aguilar, J.A.; Christov, A.; Montaruli, T.; Rameez, M.; Vallecorsa, S. [Universite de Geneve, Departement de physique nucleaire et corpusculaire, Geneva (Switzerland); Altmann, D.; Classen, L.; Gora, D.; Kappes, A.; Tselengidou, M. [Friedrich-Alexander-Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen Centre for Astroparticle Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Arlen, T.C.; De Andre, J.P.A.M.; DeYoung, T.; Dunkman, M.; Eagan, R.; Groh, J.C.; Huang, F.; Quinnan, M.; Smith, M.W.E.; Stanisha, N.A.; Tesic, G. [Pennsylvania State University, Department of Physics, University Park, PA (United States); Auffenberg, J.; Bissok, M.; Blumenthal, J.; Gretskov, P.; Haack, C.; Hallen, P.; Heinen, D.; Jagielski, K.; Kriesten, A.; Krings, K.; Leuermann, M.; Paul, L.; Raedel, L.; Reimann, R.; Schoenen, S.; Schukraft, A.; Vehring, M.; Wallraff, M.; Wiebusch, C.H.; Zierke, S. [RWTH Aachen University, III. Physikalisches Institut, Aachen (Germany); Bai, X.; Evenson, P.A.; Gaisser, T.K.; Gonzalez, J.G.; Hussain, S.; Kuwabara, T.; Ruzybayev, B.; Seckel, D.; Stanev, T.; Tamburro, A.; Tilav, S. [University of Delaware, Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Newark, DE (United States); Barwick, S.W.; Yodh, G. [University of California, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Irvine, CA (United States); Baum, V.; Eberhardt, B.; Koepke, L.; Kroll, G.; Luenemann, J.; Sander, H.G.; Schatto, K.; Wiebe, K. [University of Mainz, Institute of Physics, Mainz (Germany); Bay, R.; Filimonov, K.; Price, P.B.; Woschnagg, K. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Beatty, J.J. [Ohio State University, Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Columbus, OH (United States); Ohio State University, Department of Astronomy, Columbus, OH (United States); Becker Tjus, J.; Eichmann, B.; Fedynitch, A.; Saba, S.M.; Schoeneberg, S.; Unger, E. [Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Bochum (Germany); Becker, K.H.; Bindig, D.; Fischer-Wasels, T.; Helbing, K.; Hoffmann, R.; Klaes, J.; Kopper, S.; Naumann, U.; Obertacke, A.; Omairat, A.; Posselt, J.; Soldin, D.; Tepe, A. [University of Wuppertal, Department of Physics, Wuppertal (Germany); Berley, D.; Blaufuss, E.; Christy, B.; Goodman, J.A.; Hellauer, R.; Hoffman, K.D.; Huelsnitz, W.; Meagher, K.; Olivas, A.; Redl, P.; Richman, M.; Schmidt, T.; Sullivan, G.W.; Wissing, H. [University of Maryland, Department of Physics, College Park, MD (United States); Bernhard, A.; Coenders, S.; Gross, A.; Leute, J.; Resconi, E.; Schulz, O.; Sestayo, Y. [T.U. Munich, Garching (Germany); Besson, D.Z. [University of Kansas, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Lawrence, KS (United States); Binder, G.; Gerhardt, L.; Ha, C.; Klein, S.R.; Miarecki, S. [University of California, Department of Physics, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States); Boersma, D.J.; Botner, O.; Euler, S.; Hallgren, A.; Perez de los Heros, C.; Stroem, R.; Taavola, H. [Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Box 516, Uppsala (Sweden); Bohm, C.; Danninger, M.; Finley, C.; Flis, S.; Hulth, P.O.; Hultqvist, K.; Walck, C.; Wolf, M.; Zoll, M. [Stockholm University, Oskar Klein Centre and Department of Physics, Stockholm (Sweden); Bose, D.; Rott, C. [Sungkyunkwan University, Department of Physics, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration; and others

    2014-07-15

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory is a large Cherenkov detector instrumenting 1 km{sup 3} of Antarctic ice. The detector can be used to search for signatures of particle physics beyond the Standard Model. Here, we describe the search for non-relativistic, magnetic monopoles as remnants of the Grand Unified Theory (GUT) era shortly after the Big Bang. Depending on the underlying gauge group these monopoles may catalyze the decay of nucleons via the Rubakov-Callan effect with a cross section suggested to be in the range of 10{sup -27} to 10{sup -21} cm{sup 2}. In IceCube, the Cherenkov light from nucleon decays along the monopole trajectory would produce a characteristic hit pattern. This paper presents the results of an analysis of first data taken from May 2011 until May 2012 with a dedicated slow particle trigger for DeepCore, a subdetector of IceCube. A second analysis provides better sensitivity for the brightest non-relativistic monopoles using data taken from May 2009 until May 2010. In both analyses no monopole signal was observed. For catalysis cross sections of 10{sup -22} (10{sup -24}) cm{sup 2} the flux of non-relativistic GUT monopoles is constrained up to a level of Φ{sub 90} ≤ 10{sup -18} (10{sup -17}) cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1} at a 90 % confidence level, which is three orders of magnitude below the Parker bound. The limits assume a dominant decay of the proton into a positron and a neutral pion. These results improve the current best experimental limits by one to two orders of magnitude, for a wide range of assumed speeds and catalysis cross sections. (orig.)

  15. Geometric correction methods for Timepix based large area detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemlicka, J.; Dudak, J.; Karch, J.; Krejci, F.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray micro radiography with the hybrid pixel detectors provides versatile tool for the object inspection in various fields of science. It has proven itself especially suitable for the samples with low intrinsic attenuation contrast (e.g. soft tissue in biology, plastics in material sciences, thin paint layers in cultural heritage, etc.). The limited size of single Medipix type detector (1.96 cm2) was recently overcome by the construction of large area detectors WidePIX assembled of Timepix chips equipped with edgeless silicon sensors. The largest already built device consists of 100 chips and provides fully sensitive area of 14.3 × 14.3 cm2 without any physical gaps between sensors. The pixel resolution of this device is 2560 × 2560 pixels (6.5 Mpix). The unique modular detector layout requires special processing of acquired data to avoid occurring image distortions. It is necessary to use several geometric compensations after standard corrections methods typical for this type of pixel detectors (i.e. flat-field, beam hardening correction). The proposed geometric compensations cover both concept features and particular detector assembly misalignment of individual chip rows of large area detectors based on Timepix assemblies. The former deals with larger border pixels in individual edgeless sensors and their behaviour while the latter grapple with shifts, tilts and steps between detector rows. The real position of all pixels is defined in Cartesian coordinate system and together with non-binary reliability mask it is used for the final image interpolation. The results of geometric corrections for test wire phantoms and paleo botanic material are presented in this article.

  16. Cellular automaton-based position sensitive detector equalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrando, Nestor [Grupo de Diseno de Sistemas Digitales, Instituto de Aplicaciones de las Tecnologias de la Informacion y de las Comunicaciones Avanzadas, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain)], E-mail: nesferjo@upvnet.upv.es; Herrero, V.; Cerda, J.; Lerche, C.W.; Colom, R.J.; Gadea, R.; Martinez, J.D.; Monzo, J.M.; Mateo, F.; Sebastia, A.; Benlloch, J.M. [Grupo de Diseno de Sistemas Digitales, Instituto de Aplicaciones de las Tecnologias de la Informacion y de las Comunicaciones Avanzadas, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Camino de Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2009-06-01

    Indirect position detectors based on scintillator crystals lack of spacial uniformity in their response. This happens due to crystal inhomogeneities and gain differences among the photomultiplier anodes. In order to solve this, PESIC, an integrated front-end for multianode photomultiplier based nuclear imaging devices was created. One of its main features is the digitally programmable gain adjustment for every photomultiplier output. On another front, cellular automata have been proved to be a useful method for dynamic system modeling. In this paper, a cellular automaton which emulates the behavior of the scintillator crystal, the photomultiplier and the front-end is introduced. Thanks to this model, an automatic energy-based calibration of the detector can be done by configuring the cellular automaton with experimental data and making it evolve up to an stable state. This can be useful as a precalibration method of the detector.

  17. Numerical Evidence for Thermally Induced Monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Wirnsberger, Peter; Lightwood, Roger Adam; Šarić, Anđela; Dellago, Christoph; Frenkel, Daan

    2016-01-01

    Electrical charges are conserved. The same would be expected to hold for magnetic charges, yet magnetic monopoles have never been observed. It is therefore surprising that the laws of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, combined with Maxwell's equations, suggest that colloidal particles heated or cooled in certain polar or paramagnetic solvents may behave as if they carry an electrical/magnetic charge [J. Phys. Chem. B $\\textbf{120}$, 5987 (2016)]. Here we present numerical simulations that show that the field distribution around a pair of such heated/cooled colloidal particles agrees quantitatively with the theoretical predictions for a pair of oppositely charged electrical or magnetic monopoles. However, in other respects, the non-equilibrium colloids do not behave as monopoles: they cannot be moved by a homogeneous applied field. The numerical evidence for the monopole-like fields around heated/cooled colloids is crucial because the experimental and numerical determination of forces between such colloids would...

  18. Status of Searches for Magnetic Monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Patrizii, L

    2015-01-01

    The searches for magnetic monopoles (Ms) is a fascinating interdisciplinary field with implications in fundamental theories, in particle physics, astrophysics, and cosmology. The quantum theory of Ms and its consistency with electrodynamics was derived by Dirac. This marked the start of the searches for classical monopoles at every new accelerator, up to the LHC. Magnetic monopoles are required by Grand Unification Theories, but unlike classical monopoles they would be incredibly massive, out of the reach of any conceivable accelerator. Large efforts have been made to search for them in the cosmic radiation as relic particles from the early Universe in the widest range of mass and velocity experimentally accessible. In this paper the status of the searches for classical Ms at accelerators, for GUT, superheavy Ms in the penetrating cosmic radiation and for Intermediate Mass Ms at high altitudes is discussed, with emphasis on the most recent results and future perspectives.

  19. Some comments on quantum magnetic monopoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botelho, Luiz C.L. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Matematica. Dept. de Matematica Aplicada]. E-mail: botelho.luiz@ig.com.br

    2008-07-01

    In this paper we intend to present some path-integral studies in the problem of confinement in the presence of fermionic and scalar magnetic monopole fields through: a Wilson loop path-integral evaluation associated to an effective second-quantized electromagnetic field generated by chiral abelian point-like monopole magnetic field current at its large mass London asymptotic limit; a path-integral bosonization analysis of quarks fields interacting with Kalb-Ramond fields considered as an effective disorder field theory of a Q.C.D. vacuum of heavier monopoles; improvements on the Wilson loops evaluations in the well-known ADHM Antonov-Ebert model for Cooper pairs of point-like fermionic magnetic monopoles. (author)

  20. Hyperbolic monopoles, JNR data and spectral curves

    CERN Document Server

    Bolognesi, Stefano; Sutcliffe, Paul

    2014-01-01

    A large class of explicit hyperbolic monopole solutions can be obtained from JNR instanton data, if the curvature of hyperbolic space is suitably tuned. Here we provide explicit formulae for both the monopole spectral curve and its rational map in terms of JNR data. Examples with platonic symmetry are presented, together with some one-parameter families with cyclic and dihedral symmetries. These families include hyperbolic analogues of geodesics that describe symmetric monopole scatterings in Euclidean space and we illustrate the results with energy density isosurfaces. There is a metric on the moduli space of hyperbolic monopoles, defined using the abelian connection on the boundary of hyperbolic space, and we provide a simple integral formula for this metric on the space of JNR data.

  1. Magnetic monopole solutions with a massive dilaton

    CERN Document Server

    Forgács, Péter; Forgacs, Peter; Gyurusi, Jozsef

    1998-01-01

    Static, spherically symmetric monopole solutions of a spontaneously broken SU(2) gauge theory coupled to a massive dilaton field are studied in detail in function of the dilaton coupling strength and of the dilaton mass.

  2. Electric transport in three-dimensional Skyrmion/monopole crystal

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiao-Xiao; Mishchenko, Andrey S.; De Filippis, Giulio; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    We study theoretically the transport properties of a three-dimensional spin texture made from three orthogonal helices, which is essentially a lattice of monopole-antimonopole pairs connected by Skyrmion strings. This spin structure is proposed for MnGe based on the neutron scattering experiment as well as the Lorentz transmission electron microscopy observation. Equipped with a sophisticated spectral analysis method, we adopt finite temperature Green's function technique to calculate the lon...

  3. Thermal neutron detectors based on hexagonal boron nitride epilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doan, T. C.; Marty, A.; Li, J.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.

    2016-09-01

    Solid-state neutron detectors with high performances are urgently sought after for the detection of fissile materials. Until now, direct-conversion neutron detectors based on semiconductors with a measureable efficiency have not been realized. We have successfully synthesized hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) epilayers with varying thicknesses (0.3 μm - 50 μm) by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) on sapphire substrates. In this paper, we present the detailed characterization of thermal neutron detectors fabricated from h-BN epilayers with a thickness up to 5 m to obtain insights into the h-BN epilayer thickness dependence of the device performance. The results revealed that the charge collection efficiency is almost independent of the h-BN epilayer thickness. By minimizing h-BN material removal by dry etching, it was shown that detectors incorporating an isotopically 10B-enriched h-BN epilayer of 2.7 μm in thickness exhibited an overall detection efficiency for thermal neutrons of 4% and a charge collection efficiency as high as 83%. By doing away altogether with dry etching, we have successfully realized a simple vertical 43 μm thick h-10BN detector which delivers a detection efficiency of 51.4% for thermal neutrons, which is the highest reported efficiency for any semiconductor-based neutron detector The h-BN detectors possess all the advantages of semiconductor devices including low cost, high efficiency and sensitivity, wafer-scale processing, compact size, light weight, and ability to integrate with other functional devices.

  4. Deformed self-dual magnetic monopoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazeia, D. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58051-900, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, 58109-970, Campina Grande (Brazil); Casana, R.; Ferreira, M.M. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, 65085-580, São Luís, Maranhão (Brazil); Hora, E. da, E-mail: edahora.ufma@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, 65085-580, São Luís, Maranhão (Brazil); Coordenadoria do Curso Interdisciplinar em Ciência e Tecnologia, Universidade Federal do Maranhão, 65080-805, São Luís, Maranhão (Brazil); Losano, L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, 58051-900, João Pessoa, Paraíba (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Campina Grande, 58109-970, Campina Grande (Brazil)

    2013-12-18

    We develop a deformation method for attaining new magnetic monopole analytical solutions consistent with generalized Yang–Mills–Higgs model introduced recently. The new solutions fulfill the usual radially symmetric ansatz and the boundary conditions suitable to assure finite energy configurations. We verify our prescription by studying some particular cases involving both exactly and partially analytical initial configurations whose deformation leads to new analytic BPS monopoles. The results show consistency among the models, the deformation procedure and the profile of the new solutions.

  5. Deformed self-dual magnetic monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Bazeia, D; Ferreira, M M; da Hora, E; Losano, L

    2013-01-01

    We develop a deformation method for attaining new magnetic monopole analytical solutions consistent with generalized Yang-Mills-Higgs model introduced recently. The new solutions fulfill the usual radially symmetric ansatz and the boundary conditions suitable to assure finite energy configurations. We verify our prescription by studying some particular cases involving both exactly and partially analytical initial configurations whose deformation leads to new analytic BPS monopoles. The results show consistency among the models, the deformation procedure and the profile of the new solutions.

  6. Deformed self-dual magnetic monopoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazeia, D.; Casana, R.; Ferreira, M. M.; da Hora, E.; Losano, L.

    2013-12-01

    We develop a deformation method for attaining new magnetic monopole analytical solutions consistent with generalized Yang-Mills-Higgs model introduced recently. The new solutions fulfill the usual radially symmetric ansatz and the boundary conditions suitable to assure finite energy configurations. We verify our prescription by studying some particular cases involving both exactly and partially analytical initial configurations whose deformation leads to new analytic BPS monopoles. The results show consistency among the models, the deformation procedure and the profile of the new solutions.

  7. Nonminimal global monopoles and bound orbits

    CERN Document Server

    Nucamendi, U; Sudarsky, D; Nucamendi, Ulises; Salgado, Marcelo; Sudarsky, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    We perform a numerical analysis of the gravitational field of a global monopole coupled nonminimally to gravity, and find that, for some given nonminimal couplings (in constrast with the minimal coupling case), there is an attractive region where bound orbits exist. We exhibit the behavior of the frequency shifts that would be associated with `rotation curves' of stars in circular orbits in the spacetimes of such global monopoles.

  8. Magnetic Monopole in the Loop Representation

    CERN Document Server

    Leal, L; Leal, Lorenzo; Lopez, Alexander

    2004-01-01

    We quantize the electromagnetic field in the presence of a static magnetic monopole, within the loop-representation formalism. We find that the loop-dependent wave functional becomes multivalued, in the sense that it acquires a dependence on the surfaces bounded by the loop. This generalizes what occurs in quantum mechanics in multiply connected spaces. When Dirac's quantization condition holds, this surface-dependence disappears, together with the effect of the monopole on the electromagnetic field.

  9. Electronic readout for THGEM detectors based on FPGA TDCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Tobias; Buechele, Maximilian; Fischer, Horst; Gorzellik, Matthias; Grussenmeyer, Tobias; Herrmann, Florian; Joerg, Philipp; Koenigsmann, Kay; Kremser, Paul; Kunz, Tobias; Michalski, Christoph; Schopferer, Sebastian; Szameitat, Tobias [Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg Univ. (Germany); Collaboration: COMPASS-II RICH upgrade Group

    2013-07-01

    In the framework of the RD51 programme the characteristics of a new detector design, called THGEM, which is based on multi-layer arrangements of printed circuit board material, is investigated. The THGEMs combine the advantages for covering gains up to 10{sup 6} in electron multiplication at large detector areas and low material budget. Studies are performed by extending the design to a hybrid gas detector by adding a Micromega layer, which significantly improves the ion back flow ratio of the chamber. With the upgrade of the COMPASS experiment at CERN a MWPC plane of the RICH-1 detector will be replaced by installing THGEM chambers. This summarizes to 40k channels of electronic readout, including amplification, discrimination and time-to-digital conversion of the anode signals. Due to the expected hit rate of the detector we design a cost-efficient TDC, based on Artix7 FPGA technology, with time resolution below 100 ps and sufficient hit buffer depth. To cover the large readout area the data is transferred via optical fibres to a central readout system which is part of the GANDALF framework.

  10. Electric transport in three-dimensional skyrmion/monopole crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Xiao; Mishchenko, Andrey S.; De Filippis, Giulio; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2016-11-01

    We study theoretically the transport properties of a three-dimensional spin texture made from three orthogonal helices, which is essentially a lattice of monopole-antimonopole pairs connected by skyrmion strings. This spin structure is proposed for MnGe based on neutron scattering experiments as well as Lorentz transmission electron microscopy observations. Equipped with a sophisticated spectral analysis method, we adopt the finite temperature Green's function technique to calculate the longitudinal dc electric transport in such a system. We consider conduction electrons interacting with spin waves of the topologically nontrivial spin texture, wherein fluctuations of monopolar emergent magnetic fields enter. We study in detail the behavior of electric resistivity under the influence of temperature, external magnetic field, and a characteristic monopole motion, especially a novel magnetoresistivity effect describing the latest experimental observations in MnGe, wherein a topological phase transition signifying strong correlations is identified.

  11. Vortex Lines and Monopoles in Electrically Conducting Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ji-Biao; REN Ji-Rong; LI Ran

    2009-01-01

    Based on the C-mapping topological current theory and the decomposition of gauge potential theory, the vortex lines and the monopoles in electrically conducting plasmas are studied.It is pointed out that these two topological structures respectively inhere in two-dimensional and three-dimensional topological currents, which can be derived from the same topological term , and both these topological structures are characterized by the φ-mapping topological numbers-Hopf indices and Brouwer degrees.Furthermore, the spatial bifurcation of vortex lines and the generation and annihilation of monopoles are also discussed.At last, we point out that the Hopf invariant is a proper topological invariant to describe the knotted solitons.

  12. On-line alkali detector based on surface ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsson, J.G.; Loenn, B.; Jaeglid, B.; Engvall, K.; Pettersson, J.B.C. [Chalmers University of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Dept. of Physical Chemistry GU

    1998-12-31

    This project adapts a new on-line alkali measurement technique to coal and biomass combustion and gasification. Alkali metal atoms are known to easily ionize in contact with hot metal surfaces, and the instrument is based on this principle called surface ionization (SI). The primary parts of the detector are a platinum filament and an ion collector. The platinum filament is supported between two electrodes and heated to the temperature for alkali vaporization in ionic form. The ion collector is situated close to the filament. The measured current is proportional to the arrival rate of alkali atoms onto the filament. Laboratory tests were performed on detector sensitivity, detection limit, and time response. Similar sensitivity to both sodium and potassium regardless of molecular form was found. The time response of the detector is determined to be approximately 1 ms enabling it to monitor fast concentration changes in flue gas. Particles with a size below 5 nm melt completely on the hot platinum surface and give similar signals. For larger particles, the ionization efficiency is not 100% and depends on the type of salt. This problem can be overcome with an alternative filament configuration. The detector function was tested in a laboratory high pressure furnace using different fuel samples, atmospheres, and pressures. Alkali release from coal in general is lower than for biomass samples, rate constants and activation energies for alkali release were determined. Measurements were carried out in a biomass pyrolysis apparatus and a gasification pilot plant. The detector function was not influenced by a high concentration of hydrocarbons in the gas phase, and the measurements confirmed detector function in a hostile environment. The detector performed well in laboratory tests, and is a strong candidate for further development into a standard on-line monitor of alkali species in hot flue gas. 10 refs., 16 figs.

  13. Development of a polymer based fiberoptic magnetostrictive metal detector system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Wei Shu; Hooks, Joshua Rosenberg; Wu, Wen Jong; Wang, Wei Chih

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a new metal detector using a fiberoptic magnetostriction sensor. The metal sensor uses a fiber-optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a newly developed ferromagnetic polymer as the magnetostrictive sensing material. This polymeric magnetostrictive fiberoptic metal sensor is simple to fabricate, small in size, and resistant to RF interference (which is common in typical electromagnetic type metal detectors). Metal detection is based on disruption of the magnetic flux density across the magnetostriction sensor. In this paper, characteristics of the material being sensed and magnetic properties of the ferromagnetic polymers will be discussed.

  14. Detectors based on silicon photomultiplier arrays for medical imaging applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llosa, G.; Barrio, J.; Cabello, J.; Lacasta, C.; Oliver, J. F. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular - IFIC-CSIC/UVEG, Valencia (Spain); Rafecas, M. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular - IFIC-CSIC/UVEG, Valencia (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular Y Nuclear, Universitat de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Stankova, V.; Solaz, C. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular - IFIC-CSIC/UVEG, Valencia (Spain); Bisogni, M. G.; Del Guerra, A. [Universite di Pisa, INFN Pisa, Pisa (Italy)

    2011-07-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) have experienced a fast development and are now employed in different research fields. The availability of 2D arrays that provide information of the interaction position in the detector has had a high interest for medical imaging. Continuous crystals combined with segmented photodetectors can provide higher efficiency than pixellated crystals and very high spatial resolution. The IRIS group at IFIC is working on the development of detector heads based on continuous crystals coupled to SiPM arrays for different applications, including a small animal PET scanner in collaboration with the Univ. of Pisa and INFN Pisa, and a Compton telescope for dose monitoring in hadron therapy. (authors)

  15. Experimental characterization of semiconductor-based thermal neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedogni, R., E-mail: roberto.bedogni@lnf.infn.it [IFNF—LNF, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Bortot, D.; Pola, A.; Introini, M.V.; Lorenzoli, M. [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Energia, via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); INFN—Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Gómez-Ros, J.M. [IFNF—LNF, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Sacco, D. [IFNF—LNF, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); INAIL—DIT, Via di Fontana Candida 1, 00040 Monteporzio Catone (Italy); Esposito, A.; Gentile, A.; Buonomo, B. [IFNF—LNF, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Palomba, M.; Grossi, A. [ENEA Triga RC-1C.R. Casaccia, via Anguillarese 301, 00060 S. Maria di Galeria, Roma (Italy)

    2015-04-21

    In the framework of NESCOFI@BTF and NEURAPID projects, active thermal neutron detectors were manufactured by depositing appropriate thickness of {sup 6}LiF on commercially available windowless p–i–n diodes. Detectors with different radiator thickness, ranging from 5 to 62 μm, were manufactured by evaporation-based deposition technique and exposed to known values of thermal neutron fluence in two thermal neutron facilities exhibiting different irradiation geometries. The following properties of the detector response were investigated and presented in this work: thickness dependence, impact of parasitic effects (photons and epithermal neutrons), linearity, isotropy, and radiation damage following exposure to large fluence (in the order of 10{sup 12} cm{sup −2})

  16. Model-based optoacoustic inversion with arbitrary-shape detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Amir; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Razansky, Daniel

    2011-07-01

    Optoacoustic imaging enables mapping the optical absorption of biological tissue using optical excitation and acoustic detection. Although most image-reconstruction algorithms are based on the assumption of a detector with an isotropic sensitivity, the geometry of the detector often leads to a response with spatially dependent magnitude and bandwidth. This effect may lead to attenuation or distortion in the recorded signal and, consequently, in the reconstructed image. Herein, an accurate numerical method for simulating the spatially dependent response of an arbitrary-shape acoustic transducer is presented. The method is based on an analytical solution obtained for a two-dimensional line detector. The calculated response is incorporated in the forward model matrix of an optoacoustic imaging setup using temporal convolution, and image reconstruction is performed by inverting the matrix relation. The method was numerically and experimentally demonstrated in two dimensions for both flat and focused transducers and compared to the spatial-convolution method. In forward simulations, the developed method did not suffer from the numerical errors exhibited by the spatial-convolution method. In reconstruction simulations and experiments, the use of both temporal-convolution and spatial-convolution methods lead to an enhancement in resolution compared to a reconstruction with a point detector model. However, because of its higher modeling accuracy, the temporal-convolution method achieved a noise figure approximated three times lower than the spatial-convolution method. The demonstrated performance of the spatial-convolution method shows it is a powerful tool for reducing reconstruction artifacts originating from the detector finite size and improving the quality of optoacoustic reconstructions. Furthermore, the method may be used for assessing new system designs. Specifically, detectors with nonstandard shapes may be investigated.

  17. Novel detectors for silicon based microdosimetry, their concepts and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenfeld, Anatoly B., E-mail: anatoly@uow.edu.au

    2016-02-11

    This paper presents an overview of the development of semiconductor microdosimetry and the most current (state-of-the-art) Silicon on Insulator (SOI) detectors for microdosimetry based mainly on research and development carried out at the Centre for Medical Radiation Physics (CMRP) at the University of Wollongong with collaborators over the last 18 years. In this paper every generation of CMRP SOI microdosimeters, including their fabrication, design, and electrical and charge collection characterisation are presented. A study of SOI microdosimeters in various radiation fields has demonstrated that under appropriate geometrical scaling, the response of SOI detectors with the well-known geometry of microscopically sensitive volumes will record the energy deposition spectra representative of tissue cells of an equivalent shape. This development of SOI detectors for microdosimetry with increased complexity has improved the definition of microscopic sensitive volume (SV), which is modelling the deposition of ionising energy in a biological cell, that are led from planar to 3D SOI detectors with an array of segmented microscopic 3D SVs. The monolithic ΔE−E silicon telescope, which is an alternative to the SOI silicon microdosimeter, is presented, and as an example, applications of SOI detectors and ΔE−E monolithic telescope for microdosimetery in proton therapy field and equivalent neutron dose measurements out of field are also presented. An SOI microdosimeter “bridge” with 3D SVs can derive the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in {sup 12}C ion radiation therapy that matches the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) quite well, but with outstanding spatial resolution. The use of SOI technology in experimental microdosimetry offers simplicity (no gas system or HV supply), high spatial resolution, low cost, high count rates, and the possibility of integrating the system onto a single device with other types of detectors.

  18. Characterization of a GEM-based fast neutron detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposito, B., E-mail: basilio.esposito@enea.it [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via E. Fermi, 45, I-00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Marocco, D.; Villari, R. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via E. Fermi, 45, I-00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Murtas, F. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via E. Fermi, 40, I-00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Rodionov, R. [SRC RF TRINITI Troitsk, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-03-21

    The neutron efficiency of a Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM)-based detector designed for fast neutron measurements in fusion devices was determined through the combined use of Monte Carlo (MCNPX) calculations and analysis of deuterium–deuterium and deuterium–tritium neutron irradiation experiments. The detector, characterized by a triple GEM structure flushed with a Ar/CO{sub 2}/CF{sub 4} – 45/15/40 gas mixture, features a digital read-out system and has two sub-units for the detection of 2.5+14 MeV neutrons and 14 MeV neutrons (U{sub DD} and U{sub DT}, respectively). The pulse height spectra (PHS) determined from the curves of experimental efficiency as a function of the detector's high voltage (HV) and the MCNPX-simulated PHS were compared using a fitting routine that finds the best match between the experimental and simulated PHS by assuming a parametric model for the relation between HV (that determines the detector's gain) and the energy deposited in the gas. This led to express the experimental neutron efficiency as a function of the discrimination level set on the deposited energy (energy threshold). The detector sensitivity to γ-rays was also analyzed and the operational range in which the γ-ray contribution to the signal is not negligible was determined. It is found that this detector can reach a maximum neutron efficiency of ∼1×10{sup −3} counts/n at 2.5 MeV (U{sub DD} sub-unit) and of ∼4×10{sup −3} counts/n at 14 MeV (U{sub DT} and U{sub DD} sub-units)

  19. Electric Monopole Transition Strengths in Stable Nickel Isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evitts, Lee; Garnsworthy, Adam; Kibedi, Tibor; Super-e Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    Electric monopole (E 0) transition strengths are a sensitive probe for investigating nuclear structure and shape coexistence. There is a need for E 0 transition strengths in closed shell nuclei in order to develop our understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the generation of electric monopole strength. Simultaneous detections of γ rays and internal conversion electrons must be measured in order to determine an E 0 transition strength. A series of measurements in the stable nickel isotopes were performed at the Australian National University. Excited states in 58 , 60 , 62Ni were populated via inelastic proton scattering. The CAESAR array of Compton-suppressed HPGe detectors was used to measure the (E 2 / M 1) mixing ratio of transitions from angular distributions of γ rays. The Super-e spectrometer was used to measure electron-gamma branching ratios in order to extract E 0 transition strengths for a number of Jπ ->Jπ transitions. An overview of the experiments will be presented, along with preliminary results for E 0 transition strengths between Jπ ≠ 0 states in the semi-magic nuclei, 58 , 60 , 62Ni. A comparison with the matrix elements obtained from a new microscopic model for E 0 transitions will be made. This work was supported in part by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC).

  20. Ruby-based inorganic scintillation detectors for 192Ir brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertzscher, Gustavo; Beddar, Sam

    2016-11-01

    We tested the potential of ruby inorganic scintillation detectors (ISDs) for use in brachytherapy and investigated various unwanted luminescence properties that may compromise their accuracy. The ISDs were composed of a ruby crystal coupled to a poly(methyl methacrylate) fiber-optic cable and a charge-coupled device camera. The ISD also included a long-pass filter that was sandwiched between the ruby crystal and the fiber-optic cable. The long-pass filter prevented the Cerenkov and fluorescence background light (stem signal) induced in the fiber-optic cable from striking the ruby crystal, which generates unwanted photoluminescence rather than the desired radioluminescence. The relative contributions of the radioluminescence signal and the stem signal were quantified by exposing the ruby detectors to a high-dose-rate brachytherapy source. The photoluminescence signal was quantified by irradiating the fiber-optic cable with the detector volume shielded. Other experiments addressed time-dependent luminescence properties and compared the ISDs to commonly used organic scintillator detectors (BCF-12, BCF-60). When the brachytherapy source dwelled 0.5 cm away from the fiber-optic cable, the unwanted photoluminescence was reduced from  >5% to  5% within 10 s from the onset of irradiation and after the source had retracted. The ruby-based ISDs generated signals of up to 20 times that of BCF-12-based detectors. The study presents solutions to unwanted luminescence properties of ruby-based ISDs for high-dose-rate brachytherapy. An optic filter should be sandwiched between the ruby crystal and the fiber-optic cable to suppress the photoluminescence. Furthermore, we recommend avoiding ruby crystals that exhibit significant time-dependent luminescence.

  1. Finite Energy Magnetic Half-Monopole Solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Teh, Rosy; Wong, Khai-Ming

    2011-01-01

    We would like to present finite energy SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs monopole solutions of one half topological charge. These non-Abelian solutions possess gauge potentials that are singular at a point on either the positive or the negative z-axis at large distances, elsewhere they are regular. The gauge potentials of the Type $A$ half-monopole solutions are singular at a point at infinity on the negative z-axis whereas the Type $B$ half-monopole solutions are singular at a point at infinity on the positive z-axis. The 't Hooft magnetic fields of these solutions at large $r$ correspond to the magnetic field of a positive half-monopole located at the origin $r=0$. These solutions do not satisfy the first order Bogomol'nyi equations and are non-BPS solutions. The total energies of these half-monopole solutions were calculated for various strength of the Higgs field self coupling contstant $\\lambda$ from zero to 100 and they were found to increase logarithmically with $\\lambda$.

  2. Monopole-Antimonopole and Vortex Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Teh, R; Teh, Rosy; Wong, Khai-Ming

    2004-01-01

    The SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs theory supports the existence of monopoles, antimonopoles, and vortex rings. In this paper, we would like to present new exact static antimonopole-monopole-antimonopole (A-M-A) configurations. The net magnetic charge of these configurations is always negative one, whilst the net magnetic charge at the origin is always positive one for all positive integer values of the solution parameter $m$. However, when $m$ increases beyond one, vortex rings appear coexisting with these A-M-A configurations. The number of vortex rings increases proportionally with the value of $m$. They are magnetically neutral and are located in space where the Higgs field vanishes. We also show that a single point singularity in the Higgs field need not corresponds to a structureless 1-monopole at the origin but to a zero size monopole-antimonopole-monopole (MAM) structure. These exact solutions are a different kind of BPS solutions as they satisfy the first order Bogomol'nyi equation but possess infinite energ...

  3. Monopole Condensation and Confinement in SU(2) QCD (2)

    CERN Document Server

    Shiba, H; Shiba, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Tsuneo

    1993-01-01

    Monopole and photon contributions to Wilson loops are calculated using Monte-Carlo simulations of SU(2) QCD in the maximally abelian gauge. The string tensions of SU(2) QCD are well reproduced by extended monopole contributions alone.

  4. Neutron detector based on lithiated sol-gel glass

    CERN Document Server

    Wallace, S; Miller, L F; Dai, S

    2002-01-01

    A neutron detector technology is demonstrated based on sup 6 Li/ sup 1 sup 0 B doped sol-gel glass. The detector is a sol-gel glass film coated silicon surface barrier detector (SBD). The ionized charged particles from (n, alpha) reactions in the sol-gel film enter the SBD and are counted. Data showing that gamma-ray pulse amplitudes interfere with identifying charged particles that exit the film layer with energies below the gamma-ray energy is presented. Experiments were performed showing the effect of sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs and sup 6 sup 0 Co gamma rays on the SBD detector. The reaction product energies of the triton and alpha particles from sup 6 Li are significantly greater than the energies of the Compton electrons from high-energy gamma rays, allowing the measurement of neutrons in a high gamma background. The sol-gel radiation detection technology may be applicable to the characterization of transuranic waste, spent nuclear fuel and to the monitoring of stored plutonium.

  5. Magnetic monopoles in quantum spin ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Olga; Moessner, Roderich; Sondhi, Shivaji

    Typical spin ice materials can be modeled using classical Ising spins. The geometric frustration of the pyrochlore lattice causes the spins to satisfy ice rules, whereas a violation of the ice constraint constitutes an excitation. Flipping adjacent spins fractionalizes the excitation into two monopoles. Long range dipolar spin couplings result in Coulombic interactions between charges, while the leading effect of quantum fluctuations is to provide the monopoles with kinetic energy. We study the effect of adding quantum dynamics to spin ice, a well-known classical spin liquid, with a particular view of how to best detect its presence in experiment. For the weakly diluted quantum spin ice, we find a particularly crisp phenomenon, namely, the emergence of hydrogenic excited states in which a magnetic monopole is bound to a vacancy at various distances.

  6. Some remarkable spin physics with monopoles and fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craigie, N.S.

    1984-01-01

    This review will cover the following topics, which follow the historical evolution of the subject: the Dirac monopole; the Kazama-Yang Goldhaber problem in electron-monopole scattering; the 't Hooft-Polyakov monopole and spin from isospin; the Rubakov analysis; monopole catalysis of proton decay the Rubakov-Callan effect; the role of exactly solvable 2-dimensional QFT's and finally observable consequences. 15 references.

  7. Magnetic monopoles over topologically non trivial Riemann surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, I

    1996-01-01

    An explicit canonical construction of monopole connections on non trivial U(1) bundles over Riemann surfaces of any genus is given. The class of monopole solutions depend on the conformal class of the given Riemann surface and a set of integer weights. The reduction of Seiberg-Witten 4-monopole equations to Riemann surfaces is performed. It is shown then that the monopole connections constructed are solutions to these equations.

  8. A risk-based approach to flammable gas detector spacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defriend, Stephen; Dejmek, Mark; Porter, Leisa; Deshotels, Bob; Natvig, Bernt

    2008-11-15

    Flammable gas detectors allow an operating company to address leaks before they become serious, by automatically alarming and by initiating isolation and safe venting. Without effective gas detection, there is very limited defense against a flammable gas leak developing into a fire or explosion that could cause loss of life or escalate to cascading failures of nearby vessels, piping, and equipment. While it is commonly recognized that some gas detectors are needed in a process plant containing flammable gas or volatile liquids, there is usually a question of how many are needed. The areas that need protection can be determined by dispersion modeling from potential leak sites. Within the areas that must be protected, the spacing of detectors (or alternatively, number of detectors) should be based on risk. Detector design can be characterized by spacing criteria, which is convenient for design - or alternatively by number of detectors, which is convenient for cost reporting. The factors that influence the risk are site-specific, including process conditions, chemical composition, number of potential leak sites, piping design standards, arrangement of plant equipment and structures, design of isolation and depressurization systems, and frequency of detector testing. Site-specific factors such as those just mentioned affect the size of flammable gas cloud that must be detected (within a specified probability) by the gas detection system. A probability of detection must be specified that gives a design with a tolerable risk of fires and explosions. To determine the optimum spacing of detectors, it is important to consider the probability that a detector will fail at some time and be inoperative until replaced or repaired. A cost-effective approach is based on the combined risk from a representative selection of leakage scenarios, rather than a worst-case evaluation. This means that probability and severity of leak consequences must be evaluated together. In marine and

  9. Hawking radiation of Dirac monopoles from the global monopole black hole with quantum gravity effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jusufi, Kimet; Apostolovska, Gordana

    2016-12-01

    In this paper we study the quantum tunneling of Dirac magnetic monopoles from the global monopole black hole under quantum gravity effects. We start from the modified Maxwell's equations and the Generalized Uncertainty Relation (GUP), to recover the GUP corrected temperature for the global monopole black hole by solving the modified Dirac equation via Hamilton-Jacobi method. Furthermore, we also include the quantum corrections beyond the semiclassical approximation, in particular, first we find the logarithmic corrections of GUP corrected entropy and finally we calculate the GUP corrected specific heat capacity. It is argued that the GUP effects may prevent a black hole from complete evaporation and leave remnants.

  10. Diamond based detectors for high temperature, high radiation environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, A.; Fern, G. R.; Hobson, P. R.; Smith, D. R.; Lefeuvre, G.; Saenger, R.

    2017-01-01

    Single crystal CVD diamond has many desirable properties as a radiation detector; exceptional radiation hardness and physical hardness, chemical inertness, low Z (close to human tissue, good for dosimetry and transmission mode applications), wide bandgap (high temperature operation with low noise and solar blind), an intrinsic pathway to fast neutron detection through the 12C(n,α)9Be reaction. This combination of radiation hardness, temperature tolerance and ability to detect mixed radiation types with a single sensor makes diamond particularly attractive as a detector material for harsh environments such as nuclear power station monitoring (fission and fusion) and oil well logging. Effective exploitation of these properties requires the development of a metallisation scheme to give contacts that remain stable over extended periods at elevated temperatures (up to 250°C in this instance). Due to the cost of the primary detector material, computational modelling is essential to best utilise the available processing methods for optimising sensor response through geometry and conversion media configurations and to fully interpret experimental data. Monte Carlo simulations of our diamond based sensor have been developed, using MCNP6 and FLUKA2011, assessing the sensor performance in terms of spectral response and overall efficiency as a function of the detector and converter geometry. Sensors with varying metallisation schemes for high temperature operation have been fabricated at Brunel University London and by Micron Semiconductor Limited. These sensors have been tested under a varied set of conditions including irradiation with fast neutrons and alpha particles at high temperatures. The presented study indicates that viable metallisation schemes for high temperature contacts have been successfully developed and the modelling results, supported by preliminary experimental data from partners, indicate that the simulations provide a reasonable representation of

  11. Thermal phase transition in artificial spin ice systems induces the formation and migration of monopole-like magnetic excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Alejandro

    2016-11-01

    Artificial spin ice systems exhibit monopole-like magnetic excitations. We develop here a theoretical study of the thermal phase transition of an artificial spin ice system, and we elucidate the role of the monopole excitations in the transition temperature. The dynamics of the spin ice is described by an efficient model based on cellular automata, which considers both thermal effects and dipolar interactions. We have established the critical temperature of the phase transition as function of the magnetic moment and the energy barrier of reversion. In addition, we predict that thermal gradients in the system induce the motion of elementary excitations, which could permit to manipulate monopole-like states.

  12. Thermal phase transition in artificial spin ice systems induces the formation and migration of monopole-like magnetic excitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    León, Alejandro

    2016-11-01

    Artificial spin ice systems exhibit monopole-like magnetic excitations. We develop here a theoretical study of the thermal phase transition of an artificial spin ice system, and we elucidate the role of the monopole excitations in the transition temperature. The dynamics of the spin ice is described by an efficient model based on cellular automata, which considers both thermal effects and dipolar interactions. We have established the critical temperature of the phase transition as function of the magnetic moment and the energy barrier of reversion. In addition, we predict that thermal gradients in the system induce the motion of elementary excitations, which could permit to manipulate monopole-like states.

  13. More on core instabilities of magnetic monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Striet, J

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we present new results on the core instability of the 't Hooft Polyakov monopoles we reported on before. This instability, where the spherical core decays in a toroidal one, typically occurs in models in which charge conjugation is gauged. In this paper we also discuss a third conceivable configuration denoted as ``split core'', which brings us to some details of the numerical methods we employed. We argue that a core instability of 't Hooft Polyakov type monopoles is quite a generic feature of models with charged Higgs particles.

  14. Symmetry Breaking by Electric Discharges in Water and Formation of Light Magnetic Monopoles in an Extended Standard Model (Part II)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harald Stumpf

    2011-01-01

    .... Based on a quantum field theoretic development of de Broglie’s and Heisenberg’s fusion ideas and the results of preceding papers a transparent proof is given that such magnetic monopoles can occur during discharges...

  15. Vehicle passes detector based on multi-sensor analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocharov, D.; Sidorchuk, D.; Konovalenko, I.; Koptelov, I.

    2015-02-01

    The study concerned deals with a new approach to the problem of detecting vehicle passes in vision-based automatic vehicle classification system. Essential non-affinity image variations and signals from induction loop are the events that can be considered as detectors of an object presence. We propose several vehicle detection techniques based on image processing and induction loop signal analysis. Also we suggest a combined method based on multi-sensor analysis to improve vehicle detection performance. Experimental results in complex outdoor environments show that the proposed multi-sensor algorithm is effective for vehicles detection.

  16. Neural network based cluster creation in the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Andreazza, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2012-01-01

    The read-out from individual pixels on planar semi-conductor sensors are grouped into clusters to reconstruct the location where a charged particle passed through the sensor. The resolution given by individual pixel sizes is significantly improved by using the information from the charge sharing be- tween pixels. Such analog cluster creation techniques have been used by the ATLAS experiment for many years to obtain an excellent performance. How- ever, in dense environments, such as those inside high-energy jets, clusters have an increased probability of merging the charge deposited by multiple particles. Recently, a neural network based algorithm which estimates both the cluster position and whether a cluster should be split has been developed for the ATLAS Pixel Detector. The algorithm significantly reduces ambigui- ties in the assignment of pixel detector measurement to tracks and improves the position accuracy with respect to standard techniques by taking into account the 2-dimensional charge distribution.

  17. Intrinsic Radiation in Lutetium Based PET Detector: Advantages and Disadvantages

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Qingyang

    2015-01-01

    Lutetium (Lu) based scintillators such as LSO and LYSO, are widely used in modern PET detectors due to their high stopping power for 511 keV gamma rays, high light yield and short decay time. However, 2.6% of naturally occurring Lu is 176Lu, a long-lived radioactive element including a beta decay and three major simultaneous gamma decays. This phenomenon introduces random events to PET systems that affects the system performance. On the other hand, the advantages of intrinsic radiation of 176Lu (IRL) continues to be exploited. In this paper, research literatures about IRL in PET detectors are reviewed. Details about the adverse effects of IRL to PET and their solutions, as well as the useful applications are presented and discussed.

  18. Bohr-Sommerfeld Theory of the Magnetic Monopole

    CERN Document Server

    Pankovic, Vladan

    2010-01-01

    In this work we consider a simple, Bohr-Sommerfeld (Old quantum atomic) theory of the magnetic monopole. We consider the system, simply called magnetic monopole "atom", consisting of the practically standing, massive magnetic monopole as the "nucleus" and electron rotating around magnetic monopole. At this system we apply quasi-classical, Bohr-Sommerfeld quantum atomic theory. Precisely, we apply firstly, by the electron rotation, Bohr-Sommerfeld momentum quantization postulate. Secondly we use equivalence between total centrifugal force acting at rotating electron and classical magnetostatic interaction between rotating electron and magnetic monopole. It yields result practically equivalent to the Dirac quantization relation between electrical and magnetic charge.

  19. Magnetic Monopoles from Global Monopoles in the presence of Kalb-Ramond Torsion

    CERN Document Server

    Mavromatos, Nick E

    2016-01-01

    Possible classical solutions for electromagnetic monopoles induced by gravitational (global) monopoles in the presence of torsion are found. Such solutions rely on a non-zero (Kalb-Ramond) torsion strength, which may characterise low energy theories inspired from string models. Bounds from the current run of the LHC experiments are used to constrain the parameters of the model, but because the production mechanism depends on the details of the model and its ultraviolet completion, such bounds are presently only indicative.

  20. Graphene-Based Josephson-Junction Single-Photon Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Evan D.; Efetov, Dmitri K.; Lee, Gil-Ho; Heuck, Mikkel; Crossno, Jesse; Ohki, Thomas A.; Kim, Philip; Englund, Dirk; Fong, Kin Chung

    2017-08-01

    We propose to use graphene-based Josephson junctions (GJJs) to detect single photons in a wide electromagnetic spectrum from visible to radio frequencies. Our approach takes advantage of the exceptionally low electronic heat capacity of monolayer graphene and its constricted thermal conductance to its phonon degrees of freedom. Such a system could provide high-sensitivity photon detection required for research areas including quantum information processing and radio astronomy. As an example, we present our device concepts for GJJ single-photon detectors in both the microwave and infrared regimes. The dark count rate and intrinsic quantum efficiency are computed based on parameters from a measured GJJ, demonstrating feasibility within existing technologies.

  1. Creation of Magnetic Monopoles in Classical Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Vachaspati, Tanmay

    2016-01-01

    We consider the creation of 't Hooft-Polyakov magnetic monopoles by scattering classical wave packets of gauge fields. An example with eight clearly separated magnetic poles created with parity violating helical initial conditions is shown. No clear separation of topological charge is observed with corresponding parity symmetric initial conditions.

  2. Monopole star products are non-alternative

    CERN Document Server

    Bojowald, Martin; Buyukcam, Umut; Strobl, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Non-associative algebras appear in some quantum-mechanical systems, for instance if a charged particle in a distribution of magnetic monopoles is considered. Using methods of deformation quantization it is shown here, that algebras for such systems cannot be alternative, i.e. their associator cannot be completely anti-symmetric.

  3. Searches for Magnetic Monopoles and ... beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomelli, G; Sahnoun, Z

    2011-01-01

    The searches for classical Magnetic Monopoles (MMs) at accelerators, for GUT Superheavy MMs in the penetrating cosmic radiation and for Intermediate Mass MMs at high altitudes are discussed. The status of the search for other massive exotic particles such as nuclearites and Q-balls is briefly reviewed.

  4. Multidimensional Global Monopole and Nonsingular Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Bronnikov, K A; Bronnikov, Kirill A.; Meierovich, Boris E.

    2003-01-01

    We consider a spherically symmetric global monopole in general relativity in $(D=d+2)$-dimensional spacetime. The monopole is shown to be asymptotically flat up to a solid angle defect in case $\\gamma < d-1$, where $\\gamma$ is a parameter characterizing the gravitational field strength. In the range $d-1< \\gamma < 2d(d+1)/(d+2)$ the monopole space-time contains a cosmological horizon. Outside the horizon the metric corresponds to a cosmological model of Kantowski-Sachs type, where spatial sections have the topology ${\\R\\times \\S}^d$. In the important case when the horizon is far from the monopole core, the temporal evolution of the Kantowski-Sachs metric is described analytically. The Kantowski-Sachs space-time contains a subspace with a $(d+1)$-dimensional Friedmann-Robertson-Walker metric, and its possible cosmological application is discussed. Some numerical estimations in case $d=3$ are made showing that this class of nonsingular cosmologies can be viable. Other results, generalizing those known ...

  5. Chiral symmetry breaking, instantons, and monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Di Giacomo, Adriano

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to show that monopoles induce the chiral symmetry breaking. In order to indicate the evidence, we add one pair of monopoles with magnetic charges to the quenched SU(3) configurations by a monopole creation operator, and investigate the propaties of the chiral symmetry breaking using the Overlap fermion. We show that instantons are created by the monopoles. The pseudoscalar meson mass and decay constant are computed from the correlation functions, and the renormalization constant $Z_{S}$ is determined by the non perturbative method. The renormalization group invariant chiral condensate in $\\overline{\\mbox{MS}}$-scheme at 2 [GeV] is evaluated by the Gell-Mann-Oakes-Renner formula, and the random matrix theory. Finally, we estimate the renormalization group invariant quark masses $\\bar{m} = (m_{u} + m_{d})/2$, and $m_{s}$ in $\\overline{\\mbox{MS}}$-scheme at 2 [GeV]. The preliminary results indicate that the chiral condensate decreases and the quark masses become slightly heavy by inc...

  6. MoEDAL AND MAGNETIC MONOPOLES

    CERN Multimedia

    Paola Catapano

    2016-01-01

    The LHC MoEDAL experiment publishes its first paper on its search for magnetic monopoles Geneva XXXX. In a paper published by the journal JHEP today, the MoEDAL experiment at CERN narrows the window of where to search for a hypothetical particle, the magnetic monopole. Over the last decades, experiments have been trying to find evidence for magnetic monopoles at accelerators, including at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider. Such particles were first predicted by physicist Paul Dirac in the 1930s but have never been observed so far. “Today MoEDAL celebrates the release of its first physics result and joins the other LHC experiments at the discovery frontier," says Spokesperson of the MoEDAL experiment, James Pinfold. Just as electricity comes with two charges, positive and negative, so magnetism comes with two poles, North and South. The difference is that while it’s easy to isolate a positive or negative electric charge, nobody has ever seen a solitary magnetic charge, or monopole. If you

  7. The coexistence of a 't Hooft-Polyakov monopole and a one-half monopole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Rosy; Ng, Ban-Loong; Wong, Khai-Ming

    2014-03-01

    Recently we have reported on the existence of finite energy SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs particle of one-half topological charge. In this paper, we show that this one-half monopole can co-exist with a 't Hooft-Polyakov monopole. The magnetic charge of the one-half monopole is -1/2 while the magnetic charge of the 't Hooft-Polyakov monopole is positive unity. However the net magnetic charge of the configuration is zero due to the presence of a semi-infinite Dirac string along the positive z-axis that carries the magnetic monopole charge of another -1/2. The solution possesses gauge potentials that are singular along the z-axis, elsewhere they are regular. This monopole configuration possesses finite total energy and magnetic dipole moment. The total energy is found to increase with the strength of the Higgs field self-coupling constant λ. However the dipole separation and the magnetic dipole moment decrease with λ. This solution is non-BPS even in the BPS limit when the Higgs self-coupling constant vanishes.

  8. Switching variability index based multiple strategy CFAR detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Li; Zhenyuan Ji; Bingfei Li; Gil Alterovitz

    2014-01-01

    A switching variability index (SVI) constant false alarm rate (CFAR) detector is proposed for improving the detection performance of VI-CFAR detectors in multiple targets back-grounds. When the presence of non-homogeneity in CFAR re-ference windows is indicated by a VI-CFAR detector, a switching-CFAR detector is introduced to optimize the performance of the VI-CFAR detector in homogeneous, multiple targets and clut-ter edge backgrounds. The structure and parameters selection method of the SVI-CFAR detector is presented. Comparisons with classic CFAR detectors and recently proposed detectors are also given. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that SVI-CFAR detector maintains the good performance of the VI-CFAR detector in homogeneous and clutter edge backgrounds, while greatly improving the capacity of anti-multi targets.

  9. Search for Intermediate Mass Magnetic Monopoles and Nuclearites with the SLIM experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Cecchini, S; Ferdinando, D D; Cozzi, M; Frutti, M; Giacomelli, G; Kumar, A; Manzoor, S; McDonald, J; Medinaceli, E; Nogales, J; Patrizii, L; Pinfold, J L; Popa, V; Qureshi, I E; Saavedra, O; Sher, G; Shahzad, M I; Spurio, M; Ticona, R; Togo, V; Velarde, A

    2005-01-01

    SLIM is a large area experiment (440 m2) installed at the Chacaltaya cosmic ray laboratory since 2001, and about 100 m2 at Koksil, Himalaya, since 2003. It is devoted to the search for intermediate mass magnetic monopoles (107-1013 GeV/c2) and nuclearites in the cosmic radiation using stacks of CR39 and Makrofol nuclear track detectors. In four years of operation it will reach a sensitivity to a flux of about 10-15 cm-2 s-1 sr-1. We present the results of the calibration of CR39 and Makrofol and the analysis of a first sample of the exposed detector.

  10. Future Gravitational Wave Detectors Based on Atom Interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Geiger, Remi

    2016-01-01

    We present the perspective of using atom interferometry for gravitational wave (GW) detection in the mHz to about 10 Hz frequency band. We focus on light-pulse atom interferometers which have been subject to intense developments in the last 25 years. We calculate the effect of the GW on the atom interferometer and present in details the atomic gradiometer configuration which has retained more attention recently. The principle of such a detector is to use free falling atoms to measure the phase of a laser, which is modified by the GW. We highlight the potential benefits of using atom interferometry compared to optical interferometry as well as the challenges which remain for the realization of an atom interferometry based GW detector. We present some of the important noise sources which are expected in such detectors and strategies to cirucumvent them. Experimental techniques related to cold atom interferometers are briefly explained. We finally present the current progress and projects in this rapidly evolvin...

  11. Large area radiation detectors based on II VI thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quevedo-Lopez, Manuel

    2015-03-01

    The development of low temperature device technologies that have enabled flexible displays also present opportunities for flexible electronics and flexible integrated systems. Of particular interest are possible applications in flexible, low metal content, sensor systems for unattended ground sensors, smart medical bandages, electronic ID tags for geo-location, conformal antennas, neutron/gamma-ray/x-ray detectors, etc. In this talk, our efforts to develop novel CMOS integration schemes, circuits, memory, sensors as well as novel contacts, dielectrics and semiconductors for flexible electronics are presented. In particular, in this presentation we discuss fundamental materials properties including crystalline structure, interfacial reactions, doping, etc. defining performance and reliability of II-VI-based radiation sensors. We investigate the optimal thickness of a semiconductor diode for thin-film solid state thermal neutron detectors. Besides II-VI materials, we also evaluated several diode materials, Si, CdTe,GaAs, C (diamond), and ZnO, and two neutron converter materials,10B and 6LiF. We determine the minimum semiconductor thickness needed to achieve maximum neutron detection efficiency. By keeping the semiconductor thickness to a minimum, gamma rejection is kept as high as possible. In this way, we optimize detector performance for different thin-film semiconductor materials.

  12. The Effect of Personalization on Smartphone-Based Fall Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Medrano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The risk of falling is high among different groups of people, such as older people, individuals with Parkinson's disease or patients in neuro-rehabilitation units. Developing robust fall detectors is important for acting promptly in case of a fall. Therefore, in this study we propose to personalize smartphone-based detectors to boost their performance as compared to a non-personalized system. Four algorithms were investigated using a public dataset: three novelty detection algorithms—Nearest Neighbor (NN, Local Outlier Factor (LOF and One-Class Support Vector Machine (OneClass-SVM—and a traditional supervised algorithm, Support Vector Machine (SVM. The effect of personalization was studied for each subject by considering two different training conditions: data coming only from that subject or data coming from the remaining subjects. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC was selected as the primary figure of merit. The results show that there is a general trend towards the increase in performance by personalizing the detector, but the effect depends on the individual being considered. A personalized NN can reach the performance of a non-personalized SVM (average AUC of 0.9861 and 0.9795, respectively, which is remarkable since NN only uses activities of daily living for training.

  13. Observational Selection Effects with Ground-based Gravitational Wave Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Yu; Essick, Reed; Vitale, Salvatore; Holz, Daniel E.; Katsavounidis, Erik

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based interferometers are not perfect all-sky instruments, and it is important to account for their behavior when considering the distribution of detected events. In particular, the LIGO detectors are most sensitive to sources above North America and the Indian Ocean, and as the Earth rotates, the sensitive regions are swept across the sky. However, because the detectors do not acquire data uniformly over time, there is a net bias on detectable sources’ right ascensions. Both LIGO detectors preferentially collect data during their local night; it is more than twice as likely to be local midnight than noon when both detectors are operating. We discuss these selection effects and how they impact LIGO’s observations and electromagnetic (EM) follow-up. Beyond galactic foregrounds associated with seasonal variations, we find that equatorial observatories can access over 80% of the localization probability, while mid-latitudes will access closer to 70%. Facilities located near the two LIGO sites can observe sources closer to their zenith than their analogs in the south, but the average observation will still be no closer than 44° from zenith. We also find that observatories in Africa or the South Atlantic will wait systematically longer before they can begin observing compared to the rest of the world though, there is a preference for longitudes near the LIGOs. These effects, along with knowledge of the LIGO antenna pattern, can inform EM follow-up activities and optimization, including the possibility of directing observations even before gravitational-wave events occur.

  14. Measurement of the Isoscalar Monopole Response in the Neutron-Rich Nucleus 68Ni using the Active Target MAYA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandebrouck, M.; Gibelin, J.; Khan, E.; Achouri, N. L.; Baba, H.; Beaumel, D.; Blumenfeld, Y.; Caamaño, M.; Càceres, L.; Colò, G.; Delaunay, F.; Fernandez-Dominguez, B.; Garg, U.; Grinyer, G. F.; Harakeh, M. N.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Keeley, N.; Mittig, W.; Pancin, J.; Raabe, R.; Roger, T.; Roussel-Chomaz, P.; Savajols, H.; Sorlin, O.; Stodel, C.; Suzuki, D.; Thomas, J. C.

    We report the measurement of the isoscalar monopole strength in the unstable nucleus 68Ni using inelastic alpha scattering at 50A MeV in inverse kinematics. This experiment has been performed at GANIL with LISE spectrometer using a dedicated detector: the active target MAYA. A part of the isoscalar giant monopole resonance (ISGMR) has been measured at 21.1 ± 1.9 MeV and indications for a soft monopole mode are provided for the first time at 12.9 ± 1.0 MeV. Distorted-wave born approximation (DWBA) with random-phase approximation (RPA) transition densities have been used to study angular distribution and indicate that the L = 0 multipolarity dominates the cross-section for the ISGMR, and significantly contributes to the soft mode.

  15. How the active and diffusional nature of brain tissues can generate monopole signals at micrometer sized measures

    CERN Document Server

    Cabo, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    We investigate mechanisms which could generate transient monopole signals in measuring current source density (CSD), as it had been indicated to occur in recent small volume experiments. A simple model is defined for this purpose. It is emphasized that the active nature of the neural biological activity, with its ability to generate ionic density imbalances, might be able to induce appreciable monopole signals in CSD detectors at micrometer scales. Thus, it follows that when both diffusive and ohmic transport are considered to be present in neural tissues, potential measures in micrometer regions can include appreciable electric monopole signals, for sufficiently small values of the ratio (\\sigma a^{2})/(\\epsilon D), where "\\sigma" is the conductivity, "\\epsilon" is the dielectric constant, "D" is the diffusion constant and "a" is the linear dimension of the ionic charge densities generated by the neural processes. Ranges of possible magnitudes for these parameters in the considered experimental studies are e...

  16. Search for Ultra-relativistic Magnetic Monopoles with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Aab, A; Aglietta, M; Samarai, I Al; Albuquerque, I F M; Allekotte, I; Almela, A; Castillo, J Alvarez; Alvarez-Muñiz, J; Ambrosio, M; Anastasi, G A; Anchordoqui, L; Andrada, B; Andringa, S; Aramo, C; Arqueros, F; Arsene, N; Asorey, H; Assis, P; Aublin, J; Avila, G; Badescu, A M; Balaceanu, A; Luz, R J Barreira; Baus, C; Beatty, J J; Becker, K H; Bellido, J A; Berat, C; Bertaina, M E; Bertou, X; Biermann, P L; Billoir, P; Biteau, J; Blaess, S G; Blanco, A; Blazek, J; Bleve, C; Boháčová, M; Boncioli, D; Bonifazi, C; Borodai, N; Botti, A M; Brack, J; Brancus, I; Bretz, T; Bridgeman, A; Briechle, F L; Buchholz, P; Bueno, A; Buitink, S; Buscemi, M; Caballero-Mora, K S; Caccianiga, L; Cancio, A; Canfora, F; Caramete, L; Caruso, R; Castellina, A; Cataldi, G; Cazon, L; Cester, R; Chavez, A G; Chinellato, J A; Chudoba, J; Clay, R W; Colalillo, R; Coleman, A; Collica, L; Coluccia, M R; Conceição, R; Contreras, F; Cooper, M J; Coutu, S; Covault, C E; Cronin, J; D'Amico, S; Daniel, B; Dasso, S; Daumiller, K; Dawson, B R; de Almeida, R M; de Jong, S J; De Mauro, G; Neto, J R T de Mello; De Mitri, I; de Oliveira, J; de Souza, V; Debatin, J; Deligny, O; Di Giulio, C; Di Matteo, A; Castro, M L Díaz; Diogo, F; Dobrigkeit, C; D'Olivo, J C; Dorofeev, A; Anjos, R C dos; Dova, M T; Dundovic, A; Ebr, J; Engel, R; Erdmann, M; Erfani, M; Escobar, C O; Espadanal, J; Etchegoyen, A; Falcke, H; Fang, K; Farrar, G; Fauth, A C; Fazzini, N; Fick, B; Figueira, J M; Filipčič, A; Fratu, O; Freire, M M; Fujii, T; Fuster, A; Gaior, R; García, B; Garcia-Pinto, D; Gaté, F; Gemmeke, H; Gherghel-Lascu, A; Ghia, P L; Giaccari, U; Giammarchi, M; Giller, M; Głas, D; Glaser, C; Glass, H; Golup, G; Berisso, M Gómez; Vitale, P F Gómez; González, N; Gookin, B; Gorgi, A; Gorham, P; Gouffon, P; Grillo, A F; Grubb, T D; Guarino, F; Guedes, G P; Hampel, M R; Hansen, P; Harari, D; Harrison, T A; Harton, J L; Hasankiadeh, Q; Haungs, A; Hebbeker, T; Heck, D; Heimann, P; Herve, A E; Hill, G C; Hojvat, C; Holt, E; Homola, P; Hörandel, J R; Horvath, P; Hrabovský, M; Huege, T; Hulsman, J; Insolia, A; Isar, P G; Jandt, I; Jansen, S; Johnsen, J A; Josebachuili, M; Kääpä, A; Kambeitz, O; Kampert, K H; Kasper, P; Katkov, I; Keilhauer, B; Kemp, E; Kemp, J; Kieckhafer, R M; Klages, H O; Kleifges, M; Kleinfeller, J; Krause, R; Krohm, N; Kuempel, D; Mezek, G Kukec; Kunka, N; Awad, A Kuotb; LaHurd, D; Lauscher, M; Lebrun, P; Legumina, R; de Oliveira, M A Leigui; Letessier-Selvon, A; Lhenry-Yvon, I; Link, K; Lopes, L; López, R; Casado, A López; Luce, Q; Lucero, A; Malacari, M; Mallamaci, M; Mandat, D; Mantsch, P; Mariazzi, A G; Mariş, I C; Marsella, G; Martello, D; Martinez, H; Bravo, O Martínez; Meza, J J Masías; Mathes, H J; Mathys, S; Matthews, J; Matthews, J A J; Matthiae, G; Mayotte, E; Mazur, P O; Medina, C; Medina-Tanco, G; Melo, D; Menshikov, A; Messina, S; Micheletti, M I; Middendorf, L; Minaya, I A; Miramonti, L; Mitrica, B; Mockler, D; Molina-Bueno, L; Mollerach, S; Montanet, F; Morello, C; Mostafá, M; Müller, G; Muller, M A; Müller, S; Naranjo, I; Nellen, L; Neuser, J; Nguyen, P H; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M; Niechciol, M; Niemietz, L; Niggemann, T; Nitz, D; Nosek, D; Novotny, V; Nožka, H; Núñez, L A; Ochilo, L; Oikonomou, F; Olinto, A; Selmi-Dei, D Pakk; Palatka, M; Pallotta, J; Papenbreer, P; Parente, G; Parra, A; Paul, T; Pech, M; Pedreira, F; Pękala, J; Pelayo, R; Peña-Rodriguez, J; Pereira, L A S; Perrone, L; Peters, C; Petrera, S; Phuntsok, J; Piegaia, R; Pierog, T; Pieroni, P; Pimenta, M; Pirronello, V; Platino, M; Plum, M; Porowski, C; Prado, R R; Privitera, P; Prouza, M; Quel, E J; Querchfeld, S; Quinn, S; Ramos-Pollan, R; Rautenberg, J; Ravignani, D; Reinert, D; Revenu, B; Ridky, J; Risse, M; Ristori, P; Rizi, V; de Carvalho, W Rodrigues; Fernandez, G Rodriguez; Rojo, J Rodriguez; Rogozin, D; Roth, M; Roulet, E; Rovero, A C; Saffi, S J; Saftoiu, A; Salamida, F; Salazar, H; Saleh, A; Greus, F Salesa; Salina, G; Gomez, J D Sanabria; Sánchez, F; Sanchez-Lucas, P; Santos, E M; Santos, E; Sarazin, F; Sarkar, B; Sarmento, R; Sarmiento, C A; Sato, R; Schauer, M; Scherini, V; Schieler, H; Schimp, M; Schmidt, D; Scholten, O; Schovánek, P; Schröder, F G; Schulz, A; Schulz, J; Schumacher, J; Sciutto, S J; Segreto, A; Settimo, M; Shadkam, A; Shellard, R C; Sigl, G; Silli, G; Sima, O; Śmiałkowski, A; Šmída, R; Snow, G R; Sommers, P; Sonntag, S; Sorokin, J; Squartini, R; Stanca, D; Stanič, S; Stasielak, J; Stassi, P; Strafella, F; Suarez, F; Durán, M Suarez; Sudholz, T; Suomijärvi, T; Supanitsky, A D; Swain, J; Szadkowski, Z; Taboada, A; Taborda, O A; Tapia, A; Theodoro, V M; Timmermans, C; Peixoto, C J Todero; Tomankova, L; Tomé, B; Elipe, G Torralba; Machado, D Torres; Torri, M; Travnicek, P; Trini, M; Ulrich, R; Unger, M; Urban, M; Galicia, J F Valdés; Valiño, I; Valore, L; van Aar, G; van Bodegom, P; Berg, A M van den; van Vliet, A; Varela, E; Cárdenas, B Vargas; Varner, G; Vázquez, J R; Vázquez, R A; Veberič, D; Quispe, I D Vergara; Verzi, V; Vicha, J; Villaseñor, L; Vorobiov, S; Wahlberg, H; Wainberg, O; Walz, D; Watson, A A; Weber, M; Weindl, A; Wiencke, L; Wilczyński, H; Winchen, T; Wittkowski, D; Wundheiler, B; Wykes, S; Yang, L; Yelos, D; Yushkov, A; Zas, E; Zavrtanik, D; Zavrtanik, M; Zepeda, A; Zimmermann, B; Ziolkowski, M; Zong, Z; Zuccarello, F

    2016-01-01

    We present a search for ultra-relativistic magnetic monopoles with the Pierre Auger Observatory. Such particles, possibly a relic of phase transitions in the early universe, would deposit a large amount of energy along their path through the atmosphere, comparable to that of ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). The air shower profile of a magnetic monopole can be effectively distinguished by the fluorescence detector from that of standard UHECRs. No candidate was found in the data collected between 2004 and 2012, with an expected background of less than 0.1 event from UHECRs. The corresponding 90% confidence level (C.L.) upper limits on the flux of ultra-relativistic magnetic monopoles range from $10^{-19}$ (cm$^{2}$ sr s)$^{-1}$ for a Lorentz factor $\\gamma=10^9$ to $2.5 \\times10^{-21}$ (cm$^{2}$ sr s)$^{-1}$ for $\\gamma=10^{12}$. These results - the first obtained with a UHECR detector - improve previously published limits by up to an order of magnitude.

  17. The STACEE Ground-Based Gamma-Ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gingrich, D M; Bramel, D; Carson, J; Covault, C E; Fortin, P; Hanna, D S; Hinton, J A; Jarvis, A; Kildea, J; Lindner, T; Müller, C; Mukherjee, R; Ong, R A; Ragan, K; Scalzo, R A; Theoret, C G; Williams, D A; Zweerink, J A

    2005-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the Solar Tower Atmospheric Cherenkov Effect Experiment (STACEE) in its complete configuration. STACEE uses the heliostats of a solar energy research facility to collect and focus the Cherenkov photons produced in gamma-ray induced air showers. The light is concentrated onto an array of photomultiplier tubes located near the top of a tower. The large Cherenkov photon collection area of STACEE results in a gamma-ray energy threshold below that of previous ground-based detectors. STACEE is being used to observe pulsars, supernova remnants, active galactic nuclei, and gamma-ray bursts.

  18. New topological structures of Skyrme theory: baryon number and monopole number

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Y.M. [Chinese Academy of Science, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China); Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, School of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kimm, Kyoungtae [Seoul National University, Faculty of Liberal Education, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, J.H. [Konkuk University, Department of Physics, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Zhang, Pengming [Chinese Academy of Science, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China)

    2017-02-15

    Based on the observation that the skyrmion in Skyrme theory can be viewed as a dressed monopole, we show that the skyrmions have two independent topology, the baryon topology π{sub 3}(S{sup 3}) and the monopole topology π{sub 2}(S{sup 2}). With this we propose to classify the skyrmions by two topological numbers (m, n), the monopole number m and the shell (radial) number n. In this scheme the popular (non spherically symmetric) skyrmions are classified as the (m, 1) skyrmions but the spherically symmetric skyrmions are classified as the (1, n) skyrmions, and the baryon number B is given by B = mn. Moreover, we show that the vacuum of the Skyrme theory has the structure of the vacuum of the Sine-Gordon theory and QCD combined together, which can also be classified by two topological numbers (p, q). This puts the Skyrme theory in a totally new perspective. (orig.)

  19. Monopole and dipole estimation for multi-frequency sky maps by linear regression

    CERN Document Server

    Wehus, I K; Eriksen, H K; Banday, A J; Dickinson, C; Ghosh, T; Gorski, K M; Lawrence, C R; Leahy, J P; Maino, D; Reich, P; Reich, W

    2014-01-01

    We describe a simple but efficient method for deriving a consistent set of monopole and dipole corrections for multi-frequency sky map data sets, allowing robust parametric component separation with the same data set. The computational core of this method is linear regression between pairs of frequency maps, often called "T-T plots". Individual contributions from monopole and dipole terms are determined by performing the regression locally in patches on the sky, while the degeneracy between different frequencies is lifted when ever the dominant foreground component exhibits a significant spatial spectral index variation. Based on this method, we present two different, but each internally consistent, sets of monopole and dipole coefficients for the 9-year WMAP, Planck 2013, SFD 100 um, Haslam 408 MHz and Reich & Reich 1420 MHz maps. The two sets have been derived with different analysis assumptions and data selection, and provides an estimate of residual systematic uncertainties. In general, our values are...

  20. Polarization and Radiation Pattern Reconfigurability of a Planar Monopole-Fed Loop Antenna for GPS Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Fakharian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a reconfigurable loop antenna with monopole-fed using embedded RF PIN switches based shorted parasitic elements for GPS applications. The antenna can independently reconfiguring multiple polarizations with switchable radiation pattern. Four switched metallic patches are used as parasitic elements to provide a reconfiguration capability to antenna acting as a driven monopole-fed loop. The edge of the parasitic elements is shorted by posts. The parasitic patches are connected/disconnected by using switching, therewith changing the configuration of monopole, to turn changes the current distribution over the loop surface. The antenna is designed to work on the GPS L1 frequency band. The antenna simultaneously changes the radiation beam in E- and H-planes, and switches among three polarizations (LP, LHCP, and RHCP in the various modes. The antenna maximum gain among the different modes is tuned between 1.5 and 4.2 dBi.

  1. Micro flame-based detector suite for universal gas sensing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, Thomas Warren; Washburn, Cody M.; Moorman, Matthew Wallace; Manley, Robert George; Lewis, Patrick Raymond; Miller, James Edward; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Shelmidine, Gregory J.; Manginell, Ronald Paul; Okandan, Murat

    2005-11-01

    A microflame-based detector suit has been developed for sensing of a broad range of chemical analytes. This detector combines calorimetry, flame ionization detection (FID), nitrogen-phosphorous detection (NPD) and flame photometric detection (FPD) modes into one convenient platform based on a microcombustor. The microcombustor consists in a micromachined microhotplate with a catalyst or low-work function material added to its surface. For the NPD mode a low work function material selectively ionizes chemical analytes; for all other modes a supported catalyst such as platinum/alumina is used. The microcombustor design permits rapid, efficient heating of the deposited film at low power. To perform calorimetric detection of analytes, the change in power required to maintain the resistive microhotplate heater at a constant temperature is measured. For FID and NPD modes, electrodes are placed around the microcombustor flame zone and an electrometer circuit measures the production of ions. For FPD, the flame zone is optically interrogated to search for light emission indicative of deexcitation of flame-produced analyte compounds. The calorimetric and FID modes respond generally to all hydrocarbons, while sulfur compounds only alarm in the calorimetric mode, providing speciation. The NPD mode provides 10,000:1 selectivity of nitrogen and phosphorous compounds over hydrocarbons. The FPD can distinguish between sulfur and phosphorous compounds. Importantly all detection modes can be established on one convenient microcombustor platform, in fact the calorimetric, FID and FPD modes can be achieved simultaneously on only one microcombustor. Therefore, it is possible to make a very universal chemical detector array with as little as two microcombustor elements. A demonstration of the performance of the microcombustor in each of the detection modes is provided herein.

  2. Iron filled carbon nanotubes as novel monopole-like sensors for quantitative magnetic force microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolny, F.; Mühl, T.; Weissker, U.; Lipert, K.; Schumann, J.; Leonhardt, A.; Büchner, B.

    2010-10-01

    We present a novel ultrahigh stability sensor for quantitative magnetic force microscopy (MFM) based on an iron filled carbon nanotube. In contrast to the complex magnetic structure of conventional MFM probes, this sensor constitutes a nanomagnet with defined properties. The long iron nanowire can be regarded as an extended dipole of which only the monopole close to the sample surface is involved in the imaging process. We demonstrate its potential for high resolution imaging. Moreover, we present an easy routine to determine its monopole moment and prove that this calibration, unlike other approaches, is universally applicable. For the first time this enables straightforward quantitative MFM measurements.

  3. An update in monopole condensation in two-flavour Adjoint QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Lacagnina, G; D'Elia, M; Di Giacomo, A; Pica, C

    2007-01-01

    QCD with fermions in the adjoint representation (aQCD) is a model for which a deconfinement and a chiral phase transition take place at different temperatures. In this work, we present a study of the deconfinement transition in the dual superconductor picture based on the evaluation of an operator which carries magnetic charge. The expectation value of this operator signals monopole condensation and is an order parameter for deconfinement as in the case of fermions in the fundamental representation. We find a sharp first order deconfinement transition. We also study the effects of the chiral transition on the monopole order parameter and find them negligible.

  4. Ultra-sharp plasmonic resonances from monopole optical nanoantenna phased arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shi-Qiang; Bruce Buchholz, D. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, 2220 Campus Dr., Evanston, Illinois 60208-3108 (United States); Zhou, Wei [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford St., Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Ketterson, John B. [Department of Physics, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, Illinois 60208-3113 (United States); NU-NIMS Materials Innovation Center, 2220 Campus Dr., Evanston, Illinois 60208-3108 (United States); Ocola, Leonidas E. [Center for Nanoscale Materials, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S Cass Ave., Lemont, Illinois 60439 (United States); Sakoda, Kazuaki [NU-NIMS Materials Innovation Center, 2220 Campus Dr., Evanston, Illinois 60208-3108 (United States); National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Chang, Robert P. H., E-mail: r-chang@northwestern.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, 2220 Campus Dr., Evanston, Illinois 60208-3108 (United States); NU-NIMS Materials Innovation Center, 2220 Campus Dr., Evanston, Illinois 60208-3108 (United States)

    2014-06-09

    Diffractively coupled plasmonic resonances possess both ultra-sharp linewidths and giant electric field enhancement around plasmonic nanostructures. They can be applied to create a new generation of sensors, detectors, and nano-optical devices. However, all current designs require stringent index-matching at the resonance condition that limits their applicability. Here, we propose and demonstrate that it is possible to relieve the index-matching requirement and to induce ultra-sharp plasmon resonances in an ordered vertically aligned optical nano-antenna phased array by transforming a dipole resonance to a monopole resonance with a mirror plane. Due to the mirror image effect, the monopole resonance not only retained the dipole features but also enhanced them. The engineered resonances strongly suppressed the radiative decay channel, resulting in a four-order of magnitude enhancement in local electric field and a Q-factor greater than 200.

  5. A carbon nanotube based x-ray detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucher, Richard A.; Bauch, Jürgen; Wünsche, Dietmar; Lackner, Gerhard; Majumder, Anindya

    2016-11-01

    X-ray detectors based on metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors couple instantaneous measurement with high accuracy. However, they only have a limited measurement lifetime because they undergo permanent degradation due to x-ray beam exposure. A field effect transistor based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs), however, overcomes this drawback of permanent degradation, because it can be reset into its starting state after being exposed to the x-ray beam. In this work the CNTs were deposited using a dielectrophoresis method on SiO2 coated p-type (boron-doped) Si substrates. For the prepared devices a best gate voltage shift of 244 V Gy-1 and a source-drain current sensitivity of 382 nA Gy-1 were achieved. These values are larger than those reached by the currently used MOSFET based devices.

  6. Atmospheric Neutron Measurements using a Small Scintillator Based Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kole, Merlin; Pearce, Mark; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Fukuda, Kentaro; Ishizu, Sumito; Jackson, Miranda; Kamae, Tune; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Kawano, Takafumi; Kiss, Mozsi; Moretti, Elena; Yanagida, Takayuki; Chauvin, Maxime; Mikhalev, Victor; Rydstrom, Stefan; Takahashi, Hiromitsu

    PoGOLino is a standalone scintillator-based neutron detector designed for balloon-borne missions. Its main purpose is to provide data of the neutron flux in 2 different energy ranges in the high altitude / high latitude region where the highest neutron flux in the atmosphere is found. Furthermore the influence of the Solar activity upon the neutron environment in this region is relatively strong. As a result both short and long term time fluctuations are strongest in this region. At high altitudes neutrons can form a source of background for balloon-borne scientific measurements. They can furthermore form a major source for single event upsets in electronics. A good understanding of the high altitude / high latitude neutron environment is therefore important. Measurements of the neutron environment in this region are however lacking. PoGOLino contains two 5 mm thick Lithium Calcium Aluminium Fluoride (LiCAF) scintillators used for neutron detection. The LiCAF crystals are sandwiched between 2 Bismuth Germanium Oxide (BGO) scintillating crystals, which serve to veto signals produced by gamma-rays and charged particles. The veto system makes measurements of the neutron flux possible even in high radiation environments. One LiCAF detector is shielded with polyethylene while the second remains unshielded, making the detectors sensitive in different energy ranges. The choice of a scintillator crystals as the detection material ensures a high detection efficiency while keeping the instrument small, robust and light weight. The full standalone cylindrical instrument has a radius of 120 mm, a height of 670 mm and a total mass of 13 kg, making it suitable as a piggy back mission. PoGOLino was successfully launched on March 20th 2013 from the Esrange Space Center in Northern Sweden to an altitude of 30.9 km. A detailed description of the detector design is presented, along with results of of the flight. The neutron flux measured during flight is compared to predictions based

  7. Algebraic properties of the monopole formula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanany, Amihay; Sperling, Marcus

    2017-02-01

    The monopole formula provides the Hilbert series of the Coulomb branch for a 3-dimensional N=4 gauge theory. Employing the concept of a fan defined by the matter content, and summing over the corresponding collection of monoids, allows the following: firstly, we provide explicit expressions for the Hilbert series for any gauge group. Secondly, we prove that the order of the pole at t = 1 and t → ∞ equals the complex or quaternionic dimension of the moduli space, respectively. Thirdly, we determine all bare and dressed BPS monopole operators that are sufficient to generate the entire chiral ring. As an application, we demonstrate the implementation of our approach to computer algebra programs and the applicability to higher rank gauge theories.

  8. Algebraic properties of the monopole formula

    CERN Document Server

    Hanany, Amihay

    2016-01-01

    The monopole formula provides the Hilbert series of the Coulomb branch for a 3-dimensional N=4 gauge theory. Employing the concept of a fan defined by the matter content, and summing over the corresponding collection of monoids, allows the following: firstly, we provide explicit expressions for the Hilbert series for any gauge group. Secondly, we prove that the order of the pole at t=1 and t=infinity equals the complex or quaternionic dimension of the moduli space, respectively. Thirdly, we determine all bare and dressed BPS monopole operators that are sufficient to generate the entire chiral ring. As an application, we demonstrate the implementation of our approach to computer algebra programs and the applicability to higher rank gauge theories.

  9. A prototype coordinate detector based on granulated thin-walled drift tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Bazylev, S N; Tikhomirov, V O; Davkov, K I; Gregor, I; Smirnov, S Y; Senger, P; Shutov, A V; Slepnev, I V; Myalkovskiy, V V; Naumann, L; Mouraviev, S V; Zhukov, I A; Peshekhonov, V D; Russakovich, N A; Rufanov, I A; Rembser, C

    2011-01-01

    A prototype detector based on thin-walled segmented tubes has been developed and its parameters have been studied. The detector contains 360 registration channels with a straw diameter of 4 mm. The prototype' granularity is 4 cm(2) and the length of insensitive region due to straw internal elements is less than 5\\% of its full sensitive area. Deterioration of the spatial resolution near these elements is observed for 1.0\\% of the detector sensitive area. The time and spatial parameters of the detector do not differ from those of conventional tracking detectors based on drift tubes. (C) 2011 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. On the Dirac Monopole Mass Scale

    CERN Document Server

    Caruso, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    It is shown, by a semi-classical argument, that the Dirac charge quantization is still valid in the (classical) Born-Infeld electromagnetic theory. Then it is possible to calculate Dirac's monopole mass in the framework of this theory, which is not possible in Maxwell's theory. The existence of an upper limit for the field intensities in this theory plays an important role in this proof.

  11. Deformation effects in Giant Monopole Resonance

    CERN Document Server

    Kvasil, J; Repko, A; Bozik, D; Kleinig, W; Reinhard, P -G

    2014-01-01

    The isoscalar giant monopole resonance (GMR) in Samarium isotopes (from spherical $^{144}$Sm to deformed $^{148-154}$Sm) is investigated within the Skyrme random-phase-approximation (RPA) for a variety of Skyrme forces. The exact RPA and its separable version (SRPA) are used for spherical and deformed nuclei, respectively. The quadrupole deformation is shown to yield two effects: the GMR broadens and attains a two-peak structure due to the coupling with the quadrupole giant resonance.

  12. BPS Monopoles and Open Spin Chains

    CERN Document Server

    Doikou, Anastasia

    2010-01-01

    We construct SU(n+1) BPS monopoles with minimal symmetry breaking by solving the full Weyl equation. In this context, we explore and discuss the existence of an open spin chain-like part within the Weyl equation. For instance, in the SU(3) case the relevant spin chain is the 2-site spin 1/2 XXX chain with open boundary conditions. We exploit the existence of such a spin chain part in order to solve the full Weyl equation.

  13. Electric Spark Discharges in Water. Low-energy Nuclear Transmutations and Light Leptonic Magnetic Monopoles in an Extended Standard Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Harald

    2017-08-01

    Light leptonic magnetic monopoles were predicted by Lochak [G. Lochak, Intern. J. Theor. Phys. 24, 1019 (1985).]. Experimental indications based on nuclear transmutations were announced by Urutskoiev et al. [L. I. Urutskoiev, V. I. Liksonov, V. G. Tsinoev, Ann. Fond. L. de Broglie 27, Nr.4, 791 (2002).] and Urutskoev [L. J. Urutskoev, Ann. Fond. L. de Broglie 29, 1149 (2004).]. A theoretical interpretation of these transmutations is proposed under the assumption that light leptonic magnetic monopoles are created during spark discharges in water. The latter should be excited neutrinos according to Lochak. This hypothesis enforces the introduction of an extended Standard Model described in previous papers. The most important results of this study are (i) that multiple proton captures are responsible for the variety of transmutations and that leptonic magnetic monopoles are involved in these processes (ii) that electromagnetic duality can be established for bound states of leptonic monopoles although massive monopoles are in general unstable (iii) that criteria for the emission of leptonic magnetic monopoles and for their catalytic effect on weak decays are set up and elaborated. The study can be considered as a contribution to the efforts of Urutskoiev and Lochak to understand the reasons for accidents in power plants.

  14. Illicit material detector based on gas sensors and neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi, Vincent; Politano, Jean-Luc

    1997-02-01

    In accordance with its missions, le Centre de Recherches et d'Etudes de la Logistique de la Police Nationale francaise (CREL) has been conducting research for the past few years targeted at detecting drugs and explosives. We have focused our approach of the underlying physical and chemical detection principles on solid state gas sensors, in the hope of developing a hand-held drugs and explosives detector. The CREL and Laboratory and Scientific Services Directorate are research partners for this project. Using generic hydrocarbon, industrially available, metal oxide sensors as illicit material detectors, requires usage precautions. Indeed, neither the product's concentrations, nor even the products themselves, belong to the intended usage specifications. Therefore, the CREL is currently investigating two major research topics: controlling the sensor's environment: with environmental control we improve the detection of small product concentration; determining detection thresholds: both drugs and explosives disseminate low gas concentration. We are attempting to quantify the minimal concentration which triggers detection. In the long run, we foresee a computer-based tool likely to detect a target gas in a noisy atmosphere. A neural network is the suitable tool for interpreting the response of heterogeneous sensor matrix. This information processing structure, alongside with proper sensor environment control, will lessen the repercussions of common MOS sensor sensitivity characteristic dispersion.

  15. Compactness and gluing theory for monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Frøyshov, Kim A

    2008-01-01

    This book is devoted to the study of moduli spaces of Seiberg-Witten monopoles over spinc Riemannian 4–manifolds with long necks and/or tubular ends. The original purpose of this work was to provide analytical foundations for a certain construction of Floer homology of rational homology 3–spheres; this is carried out in [Monopole Floer homology for rational homology 3–spheres arXiv:08094842]. However, along the way the project grew, and, except for some of the transversality results, most of the theory is developed more generally than is needed for that construction. Floer homology itself is hardly touched upon in this book, and, to compensate for that, I have included another application of the analytical machinery, namely a proof of a "generalized blow-up formula" which is an important tool for computing Seiberg–Witten invariants. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 is almost identical to my paper [Monopoles over 4–manifolds containing long necks I, Geom. Topol. 9 (2005) 1–93]. The oth...

  16. Monopole action from vacuum configurations in compact QED

    CERN Document Server

    Shiba, H; Hiroshi Shiba; Tsuneo Suzuki

    1994-01-01

    It is possible to derive a monopole action from vacuum configurations obtained in Monte-Carlo simulations extending the method developed by Swendsen. We apply the method to compact QED both in the Villain and in the Wilson forms. The action of the natural monopoles in the Villain case is in fairly good agreement with that derived by the exact dual transformation. Comparing the monopole actions, we find (1) the DeGrand-Toussaint monopole definition may be useful for \\beta_V larger than about 0.5, (2) the Villain model well approximates the Wilson one for \\beta smaller than \\beta_c and (3) in the Wilson action the monopole condensation occurs in the confinement phase and \\beta_c may be explained by the energy-entropy balance of monopole loops like in the Villain case.

  17. Monopole Condensation and Confinement in SU(2) QCD (1)

    CERN Document Server

    Shiba, H; Shiba, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Tsuneo

    1993-01-01

    An effective monopole action is derived from vacuum configurations after abelian projection in the maximally abelian gauge in $SU(2)$ QCD. Entropy dominance over energy of monopole loops is seen on the renormalized lattice with the spacing $b>b_c\\simeq 5.2\\times10^{-3} \\Lambda_L^{-1}$ when the physical volume of the system is large enough. QCD confinement may be interpreted as the (dual) Meissner effect due to the monopole condensation.

  18. Resolution of SU(2) monopole singularities by oxidation

    CERN Document Server

    Bueno, Pablo; Meessen, Patrick; Ortin, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    We show how "colored" SU(2) BPS monopoles (that is: SU(2) monopoles satisfying the Bogomol'nyi equation whose Higgs field and magnetic charge vanish at infinity and which are singular at the origin) can be obtained from the BPST instanton by a singular dimensional reduction, explaining the origin of the singularity and implying that the singularity can be cured by the oxidation of the solution. We study the oxidation of other monopole solutions in this scheme.

  19. Resolution of SU (2) monopole singularities by oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Pablo; Meessen, Patrick; Ortín, Tomás; Ramírez, Pedro F.

    2015-06-01

    We show how colored SU (2) BPS monopoles (that is: SU (2) monopoles satisfying the Bogomol'nyi equation whose Higgs field and magnetic charge vanish at infinity and which are singular at the origin) can be obtained from the BPST instanton by a singular dimensional reduction, explaining the origin of the singularity and implying that the singularity can be cured by the oxidation of the solution. We study the oxidation of other monopole solutions in this scheme.

  20. Higher dimensional global monopole in Brans–Dicke theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Farook Rahaman; Subenoy Chakraborty; Mehedi Kalam

    2002-01-01

    The gravitational field of a higher dimensional global monopole in the context of Brans–Dicke theory of gravity is investigated. The space time metric and the scalar field generated by a global monopole are obtained using the weak field approximation. Finally, the geodesic of a test particle due to the gravitational field of the monopole is studied.

  1. Resolution of SU(2 monopole singularities by oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Bueno

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We show how colored SU(2 BPS monopoles (that is: SU(2 monopoles satisfying the Bogomol'nyi equation whose Higgs field and magnetic charge vanish at infinity and which are singular at the origin can be obtained from the BPST instanton by a singular dimensional reduction, explaining the origin of the singularity and implying that the singularity can be cured by the oxidation of the solution. We study the oxidation of other monopole solutions in this scheme.

  2. Monopoles and Confinement in U(1) Lattice Gauge Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Timothy John

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Confinement in U(1) gauge theory is investigated, with particular emphasis on the role of monopoles. Starting from the work of Polyakov, the theoretical aspects are considered first, in some detail. This leads to the conclusion that the conventional techniques for analysing Monte Carlo data may not be adequate, and motivates the development of an alternative interpretation based on the theoretical insight gained. This takes more account of the expected physical properties of the theory, and does not assume beforehand that one type of behaviour (perturbative, or monopole driven) dominates. It is found that better fits to the Monte Carlo data can be achieved this way than by using the conventional methods, although different string tensions are found. The small distance behaviour is found to be best explained in terms of Coulomb effects, rather than the Luscher vibrating string picture sometimes used before. Perturbative calculations are made of Wilson loops on lattices of different shapes, and some comparisons with Monte Carlo data are made. Comments are made on the significance of these results for four dimensions, and for SU(2) and SU(3).

  3. Baryon number violation catalysed by grand unified monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Olive, Keith A

    1982-01-01

    It has been recognized for some time that grand unified monopoles may catalyze Delta B not=0 processes. The authors obtain model-independent upper bounds on the rates for such reactions from the survival of the baryon number generated in the early Universe and from present-day baryon stability. These constraints are compatible with recent estimates of large baryon number violating monopole cross sections, but a monopole flux close to present experimental upper limits could be detectable in forthcoming baryon decay experiments. The authors mention signatures for monopole-induced baryon 'decay' and point out that it could be used to solve the energy crisis.

  4. SU(5) monopoles and the dual standard model

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, H; Liu, Hong; Vachaspati, Tanmay

    1997-01-01

    We find the spectrum of magnetic monopoles produced in the symmetry breaking SU(5) \\rightarrow [SU(3)\\times SU(2)\\times U(1)']/Z_6 by constructing classical bound states of the fundamental monopoles. The spectrum of monopoles is found to correspond to the spectrum of one family of standard model fermions and hence, is a starting point for constructing the dual standard model. At this level, however, there is an extra monopole state - the ``diquark'' monopole - with no corresponding standard model fermion. If the SU(3) factor now breaks down to Z_3, the monopoles with non-trivial SU(3) charge get confined by strings in SU(3) singlets. Another outcome of this symmetry breaking is that the diquark monopole becomes unstable (metastable) to fragmentation into fundamental monopoles and the one-one correspondence with the standard model fermions is restored. We discuss the fate of the monopoles if the [SU(2)\\times U(1)']/Z_2 factor breaks down to U(1)_Q by a Higgs mechanism as in the electroweak model. Here we find ...

  5. Monopole action and condensation in SU(2) QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Shiba, H; Hiroshi Shiba; Tsuneo Suzuki

    1994-01-01

    An effective monopole action for various extended monopoles is derived from vacuum configurations after abelian projection in the maximally abelian gauge in SU(2) QCD. The action appears to be independent of the lattice volume. Moreover it seems to depend only on the physical lattice spacing of the renormalized lattice, not on \\beta. Entropy dominance over energy of monopole loops is seen on the renormalized lattice with the spacing b>b_c\\simeq 5.2\\times10^{-3} \\Lambda_L^{-1}. This suggests that monopole condensation always (for all \\beta) occurs in the infinite-volume limit of lattice QCD.

  6. Joint preprocesser-based detector for cooperative networks with limited hardware processing capability

    KAUST Repository

    Abuzaid, Abdulrahman I.

    2015-02-01

    In this letter, a joint detector for cooperative communication networks is proposed when the destination has limited hardware processing capability. The transmitter sends its symbols with the help of L relays. As the destination has limited hardware, only U out of L signals are processed and the energy of the remaining relays is lost. To solve this problem, a joint preprocessing based detector is proposed. This joint preprocessor based detector operate on the principles of minimizing the symbol error rate (SER). For a realistic assessment, pilot symbol aided channel estimation is incorporated for this proposed detector. From our simulations, it can be observed that our proposed detector achieves the same SER performance as that of the maximum likelihood (ML) detector with all participating relays. Additionally, our detector outperforms selection combining (SC), channel shortening (CS) scheme and reduced-rank techniques when using the same U. Our proposed scheme has low computational complexity.

  7. Optimizing timing performance of silicon photomultiplier-based scintillation detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeom, Jung Yeol; Vinke, Ruud; Levin, Craig S

    2013-02-21

    Precise timing resolution is crucial for applications requiring photon time-of-flight (ToF) information such as ToF positron emission tomography (PET). Silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) for PET, with their high output capacitance, are known to require custom preamplifiers to optimize timing performance. In this paper, we describe simple alternative front-end electronics based on a commercial low-noise RF preamplifier and methods that have been implemented to achieve excellent timing resolution. Two radiation detectors with L(Y)SO scintillators coupled to Hamamatsu SiPMs (MPPC S10362-33-050C) and front-end electronics based on an RF amplifier (MAR-3SM+), typically used for wireless applications that require minimal additional circuitry, have been fabricated. These detectors were used to detect annihilation photons from a Ge-68 source and the output signals were subsequently digitized by a high speed oscilloscope for offline processing. A coincident resolving time (CRT) of 147 ± 3 ps FWHM and 186 ± 3 ps FWHM with 3 × 3 × 5 mm(3) and with 3 × 3 × 20 mm(3) LYSO crystal elements were measured, respectively. With smaller 2 × 2 × 3 mm(3) LSO crystals, a CRT of 125 ± 2 ps FWHM was achieved with slight improvement to 121 ± 3 ps at a lower temperature (15° C). Finally, with the 20 mm length crystals, a degradation of timing resolution was observed for annihilation photon interactions that occur close to the photosensor compared to shallow depth-of-interaction (DOI). We conclude that commercial RF amplifiers optimized for noise, besides their ease of use, can produce excellent timing resolution comparable to best reported values acquired with custom readout electronics. On the other hand, as timing performance degrades with increasing photon DOI, a head-on detector configuration will produce better CRT than a side-irradiated setup for longer crystals.

  8. Research on Stealthy Headphone Detector Based on Geomagnetic Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Ya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A kind of stealth headphone detector based on geomagnetic sensor has been developed to deal with the stealth headphones which are small, extremely stealthy and hard to detect. The U.S. PNI geomagnetic sensor is chosen to obtain magnetic field considering the strong magnetic performance of stealth headphones. The earth’s magnetic field at the geomagnetic sensor is eliminated by difference between two geomagnetic sensors, and then weak variations of magnetic field is detected. STM8S103K2 is chosen as the central controlling chip, which is connected to LED, buzzer and LCD 1602. As shown by the experimental results, the probe is not liable to damage by the magnetic field and the developed device has high sensitivity, low False Positive Rate (FAR and satisfactory reliability.

  9. Scintillation neutron detectors based on solid-state photomultipliers and lightguides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvin, V. S., E-mail: vlitvin@inr.ru; Marin, V. N.; Karaevsky, S. K.; Trunov, D. N.; Axenov, S. N.; Stolyarov, A. A.; Sadykov, R. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Neutron detectors based on scintillation screens ZnS(Ag)/LiF and solid-state photomultipliers have been developed. Lightguides are used to collect light. The application of a coincidence scheme provides a low dark count and a neutron detection efficiency as high as 70%. A scheme of x-y neutron detector based on wavelength shifting fibers is also proposed. Tests of the proposed versions of detectors in a neutron beam have shown their efficiency.

  10. Design of FPGA-based radiation tolerant quench detectors for LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckert, J.; Skoczen, A.

    2017-04-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) comprises many superconducting circuits. Most elements of these circuits require active protection. The functionality of the quench detectors was initially implemented as microcontroller based equipment. After the initial stage of the LHC operation with beams the introduction of a new type of quench detector began. This article presents briefly the main ideas and architectures applied to the design and the validation of FPGA-based quench detectors.

  11. Blind multiuser detector for chaos-based CDMA using support vector machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Johnny Wei-Hsun; Berber, Stevan Mirko; Kecman, Vojislav

    2010-08-01

    The algorithm and the results of a blind multiuser detector using a machine learning technique called support vector machine (SVM) on a chaos-based code division multiple access system is presented in this paper. Simulation results showed that the performance achieved by using SVM is comparable to existing minimum mean square error (MMSE) detector under both additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) and Rayleigh fading conditions. However, unlike the MMSE detector, the SVM detector does not require the knowledge of spreading codes of other users in the system or the estimate of the channel noise variance. The optimization of this algorithm is considered in this paper and its complexity is compared with the MMSE detector. This detector is much more suitable to work in the forward link than MMSE. In addition, original theoretical bit-error rate expressions for the SVM detector under both AWGN and Rayleigh fading are derived to verify the simulation results.

  12. VME-based data acquisition system for the India-based Neutrino Observatory prototype detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhuyan, M. [Department of High Energy Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Chandratre, V.B. [Electronics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Dasgupta, S. [Department of High Energy Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Datar, V.M. [Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kalmani, S.D.; Lahamge, S.M.; Mondal, N.K.; Nagaraj, P.; Pal, S.; Rao, S.K.; Redij, A. [Department of High Energy Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Samuel, D., E-mail: samuel@tifr.res.in [Department of High Energy Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Saraf, M.N.; Satyanarayana, B.; Shinde, R.R.; Upadhya, S.S. [Department of High Energy Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2012-01-01

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) collaboration has proposed to build a 50 kton Iron-Calorimeter (ICAL) to study neutrino oscillations. About 28,800 Resistive Plate Chambers will be used as active detector elements in this experiment. Preliminary studies are currently underway and as a part of it, a prototype detector was developed which now serves as a cosmic-ray telescope and as a test-bench to study the indigenously built RPCs. A VME-based data acquisition system was designed for this prototype system. Modern software tools were used in the designing of the DAQ software. The design and development of this DAQ system are discussed.

  13. Study on Signal Processing Circuit Based on Scintillation Detector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO; Yong-gang; DENG; Chang-ming; LI; Jian-wei; XIAO; Cai-jin; ZHANG; Gui-ying; WANG; Ping-sheng; WANG; Xing-hua; JIN; Xiang-chun; HUA; Long; YUAN; Guo-jun; NI; Bang-fa

    2013-01-01

    Compared with silicon semiconductor detector,higher energy resolution and together with the high detection efficiency,big sensitive volume,good adaptability to environment and high sensitivityespecially in nature background environment are the characteristics of scintillation detector.The most widely applied scintillator includes inorganic crystals,of which sodium iodide is the favorite and

  14. MCP-based detector some results and perspectives

    CERN Document Server

    Patarakin, O O; Strepetov, A N; Turbin, E V; Sinitsin, V I; Kartamushev, A A

    1997-01-01

    The timing resolution of photomultiplier tubes (PMT) based on shevron-type microchannel plates (MCP) has been studied inmagnetic fields. The same timingresolution with and without a longitudinal magnetic field up to 2.0 kGwas obtained as = 85 ± 2 ps. It is shown that an increase of timing resolution in this magnetic field does not exceed25 ps (upper limit). The timing resolution of = 31 ± 2 pswas obtained for narrow (10resolution) amplitude spectrumfrom Corone discharge. The counting rate of MCP-based detector was studied in function of the direction of the magnetic field.The spatial and timing resolution for the MCP-based PMT were obtained using laser pulses as well. With laser pulses of 0.3 ns a timing resolution of ≅ 450 ps was obtained. Taking into account the amplitude correction narrows to 140 ps. Using 100 fs-laser with the standard constant fractiondiscriminator gives a timing resolution from 20 to 40 ps depending on the read-out MCP region.The perspectives of using...

  15. A beta-ray spectrometer based on a two-or three silicon detector coincidence telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, Y.S. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel). Dept. of Physics; Weizman, Y. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel). Dept. of Physics; Hirning, C.R. [Health Physics Dept., Ontario Hydro, Whitby (Canada)

    1995-03-11

    This report describes the operation of a beta-ray energy spectrometer based on a silicon detector telescope using two or three elements. The front detector is a planar, totally-depleted, silicon surface barrier detector that is 97 {mu}m thick, the back detector is a room-temperature, lithium compensated, silicon detector that is 5000 {mu}m thick, and the intermediate detector is similar to the front detector but 72 {mu}m thick and intended to be used only in intense photon fields. The three detectors are mounted in a light-tight aluminum housing. The capability of the spectrometer to reject photons is based upon the fact that the incident photon will have a small probability of simultaneously losing detectable energy in two detectors, and an even smaller probability of losing detectable energy in all three detectors. Electrons will, however, almost always record measurable events in either the front two or all three detectors. A coincidence requirement between the detectors thus rejects photon induced events. With a 97 {mu}m thick detector the lower energy coincidence threshold is approximately 110 keV. With an ultra-thin 40 {mu}m thick front detector, and operated at 15 C, the spectrometer is capable of detecting even 60-70 keV electrons with a coincidence efficiency of 60%. The spectrometer has been used to measure beta radiation fields in CANDU reactor working environments, and the spectral information is intended to support dose algorithms for the LiF TLD chips used in the Ontario Hydro dosimetry program. (orig.).

  16. Dirac's monopole, quaternions, and the Zassenhaus formula

    CERN Document Server

    Soloviev, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    Starting from the quaternionic quantization scheme proposed by Emch and Jadczyk for describing the motion of a quantum particle in the magnetic monopole field, we derive an algorithm for finding the differential representation of the star product generated by the quaternionic Weyl correspondence on phase-space functions. This procedure is illustrated by explicit calculation of the star product up to the second order in the Planck constant. Our main tools are an operator analog of the twisted convolution and the Zassenhaus formula for the products of exponentials of noncommuting operators.

  17. Non-geometric branes are DFT monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    Bakhmatov, Ilya; Musaev, Edvard T

    2016-01-01

    The double field theory monopole solution by Berman and Rudolph is shown to reproduce non-geometric backgrounds with non-vanishing Q- and R-flux upon an appropriate choice of physical and dual coordinates. The obtained backgrounds depend non-trivially on dual coordinates and have only trivial monodromies. Upon smearing the solutions along the dual coordinates one reproduces the known $5^2_2$ solution for the Q-brane and co-dimension 1 solution for the R-brane. The T-duality invariant magnetic charge is explicitly calculated for all these backgrounds and is found to be equal to the magnetic charge of (unsmeared) NS5-brane.

  18. Dyons of One Half Monopole Charge

    CERN Document Server

    Teh, R; Teh, Rosy; Wong, Khai-Ming

    2005-01-01

    We would like to present some exact SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs dyon solutions of one half monopole charge. These static dyon solutions satisfy the first order Bogomol'nyi equations and are characterized by a parameter, $m$. They are axially symmetric. The gauge potentials and the electromagnetic fields possess a string singularity along the negative z-axis and hence they possess infinite energy density along the line singularity. However the net electric charges of these dyons which varies with the parameter $m$ are finite.

  19. Dyons of One-Half Monopole Charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Rosy; Wong, Khai-Ming

    We would like to present some exact SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs dyon solutions of one-half monopole charge. These static dyon solutions satisfy the first order Bogomol'nyi equations and are characterized by a parameter, m. They are axially symmetric. The gauge potentials and the electromagnetic fields possess a string singularity along the negative z-axis and hence they possess infinite energy density along the line singularity. However the net electric charges of these dyons which varies with the parameter m are finite.

  20. Finite Energy One-Half Monopole Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Rosy; Ng, Ban-Loong; Wong, Khai-Ming

    2012-12-01

    We present finite energy SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs particles of one-half topological charge. The magnetic fields of these solutions at spatial infinity correspond to the magnetic field of a positive one-half magnetic monopole at the origin and a semi-infinite Dirac string on one-half of the z-axis carrying a magnetic flux of (2π )/(g) going into the origin. Hence the net magnetic charge is zero. The gauge potentials are singular along one-half of the z-axis, elsewhere they are regular.

  1. Vacuum less global monopole in Brans-Dicke theory

    CERN Document Server

    Rahaman, F; Kalam, M; Mukherjee, R; Roy, T

    2007-01-01

    In the present work, the gravitational field of a vacuum less global monopole has been investigated in Brans-Dicke theory under weak field assumption of the field equations. It has been shown that the vacuum less global monopole exerts attractive gravitational effects on a test particle. It is dissimilar to the case studied in general relativity.

  2. Monopoles and string tension in SU(2) QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Shiba, H; Hiroshi Shiba; Tsuneo Suzuki

    1994-01-01

    Monopole and photon contributions to abelian Wilson loops are calculated using Monte-Carlo simulations of SU(2) QCD in the maximally abelian gauge. The string tension is well reproduced only by monopole contributions, whereas photons alone are responsible for the Coulomb coefficient of the abelian static potential.

  3. Cho Decomposition of One-Half Integer Monopoles Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teh, Rosy; Ng, Ban-Loong; Wong, Khai-Ming

    2013-11-01

    We performed the Cho decomposition of the SU(2) Yang-Mills-Higgs gauge potentials of the finite energy (1) one-half monopole solution and (2) the one and a half monopoles solution into Abelian and non-Abelian components. We found that the semi-infinite string singularity in the gauge potentials is a contribution from the Higgs field of the one-half monopole in both of the solutions. The non-Abelian components of the gauge potentials are able to remove the point singularity of the Abelian components of the 't Hooft-Polyakov monopole but not the string singularity of the one-half monopole which is topological in nature. Hence the total energy of a one monopole is infinite in the Maxwell electromagnetic theory but the total energy of a one-half monopole is finite. By analyzing the magnetic fields and the gauge covariant derivatives of the Higgs field, we are able to conclude that both the one-half integer monopoles solutions are indeed non-BPS even in the limit of vanishing Higgs self-coupling constant.

  4. ANALYSIS OF MONOPOLE ANTENNA ON CIRCULAR DISC BY MODE MATCHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Baohua; Zhang Fushun; Liu Qizhong

    2001-01-01

    Mode matching is used for the analysis of monopole antenna on circular disc, which is achieved by developing a novel model consisting of two artificial ground planes above and bellow the monopole antenna. Using this model, the input impedance is computed and compared with measured data reported in literatures, and excellent agreement is observed.

  5. Flexible sixteen monopole antenna array for microwave breast cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, H; Porter, E; Santorelli, A; Gosselin, B; Popovic, M; Rusch, L A

    2014-01-01

    Radar based microwave imaging (MI) has been widely studied for breast cancer detection in recent times. Sensing dielectric property differences of tissues over a wide frequency band has been made possible by ultra-wideband (UWB) techniques. In this paper, a flexible, compact monopole antenna on a 100 μm Kapton polyimide is designed, using a high frequency structure simulator (HFSS), to be in contact with biological breast tissues over the 2-5GHz frequency range. The antenna parameters are optimized to obtain a good impedance match over the required frequency range. The designed antenna size is 18mm × 18mm. Further, a flexible conformal 4×4 ultra-wideband antenna array, in a format similar to that of a bra, was developed for a radar-based breast cancer detection system.

  6. Detector Based Realisation of Illuminance Scale at NML-SIRIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Mohd Nizam; Abidin, Mohd Nasir Zainal; Abidin, Abdul Rashid Zainal; Shaari, Sahbudin

    2009-07-01

    Illuminance scale is one of the fundamentals in the realisation of candela in optical radiation. The en route of the realisation is based on the fundamental process from the unbroken chain of traceability which includes from the primary standard disseminated to working standard and lastly the end user. There are many variations towards this realisation even though some of the national metrology institutes (NMI) does not have the primary standard but their traceability still valid. The realisation of National Metrology Laboratory SIRIM (NML-SIRIM), Malaysia illuminance scale is based on detector. The scale is traceable to National Physical Labortaory (NPL), United Kingdom (UK) by annually calibrating photometers and luminous intensity lamp. This paper describes measurement method and the system set-up was previously crosschecked with Korea Research Institute Standards and Science (KRISS), Republic of Korea. The agreement between both laboratories is within 0.5% the uncertainty maintained at NML-SIRIM. Furthermore, the basic measurement equation for illuminance realisation is also derived.

  7. Electronics and data acquisition system for the ICAL prototype detector of India-based neutrino observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behere, A. [Electronics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Bhuyan, M. [Department of High Energy Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Chandratre, V.B. [Electronics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Dasgupta, S., E-mail: sudeshnadasgupta@tifr.res.in [Department of High Energy Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Datar, V.M. [Nuclear Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Kalmani, S.D.; Lahamge, S.M.; Mondal, N.K. [Department of High Energy Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Mukhopadhyay, P.K. [Electronics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Nagaraj, P.; Nagesh, B.K.; Pal, S.; Rao, Shobha K.; Samuel, D.; Saraf, M.N.; Satyanarayana, B. [Department of High Energy Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Shastrakar, R.S. [Electronics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Shinde, R.R. [Department of High Energy Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Sudheer, K.M. [Electronics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Upadhya, S.S. [Department of High Energy Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); and others

    2013-02-11

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) collaboration has proposed to build a 50 kton magnetized Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector with the primary goal to study neutrino oscillations, employing Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) as active detector elements. A prototype of the ICAL detector has been built in order to develop and characterize the intrinsic sub-systems, like RPCs, gas system, electronics and data acquisition system, etc. This paper describes in detail the readout electronics as well as the VME-based data acquisition system for the prototype detector.

  8. A beta ray spectrometer based on a two-, or three-element silicon detector coincidence telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horowitz, Y.S.; Weizman, Y. [Ben-Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Beersheba (Israel). Dept. of Physics; Hirning, C.R. [Ontario Hydro, Whitby, ON (Canada). Health Physics Dept.

    1995-12-31

    The operation of a beta ray energy spectrometer based on a two-or three-element silicon detector telescope is described. The front detector (A) is a thin, totally depleted, silicon surface barrier detector either 40 {mu}m, 72 {mu}m or 98 {mu}m thick. The back detector (C) is a Li compensated silicon detector, 5000 {mu}m thick. An additional thin detector can be inserted between these two detectors when additional photon rejection capability is required in intense photon fields. The capability of the spectrometer to reject photons is based on the fact that incident photons will have a small probability of simultaneously losing detectable energy in two detectors and an even smaller probability of losing detectable energy in all three detectors. Electrons, however, above a low energy threshold, will always record simultaneous, events in all three detectors. The spectrometer is capable of measuring electron energies from a lower energy coincidence threshold of 70 keV with 60% efficiency increasing to 100% efficiency in the energy region between 150 keV and 2.5 MeV. (Author).

  9. Characterization of the KID-Based Light Detectors of CALDER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casali, N.; Bellini, F.; Cardani, L.; Castellano, M. G.; Colantoni, I.; Coppolecchia, A.; Cosmelli, C.; Cruciani, A.; D'Addabbo, A.; Di Domizio, S.; Martinez, M.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M.

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the Cryogenic wide-Area Light Detectors with Excellent Resolution (CALDER) project is the development of light detectors with active area of 5 × 5 cm2 and noise energy resolution smaller than 20 eV RMS, implementing phonon-mediated kinetic inductance detectors. The detectors are developed to improve the background suppression in large-mass bolometric experiments such as CUORE, via the double read-out of the light and the heat released by particles interacting in the bolometers. In this work, we present the characterization of the first light detectors developed by CALDER. We describe the analysis tools to evaluate the resonator parameters (resonant frequency and quality factors) taking into account simultaneously all the resonance distortions introduced by the read-out chain (as the feed-line impedance and its mismatch) and by the power stored in the resonator itself. We detail the method for the selection of the optimal point for the detector operation (maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio). Finally, we present the response of the detector to optical pulses in the energy range of 0{-}30 keV.

  10. Optimisation and Characterisation of Glass RPC for India-based Neutrino Observatory Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Kanishka, R; Indumathi, D

    2016-01-01

    The proposed magnetised Iron CALorimeter detector (ICAL) to be built in the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) laboratory aims to detect atmospheric muon neutrinos. In order to achieve improved physics results, the constituent components of the detector must be fully understood by proper characterisation and optimisation of various parameters. Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) are the active detector elements in the ICAL detector and can be made of glass or bakelite. The number of RPCs required for this detector is very large number so a detailed R & D is necessary to establish the characterisation and optimisation of these RPCs. These detectors once installed will be taking data for 15-20 years. In this paper, we report the selection criteria of glass used of various Indian manufacturers such as Asahi, Saint Gobain and Modi. Based on the factors like aging that deteriorate the quality of glass the choice is made. The glass characterisation studies include UV-VIS transmission for optical properties, SEM...

  11. Ethernet-Based DAQ System for QUIET-II Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, M.; Ishidoshiro, K.; Higuchi, T.; Ikeno, M.; Hasegawa, M.; Hazumi, M.; Tajima, O.; Tanaka, M.; Uchida, T.

    2012-06-01

    The B-modes in cosmic microwave background polarization are a smoking gun for the inflationary universe. For the detection of the B-modes, having a large detector array is a generic approach since the B-modes is so faint pattern ( T b≲0.1 μK). The Q/U Imaging ExperimenT Phase-II (QUIET-II) is proposed to search the B-modes, using an array with 500 HEMT-based polarimeters. Each polarimeter element has 4-outputs, therefore we have to manage 2000 channels in total. We developed a scalable DAQ system based on TCP/Ethernet for QUIET-II. The DAQ system is composed of the polarimeters, ADC boards, a Master Clock and a control computer (PC). The analog signals from the polarimeters are digitized on the ADC boards. On-board demodulation, which synchronizes the phase flip modulations on the polarimeter, extracts the polarized components in the digitized signal. The Master Clock distributes all necessary clocks to the ADC boards as well as the polarimeters. This scheme guarantees the synchronization of the modulations and demodulations. We employed Ethernet-based communication scheme between the data collection program (Collector) on the PC and the ADC boards as well as the Master Clock. Such an Ethernet-based communication scheme allows us to construct a simple structure of the upper level software, which results in the high scalability to increase the number of channels. All basic functions and requirements are confirmed by the laboratory tests; demonstration with test signals as well as the signals from the polarimeters, measurements of the data transfer rate, and the synchronous operation with two ADC boards. Therefore, the DAQ system is confirmed to be suitable for QUIET-II.

  12. BJT detector with FPGA-based read-out for alpha particle monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyzhnevyi, V; Dalla Betta, G-F [Universita di Trento, via Sommarive, 14, 38123 Trento (Italy); Rovati, L [Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via Vignolese 905, 41125 Modena (Italy); Verzellesi, G [Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, via Amendola 2, Pad. Morselli, 42100 Reggio Emilia (Italy); Zorzi, N, E-mail: tyzhnevyi@disi.unitn.it [Fondazione Bruno Kessler, via Sommarive, 18, 38123 Trento (Italy)

    2011-01-15

    In this work we introduce a new prototype of readout electronics (ALPHADET), which was designed for an {alpha}-particle detection system based on a bipolar junction transistor (BJT) detector. The system uses an FPGA, which provides many advantages at the stage of prototyping and testing the detector. The main design and electrical features of the board are discussed in this paper, along with selected results from the characterization of ALPHADET coupled to BJT detectors.

  13. AlN Based Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Detectors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I project is to investigate the feasibility for achieving EUV detectors for space applications by exploiting the ultrahigh bandgap semiconductor - AlN. We...

  14. Characterization of a Polymer-Based MEMS Pyroelectric Infrared Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    engineered protein in hydrogels tailors stimuli-responsive characteristics.” Nature, vol 4, pp 298 – 302, Apr 2005. [8] Brott, Lawrence L...CR Detector Pre- amp Φe (t) 38 three regimes can be seen in Figure 14, which represents the voltage reponsivity...detector needs amplification, using one of the two circuits shown in Figure 19 or 20. In lieu of this circuit, a voltage pre- amp was used

  15. Theoretical performance analysis for CMOS based high resolution detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2013-03-06

    High resolution imaging capabilities are essential for accurately guiding successful endovascular interventional procedures. Present x-ray imaging detectors are not always adequate due to their inherent limitations. The newly-developed high-resolution micro-angiographic fluoroscope (MAF-CCD) detector has demonstrated excellent clinical image quality; however, further improvement in performance and physical design may be possible using CMOS sensors. We have thus calculated the theoretical performance of two proposed CMOS detectors which may be used as a successor to the MAF. The proposed detectors have a 300 μm thick HL-type CsI phosphor, a 50 μm-pixel CMOS sensor with and without a variable gain light image intensifier (LII), and are designated MAF-CMOS-LII and MAF-CMOS, respectively. For the performance evaluation, linear cascade modeling was used. The detector imaging chains were divided into individual stages characterized by one of the basic processes (quantum gain, binomial selection, stochastic and deterministic blurring, additive noise). Ranges of readout noise and exposure were used to calculate the detectors' MTF and DQE. The MAF-CMOS showed slightly better MTF than the MAF-CMOS-LII, but the MAF-CMOS-LII showed far better DQE, especially for lower exposures. The proposed detectors can have improved MTF and DQE compared with the present high resolution MAF detector. The performance of the MAF-CMOS is excellent for the angiography exposure range; however it is limited at fluoroscopic levels due to additive instrumentation noise. The MAF-CMOS-LII, having the advantage of the variable LII gain, can overcome the noise limitation and hence may perform exceptionally for the full range of required exposures; however, it is more complex and hence more expensive.

  16. Development of compact particle detectors for space based instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barner, Lindsey; Grove, Andrew; Mohler, Jacob; Sisson, Caleb; Roth, Alex; Kryemadhi, Abaz

    2017-01-01

    The Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs) are new photon-detectors which have been increasingly used in particle physics. Their small size, good single photon resolution, simple readout, and immunity to magnetic fields offers benefits compared to traditional photomultipliers. LYSO and CeBr3 crystals are relatively new scintillators with high stopping power, very good light yield and fast decay time. The response of these detectors to low energy gamma rays will be presented. NASA Pennsylvania Space Grant Consortium.

  17. Injection quality measurements with diamond based particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Stein, Oliver; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    During the re-commissioning phase of the LHC after the long shutdown 1 very high beam losses were observed at the TDI during beam injection. The losses reached up to 90% of the dump threshold. To decrease the through beam losses induced stress on the accelerator components these loss levels need to be reduced. Measurements with diamond based particle detectors (dBLMs), which have nano-second time resolution, revealed that the majority of these losses come from recaptured SPS beam surrounding the nominal bunch train. In this MD the injection loss patterns and loss intensities were investigated in greater detail. Performed calibration shots on the TDI (internal beam absorber for injection) gave a conversion factor from impacting particles intensities to signal in the dBLMs (0.1Vs/109 protons). Using the SPS tune kicker for cleaning the recaptured beam in the SPS and changing the LHC injection kicker settings resulted in a reduction of the injection losses. For 144 bunch injections the loss levels were decreased...

  18. Low power adder based digital filter for QRS detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, L; Chitra, D; Manigandan, T

    2014-01-01

    Most of the Biomedical applications use dedicated processors for the implementation of complex signal processing. Among them, sensor network is also a type, which has the constraint of low power consumption. Since the processing elements are the most copiously used operations in the signal processors, the power consumption of this has the major impact on the system level application. In this paper, we introduce low power concept of transistor stacking to reduce leakage power; and new architectures based on stacking to implement the full adder and its significance at the digital filter level for QRS detector are implemented. The proposed concept has lesser leakage power at the adder as well as filter level with trade-off in other quality metrics of the design. This enabled the design to be dealt with as the low-power corner and can be made adaptable to any level of hierarchical abstractions as per the requirement of the application. The proposed architectures are designed, modeled at RTL level using the Verilog-HDL, and synthesized in Synopsys Design Compiler by mapping the design to 65 nm technology library standard cells.

  19. CdTe detector based PIXE mapping of geological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaves, P.C., E-mail: cchaves@ctn.ist.utl.pt [Centro de Física Atómica da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); IST/ITN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, EN10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Taborda, A. [Centro de Física Atómica da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); IST/ITN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, EN10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Oliveira, D.P.S. de [Laboratório Nacional de Energia e Geologia (LNEG), Apartado 7586, 2611-901 Alfragide (Portugal); Reis, M.A. [Centro de Física Atómica da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); IST/ITN, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, EN10, 2686-953 Sacavém (Portugal)

    2014-01-01

    A sample collected from a borehole drilled approximately 10 km ESE of Bragança, Trás-os-Montes, was analysed by standard and high energy PIXE at both CTN (previous ITN) PIXE setups. The sample is a fine-grained metapyroxenite grading to coarse-grained in the base with disseminated sulphides and fine veinlets of pyrrhotite and pyrite. Matrix composition was obtained at the standard PIXE setup using a 1.25 MeV H{sup +} beam at three different spots. Medium and high Z elemental concentrations were then determined using the DT2fit and DT2simul codes (Reis et al., 2008, 2013 [1,2]), on the spectra obtained in the High Resolution and High Energy (HRHE)-PIXE setup (Chaves et al., 2013 [3]) by irradiation of the sample with a 3.8 MeV proton beam provided by the CTN 3 MV Tandetron accelerator. In this paper we present results, discuss detection limits of the method and the added value of the use of the CdTe detector in this context.

  20. Characterization of the KID-Based Light Detectors of CALDER

    CERN Document Server

    Casali, N; Cardani, L; Castellano, M G; Colantoni, I; Coppolecchia, A; Cosmelli, C; Cruciani, A; D'Addabbo, A; Di Dominio, S; Martinez, M; Tomei, C; Vignati, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the Cryogenic wide-Area Light Detectors with Excellent Resolution (CALDER) project is the development of light detectors with active area of $5\\times5$ cm$^2$ and noise energy resolution smaller than 20 eV RMS, implementing phonon-mediated kinetic inductance detectors. The detectors are developed to improve the background suppression in large-mass bolometric experiments such as CUORE, via the double read-out of the light and the heat released by particles interacting in the bolometers. In this work, we present the characterization of the first light detectors developed by CALDER. We describe the analysis tools to evaluate the resonator parameters (resonant frequency and quality factors) taking into account simultaneously all the resonance distortions introduced by the read-out chain (as the feed-line impedance and its mismatch) and by the power stored in the resonator itself. We detail the method for the selection of the optimal point for the detector operation (maximizing the signal-to-noise ratio...

  1. Cosmic microwave background constraints for global strings and global monopoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Eiguren, Asier; Lizarraga, Joanes; Hindmarsh, Mark; Urrestilla, Jon

    2017-07-01

    We present the first cosmic microwave background (CMB) power spectra from numerical simulations of the global O(N) linear σ-model, with N=2,3, which have global strings and monopoles as topological defects. In order to compute the CMB power spectra we compute the unequal time correlators (UETCs) of the energy-momentum tensor, showing that they fall off at high wave number faster than naive estimates based on the geometry of the defects, indicating non-trivial (anti-)correlations between the defects and the surrounding Goldstone boson field. We obtain source functions for Einstein-Boltzmann solvers from the UETCs, using a recently developed method that improves the modelling at the radiation-matter transition. We show that the interpolation function that mimics the transition is similar to other defect models, but not identical, confirming the non-universality of the interpolation function. The CMB power spectra for global strings and global monopoles have the same overall shape as those obtained using the non-linear σ-model approximation, which is well captured by a large-N calculation. However, the amplitudes are larger than the large-N calculation would naively predict, and in the case of global strings much larger: a factor of 20 at the peak. Finally we compare the CMB power spectra with the latest CMB data in other to put limits on the allowed contribution to the temperature power spectrum at multipole l = 10 of 1.7% for global strings and 2.4% for global monopoles. These limits correspond to symmetry-breaking scales of 2.9× 1015 GeV (6.3× 1014 GeV with the expected logarithmic scaling of the effective string tension between the simulation time and decoupling) and 6.4× 1015 GeV respectively. The bound on global strings is a significant one for the ultra-light axion scenario with axion masses ma lesssim 10-28 eV . These upper limits indicate that gravitational waves from global topological defects will not be observable at the gravitational wave observatory

  2. Dynamics of a magnetic monopole in matter; Dynamique d'un monopole magnetique dans la matiere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayolle, David [Inst. de Physique Nucleaire, Lyon-1 Univ., 69 - Villeurbanne (France)

    1999-07-01

    We study the dynamics of a slow (v/c {approx} 10{sup -4}) Dirac magnetic monopole in matter. First, we show at macroscopic scale that the force exerted on a monopole is F vector = g(H vector - v vector x D vector), as if the monopole was not allowed to cross neither microscopic current loops nor microscopic electric dipoles. We interpret this result in terms of adiabatic monopole-atom interactions. Secondly, we generalized the macroscopic Maxwell's equations in 'dual symmetric' matter which contains monopoles and dyons, from which we deduce several properties such as the velocity of light, the behaviour under C, P and T transformation, and we generalize the energy-momentum tensor. These equations also apply when nucleons or electrons possess an electric dipole moment and we propose two experimental methods for detecting this electric dipole moment via its macroscopic polarization effects. (author)

  3. Evaluation of cassette-based digital radiography detectors using standardized image quality metrics: AAPM TG-150 Draft Image Detector Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guang; Greene, Travis C; Nishino, Thomas K; Willis, Charles E

    2016-09-08

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate several of the standardized image quality metrics proposed by the American Association of Physics in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 150. The task group suggested region-of-interest (ROI)-based techniques to measure nonuniformity, minimum signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), number of anomalous pixels, and modulation transfer function (MTF). This study evaluated the effects of ROI size and layout on the image metrics by using four different ROI sets, assessed result uncertainty by repeating measurements, and compared results with two commercially available quality control tools, namely the Carestream DIRECTVIEW Total Quality Tool (TQT) and the GE Healthcare Quality Assurance Process (QAP). Seven Carestream DRX-1C (CsI) detectors on mobile DR systems and four GE FlashPad detectors in radiographic rooms were tested. Images were analyzed using MATLAB software that had been previously validated and reported. Our values for signal and SNR nonuniformity and MTF agree with values published by other investigators. Our results show that ROI size affects nonuniformity and minimum SNR measurements, but not detection of anomalous pixels. Exposure geometry affects all tested image metrics except for the MTF. TG-150 metrics in general agree with the TQT, but agree with the QAP only for local and global signal nonuniformity. The difference in SNR nonuniformity and MTF values between the TG-150 and QAP may be explained by differences in the calculation of noise and acquisition beam quality, respectively. TG-150's SNR nonuniformity metrics are also more sensitive to detector nonuniformity compared to the QAP. Our results suggest that fixed ROI size should be used for consistency because nonuniformity metrics depend on ROI size. Ideally, detector tests should be performed at the exact calibration position. If not feasible, a baseline should be established from the mean of several repeated measurements. Our study indicates that the TG-150 tests can be

  4. Physics Potential of the ICAL detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO)

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Shakeel; Hasan, Rashid; Salim, Mohammad; Singh, S K; Inbanathan, S S R; Singh, Venktesh; Subrahmanyam, V S; Behera, Shiba Prasad; Chandratre, Vinay B; Dash, Nitali; Datar, Vivek M; Kashyap, V K S; Mohanty, Ajit K; Pant, Lalit M; Chatterjee, Animesh; Choubey, Sandhya; Gandhi, Raj; Ghosh, Anushree; Tiwari, Deepak; Ajmi, Ali; Sankar, S Uma; Behera, Prafulla; Chacko, Aleena; Jafer, Sadiq; Libby, James; Raveendrababu, K; Rebin, K R; Indumathi, D; Meghna, K; Lakshmi, S M; Murthy, M V N; Pal, Sumanta; Rajasekaran, G; Sinha, Nita; Agarwalla, Sanjib Kumar; Khatun, Amina; Mehta, Poonam; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Kanishka, R; Kumar, A; Shahi, J S; Singh, J B; Ghosh, Monojit; Ghoshal, Pomita; Goswami, Srubabati; Gupta, Chandan; Raut, Sushant; Bhattacharya, Sudeb; Bose, Suvendu; Ghosal, Ambar; Jash, Abhik; Kar, Kamalesh; Majumdar, Debasish; Majumdar, Nayana; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Saha, Satyajit; Acharya, B S; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bhattacharya, Kolahal; Dasgupta, Sudeshna; Devi, Moon Moon; Dighe, Amol; Majumder, Gobinda; Mondal, Naba K; Redij, Asmita; Samuel, Deepak; Satyanarayana, B; Thakore, Tarak; Ravikumar, C D; Vinodkumar, A M; Gangopadhyay, Gautam; Raychaudhuri, Amitava; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Gaur, Ankit; Kaur, Daljeet; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Sanjeev; Naimuddin, Md; Bari, Waseem; Malik, Manzoor A; Singh, Jyotsna; Krishnaveni, S; Ravikumar, H B; Ranganathaiah, C; Mahapatra, Swapna; Biswas, Saikat; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Ganai, Rajesh; Ghosh, Tapasi; Viyogi, Y P

    2015-01-01

    The upcoming 50 kt magnetized iron calorimeter (ICAL) detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is designed to study the atmospheric neutrinos and antineutrinos separately over a wide range of energies and path lengths. The primary focus of this experiment is to explore the Earth matter effects by observing the energy and zenith angle dependence of the atmospheric neutrinos in the multi-GeV range. This study will be crucial to address some of the outstanding issues in neutrino oscillation physics, including the fundamental issue of neutrino mass hierarchy. In this document, we present the physics potential of the detector as obtained from realistic detector simulations. We describe the simulation framework, the neutrino interactions in the detector, and the expected response of the detector to particles traversing it. The ICAL detector can determine the energy and direction of the muons to a high precision, and in addition, its sensitivity to multi-GeV hadrons increases its physics reach substant...

  5. A measurement method of a detector response function for monochromatic electrons based on the Compton scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhlanov, S. V.; Bazlov, N. V.; Derbin, A. V.; Drachnev, I. S.; Kayunov, A. S.; Muratova, V. N.; Semenov, D. A.; Unzhakov, E. V.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we present a method of scintillation detector energy calibration using the gamma-rays. The technique is based on the Compton scattering of gamma-rays in a scintillation detector and subsequent photoelectric absorption of the scattered photon in the Ge-detector. The novelty of this method is that the source of gamma rays, the germanium and scintillation detectors are immediately arranged adjacent to each other. The method presents an effective solution for the detectors consisting of a low atomic number materials, when the ratio between Compton effect and photoelectric absorption is large and the mean path of gamma-rays is comparable to the size of the detector. The technique can be used for the precision measurements of the scintillator light yield dependence on the electron energy.

  6. A measurement method of a detector response function for monochromatic electrons based on the Compton scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Bakhlanov, S V; Derbin, A V; Drachnev, I S; Kayunov, A S; Muratova, V N; Semenov, D A; Unzhakov, E V

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present a method of scintillation detector energy calibration using the gamma-rays. The technique is based on the Compton scattering of gamma-rays in a scintillation detector and subsequent photoelectric absorption of the scattered photon in the Ge-detector. The novelty of this method is that the source of gamma rays, the germanium and scintillation detectors are immediately arranged adjacent to each other. The method presents an effective solution for the detectors consisting of a low atomic number materials, when the ratio between Compton effect and photoelectric absorption is large and the mean path of gamma-rays is comparable to the size of the detector. The technique can be used for the precision measurements of the scintillator light yield dependence on the electron energy.

  7. A measurement method of a detector response function for monochromatic electrons based on the Compton scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakhlanov, S.V. [St.Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Bazlov, N.V. [Saint-Petersburg State University, Universitetskaja nab. 7/9, Saint-Petersburg 199034 (Russian Federation); Derbin, A.V., E-mail: derbin@pnpi.spb.ru [St.Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); Drachnev, I.S. [St.Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation); GranSasso Science Institute, INFN, L' Aquila (AQ) I-67100 (Italy); Kayunov, A.S.; Muratova, V.N.; Semenov, D.A.; Unzhakov, E.V. [St.Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, National Research Center “Kurchatov Institute”, Gatchina 188300 (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-11

    In this paper we present a method of scintillation detector energy calibration using the gamma-rays. The technique is based on the Compton scattering of gamma-rays in a scintillation detector and subsequent photoelectric absorption of the scattered photon in the Ge-detector. The novelty of this method is that the source of gamma rays, the germanium and scintillation detectors are immediately arranged adjacent to each other. The method presents an effective solution for the detectors consisting of a low atomic number materials, when the ratio between Compton effect and photoelectric absorption is large and the mean path of gamma-rays is comparable to the size of the detector. The technique can be used for the precision measurements of the scintillator light yield dependence on the electron energy.

  8. Review of amorphous silicon based particle detectors: the quest for single particle detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyrsch, N.; Ballif, C.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is attractive for radiation detectors because of its radiation resistance and processability over large areas with mature Si microfabrication techniques. While the use of a-Si:H for medical imaging has been very successful, the development of detectors for particle tracking and minimum-ionizing-particle detection has lagged, with almost no practical implementation. This paper reviews the development of various types of a-Si:H-based detectors and discusses their respective achievements and limitations. It also presents more recent developments of detectors that could potentially achieve single particle detection and be integrated in a monolithic fashion into a variety of applications.

  9. Development of trigger scheme for the ICAL detector of India-based Neutrino Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasgupta, S., E-mail: sudeshnadasgupta@tifr.res.in [Department of High Energy Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Mondal, N.K.; Samuel, D.; Saraf, M.N.; Satyanarayana, B.; Upadhya, S.S. [Department of High Energy Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2012-06-21

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) collaboration has proposed to build a 50 kton magnetized Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector with the primary goal to study neutrino oscillations, employing Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) as active detector elements. Various aspects of a proposed trigger scheme for the ICAL detector are discussed. The associated chance trigger rates are calculated and the trigger efficiency of the scheme for the events of interest for the ICAL detector is determined. An approach toward the implementation of the scheme is also presented.

  10. Detection of magnetic monopoles in the future neutrino telescope Antares and characterization of the photomultiplier pulse treatment; Etude de la detection de monopoles magnetiques au sein du futur telescope a neutrinos antares et caracterisation des performances du traitement des impulsions des photomultiplicateurs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ricol, J.St

    2002-10-01

    Grand unified theories (GUT) involve phase transitions in the early universe, that could create topological defects, like magnetic monopoles. Monopoles main characteristics are shown and in particular energy losses and flux limits. High energy neutrino telescopes offer a new opportunity for magnetic monopole search. The study of the photomultiplier pulse treatment by the Antares detector front-end electronics indicates that this one is well adapted to the telescope needs. The pulses detailed analysis has allowed to obtain a time measurement precision lower than 0.6 ns and electronic noise and saturation have no relevant effect on the telescope performances. Relativistic monopoles generate a large amount of light, that leads to an effective area for the Antares detector of about 0.06 km{sup 2} for velocities {beta}{sub mon} = 0.6 and 0.35 km{sup 2} for velocities {beta}{sub mon} {approx} 1. Monopole track are well reconstructed and the velocity determination is made with an error lower than few percents, which represents a decisive result for the background rejection, caused by high energy muons with a velocity {beta}{sub {mu}} {approx} 1. The very dispersive light emission of monopoles below the Cherenkov limit, 0.6 {approx}< {beta}{sub mon} {<=} 0.74, via the delta-rays produced by ionisation, does not allow an accurate expecting signal and the bad reconstructed muons rejection must be improved. Above the Cherenkov limit, {beta}{sub mon} {>=} 0.8, bad reconstructed events can be rejected from the Cherenkov emission parametrisation. A magnetic monopole signal can then clearly be distinguished from background. (author)

  11. Position resolution of a double junction superconductive detector based on a single material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samedov, V. V.

    2008-02-01

    The Naples group from Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare presented the results of theoretical investigations of a new class of superconductive radiation detectors - double junction superconductive detector based on a single material [1]. In such detectors, the absorption of energy occurs in a long superconductive strip while two superconductive tunnel junctions positioned at the ends of the strip provide the readout of the signals. The main peculiarity of this type of detectors is that they are based on a single superconducting material, i.e., without trapping layers at the ends of the strip. In this paper, general approach to the position resolution of this type of detectors has been attempted. The formula for the position resolution is derived. It is shown that the application of the aluminium for the absorber may be the best possible way not only due to the small gap energy, but also mainly for STJ fabrication technology based on the aluminium oxide tunnel barrier.

  12. Asymmetric devices based on carbon nanotubes as detectors of sub-THz radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayduchenko, I. A.; Fedorov, G. E.; Stepanova, T. S.; Titova, N.; Voronov, B. M.; But, D.; Coquillat, D.; Diakonova, N.; Knap, W.; Goltsman, G. N.

    2016-08-01

    Demand for efficient terahertz (THz) radiation detectors resulted in intensive study of the asymmetric carbon nanostructures as a possible solution for that problem. In this work, we systematically investigate the response of asymmetric carbon nanodevices to sub-terahertz radiation using different sensing elements: from dense carbon nanotube (CNT) network to individual CNT. We conclude that the detectors based on individual CNTs both semiconducting and quasi-metallic demonstrate much stronger response in sub-THz region than detectors based on disordered CNT networks at room temperature. We also demonstrate the possibility of using asymmetric detectors based on CNT for imaging in the THz range at room temperature. Further optimization of the device configuration may result in appearance of novel terahertz radiation detectors.

  13. An Ultra-Wideband Schottky Diode Based Envelope Detector for 2.5 Gbps signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cimoli, Bruno; Valdecasa, Guillermo Silva; Granja, Angel Blanco

    2016-01-01

    In this paper an ultra-wideband (UWB) Schottky diode based envelope detector is reported. The detector consists of an input matching network, a Schottky diode and wideband output filtering network. The output network is tailored to demodulate ultra-wideband amplitude shift keying (ASK) signals up...

  14. A specific gas chromatographic detector for carbonyl compounds, based on polarography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleet, B; Risby, T H

    1969-07-01

    The evaluation of a specific gas Chromatographie detector for carbonyl compounds is described. This is based on the polarographic reduction of the Girard T hydrazone derivative which is formed when the carbonyl compound is absorbed in a buffered supporting electrolyte containing the carbonyl reagent. The detector was used to monitor the separation of a homologous series of alkanals.

  15. Organic semiconductor nickel phthalocyanine-based photocapacitive and photoresistive detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mutabar; Karimov, Kh S.; Sayyad, M. H.

    2010-07-01

    In this study, the photosensitive organic semiconductor nickel phthalocyanine (NiPc) is investigated as a photocapacitive and photoresistive detector. NiPc thin film is grown by vacuum thermal evaporation on an indium tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrate. Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) is deposited as a top electrode by drop-casting to fabricate the ITO/NiPc/PEDOT:PSS light detector. It has been observed that under the unmodulated filament lamp illumination of up to 9720 lux the capacitance of the detectors increased up to 21, 18 and 4% at a frequency of measuring voltage of 120 Hz, 1 kHz and 10 kHz, respectively, under dark conditions. The change in resistance with the variation in the intensity of light is also investigated. The capacitance and resistance of the light detector decrease with an increase in the frequency. It is assumed that the photocapacitive and photoresistive response of the detector is associated with polarization occurring due to the transfer of photo-generated electrons and holes. The calculated results are in reasonable agreement with the experimental results.

  16. Development of a microstrip-based neutron detector

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S S Desai; A M Shaikh; V Radhakrishna; K Rajanna

    2004-08-01

    A gas-filled microstrip detector for thermal neutrons has been built and successfully tested in our laboratory. The detector has an active area of 20 mm × 15 mm and consists of alternate anodes and cathodes of widths 12 m and 300 m respectively. The anode to cathode gap is 150 m and the pitch is 612 m. A high resistance, meandering type horizontal strip connects the anodes at one end and aids in position sensing by charge division method. The detector is tested with gas mixtures 3He+Kr (1 : 2) and 3He+CF4 (2 : 1) at pressure of 3 atmospheres and using a Pu-Be neutron source. The pulse height spectrum shows energy resolution of ∼ 8% (FWHM) for the 764 keV peak at anode voltage of 525 V for 3He+Kr and ∼ 15% at anode voltage of 800 V for 3He+CF4. Gas gains up to 6.3 × 103 and 3.6 × 103 are obtained respectively with these gas mixtures. The overall efficiency of the detector along the sensitive length is tested by exposing the active area to neutrons and recording the position spectrum. The detector shows fairly uniform efficiency (∼ 45\\%) over the active length.

  17. An Omnidirectional Polarization Detector Based on a Metamaterial Absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Binzhen; Zhang, Yong; Duan, Junping; Zhang, Wendong; Wang, Wanjun

    2016-01-01

    The theory, design, simulation, fabrication, and performance of an omnidirectional polarization detector (PD) with two resonances located in the X and Ka ranges based on a metamaterial absorber (MMA) are presented in this paper. The sandwich structure of PD is composed of 0.1 μm periodic “I” shaped patches on the metasurface, a dielectric of 200 μm FR-4 on the interlayer, and a 0.3 μm copper film on the substrate. PD absorptivity is first used to reflect and describe the polarization of the incident wave. The numerical results, derived from the standard full wave finite integration technology (FIT) of CST 2015, indicates that the designed PD shows polarization sensitivity at all incidence angles. The effects on absorptivity produced by the incidence angles, polarization angles, and materials are investigated. The amplitude of absorptivity change caused by polarization reaches 99.802%. A laser ablation process is adopted to prepare the designed PD on a FR-4 board coated with copper on the double plane with a thickness that was 1/93 and 1/48 of wavelength at a resonance frequency of 16.055 GHz and 30.9 GHz, respectively. The sample test results verify the designed PD excellent detectability on the polarization of the incident waves. The proposed PD, which greatly enriches the applications of metamaterials in bolometers, thermal images, stealth materials, microstructure measurements, and electromagnetic devices, is easy to mass produce and market because of its strong detectability, ultrathin thickness, effective cost, and convenient process. PMID:27455280

  18. THGEM-based photon detectors for the upgrade of COMPASS RICH-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeev, M.; Birsa, R. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Büchele, M. [Universität Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Chiosso, M. [INFN, Sezione di Torino and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Ciliberti, P. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Denisov, O. [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Torino (Italy); Duic, V. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Finger, M.; Finger, M. [Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic and JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); Fischer, H. [Universität Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Giorgi, M. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Gobbo, B.; Gregori, M. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Herrmann, F.; Königsmann, K. [Universität Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Levorato, S. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); and others

    2013-12-21

    New Cherenkov photon detectors are being developed for the upgrade of COMPASS RICH-1. The detectors are based on THGEMs, arranged in a three layer architecture, with a CsI film on the first layer acting as a reflective photocathode. The response of THGEMs with various geometries under different conditions has been studied and photon detector prototypes have been built, tested in laboratory and operated during test beam runs providing a typical gain of 10{sup 5} and a time resolution of better than 10 ns. A photon detector prototype with 300×300 mm{sup 2} active area, operated at the CERN PS T10 test beam in November 2012, has confirmed the validity of this novel technology and has allowed further studies of the detector response. -- Highlights: •The COMPASS THGEM R and D team has performed systematic studies and parameter optimization for THGEMs to be used in RICH applications. •A triple-THGEM photon detector with 300×300 mm{sup 2} active area has been successfully tested at the CERN PS T10 test-beam. •A photon detector prototype based on coupling THGEM and Micromegas has provided encouraging results in laboratory tests. •For the upgrade of COMPASS RICH-1 a set of THGEM-based photon detectors will be produced.

  19. Experimental research on the THGEM-based thermal neutron detector

    CERN Document Server

    Lei, Yang; Zhi-Jia, Sun; Ying, Zhang; Chao-Qiang, Huang; Guang-Ai, Sun; Yan-Feng, Wang; Gui-An, Yang; Hong, Xu; Yu-Guang, Xie; Yuan-Bo, Chen

    2014-01-01

    A new thermal neutron detector with the domestically produced THGEM (THick Gas Electron Multiplier) was developed as an alternative to 3He to meet the needs of the next generation of neutron facilities. One type of Au-coated THGEM was designed specifically for the neutron detection. A detector prototype had been developed and the preliminary experimental tests were presented, including the performance of the Au-coated THGEM working in the Ar/CO2 gas mixtures and the neutron imaging test with 252CF source, which would provide the reference of experimental data for the research in future.

  20. AIGO: a southern hemisphere detector for the worldwide array of ground-based interferometric gravitational wave detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga, P; Blair, D G; Coward, D; Davidson, J; Dumas, J-C; Howell, E; Ju, L; Wen, L; Zhao, C [School of Physics, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); McClelland, D E; Scott, S M; Slagmolen, B J J; Inta, R [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Munch, J; Ottaway, D J; Veitch, P; Hosken, D [Department of Physics, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Melatos, A; Chung, C; Sammut, L, E-mail: pbarriga@cyllene.uwa.edu.a [School of Physics University of Melbourne, Parkville, Vic 3010 (Australia)

    2010-04-21

    This paper describes the proposed AIGO detector for the worldwide array of interferometric gravitational wave detectors. The first part of the paper summarizes the benefits that AIGO provides to the worldwide array of detectors. The second part gives a technical description of the detector, which will follow closely the Advanced LIGO design. Possible technical variations in the design are discussed.

  1. Suppressing the QCD axion abundance by hidden monopoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawasaki, Masahiro [Tokyo Univ., Chiba (Japan). Inst. for Cosmic Ray Research; Tokyo Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS; Takahashi, Fuminobu [Tokyo Univ., Miyagi (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Tokyo Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS; Yamada, Masaki [Tokyo Univ., Chiba (Japan). Inst. for Cosmic Ray Research; Tokyo Univ., Chiba (Japan). Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS; DESY Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-11-15

    We study the Witten effect of hidden monopoles on the QCD axion dynamics, and show that its abundance as well as isocurvature perturbations can be significantly suppressed if there is a sufficient amount of hidden monopoles. When the hidden monopoles make up a significant fraction of dark matter, the Witten effect suppresses the abundance of axion with the decay constant smaller than 10{sup 12} GeV. The cosmological domain wall problem of the QCD axion can also be avoided, relaxing the upper bound on the decay constant when the Peccei-Quinn symmetry is spontaneously broken after inflation.

  2. Suppressing the QCD axion abundance by hidden monopoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahiro Kawasaki

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We study the Witten effect of hidden monopoles on the QCD axion dynamics, and show that its abundance as well as isocurvature perturbations can be significantly suppressed if there is a sufficient amount of hidden monopoles. When the hidden monopoles make up a significant fraction of dark matter, the Witten effect suppresses the abundance of axion with the decay constant smaller than 1012GeV. The cosmological domain wall problem of the QCD axion can also be avoided, relaxing the upper bound on the decay constant when the Peccei–Quinn symmetry is spontaneously broken after inflation.

  3. Parker limit for monopoles with large magnetic charge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodges, H.M.; Kolb, E.W.; Turner, M.S.

    1986-04-28

    The survival of galactic magnetic fields places a limit on the flux of magnetic monopoles, the so-called ''Parker limit.'' Previous discussions of the Parker limit have assumed that the charge of the monopole is the Dirac value, g/sub Dirac/ = 2..pi../e. However, if the grand unified group is broken by Wilson lines, as is assumed in some superstring models, the minimum value of the magnetic charge is not the Dirac quantum, but an integer multiple of it. In this brief report we investigate the dependence of the Parker limit on the charge of the magnetic monopole. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  4. The Rubakov-Callan scattering on the supergravity monopole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chamseddine, Ali H. [Physics Department, American University of Beirut (Lebanon); Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique CNRS-UMR 6083, Universite de Tours, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France); LE STUDIUM, Loire Valley Institute for Advanced Studies, Tours and Orleans (France); Volkov, Mikhail S., E-mail: volkov@lmpt.univ-tours.fr [Laboratoire de Mathematiques et Physique Theorique CNRS-UMR 6083, Universite de Tours, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France)

    2011-10-05

    We study small perturbations around the supersymmetric CVMN monopole solution of the gauged supergravity in D=4. We find that the perturbation spectrum contains an infinite tower of Coulomb-type bound states both in the bosonic and fermionic parts of the supergravity multiplet. Due to supersymmetry, the eigenvalues are the same for the two bosonic parity sectors, as well as for the fermionic sector. We also find that the fermion scattering on the monopole is accompanied by isospin flip. This is analogous to the Rubakov-Callan effect of monopole catalysis of proton decay and suggests that there could be a similar effect of catalysis for decay of fermionic systems in supergravity.

  5. From Taub-NUT to Kaluza-Klein magnetic monopole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazi, Nematollah; Hashemi, S. Sedigheh

    2016-03-01

    We present a Kaluza-Klein vacuum solution which closely resembles the Taub-NUT magnetic monopole and we investigate its physical properties as viewed from four space-time dimensions. We show that the Taub-NUT Kaluza-Klein vacuum solution in five dimensions is a static magnetic monopole. We find that the four dimensional matter properties do not obey the equation of state of radiation and there is no event horizon. A comparison with the available magnetic monopole solutions and the issue of vanishing and negative mass are discussed.

  6. From Taub-NUT to Kaluza-Klein magnetic monopole

    CERN Document Server

    Riazi, Nematollah

    2016-01-01

    We present a Kaluza-Klien vacuum solution which closely resembles the Taub-NUT magnetic monopole and we investigate its physical properties as viewed from four space-time dimensions. We show that the Taub-NUT Kaluza-Klein vacuum solution in five dimensions is a static magnetic monopole. We find that the four dimensional matter properties do not obey the equation of state of radiation and there is no event horizon. A comparison with the available magnetic monopole solutions and the issue of vanishing and negative mass are discussed.

  7. A monopole homology for integral homology 3-spheres

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    To an integral homology 3-sphere Y, we assign a well-defined {\\mathbb Z}-graded (monopole) homology MH*(Y, Ih(Q; h0)) whose construction in principle follows from the instanton Floer theory with the dependence of the spectral flow Ih(Q; h0), where Q is the unique U(1)-reducible monopole of the Seiberg-Witten equation on Y and h0 is a reference perturbation datum. The definition uses the moduli space of monopoles on Y \\times {\\mathbb R} introduced by Seiberg-Witten in studying smooth ...

  8. Evaluation of Compton gamma camera prototype based on pixelated CdTe detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Y Calderón; Chmeissani, M.; Kolstein, M.; De Lorenzo, G.

    2014-01-01

    A proposed Compton camera prototype based on pixelated CdTe is simulated and evaluated in order to establish its feasibility and expected performance in real laboratory tests. The system is based on module units containing a 2×4 array of square CdTe detectors of 10×10 mm2 area and 2 mm thickness. The detectors are pixelated and stacked forming a 3D detector with voxel sizes of 2 × 1 × 2 mm3. The camera performance is simulated with Geant4-based Architecture for Medicine-Oriented Simulations(G...

  9. Non-geometric branes are DFT monopoles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakhmatov, Ilya [Kazan Federal University, Institute of Physics, General Relativity Department,Kremlevskaya 16a, 420111, Kazan (Russian Federation); Kleinschmidt, Axel [Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institut),Am Mühlenberg 1, DE-14476 Potsdam (Germany); International Solvay Institutes,Campus Plaine C.P. 231, Boulevard du Triomphe, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Musaev, Edvard T. [Max-Planck-Institut für Gravitationsphysik (Albert-Einstein-Institut),Am Mühlenberg 1, DE-14476 Potsdam (Germany); Kazan Federal University, Institute of Physics, General Relativity Department,Kremlevskaya 16a, 420111, Kazan (Russian Federation)

    2016-10-14

    The double field theory monopole solution by Berman and Rudolph is shown to reproduce non-geometric backgrounds with non-vanishing Q- and R-flux upon an appropriate choice of physical and dual coordinates. The obtained backgrounds depend non-trivially on dual coordinates and have only trivial monodromies. Upon smearing the solutions along the dual coordinates one reproduces the known 5{sub 2}{sup 2} solution for the Q-brane and co-dimension 1 solution for the R-brane. The T-duality invariant magnetic charge is explicitly calculated for all these backgrounds and is found to be equal to the magnetic charge of (unsmeared) NS5-brane.

  10. Matrix Models, Monopoles and Modified Moduli

    CERN Document Server

    Erlich, J; Unsal, M; Erlich, Joshua; Hong, Sungho; Unsal, Mithat

    2004-01-01

    Motivated by the Dijkgraaf-Vafa correspondence, we consider the matrix model duals of N=1 supersymmetric SU(Nc) gauge theories with Nf flavors. We demonstrate via the matrix model solutions a relation between vacua of theories with different numbers of colors and flavors. This relation is due to an N=2 nonrenormalization theorem which is inherited by these N=1 theories. Specializing to the case Nf=Nc, the simplest theory containing baryons, we demonstrate that the explicit matrix model predictions for the locations on the Coulomb branch at which monopoles condense are consistent with the quantum modified constraints on the moduli in the theory. The matrix model solutions include the case that baryons obtain vacuum expectation values. In specific cases we check explicitly that these results are also consistent with the factorization of corresponding Seiberg-Witten curves. Certain results are easily understood in terms of M5-brane constructions of these gauge theories.

  11. Matrix Models, Monopoles and Modified Moduli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erlich, Joshua; Hong, Sungho; Unsal, Mithat

    2004-09-01

    Motivated by the Dijkgraaf-Vafa correspondence, we consider the matrix model duals of Script N = 1 supersymmetric SU(Nc) gauge theories with Nf flavors. We demonstrate via the matrix model solutions a relation between vacua of theories with different numbers of colors and flavors. This relation is due to an Script N = 2 nonrenormalization theorem which is inherited by these Script N = 1 theories. Specializing to the case Nf = Nc, the simplest theory containing baryons, we demonstrate that the explicit matrix model predictions for the locations on the Coulomb branch at which monopoles condense are consistent with the quantum modified constraints on the moduli in the theory. The matrix model solutions include the case that baryons obtain vacuum expectation values. In specific cases we check explicitly that these results are also consistent with the factorization of corresponding Seiberg-Witten curves. Certain results are easily understood in terms of M5-brane constructions of these gauge theories.

  12. HiFi-MBQC High Fidelitiy Measurement-Based Quantum Computing using Superconducting Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-04

    computer. We exploit the conceptual framework of measurement - based quantum computation that enables a client to delegate a computation to a quantum...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0006 HiFi-MBQC High Fidelitiy Measurement - Based Quantum Computing using Superconducting Detectors Philip Walther UNIVERSITT...HiFi-MBQC High Fidelitiy Measurement - Based Quantum Computing using Superconducting Detectors 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8655-11-1-3004 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  13. Implementing a Java Based GUI for RICH Detector Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendacky, Andrew; Voloshin, Andrew; Benmokhtar, Fatiha

    2016-09-01

    The CLAS12 detector at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) is undergoing an upgrade. One of the improvements is the addition of a Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detector to improve particle identification in the 3-8 GeV/c momentum range. Approximately 400 multi anode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMTs) are going to be used to detect Cherenkov Radiation in the single photoelectron spectra (SPS). The SPS of each pixel of all MAPMTs have been fitted to a mathematical model of roughly 45 parameters for 4 HVs, 3 OD. Out of those parameters, 9 can be used to evaluate the PMTs performance and placement in the detector. To help analyze data when the RICH is operational, a GUI application was written in Java using Swing and detector packages from TJNAF. To store and retrieve the data, a MySQL database program was written in Java using the JDBC package. Using the database, the GUI pulls the values and produces histograms and graphs for a selected PMT at a specific HV and OD. The GUI will allow researchers to easily view a PMT's performance and efficiency to help with data analysis and ring reconstruction when the RICH is finished.

  14. Radiation effects on II-VI compound-based detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Cavallini, A; Dusi, W; Auricchio, N; Chirco, P; Zanarini, M; Siffert, P; Fougeres, P

    2002-01-01

    The performance of room temperature CdTe and CdZnTe detectors exposed to a radiation source can be strongly altered by the interaction of the ionizing particles and the material. Up to now, few experimental data are available on the response of II-VI compound detectors to different types of radiation sources. We have carried out a thorough investigation on the effects of gamma-rays, neutrons and electron irradiation both on CdTe : Cl and Cd sub 0 sub . sub 9 Zn sub 0 sub . sub 1 Te detectors. We have studied the detector response after radiation exposure by means of dark current measurements and of quantitative spectroscopic analyses at low and medium energies. The deep traps present in the material have been characterized by means of PICTS (photo-induced current transient spectroscopy) analyses, which allow to determine the trap apparent activation energy and capture cross-section. The evolution of the trap parameters with increasing irradiation doses has been monitored for all the different types of radiati...

  15. Proximity focusing RICH detector based on multilayer silica aerogel radiator

    CERN Document Server

    De Leo, R; Bellunato, T; Calvi, M; Cisbani, E; Cusanno, F; Garibaldi, F; Lagamba, L; Marra, M; Marrone, S; Matteuzzi, C; Musico, P; Nappi, E; Perego, D L; Torrioli, S; Vilardi, I

    2010-01-01

    The performance of a proximity focusing Ring Imaging Cherenkov detector equipped with a radiator of silica aerogel is presented. The aerogel tile used is a monolith with variable index of refraction. Cherenkov photons are detected with high granularity by eight Hamamatsu H9500 flat panel multi anode phototubes.

  16. Amorphous selenium based detectors for medical imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Krishna C.; Kang, Sung H.; Choi, Michael; Jellison, Gerald E., Jr.

    2006-08-01

    We have developed and characterized large volume amorphous (a-) selenium (Se) stabilized alloys for room temperature medical imaging devices and high-energy physics detectors. The synthesis and preparation of well-defined and high quality a-Se (B, As, Cl) alloy materials have been conducted using a specially designed alloying reactor at EIC and installed in an argon atmosphere glove box. The alloy composition has been precisely controlled and optimized to ensure good device performance. The synthesis of large volume boron (B) doped (natural and isotopic 10B) a-Se (As, Cl) alloys has been carried out by thoroughly mixing vacuum distilled and zone-refined (ZR) Se with previously synthesized Se-As master alloys, Se-Cl master alloys and B. The synthesized a-Se (B, As, Cl) alloys have been characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS), and detector testing. The a- Se alloys have shown high promise for x-ray detectors with its high dark resistivity (10 10-10 13 Ωcm), good charge transport properties, and cost-effective large area scalability. Details of various steps about detector fabrication and testing of these imaging devices are also presented.

  17. Dual Quantum Electrodynamics Dyon-Dyon and Charge-Monopole Scattering in a High-Energy Approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Gamberg, L P; Gamberg, Leonard; Milton, Kimball A.

    2000-01-01

    We develop the quantum field theory of electron-point magnetic monopole interactions and more generally, dyon-dyon interactions, based on the original string-dependent ``nonlocal'' action of Dirac and Schwinger. We demonstrate that a viable nonperturbative quantum field theoretic formulation can be constructed that results in a string {\\em independent} cross section for monopole-electron and dyon-dyon scattering. Such calculations can be done only by using nonperturbative approximations such as the eikonal and not by some mutilation of lowest-order perturbation theory.

  18. Absolute efficiency measurements with the {sup 10}B based Jalousie detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modzel, G., E-mail: modzel@physi.uni-heidelberg [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Neuenheimer Feld 226, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Henske, M. [CDT CASCADE Detector Technologies GmbH, Hans-Bunte-Str. 8–10, 69123 Heidelberg (Germany); Houben, A. [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Landoltweg 1, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Klein, M. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Neuenheimer Feld 226, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); CDT CASCADE Detector Technologies GmbH, Hans-Bunte-Str. 8–10, 69123 Heidelberg (Germany); Köhli, M.; Lennert, P. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Neuenheimer Feld 226, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Meven, M. [Heinz Maier-Leibnitz Zentrum (MLZ), 85747 Garching (Germany); Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich Centre for Neutron Science (JCNS), Outstation at MLZ, 85747 Garching (Germany); Schmidt, C.J. [CDT CASCADE Detector Technologies GmbH, Hans-Bunte-Str. 8–10, 69123 Heidelberg (Germany); GSI Detector Laboratory, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Schmidt, U. [Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Neuenheimer Feld 226, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Schweika, W. [Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Jülich Centre for Neutron Science (JCNS), 52425 Jülich (Germany); European Spallation Source ESS AB, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden)

    2014-04-11

    The {sup 10}B based Jalousie detector is a replacement for {sup 3}He counter tubes, which are nowadays less affordable for large area detectors due to the {sup 3}He crisis. In this paper we investigate and verify the performance of the new {sup 10}B based detector concept and its adoption for the POWTEX diffractometer, which is designed for the detection of thermal neutrons with predicted detection efficiencies of 75–50% for neutron energies of 10–100 meV, respectively. The predicted detection efficiency has been verified by absolute measurements using neutrons with a wavelength of 1.17 Å (59 meV)

  19. Influence of field effect on the performance of InGaAs-based terahertz radiation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Minkevičius, Linas; Kojelis, Martynas; Žąsinas, Ernestas; Bukauskas, Virginijus; Šetkus, Arūnas; Kašalynas, Irmantas; Valušis, Gintaras

    2016-01-01

    Detailed electric characterization of high-performance InGaAs-based terahertz radiation detectors and corresponding simulation results are presented. The local surface potential and tunneling current were scanned on the surface of detectors by Kelvin probe force microscope (KPFM) and scanning tunneling microscope (STM) and a position of the Fermi level was obtained from these experiments. Current-voltage curves were measured and modelled using Synopsys Sentaurus TCAD package to get a better insight of processes happening within the detector. In addition, finite-difference time-domain simulations were performed to reveal the peculiarities of electric field concentration by the metal contacts of the detectors. Results of our investigation confirm, that field-effect induced conductivity modulation is a possible contributing mechanism to high sensitivity of the detectors.

  20. An InGrid based Low Energy X-ray Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Krieger, Christoph; Kaminski, Jochen; Lupberger, Michael; Vafeiadis, Theodoros

    2014-01-01

    An X-ray detector based on the combination of an integrated Micromegas stage with a pixel chip has been built in order to be installed at the CERN Axion Solar Telescope. Due to its high granularity and spatial resolution this detector allows for a topological background suppression along with a detection threshold below $1\\,\\text{keV}$. Tests at the CAST Detector Lab show the detector's ability to detect X-ray photons down to an energy as low as $277\\,\\text{eV}$. The first background data taken after the installation at the CAST experiment underline the detector's performance with an average background rate of $5\\times10^{-5}\\,/\\text{keV}/\\text{cm}^2/\\text{s}$ between 2 and $10\\,\\text{keV}$ when using a lead shielding.

  1. Design of wavelet-based ECG detector for implantable cardiac pacemakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Young-Jae; Kim, Hoon-Ki; Kang, Yu-Ri; Kim, Gil-Su; Park, Jongsun; Kim, Soo-Won

    2013-08-01

    A wavelet Electrocardiogram (ECG) detector for low-power implantable cardiac pacemakers is presented in this paper. The proposed wavelet-based ECG detector consists of a wavelet decomposer with wavelet filter banks, a QRS complex detector of hypothesis testing with wavelet-demodulated ECG signals, and a noise detector with zero-crossing points. In order to achieve high detection accuracy with low power consumption, a multi-scaled product algorithm and soft-threshold algorithm are efficiently exploited in our ECG detector implementation. Our algorithmic and architectural level approaches have been implemented and fabricated in a standard 0.35 μm CMOS technology. The testchip including a low-power analog-to-digital converter (ADC) shows a low detection error-rate of 0.196% and low power consumption of 19.02 μW with a 3 V supply voltage.

  2. Optimal Filtering Algorithm-Based Multiuser Detector for Fast Fading CDMA Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A multiuser detector was developed for fast fading code-division multiple-access systems by representing the channels as a system with the multiplicative noise (SMN) model and then using the known optimal filtering algorithm for the SMN for multiuser detection (MUD). This multiuser detector allows the channel response to be stochastic in one symbol duration, which can be regarded as an effective method of MUD for fast fading CDMA systems. Performance analyses show that the multiuser detector is theoretically valid for CDMA systems over fast fading channels. Simulations show that the multiuser detector performs better than the Kalman filter-based multiuser detector with a faster convergence rate and lower bit error rate.

  3. Geant4 based simulation of the Water Cherenkov Detectors of the LAGO Project

    CERN Document Server

    Calderón, R; Núñez, L A

    2015-01-01

    To characterize the signals registered by the different types of water Cherenkov detectors (WCD) used by the Latin American Giant Observatory (LAGO) Project, it is necessary to develop detailed simulations of the detector response to the flux of secondary particles at the detector level. These particles are originated during the interaction of cosmic rays with the atmosphere. In this context, the LAGO project aims to study the high energy component of gamma rays bursts (GRBs) and space weather phenomena by looking for the solar modulation of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs). Focus in this, a complete and complex chain of simulations is being developed that account for geomagnetic effects, atmospheric reaction and detector response at each LAGO site. In this work we shown the first steps of a GEANT4 based simulation for the LAGO WCD, with emphasis on the induced effects of the detector internal diffusive coating.

  4. Long-distance transmission of light in a scintillator-based radiation detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowell, Jonathan L.; Talbott, Dale V.; Hehlen, Markus P.

    2017-07-11

    Scintillator-based radiation detectors capable of transmitting light indicating the presence of radiation for long distances are disclosed herein. A radiation detector can include a scintillator layer and a light-guide layer. The scintillator layer is configured to produce light upon receiving incident radiation. The light-guide layer is configured to receive light produced by the scintillator layer and either propagate the received light through the radiation detector or absorb the received light and emit light, through fluorescence, that is propagated through the radiation detector. A radiation detector can also include an outer layer partially surrounding the scintillator layer and light-guide layer. The index of refraction of the light-guide layer can be greater than the index of refraction of adjacent layers.

  5. Image-based spectral distortion correction for photon-counting x-ray detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Huanjun; Molloi, Sabee

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using an image-based method to correct for distortions induced by various artifacts in the x-ray spectrum recorded with photon-counting detectors for their application in breast computed tomography (CT).

  6. FIR Detectors/Cameras Based on GaN and Si Field-Effect Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SETI proposes to develop GaN and Si based multicolor FIR/THz cameras with detector elements and readout, signal processing electronics integrated on a single chip....

  7. New detector for spread-spectrum based image watermarking using underdetermined ICA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Hafiz; Khokhar, Ashfaq; Ansari, Rashid

    2006-02-01

    This paper presents a novel scheme for detection of watermarks embedded in multimedia signals using spread spectrum (SS) techniques. The detection method is centered on using the model that the embedded watermark and the host signal are mutually independent. The proposed detector assumes that the host signal and the watermark obey non-Gaussian distributions. The proposed blind watermark detector employs underdetermined blind source separation (BSS) based on independent component analysis (ICA) for watermark estimation from the watermarked image. The mean-field theory based undetermined BSS scheme is used for watermark estimation. Analytical results are presented showing that the proposed detector performs significantly better than the existing correlation based blind detectors traditionally used for SS-based image watermarking.

  8. Search for relativistic magnetic monopoles with the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Aguilar, J. A.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Assis Jesus, A. C.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouhou, B.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Cârloganu, C.; Carminati, G.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charif, Z.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Fermani, P.; Ferri, M.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J.-L.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Giacomelli, G.; Giordano, V.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; Hartman, J.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hößl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefèvre, D.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; Meli, A.; Montaruli, T.; Morganti, M.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Palioselitis, D.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Payet, K.; Payre, P.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Reed, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Richter, R.; Rivière, C.; Robert, A.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Ruiz-Rivas, J.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Sapienza, P.; Schöck, F.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Toscano, S.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vannoni, G.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Wagner, S.; Wijnker, G.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2012-05-01

    Magnetic monopoles are predicted in various unified gauge models and could be produced at intermediate mass scales. Their detection in a neutrino telescope is facilitated by the large amount of light emitted compared to that from muons. This paper reports on a search for upgoing relativistic magnetic monopoles with the ANTARES neutrino telescope using a data set of 116 days of live time taken from December 2007 to December 2008. The one observed event is consistent with the expected atmospheric neutrino and muon background, leading to a 90% C.L. upper limit on the monopole flux between 1.3 × 10-17 and 8.9 × 10-17 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 for monopoles with velocity β ⩾ 0.625.

  9. Search for Relativistic Magnetic Monopoles with the ANTARES Neutrino Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Adrián-Martínez, S; Samarai, I Al; Albert, A; André, M; Anghinolfi, M; Anton, G; Anvar, S; Ardid, M; Jesus, A C Assis; Astraatmadja, T; Aubert, J-J; Baret, B; Basa, S; Bertin, V; Biagi, S; Bigongiari, C; Bogazzi, C; Bou-Cabo, M; Bouhou, B; Bouwhuis, M C; Brunner, J; Busto, J; Camarena, F; Capone, A; Cârloganu, C; Carminati, G; Carr, J; Cecchini, S; Charif, Z; Charvis, Ph; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Costantini, H; Coyle, P; Curtil, C; Decowski, M P; Dekeyser, I; Deschamps, A; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Dorosti, Q; Drouhin, D; Eberl, T; Emanuele, U; Enzenhöfer, A; Ernenwein, J-P; Escoffier, S; Fermani, P; Ferri, M; Flaminio, V; Folger, F; Fritsch, U; Fuda, J-L; Galatà, S; Gay, P; Giacomelli, G; Giordano, V; Gómez-González, J P; Graf, K; Guillard, G; Halladjian, G; Hallewell, G; van Haren, H; Hartman, J; Heijboer, A J; Hello, Y; Hernández-Rey, J J; Herold, B; Hößl, J; Hsu, C C; de Jong, M; Kadler, M; Kalekin, O; Kappes, A; Katz, U; Kavatsyuk, O; Kooijman, P; Kopper, C; Kouchner, A; Kreykenbohm, I; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lamare, P; Larosa, G; Lattuada, D; Lefèvre, D; Lim, G; Presti, D Lo; Loehner, H; Loucatos, S; Mangano, S; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Martínez-Mora, J A; Meli, A; Montaruli, T; Morganti, M; Moscoso, L; Motz, H; Neff, M; Nezri, E; Palioselitis, D; Păvălaş, G E; Payet, K; Payre, P; Petrovic, J; Piattelli, P; Picot-Clemente, N; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Presani, E; Racca, C; Reed, C; Riccobene, G; Richardt, C; Richter, R; Rivière, C; Robert, A; Roensch, K; Rostovtsev, A; Ruiz-Rivas, J; Rujoiu, M; Russo, G V; Salesa, F; Sapienza, P; Schöck, F; Schuller, J-P; Schüssler, F; Seitz, T; Shanidze, R; Simeone, F; Spies, A; Spurio, M; Steijger, J J M; Stolarczyk, Th; Sánchez-Losa, A; Taiuti, M; Tamburini, C; Toscano, S; Vallage, B; Van Elewyck, V; Vannoni, G; Vecchi, M; Vernin, P; Wagner, S; Wijnker, G; Wilms, J; de Wolf, E; Yepes, H; Zaborov, D; Zornoza, J D; Zúñiga, J

    2011-01-01

    Magnetic monopoles are predicted in various unified gauge models and could be produced at intermediate mass scales. Their detection in a neutrino telescope is facilitated by the large amount of light emitted compared to that from muons. This paper reports on a search for upgoing relativistic magnetic monopoles with the ANTARES neutrino telescope using a data set of 116 days of live time taken from December 2007 to December 2008. The one observed event is consistent with the expected atmospheric neutrino and muon background, leading to a 90% C.L. upper limit on the monopole flux between 1.3E-17 and 8.9E-17 cm-2.s-1.sr-1 for monopoles with velocity beta greater than 0.625.

  10. TDH solution of the Suzuki model of nuclear monopole oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalski, J.

    1987-09-01

    The exact time-dependent Hartree solution of the schematic model describing nuclear monopole oscillation — the Suzuki model — is presented. The energies of vibrational states are quantized according to the gauge-invariant periodic quantization prescription.

  11. Bandwidth enhanced electromagnetic bandgap structure structured closed ground monopole antenna

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Modali S. S. S. SRINIVAS; Tottempudi Venkata RAMAKRISHNA; Boddapati T. P. MADHAV; Sathuluri Venkata RAMA RAO; Shaik ASHRAF ALI

    2016-01-01

    .... To overcome this problem a coplanar wave guide fed square patch monopole antenna with closed ground structure is proposed in this paper and electromagnetic band gap structure is added to the antenna...

  12. Search for GUT Monopoles at Super-Kamiokande

    CERN Document Server

    Ueno, K; Hayato, Y; Iida, T; Iyogi, K; Kameda, J; Koshio, Y; Kozuma, Y; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Nakahata, M; Nakayama, S; Obayashi, Y; Sekiya, H; Shiozawa, M; Suzuki, Y; Takeda, A; Takenaga, Y; Ueshima, K; Yamada, S; Yokozawa, T; Martens, K; Schuemann, J; Vagins, M; Ishihara, C; Kaji, H; Kajita, T; Kaneyuki, K; McLachlan, T; Okumura, K; Shimizu, Y; Tanimoto, N; Kearns, E; Litos, M; Raaf, J L; Stone, J L; Sulak, L R; Bays, K; Kropp, W R; Mine, S; Regis, C; Renshaw, A; Smy, M B; Sobel, H W; Ganezer, K S; Hill, J; Keig, W E; Jang, J S; Kim, J Y; Lim, I T; Albert, J B; Scholberg, K; Walter, C W; Wendell, R; Wongjirad, T; Ishizuka, T; Tasaka, S; Learned, J G; Matsuno, S; Hasegawa, T; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Kobayashi, T; Nakadaira, T; Nakamura, K; Nishikawa, K; Oyama, Y; Sakashita, K; Sekiguchi, T; Tsukamoto, T; Suzuki, A T; Takeuchi, Y; Ikeda, M; Minamino, A; Nakaya, T; Labarga, L; Marti, Ll; Fukuda, Y; Itow, Y; Mitsuka, G; Tanaka, T; Jung, C K; Lopez, G; Taylor, I; Yanagisawa, C; Ishino, H; Kibayashi, A; Mino, S; Mori, T; Sakuda, M; Toyota, H; Kuno, Y; Yoshida, M; Kim, S B; Yang, B S; Okazawa, H; Choi, Y; Nishijima, K; Koshiba, M; Totsuka, Y; Yokoyama, M; Chen, S; Heng, Y; Yang, Z; Zhang, H; Kielczewska, D; Mijakowski, P; Connolly, K; Dziomba, M; Thrane, E; Wilkes, R J

    2012-01-01

    GUT monopoles captured by the Sun's gravitation are expected to catalyze proton decays via the Callan-Rubakov process. In this scenario, protons, which initially decay into pions, will ultimately produce \

  13. Monopole Floer homology for rational homology 3-spheres

    OpenAIRE

    Froyshov, Kim A.

    2010-01-01

    We give a new construction of monopole Floer homology for $\\text{spin}^c$ rational homology $3$ -spheres. As applications, we define two invariants of certain $4$ -manifolds with $b_1=1$ and $b^+=0$ .

  14. Formation of the remnant close to Planck scale and the Schwarzschild black hole with global monopole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui-Ling; Chen, Shuai-Ru

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we use the generalized uncertainty principle (GUP) and quantum tunneling method to research the formation of the remnant from a Schwarzschild black hole with global monopole. Based on the corrected Hamilton-Jacobi equation, the corrections to the Hawking temperature, heat capacity and entropy are calculated. We not only find the remnant close to Planck scale by employing GUP, but also research the thermodynamic stability of the black hole remnant according to the phase transition and heat capacity.

  15. NeuLAND MRPC-based detector prototypes tested with fast neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caesar, Christoph [GSI Darmstadt, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    A detector for momentum measurements of high-energy neutrons in the energy range 0.2-1 GeV is being developed for the R{sup 3}B (Reactions with Relativistic Radioactive Beams) experiment at FAIR. Based on the running LAND detector at GSI, the currently pursued concept for NeuLAND is a layered structure made of iron converters and charged particle detectors. As charged particle detectors Multigap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) detectors will be used. The excellent time resolution of the MRPC units will allow for a very good time-of-flight resolution of NeuLAND. The design goal for the full detector is {sigma}{sub time} <100 ps. The full NeuLAND detector will consist of about 60 layers of the basic structure (converter+MRPC), leading to a detection efficiency of close to 100% for neutrons with energies higher than 200 MeV. Prototypes built at GSI and FZD were tested using MIPs at the ELBE electron beam facility at FZD. Here we present recent results from a first irradiation of the prototypes with fast neutrons. The TSL Uppsala monoenergetic neutron beam of E{sub n}=175 MeV is well-suited for such a study. These data will serve both for the validation of the basic detection scheme and as important input to refine GEANT4 and FLUKA simulations of the final detector.

  16. Half-monopoles in the Yang–Mills theory

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Harikumar; Indrajit Mitra; H S Sharatchandra

    2003-11-01

    Using a gauge-invariant characterization of monopoles defined via their centres, we investigate the generic topological field pattern for the three-dimensional Yang–Mills theory. This leads to field patterns with one-half winding number. After presenting the main features through the simpler case of half-vortices, we consider half-monopoles in detail.

  17. Monopoles in Space-Time Noncommutative Born-Infeld theory

    OpenAIRE

    Aschieri, Paolo

    2001-01-01

    We transform static solutions of space-noncommutative Dirac-Born-Infeld theory (DBI) into static solutions of space-time noncommutative DBI. Via Seiberg-Witten map we match this symmetry transformation with a corresponding symmetry of commutative DBI. This allows to: 1) study new BPS type magnetic monopoles, with constant electric and magnetic background and describe them both in the commutative and in the noncommutative setting; 2) relate by S-duality space-noncommutative magnetic monopoles ...

  18. Does the Gursey-Tze solution represent a monopole condensate?

    CERN Document Server

    Nergiz, S; Nergiz, Serdar; Saclioglu, Cihan

    1995-01-01

    We recast the quaternionic Gursey-Tze solution, which is a fourfold quasi-periodic self-dual Yang-Mills field with a unit instanton number per Euclidean spacetime cell, into an ordinary coordinate formulation. After performing the sum in the Euclidean time direction, we use an observation by Rossi which suggests the solution represents an arrangement with a BPS monopole per space lattice cell. This may provide a concrete realization of a monopole condensate in pure Yang-Mills theory.

  19. Model-based detection of synthetic bat echolocation calls using an energy threshold detector for initialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowronski, Mark D; Fenton, M Brock

    2008-05-01

    Detection of echolocation calls is fundamental to quantitative analysis of bat acoustic signals. Automated methods of detection reduce the subjectivity of hand labeling of calls and speed up the detection process in an accurate and repeatable manner. A model-based detector was initialized using a baseline energy threshold detector, removing the need for hand labels to train the model, and shown to be superior to the baseline detector using synthetic calls in two experiments: (1) an artificial environment and (2) a field playback setting. Synthetic calls using a piecewise exponential frequency modulation function from five hypothetical species were employed to control the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in each experiment and to provide an absolute ground truth to judge detector performance. The model-based detector outperformed the baseline detector by 2.5 dB SNR in the artificial environment and 1.5 dB SNR in the field playback setting. Atmospheric absorption was measured for the synthetic calls, and 1.5 dB increased the effective detection radius by between 1 and 7 m depending on species. The results demonstrate that hand labels are not necessary for training detection models and that model-based detectors significantly increase the range of detection for a recording system.

  20. Saturated virtual fluorescence emission difference microscopy based on detector array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaocong; Sun, Shiyi; Kuang, Cuifang; Ge, Baoliang; Wang, Wensheng; Liu, Xu

    2017-07-01

    Virtual fluorescence emission difference microscopy (vFED) has been proposed recently to enhance the lateral resolution of confocal microscopy with a detector array, implemented by scanning a doughnut-shaped pattern. Theoretically, the resolution can be enhanced by around 1.3-fold compared with that in confocal microscopy. For further improvement of the resolving ability of vFED, a novel method is presented utilizing fluorescence saturation for super-resolution imaging, which we called saturated virtual fluorescence emission difference microscopy (svFED). With a point detector array, matched solid and hollow point spread functions (PSF) can be obtained by photon reassignment, and the difference results between them can be used to boost the transverse resolution. Results show that the diffraction barrier can be surpassed by at least 34% compared with that in vFED and the resolution is around 2-fold higher than that in confocal microscopy.

  1. The AMANDA Neutrino Detector - Status report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wischnewski, R.; Andres, E.; Bai, X.; Barouch, G.; Barwick, S.; Bay, R.; Becker, K.; Bergstroem, L.; Bertrand, D.; Besson, D.; Biron, A.; Booth, J.; Botner, O.; Bouchta, A.; Carius, S.; Carlson, M.; Chinowsky, W.; Chirkin, D.; Conrad, J.; Cowen, D.F.; Costa, C.; Dalberg, E.; Desiati, P.; Dewulf, J.; Deyoung, T.; Doksus, P.; Edsjoe, J.; Ekstroem, P.; Feser, T.; Frichter, G.; Gaisser, T.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goobar, A.; Hallgren, A.; Halzen, F.; Hardtke, R.; Hellwig, M.; Hill, G.; Hulth, P.; Hundertmark, S.; Jacobsen, J.; Karle, A.; Kim, J.; Koepke, L.; Kowalski, M.; Kravchenko, I.; Lamoureux, J.; Leich, H.; Leuthold, M.; Lindahl, P.; Liss, T.; Loaiza, P.; Lowder, D.; Ludvig, J.; Marciniewski, P.; Matis, H.; Miller, T.; Miocinovic, P.; Mock, P.; Morse, R.; Neunhoeffer, T.; Newcomer, M.; Niessen, P.; Nygren, D.; Perez de los Heros, C.; Porrata, R.; Price, P.; Przybylski, G.; Rawlins, K.; Rhode, W.; Richter, S.; Rodriguez, J.; Romenesko, P.; Ross, D.; Rubinstein, H.; Sander, H.; Schaefer, U.; Schmidt, T.; Schneider, E.; Schwarz, R.; Schwendicke, U.; Silvestri, A.; Smoot, G.; Solarz, M.; Spiczak, G.; Spiering, C.; Starinski, N.; Steffen, P.; Stokstad, R.; Streicher, O.; Taboada, I.; Thollander, L.; Thon, T.; Tilav, S.; Vander Donckt, M.; Walck, C.; Wiebusch, C.; Woschnagg, K.; Wu, W.; Yodh, G.; Young, S

    2000-05-01

    The first stage of the AMANDA High Energy Neutrino Detector at the South Pole, the 302 PMT array AMANDA-B10, is taking data since 1997. We describe results on atmospheric neutrinos, limits on indirect WIMP detection, seasonal muon flux variation, relativistic monopole flux limits, a search for gravitational collapse neutrinos, and a depth scan of the optical ice properties. The next stage 19-string detector AMANDA-II with {approx}650 PMTs will be completed in spring 2000.

  2. HgZnTe-based detectors for LWIR NASA applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Elizabeth A.; Kalisher, Murray H.

    1990-01-01

    The initial goal was to grow and characterize HgZnTe and determine if it indeed had the advantageous properties that were predicted. Researchers grew both bulk and liquid phase epitaxial HgZnTe. It was determined that HgZnTe had the following properties: (1) microhardness at least 50 percent greater than HgCdTe of equivalent bandgap; (2) Hg annealing rates of at least 2 to 4 times longer than HgCdTe; and (3) higher Hg vacancy formation energies. This early work did not focus on one specific composition (x-value) of HgZnTe since NASA was interested in HgZnTe's potential for a variety of applications. Since the beginning of 1989, researchers have been concentrating, however, on the liquid phase growth of very long wavelength infrared (VLWIR) HgZnTe (cutoff approx. equals 17 microns at 65K) to address the requirements of the Earth Observing System (EOS). Since there are no device models to predict the advantages in reliability one can gain with increased microhardness, surface stability, etc., one must fabricate HgZnTe detectors and assess their relative bake stability (accelerated life test behavior) compared with HgCdTe devices fabricated in the same manner. Researchers chose to fabricate HIT detectors as a development vehicle for this program because high performance in the VLWIR has been demonstrated with HgCdTe HIT detectors and the HgCdTe HIT process should be applicable to HgZnTe. HIT detectors have a significant advantage for satellite applications since these devices dissipate much less power than conventional photoconductors to achieve the same responsivity.

  3. A Directional Gamma-Ray Detector Based on Scintillator Plates

    CERN Document Server

    Hanna, D; Boyle, P; MacLeod, A M L

    2015-01-01

    A simple device for determining the azimuthal location of a source of gamma radiation, using ideas from astrophysical gamma-ray burst detection, is described. A compact and robust detector built from eight identical modules, each comprising a plate of CsI(Tl) scintillator coupled to a photomultiplier tube, can locate a point source of gamma rays with degree-scale precision by comparing the count rates in the different modules. Sensitivity to uniform environmental background is minimal.

  4. Novel Boron-10-based detectors for Neutron Scattering Science

    CERN Document Server

    Piscitelli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays neutron scattering science is increasing its instrumental power. Most of the neutron sources in the world are pushing the development of their technologies to be more performing. The neutron scattering development is also pushed by the European Spallation Source (ESS) in Sweden, a neutron facility which has just started construction. Concerning small area detectors (1m^2), the 3He technology, which is today cutting edge, is reaching fundamental limits in its development. Counting rate capability, spatial resolution and cost-e?ectiveness, are only a few examples of the features that must be improved to ful?fill the new requirements. On the other hand, 3He technology could still satisfy the detector requirements for large area applications (50m^2), however, because of the present 3He shortage that the world is experiencing, this is not practical anymore. The recent detector advances (the Multi-Grid and the Multi-Blade prototypes) developed in the framework of the collaboration between the Institut Laue...

  5. Bandwidth Enhancement Technique of the Meandered Monopole Antenna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Jen Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A small dual-band monopole antenna with coplanar waveguide (CPW feeding structure is presented in this paper. The antenna is composed of a meandered monopole, an extended conductor tail, and an asymmetrical ground plane. Tuning geometrical structure of the ground plane excites an additional resonant frequency band and thus enhances the impedance bandwidth of the meandered monopole antenna. Unlike the conventional monopole antenna, the new resonant mode is excited by a slot trace of the CPW transmission line. The radiation performance of the slot mode is as similar as that of the monopole. The parametrical effect of the size of the one-side ground plane on impedance matching condition has been derived by the simulation. The measured impedance bandwidths, which are defined by the reflection coefficient of −6 dB, are 186 MHz (863–1049 MHz, 19.4% at the lower resonant band and 1320 MHz (1490–2810 MHz, 61.3% at the upper band. From the results of the reflection coefficients of the proposed monopole antenna, the operated bandwidths of the commercial wireless communication systems, such as GSM 900, DCS, IMT-2000, UMTS, WLAN, LTE 2300, and LTE 2500, are covered for uses.

  6. A comparative study of the PIFA and printed monopole antenna EM absorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Ikbal; Iqbal Faruque, Mohammad Rashed; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul

    2017-02-01

    This paper represents a comparative study on electromagnetic (EM) absorption in the human head between a printed monopole antenna and a planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA). The specific absorption rate (SAR) values and total absorbed power in the human head phantom are used to evaluate EM absorption for both antennae. Moreover, antenna performances in terms of return loss, radiation efficiency, and gain are also investigated in this study. The finite integration technique (FIT) based on CST Microwave studio and SAM head phantom are used in this study. The antenna performances are measured in an anechoic chamber and the SAR is tested using COMOSAR measurement system. The obtained results indicate that the printed monopole antenna lead to higher EM absorption in the human head as compared to PIFA for both GSM frequencies.

  7. A GEM-based dose imaging detector with optical readout for proton radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klyachko, A.V., E-mail: aklyachk@indiana.edu [Indiana University Cyclotron Operations, Indiana University Integrated Science and Accelerator Technology Hall, 2401 Milo. B. Sampson Ln., Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Moskvin, V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Medicine, Indiana University, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States); Nichiporov, D.F.; Solberg, K.A. [Indiana University Cyclotron Operations, Indiana University Integrated Science and Accelerator Technology Hall, 2401 Milo. B. Sampson Ln., Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States)

    2012-12-01

    New techniques in proton radiation therapy and advances in beam delivery systems design such as beam scanning require accurate 2D dosimetry systems to verify the delivered dose distribution. Dose imaging detectors based on gas electron multipliers (GEMs) are capable of providing high sensitivity, improved dose measurement linearity, position resolution, fast response and accurate characterization of depth-dose distributions. In this work, we report on the development of a GEM-based dose imaging detector with optical readout using a CCD camera. A 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm{sup 2} detector has been tested in a 205 MeV proton beam in single- and double-GEM configurations. The detector demonstrates linearity in dose rate up to 100 Gy/min and position resolution ({sigma}) of 0.42 mm. Transverse non-uniformity of the detector response is {<=}10% before correction and the stability of the detector output throughout the day is within {+-}1%, with day-to-day reproducibility of about 10%. The depth-dose response of the detector is close to that of a wide-aperture air-filled ionization chamber and is in good agreement with Monte Carlo simulations.

  8. Spatial resolution of a μPIC-based neutron imaging detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parker, J.D., E-mail: jparker@cr.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Harada, M. [Materials and Life Science Facility Division, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hattori, K.; Iwaki, S.; Kabuki, S.; Kishimoto, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kurosawa, S.; Matsuoka, Y.; Miuchi, K.; Mizumoto, T.; Nishimura, H. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Oku, T. [Materials and Life Science Facility Division, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Sawano, T. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Shinohara, T.; Suzuki, J. [Materials and Life Science Facility Division, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Takada, A.; Tanimori, T.; Ueno, K. [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa-oiwakecho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2013-10-21

    We present a detailed study of the spatial resolution of our time-resolved neutron imaging detector utilizing a new neutron position reconstruction method that improves both spatial resolution and event reconstruction efficiency. Our prototype detector system, employing a micro-pattern gaseous detector known as the micro-pixel chamber (μPIC) coupled with a field-programmable-gate-array-based data acquisition system, combines 100μm-level spatial and sub-μs time resolutions with excellent gamma rejection and high data rates, making it well suited for applications in neutron radiography at high-intensity, pulsed neutron sources. From data taken at the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility within the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC), the spatial resolution was found to be approximately Gaussian with a sigma of 103.48±0.77μm (after correcting for beam divergence). This is a significant improvement over that achievable with our previous reconstruction method (334±13μm), and compares well with conventional neutron imaging detectors and with other high-rate detectors currently under development. Further, a detector simulation indicates that a spatial resolution of less than 60μm may be possible with optimization of the gas characteristics and μPIC structure. We also present an example of imaging combined with neutron resonance absorption spectroscopy. -- Highlights: • Neutron imaging detector with micro-pattern gaseous detector and {sup 3}He was developed. • Detector combines imaging with energy by time-of-flight and high-rate capability. • Detector features 18% efficiency, 0.6μs time resolution, and γ sensitivity <10{sup −12}. • New analysis method with template fit achieves spatial resolution of nearly 100μm. • Simulation study indicates improvement to ∼60μm after optimization.

  9. Experimental and theoretical performance analysis for a CMOS-based high resolution image detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-19

    Increasing complexity of endovascular interventional procedures requires superior x-ray imaging quality. Present state-of-the-art x-ray imaging detectors may not be adequate due to their inherent noise and resolution limitations. With recent developments, CMOS based detectors are presenting an option to fulfill the need for better image quality. For this work, a new CMOS detector has been analyzed experimentally and theoretically in terms of sensitivity, MTF and DQE. The detector (Dexela Model 1207, Perkin-Elmer Co., London, UK) features 14-bit image acquisition, a CsI phosphor, 75 µm pixels and an active area of 12 cm × 7 cm with over 30 fps frame rate. This detector has two modes of operations with two different full-well capacities: high and low sensitivity. The sensitivity and instrumentation noise equivalent exposure (INEE) were calculated for both modes. The detector modulation-transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectra (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were measured using an RQA5 spectrum. For the theoretical performance evaluation, a linear cascade model with an added aliasing stage was used. The detector showed excellent linearity in both modes. The sensitivity and the INEE of the detector were found to be 31.55 DN/µR and 0.55 µR in high sensitivity mode, while they were 9.87 DN/µR and 2.77 µR in low sensitivity mode. The theoretical and experimental values for the MTF and DQE showed close agreement with good DQE even at fluoroscopic exposure levels. In summary, the Dexela detector's imaging performance in terms of sensitivity, linear system metrics, and INEE demonstrates that it can overcome the noise and resolution limitations of present state-of-the-art x-ray detectors.

  10. Experimental and theoretical performance analysis for a CMOS-based high resolution image detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Amit; Bednarek, Daniel R.; Rudin, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    Increasing complexity of endovascular interventional procedures requires superior x-ray imaging quality. Present stateof- the-art x-ray imaging detectors may not be adequate due to their inherent noise and resolution limitations. With recent developments, CMOS based detectors are presenting an option to fulfill the need for better image quality. For this work, a new CMOS detector has been analyzed experimentally and theoretically in terms of sensitivity, MTF and DQE. The detector (Dexela Model 1207, Perkin-Elmer Co., London, UK) features 14-bit image acquisition, a CsI phosphor, 75 μm pixels and an active area of 12 cm x 7 cm with over 30 fps frame rate. This detector has two modes of operations with two different full-well capacities: high and low sensitivity. The sensitivity and instrumentation noise equivalent exposure (INEE) were calculated for both modes. The detector modulation-transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectra (NPS) and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) were measured using an RQA5 spectrum. For the theoretical performance evaluation, a linear cascade model with an added aliasing stage was used. The detector showed excellent linearity in both modes. The sensitivity and the INEE of the detector were found to be 31.55 DN/μR and 0.55 μR in high sensitivity mode, while they were 9.87 DN/μR and 2.77 μR in low sensitivity mode. The theoretical and experimental values for the MTF and DQE showed close agreement with good DQE even at fluoroscopic exposure levels. In summary, the Dexela detector's imaging performance in terms of sensitivity, linear system metrics, and INEE demonstrates that it can overcome the noise and resolution limitations of present state-of-the-art x-ray detectors.

  11. A GridPix-based X-ray detector for the CAST experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, C.; Kaminski, J.; Lupberger, M.; Desch, K.

    2017-09-01

    The CAST experiment has been searching for axions and axion-like particles for more than 10 years. The continuous improvements in the detector designs have increased the physics reach of the experiment far beyond what was originally conceived. As part of this development, a new detector based on a GridPix readout had been developed in 2014 and was mounted on the CAST experiment during the end of the data taking period of 2014 and the complete period in 2015. We report on the detector design, its advantages and the performance during both periods.

  12. Robust PCA-Based Abnormal Traffic Flow Pattern Isolation and Loop Detector Fault Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIN Xuexiang; ZHANG Yi; LI Li; HU Jianming

    2008-01-01

    One key function of intelligent transportation systems is to automatically detect abnormal traffic phenomena and to help further investigations of the cause of the abnormality. This paper describes a robust principal components analysis (RPCA)-based abnormal traffic flow pattern isolation and loop detector fault detection method. The results show that RPCA is a useful tool to distinguish regular traffic flow from abnor-mal traffic flow patterns caused by accidents and loop detector faults. This approach gives an effective traffic flow data pre-processing method to reduce the human effort in finding potential loop detector faults. The method can also be used to further investigate the causes of the abnormality.

  13. Detector block based on arrays of 144 SiPMs and monolithic scintillators: A performance study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González, A.J.; Conde, P.; Iborra, A. [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging (I3M), Universidad Politécnica de Valencia – CSIC – CIEMAT (Spain); Aguilar, A. [Communications and Digital Systems Design Group (DSDC), Universidad de Valencia (Spain); Bellido, P. [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging (I3M), Universidad Politécnica de Valencia – CSIC – CIEMAT (Spain); García-Olcina, R. [Communications and Digital Systems Design Group (DSDC), Universidad de Valencia (Spain); Hernández, L.; Moliner, L.; Rigla, J.P.; Rodríguez-Álvarez, M.J.; Sánchez, F.; Seimetz, M.; Soriano, A. [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging (I3M), Universidad Politécnica de Valencia – CSIC – CIEMAT (Spain); Torres, J. [Communications and Digital Systems Design Group (DSDC), Universidad de Valencia (Spain); Vidal, L.F.; Benlloch, J.M. [Institute for Instrumentation in Molecular Imaging (I3M), Universidad Politécnica de Valencia – CSIC – CIEMAT (Spain)

    2015-07-01

    We have developed a detector block composed by a monolithic LYSO scintillator coupled to a custom made 12×12 SiPMs array. The design is mainly focused to applications such as Positron Emission Tomography. The readout electronics is based on 3 identical and scalable Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC). We have determined the main performance of the detector block namely spatial, energy, and time resolution but also the system capability to determine the photon depth of interaction, for different crystal surface treatments. Intrinsic detector spatial resolution values as good as 1.7 mm FWHM and energies of 15% for black painted crystals were measured.

  14. Vacuum Polarization Effects in the Global Monopole Spacetime in the Presence of Wu-Yang Magnetic Monopole

    CERN Document Server

    De Mello, E R B

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we consider the presence of the Wu-Yang magnetic monopole in the global monopole spacetime and their influence on the vacuum polarization effects around these two monopoles placed together. According to Wu-Yang [Nucl. Phys. {\\bf B107}, 365 (1976)] the solution of the Klein-Gordon equation in such an external field will not be an ordinary function but, instead, {\\it section}. Because of the peculiar radial symmetry of the global monopole spacetime, it is possible to cover its space section by two overlapping regions, needed to define the singularity free vector potential, and to study the quantum effects due to a charged scalar field in this system. In order to develop this analysis we construct the explicit Euclidean scalar Green {\\it section} associated with a charged massless field in a global monopole spacetime in the presence of the Abelian Wu-Yang magnetic monopole. Having this Green section it is possible to study the vacuum polarization effects. We explicitly calculate the renormalized va...

  15. Smartphone based point-of-care detector of urine albumin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cmiel, Vratislav; Svoboda, Ondrej; Koscova, Pavlina; Provaznik, Ivo

    2016-03-01

    Albumin plays an important role in human body. Its changed level in urine may indicate serious kidney disorders. We present a new point-of-care solution for sensitive detection of urine albumin - the miniature optical adapter for iPhone with in-built optical filters and a sample slot. The adapter exploits smart-phone flash to generate excitation light and camera to measure the level of emitted light. Albumin Blue 580 is used as albumin reagent. The proposed light-weight adapter can be produced at low cost using a 3D printer. Thus, the miniaturized detector is easy to use out of lab.

  16. High dynamic range CMOS-based mammography detector for FFDM and DBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Inge M.; Smit, Chiel; Miller, James J.; Lomako, Andrey

    2016-03-01

    Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) requires excellent image quality in a dynamic mode at very low dose levels while Full Field Digital Mammography (FFDM) is a static imaging modality that requires high saturation dose levels. These opposing requirements can only be met by a dynamic detector with a high dynamic range. This paper will discuss a wafer-scale CMOS-based mammography detector with 49.5 μm pixels and a CsI scintillator. Excellent image quality is obtained for FFDM as well as DBT applications, comparing favorably with a-Se detectors that dominate the X-ray mammography market today. The typical dynamic range of a mammography detector is not high enough to accommodate both the low noise and the high saturation dose requirements for DBT and FFDM applications, respectively. An approach based on gain switching does not provide the signal-to-noise benefits in the low-dose DBT conditions. The solution to this is to add frame summing functionality to the detector. In one X-ray pulse several image frames will be acquired and summed. The requirements to implement this into a detector are low noise levels, high frame rates and low lag performance, all of which are unique characteristics of CMOS detectors. Results are presented to prove that excellent image quality is achieved, using a single detector for both DBT as well as FFDM dose conditions. This method of frame summing gave the opportunity to optimize the detector noise and saturation level for DBT applications, to achieve high DQE level at low dose, without compromising the FFDM performance.

  17. Novel ultrasound detector based on small slot micro-ring resonator with ultrahigh Q factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Senlin; Chen, Jian; He, Sailing

    2017-01-01

    An ultrasound detector based on a novel slot micro-ring resonator (SMRR) with ultrahigh Q factor and small size is proposed in this study. The theoretical Q factor of SMRR can be approximately 8.34×108 with bending radius of merely 12 μm. The ultrahigh Q factor leads to an enhanced sensitivity that is approximately two orders of that of state-of-the-art ultrasound detector based on polymer micro-ring resonator. Moreover, the 3 dB bandwidth of the ultrasound detector is approximately 540 MHz, thereby leading to an ultrahigh axial resolution of 1.2 μm. The proposed detector is also CMOS compatible and can be easily and extensively integrated to be maximized in photoacoustic microscopy.

  18. Proton recoil telescope based on diamond detectors for measurement of fusion neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Caiffi, B; Ripani, M; Pillon, M; Taiuti, M

    2015-01-01

    Diamonds are very promising candidates for the neutron diagnostics in harsh environments such as fusion reactor. In the first place this is because of their radiation hardness, exceeding that of Silicon by an order of magnitude. Also, in comparison to the standard on-line neutron diagnostics (fission chambers, silicon based detectors, scintillators), diamonds are less sensitive to $\\gamma$ rays, which represent a huge background in fusion devices. Finally, their low leakage current at high temperature suppresses the detector intrinsic noise. In this talk a CVD diamond based detector has been proposed for the measurement of the 14 MeV neutrons from D-T fusion reaction. The detector was arranged in a proton recoil telescope configuration, featuring a plastic converter in front of the sensitive volume in order to induce the (n,p) reaction. The segmentation of the sensitive volume, achieved by using two crystals, allowed to perform measurements in coincidence, which suppressed the neutron elastic scattering backg...

  19. The role of space charge in GaAs-based particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Mares, J J; Hubik, P; Pospísil, S

    1999-01-01

    The direct measurement of the captured charge using the Faraday cup method together with the analysis of current-voltage curves was used for the experimental proof of the existence of the space charge in biased GaAs detector structures. The role of this space charge was discussed using the generalized Ramo-Gunn's theorem which enabled the explanation of the data observed and, moreover, provides a useful criterion for the optimization of GaAs-based particle detectors. (author)

  20. Quantum Engineering of States in Heterostructure-based Detectors for Enhance Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-26

    Quantum Well Lasers, Journal of Applied Physics , 80, 6864 (1996). Stroscio, Michael A., Mihail Kisin, Gregory Belenke, and Serge Luryi, Phonon...AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2017-0109 Quantum engineering of heterostructure detectors for enhanced performance Michael Stroscio UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS Final...SUBTITLE Quantum Engineering of States in Heterostructure-based Detectors for Enhance Performance 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-15-1

  1. TORCH - a Cherenkov-based time-of-flight detector

    CERN Document Server

    van Dijk, M W U; Cowie, E N; Cussans, D; D' Ambrosio, C; Forty, R; Frei, C; Gys, T; Piedigrossi, D; Castillo Garcia, L; Fopma, J; Gao, R; Harnew, N; Keri, T

    2014-01-01

    TORCH is an innovative high-precision time-of-flight system to provide particle identification in the difficult intermediate momentum region up to 10 GeV/c. It is also suitable for large-area applications. The detector provides a time-of-flight measurement from the imaging of Cherenkov photons emitted in a 1 cm thick quartz radiator. The photons propagate by total internal reflection to the edge of the quartz plate, where they are focused onto an array of photon detectors at the periphery. A time-of-flight resolution of about 10–15 ps per incident charged particle needs to be achieved for a three sigma kaon–pion separation up to 10 GeV/c momentum for the TORCH located 9.5 m from the interaction point. Given ∼ 30 detected photons per incident charged particle, this requires measuring the time-of-arrival of individual photons to about 70 ps. This paper will describe the design of a TORCH prototype involving a number of ground-breaking and challenging techniques.

  2. New scintillating media based on liquid crystals for particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Barnik, M I; Vasilchenko, V G; Golovkin, S V; Medvedkov, A M; Soloviev, A S

    2000-01-01

    The study results of optical, photoluminiscent and scintillation properties of a liquid crystal 4-pentyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl are presented. The scintillation light output of this liquid crystal is about 35% of crystal anthracene, its main decay time constants are 4 and 14 ns, and the maximum of light emission spectrum is about 400 nm. The light output of a dissolution of green emitting light scintillation dopant R6 in the liquid crystal is about 120% of crystal anthracene. The light output of the frozen dissolution measured at -112 deg. C is about 2.5 times higher as observed at +20 deg. C. In the uniaxially oriented liquid crystal, the predominant intensity direction of emitted light is pointed perpendicular to the liquid crystal director and an appreciable part of the emitted light is elliptically polarized. The possibility to use scintillation properties of liquid crystals is considered both for the improvement of existing particle detector characteristics and for the creation of new gated particle detectors.

  3. New gamma detector modules based on micropixel avalanche photodiode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadov, F.; Ahmadov, G.; Guliyev, E.; Madatov, R.; Sadigov, A.; Sadygov, Z.; Suleymanov, S.; Akberov, R.; Nuriyev, S.; Zerrouk, F.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper presented the results of the ionizing radiation detector modules, which developed on the basis of a new generation of micropixel avalanche photodiode (MAPD) of MAPD-3NK type. The samples were produced in cooperation with the Zecotek Photonics and characterized by the following parameters: sensitive area—3.7 mm × 3.7 mm, density of pixels—10000 pixels/mm2, photon detection efficiency—35-40% (at wavelength of 450-550 nm) and operation voltage—91 V. The beta particle and gamma ray detection performance of MAPD with different single scintillation crystal such as NaI, LFS and p-terphenyl was investigated. The gamma ray detector modules demonstrated a perfect linear behavior of detected signal amplitudes as a function of the gamma ray energy (from 26.3 keV up to 1.33 MeV). Energy resolution for 662 keV gamma rays was 11.2% and the minimum detectable energy was 26.3 keV.

  4. Neutron detectors based on CMOS solid state photomultipliers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sia, Radia; Christian, James F.; Stapels, Christopher J.; Prettyman, Thomas; Squillante, Michael R.

    2008-08-01

    CMOS solid-state photomultipliers (CMOS-SSPM) are new, potentially very inexpensive, photodetectors that have the promise of supplanting photomultiplier tubes and standard photodiodes for many nuclear radiation detection measurements using scintillator crystals. The compact size and very high gain make SSPMs attractive for use in applications where photomultiplier tubes cannot be used and standard photodiodes have insufficient sensitivity. In this effort, the use of SSPMs was investigated for the detection of neutrons with the goal of designing a detector for portable systems that has the capability of discriminating neutrons from gamma rays. The neutron scintillation signatures were measured using boron-loaded plastic scintillators. Our detector concept design incorporates a dual-scintillator design with both a neutrons sensitive organic scintillator (a boron-loaded gel) and a gamma ray sensitive inorganic scintillator (LYSO). Using this design, the gamma ray signal is suppressed and the neutron events are clearly resolved. The design was modeled to optimize the detection efficiency for both thermal and energetic neutrons. In addition, the detection of thermal neutrons in the presence of gamma rays was examined using the SSPM coupled to Cs2LiYCl6:Ce scintillator (CLYC).

  5. Track detector based dosimetry for therapeutic carbon beams

    CERN Document Server

    Osinga, J -M; Brabcová, K Pachnerová; Akselrod, M S; Jäkel, O; Davídková, M; Greilich, S

    2013-01-01

    The ability of plastic and fluorescent nuclear track detectors (PNTDs and FNTDs) to measure fluence and the linear energy transfer (LET) of clinical carbon ion beams was investigated. We employed coincident measurements with both systems and registered the results at the level of single tracks. Irradiations were performed in the entrance channel of the monoenergetic carbon ion beam covering the therapeutically useful energy range from 80 to 425 MeV/u. About 99 % of all primary particle tracks detected by both detectors were successfully matched, while 1 % of the particles were only detected by the FNTDs because of their superior spatial resolution. We conclude that both PNTDs and FNTDs are suitable for clinical carbon beam dosimetry with a detection efficiency of at least 98.82 % and 99.83 % respectively, if irradiations are performed with low fluence in the entrance channel of the ion beam. Additionally, a relationship between the mean LET as determined with PNTDs and the mean fluorescence amplitude of the p...

  6. Monopole and dipole estimation for multi-frequency sky maps by linear regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehus, I. K.; Fuskeland, U.; Eriksen, H. K.; Banday, A. J.; Dickinson, C.; Ghosh, T.; Górski, K. M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Maino, D.; Reich, P.; Reich, W.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a simple but efficient method for deriving a consistent set of monopole and dipole corrections for multi-frequency sky map data sets, allowing robust parametric component separation with the same data set. The computational core of this method is linear regression between pairs of frequency maps, often called T-T plots. Individual contributions from monopole and dipole terms are determined by performing the regression locally in patches on the sky, while the degeneracy between different frequencies is lifted whenever the dominant foreground component exhibits a significant spatial spectral index variation. Based on this method, we present two different, but each internally consistent, sets of monopole and dipole coefficients for the nine-year WMAP, Planck 2013, SFD 100 μm, Haslam 408 MHz and Reich & Reich 1420 MHz maps. The two sets have been derived with different analysis assumptions and data selection, and provide an estimate of residual systematic uncertainties. In general, our values are in good agreement with previously published results. Among the most notable results are a relative dipole between the WMAP and Planck experiments of 10-15μK (depending on frequency), an estimate of the 408 MHz map monopole of 8.9 ± 1.3 K, and a non-zero dipole in the 1420 MHz map of 0.15 ± 0.03 K pointing towards Galactic coordinates (l,b) = (308°,-36°) ± 14°. These values represent the sum of any instrumental and data processing offsets, as well as any Galactic or extra-Galactic component that is spectrally uniform over the full sky.

  7. Monopole Charge Domain in High-Gain Gallium Arsenide Photoconductive Switches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施卫; 陈二柱; 张显斌; 李琦

    2002-01-01

    Considering that semi-insulating gallium arsenide photoconductive switches can be triggered into the high gain mode and no reliable theories can account for the observed transient characteristics, we propose the monopole charge domain model to explain the peculiar switching phenomena occurring in the high gain mode and we discuss the requirements for the lock-on switching. During operation on this mode, the applied field across the switch and the lock-on field are all larger than the Gunn threshold field. Our developed monopole charge domain is based on the transferred-electron effect, but the domain is only composed of large numbers of electrons piled up due to the negative differential mobility. Using the model and taking the physical mechanism of the avalanche impact ionization and recombination radiation into consideration, we interpret the typical phenomena of the lock-on effect, such as the time delay between the beginning of optical illumination and turning-on of the switch, and the conduction mechanism of the sustaining phase. Under different conditions of bias field intensity and incident light energy, the time delay of the switching is calculated. The results show that the physical mechanisms of impact ionization and recombination radiation occurring in the monopole charge domain are responsible for the lock-on switching.

  8. Receiving and Detection of Ultra-Wideband Microwave Signals Radiated by Pulsed Excitation of Monopole Antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steponas AŠMONTAS

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pulsed excitation of small size monopole antennas for generating wideband electromagnetic pulses was used. The monopoles were excited by electrical pulses having rise times of 600 ps, 200 ps, 70 ps and voltages 100 V, 15 V, and 0.4 V respectively. Antennas spanning (0.3 – 26 GHz bandwidth, including broadband horns with coaxial outputs, were employed to receive signals, which were investigated using (0 – 26 GHz passband sampling oscilloscope. It was found that waveforms of signals, received by the antennas, mostly depend on the pulse rise time and on the details of geometry of monopoles. The electromagnetic pulses have relatively long duration of about 30 ns and spectral harmonics up to 22 GHz. Therefore they can be attributed to pulses with large base. The results show that the upper frequencies of the spectrum most probably are cut off by existing arrangement. Usage of such pulses can find wide practical application when they are received after transmission trough different media by a number of antennas having different operational frequency ranges, followed by digital signal processing. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.2.6330

  9. Application of GEM-based detectors in full-field XRF imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowski, W.; Fiutowski, T.; Frączek, P.; Koperny, S.; Lankosz, M.; Mendys, A.; Mindur, B.; Świentek, K.; Wiącek, P.; Wróbel, P. M.

    2016-12-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) is a commonly used technique for non-destructive elemental analysis of cultural heritage objects. It can be applied to investigations of provenance of historical objects as well as to studies of art techniques. While the XRF analysis can be easily performed locally using standard available equipment there is a growing interest in imaging of spatial distribution of specific elements. Spatial imaging of elemental distrbutions is usually realised by scanning an object with a narrow focused X-ray excitation beam and measuring characteristic fluorescence radiation using a high energy resolution detector, usually a silicon drift detector. Such a technique, called macro-XRF imaging, is suitable for investigation of flat surfaces but it is time consuming because the spatial resolution is basically determined by the spot size of the beam. Another approach is the full-field XRF, which is based on simultaneous irradiation and imaging of large area of an object. The image of the investigated area is projected by a pinhole camera on a position-sensitive and energy dispersive detector. The infinite depth of field of the pinhole camera allows one, in principle, investigation of non-flat surfaces. One of possible detectors to be employed in full-field XRF imaging is a GEM based detector with 2-dimensional readout. In the paper we report on development of an imaging system equipped with a standard 3-stage GEM detector of 10 × 10 cm2 equipped with readout electronics based on dedicated full-custom ASICs and DAQ system. With a demonstrator system we have obtained 2-D spatial resolution of the order of 100 μm and energy resolution at a level of 20% FWHM for 5.9 keV . Limitations of such a detector due to copper fluorescence radiation excited in the copper-clad drift electrode and GEM foils is discussed and performance of the detector using chromium-clad electrodes is reported.

  10. Abelian monopole or non-Abelian monopole responsible for quark confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Shibata, Akihiro; Kato, Seikou; Shinohara, Toru

    2015-01-01

    We have pointed out that the $SU(3)$ Yang-Mills theory has a new way of reformulation using new field variables (minimal option), in addition to the conventional option adopted by Cho, Faddeev and Niemi (maximal option). The reformulation enables us to change the original non-Abelian gauge field into the new field variables such that one of them called the restricted field gives the dominant contribution to quark confinement in the gauge-independent way. In the minimal option, especially, the restricted field is non-Abelian $U(2)$ and involves the non-Abelian magnetic monopole. In the preceding lattice conferences, we have accumulated the numerical evidences for the non-Abelian magnetic-monopole dominance in addition to the restricted non-Abelian field dominance for quark confinement supporting the non-Abelian dual superconductivity using the minimal option for the SU(3) Yang-Mills theory. This should be compared with the maximal option which is a gauge invarient version of the Abelian projection in the maxim...

  11. Monte Carlo based performance assessment of different animal PET architectures using pixellated CZT detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visvikis, D. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F-29609 Brest (France)]. E-mail: Visvikis.Dimitris@univ-brest.fr; Lefevre, T. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F-29609 Brest (France); Lamare, F. [INSERM U650, LaTIM, University Hospital Medical School, F-29609 Brest (France); Kontaxakis, G. [ETSI Telecomunicacion Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, s/n 28040, Madrid (Spain); Santos, A. [ETSI Telecomunicacion Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria, s/n 28040, Madrid (Spain); Darambara, D. [Department of Physics, School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-20

    The majority of present position emission tomography (PET) animal systems are based on the coupling of high-density scintillators and light detectors. A disadvantage of these detector configurations is the compromise between image resolution, sensitivity and energy resolution. In addition, current combined imaging devices are based on simply placing back-to-back and in axial alignment different apparatus without any significant level of software or hardware integration. The use of semiconductor CdZnTe (CZT) detectors is a promising alternative to scintillators for gamma-ray imaging systems. At the same time CZT detectors have the potential properties necessary for the construction of a truly integrated imaging device (PET/SPECT/CT). The aims of this study was to assess the performance of different small animal PET scanner architectures based on CZT pixellated detectors and compare their performance with that of state of the art existing PET animal scanners. Different scanner architectures were modelled using GATE (Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission). Particular scanner design characteristics included an overall cylindrical scanner format of 8 and 24 cm in axial and transaxial field of view, respectively, and a temporal coincidence window of 8 ns. Different individual detector modules were investigated, considering pixel pitch down to 0.625 mm and detector thickness from 1 to 5 mm. Modified NEMA NU2-2001 protocols were used in order to simulate performance based on mouse, rat and monkey imaging conditions. These protocols allowed us to directly compare the performance of the proposed geometries with the latest generation of current small animal systems. Results attained demonstrate the potential for higher NECR with CZT based scanners in comparison to scintillator based animal systems.

  12. Optimization of a bolometer detector for ITER based on Pt absorber on SiN membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meister, H; Eich, T; Endstrasser, N; Giannone, L; Kannamüller, M; Kling, A; Koll, J; Trautmann, T; Detemple, P; Schmitt, S

    2010-10-01

    Any plasma diagnostic in ITER must be able to operate at temperatures in excess of 200 °C and neutron loads corresponding to 0.1 dpa over its lifetime. To achieve this aim for the bolometer diagnostic, a miniaturized metal resistor bolometer detector based on Pt absorbers galvanically deposited on SiN membranes is being developed. The first two generations of detectors featured up to 4.5 μm thick absorbers. Results from laboratory tests are presented characterizing the dependence of their calibration constants under thermal loads up to 450 °C. Several detectors have been tested in ASDEX Upgrade providing reliable data but also pointing out the need for further optimization. A laser trimming procedure has been implemented to reduce the mismatch in meander resistances below 1% for one detector and the thermal drifts from this mismatch.

  13. Optimization of a bolometer detector for ITER based on Pt absorber on SiN membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meister, H.; Eich, T.; Endstrasser, N.; Giannone, L.; Kannamueller, M.; Kling, A.; Koll, J.; Trautmann, T. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Detemple, P.; Schmitt, S. [Institut fuer Mikrotechnik Mainz GmbH, Carl-Zeiss-Str. 18-20, D-55129 Mainz (Germany); Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2010-10-15

    Any plasma diagnostic in ITER must be able to operate at temperatures in excess of 200 deg. C and neutron loads corresponding to 0.1 dpa over its lifetime. To achieve this aim for the bolometer diagnostic, a miniaturized metal resistor bolometer detector based on Pt absorbers galvanically deposited on SiN membranes is being developed. The first two generations of detectors featured up to 4.5 {mu}m thick absorbers. Results from laboratory tests are presented characterizing the dependence of their calibration constants under thermal loads up to 450 deg. C. Several detectors have been tested in ASDEX Upgrade providing reliable data but also pointing out the need for further optimization. A laser trimming procedure has been implemented to reduce the mismatch in meander resistances below 1% for one detector and the thermal drifts from this mismatch.

  14. Mosaic diamond based detector for MIPs detection, T0 determination and triggering in HADES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pietraszko, Jerzy; Koenig, Wolfgang [GSI Helmholtzzentum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Collaboration: HADES-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The CVD based diamond detectors were successfully used for HI detection in HADES already in 2001. In the following experiments the polycrystalline diamond material showed very good performance (time resolution below 50 ps sigma) and stable long term operation. Detection of the minimum ionising particles (MIPs) by means of the diamond detectors is a challenging task mainly because of very small energy deposit in the diamond material. In this case the single crystalline CVD diamond material has to be used which is well known for its excellent charge collection efficiency (almost 100 %) and for its very good timing properties. For pion induced experiments at HADES a large area, segmented, position sensitive, operated in vacuum detector was developed. The construction of the detector is presented along with the requirements and the obtained performance.

  15. OFDM Signal Detector Based on Cyclic Autocorrelation Function and its Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Fedra

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to research of the general and particular properties of the OFDM signal detector based on the cyclic autocorrelation function. The cyclic autocorrelation function is estimated using DFT. The parameters of the testing signal have been chosen according to 802.11g WLAN. Some properties are described analytically; all events are examined via computer simulations. It is shown that the detector is able to detect an OFDM signal in the case of multipath propagation, inexact frequency synchronization and without time synchronization. The sensitivity of the detector could be decreased in the above cases. An important condition for proper value of the detector sampling interval was derived. Three types of the channels were studied and compared. Detection threshold SNR=-9 dB was found for the signal under consideration and for two-way propagation.

  16. A large area, silicon photomultiplier-based PET detector module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raylman, Rr; Stolin, A; Majewski, S; Proffitt, J

    2014-01-21

    The introduction of silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) has facilitated construction of compact, efficient and magnetic field-hardened positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. To take full advantage of these devices, methods for using them to produce large field-of-view PET scanners are needed. In this investigation, we explored techniques to combine two SiPM arrays to form the building block for a small animal PET scanner. The module consists of a 26 × 58 array of 1.5 × 1.5mm(2) LYSO elements (spanning 41 × 91mm(2)) coupled to two SensL SiPM arrays. The SiPMs were read out with new multiplexing electronics developed for this project. To facilitate calculation of event position with multiple SiPM arrays it was necessary to spread scintillation light amongst a number of elements with a small light guide. This method was successful in permitting identification of all detector elements, even at the seam between two SiPM arrays. Since the performance of SiPMs is enhanced by cooling, the detector module was fitted with a cooling jacket, which allowed the temperature of the device and electronics to be controlled. Testing demonstrated that the peak-to-valley contrast ratio of the light detected from the scintillation array was increased by ∼45% when the temperature was reduced from 28 °C to 16 °C. Energy resolution for 511 keV photons improved slightly from 18.8% at 28 °C to 17.8% at 16 °C. Finally, the coincidence timing resolution of the module was found to be insufficient for time-of-flight applications (∼2100 ps at 14 °C). The first use of these new modules will be in the construction of a small animal PET scanner to be integrated with a 3T clinical magnetic resonance imaging scanner.

  17. Solid-state neutron detectors based on thickness scalable hexagonal boron nitride

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, Kawser; Weltz, Adam; Lu, James J -Q; Danon, Yaron; Bhat, Ishwara B

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports on the device processing and characterization of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) based solid-state thermal neutron detectors, where hBN thickness varied from 2.5 to 15 microns. These natural hBN epilayers (with 19.9% B-10) were grown by a low pressure chemical vapor deposition process. Complete dry processing was adopted for the fabrication of these metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) configuration detectors. These detectors showed intrinsic thermal neutron detection efficiency values of 0.86%, 2.4%, 3.15%, and 4.71% for natural hBN thickness values of 2.5, 7.5, 10, and 15 microns, respectively. Measured efficiencies are very close (more than 92%) to the theoretical maximum efficiencies for corresponding hBN thickness values for these detectors. This clearly shows the hBN thickness scalability of these detectors. A 15-micron thick hBN based MSM detector is expected to yield an efficiency of 21.4%, if enriched hBN (with ~100% B-10) is used instead of natural hBN. These results demonstrate that the...

  18. A Correlation-Based Joint CFAR Detector Using Adaptively-Truncated Statistics in SAR Imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Jiaqiu; Yang, Xuezhi; Zhou, Fang; Dong, Zhangyu; Jia, Lu; Yan, He

    2017-03-27

    Traditional constant false alarm rate (CFAR) detectors only use the contrast information between ship targets and clutter, and they suffer probability of detection (PD) degradation in multiple target situations. This paper proposes a correlation-based joint CFAR detector using adaptively-truncated statistics (hereafter called TS-2DLNCFAR) in SAR images. The proposed joint CFAR detector exploits the gray intensity correlation characteristics by building a two-dimensional (2D) joint log-normal model as the joint distribution (JPDF) of the clutter, so joint CFAR detection is realized. Inspired by the CFAR detection methodology, we design an adaptive threshold-based clutter truncation method to eliminate the high-intensity outliers, such as interfering ship targets, side-lobes, and ghosts in the background window, whereas the real clutter samples are preserved to the largest degree. A 2D joint log-normal model is accurately built using the adaptively-truncated clutter through simple parameter estimation, so the joint CFAR detection performance is greatly improved. Compared with traditional CFAR detectors, the proposed TS-2DLNCFAR detector achieves a high PD and a low false alarm rate (FAR) in multiple target situations. The superiority of the proposed TS-2DLNCFAR detector is validated on the multi-look Envisat-ASAR and TerraSAR-X data.

  19. Multiplexed readout demonstration of a TES-based detector array in a resistance locked loop

    CERN Document Server

    van der Kuur, Jan; Kiviranta, Mikko; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Khosropanah, Pourya; Hartog, Roland den; Suzuki, Toyoaki; Jackson, Brian

    2015-01-01

    TES-based bolometer and microcalorimeter arrays with thousands of pixels are under development for several space-based and ground-based applications. A linear detector response and low levels of cross talk facilitate the calibration of the instruments. In an effort to improve the properties of TES-based detectors, fixing the TES resistance in a resistance-locked loop (RLL) under optical loading has recently been proposed. Earlier theoretical work on this mode of operation has shown that the detector speed, linearity and dynamic range should improve with respect to voltage biased operation. This paper presents an experimental demonstration of multiplexed readout in this mode of operation in a TES-based detector array with noise equivalent power values (NEP) of $3.5\\cdot 10^{-19} $W/$\\sqrt{\\mathrm{Hz}}$. The measured noise and dynamic properties of the detector in the RLL will be compared with the earlier modelling work. Furthermore, the practical implementation routes for future FDM systems for the readout of ...

  20. Fast 4$\\pi$ track reconstruction in nuclear emulsion detectors based on GPU technology

    CERN Document Server

    Ariga, A

    2013-01-01

    Fast 4$\\pi$ solid angle particle track recognition has been a challenge in particle physics for a long time, especially in using nuclear emulsion detectors. The recent advances in computing technology opened the way for its realization. A fast 4$\\pi$ solid angle particle track reconstruction based on GPU technology combined with a multithread programming is reported here with a detailed comparison between GPU-based and CPU-based programming. A 60 times faster processing of 3D emulsion detector data, corresponding to processing of 15 cm$^2$ emulsion surface scanned per hour, has been achieved by GPUs with an excellent tracking performance.

  1. A Scale Invariant Interest Point Detector in Gabor Based Energy Space

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO Zheng-Cai; MA Feng-Le; FU Yi-Li; ZHANG Jian

    2014-01-01

    Interest point detection is a fundamental issue in many intermediate level vision problems and plays a significant role in vision systems. The previous interest point detectors are designed to detect some special image structures such as corners, junctions, line terminations and so on. These detectors based on some simplified 2D feature models will not work for image fea-tures that differ significantly from the models. In this paper, a scale invariant interest point detector, which is appropriate for most types of image features, is proposed based on an iterative method in the Gabor based energy space. It detects interest points by noting that there are some similarities in the phase domain for all types of image features, which are obtained by different detectors respectively. Firstly, this approach obtains the positions of candidate points by detecting the local maxima of a series of energy maps constructed by Gabor filter responses. Secondly, an iterative algorithm is adopted to select the corre-sponding characteristic scales and accurately locate the interest points simultaneously in the Gabor based energy space. Finally, in order to improve the real-time performance of the approach, a fast implementation of Gabor function is used to accelerate the process of energy space construction. Experiments show that this approach has a broader applicability than the other detec-tors and has a good performance under rotation and some other image changes.

  2. Photodiode forward bias to reduce temporal effects in a-Si based flat panel detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollov, Ivan; Tognina, Carlo; Colbeth, Richard

    2008-03-01

    Lag and sensitivity modulation are well known temporal artifacts of a-Si photodiode based flat panel detectors. Both effects are caused by charge carriers being trapped in the semiconductor. Trapping and releasing of these carriers is a statistical process with time constants much longer than the frame time of flat panel detectors. One way to reduce these temporal artifacts is to keep the traps filled by applying a pulse of light over the entire detector area every frame before the x-ray exposure. This paper describes an alternative method, forward biasing the a-Si photodiodes and supplying free carriers to fill the traps. The array photodiodes are forward biased and then reversed biased again every frame between the panel readout and x-ray exposure. The method requires no change to the mechanical construction of the detector, only minor modifications of the detector electronics and no image post processing. An existing flat panel detector was modified and evaluated for lag and sensitivity modulation. The required changes of the panel configuration, readout scheme and readout timing are presented in this paper. The results of applying the new technique are presented and compared to the standard mode of operation. The improvements are better than an order of magnitude for both sensitivity modulation and lag; lowering their values to levels comparable to the scintillator afterglow. To differentiate the contribution of the a-Si array, from that of the scintillator, a large area light source was used. Possible implementations and applications of the method are discussed.

  3. NaI(Tl Detector Efficiency Computation Using Radioactive Parallelepiped Sources Based on Efficiency Transfer Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed S. Badawi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency transfer (ET principle is considered as a simple numerical simulation method, which can be used to calculate the full-energy peak efficiency (FEPE of 3″×3″ NaI(Tl scintillation detector over a wide energy range. In this work, the calculations of FEPE are based on computing the effective solid angle ratio between a radioactive point and parallelepiped sources located at various distances from the detector surface. Besides, the attenuation of the photon by the source-to-detector system (detector material, detector end cap, and holder material was considered and determined. This method is straightforwardly useful in setting up the efficiency calibration curve for NaI(Tl scintillation detector, when no calibration sources exist in volume shape. The values of the efficiency calculations using theoretical method are compared with the measured ones and the results show that the discrepancies in general for all the measurements are found to be less than 6%.

  4. Zinc Selenide-Based Schottky Barrier Detectors for Ultraviolet-A and Ultraviolet-B Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Naval

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Wide-bandgap semiconductors such as zinc selenide (ZnSe have become popular for ultraviolet (UV photodetectors due to their broad UV spectral response. Schottky barrier detectors made of ZnSe in particular have been shown to have both low dark current and high responsivity. This paper presents the results of electrical and optical characterization of UV sensors based on ZnSe/Ni Schottky diodes fabricated using single-crystal ZnSe substrate with integrated UV-A (320–400 nm and UV-B (280–320 nm filters. For comparison, characteristics characterization of an unfiltered detector is also included. The measured photoresponse showed good discrimination between the two spectral bands. The measured responsivities of the UV-A and UV-B detectors were 50 mA/W and 10 mA/W, respectively. A detector without a UV filter showed a maximum responsivity of about 110 mA/W at 375 nm wavelength. The speed of the unfiltered detector was found to be about 300 kHz primarily limited by the RC time constant determined largely by the detector area.

  5. Development of a GEM based detector for the CBM Muon Chamber (MUCH)

    CERN Document Server

    Biswas, S; Abuhoza, A; Frankenfeld, U; Garabatos, C; Hehner, J; Kleipa, V; Morhardt, T; Schmidt, C J; Schmidt, H R; Wiechula, J

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of triple GEM detectors have been studied systematically by using cosmic ray muons. The minimum ionizing particle (MIP) spectra has been taken for different GEM voltage setting. Efficiency of GEM detector has been measured for cosmic ray. At high rate operation of GEMs the value of the protection resistor influences the gain and the stability. This feature has been investigated varying both the rate and the value of the protection resistor. This measurement has been performed using both X-ray generator and Fe55 source. The ageing and long-term stability of GEM based detectors has been studied employing both X-ray generator and Fe55 source. The ageing study of one GEM module is performed by using a 8 keV Cu X-ray generator to verify the stability and integrity of the GEM detectors over a longer period of time. The accumulated charge on the detector is calculated from the rate of the X-ray and the average gain of the detector. The details of the measurement and results has been described in ...

  6. Near Detectors based on gas TPCs for neutrino long baseline experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Blondel, A

    2017-01-01

    Time Projection Chambers have been used with success for the T2K ND280 near detector and are proposed for an upgrade of the T2K near detector. High pressure TPCs are also being considered for future long-baseline experiments like Hyper-Kamiokande and DUNE. A High Pressure TPC would be a very sensitive detector for the detailed study of neutrino-nucleus interactions, a limiting factor for extracting the ultimate precision in long baseline experiments. The requirements of TPCs for neutrino detectors are quite specific. We propose here the development of state-of-the-art near detectors based on gas TPC: atmospheric pressure TPCs for T2K-II and a high-pressure TPC for neutrino experiments. The project proposed here benefits from a strong involvement of the European (CERN) members of the T2K collaboration and beyond. It is a strongly synergetic precursor of other projects of near detectors using gas TPCs that are under discussion for the long baseline neutrino projects worldwide. It will help maintain and develop...

  7. A novel technique for the characterization of a HPGe detector response based on pulse shape comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespi, F.C.L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano and INFN Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Camera, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano and INFN Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)], E-mail: camera@mi.infn.it; Million, B.; Sassi, M.; Wieland, O.; Bracco, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano and INFN Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2008-08-11

    A novel technique for measuring the HPGe detector pulse shape as a function of the {gamma}-ray interaction position inside the detector volume is presented. This technique is based on a specific pulse shape comparison procedure. Its main feature is that it allows to characterize the 3D position response of a HPGe segmented detector in a much shorter time as compared with the standard coincidence techniques. The method was first validated using a GEANT simulation of a 36-fold HPGe AGATA detector realized taking into account the effects of the electronic chain response and electrical noise on the calculated signal shape. This procedure was then applied to extract experimentally the position response of a non-segmented coaxial HPGe detector along the radial direction, using a 438 MBq {sup 137}Cs collimated {gamma}-source. The results of this measurement show a dependence of the pulse shape as a function of {gamma}-ray interaction radial coordinate consistent with that obtained with calculations. The signal acquisition rate reached using this characterization technique allows to realize a full scan of a large volume highly segmented HPGe detector in less than a week.

  8. Test of on-line alkali detector based on surface ionisation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiktorsson, L.-P.A.; Sjoestroem, L.K. [Chemical Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology

    1998-12-31

    The objective of this project is to test on-line alkali metal measuring equipment in a reducing atmosphere. The equipment is based on surface ionisation (SI) technique. The tests have taken place in reactors of varying sizes, from mg per batch to continuous feeding of kg/h, non-pressurised and pressurised. On-line alkali metal detector prototypes have been tested in real gases at atmospheric and elevated pressure. The primary parts of the detector prototypes are a platinum filament and an ion collector. The first prototype (A) of the surface ionisation detector was tested in a mg-scale pyrolysis reactor, a so-called Pyrojector, by introducing the coal sample with a `pelletizer`. The generated detector signal, a current in the pA to {mu}A range, was directly proportional to the sample weight. The second prototype (B) of the surface ionisation detector was tested in a very tarry gas flow, 20 g tar/Nm{sup 3}, at atmospheric pressure in a continuously fed g/min-scale biomass pyrolysis apparatus. The generated detector signal, a current in the {mu}A range, was measured by a picoammeter and sampled on a computer. The feedstocks were pine and birch and straw. A third prototype (D) of the surface ionisation detector was tested during pressurised gasification in a fluidised bed reactor. The feedstock was birch. The prototype detected alkali in the gas, though the temperature was only 773-793 K in the vicinity of the detector. The filament temperature control has to be further developed and tested. 1 ref., 19 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. New Fast Response Thin Film-Based Superconducting Quench Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; van de Camp, W; Ravaioli, E; Teixeira, A; ten Kate, H H J

    2014-01-01

    Quench detection on superconducting bus bars and other devices with a low normal zone propagation velocity and low voltage build-up is quite difficult with conventional quench detection techniques. Currently, on ATLAS superconducting bus bar sections, superconducting quench detectors (SQD) are mounted to detect quench events. A first version of the SQD essentially consists of an insulated superconducting wire glued to a superconducting bus line or windings, which in the case of a quench rapidly builds up a relatively high resistance that can be easily and quietly detected. We now introduce a new generation of drastically improved SQDs. The new version makes the detection of quenches simpler, more reliable, and much faster. Instead of a superconducting wire, now a superconducting thin film is used. The layout of the sensor shows a meander like pattern that is etched out of a copper coated 25 mu m thick film of Nb-Ti glued in between layers of Kapton. Since the sensor is now much smaller and thinner, it is easi...

  10. Two-dimensional photon counting imaging detector based on a Vernier position sensitive anode readout

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鄢秋荣; 赵宝升; 刘永安; 杨颢; 盛立志; 韦永林

    2011-01-01

    A two-dimensional photon counting imaging detector based on a Vernier position sensitive anode is reported. The decode principle and design of a two-dimensional Vernier anode are introduced in detail. A photon counting imaging system was built based on a

  11. Development of a detector based on Silicon Drift Detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy and imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busca, P.; Butt, A. D.; Fiorini, C.; Marone, A.; Occhipinti, M.; Peloso, R.; Quaglia, R.; Bombelli, L.; Giacomini, G.; Piemonte, C.; Camera, F.; Giaz, A.; Million, B.; Nelms, N.; Shortt, B.

    2014-05-01

    This work deals with the development of a new gamma detector based on Silicon Drift Detectors (SDDs) to readout large LaBr3:Ce scintillators for gamma-ray spectroscopy and imaging applications. The research is supported by the European Space Agency through the Technology Research Programme (TRP) and by Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN) within the Gamma project. The SDDs, produced at Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK) semiconductor laboratories, are designed as monolithic arrays of 3 × 3 units, each one of an active area of 8 mm × 8 mm (overall area of 26 mm × 26 mm). The readout electronics and the architecture of the camera are briefly described and then first experimental results coupling the SDD array with a 1'' × 1'' LaBr3:Ce scintillator are reported. An energy resolution of 3% FWHM at 662 keV has been measured at -20°C, better than coupling the same scintillator with a photomultiplier tube. The same scintillator is also used to evaluate position sensitivity with a 1 mm collimated Cs-137 source. The main difficulty in determining the position of the gamma-ray interaction in the crystal is associated to the high thickness/diameter ratio of the crystal (1:1) and the use of reflectors on all lateral and top sides the crystal. This last choice enhances energy resolution but makes imaging capability more challenging because light is spread over all photodetectors. Preliminary results show that the camera is able to detect shifts in the measured signals, when the source is moved with steps of 5 mm. A modified version of the centroid method is finally implemented to evaluate the imaging capability of the system.

  12. Low-SAR metamaterial-inspired printed monopole antenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, M. I.; Faruque, M. R. I.; Islam, M. T.; Ali, M. T.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a low-SAR metamaterial-embedded planar monopole antenna is introduced for a wireless communication system. A printed monopole antenna is designed for modern mobile, which operates in GSM, UMTS, LTE, WLAN, and Bluetooth frequency bands. A metamaterial structure is designed to use in the mobile handset with a multi-band printed monopole antenna. The finite integration technique of the CST microwave studio is used in this study. The measurement of antenna performances is taken in an anechoic chamber, and the SAR values are measured using COMOSAR system. The results indicate that metamaterial structure leads to reduce SAR without affecting antenna performance significantly. According to the measured results, the metamaterial attachment leads to reduce 87.7% peak SAR, 68.2% 1-g SAR, and 46.78% 10-g SAR compared to antenna without metamaterial.

  13. Are there Local Minima in the Magnetic Monopole Potential in Compact QED?

    CERN Document Server

    Bozkaya, H; Koppensteiner, P; Pitschmann, M

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the influence of the granularity of the lattice on the potential between monopoles. Using the flux definition of monopoles we introduce their centers of mass and are able to realize continuous shifts of the monopole positions. We find periodic deviations from the $1/r$-behavior of the monopole-antimonopole potential leading to local extrema. We suppose that these meta-stabilities may influence the order of the phase transition in compact QED.

  14. Gravitational magnetic monopoles and Majumdar-Papapetrou stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos, José P. S.; Zanchin, Vilson T.

    2006-04-01

    A large amount of work has been dedicated to studying general relativity coupled to non-Abelian Yang-Mills type theories. It has been shown that the magnetic monopole, a solution of the Yang-Mills-Higgs equations can be coupled to gravitation. For a low Higgs mass there are regular solutions, and for a sufficiently massive monopole the system develops an extremal magnetic Reissner-Nordstrom quasi-horizon. These solutions, called quasi-black holes, although non-singular, are arbitrarily close to having a horizon. However, at the critical value the quasi-black hole turns into a degenerate spacetime. On the other hand, for a high Higgs mass, a sufficiently massive monopole develops also a quasi-black hole, but it turns into an extremal true horizon, with matter fields outside. One can also put a small Schwarzschild black hole inside the magnetic monopole, an example of a non-Abelian black hole. Surprisingly, Majumdar-Papapetrou systems, Abelian systems constructed from extremal dust, also show a resembling behavior. Previously, we have reported that one can find Majumdar-Papapetrou solutions which can be arbitrarily close of being a black hole, displaying quasi-black hole behavior. With the aim of better understanding the similarities between gravitational monopoles and Majumdar-Papapetrou systems, we study a system composed of two extremal electrically charged spherical shells (or stars, generically) in the Einstein--Maxwell--Majumdar-Papapetrou theory. We review the gravitational properties of the monopoles, and compare with the properties of the double extremal electric shell system. These quasi-black holes can help in the understanding of true black holes, and can give insight into the nature of the entropy of black holes in the form of entanglement.

  15. Luminescence of water or ice as a new detection method for magnetic monopoles

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic ray detectors use air as a radiator for luminescence. In water and ice, Cherenkov light is the dominant light producing mechanism when the particle's velocity exceeds the Cherenkov threshold, approximately three quarters of the speed of light in vacuum. Luminescence is produced by highly ionizing particles passing through matter due to the electronic excitation of the surrounding molecules. The observables of luminescence, such as the wavelength spectrum and decay times, are highly dependent on the properties of the medium, in particular, temperature and purity. The results for the light yield of luminescence of previous measurements vary by two orders of magnitude. It will be shown that even for the lowest measured light yield, luminescence is an important signature of highly ionizing particles below the Cherenkov threshold. These could be magnetic monopoles or other massive and highly ionizing exotic particles. With the highest observed efficiencies, luminescence may even contribute significantly to ...

  16. Thin film CdTe based neutron detectors with high thermal neutron efficiency and gamma rejection for security applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.; Murphy, J. W.; Kim, J.; Rozhdestvenskyy, S.; Mejia, I.; Park, H.; Allee, D. R.; Quevedo-Lopez, M.; Gnade, B.

    2016-12-01

    Solid-state neutron detectors offer an alternative to 3He based detectors, but suffer from limited neutron efficiencies that make their use in security applications impractical. Solid-state neutron detectors based on single crystal silicon also have relatively high gamma-ray efficiencies that lead to false positives. Thin film polycrystalline CdTe based detectors require less complex processing with significantly lower gamma-ray efficiencies. Advanced geometries can also be implemented to achieve high thermal neutron efficiencies competitive with silicon based technology. This study evaluates these strategies by simulation and experimentation and demonstrates an approach to achieve >10% intrinsic efficiency with <10-6 gamma-ray efficiency.

  17. The laser calibration system for the STACEE ground-based gamma ray detector

    CERN Document Server

    Hanna, D

    2002-01-01

    We describe the design and performance of the laser system used for calibration monitoring of components of the STACEE detector. STACEE is a ground based gamma ray detector which uses the heliostats of a solar power facility to collect and focus Cherenkov light onto a system of secondary optics and photomultiplier tubes. To monitor the gain and check the linearity and timing properties of the phototubes and associated electronics, a system based on a dye laser, neutral density filters and optical fibres has been developed. In this paper we describe the system and present some results from initial tests made with it.

  18. Tissue sensitive imaging and tomography without contrast agents for small animals with Timepix based detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojanova, E.; Schyns, L. E. J. R.; Ludwig, D.; Jakubek, J.; Le Pape, A.; Sefc, L.; Lotte, S.; Sykora, V.; Turecek, D.; Uher, J.; Verhaegen, F.

    2017-01-01

    The tissue type resolving X-ray radiography and tomography can be performed even without contrast agents. The differences between soft tissue types such as kidney, muscles, fat, liver, brain and spleen were measured based on their spectral response. The Timepix based X-ray imaging detector WidePIX2×5 with 300 μm thick silicon sensors was used for most of the measurements presented in this work. These promising results are used for further optimizations of the detector technology and radiographic methods.

  19. Pixel Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Wermes, Norbert

    2005-01-01

    Pixel detectors for precise particle tracking in high energy physics have been developed to a level of maturity during the past decade. Three of the LHC detectors will use vertex detectors close to the interaction point based on the hybrid pixel technology which can be considered the state of the art in this field of instrumentation. A development period of almost 10 years has resulted in pixel detector modules which can stand the extreme rate and timing requirements as well as the very harsh...

  20. Nonperturbative study of the 't Hooft-Polyakov monopole form factors

    CERN Document Server

    Rajantie, Arttu

    2011-01-01

    The mass and interactions of a quantum 't Hooft-Polyakov monopole are measured nonperturbatively using correlation functions in lattice Monte Carlo simulations. A method of measuring the form factors for interactions between the monopole and fundamental particles, such as the photon, is demonstrated. These quantities are potentially of experimental relevance in searches for magnetic monopoles.

  1. Nonperturbative study of the 't Hooft-Polyakov monopole form factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajantie, Arttu; Weir, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The mass and interactions of a quantum ’t Hooft-Polyakov monopole are measured nonperturbatively using correlation functions in lattice Monte Carlo simulations. A method of measuring the form factors for interactions between the monopole and fundamental particles, such as the photon, is demonstrated. These quantities are potentially of experimental relevance in searches for magnetic monopoles.

  2. A mild source for the Wu-Yang magnetic monopole

    CERN Document Server

    Constantinidis, C P; Luchini, G

    2016-01-01

    We establish that the Wu-Yang monopole needs the introduction of a magnetic point source at the origin in order for it to be a solution of the integral equations for the Yang-Mills theory. That result is corroborated by the analysis of the differential Yang-Mills equations using distribution theory. The subtlety lies on the fact that with the non-vanishing magnetic point source required by the Yang-Mills integral equations, the Wu-Yang monopole configuration does not violate, in the sense of distribution theory, the differential Bianchi identity.

  3. Gravito-magnetic monopoles in traversable wormholes from WIMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Jesús Martín; Bellini, Mauricio

    2017-03-01

    Using Weitzenböck Induced Matter Theory (WIMT), we study Schwarzschild wormholes performing different foliations on an extended (non-vacuum) 5D manifold. We explore the geodesic equations for observers which are in the interior of a traversable wormhole and how these observers can detect gravito-magnetic monopoles which are dual to gravito-electric sources observed in the outer zone of some Schwarzschild Black-Hole (BH). The densities of these monopoles are calculated and quantized in the Dirac sense. This kind of duality on the extended Einstein-Maxwell equations, relates electric and magnetic charges on causally disconnected space regions.

  4. Nontopological magnetic monopoles and new magnetically charged black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, K; Kimyeong Lee; Erick J Weinberg

    1994-01-01

    The existence of nonsingular classical magnetic monopole solutions is usually understood in terms of topologically nontrivial Higgs field configurations. We show that finite energy magnetic monopole solutions also exist within a class of purely Abelian gauge theories containing charged vector mesons, even though the possibility of nontrivial topology does not even arise. provided that certain relationships among the parameters of the theory are satisfied. These solutions are singular if these relationships do not hold, but even then become meaningful once the theory is coupled to gravity, for they then give rise to an interesting new class of magnetically charged black holes with hair.

  5. Nontopological magnetic monopoles and new magnetically charged black holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kimyeong; Weinberg, Erick J.

    1994-08-01

    The existence of nonsingular classical magnetic monopole solutions is usually understood in terms of topologically nontrivial Higgs field configurations. We show that finite energy magnetic monopole solutions also exist within a class of purely Abelian gauge theories containing charged vector mesons, even though the possibility of nontrivial topology does not even arise provided that certain relationships among the parameters of the theory are satisfied. These solutions are singular if these relationships do not hold, but even then become meaningful once the theory is coupled to gravity, for they then give rise to an interesting new class of magnetically charged black holes with hair.

  6. Monopole condensation in two-flavour Adjoint QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Cossu, G; Di Giacomo, Adriano; Lacagnina, G; Pica, C

    2006-01-01

    Two distinct phase transitions occur at different temperatures in QCD with adjoint fermions (aQCD): deconfinement and chiral symmetry restoration. In this model, quarks do no explicitely break the center Z(3) symmetry and therefore the Polyakov loop is a good order parameter for the deconfinement transition. We study monopole condensation by inspecting the expectation value of an operator which creates a monopole. Such a quantity is expected to be an order parameter for the deconfinement transition as in the case of fundamental fermions.

  7. Development of Data Acquisition Methods for an FPGA-Based Photon Counting Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambily, S.; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Mathew, Joice; Sreejith, A. G.; Nirmal, K.; Prakash, Ajin; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    MCP-based detectors are widely used in the ultraviolet (UV) region due to their low noise levels, high sensitivity and good spatial and temporal resolution. We have developed a compact near-UV (NUV) detector for high-altitude balloon and space flights, using off-the-shelf MCP, CMOS sensor, and optics. The detector is designed to be capable of working in the direct frame transfer mode as well in the photon counting mode for single photon event detection. The identification and centroiding of each photon event are done using an FPGA-based data acquisition and real-time processing system. In this paper, we discuss various algorithms and methods used in both operating modes, as well as their implementation on the hardware.

  8. Performance evaluation of a lossy transmission lines based diode detector at cryogenic temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, E.; Aja, B.; de la Fuente, L.; Artal, E.

    2016-01-01

    This work is focused on the design, fabrication, and performance analysis of a square-law Schottky diode detector based on lossy transmission lines working under cryogenic temperature (15 K). The design analysis of a microwave detector, based on a planar gallium-arsenide low effective Schottky barrier height diode, is reported, which is aimed for achieving large input return loss as well as flat sensitivity versus frequency. The designed circuit demonstrates good sensitivity, as well as a good return loss in a wide bandwidth at Ka-band, at both room (300 K) and cryogenic (15 K) temperatures. A good sensitivity of 1000 mV/mW and input return loss better than 12 dB have been achieved when it works as a zero-bias Schottky diode detector at room temperature, increasing the sensitivity up to a minimum of 2200 mV/mW, with the need of a DC bias current, at cryogenic temperature.

  9. Techniques to extend the reach of ground based gravitational wave detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Sheila

    2016-03-01

    While the current generation of advanced ground based detectors will open the gravitational wave universe to observation, ground based interferometry has the potential to extend the reach of these observatories to high redshifts. Several techniques have the potential to improve the advanced detectors beyond design sensitivity, including the use of squeezed light, upgraded suspensions, and possibly new optical coatings, new test mass materials, and cryogenic suspensions. To improve the sensitivity by more than a factor of 10 compared to advanced detectors new, longer facilities will be needed. Future observatories capable of hosting interferometers 10s of kilometers long have the potential to extend the reach of gravitational wave astronomy to cosmological distances, enabling detection of binary inspirals from throughout the history of star formation.

  10. Performance evaluation of a lossy transmission lines based diode detector at cryogenic temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, E; Aja, B; de la Fuente, L; Artal, E

    2016-01-01

    This work is focused on the design, fabrication, and performance analysis of a square-law Schottky diode detector based on lossy transmission lines working under cryogenic temperature (15 K). The design analysis of a microwave detector, based on a planar gallium-arsenide low effective Schottky barrier height diode, is reported, which is aimed for achieving large input return loss as well as flat sensitivity versus frequency. The designed circuit demonstrates good sensitivity, as well as a good return loss in a wide bandwidth at Ka-band, at both room (300 K) and cryogenic (15 K) temperatures. A good sensitivity of 1000 mV/mW and input return loss better than 12 dB have been achieved when it works as a zero-bias Schottky diode detector at room temperature, increasing the sensitivity up to a minimum of 2200 mV/mW, with the need of a DC bias current, at cryogenic temperature.

  11. Spectrum reconstruction method based on the detector response model calibrated by x-ray fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruizhe; Li, Liang; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2017-02-01

    Accurate estimation of distortion-free spectra is important but difficult in various applications, especially for spectral computed tomography. Two key problems must be solved to reconstruct the incident spectrum. One is the acquisition of the detector energy response. It can be calculated by Monte Carlo simulation, which requires detailed modeling of the detector system and a high computational power. It can also be acquired by establishing a parametric response model and be calibrated using monochromatic x-ray sources, such as synchrotron sources or radioactive isotopes. However, these monochromatic sources are difficult to obtain. Inspired by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrum modeling, we propose a feasible method to obtain the detector energy response based on an optimized parametric model for CdZnTe or CdTe detectors. The other key problem is the reconstruction of the incident spectrum with the detector response. Directly obtaining an accurate solution from noisy data is difficult because the reconstruction problem is severely ill-posed. Different from the existing spectrum stripping method, a maximum likelihood-expectation maximization iterative algorithm is developed based on the Poisson noise model of the system. Simulation and experiment results show that our method is effective for spectrum reconstruction and markedly increases the accuracy of XRF spectra compared with the spectrum stripping method. The applicability of the proposed method is discussed, and promising results are presented.

  12. Development of GAGG depth-of-interaction (DOI) block detectors based on pulse shape analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Yeol Yeom, Jung; Morishita, Yuki; Sato, Hiroki; Endo, Takanori; Usuki, Yoshiyuki; Kamada, Kei; Yoshikawa, Akira

    2014-12-01

    A depth-of-interaction (DOI) detector is required for developing a high resolution and high sensitivity PET system. Ce-doped Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (GAGG fast: GAGG-F) is a promising scintillator for PET applications with high light output, no natural radioisotope and suitable light emission wavelength for semiconductor based photodetectors. However, no DOI detector based on pulse shape analysis with GAGG-F has been developed to date, due to the lack of appropriate scintillators of pairing. Recently a new variation of this scintillator with different Al/Ga ratios-Ce-doped Gd3Al2.6Ga2.4O12 (GAGG slow: GAGG-S), which has slower decay time was developed. The combination of GAGG-F and GAGG-S may allow us to realize high resolution DOI detectors based on pulse shape analysis. We developed and tested two GAGG phoswich DOI block detectors comprised of pixelated GAGG-F and GAGG-S scintillation crystals. One phoswich block detector comprised of 2×2×5 mm pixel that were assembled into a 5×5 matrix. The DOI block was optically coupled to a silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) array (Hamamatsu MPPC S11064-050P) with a 2-mm thick light guide. The other phoswich block detector comprised of 0.5×0.5×5 mm (GAGG-F) and 0.5×0.5×6 mm3 (GAGG-S) pixels that were assembled into a 20×20 matrix. The DOI block was also optically coupled to the same Si-PM array with a 2-mm thick light guide. In the block detector of 2-mm crystal pixels (5×5 matrix), the 2-dimensional histogram revealed excellent separation with an average energy resolution of 14.1% for 662-keV gamma photons. The pulse shape spectrum displayed good separation with a peak-to-valley ratio of 8.7. In the block detector that used 0.5-mm crystal pixels (20×20 matrix), the 2-dimensional histogram also showed good separation with energy resolution of 27.5% for the 662-keV gamma photons. The pulse shape spectrum displayed good separation with a peak-to-valley ratio of 6.5. These results indicate that phoswich DOI detectors with the two

  13. Development of GAGG depth-of-interaction (DOI) block detectors based on pulse shape analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi, E-mail: s-yama@met.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Kobayashi, Takahiro [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Department of Radiology, Daiyukai General Hospital, Ichinomiya (Japan); Yeol Yeom, Jung [Kumoh National institute of Technology, Gumi (Korea, Republic of); Morishita, Yuki [Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Sato, Hiroki; Endo, Takanori; Usuki, Yoshiyuki [Furukawa Corporation, Ichihara (Japan); Kamada, Kei [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe), Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Yoshikawa, Akira [New Industry Creation Hatchery Center (NICHe), Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Institute for Materials Research (IMR), Tohoku University, Tohoku (Japan)

    2014-12-11

    A depth-of-interaction (DOI) detector is required for developing a high resolution and high sensitivity PET system. Ce-doped Gd{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Ga{sub 3}O{sub 12} (GAGG fast: GAGG-F) is a promising scintillator for PET applications with high light output, no natural radioisotope and suitable light emission wavelength for semiconductor based photodetectors. However, no DOI detector based on pulse shape analysis with GAGG-F has been developed to date, due to the lack of appropriate scintillators of pairing. Recently a new variation of this scintillator with different Al/Ga ratios—Ce-doped Gd{sub 3}Al{sub 2.6}Ga{sub 2.4}O{sub 12} (GAGG slow: GAGG-S), which has slower decay time was developed. The combination of GAGG-F and GAGG-S may allow us to realize high resolution DOI detectors based on pulse shape analysis. We developed and tested two GAGG phoswich DOI block detectors comprised of pixelated GAGG-F and GAGG-S scintillation crystals. One phoswich block detector comprised of 2×2×5 mm pixel that were assembled into a 5×5 matrix. The DOI block was optically coupled to a silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) array (Hamamatsu MPPC S11064-050P) with a 2-mm thick light guide. The other phoswich block detector comprised of 0.5×0.5×5 mm (GAGG-F) and 0.5×0.5×6 mm{sup 3} (GAGG-S) pixels that were assembled into a 20×20 matrix. The DOI block was also optically coupled to the same Si-PM array with a 2-mm thick light guide. In the block detector of 2-mm crystal pixels (5×5 matrix), the 2-dimensional histogram revealed excellent separation with an average energy resolution of 14.1% for 662-keV gamma photons. The pulse shape spectrum displayed good separation with a peak-to-valley ratio of 8.7. In the block detector that used 0.5-mm crystal pixels (20×20 matrix), the 2-dimensional histogram also showed good separation with energy resolution of 27.5% for the 662-keV gamma photons. The pulse shape spectrum displayed good separation with a peak-to-valley ratio of 6.5. These

  14. Modelling of scintillator based flat-panel detectors with Monte-Carlo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reims, N.; Sukowski, F.; Uhlmann, N.

    2011-01-01

    Scintillator based flat panel detectors are state of the art in the field of industrial X-ray imaging applications. Choosing the proper system and setup parameters for the vast range of different applications can be a time consuming task, especially when developing new detector systems. Since the system behaviour cannot always be foreseen easily, Monte-Carlo (MC) simulations are keys to gain further knowledge of system components and their behaviour for different imaging conditions. In this work we used two Monte-Carlo based models to examine an indirect converting flat panel detector, specifically the Hamamatsu C9312SK. We focused on the signal generation in the scintillation layer and its influence on the spatial resolution of the whole system. The models differ significantly in their level of complexity. The first model gives a global description of the detector based on different parameters characterizing the spatial resolution. With relatively small effort a simulation model can be developed which equates the real detector regarding signal transfer. The second model allows a more detailed insight of the system. It is based on the well established cascade theory, i.e. describing the detector as a cascade of elemental gain and scattering stages, which represent the built in components and their signal transfer behaviour. In comparison to the first model the influence of single components especially the important light spread behaviour in the scintillator can be analysed in a more differentiated way. Although the implementation of the second model is more time consuming both models have in common that a relatively small amount of system manufacturer parameters are needed. The results of both models were in good agreement with the measured parameters of the real system.

  15. Boron-coated straws as a replacement for 3He-based neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Jeffrey L.; Athanasiades, Athanasios; Sun, Liang; Martin, Christopher S.; Lyons, Tom D.; Foss, Michael A.; Haygood, Hal B.

    2011-10-01

    US and international government efforts to equip major seaports with large area neutron detectors, aimed to intercept the smuggling of nuclear materials, have precipitated a critical shortage of 3He gas. It is estimated that the annual demand of 3He for US security applications alone is more than the worldwide supply. This is strongly limiting the prospects of neutron science, safeguards, and other applications that rely heavily on 3He-based detectors. Clearly, alternate neutron detection technologies that can support large sensitive areas, and have low gamma sensitivity and low cost must be developed. We propose a low-cost technology based on long copper tubes (straws), coated on the inside with a thin layer of 10B-enriched boron carbide ( 10B 4C). In addition to the high abundance of boron on Earth and low cost of 10B enrichment, the boron-coated straw (BCS) detector offers distinct advantages over conventional 3He-based detectors, and alternate technologies such as 10BF 3 tubes and 10B-coated rigid tubes. These include better distribution inside moderator assemblies, many-times faster electronic signals, no pressurization, improved gamma-ray rejection, no toxic or flammable gases, and ease of serviceability. We present the performance of BCS detectors dispersed in a solid plastic moderator to address the need for portal monitoring. The design adopts the outer dimensions of currently deployed 3He-based monitors, but takes advantage of the small BCS diameter to achieve a more uniform distribution of neutron converter throughout the moderating material. We show that approximately 63 BCS detectors, each 205 cm long, distributed inside the moderator, can match or exceed the detection efficiency of typical monitors fitted with a 5 cm diameter 3He tube, 187 cm long, pressurized to 3 atm.

  16. Radiative processes for Rindler and accelerating observers and the stress-tensor detector

    CERN Document Server

    De Paola, R

    1996-01-01

    We consider a monopole detector interacting with a massive scalar field. The radiative processes are discussed from the accelerated frame point of view. After this, we obtain the Minkowski vacuum stress tensor measured by the accelerated observer using a non-gravitational stress tensor detector as discussed by Ford and Roman (PRD 48, 776 (1993)). Finally, we analyse radiative processes of the monopole detector travelling in a world line that is inertial in the infinite past and has a constant proper acceleration in the infinite future.

  17. Study of laser location based on four-quadrant detector APD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xing; Qian, Weixian; Gu, Guohua; Chen, Qian; Cao, Ercong; Hu, Xiaobo

    2016-10-01

    Laser positioning technology in the world has a very broad application prospects. With the development of technology and enhancement of productivity, the technology of positioning accuracy and the detection region also need to improve. There are key factors for laser positioning system, including performance of photosensitive devices, localization algorithm and signal processing circuitry, which are important in determining the performance advantages and disadvantages. Therefore, we need to study in-depth research and improvement to enhance the overall performance of the detector. In this paper, after analyzing the principle of mainstream photo-sensitive induction device, we focus on the current and various positioning algorithms which are widely used. Then use simulation to compare the advantages and disadvantages of each method. Based detector probe in the actual working conditions, we analyze the reasons for the differences in the measurement detector sensitivity, linearity, etc., and provide noise and uniformity correction algorithm while improving on the previous probe calibration method. According to the distribution of the incident light energy, we improve the mathematical model of the original description of the received light energy in each quadrant. Based on the Gaussian distribution of light energy, light intensity correction algorithm is proposed in order to meet the needs of the actual probe. Based on the selected four-quadrant detector APD, we design and build a complete laser positioning system. At last, we design and build the experimental system which can be used to test the main parameters including measurement accuracy and response range of the four-quadrant detector, so the laser positioning system has been tested and verify the feasibility of the system. This paper has mainly innovation in the localization algorithm on the detector.

  18. Development of an angled Si-PM-based detector unit for positron emission mammography (PEM) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Kouhei; Yamamoto, Seiichi

    2016-11-01

    Positron emission mammography (PEM) systems have higher sensitivity than clinical whole body PET systems because they have a smaller ring diameter. However, the spatial resolution of PEM systems is not high enough to detect early stage breast cancer. To solve this problem, we developed a silicon photomultiplier (Si-PM) based detector unit for the development of a PEM system. Since a Si-PM's channel is small, Si-PM can resolve small scintillator pixels to improve the spatial resolution. Also Si-PM based detectors have inherently high timing resolution and are able to reduce the random coincidence events by reducing the time window. We used 1.5×1.9×15 mm LGSO scintillation pixels and arranged them in an 8×24 matrix to form scintillator blocks. Four scintillator blocks were optically coupled to Si-PM arrays with an angled light guide to form a detector unit. Since the light guide has angles of 5.625°, we can arrange 64 scintillator blocks in a nearly circular shape (a regular 64-sided polygon) using 16 detector units. We clearly resolved the pixels of the scintillator blocks in a 2-dimensional position histogram where the averages of the peak-to-valley ratios (P/Vs) were 3.7±0.3 and 5.7±0.8 in the transverse and axial directions, respectively. The average energy resolution was 14.2±2.1% full-width at half-maximum (FWHM). By including the temperature dependent gain control electronics, the photo-peak channel shifts were controlled within ±1.5% with the temperature from 23 °C to 28 °C. With these results, in addition to the potential high timing performance of Si-PM based detectors, our developed detector unit is promising for the development of a high-resolution PEM system.

  19. Laser and alpha particle characterization of floating-base BJT detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyzhnevyi, V., E-mail: tyzhnevyi@disi.unitn.i [Universita di Trento and INFN Trento, Trento (Italy); Batignani, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa and INFN Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Bosisio, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trieste and INFN Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Dalla Betta, G.-F. [Universita di Trento and INFN Trento, Trento (Italy); Verzellesi, G. [Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia and INFN Trento, Reggio Emilia (Italy); Zorzi, N. [Fondazione Bruno Kessler (FBK), Trento (Italy)

    2010-05-21

    In this work, we investigate the detection properties of existing prototypes of BJT detectors operated with floating base. We report about results of two functional tests. The charge-collection properties of BJT detectors were evaluated by means of a pulsed laser setup. The response to {alpha}-particles emitted from radioactive {sup 241}Am source are also presented. Experimental results show that current gains of about 450 with response times in the order of 50 {mu}s are preserved even in this non-standard operation mode, in spite of a non-optimized structure.

  20. Velocity measurement of cosmic muons using the India-based Neutrino Observatory prototype detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumder, G. [Department of High Energy Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Mohammed, S. [Department of Physics, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh 202002 (India); Mondal, N.K. [Department of High Energy Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Pal, S., E-mail: sumanta@tifr.res.in [Department of High Energy Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India); Samuel, D.; Satyanarayana, B. [Department of High Energy Physics, Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Mumbai 400005 (India)

    2012-01-01

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) collaboration is planning to set up a magnetized 50 kton iron-calorimeter with resistive plate chambers (RPC) as active detectors to study neutrino oscillations. A prototype detector stack (without magnet) comprising 12 layers of RPCs of 1 m Multiplication-Sign 1 m in area has been set-up to track cosmic ray muons. To study its capability and the feasibility of distinguishing between up-going and down-going particles, the velocity of cosmic muons recorded in this stack has been measured. The measurement procedure, calibration and results are described here.

  1. Ultra-low noise single-photon detector based on Si avalanche photodiode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Su; Jeong, Youn-Chang; Sauge, Sebastien; Makarov, Vadim; Kim, Yoon-Ho

    2011-09-01

    We report operation and characterization of a lab-assembled single-photon detector based on commercial silicon avalanche photodiodes (PerkinElmer C30902SH, C30921SH). Dark count rate as low as 5 Hz was achieved by cooling the photodiodes down to -80 °C. While afterpulsing increased as the photodiode temperature was decreased, total afterpulse probability did not become significant due to detector's relatively long deadtime in a passively-quenched scheme. We measured photon detection efficiency >50% at 806 nm. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  2. GaN ultraviolet detector based demonstrator board for UV-index monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Man; Xie, Feng; Wang, Jun; Wang, Tanglin; Guo, Jin

    2015-04-01

    Currently, various types of III nitride-based materials have been successfully used for short-wavelength optoelectronic devices. The GaN ultraviolet detector has been wildly used for UV-Index(UVI) monitoring, UV curing and water disinfection. The global solar UVI describes the levels of solar UV radiation at the Earth's surface. The higher the UVI value, the greater the potential damage to the skin and eyes. The UVI monitoring demonstrator board with GaN detector is briefly introduced in this paper.

  3. PoGOLino: a scintillator-based balloon-borne neutron detector

    CERN Document Server

    Kole, Merlin; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Fukuda, Kentaro; Ishizu, Sumito; Jackson, Miranda; Kamae, Tune; Kawaguchi, Noriaki; Kawano, Takafumi; Kiss, Mozsi; Moretti, Elena; Pearce, Mark; Rydström, Stefan; Takahashi, Hiromitsu; Yanagida, Takayuki

    2014-01-01

    PoGOLino is a balloon-borne scintillator-based experiment developed to study the largely unexplored high altitude neutron environment at high geomagnetic latitudes. The instrument comprises two detectors that make use of LiCAF, a novel neutron sensitive scintillator, sandwiched by BGO crystals for background reduction. The experiment was launched on March 20th 2013 from the Esrange Space Centre, Northern Sweden (geomagnetic latitude of $65^\\circ$), for a three hour flight during which the instrument took data up to an altitude of 30.9 km. The detector design and ground calibration results are presented together with the measurement results from the balloon flight.

  4. A scintillator based muon and KLong detector for the Belle II experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Aushev, T; Chilikin, K; Chistov, R; Danilov, M; Katrenko, P; Mizuk, R; Pakhlova, G; Pakhlov, P; Rusinov, V; Solovieva, E; Tarkovsky, E; Tikhomirov, I; Uglov, T

    2014-01-01

    A new muon and K_Long detector based on scintillators will be used for the endcap and inner barrel regions in the Belle II experiment, currently under construction. The increased luminosity of the e+e- SuperKEKB collider entails challenging detector requirements. We demonstrate that relatively inexpensive polystyrene scintillator stips with wave length shifting fibers ensure a sufficient light yield at the Silcon PhotoMultiplier (SiPM) photodetector, are robust and provide improved physics performance for the Belle II experiment compared to its predecessor, Belle.

  5. NaI(Tl) Detector Efficiency Computation Using Radioactive Parallelepiped Sources Based on Efficiency Transfer Principle

    OpenAIRE

    MOHAMED S. BADAWI; Mona M. Gouda; Ahmed M. El-Khatib; Thabet, Abouzeid A.; Salim, Ahmed A.; Mahmoud I. Abbas

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency transfer (ET) principle is considered as a simple numerical simulation method, which can be used to calculate the full-energy peak efficiency (FEPE) of 3″×3″ NaI(Tl) scintillation detector over a wide energy range. In this work, the calculations of FEPE are based on computing the effective solid angle ratio between a radioactive point and parallelepiped sources located at various distances from the detector surface. Besides, the attenuation of the photon by the source-to-detect...

  6. A Leakage Current-based Measurement of the Radiation Damage in the ATLAS Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Gorelov, Igor; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    A measurement has been made of the radiation damage incurred by the ATLAS Pixel Detector barrel silicon modules from the beginning of operations through the end of 2012. This translates to hadronic fluence received over the full period of operation at energies up to and including 8 TeV. The measurement is based on a per-module measurement of the silicon sensor leakage current. The results are presented as a function of integrated luminosity and compared to predictions by the Hamburg Model. This information can be used to predict limits on the lifetime of the Pixel Detector due to current, for various operating scenarios.

  7. Development of 10B-Based 3He Replacement Neutron Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Michael J.; Gozani, Tsahi; Hilliard, Donald B.

    2011-12-01

    Radiation portal monitors (RPM) are currently deployed at United States border crossings to passively inspect vehicles and persons for any emission of neutrons and/or gamma rays, which may indicate the presence of unshielded nuclear materials. The RPM module contains an organic scintillator with 3He proportional counters to detect gamma rays and thermalized neutrons, respectively. The supply of 3He is rapidly dwindling, requiring alternative detectors to provide the same function and performance. Our alternative approach is one consisting of a thinly-coated 10B flat-panel ionization chamber neutron detector that can be deployed as a direct drop-in replacement for current RPM 3He detectors. The uniqueness of our approach in providing a large-area detector is in the simplicity of construction, scalability of the unit cell detector, ease of adaptability to a variety of applications and low cost. Currently, Rapiscan Laboratories and Helicon Thin Film Systems have designed and developed an operational 100 cm2 multi-layer prototype 10BB-based ionization chamber.

  8. Integrated optical and nuclear simulation of a monolithic LYSO:Ce based PET detector module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Játékos, B.; Patay, G.; Lőrincz, E.; Erdei, G.

    2017-05-01

    In the recent years new digital photon counter devices (also known as silicon photomultipliers, SiPMs) were designed and manufactured to be used specifically in positron emission tomography (PET) scanners. Finely pixelated SiPM arrays have opened new opportunities in PET detector development, such as the utilization of monolithic scintillator crystals. We worked out a simulation tool (SCOPE2) to assist the optimization and characterization of such PET detector modules. In the present paper we report the first application of SCOPE2 on the performance evaluation of a prototype PET detector module. The PET detector is based on monolithic LYSO:Ce scintillator crystal and a fully digital, silicon photon-counter, SPADnet-I. A new interface has been developed for SCOPE2 to access GATE simulation results. A combination of GATE and SCOPE2 was used to simulate excitation of the prototype PET detector with an electronically collimated γ -beam. Measurement results from the collimated γ-beam experiment were compared with the combined simulation. A good agreement was observed in the tendencies of total count spectrum and point of interaction distribution. We used the performance evaluation to understand and explain the measurement results in detail.

  9. Large area high-resolution CCD-based X-ray detector for macromolecular crystallography

    CERN Document Server

    Pokric, M; Jorden, A R; Cox, M P; Marshall, A; Long, P G; Moon, K; Jerram, P A; Pool, P; Nave, C; Derbyshire, G E; Helliwell, J R

    2002-01-01

    An X-ray detector system for macromolecular crystallography based on a large area charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor has been developed as part of a large research and development programme for advanced X-ray sensor technology, funded by industry and the Particle Physics and Astronomy Research Council (PPARC) in the UK. The prototype detector consists of two large area three-sides buttable charge-coupled devices (CCD 46-62 EEV), where the single CCD area is 55.3 mmx41.5 mm. Overall detector imaging area is easily extendable to 85 mmx110 mm. The detector consists of an optically coupled X-ray sensitive phosphor, skewed fibre-optic studs and CCDs. The crystallographic measurement requirements at synchrotron sources are met through a high spatial resolution (2048x1536 pixel array), high dynamic range (approx 10 sup 5), a fast readout (approx 1 s), low noise (<10e sup -) and much reduced parallax error. Additionally, the prototype detector system has been optimised by increasing its efficiency at low X-ray ene...

  10. LUCID A Cherenkov Tube Based Detector for Monitoring the ATLAS Experiment Luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Sbrizzi, A

    2007-01-01

    The LUCID (LUminosity Cherenkov Integrating Detector) apparatus is composed by two symmetric arms deployed at about 17 m from the ATLAS interaction point. The purpose of this detector, which will be installed in january 2008, is to monitor the luminosity delivered by the LHC machine to the ATLAS experiment. An absolute luminosity calibration is needed and it will be provided by a Roman Pot type detector with the two arms placed at about 240 m from the interaction point. Each arm of the LUCID detector is based on an aluminum vessel containing 20 Cherenkov tubes, 15 mm diameter and 1500 mm length, filled with C4F10 radiator gas at 1.5 bar. The Cherenkov light generated by charged particles above the threshold is collected by photomultiplier tubes (PMT) directly placed at the tubes end. The challenging aspect of this detector is its readout in an environment characterized by the high dose of radiation (about 0.7 Mrad/year at 10^33cm^2 s^-1) it must withstand. In order to fulfill these radiation hardness requirem...

  11. Improvement of an X-ray imaging detector based on a scintillating guides screen

    CERN Document Server

    Badel, X; Linnros, J; Kleimann, P; Froejdh, C; Petersson, C S

    2002-01-01

    An X-ray imaging detector has been developed for dental applications. The principle of this detector is based on application of a silicon charge coupled device covered by a scintillating wave-guide screen. Previous studies of such a detector showed promising results concerning the spatial resolution but low performance in terms of signal to noise ratio (SNR) and sensitivity. Recent results confirm the wave-guiding properties of the matrix and show improvement of the detector in terms of response uniformity, sensitivity and SNR. The present study is focussed on the fabrication of the scintillating screen where the principal idea is to fill a matrix of Si pores with a CsI scintillator. The photoluminescence technique was used to prove the wave-guiding property of the matrix and to inspect the filling uniformity of the pores. The final detector was characterized by X-ray evaluation in terms of spatial resolution, light output and SNR. A sensor with a spatial resolution of 9 LP/mm and a SNR over 50 has been achie...

  12. Feasibility of Amorphous Selenium Based Photon Counting Detectors for Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.; O' Connor, P.; Lehnert, J., De Geronimo, G., Dolazza, E., Tousignant, O., Laperriere, L., Greenspan, J., Zhao, W.

    2009-02-27

    Amorphous selenium (a-Se) has been incorporated successfully in direct conversion flat panel x-ray detectors, and has demonstrated superior image quality in screening mammography and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) under energy integration mode. The present work explores the potential of a-Se for photon counting detectors in DBT. We investigated major factors contributing to the variation in the charge collected by a pixel upon absorption of each x-ray photon. These factors included x-ray photon interaction, detector geometry, charge transport, and the pulse shaping and noise properties of the photon counting readout circuit. Experimental measurements were performed on a linear array test structure constructed by evaporating an a-Se layer onto an array of 100 {mu}m pitch strip electrodes, which are connected to a 32 channel low noise photon counting integrated circuit. The measured pulse height spectrum (PHS) under polychromatic xray exposure was interpreted quantitatively using the factors identified. Based on the understanding of a-Se photon counting performance, design parameters were proposed for a 2D detector with high quantum efficiency and count rate that could meet the requirements of photon counting detector for DBT.

  13. First Compton telescope prototype based on continuous LaBr{sub 3}-SiPM detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llosá, G., E-mail: gabriela.llosa@ific.uv.es [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC-CSIC/UVEG), Valencia (Spain); Cabello, J. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC-CSIC/UVEG), Valencia (Spain); Callier, S. [Laboratoire de L' Accélérateur Linéaire, Orsay (France); Gillam, J.E.; Lacasta, C. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC-CSIC/UVEG), Valencia (Spain); Rafecas, M. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC-CSIC/UVEG), Valencia (Spain); Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universitat de Valencia, Valencia (Spain); Raux, L. [Laboratoire de L' Accélérateur Linéaire, Orsay (France); Solaz, C.; Stankova, V.; La Taille, C. de; Trovato, M.; Barrio, J. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC-CSIC/UVEG), Valencia (Spain)

    2013-08-01

    A first prototype of a Compton camera based on continuous scintillator crystals coupled to silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays has been successfully developed and operated. The prototype is made of two detector planes. The first detector is made of a continuous 16×18×5 mm{sup 3} LaBr{sub 3} crystal coupled to a 16-elements SiPM array. The elements have a size of 3×3 mm {sup 3} in a 4.5×4.05 mm{sup 2} pitch. The second detector, selected by availability, consists of a continuous 16×18×5 mm{sup 3} LYSO crystal coupled to a similar SiPM array. The SPIROC1 ASIC is employed in the readout electronics. Data have been taken with a {sup 22}Na source placed at different positions and images have been reconstructed with the simulated one-pass list-mode (SOPL) algorithm. Detector development for the construction of a second prototype with three detector planes is underway. LaBr{sub 3} crystals of 32×36 mm{sup 2} size and 5/10 mm thickness have been acquired and tested with a PMT. The resolution obtained is 3.5% FWHM at 511 keV. Each crystal will be coupled to four MPPC arrays. Different options are being tested for the prototype readout.

  14. Superconducting X-ray detectors based on Nb absorbers and Nb/Al tunnel junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamster, Arnout Willem

    1999-01-01

    This thesis describes the research and development of STJs based on Nb/Al technology for application as X-ray detectors in astrophysics conducted by the Low Temperature division of the University of Twente in collaboration with the Stichting Ruimteonderzoek Nederland (SRON). Three topics have been i

  15. The development of drift-strip detectors based on CdZnTe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gostilo, V.; Budtz-Jørgensen, Carl; Kuvvetli, Irfan

    2002-01-01

    The design and technological development of a CdZnTe drift strip detector is described. The device is based on a monocrystal of dimensions 10 x 10 x 3 mm(3) and has a pitch of 200 mum and a strip width of 100 mum. The strip length is 9.5 mm. The distribution of the leakage currents of the strips...

  16. Development of a thermal neutron detector based on scintillating fibers and silicon photomultipliers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbagallo, Massimo; Cosentino, Luigi; Greco, Giuseppe; Montereali, Rosa Maria; Pappalardo, Alfio; Scirè, Carlotta; Scirè, Sergio; Vincenti, Maria Aurora; Finocchiaro, Paolo

    2010-09-01

    We propose a technique for thermal neutron detection, based on a (6)Li converter placed in front of scintillating fibers readout by means of silicon photomultipliers. Such a technique allows building cheap and compact detectors and dosimeters, thus possibly opening new perspectives in terms of granular monitoring of neutron fluxes as well as space-resolved neutron detection.

  17. Low noise pixel detectors based on gated geiger mode avalanche photodiodes

    OpenAIRE

    Vilella Figueras, Eva; Comerma Montells, Albert; Alonso Casanovas, Oscar; Diéguez Barrientos, Àngel

    2011-01-01

    The gated operation is proposed as an effective method to reduce the noise in pixel detectors based on Geiger mode avalanche photodiodes. A prototype with the sensor and the front-end electronics monolithically integrated has been fabricated with a conventional HV-CMOS process. Experimental results demonstrate the increase of the dynamic range of the sensor by applying this technique.

  18. BPM Electronics based on Compensated Diode Detectors – Results from development Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gasior, M; Steinhagen, RJ

    2012-01-01

    High resolution beam position monitor (BPM) electronics based on diode peak detectors is being developed for processing signals from button BPMs embedded into future LHC collimators. Its prototypes were measured in a laboratory as well as with beam signals from the collimator BPM installed on the SPS and with LHC BPMs. Results from these measurements are presented and discussed.

  19. Characterization of thermal cross-talk in a MEMS-based thermopile detector array

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, H.; Grabarnik, S.; Emadi, A.; De Graaf, G.; Wolffenbuttel, R.F.

    2009-01-01

    The spectral resolution of a MEMS-based IR microspectrometer critically depends on the thermal cross-talk between adjacent TE elements in the detector array. Thermal isolation between elements is realized by using bulk micromachining directly following CMOS processing. This paper reports on the char

  20. A Real Valued Neural Network Based Autoregressive Energy Detector for Cognitive Radio Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onumanyi, A J; Onwuka, E N; Aibinu, A M; Ugweje, O C; Salami, M J E

    2014-01-01

    A real valued neural network (RVNN) based energy detector (ED) is proposed and analyzed for cognitive radio (CR) application. This was developed using a known two-layered RVNN model to estimate the model coefficients of an autoregressive (AR) system. By using appropriate modules and a well-designed detector, the power spectral density (PSD) of the AR system transfer function was estimated and subsequent receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves of the detector generated and analyzed. A high detection performance with low false alarm rate was observed for varying signal to noise ratio (SNR), sample number, and model order conditions. The proposed RVNN based ED was then compared to the simple periodogram (SP), Welch periodogram (WP), multitaper (MT), Yule-Walker (YW), Burg (BG), and covariance (CV) based ED techniques. The proposed detector showed better performance than the SP, WP, and MT while providing better false alarm performance than the YW, BG, and CV. Data provided here support the effectiveness of the proposed RVNN based ED for CR application.

  1. Superconducting X-ray detectors based on Nb absorbers and Nb/Al tunnel junctions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamster, A.W.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis describes the research and development of STJs based on Nb/Al technology for application as X-ray detectors in astrophysics conducted by the Low Temperature division of the University of Twente in collaboration with the Stichting Ruimteonderzoek Nederland (SRON). Three topics have been

  2. Demonstrating a directional detector based on neon for characterizing high energy neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Hexley, A; Spitz, J; Conrad, J M

    2015-01-01

    MITPC is a gas-based time projection chamber used for detecting fast, MeV-scale neutrons. The standard version of the detector relies on a mixture of 600~torr gas composed of 87.5% $^4$He and 12.5% CF$_4$ for precisely measuring the energy and direction of neutron-induced nuclear recoils. We describe studies performed with a prototype detector investigating the use of Ne, as a replacement for $^4$He, in the gas mixture. Our discussion focuses on the advantages of Ne as the fast neutron target for high energy neutron events ($\\lesssim$100 MeV) and a demonstration that the mixture will be effective for this event class. We find that the achievable gain and transverse diffusion of drifting electrons in the Ne mixture are acceptable and that the detector uptime lost due to voltage breakdowns in the amplification plane is negligible, compared to $\\sim$ 20% with the $^4$He mixture.

  3. Superconducting detector of IR single-photons based on thin WSi films

    CERN Document Server

    Seleznev, V A; Vakhtomin, Yu B; Morozov, P V; Zolotov, P I; Vasilev, D D; Moiseev, K M; Malevannaya, E I; Smirnov, K V

    2016-01-01

    We have developed the deposition technology of WSi thin films 4 to 9 nm thick with high temperature values of superconducting transition (Tc~4 K). Based on deposed films there were produced nanostructures with indicative planar sizes ~100 nm, and the research revealed that even on nanoscale the films possess of high critical temperature values of the superconducting transition (Tc~3.3-3.7K ) which certifies high quality and homogeneity of the films created. The first experiments on creating superconducting single-photon detectors showed that the detectors SDE (system detection efficiency) with increasing bias current (Ib) reaches a constant value of ~30% (for 1550 nm) defined by infrared radiation absorption by the superconducting structure. To enhance radiation absorption by the superconductor there were created detectors with cavity structures which demonstrated a practically constant value of quantum efficiency >65% for bias currents Ib>=0.6Ic. The minimal dark counts level (DC) made 1 s^-1 limited with ba...

  4. Fabrication of Gamma Detectors Based on Magnetic Ag:Er Microcalorimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Stephan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Boyd, Stephen [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cantor, Robin [STAR Cryoelectronics, Santa Fe, NM (United States)

    2016-05-06

    This report discusses the photolithographic fabrication of ultra-high resolution gamma-ray detectors based on magnetic microcalorimeters (MMCs). The MMC uses a novel Er-doped silver sensor (Ag:Er) that is expected to have higher sensitivity than the Er-doped gold (Au:Er) sensors currently in use. The MMC also integrates the first-stage SQUID preamplifier on the same chip as the MMC gamma detector to increase its signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, the MMC uses a passive Ta-Nb heat switch to replace one of the common long-term failure points in earlier detectors. This report discusses the fabrication process we have developed to implement the proposed improvements.

  5. Discriminating cosmic muons and X-rays based on rise time using a GEM detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui-Yin; Zhao, Sheng-Ying; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xian-Ming; Qi, Hui-Rong; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Ke-Yan; Hu, Bi-Tao; Zhang, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Gas electron multiplier (GEM) detectors have been used in cosmic muon scattering tomography and neutron imaging over the last decade. In this work, a triple GEM device with an effective readout area of 10 cm × 10 cm is developed, and a method of discriminating between cosmic muons and X-rays based on rise time is tested. The energy resolution of the GEM detector is tested by 55Fe ray source to prove the GEM detector has a good performance. Analysis of the complete signal-cycles allows us to get the rise time and pulse heights. The experiment result indicates that cosmic muons and X-rays can be discriminated with an appropriate rise time threshold. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11135002, 11275235, 11405077, 11575073)

  6. Neutron imaging detector based on the muPIC micro-pixel chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Parker, J D; Fujioka, H; Harada, M; Iwaki, S; Kabuki, S; Kishimoto, Y; Kubo, H; Kurosawa, S; Miuchi, K; Nagae, T; Nishimura, H; Oku, T; Sawano, T; Shinohara, T; Suzuki, J; Takada, A; Tanimori, T; Ueno, K

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a prototype time-resolved neutron imaging detector employing the micro-pixel chamber (muPIC), a micro-pattern gaseous detector, coupled with a field programmable gate array-based data acquisition system for applications in neutron radiography at high-intensity neutron sources. The prototype system, with an active area of 10cm x 10cm and operated at a gas pressure of 2 atm, measures both the energy deposition (via time-over-threshold) and 3-dimensional track of each neutron-induced event, allowing the reconstruction of the neutron interaction point with improved accuracy. Using a simple position reconstruction algorithm, a spatial resolution of 349 +/- 36 microns was achieved, with further improvement expected. The detailed tracking allows strong rejection of background gamma-rays, resulting in an effective gamma sensitivity of 10^-12 or less, coupled with stable, robust neutron identification. The detector also features a time resolution of 0.6 microseconds.

  7. Demonstrating a directional detector based on neon for characterizing high energy neutrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hexley, Allie

    2016-03-01

    MITPC is a gas-based time projection chamber used for detecting fast, MeV-scale neutrons. The standard version of the detector relies on a mixture of 600 torr gas composed of 87.5% helium-4 and 12.5% tetrafluoromethane for precisely measuring the energy and direction of neutron-induced nuclear recoils. I describe studies performed with a prototype detector investigating the use of neon, as a replacement for helium-4, in the gas mixture. My discussion focuses on the advantages of neon as the fast neutron target for high energy neutron events (100 MeV) and a demonstration that the mixture will be effective for this event class. I show that the achievable gain and transverse diffusion of drifting electrons in the neon mixture are acceptable and that the detector uptime lost due to voltage breakdowns in the amplification plane is negligible, compared to 20% with the helium-4 mixture.

  8. A region segmentation based algorithm for building crystal position lookup table in scintillation detector

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Hai Peng; Liu, Shuang Quan; Fan, Xin; Cao, Xue Xiang; Chai, Pei; Shan, Bao Ci

    2014-01-01

    In scintillation detector, scintillation crystals are typically made into 2-dimension modular array. The location of incident gamma-ray need be calibrated due to spatial response nonlinearity. Generally, position histograms, the characteristic flood response of scintillation detectors, are used for position calibration. In this paper, a position calibration method based on crystal position lookup table which maps the inaccurate location calculated by Anger logic to the exact hitting crystal position has been proposed, Firstly, position histogram is segmented into disconnected regions. Then crystal marking points are labeled by finding the centroids of regions. Finally, crystal boundaries are determined and crystal position lookup table is generated. The scheme is evaluated by the whole-body PET scanner and breast dedicated SPECT detector developed by Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The results demonstrate that the algorithm is accurate, efficient, robust and general purpose.

  9. Impact of particles on the Planck HFI detectors: Ground-based measurements and physical interpretation

    CERN Document Server

    Catalano, A; Atik, Y; Benoit, A; Bréele, E; Bock, J J; Camus, P; Chabot, M; Charra, M; Crill, B P; Coron, N; Coulais, A; Désert, F -X; Fauvet, L; Giraud-Héraud, Y; Guillaudin, O; Holmes, W; Jones, W C; Lamarre, J -M; Macías-Pérez, J; Martinez, M; Miniussi, A; Monfardini, A; Pajot, F; Patanchon, G; Pelissier, A; Piat, M; Puget, J -L; Renault, C; Rosset, C; Santos, D; Sauvé, A; Spencer, L D; Sudiwala, R

    2014-01-01

    The Planck High Frequency Instrument (HFI) surveyed the sky continuously from August 2009 to January 2012. Its noise and sensitivity performance were excellent, but the rate of cosmic ray impacts on the HFI detectors was unexpectedly high. Furthermore, collisions of cosmic rays with the focal plane produced transient signals in the data (glitches) with a wide range of characteristics. A study of cosmic ray impacts on the HFI detector modules has been undertaken to categorize and characterize the glitches, to correct the HFI time-ordered data, and understand the residual effects on Planck maps and data products. This paper presents an evaluation of the physical origins of glitches observed by the HFI detectors. In order to better understand the glitches observed by HFI in flight, several ground-based experiments were conducted with flight-spare HFI bolometer modules. The experiments were conducted between 2010 and 2013 with HFI test bolometers in different configurations using varying particles and impact ener...

  10. Flexible calibration method for an inner surface detector based on circle structured light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ye; Gu, Yonggang; Jin, Yi; Zhai, Chao

    2016-02-10

    A new calibration method for an inner surface detector based on circle structured light is proposed in this study. Compared with existing methods, this technique is more flexible and practical and only requires a blank planar board and an additional camera, which is precalibrated under the detector's coordinate system. The board is observed by the detector and the additional camera at a few (at least two) different orientations, which need not be known. The mathematical model of this method considers different alignment errors, which are disregarded in existing methods; therefore, precise assembly is not required. The binocular intersection algorithm is used to calculate the coordinates of the calibration points. The measurement system calibrated by this method performs well in the field test in which the maximum relative error of the measured values is less than 0.18%. The experimental result indicates that this method is highly accurate and can be easily applied in inner surface detection.

  11. Fabrication of Gamma Detectors Based on Magnetic Ag:Er Microcalorimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedrich, Stephan [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Boyd, Stephen [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cantor, Robin [STAR Cryoelectronics, Santa Fe, NM (United States)

    2015-11-25

    This report discusses the photolithographic fabrication of ultra-high resolution gamma-ray detectors based on magnetic microcalorimeters (MMCs). The MMC uses a novel Er-doped silver sensor (Ag:Er) that is expected to have higher sensitivity than the Er-doped gold (Au:Er) sensors currently in use. The MMC also integrates the first-stage SQUID preamplifier on the same chip as the MMC gamma detector to increase its signal-to-noise ratio. In addition, the MMC uses a passive Ta-Nb heat switch to replace one of the common long-term failure points in earlier detectors. This report discusses the fabrication process we have developed to implement the proposed improvements.

  12. Capacitance and effective area of flush monopole probes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Johnson, William Arthur; Morris, Marvin E.; Basilio, Lorena I.; Lehr, Jane Marie; Higgins, Matthew B.

    2004-08-01

    Approximate formulas are constructed and numerical simulations are carried out for electric field derivative probes that have the form of flush mounted monopoles. Effects such as rounded edges are included. A method is introduced to make results from two-dimensional conformal mapping analyses accurately apply to the three-dimensional axisymmetric probe geometry

  13. Kaluza-Klein monopoles and gauged sigma-models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E; Janssen, B; Ortin, T; Alvarez-Gaumé, L.

    1997-01-01

    We propose an effective action for the eleven-dimensional (bosonic) Kaluza-Klein monopole solution. The construction of the action requires that the background fields admit an Abelian isometry group. The corresponding sigma-model is gauged with respect to this isometry. The gauged sigma-model is the

  14. Kaluza-Klein Monopoles and Gauged Sigma Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, E.A.

    1998-01-01

    We review some aspects of branes. In particular, we discuss the worldvolume theory describing the dynamics of the Kaluza-Klein monopole which turns out to be a gauged sigma model. We also briefly review some recent applications of gauged sigma models to the worldvolume description of massive branes,

  15. Seiberg-Witten Like Monopole Equations on IR5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DE(G)IRMENCI Nedim; KARAPAZAR Senay

    2011-01-01

    We give an analogy of Seiberg-Witten monopole equations on flat Euclidian space R5. For this we used an irreducible representation of complex Clifford algebra Cl5. For the curvature equation we use a kind of self-duality notion of a 2-form on R5 which is given in[1].

  16. Fermion dynamics in the Kaluza-Klein monopole geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bais, F.A.; Batenburg, P.

    1984-01-01

    The behaviour of charged particles in the Kaluza-Klein monopole geometry is studied. A discussion of the five-dimensional geodesics is followed by an analysis of the corresponding Dirac equation. A main observation is that a charged particle cannot reach the core of the pole, in contrast with the co

  17. Kaluza-Klein monopole and 5-brane effective actions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eyras, E; Lozano, Y

    2000-01-01

    We review the construction of the Kaluza-Klein monopole of the Type IIA theory in the most general case of a massive background, as well as its relation via T-duality with the Type IIB NS-5-brane. This last effective action is shown to be related by S-duality to the D5-brane effective action. [GRAPH

  18. Search for ultrarelativistic magnetic monopoles with the Pierre Auger observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anastasi, G. A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andrada, B.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Balaceanu, A.; Barreira Luz, R. J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Biteau, J.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Botti, A. M.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Briechle, F. L.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, L.; Cancio, A.; Canfora, F.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; D'Amico, S.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Jong, S. J.; De Mauro, G.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; De Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; Debatin, J.; Deligny, O.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, R. C.; Dova, M. T.; Dundovic, A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filipcic, A.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; Fuster, A.; Gaior, R.; Garcia, B.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glas, D.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gomez Vitale, P. F.; Gonzalez, N.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Qader; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huege, T.; Hulsman, J.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kaeaepae, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kemp, J.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Mezek, G. Kukec; Kunka, N.; Awad, A. Kuotb; LaHurd, D.; Lauscher, M.; Lebrun, P.; Legumina, R.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopes, L.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Casado, A.; Luce, Q.; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Masias Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Mockler, D.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafa, M.; Mueller, G.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, S.; Naranjo, I.; Nellen, L.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nozka, H.; Nunez, L. A.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pedreira, F.; Kala, J. Pe; Pelayo, R.; Pena-Rodriguez, J.; Pereira, L. A. S.; Perrone, L.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Ramos-Pollan, R.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravignani, D.; Reinert, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Fernandez, G. Rodriguez; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rogozin, D.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Sanabria Gomez, J. D.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E. M.; Santos, E.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sarmiento, C. A.; Sato, R.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schovanek, P.; Schroder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sigl, G.; Silli, G.; Sima, O.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sonntag, S.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Stanca, D.; Stanic, S.; Stasielak, J.; Stassi, P.; Strafella, F.; Suarez, F.; Suarez Duran, M.; Sudholz, T.; Suomijarvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taboada, A.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Torri, M.; Travnicek, P.; Trini, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Vergara Quispe, I. D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Villasenor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weindl, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynski, H.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yang, L.; Yelos, D.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zong, Z.; Zuccarello, F.

    2016-01-01

    We present a search for ultrarelativistic magnetic monopoles with the Pierre Auger observatory. Such particles, possibly a relic of phase transitions in the early Universe, would deposit a large amount of energy along their path through the atmosphere, comparable to that of ultrahigh-energy cosmic r

  19. Gravity of a noncanonical global monopole: conical topology and compactification

    CERN Document Server

    Prasetyo, Ilham

    2015-01-01

    We obtain solutions of Einstein's equations describing gravitational field outside a noncanonical global monopole with cosmological constant. In particular, we consider two models of k-monopoles: the Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) and the power-law types, and study their corresponding exterior gravitational fields. For each model we found two types of solutions. The first of which are global k-monopole black hole with conical global topology. These are generalizations of the Barriola-Vilenkin solution of global monopole. The appearance of noncanonical kinetic terms does not modify the critical symmetry-breaking scale, $\\eta_{crit}$, but it does affect the corresponding horizon(s). The second type of solution is compactification, whose topology is a product of two $2$-dimensional spaces with constant curvatures; ${\\mathcal Y}_4\\rightarrow {\\mathcal Z}_2\\times S^2$, with ${\\mathcal Y}, {\\mathcal Z}$ can be de Sitter, Minkowski, or Anti-de Sitter, and $S^2$ is the $2$-sphere. We investigate all possible compactificatio...

  20. Gravitational magnetic monopoles and Majumdar-Papapetrou stars

    CERN Document Server

    Lemos, J P S; Lemos, Jose' P. S.; Zanchin, Vilson T.

    2006-01-01

    A large amount of work has been dedicated to studying general relativity coupled to non-Abelian Yang-Mills type theories. It has been shown that the magnetic monopole, a solution of the Yang-Mills-Higgs equations can be coupled to gravitation. For a low Higgs mass there are regular solutions, and for a sufficiently massive monopole the system develops an extremal magnetic Reissner-Nordstrom quasi-horizon. These solutions, called quasi-black holes, although non-singular, are arbitrarily close to having a horizon. However, at the critical value the quasi-black hole turns into a degenerate spacetime. On the other hand, for a high Higgs mass, a sufficiently massive monopole develops also a quasi-black hole, but it turns into an extremal true horizon, with matter fields outside. One can also put a small Schwarzschild black hole inside the magnetic monopole, an example of a non-Abelian black hole. Surprisingly, Majumdar-Papapetrou systems, Abelian systems constructed from extremal dust, also show a resembling behav...

  1. Search for ultrarelativistic magnetic monopoles with the Pierre Auger observatory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anastasi, G. A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andrada, B.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Arqueros, F.; Arsene, N.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Avila, G.; Badescu, A. M.; Balaceanu, A.; Barreira Luz, R. J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Biteau, J.; Blaess, S. G.; Blanco, A.; Blazek, J.; Bleve, C.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Borodai, N.; Botti, A. M.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bretz, T.; Bridgeman, A.; Briechle, F. L.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, L.; Cancio, A.; Canfora, F.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Clay, R. W.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; D'Amico, S.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; de Jong, S. J.; De Mauro, G.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; De Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; Debatin, J.; Deligny, O.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; dos Anjos, R. C.; Dova, M. T.; Dundovic, A.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filipcic, A.; Fratu, O.; Freire, M. M.; Fujii, T.; Fuster, A.; Gaior, R.; Garcia, B.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Gherghel-Lascu, A.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glas, D.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Golup, G.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gomez Vitale, P. F.; Gonzalez, N.; Gookin, B.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Harton, J. L.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Qader; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Horandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huege, T.; Hulsman, J.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Johnsen, J. A.; Josebachuili, M.; Kaeaepae, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Keilhauer, B.; Kemp, E.; Kemp, J.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kuempel, D.; Mezek, G. Kukec; Kunka, N.; Awad, A. Kuotb; LaHurd, D.; Lauscher, M.; Lebrun, P.; Legumina, R.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopes, L.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Casado, A.; Luce, Q.; Lucero, A.; Malacari, M.; Mallamaci, M.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Maris, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Masias Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Mockler, D.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafa, M.; Mueller, G.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, S.; Naranjo, I.; Nellen, L.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P. H.; Niculescu-Oglinzanu, M.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nozka, H.; Nunez, L. A.; Ochilo, L.; Oikonomou, F.; Olinto, A.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pedreira, F.; Kala, J. Pe; Pelayo, R.; Pena-Rodriguez, J.; Pereira, L. A. S.; Perrone, L.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Ramos-Pollan, R.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravignani, D.; Reinert, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Fernandez, G. Rodriguez; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rogozin, D.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Sanabria Gomez, J. D.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santos, E. M.; Santos, E.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sarmiento, C. A.; Sato, R.; Schauer, M.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schimp, M.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schovanek, P.; Schroder, F. G.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sigl, G.; Silli, G.; Sima, O.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sonntag, S.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Stanca, D.; Stanic, S.; Stasielak, J.; Stassi, P.; Strafella, F.; Suarez, F.; Suarez Duran, M.; Sudholz, T.; Suomijarvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Taboada, A.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Torri, M.; Travnicek, P.; Trini, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Vergara Quispe, I. D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Villasenor, L.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weindl, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynski, H.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yang, L.; Yelos, D.; Yushkov, A.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zepeda, A.; Zimmermann, B.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zong, Z.; Zuccarello, F.

    2016-01-01

    We present a search for ultrarelativistic magnetic monopoles with the Pierre Auger observatory. Such particles, possibly a relic of phase transitions in the early Universe, would deposit a large amount of energy along their path through the atmosphere, comparable to that of ultrahigh-energy cosmic r

  2. Search for relativistic magnetic monopoles with the ANTARES neutrino telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Aguilar, J.A.; Kooijman, P.; Zuniga, J.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic monopoles are predicted in various unified gauge models and could be produced at intermediate mass scales. Their detection in a neutrino telescope is facilitated by the large amount of light emitted compared to that from muons. This paper reports on a search for upgoing relativistic magneti

  3. Fermion dynamics in the Kaluza-Klein monopole geometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bais, F.A.; Batenburg, P.

    1984-01-01

    The behaviour of charged particles in the Kaluza-Klein monopole geometry is studied. A discussion of the five-dimensional geodesics is followed by an analysis of the corresponding Dirac equation. A main observation is that a charged particle cannot reach the core of the pole, in contrast with the co

  4. FPGA-based GEM detector signal acquisition for SXR spectroscopy system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojenski, A.; Pozniak, K. T.; Kasprowicz, G.; Kolasinski, P.; Krawczyk, R.; Zabolotny, W.; Chernyshova, M.; Czarski, T.; Malinowski, K.

    2016-11-01

    The presented work is related to the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector soft X-ray spectroscopy system for tokamak applications. The used GEM detector has one-dimensional, 128 channel readout structure. The channels are connected to the radiation-hard electronics with configurable analog stage and fast ADCs, supporting speeds of 125 MSPS for each channel. The digitalized data is sent directly to the FPGAs using fast serial links. The preprocessing algorithms are implemented in the FPGAs, with the data buffering made in the on-board 2Gb DDR3 memory chips. After the algorithmic stage, the data is sent to the Intel Xeon-based PC for further postprocessing using PCI-Express link Gen 2. For connection of multiple FPGAs, PCI-Express switch 8-to-1 was designed. The whole system can support up to 2048 analog channels. The scope of the work is an FPGA-based implementation of the recorder of the raw signal from GEM detector. Since the system will work in a very challenging environment (neutron radiation, intense electro-magnetic fields), the registered signals from the GEM detector can be corrupted. In the case of the very intense hot plasma radiation (e.g. laser generated plasma), the registered signals can overlap. Therefore, it is valuable to register the raw signals from the GEM detector with high number of events during soft X-ray radiation. The signal analysis will have the direct impact on the implementation of photon energy computation algorithms. As the result, the system will produce energy spectra and topological distribution of soft X-ray radiation. The advanced software was developed in order to perform complex system startup and monitoring of hardware units. Using the array of two one-dimensional GEM detectors it will be possible to perform tomographic reconstruction of plasma impurities radiation in the SXR region.

  5. Assembling and Using an LED-Based Detector to Monitor Absorbance Changes during Acid-Base Titrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Willy G.; Cavalheiro, E´der T. G.

    2015-01-01

    A simple photometric assembly based in an LED as a light source and a photodiode as a detector is proposed in order to follow the absorbance changes as a function of the titrant volume added during the course of acid-base titrations in the presence of a suitable visual indicator. The simplicity and low cost of the electronic device allow the…

  6. Assembling and Using an LED-Based Detector to Monitor Absorbance Changes during Acid-Base Titrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Willy G.; Cavalheiro, E´der T. G.

    2015-01-01

    A simple photometric assembly based in an LED as a light source and a photodiode as a detector is proposed in order to follow the absorbance changes as a function of the titrant volume added during the course of acid-base titrations in the presence of a suitable visual indicator. The simplicity and low cost of the electronic device allow the…

  7. MMC-based low-temperature detector system of the AMoRE-Pilot experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, C. S.; Jeon, J. A.; Jo, H. S.; Kim, G. B.; Kim, H. L.; Kim, I.; Kim, S. R.; Kim, Y. H.; Kwon, D. H.; Lee, C.; Lee, H. J.; Lee, M. K.; Lee, S. H.; Oh, S. Y.; So, J. H.; Yoon, Y. S.

    2017-08-01

    Metallic magnetic calorimeters (MMCs) are highly sensitive temperature sensors that operate at millikelvin temperatures. An energy deposit in a detector can be measured using an MMC through the induced temperature increase. The MMC signal, i.e., a variation in magnetization can then be measured using a superconducting quantum interference device. MMCs are used in particle physics experiments searching for rare processes as their high sensitivity and fast response provide high energy and timing resolutions and good particle discrimination. Low-temperature detectors consisting of molybdenum-based scintillating crystals read out via MMCs were designed and built to perform simultaneous measurements of heat and light signals at millikelvin temperatures. These detectors have been used in the advanced Mo-based rare process experiment (AMoRE) that searches for the neutrinoless double beta decay of 100Mo. This article provides a detailed description of the MMC-based low-temperature detector system of the AMoRE-Pilot experiment which currently uses five crystals.

  8. An Adaptive Failure Detector Based on Quality of Service in Peer-to-Peer Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Dong

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The failure detector is one of the fundamental components that maintain high availability of Peer-to-Peer (P2P networks. Under different network conditions, the adaptive failure detector based on quality of service (QoS can achieve the detection time and accuracy required by upper applications with lower detection overhead. In P2P systems, complexity of network and high churn lead to high message loss rate. To reduce the impact on detection accuracy, baseline detection strategy based on retransmission mechanism has been employed widely in many P2P applications; however, Chen’s classic adaptive model cannot describe this kind of detection strategy. In order to provide an efficient service of failure detection in P2P systems, this paper establishes a novel QoS evaluation model for the baseline detection strategy. The relationship between the detection period and the QoS is discussed and on this basis, an adaptive failure detector (B-AFD is proposed, which can meet the quantitative QoS metrics under changing network environment. Meanwhile, it is observed from the experimental analysis that B-AFD achieves better detection accuracy and time with lower detection overhead compared to the traditional baseline strategy and the adaptive detectors based on Chen’s model. Moreover, B-AFD has better adaptability to P2P network.

  9. Pixel Vertex Detectors

    OpenAIRE

    Wermes, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    Pixel vertex detectors are THE instrument of choice for the tracking of charged particles close to the interaction point at the LHC. Hybrid pixel detectors, in which sensor and read-out IC are separate entities, constitute the present state of the art in detector technology. Three of the LHC detectors use vertex detectors based on this technology. A development period of almost 10 years has resulted in pixel detector modules which can stand the extreme rate and timing requirements as well as ...

  10. Ticor-based scintillation detectors for detection of mixed radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Litvinov, L A; Kolner, V B; Ryzhikov, V D; Volkov, V G; Tarasov, V A; Zelenskaya, O V

    2002-01-01

    Detection of mixed radiation of thermal neutrons and gamma-rays have been realized using a new ceramic material based on small-crystalline long-wave scintillator alpha-Al sub 2 O sub 3 :Ti (Ticor) and lithium fluoride. Characteristics are presented for scintillators with Si-PIN-PD type photoreceivers and PMT under sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu alpha-particles, sup 2 sup 0 sup 7 Bi internal conversion electrons,as well as sup 2 sup 4 sup 1 Am and sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs gamma-quanta. Detection efficiency of thermal neutron is estimated for composite materials based on Ticor and lithium fluoride.

  11. The MAPS-based vertex detector for the STAR experiment: Lessons learned and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contin, Giacomo, E-mail: gcontin@lbl.gov

    2016-09-21

    The PiXeL detector (PXL) of the STAR experiment at RHIC is the first application of the state-of-the-art thin Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) technology in a collider environment. The PXL, together with the Intermediate Silicon Tracker (IST) and the Silicon Strip Detector (SSD), form the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT), which has been designed to improve the vertex resolution and extend the STAR measurement capabilities in the heavy flavor domain, providing a clean probe for studying the Quark–Gluon Plasma. The two PXL layers are placed at a radius of 2.8 and 8 cm from the beam line, respectively, and is based on ultra-thin high resolution MAPS sensors. The sensor features 20.7 μm pixel pitch, 185.6 μs readout time and 170 mW/cm{sup 2} power dissipation. The detector is air-cooled, allowing a global material budget of 0.4% radiation length on the innermost layer. A novel mechanical approach to detector insertion allows for fast installation and integration of the pixel sub detector. The HFT took data in Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV during the 2014 RHIC run. Modified during the RHIC shutdown to improve its reliability, material budget, and tracking capabilities, the HFT took data in p+p and p+Au collisions at √s{sub NN}=200 GeV in the 2015 RHIC run. In this paper we present detector specifications, experience from the construction and operations, and lessons learned. We also show preliminary results from 2014 Au+Au data analyses, demonstrating the capabilities of charm reconstruction with the HFT. - Highlights: • First MAPS-based vertex detector in a collider experiment. • Achieved low material budget of 0.39% of radiation length per detector layer. • Track pointing resolution to the primary vertex better than 10⊕24 GeV/p×c μm. • Gain in significance for the topological reconstruction of the D{sup 0}−>K+π decay in STAR. • Observed latch-up induced damage of MAPS sensors.

  12. Detector with a profile-based cathode and a two-coordinate pad-strip readout system

    CERN Document Server

    Kuchinskiy, N A; Kravchuk, N P; Korenchenko, A S; Khomutov, N V; Smirnov, V S; Chekhovskii, V A; Movchan, S A; Zyazyulya, F E

    2011-01-01

    A detector with a profile-based cathode and a pad-strip cathode readout system is experimentally investigated. Cathode pads arranged along each anode wire are diagonally interconnected and form strips that cross the detector at an angle with respect to the anode wire. Two coordinates from the cathodes and one from the anode wire allow identification of tracks in high multiplicity events with a single detector plane.

  13. A crystal identification method for monolithic phoswich detectors based on scintillation light distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preziosi, E.; Pani, R.; Trigila, C.; Polito, C.; Bettiol, M.; Borrazzo, C.; Cinti, M. N.; Fabbri, A.; Pellegrini, R.; Pani, R.

    2016-12-01

    Phoswich detectors based on scintillation crystals are widely diffused for both PET and SPECT applications. In order to separate the signals arising from different layers many methods have been proposed in literature. Separation of the layers commonly relies on time discrimination or pulse height discrimination. In this work, by means of experimental measurement on a phoswich detector based on Lanthanum Bromide and Lutetium Fine Silicate monolithic crystals, a novel method allowing to separate signals coming from different layers has been evaluated. The main feature of this method, specifically developed for phoswich based on monolithic scintillation crystals, is the discrimination capability based on the scintillation light distribution shape. For this reason, the findings that will be shown could be easily extended to whatever combination of scintillator, independently from their decay time or light yield.

  14. The MAPS-based vertex detector for the STAR experiment: Lessons learned and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contin, Giacomo

    2016-09-01

    The PiXeL detector (PXL) of the STAR experiment at RHIC is the first application of the state-of-the-art thin Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) technology in a collider environment. The PXL, together with the Intermediate Silicon Tracker (IST) and the Silicon Strip Detector (SSD), form the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT), which has been designed to improve the vertex resolution and extend the STAR measurement capabilities in the heavy flavor domain, providing a clean probe for studying the Quark-Gluon Plasma. The two PXL layers are placed at a radius of 2.8 and 8 cm from the beam line, respectively, and is based on ultra-thin high resolution MAPS sensors. The sensor features 20.7 μm pixel pitch, 185.6 μs readout time and 170 mW/cm2 power dissipation. The detector is air-cooled, allowing a global material budget of 0.4% radiation length on the innermost layer. A novel mechanical approach to detector insertion allows for fast installation and integration of the pixel sub detector. The HFT took data in Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV during the 2014 RHIC run. Modified during the RHIC shutdown to improve its reliability, material budget, and tracking capabilities, the HFT took data in p+p and p+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV in the 2015 RHIC run. In this paper we present detector specifications, experience from the construction and operations, and lessons learned. We also show preliminary results from 2014 Au+Au data analyses, demonstrating the capabilities of charm reconstruction with the HFT.

  15. CFAR Detector Based on Goodness-of-Fit Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaobo; Pi, Yiming; Cao, Zhenglin

    This paper develops a complete architecture for constant false alarm rate (CFAR) detection based on a goodness-of-fit (GOF) test. This architecture begins with a logarithmic amplifier, which transforms the background distribution, whether Weibull or lognormal into a location-scale (LS) one, some relevant properties of which are exploited to ensure CFAR. A GOF test is adopted at last to decide whether the samples under test belong to the background or are abnormal given the background and so should be declared to be a target of interest. The performance of this new CFAR scheme is investigated both in homogeneous and multiple interfering targets environment.

  16. EIT Based Gas Detector Design by Using Michelson Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasian, K.; Rostami, A.; Abdollahi, M. H.

    2011-12-01

    Electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is one of the interesting phenomena of light-matter interaction which modifies matter properties for propagation of light. In other words, we can change the absorption and refractive index (RI) in neighborhood of the resonant frequency using EIT. In this paper, we have doped 3-level quantum dots in one of the Michelson Interferometer's mirror and used EIT to change its RI. So, a controllable phase difference between lights in two arms of interferometer is created. Long response time is the main drawback of Michelson interferometer based sensor, which is resolved by this technique.

  17. Test of a prototype neutron spectrometer based on diamond detectors in a fast reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Osipenko, M; Ripani, M; Pillon, M; Ricco, G; Caiffi, B; Cardarelli, R; Verona-Rinati, G; Argiro, S

    2015-01-01

    A prototype of neutron spectrometer based on diamond detectors has been developed. This prototype consists of a $^6$Li neutron converter sandwiched between two CVD diamond crystals. The radiation hardness of the diamond crystals makes it suitable for applications in low power research reactors, while a low sensitivity to gamma rays and low leakage current of the detector permit to reach good energy resolution. A fast coincidence between two crystals is used to reject background. The detector was read out using two different electronic chains connected to it by a few meters of cable. The first chain was based on conventional charge-sensitive amplifiers, the other used a custom fast charge amplifier developed for this purpose. The prototype has been tested at various neutron sources and showed its practicability. In particular, the detector was calibrated in a TRIGA thermal reactor (LENA laboratory, University of Pavia) with neutron fluxes of $10^8$ n/cm$^2$s and at the 3 MeV D-D monochromatic neutron source na...

  18. GATE simulation of a LYSO-based SPECT imager: Validation and detector optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Suying [Department of Biomedicine and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, No. 5 Yiheyuan Road, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang, Qiushi [Institute for Drug and Instrument Control of Health Department GLD of PLA, No. 17 Fengtai West Road, Beijing 100071 (China); Xie, Zhaoheng; Liu, Qi [Department of Biomedicine and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, No. 5 Yiheyuan Road, Beijing 100871 (China); Xu, Baixuan [The General Hospital of Chinese People’s Liberation Army, No. 28 Fuxing Road, Beijing 100039 (China); Yang, Kun; Li, Changhui [Department of Biomedicine and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, No. 5 Yiheyuan Road, Beijing 100871 (China); Ren, Qiushi, E-mail: renqsh@coe.pku.edu.cn [Department of Biomedicine and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, No. 5 Yiheyuan Road, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-02-11

    This paper presents a small animal SPECT system that is based on cerium doped lutetium–yttrium oxyorthosilicate (LYSO) scintillation crystal, position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs) and parallel hole collimator. Spatial resolution test and animal experiment were performed to demonstrate the imaging performance of the detector. Preliminary results indicated a spatial resolution of 2.5 mm at FWHM that cannot meet our design requirement. Therefore, we simulated this gamma camera using GATE (GEANT 4 Application for Tomographic Emission) aiming to make detector spatial resolution less than 2 mm. First, the GATE simulation process was validated through comparison between simulated and experimental data. This also indicates the accuracy and effectiveness of GATE simulation for LYSO-based gamma camera. Then the different detector sampling methods (crystal size with 1.5, and 1 mm) and collimator design (collimator height with 30, 34.8, 38, and 43 mm) were studied to figure out an optimized parameter set. Detector sensitivity changes were also focused on with different parameters set that generated different spatial resolution results. Tradeoff curves of spatial resolution and sensitivity were plotted to determine the optimal collimator height with different sampling methods. Simulation results show that scintillation crystal size of 1 mm and collimator height of 38 mm, which can generate a spatial resolution of ∼1.8 mm and sensitivity of ∼0.065 cps/kBq, can be an ideal configuration for our SPECT imager design.

  19. A Wireless Sensor Network-Based Portable Vehicle Detector Evaluation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-eun Yoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In an upcoming smart transportation environment, performance evaluations of existing Vehicle Detection Systems are crucial to maintain their accuracy. The existing evaluation method for Vehicle Detection Systems is based on a wired Vehicle Detection System reference and a video recorder, which must be operated and analyzed by capable traffic experts. However, this conventional evaluation system has many disadvantages. It is inconvenient to deploy, the evaluation takes a long time, and it lacks scalability and objectivity. To improve the evaluation procedure, this paper proposes a Portable Vehicle Detector Evaluation System based on wireless sensor networks. We describe both the architecture and design of a Vehicle Detector Evaluation System and the implementation results, focusing on the wireless sensor networks and methods for traffic information measurement. With the help of wireless sensor networks and automated analysis, our Vehicle Detector Evaluation System can evaluate a Vehicle Detection System conveniently and objectively. The extensive evaluations of our Vehicle Detector Evaluation System show that it can measure the traffic information such as volume counts and speed with over 98% accuracy.

  20. A wireless sensor network-based portable vehicle detector evaluation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Seong-eun

    2013-01-17

    In an upcoming smart transportation environment, performance evaluations of existing Vehicle Detection Systems are crucial to maintain their accuracy. The existing evaluation method for Vehicle Detection Systems is based on a wired Vehicle Detection System reference and a video recorder, which must be operated and analyzed by capable traffic experts. However, this conventional evaluation system has many disadvantages. It is inconvenient to deploy, the evaluation takes a long time, and it lacks scalability and objectivity. To improve the evaluation procedure, this paper proposes a Portable Vehicle Detector Evaluation System based on wireless sensor networks. We describe both the architecture and design of a Vehicle Detector Evaluation System and the implementation results, focusing on the wireless sensor networks and methods for traffic information measurement. With the help of wireless sensor networks and automated analysis, our Vehicle Detector Evaluation System can evaluate a Vehicle Detection System conveniently and objectively. The extensive evaluations of our Vehicle Detector Evaluation System show that it can measure the traffic information such as volume counts and speed with over 98% accuracy.

  1. Simulation of Low Gain Avalanche Detector characteristics based on the concept of negative feedback in irradiated silicon detectors with carrier impact ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbitskaya, E.; Eremin, V.; Zabrodskii, A.; Luukka, P.

    2016-12-01

    In this study the main characteristics of silicon Low Gain Avalanche Detectors (LGAD), the dependencies of the collected charge versus bias voltage and fluence, are calculated to fit experimental data. The calculations are based on two previously developed Ioffe Institute models of radiation degradation in Si detectors: 1) a model of two effective energy levels of radiation-induced defects, and 2) a mechanism of internal negative feedback responsible for the gain degradation in irradiated Si detectors originating from the avalanche multiplication at the detector junction. The combination of these models describes well the properties of irradiated p-i-n detectors in a wide range of fluences. For simulating the LGAD characteristics the models are adapted to its n+-pbi-p-p+ structure, where the built-in boron-doped layer pbi produces high electric field sufficient for carrier impact ionization. It is shown that the developed models give adequate quantitative description of the experimental results for the LGADs up to the fluence of 2×1015 n/cm2 including the detector pulse response; however, additional boron removal from the pbi layer is required to have the best correlation with the experimental data. Similar to the physical model developed for silicon strip detectors operated at high voltage, the results are interpreted in terms of the internal negative feedback mechanism. It is shown that in irradiated LGADs this feedback leads to the transfer of a significant fraction of the potential drop from the built-in layer toward the p+ contact. It initiates two negative effects, which both cause the gain degradation with irradiation: the lowering of the electric field in the n+-pbi region that reduces the multiplication probability, and the increase of the collection time and trapping-related charge losses.

  2. Gamma thermometer based reactor core liquid level detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Thomas J.

    1983-01-01

    A system is provided which employs a modified gamma thermometer for determining the liquid coolant level within a nuclear reactor core. The gamma thermometer which normally is employed to monitor local core heat generation rate (reactor power), is modified by thermocouple junctions and leads to obtain an unambiguous indication of the presence or absence of coolant liquid at the gamma thermometer location. A signal processor generates a signal based on the thermometer surface heat transfer coefficient by comparing the signals from the thermocouples at the thermometer location. The generated signal is a direct indication of loss of coolant due to the change in surface heat transfer when coolant liquid drops below the thermometer location. The loss of coolant indication is independent of reactor power at the thermometer location. Further, the same thermometer may still be used for the normal power monitoring function.

  3. The scientific potential of space-based gravitational wave detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gair, Jonathan R

    2014-01-01

    The millihertz gravitational wave band can only be accessed with a space-based interferometer, but it is one of the richest in potential sources. Observations in this band have amazing scientific potential. The mergers between massive black holes with mass in the range 10 thousand to 10 million solar masses, which are expected to occur following the mergers of their host galaxies, produce strong millihertz gravitational radiation. Observations of these systems will trace the hierarchical assembly of structure in the Universe in a mass range that is very difficult to probe electromagnetically. Stellar mass compact objects falling into such black holes in the centres of galaxies generate detectable gravitational radiation for several years prior to the final plunge and merger with the central black hole. Measurements of these systems offer an unprecedented opportunity to probe the predictions of general relativity in the strong-field and dynamical regime. Millihertz gravitational waves are also generated by mil...

  4. Circularly polarized light detector based on ferromagnet/semiconductor junctions

    CERN Document Server

    Ikeda, H; Nishibayashi, K; Munekata, H

    2014-01-01

    Helicity-dependent photocurrent delta-I has been detected successfully under experimental configuration that a circularly polarized light beam is impinged with a right angle on a cleaved sidewall of the Fe/x-AlOx/GaAs-based n-i-p double-heterostructure. The photocurrent delta-I has showed a well-defined hysteresis loop which resembles that of the magnetization of the in-plane magnetized Fe layer in the devices. The value of delta-I has been |delta-I|~0.2 nA at 5 K under the remnant magnetization state. Study on temperature dependence of the relative delta-I value at H = 0 has revealed that it is maximized at temperatures 125 - 150 K, and is still measurable at room temperature.

  5. Diagnosis of compartment syndrome using a microwave-based detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Geoffrey S. F.; Riechers, Ronald G., Sr.; Pasala, Krishna M.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Rosner, Michael; Jarell, Abel; Yun, Catherine; Garcia-Pinto, Patricia; Song, Ki-Il; Day, Keith; Riechers, Ronald G., Jr.; Zeidman, Seth M.; Rhee, Peter; Ecklund, James M.; Fitzpatrick, Thomas; Lockhart, Stephen

    2002-07-01

    A novel method for identifying compartment syndrome is presented. This method is based on a novel device that uses electromagnetic waves in the microwave radio frequency (RF) region and a modified algorithm previously used for the estimation of the angle of arrival of radar signals. In this study, we employ this radio frequency triage tool (RAFT) to the clinical condition of compartment syndrome, which is a clinical condition where blood or edema in the muscle compartment of the leg leads to critical sichemia of that exptremity. In anesthetized pigs, RAFT, can detect changes in the RF signature from a leg is due to 2cc or greater of either blood or slaine (a surrogate of edema). These results are compared to clinical examination. RAFT is superior to clinical examination in its ability to detect compartment syndrome in pgis.

  6. Joint Preprocesser-Based Detectors for One-Way and Two-Way Cooperative Communication Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Abuzaid, Abdulrahman I.

    2014-05-01

    Efficient receiver designs for cooperative communication networks are becoming increasingly important. In previous work, cooperative networks communicated with the use of L relays. As the receiver is constrained, channel shortening and reduced-rank techniques were employed to design the preprocessing matrix that reduces the length of the received vector from L to U. In the first part of the work, a receiver structure is proposed which combines our proposed threshold selection criteria with the joint iterative optimization (JIO) algorithm that is based on the mean square error (MSE). Our receiver assists in determining the optimal U. Furthermore, this receiver provides the freedom to choose U for each frame depending on the tolerable difference allowed for MSE. Our study and simulation results show that by choosing an appropriate threshold, it is possible to gain in terms of complexity savings while having no or minimal effect on the BER performance of the system. Furthermore, the effect of channel estimation on the performance of the cooperative system is investigated. In the second part of the work, a joint preprocessor-based detector for cooperative communication networks is proposed for one-way and two-way relaying. This joint preprocessor-based detector operates on the principles of minimizing the symbol error rate (SER) instead of minimizing MSE. For a realistic assessment, pilot symbols are used to estimate the channel. From our simulations, it can be observed that our proposed detector achieves the same SER performance as that of the maximum likelihood (ML) detector with all participating relays. Additionally, our detector outperforms selection combining (SC), channel shortening (CS) scheme and reduced-rank techniques when using the same U. Finally, our proposed scheme has the lowest computational complexity.

  7. Stroke Detector and Structure Based Models for Character Recognition: A Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Cun-Zhao; Gao, Song; Liu, Meng-Tao; Qi, Cheng-Zuo; Wang, Chun-Heng; Xiao, Bai-Hua

    2015-12-01

    Characters, which are man-made symbols composed of strokes arranged in a certain structure, could provide semantic information and play an indispensable role in our daily life. In this paper, we try to make use of the intrinsic characteristics of characters and explore the stroke and structure-based methods for character recognition. First, we introduce two existing part-based models to recognize characters by detecting the elastic strokelike parts. In order to utilize strokes of various scales, we propose to learn the discriminative multi-scale stroke detector-based representation (DMSDR) for characters. However, the part-based models and DMSDR need to manually label the parts or key points for training. In order to learn the discriminative stroke detectors automatically, we further propose the discriminative spatiality embedded dictionary learning-based representation (DSEDR) for character recognition. We make a comparative study of the performance of the tree-structured model (TSM), mixtures-of-parts TSM, DMSDR, and DSEDR for character recognition on three challenging scene character recognition (SCR) data sets as well as two handwritten digits recognition data sets. A series of experiments is done on these data sets with various experimental setup. The experimental results demonstrate the suitability of stroke detector-based models for recognizing characters with deformations and distortions, especially in the case of limited training samples.

  8. The study of the field equations of a rotating magnetic monopole%旋转磁单极子场方程的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡永红; 毛彩霞

    2012-01-01

    从‘t Hooft磁单极子和Julia-Zee双子的场方程及其严格经典解出发,推导了稳态旋转磁单极子的场方程.并讨论了旋转对磁单极子解随旋转角速度增大的变化情况.%We deduced the stable-state field equations of the rotating magnetic monopole based on the field equations and their solutions of the ' t Hooft magnetic monopole and the Julia-Zee dyon. And we discussed the variations of the rotating magnetic monopole solution with respect to the variation of the angular velocity of rotation.

  9. Bioaerosol collection and concentration for microseparations-based detectors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cummings, Eric B. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Ellis, C. R. Bowe (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Kanouff, Michael P. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Rader, Daniel John; Wally, Karl (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-03-01

    The ability to detect Weapons of Mass Destruction biological agents rapidly and sensitively is vital to homeland security, spurring development of compact detection systems at Sandia and elsewhere. One such system is Sandia's microseparations-based pChemLab. Many bio-agents are serious health threats even at extremely low concentrations. Therefore, a universal challenge for detection systems is the efficient collection and selective transport of highly diffuse bio-agents against the enormous background of benign particles and species ever present in the ambient environment. We have investigated development of a ''front end'' system for the collection, preconcentration, and selective transport of aerosolized biological agents from dilute (1-10 active particles per liter of air) atmospheric samples, to ultimate concentrations of {approx}20 active particles per microliter of liquid, for interface with microfluidic-based analyses and detection systems. Our approach employs a Sandia-developed aerosol particle-focusing microseparator array to focus size-selected particles into a mating microimpinger array of open microfluidic transport channels. Upon collection (i.e., impingement, submergence, and liquid suspension), microfluidic dielectrophoretic particle concentrators and sorters can be employed to further concentrate and selectively transport bio-agent particles to the sample preparation stages of microfluidic analyses and detection systems. This report documents results in experimental testing, modeling and analysis, component design, and materials fabrication critical to establishing proof-of-principle for this collection ''front end''. Outstanding results have been achieved for the aerodynamic microseparator, and for the post-collection dielectrophoretic concentrator and sorter. Results have been obtained for the microimpinger, too, but issues of particle-trapping by surface tension in liquid surfaces have proven

  10. Dirac Monopole from Lorentz Symmetry in N-Dimensions: II. The Generalized Monopole

    CERN Document Server

    Land, M

    2006-01-01

    In a previous paper, we found an extension of the N-dimensional Lorentz generators that partially restores the closed operator algebra in the presence of a Maxwell field, and is conserved under system evolution. Generalizing the construction found by Berard, Grandati, Lages and Mohrbach for the angular momentum operators in the O(3)-invariant nonrelativistic case, we showed that the construction can be maximally satisfied in a three dimensional subspace of the full Minkowski space; this subspace can be chosen to describe either the O(3)-invariant space sector, or an O(2,1)-invariant restriction of spacetime. When the O(3)-invariant subspace is selected, the field solution reduces to the Dirac monopole field found in the nonrelativistic case. For the O(2,1)-invariant subspace, the Maxwell field can be associated with a Coulomb-like potential on spacetime, similar to that used by Horwitz and Arshansky to obtain a covariant generalization of the hydrogen-like bound state. In this paper we elaborate on the genera...

  11. GEM400: A front-end chip based on capacitor-switch array for pixel-based GEM detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H. S.; Jiang, X. S.; Liu, G.; Wang, N.; Sheng, H. Y.; Zhuang, B. A.; Zhao, J. W.

    2012-03-01

    The upgrade of Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF) needs two-dimensional position-sensitive detection equipment to improve the experimental performance. Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) detector, in particular, pixel-based GEM detector has good application prospects in the domain of synchrotron radiation. The read-out of larger scale pixel-based GEM detector is difficult for the high density of the pixels (PAD for collecting electrons). In order to reduce the number of cables, this paper presents a read-out scheme for pixel-based GEM detector, which is based on System-in-Package technology and ASIC technology. We proposed a circuit structure based on capacitor switch array circuit, and design a chip GEM400, which is a 400 channels ASIC. The proposed circuit can achieve good stability and low power dissipation. The chip is implemented in a 0.35μm CMOS process. The basic functional circuitry in ths chip includes analog switch, analog buffer, voltage amplifier, bandgap and control logic block, and the layout of this chip takes 5mm × 5mm area. The simulation results show that the chip can allow the maximum amount of input charge 70pC on the condition of 100pF external integrator capacitor. Besides, the chip has good channel uniformity (INL is better than 0.1%) and lower power dissipation.

  12. Model-based detector and extraction of weak signal frequencies from chaotic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Cangtao; Cai, Tianxing; Heng Lai, Choy; Wang, Xingang; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2008-03-01

    Detecting a weak signal from chaotic time series is of general interest in science and engineering. In this work we introduce and investigate a signal detection algorithm for which chaos theory, nonlinear dynamical reconstruction techniques, neural networks, and time-frequency analysis are put together in a synergistic manner. By applying the scheme to numerical simulation and different experimental measurement data sets (Henon map, chaotic circuit, and NH(3) laser data sets), we demonstrate that weak signals hidden beneath the noise floor can be detected by using a model-based detector. Particularly, the signal frequencies can be extracted accurately in the time-frequency space. By comparing the model-based method with the standard denoising wavelet technique as well as supervised principal components analysis detector, we further show that the nonlinear dynamics and neural network-based approach performs better in extracting frequencies of weak signals hidden in chaotic time series.

  13. Performance of the Insertable B-Layer for the ATLAS Pixel Detector during Quality Assurance and a Novel Pixel Detector Readout Concept based on PCIe

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00356268; Pernegger, Heinz

    2016-07-27

    During the first long shutdown of the LHC the Pixel detector has been upgraded with a new 4th innermost layer, the Insertable B-Layer (IBL). The IBL will increase the tracking performance and help with higher than nominal luminosity the LHC will produce. The IBL is made up of 14 staves and in total 20 staves have been produced for the IBL. This thesis presents the results of the final quality tests performed on these staves in an detector-like environment, in order to select the 14 best of the 20 staves for integration onto the detector. The test setup as well as the testing procedure is introduced and typical results of each testing stage are shown and discussed. The overall performance of all staves is presented in regards to: tuning performance, radioactive source measurements, and number of failing pixels. Other measurement, which did not directly impact the selection of staves, but will be important for the operation of the detector or production of a future detector, are included. Based on the experienc...

  14. Evaluation of signal energy calculation methods for a light-sharing SiPM-based PET detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qingyang; Ma, Tianyu; Xu, Tianpeng; Liu, Yaqiang; Wang, Shi; Gu, Yu

    2017-03-01

    Signals of a light-sharing positron emission tomography (PET) detector are commonly multiplexed to three analog pulses (E, X, and Y) and then digitally sampled. From this procedure, the signal energy that are critical to detector performance are obtained. In this paper, different signal energy calculation strategies for a self-developed SiPM-based PET detector, including pulse height and different integration methods, are evaluated in terms of energy resolution and spread of the crystal response in the flood histogram using a root-mean-squared (RMS) index. Results show that integrations outperform the pulse height. Integration using the maximum derivative value of the pulse E as the landmark point and 28 integrated points (448 ns) has the best performance in these evaluated methods for our detector. Detector performance in terms of energy and position is improved with this integration method. The proposed methodology is expected to be applicable for other light-sharing PET detectors.

  15. Hit time and hit position reconstruction in the J-PET detector based on a library of averaged model signals

    CERN Document Server

    Moskal, P; Silarski, M; Bednarski, T; Białas, P; Bułka, J; Czerwiński, E; Gajos, A; Kamińska, D; Kapłon, L; Kochanowski, A; Korcyl, G; Kowal, J; Kowalski, P; Kozik, T; Krzemień, W; Kubicz, E; Niedźwiecki, Sz; Pałka, M; Raczyński, L; Rudy, Z; Rundel, O; Salabura, P; Słomski, A; Smyrski, J; Strzelecki, A; Wieczorek, A; Wiślicki, W; Wochlik, I; Zieliński, M; Zoń, N

    2015-01-01

    In this article we present a novel method of hit time and hit position reconstruction in long scintillator detectors. We take advantage of the fact that for this kind of detectors amplitude and shape of registered signals depends strongly on the position where particle hit the detector. The reconstruction is based on determination of the degree of similarity between measured and averaged signals stored in a library for a set of well-defined positions along the scintillator. Preliminary results of validation of the introduced method with experimental data obtained by means of the double strip prototype of the J-PET detector are presented.

  16. Development of Si-based detectors for intermediate energy heavy-ion physics at a storage-ring accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitlow, H.J.; Jaworowski, J.; Leandersson, M.; El Bouanani, M. [Lund Institute of Technology, Solvegatan Lund, (Sweden). Department of Nuclear Physics; Jakobsson, B. [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Cosmic and Subatomic Physics; Romanski, J.; Westerberg, L.; Van Veldhuizen, E.J. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden); The Chicsi Collaboration

    1996-12-31

    Ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) compatible Si detectors are being developed by the CELSIUS Heavy lon Collaboration (CHIC) for measuring the energy and identity of Intermediate Mass Fragments (IMF) with Z {approx} 3 - 12 and energies of 0.7 - I 0 A MeV. Here we give an overview of the development of Si {delta}E-E detector telescopes and investigations on IMF identification based on the pulse shape from Si-detectors where the particles impinge on the rear-face of the detector. 9 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Extensive simulation studies on the reconstructed image resolution of a position sensitive detector based on pixelated CdTe crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Zachariadou, K; Kaissas, I; Seferlis, S; Lambropoulos, C; Loukas, D; Potiriadis, C

    2011-01-01

    We present results on the reconstructed image resolution of a position sensitive radiation instrument (COCAE) based on extensive simulation studies. The reconstructed image resolution has been investigated in a wide range of incident photon energies emitted by point-like sources located at different source-to-detector distances on and off the detector's symmetry axis. The ability of the detector to distinguish multiple radioactive sources observed simultaneously is investigating by simulating point-like sources of different energies located on and off the detector's symmetry axis and at different positions

  18. Status and progress of the novel photon detectors based on THGEM and hybrid MPGD architectures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexeev, M.; Birsa, R. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Büchele, M. [Universität Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Chiosso, M. [INFN, Sezione di Torino and University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Ciliberti, P. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Dalla Torre, S.; Dasgupta, S. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Denisov, O. [INFN, Sezione di Torino, Torino (Italy); Duic, V. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Finger, M.; Finger, M. [Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); Fischer, H. [Universität Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Giorgi, M. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Gobbo, B.; Gregori, M. [INFN, Sezione di Trieste, Trieste (Italy); Herrmann, F.; Königsmann, K. [Universität Freiburg, Physikalisches Institut, Freiburg (Germany); Levorato, S., E-mail: stefano.levorato@ts.infn.it [INFN, Sezione di Trieste and University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy); and others

    2014-12-01

    We are developing large size THick GEM (THGEM)-based detectors of single photons, mainly meant for Cherenkov imaging applications. The R and D programme includes the complete characterisation of the THGEM electron multipliers, the study of the aspects related to the detection of single photons and the engineering towards large size detector prototypes. Our most recent achievements include dedicated studies concerning the ion backflow to the photocathode; relevant progress in the engineering aspects, in particularly related to the production of large-size THGEMs, where the strict correlation between the local gain-value and the local thickness-value has been demonstrated and a 300×300 mm{sup 2} active area detector has been successfully operated at the CERN PS T10 test beam; the introduction of a new hybrid detector architecture, offering promising performance, which is formed by a THGEM layer which acts both as photocathode and pre-amplification device, followed by a MICROMEGAS (MM) multiplication stage. We report about the general status of the R and D programme and, in detail, about the recent progress. - Highlights: • The paper presents a study of micropattern gas electron multipliers based on THGEMs. • The paper focuses on the use of THGEMs as photon detector for RICH application: single photon detection. • The paper addresses the R and D activity and the results obtained both in laboratory activities and test beams. • The paper describes the technological challenges to instrument large surfaces, presenting possible solutions to the critical issues faced during the R and D activity.

  19. Low SWaP MWIR detector based on XBn focal plane array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klipstein, P. C.; Gross, Y.; Aronov, D.; ben Ezra, M.; Berkowicz, E.; Cohen, Y.; Fraenkel, R.; Glozman, A.; Grossman, S.; Klin, O.; Lukomsky, I.; Marlowitz, T.; Shkedy, L.; Shtrichman, I.; Snapi, N.; Tuito, A.; Yassen, M.; Weiss, E.

    2013-06-01

    Over the past few years, a new type of High Operating Temperature (HOT) photon detector has been developed at SCD, which operates in the blue part of the MWIR window of the atmosphere (3.4-4.2 μm). This window is generally more transparent than the red part of the MWIR window (4.4-4.9 μm), especially for mid and long range applications. The detector has an InAsSb active layer, and is based on the new "XBn" device concept. We have analyzed various electrooptical systems at different atmospheric temperatures, based on XBn-InAsSb operating at 150K and epi-InSb at 95K, respectively, and find that the typical recognition ranges of both detector technologies are similar. Therefore, for very many applications there is no disadvantage to using XBn-InAsSb instead of InSb. On the other hand XBn technology confers many advantages, particularly in low Size, Weight and Power (SWaP) and in the high reliability of the cooler and Integrated Detector Cooler Assembly (IDCA). In this work we present a new IDCA, designed for 150K operation. The 15 μm pitch 640×512 digital FPA is housed in a robust, light-weight, miniaturised Dewar, attached to Ricor's K562S Stirling cycle cooler. The complete IDCA has a diameter of 28 mm, length of 80 mm and weight of < 300 gm. The total IDCA power consumption is ~ 3W at a 60Hz frame rate, including an external miniature proximity card attached to the outside of the Dewar. We describe some of the key performance parameters of the new detector, including its NETD, RNU and operability, pixel cross-talk, and early stage yield results from our production line.

  20. Towards monolithic scintillator based TOF-PET systems: practical methods for detector calibration and operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghi, Giacomo; Tabacchini, Valerio; Schaart, Dennis R.

    2016-07-01

    Gamma-ray detectors based on thick monolithic scintillator crystals can achieve spatial resolutions  published k-NN 1D method. Also, the procedures for estimating the DOI and time of interaction are revised to enable full detector calibration by means of fan-beam or flood irradiations only. Moreover, a new technique is presented to allow the use of events in which some of the photosensor pixel values and/or timestamps are missing (e.g. due to dead time), so as to further increase system sensitivity. The accelerated methods were tested on a monolithic scintillator detector specifically developed for clinical PET applications, consisting of a 32 mm  ×  32 mm  ×  22 mm LYSO : Ce crystal coupled to a digital photon counter (DPC) array. This resulted in a spatial resolution of 1.7 mm FWHM, an average DOI resolution of 3.7 mm FWHM, and a CRT of 214 ps. Moreover, the possibility of using events missing the information of up to 16 out of 64 photosensor pixels is shown. This results in only a small deterioration of the detector performance.