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Sample records for monophosphate cgmp cascade

  1. cyclic monophosphate

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2006-10-02

    Oct 2, 2006 ... Second messengers are small transient molecules that transmit and/or modulate environmental or hormonal signals ... cyclases (pGCs), and soluble cytosolic guanylyl cyclases ... Figure 2. Model of cGMP generation and cGMP dependent cellular effects. ..... dynamics of colonic epithelial proliferation.

  2. Vascular relaxation and cyclic guanosine monophosphate in hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otsuka, Y.; DiPiero, A.; Lockette, W.

    1986-03-01

    Isolated aortae from hypertensive rats have a decreased relaxation response to acetylcholine (Ach), A23187, and nitroprusside (SNP). Since cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) has been shown to increase in response to these vasodilators, the authors measured cGMP in response to these agents in isolated aortae from normotensive rats and DOCA, 1K1C, and coarctation induced hypertension. cGMP was measured by radioimmunoassay in vessels after exposure to phenylephrine followed by either Ach, A23187, or SNP. The aortae from the hypertensive rats had decreased basal levels of cGMP and attenuated increases in cGMP in response to Ach and A23187. Rises in cGMP in response to SNP were also attenuated in aortae from the hypertensive rats, even at concentrations which induced similar relaxation in normotensive and hypertensive blood vessels. The data suggest that changes in cGMP do not necessarily reflect changes in endothelium independent vascular relaxation in hypertension.

  3. Regulation of cGMP synthesis in cultured podocytes by vasoactive hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewko, B; Gołos, M; Latawiec, E; Angielski, S; Stepinski, J

    2006-12-01

    The podocytes are highly differentiated cells playing a key role in glomerular filtration. Vasoactive factors including angiotensin II (Ang II) and cyclic guanosine 5' monophosphate (cGMP) are synthesized by these cells upon stimulation as well as in the basal state. In this study we have tested whether angiotensin II affects the total synthesis of cGMP in primary culture of rat podocytes. The cells were stimulated with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and/or a nitric oxide (NO) donor, S-nitroso-N-acetyl penicillamine (SNAP), in the absence or presence of Ang II. The cGMP synthesis was determined by radioimmunoassay (RIA). ANP or SNAP alone increased the cGMP synthesis in podocytes although the effects were not additive unless Ang II was present in the medium. Ang II suppressed the ANP-dependent cGMP synthesis whereas SNAP-dependent cGMP production remained unaffected. These effects were prevented by a non-specific antagonist of Ang II receptors (AT), saralasin. Adversely, PD123319, a specific inhibitor of AT2 receptors, augmented inhibition of ANP-dependent and enhanced the NO-dependent cGMP production. Probenecid, an inhibitor of cGMP extrusion from the cells, suppressed the cGMP generation by both ANP and SNAP. We conclude that cGMP synthesis in cultured podocytes is modulated by angiotensin II and that two adversely acting receptors, AT1 and AT2 are involved in this effect. Additionally, production of cGMP might be intrinsically inhibited by cGMP accumulating inside the cells.

  4. cGMP signalling : different ways to create a pathway

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, Jeroen; Smith, Janet L.; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    2003-01-01

    Recently, a novel cGMP signalling cascade was uncovered in Dictyostelium, a eukaryote that diverged from the lineage leading to metazoa after plants and before yeast. In both Dictyostelium and metazoa, the ancient cAMP-binding (cNB) motif of bacterial CAP has been modified and assembled with other d

  5. Correlative intravital imaging of cGMP signals and vasodilation in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin eThunemann

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP is an important signaling molecule and drug target in the cardiovascular system. It is well known that stimulation of the vascular nitric oxide (NO-cGMP pathway results in vasodilation. However, the spatiotemporal dynamics of cGMP signals themselves and the cGMP concentrations within specific cardiovascular cell types in health, disease, and during pharmacotherapy with cGMP-elevating drugs are largely unknown. To facilitate the analysis of cGMP signaling in vivo, we have generated transgenic mice that express fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET-based cGMP sensor proteins. Here, we describe two models of intravital FRET/cGMP imaging in the vasculature of cGMP sensor mice: (1 epifluorescence-based ratio imaging in resistance-type vessels of the cremaster muscle and (2 ratio imaging by multiphoton microscopy within the walls of subcutaneous blood vessels accessed through a dorsal skinfold chamber. Both methods allow simultaneous monitoring of NO-induced cGMP transients and vasodilation in living mice. Detailed protocols of all steps necessary to perform and evaluate intravital imaging experiments of the vasculature of anesthetized mice including surgery, imaging, and data evaluation are provided. An image segmentation approach is described to estimate FRET/cGMP changes within moving structures such as the vessel wall during vasodilation. The methods presented herein should be useful to visualize cGMP or other biochemical signals that are detectable with FRET-based biosensors, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate or Ca2+, and to correlate them with respective vascular responses. With further refinement and combination of transgenic mouse models and intravital imaging technologies, we envision an exciting future, in which we are able to ‘watch’ biochemistry, (patho physiology, and pharmacotherapy in the context of a living mammalian organism.

  6. Correlative intravital imaging of cGMP signals and vasodilation in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thunemann, Martin; Schmidt, Kjestine; de Wit, Cor; Han, Xiaoxing; Jain, Rakesh K.; Fukumura, Dai; Feil, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is an important signaling molecule and drug target in the cardiovascular system. It is well known that stimulation of the vascular nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP pathway results in vasodilation. However, the spatiotemporal dynamics of cGMP signals themselves and the cGMP concentrations within specific cardiovascular cell types in health, disease, and during pharmacotherapy with cGMP-elevating drugs are largely unknown. To facilitate the analysis of cGMP signaling in vivo, we have generated transgenic mice that express fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based cGMP sensor proteins. Here, we describe two models of intravital FRET/cGMP imaging in the vasculature of cGMP sensor mice: (1) epifluorescence-based ratio imaging in resistance-type vessels of the cremaster muscle and (2) ratio imaging by multiphoton microscopy within the walls of subcutaneous blood vessels accessed through a dorsal skinfold chamber. Both methods allow simultaneous monitoring of NO-induced cGMP transients and vasodilation in living mice. Detailed protocols of all steps necessary to perform and evaluate intravital imaging experiments of the vasculature of anesthetized mice including surgery, imaging, and data evaluation are provided. An image segmentation approach is described to estimate FRET/cGMP changes within moving structures such as the vessel wall during vasodilation. The methods presented herein should be useful to visualize cGMP or other biochemical signals that are detectable with FRET-based biosensors, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate or Ca2+, and to correlate them with respective vascular responses. With further refinement and combination of transgenic mouse models and intravital imaging technologies, we envision an exciting future, in which we are able to “watch” biochemistry, (patho-)physiology, and pharmacotherapy in the context of a living mammalian organism. PMID:25352809

  7. Plasma levels of cAMP, cGMP and CGRP in sildenafil-induced headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruuse, Christina Rostrup; Frandsen, E; Schifter, S;

    2004-01-01

    Sildenafil, a selective inhibitor of the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) degrading phosphodiestrase 5 (PDE5), induced migraine without aura in 10 of 12 migraine patients and in healthy subjects it induced significantly more headache than placebo. The aim of the present study was to determin...... an important role of these signalling molecules, the present study questions whether cAMP and cGMP in peripheral blood can be used for monitoring pathophysiological events in headache and migraine mechanisms.......Sildenafil, a selective inhibitor of the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) degrading phosphodiestrase 5 (PDE5), induced migraine without aura in 10 of 12 migraine patients and in healthy subjects it induced significantly more headache than placebo. The aim of the present study was to determine...... whether the pain-inducing effects of sildenafil would be reflected in plasma levels of important signalling molecules in migraine: cGMP, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Ten healthy subjects (four women, six men) and 12 patients (12 women) suffering from...

  8. Smooth muscle cell-derived carbon monoxide is a regulator of vascular cGMP.

    OpenAIRE

    Morita, T.; Perrella, M A; Lee, M E; Kourembanas, S

    1995-01-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a product of the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO; EC 1.14.99.3). In vascular smooth muscle cells, exogenously administered CO increases cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP), which is an important regulator of vessel tone. We report here that smooth muscle cells produce CO via HO and that it regulates cGMP levels in these cells. Hypoxia, which has profound effects on vessel tone, significantly increased the transcriptional rate of the HO-1 gene resulting in correspondi...

  9. Modulation of cGMP by human HO-1 retrovirus gene transfer in pulmonary microvessel endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Nader G; Quan, Shuo; Mieyal, Paul A; Yang, Liming; Burke-Wolin, Theresa; Mingone, Christopher J; Goodman, Alvin I; Nasjletti, Alberto; Wolin, Michael S

    2002-11-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) stimulates guanylate cyclase (GC) and increases guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) levels. We transfected rat-lung pulmonary endothelial cells with a retrovirus-mediated human heme oxygenase (hHO)-1 gene. Pulmonary cells that expressed hHO-1 exhibited a fourfold increase in HO activity associated with decreases in the steady-state levels of heme and cGMP without changes in soluble GC (sGC) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) proteins or basal nitrite production. Heme elicited significant increases in CO production and intracellular cGMP levels in both pulmonary endothelial and pulmonary hHO-1-expressing cells. N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of NOS, significantly decreased cGMP levels in heme-treated pulmonary endothelial cells but not heme-treated hHO-1-expressing cells. In the presence of exogenous heme, CO and cGMP levels in hHO-1-expressing cells exceeded the corresponding levels in pulmonary endothelial cells. Acute exposure of endothelial cells to SnCl2, which is an inducer of HO-1, increased cGMP levels, whereas chronic exposure decreased heme and cGMP levels. These results indicate that prolonged overexpression of HO-1 ultimately decreases sGC activity by limiting the availability of cellular heme. Heme activates sGC and enhances cGMP levels via a mechanism that is largely insensitive to NOS inhibition.

  10. cGMP in Mouse Rods: the spatiotemporal dynamics underlying single photon responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen P. Gross

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Vertebrate vision begins when retinal photoreceptors transduce photons into membrane hyperpolarization, which reduces glutamate release onto second-order neurons. In rod photoreceptors, transduction of single photons is achieved by a well-understood G-protein cascade that modulates cGMP levels, and in turn, cGMP-sensitive inward current. The spatial extent and depth of the decline in cGMP during the single photon response have been major issues in phototransduction research since the discovery that single photons elicit substantial and reproducible changes in membrane current. The spatial profile of cGMP decline during the single photon response affects signal gain, and thus may contribute to reduction of trial-to-trial fluctuations in the single photon response. Here we summarize the general principles of rod phototransduction, emphasizing recent advances in resolving the spatiotemporal dynamics of cGMP during the single photon response.

  11. Effects of plant extract neferine on cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels in rabbit corpus cavernosum in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Chen; Ji-Hong Liu; Tao Wang; Heng-Jun Xiao; Chun-Ping Yin; Jun Yang

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To further investigate the relaxation mechanism of neferine (Nef), a bis-benzylisoquinoline alkaloid extracted (isolated) from the green seed embryo of Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn in China, on rabbit corpus cavernosum tissue in vitro. Methods: The effects of Nef on the concentrations of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in isolated and incubated rabbit corpus cavernosum tissue were re-corded using125Ⅰ radioimmunoassay. Results: The basal concentration of cAMP in corpus cavernosum tissue was 5.67±0.97 pmol/mg. Nef increased the cAMP concentration in a dose-dependent manner (P 0.05). The accumulation of cAMP induced by prostaglandin E1(PGE1, a stimulator of cAMP production) was also augmented by Nef in a dose-dependent manner (P 0.05). Also,sodium nitroprusside (SNP, a stimulator of cGMP production)-induced cGMP production was not enhanced by Nef (P > 0.05). Conclusion: Nef, with its relaxation mechanism, can enhance the concentration of cAMP in rabbit corpus cavernosum tissue, probably by inhibiting phosphodiesterase activity.

  12. The role of cGMP hydrolysing phosphodiesterases 1 and 5 in cerebral artery dilatation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruuse, C; Rybalkin, S D; Khurana, T S;

    2001-01-01

    The aim was to investigate the presence and activity of cGMP hydrolysing phosphodiesterases in guinea pig basilar arteries and the effect of selective and non-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitors on cerebral artery dilatation involving the nitric oxide (NO)-guanosine cyclic 3'5-monophosphate (c...... by cGMP-independent mechanisms. Targeting the phosphodiesterases present in cerebral arteries, with selective inhibitors or activators of phosphodiesterase, may be a possible new way of treating cerebrovascular disease.......The aim was to investigate the presence and activity of cGMP hydrolysing phosphodiesterases in guinea pig basilar arteries and the effect of selective and non-selective phosphodiesterase inhibitors on cerebral artery dilatation involving the nitric oxide (NO)-guanosine cyclic 3'5-monophosphate (c......GMP) pathway. Immunoreactivity to phosphodiesterases 1A, 1B and 5, but not phosphodiesterase 1C was found in fractions of homogenised cerebral arteries eluted by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Both the phosphodiesterase 1 inhibitor 8-methoxymethyl-1-methyl-3-(2methylpropyl)-xanthine (8-MM...

  13. Association between plasma cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels and hemodynamic instability during liver transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezinover, Dmitri; Kadry, Zakiyah; Uemura, Tadahiro; Sharghi, Michael; Mastro, Andrea M; Sosnoski, Donna M; Dalal, Priti; Janicki, Piotr K

    2013-02-01

    The activation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production in patients with end-stage liver disease (ESLD) has been associated with hemodynamic instability during orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). The aim of this prospective, observational study was to investigate the involvement of cGMP in the mediation of profound hypotension during liver graft reperfusion. An additional objective was to determine whether preoperative cGMP levels are associated with intraoperative hemodynamic instability. Forty-four consecutive patients undergoing OLT were included in the study. Blood samples for cGMP analysis were obtained from (1) the radial artery before the surgical incision; (2) the radial artery, portal vein, and flush blood during the anhepatic phase; and (3) the radial artery 20 minutes after liver graft reperfusion. On the basis of a statistical analysis, the patients were divided into 2 groups: group 1 (preoperative cGMP level ≥ 0.05 μmol/L) and group 2 (preoperative cGMP level < 0.05 μmol/L). We demonstrated a significant correlation between the preoperative levels of cGMP and the amount of catecholamine required to maintain hemodynamic stability during reperfusion (r = 0.52, P < 0.001), the length of the hospital stay (r = 0.38, P = 0.01), and the length of the intensive care unit (ICU) stay (r = 0.44, P = 0.004). We also demonstrated a significantly higher intraoperative catecholamine requirement (P < 0.001) and a prolonged postoperative ICU stay (P = 0.02) in group 1 patients versus group 2 patients. In conclusion, this study demonstrates increased baseline cGMP production in patients with ESLD, which is significantly associated with severe hypotension during OLT. We suggest that preoperative levels of cGMP correlate with hemodynamic instability during liver graft reperfusion. Copyright © 2012 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  14. Smooth muscle cell-derived carbon monoxide is a regulator of vascular cGMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, T; Perrella, M A; Lee, M E; Kourembanas, S

    1995-02-28

    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a product of the enzyme heme oxygenase (HO; EC 1.14.99.3). In vascular smooth muscle cells, exogenously administered CO increases cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP), which is an important regulator of vessel tone. We report here that smooth muscle cells produce CO via HO and that it regulates cGMP levels in these cells. Hypoxia, which has profound effects on vessel tone, significantly increased the transcriptional rate of the HO-1 gene resulting in corresponding increases of its mRNA and HO enzymatic activity. In addition, under the same conditions, rat aortic and pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells accumulated high levels of cGMP following a similar time course to that of HO-1 production. The increased accumulation of cGMP in smooth muscle cells required the enzymatic activity of HO, since it was abolished by a specific HO inhibitor, tin protoporphyrin. In contrast, N omega-nitro-L-arginine, a potent inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, had no effect on cGMP produced by smooth muscle cells, indicating that NO is not responsible for the activation of guanylyl cyclase in this setting. Furthermore, conditioned medium from hypoxic smooth muscle cells stimulated cGMP production in recipient cells and this stimulation was completely inhibited by tin protoporphyrin or hemoglobin, an inhibitor of CO production and a scavenger of CO, respectively. This report shows that HO-1 is expressed by vascular smooth muscle cells and that its product, CO, may regulate vascular tone under physiologic and pathophysiologic (such as hypoxic) conditions.

  15. Receptors and cGMP signalling mechanism for E. coli enterotoxin in opossum kidney

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forte, L.R.; Krause, W.J.; Freeman, R.H. (Univ. of Missouri, Columbia (USA) Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans Medical Center, Columbia, MO (USA))

    1988-11-01

    Receptors for the heat-stable enterotoxin produced by Escherichia coli were found in the kidney and intestine of the North American opossum and in cultured renal cell lines. The enterotoxin markedly increased guanosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) production in slices of kidney cortex and medulla, in suspensions of intestinal mucosa, and in the opossum kidney (OK) and rat kangaroo kidney (PtK-2) cell lines. In contrast, atrial natriuretic factor elicited much smaller increases in cGMP levels of kidney, intestine, or cultured kidney cell lines. The enterotoxin receptors in OK cells had a molecular mass of approximately 120 kDa when measured by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of receptors crosslinked with {sup 125}I-enterotoxin. The occurrence of receptors for the E. coli peptide in OK implies that these receptors may be involved in the regulation of renal tubular function in the opossum. E. coli enterotoxin caused a much larger increase in urine cGMP excretion than did atrial natriuretic factor when these peptides were injected intravenously into opossums. However, atrial natriuretic factor elicited a marked diuresis, natriuresis, and increased urinary excretion of calcium, phosphate, potassium, and magnesium. In contrast, the enterotoxin did not acutely influence OK fluid and electrolyte excretion. Thus the substantial increase in cGMP synthesis produced by the bacterial peptide in OK cortex and medulla in vitro and the increased renal excretion of cGMP in vivo were not associated with changes in electrolyte or water excretion. Whether cGMP represents a second messenger molecule in the kidney is an interesting question that was raised but not answered in this series of experiments.

  16. Potentiation of cGMP signaling increases oxygen delivery and oxidative metabolism in contracting skeletal muscle of older but not young humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Piil, Peter Bergmann; Egelund, Jon;

    2015-01-01

    regulation remain unresolved. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is one of the main second messengers that mediate smooth muscle vasodilation and alterations in cGMP signaling could, therefore, be one mechanism by which skeletal muscle perfusion is impaired with advancing age. The current study aimed...... to evaluate the effect of inhibiting the main enzyme involved in cGMP degradation, phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5), on blood flow and O2 delivery in contracting skeletal muscle of young and older humans. A group of young (23 ± 1 years) and a group of older (72 ± 2 years) male human subjects performed submaximal...... in the older subjects correlated with the increase in leg O2 uptake (r (2) = 0.843). These findings suggest an insufficient O2 delivery to the contracting skeletal muscle of aged individuals and that reduced cGMP availability is a novel mechanism underlying impaired skeletal muscle perfusion with advancing age....

  17. Transgenic Mice for cGMP Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thunemann, Martin; Wen, Lai; Hillenbrand, Matthias; Vachaviolos, Angelos; Feil, Susanne; Ott, Thomas; Han, Xiaoxing; Fukumura, Dai; Jain, Rakesh K.; Russwurm, Michael; de Wit, Cor; Feil, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Cyclic GMP (cGMP) is an important intracellular signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system, but its spatiotemporal dynamics in vivo is largely unknown. Objective To generate and characterize transgenic mice expressing the fluorescence resonance energy transfer–based ratiometric cGMP sensor, cGMP indicator with an EC50 of 500 nmol/L (cGi500), in cardiovascular tissues. Methods and Results Mouse lines with smooth muscle–specific or ubiquitous expression of cGi500 were generated by random transgenesis using an SM22α promoter fragment or by targeted integration of a Cre recombinase–activatable expression cassette driven by the cytomegalovirus early enhancer/chicken β-actin/β-globin promoter into the Rosa26 locus, respectively. Primary smooth muscle cells isolated from aorta, bladder, and colon of cGi500 mice showed strong sensor fluorescence. Basal cGMP concentrations were 3 µmol/L could also be monitored in blood vessels of the isolated retina and in the cremaster microcirculation of anesthetized mice. Moreover, with the use of a dorsal skinfold chamber model and multiphoton fluorescence resonance energy transfer microscopy, nitric oxide–stimulated vascular cGMP signals associated with vasodilation were detected in vivo in an acutely untouched preparation. Conclusions These cGi500 transgenic mice permit the visualization of cardiovascular cGMP signals in live cells, tissues, and mice under normal and pathological conditions or during pharmacotherapy with cGMP-elevating drugs. PMID:23801067

  18. Auxin-induced nitric oxide, cGMP and gibberellins were involved in the gravitropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Weiming; Hu, Liwei; Hu, Xiangyang; Cui, Dayong; Cai, Weiming

    Gravitropism is the asymmetric growth or curvature of plant organs in response to gravistimulation. There is a complex signal transduction cascade which involved in the differential growth of plants in response to changes in the gravity vector. The role of auxin in gravitropism has been demonstrated by many experiments, but little is known regarding the molecular details of such effects. In our studies before, mediation of the gravitropic bending of soybean roots and rice leaf sheath bases by nitric oxide, cGMP and gibberellins, are induced by auxin. The asymmetrical distribution of nitric oxide, cGMP and gibberellins resulted from the asymmetrical synthesis of them in bending sites. In soybean roots, inhibitions of NO and cGMP synthesis reduced differential NO and cGMP accumulation respectively, which both of these effects can lead to the reduction of gravitropic bending. Gibberellin-induced OsXET, OsEXPA4 and OsRWC3 were also found involved in the gravitropic bending. These data indicated that auxin-induced nitric oxide, cGMP and gibberellins were involved in the gravitropism. More experiments need to prove the more detailed mechanism of them.

  19. The Receptor-Bound Guanylyl Cyclase DAF-11 Is the Mediator of Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced cGMP Increase in Caenorhabditis elegans [corrected]..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Beckert

    Full Text Available Adenosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP and guanosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP are well-studied second messengers that transmit extracellular signals into mammalian cells, with conserved functions in various other species such as Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans. cAMP is generated by adenylyl cyclases, and cGMP is generated by guanylyl cyclases, respectively. Studies using C. elegans have revealed additional roles for cGMP signaling in lifespan extension. For example, mutants lacking the function of a specific receptor-bound guanylyl cyclase, DAF-11, have an increased life expectancy. While the daf-11 phenotype has been attributed to reductions in intracellular cGMP concentrations, the actual content of cyclic nucleotides has not been biochemically determined in this system. Similar assumptions were made in studies using phosphodiesterase loss-of-function mutants or using adenylyl cyclase overexpressing mutants. In the present study, cyclic nucleotide regulation in C. elegans was studied by establishing a special nematode protocol for the simultaneous detection and quantitation of cyclic nucleotides. We also examined the influence of reactive oxygen species (ROS on cyclic nucleotide metabolism and lifespan in C. elegans using highly specific HPLC-coupled tandem mass-spectrometry and behavioral assays. Here, we show that the relation between cGMP and survival is more complex than previously appreciated.

  20. Cyclic Nucleotide Monophosphates and Their Cyclases in Plant Signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Gehring, Christoph A.

    2017-10-04

    The cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (cNMPs), and notably 3′,5′-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and 3′,5′-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) are now accepted as key signaling molecules in many processes in plants including growth and differentiation, photosynthesis, and biotic and abiotic defense. At the single molecule level, we are now beginning to understand how cNMPs modify specific target molecules such as cyclic nucleotide-gated channels, while at the systems level, a recent study of the Arabidopsis cNMP interactome has identified novel target molecules with specific cNMP-binding domains. A major advance came with the discovery and characterization of a steadily increasing number of guanylate cyclases (GCs) and adenylate cyclases (ACs). Several of the GCs are receptor kinases and include the brassinosteroid receptor, the phytosulfokine receptor, the Pep receptor, the plant natriuretic peptide receptor as well as a nitric oxide sensor. We foresee that in the near future many more molecular mechanisms and biological roles of GCs and ACs and their catalytic products will be discovered and further establish cNMPs as a key component of plant responses to the environment.

  1. CSF concentrations of cAMP and cGMP are lower in patients with Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease but not Parkinson's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

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    Patrick Oeckl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cyclic nucleotides cyclic adenosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP and cyclic guanosine-3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP are important second messengers and are potential biomarkers for Parkinson's disease (PD, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we investigated by liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF concentrations of cAMP and cGMP of 82 patients and evaluated their diagnostic potency as biomarkers. For comparison with a well-accepted biomarker, we measured tau concentrations in CSF of CJD and control patients. CJD patients (n = 15 had lower cAMP (-70% and cGMP (-55% concentrations in CSF compared with controls (n = 11. There was no difference in PD, PD dementia (PDD and ALS cases. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve analyses confirmed cAMP and cGMP as valuable diagnostic markers for CJD indicated by the area under the curve (AUC of 0.86 (cAMP and 0.85 (cGMP. We calculated a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 64% for cAMP and a sensitivity of 67% and specificity of 100% for cGMP. The combination of both nucleotides increased the sensitivity to 80% and specificity to 91% for the term cAMPxcGMP (AUC 0.92 and to 93% and 100% for the ratio tau/cAMP (AUC 0.99. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that the CSF determination of cAMP and cGMP may easily be included in the diagnosis of CJD and could be helpful in monitoring disease progression as well as in therapy control.

  2. [Phosphodiesterase 3 mediates cross-talk between the protein kinase- and cGMP- dependent pathways and cyclic AMP metabolism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makuch, Edyta; Matuszyk, Janusz

    2012-07-20

    PDE3 is a dual-substrate phosphodiesterase responsible for hydrolyzing both cAMP and cGMP whilst being simultaneously inhibited by cGMP. This feature is related to presence of the 44 amino acid insert in the catalytic domain, which determines the mechanism of introduction of the cyclic nucleotide into the catalytic pocket of the enzyme. Once bound in the catalytic site cGMP results in steric hindrance for cAMP to enter the site. The regulatory domain of PDE3 consists of two hydrophobic regions: NHR1 and NHR2. Their presence defines the enzyme's intracellular localization, thus determining its participation in particular signaling cascades. Due to the properties of PDE3 this enzyme has exceptional importance for the cross-talk between cAMP-dependent signaling and other cascades. There are two different mechanisms of action of PDE3 enzymes in cell signaling pathways. In many signaling cascades assembly of a signalosome is necessary for phosphorylation and activation of the PDE3 proteins. In response to certain hormones and growth factors, PDE3 merges the metabolism of cAMP with protein kinase-dependent signaling pathways. PDE3 also controls the level of cAMP with regard to the alternating concentration of cGMP. This effect occurs in signaling cascades activated by natriuretic peptide.

  3. Potentiation of cGMP signaling increases oxygen delivery and oxidative metabolism in contracting skeletal muscle of older but not young humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Michael Permin; Piil, Peter Bergmann; Egelund, Jon

    2015-01-01

    to evaluate the effect of inhibiting the main enzyme involved in cGMP degradation, phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5), on blood flow and O2 delivery in contracting skeletal muscle of young and older humans. A group of young (23 ± 1 years) and a group of older (72 ± 2 years) male human subjects performed submaximal......Aging is associated with progressive loss of cardiovascular and skeletal muscle function. The impairment in physical capacity with advancing age could be related to an insufficient peripheral O2 delivery to the exercising muscles. Furthermore, the mechanisms underlying an impaired blood flow...... regulation remain unresolved. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) is one of the main second messengers that mediate smooth muscle vasodilation and alterations in cGMP signaling could, therefore, be one mechanism by which skeletal muscle perfusion is impaired with advancing age. The current study aimed...

  4. Changes of nitric oxide synthase and cyclic guanosine monophosphate in form deprivation myopia in guinea pigs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jie; LIU Qiong; YANG Xiao; YANG Hui; WANG Xin-mei; ZENG Jun-wen

    2007-01-01

    Background The form deprivation(FD)reduces spatial contrasts and induces myopia. Nitric oxide and cyclic guanosine monophosphate(cGMP)are involved in visual signal transmission.This study investigated changes in nitric oxide synthase(NOS)activity and cGMP concentration in ocular tissues in acute and chronic form deprivation myopia.Methods Guinea pigs had one eye covered by translucent glass for 7,14 or 21 days.Untreated litter mates were used as controls.NOS activity and cGMP concentrations in the retinal,choroidal and scleral tissues of FD eyes and controleyes were analyzed by radioimmunoassay after various durations of FD.The expression of NOS subtypes was identified by immunohistochemistry.Results Myopia was successfully induced in FD eyes after 14 days.Compared with control groups,the retinal NOS activity and cGMP concentrations in the FD eyes significantly increased after 14 and 21 days while the retinal NOS activity in the FD eyes was transiently suppressed by 7 days of FD.The NOS activity and cGMP concentrations of choroid and sclera in the FD eyes were higher than in the control groups at 21 days.The three isoenzymes of nitric oxide synthase were detected in the ocular tissues of guinea pigs.Conclusions The NOS activity and cGMP concentrations were upregulated after chronic FD and the retinal NOS activity was transiently suppressed at acute FD.The function of elevated NOS activity may be mediated by cGMP.

  5. Physiological and Molecular Effects of the Cyclic Nucleotides cAMP and cGMP on Arabidopsis thaliana

    KAUST Repository

    Herrera, Natalia M.

    2012-12-01

    The cyclic nucleotide monophosphates (CNs), cAMP and cGMP, are second messengers that participate in the regulation of development, metabolism and adaptive responses. In plants, CNs are associated with the control of pathogen responses, pollen tube orientation, abiotic stress response, membrane transport regulation, stomatal movement and light perception. In this study, we hypothesize that cAMP and cGMP promote changes in the transcription level of genes related to photosynthesis, high light and membrane transport in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves and, that these changes at the molecular level can have functional biological consequences. For this reason we tested if CNs modulate the photosynthetic rate, responses to high light and root ion transport. Real time quantitative PCR was used to assess transcription levels of selected genes and infrared gas analyzers coupled to fluorescence sensors were used to measure the photosynthetic parameters. We present evidence that both cAMP and cGMP modulate foliar mRNA levels early after stimulation. The two CNs trigger different responses indicating that the signals have specificity. A comparison of proteomic and transcriptional changes suggest that both transcriptional and post-transcriptional mechanisms are modulated by CNs. cGMP up-regulates the mRNA levels of components of the photosynthesis and carbon metabolism. However, neither cAMP nor cGMP trigger differences in the rate of carbon assimilation, maximum efficiency of the photosystem II (PSII), or PSII operating efficiency. It was also demonstrated that CN regulate the expression of its own targets, the cyclic nucleotide gated channels - CNGC. Further studies are needed to identify the components of the signaling transduction pathway that mediate cellular changes and their respective regulatory and/or signaling roles.

  6. Angiotensin-(1-7) Downregulates Diabetes-Induced cGMP Phosphodiesterase Activation in Rat Corpus Cavernosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benter, Ibrahim F.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms of the beneficial effects of angiotensin-(1-7), Ang-(1-7), in diabetes-related complications, including erectile dysfunction, remain unclear. We examined the effect of diabetes and/or Ang-(1-7) treatment on vascular reactivity and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) phosphodiesterase (PDE) in corpus cavernosum. Male Wistar rats were grouped as (1) control, (2) diabetic (streptozotocin, STZ, treated), (3) control + Ang-(1-7), and (4) diabetic + Ang-(1-7). Following 3 weeks of Ang-(1-7) treatment subsequent to induction of diabetes, rats were sacrificed. Penile cavernosal tissue was isolated to measure vascular reactivity, PDE gene expression and activity, and levels of p38MAP kinase, nitrites, and cGMP. Carbachol-induced vasorelaxant response after preincubation of corpus cavernosum with PE was significantly attenuated in diabetic rats, and Ang-(1-7) markedly corrected the diabetes-induced impairment. Gene expression and activity of PDE and p38MAP kinase were significantly increased in cavernosal tissue of diabetic rats, and Ang-(1-7) markedly attenuated STZ-induced effects. Ang-(1-7) significantly increased the levels of nitrite and cGMP in cavernosal tissue of control and diabetic rats. Cavernosal tissue of diabetic rats had significantly reduced cGMP levels and Ang-(1-7) markedly prevented the STZ-induced cGMP depletion. This study demonstrates that attenuation of diabetes-induced PDE activity might be one of the key mechanisms in the beneficial effects of Ang-(1-7).

  7.  Phosphodiesterase 3 mediates cross-talk between the protein kinase- and cGMP- dependent pathways and cyclic AMP metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Makuch

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available  PDE3 is a dual-substrate phosphodiesterase responsible for hydrolyzing both cAMP and cGMP whilst being simultaneously inhibited by cGMP. This feature is related to presence of the 44 amino acid insert in the catalytic domain, which determines the mechanism of introduction of the cyclic nucleotide into the catalytic pocket of the enzyme. Once bound in the catalytic site cGMP results in steric hindrance for cAMP to enter the site. The regulatory domain of PDE3 consists of two hydrophobic regions: NHR1 and NHR2. Their presence defines the enzyme’s intracellular localization, thus determining its participation in particular signaling cascades. Due to the properties of PDE3 this enzyme has exceptional importance for the cross-talk between cAMP-dependent signaling and other cascades. There are two different mechanisms of action of PDE3 enzymes in cell signaling pathways. In many signaling cascades assembly of a signalosome is necessary for phosphorylation and activation of the PDE3 proteins. In response to certain hormones and growth factors, PDE3 merges the metabolism of cAMP with protein kinase-dependent signaling pathways. PDE3 also controls the level of cAMP with regard to the alternating concentration of cGMP. This effect occurs in signaling cascades activated by natriuretic peptide.

  8. Post-translational Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana Proteins in Response to Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate Treatment

    KAUST Repository

    Parrott, Brian

    2011-12-12

    The introduction of mass spectrometry techniques to the field of biology has made possible the exploration of the proteome as a whole system as opposed to prior techniques, such as anti-body based assays or yeast two-hybrid studies, which were strictly limited to the study of a few proteins at a time. This practice has allowed for a systems biology approach of exploring the proteome, with the possibility of viewing entire pathways over increments of time. In this study, the effect of treating Arabidopsis thaliana suspension culture cells with 3’,5’-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), which is a native second messenger, was examined. Samples were collected at four time points and proteins were extracted and enriched for both oxidation and phosphorylation before analysis via mass spectrometry. Preliminary results suggest a tendency towards an increased number of phosphorylated proteins as a result of cGMP treatment. The data also showed a sharp increase in methionine oxidation in response to the treatment, occurring within the first ten minutes. This finding suggests that cGMP may utilize methionine oxidation as a mechanism of signal transduction. As such, this study corroborates a growing body of evidence supporting the inclusion of methionine oxidation in intracellular signaling pathways.

  9. Beneficial effects of combined benazepril-amlodipine on cardiac nitric oxide, cGMP, and TNF-alpha production after cardiac ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siragy, Helmy M; Xue, Chun; Webb, Randy L

    2006-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if myocardial inflammation is increased after myocardial ischemia and whether angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, calcium channel blockers, or diuretics decrease mediators of inflammation in rats with induced myocardial ischemia. Changes in cardiac interstitial fluid (CIF) levels of nitric oxide metabolites (NOX), cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP), angiotensin II (Ang II), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were monitored with/without oral administration of benazepril, amlodipine, combined benazepril-amlodipine, or hydrochlorothiazide. Using a microdialysis technique, levels of several mediators of inflammation were measured after sham operation or 30-minute occlusion of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Compared with sham animals, levels of CIF NOX and cGMP were decreased in animals with ischemia (P Benazepril or amlodipine significantly increased NOX levels (P benazepril significantly increased cGMP (P benazepril-amlodipine further increased CIF NOX and cGMP (P Amlodipine alone, benazepril alone, or combined benazepril-amlodipine significantly reduced TNF-alpha (P benazepril-amlodipine may be beneficial for managing cardiac ischemia.

  10. Effects of Kaempferia parviflora Wall. Ex. Baker and sildenafil citrate on cGMP level, cardiac function, and intracellular Ca2+ regulation in rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerateerangkul, Punate; Palee, Siripong; Chinda, Kroekkiat; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2012-09-01

    Although Kaempferia parviflora extract (KPE) and its flavonoids have positive effects on the nitric oxide (NO) signaling pathway, its mechanisms on the heart are still unclear. Because our previous studies demonstrated that KPE decreased defibrillation efficacy in swine similar to that of sildenafil citrate, the phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitor, it is possible that KPE may affect the cardiac NO signaling pathway. In the present study, the effects of KPE and sildenafil citrate on cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) level, modulation of cardiac function, and Ca transients in ventricular myocytes were investigated. In a rat model, cardiac cGMP level, cardiac function, and Ca transients were measured before and after treatment with KPE and sildenafil citrate. KPE significantly increased the cGMP level and decreased cardiac function and Ca transient. These effects were similar to those found in the sildenafil citrate-treated group. Furthermore, the nonspecific NOS inhibitor could abolish the effects of KPE and sildenafil citrate on Ca transient. KPE has positive effect on NO signaling in the heart, resulting in an increased cGMP level, similar to that of sildenafil citrate. This effect was found to influence the physiology of normal heart via the attenuation of cardiac function and the reduction of Ca transient in ventricular myocytes.

  11. Brain-natriuretic peptide and cyclic guanosine monophosphate as biomarkers of myxomatous mitral valve disease in dogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesgaard, Sophia Gry; Falk, Bo Torkel; Teerlink, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Elevations in the plasma concentrations of natriuretic peptides correlate with increased severity of myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) in dogs. This study correlates the severity of MMVD with the plasma concentrations of the biomarkers N-terminal fragment of the pro-brain-natriuretic peptide...... (NT-proBNP) and its second messenger, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). Furthermore, the l-arginine:asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) ratio was measured as an index of nitric oxide availability. The study included 75 dogs sub-divided into five groups based on severity of MMVD as assessed...... by clinical examination and echocardiography. Plasma NT-proBNP and cGMP concentrations increased with increasing valve dysfunction and were significantly elevated in dogs with heart failure. The cGMP:NT-proBNP ratio decreased significantly in dogs with heart failure, suggesting the development of natriuretic...

  12. Elevated nitric oxide and 3',5' cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    C(i)ntia Siqueira; Miguel Carneiro de Moura; Ana J(u)lia Pedro; Paula Rocha

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate whether serum levels of nitric oxide (NO') and plasma levels of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (Cgmp) and total glutathione (GSH) are altered in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and to examine their correlation with the severity of liver disease.METHODS: Twenty-six patients with alcoholic liver cirrhosis were studied. Serum levels of NO· and plasma levels of cGMP and GSH were measured in 7 patients with compensated alcoholic cirrhosis (Child-Pugh A) and 19 patients with advanced cirrhosis (Child-Pugh B and C).The model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score was evaluated. Sixteen healthy volunteers served as controls.Liver enzymes and creatinine levels were also tested.RESULTS: NO· and cGMP levels were higher in patients with Child-Pugh B and C cirrhosis than in Child-Pugh A cirrhosis or controls (NO·: 21.70 ± 8.07 vs 11.70 ± 2.74; 21.70 ± 8.07 vs 7.26 ± 2.47 μmol/L, respectively;P < 0.001) and (cGMP: 20.12 ± 6.62 vs 10.14 ± 2.78;20.12 ± 6.62 vs 4.95 ± 1.21 pmol/L, respectively; P <0.001). Total glutathione levels were lower in patients with Child-Pugh B and C cirrhosis than in patients with Child-Pugh A cirrhosis or controls (16.04 ± 6.06 vs 23.01 ± 4.38 or 16.04 ± 6.06 vs 66.57 ± 26.23 μmol/L,respectively; P < 0.001). There was a significant correlation between NO· and cGMP levels in all patients with alcoholic cirrhosis. A significant negative correlation between reduced glutathione/glutathione disulfide and the MELD score was found in all cirrhotic patients. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest a role for oxidative stress in alcoholic liver cirrhosis, which is more significant in decompensated patients with higher levels of NO· and cGMP and lower GSH levels than in compensated and control patients. Altered mediator levels in decompensated patients may influence the hemodynamic changes in and progression of liver disease.

  13. Plasma concentrations of the cyclic nucleotides, adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and guanosine 3'.5'-monophosphate, in healthy adults treated with theophylline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, M; Eriksen, P B; Andersen, O;

    1982-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of cyclic adenosine monophosphate and cyclic guanosine monophosphate were measured in 10 health adults before, during and after periods of theophylline administration. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate concentrations did not change significantly, but cyclic guanosine monophosph...

  14. Switching direction in electric-signal-induced cell migration by cyclic guanosine monophosphate and phosphatidylinositol signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Masayuki J; Kuwayama, Hidekazu; van Egmond, Wouter N; Takayama, Airi L K; Takagi, Hiroaki; van Haastert, Peter J M; Yanagida, Toshio; Ueda, Masahiro

    2009-04-21

    Switching between attractive and repulsive migration in cell movement in response to extracellular guidance cues has been found in various cell types and is an important cellular function for translocation during cellular and developmental processes. Here we show that the preferential direction of migration during electrotaxis in Dictyostelium cells can be reversed by genetically modulating both guanylyl cyclases (GCases) and the cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)-binding protein C (GbpC) in combination with the inhibition of phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinases (PI3Ks). The PI3K-dependent pathway is involved in cathode-directed migration under a direct-current electric field. The catalytic domains of soluble GCase (sGC) and GbpC also mediate cathode-directed signaling via cGMP, whereas the N-terminal domain of sGC mediates anode-directed signaling in conjunction with both the inhibition of PI3Ks and cGMP production. These observations provide an identification of the genes required for directional switching in electrotaxis and suggest that a parallel processing of electric signals, in which multiple-signaling pathways act to bias cell movement toward the cathode or anode, is used to determine the direction of migration.

  15. Induction of haem oxygenase contributes to the synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines in re-oxygenated rat macrophages: role of cGMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamion, F; Richard, V; Lyoumi, S; Hiron, M; Bonmarchand, G; Leroy, J; Daveau, M; Thuillez, C; Lebreton, J P

    1999-05-01

    Macrophage activation and the resulting inflammatory response may be a major component of tissue injury upon hypoxia and re-oxygenation. Activation of the haem oxygenase (HO)/carbon monoxide (CO) pathway may be an important regulator of the inflammatory response, through production of cyclic 3', 5'-monophosphate (cGMP). We have assessed whether HO contributes to the increased production of the pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-6 in re-oxygenated rat peritoneal macrophages.Hypoxia/re-oxygenation markedly increased levels of HO-1 mRNA and cGMP. The increase in cGMP was reduced by the HO-1 inhibitor tin-protoporphyrin (SnPP-9) given during re-oxygenation. Hypoxia and re-oxygenation also increased IL-6 and TNF-alpha mRNA expression, as well as IL-6 and TNF-alpha concentrations in the cell supernatant. These increases were nullified by SnPP-9 and by Methylene Blue, an inhibitor of guanylate cyclase, but were not affected by L-NNA, an inhibitor of NO synthesis. The inhibitory effect of SnPP on the synthesis of cytokines was reversed by co-administration of the stable analogue of cGMP, 8-Br-cGMP. Our results indicate that activation of haem oxygenase and of the CO/cGMP pathway is a major stimulus for the synthesis and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in re-oxygenated macrophages. This pathway may play a central role in pathological situations in which local tissue hypoxia/re-oxygenation triggers a systemic inflammatory response, for example in patients with shock.

  16. Urinary cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate changes in spontaneous and induced onset active labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Da-Chung; Yuan, Shyng-Shiou F; Su, Her-Young; Lo, Shin-Chieh; Ren, Shin-Sia; Wu, Gwo-Jang

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this prospective, randomized study was to investigate the changes in urinary cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cGMP) and cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) between the latent and the active phases of spontaneous and prostaglandin E(1) (PGE(1))-induced labor. Seventy singleton pregnant women at 36-41(+) weeks' gestation without signs of fetal distress were enrolled. The first group consisted of 35 pregnant women in whom labor was induced by PGE(1) applied intravaginally. The second group consisted of 35 women who had spontaneous active labor. Clinical data of the two groups were assessed as labor progressed. After the onset of active labor, urinary cGMP/creatinine (U cGMP/Cr) decreased in both groups with the percentage decline of 35.2 and 9.7, respectively, but this difference was only significant in the PGE(1)-induced group (P=0.033). After the onset of active labor, urinary cAMP/creatinine (U cAMP/Cr) decreased in both groups with the percentage decline of 36.5 and 15.6, respectively, but this difference was only significant in the PGE(1)-induced group (P=0.001). The duration of the latent phase was significantly shortened in the PGE(1)-induced group compared with the spontaneous labor group (Plabor. Our results suggest that U cGMP/Cr and U cAMP/Cr can serve as easily obtained secondary messenger markers of myometrial contractility and cervical ripening at the onset of active labor. The NO-cGMP system and the G-protein alpha-cAMP system in the human uterus may concomitantly contribute to uterine quiescence during pregnancy and show downregulation in U cGMP/Cr and U cAMP/Cr at the initiation of active labor.

  17. Design of CGMP Production of 18F- and 68Ga-Radiopharmaceuticals

    OpenAIRE

    Yen-Ting Chi; Pei-Chun Chu; Hao-Yu Chao; Wei-Chen Shieh; Chen, Chuck C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Radiopharmaceutical production process must adhere to current good manufacturing process (CGMP) compliance to ensure the quality of precursor, prodrug (active pharmaceutical ingredient, API), and the final drug product that meet acceptance criteria. We aimed to develop an automated system for production of CGMP grade of PET radiopharmaceuticals. Methods. The hardware and software of the automated synthesizer that fit in the hot cell under cGMP requirement were developed. Examples...

  18. Effects of hydrazine derivatives on vascular smooth muscle contractility, blood pressure and cGMP production in rats: comparison with hydralazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidrio, Horacio; Fernández, Gabriela; Medina, Martha; Alvarez, Ezequiel; Orallo, Francisco

    2003-01-01

    Hydralazine is a hydrazine derivative used clinically as a vasodilator and antihypertensive agent. Despite numerous studies with the drug, its mechanism of action has remained unknown; guanylate cyclase activation and release of endothelial relaxing factors are thought to be involved in its vasodilator effect. Other hydrazine derivatives are known to stimulate guanylate cyclase and could therefore share the vasodilator activity of hydralazine, although such possibility has not been assessed systematically. In the present study, hydralazine, hydrazine, phenylhydrazine, and isoniazid were evaluated for vascular smooth muscle relaxation in rat aortic rings with and without endothelium, as well as after incubation with the guanylate cyclase inhibitor methylene blue. They were also tested for enhancement of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) production by cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells and for hypotension in the anesthetized rat. All hydrazines relaxed aortic rings, an action unaffected by endothelium removal and, in all cases except hydralazine, antagonized by methylene blue. Only phenylhydrazine increased cGMP production and only hydralazine markedly lowered blood pressure. It was concluded that hydralazine vascular relaxation is independent of endothelium and is not related to guanylate cyclase activation. The other hydrazines studied also elicit endothelium-independent relaxation, but the effect is related to guanylate cyclase. The marked hypotensive effect of hydralazine contrasts with its modest relaxant activity and is not shared by the other hydrazines. The fact that hydrazine and isoniazid produce methylene blue-sensitive relaxation, yet do not enhance cGMP production suggests the need for activating factors present in aortic rings but not in isolated cells.

  19. Nitric oxide synthetic pathway and cGMP levels are altered in red blood cells from end-stage renal disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pietro, Natalia; Giardinelli, Annalisa; Sirolli, Vittorio; Riganti, Chiara; Di Tomo, Pamela; Gazzano, Elena; Di Silvestre, Sara; Panknin, Christina; Cortese-Krott, Miriam M; Csonka, Csaba; Kelm, Malte; Ferdinandy, Péter; Bonomini, Mario; Pandolfi, Assunta

    2016-06-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) enzymatically produce nitric oxide (NO) by a functional RBC-nitric oxide synthase (RBC-NOS). NO is a vascular key regulatory molecule. In RBCs its generation is complex and influenced by several factors, including insulin, acetylcholine, and calcium. NO availability is reduced in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and associated with endothelial dysfunction. We previously demonstrated that, through increased phosphatidylserine membrane exposure, ESRD-RBCs augmented their adhesion to human cultured endothelium, in which NO bioavailability decreased. Since RBC-NOS-dependent NO production in ESRD is unknown, this study aimed to investigate RBC-NOS levels/activation, NO production/bioavailability in RBCs from healthy control subjects (C, N = 18) and ESRD patients (N = 27). Although RBC-NOS expression was lower in ESRD-RBCs, NO, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), RBC-NOS Serine1177 phosphorylation level and eNOS/Calmodulin (CaM)/Heat Shock Protein-90 (HSP90) interaction levels were higher in ESRD-RBCs, indicating increased enzyme activation. Conversely, following RBCs stimulation with insulin or ionomycin, NO and cGMP levels were significantly lower in ESRD- than in C-RBCs, suggesting that uremia might reduce the RBC-NOS response to further stimuli. Additionally, the activity of multidrug-resistance-associated protein-4 (MRP4; cGMP-membrane transporter) was significantly lower in ESRD-RBCs, suggesting a possible compromised efflux of cGMP across the ESRD-RBCs membrane. This study for the first time showed highest basal RBC-NOS activation in ESRD-RBCs, possibly to reduce the negative impact of decreased NOS expression. It is further conceivable that high NO production only partially affects cell function of ESRD-RBCs maybe because in vivo they are unable to respond to physiologic stimuli, such as calcium and/or insulin.

  20. Primary adenosine monophosphate (AMP) deaminase deficiency in a hypotonic infant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Gago, Manuel; Gómez-Lado, Carmen; Pérez-Gay, Laura; Eirís-Puñal, Jesús; Martínez, Elena Pintos; García-Consuegra, Inés; Martín, Miguel Angel

    2011-06-01

    The spectrum of the adenosine monophosphate (AMP) deaminase deficiency ranges from asymptomatic carriers to patients who manifest exercise-induced muscle pain, occasionally rhabdomyolysis, and idiopathic hyperCKemia. However, previous to the introduction of molecular techniques, rare cases with congenital weakness and hypotonia have also been reported. We report a 6-month-old girl with the association of congenital muscle weakness and hypotonia, muscle deficiency of adenosine monophosphate deaminase, and the homozygous C to T mutation at nucleotide 34 of the adenosine monophosphate deaminase-1 gene. This observation indicates the possible existence of a primary adenosine monophosphate deaminase deficiency manifested by congenital muscle weakness and hypotonia.

  1. Studies on Relationship between Serum Nitric Oxide and Plasma Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate and Prolonged Bleeding after Medical Abortion as well as Prophylaxis and Treatment of Bleeding with Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    廖玎玲; 谭布珍; 辛华; 贺晓菊

    1999-01-01

    Objectives To study the relationship between serum nitric oxide(NO and plasma cyclic guanosine monophosphate(cGMP)and prolonged bleeding after medical abortion.Methods A total of 120women having received medical abortions at random were recruited and divided into two groups:the one(Group A,n=60) taking “Gong-Fu Mixture(Uterus-Recovering Mixture)”and the other(Group B,n=60)not taking it after abortion.On d 10,20 and 30 after medical abortion,serum NO and plasma cGMP were tested before and after mifepristone administration and 10 d later by Gresis reac-tion method and radioimmunoassay respectively.Results NO concentration in serum and cGMP concentration in plasma decreased signifi-cantly after taking mifeprlstone given(P<0. 05).Ten days later,the number of thos ewith bleeding discontinuation in the group A was significantly greater than that in the group B(P<0.05).Serum NO level and plasma cGMP level in the group A de-creased more significantly than those in the group B(P<0. 05).Conclusion The slow decrease of serum NO and plasma cGMP is closely related to prolonged bleeding after medical abortion.“Gong-Fu Mixture(uterus-recovering mixture)”is effective in prevention and treatment of prolonged bleeding.

  2. Design of CGMP production of 18F- and 68Ga-radiopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Yen-Ting; Chu, Pei-Chun; Chao, Hao-Yu; Shieh, Wei-Chen; Chen, Chuck C

    2014-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical production process must adhere to current good manufacturing process (CGMP) compliance to ensure the quality of precursor, prodrug (active pharmaceutical ingredient, API), and the final drug product that meet acceptance criteria. We aimed to develop an automated system for production of CGMP grade of PET radiopharmaceuticals. The hardware and software of the automated synthesizer that fit in the hot cell under cGMP requirement were developed. Examples of production yield and purity for (68)Ga-DOTATATE and (18)F-FDG at CGMP facility were optimized. Analytical assays and acceptance criteria for cGMP grade of (68)Ga-DOTATATE and (18)F-FDG were established. CGMP facility for the production of PET radiopharmaceuticals has been established. Radio-TLC and HPLC analyses of (68)Ga-DOTATATE and (18)F-FDG showed that the radiochemical purity was 92% and 96%, respectively. The products were sterile and pyrogenic-free. CGMP compliance of radiopharmaceuticals has been reviewed. (68)Ga-DOTATATE and (18)F-FDG were synthesized with high radiochemical yield under CGMP process.

  3. Effect of atrial natriuretic factor and 8-bromo cyclic guanosine 3':5'-monophosphate on ( sup 3 H)acetylcholine outflow from myenteric-plexus longitudinal muscle of the guinea pig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matusak, O.; Kuchel, O.; Hamet, P. (Clinical Research Institute of Montreal, Quebec, (Canada))

    1991-04-01

    We report that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) inhibits electrically induced cholinergic twitches of longitudinal muscle in whole intestinal segments and myenteric-plexus longitudinal muscle (MPLM) strips from the guinea pig ileum. To elucidate the possible presynaptic mechanism of ANF's action, we studied spontaneous and stimulation-evoked radiolabeled acetylcholine (ACh) outflow from MPLM after incubation with ({sup 3}H)choline. We developed a method of mounting and treating MPLM preparations, which allowed us, at the same time, to record isometric contractions and to determine ({sup 3}H)ACh outflow upon electrical stimulation by a train of three pulses. ANF (5 x 10{sup {minus} 8}M), norepinephrine (2 x 10{sup {minus} 7}) M and 8-bromoguanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (10{sup {minus} 3} M) in nearly equieffective concentrations caused a similar inhibition of cholinergic twitches. However, ANF had no effect on ({sup 3}H)ACh outflow, whereas norepinephrine was found to suppress ({sup 3}H)ACh outflow and 8-bromoguanosine 3':5'-cGMP to enhanced ({sup 3}H)ACh outflow. ANF (5 x 10{sup {minus} 8} M) caused a 7.0-fold increase of cGMP over control values, predominantly in muscle layers, whereas Escherichia coli heat-stable toxin (12.5 U/ml) elicited a 35-fold increment of cGMP in the extramuscular layer. Thus, ANF is able to elevate cGMP in intestinal smooth muscle and to inhibit cholinergic contractions of MPLM. This inhibition is mimicked by exogenous cGMP and by endogenously generated cyclic nucleotides. We suggest that the depressive action of ANF on cholinergic contractions of MPLM is mediated via its postsynaptic impact implicating elevation of cGMP in smooth muscle.

  4. Cyclic nucleotide specificity of the activator and catalytic sites of a cGMP-stimulated cGMP phosphodiesterase from Dictyostelium discoideum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kesbeke, Fanja; Baraniak, Janina; Bulgakov, Roman; Jastorff, Bernd; Morr, Michael; Petridis, Georg; Stec, Wojciech J.; Seela, Frank; Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1985-01-01

    The cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum has an intracellular phosphodiesterase which specifically hydrolyzes cGMP. The enzyme is activated by low cGMP concentrations, and is involved in the reduction of chemoattractant-mediated elevations of cGMP levels. The interaction of 20 cGMP derivativ

  5. Systemic induction of NO-, redox- and cGMP signalling in the pumpkin extrafascicular phloem upon local leaf wounding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eGaupels

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cucurbits developed the unique extrafascicular phloem (EFP as a defensive structure against herbivorous animals. Mechanical leaf injury was previously shown to induce a systemic wound response in the EFP of pumpkin (Cucurbita maxima. Here, we demonstrate that the phloem antioxidant system and protein modifications by NO are strongly regulated during this process. Activities of the central antioxidant enzymes dehydroascorbate reductase, glutathione reductase and ascorbate reductase were rapidly down-regulated at 30 min with a second minimum at 24 h after wounding. As a consequence levels of total ascorbate and glutathione also decreased with similar bi-phasic kinetics. These results hint towards a wound-induced shift in the redox status of the EFP. Nitric oxide (NO is another important player in stress-induced redox signalling in plants. Therefore, we analysed NO-dependent protein modifications in the EFP. Six to 48 h after leaf damage total S-nitrosothiol content and protein S-nitrosylation were clearly reduced, which was contrasted by a pronounced increase in protein tyrosine nitration. Collectively, these findings suggest that NO-dependent S-nitrosylation turned into peroxynitrite-mediated protein nitration upon a stress-induced redox shift probably involving the accumulation of reactive oxygen species within the EFP. Using the biotin switch assay and anti-nitrotyrosine antibodies we identified 9 candidate S-nitrosylated and 6 candidate tyrosine-nitrated phloem proteins. The wound-responsive Phloem Protein 16-1 (PP16-1 and Cyclophilin 18 (CYP18 as well as the 26.5 kD isoform of Phloem Protein 2 (PP2 were amenable to both NO modifications and could represent important redox-sensors within the cucurbit EFP. We also found that leaf injury triggered the systemic accumulation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP in the EFP and discuss the possible function of this second messenger in systemic NO and redox signalling within the EFP.

  6. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition prevents myocardial infarction-induced increase in renal cortical cGMP and cAMP phosphodiesterase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clauss, François; Charloux, Anne; Piquard, François; Doutreleau, Stéphane; Talha, Samy; Zoll, Joffrey; Lugnier, Claire; Geny, Bernard

    2015-08-01

    We investigated whether myocardial infarction (MI) enhances renal phosphodiesterases (PDE) activities, investigating particularly the relative contribution of PDE1-5 isozymes in total PDE activity involved in both cGMP and cAMP pathways, and whether angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition (ACEi) decreases such renal PDE hyperactivities. We also investigated whether ACEi might thereby improve atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) efficiency. We studied renal cortical PDE1-5 isozyme activities in sham (SH)-operated, MI rats and in MI rats treated with perindopril (ACEi) 1 month after coronary artery ligation. Circulating atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), its second intracellular messenger cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and cGMP/ANP ratio were also determined. Cortical cGMP-PDE2 (80.3 vs. 65.1 pmol/min/mg) and cGMP-PDE1 (50.7 vs. 30.1 pmol/min/mg), and cAMP-PDE2 (161 vs. 104.1 pmol/min/mg) and cAMP-PDE4 (307.5 vs. 197.2 pmol/min/mg) activities were higher in MI than in SH rats. Despite increased ANP plasma level, ANP efficiency tended to be decreased in MI compared to SH rats. Perindopril restored PDE activities and tended to improve ANP efficiency in MI rats. One month after coronary ligation, perindopril treatment of MI rats prevents the increase in renal cortical PDE activities. This may contribute to increase renal ANP efficiency in MI rats.

  7. Learning Cascading

    CERN Document Server

    Covert, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended for software developers, system architects and analysts, big data project managers, and data scientists who wish to deploy big data solutions using the Cascading framework. You must have a basic understanding of the big data paradigm and should be familiar with Java development techniques.

  8. Effects of Biotin Supplementation in the Diet on Adipose Tissue cGMP Concentrations, AMPK Activation, Lipolysis, and Serum-Free Fatty Acid Levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boone-Villa, Daniel; Aguilera-Méndez, Asdrubal; Miranda-Cervantes, Adriana; Fernandez-Mejia, Cristina

    2015-10-01

    Several studies have shown that pharmacological concentrations of biotin decrease hyperlipidemia. The molecular mechanisms by which pharmacological concentrations of biotin modify lipid metabolism are largely unknown. Adipose tissue plays a central role in lipid homeostasis. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of biotin supplementation in adipose tissue on signaling pathways and critical proteins that regulate lipid metabolism, as well as on lipolysis. In addition, we assessed serum fatty acid concentrations. Male BALB/cAnN Hsd mice were fed a control or a biotin-supplemented diet (control: 1.76 mg biotin/kg; supplemented: 97.7 mg biotin/kg diet) over 8 weeks postweaning. Compared with the control group, biotin-supplemented mice showed an increase in the levels of adipose guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) (control: 30.3±3.27 pmol/g wet tissue; supplemented: 49.5±3.44 pmol/g wet tissue) and of phosphorylated forms of adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK; 65.2%±1.06%), acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA), carboxylase-1 (196%±68%), and acetyl-CoA carboxylase-2 (78.1%±18%). Serum fatty acid concentrations were decreased (control: 1.12±0.04 mM; supplemented: 0.91±0.03 mM), and no change in lipolysis was found (control: 0.29±0.05 μmol/mL; supplemented: 0.33±0.08 μmol/mL). In conclusion, 8 weeks of dietary biotin supplementation increased adipose tissue cGMP content and protein expression of the active form of AMPK and of the inactive forms of acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1 and acetyl-CoA carboxylase-2. Serum fatty acid levels fell, and no change in lipolysis was observed. These findings provide insight into the effects of biotin supplementation on adipose tissue and support its use in the treatment of dyslipidemia.

  9. Structure of Staphylococcus aureus cytidine monophosphate kinase in complex with cytidine 5'-monophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaliwal, Balvinder; Ren, Jingshan; Lockyer, Michael; Charles, Ian; Hawkins, Alastair R; Stammers, David K

    2006-08-01

    The crystal structure of Staphylococcus aureus cytidine monophosphate kinase (CMK) in complex with cytidine 5'-monophosphate (CMP) has been determined at 2.3 angstroms resolution. The active site reveals novel features when compared with two orthologues of known structure. Compared with the Streptococcus pneumoniae CMK solution structure of the enzyme alone, S. aureus CMK adopts a more closed conformation, with the NMP-binding domain rotating by approximately 16 degrees towards the central pocket of the molecule, thereby assembling the active site. Comparing Escherichia coli and S. aureus CMK-CMP complex structures reveals differences within the active site, including a previously unreported indirect interaction of CMP with Asp33, the replacement of a serine residue involved in the binding of CDP by Ala12 in S. aureus CMK and an additional sulfate ion in the E. coli CMK active site. The detailed understanding of the stereochemistry of CMP binding to CMK will assist in the design of novel inhibitors of the enzyme. Inhibitors are required to treat the widespread hospital infection methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), currently a major public health concern.

  10. Plasmin is a potent and specific chemoattractant for human peripheral monocytes acting via a cyclic guanosine monophosphate-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrovets, T; Tippler, B; Rieks, M; Simmet, T

    1997-06-15

    We have previously reported that the serine protease plasmin generated during contact activation of human plasma triggers biosynthesis of leukotrienes (LTs) in human peripheral monocytes (PMs), but not in polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). We now show that purified plasmin acts as a potent chemoattractant on human monocytes, but not on PMNs. Human plasmin or plasminogen activated with urokinase, but not active site-blocked plasmin or plasminogen, elicited monocyte migration across polycarbonate membranes. Similarly, stimulation of monocytes with plasmin, but not with active site-blocked plasmin or plasminogen, induced actin polymerization. As assessed by checkerboard analysis, the plasmin-mediated monocyte locomotion was a true chemotaxis. The plasmin-induced chemotactic response was inhibited by the lysine analog trans-4-(aminomethyl)cyclohexane-1-carboxylic acid (t-AMCA), which prevents binding of plasmin/ogen to the appropriate membrane binding sites. In addition, active site-blocked plasmin inhibited monocyte migration triggered by active plasmin. Further, plasmin-induced monocyte chemotaxis was inhibited by pertussis toxin (PTX) and 1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycerol (HMG) and chelerythrine, two structurally unrelated inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC). Plasmin, but not active site-blocked plasmin or plasminogen, triggered formation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in monocytes. LY83583, an inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase, inhibited both plasmin-induced cGMP formation and the chemotactic response. The latter effect could be antagonized by 8-bromo-cGMP. In addition, KT5823 and (Rp)-8-(p-chlorophenylthio)guanosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate [(Rp)-8-pCPT-cGMPs], two structurally unrelated inhibitors of cGMP-dependent protein kinase, inhibited plasmin-mediated monocyte chemotaxis. Thus, beyond being a stimulus for lipid mediator release, plasmin is a potent and specific chemoattractant for human monocytes acting via a c

  11. Inositol monophosphate phosphatase genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parish Tanya

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycobacteria use inositol in phosphatidylinositol, for anchoring lipoarabinomannan (LAM, lipomannan (LM and phosphatidylinosotol mannosides (PIMs in the cell envelope, and for the production of mycothiol, which maintains the redox balance of the cell. Inositol is synthesized by conversion of glucose-6-phosphate to inositol-1-phosphate, followed by dephosphorylation by inositol monophosphate phosphatases (IMPases to form myo-inositol. To gain insight into how Mycobacterium tuberculosis synthesises inositol we carried out genetic analysis of the four IMPase homologues that are present in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome. Results Mutants lacking either impA (Rv1604 or suhB (Rv2701c were isolated in the absence of exogenous inositol, and no differences in levels of PIMs, LM, LAM or mycothiol were observed. Mutagenesis of cysQ (Rv2131c was initially unsuccessful, but was possible when a porin-like gene of Mycobacterium smegmatis was expressed, and also by gene switching in the merodiploid strain. In contrast, we could only obtain mutations in impC (Rv3137 when a second functional copy was provided in trans, even when exogenous inositol was provided. Experiments to obtain a mutant in the presence of a second copy of impC containing an active-site mutation, in the presence of porin-like gene of M. smegmatis, or in the absence of inositol 1-phosphate synthase activity, were also unsuccessful. We showed that all four genes are expressed, although at different levels, and levels of inositol phosphatase activity did not fall significantly in any of the mutants obtained. Conclusions We have shown that neither impA, suhB nor cysQ is solely responsible for inositol synthesis. In contrast, we show that impC is essential for mycobacterial growth under the conditions we used, and suggest it may be required in the early stages of mycothiol synthesis.

  12. cGMP and NHR signaling co-regulate expression of insulin-like peptides and developmental activation of infective larvae in Strongyloides stercoralis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltzfus, Jonathan D; Bart, Stephen M; Lok, James B

    2014-07-01

    The infectious form of the parasitic nematode Strongyloides stercoralis is a developmentally arrested third-stage larva (L3i), which is morphologically similar to the developmentally arrested dauer larva in the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. We hypothesize that the molecular pathways regulating C. elegans dauer development also control L3i arrest and activation in S. stercoralis. This study aimed to determine the factors that regulate L3i activation, with a focus on G protein-coupled receptor-mediated regulation of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway signaling, including its modulation of the insulin/IGF-1-like signaling (IIS) pathway. We found that application of the membrane-permeable cGMP analog 8-bromo-cGMP potently activated development of S. stercoralis L3i, as measured by resumption of feeding, with 85.1 ± 2.2% of L3i feeding in 200 µM 8-bromo-cGMP in comparison to 0.6 ± 0.3% in the buffer diluent. Utilizing RNAseq, we examined L3i stimulated with DMEM, 8-bromo-cGMP, or the DAF-12 nuclear hormone receptor (NHR) ligand Δ7-dafachronic acid (DA)--a signaling pathway downstream of IIS in C. elegans. L3i stimulated with 8-bromo-cGMP up-regulated transcripts of the putative agonistic insulin-like peptide (ILP) -encoding genes Ss-ilp-1 (20-fold) and Ss-ilp-6 (11-fold) in comparison to controls without stimulation. Surprisingly, we found that Δ7-DA similarly modulated transcript levels of ILP-encoding genes. Using the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002, we demonstrated that 400 nM Δ7-DA-mediated activation (93.3 ± 1.1% L3i feeding) can be blocked using this IIS inhibitor at 100 µM (7.6 ± 1.6% L3i feeding). To determine the tissues where promoters of ILP-encoding genes are active, we expressed promoter::egfp reporter constructs in transgenic S. stercoralis post-free-living larvae. Ss-ilp-1 and Ss-ilp-6 promoters are active in the hypodermis and neurons and the Ss-ilp-7 promoter is active in the intestine

  13. Development of a whole cell pneumococcal vaccine: BPL inactivation, cGMP production, and stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Viviane M; Dias, Waldely O; Campos, Ivana B; Liberman, Celia; Sbrogio-Almeida, Maria E; Silva, Eliane P; Cardoso, Celso P; Alderson, Mark; Robertson, George; Maisonneuve, Jean-François; Tate, Andrea; Anderson, Porter; Malley, Richard; Fratelli, Fernando; Leite, Luciana C C

    2014-02-19

    Pneumococcal infections impose a large burden of disease on the human population, mainly in developing countries, and the current pneumococcal vaccines offer serotype-specific protection, but do not cover all pathogenic strains, leaving populations vulnerable to disease caused by non-vaccine serotypes. The pneumococcal whole cell vaccine is a low-cost strategy based on non-capsular antigens common to all strains, inducing serotype-independent immunity. Therefore, we developed the process for the cGMP production of this cellular vaccine. Initially, three engineering runs and two cGMP runs were performed in 60-L bioreactors, demonstrating the consistency of the production process, as evaluated by the growth curves, glucose consumption and metabolite formation (lactate and acetate). Cell recovery by tangential filtration was 92 ± 13 %. We optimized the conditions for beta-propiolactone (BPL) inactivation of the bacterial suspensions, establishing a maximum cell density of OD600 between 27 and 30, with a BPL concentration of 1:4000 (v/v) at 150 rpm and 4 °C for 30 h. BPL was hydrolyzed by heating for 2h at 37 °C. The criteria and methods for quality control were defined using the engineering runs and the cGMP Lots passed all specifications. cGMP vaccine Lots displayed high potency, inducing between 80 and 90% survival in immunized mice when challenged with virulent pneumococci. Sera from mice immunized with the cGMP Lots recognized several pneumococcal proteins in the extract of encapsulated strains by Western blot. The cGMP whole cell antigen bulk and whole cell vaccine product lots were shown to be stable for up to 12 and 18 months, respectively, based upon survival assays following i.p. challenge. Our results show the consistency and stability of the cGMP whole cell pneumococcal vaccine lots and demonstrate the feasibility of production in a developing country setting.

  14. Cascading Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Nishant; Khoury, Justin; Trodden, Mark

    2009-01-01

    We develop a fully covariant, well-posed 5D effective action for the 6D cascading gravity brane-world model, and use this to study cosmological solutions. We obtain this effective action through the 6D decoupling limit, in which an additional scalar degree mode, \\pi, called the brane-bending mode, determines the bulk-brane gravitational interaction. The 5D action obtained this way inherits from the sixth dimension an extra \\pi self-interaction kinetic term. We compute appropriate boundary terms, to supplement the 5D action, and hence derive fully covariant junction conditions and the 5D Einstein field equations. Using these, we derive the cosmological evolution induced on a 3-brane moving in a static bulk. We study the strong- and weak-coupling regimes analytically in this static ansatz, and perform a complete numerical analysis of our solution. Although the cascading model can generate an accelerating solution in which the \\pi field comes to dominate at late times, the presence of a critical singularity prev...

  15. Biophysical Techniques for Detection of cAMP and cGMP in Living Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viacheslav O. Nikolaev

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotides cAMP and cGMP are ubiquitous second messengers which regulate myriads of functions in virtually all eukaryotic cells. Their intracellular effects are often mediated via discrete subcellular signaling microdomains. In this review, we will discuss state-of-the-art techniques to measure cAMP and cGMP in biological samples with a particular focus on live cell imaging approaches, which allow their detection with high temporal and spatial resolution in living cells and tissues. Finally, we will describe how these techniques can be applied to the analysis of second messenger dynamics in subcellular signaling microdomains.

  16. A short history of cGMP, guanylyl cyclases, and cGMP-dependent protein kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kots, Alexander Y; Martin, Emil; Sharina, Iraida G; Murad, Ferid

    2009-01-01

    Here, we review the early studies on cGMP, guanylyl cyclases, and cGMP-dependent protein kinases to facilitate understanding of development of this exciting but complex field of research encompassing pharmacology, biochemistry, physiology, and molecular biology of these important regulatory molecules.

  17. A novel crosstalk between Alk7 and cGMP signaling differentially regulates brown adipocyte function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aileen Balkow

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: We found a so far unknown crosstalk between cGMP and Alk7 signaling pathways. Tight regulation of Alk7 is required for efficient differentiation of brown adipocytes. Alk7 has differential effects on adipogenic differentiation and the development of the thermogenic program in brown adipocytes.

  18. Filtration behavior of casein glycomacropeptide (CGMP) in an enzymatic membrane reactor: fouling control by membrane selection and threshold flux operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Jianquan; Morthensen, Sofie Thage; Meyer, Anne S.

    2014-01-01

    . In this study, the filtration performance and fouling behavior during ultrafiltration (UF) of CGMP for the enzymatic production of 3′-sialyllactose were investigated. A 5kDa regenerated cellulose membrane with high anti-fouling performance, could retain CGMP well, permeate 3′-sialyllactose, and was found...... concentration on the threshold flux were studied based on the resistance-in-series model. Higher hydrophilicity of the membrane, elevated pH and agitation, and lower CGMP concentration were found to increase the threshold flux and decrease membrane fouling....

  19. [Isolation of inosine-5'-monophosphate from fish muscles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugaĭ, V A; Akulin, V N; Epshteĭn, L M

    1987-01-01

    Conditions for transformation of tissue adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP) into inosine-5'-monophosphate (IMP) with the aid of endogenic AMP-aminohydrolase are developed resting on the studied properties of AMP-aminohydrolase (EC 3.5.4.6) from saltwater fish muscles (one of the enzymes participating in the nucleotide metabolism). Sorption of the nucleotide is performed on the activated charcoals A gamma-3 A gamma-5 which eluate IMP from acid solutions. It reduces the process of isolation, permits application of the acid wash solutions to remove salts; the alkaline ethyl alcohol-aid elution at the subsequent stages accelerates the process of nucleotide concentration by means of vacuum evaporation. The suggested approaches allow developing a simple method of IMP production from fish tissues which diminishes the cost of preparation.

  20. RECIPIENT PRETRANSPLANT INOSINE MONOPHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE ACTIVITY IN NONMYELOABLATIVE HCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, Meagan J.; Risler, Linda J.; Phillips, Brian R.; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S.; Boeckh, Michael J.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2014-01-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5’- monophosphate (IMP) to xanthosine 5’-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNC) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T-cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation, but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, non-relapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient’s pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient’s sensitivity to MMF, but confirmatory studies are needed. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. PMID:24923537

  1. Neurotoxicity of cGMP in the vertebrate retina: from the initial research on rd mutant mice to zebrafish genetic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iribarne, Maria; Masai, Ichiro

    2017-09-01

    Zebrafish are an excellent animal model for research on vertebrate development and human diseases. Sophisticated genetic tools including large-scale mutagenesis methodology make zebrafish useful for studying neuronal degenerative diseases. Here, we review zebrafish models of inherited ophthalmic diseases, focusing on cGMP metabolism in photoreceptors. cGMP is the second messenger of phototransduction, and abnormal cGMP levels are associated with photoreceptor death. cGMP concentration represents a balance between cGMP phosphodiesterase 6 (PDE6) and guanylate cyclase (GC) activities in photoreceptors. Various zebrafish cGMP metabolism mutants were used to clarify molecular mechanisms by which dysfunctions in this pathway trigger photoreceptor degeneration. Here, we review the history of research on the retinal degeneration (rd) mutant mouse, which carries a genetic mutation of PDE6b, and we also highlight recent research in photoreceptor degeneration using zebrafish models. Several recent discoveries that provide insight into cGMP toxicity in photoreceptors are discussed.

  2. IL-4 induces cAMP and cGMP in human monocytic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Dugas

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Human monocytes, preincubated with IFN-γ respond to IL-4 by a cGMP increase through activation of an inducible NO synthase. Here, IL-4 was found to induce an accumulation of cGMP (1 – 3 min and cAMP (20 – 25 min in unstimulated monocytes. This was impaired with NOS inhibitors, but also with EGTA and calcium/calmodulin inhibitors. These results suggest that: (1 IL-4 may stimulate different NOS isoforms in resting and IFN-γ activated monocytes, and (2 cAMP accumulation may be partially dependent on the NO pathway. By RT-PCR, a type III constitutive NOS mRNA was detected in U937 monocytic cells. IL-4 also increased the [Ca2+]i in these cells. Different NOS may thus be expressed in monocytic cells depending on their differentiation and the signals they receive.

  3. From bedside to bench--meeting report of the 7th International Conference on cGMP "cGMP: generators, effectors and therapeutic implications" in Trier, Germany, from June 19th to 21st 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friebe, Andreas; Sandner, Peter; Seifert, Roland

    2015-12-01

    During the past decade, our knowledge on the physiology, pathophysiology, basic pharmacology, and clinical pharmacology of the second messenger (cGMP) has increased tremendously. It is now well-established that cGMP, generated by soluble and particulate guanylate cyclases, is highly compartmentalized in cells and regulates numerous body functions. New cGMP-regulated physiological functions include meiosis and temperature perception. cGMP is involved in the genesis of numerous pathologies including cardiovascular, pulmonary, endocrine, metabolic, neuropsychiatric, eye, and tumor diseases. Several new clinical uses of stimulators and activators of soluble guanylate cyclase and of phosphodiesterase inhibitors such as heart failure, kidney failure, cognitive disorders, obesity bronchial asthma, and osteoporosis are emerging. The combination of neprilysin inhibitors-enhancing stimulation of the particulate guanylate cyclase pathway by preventing natriuretic peptide degradation-with angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonists constitutes a novel promising strategy for heart failure treatment. The role of oxidative stress in cGMP signaling, application of cGMP sensors, and gene therapy for degenerative eye diseases are emerging topics. It is anticipated that cGMP research will further prosper over the next years and reach out into more and more basic and clinical disciplines.

  4. Establishing a cGMP pancreatic islet processing facility: the first experience in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larijani, Bagher; Arjmand, Babak; Amoli, Mahsa M; Ao, Ziliang; Jafarian, Ali; Mahdavi-Mazdah, Mitra; Ghanaati, Hossein; Baradar-Jalili, Reza; Sharghi, Sasan; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Aghayan, Hamid Reza

    2012-12-01

    It has been predicted that one of the greatest increase in prevalence of diabetes will happen in the Middle East bear in the next decades. The aim of standard therapeutic strategies for diabetes is better control of complications. In contrast, some new strategies like cell and gene therapy have aimed to cure the disease. In recent years, significant progress has occurred in beta-cell replacement therapies with a progressive improvement of short-term and long term outcomes. In year 2005, considering the impact of the disease in Iran and the promising results of the Edmonton protocol, the funding for establishing a current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) islet processing facility by Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center was approved by Tehran University of Medical Sciences. Several islet isolations were performed following establishment of cGMP facility and recruitment of all required equipments for process validation and experimental purpose. Finally the first successful clinical islet isolation and transplantation was performed in September 2010. In spite of a high cost of the procedure it is considered beneficial and may prevent long term complications and the costs associated with secondary cares. In this article we will briefly describe our experience in setting up a cGMP islet processing facility which can provide valuable information for regional countries interested to establish similar facilities.

  5. Nucleic acid molecules encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, and methods of use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croteau, Rodney B. (Pullman, WA); Lange, Bernd M. (Pullman, WA)

    2001-01-01

    A cDNA encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase (IPK) from peppermint (Mentha x piperita) has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Accordingly, an isolated DNA sequence (SEQ ID NO:1) is provided which codes for the expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase (SEQ ID NO:2), from peppermint (Mentha x piperita). In other aspects, replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or for a base sequence sufficiently complementary to at least a portion of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase DNA or RNA to enable hybridization therewith. In yet other aspects, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding isopentenyl monophosphate kinase. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of the aforementioned recombinant isopentenyl monophosphate kinase that may be used to facilitate its production, isolation and purification in significant amounts. Recombinant isopentenyl monophosphate kinase may be used to obtain expression or enhanced expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase in plants in order to enhance the production of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or isoprenoids derived therefrom, or may be otherwise employed for the regulation or expression of isopentenyl monophosphate kinase, or the production of its products.

  6. Lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptors and adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate during and after normal pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Mandach, U.; Gubler, H. P.; Engel, G.; Huch, R.; Huch, A.

    1993-01-01

    1. The beta 2-sympathomimetics, used to inhibit preterm labour, bind predominantly to beta 2-adrenoceptors, activating adenylate cyclase to form adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP), a messenger substance which inhibits the enzyme cascade triggering smooth muscle contraction. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP formation can be used as markers of beta 2-adrenergic effect. 2. The present study addresses the influence of pregnancy on the beta-adrenoceptor system. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP concentrations (basal and evoked by isoprenaline) in circulating lymphocytes were determined at three points in gestation (16, 29 and 37 weeks) and 9 weeks post partum in 22 normal pregnancies. (-)-[125Iodo]-cyanopindolol was used as the ligand to identify a homogeneous population of beta 2-adrenoceptors on lymphocytes. B- and T-cell fractions were estimated from the same samples. 3. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density decreased significantly during gestation until week 37 (P < 0.01), then increased post partum (P < 0.005). Cyclic AMP concentrations (basal and evoked by isoprenaline) were significantly lower after 16 weeks of gestation than post partum (P < 0.05). 4. The results, which cannot be explained in terms of a shift in the lymphocyte (B- and T-cell) ratio, indicate that beta-adrenoceptor density and function are reduced in normal pregnancy and only return to normal post partum. These findings may be of significance in devising future tocolytic therapy with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists. PMID:8383562

  7. Lymphocyte beta 2-adrenoceptors and adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate during and after normal pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Mandach, U; Gubler, H P; Engel, G; Huch, R; Huch, A

    1993-02-01

    1. The beta 2-sympathomimetics, used to inhibit preterm labour, bind predominantly to beta 2-adrenoceptors, activating adenylate cyclase to form adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic AMP), a messenger substance which inhibits the enzyme cascade triggering smooth muscle contraction. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP formation can be used as markers of beta 2-adrenergic effect. 2. The present study addresses the influence of pregnancy on the beta-adrenoceptor system. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density and cyclic AMP concentrations (basal and evoked by isoprenaline) in circulating lymphocytes were determined at three points in gestation (16, 29 and 37 weeks) and 9 weeks post partum in 22 normal pregnancies. (-)-[125Iodo]-cyanopindolol was used as the ligand to identify a homogeneous population of beta 2-adrenoceptors on lymphocytes. B- and T-cell fractions were estimated from the same samples. 3. beta 2-Adrenoceptor density decreased significantly during gestation until week 37 (P < 0.01), then increased post partum (P < 0.005). Cyclic AMP concentrations (basal and evoked by isoprenaline) were significantly lower after 16 weeks of gestation than post partum (P < 0.05). 4. The results, which cannot be explained in terms of a shift in the lymphocyte (B- and T-cell) ratio, indicate that beta-adrenoceptor density and function are reduced in normal pregnancy and only return to normal post partum. These findings may be of significance in devising future tocolytic therapy with beta 2-adrenoceptor agonists.

  8. Specific Interactions of Antitumor Metallocenes with Deoxydinucleoside Monophosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Rahel P.; Hari, Yvonne; Schürch, Stefan

    2017-09-01

    Bent metallocenes Cp2MCl2 (M = Ti, V, Nb, Mo) are known to exhibit cytotoxic activity against a variety of cancer types. Though the mechanism of action is not fully understood yet, the accumulation of the metal ions in the nucleus points towards DNA as one of the primary targets. A set of eight deoxydinucleoside monophosphates was used to study the adduct yields with metallocenes and cisplatin. The binding affinities are reflected by the relative intensities of the adducts and were found to follow the order of Pt > V > Ti > Mo (no adducts were detected with Nb). High-resolution tandem mass spectrometry was applied to locate the binding patterns in the deoxydinucleoside monophosphates. Whereas cisplatin binds to the soft nitrogen atoms in the purine nucleobases, the metallocenes additionally interact with the hard phosphate oxygen, which is in good agreement with the hard and soft (Lewis) acids and bases (HSAB) concept. However, the binding specificities were found to be unique for each metallocene. The hard Lewis acids titanium and vanadium predominantly bind to the deprotonated phosphate oxygen, whereas molybdenum, an intermediate Lewis acid, preferentially interacts with the nucleobases. Nucleobases comprise alternative binding sites for titanium and vanadium, presumably oxygen atoms for the first and nitrogen atoms for the latter. In summary, the intrinsic binding behavior of the different metallodrugs is reflected by the gas-phase dissociation of the adducts. Consequently, MS/MS can provide insights into therapeutically relevant interactions between metallodrugs and their cellular targets. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Glutamine inhibits ammonia-induced accumulation of cGMP in rat striatum limiting arginine supply for NO synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilgier, Wojciech; Freśko, Inez; Klemenska, Emilia; Beresewicz, Andrzej; Oja, Simo S; Saransaari, Pirjo; Albrecht, Jan; Zielińska, Magdalena

    2009-07-01

    Brain L-glutamine (Gln) accumulation and increased activity of the NO/cGMP pathway are immediate consequences of acute exposure to ammonia. This study tested whether excess Gln may influence NO and/or cGMP synthesis. Intrastriatal administration of the glutaminase inhibitor 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine or the system A-specific Gln uptake inhibitor methylaminoisobutyrate increased microdialysate Gln concentration and reduced basal and ammonia-induced NO and cGMP accumulation. Gln applied in vivo (via microdialysis) or in vitro (to rat brain cortical slices) reduced NO and cGMP accumulation in the presence and/or absence of ammonia, but not cGMP synthesis induced by the NO donor sodium nitroprusside. Attenuation of cGMP synthesis by Gln was prevented by administration of L-arginine (Arg). The L-arginine co-substrates of y(+)LAT2 transport system, L-leucine and cyclo-leucine, mimicked the effect of exogenous Gln, suggesting that Gln limits Arg supply for NO synthesis by interfering with y+LAT2-mediated Arg uptake across the cell membrane.

  10. The brassinosteroid receptor BRI1 can generate cGMP enabling cGMP-dependent downstream signaling

    KAUST Repository

    Wheeler, Janet I.

    2017-05-08

    The brassinosteroid receptor BRASSINOSTEROID INSENSITIVE 1 (BRI1) is a member of the leucine rich repeat receptor like kinase family. The intracellular kinase domain of BRI1 is an active kinase and also encapsulates a guanylate cyclase catalytic centre. Using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we confirmed that the recombinant cytoplasmic domain of BRI1 generates pmol amounts of cGMP per μg protein with a preference for magnesium over manganese as a co-factor. Importantly, a functional BRI1 kinase is essential for optimal cGMP generation. Therefore, the guanylate cyclase activity of BRI1 is modulated by the kinase while cGMP, the product of the guanylate cyclase, in turn inhibits BRI1 kinase activity. Furthermore, we show using Arabidopsis root cell cultures that cGMP rapidly potentiates phosphorylation of the downstream substrate BRASSINOSTEROID SIGNALING KINASE 1 (BSK1). Taken together, our results suggest that cGMP acts as a modulator that enhances downstream signaling while dampening signal generation from the receptor. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. cAMP and cGMP signaling: sensory systems with prokaryotic roots adopted by eukaryotic cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jacque-Lynne F; Leroux, Michel R

    2010-08-01

    An exciting discovery of the new millennium is that primary cilia, organelles found on most eukaryotic cells, play crucial roles in vertebrate development by modulating Hedgehog, Wnt and PDGF signaling. Analysis of the literature and sequence databases reveals that the ancient signal transduction pathway, which uses cGMP in eukaryotes or related cyclic di-GMP in bacteria, exists in virtually all eukaryotes. However, many eukaryotes that secondarily lost cilia during evolution, including flowering plants, slime molds and most fungi, lack otherwise evolutionarily conserved cGMP signaling components. Based on this intriguing phylogenetic distribution, the presence of cGMP signaling proteins within cilia, and the indispensable roles that cGMP plays in transducing environmental signals in divergent ciliated cells (e.g. vertebrate photoreceptors and Caenorhabditis elegans sensory neurons), we propose that cGMP signaling has a strong ciliary basis. cAMP signaling, also inherent to bacteria and crucial for cilium-dependent olfaction, similarly appears to have widespread usage in diverse cilia. Thus, we argue here that both cyclic nucleotides play essential and potentially ubiquitous roles in modulating ciliary functions.

  12. Modification of Tau by 8-Nitroguanosine 3',5'-Cyclic Monophosphate (8-Nitro-cGMP): EFFECTS OF NITRIC OXIDE-LINKED CHEMICAL MODIFICATION ON TAU AGGREGATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshitake, Jun; Soeda, Yoshiyuki; Ida, Tomoaki; Sumioka, Akio; Yoshikawa, Misato; Matsushita, Kenji; Akaike, Takaaki; Takashima, Akihiko

    2016-10-21

    Neurofibrillar tangles caused by intracellular hyperphosphorylated tau inclusion and extracellular amyloid β peptide deposition are hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. Tau contains one or two cysteine residues in three or four repeats of the microtubule binding region following alternative splicing of exon 10, and formation of intermolecular cysteine disulfide bonds accelerates tau aggregation. 8-Nitroguanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-nitro-cGMP) acts as a novel second messenger of nitric oxide (NO) by covalently binding cGMP to cysteine residues by electrophilic properties, a process termed protein S-guanylation. Here we studied S-guanylation of tau and its effects on tau aggregation. 8-Nitro-cGMP exposure induced S-guanylation of tau both in vitro and in tau-overexpressed HEK293T cells. S-guanylated tau inhibited heparin-induced tau aggregation in a thioflavin T assay. Atomic force microscopy observations indicated that S-guanylated tau could not form tau granules and fibrils. Further biochemical analyses showed that S-guanylated tau was inhibited at the step of tau oligomer formation. In P301L tau-expressing Neuro2A cells, 8-nitro-cGMP treatment significantly reduced the amount of sarcosyl-insoluble tau. NO-linked chemical modification on cysteine residues of tau could block tau aggregation, and therefore, increasing 8-nitro-cGMP levels in the brain could become a potential therapeutic strategy for Alzheimer's disease. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Funktionelle in vitro-Effekte CAMP/CGMP-modulierender Pharmaka am humanen Detrusormuskel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ückert St

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Die zyklischen Nukleotidmonophosphate cAMP und cGMP regulieren als intrazelluläre Second Messenger zahlreiche Gewebe- und Organfunktionen. cAMP und cGMP werden von zellulären Adenylat- und Guanylatzyklasen synthetisiert und von Phosphodiesterasen degradiert, die somit Schlüsselenzyme im Prozeß der Tonusregulation glatter Muskulatur sind. Die Markteinführung des PDE5-Inhibitors Sildenafil (Viagra hat dem Konzept der PDE-Inhibition auch in der Urologie breite Akzeptanz verschafft. Eigene Arbeiten der vergangenen Jahre beschreiben die Präsenz der PDE-Isoenzyme 1, 2, 3, 4 und 5 in der Muskulatur des humanen Detrusors und zeigen das klinische Potential des PDE1-Inhibitors Vinpocetin in der Behandlung der motorischen Dranginkontinenz. Mit dem Ziel der Charakterisierung geeigneter Substanzen für die Pharmakotherapie der Detrusorhyperaktivität haben wir die in vitro-Effekte neuer, selektiver Inhibitoren der PDE des Typs 2, 3 und 5 auf isolierte humane Detrusormuskulatur untersucht und mit denen des Diterpens Forskolin (Aktivator der Adenylatzyklase und der Stickoxid (NO-Donatoren Dihydropyridin (DHP und Na+Nitroprussid (NNP verglichen.

  14. Adenosine Monophosphate-Based Detection of Bacterial Spores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Roger G.; Chen, Fei; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri; Hattori, Nori; Suzuki, Shigeya

    2009-01-01

    A method of rapid detection of bacterial spores is based on the discovery that a heat shock consisting of exposure to a temperature of 100 C for 10 minutes causes the complete release of adenosine monophosphate (AMP) from the spores. This method could be an alternative to the method described in the immediately preceding article. Unlike that method and related prior methods, the present method does not involve germination and cultivation; this feature is an important advantage because in cases in which the spores are those of pathogens, delays involved in germination and cultivation could increase risks of infection. Also, in comparison with other prior methods that do not involve germination, the present method affords greater sensitivity. At present, the method is embodied in a laboratory procedure, though it would be desirable to implement the method by means of a miniaturized apparatus in order to make it convenient and economical enough to encourage widespread use.

  15. Hypergravity differentially modulates cGMP efflux in human melanocytic cells stimulated by nitric oxide and natriuretic peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, K.; Stieber, C.; Lambers, B.; Block, I.; Krieg, R.; Wellmann, A.; Gerzer, R.

    Nitric oxide NO plays a key role in many patho physiologic processes including inflammation and skin cancer The diverse cellular effects of NO are mainly mediated by activation of the soluble guanylyl cyclase sGC isoform that leads to increases in intracellular cGMP levels whereas the membrane-bound isoforms serve as receptors for natriuretic peptides e g ANP In human skin epidermal melanocytes represent the principal cells for skin pigmentation by synthesizing the pigment melanin Melanin acts as a scavenger for free radicals that may arise during metabolic stress as a result of potentially harmful effects of the environment In previous studies we found that long-term exposure to hypergravity stimulated cGMP efflux in normal human melanocytes NHMs and non-metastatic melanoma cells at least partly by an enhanced expression of the multidrug resistance proteins MRP and cGMP transporters MRP4 5 The present study investigated whether hypergravity generated by centrifugal acceleration may modulate the cGMP efflux in NO-stimulated NHMs and melanoma cells MCs with different metastatic potential The NONOates PAPA-NO and DETA-NO were used as direct NO donors for cell stimulation In the presence of 0 1 mM DETA-NO t 1 2 sim 20 h long-term application of hypergravity up to 5 g for 24 h reduced intracellular cGMP levels by stimulating cGMP efflux in NHMs and non-metastatic MCs in comparison to 1 g whereas exposure to 5 g for 6 h in the presence of 0 1 mM PAPA-NO t 1 2 sim 30 min was not effective The hypergravity-stimulated

  16. cGMP and nitric oxide modulate thrombin-induced endothelial permeability : Regulation via different pathways in human aortic and umbilical vein endothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draijer, R.; Atsma, D.E.; Laarse, A. van der; Hinsbergh, V.W.M. van

    1995-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that cGMP and cAMP reduce the endothelial permeability for fluids and macromolecules when the endothelial permeability is increased by thrombin. In this study, we have investigated the mechanism by which cGMP improves the endothelial barrier function and examined w

  17. Cascade quantum teleportation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Nan-run; GONG Li-hua; LIU Ye

    2006-01-01

    In this letter a cascade quantum teleportation scheme is proposed. The proposed scheme needs less local quantum operations than those of quantum multi-teleportation. A quantum teleportation scheme based on entanglement swapping is presented and compared with the cascade quantum teleportation scheme. Those two schemes can effectively teleport quantum information and extend the distance of quantum communication.

  18. The determination of total cGMP levels in rod outer segments from intact toad photoreceptors in response to light superimposed on background and to consecutive flashes: a second light flash accelerates the dark recovery rate of cGMP levels in control media, but not in Na(+)-free, low Ca2+ medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, A I; Blazynski, C

    1993-01-01

    In previous experiments we established that a light flash reduced cGMP levels of toad rod outer segments within the transduction time interval, but that recovery of the dark level of cGMP occurred more slowly than reported electrophysiological recovery of membrane potential. We now report that a second light flash accelerates the recovery rate of total cGMP following an initial flash, but that this acceleration is blocked in a medium which is both sodium and calcium deficient. We also noted that calcium deficiency only elevated cGMP levels when sodium was present. For other experiments, we recorded ERG or aspartate isolated PIII responses from eyecups or retinas mounted on our quick-freeze apparatus, the light stimuli originating from the double light-bench of the latter. Whereas background illumination depressed cGMP, no detectable further cGMP loss accompanied the electrical response to a flash superimposed on the background.

  19. 牙龈卟啉单胞菌对人脐静脉血管内皮细胞cGMP生成的影响%Effect of Porphyromonas gingivalis on cGMP production in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴娟; 林良缘; 孙卫斌

    2012-01-01

    目的:体外研究牙龈卟啉单胞菌(Porphyromonas gingivalis,Pg)对人脐静脉血管内皮细胞(human umbilical vein endothelial cell,HUVEC)cGMP水平的影响.方法:用Pg ATCC 33277分别以感染复数(multiplicity of infection,MOI)1∶10、1∶50、1∶250干预HUVEC,并以未受Pg ATCC 33277干预的HUVEC作为阴性对照,分别培养4、12、36 h,在倒置显微镜下观察各组细胞形态;125I cGMP放射免疫试剂盒检测各组HUVECcGMP的水平.结果:与对照组相比,Pg ATCC 33277分别以MOI 1∶10、1∶50、1∶250干预HUVEC 4、12、36 h后,实验各组HUVEC的细胞形态未见明显改变,仍呈典型的“铺路石”状单层贴壁生长;Pg ATCC 33277 MOI1∶250时可呈时间依赖性地降低HUVEC cGMP水平,而同一时间点内,各浓度组的cGMP水平并无明显差异.结论:短时间内,Pg ATCC 33277对HUVEC的细胞形态无明显影响,但可降低HUVEC cGMP的生成,HUVECNO生物利用度下降.%AIM: To observe the effect of Porphyromonas gingivalis ATCC 33277 ( Pg ATCC 33277 ) on the production of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). METHODS: Pg ATCC 33277 was cultured anaerobically, and HUVEC were treated with Pg ATCC 33277 at multiplicities of infection (MOI) of 1 : 10, 1 : 50 and 1 : 250 for 4,12 and 36 h. HUVEC were observed using an inverted microscope and the intracellular cGMP levels in the cultured HUVEC were determined using radioimmunoassay. Detection of cGMP was used as a reporter assay for the biuavailability of NO. RESULTS: Compared with uninfected control group, HUVEC co-incubated with Pg ATCC 33277 for 4, 12 and 36 h at MOI of 1 : 10, 1 :50 and 1 : 250 respectively presented as an intact monolayer. Pg ATCC 33277 infection time-dependency reduced cGMP-production in HUVEC (P<0.05). Dose-dependence was not observed at all time points. CONCLUSION: Our results showed that within certain time period, the morphology of HUVEC is not affected with Pg

  20. Structural basis for the catalytic mechanism of a proficient enzyme: Orotidine 5'-Monophosphate Decarboxylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harris, Pernille Hanne; Poulsen, Jens-Christian Navarro; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    2000-01-01

    Orotidine 5‘-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase) catalyzes the decarboxylation of orotidine 5‘-monophosphate, the last step in the de novo synthesis of uridine 5‘-monophosphate. ODCase is a very proficient enzyme [Radzicka, A., and Wolfenden, R. (1995) Science 267, 90-93], enhancing the reaction...... rate by a factor of 1017. This proficiency has been enigmatic, since it is achieved without metal ions or cofactors. Here we present a 2.5 Å resolution structure of ODCase complexed with the inhibitor 1-(5‘-phospho-ß-d-ribofuranosyl)barbituric acid. It shows a closely packed dimer composed of two a...

  1. Relationship between Adaptation of the Folic Acid and the cAMP Mediated cGMP Response in Dictyostelium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haastert, Peter J.M. van

    1983-01-01

    Chemotactic stimulation of post-vegetative Dictyostelium cells with folic acid or aggregative cells with cAMP results in a fast transient cGMP response which peaks at 10 s; basal levels are recovered in about 30-40 s. Stimulation with folic acid or cAMP rapidly desensitizes the cells for equal or lo

  2. Conformation Changes N-terminal Involvement and cGMP Signal Relay in the Phosphodiesterase-5 GAF Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H Wang; H Robinson; H Ke

    2011-12-31

    The activity of phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) is specific for cGMP and is regulated by cGMP binding to GAF-A in its regulatory domain. To better understand the regulatory mechanism, x-ray crystallographic and biochemical studies were performed on constructs of human PDE5A1 containing the N-terminal phosphorylation segment, GAF-A, and GAF-B. Superposition of this unliganded GAF-A with the previously reported NMR structure of cGMP-bound PDE5 revealed dramatic conformational differences and suggested that helix H4 and strand B3 probably serve as two lids to gate the cGMP-binding pocket in GAF-A. The structure also identified an interfacial region among GAF-A, GAF-B, and the N-terminal loop, which may serve as a relay of the cGMP signal from GAF-A to GAF-B. N-terminal loop 98-147 was physically associated with GAF-B domains of the dimer. Biochemical analyses showed an inhibitory effect of this loop on cGMP binding and its involvement in the cGMP-induced conformation changes.

  3. Aging has the opposite effect on cAMP and cGMP circadian variations in rat Leydig cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baburski, Aleksandar Z; Sokanovic, Srdjan J; Andric, Silvana A; Kostic, Tatjana S

    2017-05-01

    The Leydig cell physiology displays a circadian rhythm driven by a complex interaction of the reproductive axis hormones and circadian system. The final output of this regulatory process is circadian pattern of steroidogenic genes expression and testosterone production. Aging gradually decreases robustness of rhythmic testosterone secretion without change in pattern of LH secretion. Here, we analyzed effect of aging on circadian variation of cAMP and cGMP signaling in Leydig cells. Results showed opposite effect of aging on cAMP and cGMP daily variation. Reduced amplitude of cAMP circadian oscillation was probably associated with changed expression of genes involved in cAMP production (increased circadian pattern of Adcy7, Adcy9, Adcy10 and decreased Adcy3); cAMP degradation (increased Pde4a, decreased Pde8b, canceled rhythm of Pde4d, completely reversed circadian pattern of Pde7b and Pde8a); and circadian expression of protein kinase A subunits (Prkac/PRKAC and Prkar2a). Aging stimulates expression of genes responsible for cGMP production (Nos2, Gucy1a3 and Gucy1b3/GUCYB3) and degradation (Pde5a, Pde6a and Pde6h) but the overall net effect is elevation of cGMP circadian oscillations in Leydig cells. In addition, the expression of cGMP-dependent kinase, Prkg1/PRKG1 is up-regulated. It seems that aging potentiate cGMP- and reduce cAMP-signaling in Leydig cells. Since both signaling pathways affect testosterone production and clockwork in the cells, further insights into these signaling pathways will help to unravel disorders linked to the circadian timing system, aging and reproduction.

  4. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate signal pathway in targeted therapy of lymphoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DOU Ai-xia; WANG Xin

    2010-01-01

    Objective To review the role of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) signal pathway in the pathogenesis oflymphoma and explore a potential lymphoma therapy targeted on this signaling pathway.Data sources The data cited in this review were mainly obtained from the articles listed in Medline and PubMed,published from January 1995 to June 2009. The search terms were "cAMP" and "lymphoma".Study selection Articles regarding the role of the cAMP pathway in apoptosis of lymphoma and associated cells and itspotential role in targeted therapy of lymphoma.Results In the transformation of lymphocytic malignancies, several signal pathways are involved. Among of them, thecAMP pathway has attracted increasing attention because of its apoptosis-inducing role in several lymphoma cells. cAMPpathway impairment is found to influence the prognosis of lymphoma. Targeted therapy to the cAMP pathway seems tobe a new direction for lymphoma treatment, aiming at restoring the cAMP function.Conclusions cAMP signal pathway has different effects on various lymphoma cells. cAMP analogues andphosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B) inhibitors have potential clinical significance. However, many challenges remain inunderstanding the various roles of such agents.

  5. [Identification of thiamine monophosphate hydrolyzing enzymes in chicken liver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolos, I K; Makarchikov, A F

    2014-01-01

    In animals, thiamine monophosphate (TMP) is an intermediate on the path of thiamine diphosphate, the coenzyme form of vitamin B1, degradation. The enzymes involved in TMP metabolism in animal tissues are not identified hitherto. The aim of this work was to study TMP hydrolysis in chicken liver. Two phosphatases have been found to contribute to TMP hydrolysis in liver homogenate. The first one, possessing a maximal activity at pH 6.0, is soluble, whereas the second one represents a membrane-bound enzyme with a pH optimum of 9.0. Membrane-bound TMPase activity was enhanced 1.7-fold by 5 mM Mg2+ ions and strongly inhibited by levamisole in uncompetitive manner with K1 of 53 μM, indicating the involvement of alkaline phosphatase. An apparent Km of alkaline phosphatase for TMP was calculated from the Hanes plot to be 0.6 mM. The soluble TMPase has an apparent Km of 0.7 mM; this enzyme is Mg2+ independent and insensitive to levamisole. As estimated by gel filtration on a Toyopearl HW-55 column, the soluble enzyme has a molecular mass of 17.8 kDa, TMPase activity being eluted simultaneously with peaks of flavinmononucleotide and p-nitrophenyl phosphatase activity. Thus, TMP appears to be a physiological substrate for a low-molecular weight acid phosphatase, also known as low-molecular-weight protein phosphotyrosine phosphatase.

  6. ALLERGEN-INDUCED CHANGES IN ADENOSINE 5'-MONOPHOSPHATE BRONCHIAL RESPONSIVENESS - EFFECT OF NEDOCROMIL SODIUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    AALBERS, R; KAUFMAN, HF; GROEN, H; KOETER, GH; DEMONCHY, JGR

    1992-01-01

    Bronchial hyperresponsiveness to adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) was studied after allergen challenge in allergic asthmatic patients. Measurements were made with and without nedocromil sodium pretreatment. Nedocromil sodium inhibited both the early and late asthmatic reactions (P <.01). After aller

  7. ALLERGEN-INDUCED CHANGES IN ADENOSINE 5'-MONOPHOSPHATE BRONCHIAL RESPONSIVENESS - EFFECT OF NEDOCROMIL SODIUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    AALBERS, R; KAUFMAN, HF; GROEN, H; KOETER, GH; DEMONCHY, JGR

    1992-01-01

    Bronchial hyperresponsiveness to adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) was studied after allergen challenge in allergic asthmatic patients. Measurements were made with and without nedocromil sodium pretreatment. Nedocromil sodium inhibited both the early and late asthmatic reactions (P <.01). After

  8. Identification of thiamine monophosphate hydrolyzing enzymes in chicken liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. K. Kolas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In animals, thiamine monophosphate (TMP is an intermediate on the path of thiamine diphosphate, the coenzyme form of vitamin B1, degradation. The enzymes involved in TMP metabolism in animal tissues are not identified hitherto. The aim of this work was to study TMP hydrolysis in chicken liver. Two phosphatases have been found to contribute to TMP hydrolysis in liver homogenate. The first one, possessing a maximal activity at pH 6.0, is soluble, whereas the second one represents a membrane-bound enzyme with a pH optimum of 9.0. Membrane-bound TMPase activity was enhanced 1.7-fold by 5 mM Mg2+ ions and strongly inhibited by levami­sole in uncompetitive manner with Ki of 53 μM, indicating the involvement of alkaline phosphatase. An apparent Km of alkaline phosphatase for TMP was calculated from the Hanes plot to be 0.6 mM. The soluble TMPase has an apparent­ Km of 0.7 mM; this enzyme is Mg2+ independent and insensitive to levamisole. As estimated by gel filtration on a Toyopearl HW-55 column, the soluble enzyme has a molecular mass of 17.8 kDa, TMPase activity being eluted simultaneously with peaks of flavinmononucleotide and p-nitrophenyl phosphatase activity. Thus, TMP appears to be a physiological substrate for a low-molecular weight acid phosphatase, also known as low-molecu­lar-weight protein phosphotyrosine phosphatase

  9.  Phosphodiesterase 3 mediates cross-talk between the protein kinase- and cGMP- dependent pathways and cyclic AMP metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Edyta Makuch; Janusz Matuszyk

    2012-01-01

     PDE3 is a dual-substrate phosphodiesterase responsible for hydrolyzing both cAMP and cGMP whilst being simultaneously inhibited by cGMP. This feature is related to presence of the 44 amino acid insert in the catalytic domain, which determines the mechanism of introduction of the cyclic nucleotide into the catalytic pocket of the enzyme. Once bound in the catalytic site cGMP results in steric hindrance for cAMP to enter the site. The regulatory domain of PDE3 consists of two hydrophobic regio...

  10. Cascade Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Schlenker, Cody W.

    2011-09-27

    We demonstrate planar organic solar cells consisting of a series of complementary donor materials with cascading exciton energies, incorporated in the following structure: glass/indium-tin-oxide/donor cascade/C 60/bathocuproine/Al. Using a tetracene layer grown in a descending energy cascade on 5,6-diphenyl-tetracene and capped with 5,6,11,12-tetraphenyl- tetracene, where the accessibility of the π-system in each material is expected to influence the rate of parasitic carrier leakage and charge recombination at the donor/acceptor interface, we observe an increase in open circuit voltage (Voc) of approximately 40% (corresponding to a change of +200 mV) compared to that of a single tetracene donor. Little change is observed in other parameters such as fill factor and short circuit current density (FF = 0.50 ± 0.02 and Jsc = 2.55 ± 0.23 mA/cm2) compared to those of the control tetracene-C60 solar cells (FF = 0.54 ± 0.02 and Jsc = 2.86 ± 0.23 mA/cm2). We demonstrate that this cascade architecture is effective in reducing losses due to polaron pair recombination at donor-acceptor interfaces, while enhancing spectral coverage, resulting in a substantial increase in the power conversion efficiency for cascade organic photovoltaic cells compared to tetracene and pentacene based devices with a single donor layer. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  11. Critical Mandelbrot Cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barral, Julien; Kupiainen, Antti; Nikula, Miika; Saksman, Eero; Webb, Christian

    2014-01-01

    We study Mandelbrot's multiplicative cascade measures at the critical temperature. As has been recently shown by Barral et al. (C R Acad Sci Paris Ser I 350:535-538, 2012), an appropriately normalized sequence of cascade measures converges weakly in probability to a nontrivial limit measure. We prove that these limit measures have no atoms and give bounds for the modulus of continuity of the cumulative distribution function of the measure. Using the earlier work of Barral and Seuret (Adv Math 214:437-468, 2007), we compute the multifractal spectrum of the measures. We also extend the result of Benjamini and Schramm (Commun Math Phys 289:653-662, 2009), in which the KPZ formula from quantum gravity is validated for the high temperature cascade measures, to the critical and low temperature cases.

  12. Effect of aerobic exercise training on cGMP levels and blood pressure in treated hypertensive postmenopausal women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iane P Novais

    Full Text Available Abstract The second messenger cGMP has been largely studied as a therapeutic target in a variety of disorders such as erectile dysfunction, arterial hypertension and heart failure. Evidence has shown thatcGMP activators are less efficient in estrogen-deficiency animals, but no studies exist involving non-pharmacological approacheson NO/cGMP signaling pathway in hypertensive postmenopausal women. The aim of this study is to examine NO/cGMP pathway, redox state and blood pressure in trained treatedhypertensive (HT postmenopausal women comparing with normotensive (NT group. The rationale for that is most of HT patients is encouraged by physician to perform exercise associated with pharmacological treatments.Aerobic exercise training (AET consisted of 24 sessions, 3 times/week.Parameters were evaluated at baseline and after AET for both groups (HT=28; NT=33.In treatedHT group, AET was significantly effective in increasing cGMP concentrations (28% accompanied by an up-regulation of SOD (97% and catalase activity (37%. In NT group, we found an increasein SOD activity (58%. TreatedHT postmenopausal women were still responsive to AET increasing cGMP levels and up-regulating antioxidant system. It should also be emphasized that these findings provide information on the circulating biomarkers that might delay the developing of cardiovascular events in this particular population.

  13. The Nitric oxide/CGMP/KATP pathway mediates systemic and central antinociception induced by resistance exercise in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdino, Giovane S; Xavier, Carlos H; Almeida, Renato; Silva, Grazielle; Fontes, Marcos A; Menezes, Gustavo; Duarte, Igor D; Perez, Andrea C

    2015-01-01

    Resistance exercise (RE) is characterized to increase strength, tone, mass, and/or muscular endurance and also for produces many beneficial effects, such as blood pressure and osteoporosis reduction, diabetes mellitus control, and analgesia. However, few studies have investigated endogenous mechanisms involved in the RE-induced analgesia. Thus, the aim of this study was evaluate the role of the NO/CGMP/KATP pathway in the antinociception induced by RE. Wistar rats were submitted to acute RE in a weight-lifting model. The nociceptive threshold was measured by mechanical nociceptive test (paw-withdrawal). To investigate the involvement of the NO/CGMP/KATP pathway the following nitric oxide synthase (NOS) non-specific and specific inhibitors were used: N-nitro-l-arginine (NOArg), Aminoguanidine, N5-(1-Iminoethyl)-l-ornithine dihydrocloride (l-NIO), Nω-Propyl-l-arginine (l-NPA); guanylyl cyclase inhibitor, 1H-[1,2,4]oxidiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ); and KATP channel blocker, Glybenclamide; all administered subcutaneously, intrathecally and intracerebroventricularly. Plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) nitrite levels were determined by spectrophotometry. The RE protocol produced antinociception, which was significantly reversed by NOS specific and unspecific inhibitors, guanylyl cyclase inhibitor (ODQ) and KATP channel blocker (Glybenclamide). RE was also responsible for increasing nitrite levels in both plasma and CSF. These finding suggest that the NO/CGMP/KATP pathway participates in antinociception induced by RE.

  14. Effects of Na/sup +/ on ultraviolet light-induced photorelaxation and c-GMP levels in rabbit aorta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aceto, J.F.; Raffa, R.B.; Tallarida, R.J.

    1986-03-05

    Isolated strips of rabbit aorta in a state of drug-induced contraction relax reversibly when irradiated with ultraviolet light. The authors previously found that the magnitude of the photorelaxation progressively diminished as the extracellular Na/sup +/ ion concentration was reduced from 145 mM to 85 mM. At 85 mM Na/sup +/, there was minimal photorelaxation, even though the preparation continued to respond to vasoconstricting agents. The reduction in photosensitivity is not an osmotic effect because restoration of osmolarity did not restore photosensitivity. Neither the mechanism underlaying photorelaxation nor its modification by Na/sup +/ is precisely known. In order to examine these further the authors measured cyclic GMP levels in the absence and presence of UV light at both normal and reduced Na/sup +/ levels. At 145 mM Na/sup +/, irradiation resulted in an increase of cGMP from 0.299 to 0.717 fmole/..mu..g protein. At 85 mM Na/sup +/, the corresponding levels were 0.541 and 1.24 fmole/..mu..g protein. Thus, cGMP levels increase (approximately double) with UV irradiation at both reduced and normal Na/sup +/ concentrations even though there is little or no photorelaxation in the reduced Na/sup +/ environment. The reduction in Na/sup +/ may uncouple a link between cGMP elevation and cytoplasmic calcium in the aortic cell.

  15. Co-crystal structures of PKG Iβ (92-227 with cGMP and cAMP reveal the molecular details of cyclic-nucleotide binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong Joo Kim

    Full Text Available Cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinases (PKGs are central mediators of the NO-cGMP signaling pathway and phosphorylate downstream substrates that are crucial for regulating smooth muscle tone, platelet activation, nociception and memory formation. As one of the main receptors for cGMP, PKGs mediate most of the effects of cGMP elevating drugs, such as nitric oxide-releasing agents and phosphodiesterase inhibitors which are used for the treatment of angina pectoris and erectile dysfunction, respectively.We have investigated the mechanism of cyclic nucleotide binding to PKG by determining crystal structures of the amino-terminal cyclic nucleotide-binding domain (CNBD-A of human PKG I bound to either cGMP or cAMP. We also determined the structure of CNBD-A in the absence of bound nucleotide. The crystal structures of CNBD-A with bound cAMP or cGMP reveal that cAMP binds in either syn or anti configurations whereas cGMP binds only in a syn configuration, with a conserved threonine residue anchoring both cyclic phosphate and guanine moieties. The structure of CNBD-A in the absence of bound cyclic nucleotide was similar to that of the cyclic nucleotide bound structures. Surprisingly, isothermal titration calorimetry experiments demonstrated that CNBD-A binds both cGMP and cAMP with a relatively high affinity, showing an approximately two-fold preference for cGMP.Our findings suggest that CNBD-A binds cGMP in the syn conformation through its interaction with Thr193 and an unusual cis-peptide forming residues Leu172 and Cys173. Although these studies provide the first structural insights into cyclic nucleotide binding to PKG, our ITC results show only a two-fold preference for cGMP, indicating that other domains are required for the previously reported cyclic nucleotide selectivity.

  16. Angiotensin II increases phosphodiesterase 5A expression in vascular smooth muscle cells: A mechanism by which angiotensin II antagonizes cGMP signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongsoo; Aizawa, Toru; Wei, Heng; Pi, Xinchun; Rybalkin, Sergei D.; Berk, Bradford C.; Yan, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) and nitric oxide (NO)/natriuretic peptide (NP) signaling pathways mutually regulate each other. Imbalance of Ang II and NO/NP has been implicated in the pathophysiology of many vascular diseases. cGMP functions as a key mediator in the interaction between Ang II and NO/NP. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 5A (PDE5A) is important in modulating cGMP signaling by hydrolyzing cGMP in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Therefore, we examined whether Ang II negatively modulates intracellular cGMP signaling in VSMC by regulating PDE5A. Ang II rapidly and transiently increased PDE5A mRNA levels in rat aortic VSMC. Upregulation of PDE5A mRNA was associated with a time-dependent increase of both PDE5 protein expression and activity. Increased PDE5A mRNA level was transcription-dependent and mediated by the Ang II type 1 receptor. Ang II-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) was essential for Ang II-induced PDE5A upregulation. Pretreatment of VSMC with Ang II inhibited C-type NP (CNP) stimulated cGMP signaling, such as cGMP dependent protein kinase (PKG)-mediated phosphorylation of vasodilator-stimulated-phosphoprotein (VASP). Ang II-mediated inhibition of PKG was blocked when PDE5 activity was decreased by selective PDE5 inhibitors, suggesting that upregulation of PDE5A expression is an important mechanism for Ang II to attenuate cGMP signaling. PDE5A may also play a critical role in the growth promoting effects of Ang II because inhibition of PDE5A activity significantly decreased Ang II-stimulated VSMC growth. These observations establish a new mechanism by which Ang II antagonizes cGMP signaling and stimulates VSMC growth. PMID:15623434

  17. Now that you want to take your HIV/AIDS vaccine/biological product research concept into the clinic: what are the "cGMP"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheets, Rebecca L; Rangavajhula, Vijaya; Pullen, Jeffrey K; Butler, Chris; Mehra, Vijay; Shapiro, Stuart; Pensiero, Michael

    2015-04-08

    The Division of AIDS Vaccine Research Program funds the discovery and development of HIV/AIDS vaccine candidates. Basic researchers, having discovered a potential vaccine in the laboratory, next want to take that candidate into the clinic to test the concept in humans, to see if it translates. Many of them have heard of "cGMP" and know that they are supposed to make a "GMP product" to take into the clinic, but often they are not very familiar with what "cGMP" means and why these good practices are so important. As members of the Vaccine Translational Research Branch, we frequently get asked "can't we use the material we made in the lab in the clinic?" or "aren't Phase 1 studies exempt from cGMP?" Over the years, we have had many experiences where researchers or their selected contract manufacturing organizations have not applied an appropriate degree of compliance with cGMP suitable for the clinical phase of development. We share some of these experiences and the lessons learned, along with explaining the importance of cGMP, just what cGMP means, and what they can assure, in an effort to de-mystify this subject and facilitate the rapid and safe translational development of HIV vaccines.

  18. Cascaded Poisson processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Kuniaki; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.; Teich, Malvin Carl

    1982-12-01

    We investigate the counting statistics for stationary and nonstationary cascaded Poisson processes. A simple equation is obtained for the variance-to-mean ratio in the limit of long counting times. Explicit expressions for the forward-recurrence and inter-event-time probability density functions are also obtained. The results are expected to be of use in a number of areas of physics.

  19. Integrated Broadband Quantum Cascade Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Kamjou (Inventor); Soibel, Alexander (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A broadband, integrated quantum cascade laser is disclosed, comprising ridge waveguide quantum cascade lasers formed by applying standard semiconductor process techniques to a monolithic structure of alternating layers of claddings and active region layers. The resulting ridge waveguide quantum cascade lasers may be individually controlled by independent voltage potentials, resulting in control of the overall spectrum of the integrated quantum cascade laser source. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  20. Squalenoyl nucleoside monophosphate nanoassemblies: new prodrug strategy for the delivery of nucleotide analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Joachim; Reddy, L Harivardhan; Lepêtre-Mouelhi, Sinda; Wack, Séverine; Clayette, Pascal; Rogez-Kreuz, Christine; Yousfi, Rahima; Couvreur, Patrick; Desmaële, Didier

    2010-05-01

    4-(N)-1,1',2-trisnor-squalenoyldideoxycytidine monophosphate (SQddC-MP) and 4-(N)-1,1',2-trisnor-squalenoylgemcitabine monophosphate (SQdFdC-MP) were synthesized using phosphoramidite chemistry. These amphiphilic molecules self-assembled to about hundred nanometers size nanoassemblies in aqueous medium. Nanoassemblies of SQddC-MP displayed significant anti-HIV activity whereas SQdFdC-MP nanoassemblies displayed promising anticancer activity on leukemia cells. These results suggested that squalene conjugate of negatively charged nucleotide analogues efficiently penetrated within cells. Thus, we propose a new prodrug strategy for improved delivery of nucleoside analogues to ameliorate their biological efficacy.

  1. A new cascadic multigrid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI; Zhongci

    2001-01-01

    [1]Bornemann, F., Deuflhard, P., The cascadic multigrid method for elliptic problems, Numer. Math., 996, 75: 35.[2]Bornemann, F., Deuflhard, P., The cascadic multigrid method, The Eighth International Conference on Domain Decomposition Methods for Partial Differential Equations (eds. Glowinski, R., Periaux, J., Shi, Z. et al.), New York: John Wiley and Sons, 997.[3]Bornemann, F., Krause, R., Classical and cascadic multigrid-methodogical comparison, Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Domain Decomposition (eds. Bjorstad, P., Espedal, M., Keyes, D.), New York: John Wiley and Sons, 998.[4]Shaidurov, V., Some estimates of the rate of convergence for the cascadic conjugate gradient method, Comp. Math. Applic., 996, 3: 6.[5]Shi, Z., Xu, X., Cascadic multigrid method for the second order elliptic problem, East-West J. Numer. Math., 998, 6: 309.[6]Shi, Z., Xu, X., Cascadic multigrid for elliptic problems, East-West J. Numer. Math., 999, 7: 99.[7]Shi, Z., Xu, X., Cascadic multigrid method for the plate bending problem, East-West J. Numer. Math., 998, 6: 37.[8]Braess, D., Dahmen, W., A cascade multigrid algorithm for the Stokes equations, Number. Math., 999, 82: 79.[9]Shi, Z., Xu, X., Cascadic multigrid for parabolic problems, J. Comput. Math., 2000, 8: 450.[10]Ciarlet, P.,The Finite Element Method for Elliptic Problems, Amsterdam: North-Holland, 978.[11]Zienkiewicz, O. C., The Finite Element Method, 3rd. ed., London: McGraw-Hill, 977.[12]Powell, M. J. D., Sabin, M. A., Piecewise quadratic approximations on triangles, ACM Trans. Mat. Software, 977, 3: 36.[13]Xu, J., The auxiliary space method and optimal multigrid precondition techniques for unstructured grids, Computing, 996, 56: 25.[14]Bank, R., Dupont, T., An optimal order process for solving finite element equations, Math. Comput., 980, 36: 35.[15]Brenner, S., Convergence of nonconforming multigrid methods without full elliptic regularity, Math

  2. Information cascade on networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisakado, Masato; Mori, Shintaro

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss a voting model by considering three different kinds of networks: a random graph, the Barabási-Albert (BA) model, and a fitness model. A voting model represents the way in which public perceptions are conveyed to voters. Our voting model is constructed by using two types of voters-herders and independents-and two candidates. Independents conduct voting based on their fundamental values; on the other hand, herders base their voting on the number of previous votes. Hence, herders vote for the majority candidates and obtain information relating to previous votes from their networks. We discuss the difference between the phases on which the networks depend. Two kinds of phase transitions, an information cascade transition and a super-normal transition, were identified. The first of these is a transition between a state in which most voters make the correct choices and a state in which most of them are wrong. The second is a transition of convergence speed. The information cascade transition prevails when herder effects are stronger than the super-normal transition. In the BA and fitness models, the critical point of the information cascade transition is the same as that of the random network model. However, the critical point of the super-normal transition disappears when these two models are used. In conclusion, the influence of networks is shown to only affect the convergence speed and not the information cascade transition. We are therefore able to conclude that the influence of hubs on voters' perceptions is limited.

  3. The Role of Aquaporin 1 Activated by cGMP in Myocardial Edema Caused by Cardiopulmonary Bypass in Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang-bao Ding

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Most cardiac procedures involve the use of cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB, which pumps oxygenated blood to the body while the heart and lungs are isolated. CPB can cause profound alterations V in the homeostasis of physiological fluids, which often results in myocardial edema. In our study, we used sheep CPB model of in vivo and in vitro to assess the relationship between cGMP and AQP1 during CPB. Methods: ODQ, a specific inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC, was used to treat the CPB animals or cardiomyocytes. Left ventricular function of each group was determined by pressure-volume system. Water content of myocardial tissue was assessed by dry-wet weight, and cardiomyocytes water permeability was also calculated. The concentration of cGMP was determined by Radioimmunoassay (RIA. mRNA and protein expression of AQP1 were detected by real-time PCR and western blot, respectively. Results: The relative expression level of AQP1 mRNA and protein at each time point (0, 6, 12, 24 or 48 h after CPB was significantly increased (1.18-fold at 12 h, 1.77-fold at 24 h and 2.18-fold at 48h compared with each sham group, the protein expression of AQP1 also showed a rising trend after CPB. The degree of myocardial edema (75.1% at 12 h, 79.3% at 24 h and 81.0% at 48h increased following the CPB surgery. The mRNA expression level of AQP1 was significantly decreased by 39.7% (pin vitro experiments showed the same changing trends as in vivo. Conclusion: cGMP pathway controls water channels and then affects water intake during CPB through an AQP1-mediated pathway.

  4. The Importance of cGMP Signaling in Sensory Cilia for Body Size Regulation in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Manabi; Hino, Takahiro; Miyamoto, Ryuta; Inada, Hitoshi; Mori, Ikue; Koga, Makoto; Miyahara, Koji; Ohshima, Yasumi; Ishihara, Takeshi

    2015-12-01

    The body size of Caenorhabditis elegans is thought to be controlled by sensory inputs because many mutants with sensory cilium structure defects exhibit small body size. The EGL-4 cGMP-dependent protein kinase acts in sensory neurons to reduce body size when animals fail to perceive sensory signals. In addition to body size control, EGL-4 regulates various other behavioral and developmental pathways, including those involved in the regulation of egg laying and chemotaxis behavior. Here we have identified gcy-12, which encodes a receptor-type guanylyl cyclase, as a gene involved in the sensory regulation of body size. Analyses with GFP fusion constructs showed that gcy-12 is expressed in several sensory neurons and localizes to sensory cilia. Genetic analyses indicated that GCY-12 acts upstream of EGL-4 in body size control but does not affect other EGL-4 functions. Our studies indicate that the function of the GCY-12 guanylyl cyclase is to provide cGMP to the EGL-4 cGMP-dependent kinase only for limited tasks including body size regulation. We also found that the PDE-2 cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase negatively regulates EGL-4 in controlling body size. Thus, the cGMP level is precisely controlled by GCY-12 and PDE-2 to determine body size through EGL-4, and the defects in the sensory cilium structure may disturb the balanced control of the cGMP level. The large number of guanylyl cyclases encoded in the C. elegans genome suggests that EGL-4 exerts pleiotropic effects by partnering with different guanylyl cyclases for different downstream functions.

  5. Role of AC-cAMP-PKA Cascade in Antidepressant Action of Electroacupuncture Treatment in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-hua Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adenylyl cyclase (AC-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP-cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA cascade is considered to be associated with the pathogenesis and treatment of depression. The present study was conducted to explore the role of the cAMP cascade in antidepressant action of electroacupuncture (EA treatment for chronic mild stress (CMS-induced depression model rats. The results showed that EA improved significantly behavior symptoms in depression and dysfunction of AC-cAMP-PKA signal transduction pathway induced by CMS, which was as effective as fluoxetine. Moreover, the antidepressant effects of EA rather than Fluoxetine were completely abolished by H89, a specific PKA inhibitor. Consequently, EA has a significant antidepressant treatment in CMS-induced depression model rats, and AC-cAMP-PKA signal transduction pathway is crucial for it.

  6. Gold Core Mesoporous Organosilica Shell Degradable Nanoparticles for Two-Photon Imaging and Gemcitabine Monophosphate Delivery

    KAUST Repository

    Rhamani, Saher

    2017-09-12

    The synthesis of gold core degradable mesoporous organosilica shell nanoparticles is described. The nanopaticles were very efficient for two-photon luminescence imaging of cancer cells and for in vitro gemcitabine monophosphate delivery, allowing promising theranostic applications in the nanomedicine field.

  7. DISSIMILARITY IN METHACHOLINE AND ADENOSINE 5'-MONOPHOSPHATE RESPONSIVENESS 3-H AND 24-H AFTER ALLERGEN CHALLENGE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    AALBERS, R; KAUFFMAN, HF; KOETER, GH; POSTMA, DS; DEVRIES, K; DEMONCHY, JGR

    1991-01-01

    Bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) to methacholine and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) was studied in 15 allergic asthmatic patients before and 3 and 24 h after allergen challenge with hose dust mite (HDM). Subjects attended the clinic on 3 consecutive days. On the first day a control solution was

  8. The brassinosteroid receptor BRI1 can generate cGMP enabling cGMP-dependent downstream signaling

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Wheeler, J

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available . Data were analysed by two-way ANOVA followed by Sidak’s multiple comparisons post-hoc test. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd, The Plant Journal, (2017), doi: 10.1111/tpj.13589 BRI1 generates cGMP to modulate....49 � 0.132 pmol/lg protein (Figure 1c). A BRI model incorporating the KR1083/4AA mutations was able to form a helical structural fold (Fig- ure S1) that characterizes all Arabidopsis GC centres reported to-date (Wong et al., 2015) and thus may account...

  9. Raising the standard: changes to the Australian Code of Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) for human blood and blood components, human tissues and human cellular therapy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Craig; Velickovic, Zlatibor; Brown, Ross; Larsen, Stephen; Macpherson, Janet L; Gibson, John; Rasko, John E J

    2014-04-01

    In Australia, manufacture of blood, tissues and biologicals must comply with the federal laws and meet the requirements of the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) Manufacturing Principles as outlined in the current Code of Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP). The Therapeutic Goods Order (TGO) No. 88 was announced concurrently with the new cGMP, as a new standard for therapeutic goods. This order constitutes a minimum standard for human blood, tissues and cellular therapeutic goods aimed at minimising the risk of infectious disease transmission. The order sets out specific requirements relating to donor selection, donor testing and minimisation of infectious disease transmission from collection and manufacture of these products. The Therapeutic Goods Manufacturing Principles Determination No. 1 of 2013 references the human blood and blood components, human tissues and human cellular therapy products 2013 (2013 cGMP). The name change for the 2013 cGMP has allowed a broadening of the scope of products to include human cellular therapy products. It is difficult to directly compare versions of the code as deletion of some clauses has not changed the requirements to be met, as they are found elsewhere amongst the various guidelines provided. Many sections that were specific for blood and blood components are now less prescriptive and apply to a wider range of cellular therapies, but the general overall intent remains the same. Use of 'should' throughout the document instead of 'must' allows flexibility for alternative processes, but these systems will still require justification by relevant logical argument and validation data to be acceptable to TGA. The cGMP has seemingly evolved so that specific issues identified at audit over the last decade have now been formalised in the new version. There is a notable risk management approach applied to most areas that refer to process justification and decision making. These requirements commenced on 31 May 2013 and a 12 month

  10. Hydralazine decreases sodium nitroprusside-induced rat aortic ring relaxation and increased cGMP production by rat aortic myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidrio, Horacio; González-Romo, Pilar; Alvarez, Ezequiel; Alcaide, Carlos; Orallo, Francisco

    2005-10-28

    Association of hydralazine with nitrova-sodilators has long been known to be beneficial in the vasodilator treatment of heart failure. We previously found that hydralazine appeared to reduce the increase in cGMP induced by sodium nitroprusside in cultured rat aortic myocytes. In order to further explore this seemingly paradoxical interaction, we extended our initial observations in rat aortic myocytes and also determined the influence of hydralazine on sodium nitroprusside-induced relaxation of rat aortic rings. Hydralazine produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of sodium nitroprusside stimulation of cGMP production and caused a rightward shift of concentration-relaxation curves in aortic rings. A possible mechanism of the hydralazine-nitroprusside interaction could be the interference with bioactivation of the nitro-vasodilator to release nitric oxide. Recent evidence indicates that vascular NADH oxidase, an enzyme known to be inhibited by hydralazine, could be involved in this process. Accordingly, hydralazine was found to inhibit NADH oxidase activity in rat aortic myocytes at concentrations similar to those reducing sodium nitroprusside responses. It was concluded that antagonism of sodium nitroprusside action by hydralazine could be a consequence of interference with bioactivation of the former, apparently through inhibition of vascular NADH oxidase.

  11. cGMP production of patient-specific iPSCs and photoreceptor precursor cells to treat retinal degenerative blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Luke A; Burnight, Erin R; DeLuca, Adam P; Anfinson, Kristin R; Cranston, Cathryn M; Kaalberg, Emily E; Penticoff, Jessica A; Affatigato, Louisa M; Mullins, Robert F; Stone, Edwin M; Tucker, Budd A

    2016-07-29

    Immunologically-matched, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived photoreceptor precursor cells have the potential to restore vision to patients with retinal degenerative diseases like retinitis pigmentosa. The purpose of this study was to develop clinically-compatible methods for manufacturing photoreceptor precursor cells from adult skin in a non-profit cGMP environment. Biopsies were obtained from 35 adult patients with inherited retinal degeneration and fibroblast lines were established under ISO class 5 cGMP conditions. Patient-specific iPSCs were then generated, clonally expanded and validated. Post-mitotic photoreceptor precursor cells were generated using a stepwise cGMP-compliant 3D differentiation protocol. The recapitulation of the enhanced S-cone phenotype in retinal organoids generated from a patient with NR2E3 mutations demonstrated the fidelity of these protocols. Transplantation into immune compromised animals revealed no evidence of abnormal proliferation or tumor formation. These studies will enable clinical trials to test the safety and efficiency of patient-specific photoreceptor cell replacement in humans.

  12. Period-doubling cascades galore

    OpenAIRE

    Sander, Evelyn; Yorke, James A.

    2009-01-01

    The appearance of numerous period-doubling cascades is among the most prominent features of {\\bf parametrized maps}, that is, smooth one-parameter families of maps $F:R \\times {\\mathfrak M} \\to {\\mathfrak M}$, where ${\\mathfrak M}$ is a smooth locally compact manifold without boundary, typically $R^N$. Each cascade has infinitely many period-doubling bifurcations, and it is typical to observe -- such as in all the examples we investigate here -- that whenever there are any cascades, there are...

  13. The Neurometabolic Cascade of Concussion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Giza, Christopher C; Hovda, David A

    2001-01-01

    Data Synthesis: The primary elements of the pathophysiologic cascade following concussive brain injury include abrupt neuronal depolarization, release of excitatory neurotransmitters, ionic shifts, changes...

  14. Inferring Network Structure from Cascades

    CERN Document Server

    Ghonge, Sushrut

    2016-01-01

    Many physical, biological and social phenomena can be described by cascades taking place on a network. Often, the activity can be empirically observed, but not the underlying network of interactions. In this paper we solve the dynamics of general cascade processes. We then offer three topological inversion methods to infer the structure of any directed network given a set of cascade arrival times. Our forward and inverse formulas hold for a very general class of models where the activation probability of a node is a generic function of its degree and the number of its active neighbors. We report high success rates for synthetic and real networks, for 5 different cascade models.

  15. Energy Cascades in MHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexakis, A.

    2009-04-01

    Most astrophysical and planetary systems e.g., solar convection and stellar winds, are in a turbulent state and coupled to magnetic fields. Understanding and quantifying the statistical properties of magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) turbulence is crucial to explain the involved physical processes. Although the phenomenological theory of hydro-dynamic (HD) turbulence has been verified up to small corrections, a similar statement cannot be made for MHD turbulence. Since the phenomenological description of Hydrodynamic turbulence by Kolmogorov in 1941 there have been many attempts to derive a similar description for turbulence in conducting fluids (i.e Magneto-Hydrodynamic turbulence). However such a description is going to be based inevitably on strong assumptions (typically borrowed from hydrodynamics) that do not however necessarily apply to the MHD case. In this talk I will discuss some of the properties and differences of the energy and helicity cascades in turbulent MHD and HD flows. The investigation is going to be based on the analysis of direct numerical simulations. The cascades in MHD turbulence appear to be a more non-local process (in scale space) than in Hydrodynamics. Some implications of these results to turbulent modeling will be discussed

  16. Information cascade on networks

    CERN Document Server

    Hisakado, Masato

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we discuss a voting model by considering three different kinds of networks: a random graph, the Barab\\'{a}si-Albert(BA) model, and a fitness model. A voting model represents the way in which public perceptions are conveyed to voters. Our voting model is constructed by using two types of voters--herders and independents--and two candidates. Independents conduct voting based on their fundamental values; on the other hand, herders base their voting on the number of previous votes. Hence, herders vote for the majority candidates and obtain information relating to previous votes from their networks. We discussed the difference between the phases on which the networks depend. Two kinds of phase transitions, an information cascade transition and a super-normal transition, were identified. The first of these is a transition between a state in which most voters make the correct choices and a state in which most of them are wrong. The second is a transition of convergence speed. The information cascade t...

  17. Cascade Distillation System Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, Michael R.; Sargushingh, Miriam; Shull, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Life Support System (LSS) Project is chartered with de-veloping advanced life support systems that will ena-ble NASA human exploration beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). The goal of AES is to increase the affordabil-ity of long-duration life support missions, and to re-duce the risk associated with integrating and infusing new enabling technologies required to ensure mission success. Because of the robust nature of distillation systems, the AES LSS Project is pursuing develop-ment of the Cascade Distillation Subsystem (CDS) as part of its technology portfolio. Currently, the system is being developed into a flight forward Generation 2.0 design.

  18. Triazole inhibitors of Cryptosporidium parvum inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase

    OpenAIRE

    Maurya, Sushil K.; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Zhang, Minjia; Johnson, Corey R.; Benjamin, Nicole N.; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Gregory D Cuny

    2009-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is an important human pathogen and potential bioterrorism agent. This protozoan parasite cannot salvage guanine or guanosine and therefore relies on inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) for biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides and hence for survival. Since C. parvum IMPDH is highly divergent from the host counterpart, selective inhibitors could potentially be used to treat cryptosporidiosis with minimal effects on its mammalian host. A series of 1,2,3-triazole ...

  19. Interband cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vurgaftman, I.; Weih, R.; Kamp, M.; Meyer, J. R.; Canedy, C. L.; Kim, C. S.; Kim, M.; Bewley, W. W.; Merritt, C. D.; Abell, J.; Höfling, S.

    2015-04-01

    We review the current status of interband cascade lasers (ICLs) emitting in the midwave infrared (IR). The ICL may be considered the hybrid of a conventional diode laser that generates photons via electron-hole recombination, and an intersubband-based quantum cascade laser (QCL) that stacks multiple stages for enhanced current efficiency. Following a brief historical overview, we discuss theoretical aspects of the active region and core designs, growth by molecular beam epitaxy, and the processing of broad-area, narrow-ridge, and distributed feedback (DFB) devices. We then review the experimental performance of pulsed broad area ICLs, as well as the continuous-wave (cw) characteristics of narrow ridges having good beam quality and DFBs producing output in a single spectral mode. Because the threshold drive powers are far lower than those of QCLs throughout the λ = 3-6 µm spectral band, ICLs are increasingly viewed as the laser of choice for mid-IR laser spectroscopy applications that do not require high output power but need to be hand-portable and/or battery operated. Demonstrated ICL performance characteristics to date include threshold current densities as low as 106 A cm-2 at room temperature (RT), cw threshold drive powers as low as 29 mW at RT, maximum cw operating temperatures as high as 118 °C, maximum cw output powers exceeding 400 mW at RT, maximum cw wallplug efficiencies as high as 18% at RT, maximum cw single-mode output powers as high as 55 mW at RT, and single-mode output at λ = 5.2 µm with a cw drive power of only 138 mW at RT.

  20. Unsteady turbulence cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Susumu; Vassilicos, J. C.

    2016-11-01

    We have run a total of 311 direct numerical simulations (DNSs) of decaying three-dimensional Navier-Stokes turbulence in a periodic box with values of the Taylor length-based Reynolds number up to about 300 and an energy spectrum with a wide wave-number range of close to -5 /3 power-law dependence at the higher Reynolds numbers. On the basis of these runs, we have found a critical time when (i) the rate of change of the square of the integral length scale turns from increasing to decreasing, (ii) the ratio of interscale energy flux to high-pass filtered turbulence dissipation changes from decreasing to very slowly increasing in the inertial range, (iii) the signature of large-scale coherent structures disappears in the energy spectrum, and (iv) the scaling of the turbulence dissipation changes from the one recently discovered in DNSs of forced unsteady turbulence and in wind tunnel experiments of turbulent wakes and grid-generated turbulence to the classical scaling proposed by G. I. Taylor [Proc. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 151, 421 (1935), 10.1098/rspa.1935.0158] and A. N. Kolmogorov [Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR 31, 538 (1941)]. Even though the customary theoretical basis for this Taylor-Kolmogorov scaling is a statistically stationary cascade where large-scale energy flux balances dissipation, this is not the case throughout the entire time range of integration in all our DNS runs. The recently discovered dissipation scaling can be reformulated physically as a situation in which the dissipation rates of the small and large scales evolve together. We advance two hypotheses that may form the basis of a theoretical approach to unsteady turbulence cascades in the presence of large-scale coherent structures.

  1. Protective effects of inhibition of adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase activity against cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    补娟

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of inhibition of adenosine monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) on shape,function and inflammatory factor of microglia for mice after cerebral ischemia-reperfusion

  2. Recipient pretransplant inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase activity in nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, Meagan J; Risler, Linda J; Phillips, Brian R; Wang, Joanne; Storer, Barry E; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Duan, Haichuan; Raccor, Brianne S; Boeckh, Michael J; McCune, Jeannine S

    2014-10-01

    Mycophenolic acid, the active metabolite of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), inhibits inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity. IMPDH is the rate-limiting enzyme involved in de novo synthesis of guanosine nucleotides and catalyzes the oxidation of inosine 5'-monophosphate to xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP). We developed a highly sensitive liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method to quantitate XMP concentrations in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) isolated from the recipient pretransplant and used this method to determine IMPDH activity in 86 nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) patients. The incubation procedure and analytical method yielded acceptable within-sample and within-individual variability. Considerable between-individual variability was observed (12.2-fold). Low recipient pretransplant IMPDH activity was associated with increased day +28 donor T cell chimerism, more acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), lower neutrophil nadirs, and more cytomegalovirus reactivation but not with chronic GVHD, relapse, nonrelapse mortality, or overall mortality. We conclude that quantitation of the recipient's pretransplant IMPDH activity in PMNC lysate could provide a useful biomarker to evaluate a recipient's sensitivity to MMF. Further trials should be conducted to confirm our findings and to optimize postgrafting immunosuppression in nonmyeloablative HCT recipients.

  3. cAMP and cGMP in nasal mucus related to severity of smell loss in patients with smell dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henkin, R I; Velicu, I

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate nasal mucus levels of cAMP and cGMP in patients with taste and smell dysfunction with respect to severity of their smell loss. cAMP and cGMP were measured in nasal mucus using a sensitive spectrophotometric 96 plate ELISA technique. Smell loss was measured in patients with taste and smell dysfunction by standardized psychophysical measurements of olfactory function and classified by severity of loss into four types from most severe to least severe such that anosmia > Type I hyposmia > Type II hyposmia > Type III hyposmia. Measurements of nasal mucus cyclic nucleotides and smell loss were made independently. As smell loss severity increased stepwise cAMP and cGMP levels decreased stepwise [cAMP, cGMP (in pmol/ml); anosmia - 0.004, 0.008: Type I hyposmia - 0.12+/-0.03, 0.10+/-0.03: Type II hyposmia - 0.15+/-0.02, 0.16+/-0.01: Type III hyposmia - 0.23+/-0.05, 0.20+/-0.15]. These results confirm the association of biochemical changes in cyclic nucleotides with systematic losses of smell acuity. These results confirm the usefulness of the psychophysical methods we defined to determine the systematic classification of smell loss severity. These changes can form the basis for the biochemical definition of smell loss among some patients with smell loss as well as for their therapy.

  4. Cascade Mountain Range in Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrod, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The Cascade mountain system extends from northern California to central British Columbia. In Oregon, it comprises the Cascade Range, which is 260 miles long and, at greatest breadth, 90 miles wide (fig. 1). Oregon’s Cascade Range covers roughly 17,000 square miles, or about 17 percent of the state, an area larger than each of the smallest nine of the fifty United States. The range is bounded on the east by U.S. Highways 97 and 197. On the west it reaches nearly to Interstate 5, forming the eastern margin of the Willamette Valley and, farther south, abutting the Coast Ranges. 

  5. Plasma guanosine 3 ',5 '-cyclic monophosphate and severity of peri/intraventricular haemorrhage in the preterm newborn

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bel, F; Valk, L; Uiterwaal, CSPM; Egberts, J; Krediet, TG

    2002-01-01

    A poorly controlled cerebral circulation. caused by excessive production of nitric oxide. has been suggested as predisposing to peri/intraventricular haemorrhage (PIVH) in the immature neonate. It is hypothesized that a relation exists between plasma cyclic GMP (cGMP) as an effector of endogenous va

  6. Are longer cascades more stable?

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Yes, they are. We consider data from experimental cascade games that were run in different laboratories, and find uniformly that subjects are more willing to follow the crowd, the bigger the crowd is �although the decision makers who are added to the crowd should in theory simply follow suit and hence reveal no information. This correlation of length and strength of cascades appears consistently across games with different parameters and different choice sets for the subjects. ...

  7. Cascading Gravity is Ghost Free

    CERN Document Server

    de Rham, Claudia; Tolley, Andrew J

    2010-01-01

    We perform a full perturbative stability analysis of the 6D cascading gravity model in the presence of 3-brane tension. We demonstrate that for sufficiently large tension on the (flat) 3-brane, there are no ghosts at the perturbative level, consistent with results that had previously only been obtained in a specific 5D decoupling limit. These results establish the cascading gravity framework as a consistent infrared modification of gravity.

  8. Aeroelasticity in Turbomachine-Cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-11-10

    STABLE -180 UNSTABLE -360 ’ - ’ - -180 0. 󈧖O DIAGRAM 3 AERODYNAMIC LIFT (OENT)COEFFICIENTI AND PHASE LEADS IN DEPENDANCE OF FLOM GUANTATIES AND CASCADE...ABL -0.8 0.0 -5 0. -5 DIAGRAM ’. AERODYNAMIC NORK AND DAMPING COEFFICIENTS (FOR A RIGID NOTION) IN DEPENDANCE OF FLOW OURNTATIES AND CASCADE GEOMETRY...coefficients on blades + blade vibration + vizualization in the transonic flow domain (Schlieren) + instability dependance on flow conditions, blade

  9. Low Noise Interband Cascade Photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-28

    National Laboratories, Zhaobing Tian, Zhihua Cai, R. T. Hinkey, L. Li, Tetsuya D. Mishima , Michael B. Santos, and Matthew B. Johnson at the...Phys. 107, No. 5, 054514 (2010). 2. R. Q. Yang, Z. Tian, J. F. Klem, T. D. Mishima , M. B. Santos, and M. B. Johnson, “Interband cascade photovoltaic...2012). 4. Z. Tian, Z. Cai, R. Q. Yang, T. D. Mishima , M. B. Santos, M. B. Johnson, and J. F. Klem, “Interband Cascade Infrared Photodetectors

  10. Cascade Product of Permutation Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Egri-Nagy, Attila; Nehaniv, Chrystopher L.

    2013-01-01

    We define the cascade product of permutation groups as an external product, an explicit construction of substructures of the iterated wreath product that are much smaller than the full wreath product. This construction is essential for computational implementations of algebraic hierarchical decompositions of finite automata. We show how direct, semidirect, and wreath products and group extensions can all be expressed as cascade products, and analyse examples of groups that can be constructed ...

  11. Interband Cascade Photovoltaic Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Rui Q. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Santos, Michael B. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Johnson, Matthew B. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2014-09-24

    In this project, we are performing basic and applied research to systematically investigate our newly proposed interband cascade (IC) photovoltaic (PV) cells [1]. These cells follow from the great success of infrared IC lasers [2-3] that pioneered the use of quantum-engineered IC structures. This quantum-engineered approach will enable PV cells to efficiently convert infrared radiation from the sun or other heat source, to electricity. Such cells will have important applications for more efficient use of solar energy, waste-heat recovery, and power beaming in combination with mid-infrared lasers. The objectives of our investigations are to: achieve extensive understanding of the fundamental aspects of the proposed PV structures, develop the necessary knowledge for making such IC PV cells, and demonstrate prototype working PV cells. This research will focus on IC PV structures and their segments for utilizing infrared radiation with wavelengths from 2 to 5 μm, a range well suited for emission by heat sources (1,000-2,000 K) that are widely available from combustion systems. The long-term goal of this project is to push PV technology to longer wavelengths, allowing for relatively low-temperature thermal sources. Our investigations address material quality, electrical and optical properties, and their interplay for the different regions of an IC PV structure. The tasks involve: design, modeling and optimization of IC PV structures, molecular beam epitaxial growth of PV structures and relevant segments, material characterization, prototype device fabrication and testing. At the end of this program, we expect to generate new cutting-edge knowledge in the design and understanding of quantum-engineered semiconductor structures, and demonstrate the concepts for IC PV devices with high conversion efficiencies.

  12. A redox-regulated tyrosine phosphorylation cascade in rat spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, B; Aitken, R J

    2001-01-01

    Rat spermatozoa from both the caput and cauda epididymidis were shown to generate superoxide anion (O2-.) both spontaneously and following stimulation with NAD(P)H. Caput spermatozoa gave a significantly greater O2- response to NADPH stimulation than caudal cells, whereas in both cell types the responses to exogenous NADPH and NADH were approximately equivalent. Analysis of H2O2 production revealed that this oxidant was generated only by caudal epididymal cells and only in these cells did the stimulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production with NADPH lead to an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation. Stimulation of ROS production with NADPH increased intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels in both caput and caudal epididymal cells, but only in caudal cells did cAMP stimulate tyrosine phosphorylation, in keeping with the NADPH results. On the basis of these findings we propose that tyrosine phosphorylation in rat spermatozoa is driven by ROS acting via 2 different but complementary mechanisms; O2-. stimulates tyrosine kinase activity indirectly through the elevation of intracellular cAMP while H2O2 acts directly on the kinase/phosphatase system, stimulating the former and inhibiting the latter. Zinc was examined as a potential regulator of this signal transduction cascade and was shown to suppress tyrosine phosphorylation in caput cells but to promote this activity in caudal spermatozoa, possibly through an inhibitory effect on tyrosine phosphatase activity. These results reveal the maturation of a redox-regulated, cAMP-mediated, signal transduction cascade during epididymal transit in the rat that is sensitive to zinc and plays a key role in the control of tyrosine phosphorylation events associated with capacitation.

  13. Gas-phase spectroscopy of protonated adenine, adenosine 5′-monophosphate and monohydrated ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, S.O.; Støchkel, K.; Byskov, C.S.

    2013-01-01

    Microsolvation of chromophore ions commonly has large effects on their electronic structure and as a result on their optical absorption spectra. Here spectroscopy of protonated adenine (AdeH+) and its complex with one water molecule isolated in vacuo was done using a home-built mass spectrometer...... in combination with a tuneable pulsed laser system. Experiments also included the protonated adenosine 5′-monophosphate nucleotide (AMPH+). In the case of bare AdeH+ ions, one-photon absorption leads to four dominant fragment ions corresponding to ammonium and ions formed after loss of either NH3, HCN, or NH2CN...

  14. Communication Scheme via Cascade Chaotic Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUA Chang-Chun; GUAN Xin-Ping

    2004-01-01

    @@ A new chaotic communication scheme is constructed. Different from the existing literature, cascade chaotic systems are employed. Two cascade modes are considered. First, we investigate the input to state cascade mode;cascade systems between different kinds of chaotic systems are considered. Then the parameter cascade case of chaotic system is studied. Under the different cases, the corresponding receivers are designed, which can succeed in recovering the former emitted signal. Simulations are performed to verify the validity of the proposed main results.

  15. InsP3R-associated cGMP kinase substrate determines inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor susceptibility to phosphoregulation by cyclic nucleotide-dependent kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Wataru; Betzenhauser, Matthew J; Yule, David I

    2010-11-26

    Ca(2+) release through inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors (InsP(3)R) can be modulated by numerous factors, including input from other signal transduction cascades. These events shape the spatio-temporal characteristics of the Ca(2+) signal and provide fidelity essential for the appropriate activation of effectors. In this study, we investigate the regulation of Ca(2+) release via InsP(3)R following activation of cyclic nucleotide-dependent kinases in the presence and absence of expression of a binding partner InsP(3)R-associated cGMP kinase substrate (IRAG). cGMP-dependent kinase (PKG) phosphorylation of only the S2+ InsP(3)R-1 subtype resulted in enhanced Ca(2+) release in the absence of IRAG expression. In contrast, IRAG bound to each InsP(3)R subtype, and phosphorylation of IRAG by PKG attenuated Ca(2+) release through all InsP(3)R subtypes. Surprisingly, simply the expression of IRAG attenuated phosphorylation and inhibited the enhanced Ca(2+) release through InsP(3)R-1 following cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activation. In contrast, IRAG expression did not influence the PKA-enhanced activity of the InsP(3)R-2. Phosphorylation of IRAG resulted in reduced Ca(2+) release through all InsP(3)R subtypes during concurrent activation of PKA and PKG, indicating that IRAG modulation is dominant under these conditions. These studies yield mechanistic insight into how cells with various complements of proteins integrate and prioritize signals from ubiquitous signaling pathways.

  16. Cascaded-cladding-pumped cascaded Raman fiber amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huawei; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Yan

    2015-06-01

    The conversion efficiency of double-clad Raman fiber laser is limited by the cladding-to-core area ratio. To get high conversion efficiency, the inner-cladding-to-core area ratio has to be less than about 8, which limits the brightness enhancement. To overcome the problem, a cascaded-cladding-pumped cascaded Raman fiber laser with multiple-clad fiber as the Raman gain medium is proposed. A theoretical model of Raman fiber amplifier with multiple-clad fiber is developed, and numerical simulation proves that the proposed scheme can improve the conversion efficiency and brightness enhancement of cladding pumped Raman fiber laser.

  17. [Successful treatment of T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) with fludarabine monophosphate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Akinori; Iwai, Kazuya; Ishibashi, Takafumi

    2009-08-01

    We report a 79-year-old woman with T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) who was successfully treated with fludarabine monophosphate. She was admitted to our hospital because of dyspnea on effort. On admission, anemia and hepatosplenomegaly were apparent but lymphadenopathy was absent. Peripheral blood examination showed anemia and leukocytosis with 29.5% abnormal lymphocytes. The bone marrow was infiltrated with 84.1% abnormal lymphocytes. The nucleolus was visible in some of these abnormal cells. These cells were positive for CD2, CD3, CD4, CD5, CD7, CD38, CD52, and negative for CD8, CD10, CD19, CD20, CD25, CD56. Based on these findings, she was diagnosed as having T-PLL. Therapy with oral cyclophosphamide (50 mg/day) was started, but was discontinued because of agranulocytosis. Then, she received intravenous fludarabine monophosphate (30 mg/day) on days 1-5 every four to five weeks. The reticulocyte count increased gradually, and she became free from red cell transfusions. Unfortunately, she finally died from massive gastro intestinal hemorrhage, but T-PLL was well controlled at the time of death.

  18. Adenosine Monophosphate (AMP)-Activated Protein Kinase: A New Target for Nutraceutical Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín-Aguilar, Fabiola; Pavillard, Luis E; Giampieri, Francesca; Bullón, Pedro; Cordero, Mario D

    2017-01-29

    Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important energy sensor which is activated by increases in adenosine monophosphate (AMP)/adenosine triphosphate (ATP) ratio and/or adenosine diphosphate (ADP)/ATP ratio, and increases different metabolic pathways such as fatty acid oxidation, glucose transport and mitochondrial biogenesis. In this sense, AMPK maintains cellular energy homeostasis by induction of catabolism and inhibition of ATP-consuming biosynthetic pathways to preserve ATP levels. Several studies indicate a reduction of AMPK sensitivity to cellular stress during aging and this could impair the downstream signaling and the maintenance of the cellular energy balance and the stress resistance. However, several diseases have been related with an AMPK dysfunction. Alterations in AMPK signaling decrease mitochondrial biogenesis, increase cellular stress and induce inflammation, which are typical events of the aging process and have been associated to several pathological processes. In this sense, in the last few years AMPK has been identified as a very interesting target and different nutraceutical compounds are being studied for an interesting potential effect on AMPK induction. In this review, we will evaluate the interaction of the different nutraceutical compounds to induce the AMPK phosphorylation and the applications in diseases such as cancer, type II diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases or cardiovascular diseases.

  19. Aversive Behavior in the Nematode C. elegans Is Modulated by cGMP and a Neuronal Gap Junction Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzanowski, Michelle C.; Wood, Jordan F.; Brueggemann, Chantal; Bowitch, Alexander; Bethke, Mary; L’Etoile, Noelle D.; Ferkey, Denise M.

    2016-01-01

    All animals rely on their ability to sense and respond to their environment to survive. However, the suitability of a behavioral response is context-dependent, and must reflect both an animal’s life history and its present internal state. Based on the integration of these variables, an animal’s needs can be prioritized to optimize survival strategies. Nociceptive sensory systems detect harmful stimuli and allow for the initiation of protective behavioral responses. The polymodal ASH sensory neurons are the primary nociceptors in C. elegans. We show here that the guanylyl cyclase ODR-1 functions non-cell-autonomously to downregulate ASH-mediated aversive behaviors and that ectopic cGMP generation in ASH is sufficient to dampen ASH sensitivity. We define a gap junction neural network that regulates nociception and propose that decentralized regulation of ASH signaling can allow for rapid correlation between an animal’s internal state and its behavioral output, lending modulatory flexibility to this hard-wired nociceptive neural circuit. PMID:27459302

  20. Autoregressive cascades on random networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Srikanth K.; Vaze, Rahul; Narasimha, Dheeraj

    2016-04-01

    A network cascade model that captures many real-life correlated node failures in large networks via load redistribution is studied. The considered model is well suited for networks where physical quantities are transmitted, e.g., studying large scale outages in electrical power grids, gridlocks in road networks, and connectivity breakdown in communication networks, etc. For this model, a phase transition is established, i.e., existence of critical thresholds above or below which a small number of node failures lead to a global cascade of network failures or not. Theoretical bounds are obtained for the phase transition on the critical capacity parameter that determines the threshold above and below which cascade appears or disappears, respectively, that are shown to closely follow numerical simulation results.

  1. Infectious Agents Trigger Trophic Cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Julia C; Ripple, William J

    2017-09-01

    Most demonstrated trophic cascades originate with predators, but infectious agents can also cause top-down indirect effects in ecosystems. Here we synthesize the literature on trophic cascades initiated by infectious agents including parasitoids, pathogens, parasitic castrators, macroparasites, and trophically transmitted parasites. Like predators, infectious agents can cause density-mediated and trait-mediated indirect effects through their direct consumptive and nonconsumptive effects respectively. Unlike most predators, however, infectious agents are not fully and immediately lethal to their victims, so their consumptive effects can also trigger trait-mediated indirect effects. We find that the frequency of trophic cascades reported for different consumer types scales with consumer lethality. Furthermore, we emphasize the value of uniting predator-prey and parasite-host theory under a general consumer-resource framework. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. NO regulates the strength of synaptic inputs onto hippocampal CA1 neurons via NO-GC1/cGMP signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neitz, A; Mergia, E; Neubacher, U; Koesling, D; Mittmann, T

    2015-06-01

    GABAergic interneurons are the predominant source of inhibition in the brain that coordinate the level of excitation and synchronization in neuronal circuitries. However, the underlying cellular mechanisms are still not fully understood. Here we report nitric oxide (NO)/NO-GC1 signalling as an important regulatory mechanism of GABAergic and glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the hippocampal CA1 region. Deletion of the NO receptor NO-GC1 induced functional alterations, indicated by a strong reduction of spontaneous and evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs), which could be compensated by application of the missing second messenger cGMP. Moreover, we found a general impairment in the strength of inhibitory and excitatory synaptic inputs onto CA1 pyramidal neurons deriving from NO-GC1KO mice. Finally, we disclosed one subpopulation of GABAergic interneurons, fast-spiking interneurons, that receive less excitatory synaptic input and consequently respond with less spike output after blockage of the NO/cGMP signalling pathway. On the basis of these and previous findings, we propose NO-GC1 as the major NO receptor which transduces the NO signal into cGMP at presynaptic terminals of different neuronal subtypes in the hippocampal CA1 region. Furthermore, we suggest NO-GC1-mediated cGMP signalling as a mechanism which regulates the strength of synaptic transmission, hence being important in gating information processing between hippocampal CA3 and CA1 region.

  3. Icariin upregulates phosphorylated cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein levels in the hippocampus of the senescence- accelerated mouse

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhanwei Zhang; Ting Zhang; Keli Dong

    2012-01-01

    At 8 weeks after intragastric administration of icariin to senescence-accelerated mice (P8 strain), Morris water maze results showed that escape latency was shortened, and the number of platform crossings was increased. Immunohistochemical staining and western blot assay detected signifi-cantly increased levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein. These results suggest that icariin upregulates phosphorylated cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein levels and improves learning and memory functions in hippo-campus of the senescence-accelerated mouse.

  4. Nitric oxide participates in cold-inhibited Camellia sinensis pollen germination and tube growth partly via cGMP in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hua Wang

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO plays essential roles in many biotic and abiotic stresses in plant development procedures, including pollen tube growth. Here, effects of NO on cold stress inhibited pollen germination and tube growth in Camellia sinensis were investigated in vitro. The NO production, NO synthase (NOS-like activity, cGMP content and proline (Pro accumulation upon treatment with NO scavenger cPTIO, NOS inhibitor L-NNA, NO donor DEA NONOate, guanylate cyclase (GC inhibitor ODQ or phosphodiesterase (PDE inhibitor Viagra at 25°C (control or 4°C were analyzed. Exposure to 4°C for 2 h reduced pollen germination and tube growth along with increase of NOS-like activity, NO production and cGMP content in pollen tubes. DEA NONOate treatment inhibited pollen germination and tube growth in a dose-dependent manner under control and reinforced the inhibition under cold stress, during which NO production and cGMP content promoted in pollen tubes. L-NNA and cPTIO markedly reduced the generation of NO induced by cold or NO donor along with partly reverse of cold- or NO donor-inhibited pollen germination and tube growth. Furthermore, ODQ reduced the cGMP content under cold stress and NO donor treatment in pollen tubes. Meanwhile, ODQ disrupted the reinforcement of NO donor on the inhibition of pollen germination and tube growth under cold condition. Additionally, Pro accumulation of pollen tubes was reduced by ODQ compared with that receiving NO donor under cold or control condition. Effects of cPTIO and L-NNA in improving cold-treated pollen germination and pollen tube growth could be lowered by Viagra. Moreover, the inhibitory effects of cPTIO and L-NNA on Pro accumulation were partly reversed by Viagra. These data suggest that NO production from NOS-like enzyme reaction decreased the cold-responsive pollen germination, inhibited tube growth and reduced Pro accumulation, partly via cGMP signaling pathway in C. sinensis.

  5. CASCADE: Introducing AI into CBT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendley, R. J.; Jurascheck, N.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses changes in training requirements of commerce and industry in the United Kingdom and describes a project, CASCADE, that was developed to investigate and implement the introduction of artificial intelligence (AI) techniques into computer-based training (CBT). An overview of pilot projects in higher education settings is provided. (eight…

  6. Unsteady transonic flow in cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surampudi, S. P.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    There is a need for methods to predict the unsteady air loads associated with flutter of turbomachinery blading at transonic speeds. The results of such an analysis in which the steady relative flow approaching a cascade of thin airfoils is assumed to be transonic, irrotational, and isentropic is presented. The blades in the cascade are allowed to undergo a small amplitude harmonic oscillation which generates a small unsteady flow superimposed on the existing steady flow. The blades are assumed to oscillate with a prescribed motion of constant amplitude and interblade phase angle. The equations of motion are obtained by linearizing about a uniform flow the inviscid nonheat conducting continuity and momentum equations. The resulting equations are solved by employing the Weiner Hopf technique. The solution yields the unsteady aerodynamic forces acting on the cascade at Mach number equal to 1. Making use of an unsteady transonic similarity law, these results are compared with the results obtained from linear unsteady subsonic and supersonic cascade theories. A parametric study is conducted to find the effects of reduced frequency, solidity, stagger angle, and position of pitching axis on the flutter.

  7. Azobenzene-functionalized cascade molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archut, A.; Vogtle, F.; De Cola, L.;

    1998-01-01

    Cascade molecules bearing up to 32 azobenzene groups in the periphery have been prepared from poly(propylene imine) dendrimers and N-hydroxysuccinimide esters. The dendritic azobenzene species show similar isomerization properties as the corresponding azobenzene monomers. The all-E azobenzene...

  8. Applications of cascade multilevel inverters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭方正; 钱照明

    2003-01-01

    Cascade multilevel inverters have been developed for electric utility applications. A cascade M-level inverter consists of (M-1)/2 H-bridges in which each bridge's dc voltage is supported by its own dc capacitor. The new inverter can: (1) generate almost sinusoidal waveform voltage while only switching one time per fundamental cycle; (2) dispense with multi-pulse inverters' transformers used in conventional utility interfaces and static var compensators; (3) enables direct parallel or series transformer-less connection to medium- and high-voltage power systems. In short, the cascade inverter is much more efficient and suitable for utility applications than traditional multi-pulse and pulse width modulation (PWM) inverters. The authors have experimentally demonstrated the superiority of the new inverter for power supply, (hybrid) electric vehicle (EV) motor drive, reactive power (var) and harmonic compensation. This paper summarizes the features, feasibility, and control schemes of the cascade inverter for utility applications including utility interface of renewable energy, voltage regulation, var compensation, and harmonic filtering in power systems. Analytical, simulated, and experimental results demonstrated the superiority of the new inverters.

  9. Applications of cascade multilevel inverters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭方正; 钱照明

    2003-01-01

    Cascade multilevel inverters have been developed for electric utility applications. A cascade M-level inverter consists of (M-1)/2 H-bridges in which each bridge's dc voltage is supported by its own de ca-pacitor. The new inverter can : ( 1 ) generate almost sinusoidal waveform voltage while only switching one timeper fundamental cycle ; (2) dispense with multi-pulse inverters' transformers used in conventional utility in-terfaces and static var compensators; (3) enables direct parallel or series transformer-less connection to medium- and high-voltage power systems. In short, the cascade inverter is much more efficient and suitable for utility applications than traditional multi-pulse and pulse width modulation (PWM) inverters. The authors have experimentally demonstrated the superiority of the new inverter for power supply, (hybrid) electric vehicle (EV) motor drive, reactive power (var) and harmonic compensation. This paper summarizes the features,feasibility, and control schemes of the cascade inverter for utility applications including utility interface of renewable energy, voltage regulation, var compensation, and harmonic filtering in power systems. Analytical,simulated, and experimental results demonstrated the superiority of the new inverters.

  10. Cascade Support Vector Machines with Dimensionality Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Kramer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cascade support vector machines have been introduced as extension of classic support vector machines that allow a fast training on large data sets. In this work, we combine cascade support vector machines with dimensionality reduction based preprocessing. The cascade principle allows fast learning based on the division of the training set into subsets and the union of cascade learning results based on support vectors in each cascade level. The combination with dimensionality reduction as preprocessing results in a significant speedup, often without loss of classifier accuracies, while considering the high-dimensional pendants of the low-dimensional support vectors in each new cascade level. We analyze and compare various instantiations of dimensionality reduction preprocessing and cascade SVMs with principal component analysis, locally linear embedding, and isometric mapping. The experimental analysis on various artificial and real-world benchmark problems includes various cascade specific parameters like intermediate training set sizes and dimensionalities.

  11. Osmium (VI) complexes of the 3', 5'-dinucleoside monophosphates, ApU and UpA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, F B; Behrman, E J

    1976-02-10

    The dinucleoside monophosphates, ApU and UpA, react with potassium osmate (VI) and 2,2'-bipyridyl to form the corresponding oxo-osmium (VI) bipyridyl sugar ester in which the osmate group is bonded to the terminal 2',3'-glycol. Osmium (VIII) tetroxide and 2,2'-bipyridyl react with the dinucleosides to form the corresponding oxo-osmium (VI) bipyridyl heterocyclic esters which result from addition of the tetroxide to the 5,6-double bond of the uracil residue. Although capable of transesterification reactions, these heterocyclic esters are exceptionally stable toward exchange reactions in solution. No apparent exchange was observed after 1 month. This reaction thus seems promising for single-site osmium labeling in polynucleotides.

  12. Influences of dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate and forskolin on human sperm motility in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-HongLIU; YangLI; Zheng-GuoCAO; Zhang-QunYE

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To study the influences of dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (dbcAMP) and forskolin on human sperm motility in vitro. Methods: Semen samples, aseptically obtained by masturbation and prepared by swim-up technique from 20 fertile men, were incubated with different concenlrations of dbcAMP and forskolin at 37℃. Measurements were carried out after l0 min, 20 min, 30 min and 60 min incubation. Motility parameters were estimated by using an automatic analyzing system. Results: Treatment with dbcAMP or forskolin resulted in a significant increase in sperm motility and progressive motility. The larger the concenlrations of dbcAMP or forskolin,the greater the effect appeared. The straight linear velocity and curvilinear velocity were not affected by both agents.Conclusion: dbcAMP and forskolin increase the motility and progressive motility of human sperm in vitro. ( Asian J Androl 2003 Jun; 5: 113-115)

  13. Corticosteroid-Responsive Pulmonary Toxicity Associated with Fludarabine Monophosphate: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milda Rudzianskiene

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Fludarabine monophosphate is an effective drug for the treatment of lymphoid malignancies. Myelosuppression, opportunistic infections, and autoimmune hemolytic anemia are the most common side effects of fludarabine. Herein we report a 55-year-old female that presented with fever and dyspnea after completing her third cycle of FMD (fludarabine, mitoxantrone, and dexamethasone chemotherapy for stage IV non-Hodgkin follicular lymphoma. Chest X-ray revealed bilateral pneumofibrotic changes and chest CT showed bilateral diffuse interstitial changes with fibrotic alterations. No evidence of infectious agents was noted. The patient had a reduced carbon monoxide transfer factor (45%. Her symptoms and radiographic findings resolved following treatment with prednisolone. The literature contains several cases of fludarabine-associated interstitial pulmonary toxicity that responded to steroid therapy. Fludarabine-induced pulmonary toxicity is reversible with cessation of the drug and administration of glucocorticosteroids.

  14. Structural determinants for the inhibitory ligands of orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meza-Avina, Maria Elena; Wei, Lianhu; Liu, Yan; Poduch, Ewa; Bello, Angelica M.; Mishra, Ram K.; Pai, Emil F.; Kotra, Lakshmi P. (TGRI); (Toronto)

    2010-06-14

    In recent years, orotidine-5{prime}-monophosphate decarboxylase (ODCase) has gained renewed attention as a drug target. As a part of continuing efforts to design novel inhibitors of ODCase, we undertook a comprehensive study of potent, structurally diverse ligands of ODCase and analyzed their structural interactions in the active site of ODCase. These ligands comprise of pyrazole or pyrimidine nucleotides including the mononucleotide derivatives of pyrazofurin, barbiturate ribonucleoside, and 5-cyanouridine, as well as, in a computational approach, 1,4-dihydropyridine-based non-nucleoside inhibitors such as nifedipine and nimodipine. All these ligands bind in the active site of ODCase exhibiting distinct interactions paving the way to design novel inhibitors against this interesting enzyme. We propose an empirical model for the ligand structure for rational modifications in new drug design and potentially new lead structures.

  15. Metabolic syndrome: adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and malonyl coenzyme A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruderman, Neil B; Saha, Asish K

    2006-02-01

    The metabolic syndrome can be defined as a state of metabolic dysregulation characterized by insulin resistance, central obesity, and a predisposition to type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, premature atherosclerosis, and other diseases. An increasing body of evidence has linked the metabolic syndrome to abnormalities in lipid metabolism that ultimately lead to cellular dysfunction. We review here the hypothesis that, in many instances, the cause of these lipid abnormalities could be a dysregulation of the adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)/malonyl coenzyme A (CoA) fuel-sensing and signaling mechanism. Such dysregulation could be reflected by isolated increases in malonyl CoA or by concurrent changes in malonyl CoA and AMPK, both of which would alter intracellular fatty acid partitioning. The possibility is also raised that pharmacological agents and other factors that activate AMPK and/or decrease malonyl CoA could be therapeutic targets.

  16. Cascaded Bragg scattering in fiber optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Y Q; Erkintalo, M; Genty, G; Murdoch, S G

    2013-01-15

    We report on a theoretical and experimental study of cascaded Bragg scattering in fiber optics. We show that the usual energy-momentum conservation of Bragg scattering can be considerably relaxed via cascade-induced phase-matching. Experimentally we demonstrate frequency translation over six- and 11-fold cascades, in excellent agreement with derived phase-matching conditions.

  17. Enhanced tumor necrosis factor suppression and cyclic adenosine monophosphate accumulation by combination of phosphodiesterase inhibitors and prostanoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinha, B; Semmler, J; Eisenhut, T; Eigler, A; Endres, S

    1995-01-01

    We investigated cooperative effects of phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors and prostanoids on cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha synthesis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). PDE inhibitors alone induced only a small increase in cA

  18. Protective effect of oral terfenadine and not inhaled ipratropium on adenosine 5 '-monophosphate-induced bronchoconstriction in patients with COPD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutgers, [No Value; Koeter, GH; Van der Mark, TW; Postma, DS

    1999-01-01

    Background Inhalation of adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) causes bronchoconstriction in patients with asthma and in many patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In asthma, AMP-induced bronchoconstriction has been shown to be determined mainly by release of mast cell mediators, an

  19. Adsorption of nucleotides on biomimetic apatite: The case of adenosine 5‧ monophosphate (AMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammami, K.; Feki, H. El; Marsan, O.; Drouet, C.

    2015-10-01

    This work investigates the interaction between the nucleotide adenosine 5‧ monophosphate molecule (AMP) and a biomimetic nanocrystalline carbonated apatite as a model for bone mineral. The analogy of the apatite phase used in this work with biological apatite was first pointed out by complementary techniques. AMP adsorption isotherms were then investigated. Obtained data were fitted to a Sips isotherm with an exponent greater than one suggesting positive cooperativity among adsorbed molecules. The data were compared to a previous study relative to the adsorption of another nucleotide, cytidine monophosphate (CMP) onto a similar substrate, evidencing some effect of the chemical nature of the nucleic base. An enhanced adsorption was observed under acidic (pH 6) conditions as opposed to pH 7.4, which parallels the case of DNA adsorption on biomimetic apatite. An estimated standard Gibbs free energy associated to the adsorption process (ΔG°ads ≅ -22 kJ/mol) intermediate between "physisorption" and "chemisorption" was found. The analysis of the solids after adsorption pointed to the preservation of the main characteristics of the apatite substrate but shifts or enhancements of Raman bands attributed to AMP showed the existence of chemical interactions involving both the phosphate and adenine parts of AMP. This contribution adds to the works conducted in view of better understanding the interaction of DNA/RNA and their constitutive nucleotides and the surface of biomimetic apatites. It could prove helpful in disciplines such as bone diagenesis (DNA/apatite interface in aged bones) or nanomedicine (setup of DNA- or RNA-loaded apatite systems). Also, the adsorption of nucleic acids on minerals like apatites could have played a role in the preservation of such biomolecules in the varying conditions known to exist at the origin of life on Earth, underlining the importance of dedicated adsorption studies.

  20. 芎芷地龙汤对偏头痛风热证模型NO、NOS、cGMP的影响%Effect of Xiongzhi Dilong Decoction on NO,NOS and cGMP in Migraine Model with Wind heat Syndrome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵永烈; 王玉来; 姚卓亭; 岳广欣

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of Xiongzhi Dilong decoction(XDD)on nitric oxide (NO)/NO synthase (NOS)/cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP)in migraine with wind heat syndrome.Methods The migraine model with wind heat syndrome was established by combining exterior pathogen(hot wind)and GTN administration.The frequency of scratching head within 2 h was examined.The contents of plasma cyclic cGMP,NO and NOS were assayed by radioimmunoassay(RIA),nitrate reductase method and colorimetric method.Results The contents of plasma NOS,NO,and cGMP in migraine model were significantly higher than that in normal group and wind heat group(P<0.01),and the contents of plasma NOS,NO and cGMP in migraine with wind heat syn-drome model persistently increased,which was significant difference compared to normal group(P<0.01),and was significant differ-ence compared to migraine model group(P<0.05).The contents of plasma NOS,NO and cGMP in Chinese medicine treatment group were recovered,which was significant difference compared to migraine with wind heat syndrome model and migraine model group(P<0.05).Conclusion There is no significant effect on normal organism which sufferd from wind heat,but there is significant effect on migraine model induced by nitroglycerin.The content of plasma NOS,NO and cGMP in migraine model which is invaded by wind and heat persistently increased.XDD can attenuate remarkably the contents of plasma NOS,NO and cGMP in migraine model with wind heat syndrome.%目的:探讨芎芷地龙汤对偏头痛风热证一氧化氮(NO)、一氧化氮合酶(NOS)、环鸟苷酸(cGMP)的影响。方法使用热风及硝酸甘油协同诱导建立大鼠偏头痛风热证模型,观察2h内搔头次数,用放免法测定血浆中环鸟苷酸的含量,用硝酸还原酶法测定血浆中一氧化氮的含量,用比色法测定血浆中一氧化氮合酶的含量。结果偏头痛模型组血浆 NOS、NO、cGMP含量升高,与正常组、风热组相

  1. Optimally Training a Cascade Classifier

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Chunhua; Hengel, Anton van den

    2010-01-01

    Cascade classifiers are widely used in real-time object detection. Different from conventional classifiers that are designed for a low overall classification error rate, a classifier in each node of the cascade is required to achieve an extremely high detection rate and moderate false positive rate. Although there are a few reported methods addressing this requirement in the context of object detection, there is no a principled feature selection method that explicitly takes into account this asymmetric node learning objective. We provide such an algorithm here. We show a special case of the biased minimax probability machine has the same formulation as the linear asymmetric classifier (LAC) of \\cite{wu2005linear}. We then design a new boosting algorithm that directly optimizes the cost function of LAC. The resulting totally-corrective boosting algorithm is implemented by the column generation technique in convex optimization. Experimental results on object detection verify the effectiveness of the proposed bo...

  2. Bankruptcy Cascades in Interbank Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi, Gabriele; Mazloumian, Amin; Gallegati, Mauro; Helbing, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    We study a credit network and, in particular, an interbank system with an agent-based model. To understand the relationship between business cycles and cascades of bankruptcies, we model a three-sector economy with goods, credit and interbank market. In the interbank market, the participating banks share the risk of bad debits, which may potentially spread a bank’s liquidity problems through the network of banks. Our agent-based model sheds light on the correlation between bankruptcy cascades and the endogenous economic cycle of booms and recessions. It also demonstrates the serious trade-off between, on the one hand, reducing risks of individual banks by sharing them and, on the other hand, creating systemic risks through credit-related interlinkages of banks. As a result of our study, the dynamics underlying the meltdown of financial markets in 2008 becomes much better understandable. PMID:23300760

  3. Thermal cascaded lattice Boltzmann method

    CERN Document Server

    Fei, Linlin

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a thermal cascaded lattice Boltzmann method (TCLBM) is developed in combination with the double-distribution-function (DDF) approach. A density distribution function relaxed by the cascaded scheme is employed to solve the flow field, and a total energy distribution function relaxed by the BGK scheme is used to solve temperature field, where two distribution functions are coupled naturally. The forcing terms are incorporated by means of central moments, which is consistent with the previous force scheme [Premnath \\emph{et al.}, Phys. Rev. E \\textbf{80}, 036702 (2009)] but the derivation is more intelligible and the evolution process is simpler. In the method, the viscous heat dissipation and compression work are taken into account, the Prandtl number and specific-heat ratio are adjustable, the external force is considered directly without the Boussinesq assumption, and the low-Mach number compressible flows can also be simulated. The forcing scheme is tested by simulating a steady Taylor-Green f...

  4. Cascade Chaotic System With Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yicong; Hua, Zhongyun; Pun, Chi-Man; Chen, C L Philip

    2015-09-01

    Chaotic maps are widely used in different applications. Motivated by the cascade structure in electronic circuits, this paper introduces a general chaotic framework called the cascade chaotic system (CCS). Using two 1-D chaotic maps as seed maps, CCS is able to generate a huge number of new chaotic maps. Examples and evaluations show the CCS's robustness. Compared with corresponding seed maps, newly generated chaotic maps are more unpredictable and have better chaotic performance, more parameters, and complex chaotic properties. To investigate applications of CCS, we introduce a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) and a data encryption system using a chaotic map generated by CCS. Simulation and analysis demonstrate that the proposed PRNG has high quality of randomness and that the data encryption system is able to protect different types of data with a high-security level.

  5. Bankruptcy cascades in interbank markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedeschi, Gabriele; Mazloumian, Amin; Gallegati, Mauro; Helbing, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    We study a credit network and, in particular, an interbank system with an agent-based model. To understand the relationship between business cycles and cascades of bankruptcies, we model a three-sector economy with goods, credit and interbank market. In the interbank market, the participating banks share the risk of bad debits, which may potentially spread a bank's liquidity problems through the network of banks. Our agent-based model sheds light on the correlation between bankruptcy cascades and the endogenous economic cycle of booms and recessions. It also demonstrates the serious trade-off between, on the one hand, reducing risks of individual banks by sharing them and, on the other hand, creating systemic risks through credit-related interlinkages of banks. As a result of our study, the dynamics underlying the meltdown of financial markets in 2008 becomes much better understandable.

  6. Bankruptcy cascades in interbank markets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Tedeschi

    Full Text Available We study a credit network and, in particular, an interbank system with an agent-based model. To understand the relationship between business cycles and cascades of bankruptcies, we model a three-sector economy with goods, credit and interbank market. In the interbank market, the participating banks share the risk of bad debits, which may potentially spread a bank's liquidity problems through the network of banks. Our agent-based model sheds light on the correlation between bankruptcy cascades and the endogenous economic cycle of booms and recessions. It also demonstrates the serious trade-off between, on the one hand, reducing risks of individual banks by sharing them and, on the other hand, creating systemic risks through credit-related interlinkages of banks. As a result of our study, the dynamics underlying the meltdown of financial markets in 2008 becomes much better understandable.

  7. Lens Coupled Quantum Cascade Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qing (Inventor); Lee, Alan Wei Min (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Terahertz quantum cascade (QC) devices are disclosed that can operate, e.g., in a range of about 1 THz to about 10 THz. In some embodiments, QC lasers are disclosed in which an optical element (e.g., a lens) is coupled to an output facet of the laser's active region to enhance coupling of the lasing radiation from the active region to an external environment. In other embodiments, terahertz amplifier and tunable terahertz QC lasers are disclosed.

  8. Turbulence: does energy cascade exist?

    CERN Document Server

    Josserand, Christophe; Lehner, Thierry; Pomeau, Yves

    2016-01-01

    To answer the question whether a cascade of energy exists or not in turbulence, we propose a set of correlation functions able to test if there is an irreversible transfert of energy, step by step, from large to small structures. These tests are applied to real Eulerian data of a turbulent velocity flow, taken in the wind grid tunnel of Modane, and also to a prototype model equation for wave turbulence. First we demonstrate the irreversible character of the flow by using multi-time correlation function at a given point of space. Moreover the unexpected behavior of the test function leads us to connect irreversibility and finite time singularities (intermittency). Secondly we show that turbulent cascade exists, and is a dynamical process, by using a test function depending on time and frequency. The cascade shows up only in the inertial domain where the kinetic energy is transferred more rapidly (on average) from the wavenumber $k_{1}$ to $k_{2}$ than from $k_{1}$ to $k'_{2}$ larger than $k_{2}$.

  9. Control of Cascaded Multilevel Inverters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    Abstract-A new type of multilevel inverter is introduced which is created by cascading two three-phase three-level inverters using the load connection, but requires only one DC voltage source. This new inverter can operateas a seven-level inverter and naturally splits the power conversion into a higher-voltage lower-frequency inverter and a lower-voltage higher-fre-quency inverter. This type of system presents particular advantages to Naval ship propulsion systems which rely on high power quality, survivable drives. New control methods are described involving both joint and separate control of the individual three-level inverters. Simulation resuits demonstrate the effectiveness of both controls. A laboratory set-up at the Naval Surface Warfare Center power electronics laboratory was used to validate the proposed joint-inverter control. Due to the effect of compounding levels in the cascaded inverter, a high number of levels are available resulting in a voltage THD of 9% (without filtering). Index Terms-Cascaded inverter, multilevel inverter, three-level inverter.

  10. Time-lapse imaging as a tool to investigate contractility of the epididymal duct--effects of cGMP signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Mietens

    Full Text Available The well orchestrated function of epididymal smooth muscle cells ensures transit of spermatozoa through the epididymal duct during which spermatozoa acquire motility and fertilizing capacity. Relaxation of smooth muscle cells is mediated by cGMP signaling and components of this pathway are found within the male reproductive tract. Whereas contractile function of caudal parts of the rat epididymal duct can be examined in organ bath studies, caput and corpus regions are fragile and make it difficult to mount them in an organ bath. We developed an ex vivo time-lapse imaging-based approach to investigate the contractile pattern in these parts of the epididymal duct. Collagen-embedding allowed immobilization without impeding contractility or diffusion of drugs towards the duct and therefore facilitated subsequent movie analyses. The contractile pattern was made visible by placing virtual sections through the acquired image stack to track wall movements over time. By this, simultaneous evaluation of contractile activity at different positions of the observed duct segment was possible. With each contraction translating into a spike, drug-induced alterations in contraction frequency could be assessed easily. Peristaltic contractions were also detectable and throughout all regions in the proximal epididymis we found regular spontaneous contractile activity that elicited movement of intraluminal contents. Stimulating cGMP production by natriuretic peptide ANP or inhibiting degradation of cGMP by the phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor sildenafil significantly reduced contractile frequency in isolated duct segments from caput and corpus. RT-PCR analysis after laser-capture microdissection localized the corresponding molecules to the smooth muscle layer of the duct. Our time-lapse imaging approach proved to be feasible to assess contractile function in all regions of the epididymal duct under near physiological conditions and provides a tool to evaluate acute

  11. Energy cascades in the upper ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ray Q.Lin; Scott Chubb

    2006-01-01

    Wave-wave interactions cause energy cascades. These are the most important processes in the upper ocean because they govern wave-growth and dissipation. Through indirect cascades, wave energy is transferred from higher frequencies to lower frequencies, leading to wave growth. In direct cascades, energy is transferred from lower frequencies to the higher frequencies, which causes waves to break, and dissipation of wave energy. However, the evolution and origin of energy cascade processes are still not fully understood. In particular, for example, results from a recent theory (Kalmykov, 1998) suggest that the class I wave-wave interactions (defined by situations involving 4-, 6-, 8-, etc, even numbers of resonantly interacting waves) cause indirect cascades, and Class II wave-wave interactions (involving, 5-, 7-, 9-, etc, .., odd numbers of waves) cause direct cascades. In contrast to this theory, our model results indicate the 4-wave interactions can cause significant transfer of wave energy through both direct and indirect cascades. In most situations, 4-wave interactions provide the major source of energy transfer for both direct cascades and indirect cascades, except when the wave steepness is larger than 0.28. Our model results agree well with wave measurements, obtained using field buoy data (for example, Lin and Lin, 2002). In particular, in these observations, asymmetrical wave-wave interactions were studied. They found that direct and indirect cascades both are mainly due to the 4-wave interactions when wave steepness is less than 0.3.

  12. A Comparison of Methods for Cascade Prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Ruocheng

    2016-01-01

    Information cascades exist in a wide variety of platforms on Internet. A very important real-world problem is to identify which information cascades can go viral. A system addressing this problem can be used in a variety of applications including public health, marketing and counter-terrorism. As a cascade can be considered as compound of the social network and the time series. However, in related literature where methods for solving the cascade prediction problem were proposed, the experimental settings were often limited to only a single metric for a specific problem formulation. Moreover, little attention was paid to the run time of those methods. In this paper, we first formulate the cascade prediction problem as both classification and regression. Then we compare three categories of cascade prediction methods: centrality based, feature based and point process based. We carry out the comparison through evaluation of the methods by both accuracy metrics and run time. The results show that feature based met...

  13. Disaster Mythology and Availability Cascades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Grow Sun

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sociological research conducted in the aftermath of natural disasters has uncovered a number of “disaster myths” – widely shared misconceptions about typical post-disaster human behavior. This paper discusses the possibility that perpetuation of disaster mythology reflects an “availability cascade,” defined in prior scholarship as a “self-reinforcing process of collective belief formation by which an expressed perception triggers a chain reaction that gives the perception increasing plausibility through its rising availability in public discourse.” (Kuran and Sunstein 1999. Framing the spread of disaster mythology as an availability cascade suggests that certain tools may be useful in halting the myths’ continued perpetuation. These tools include changing the legal and social incentives of so-called “availability entrepreneurs” – those principally responsible for beginning and perpetuating the cascade, as well as insulating decision-makers from political pressures generated by the availability cascade. This paper evaluates the potential effectiveness of these and other solutions for countering disaster mythology. Las investigaciones sociológicas realizadas tras los desastres naturales han hecho evidentes una serie de “mitos del desastre”, conceptos erróneos ampliamente compartidos sobre el comportamiento humano típico tras un desastre. Este artículo analiza la posibilidad de que la perpetuación de los mitos del desastre refleje una “cascada de disponibilidad”, definida en estudios anteriores como un “proceso de auto-refuerzo de la formación de una creencia colectiva, a través del que una percepción expresada produce una reacción en cadena que hace que la percepción sea cada vez más verosímil, a través de una mayor presencia en el discurso público” (Kuran y Sunstein 1999. Enmarcar la propagación de los mitos del desastre como una cascada de disponibilidad sugiere que ciertas herramientas pueden ser

  14. Spray formation: an inverse cascade

    CERN Document Server

    Ling, Yue; Tryggvason, Gretar; zaleski, Stephane

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of droplet formation in a gas-liquid mixing layer using direct numerical simulation. It is seen that two mechanisms compete to generate the droplets: fingering at the tip of the waves and hole formation in the thin liquid sheet. The three dimensional liquid structures are much shorter than the longitudinal wavelength of the instability at the first instant of their formation. As time evolves, the structures evolves to larger and larger scales, in a way similar to the inverse cascade of length scales in droplet impact and impact crown formation.

  15. Gemcitabine-based therapy for pancreatic cancer using the squalenoyl nucleoside monophosphate nanoassemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimenko, Andrei; Caron, Joachim; Mougin, Julie; Desmaële, Didier; Couvreur, Patrick

    2015-03-30

    Gemcitabine is currently the most effective agent against advanced pancreatic cancer. However, the major therapeutic hurdles using gemcitabine include rapid inactivation by blood deaminases and fast development of cell chemoresistance, induced by down-regulation of deoxycytidine kinase or nucleoside transporters. To overcome the above drawbacks we designed recently a novel nanomedicine strategy based on squalenoyl prodrug of 5'-monophosphate gemcitabine (SQdFdC-MP). This amphiphilic conjugate self-organized in water into unilamellar vesicles with a mean diameter of 100 nm. In this study the antitumor efficacy of SQdFdC-MP nanoassemblies (NAs) on chemoresistant and chemosensitive pancreatic adenocarcinoma models have been investigated. Cell viability assays showed that SQdFdC-MP NAs displayed higher antiproliferative and cytotoxic effects, particularly in chemoresistant pancreatic tumor cells. In in vivo studies, SQdFdC-MP NAs decreased significantly the growth (∼70%) of human MiaPaCa2 xenografts, also preventing tumor cell invasion, whereas native dFdC did not display any anticancer activity when tumor growth inhibition was only 35% with SQdFdC NAs. These results correlated with a reduction of Ki-67 antigen and the induction of apoptosis mediated by caspase-3 activation in tumor cells. These findings demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing SQdFdC-MP NAs to make tumor cells more sensitive to gemcitabine and thus providing an efficient new therapeutic alternative for pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

  16. Turning an antiviral into an anticancer drug: nanoparticle delivery of acyclovir monophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jing; Zhang, Yuan; Ramishetti, Srinivas; Wang, Yuhua; Huang, Leaf

    2013-09-28

    Anti-herpes simplex virus (HSV) drug acyclovir (ACV) is phosphorylated by the viral thymidine kinase (TK), but not the cellular TK. Phosphorylated ACV inhibits cellular DNA synthesis and kills the infected cells. We hypothesize that ACV monophosphate (ACVP), which is an activated metabolite of ACV, should be efficient in killing cells independent of HSV-TK. If so, ACVP should be a cytotoxic agent if properly delivered to the cancer cells. The Lipid/Calcium/Phosphate (LCP) nanoparticles (NPs) with a membrane/core structure were used to encapsulate ACVP to facilitate the targeted delivery of ACVP to the tumor. The LCP NPs showed entrapment efficiency of ~70%, the nano-scaled particle size and positive zeta potential. Moreover, ACVP-loaded LCP NPs (A-LCP NPs) exhibited concentration-dependent cytotoxicity against H460 cells and increased S-phase arrest. More importantly, a significant reduction of the tumor volume over 4 days following administration (pACV and ACVP) and blank LCP NPs showed little or no therapeutic effect. It was also found that the high efficacy of A-LCP NPs was associated with the ability to induce dramatic apoptosis of the tumor cells, as well as significantly inhibit tumor cell proliferation and cell cycle progression. In conclusion, with the help of LCP NPs, monophosphorylation modification of ACV can successfully modify an HSV-TK-dependent antiviral drug into an anti-tumor drug.

  17. Controlled supramolecular structure of guanosine monophosphate in the interlayer space of layered double hydroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyeong-Hyeon Gwak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Guanosine monophosphates (GMPs were intercalated into the interlayer space of layered double hydroxides (LDHs and the molecular arrangement of GMP was controlled in LDHs. The intercalation conditions such as GMP/LDH molar ratio and reaction temperature were systematically adjusted. When the GMP/LDH molar ratio was 1:2, which corresponds to the charge balance between positive LDH sheets and GMP anions, GMP molecules were well-intercalated to LDH. At high temperature (100 and 80 °C, a single GMP molecule existed separately in the LDH interlayer. On the other hand, at lower temperature (20, 40 and 60 °C, GMPs tended to form ribbon-type supramolecular assemblies. Differential scanning calorimetry showed that the ribbon-type GMP assembly had an intermolecular interaction energy of ≈101 kJ/mol, which corresponds to a double hydrogen bond between guanosine molecules. Once stabilized, the interlayer GMP orientations, single molecular and ribbon phase, were successfully converted to the other phase by adjusting the external environment by stoichiometry or temperature control.

  18. 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase and the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mor, Vijay; Unnikrishnan, M K

    2011-09-01

    Lifestyle changes such as physical inactivity combined with calorie-rich, low-fibre diets have triggered an explosive surge in metabolic syndrome, outlined as a cluster of heart attack risk factors such as insulin resistance, raised fasting plasma glucose, abdominal obesity, high cholesterol and high blood pressure. By acting as a master-switch of energy homeostasis and associated pathophysiological phenomena, 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) appears to orchestrate the adaptive physiology of energy deficit, suggesting that the sedentary modern human could be suffering from chronic suboptimal AMPK activation. Addressing individual targets with potent ligands with high specificity may be inappropriate (it has not yielded any molecule superior to the sixty year old metformin) because this strategy cannot address a cluster of interrelated pathologies. However, spices, dietary supplements and nutraceuticals attenuate the multiple symptoms of metabolic syndrome in a collective and perhaps more holistic fashion with fewer adverse events. Natural selection could have favoured races that developed a taste for spices and dietary supplements, most of which are not only antioxidants but also activators of AMPK. The review will outline the various biochemical mechanisms and pathophysiological consequences of AMPK activation involving the cluster of symptoms that embrace metabolic syndrome and beyond. Recent advances that integrate energy homeostasis with a number of overarching metabolic pathways and physiological phenomena, including inflammatory conditions, cell growth and development, malignancy, life span, and even extending into environmental millieu, as in obesity mediated by gut microflora and others will also be outlined.

  19. PHARMACOKINETIC AND PHARMACODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF INOSINE MONOPHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE (IMPDH) ACTIVITY IN MMF-TREATED HCT RECIPIENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Mager, Donald E.; Sandmaier, Brenda M.; Storer, Barry E.; Boeckh, Michael J.; Bemer, Meagan J.; Phillips, Brian R.; Risler, Linda J.; McCune, Jeannine S.

    2014-01-01

    A novel approach to personalizing postgrafting immunosuppression in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients is evaluating inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity as a drug-specific biomarker of mycophenolic acid (MPA)-induced immunosuppression. This prospective study evaluated total MPA, unbound MPA, and total MPA glucuronide plasma concentrations and IMPDH activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNC) at five time points after the morning dose of oral mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) on day +21 in 56 nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. Substantial interpatient variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics was observed and accurately characterized by the population pharmacokinetic/dynamic model. IMPDH activity decreased with increasing MPA plasma concentration, with maximum inhibition coinciding with maximum MPA concentration in most patients. The overall relationship between MPA concentration and IMPDH activity was described by a direct inhibitory Emax model with an IC50 = 3.23 mg/L total MPA and 57.3 ng/mL unbound MPA. The day +21 IMPDH area under the effect curve (AUEC) was associated with cytomegalovirus reactivation, non-relapse mortality, and overall mortality. In conclusion, a pharmacokinetic/dynamic model was developed that relates plasma MPA concentrations with PMNC IMPDH activity after an MMF dose in HCT recipients. Future studies should validate this model and confirm that day +21 IMPDH AUEC is a predictive biomarker. PMID:24727337

  20. Triazole inhibitors of Cryptosporidium parvum inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Sushil K.; Gollapalli, Deviprasad R.; Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Zhang, Minjia; Johnson, Corey R.; Benjamin, Nicole N.; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Cuny, Gregory D.

    2010-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum is an important human pathogen and potential bioterrorism agent. This protozoan parasite cannot salvage guanine or guanosine and therefore relies on inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) for biosynthesis of guanine nucleotides and hence for survival. Since C. parvum IMPDH is highly divergent from the host counterpart, selective inhibitors could potentially be used to treat cryptosporidiosis with minimal effects on its mammalian host. A series of 1,2,3-triazole containing ether CpIMPDH inhibitors are described. A structure-activity relationship study revealed that a small alkyl group on the alpha-position of the ether was required with the (R)-enantiomer significantly more active than the (S)-enantiomer. Electron-withdrawing groups in the 3- and/or 4-positions of the pendent phenyl ring were best and conversion of the quinoline containing inhibitors to quinoline-N-oxides retained inhibitory activity both in the presence and absence of bovine serum albumin. The 1,2,3-triazole CpIMPDH inhibitors provide new tools for elucidating the role of IMPDH in C. parvum and may serve as potential therapeutics for treating cryptosporidiosis. PMID:19624136

  1. Recognition of nucleoside monophosphate substrates by Haemophilus influenzae class C acid phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harkewal; Schuermann, Jonathan P; Reilly, Thomas J; Calcutt, Michael J; Tanner, John J

    2010-12-10

    The e (P4) phosphatase from Haemophilus influenzae functions in a vestigial NAD(+) utilization pathway by dephosphorylating nicotinamide mononucleotide to nicotinamide riboside. P4 is also the prototype of class C acid phosphatases (CCAPs), which are nonspecific 5',3'-nucleotidases localized to the bacterial outer membrane. To understand substrate recognition by P4 and other class C phosphatases, we have determined the crystal structures of a substrate-trapping mutant P4 enzyme complexed with nicotinamide mononucleotide, 5'-AMP, 3'-AMP, and 2'-AMP. The structures reveal an anchor-shaped substrate-binding cavity comprising a conserved hydrophobic box that clamps the nucleotide base, a buried phosphoryl binding site, and three solvent-filled pockets that contact the ribose and the hydrogen-bonding edge of the base. The span between the hydrophobic box and the phosphoryl site is optimal for recognizing nucleoside monophosphates, explaining the general preference for this class of substrate. The base makes no hydrogen bonds with the enzyme, consistent with an observed lack of base specificity. Two solvent-filled pockets flanking the ribose are key to the dual recognition of 5'-nucleotides and 3'-nucleotides. These pockets minimize the enzyme's direct interactions with the ribose and provide sufficient space to accommodate 5' substrates in an anti conformation and 3' substrates in a syn conformation. Finally, the structures suggest that class B acid phosphatases and CCAPs share a common strategy for nucleotide recognition.

  2. [Involvement of cyclic adenosine monophosphate in the control of motile behavior of Physarum polycephalum plasmodium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveeva, N B; Teplov, V A; Nezvetskiĭ, A R; Orlova, T G; Beĭlina, S I

    2012-01-01

    Possible involvement of autocrine factors into the control of motile behavior via a receptor-mediated mechanism was investigated in Physarum polycephalum plasmodium, a multinuclear amoeboid cell with the auto-oscillatory mode of motility. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and extracellular cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase, its involvement into the control of plasmodium motile behavior was proved by action of its strong inhibitor, were regarded as putative autocrine factors. It was shown that the plasmodium secreted cAMP. When it was introduced into agar support, 0,1-1 mM cAMP induced a delay of the plasmodium spreading and its transition to migration. When locally applied, cAMP at the same concentrations induced typical for attractant action the increase in oscillation frequency and the decrease of ectoplasm elasticity. The ability to exhibit positive chemotaxis in cAMP gradient and the dependence of its realization were shown to depend on the plasmodium state. Chemotaxis test specimens obtained from the migrating plasmodium, unlike those obtained from growing culture, generate alternative fronts which compete effectively with fronts oriented towards the attractant increment. The results obtained support our supposition stated earlier that advance of the Physarum polycephalum plasmodium leading edge is determined by local extracellular cAMP gradients arising from a time delay between secretion and hydrolysis of the nucleotide.

  3. Ion-exclusion chromatography determination of organic acid in uridine 5'-monophosphate fermentation broth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Huanqing; Chen, Yong; Xie, Jingjing; Chen, Xiaochun; Bai, Jianxin; Wu, Jinglan; Liu, Dong; Ying, Hanjie

    2012-09-01

    Simultaneous determination of organic acids using ion-exclusion liquid chromatography and ultraviolet detection is described. The chromatographic conditions are optimized when an Aminex HPX-87H column (300 × 7.8 mm) is employed, with a solution of 3 mmol/L sulfuric acid as eluent, a flow rate of 0.4 mL/min and a column temperature of 60°C. Eight organic acids (including orotic acid, α-ketoglutaric acid, citric acid, pyruvic acid, malic acid, succinic acid, lactic acid and acetic acid) and one nucleotide are successfully quantified. The calibration curves for these analytes are linear, with correlation coefficients exceeding 0.999. The average recovery of organic acids is in the range of 97.6% ∼ 103.1%, and the relative standard deviation is in the range of 0.037% ∼ 0.38%. The method is subsequently applied to obtain organic acid profiles of uridine 5'-monophosphate culture broth fermented from orotic acid by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These data demonstrate the quantitative accuracy for nucleotide fermentation mixtures, and suggest that the method may also be applicable to other biological samples.

  4. Effects of adenosine 5’monophosphate-activated protein kinase on europrotection induced by ischemic preconditioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-ru-hua TIAN

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effects of adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK and phosphated AMPK (pAMPK signals in ischemic preconditioning (IPC, and the effect of pharmacological intervention of AMPK on infarct size of the brain. Methods A brief (3min middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO was employed to induce IPC in male rat, and another 90-min MCAO was performed 4 or 72h later. The levels of AMPK and pAMPK were assessed after IPC. A pharmacological activator metformin, or inhibitor compound C of AMPK, was used to analyze the correlation of IPC to AMPK signaling in MCAO rats. Results The infarct size of total cerebral hemisphere and cortex was significantly decreased in MCAO animals by IPC for 72h (P0.05, n=6. The AMPK activator metformin can significantly reverse the protective effect of IPC (P<0.05, n=6. Conclusions The signals of AMPK and pAMPK play an important role in neuroprotective effect of IPC on cerebral ischemic injury. The neuroprotective effect of IPC may be associated with the down-regulation of pAMPK. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.05.07

  5. CMP kinase from Escherichia coli is structurally related to other nucleoside monophosphate kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucurenci, N; Sakamoto, H; Briozzo, P; Palibroda, N; Serina, L; Sarfati, R S; Labesse, G; Briand, G; Danchin, A; Bărzu, O; Gilles, A M

    1996-02-02

    CMP kinase from Escherichia coli is a monomeric protein of 225 amino acid residues. The protein exhibits little overall sequence similarities with other known NMP kinases. However, residues involved in binding of substrates and/or in catalysis were found conserved, and sequence comparison suggested conservation of the global fold found in adenylate kinases or in several CMP/UMP kinases. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity, crystallized, and analyzed for its structural and catalytic properties. The crystals belong to the hexagonal space group P6(3), have unit cell parameters a = b = 82.3 A and c = 60.7 A, and diffract x-rays to a 1.9 A resolution. The bacterial enzyme exhibits a fluorescence emission spectrum with maximum at 328 nm upon excitation at 295 nm, which suggests that the single tryptophan residue (Trp30) is located in a hydrophobic environment. Substrate specificity studies showed that CMP kinase from E. coli is active with ATP, dATP, or GTP as donors and with CMP, dCMP, and arabinofuranosyl-CMP as acceptors. This is in contrast with CMP/UMP kinase from Dictyostelium discoideum, an enzyme active on CMP or UMP but much less active on the corresponding deoxynucleotides. Binding of CMP enhanced the affinity of E. coli CMP kinase for ATP or ADP, a particularity never described in this family of proteins that might explain inhibition of enzyme activity by excess of nucleoside monophosphate.

  6. Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate and germination of sporangiospores from the fungus Mucor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlowski, M

    1980-06-01

    Cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cAMP) metabolism was examined in germinating sporangiospores of Mucor genevensis and Mucor mucedo. Exogenous cAMP prevented normal hyphal development from sporangiospores. Internal pools of cAMP fluctuated profoundly during development. Spherical growth of the spores was characterized by large pools of cAMP whereas germ tube emergence and hyphal elongation were characterized by small pools of cAMP. These observations suggest a possible role for cAMP in sporangiospore germination. Adenylate cyclase activities fluctuated significantly during germination with maximum values attained during spherical growth. In contrast, cAMP phosphodiesterase activities remained constant throughout germination. Internal cAMP levels may therefore be regulated by adjustment of adenylate cyclase activities. The binding of cAMP by soluble cell proteins was measured. cAMP-binding activity changed greatly during germination. Dormant and spherically growing spores possessed the highest activities. Developing hyphae contained the lowest activities. Use of the photoaffinity label, 8-azido-[32P]cAMP, in conjunction with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis allowed the identification of a small population of morphogenetic-stage-specific proteins which bind cAMP and may be of regulatory significance to development.

  7. The clinical correlation of regulatory T cells and cyclic adenosine monophosphate in enterovirus 71 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Min Wang

    Full Text Available Brainstem encephalitis (BE and pulmonary edema (PE are notable complications of enterovirus 71 (EV71 infection.This study investigated the immunoregulatory characterizations of EV71 neurological complications by disease severity and milrinone treatment.Patients <18 years with virologically confirmed EV71 infections were enrolled and divided into 2 groups: the hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD or BE group, and the autonomic nervous system (ANS dysregulation or PE group. Cytokine and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP levels, and the regulatory T cell (Tregs profiles of the patients were determined.Patients with ANS dysregulation or PE exhibited significantly low frequency of CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3+ and CD4(+Foxp3(+ T cells compared with patients with HFMD or BE. The expression frequency of CD4-CD8- was also significantly decreased in patients with ANS dysregulation or PE. Among patients with ANS dysregulation or PE, the expression frequency of CD4+Foxp3+ increased markedly after milrinone treatment, and was associated with reduction of plasma levels IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10. Plasma concentrations of cAMP were significantly decreased in patients with ANS dysregulation or PE compared with patients with HFMD or BE; however, cAMP levels increased after milrinone treatment.These findings suggested decreased different regulatory T populations and cAMP expression correlate with increased EV71 disease severity. Improved outcome after milrinone treatment may associate with increased regulatory T populations, cAMP expression and modulation of cytokines levels.

  8. Kinetic mechanism and energetics of binding of phosphoryl group acceptors to Mycobacterium tuberculosis cytidine monophosphate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskulski, Léia; Rosado, Leonardo A; Rostirolla, Diana C; Timmers, Luis F S M; de Souza, Osmar N; Santos, Diogenes S; Basso, Luiz A

    2013-08-01

    Cytidine monophosphate kinase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MtCMK) likely plays a role in supplying precursors for nucleic acid synthesis. MtCMK catalyzes the ATP-dependent phosphoryl group transfer preferentially to CMP and dCMP. Initial velocity studies and Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) measurements showed that MtCMK follows a random-order mechanism of substrate (CMP and ATP) binding, and an ordered mechanism for product release, in which ADP is released first followed by CDP. The thermodynamic signatures of CMP and CDP binding to MtCMK showed favorable enthalpy and unfavorable entropy, and ATP binding was characterized by favorable changes in enthalpy and entropy. The contribution of linked protonation events to the energetics of MtCMK:phosphoryl group acceptor binary complex formation suggested a net gain of protons. Values for the pKa of a likely chemical group involved in proton exchange and for the intrinsic binding enthalpy were calculated. The Asp187 side chain of MtCMK is suggested as the likely candidate for the protonation event. Data on thermodynamics of binary complex formation were collected to evaluate the contribution of 2'-OH group to intermolecular interactions. The data are discussed in light of functional and structural comparisons between CMP/dCMP kinases and UMP/CMP ones.

  9. Lateral Modes in Quantum Cascade Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory C. Dente

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We will examine the waveguide mode losses in ridge-guided quantum cascade lasers. Our analysis illustrates how the low-loss mode for broad-ridge quantum cascade lasers (QCLs can be a higher-order lateral waveguide mode that maximizes the feedback from the sloped ridge-wall regions. The results are in excellent agreement with the near- and far-field data taken on broad-ridge-guided quantum cascade lasers processed with sloped ridge walls.

  10. Cascades on clique-based graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Hackett, Adam

    2013-01-01

    We present an analytical approach to determining the expected cascade size in a broad range of dynamical models on the class of highly-clustered random graphs introduced in [J. P. Gleeson, Phys. Rev. E 80, 036107 (2009)]. A condition for the existence of global cascades is also derived. Applications of this approach include analyses of percolation, and Watts's model. We show how our techniques can be used to study the effects of in-group bias in cascades on social networks.

  11. Structure-Based Design, Synthesis, Evaluation And Crystal Structures of Transition State Analogue Inhibitors of Inosine Monophosphate Cyclohydrolase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, L.; Chong, Y.; Hwang, I.; D' Onofrio, A.; Amore, K.; Beardsley, G.P.; Li, C.; Olson, A.J.; Boger, D.L.; Wilson, I.A.; /Skaggs Inst. Chem. Biol. /Scripps Res. Inst.

    2007-07-13

    The inosine monophosphate cyclohydrolase (IMPCH) component (residues 1-199) of the bifunctional enzyme aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide transformylase (AICAR Tfase, residues 200-593)/IMPCH (ATIC) catalyzes the final step in the de novo purine biosynthesis pathway that produces IMP. As a potential target for antineoplastic intervention, we designed IMPCH inhibitors, 1,5-dihydroimidazo[4,5-c][1,2,6]thiadiazin-4(3H)-one 2,2-dioxide (heterocycle, 1), the corresponding nucleoside (2), and the nucleoside monophosphate (nucleotide) (3), as mimics of the tetrahedral intermediate in the cyclization reaction. All compounds are competitive inhibitors against IMPCH (K(i) values = 0.13-0.23 microm) with the simple heterocycle 1 exhibiting the most potent inhibition (K(i) = 0.13 microm). Crystal structures of bifunctional ATIC in complex with nucleoside 2 and nucleotide 3 revealed IMPCH binding modes similar to that of the IMPCH feedback inhibitor, xanthosine 5'-monophosphate. Surprisingly, the simpler heterocycle 1 had a completely different IMPCH binding mode and was relocated to the phosphate binding pocket that was identified from previous xanthosine 5'-monophosphate structures. The aromatic imidazole ring interacts with a helix dipole, similar to the interaction with the phosphate moiety of 3. The crystal structures not only revealed the mechanism of inhibition of these compounds, but they now serve as a platform for future inhibitor improvements. Importantly, the nucleoside-complexed structure supports the notion that inhibitors lacking a negatively charged phosphate can still inhibit IMPCH activity with comparable potency to phosphate-containing inhibitors. Provocatively, the nucleotide inhibitor 3 also binds to the AICAR Tfase domain of ATIC, which now provides a lead compound for the design of inhibitors that simultaneously target both active sites of this bifunctional enzyme.

  12. Predictive value of adenosine 5'-monophosphate challenge in preschool children for the diagnosis of asthma 5 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Shlomo; Avital, Avraham; Hevroni, Avigdor; Avenshtein, Alina; Hadi, Ronen; Springer, Chaim

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated the predictive values of preschool bronchial challenge with nebulized adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) using the auscultation method for having asthma 5 years later. Preschool AMP challenge had a high negative (90%) and a moderate positive (67%) predictive value for asthma 5 years later. Positive predictive value increased with the age at which the challenge was performed. The degree of preschool response to AMP was associated with the severity of asthma at school age.

  13. Vasorelaxant Effect of a New Hydrogen Sulfide-Nitric Oxide Conjugated Donor in Isolated Rat Aortic Rings through cGMP Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Wu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Endothelium-dependent vasorelaxant injury leads to a lot of cardiovascular diseases. Both hydrogen sulfide (H2S and nitric oxide (NO are gasotransmitters, which play a critical role in regulating vascular tone. However, the interaction between H2S and NO in vasorelaxation is still unclear. ZYZ-803 was a novel H2S and NO conjugated donor developed by H2S-releasing moiety (S-propyl-L-cysteine (SPRC and NO-releasing moiety (furoxan. ZYZ-803 could time- and dose-dependently relax the sustained contraction induced by PE in rat aortic rings, with potencies of 1.5- to 100-fold greater than that of furoxan and SPRC. Inhibition of the generations of H2S and NO with respective inhibitors abolished the vasorelaxant effect of ZYZ-803. ZYZ-803 increased cGMP level and the activity of vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP in aortic rings, and those effects could be suppressed by the inhibitory generation of H2S and NO. Both the inhibitor of protein kinase G (KT5823 and the inhibitor of KATP channel (glibenclamide suppressed the vasorelaxant effect of ZYZ-803. Our results demonstrated that H2S and NO generation from ZYZ-803 cooperatively regulated vascular tone through cGMP pathway, which indicated that ZYZ-803 had therapeutic potential in cardiovascular diseases.

  14. Vasorelaxant Effect of a New Hydrogen Sulfide-Nitric Oxide Conjugated Donor in Isolated Rat Aortic Rings through cGMP Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Dan; Hu, Qingxun; Ma, Fenfen; Zhu, Yi Zhun

    2016-01-01

    Endothelium-dependent vasorelaxant injury leads to a lot of cardiovascular diseases. Both hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and nitric oxide (NO) are gasotransmitters, which play a critical role in regulating vascular tone. However, the interaction between H2S and NO in vasorelaxation is still unclear. ZYZ-803 was a novel H2S and NO conjugated donor developed by H2S-releasing moiety (S-propyl-L-cysteine (SPRC)) and NO-releasing moiety (furoxan). ZYZ-803 could time- and dose-dependently relax the sustained contraction induced by PE in rat aortic rings, with potencies of 1.5- to 100-fold greater than that of furoxan and SPRC. Inhibition of the generations of H2S and NO with respective inhibitors abolished the vasorelaxant effect of ZYZ-803. ZYZ-803 increased cGMP level and the activity of vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) in aortic rings, and those effects could be suppressed by the inhibitory generation of H2S and NO. Both the inhibitor of protein kinase G (KT5823) and the inhibitor of KATP channel (glibenclamide) suppressed the vasorelaxant effect of ZYZ-803. Our results demonstrated that H2S and NO generation from ZYZ-803 cooperatively regulated vascular tone through cGMP pathway, which indicated that ZYZ-803 had therapeutic potential in cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26635911

  15. WHISTLER TURBULENCE FORWARD CASCADE VERSUS INVERSE CASCADE: THREE-DIMENSIONAL PARTICLE-IN-CELL SIMULATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Ouliang [Oracle Corporation, Redwood Shores, CA (United States); Gary, S. Peter [Space Science Institute, Boulder, CO (United States); Wang, Joseph, E-mail: ouliang@usc.edu, E-mail: pgary@lanl.gov, E-mail: josephjw@usc.edu [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2015-02-20

    We present the results of the first fully three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations of decaying whistler turbulence in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma in which both forward cascades to shorter wavelengths, and inverse cascades to longer wavelengths are allowed to proceed. For the electron beta β {sub e} = 0.10 initial value considered here, the early-time rate of inverse cascade is very much smaller than the rate of forward cascade, so that at late times the fluctuation energy in the regime of the inverse cascade is much weaker than that in the forward cascade regime. Similarly, the wavevector anisotropy in the inverse cascade regime is much weaker than that in the forward cascade regime.

  16. Effect of Sodium-Potassium Pump Inhibitors and Membrane-Depolarizing Agents on Sodium Nitroprusside-Induced Relaxation and Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate Accumulation in Rat Aorta

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rapoport, Robert M; Schwartz, Karen; Murad, Ferid

    1985-01-01

    ... or tetraethylammonium, membrane-depolarizing agents, inhibited relaxation to nitroprusside. These conditions had little or no effect on the elevated cyclic guanosine monophosphate levels at a concentration of nitroprusside (0.1 μM...

  17. Unsteady transonic flow over cascade blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surampudi, S. P.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1986-01-01

    An attempt is made to develop an efficient staggered cascade blade unsteady aerodynamics model for the neighborhood of March 1, representing the blade row by a rectilinear two-dimensional cascade of thin, flat plate airfoils. The equations of motion are derived on the basis of linearized transonic small perturbation theory, and an analytical solution is obtained by means of the Wiener-Hopf procedure. Making use of the transonic similarity law, the results obtained are compared with those of other linearized cascade analyses. A parametric study is conducted to find the effects of reduced frequency, stagger angle, solidity, and the location of the pitching axis on cascade stability.

  18. Contingency Analysis of Cascading Line Outage Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas L Baldwin; Magdy S Tawfik; Miles McQueen

    2011-03-01

    As the US power systems continue to increase in size and complexity, including the growth of smart grids, larger blackouts due to cascading outages become more likely. Grid congestion is often associated with a cascading collapse leading to a major blackout. Such a collapse is characterized by a self-sustaining sequence of line outages followed by a topology breakup of the network. This paper addresses the implementation and testing of a process for N-k contingency analysis and sequential cascading outage simulation in order to identify potential cascading modes. A modeling approach described in this paper offers a unique capability to identify initiating events that may lead to cascading outages. It predicts the development of cascading events by identifying and visualizing potential cascading tiers. The proposed approach was implemented using a 328-bus simplified SERC power system network. The results of the study indicate that initiating events and possible cascading chains may be identified, ranked and visualized. This approach may be used to improve the reliability of a transmission grid and reduce its vulnerability to cascading outages.

  19. Single-Seed Cascades on Clustered Networks

    CERN Document Server

    McSweeney, John K

    2015-01-01

    We consider a dynamic network cascade process developed by Watts applied to a random networks with a specified amount of clustering, belonging to a class of random networks developed by Newman. We adapt existing tree-based methods to formulate an appropriate two-type branching process to describe the spread of a cascade started with a single active node, and obtain a fixed-point equation to implicitly express the extinction probability of such a cascade. In so doing, we also recover a special case of a formula of Hackett et al. giving conditions for certain extinction of the cascade.

  20. Time evolution of cascade decay

    CERN Document Server

    Boyanovsky, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    We study non-perturbatively the time evolution of cascade decay for generic fields $\\pi \\rightarrow \\phi_1\\phi_2\\rightarrow \\phi_2\\chi_1\\chi_2$ and obtain the time dependence of amplitudes and populations for the resonant and final states. We analyze in detail the different time scales and the manifestation of unitary time evolution in the dynamics of production and decay of resonant intermediate and final states. The probability of occupation (population) ``flows'' as a function of time from the initial to the final states. When the decay width of the parent particle $\\Gamma_\\pi$ is much larger than that of the intermediate resonant state $\\Gamma_{\\phi_1}$ there is a ``bottleneck'' in the flow, the population of resonant states builds up to a maximum at $t^* = \\ln[\\Gamma_\\pi/\\Gamma_{\\phi_1}]/(\\Gamma_\\pi-\\Gamma_{\\phi_1})$ nearly saturating unitarity and decays to the final state on the longer time scale $1/\\Gamma_{\\phi_1}$. As a consequence of the wide separation of time scales in this case the cascade decay ...

  1. Multifunctional Cascaded Metamaterials: Integrated Transmitarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsakka, Amr A.; Asadchy, Viktar S.; Faniayeu, Ihar A.; Tcvetkova, Svetlana N.; Tretyakov, Sergei A.

    2016-10-01

    Control of electromagnetic waves using engineered materials is very important in a wide range of applications, therefore there is always a continuous need for new and more efficient solutions. Known natural and artificial materials and surfaces provide a particular functionality in the frequency range they operate but cast a "shadow" and produce reflections at other frequencies. Here, we introduce a concept of multifunctional engineered materials that possess different predetermined functionalities at different frequencies. Such response can be accomplished by cascading metasurfaces (thin composite layers) that are designed to perform a single operation at the desired frequency and are transparent elsewhere. Previously, out-of-band transparent metasurfaces for control over reflection and absorption were proposed. In this paper, to complete the full set of functionalities for wave control, we synthesize transmitarrays that tailor transmission in a desired way, being "invisible" beyond the operational band. The designed transmitarrays for wavefront shaping and anomalous refraction are tested numerically and experimentally. To demonstrate our concept of multifunctional engineered materials, we have designed a cascade of three metasurfaces that performs three different functions for waves at different frequencies. Remarkably, applied to volumetric metamaterials, our concept can enable a single composite possessing desired multifunctional response.

  2. Effect of swimming training on spatial learning-memory function of rats and its relationship with cAMP and cGMP in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex%游泳训练对大鼠空间学习记忆能力与海马、前额叶皮质环磷酸腺苷、环磷酸鸟苷水平的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢敏; 徐波; 王泽军

    2009-01-01

    目的:探讨8周游泳训练对大鼠空间学习记忆能力的影响与环磷酸腺苷(cAMP)、环磷酸鸟苷(cGMP)信号传导途径的关系.方法:以大鼠为实验对象,采用Morris水迷官法,研究8周游泳训练对大鼠空间学习记忆能力的作用;采用放射免疫法测定研究8周游泳训练对大鼠海马、前额叶皮质中cGMP、cAMP含量的影响.结果:①Morris水迷宫的测试表明,8周游泳训练后,大鼠的空间记忆能力有一定提高.②与安静组相比,8周游泳训练使大鼠海马cAMP水平非常显著性增加(P<0.01),cAMP/cGMP比值显著性增高(P<0.05),同时,前额叶皮质cAMP与cAMP/cGMP比值显著性增高(P<0.05).结论:8周的游泳训练在提高大鼠空间学习记忆能力的同时伴有海马、前额叶皮质cAMP含量与cAMP/cGMP比值的变化,从而部分揭示了运动促进学习记忆能力提高的可能机制.%Objective: To analyze the influence of long-term swimming training on spatial learning-memory in rats and its relationship with cyclic adenosine monophosphate(cAMP) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate(cGMP) signal transduction pathway. Method: After 3 times adaptable swimming exercises (30min each time), 40 male SD rats were divided into 2 groups: control group (CR, n=20) and exercises, group (TR, n=20). CR group didn't swim, and TR group swam without burden (6 times/week, 60 min each time). After 8 weeks training, 10 rats were selected from both groups respectively for examing of Morris water maze test. Radioimmunoassay was used to measure the levels of cAMP and cGMP in hippocampus and prefrontal cortex of rats. Result: ①Compared with CR group, in TR group learning-memory improved in a certain extent: ②Compared with CR group, in TR group, the level of cAMP in hippocampus enhanced very obviously (P<0.01), the cAMP/cGMP ratio enhanced obviously (P<0.05); in prefrontal cortex the levels of cAMP and cAMP/cGMP ratio enhanced obviously (P<0.05). Conclusion: Swimming

  3. A NOTE ON VECTOR CASCADE ALGORITHM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiu-hui Chen; Jin-zhao Liu; Wen-sheng Zhang

    2002-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the relationship between accuracy of multivariate refinable vector and vector cascade algorithm. We show that, if the vector cascade algorithm (1.5) with isotropic dilation converges to a vector-valued function with regularity, then the initial function must satisfy the Strang-Fix conditions.

  4. DISTURBANCE ATTENUATION FOR UNCERTAIN NONLINEAR CASCADED SYSTEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BI Weiping; MU Xiaowu; SUN Yuqiang

    2004-01-01

    In present paper, the disturbance attenuation problem of uncertain nonlinear cascaded systems is studied. Based on the adding one power integrator technique and recursive design, a feedback controller that solves the disturbance attenuation problem is constructed for uncertain nonlinear cascaded systems with internal stability.

  5. Cascade Harvest’ red raspberry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascade Harvest’ is a new floricane fruiting raspberry cultivar (Rubus idaeus L.) jointly released by Washington State University (WSU), Oregon State University (OSU) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). ‘Cascade Harvest’ produces a high yield of large, firm fruit suited to machine harves...

  6. Cascading costs: An economic nitrogen cycle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William R. Moomaw; Melissa B. L. Birch

    2005-01-01

    The chemical nitrogen cycle is becoming better characterized in terms of fluxes and reservoirs on a variety of scales. Galloway has demonstrated that reactive nitrogen can cascade through multiple ecosystems causing environmental damage at each stage before being denitrifled to N2. We propose to construct a parallel economic nitrogen cascade (ENC) in which economic impacts of nitrogen fluxes can be estimated by the costs associated with each stage of the chemical cascade. Using economic data for the benefits of damage avoided and costs of mitigation in the Chesapeake Bay basin, we have constructed an economic nitrogen cascade for the region. Since a single tonne of nitrogen can cascade through the system, the costs also cascade.Therefore evaluating the benefits of mitigating a tonne of reactive nitrogen released needs to consider the damage avoided in all of the ecosystems through which that tonne would cascade.The analysis reveals that it is most cost effective to remove a tonne of nitrogen coming from combustion since it has the greatest impact on human health and creates cascading damage through the atmospheric, terrestrial, aquatic and coastal ecosystems. We will discuss the implications of this analysis for determining the most cost effective policy option for achieving environmental quality goals.

  7. Xylazine Activates Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway in the Central Nervous System of Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xing-Xing; Yin, Bai-Shuang; Yang, Peng; Chen, Hao; Li, Xin; Su, Li-Xue; Fan, Hong-Gang; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Xylazine is a potent analgesic extensively used in veterinary and animal experimentation. Evidence exists that the analgesic effect can be inhibited using adenosine 5’-monophosphate activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitors. Considering this idea, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the AMPK signaling pathway is involved in the central analgesic mechanism of xylazine in the rat. Xylazine was administrated via the intraperitoneal route. Sprague-Dawley rats were sacrificed and the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus, thalamus and brainstem were collected for determination of liver kinase B1 (LKB1) and AMPKα mRNA expression using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα levels using western blot. The results of our study showed that compared with the control group, xylazine induced significant increases in AMPK activity in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, thalamus and cerebellum after rats received xylazine (P < 0.01). Increased AMPK activities were accompanied with increased phosphorylation levels of LKB1 in corresponding regions of rats. The protein levels of phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα in these regions returned or tended to return to control group levels. However, in the brainstem, phosphorylated LKB1 and AMPKα protein levels were decreased by xylazine compared with the control (P < 0.05). In conclusion, our data indicates that xylazine alters the activities of LKB1 and AMPK in the central nervous system of rats, which suggests that xylazine affects the regulatory signaling pathway of the analgesic mechanism in the rat brain. PMID:27049320

  8. The role of renal adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate in the control of erythropoietin production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, G M; Fisher, J W; George, W J

    1975-01-01

    A regulatory role for adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP) in the production of the renal hormone rythropoietin following erythropoietic stimulation with cobaltous chloride hexahydrate is proposed. Studies in rates reveal a temporal relationship between renal cyclic AMP levels and plasma titers of erythropoietin. In addition, cobalt increases the activity of an erythropoietin-generating enzyme (renal erythropoietic factor) with maximal enzyme activity occurring after the rise in cyclic AMP levels but before the increase in erythropoietin titers. This increase in renal cyclic AMP is localized to the renal cortex. Cobalt stimulates renal cortical adenylate cyclase but has no effect on renal cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase. The addition of cyclic AMP (3 time 10-6 M) and a partially purified cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase from rat kidney to an inactive preparation of renal erythropoietic factor increases the ability of renal erythropoietic factor to generate erythropoietin. Data from the polycythemic mouse assay, a bioassay used to quantitate erythropoietic activity of test substances, indicate that dibutyryl cyclic AMP is erythropoietically active with respect to its ability to increase radioactive-labelled iron (59Fe) incorporation into heme of newly formed red blood cells. Theophylline, which by itself is erythropoietically inactive, potentiated the erythropoietic effect of cobalt in polycythemic mice. These results suggest that cyclic AMP plays a significant role in the renal production of erythropoietin following cobalt administration. It is postulated that cobalt stimulates renal cortical adenyoate cyclase, thus increasing renal cyclic AMP levels. Cyclic AMP then activates a protein kinase which subsequently stimulates renal erythropoietic factor to generate erythropoietin. A similar cyclic AMP mechanism may be operative after erythropoietic stimulation by exposure to hypoxia or prostaglandin treatment.

  9. Characterization of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase from Staphylococcus aureus ATCC12600 and its involvement in biofilm formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yeswanth

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In Staphylococcus aureus purine metabolism plays a crucial role in the formation of biofilm which is a key pathogenic factor. The present study is aimed in the characterization of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH from Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 12600. Methods: IMPDH gene was amplified using primers designed from IMPDH gene sequence of S. aureus reported in the database. Then polymerase chain reaction (PCR product was cloned in the Sma I site of M13mp18 and expressed in Escherichia coli JM109. The recombinant IMPDH (rIMPDH was overexpressed with 1 mM isopropyl beta-D-1- thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG; Michaelis constant (Km, maximum enzyme velocity (Vmax and catalytic constant (Kcat of expressed IMPDH were determined. Results: The enzyme kinetics of IMPDH grown under aerobic conditions showed a Km of 43.71±1.56 µM, Vmax of 0.247±0.84/µM/mg/min and Kcat of 2.74±0.015/min while in anaerobic conditions the kinetics showed Km of 42.81±3.154/ µM, Vmax of 0.378±0.036 µM/mg/min and Kcat of 4.78±0.021 /min, indicating elevated levels of IMPDH activity under anaerobic conditions. Three-folds increased activity in the presence of 1 mM adenosine triphosphate (ATP correlated with biofilm formation. The kinetics of pure rIMPDH were close to the native IMPDH of S. aureus ATCC12600 and the enzyme showed single band in sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with a molecular weight of 53 KDa. Conclusions: Elevated activity of IMPDH was observed in S. aureus grown under anaerobic conditions and this was correlated with the biofilm formation indicating the linkage between purine metabolism and pathogenesis.

  10. Different characteristics and nucleotide binding properties of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine C Thomas

    Full Text Available We recently reported that Inosine Monophosphate Dehydrogenase (IMPDH, a rate-limiting enzyme in de novo guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, clustered into macrostructures in response to decreased nucleotide levels and that there were differences between the IMPDH isoforms, IMPDH1 and IMPDH2. We hypothesised that the Bateman domains, which are present in both isoforms and serve as energy-sensing/allosteric modules in unrelated proteins, would contribute to isoform-specific differences and that mutations situated in and around this domain in IMPDH1 which give rise to retinitis pigmentosa (RP would compromise regulation. We employed immuno-electron microscopy to investigate the ultrastructure of IMPDH macrostructures and live-cell imaging to follow clustering of an IMPDH2-GFP chimera in real-time. Using a series of IMPDH1/IMPDH2 chimera we demonstrated that the propensity to cluster was conferred by the N-terminal 244 amino acids, which includes the Bateman domain. A protease protection assay suggested isoform-specific purine nucleotide binding characteristics, with ATP protecting IMPDH1 and AMP protecting IMPDH2, via a mechanism involving conformational changes upon nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain without affecting IMPDH catalytic activity. ATP binding to IMPDH1 was confirmed in a nucleotide binding assay. The RP-causing mutation, R224P, abolished ATP binding and nucleotide protection and this correlated with an altered propensity to cluster. Collectively these data demonstrate that (i the isoforms are differentially regulated by AMP and ATP by a mechanism involving the Bateman domain, (ii communication occurs between the Bateman and catalytic domains and (iii the RP-causing mutations compromise such regulation. These findings support the idea that the IMPDH isoforms are subject to distinct regulation and that regulatory defects contribute to human disease.

  11. Recognition of Nucleoside Monophosphate Substrates by Haemophilus influenzae Class C Acid Phosphatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Harkewal; Schuermann, Jonathan P.; Reilly, Thomas J.; Calcutt, Michael J.; Tanner, John J. (Cornell); (UMC)

    2010-12-08

    The e (P4) phosphatase from Haemophilus influenzae functions in a vestigial NAD{sup +} utilization pathway by dephosphorylating nicotinamide mononucleotide to nicotinamide riboside. P4 is also the prototype of class C acid phosphatases (CCAPs), which are nonspecific 5{prime},3{prime}-nucleotidases localized to the bacterial outer membrane. To understand substrate recognition by P4 and other class C phosphatases, we have determined the crystal structures of a substrate-trapping mutant P4 enzyme complexed with nicotinamide mononucleotide, 5{prime}-AMP, 3{prime}-AMP, and 2{prime}-AMP. The structures reveal an anchor-shaped substrate-binding cavity comprising a conserved hydrophobic box that clamps the nucleotide base, a buried phosphoryl binding site, and three solvent-filled pockets that contact the ribose and the hydrogen-bonding edge of the base. The span between the hydrophobic box and the phosphoryl site is optimal for recognizing nucleoside monophosphates, explaining the general preference for this class of substrate. The base makes no hydrogen bonds with the enzyme, consistent with an observed lack of base specificity. Two solvent-filled pockets flanking the ribose are key to the dual recognition of 5{prime}-nucleotides and 3{prime}-nucleotides. These pockets minimize the enzyme's direct interactions with the ribose and provide sufficient space to accommodate 5{prime} substrates in an anti conformation and 3{prime} substrates in a syn conformation. Finally, the structures suggest that class B acid phosphatases and CCAPs share a common strategy for nucleotide recognition.

  12. Arabidopsis TH2 Encodes the Orphan Enzyme Thiamin Monophosphate Phosphatase[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaus, Thomas D.; Hasnain, Ghulam; Gidda, Satinder K.; Nguyen, Thuy N.D.; Anderson, Erin M.; Brown, Greg; Yakunin, Alexander F.; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Gregory, Jesse F.

    2016-01-01

    To synthesize the cofactor thiamin diphosphate (ThDP), plants must first hydrolyze thiamin monophosphate (ThMP) to thiamin, but dedicated enzymes for this hydrolysis step were unknown and widely doubted to exist. The classical thiamin-requiring th2-1 mutation in Arabidopsis thaliana was shown to reduce ThDP levels by half and to increase ThMP levels 5-fold, implying that the THIAMIN REQUIRING2 (TH2) gene product could be a dedicated ThMP phosphatase. Genomic and transcriptomic data indicated that TH2 corresponds to At5g32470, encoding a HAD (haloacid dehalogenase) family phosphatase fused to a TenA (thiamin salvage) family protein. Like the th2-1 mutant, an insertional mutant of At5g32470 accumulated ThMP, and the thiamin requirement of the th2-1 mutant was complemented by wild-type At5g32470. Complementation tests in Escherichia coli and enzyme assays with recombinant proteins confirmed that At5g32470 and its maize (Zea mays) orthologs GRMZM2G148896 and GRMZM2G078283 are ThMP-selective phosphatases whose activity resides in the HAD domain and that the At5g32470 TenA domain has the expected thiamin salvage activity. In vitro and in vivo experiments showed that alternative translation start sites direct the At5g32470 protein to the cytosol and potentially also to mitochondria. Our findings establish that plants have a dedicated ThMP phosphatase and indicate that modest (50%) ThDP depletion can produce severe deficiency symptoms. PMID:27677881

  13. Hindbrain raphe stimulation boosts cyclic adenosine monophosphate and signaling proteins in the injured spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballosa-Gonzalez, Melissa M; Vitores, Alberto; Hentall, Ian D

    2014-01-16

    Early recovery from incomplete spinal cord contusion is improved by prolonged stimulation of the hindbrain's serotonergic nucleus raphe magnus (NRM). Here we examine whether increases in cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), an intracellular signaling molecule with several known restorative actions on damaged neural tissue, could play a role. Subsequent changes in cAMP-dependent phosphorylation of protein kinase A (PKA) and PKA-dependent phosphorylation of the transcription factor "cAMP response element-binding protein" (CREB) are also analyzed. Rats with moderate weight-drop injury at segment T8 received 2h of NRM stimulation beginning three days after injury, followed immediately by separate extraction of cervical, thoracic and lumbar spinal cord for immunochemical assay. Controls lacked injury, stimulation or both. Injury reduced cAMP levels to under half of normal in all three spinal regions. NRM stimulation completely restored these levels, while producing no significant change in non-injured rats. Pretreatment with the 5-HT7 receptor antagonist pimozide (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) lowered cAMP in non-injured rats to injury amounts, which were unchanged by NRM stimulation. The phosphorylated fraction of PKA (pPKA) and CREB (pCREB) was reduced significantly in all three regions after SCI and restored by NRM stimulation, except for pCREB in lumbar segments. In conclusion, SCI produces spreading deficits in cAMP, pPKA and pCREB that are reversible by Gs protein-coupled 5-HT receptors responding to raphe-spinal activity, although these signaling molecules are not reactive to NRM stimulation in normal tissue. These findings can partly explain the benefits of NRM stimulation after SCI. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Accumulation and beta-Adrenergic Binding in Unweighted and Denervated Rat Soleus Muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Christopher R.; Woodman, Christopher R.; Woolridge, Dale; Tischler, Marc E.

    1992-01-01

    Unweighting, but not denervation, of muscle reportedly "spares" insulin receptors, increasing insulin sensitivity. Unweighting also increases beta-adrenergic responses of carbohydrate metabolism. These differential characteristics were studied further by comparing cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) accumulation and beta-adrenergic binding in normal and 3-day unweighted or denervated soleus muscle. Submaximal amounts of isoproterenol, a p-agonist, increased cAMP accumulation in vitro and in vivo (by intramuscular (IM) injection) to a greater degree (P less than .05) in unweighted muscles. Forskolin or maximal isoproterenol had similar in vitro effects in all muscles, suggesting increased beta-adrenergic sensitivity following unweighting. Increased sensitivity was confirmed by a greater receptor density (B(sub max)) for iodo-125(-)-pindolol in particulate preparations of unweighted (420 x 10(exp -18) mol/mg muscle) than of control or denervated muscles (285 x 10(exp-18) mol/mg muscle). The three dissociation constant (Kd) values were similar (20.3 to 25.8 pmol/L). Total binding capacity (11.4 fmol/muscle) did not change during 3 days of unweighting, but diminished by 30% with denervation. This result illustrates the "sparing" and loss of receptors, respectively, in these two atrophy models. In diabetic animals, IM injection of insulin diminished CAMP accumulation in the presence of theophylline in unweighted muscle (-66% +/- 2%) more than in controls (-42% +'- 6%, P less than .001). These results show that insulin affects CAMP formation in muscle, and support a greater in vivo insulin response following unweighting atrophy. These various data support a role for lysosomal proteolysis in denervation, but not in unweighting, atrophy.

  15. Optimization of benzoxazole-based inhibitors of Cryptosporidium parvum inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorla, Suresh Kumar; Kavitha, Mandapati; Zhang, Minjia; Chin, James En Wai; Liu, Xiaoping; Striepen, Boris; Makowska-Grzyska, Magdalena; Kim, Youngchang; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Hedstrom, Lizbeth; Cuny, Gregory D

    2013-05-23

    Cryptosporidium parvum is an enteric protozoan parasite that has emerged as a major cause of diarrhea, malnutrition, and gastroenteritis and poses a potential bioterrorism threat. C. parvum synthesizes guanine nucleotides from host adenosine in a streamlined pathway that relies on inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH). We have previously identified several parasite-selective C. parvum IMPDH (CpIMPDH) inhibitors by high-throughput screening. In this paper, we report the structure-activity relationship (SAR) for a series of benzoxazole derivatives with many compounds demonstrating CpIMPDH IC50 values in the nanomolar range and >500-fold selectivity over human IMPDH (hIMPDH). Unlike previously reported CpIMPDH inhibitors, these compounds are competitive inhibitors versus NAD(+). The SAR study reveals that pyridine and other small heteroaromatic substituents are required at the 2-position of the benzoxazole for potent inhibitory activity. In addition, several other SAR conclusions are highlighted with regard to the benzoxazole and the amide portion of the inhibitor, including preferred stereochemistry. An X-ray crystal structure of a representative E·IMP·inhibitor complex is also presented. Overall, the secondary amine derivative 15a demonstrated excellent CpIMPDH inhibitory activity (IC50 = 0.5 ± 0.1 nM) and moderate stability (t1/2 = 44 min) in mouse liver microsomes. Compound 73, the racemic version of 15a, also displayed superb antiparasitic activity in a Toxoplasma gondii strain that relies on CpIMPDH (EC50 = 20 ± 20 nM), and selectivity versus a wild-type T. gondii strain (200-fold). No toxicity was observed (LD50 > 50 μM) against a panel of four mammalian cells lines.

  16. Perfluorooctyl Iodide Stimulates Steroidogenesis in H295R Cells via a Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chang; Ruan, Ting; Liu, Jiyan; He, Bin; Zhou, Qunfang; Jiang, Guibin

    2015-05-18

    Perfluorinated iodine alkanes (PFIs) are used widely in the organic fluorine industry. Increased production of PFIs has caused environmental health concerns. To evaluate the potential endocrine-disrupting effect of PFIs, we investigated the effects of perfluorooctyl iodide (PFOI) on steroidogenesis in human adrenocortical carcinoma cells (H295R). Levels of aldosterone, cortisol, 17β-estradiol, and testosterone were measured in H295R culture medium upon treatment with perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and PFIs. Expression of 10 steroidogenic genes (StAR, HMGR, CYP11A1, 3βHSD2, 17βHSD, CYP17, CYP21, CYP11B1, CYP11B2, and CYP19) was measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Levels of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and adenylate cyclase (AC) activity were measured to understand the underlying mechanism of steroidogenic perturbations. Levels of production of aldosterone, cortisol, and 17β-estradiol were elevated significantly, and the level of testosterone generation decreased upon treatment with 100 μM PFOI. Similar to the effect induced by forskolin (AC activator), expression of all 10 genes involved in the synthesis of steroid hormones was upregulated significantly upon exposure to 100 μM PFOI. PFOA had no effect on steroid hormone production or steroidogenic gene expression even though it is highly structurally similar with PFOI. Therefore, the terminal -CF2I group in PFOI could be a critical factor for mediation of steroidogenesis. PFOI increased AC activity and cAMP levels in H295R cells, which implied an underlying mechanism for the disturbance of steroidogenesis. These data suggest that PFOI may act as an AC activator, thereby stimulating steroidogenesis by activating a cAMP signaling pathway.

  17. Multifunctional Cascaded Metamaterials: Integrated Transmitarrays

    CERN Document Server

    Elsakka, Amr A; Faniayeu, Ihar A; Tcvetkova, Svetlana N; Tretyakov, Sergei A

    2016-01-01

    Control of electromagnetic waves using engineered materials is very important in a wide range of applications, therefore there is always a continuous need for new and more efficient solutions. Known natural and artificial materials and surfaces provide a particular functionality in the frequency range they operate but cast a "shadow" and produce reflections at other frequencies. Here, we introduce a concept of multifunctional engineered materials that possess different predetermined functionalities at different frequencies. Such response can be accomplished by cascading metasurfaces (thin composite layers) that are designed to perform a single operation at the desired frequency and are transparent elsewhere. Previously, out-of-band transparent metasurfaces for control over reflection and absorption were proposed. In this paper, to complete the full set of functionalities for wave control, we synthesize transmitarrays that tailor transmission in a desired way, being "invisible" beyond the operational band. The...

  18. Network reconstruction from infection cascades

    CERN Document Server

    Braunstein, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing propagation networks from observations is a fundamental inverse problem, and it's crucial to understand and control dynamics in complex systems. Here we show that it is possible to reconstruct the whole structure of an interaction network and to simultaneously infer the complete time course of activation spreading, relying just on single snapshots of a small number of activity cascades. The method, that we called Inverse Dynamics Network Reconstruction (IDNR), is shown to work successfully on several synthetic and real networks, inferring the networks and the sources of infection based on sparse observations, including single snapshots. IDNR is built on a Belief Propagation approximation, that has an impressive performance in a wide variety of topological structures. The method can be applied in absence of complete time-series data by providing a detailed modeling of the posterior distribution of trajectories conditioned to the observations. Furthermore, we show by experiments that the informat...

  19. Cascades in interdependent flow networks

    CERN Document Server

    Scala, Antonio; Caldarelli, Guido; D'Agostino, Gregorio

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the abrupt breakdown behavior of coupled distribution grids under load growth. This scenario mimics the ever-increasing customer demand and the foreseen introduction of energy hubs interconnecting the different energy vectors. We extend an analytical model of cascading behavior due to line overloads to the case of interdependent networks and find evidence of first order transitions due to the long-range nature of the flows. Our results indicate that the foreseen increase in the couplings between the grids has two competing effects: on the one hand, it increases the safety region where grids can operate without withstanding systemic failures; on the other hand, it increases the possibility of a joint systems' failure.

  20. Availability Cascades & the Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netter, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    In search of a new concept that will provide answers to as to how modern societies should not only make sense but also resolve the social and environmental problems linked with our modes of production and consumption, collaborative consumption and the sharing economy are increasingly attracting...... attention. This conceptual paper attempts to explain the emergent focus on the sharing economy and associated business and consumption models by applying cascade theory. Risks associated with this behavior will be especially examined with regard to the sustainability claim of collaborative consumption....... With academics, practitioners, and civil society alike having a shared history in being rather fast in accepting new concepts that will not only provide business opportunities but also a good conscience, this study proposes a critical study of the implications of collaborative consumption, before engaging...

  1. Availability Cascades & the Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netter, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    In search of a new concept that will provide answers to as to how modern societies should not only make sense but also resolve the social and environmental problems linked with our modes of production and consumption, collaborative consumption and the sharing economy are increasingly attracting...... attention. This conceptual paper attempts to explain the emergent focus on the sharing economy and associated business and consumption models by applying cascade theory. Risks associated with this behavior will be especially examined with regard to the sustainability claim of collaborative consumption....... With academics, practitioners, and civil society alike having a shared history in being rather fast in accepting new concepts that will not only provide business opportunities but also a good conscience, this study proposes a critical study of the implications of collaborative consumption, before engaging...

  2. MAPK Cascades in Guard Cell Signal Transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuree; Kim, Yun Ju; Kim, Myung-Hee; Kwak, June M.

    2016-01-01

    Guard cells form stomata on the epidermis and continuously respond to endogenous and environmental stimuli to fine-tune the gas exchange and transpirational water loss, processes which involve mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. MAPKs form three-tiered kinase cascades with MAPK kinases and MAPK kinase kinases, by which signals are transduced to the target proteins. MAPK cascade genes are highly conserved in all eukaryotes, and they play crucial roles in myriad developmental and physiological processes. MAPK cascades function during biotic and abiotic stress responses by linking extracellular signals received by receptors to cytosolic events and gene expression. In this review, we highlight recent findings and insights into MAPK-mediated guard cell signaling, including the specificity of MAPK cascades and the remaining questions. PMID:26904052

  3. MAPK cascades in guard cell signal transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuree eLee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Guard cells form stomata on the epidermis and continuously respond to endogenous and environmental stimuli to fine-tune the gas exchange and transpirational water loss, processes which involve mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades. MAPKs form three-tiered kinase cascades with MAPK kinases and MAPK kinase kinases, by which signals are transduced to the target proteins. MAPK cascade genes are highly conserved in all eukaryotes, and they play crucial roles in myriad developmental and physiological processes. MAPK cascades function during biotic and abiotic stress responses by linking extracellular signals received by receptors to cytosolic events and gene expression. In this review, we highlight recent findings and insights into MAPK-mediated guard cell signaling, including the specificity of MAPK cascades and the remaining questions.

  4. Stochastic annealing simulation of cascades in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinisch, H.L.

    1996-04-01

    The stochastic annealing simulation code ALSOME is used to investigate quantitatively the differential production of mobile vacancy and SIA defects as a function of temperature for isolated 25 KeV cascades in copper generated by MD simulations. The ALSOME code and cascade annealing simulations are described. The annealing simulations indicate that the above Stage V, where the cascade vacancy clusters are unstable,m nearly 80% of the post-quench vacancies escape the cascade volume, while about half of the post-quench SIAs remain in clusters. The results are sensitive to the relative fractions of SIAs that occur in small, highly mobile clusters and large stable clusters, respectively, which may be dependent on the cascade energy.

  5. Validation of High-Performance Thin-Layer Chromatographic Methods for the Identification of Botanicals in a cGMP Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    REICH, EIKE; SCHIBLI, ANNE; DEBATT, ALISON

    2009-01-01

    Current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) for botanicals stipulates the use of appropriate methods for identification of raw materials. Due to natural variability, chemical analysis of plant material is a great challenge and requires special approaches. This paper presents a comprehensive proposal to the process of validating qualitative high-performance thin-layer chromatographic (HPTLC) methods, proving that such methods are suitable for the purpose. The steps of the validation process are discussed and illustrated with examples taken from a project aiming at validation of methods for identification of green tea leaf, ginseng root, eleuthero root, echinacea root, black cohosh rhizome, licorice root, kava root, milk thistle aerial parts, feverfew aerial parts, and ginger root. The appendix of the paper, which includes complete documentation and method write-up for those plants, is available on the J. AOAC Int. Website (http://www.atypon-link.com/AOAC/loi/jaoi). PMID:18376581

  6. Validation of high-performance thin-layer chromatographic methods for the identification of botanicals in a cGMP environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Eike; Schibli, Anne; DeBatt, Alison

    2008-01-01

    Current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP) for botanicals stipulates the use of appropriate methods for identification of raw materials. Due to natural variability, chemical analysis of plant material is a great challenge and requires special approaches. This paper presents a comprehensive proposal to the process of validating qualitative high-performance thin-layer chromatographic (HPTLC) methods, proving that such methods are suitable for the purpose. The steps of the validation process are discussed and illustrated with examples taken from a project aiming at validation of methods for identification of green tea leaf, ginseng root, eleuthero root, echinacea root, black cohosh rhizome, licorice root, kava root, milk thistle aerial parts, feverfew aerial parts, and ginger root. The appendix of the paper, which includes complete documentation and method write-up for those plants, is available on the J. AOAC Int. Website (http://www.atypon-link.com/AOAC/loi/jaoi).

  7. Dephosphorylation and inactivation of NPR2 guanylyl cyclase in granulosa cells contributes to the LH-induced decrease in cGMP that causes resumption of meiosis in rat oocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbert, Jeremy R.; Shuhaibar, Leia C.; Edmund, Aaron B.; Van Helden, Dusty A.; Robinson, Jerid W.; Uliasz, Tracy F.; Baena, Valentina; Geerts, Andreas; Wunder, Frank; Potter, Lincoln R.; Jaffe, Laurinda A.

    2014-01-01

    In mammals, the meiotic cell cycle of oocytes starts during embryogenesis and then pauses. Much later, in preparation for fertilization, oocytes within preovulatory follicles resume meiosis in response to luteinizing hormone (LH). Before LH stimulation, the arrest is maintained by diffusion of cyclic (c)GMP into the oocyte from the surrounding granulosa cells, where it is produced by the guanylyl cyclase natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2). LH rapidly reduces the production of cGMP, but how this occurs is unknown. Here, using rat follicles, we show that within 10 min, LH signaling causes dephosphorylation and inactivation of NPR2 through a process that requires the activity of phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP)-family members. The rapid dephosphorylation of NPR2 is accompanied by a rapid phosphorylation of the cGMP phosphodiesterase PDE5, an enzyme whose activity is increased upon phosphorylation. Later, levels of the NPR2 agonist C-type natriuretic peptide decrease in the follicle, and these sequential events contribute to the decrease in cGMP that causes meiosis to resume in the oocyte. PMID:25183874

  8. Dephosphorylation and inactivation of NPR2 guanylyl cyclase in granulosa cells contributes to the LH-induced decrease in cGMP that causes resumption of meiosis in rat oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbert, Jeremy R; Shuhaibar, Leia C; Edmund, Aaron B; Van Helden, Dusty A; Robinson, Jerid W; Uliasz, Tracy F; Baena, Valentina; Geerts, Andreas; Wunder, Frank; Potter, Lincoln R; Jaffe, Laurinda A

    2014-09-01

    In mammals, the meiotic cell cycle of oocytes starts during embryogenesis and then pauses. Much later, in preparation for fertilization, oocytes within preovulatory follicles resume meiosis in response to luteinizing hormone (LH). Before LH stimulation, the arrest is maintained by diffusion of cyclic (c)GMP into the oocyte from the surrounding granulosa cells, where it is produced by the guanylyl cyclase natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (NPR2). LH rapidly reduces the production of cGMP, but how this occurs is unknown. Here, using rat follicles, we show that within 10 min, LH signaling causes dephosphorylation and inactivation of NPR2 through a process that requires the activity of phosphoprotein phosphatase (PPP)-family members. The rapid dephosphorylation of NPR2 is accompanied by a rapid phosphorylation of the cGMP phosphodiesterase PDE5, an enzyme whose activity is increased upon phosphorylation. Later, levels of the NPR2 agonist C-type natriuretic peptide decrease in the follicle, and these sequential events contribute to the decrease in cGMP that causes meiosis to resume in the oocyte.

  9. Neuronal nitric oxide contributes to neuroplasticity-associated protein expression through cGMP, protein kinase G, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Eduardo F; Iadecola, Costantino

    2011-05-11

    Nitric oxide (NO) synthesized by neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) has long been implicated in brain plasticity. However, it is unclear how this short-lived mediator contributes to the long-term molecular changes underlying neuroplasticity, which typically require activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway and gene expression. To address this issue, we used a neuroplasticity model based on treatment of neuronal cultures with bicuculline and a model of experience-dependent plasticity in the barrel cortex. In neuronal cultures, NOS inhibition attenuated the bicuculline-induced activation of ERK and the expression of c-Fos, Egr-1, Arc, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), proteins essential for neuroplasticity. Furthermore, inhibition of the NO target soluble guanylyl cyclase or of the cGMP effector kinase protein kinase G (PKG) reduced both ERK activation and plasticity-related protein expression. NOS inhibition did not affect phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a well-established ERK nuclear target, but it attenuated the nuclear accumulation of the CREB coactivator TORC1 and suppressed the activation of Elk-1, another transcription factor target of ERK. Consistent with these in vitro observations, induction of c-Fos, Egr-1, and BDNF was attenuated in the D1 cortical barrel of nNOS(-/-) mice subjected to single whisker experience. These results establish nNOS-derived NO as a key factor in the expression of proteins involved in neuroplasticity, an effect mediated through cGMP, PKG, and ERK signaling. These actions of NO do not depend on CREB phosphorylation but may involve TORC1 and Elk-1. Our data unveil a previously unrecognized link between neuronal NO and the molecular machinery responsible for the sustained synaptic changes underlying neuroplasticity.

  10. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate-mediated protection against bile acid-induced apoptosis in cultured rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, C R; Anwer, M S

    1998-05-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) has been shown to modulate apoptosis. To evaluate the role of cAMP in bile acid-induced hepatocyte apoptosis, we studied the effect of agents that increase cAMP on the induction of apoptosis by glycochenodeoxycholate (GCDC) in cultured rat hepatocytes. GCDC induced apoptosis in 26.5%+/-1.1% of hepatocytes within 2 hours. Twenty-minute pretreatment of hepatocytes with 100 micromol/L 8-(4-chlorothiophenyl) cAMP (CP-cAMP) resulted in a reduction in the amount of apoptosis to 35.2%+/-3.8% of that seen in hepatocytes treated with GCDC alone. Other agents that increase intracellular cAMP, including dibutyryl cAMP (100 micromol/L), glucagon (200 nmol/L), and a combination of forskolin (20 micromol/L) and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (20 micromol/L), also inhibited GCDC-induced apoptosis to a similar extent. Pretreatment with the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor, KT5720, prevented the protective effect of CP-cAMP and inhibited CP-cAMP-induced activation of PKA activity. Inhibitors of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), wortmannin (50 nmol/L), or Ly 294002 (20 micromol/L) also prevented the cytoprotective effect of cAMP. PI3K assays confirmed that wortmannin (50 nmol/L) inhibited PI3K activity, while CP-cAMP had no effect on the activity of this lipid kinase. GCDC increased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activity, but had no effect on stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK) activity in hepatocytes. cAMP decreased basal and GCDC-induced MAPK activity and increased SAPK activity. The MAPK kinase inhibitor, PD 98059, inhibited both GCDC-mediated MAPK activation and GCDC-induced apoptosis. 1) agents that increase intracellular cAMP protect against hepatocyte apoptosis induced by hydrophobic bile acids; 2) activation of MAPK by GCDC may be involved in bile acid-induced apoptosis; and 3) cAMP-mediated cytoprotection against bile acid-induced apoptosis appears to involve PKA, MAPK, and PI3K.

  11. Cascades on clique-based graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Adam; Gleeson, James P.

    2013-06-01

    We present an analytical approach to determining the expected cascade size in a broad range of dynamical models on the class of highly clustered random graphs introduced by Gleeson [J. P. Gleeson, Phys. Rev. EPLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.80.036107 80, 036107 (2009)]. A condition for the existence of global cascades is also derived. Applications of this approach include analyses of percolation, and Watts's model. We show how our techniques can be used to study the effects of in-group bias in cascades on social networks.

  12. Cascade Hierarchy in SUSY SU(5) GUT

    CERN Document Server

    Kojima, Kentaro; Takahashi, Ryo

    2010-01-01

    We study cascade hierarchy in supersymmetric SU(5) grand unified theory. The neutrino Dirac mass matrix of the cascade form can lead to the tri-bimaximal generation mixing at the leading order in the seesaw mechanism while the down quark mass matrix of a hybrid cascade form naturally gives the CKM structure. We embed such experimentally favored mass textures into supersymmetric SU(5) GUT, which gives a relation between the down quark and charged lepton mass matrices. Related phenomenologies, such as lepton flavor violating processes and leptogenesis, are also investigated in addition to lepton mixing angles.

  13. Hypothermia induced by adenosine 5'-monophosphate attenuates early stage injury in an acute gouty arthritis rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Zhimin; Guo, Weiting; Lu, Shulai; Lv, Wenshan; Li, Changgui; Wang, Yangang; Zhao, Shihua; Yan, Shengli; Tao, Zhenyin; Wang, Yunlong

    2013-08-01

    To investigate whether the hypothermia induced by Adenosine 5'-Monophosphate (5'-AMP) could attenuate early stage injury in a rat acute gouty arthritis model. Ankle joint injection with monosodium urate monohydrate crystals (MSU crystals) in hypothermia rat model which was induced by 5'-AMP and then observe whether hypothermia induced by 5'-AMP could be effectively inhibit the inflammation on acute gouty arthritis in rats. AMP-induced hypothermia has protective effects on our acute gouty arthritis, which was demonstrated by the following criteria: (1) a significant reduction in the ankle swelling (p gouty arthritis model.

  14. Quantum Cascade Laser Frequency Combs

    CERN Document Server

    Faist, Jérôme; Scalari, Giacomo; Rösch, Markus; Bonzon, Christopher; Hugi, Andreas; Beck, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated that broadband quantum cascade lasers can operate as frequency combs. As such, they operate under direct electrical pumping at both mid-infrared and THz frequencies, making them very attractive for dual-comb spectroscopy. Performance levels are continuously improving, with average powers over 100 mW and frequency coverage of 100 cm$^{-1}$ in the mid-infrared. In the THz range, 10 mW of average power and 600 GHz of frequency coverage are reported. As a result of the very short upper state lifetime of the gain medium, the mode proliferation in these sources arises from four wave mixing rather than saturable absorption. As a result, their optical output is characterized by the tendency of small intensity modulation of the output power, and the relative phases of the modes to be similar to the ones of a frequency modulated laser. Recent results include the proof of comb operation down to a metrological level, the observation of a Schawlow-Townes broadened linewidth, as well as the fir...

  15. Quantum Cascade Laser Frequency Combs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faist Jérôme

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available It was recently demonstrated that broadband quantum cascade lasers can operate as frequency combs. As such, they operate under direct electrical pumping at both mid-infrared and THz frequencies, making them very attractive for dual-comb spectroscopy. Performance levels are continuously improving, with average powers over 100mW and frequency coverage of 100 cm-1 in the mid-infrared region. In the THz range, 10mW of average power and 600 GHz of frequency coverage are reported. As a result of the very short upper state lifetime of the gain medium, the mode proliferation in these sources arises from four-wave mixing rather than saturable absorption. As a result, their optical output is characterized by the tendency of small intensity modulation of the output power, and the relative phases of the modes to be similar to the ones of a frequency modulated laser. Recent results include the proof of comb operation down to a metrological level, the observation of a Schawlow-Townes broadened linewidth, as well as the first dual-comb spectroscopy measurements. The capability of the structure to integrate monothically nonlinear optical elements as well as to operate as a detector shows great promise for future chip integration of dual-comb systems.

  16. Mount Rainier active cascade volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Mount Rainier is one of about two dozen active or recently active volcanoes in the Cascade Range, an arc of volcanoes in the northwestern United States and Canada. The volcano is located about 35 kilometers southeast of the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area, which has a population of more than 2.5 million. This metropolitan area is the high technology industrial center of the Pacific Northwest and one of the commercial aircraft manufacturing centers of the United States. The rivers draining the volcano empty into Puget Sound, which has two major shipping ports, and into the Columbia River, a major shipping lane and home to approximately a million people in southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon. Mount Rainier is an active volcano. It last erupted approximately 150 years ago, and numerous large floods and debris flows have been generated on its slopes during this century. More than 100,000 people live on the extensive mudflow deposits that have filled the rivers and valleys draining the volcano during the past 10,000 years. A major volcanic eruption or debris flow could kill thousands of residents and cripple the economy of the Pacific Northwest. Despite the potential for such danger, Mount Rainier has received little study. Most of the geologic work on Mount Rainier was done more than two decades ago. Fundamental topics such as the development, history, and stability of the volcano are poorly understood.

  17. Mount Rainier active cascade volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount Rainier is one of about two dozen active or recently active volcanoes in the Cascade Range, an arc of volcanoes in the northwestern United States and Canada. The volcano is located about 35 kilometers southeast of the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area, which has a population of more than 2.5 million. This metropolitan area is the high technology industrial center of the Pacific Northwest and one of the commercial aircraft manufacturing centers of the United States. The rivers draining the volcano empty into Puget Sound, which has two major shipping ports, and into the Columbia River, a major shipping lane and home to approximately a million people in southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon. Mount Rainier is an active volcano. It last erupted approximately 150 years ago, and numerous large floods and debris flows have been generated on its slopes during this century. More than 100,000 people live on the extensive mudflow deposits that have filled the rivers and valleys draining the volcano during the past 10,000 years. A major volcanic eruption or debris flow could kill thousands of residents and cripple the economy of the Pacific Northwest. Despite the potential for such danger, Mount Rainier has received little study. Most of the geologic work on Mount Rainier was done more than two decades ago. Fundamental topics such as the development, history, and stability of the volcano are poorly understood.

  18. Nitration of Tyrosine 247 Inhibits Protein Kinase G-1α Activity by Attenuating Cyclic Guanosine Monophosphate Binding*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Gross, Christine M.; Rafikov, Ruslan; Kumar, Sanjiv; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Ludewig, Britta; Jonigk, Danny; Black, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The cGMP-dependent protein kinase G-1α (PKG-1α) is a downstream mediator of nitric oxide and natriuretic peptide signaling. Alterations in this pathway play a key role in the pathogenesis and progression of vascular diseases associated with increased vascular tone and thickness, such as pulmonary hypertension. Previous studies have shown that tyrosine nitration attenuates PKG-1α activity. However, little is known about the mechanisms involved in this event. Utilizing mass spectrometry, we found that PKG-1α is susceptible to nitration at tyrosine 247 and 425. Tyrosine to phenylalanine mutants, Y247F- and Y425F-PKG-1α, were both less susceptible to nitration than WT PKG-1α, but only Y247F-PKG-1α exhibited preserved activity, suggesting that the nitration of Tyr247 is critical in attenuating PKG-1α activity. The overexpression of WT- or Y247F-PKG-1α decreased the proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (SMC), increased the expression of SMC contractile markers, and decreased the expression of proliferative markers. Nitrosative stress induced a switch from a contractile to a synthetic phenotype in cells expressing WT- but not Y247F-PKG-1α. An antibody generated against 3-NT-Y247 identified increased levels of nitrated PKG-1α in humans with pulmonary hypertension. Finally, to gain a more mechanistic understanding of how nitration attenuates PKG activity, we developed a homology model of PKG-1α. This model predicted that the nitration of Tyr247 would decrease the affinity of PKG-1α for cGMP, which we confirmed using a [3H]cGMP binding assay. Our study shows that the nitration of Tyr247 and the attenuation of cGMP binding is an important mechanism regulating in PKG-1α activity and SMC proliferation/differentiation. PMID:24469460

  19. Nitration of tyrosine 247 inhibits protein kinase G-1α activity by attenuating cyclic guanosine monophosphate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Gross, Christine M; Rafikov, Ruslan; Kumar, Sanjiv; Fineman, Jeffrey R; Ludewig, Britta; Jonigk, Danny; Black, Stephen M

    2014-03-14

    The cGMP-dependent protein kinase G-1α (PKG-1α) is a downstream mediator of nitric oxide and natriuretic peptide signaling. Alterations in this pathway play a key role in the pathogenesis and progression of vascular diseases associated with increased vascular tone and thickness, such as pulmonary hypertension. Previous studies have shown that tyrosine nitration attenuates PKG-1α activity. However, little is known about the mechanisms involved in this event. Utilizing mass spectrometry, we found that PKG-1α is susceptible to nitration at tyrosine 247 and 425. Tyrosine to phenylalanine mutants, Y247F- and Y425F-PKG-1α, were both less susceptible to nitration than WT PKG-1α, but only Y247F-PKG-1α exhibited preserved activity, suggesting that the nitration of Tyr(247) is critical in attenuating PKG-1α activity. The overexpression of WT- or Y247F-PKG-1α decreased the proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (SMC), increased the expression of SMC contractile markers, and decreased the expression of proliferative markers. Nitrosative stress induced a switch from a contractile to a synthetic phenotype in cells expressing WT- but not Y247F-PKG-1α. An antibody generated against 3-NT-Y247 identified increased levels of nitrated PKG-1α in humans with pulmonary hypertension. Finally, to gain a more mechanistic understanding of how nitration attenuates PKG activity, we developed a homology model of PKG-1α. This model predicted that the nitration of Tyr(247) would decrease the affinity of PKG-1α for cGMP, which we confirmed using a [(3)H]cGMP binding assay. Our study shows that the nitration of Tyr(247) and the attenuation of cGMP binding is an important mechanism regulating in PKG-1α activity and SMC proliferation/differentiation.

  20. Picturing perturbative parton cascades in QCD matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksi Kurkela

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on parametric reasoning, we provide a simple dynamical picture of how a perturbative parton cascade, in interaction with a QCD medium, fills phase space as a function of time.

  1. Transport properties of cascading gauge theories

    CERN Document Server

    Buchel, A

    2005-01-01

    Cascading gauge theories of Klebanov et.al. provide a model within a framework of gauge theory/string theory duality for a four dimensional non-conformal gauge theory with a spontaneously generated mass scale. Using the dual supergravity description we study sound wave propagation in strongly coupled cascading gauge theory plasma. We analytically compute the speed of sound and the bulk viscosity of cascading gauge theory plasma at a temperature much larger than the strong coupling scale of the theory. The sound wave dispersion relation is obtained from the hydrodynamic pole in the stress-energy tensor two-point correlation function. The speed of sound extracted from the pole of the correlation function agrees with its value computed in [hep-th/0506002] using the equation of state. We find that the bulk viscosity of the hot cascading gauge theory plasma is non-zero at the leading order in the deviation from conformality.

  2. Multilevel Inverter by Cascading Industrial VSI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teodorescu, Remus; Blaabjerg, Frede; Pedersen, John Kim

    2002-01-01

    In this paper the modularity concept applied to medium-voltage adjustable speed drives is addressed. First, the single-phase cascaded voltage-source inverter that uses series connection of IGBT H-bridge modules with isolated dc-buses is presented. Next, a novel three-phase cascaded voltage...... of the motor rated kVA. The concept of using cascaded inverters is further extended to a new modular motor-modular inverter system where the motor winding connections are reconnected into several three-phase groups, either six-lead or 12-lead connection according to the voltage level, each powered...... by a standard triphase IGBT inverter module. Thus, a high fault tolerance is being achieved and the output transformer requirement is eliminated. A staggered space-vector modulation technique applicable to three-phase cascaded voltage-source inverter topologies is also demonstrated. Both computer simulations...

  3. Model for cascading failures in congested Internet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian WANG; Yan-heng LIU; Jian-qi ZHU; Yu JIAO

    2008-01-01

    Cascading failures often occur in congested networks such as the Internet. A cascading failure can be described as a three-phase process: generation, diffusion, and dissipation of the congestion. In this account, we present a function that represents the extent of congestion on a given node. This approach is different from existing functions based on betweenness centrality. By introducing the concept of 'delay time', we designate an intergradation between permanent removal and nouremoval. We also construct an evaluation function of network efficiency, based on congestion, which measures the damage caused by cascading failures. Finally, we investigate the effects of network structure and size, delay time, processing ability and packet generation speed on congestion propagation. Also, we uncover the relationship between the cascade dynamics and some properties of the network such as structure and size.

  4. Cascade of period doublings of tori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arneodo, A.; Coullet, P. H.; Spiegel, E. A.

    1983-02-01

    A three-dimensional map is proposed to model the effects of periodic forcing on a system displaying a transition to chaos through a cascade of period-doubling bifurcations. The study outlined here raises the problem of the existence and bifurcation of invariant tori. A principal feature of the simulations of both the differential equations and the discrete dynamical systems is that it is possible to disrupt period-doubling sequences (and inverse sequences as well) by periodic external forcing. Even though the way in which this abortion works is not understood, the mechanism is thought to be associated with the destruction of tori (Aronson et al., 1982) when the system is on the verge of bifurcation. The simulations therefore suggest that in moving farther along the cascade, the tori become more fragile. It is suspected that for arbitrarily weak driving, the cascade will eventually be disrupted after the cascade has proceeded through a sufficient number of steps.

  5. Bursting behaviours in cascaded stimulated Brillouin scattering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Zhan-Jun; He Xian-Tu; Zheng Chun-Yang; Wang Yu-Gang

    2012-01-01

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering is studied by numerically solving the Vlasov-Maxwell system.A cascade of stimulated Brillouin scattering can occur when a linearly polarized laser pulse propagates in a plasma.It is found that a stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade can reduce the scattering and increase the transmission of light,as well as introduce a bursting behaviour in the evolution of the laser-plasma interaction.The bursting time in the reflectivity is found to be less than half the ion acoustic period.The ion temperature can affect the stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade,which can repeat several times at low ion temperatures and can be completely eliminated at high ion temperatures.For stimulated Brillouin scattering saturation,higher-harmonic generation and wave-wave interaction of the excited ion acoustic waves can restrict the amplitude of the latter.In addition,stimulated Brillouin scattering cascade can restrict the amplitude of the scattered light.

  6. Chemoenzymatic cascade processes for sustainable organic synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simons, C.

    2007-01-01

    Chemical production processes often require wasteful and expensive isolation as well as purification of intermediates. Catalytic cascades offer a unique opportunity to eliminate these inefficient and polluting steps, in particular when carefully orchestrated, involving enzymes and chemocatalysts. Th

  7. North Cascades Grizzly Bear Ecosystem Evaluation

    Data.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory — We conducted a 6-year evaluation of the North Cascades Grizzly Bear Ecosystem (NCGBE) in north-central Washington to determine the suitability of the area to support...

  8. A quantum cascade phonon-polariton laser

    CERN Document Server

    Ohtani, Keita; Bosco, Lorenzo; Beck, Mattias; Faist, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    We report a laser that coherently emits phonon-polaritons, quasi-particles arising from the coupling between photons and transverse optical phonons. The gain is provided by an intersubband transition in a quantum cascade structure. The polaritons at h$\

  9. Cascade of links in complex networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Yeqian; Sun, Bihui [Department of Management Science, School of Government, Beijing Normal University, 100875 Beijing (China); Zeng, An, E-mail: anzeng@bnu.edu.cn [School of Systems Science, Beijing Normal University, 100875 Beijing (China)

    2017-01-30

    Cascading failure is an important process which has been widely used to model catastrophic events such as blackouts and financial crisis in real systems. However, so far most of the studies in the literature focus on the cascading process on nodes, leaving the possibility of link cascade overlooked. In many real cases, the catastrophic events are actually formed by the successive disappearance of links. Examples exist in the financial systems where the firms and banks (i.e. nodes) still exist but many financial trades (i.e. links) are gone during the crisis, and the air transportation systems where the airports (i.e. nodes) are still functional but many airlines (i.e. links) stop operating during bad weather. In this letter, we develop a link cascade model in complex networks. With this model, we find that both artificial and real networks tend to collapse even if a few links are initially attacked. However, the link cascading process can be effectively terminated by setting a few strong nodes in the network which do not respond to any link reduction. Finally, a simulated annealing algorithm is used to optimize the location of these strong nodes, which significantly improves the robustness of the networks against the link cascade. - Highlights: • We propose a link cascade model in complex networks. • Both artificial and real networks tend to collapse even if a few links are initially attacked. • The link cascading process can be effectively terminated by setting a few strong nodes. • A simulated annealing algorithm is used to optimize the location of these strong nodes.

  10. Compression limits in cascaded quadratic soliton compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Krolikowski, Wieslaw;

    2008-01-01

    Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency.......Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency....

  11. Supersonic Chordwise Bending Flutter in Cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-05-31

    such a flutter boundary can be made by utilizing the trend lines predicted from a supersonic analysis based on supersonic cascade theory (Appendix I...bonding agent was injected via hypodermic needles after the blade tabs were properly inserted, The integrity and repeatability of the mounting of the indi...in conjunction with NASTRAN predictions and supersonic cascade aerodynamic computa- tions. Comparisons between theory and experiment are discussed. DD

  12. Cascade Textures and SUSY SO(10) GUT

    CERN Document Server

    Adulpravitchai, Adisorn; Takahashi, Ryo

    2010-01-01

    We give texture analyses of cascade hierarchical mass matrices in supersymmetric SO(10) grand unified theory. We embed cascade mass textures of the standard model fermion with right-handed neutrinos into the theory, which gives relations among the mass matrices of the fermions. The related phenomenologies, such as the lepton flavor violating processes and leptogenesis, are also investigated in addition to the PMNS mixing angles.

  13. Innovation cascades: artefacts, organization and attributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, David A

    2016-03-19

    Innovation cascades inextricably link the introduction of new artefacts, transformations in social organization, and the emergence of new functionalities and new needs. This paper describes a positive feedback dynamic, exaptive bootstrapping, through which these cascades proceed, and the characteristics of the relationships in which the new attributions that drive this dynamic are generated. It concludes by arguing that the exaptive bootstrapping dynamic is the principal driver of our current Innovation Society.

  14. Emergence of event cascades in inhomogeneous networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaga, Tomokatsu; Shinomoto, Shigeru

    2016-09-01

    There is a commonality among contagious diseases, tweets, and neuronal firings that past events facilitate the future occurrence of events. The spread of events has been extensively studied such that the systems exhibit catastrophic chain reactions if the interaction represented by the ratio of reproduction exceeds unity; however, their subthreshold states are not fully understood. Here, we report that these systems are possessed by nonstationary cascades of event-occurrences already in the subthreshold regime. Event cascades can be harmful in some contexts, when the peak-demand causes vaccine shortages, heavy traffic on communication lines, but may be beneficial in other contexts, such that spontaneous activity in neural networks may be used to generate motion or store memory. Thus it is important to comprehend the mechanism by which such cascades appear, and consider controlling a system to tame or facilitate fluctuations in the event-occurrences. The critical interaction for the emergence of cascades depends greatly on the network structure in which individuals are connected. We demonstrate that we can predict whether cascades may emerge, given information about the interactions between individuals. Furthermore, we develop a method of reallocating connections among individuals so that event cascades may be either impeded or impelled in a network.

  15. A study of the hydration of deoxydinucleoside monophosphates containing thymine, uracil and its 5-halogen derivatives: Monte Carlo simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderfer, J L; Danilov, V I; Poltev, V I; Slyusarchuk, O N

    1999-04-01

    An extensive Monte Carlo simulation of hydration of various conformations of the dinucleoside monophosphates (DNP), containing thymine, uracil and its 5-halogen derivatives has been performed. An anti-anti conformation is the most energetically stable one for each of the DNPs. In the majority of cases the energy preference is determined by water-water interaction. For other dimers conformational energy is the most important factor, or both the factors are of nearly equal importance. The introduction of the methyl group into the 5-position of uracil ring most noticeably influences the conformational energy and leads to the decrease of its stabilizing contribution to the total interaction energy. The introduction of halogen atoms increases the relative content of anti-syn and syn-anti conformations of DNPs as compared to the parent ones due to the formation of an energetically more favorable water structure around these conformations. A correlation is observed between the Monte Carlo results for the halogenated DNPs and their experimental photoproduct distribution. The data obtained demonstrates a sequence dependence in the photochemistry of the halogenated dinucleoside monophosphates.

  16. A novel procedure for purification of uridine 5'-monophosphate based on adsorption methodology using a hyper-cross-linked resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinglan; Zhu, Hui; Liu, Yanan; Zhou, Jingwei; Zhuang, Wei; Jiao, Pengfei; Ke, Xu; Ying, Hanjie

    2015-05-01

    The conventional ion exchange process used for recovery of uridine 5'-monophosphate (UMP) from the enzymatic hydrolysate of RNA is environmentally harmful and cost intensive. In this work, an innovative benign process, which comprises adsorption technology and use of a hyper-cross-linked resin as a stationary phase is proposed. The adsorption properties of this kind of resin in terms of adsorption equilibrium as well as kinetics were evaluated. The influences of the operating conditions, i.e., initial UMP concentration, feed flow rate, and bed height on the breakthrough curves of UMP in the fixed bed system were investigated. Subsequently, a chromatographic column model was established and validated for the prediction of the experimentally attained breakthrough curves of UMP and the main impurity component (phosphate ion) with a real enzymatic hydrolysate of RNA as a feed mixture. At the end of this paper, the crystallization of UMP was carried out. The purity of the final product (uridine 5'-monophosphate disodium, UMPNa2) of over 99.5 % was obtained.

  17. Quantum Cascade Photonic Crystal lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capasso, Federico

    2004-03-01

    QC lasers have emerged in recent years as the dominant laser technology for the mid-to far infrared spectrum in light of their room temperature operation, their tunability, ultrahigh speed operation and broad range of applications to chemical sensing, spectroscopy etc. (Ref. 1-3). After briefly reviewing the latter, I will describe a new class of mid-infrared QC lasers, Quantum Cascade Photonic Crystal Surface Emitting Lasers (QCPCSELS), that combine electronic and photonic band structure engineering to achieve vertical emission from the surface (Ref. 4). Devices operating on bandedge mode and on defect modes will be discussed. Exciting potential uses of these new devices exist in nonlinear optics, microfluidics as well as novel sensors. Finally a bird's eye view of other exciting areas of QC laser research will be given including broadband QCLs and new nonlinear optical sources based on multiwavelength QCLs. 1. F. Capasso, C. Gmachl, D. L. Sivco, and A. Y. Cho, Physics Today 55, 34 (May 2002) 2. F. Capasso, C. Gmachl, R. Paiella, A. Tredicucci, A. L. Hutchinson, D. L. Sivco, J. N. Baillargeon, A. Y. Cho and H. C. Liu, IEEE Journal of Selected Topics in Quantum Electronics, 6, 931 (2000). 3. F. Capasso, R. Paiella, R. Martini, R. Colombelli, C. Gmachl, T. L. Myers, M. S. Taubman, R. M. Williams, C. G. Bethea, K. Unterrainer, H. Y. Hwang, D. L. Sivco, A. Y. Cho, A. M. Sergent, H. C. Liu, E. A. Whittaker, IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 38, 511 (2002) 4. R. Colombelli, K. Srivasan, M. Troccoli, O. Painter, C. Gmachl, D. M. Tennant, A. M. Sergent, D. L. Sivco, A. Y. Cho and F. Capasso, Science 302, 1374 (2003)

  18. The cyclic AMP cascade is altered in the fragile X nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Kelley

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FX, the most common heritable cause of mental retardation and autism, is a developmental disorder characterized by physical, cognitive, and behavioral deficits. FX results from a trinucleotide expansion mutation in the fmr1 gene that reduces levels of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP. Although research efforts have focused on FMRP's impact on mGluR signaling, how the loss of FMRP leads to the individual symptoms of FX is not known. Previous studies on human FX blood cells revealed alterations in the cyclic adenosine 3', 5'-monophosphate (cAMP cascade. We tested the hypothesis that cAMP signaling is altered in the FX nervous system using three different model systems. Induced levels of cAMP in platelets and in brains of fmr1 knockout mice are substantially reduced. Cyclic AMP induction is also significantly reduced in human FX neural cells. Furthermore, cAMP production is decreased in the heads of FX Drosophila and this defect can be rescued by reintroduction of the dfmr gene. Our results indicate that a robust defect in cAMP production in FX is conserved across species and suggest that cAMP metabolism may serve as a useful biomarker in the human disease population. Reduced cAMP induction has implications for the underlying causes of FX and autism spectrum disorders. Pharmacological agents known to modulate the cAMP cascade may be therapeutic in FX patients and can be tested in these models, thus supplementing current efforts centered on mGluR signaling.

  19. Period-doubling cascades for large perturbations of Henon families

    OpenAIRE

    Sander, Evelyn; Yorke, James A.

    2009-01-01

    The Henon family has been shown to have period-doubling cascades. We show here that the same occurs for a much larger class: Large perturbations do not destroy cascades. Furthermore, we can classify the period of a cascade in terms of the set of orbits it contains, and count the number of cascades of each period. This class of families extends a general theory explaining why cascades occur.

  20. Noncatalytic cGMP-binding sites of amphibian rod cGMP phosphodiesterase control interaction with its inhibitory gamma-subunits. A putative regulatory mechanism of the rod photoresponse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshavsky, V Y; Dumke, C L; Bownds, M D

    1992-12-05

    The cGMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) of retinal rods plays a central role in phototransduction. Illumination leads to its activation by a rod G-protein (Gt, transducin), thus causing a decrease in intracellular cGMP concentration, closure of plasma membrane cationic channels gated by cGMP, and development of the photoresponse. The PDE holoenzyme is an alpha beta gamma 2 tetramer. The alpha- and beta-subunits each contain one catalytic and one, or possibly two, noncatalytic cGMP-binding sites. Two identical gamma-subunits serve as protein inhibitors of the enzyme. Their inhibition is removed when they bind to Gt-GTP during PDE activation. Here we report that the noncatalytic cGMP-binding sites regulate the binding of PDE alpha beta with PDE gamma and as a result determine the mechanism of PDE activation by Gt. If the noncatalytic sites are empty, Gt-GTP physically removes PDE gamma from PDE alpha beta upon activation. Alternatively, if the noncatalytic sites are occupied by cGMP, Gt-GTP releases PDE gamma inhibitory action but remains bound in a complex with the PDE heterotetramer. The kinetic parameters of activated PDE in these two cases are indistinguishable. This mechanism appears to have two implications for the physiology of photoreceptor cells. First, the tight binding of PDE gamma with PDE alpha beta when the noncatalytic sites are occupied by cGMP may be responsible for the low level of basal PDE activity observed in dark-adapted cells. Second, occupancy of the noncatalytic sites ultimately controls the rate of PDE inactivation (cf. Arshavsky, V. Yu., and Bownds, M. D. (1992) Nature 357, 416-417), for the GTPase activity that terminates PDE activity is slower when these sites are occupied and Gt stays in a complex with PDE holoenzyme. In contrast GTPase acceleration is maximal when the noncatalytic sites are empty and Gt-PDE gamma dissociates from PDE alpha beta. Because cGMP levels are known to decrease upon illumination over a concentration range

  1. Cascade reactions catalyzed by metal organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhakshinamoorthy, Amarajothi; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2014-09-01

    Cascade or tandem reactions where two or more individual reactions are carried out in one pot constitute a clear example of process intensification, targeting the maximization of spatial and temporal productivity with mobilization of minimum resources. In the case of catalytic reactions, cascade processes require bi-/multifunctional catalysts that contain different classes of active sites. Herein, we show that the features and properties of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) make these solids very appropriate materials for the development of catalysts for cascade reactions. Due to composition and structure, MOFs can incorporate different types of sites at the metal nodes, organic linkers, or at the empty internal pores, allowing the flexible design and synthesis of multifunctional catalysts. After some introductory sections on the relevance of cascade reactions from the point of view of competitiveness, sustainability, and environmental friendliness, the main part of the text provides a comprehensive review of the literature reporting the use of MOFs as heterogeneous catalysts for cascade reactions including those that combine in different ways acid/base, oxidation/reduction, and metal-organic centers. The final section summarizes the current state of the art, indicating that the development of a first commercial synthesis of a high-added-value fine chemical will be a crucial milestone in this area.

  2. Harmonic cascade FEL designs for LUX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penn, G.; Reinsch, M.; Wurtele, J.; Corlett, J.N.; Fawley, W.M.; Zholents, A.; Wan, W.

    2004-07-16

    LUX is a design concept for an ultrafast X-ray science facility, based on an electron beam accelerated to GeV energies in are circulating linac. Included in the design are short duration (200 fs or shorter FWHM) light sources using multiple stages of higher harmonic generation, seeded by a 200-250 nm laser of similar duration. This laser modulates the energy of a group of electrons within the electron bunch; this section of the electron bunch then produces radiation at a higher harmonic after entering a second, differently tuned undulator. Repeated stages in a cascade yield increasing photon energies up to 1 keV. Most of the undulators in the cascade operate in the low-gain FEL regime. Harmonic cascades have been designed for each pass of the recirculating linac up to a final electron beam energy of 3.1 GeV. For a given cascade, the photon energy can be selected over a wide range by varying the seed laser frequency and the field strength in the undulators. We present simulation results using the codes GENESIS and GINGER, as well as the results of analytical models which predict FEL performance. We discuss lattice considerations pertinent for harmonic cascade FELs, as well as sensitivity studies and requirements on the electron beam.

  3. MAP Kinase Cascades in Plant Innate Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus Wohlfahrt Rasmussen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Plant mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK cascades generally transduce extracellular stimuli into cellular responses. These stimuli include the perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs by host transmembrane pattern recognition receptors (PRRs which trigger MAPK-dependent innate immune responses. In the model Arabidopsis, molecular genetic evidence implicates a number of MAPK cascade components in PAMP signaling, and in responses to immunity-related phytohormones such as ethylene, jasmonate and salicylate. In a few cases, cascade components have been directly linked to the transcription of target genes or to the regulation of phytohormone synthesis. Thus MAPKs are obvious targets for bacterial effector proteins and are likely guardees of resistance (R proteins, which mediate defense signaling in response to the action of effectors, or effector-triggered immunity (ETI. This mini-review discusses recent progress in this field with a focus on the Arabidopsis MAPKs MPK3, 4, 6 and 11 in their apparent pathways.

  4. Emergence of event cascades in inhomogeneous networks

    CERN Document Server

    Onaga, Tomokatsu

    2016-01-01

    There is a commonality among contagious diseases, tweets, urban crimes, nuclear reactions, and neuronal firings that past events facilitate the future occurrence of events. The spread of events has been extensively studied such that the systems exhibit catastrophic chain reactions if the interaction represented by the ratio of reproduction exceeds unity; however, their subthreshold states for the case of the weaker interaction are not fully understood. Here, we report that these systems are possessed by nonstationary cascades of event-occurrences already in the subthreshold regime. Event cascades can be harmful in some contexts, when the peak-demand causes vaccine shortages, heavy traffic on communication lines, frequent crimes, or large fluctuations in nuclear reactions, but may be beneficial in other contexts, such that spontaneous activity in neural networks may be used to generate motion or store memory. Thus it is important to comprehend the mechanism by which such cascades appear, and consider controlli...

  5. Epidemic and Cascading Survivability of Complex Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Manzano, Marc; Ripoll, Jordi; Fagertun, Anna Manolova; Torres-Padrosa, Victor; Pahwa, Sakshi; Scoglio, Caterina

    2014-01-01

    Our society nowadays is governed by complex networks, examples being the power grids, telecommunication networks, biological networks, and social networks. It has become of paramount importance to understand and characterize the dynamic events (e.g. failures) that might happen in these complex networks. For this reason, in this paper, we propose two measures to evaluate the vulnerability of complex networks in two different dynamic multiple failure scenarios: epidemic-like and cascading failures. Firstly, we present \\emph{epidemic survivability} ($ES$), a new network measure that describes the vulnerability of each node of a network under a specific epidemic intensity. Secondly, we propose \\emph{cascading survivability} ($CS$), which characterizes how potentially injurious a node is according to a cascading failure scenario. Then, we show that by using the distribution of values obtained from $ES$ and $CS$ it is possible to describe the vulnerability of a given network. We consider a set of 17 different compl...

  6. Cascade enzymatic reactions for efficient carbon sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Shunxiang; Zhao, Xueyan; Frigo-Vaz, Benjamin; Zheng, Wenyun; Kim, Jungbae; Wang, Ping

    2015-04-01

    Thermochemical processes developed for carbon capture and storage (CCS) offer high carbon capture capacities, but are generally hampered by low energy efficiency. Reversible cascade enzyme reactions are examined in this work for energy-efficient carbon sequestration. By integrating the reactions of two key enzymes of RTCA cycle, isocitrate dehydrogenase and aconitase, we demonstrate that intensified carbon capture can be realized through such cascade enzymatic reactions. Experiments show that enhanced thermodynamic driving force for carbon conversion can be attained via pH control under ambient conditions, and that the cascade reactions have the potential to capture 0.5 mol carbon at pH 6 for each mole of substrate applied. Overall it manifests that the carbon capture capacity of biocatalytic reactions, in addition to be energy efficient, can also be ultimately intensified to approach those realized with chemical absorbents such as MEA.

  7. Bifurcations analysis of turbulent energy cascade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Divitiis, Nicola de, E-mail: n.dedivitiis@gmail.com

    2015-03-15

    This note studies the mechanism of turbulent energy cascade through an opportune bifurcations analysis of the Navier–Stokes equations, and furnishes explanations on the more significant characteristics of the turbulence. A statistical bifurcations property of the Navier–Stokes equations in fully developed turbulence is proposed, and a spatial representation of the bifurcations is presented, which is based on a proper definition of the fixed points of the velocity field. The analysis first shows that the local deformation can be much more rapid than the fluid state variables, then explains the mechanism of energy cascade through the aforementioned property of the bifurcations, and gives reasonable argumentation of the fact that the bifurcations cascade can be expressed in terms of length scales. Furthermore, the study analyzes the characteristic length scales at the transition through global properties of the bifurcations, and estimates the order of magnitude of the critical Taylor-scale Reynolds number and the number of bifurcations at the onset of turbulence.

  8. A scalable low-cost cGMP process for clinical grade production of the HIV inhibitor 5P12-RANTES in Pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerini, Fabrice; Gaertner, Hubert; Madden, Knut; Tolstorukov, Ilya; Brown, Scott; Laukens, Bram; Callewaert, Nico; Harner, Jay C; Oommen, Anna M; Harms, John T; Sump, Anthony R; Sealock, Robert C; Peterson, Dustin J; Johnson, Scott K; Abramson, Stephan B; Meagher, Michael; Offord, Robin; Hartley, Oliver

    2016-03-01

    In the continued absence of an effective anti-HIV vaccine, approximately 2 million new HIV infections occur every year, with over 95% of these in developing countries. Calls have been made for the development of anti-HIV drugs that can be formulated for topical use to prevent HIV transmission during sexual intercourse. Because these drugs are principally destined for use in low-resource regions, achieving production costs that are as low as possible is an absolute requirement. 5P12-RANTES, an analog of the human chemokine protein RANTES/CCL5, is a highly potent HIV entry inhibitor which acts by achieving potent blockade of the principal HIV coreceptor, CCR5. Here we describe the development and optimization of a scalable low-cost production process for 5P12-RANTES based on expression in Pichia pastoris. At pilot (150 L) scale, this cGMP compliant process yielded 30 g of clinical grade 5P12-RANTES. As well as providing sufficient material for the first stage of clinical development, this process represents an important step towards achieving production of 5P12-RANTES at a cost and scale appropriate to meet needs for topical HIV prevention worldwide.

  9. Adenosine monophosphate forms ordered arrays in multilamellar lipid matrices: insights into assembly of nucleic acid for primitive life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Toppozini

    Full Text Available A fundamental question of biology is how nucleic acids first assembled and then were incorporated into the earliest forms of cellular life 4 billion years ago. The polymerization of nucleotides is a condensation reaction in which phosphodiester bonds are formed. This reaction cannot occur in aqueous solutions, but guided polymerization in an anhydrous lipid environment could promote a non-enzymatic condensation reaction in which oligomers of single stranded nucleic acids are synthesized. We used X-ray scattering to investigate 5'-adenosine monophosphate (AMP molecules captured in a multilamellar phospholipid matrix composed of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine. Bragg peaks corresponding to the lateral organization of the confined AMP molecules were observed. Instead of forming a random array, the AMP molecules are highly entangled, with the phosphate and ribose groups in close proximity. This structure may facilitate polymerization of the nucleotides into RNA-like polymers.

  10. Effects of Adenosine Monophosphate Used in Combination with L‐Arginine on Female Rabbit Corpus Cavernosum Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Stücker, PhD

    2014-04-01

    Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that AMP induces a relaxing effect on the female rabbit corpora. They also show that L‐Arginine and AMP can potentiate each other and that a synergistic effect can be obtained by their combined use. Because only slight differences exist between both sexes in response to NO donors and/or nucleotide purines or in their use together, it is very likely that close biochemical mechanisms, although not to the same degree and not quite similar, are involved in the engorgement of the penis and the clitoris of New Zealand White rabbits. Stücker O, Pons C, Neuzillet Y, Laemmel E, and Lebret T. Original research‐sexual medicine: Effects of adenosine monophosphate used in combination with L‐Arginine on female rabbit corpus cavernosum tissue. Sex Med 2014;2:1–7.

  11. Levodopa-induced dyskinesias are associated with transient down-regulation of cAMP and cGMP in the caudate-putamen of hemiparkinsonian rats: reduced synthesis or increased catabolism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancesario, Giuseppe; Morrone, Luigi Antonio; D'Angelo, Vincenza; Castelli, Valentina; Ferrazzoli, Davide; Sica, Francesco; Martorana, Alessandro; Sorge, Roberto; Cavaliere, Federica; Bernardi, Giorgio; Giorgi, Mauro

    2014-12-01

    Second messenger cAMP and cGMP represent a key step in the action of dopamine that modulates directly or indirectly their synthesis. We aimed to verify whether levodopa-induced dyskinesias are associated with changes of the time course of levodopa/dopamine stimulated cAMP and cGMP levels, and/or with changes of their catabolism by phosphodiesterase activity in rats with experimental hemiparkinsonism. Microdialysis and tissue homogenates of the striatal tissues demonstrated that extracellular and intracellular cAMP/cGMP levels were lower in dyskinetic animals during the increasing phase of dyskinesias compared to eukinetic animals, but cAMP/cGMP levels increased in dyskinetic animals during the phase of decreasing and extinction of dyskinesias. Dyskinesias and the abnormal lowering of striatal cGMP and cAMP after levodopa were prevented by pretreatment with the multipotent drug amantadine, outlining the inverse relationship of cAMP/cGMP to dyskinesias. Moreover, dyskinetic animals showed higher striatal hydrolyzing cGMP-phosphodiesterase but not hydrolyzing cAMP-phosphodiesterase activity, suggesting that low cGMP but not cAMP levels could be due to increased catabolism. However, expressions of isozyme phosphodiesterase-1B and -10A highly and specifically located in the basal ganglia were not changed after levodopa in dyskinetic and eukinetic animals: accordingly, selective inhibitors of phosphodiesterase-1B and -10A were ineffective on levodopa dyskinesias. Therefore, the isozyme(s) expressing higher cGMP-phosphodiesterase activity in the striatum of dyskinetic animal should be determined. These observations suggest that dopamine-mediated processes of synthesis and/or degradation of cAMP/cGMP could be acutely impaired in levodopa dyskinesias, opening new ways to understanding physiopathology and treatment.

  12. Piscivores, Trophic Cascades, and Lake Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray W. Drenner

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of cascading trophic interactions predicts that an increase in piscivore biomass in lakes will result in decreased planktivorous fish biomass, increased herbivorous zooplankton biomass, and decreased phytoplankton biomass. Though often accepted as a paradigm in the ecological literature and adopted by lake managers as a basis for lake management strategies, the trophic cascading interactions hypothesis has not received the unequivocal support (in the form of rigorous experimental testing that might be expected of a paradigm. Here we review field experiments and surveys, testing the hypothesis that effects of increasing piscivore biomass will cascade down through the food web yielding a decline in phytoplankton biomass. We found 39 studies in the scientific literature examining piscivore effects on phytoplankton biomass. Of the studies, 22 were confounded by supplemental manipulations (e.g., simultaneous reduction of nutrients or removal of planktivores and could not be used to assess piscivore effects. Of the 17 nonconfounded studies, most did not find piscivore effects on phytoplankton biomass and therefore did not support the trophic cascading interactions hypothesis. However, the trophic cascading interactions hypothesis also predicts that lake systems containing piscivores will have lower phytoplankton biomass for any given phosphorus concentration. Based on regression analyses of chlorophyll�total phosphorus relationships in the 17 nonconfounded piscivore studies, this aspect of the trophic cascading interactions hypothesis was supported. The slope of the chlorophyll vs. total phosphorus regression was lower in lakes with planktivores and piscivores compared with lakes containing only planktivores but no piscivores. We hypothesize that this slope can be used as an indicator of “functional piscivory” and that communities with extremes of functional piscivory (zero and very high represent classical 3- and 4-trophic level

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase (AMPD) from Arabidopsis thaliana in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Byung Woo [Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706-1544 (United States); Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG), University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706-1549 (United States); Bingman, Craig A. [Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG), University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706-1549 (United States); Mahnke, Donna K.; Sabina, Richard L. [Department of Biochemistry, The Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI 53226-4801 (United States); Phillips, George N. Jr, E-mail: phillips@biochem.wisc.edu [Department of Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706-1544 (United States); Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG), University of Wisconsin-Madison, WI 53706-1549 (United States)

    2005-08-01

    Adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase from A. thaliana has been crystallized in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate. Diffraction data have been collected to 3.34 Å resolution. Adenosine 5′-monophosphate deaminase (AMPD) is a eukaryotic enzyme that converts adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) to inosine 5′-monophosphate (IMP) and ammonia. AMPD from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtAMPD) was cloned into the baculoviral transfer vector p2Bac and co-transfected along with a modified baculoviral genome into Spodoptera frugiperda (Sf9) cells. The resulting recombinant baculovirus were plaque-purified, amplified and used to overexpress recombinant AtAMPD. Crystals of purified AtAMPD have been obtained to which coformycin 5′-phosphate, a transition-state inhibitor, is bound. Crystals belong to space group P6{sub 2}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 131.325, c = 208.254 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°. Diffraction data were collected to 3.34 Å resolution from a crystal in complex with coformycin 5′-phosphate and to 4.05 Å resolution from a crystal of a mercury derivative.

  14. Regulation and function of transaldolase isoenzymes involved in sugar and one-carbon metabolism in the ribulose monophosphate cycle methylotroph Arthrobacter P1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Levering, P.R.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    1986-01-01

    In the facultative methylotroph Arthrobacter P1 the enzyme transaldolase plays an important role in both the pentose phosphate pathway and in the ribulose monophosphate cycle of formaldehyde fixation. Among gluconate-negative mutants of Arthrobacter P1 strains occurred which also were unable to grow

  15. Magnetic and electronic transport properties of the monophosphate tungsten bronze (PO 2) 4(WO 3) 2 m, m = 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teweldemedhin, Z. S.; Ramanujachary, K. V.; Greenblatt, M.

    1991-11-01

    Large plate-like dark-brown crystals of monophosphate tungsten bronze (PO 2) 4(WO 3) 2 m, m = 2 or PWO 5 were prepared by reacting stoichiometric mixtures of P 2O 5, WO 3, and W at 1200°C. The temperature dependence of electrical resistivity along each of the three unique crystallographic axes of a single crystal shows semiconducting behavior down to 50 K with an activation energy of ˜0.084 eV. The room temperature resistivitity along the direction of corner sharing WO 6 octahedra is 5 × 10 -3 Ω · cm and about one to two orders of magnitude lower than along other unique directions, which implies quasi one-dimensional behavior. The magnetization study made on a batch of crystals in the temperature range of 2 to 300 K is indicative of antiferromagnetic ordering with a maximum at 15 K. An earlier theoretical study on the band electronic structure of (PO 2) 4(WO 3) 4 predicted both localized and delocalized electrons in narrow and dispersive bands, respectively. The observed magnetic moment of PWO 5 is consistent with the theoretical prediction, but the observed semiconductivity behavior is not. The difference in the observed electronic transport properties of PWO 5 from that of theoretically predicted behavior, as well as the anomalous magnetic and transport properties compared to the higher members of the series of the monophosphate tungsten bronzes {(PO 2) 4(WO 3) 2 m, m = 4, 6}, is discussed in terms of the unique structure of PWO 5.

  16. Dynamics of Soliton Cascades in Fiber Amplifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Arteaga-Sierra, F R; Agrawal, Govind P

    2016-01-01

    We study numerically the formation of cascading solitons when femtosecond optical pulses are launched into a fiber amplifier with less energy than required to form a soliton of equal duration. As the pulse is amplified, cascaded fundamental solitons are created at different distances, without soliton fission, as each fundamental soliton moves outside the gain bandwidth through the Raman-induced spectral shifts. As a result, each input pulse creates multiple, temporally separated, ultrashort pulses of different wavelengths at the amplifier output. The number of pulses depends not only on the total gain of the amplifier but also on the width of input pulses.

  17. Cascaded impedance networks for NPC inverter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ding; Gao, Feng; Loh, Poh Chiang;

    2010-01-01

    would have a higher output voltage gain. It is anticipated that it would help the formed inverters find applications in photovoltaic and other renewable systems, where a high voltage gain is usually requested. Experimental testing has already been conducted and verifies the theory. ©2010 IEEE....... they are subject to the renewable sources. To date, three distinct types of impedance networks can be summarized for implementing a hybrid source impedance network, which can in principle be combined and cascaded before connected to a NPC inverter by proposed two ways. The resulting cascaded impedance network NPC...

  18. Volcano geodesy in the Cascade arc, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; Lisowski, Michael; Dzurisin, Daniel; Kramer, Rebecca; McLay, Megan; Pauk, Ben

    2017-08-01

    Experience during historical time throughout the Cascade arc and the lack of deep-seated deformation prior to the two most recent eruptions of Mount St. Helens might lead one to infer that Cascade volcanoes are generally quiescent and, specifically, show no signs of geodetic change until they are about to erupt. Several decades of geodetic data, however, tell a different story. Ground- and space-based deformation studies have identified surface displacements at five of the 13 major Cascade arc volcanoes that lie in the USA (Mount Baker, Mount St. Helens, South Sister, Medicine Lake, and Lassen volcanic center). No deformation has been detected at five volcanoes (Mount Rainier, Mount Hood, Newberry Volcano, Crater Lake, and Mount Shasta), and there are not sufficient data at the remaining three (Glacier Peak, Mount Adams, and Mount Jefferson) for a rigorous assessment. In addition, gravity change has been measured at two of the three locations where surveys have been repeated (Mount St. Helens and Mount Baker show changes, while South Sister does not). Broad deformation patterns associated with heavily forested and ice-clad Cascade volcanoes are generally characterized by low displacement rates, in the range of millimeters to a few centimeters per year, and are overprinted by larger tectonic motions of several centimeters per year. Continuous GPS is therefore the best means of tracking temporal changes in deformation of Cascade volcanoes and also for characterizing tectonic signals so that they may be distinguished from volcanic sources. Better spatial resolution of volcano deformation can be obtained through the use of campaign GPS, semipermanent GPS, and interferometric synthetic aperture radar observations, which leverage the accumulation of displacements over time to improve signal to noise. Deformation source mechanisms in the Cascades are diverse and include magma accumulation and withdrawal, post-emplacement cooling of recent volcanic deposits, magmatic

  19. Volcano geodesy in the Cascade arc, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael; Lisowski, Michael; Dzurisin, Daniel; Kramer, Rebecca; McLay, Megan; Pauk, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    Experience during historical time throughout the Cascade arc and the lack of deep-seated deformation prior to the two most recent eruptions of Mount St. Helens might lead one to infer that Cascade volcanoes are generally quiescent and, specifically, show no signs of geodetic change until they are about to erupt. Several decades of geodetic data, however, tell a different story. Ground- and space-based deformation studies have identified surface displacements at five of the 13 major Cascade arc volcanoes that lie in the USA (Mount Baker, Mount St. Helens, South Sister, Medicine Lake, and Lassen volcanic center). No deformation has been detected at five volcanoes (Mount Rainier, Mount Hood, Newberry Volcano, Crater Lake, and Mount Shasta), and there are not sufficient data at the remaining three (Glacier Peak, Mount Adams, and Mount Jefferson) for a rigorous assessment. In addition, gravity change has been measured at two of the three locations where surveys have been repeated (Mount St. Helens and Mount Baker show changes, while South Sister does not). Broad deformation patterns associated with heavily forested and ice-clad Cascade volcanoes are generally characterized by low displacement rates, in the range of millimeters to a few centimeters per year, and are overprinted by larger tectonic motions of several centimeters per year. Continuous GPS is therefore the best means of tracking temporal changes in deformation of Cascade volcanoes and also for characterizing tectonic signals so that they may be distinguished from volcanic sources. Better spatial resolution of volcano deformation can be obtained through the use of campaign GPS, semipermanent GPS, and interferometric synthetic aperture radar observations, which leverage the accumulation of displacements over time to improve signal to noise. Deformation source mechanisms in the Cascades are diverse and include magma accumulation and withdrawal, post-emplacement cooling of recent volcanic deposits, magmatic

  20. Cascaded logic gates in nanophotonic plasmon networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hong; Wang, Zhuoxian; Tian, Xiaorui; Käll, Mikael; Xu, Hongxing

    2011-07-12

    Optical computing has been pursued for decades as a potential strategy for advancing beyond the fundamental performance limitations of semiconductor-based electronic devices, but feasible on-chip integrated logic units and cascade devices have not been reported. Here we demonstrate that a plasmonic binary NOR gate, a 'universal logic gate', can be realized through cascaded OR and NOT gates in four-terminal plasmonic nanowire networks. This finding provides a path for the development of novel nanophotonic on-chip processor architectures for future optical computing technologies.

  1. Self-organized model of cascade spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualdi, S.; Medo, M.; Zhang, Y.-C.

    2011-01-01

    We study simultaneous price drops of real stocks and show that for high drop thresholds they follow a power-law distribution. To reproduce these collective downturns, we propose a minimal self-organized model of cascade spreading based on a probabilistic response of the system elements to stress conditions. This model is solvable using the theory of branching processes and the mean-field approximation. For a wide range of parameters, the system is in a critical state and displays a power-law cascade-size distribution similar to the empirically observed one. We further generalize the model to reproduce volatility clustering and other observed properties of real stocks.

  2. Self-organized model of cascade spreading

    CERN Document Server

    Gualdi, Stanislao; Zhang, Yi-Cheng

    2010-01-01

    We study simultaneous price drops of real stocks and show that for high drop thresholds they follow a power-law distribution. To reproduce these collective downturns, we propose a self-organized model of cascade spreading based on a probabilistic response of the system's elements to stress conditions. This model is solvable using the theory of branching processes and the mean-field approximation and displays a power-law cascade-size distribution-similar to the empirically observed one-over a wide range of parameters.

  3. Cascade morphology transition in bcc metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setyawan, Wahyu; Selby, Aaron P; Juslin, Niklas; Stoller, Roger E; Wirth, Brian D; Kurtz, Richard J

    2015-06-10

    Energetic atom collisions in solids induce shockwaves with complex morphologies. In this paper, we establish the existence of a morphological transition in such cascades. The order parameter of the morphology is defined as the exponent, b, in the defect production curve as a function of cascade energy (N(F) ~ E(MD)(b)). Response of different bcc metals can be compared in a consistent energy domain when the energy is normalized by the transition energy, μ, between the high- and the low-energy regime. Using Cr, Fe, Mo and W data, an empirical formula of μ as a function of displacement threshold energy, E(d), is presented for bcc metals.

  4. Energy cascade in internal wave attractors

    CERN Document Server

    Brouzet, Christophe; Joubaud, Sylvain; Sibgatullin, Ilias; Dauxois, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    One of the pivotal questions in the dynamics of the oceans is related to the cascade of mechanical energy in the abyss and its contribution to mixing. Here, we propose internal wave attractors in the large amplitude regime as a unique self-consistent experimental and numerical setup that models a cascade of triadic interactions transferring energy from large-scale monochro-matic input to multi-scale internal wave motion. We also provide signatures of a discrete wave turbulence framework for internal waves. Finally, we show how beyond this regime, we have a clear transition to a regime of small-scale high-vorticity events which induce mixing. Introduction.

  5. MAP kinase cascades in Arabidopsis innate immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Magnus Wohlfahrt; Roux, Milena Edna; Petersen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    immune responses. In the model Arabidopsis, molecular genetic evidence implicates a number of MAPK cascade components in PAMP signaling, and in responses to immunity-related phytohormones such as ethylene, jasmonate, and salicylate. In a few cases, cascade components have been directly linked...... to the transcription of target genes or to the regulation of phytohormone synthesis. Thus MAPKs are obvious targets for bacterial effector proteins and are likely guardees of resistance proteins, which mediate defense signaling in response to the action of effectors, or effector-triggered immunity. This mini...

  6. Dark matter signals from cascade annihilations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mardon, Jeremy; Nomura, Yasunori; Stolarski, Daniel; Thaler, Jesse, E-mail: jmardon@berkeley.edu, E-mail: YNomura@lbl.gov, E-mail: danchus@berkeley.edu, E-mail: jthaler@jthaler.net [Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    A leading interpretation of the electron/positron excesses seen by PAMELA and ATIC is dark matter annihilation in the galactic halo. Depending on the annihilation channel, the electron/positron signal could be accompanied by a galactic gamma ray or neutrino flux, and the non-detection of such fluxes constrains the couplings and halo properties of dark matter. In this paper, we study the interplay of electron data with gamma ray and neutrino constraints in the context of cascade annihilation models, where dark matter annihilates into light degrees of freedom which in turn decay into leptons in one or more steps. Electron and muon cascades give a reasonable fit to the PAMELA and ATIC data. Compared to direct annihilation, cascade annihilations can soften gamma ray constraints from final state radiation by an order of magnitude. However, if dark matter annihilates primarily into muons, the neutrino constraints are robust regardless of the number of cascade decay steps. We also examine the electron data and gamma ray/neutrino constraints on the recently proposed ''axion portal'' scenario.

  7. Nested Canalyzing, Unate Cascade, and Polynomial Functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrah, Abdul Salam; Raposa, Blessilda; Laubenbacher, Reinhard

    2007-09-15

    This paper focuses on the study of certain classes of Boolean functions that have appeared in several different contexts. Nested canalyzing functions have been studied recently in the context of Boolean network models of gene regulatory networks. In the same context, polynomial functions over finite fields have been used to develop network inference methods for gene regulatory networks. Finally, unate cascade functions have been studied in the design of logic circuits and binary decision diagrams. This paper shows that the class of nested canalyzing functions is equal to that of unate cascade functions. Furthermore, it provides a description of nested canalyzing functions as a certain type of Boolean polynomial function. Using the polynomial framework one can show that the class of nested canalyzing functions, or, equivalently, the class of unate cascade functions, forms an algebraic variety which makes their analysis amenable to the use of techniques from algebraic geometry and computational algebra. As a corollary of the functional equivalence derived here, a formula in the literature for the number of unate cascade functions provides such a formula for the number of nested canalyzing functions.

  8. Modeling and simulation of cascading contingencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianfeng

    This dissertation proposes a new approach to model and study cascading contingencies in large power systems. The most important contribution of the work involves the development and validation of a heuristic analytic model to assess the likelihood of cascading contingencies, and the development and validation of a uniform search strategy. We model the probability of cascading contingencies as a function of power flow and power flow changes. Utilizing logistic regression, the proposed model is calibrated using real industry data. This dissertation analyzes random search strategies for Monte Carlo simulations and proposes a new uniform search strategy based on the Metropolis-Hastings Algorithm. The proposed search strategy is capable of selecting the most significant cascading contingencies, and it is capable of constructing an unbiased estimator to provide a measure of system security. This dissertation makes it possible to reasonably quantify system security and justify security operations when economic concerns conflict with reliability concerns in the new competitive power market environment. It can also provide guidance to system operators about actions that may be taken to reduce the risk of major system blackouts. Various applications can be developed to take advantage of the quantitative security measures provided in this dissertation.

  9. Gene regulation by MAP kinase cascades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Petersen, Klaus; Petersen, Morten

    2009-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are signaling modules that transduce extracellular stimuli to a range of cellular responses. Research in yeast and metazoans has shown that MAPK-mediated phosphorylation directly or indirectly regulates the activity of transcription factors. Plant ...

  10. Forecasting Social Unrest Using Activity Cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadena, Jose; Korkmaz, Gizem; Kuhlman, Chris J; Marathe, Achla; Ramakrishnan, Naren; Vullikanti, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Social unrest is endemic in many societies, and recent news has drawn attention to happenings in Latin America, the Middle East, and Eastern Europe. Civilian populations mobilize, sometimes spontaneously and sometimes in an organized manner, to raise awareness of key issues or to demand changes in governing or other organizational structures. It is of key interest to social scientists and policy makers to forecast civil unrest using indicators observed on media such as Twitter, news, and blogs. We present an event forecasting model using a notion of activity cascades in Twitter (proposed by Gonzalez-Bailon et al., 2011) to predict the occurrence of protests in three countries of Latin America: Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela. The basic assumption is that the emergence of a suitably detected activity cascade is a precursor or a surrogate to a real protest event that will happen "on the ground." Our model supports the theoretical characterization of large cascades using spectral properties and uses properties of detected cascades to forecast events. Experimental results on many datasets, including the recent June 2013 protests in Brazil, demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach.

  11. Cascading effects of overfishing marine systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, M.; Carpenter, S.; Young, de B.

    2005-01-01

    Profound indirect ecosystem effects of overfishing have been shown for coastal systems such as coral reefs and kelp forests. A new study from the ecosystem off the Canadian east coast now reveals that the elimination of large predatory fish can also cause marked cascading effects on the pelagic food

  12. Quantum-engineered interband cascade photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui Q.; Lotfi, Hossein; Li, Lu; Hinkey, Robert T.; Ye, Hao; Klem, John F.; Lei, L.; Mishima, T. D.; Keay, J. C.; Santos, M. B.; Johnson, M. B.

    2013-12-01

    Quantum-engineered multiple stage photovoltaic (PV) devices are explored based on InAs/GaSb/AlSb interband cascade (IC) structures. These ICPV devices employ multiple discrete absorbers that are connected in series by widebandgap unipolar barriers using type-II heterostructure interfaces for facilitating carrier transport between cascade stages similar to IC lasers. The discrete architecture is beneficial for improving the collection efficiency and for spectral splitting by utilizing absorbers with different bandgaps. As such, the photo-voltages from each individual cascade stage in an ICPV device add together, creating a high overall open-circuit voltage, similar to conventional multi-junction tandem solar cells. Furthermore, photo-generated carriers can be collected with nearly 100% efficiency in each stage. This is because the carriers travel over only a single cascade stage, designed to be shorter than a typical diffusion length. The approach is of significant importance for operation at high temperatures where the diffusion length is reduced. Here, we will present our recent progress in the study of ICPV devices, which includes the demonstration of ICPV devices at room temperature and above with narrow bandgaps (e.g. 0.23 eV) and high open-circuit voltages.

  13. Cascading Crater Detection with Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, W. I.; Stepinski, T. F.; Mu, Y.; Ding, W.

    2011-03-01

    Our strategy for automatic crater detection consists of employing a cascading AdaBoost classifier for identification of craters in images, and using the SOM as an active learning tool to minimize the number of image examples that need to be labeled by an analyst.

  14. MID-INFRARED QUANTUM CASCADE LASERS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-11-03

    Nov 3, 2012 ... diode known as the quantum cascade laser (QCL) emerged. During the last .... temperature of the chip or the laser injection current. By varying the ... mospheric transmission windows between 3 - 5 im and 8 - 12 im which ...

  15. Geothermal research, Oregon Cascades: Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priest, G.R.; Black, G.L.

    1988-10-27

    Previous USDOE-funded geothermal studies have produced an extensive temperature gradient and heat flow data base for the State of Oregon. One of the important features identified as a result of these studies is a rapid transition from heat flow values on the order of 40 mW/m/sup 2/ in the Willamette Valley and Western Cascades to values of greater than or equal to100 mW/m/sup 2/ in the High Cascades and the eastern portion of the Western Cascades. These data indicate that the Cascade Range in Oregon has potential as a major geothermal province and stimulated much of the later work completed by government agencies and private industry. Additional data generated as a result of this grant and published in DOGAMI Open-File Report 0-86-2 further define the location and magnitude of this transition zone. In addition, abundant data collected from the vicinity of Breitenbush and Austin Hot Springs have permitted the formulation of relatively detailed models of these hydrothermal systems. These models are published in DOGAMI Open-File Report 0-88-5. Task 1.2 of the Deliverables section of Amendment M001 is fulfilled by DOGAMI publication GMS-48, Geologic map of the McKenzie Bridge quadrangle, Lane County, Oregon. This map was printed in October, 1988, and is part of the final submission to USDOE. 8 refs.

  16. Cascading effects of overfishing marine systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, M.; Carpenter, S.; Young, de B.

    2005-01-01

    Profound indirect ecosystem effects of overfishing have been shown for coastal systems such as coral reefs and kelp forests. A new study from the ecosystem off the Canadian east coast now reveals that the elimination of large predatory fish can also cause marked cascading effects on the pelagic food

  17. Hhcy大鼠阴茎海绵体内cAMP,cGMP含量及研究%The Study about cAMP and cGMP in the Penile Corpus Cavernous of Hyper Homocysteine Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王贵平; 李明; 张万峰; 王洪杰; 丁晓晖; 刘会恩

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To detect the levels of camp,cgmp in the penile corpus cavernous of adult male Wistar rats with high homocysteine and to explore the relationship of camp and cgmp with erectile dysfunction.Methods:Forty wistar rats were divided into a control and an Hhcy group.The control group were fed on normal diet and Hhcy group were fed diet with 3% methionine respectively.Four weeks later,the Wistar rats were detected by injecting apomorphine,the levels of camp and cgmp in the penile corpus cavenous were detect and that of serum homocysteine by the cycle enzyme method.Results:Compared with the control group,the levels of camp and cgmp in the penile corpus cavernous of the Hhcy group were significantly lower,while homocysteine was significantly higher.Conclusion:The levels of camp and cgmp in the penile corpus cavernous in Wistar rats with high homocysteine is lower.Hhcy is an significantly risk factor of erectile dysfunction.%目的:探讨高同型半胱氨酸血症大鼠阴茎海绵体组织内cAMP,cGMP含量的变化并研究其对阴茎勃起功能影响.方法:取40只成年雄性大鼠,随机分成两组,分为正常对照组和Hhcy组.Hhcy组给予3%高蛋氨酸饲料喂养,正常组给予普通饲料喂养,饲养四周后后分别注射阿扑吗啡进行大鼠阴茎勃起功能实验,抽取血清检测Hhcy含量,麻醉后取阴茎海绵体测量cAMP,cGMP含量.结果:Hhcy组血清中同型半胱氨酸含量显著高于正常组,大鼠阴茎组织中cAMP,cGMP含量显著低于正常组.结论:高同型半胱氨酸血症大鼠阴茎海绵体中cAMP,cGMP含量降低.高同型半胱氨酸血症是阴茎勃起功能障碍的危险因素.

  18. Cascades with coupled map lattices in preferential attachment community networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Di; Gao Zi-You; Zhao Xiao-Mei

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,cascading failure is studied by coupled map lattice (CML) methods in preferential attachment community networks.It is found that external perturbation R is increasing with modularity Q growing by simulation.In particular,the large modularity Q can hold off the cascading failure dynamic process in community networks.Furthermore,different attack strategies also greatly affect the cascading failure dynamic process. It is particularly significant to control cascading failure process in real community networks.

  19. Detailed comparison between parton cascade and hadronic cascade at SPS and RHIC

    CERN Document Server

    Nara, Y; Longacre, R S

    1999-01-01

    We study the importance of the partonic phase produced in relativistic heavy ion collision by comparing the parton cascade model and the hadronic cascade model. Hadron yield, baryon stopping and transverse momentum distribution are calculated with JAM and discussions are given comparing with VNI. Both of these models give good description of experimental data. We also discuss the strangeness production mechanism and the directed transverse flow. (21 refs).

  20. S-nitrosothiols dilate the mesenteric artery more potently than the femoral artery by a cGMP and L-type calcium channel-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Taiming; Schroeder, Hobe J; Zhang, Meijuan; Wilson, Sean M; Terry, Michael H; Longo, Lawrence D; Power, Gordon G; Blood, Arlin B

    2016-08-31

    S-nitrosothiols (SNOs) are metabolites of NO with potent vasodilatory activity. Our previous studies in sheep indicated that intra-arterially infused SNOs dilate the mesenteric vasculature more than the femoral vasculature. We hypothesized that the mesenteric artery is more responsive to SNO-mediated vasodilation, and investigated various steps along the NO/cGMP pathway to determine the mechanism for this difference. In anesthetized adult sheep, we monitored the conductance of mesenteric and femoral arteries during infusion of S-nitroso-l-cysteine (L-cysNO), and found mesenteric vascular conductance increased (137 ± 3%) significantly more than femoral conductance (26 ± 25%). Similar results were found in wire myography studies of isolated sheep mesenteric and femoral arteries. Vasodilation by SNOs was attenuated in both vessel types by the presence of ODQ (sGC inhibitor), and both YC-1 (sGC agonist) and 8-Br-cGMP (cGMP analog) mediated more potent relaxation in mesenteric arteries than femoral arteries. The vasodilatory difference between mesenteric and femoral arteries was eliminated by antagonists of either protein kinase G or L-type Ca(2+) channels. Western immunoblots showed a larger L-type Ca(2+)/sGC abundance ratio in mesenteric arteries than in femoral arteries. Fetal sheep mesenteric arteries were more responsive to SNOs than adult mesenteric arteries, and had a greater L-Ca(2+)/sGC ratio (p = 0.047 and r = -0.906 for correlation between Emax and L-Ca(2+)/sGC). These results suggest that mesenteric arteries, especially those in fetus, are more responsive to SNO-mediated vasodilation than femoral arteries due to a greater role of the L-type calcium channel in the NO/cGMP pathway.

  1. Higher-order Kerr effect and harmonic cascading in gases

    CERN Document Server

    Bache, Morten; Minardi, Stefano

    2012-01-01

    The higher-order Kerr effect (HOKE) has been recently advocated to explain measurements of the saturation of the nonlinear refractive index in gases. Here we show that cascaded third-harmonic generation results in an effective fifth order nonlinearity that is negative and significant. Higher-order harmonic cascading will also occur from the HOKE, and the cascading contributions may significantly modify the observed nonlinear index change. At lower wavelengths cascading increases the HOKE saturation intensity, while for longer wavelengths cascading will decrease the HOKE saturation intensity.

  2. Scaling laws of wave-cascading superfluid turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Y.

    2017-06-01

    Phenomenological model is constructed for superfluid turbulence for two distinct energy cascade scenarios, sound wave cascade and critically-balanced Kelvin wave cascade, using the method for magneto-fluid turbulence theory. Excitations along dispersion relations are used as the primary energy reservoir. The spectral indices in the inertial range are estimated as -3/2 for the long-wavelength sound wave cascade, -3 in the direction to the mean filaments for the Kelvin wave cascade, and -5/3 perpendicular to the filament direction.

  3. Study of acoustic resonance of cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honjo, M.; Tominaga, T.

    Discrete sounds and vibrations from guide vanes due to acoustic resonance in the vane flow path, are experimentally investigated. Other causes of pure sounds in stationary vanes are considered, such as direct radiation from wake shedding vortices, bubble vortices or leading edges, and radial or axial modes of air columns. Two-dimensional cascade tests are performed under various conditions, and the data are compared with theoretical results of flat plate cascades. Three-dimensional ducted guide vane model tests are carried out to apply prototype guide vanes, and to confirm the resonance of the two-dimensional tests. Results show that frequency is more sensitive to chord length than pitch length, and the ratio of the fluctuation frequency to fluid sound velocity/pitch length is independent of the scale. Bubble vortices on concave surfaces or leading edges are not exciting sources; and under the limit of solidity, no exciting energy can generate acoustic resonance in correspondence to the mode.

  4. Regimes of turbulence without an energy cascade

    CERN Document Server

    Barenghi, C F; Baggaley, A W

    2016-01-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations of turbulent $^4$He and $^3$He-B have established that, at hydrodynamic length scales larger than the average distance between quantum vortices, the energy spectrum obeys the same 5/3 Kolmogorov law which is observed in the homogeneous isotropic turbulence of ordinary fluids. The importance of the 5/3 law is that it points to the existence of a Richardson energy cascade from large eddies to small eddies. However, there is also evidence of quantum turbulent regimes without Kolmogorov scaling. This raises the important questions of why, in such regimes, the Kolmogorov spectrum fails to form, what is the physical nature of turbulence without energy cascade, and whether hydrodynamical models can account for the unusual behaviour of turbulent superfluid helium. In this work we describe simple physical mechanisms which prevent the formation of Kolmogorov scaling in the thermal counterflow, and analyze the conditions necessary for emergence of quasiclassical regime in quantum tu...

  5. Short distance properties of cascading gauge theories

    CERN Document Server

    Aharony, O; Yarom, A; Aharony, Ofer; Buchel, Alex; Yarom, Amos

    2006-01-01

    We study the short distance (large momentum) properties of correlation functions of cascading gauge theories by performing a tree-level computation in their dual gravitational background. We prove that these theories are holographically renormalizable; the correlators have only analytic ultraviolet divergences, which may be removed by appropriate local counterterms. We find that n-point correlation functions of properly normalized operators have the expected scaling in the semi-classical gravity (large N) limit: they scale as N_{eff}^{2-n} with N_{eff} proportional to ln(k/Lambda) where k is a typical momentum. Our analysis thus confirms the interpretation of the cascading gauge theories as renormalizable four-dimensional quantum field theories with an effective number of degrees of freedom which logarithmically increases with the energy.

  6. Estimating Cascading Failure Risk with Random Chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Rezaei, Pooya; Eppstein, Margaret J

    2014-01-01

    The potential for cascading failure in power systems adds substantially to overall reliability risk. Monte Carlo sampling can be used with a power system model to estimate this impact, but doing so is computationally expensive. This paper presents a new approach to estimating the risk of large cascading blackouts triggered by multiple contingencies. The method uses a search algorithm (Random Chemistry) to identify blackout-causing contingencies, and then combines the results with outage probabilities to estimate overall risk. Comparing this approach with Monte Carlo sampling for two test cases (the IEEE RTS-96 and a 2383 bus model of the Polish grid) suggests that the new approach is at least two orders of magnitude faster than Monte Carlo, without introducing measurable bias. Moreover, the approach enables one to compute the contribution of individual component-failure probabilities to overall blackout risk, allowing one to quickly identify low-cost strategies for reducing risk. By computing the sensitivity ...

  7. Cascade Apartments: Deep Energy Multifamily Retrofit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, A. [Washington State Univ. Energy Program, Olympia, WA (United States); Mattheis, L. [Washington State Univ. Energy Program, Olympia, WA (United States); Kunkle, R. [Washington State Univ. Energy Program, Olympia, WA (United States); Howard, L. [Washington State Univ. Energy Program, Olympia, WA (United States); Lubliner, M. [Washington State Univ. Energy Program, Olympia, WA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    In December of 2009-10, King County Housing Authority (KCHA) implemented energy retrofit improvements in the Cascade multifamily community, located in Kent, Washington (marine climate.)This research effort involved significant coordination from stakeholders KCHA, WA State Department of Commerce, utility Puget Sound Energy, and Cascade tenants. This report focuses on the following three primary BA research questions: 1. What are the modeled energy savings using DOE low income weatherization approved TREAT software? 2. How did the modeled energy savings compare with measured energy savings from aggregate utility billing analysis? 3. What is the Savings to Investment Ratio (SIR) of the retrofit package after considering utility window incentives and KCHA capitol improvement funding.

  8. Cascade Apartments: Deep Energy Multifamily Retrofit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gordon, A.; Mattheis, L.; Kunkle, R.; Howard, L.; Lubliner, M.

    2014-02-01

    In December of 2009-10, King County Housing Authority (KCHA) implemented energy retrofit improvements in the Cascade multifamily community, located in Kent, Washington (marine climate.)This research effort involved significant coordination from stakeholders KCHA, WA State Department of Commerce, utility Puget Sound Energy, and Cascade tenants. This report focuses on the following three primary BA research questions : 1. What are the modeled energy savings using DOE low income weatherization approved TREAT software? 2. How did the modeled energy savings compare with measured energy savings from aggregate utility billing analysis? 3. What is the Savings to Investment Ratio (SIR) of the retrofit package after considering utility window incentives and KCHA capitol improvement funding.

  9. Numerical calculation of turbomachinery cascade flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feng

    A numerical method for solving both the Euler and the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for flows in turbomachinery cascades is presented and verified. The method is based on a finite volume method with an explicit multi-stage time-stepping scheme originally developed by Jameson for the Euler equations. Modified discretization schemes, based on Martinelli's work for the second order derivatives in the Navier-Stokes equations, are proposed for both the cell-vertex and the cell-centered schemes. The new schemes avoid a potential discretization problem with kinked meshes. Use of artificial dissipation to stabilize a central difference scheme and capture shocks is discussed. Local time stepping and residual smoothing are used to increase the allowable time steps for stability. A multigrid method is employed to accelerate convergence to steady state. For steady inviscid flows enthalpy damping is also used. The method is capable of handling flows of low Mach number (lower than 0.3), and transonic and supersonic flows. Both laminar and turbulent flows are calculated in solving the Reynolds-averaged equations. The Reynolds number may range from order 1 to 10(exp 7) or even higher as long as enough mesh resolution and a proper turbulence model are provided. The Baldwin-Lomax algebraic turbulence model is used in the current work. An elliptic mesh generator is used to generate H-type meshes for cascades. The cell-centered scheme is programmed in both two- and three-dimensions for the Euler equations. Numerical results included a two-dimensional Hobson cascade, a supersonic wedge cascade and the VKI turbine cascade. The three-dimensional code is used to calculate the flow in a low pressure turbine cascade. Results compare well with experimental data at design conditions. At off-design conditions, the Euler method fails in regions of large separations.

  10. Cascaded trans-z-source inverters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ding; Loh, Poh Chiang; Zhu, Miao;

    2011-01-01

    Z-source inverter is a recently proposed single-stage inverter with added voltage-boost capability for complementing the usual voltage-buck operation of a traditional voltage-source inverter. As long as the transformer element added in to the z-source concept, a trans-z-source inverter with one...... transformer and one capacitor is reported recently. This paper has adapted the cascaded concept into the trans-z-source and trans-quasi-z-source inverters to extend each to the cascaded topologies before combination is made with allowing more sources embedded which reduces the capacitor voltage and enhanced...... the compatibility for distributed sources. Unlike existing techniques, voltage stresses within the proposed inverters are better distributed among the passive components. Theoretical analysis for explaining these operating features has already been discussed before simulation were performed and an experimental...

  11. Adaptive stabilization for cascade nonlinear systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈岚萍; 王洪元; 吴波

    2004-01-01

    An adaptive controller of full state feedback for certain cascade nonlinear systems achieving input-to-state stability with respect to unknown bounded disturbance is designed using backstepping and control Lyapunov function (CLF)techniques. We show that unknown bounded disturbance can be estimated by update laws, which requires less information on unknown disturbance, as a part of stabilizing control. The design method achieves the desired property: global robust stability. Our contribution is illustrated with the example of a disturbed pendulum.

  12. Optical encryption with cascaded fractional wavelet transforms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Liang-hua; CHEN Lin-fei; ZHAO Dao-mu

    2006-01-01

    On the basis of fractional wavelet transform, we propose a new method called cascaded fractional wavelet transform to encrypt images. It has the virtues of fractional Fourier transform and wavelet transform. Fractional orders, standard focal lengths and scaling factors are its keys. Multistage fractional Fourier transforms can add the keys easily and strengthen information security. This method can also realize partial encryption just as wavelet transform and fractional wavelet transform. Optical realization of encryption and decryption is proposed. Computer simulations confirmed its possibility.

  13. Transonic Cascade Measurements to Support Analytical Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    RECEIVED JUL 0 12005 FINAL REPORT FOR: AFOSR GRANT F49260-02-1-0284 TRANSONIC CASCADE MEASUREMENTS TO SUPPORT ANALYTICAL MODELING Paul A. Durbin ...PAD); 650-723-1971 (JKE) durbin @vk.stanford.edu; eaton@vk.stanford.edu submitted to: Attn: Dr. John Schmisseur Air Force Office of Scientific Research...both spline and control points for subsequent wall shape definitions. An algebraic grid generator was used to generate the grid for the blade-wall

  14. Toward Order-of-Magnitude Cascade Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Ruocheng; Shaabani, Elham; Bhatnagar, Abhinav; Shakarian, Paulo

    2015-01-01

    When a piece of information (microblog, photograph, video, link, etc.) starts to spread in a social network, an important question arises: will it spread to "viral" proportions -- where "viral" is defined as an order-of-magnitude increase. However, several previous studies have established that cascade size and frequency are related through a power-law - which leads to a severe imbalance in this classification problem. In this paper, we devise a suite of measurements based on "structural dive...

  15. Controllability of nonlinear degenerate parabolic cascade systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamadou Birba

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This article studies of null controllability property of nonlinear coupled one dimensional degenerate parabolic equations. These equations form a cascade system, that is, the solution of the first equation acts as a control in the second equation and the control function acts only directly on the first equation. We prove positive null controllability results when the control and a coupling set have nonempty intersection.

  16. An Introduction to Cascading Gravity and Degravitation

    CERN Document Server

    de Rham, Claudia

    2008-01-01

    Cascading gravity is an explicit realization of the idea of degravitation, where gravity behaves as a high-pass filter. This could explain why a large cosmological constant does not backreact as much as anticipated from standard General Relativity. The model relies on the presence of at least two infinite extra dimensions while our world is confined on a four-dimensional brane. Gravity is then four-dimensional at short distances and becomes weaker and weaker at larger distances.

  17. Tip Clearance Flows in Turbine Cascades

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wei; Qiao Weiyang; Sun Dawei

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the effects of some factors on the tip clearance flow in axial linear turbine cascades.The measurements of the total pressure loss coefficient are made at the cascade outlets by using a five-hole probe at exit Mach numbers of 0.10,0.14 and 0.19.At each exit Mach number,experiments axe performed at the tip clearance heights of 1.0%,1.5%,2.0%,2.5% and 3.0% of the blade height.The effects of the non-uniform tip clearance height of each blade in the pitchwise direction are also studied.The results show that at a given tip clearance height,generally,total pressure loss rises with exit Mach numbers proportionally.At a fixed exit Mach number,the total pressure loss augments nearly proportionally as the tip clearance height increases.The increased tip clearance heights in the tip regions of two adjacent blades are to be blame for the larger clearance loss of the center blade.Compared to the effects of the tip clearance height,the effects of the exit Mach number and the pitchwise variation of the tip clearance height on the cascade total pressure loss are so less significant to be omitted.

  18. HIV treatment cascade in tuberculosis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessells, Richard J.; Swaminathan, Soumya; Godfrey-Faussett, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Globally, the number of deaths associated with tuberculosis (TB) and HIV coinfection remains unacceptably high. We review the evidence around the impact of strengthening the HIV treatment cascade in TB patients and explore recent findings about how best to deliver integrated TB/HIV services. Recent findings There is clear evidence that the timely provision of antiretroviral therapy (ART) reduces mortality in TB/HIV coinfected adults. Despite this, globally in 2013, only around a third of known HIV-positive TB cases were treated with ART. Although there is some recent evidence exploring the barriers to achieve high coverage of HIV testing and ART initiation in TB patients, our understanding of which factors are most important and how best to address these within different health systems remains incomplete. There are some examples of good practice in the delivery of integrated TB/HIV services to improve the HIV treatment cascade. However, evidence of the impact of such strategies is of relatively low quality for informing integrated TB/HIV programming more broadly. In most settings, there remain barriers to higher-level organizational and functional integration. Summary There remains a need for commitment to patient-centred integrated TB/HIV care in countries affected by the dual epidemic. There is a need for better quality evidence around how best to deliver integrated services to strengthen the HIV treatment cascade in TB patients, both at primary healthcare level and within community settings. PMID:26352390

  19. Cascading failures in ac electricity grids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohden, Martin; Jung, Daniel; Tamrakar, Samyak; Kettemann, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    Sudden failure of a single transmission element in a power grid can induce a domino effect of cascading failures, which can lead to the isolation of a large number of consumers or even to the failure of the entire grid. Here we present results of the simulation of cascading failures in power grids, using an alternating current (AC) model. We first apply this model to a regular square grid topology. For a random placement of consumers and generators on the grid, the probability to find more than a certain number of unsupplied consumers decays as a power law and obeys a scaling law with respect to system size. Varying the transmitted power threshold above which a transmission line fails does not seem to change the power-law exponent q ≈1.6 . Furthermore, we study the influence of the placement of generators and consumers on the number of affected consumers and demonstrate that large clusters of generators and consumers are especially vulnerable to cascading failures. As a real-world topology, we consider the German high-voltage transmission grid. Applying the dynamic AC model and considering a random placement of consumers, we find that the probability to disconnect more than a certain number of consumers depends strongly on the threshold. For large thresholds the decay is clearly exponential, while for small ones the decay is slow, indicating a power-law decay.

  20. Towards automated design of quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirčetić, Aleksandra; Indjin, Dragan; Ikonić, Zoran; Harrison, Paul; Milanović, Vitomir; Kelsall, Robert W.

    2005-04-01

    We present an advanced technique for the design and optimization of GaAs /AlGaAs quantum cascade laser structures. It is based on the implementation of the simulated annealing algorithm with the purpose of determining a set of design parameters that satisfy predefined conditions, leading to an enhancement of the device output characteristics. Two important design aspects have been addressed: improved thermal behavior, achieved by the use of higher conduction band offset materials, and a more efficient extraction mechanism, realized via a ladder of three lower laser states, with subsequent pairs separated by the optical phonon energy. A detailed analysis of performance of the obtained structures is carried out within a full self-consistent rate equations model of the carrier dynamics. The latter uses wave functions calculated by the transfer matrix method, and evaluates all relevant carrier-phonon and carrier-carrier scattering rates from each quantized state to all others within the same and neighboring periods of the cascade. These values are then used to form a set of rate equations for the carrier density in each state, enabling further calculation of the current density and gain as a function of the applied field and temperature. This paper addresses the application of the described procedure to the design of λ ˜9μm GaAs-based mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers and presents the output characteristics of some of the designed optimized structures.

  1. Cascade laser applications: trends and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Humières, B.; Margoto, Éric; Fazilleau, Yves

    2016-03-01

    When analyses need rapid measurements, cost effective monitoring and miniaturization, tunable semiconductor lasers can be very good sources. Indeed, applications like on-field environmental gas analysis or in-line industrial process control are becoming available thanks to the advantage of tunable semiconductor lasers. Advances in cascade lasers (CL) are revolutionizing Mid-IR spectroscopy with two alternatives: interband cascade lasers (ICL) in the 3-6μm spectrum and quantum cascade lasers (QCL), with more power from 3 to 300μm. The market is getting mature with strong players for driving applications like industry, environment, life science or transports. CL are not the only Mid-IR laser source. In fact, a strong competition is now taking place with other technologies like: OPO, VCSEL, Solid State lasers, Gas, SC Infrared or fiber lasers. In other words, CL have to conquer a share of the Mid-IR application market. Our study is a market analysis of CL technologies and their applications. It shows that improvements of components performance, along with the progress of infrared laser spectroscopy will drive the CL market growth. We compare CL technologies with other Mid-IR sources and estimate their share in each application market.

  2. Prediction of Cascading Failures in Spatial Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shunkun, Yang; Jiaquan, Zhang; Dan, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Cascading overload failures are widely found in large-scale parallel systems and remain a major threat to system reliability; therefore, they are of great concern to maintainers and managers of different systems. Accurate cascading failure prediction can provide useful information to help control networks. However, for a large, gradually growing network with increasing complexity, it is often impractical to explore the behavior of a single node from the perspective of failure propagation. Fortunately, overload failures that propagate through a network exhibit certain spatial-temporal correlations, which allows the study of a group of nodes that share common spatial and temporal characteristics. Therefore, in this study, we seek to predict the failure rates of nodes in a given group using machine-learning methods. We simulated overload failure propagations in a weighted lattice network that start with a center attack and predicted the failure percentages of different groups of nodes that are separated by a given distance. The experimental results of a feedforward neural network (FNN), a recurrent neural network (RNN) and support vector regression (SVR) all show that these different models can accurately predict the similar behavior of nodes in a given group during cascading overload propagation.

  3. Evidence against mediation of adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate in the bud-inducing effect of cytokinins in moss protonemata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Scheneider

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Effects Oif adenosdne-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP, N6,O2-dibuityryl adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (DBcAMP, caffeine and theophylline on the bud-inducing activity of cytokinin in the protonema of two moss species, Ceratodon purpureus and Funaria hygrometrica were examined. The sub-stances have been found ineffective as gametophore bud inducers. Some synergism between cytokinin and cAMP or DBcAMP was observed with relation to the buds' growth, but this effect is nonspecific since it can be obtained with 5'-AMP or 5'-GMiP as well, The results seem to exclude the possibility of an involvement of cAMP as a second messenger in the mechanism of cytokinin action on morphogenetic processes in moss protonemata.

  4. Characterization of a dual-active enzyme, DcpA, involved in cyclic diguanosine monophosphate turnover in Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Indra Mani; Prakash, Sunita; Dhanaraman, Thillaivillalan; Chatterji, Dipankar

    2014-10-01

    We have reported previously that the long-term survival of Mycobacterium smegmatis is facilitated by a dual-active enzyme MSDGC-1 (renamed DcpA), which controls the cellular turnover of cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP). Most mycobacterial species possess at least a single copy of a DcpA orthologue that is highly conserved in terms of sequence similarity and domain architecture. Here, we show that DcpA exists in monomeric and dimeric forms. The dimerization of DcpA is due to non-covalent interactions between two protomers that are arranged in a parallel orientation. The dimer shows both synthesis and hydrolysis activities, whereas the monomer shows only hydrolysis activity. In addition, we have shown that DcpA is associated with the cytoplasmic membrane and exhibits heterogeneous cellular localization with a predominance at the cell poles. Finally, we have also shown that DcpA is involved in the change in cell length and colony morphology of M. smegmatis. Taken together, our study provides additional evidence about the role of the bifunctional protein involved in c-di-GMP signalling in M. smegmatis.

  5. Computer-assisted combinatorial design of bicyclic thymidine analogs as inhibitors of Mycobacterium tuberculosis thymidine monophosphate kinase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frecer, Vladimir; Seneci, Pierfausto; Miertus, Stanislav

    2011-01-01

    Thymidine monophosphate kinase (TMPKmt) is an essential enzyme for nucleotide metabolism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and thus an attractive target for novel antituberculosis agents. In this work, we have explored the chemical space around the 2',3'-bicyclic thymidine nucleus by designing and in silico screening of a virtual focused library selected via structure based methods to identify more potent analogs endowed with favorable ADME-related properties. In all the library members we have exchanged the ribose ring of the template with a cyclopentane moiety that is less prone to enzymatic degradation. In addition, we have replaced the six-membered 2',3'-ring by a number of five-membered and six-membered heterocyclic rings containing alternative proton donor and acceptor groups, to exploit the interaction with the carboxylate groups of Asp9 and Asp163 as well as with several cationic residues present in the vicinity of the TMPKmt binding site. The three-dimensional structure of the TMPKmt complexed with 5-hydroxymethyl-dUMP, an analog of dTMP, was employed to develop a QSAR model, to parameterize a scoring function specific for the TMPKmt target and to select analogues which display the highest predicted binding to the target. As a result, we identified a small highly focused combinatorial subset of bicyclic thymidine analogues as virtual hits that are predicted to inhibit the mycobacterial TMPK in the submicromolar concentration range and to display favorable ADME-related properties.

  6. Ratiometric bioluminescence indicators for monitoring cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate in live cells based on luciferase-fragment complementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Masaki; Nagaoka, Yasutaka; Yamada, Toshimichi; Takakura, Hideo; Ozawa, Takeaki

    2010-11-15

    Bioluminescent indicators for cyclic 3',5'-monophosphate AMP (cAMP) are powerful tools for noninvasive detection with high sensitivity. However, the absolute photon counts are affected substantially by adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) and d-luciferin concentrations, limiting temporal analysis in live cells. This report describes a genetically encoded bioluminescent indicator for detecting intracellular cAMP based on complementation of split fragments of two-color luciferase mutants originated from click beetles. A cAMP binding domain of protein kinase A was connected with an engineered carboxy-terminal fragment of luciferase, of which ends were connected with amino-terminal fragments of green luciferase and red luciferase. We demonstrated that the ratio of green to red bioluminescence intensities was less influenced by the changes of ATP and d-luciferin concentrations. We also showed an applicability of the bioluminescent indicator for time-course and quantitative assessments of intracellular cAMP in living cells and mice. The bioluminescent indicator will enable quantitative analysis and imaging of spatiotemporal dynamics of cAMP in opaque and autofluorescent living subjects.

  7. Highly selective colorimetric detection of Ni2+ using silver nanoparticles cofunctionalized with adenosine monophosphate and sodium dodecyl sulfonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jiayu; Jin, Weiwei; Huang, Pengcheng; Wu, Fangying

    2017-09-01

    We report a dual-ligand strategy based on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) for highly selective detection of Ni2+ using colorimetric techniques. Adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and sodium dodecyl sulfonate (SDS) were both used as ligands to modify AgNPs. The presence of Ni2+ induces the aggregation of AgNPs through cooperative electrostatic interaction and metal-ligand interaction, resulting in a color change from bright yellow to orange. The cofunctionalized AgNPs showed obvious advantages over the ones functionalized only by AMP or SDS in terms of selectivity. Under the optimized conditions, this sensing platform for Ni2+ works in the concentration range of 4.0 to 60 μM and has a low detection limit of 0.60 μM. In addition, the colorimetric assay is very fast, and the whole analysis can be completed within a few minutes. Thus, it can be directly used in tap water and lake water samples. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Methylene blue induces macroautophagy through 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase pathway to protect neurons from serum deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Luokun; Li, Wenjun; Winters, Ali; Yuan, Fang; Jin, Kunlin; Yang, Shaohua

    2013-01-01

    Methylene blue has been shown to be neuroprotective in multiple experimental neurodegenerative disease models. However, the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects have not been fully elucidated. Previous studies have shown that macroautophagy has multiple beneficial roles for maintaining normal cellular homeostasis and that induction of macroautophagy after myocardial ischemia is protective. In the present study we demonstrated that methylene blue could protect HT22 hippocampal cell death induced by serum deprivation, companied by induction of macroautophagy. We also found that methylene blue-mediated neuroprotection was abolished by macroautophagy inhibition. Interestingly, 5′ adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling, but not inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling, was activated at 12 and 24 h after methylene blue treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Methylene blue-induced macroautophagy was blocked by AMPK inhibitor. Consistent with in vitro data, macroautophagy was induced in the cortex and hippocampus of mouse brains treated with methylene blue. Our findings suggest that methylene blue-induced neuroprotection is mediated, at least in part, by macroautophagy though activation of AMPK signaling. PMID:23653592

  9. Methylene blue induces macroautophagy through 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase pathway to protect neurons from serum deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Luokun; Li, Wenjun; Winters, Ali; Yuan, Fang; Jin, Kunlin; Yang, Shaohua

    2013-01-01

    Methylene blue has been shown to be neuroprotective in multiple experimental neurodegenerative disease models. However, the mechanisms underlying the neuroprotective effects have not been fully elucidated. Previous studies have shown that macroautophagy has multiple beneficial roles for maintaining normal cellular homeostasis and that induction of macroautophagy after myocardial ischemia is protective. In the present study we demonstrated that methylene blue could protect HT22 hippocampal cell death induced by serum deprivation, companied by induction of macroautophagy. We also found that methylene blue-mediated neuroprotection was abolished by macroautophagy inhibition. Interestingly, 5' adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling, but not inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling, was activated at 12 and 24 h after methylene blue treatment in a dose-dependent manner. Methylene blue-induced macroautophagy was blocked by AMPK inhibitor. Consistent with in vitro data, macroautophagy was induced in the cortex and hippocampus of mouse brains treated with methylene blue. Our findings suggest that methylene blue-induced neuroprotection is mediated, at least in part, by macroautophagy though activation of AMPK signaling.

  10. The Inosine Monophosphate Dehydrogenase, GuaB2, Is a Vulnerable New Bactericidal Drug Target for Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vinayak; Donini, Stefano; Pacitto, Angela; Sala, Claudia; Hartkoorn, Ruben C; Dhar, Neeraj; Keri, Gyorgy; Ascher, David B; Mondésert, Guillaume; Vocat, Anthony; Lupien, Andréanne; Sommer, Raphael; Vermet, Hélène; Lagrange, Sophie; Buechler, Joe; Warner, Digby F; McKinney, John D; Pato, Janos; Cole, Stewart T; Blundell, Tom L; Rizzi, Menico; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2017-01-13

    VCC234718, a molecule with growth inhibitory activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), was identified by phenotypic screening of a 15344-compound library. Sequencing of a VCC234718-resistant mutant identified a Y487C substitution in the inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase, GuaB2, which was subsequently validated to be the primary molecular target of VCC234718 in Mtb. VCC234718 inhibits Mtb GuaB2 with a Ki of 100 nM and is uncompetitive with respect to IMP and NAD(+). This compound binds at the NAD(+) site, after IMP has bound, and makes direct interactions with IMP; therefore, the inhibitor is by definition uncompetitive. VCC234718 forms strong pi interactions with the Y487 residue side chain from the adjacent protomer in the tetramer, explaining the resistance-conferring mutation. In addition to sensitizing Mtb to VCC234718, depletion of GuaB2 was bactericidal in Mtb in vitro and in macrophages. When supplied at a high concentration (≥125 μM), guanine alleviated the toxicity of VCC234718 treatment or GuaB2 depletion via purine salvage. However, transcriptional silencing of guaB2 prevented Mtb from establishing an infection in mice, confirming that Mtb has limited access to guanine in this animal model. Together, these data provide compelling validation of GuaB2 as a new tuberculosis drug target.

  11. Phenotype, virulence and immunogenicity of Edwardsiella ictaluri cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate receptor protein (Crp) mutants in catfish host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santander, Javier; Mitra, Arindam; Curtiss, Roy

    2011-12-01

    Edwardsiella ictaluri is an Enterobacteriaceae that causes lethal enteric septicemia in catfish. Being a mucosal facultative intracellular pathogen, this bacterium is an excellent candidate to develop immersion-oral live attenuated vaccines for the catfish aquaculture industry. Deletion of the cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) receptor protein (crp) gene in several Enterobacteriaceae has been utilized in live attenuated vaccines for mammals and birds. Here we characterize the crp gene and report the effect of a crp deletion in E. ictaluri. The E. ictaluri crp gene and encoded protein are similar to other Enterobacteriaceae family members, complementing Salmonella enterica Δcrp mutants in a cAMP-dependent fashion. The E. ictaluri Δcrp-10 in-frame deletion mutant demonstrated growth defects, loss of maltose utilization, and lack of flagella synthesis. We found that the E. ictaluri Δcrp-10 mutant was attenuated, colonized lymphoid tissues, and conferred immune protection against E. ictaluri infection to zebrafish (Danio rerio) and catfish (Ictalurus punctatus). Evaluation of the IgM titers indicated that bath immunization with the E. ictaluri Δcrp-10 mutant triggered systemic and skin immune responses in catfish. We propose that deletion of the crp gene in E. ictaluri is an effective strategy to develop immersion live attenuated antibiotic-sensitive vaccines for the catfish aquaculture industry.

  12. The expression of cyclic adenosine monophosphate responsive element modulator in rat sertoli cells following seminal extract administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muslim Akmal

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aims to determine the effect of seminal vesicle extract on cyclic adenosine monophosphate responsive element modulator (CREM expression in rat Sertoli cells. Materials and Methods: This study examined the expression of CREM on 20 male rats (Rattus norvegicus at 4 months of age, weighing 250-300 g. The rats were divided into four groups: K0, KP1, KP2, and KP3. K0 group was injected with 0.2 ml normal saline; KP1 was injected with 25 mg cloprostenol (Prostavet C, Virbac S. A; KP2 and KP3 were injected with 0.2 and 0.4 ml seminal vesicle extract, respectively. The treatments were conducted 5 times within 12-day interval. At the end of the study, the rats were euthanized by cervical dislocation; then, the testicles were necropsied and processed for histology observation using immunohistochemistry staining. Results: CREM expression in rat Sertoli cells was not altered by the administration of either 0.2 or 0.4 ml seminal vesicle extract. Conclusion: The administration of seminal vesicle extract is unable to increase CREM expression in rat Sertoli cells.

  13. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analysis of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase activity in hematopoietic cell transplantation recipients treated with mycophenolate mofetil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hong; Mager, Donald E; Sandmaier, Brenda M; Storer, Barry E; Boeckh, Michael J; Bemer, Meagan J; Phillips, Brian R; Risler, Linda J; McCune, Jeannine S

    2014-08-01

    A novel approach to personalizing postgrafting immunosuppression in hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients is evaluating inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) activity as a drug-specific biomarker of mycophenolic acid (MPA)-induced immunosuppression. This prospective study evaluated total MPA, unbound MPA, and total MPA glucuronide plasma concentrations and IMPDH activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PMNCs) at 5 time points after the morning dose of oral mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) on day +21 in 56 nonmyeloablative HCT recipients. Substantial interpatient variability in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics was observed and accurately characterized by the population pharmacokinetic-dynamic model. IMPDH activity decreased with increasing MPA plasma concentration, with maximum inhibition coinciding with maximum MPA concentration in most patients. The overall relationship between MPA concentration and IMPDH activity was described by a direct inhibitory maximum effect model with an IC50 of 3.23 mg/L total MPA and 57.3 ng/mL unbound MPA. The day +21 IMPDH area under the effect curve (AUEC) was associated with cytomegalovirus reactivation, nonrelapse mortality, and overall mortality. In conclusion, a pharmacokinetic-dynamic model was developed that relates plasma MPA concentrations with PMNC IMPDH activity after an MMF dose in HCT recipients. Future studies should validate this model and confirm that day +21 IMPDH AUEC is a predictive biomarker.

  14. Barrier-free proton transfer in the valence anion of 2'-deoxyadenosine-5'-monophosphate. II. A computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobyłecka, Monika; Gu, Jiande; Rak, Janusz; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2008-01-28

    The propensity of four representative conformations of 2(')-deoxyadenosine-5(')-monophosphate (5(')-dAMPH) to bind an excess electron has been studied at the B3LYP6-31++G(d,p) level. While isolated canonical adenine does not support stable valence anions in the gas phase, all considered neutral conformations of 5(')-dAMPH form adiabatically stable anions. The type of an anionic 5(')-dAMPH state, i.e., the valence, dipole bound, or mixed (valence/dipole bound), depends on the internal hydrogen bond(s) pattern exhibited by a particular tautomer. The most stable anion results from an electron attachment to the neutral syn-south conformer. The formation of this anion is associated with a barrier-free proton transfer triggered by electron attachment and the internal rotation around the C4(')-C5(') bond. The adiabatic electron affinity of the a_south-syn anion is 1.19 eV, while its vertical detachment energy is 1.89 eV. Our results are compared with the photoelectron spectrum (PES) of 5(')-dAMPH(-) measured recently by Stokes et al., [J. Chem. Phys. 128, 044314 (2008)]. The computational VDE obtained for the most stable anionic structure matches well with the experimental electron binding energy region of maximum intensity. A further understanding of DNA damage might require experimental and computational studies on the systems in which purine nucleotides are engaged in hydrogen bonding.

  15. Adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase activation and suppression of inflammatory response by cell stretching in rabbit synovial fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunanusornchai, Wanlop; Muanprasat, Chatchai; Chatsudthipong, Varanuj

    2016-12-01

    Joint mobilization is known to be beneficial in osteoarthritis (OA) patients. This study aimed to investigate the effect of stretching on adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity and its role in modulating inflammation in rabbit synovial fibroblasts. Uniaxial stretching of isolated rabbit synovial fibroblasts for ten min was performed. Stretching-induced AMPK activation, its underlying mechanism, and its anti-inflammatory effect were investigated using Western blot. Static stretching at 20 % of initial length resulted in AMPK activation characterized by expression of phosphorylated AMPK and phosphorylated acetyl-Co A carboxylase. AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation peaked 1 h after stretching and declined toward resting activity. Using cell viability assays, static stretching did not appear to cause cellular damage. Activation of AMPK involves Ca(2+) influx via a mechanosensitive L-type Ca(2+) channel, which subsequently raises intracellular Ca(2+) and activates AMPK via Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ). Interestingly, stretching suppressed TNFα-induced expression of COX-2, iNOS, and phosphorylated NF-κB. These effects were prevented by pretreatment with compound C, an AMPK inhibitor. These results suggest that mechanical stretching suppressed inflammatory responses in synovial fibroblasts via a L-type Ca(2+)-channel-CaMKKβ-AMPK-dependent pathway which may underlie joint mobilization's ability to alleviate OA symptoms.

  16. Simultaneous liquid chromatographic assessment of thiamine, thiamine monophosphate and thiamine diphosphate in human erythrocytes: a study on alcoholics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancinelli, Rosanna; Ceccanti, Mauro; Guiducci, Maria Soccorsa; Sasso, Guido Francesco; Sebastiani, Gemma; Attilia, Maria Luisa; Allen, John Paul

    2003-06-15

    An isocratic HPLC procedure for the assessment of thiamine (T), thiamine monophosphate (TMP) and thiamine diphosphate (TDP) in human erythrocytes is described. Several aspects of the procedure make it suitable for both clinical and research purposes: limits of detection and quantification of 1 and 2.5 nmol/l, respectively, recovery of 102% on average (range 93-112%), intra- and inter-day precisions within 5 and 9%, respectively, total elution time 15 min. This analytical methodology was applied to a case-control study on erythrocyte samples from 103 healthy subjects and 36 alcohol-dependent patients at risk of thiamine deficiency. Mean control values obtained were: T=89.6+/-22.7 nmol/l, TMP=4.4+/-6.6 nmol/l and TDP=222.23+/-56.3 nmol/l. T and TDP mean values of alcoholics were significantly lower than those of control cases: T=69.4+/-35.9 nmol/l (Pthiamine was established in the study of alcohol related problems.

  17. Convenient syntheses of 3'-amino-2',3'-dideoxynucleosides, their 5'-monophosphates, and 3'-aminoterminal oligodeoxynucleotide primers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenhuth, Ralf; Richert, Clemens

    2009-01-02

    5'-Protected 3'-amino-2',3'-dideoxynucleosides containing any of the four canonical nucleobases (A/C/G/T) were prepared via azides in five to six steps, starting from deoxynucleosides. For pyrimidines, the synthetic route involved nucleophilic opening of anhydronucleosides. For purines, an in situ oxidation/reduction sequence, followed by a Mitsunobu reaction with diphenyl-2-pyridylphosphine and sodium azide, provided the 3'-azidonucleosides in high yield and purity. For solid-phase synthesis of aminoterminal oligonucleotides, aminonucleosides were linked to controlled pore glass through a novel hexafluoroglutaric acid linker. These supports gave 3'-aminoterminal primers in high yield and purity via conventional DNA chain assembly and one-step deprotection/release with aqueous ammonia. Primers thus prepared were successfully tested in enzyme-free chemical primer extension, an inexpensive methodology for genotyping and labeling. Protected 5'-monophosphates of 3'-amino-2',3'-dideoxynucleosides were also prepared, providing starting materials for the preparation of labeled or photolably protected monomers for chemical primer extension.

  18. Inosine 5'-Monophosphate Dehydrogenase (IMPDH) as a Potential Target for the Development of a New Generation of Antiprotozoan Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotie, Jean

    2016-06-19

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) is a metabolic enzyme that catalyzes the critical step in guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, and thus is at the center of cell growth and proliferation. However, although this enzyme has been exploited as potential target for the development of immunosuppressive, anticancer, and antiviral agents, the functional importance of IMPDH as a promising antiprotozoan drug target is still in its infancy mainly because of the availability of alternative nucleotides metabolic pathways in many of these parasites. This situation suggests that the inhibition of IMPDH might have little to no effect on the survival of protozoan parasites. As a result, no IMPDH inhibitor is currently commercially available or has advanced to clinical trials as a potential antiprotozoan drug. Nevertheless, recent advances toward the development of selective inhibitors of the IMPDH enzyme from Crystosporidium parvum as potential drug candidates against cryptosporidiosis should revive further investigations of this drug target in other protozoa parasites. The current review examines the chemical structures and biological activities of reported protozoan's IMPDH inhibitors. SciFinder was used to broadly pinpoint reports published on the topic in the chemical literature, with no specific time frame. Opportunities and challenges towards the development of inhibitors of IMPDH enzymes from protozoa parasites as potential chemotherapies toward the respective diseases they cause are also discussed.

  19. Determination of the electron-detachment energies of 2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-monophosphate anion: influence of the conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Mercedes; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel; Serrano-Andrés, Luis; Merchán, Manuela

    2009-02-26

    The vertical electron-detachment energies (VDEs) of the singly charged 2'-deoxyguanosine 5'-monophosphate anion (dGMP-) are determined by using the multiconfigurational second-order perturbation CASPT2 method at the MP2 ground-state equilibrium geometry of relevant conformers. The origin of the unique low-energy band in the gas phase photoelectron spectrum of dGMP-, with maximum at around 5.05 eV, is unambiguously assigned to electron detachment from the highest occupied molecular orbital of pi-character belonging to guanine fragment of a syn conformation. The presence of a short H-bond linking the 2-amino and phosphate groups, the guanine moiety acting as proton donor, is precisely responsible for the pronounced decrease of the computed VDE with respect to that obtained in other conformations. As a whole, the present research supports the nucleobase as the site with the lowest ionization potential in negatively charged (deprotonated) nucleotides at the most stable conformations as well as for B-DNA-like type arrangements, in agreement with experimental evidence.

  20. The expression of cyclic adenosine monophosphate responsive element modulator in rat sertoli cells following seminal extract administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akmal, Muslim; Siregar, Tongku Nizwan; Wahyuni, Sri; Hamny; Nasution, Mustafa Kamal; Indriati, Wiwik; Panjaitan, Budianto; Aliza, Dwinna

    2016-01-01

    Aim: This study aims to determine the effect of seminal vesicle extract on cyclic adenosine monophosphate responsive element modulator (CREM) expression in rat Sertoli cells. Materials and Methods: This study examined the expression of CREM on 20 male rats (Rattus norvegicus) at 4 months of age, weighing 250-300 g. The rats were divided into four groups: K0, KP1, KP2, and KP3. K0 group was injected with 0.2 ml normal saline; KP1 was injected with 25 mg cloprostenol (Prostavet C, Virbac S. A); KP2 and KP3 were injected with 0.2 and 0.4 ml seminal vesicle extract, respectively. The treatments were conducted 5 times within 12-day interval. At the end of the study, the rats were euthanized by cervical dislocation; then, the testicles were necropsied and processed for histology observation using immunohistochemistry staining. Results: CREM expression in rat Sertoli cells was not altered by the administration of either 0.2 or 0.4 ml seminal vesicle extract. Conclusion: The administration of seminal vesicle extract is unable to increase CREM expression in rat Sertoli cells. PMID:27733803

  1. Low-power laser irradiation promotes the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament cells via cyclic adenosine monophosphate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jyun-Yi Wu; Chia-Hsin Chen; Li-Yin Yeh; Ming-Long Yeh; Chun-Chan Ting; Yan-Hsiung Wang

    2013-01-01

    Retaining or improving periodontal ligament (PDL) function is crucial for restoring periodontal defects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physiological effects of low-power laser irradiation (LPLI) on the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of human PDL (hPDL) cells. Cultured hPDL cells were irradiated (660 nm) daily with doses of 0, 1, 2 or 4 J?cm22. Cell proliferation was evaluated by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, and the effect of LPLI on osteogenic differentiation was assessed by Alizarin Red S staining and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. Additionally, osteogenic marker gene expression was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Our data showed that LPLI at a dose of 2 J?cm22 significantly promoted hPDL cell proliferation at days 3 and 5. In addition, LPLI at energy doses of 2 and 4 J?cm22 showed potential osteogenic capacity, as it stimulated ALP activity, calcium deposition, and osteogenic gene expression. We also showed that cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) is a critical regulator of the LPLI-mediated effects on hPDL cells. This study shows that LPLI can promote the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of hPDL cells. These results suggest the potential use of LPLI in clinical applications for periodontal tissue regeneration.

  2. Isomerization mechanism of aspartate to isoaspartate implied by structures of Ustilago sphaerogena ribonuclease U2 complexed with adenosine 3'-monophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Shuji

    2010-07-01

    Aspartates in proteins are isomerized non-enzymatically to isoaspartate via succinimide in vitro and in vivo. In order to elucidate the mechanism of isoaspartate formation within the Asp45-Glu46 sequence of Ustilago sphaerogena ribonuclease U2 based on three-dimensional structure, crystal structures of ribonuclease U2 complexed with adenosine 3'-monophosphate have been solved at 0.96 and 0.99 A resolution. The crystal structures revealed that the C(gamma) atom of Asp45 is located just beside the main-chain N atom of Glu46 and that the conformation which is suitable for succinimide formation is stabilized by a hydrogen-bond network mediated by water molecules 190, 219 and 220. These water molecules are suggested to promote the formation of isoaspartate via succinimide: in the succinimide-formation reaction water 219 receives a proton from the N atom of Glu46 as a general base and waters 190 and 220 stabilize the tetrahedral intermediate, and in the succinimide-hydrolysis reaction water 219 provides a proton for the N atom of Glu46 as a general acid. The purine-base recognition scheme of ribonuclease U2 is also discussed.

  3. Structure-based in-silico rational design of a selective peptide inhibitor for thymidine monophosphate kinase of mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Sharma, Sujata; Srinivasan, Alagiri; Singh, Tej P; Kaur, Punit

    2011-05-01

    Tuberculosis still remains one of the most deadly infectious diseases. The emergence of drug resistant strains has fuelled the quest for novel drugs and drug targets for its successful treatment. Thymidine monophosphate kinase (TMPK) lies at the point where the salvage and de novo synthetic pathways meet in nucleotide synthesis. TMPK in M.tb has emerged as an attractive drug target since blocking it will affect both the pathways involved in the thymidine triphosphate synthesis. Moreover, the unique differences at the active site of TMPK enzyme in M.tb and humans can be exploited for the development of ideal drug candidates. Based on a detailed evaluation of known inhibitors and available three-dimensional structures of TMPK, several peptidic inhibitors were designed. In silico docking and selectivity analysis of these inhibitors with TMPK from M.tb and human was carried out to examine their differential binding at the active site. The designed tripeptide, Trp-Pro-Asp, was found to be most selective for M.tb. The ADMET analysis of this peptide indicated that it is likely to be a drug candidate. The tripeptide so designed is a suitable lead molecule for the development of novel TMPK inhibitors as anti-tubercular drugs.

  4. Lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy and vascular function: Role of the nitric oxide-phosphodiesterase type 5-cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, Yukihito

    2017-06-01

    It is well known that there is an association of lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy with cardiovascular disease, suggesting that lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy is a risk factor for cardiovascular events. Vascular function, including endothelial function and vascular smooth muscle function, is involved in the pathogenesis, maintenance and development of atherosclerosis, leading to cardiovascular events. Vascular dysfunction per se should also contribute to lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy. Both lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy and vascular dysfunction have cardiovascular risk factors, such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, aging, obesity and smoking. Inactivation of the phosphodiesterase type 5-cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate-nitric oxide pathway causes lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy through an enhancement of sympathetic nervous activity, endothelial dysfunction, increase in Rho-associated kinase activity and vasoconstriction, and decrease in blood flow of pelvic viscera. Both endogenous nitric oxide and exogenous nitric oxide act as vasodilators on vascular smooth muscle cells through an increase in the content of cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate, which is inactivated by phosphodiesterase type 5. In a clinical setting, phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors are widely used in patients with lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors might have beneficial effects on vascular function through not only inhibition of cyclic guanosine 3',5'-monophosphate degradation, but also increases in testosterone levels and nitric oxide bioavailability, increase in the number and improvement of the function of endothelial progenitor cells, and decrease in insulin resistance. In the present review, the relationships between lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hypertrophy, the

  5. Synthèse et fonctionnalisation de 2-thiohydantoïnes : interaction et inhibition des nucléosides monophosphate kinases

    OpenAIRE

    Gosling, Sandrine

    2011-01-01

    New therapeutical compounds determination requires the formation of a library of molecules and their screening on specific biological targets. The aim of this project was to design new inhibitors targeting nucléoside monophosphate kinases (NMPK) based on in situ dynamic combinatorial chemistry. These molecules were synthesized by ligation between analogues of phosphate acceptors and donors on which reactive functions were introduced. The topic of this PhD was to develop the ATP mimetics using...

  6. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5’-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris, semiaquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens and terrestrial (Sus scrofa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna eBarjau Perez-Milicua

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens can hold their breath for about 30 sec. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia and reduced blood supply (ischemia to tissues. Production of adenosine 5’-triphosphate (ATP requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa, are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal (n=11, semiaquatic (neotropical river otter (n=4 and terrestrial (domestic pig (n=11. Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5’-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX, inosine 5’-monophosphate (IMP, adenosine 5’-monophosphate (AMP, adenosine 5’-diphosphate (ADP, ATP, guanosine 5’-diphosphate (GDP, guanosine 5’-triphosphate (GTP, and xanthosine 5’-monophosphate (XMP were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC. The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise, aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts.

  7. Hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase and inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase activities in three mammalian species: aquatic (Mirounga angustirostris), semi-aquatic (Lontra longicaudis annectens) and terrestrial (Sus scrofa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barjau Pérez-Milicua, Myrna; Zenteno-Savín, Tania; Crocker, Daniel E; Gallo-Reynoso, Juan P

    2015-01-01

    Aquatic and semiaquatic mammals have the capacity of breath hold (apnea) diving. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) have the ability to perform deep and long duration dives; during a routine dive, adults can hold their breath for 25 min. Neotropical river otters (Lontra longicaudis annectens) can hold their breath for about 30 s. Such periods of apnea may result in reduced oxygen concentration (hypoxia) and reduced blood supply (ischemia) to tissues. Production of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) requires oxygen, and most mammalian species, like the domestic pig (Sus scrofa), are not adapted to tolerate hypoxia and ischemia, conditions that result in ATP degradation. The objective of this study was to explore the differences in purine synthesis and recycling in erythrocytes and plasma of three mammalian species adapted to different environments: aquatic (northern elephant seal) (n = 11), semiaquatic (neotropical river otter) (n = 4), and terrestrial (domestic pig) (n = 11). Enzymatic activity of hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HGPRT) was determined by spectrophotometry, and activity of inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) and the concentration of hypoxanthine (HX), inosine 5'-monophosphate (IMP), adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP), adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP), ATP, guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP), guanosine 5'-triphosphate (GTP), and xanthosine 5'-monophosphate (XMP) were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The activities of HGPRT and IMPDH and the concentration of HX, IMP, AMP, ADP, ATP, GTP, and XMP in erythrocytes of domestic pigs were higher than in erythrocytes of northern elephant seals and river otters. These results suggest that under basal conditions (no diving, sleep apnea or exercise), aquatic, and semiaquatic mammals have less purine mobilization than their terrestrial counterparts.

  8. Cyclic Nucleotide-Dependent Protein Kinases, IV. Widespread Occurrence of Adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate-dependent Protein Kinase in Various Tissues and Phyla of the Animal Kingdom

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    J. F. Kuo; Paul Greengard

    1969-01-01

    Adenosine 3 ,5 -monophosphate-dependent protein kinase activity was found in about thirty sources including many mammalian tissues as well as species representative of eight different invertebrate phyla...

  9. Hepatitis C virus core protein induces energy metabolism disorders of hepatocytes by down-regulation of silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog-1 and adenosine monophosphate-acti vated protein kinase signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于建武

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the role of silent mating type information regulation2homotog-1(SIRT1)-adenosine monophosphate(AMP)-activated protein kinase(AMPK) signaling pathway in hepatitis C virus core protein(HCV-core)induced energy metabolism disorders

  10. Human taste and umami receptor responses to chemosensorica generated by Maillard-type N²-alkyl- and N²-arylthiomethylation of guanosine 5'-monophosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, Barbara; Brockhoff, Anne; Degenhardt, Andreas; Billmayer, Sylvia; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Hofmann, Thomas

    2014-11-26

    Structural modification of the exocyclic amino function of guanosine 5'-monophosphate (5'-GMP) by Maillard-type reactions with reducing carbohydrates was recently found to increase the umami-enhancing activity of the nucleotide upon S-N(2)-1-carboxyalkylation and S-N(2)-(1-alkylamino)carbonylalkylation, respectively. Since the presence of sulfur atoms in synthetic N(2)-alkylated nucleotides was reported to be beneficial for sensory activity, a versatile Maillard-type modification of 5'-GMP upon reaction with glycine's Strecker aldehyde formaldehyde and organic thiols was performed in the present study. A series of N(2)-(alkylthiomethyl)guanosine and N(2)-(arylthiomethyl)guanosine 5'-monophosphates was generated and the compounds were evaluated to what extent they enhance the umami response to monosodium L-glutamate in vivo by a paired-choice comparison test using trained human volunteers and in vitro by means of cell-based umami taste receptor assay. Associated with a high umami-enhancing activity (β-value 5.1), N(2)-(propylthiomethyl)guanosine 5'-monophosphate could be generated when 5'-GMP reacted with glucose, glycine, and the onion-derived odorant 1-propanethiol, thus opening a valuable avenue to produce high-potency umami-enhancing chemosensorica from food-derived natural products by kitchen-type chemistry.

  11. Study of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase in complex with the top three OMP, BMP, and PMP ligands by molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Shirin; Jalili, Seifollah; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic mechanism of orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC), one of the nature most proficient enzymes which provides large rate enhancement, has not been fully understood yet. A series of 30 ns molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were run on X-ray structure of the OMPDC from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in its free form as well as in complex with different ligands, namely 1-(5'-phospho-D-ribofuranosyl) barbituric acid (BMP), orotidine 5'-monophosphate (OMP), and 6-phosphonouridine 5'-monophosphate (PMP). The importance of this biological system is justified both by its high rate enhancement and its potential use as a target in chemotherapy. This work focuses on comparing two physicochemical states of the enzyme (protonated and deprotonated Asp91) and three ligands (substrate OMP, inhibitor, and transition state analog BMP and substrate analog PMP). Detailed analysis of the active site geometry and its interactions is properly put in context by extensive comparison with relevant experimental works. Our overall results show that in terms of hydrogen bond occupancy, electrostatic interactions, dihedral angles, active site configuration, and movement of loops, notable differences among different complexes are observed. Comparison of the results obtained from these simulations provides some detailed structural data for the complexes, the enzyme, and the ligands, as well as useful insights into the inhibition mechanism of the OMPDC enzyme. Furthermore, these simulations are applied to clarify the ambiguous mechanism of the OMPDC enzyme, and imply that the substrate destabilization and transition state stabilization contribute to the mechanism of action of the most proficient enzyme, OMPDC.

  12. Mixtures of multiplicative cascade models in geochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. P. Agterberg

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Multifractal modeling of geochemical map data can help to explain the nature of frequency distributions of element concentration values for small rock samples and their spatial covariance structure. Useful frequency distribution models are the lognormal and Pareto distributions which plot as straight lines on logarithmic probability and log-log paper, respectively. The model of de Wijs is a simple multiplicative cascade resulting in discrete logbinomial distribution that closely approximates the lognormal. In this model, smaller blocks resulting from dividing larger blocks into parts have concentration values with constant ratios that are scale-independent. The approach can be modified by adopting random variables for these ratios. Other modifications include a single cascade model with ratio parameters that depend on magnitude of concentration value. The Turcotte model, which is another variant of the model of de Wijs, results in a Pareto distribution. Often a single straight line on logarithmic probability or log-log paper does not provide a good fit to observed data and two or more distributions should be fitted. For example, geochemical background and anomalies (extremely high values have separate frequency distributions for concentration values and for local singularity coefficients. Mixtures of distributions can be simulated by adding the results of separate cascade models. Regardless of properties of background, an unbiased estimate can be obtained of the parameter of the Pareto distribution characterizing anomalies in the upper tail of the element concentration frequency distribution or lower tail of the local singularity distribution. Computer simulation experiments and practical examples are used to illustrate the approach.

  13. Heat cascading regenerative sorption heat pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A simple heat cascading regenerative sorption heat pump process with rejected or waste heat from a higher temperature chemisorption circuit (HTCC) powering a lower temperature physisorption circuit (LTPC) which provides a 30% total improvement over simple regenerative physisorption compression heat pumps when ammonia is both the chemisorbate and physisorbate, and a total improvement of 50% or more for LTPC having two pressure stages. The HTCC contains ammonia and a chemisorbent therefor contained in a plurality of canisters, a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, and a heater, operatively connected together. The LTPC contains ammonia and a physisorbent therefor contained in a plurality of compressors, a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, operatively connected together. A closed heat transfer circuit (CHTC) is provided which contains a flowing heat transfer liquid (FHTL) in thermal communication with each canister and each compressor for cascading heat from the HTCC to the LTPC. Heat is regenerated within the LTPC by transferring heat from one compressor to another. In one embodiment the regeneration is performed by another CHTC containing another FHTL in thermal communication with each compressor. In another embodiment the HTCC powers a lower temperature ammonia water absorption circuit (LTAWAC) which contains a generator-absorber system containing the absorbent, and a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, operatively connected together. The absorbent is water or an absorbent aqueous solution. A CHTC is provided which contains a FHTL in thermal communication with the generator for cascading heat from the HTCC to the LTAWAC. Heat is regenerated within the LTAWAC by transferring heat from the generator to the absorber. The chemical composition of the chemisorbent is different than the chemical composition of the physisorbent, and the absorbent. The chemical composition of the FHTL is different than the chemisorbent, the physisorbent, the absorbent, and ammonia.

  14. Dynamics of quantum cascade lasers: numerics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Sande, Guy; Verschaffelt, Guy

    2016-04-01

    Since the original demonstration of terahertz quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs), the performance of these devices has shown rapid improvement. QCLs can now deliver milliwatts or more of continuous-wave radiation throughout the terahertz frequency range (300 GHz to 10 THz). Therefore, QCLs have become widely used in various applications such as spectroscopy, metrology or free-space telecommunications. For many of these applications there is a need for compact tuneable quantum cascade lasers. Nowadays most tuneable QCLs are based on a bulky external cavity configuration. We explore the possibility of tuning the operating wavelength through a fully integrated on-chip wavelength selective feedback applied to a dual wavelength QCL. Our numerical and analytical analyses are based on rate equation models describing the dynamics of QCLs extended to include delayed filtered optical feedback. We demonstrate the possibility to tune the operating wavelength by altering the absorption and/or amplification of the signal in the delayed feedback path. The tuning range of a laser is limited by the spectral width of its gain. For inter-band semiconductor lasers this spectral width is typically several tens of nm. Hence, the laser cavity supports the existence of multiple modes and on chip wavelength selective feedback has been demonstrated to be a promising tuning mechanism. We have selected a specific QCL gain structure with four energy levels and with two lasing transitions in the same cascade. In this scheme, the two lasing modes use a common upper level. Hence, the two modes compete in part for the same carriers to account for their optical gain. We have added delayed wavelength specific filtered optical feedback to the rate equation model describing these transitions. We have calculated the steady states and their stability in the absence of delay for the feedback field and studied numerically the case with non-zero delay. We have proven that wavelength tuning of a dual wavelength

  15. A stochastic model of cascades in 2D turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ditlevsen, Peter D

    2012-01-01

    The dual cascade of energy and enstrophy in 2D turbulence cannot easily be understood in terms of an analog to the Richardson-Kolmogorov scenario describing the energy cascade in 3D turbulence. The coherent up- and downscale fluxes points to non-locality of interactions in spectral space, and thus the specific spatial structure of the flow could be important. Shell models, which lack spacial structure and have only local interactions in spectral space, indeed fail in reproducing the correct scaling for the inverse cascade of energy. In order to exclude the possibility that non-locality of interactions in spectral space is crucial for the dual cascade, we introduce a stochastic spectral model of the cascades which is local in spectral space and which shows the correct scaling for both the direct enstrophy - and the inverse energy cascade.

  16. Cascading Multicriticality in Nonrelativistic Spontaneous Symmetry Breaking

    CERN Document Server

    Griffin, Tom; Horava, Petr; Yan, Ziqi

    2015-01-01

    Without Lorentz invariance, spontaneous global symmetry breaking can lead to multicritical Nambu-Goldstone modes with a higher-order low-energy dispersion $\\omega\\sim k^n$ ($n=2,3,\\ldots$), whose naturalness is protected by polynomial shift symmetries. Here we investigate the role of infrared divergences and the nonrelativistic generalization of the Coleman-Hohenberg-Mermin-Wagner (CHMW) theorem. We find novel cascading phenomena with large hierarchies between the scales at which the value of $n$ changes, leading to an evasion of the "no-go" consequences of the relativistic CHMW theorem.

  17. Direct and inverse cascades in the geodynamo

    CERN Document Server

    Reshetnyak, M

    2010-01-01

    The rapid rotation of planets causes cyclonic thermal turbulence in their cores which may generate the large-scale magnetic fields observed outside the planets. We consider the model which enables us reproduce the typical features of small-scale geostrophic flows in physical and wave spaces. We present estimates of kinetic and magnetic energy fluxes as a function of the wave number. The joint existence of forward and inverse cascades are demonstrated. We also consider the mechanism of magnetic field saturation at the end of the kinematic dynamo regime.

  18. Evaluating logic functionality of cascaded fracturable LUTs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Zhenhong; LIN Yu; LI Tianyi; JIA Rui; GAO Tongqiang; YANG Haigang

    2016-01-01

    Look Up Tables(LUTs) are the key components of Field-Programmable Gate Arrays(FPGAs). Many LUT architectures have been studied; nevertheless, it is difficult to quantificationally evaluate an LUT based architecture. Traditionally, dedicated efforts on specific modifications to the technology mapping tools are required for LUT architecture evaluation. A more feasible evaluation method for logic functionality is strongly required for the design of LUT architecture. In this paper, a mathematical method for logic functionality calculation is proposed and conventional and fracturable LUT architectures are analyzed. Furthermore, a cascaded fracturable LUT architecture is presented, which achieves twice logic functionality compared with the conventional LUTs and fracturable LUTs.

  19. Direct and inverse cascades in the geodynamo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Reshetnyak

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The rapid rotation of planets causes cyclonic thermal turbulence in their cores which may generate the large-scale magnetic fields observed outside the planets. We investigate numerically a model based on the geodynamo equations in simplified geometry, which enables us to reproduce the main features of small-scale geostrophic flows in physical and wave vector spaces. We find fluxes of kinetic and magnetic energy as a function of the wave number and demonstrate the co-existence of forward and inverse cascades. We also explain the mechanism of magnetic field saturation at the end of the kinematic dynamo regime.

  20. The Cascade of Non-Stationarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmont, P.; Kumarasamy, K.; Kelly, S. A.; Schaffrath, K. R.; Beach, T. J.

    2014-12-01

    Landscapes and channel networks are dynamic systems, often characterized by immense variability in time and space. Systematic shifts in hydrologic, geomorphic, or ecologic drivers can cause a cascade of changes within the system, which may fundamentally alter the way the system itself functions. Due to variability in resilience and resisting forces throughout the landscape, this cascade of changes may manifest in different ways within any given system. Humans may also exert considerable influence, often amplifying or damping system response. We illustrate the cascading effects of non-stationary hydrology and geomorphology in the Minnesota River Basin (MRB), a 44,000 km2 natural laboratory in which pervasive landscape disturbance has been triggered by several well-documented events. Rapid base-level lowering 13,400 YBP along the mainstem Minnesota River created a wave of incision, which continues to propagate up tributary channel networks. Temperature and precipitation have changed significantly in the MRB over the past century with rising temperatures, shifting precipitation patterns and an increase in heavy rainfall events. Streamflow has changed drastically and variably throughout the basin with 5% exceedance flows increasing 60-100% in recent decades, as increases in precipitation have been amplified by land management and artificial drainage. Increases in channel width and depth have occurred variably in the mainstem Minnesota River, the actively incising lower (knick zone) reaches of tributaries, and the low gradient, passively meandering reaches above the knick zones. Altered hydrologic regimes and channel morphologies, combined with increased sedimentation and nutrient loading have adversely affected aquatic biota via disruption of life cycles and habitat degradation. Existing landscape, water quality, and flood risk models are poorly equipped to deal with the cascading effects of non-stationarity and therefore may grossly over- or under

  1. Long-Haul TCP vs. Cascaded TCP

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Wu-chun

    2006-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the bandwidth and transfer time of long-haul TCP versus cascaded TCP [5]. First, we discuss the models for TCP throughput. For TCP flows in support of bulk data transfer (i.e., long-lived TCP flows), the TCP throughput models have been derived [2, 3]. These models rely on the congestion-avoidance algorithm of TCP. Though these models cannot be applied with short-lived TCP connections, our interest relative to logistical networking is in longer-li...

  2. Beam combining of quantum cascade laser arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Benjamin G; Kansky, Jan; Goyal, Anish K; Pflügl, Christian; Diehl, Laurent; Belkin, Mikhail A; Sanchez, Antonio; Capasso, Federico A

    2009-08-31

    Wavelength beam combining was used to co-propagate beams from 28 elements in an array of distributed-feedback quantum cascade lasers (DFB-QCLs). The beam-quality product of the array, defined as the product of near-field spot size and far-field divergence for the entire array, was improved by a factor of 21 by using wavelength beam combining. To demonstrate the applicability of wavelength beam combined DFB-QCL arrays for remote sensing, we obtained the absorption spectrum of isopropanol at a distance of 6 m from the laser array.

  3. Multiplier phenomenology in random multiplicative cascade processes

    CERN Document Server

    Jouault, B; Greiner, M; Jouault, Bruno; Lipa, Peter; Greiner, Martin

    1999-01-01

    We demonstrate that the correlations observed in conditioned multiplier distributions of the energy dissipation in fully developed turbulence can be understood as an unavoidable artefact of the observation procedure. Taking the latter into account, all reported properties of both unconditioned and conditioned multiplier distributions can be reproduced by cascade models with uncorrelated random weights if their bivariate splitting function is non-energy conserving. For the alpha-model we show that the simulated multiplier distributions converge to a limiting form, which is very close to the experimentally observed one. If random translations of the observation window are accounted for, also the subtle effects found in conditioned multiplier distributions are precisely reproduced.

  4. Plant MAPK cascades: Just rapid signaling modules?

    KAUST Repository

    Boudsocq, Marie

    2015-08-27

    © 2015 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. Abscisic acid (ABA) is a major phytohormone mediating important stress-related processes. We recently unveiled an ABA-activated MAPK signaling module constituted of MAP3K17/18-MKK3-MPK1/2/7/14. Unlike classical rapid MAPK activation, we showed that the activation of the new MAPK module is delayed and relies on the MAP3K protein synthesis. In this addendum, we discuss the role of this original and unexpected activation mechanism of MAPK cascades which suggests that MAPKs can regulate both early and longterm plant stress responses.

  5. Tracking Control for Switched Cascade Nonlinear Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxiao Dong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue of H∞ output tracking for switched cascade nonlinear systems is discussed in this paper, where not all the linear parts of subsystems are stabilizable. The conditions of the solvability for the issue are given by virtue of the structural characteristics of the systems and the average dwell time method, in which the total activation time for stabilizable subsystems is longer than that for the unstabilizable subsystems. At last, a simulation example is used to demonstrate the validity and advantages of the proposed approach.

  6. The identification of a cascade hypernucleus

    CERN Document Server

    Mondal, A S; Husain, A; Kasim, M M

    1979-01-01

    In a systematic search for rare hypernuclear species in nuclear emulsion exposed to 3.0 GeV/c K/sup -/-mesons at the CERN PS, an event with three connecting stars has been observed. The two secondary stars are most probably due to the decay of a cascade hypernucleus according to the following channel: /sub Xi //sup -13/-C to /sub Lambda //sup 8 /Be+/sub Lambda //sup 5/He+Q. The binding energy of the Xi - hypernucleus is B/sub Xi /-(/sub Xi //sup 13/-C)=(18.1+or-3.2) MeV. (11 refs).

  7. Cascaded uncoupled dual-ring modulator

    CERN Document Server

    Gu, Tingyi; Wong, Chee Wei; Dong, Po

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that by coherent driving two uncoupled rings in same direction, the effective photon circulating time in the dual ring modulator is reduced, with increased modulation quality. The inter-ring detuning dependent photon dynamics, Q-factor, extinction ratio and optical modulation amplitude of two cascaded silicon ring resonators are studied and compared with that of a single ring modulator. Experimentally measured eye diagrams, together with coupled mode theory simulations, demonstrate the enhancement of dual ring configuration at 20 Gbps with a Q ~ 20,000.

  8. Cascade impactor and jet plate for same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahlin, Robert S.; Farthing, William E.; Landham Jr., Edward C.

    2004-02-03

    A sampling system and method for sampling particulate matter from a high-temperature, high-pressure gas stream. A cyclone sampler for use at high temperatures and pressures, and having threadless sacrificial connectors is disclosed. Also disclosed is an improved cascade impactor including jet plates with integral spacers, and alignment features provided for aligning the jet plates with their associated collection substrates. An activated bauxite alkali collector is disclosed, and includes an alumina liner. The sampling system can be operated remotely or locally, and can be permanently installed or configured as a portable system.

  9. Understanding collision cascades in molecular solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krantzman, Kristin D. E-mail: krantzmank@cofc.edu; Postawa, Zbigniew; Garrison, Barbara J.; Winograd, Nicholas; Stuart, Steven J.; Harrison, Judith A

    2001-06-01

    This paper describes simulations of the sputtering of a molecular solid that uses a reactive potential with both covalent bonding and van der Waals interactions. Recently, the adaptive intermolecular REBO (AIREBO) potential has been developed, which incorporates intermolecular interactions in a manner that maintains the reactivity of the original reactive empirical bond-order (REBO) potential. Preliminary simulations of the keV bombardment of a molecular solid have been performed using the AIREBO potential. Molecules that are initially struck by the bombarding particle break into fragments. The fragments initiate molecular collision cascades leading to the ejection of intact molecules and molecular fragments from the surface.

  10. Dynamics of cavitating cascades. [transfer functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennen, C. E.; Acosta, A. J.

    1980-01-01

    The unsteady dynamics of cavitating cascades and inducer pumps were studied with a view to understanding (and possibly predicting) the dynamic characteristics of these devices. The chronology of the research is summarized as well as the final conculsions for each task. The construction of a dynamic pump test facility and its use in making experimental measurements of the transfer function is described as well as tests conducted using a scale model of the low pressure liquid oxygen turbopump inducer in the shuttle main engine. Auto-oscillation and unsteady inlet flow characteristics are discussed in addition to blade cavity influence and bubbly cavitation.

  11. Photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reininger, Peter, E-mail: peter.reininger@tuwien.ac.at; Schwarz, Benedikt; Harrer, Andreas; Zederbauer, Tobias; Detz, Hermann; Maxwell Andrews, Aaron; Gansch, Roman; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried [Institute for Solid State Electronics and Center for Micro- and Nanostructures, Vienna University of Technology, Floragasse 7, Vienna 1040 (Austria)

    2013-12-09

    In this Letter, we demonstrate the design, fabrication, and characterization of a photonic crystal slab quantum cascade detector (PCS-QCD). By employing a specifically designed resonant cavity, the performance of the photodetector is improved in three distinct ways. The PCS makes the QCD sensitive to surface normal incident light. It resonantly enhances the photon lifetime inside the active zone, thus increasing the photocurrent significantly. And, the construction form of the device inherently decreases the noise. Finally, we compare the characteristics of the PCS-QCD to a PCS - quantum well infrared photodetector and outline the advantages for certain fields of applications.

  12. Diode pumped erbium cascade fiber lasers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jackson, Stuart D.; Pollnau, Markus; Li, Jianfeng

    Cascading the 4I11/2 -> 4I13/2 transition at 2.8 μm and 4I13/2 -> 4I15/2 transition at 1.6 μm offers a solution to the thermal management of high power Er3+-doped fluoride fiber lasers. We demonstrate an output power of 8.2 W at 2.8 μm from an Er3+-doped fluorozirconate fiber laser with 56 W of

  13. Multiple Decay Mechanisms and 2D‐UV Spectroscopic Fingerprints of Singlet Excited Solvated Adenine‐Uracil Monophosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Quansong; Giussani, Angelo; Segarra‐Martí, Javier; Nenov, Artur; Rivalta, Ivan; Voityuk, Alexander A.; Mukamel, Shaul; Roca‐Sanjuán, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The decay channels of singlet excited adenine uracil monophosphate (ApU) in water are studied with CASPT2//CASSCF:MM potential energy calculations and simulation of the 2D‐UV spectroscopic fingerprints with the aim of elucidating the role of the different electronic states of the stacked conformer in the excited state dynamics. The adenine 1La state can decay without a barrier to a conical intersection with the ground state. In contrast, the adenine 1Lb and uracil S(U) states have minima that are separated from the intersections by sizeable barriers. Depending on the backbone conformation, the CT state can undergo inter‐base hydrogen transfer and decay to the ground state through a conical intersection, or it can yield a long‐lived minimum stabilized by a hydrogen bond between the two ribose rings. This suggests that the 1Lb, S(U) and CT states of the stacked conformer may all contribute to the experimental lifetimes of 18 and 240 ps. We have also simulated the time evolution of the 2D‐UV spectra and provide the specific fingerprint of each species in a recommended probe window between 25 000 and 38 000 cm−1 in which decongested, clearly distinguishable spectra can be obtained. This is expected to allow the mechanistic scenarios to be discerned in the near future with the help of the corresponding experiments. Our results reveal the complexity of the photophysics of the relatively small ApU system, and the potential of 2D‐UV spectroscopy to disentangle the photophysics of multichromophoric systems. PMID:27113273

  14. Multiple Decay Mechanisms and 2D-UV Spectroscopic Fingerprints of Singlet Excited Solvated Adenine-Uracil Monophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Quansong; Giussani, Angelo; Segarra-Martí, Javier; Nenov, Artur; Rivalta, Ivan; Voityuk, Alexander A; Mukamel, Shaul; Roca-Sanjuán, Daniel; Garavelli, Marco; Blancafort, Lluís

    2016-05-23

    The decay channels of singlet excited adenine uracil monophosphate (ApU) in water are studied with CASPT2//CASSCF:MM potential energy calculations and simulation of the 2D-UV spectroscopic fingerprints with the aim of elucidating the role of the different electronic states of the stacked conformer in the excited state dynamics. The adenine (1) La state can decay without a barrier to a conical intersection with the ground state. In contrast, the adenine (1) Lb and uracil S(U) states have minima that are separated from the intersections by sizeable barriers. Depending on the backbone conformation, the CT state can undergo inter-base hydrogen transfer and decay to the ground state through a conical intersection, or it can yield a long-lived minimum stabilized by a hydrogen bond between the two ribose rings. This suggests that the (1) Lb , S(U) and CT states of the stacked conformer may all contribute to the experimental lifetimes of 18 and 240 ps. We have also simulated the time evolution of the 2D-UV spectra and provide the specific fingerprint of each species in a recommended probe window between 25 000 and 38 000 cm(-1) in which decongested, clearly distinguishable spectra can be obtained. This is expected to allow the mechanistic scenarios to be discerned in the near future with the help of the corresponding experiments. Our results reveal the complexity of the photophysics of the relatively small ApU system, and the potential of 2D-UV spectroscopy to disentangle the photophysics of multichromophoric systems.

  15. Enhanced Molecular Recognition between Nucleobases and Guanine-5'-monophosphate-disodium (GMP) by Surfactant Aggregates in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhang; Wang, Dong; Cao, Meiwen; Han, Yuchun; Xu, Hai; Wang, Yilin

    2015-07-15

    Only specific base pairs on DNA can bind with each other through hydrogen bonds, which is called the Watson-Crick (W/C) pairing rule. However, without the constraint of DNA chains, the nucleobases in bulk aqueous solution usually do not follow the W/C pairing rule anymore because of the strong competitive effect of water and the multi-interaction edges of nucleobases. The present work applied surfactant aggregates noncovalently functionalized by nucleotide to enhance the recognition between nucleobases without DNA chains in aqueous solution, and it revealed the effects of their self-assembling ability and morphologies on the recognition. The cationic ammonium monomeric, dimeric, and trimeric surfactants DTAB, 12-3-12, and 12-3-12-3-12 were chosen. The surfactants with guanine-5'-monophosphate-disodium (GMP) form micelles, vesicles, and fingerprint-like and plate-like aggregates bearing the hydrogen-bonding sites of GMP, respectively. The binding parameters of these aggregates with adenine (A), uracil (U), guanine (G), and cytosine(C) indicate that the surfactants can promote W/C recognitions in aqueous solution when they form vesicles (GMP/DTAB) or plate-like aggregates (GMP/12-3-12) with proper molecular packing compactness, which not only provide hydrophobic environments but also shield non-W/C recognition edges. However, the GMP/12-3-12 micelles with loose molecular packing, the GMP/12-3-12 fingerprint-like aggregates where the hydrogen bond sites of GMP are occupied by itself, and the GMP/12-3-12-3-12 vesicles with too strong self-assembling ability cannot promote W/C recognition. This work provides insight into how to design self-assemblies with the performance of enhanced molecule recognition.

  16. Effect of electromagnetic field on cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in a human mu-opioid receptor cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Christina L; Teli, Thaleia; Harrison, Benjamin S

    2016-01-01

    During the cell communication process, endogenous and exogenous signaling affect normal as well as pathological developmental conditions. Exogenous influences such as extra-low-frequency electromagnetic field (EMF) have been shown to effect pain and inflammation by modulating G-protein receptors, down-regulating cyclooxygenase-2 activity, and affecting the calcium/calmodulin/nitric oxide pathway. Investigators have reported changes in opioid receptors and second messengers, such as cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), in opiate tolerance and dependence by showing how repeated exposure to morphine decreases adenylate cyclase activity causing cAMP to return to control levels in the tolerant state, and increase above control levels during withdrawal. Resonance responses to biological systems using exogenous EMF signals suggest that frequency response characteristics of the target can determine the EMF biological response. In our past research we found significant down regulation of inflammatory markers tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and nuclear factor kappa B (NFκB) using 5 Hz EMF frequency. In this study cAMP was stimulated in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells transfected with human mu-opioid receptors, then exposed to 5 Hz EMF, and outcomes were compared with morphine treatment. Results showed a 23% greater inhibition of cAMP-treating cells with EMF than with morphine. In order to test our results for frequency specific effects, we ran identical experiments using 13 Hz EMF, which produced results similar to controls. This study suggests the use of EMF as a complementary or alternative treatment to morphine that could both reduce pain and enhance patient quality of life without the side-effects of opiates.

  17. Crystallographic study of Glu58Ala RNase T1 x 2'-guanosine monophosphate at 1.9-A resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletinckx, J; Steyaert, J; Zegers, I; Choe, H W; Heinemann, U; Wyns, L

    1994-02-22

    Glu58 is known to participate in phosphodiester transesterification catalyzed by the enzyme RNase T1. For Glu58 RNase T1, an altered mechanism has been proposed in which His40 replaces Glu58 as the base catalyst [Steyaert, J., Hallenga, K., Wyns, L., & Stanssens, P. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 9064-9072]. Glu58Ala Rnase T1 has been cocrystallized with guanosine 2'-monophosphate (2'-GMP). The crystals are of space group P2(1), with one molecule per asymmetric unit (a = 32.44 A, b = 49.64 A, c = 26.09 A, beta = 99.17 degrees). The three-dimensional structure of the enzyme was determined to a nominal resolution of 1.9 A, yielding a crystallographic R factor of 0.178 for all X-ray data. Comparison of this structure with wild-type structures leads to the following conclusions. The minor changes apparent in the tertiary structure can be explained by either the mutation of Glu58 or by the change in the space group. In the active site, the extra space available through the mutation of Glu58 is occupied by the phosphate group (after a reorientation) and by a solvent molecule replacing a carboxylate oxygen of Glu58. This solvent molecule is a candidate for participation in the altered mechanism of this mutant enzyme. Following up on a study of conserved water sites in RNase T1 crystallized in space group P2(1)2(1)2(1) [Malin, R., Zielenkiewicz, P., & Saenger, W. (1991) J. Mol. Biol. 266, 4848-4852], we investigated the hydration structure for four different packing modes of RNase T1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Thiamine diphosphate in whole blood, thiamine and thiamine monophosphate in breast-milk in a refugee population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Stuetz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The provision of high doses of thiamine may prevent thiamine deficiency in the post-partum period of displaced persons. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The study aimed to evaluate a supplementation regimen of thiamine mononitrate (100 mg daily at the antenatal clinics in Maela refugee camp. Women were enrolled during antenatal care and followed after delivery. Samples were collected at 12 weeks post partum. Thiamine diphosphate (TDP in whole blood and thiamine in breast-milk of 636 lactating women were measured. Thiamine in breast-milk consisted of thiamine monophosphate (TMP in addition to thiamine, with a mean TMP to total thiamine ratio of 63%. Mean whole blood TDP (130 nmol/L and total thiamine in breast-milk (755 nmol/L were within the upper range reported for well-nourished women. The prevalence of women with low whole blood TDP (<65 nmol/L was 5% and with deficient breast-milk total thiamine (<300 nmol/L was 4%. Whole blood TDP predicted both breast-milk thiamine and TMP (R(2 = 0.36 and 0.10, p<0.001. A ratio of TMP to total thiamine ≥63% was associated with a 7.5 and 4-fold higher risk of low whole blood TDP and deficient total breast-milk thiamine, respectively. Routine provision of daily 100 mg of thiamine mononitrate post-partum compared to the previous weekly 10 mg of thiamine hydrochloride resulted in significantly higher total thiamine in breast-milk. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Thiamine supplementation for lactating women in Maela refugee camp is effective and should be continued. TMP and its ratio to total thiamine in breast-milk, reported for the first time in this study, provided useful information on thiamine status and should be included in future studies of breast-milk thiamine.

  19. Role of activation of 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase in gastric ulcer healing in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraka, Azza M; Deif, Maha M

    2011-01-01

    The potential utility of 5'-adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-activating agents, such as metformin, in inducing angiogenesis, could be a promising approach to promote healing of gastric ulcers complicated by diabetes mellitus. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of a drug that activates AMPK, namely metformin, in gastric ulcer healing in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Forty male Wistar albino rats were made diabetic by intraperitoneal (i.p.) streptozotocin injection and 10 rats were injected i.p. by a single dose of physiological saline. Six weeks following streptozotocin or saline injection, gastric ulcers were induced by serosal application of acetic acid. Three days after acetic acid application, rats were divided into group 1 (nondiabetic control), group 2 (streptozotocin-injected rats), groups 3-5 (streptozotocin-injected rats treated with metformin or metformin and an inhibitor of AMPK, namely compound C or pioglitazone) for 7 days following acetic acid application. Administration of metformin, but not pioglitazone, resulted in a significant decrease in the gastric ulcer area, a significant increase in epithelial regeneration assessed histologically, a significant increase in the number of microvessels in the ulcer margin, a significant increase in gastric vascular endothelial growth factor concentration and gastric von Willebrand factor as well as a significant increase in gastric phospho-AMPK. Compound C, an inhibitor of AMPK, blocked metformin-induced changes in assessed parameters suggesting that the effect of metformin was mediated mainly through activation of AMPK. Our results suggest the feasibility of a novel treatment strategy, namely drugs activating AMPK, for patients in whom impairment of ulcer healing constitutes a secondary complication of diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Myricetin is a novel inhibitor of human inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase with anti-leukemia activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Huiling; Hu, Qian; Wang, Jingyuan; Liu, Zehui; Wu, Dang [Shanghai Key Laboratory of New Drug Design, School of Pharmacy, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Mei Long Road, Shanghai 200237 (China); Lu, Weiqiang, E-mail: wqlu@bio.ecnu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Regulatory Biology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences and School of Life Sciences, East China Normal University, 500 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200241 (China); Huang, Jin, E-mail: huangjin@ecust.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Laboratory of New Drug Design, School of Pharmacy, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Mei Long Road, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2016-09-02

    Human inosine 5′-monophosphate dehydrogenase (hIMPDH) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the de novo biosynthetic pathway of purine nucleotides, playing crucial roles in cellular proliferation, differentiation, and transformation. Dysregulation of hIMPDH expression and activity have been found in a variety of human cancers including leukemia. In this study, we found that myricetin, a naturally occurring phytochemical existed in berries, wine and tea, was a novel inhibitor of human type 1 and type 2 IMPDH (hIMPDH1/2) with IC{sub 50} values of 6.98 ± 0.22 μM and 4.10 ± 0.14 μM, respectively. Enzyme kinetic analysis using Lineweaver-Burk plot revealed that myricetin is a mix-type inhibitor for hIMPDH1/2. Differential scanning fluorimetry and molecular docking simulation data demonstrate that myricetin is capable of binding with hIMPDH1/2. Myricetin treatment exerts potent anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects on K562 human leukemia cells in a dose-dependent manner. Importantly, cytotoxicity of myricetin on K562 cells were markedly attenuated by exogenous addition of guanosine, a salvage pathway of maintaining intracellular pool of guanine nucleotides. Taking together, these results indicate that natural product myricetin exhibits potent anti-leukemia activity by interfering with purine nucleotides biosynthetic pathway through the suppression of hIMPDH1/2 catalytic activity. - Highlights: • Myricetin, a common dietary flavonoid, is a novel inhibitor of hIMPDH1/2. • Myricetin directly binds with hIMPDH1/2 and induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of leukemia cells. • The cytotoxicity of myricetin on K562 cells is markedly attenuated by exogenous addition of guanosine.

  1. Amplified Peroxidase-Like Activity in Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Using Adenosine Monophosphate: Application to Urinary Protein Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ya-Chun; Wang, Yen-Ting; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2017-03-08

    Numerous compounds such as protein and double-stranded DNA have been shown to efficiently inhibit intrinsic peroxidase-mimic activity in Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NP) and other related nanomaterials. However, only a few studies have focused on finding new compounds for enhancing the catalytic activity of Fe3O4 NP-related nanomaterials. Herein, phosphate containing adenosine analogs are reported to enhance the oxidation reaction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and amplex ultrared (AU) for improving the peroxidase-like activity in Fe3O4 NPs. This enhancement is suggested to be a result of the binding of adenosine analogs to Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) sites on the NP surface and from adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) acting as the distal histidine residue of horseradish peroxidase for activating H2O2. Phosphate containing adenosine analogs revealed the following trend for the enhanced activity of Fe3O4 NPs: AMP > adenosine 5'-diphosphate > adenosine 5'-triphosphate. The peroxidase-like activity in the Fe3O4 NPs progressively increased with increasing AMP concentration and polyadenosine length. The Michaelis constant for AMP attached Fe3O4 NPs is 5.3-fold lower and the maximum velocity is 2.7-fold higher than those of the bare Fe3O4 NPs. Furthermore, on the basis of AMP promoted peroxidase mimicking activity in the Fe3O4 NPs and the adsorption of protein on the NP surface, a selective fluorescent turn-off system for the detection of urinary protein is developed.

  2. Methacholine and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) responsiveness, and the presence and degree of atopy in children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Dong I; Lee, Ju K; Kim, Chang K; Koh, Young Y

    2011-02-01

    The relationship between atopy and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), both key features of asthma, remains to be clarified. BHR is commonly evaluated by bronchial challenges using direct and indirect stimuli. The aim of this study was to investigate the degree of BHR to methacholine (direct stimulus) and adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) (indirect stimulus) according to the presence and degree of atopy in children with asthma. We performed a retrospective analysis of data from 120 children presenting with a diagnosis of asthma. These children were characterized by skin-prick tests (SPTs), spirometry and bronchial challenges with methacholine and AMP. Atopy was defined by at least one positive reaction to SPTs, and its degree was measured using serum total IgE levels, number of positive SPTs and atopic scores (sum of graded wheal size). A provocative concentration causing a 20% decline in FEV(1) (PC(20) ) was determined for each challenge. Patients with atopy(n=94) had a significantly lower AMP PC(20) than non-atopic patients (n=26), whereas methacholine PC(20) was not different between the two groups. Among the patients with atopy, there was no association between methacholine PC(20) and any atopy parameter. In contrast, a significant association was found between AMP PC(20) and the degree of atopy reflected in serum total IgE, number of positive SPTs and atopic scores (anova trend test, p=0.002, 0.001, 0.003, respectively). AMP responsiveness was associated with the presence and degree of atopy, whereas such a relationship was not observed for methacholine responsiveness. These findings suggest that atopic status may be better reflected by bronchial responsiveness assessed by AMP than by methacholine.

  3. Stopping pions in high-energy nuclear cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W. V.; Johnson, D. P.; Thompson, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    Results of Monte Carlo calculations for the number and energy spectra of charged pions from nuclear-electromagnetic cascades developing in rock are presented for primary hadron energies ranging from 3 to 3000 GeV. These spectra are given as functions of the longitudinal depth in the absorber and the lateral distance from the cascade axis. The number of charged pions which stop in the absorber increases with the primary energy of the hadron initiating the cascade.

  4. Application of Stereoscopic and Tomographic PIV in a Transonic Cascade

    OpenAIRE

    Klinner, Joachim; Willert, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The contribution demonstrates the applicability of volumetric PIV in a highly loaded compressor cascade at Ma_1 = 0.60. Under these operation conditions the secondary flow structures in the cascade are dominated by a passage vortex located at the base of the blade and near the suction side. The application of volume resolving thick-sheet PIV (or tomo-PIV) near the trailing edge of the cascades blades is intended to demonstrate the techniques potential of instantaneously resolving secondary fl...

  5. Large-scale separation and hysteresis in cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothmayer, A. P.; Smith, F. T.

    1985-01-01

    An approach using a two-dimensional thin aerofoil, allied with the theory of viscous bluff-body separation, is used to study the initial cross-over from massive separation to an attached flow in a single-row unstaggered cascade. Analytic solutions are developed for the limit of small cascade-spacing. From the analytic solutions several interesting features of the cascade are examined, including multiple-solution branches and multiple regions of hysteresis. In addition, numerical results are presented for several selected aerofoils. Some of the aerofoils are found to contain markedly enlarged regions of hysteresis for certain critical cascade spacings.

  6. Damped trophic cascades driven by fishing in model marine ecosystems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ken Haste; Pedersen, Martin

    2010-01-01

    that fishing does not change the overall slope of the size spectrum, but depletes the largest individuals and induces trophic cascades. A trophic cascade can propagate both up and down in trophic levels driven by a combination of changes in predation mortality and food limitation. The cascade is damped...... cascade triggered by the removal of top predators. Here we use a novel size- and trait-based model to explore how marine ecosystems might react to perturbations from different types of fishing pressure. The model explicitly resolves the whole life history of fish, from larvae to adults. The results show...

  7. The role of AVDR in linear cascade testing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bo Song; Wing F.Ng

    2007-01-01

    Linear cascade testing plays an important role in the research and development of turbomachinery and is widelv used over the world.The ideal cascade model of a turbomachinery blade row is two-dimensional.In actual linear cascade tesring,the flow through the test section converges due to the development of the boundary layer and secondary flow along the sidewall surfaces of the test section.Axial velocity density ratio(AVDR)is adopted to account for the deviation of the tested cascade flow from the ideal 2D model.Among numerous published cascade works,the influence of AVDR on cascade performance is seen to be complicated with many affecting factors,such as those related to cascade/blade geometry and flow conditions.Also,controlling AVDR is limited by the facility capability.Furthermore'real blade-to-blade flow in turborrlachines is usually associated with AVDR greater than unity due to limited span of blades between the hub and shroud such that cascade testing without reducing AVDR could be favored sometimes.All these facets add complexity and diversification to the matter.The current paper reviews previous studies and results on AVDR.ConsoIidated understanding on the role of AVDR and recommendations on how to deal with it in linear cascade testing are provided.

  8. Fear of large carnivores causes a trophic cascade

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Suraci, Justin P; Clinchy, Michael; Dill, Lawrence M; Roberts, Devin; Zanette, Liana Y

    2016-01-01

    The fear large carnivores inspire, independent of their direct killing of prey, may itself cause cascading effects down food webs potentially critical for conserving ecosystem function, particularly...

  9. Noise propagation in two-step series MAPK cascade.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Dhananjaneyulu

    Full Text Available Series MAPK enzymatic cascades, ubiquitously found in signaling networks, act as signal amplifiers and play a key role in processing information during signal transduction in cells. In activated cascades, cell-to-cell variability or noise is bound to occur and thereby strongly affects the cellular response. Commonly used linearization method (LM applied to Langevin type stochastic model of the MAPK cascade fails to accurately predict intrinsic noise propagation in the cascade. We prove this by using extensive stochastic simulations for various ranges of biochemical parameters. This failure is due to the fact that the LM ignores the nonlinear effects on the noise. However, LM provides a good estimate of the extrinsic noise propagation. We show that the correct estimate of intrinsic noise propagation in signaling networks that contain at least one enzymatic step can be obtained only through stochastic simulations. Noise propagation in the cascade depends on the underlying biochemical parameters which are often unavailable. Based on a combination of global sensitivity analysis (GSA and stochastic simulations, we developed a systematic methodology to characterize noise propagation in the cascade. GSA predicts that noise propagation in MAPK cascade is sensitive to the total number of upstream enzyme molecules and the total number of molecules of the two substrates involved in the cascade. We argue that the general systematic approach proposed and demonstrated on MAPK cascade must accompany noise propagation studies in biological networks.

  10. Nonlinear modeling of thermoacoustically driven energy cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Prateek; Scalo, Carlo; Lodato, Guido

    2016-11-01

    We present an investigation of nonlinear energy cascade in thermoacoustically driven high-amplitude oscillations, from the initial weakly nonlinear regime to the shock wave dominated limit cycle. We develop a first principle based quasi-1D model for nonlinear wave propagation in a canonical minimal unit thermoacoustic device inspired by the experimental setup of Biwa et al.. Retaining up to quadratic nonlinear terms in the governing equations, we develop model equations for nonlinear wave propagation in the proximity of differentially heated no-slip boundaries. Furthermore, we discard the effects of acoustic streaming in the present study and focus on nonlinear energy cascade due to high amplitude wave propagation. Our model correctly predicts the observed exponential growth of the thermoacoustically amplified second harmonic, as well as the energy transfer rate to higher harmonics causing wave steepening. Moreover, we note that nonlinear coupling of local pressure with heat transfer reduces thermoacoustic amplification gradually thus causing the system to reach limit cycle exhibiting shock waves. Throughout, we verify the results from the quasi-1D model with fully compressible Navier-Stokes simulations.

  11. The Cascade is a MMS Instanton

    CERN Document Server

    Evslin, J

    2004-01-01

    Wrap m D5-branes around the 2-cycle of a conifold, place n D3-branes at a point and watch the system relax. The D5-branes source m units of RR 3-form flux on the 3-cycle, which cause dielectric NS5-branes to nucleate and repeatedly sweep out the 3-cycle, each time gaining m units of D3-charge while the stack of D5-branes loses m units of D3-charge. A similar description of the Klebanov-Strassler cascade has been proposed by Kachru, et al. when m>>m-n. Using the T-dual MQCD we argue that the above process occurs for any m and n and in particular may continue for more than one step. The nonbaryonic roots of the SQCD vacua lead to new cascades because, for example, the 3-cycle swept does not link all of the D5's. This decay is the S-dual of a MMS instanton, which is the decay into flux of a brane that is trivial in twisted K-theory. This provides the first evidence for the S-dual of the K-theory classification that does not itself rely upon any strong/weak duality.

  12. High efficiency quantum cascade laser frequency comb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Quanyong; Wu, Donghai; Slivken, Steven; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2017-03-01

    An efficient mid-infrared frequency comb source is of great interest to high speed, high resolution spectroscopy and metrology. Here we demonstrate a mid-IR quantum cascade laser frequency comb with a high power output and narrow beatnote linewidth at room temperature. The active region was designed with a strong-coupling between the injector and the upper lasing level for high internal quantum efficiency and a broadband gain. The group velocity dispersion was engineered for efficient, broadband mode-locking via four wave mixing. The comb device exhibits a narrow intermode beatnote linewidth of 50.5 Hz and a maximum wall-plug efficiency of 6.5% covering a spectral coverage of 110 cm‑1 at λ ~ 8 μm. The efficiency is improved by a factor of 6 compared with previous demonstrations. The high power efficiency and narrow beatnote linewidth will greatly expand the applications of quantum cascade laser frequency combs including high-precision remote sensing and spectroscopy.

  13. Quantitative analysis of cascade impactor samples - revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlić , I.; Chiam, S. Y.; Sanchez, J. L.; Tang, S. M.

    1999-04-01

    Concentrations of aerosols collected in Singapore during the three months long haze period that affected the whole South-East Asian region in 1997 are reported. Aerosol samples were continuously collected by using a fine aerosol sampler (PM2.5) and occasionally with a single orifice cascade impactor (CI) sampler. Our results show that in the fine fraction (<2.5 μm) the concentrations of two well-known biomass burning products, i.e. K and S were generally increased by a factor 2-3 compared to the non-hazy periods. However, a discrepancy was noticed, at least for elements with lower atomic number (Ti and below) between the results obtained by the fine aerosol sampler and the cascade impactor. Careful analysis by means of Nuclear Microscopy, in particular by the Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy (STIM) technique, revealed that thicknesses of the lower CI stages exceeded thick target limits for 2 MeV protons. Detailed depth profiles of all CI stages were therefore measured using the STIM technique and concentrations corrected for absorption and proton energy loss. After correcting results for the actual sample thickness, concentrations of all major elements (S, Cl, K, Ca) agreed much better with the PM2.5 results. The importance of implementing thick target corrections in analysis of CI samples, especially those collected in the urban environments, is emphasized. Broad beam PIXE analysis approach is certainly not adequate in these cases.

  14. Cascades and perturbed Morse-Bott functions

    CERN Document Server

    Banyaga, Augustin

    2011-01-01

    Let $f:M \\rightarrow \\mathbb{R}$ be a Morse-Bott function on a finite dimensional closed smooth manifold $M$. Choosing an appropriate Riemannian metric on $M$ and Morse-Smale functions $f_j:C_j \\rightarrow \\mathbb{R}$ on the critical submanifolds $C_j$, one can construct a Morse chain complex whose boundary operator is defined by counting cascades \\cite{FraTheA}. Similar data, which also includes a parameter $\\epsilon > 0$ that scales the Morse-Smale functions $f_j$, can be used to define an explicit perturbation of the Morse-Bott function $f$ to a Morse-Smale function $h_\\epsilon:M \\rightarrow \\mathbb{R}$ \\cite{AusMor} \\cite{BanDyn}. In this paper we show that the Morse-Smale-Witten chain complex of $h_\\epsilon$ is the same as the Morse chain complex defined using cascades for any $\\epsilon >0$ sufficiently small. That is, the two chain complexes have the same generators, and their boundary operators are the same (up to a choice of sign). Thus, the Morse Homology Theorem implies that the homology of the casc...

  15. High efficiency quantum cascade laser frequency comb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Quanyong; Wu, Donghai; Slivken, Steven; Razeghi, Manijeh

    2017-01-01

    An efficient mid-infrared frequency comb source is of great interest to high speed, high resolution spectroscopy and metrology. Here we demonstrate a mid-IR quantum cascade laser frequency comb with a high power output and narrow beatnote linewidth at room temperature. The active region was designed with a strong-coupling between the injector and the upper lasing level for high internal quantum efficiency and a broadband gain. The group velocity dispersion was engineered for efficient, broadband mode-locking via four wave mixing. The comb device exhibits a narrow intermode beatnote linewidth of 50.5 Hz and a maximum wall-plug efficiency of 6.5% covering a spectral coverage of 110 cm−1 at λ ~ 8 μm. The efficiency is improved by a factor of 6 compared with previous demonstrations. The high power efficiency and narrow beatnote linewidth will greatly expand the applications of quantum cascade laser frequency combs including high-precision remote sensing and spectroscopy. PMID:28262834

  16. Frequency division using a micromechanical resonance cascade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qalandar, K. R., E-mail: kamala@engineering.ucsb.edu; Gibson, B.; Sharma, M.; Ma, A.; Turner, K. L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Strachan, B. S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48823 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48823 (United States); Shaw, S. W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48823 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48823 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    A coupled micromechanical resonator array demonstrates a mechanical realization of multi-stage frequency division. The mechanical structure consists of a set of N sequentially perpendicular microbeams that are connected by relatively weak elastic elements such that the system vibration modes are localized to individual microbeams and have natural frequencies with ratios close to 1:2:⋯:2{sup N}. Conservative (passive) nonlinear inter-modal coupling provides the required energy transfer between modes and is achieved by finite deformation kinematics. When the highest frequency beam is excited, this arrangement promotes a cascade of subharmonic resonances that achieve frequency division of 2{sup j} at microbeam j for j = 1, …, N. Results are shown for a capacitively driven three-stage divider in which an input signal of 824 kHz is passively divided through three modal stages, producing signals at 412 kHz, 206 kHz, and 103 kHz. The system modes are characterized and used to delineate the range of AC input voltages and frequencies over which the cascade occurs. This narrow band frequency divider has simple design rules that are scalable to higher frequencies and can be extended to a larger number of modal stages.

  17. Power Grid Defense Against Malicious Cascading Failure

    CERN Document Server

    Shakarian, Paulo; Lindelauf, Roy

    2014-01-01

    An adversary looking to disrupt a power grid may look to target certain substations and sources of power generation to initiate a cascading failure that maximizes the number of customers without electricity. This is particularly an important concern when the enemy has the capability to launch cyber-attacks as practical concerns (i.e. avoiding disruption of service, presence of legacy systems, etc.) may hinder security. Hence, a defender can harden the security posture at certain power stations but may lack the time and resources to do this for the entire power grid. We model a power grid as a graph and introduce the cascading failure game in which both the defender and attacker choose a subset of power stations such as to minimize (maximize) the number of consumers having access to producers of power. We formalize problems for identifying both mixed and deterministic strategies for both players, prove complexity results under a variety of different scenarios, identify tractable cases, and develop algorithms f...

  18. Quaternary Magmatism in the Cascades - Geologic Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildreth, Wes

    2007-01-01

    Foreward The Cascade magmatic arc is a belt of Quaternary volcanoes that extends 1,250 km from Lassen Peak in northern California to Meager Mountain in Canada, above the subduction zone where the Juan de Fuca Plate plunges beneath the North American Plate. This Professional Paper presents a synthesis of the entire volcanic arc, addressing all 2,300 known Quaternary volcanoes, not just the 30 or so visually prominent peaks that comprise the volcanic skyline. Study of Cascade volcanoes goes back to the geological explorers of the late 19th century and the seminal investigations of Howel Williams in the 1920s and 1930s. However, major progress and application of modern scientific methods and instrumentation began only in the 1970s with the advent of systematic geological, geophysical, and geochemical studies of the entire arc. Initial stimulus from the USGS Geothermal Research Program was enhanced by the USGS Volcano Hazards Program following the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens. Together, these two USGS Programs have provided more than three decades of stable funding, staffing, and analytical support. This Professional Paper summarizes the resultant USGS data sets and integrates them with the parallel contributions of other investigators. The product is based upon an all-encompassing and definitive geological database, including chemical and isotopic analyses to characterize the rocks and geochronology to provide the critical time constraints. Until now, this massive amount of data has not been summarized, and a systematic and uniform interpretation firmly grounded in geological fact has been lacking. Herein lies the primary utility of this Cascade volume. It not only will be the mandatory starting point for new workers, but also will provide essential geological context to broaden the perspectives of current investigators of specific Cascade volcanoes. Wes Hildreth's insightful understanding of volcanic processes and his uncompromising scientific integrity make him

  19. Sevoflurane effects on cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein, phosphorylated cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein, and Livin expression in the cortex and hippocampus of a vascular cognitive impairment rat model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin Wu; Ling Dan; Xianlin Zhu

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuronal necrosis and apoptosis play important roles in the pathophysiology of cerebral ischemia and resulting cognitive impairment. However, inhibition of neuronal necrosis and apoptosis has been shown to attenuate cognitive impairment following cerebral ischemia.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the effects of sevoflurane on cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element binding protein (CREB), phosphorylated CREB (pCREB), and Livin expression in the cortex and hippocampus of a rat model of vascular cognitive impairment.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: A randomized, controlled experiment was performed in the Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurology between June 2007 and July 2008.MATERIALS: Sevoflurane was provided by Abbott Laboratory, UK; Morris water maze was provided by Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, China; goat anti-rat CREB, goat anti-rat pCREB and goat anti-rat Livin antibodies were provided by Biosource International, USA.METHODS: A total of 42 female, Wistar rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: sham operation, vascular cognitive impairment, and sevoflurane treatment. The vascular cognitive impairment rat model was established by permanent bilateral occlusion of both common carotid arteries, and 1.0 MAC sevoflurane was immediately administered by inhalation for 2 hours.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: CREB, pCREB, and Livin expression was measured in the cortex and hippocampus by Western blot and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Behavior was evaluated with Morris water maze.RESULTS: CREB, pCREB, and Livin expression in the sevoflurane treatment group was significantly greater than the vascular cognitive impairment group (P<0.01). However, expression of CREB and pCREB was significantly less in the sevoflurane treatment and vascular cognitive impairment groups, compared with the sham operation group (P<0.01). Livin expression in the sevoflurane treatment and vascular cognitive impairment groups was significantly greater than the sham

  20. The Orbis Cascade Merger and Its Impact on Patron-Initiated Borrowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munson, Doris M.; Milton, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    In 2000, Eastern Washington University became part of the Cascade Consortium and participated in consortial borrowing through the Cascade Union Catalog. In 2003, the Orbis and Cascade consortia merged into the Orbis Cascade Alliance, which manages the Summit Union Catalog. Since 2000, Cascade or Summit consortial borrowing has increased while…

  1. Mechanism of the Orotidine 5’-Monophosphate Decarboxylase-Catalyzed Reaction: Importance of Residues in the Orotate Binding Site†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iiams, Vanessa; Desai, Bijoy J.; Fedorov, Alexander A.; Fedorov, Elena V.; Almo, Steven C.; Gerlt, John A.

    2011-01-01

    The reaction catalyzed by orotidine 5’-monophosphate decarboxylase (OMPDC) is accompanied by exceptional values for the rate enhancement [kcat/knon = 7.1 × 1016] and catalytic proficiency [(kcat/KM)/knon = 4.8 × 1022 M−1]. Although a stabilized vinyl carbanion/carbene intermediate is located on the reaction coordinate, the structural strategies by which the reduction in the activation energy barrier is realized remain incompletely understood. This laboratory recently reported that “substrate destabilization” by Asp 70 in the OMPDC from Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus (MtOMPDC) lowers the activation energy barrier by ~5 kcal/mol (contributing ~2.7 × 103 to the rate enhancement) [K. K. Chan, B. M. Wood, A. A. Fedorov, E. V. Fedorov, H. J. Imker, T. L. Amyes, J. P. Richard, S. C. Almo, and J. A. Gerlt (2009) Biochemistry 48, 5518–31]. We now report that substitutions of hydrophobic residues in a pocket proximal to the carboxylate group of the substrate (Ile 96, Leu 123, and Val 155) with neutral hydrophilic residues decrease the value of kcat by as much as 400-fold but have minimal effect on the value of kex for exchange of H6 of the FUMP product analog with solvent deuterium; we hypothesize that this pocket destabilizes the substrate by preventing hydration of the substrate carboxylate group. We also report that substitutions for Ser 127 that is proximal to O4 of the orotate ring decrease the value of kcat/KM, with the S127P substitution that eliminates hydrogen-bonding interactions with O4 producing a 2.5 × 106-fold reduction in the value of kcat/KM; this effect is consistent with delocalization of the negative charge of the carbanionic intermediate on O4 to produce an anionic carbene intermediate and thereby provide a structural strategy for stabilization of the intermediate. These observations provide additional information on the identities of the active site residues that contribute to the rate enhancement and, therefore, insights into the

  2. 36 CFR 7.66 - North Cascades National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false North Cascades National Park. 7.66 Section 7.66 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.66 North Cascades National Park....

  3. RECONFIGURING POWER SYSTEMS TO MINIMIZE CASCADING FAILURES: MODELS AND ALGORITHMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bienstock, Daniel

    2014-04-11

    the main goal of this project was to develop new scientific tools, based on optimization techniques, with the purpose of controlling and modeling cascading failures of electrical power transmission systems. We have developed a high-quality tool for simulating cascading failures. The problem of how to control a cascade was addressed, with the aim of stopping the cascade with a minimum of load lost. Yet another aspect of cascade is the investigation of which events would trigger a cascade, or more appropriately the computation of the most harmful initiating event given some constraint on the severity of the event. One common feature of the cascade models described (indeed, of several of the cascade models found in the literature) is that we study thermally-induced line tripping. We have produced a study that accounts for exogenous randomness (e.g. wind and ambient temperature) that could affect the thermal behavior of a line, with a focus on controlling the power flow of the line while maintaining safe probability of line overload. This was done by means of a rigorous analysis of a stochastic version of the heat equation. we incorporated a model of randomness in the behavior of wind power output; again modeling an OPF-like problem that uses chance-constraints to maintain low probability of line overloads; this work has been continued so as to account for generator dynamics as well.

  4. Temporal switching induced by cascaded third order nonlinearity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eilenberger, Falk; Bache, Morten; Minardi, Stefano;

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the impact of cascaded third harmonic generation and the intrinsic n4 material nonlinearity on the propagation of ultrashort pulses in noble-gas filled Kagome fibers. We show that the pressure tunability of the cascade allows for the implementation of temporal switching. We also...

  5. Impedance Coordinative Control for Cascaded Converter in Bidirectional Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Yanjun; Deng, Fujin; Chen, Zhe;

    2015-01-01

    difference between forward and reversed power flow. This paper addresses the analysis with the topology of cascaded dual-active-bridge converter (DAB) with inverter, and the proposed control method can also be implemented in unidirectional applications and other general cascaded converter system...

  6. Influence of blood flow on the coagulation cascade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The influence of diffusion and convetive flows on the blood coagulation cascade is investigated for a controlled perfusion experiment. We present a cartoon model and reaction schemes for parts of the coagulation cascade with sunsequent set up of a mathematical model in two space dimensions plus one...

  7. Cascade algorithm and multiresolution analysis on the Heisenberg group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Heping; LIU Yu; PENG Lizhong; CHU Xiaoyong

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the relationship between the convergence of cascade algorithm and orthogonal (or biorthogonal) multiresolution analysis on the Heisenberg group. It is proved that the (strong) convergence of cascade algorithm together with the perfect reconstruction condition induces an orthogonal multiresolution analysis and vice versa. Similar results are also proved for biorthogonal multiresolution analysis.

  8. Cascade vulnerability for risk analysis of water infrastructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitzenfrei, R; Mair, M; Möderl, M; Rauch, W

    2011-01-01

    One of the major tasks in urban water management is failure-free operation for at least most of the time. Accordingly, the reliability of the network systems in urban water management has a crucial role. The failure of a component in these systems impacts potable water distribution and urban drainage. Therefore, water distribution and urban drainage systems are categorized as critical infrastructure. Vulnerability is the degree to which a system is likely to experience harm induced by perturbation or stress. However, for risk assessment, we usually assume that events and failures are singular and independent, i.e. several simultaneous events and cascading events are unconsidered. Although failures can be causally linked, a simultaneous consideration in risk analysis is hardly considered. To close this gap, this work introduces the term cascade vulnerability for water infrastructure. Cascade vulnerability accounts for cascading and simultaneous events. Following this definition, cascade risk maps are a merger of hazard and cascade vulnerability maps. In this work cascade vulnerability maps for water distribution systems and urban drainage systems based on the 'Achilles-Approach' are introduced and discussed. It is shown, that neglecting cascading effects results in significant underestimation of risk scenarios.

  9. A cascaded online uninterruptible power supply using reduced semiconductor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lei; Loh, Poh Chiang; Gao, Feng

    2011-01-01

    A cascaded online uninterruptible power supply (UPS) is proposed here that uses 25% lesser semiconductor, as compared to its traditional H-bridge cascaded precedence. Unlike other component-saving configurations where compromises are unavoidable, almost no performance degradations and constraints...

  10. A simple model of global cascades on random networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Duncan J.

    2002-04-01

    The origin of large but rare cascades that are triggered by small initial shocks is a phenomenon that manifests itself as diversely as cultural fads, collective action, the diffusion of norms and innovations, and cascading failures in infrastructure and organizational networks. This paper presents a possible explanation of this phenomenon in terms of a sparse, random network of interacting agents whose decisions are determined by the actions of their neighbors according to a simple threshold rule. Two regimes are identified in which the network is susceptible to very large cascadesherein called global cascadesthat occur very rarely. When cascade propagation is limited by the connectivity of the network, a power law distribution of cascade sizes is observed, analogous to the cluster size distribution in standard percolation theory and avalanches in self-organized criticality. But when the network is highly connected, cascade propagation is limited instead by the local stability of the nodes themselves, and the size distribution of cascades is bimodal, implying a more extreme kind of instability that is correspondingly harder to anticipate. In the first regime, where the distribution of network neighbors is highly skewed, it is found that the most connected nodes are far more likely than average nodes to trigger cascades, but not in the second regime. Finally, it is shown that heterogeneity plays an ambiguous role in determining a system's stability: increasingly heterogeneous thresholds make the system more vulnerable to global cascades; but an increasingly heterogeneous degree distribution makes it less vulnerable.

  11. Climate Change and Baleen Whale Trophic Cascades in Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-30

    DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Climate Change and Baleen Whale Trophic Cascades in Greenland...SUBTITLE Climate Change And Baleen Whale Trophic Cascades In Greenland 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  12. Intermittent Flow Regimes in a Transonic Fan Airfoil Cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Lepicovsky

    2004-01-01

    velocity.To date, this flow behavior has only been observed in a linear transonic cascade. Further research is necessary to confirm this phenomenon occurs in actual transonic fans and is not the by-product of an endwall restricted linear cascade.

  13. A label-free and self-assembled electrochemical biosensor for highly sensitive detection of cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP) based on RNA riboswitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qingyun; Zhao, Fulin; Liu, Hongrui; Shan, Yanke; Liu, Fei

    2015-07-02

    Cyclic diguanylate monophosphate (c-di-GMP) is an important second messenger that regulates a variety of complex physiological processes involved in motility, virulence, biofilm formation and cell cycle progression in several bacteria. Herein we report a simple label-free and self-assembled RNA riboswitch-based biosensor for sensitive and selective detection of c-di-GMP. The detectable concentration range of c-di-GMP is from 50 nM to 1 μM with a detection limit of 50 nM.

  14. Cascaded FSO-VLC Communication System

    KAUST Repository

    Gupta, Akash

    2017-08-28

    The proposed cascaded free space optics (FSO)-visible light communication (VLC) system consists of multiple VLC access points which caters the end users connected via a decode and forward (DF) relay to the FSO backhaul link. The FSO link is assumed to be affected by path-loss, pointing error and atmospheric turbulence while the end-to-end signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of VLC downlinks are statistically characterized considering the randomness of users position. In this study, the novel closed form expressions of the statistics like probability density function (PDF) and cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the equivalent SNR are derived. Capitalizing on these, the closed form expressions for various performance metrics such as outage probability and error probability are provided. The simulation results are provided to verify the functional curves of mathematical analysis.

  15. Exact coherent structures for the turbulent cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckhardt, Bruno; Zammert, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    The exact coherent structures that are connected with the transition to turbulence in interior flows usually extend across the full height of the domain. Using exact coherent states that are localized in the shear direction together with scaling ideas for the Navier-Stokes equation that combine length and Reynolds number, we show how such large scale structures can be morphed into smaller scale coherent structures. As the Reynolds number increases, more of these states with ever smaller scales appear, all the way down to the Kolmogorov scale. We present the structure and dynamical properties of several families of exact coherent solution in plane Couette flow, with different degrees of spatial localization: Some of them remain localized in the center and help to built the turbulence cascade, others are localized near the walls and contribute to shaping the boundary layer profile.

  16. Congestion and cascades in payment systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyeler, Walter E.; Glass, Robert J.; Bech, Morten L.; Soramäki, Kimmo

    2007-10-01

    We develop a parsimonious model of the interbank payment system. The model incorporates an endogenous instruction arrival process, a scale-free topology of payments between banks, a fixed total liquidity which limits banks’ capacity to process arriving instructions, and a global market that distributes liquidity. We find that at low liquidity the system becomes congested and payment settlement loses correlation with payment instruction arrival, becoming coupled across the network. The onset of congestion is evidently related to the relative values of three characteristic times: the time for banks’ net position to return to 0, the time for a bank to exhaust its liquidity endowment, and the liquidity market relaxation time. In the congested regime settlement takes place in cascades having a characteristic length scale. A global liquidity market substantially attenuates congestion, requiring only a small fraction of the payment-induced liquidity flow to achieve strong beneficial effects.

  17. Research on Cascaded H-bridge SVG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannan Yu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the sharp increase of the non-linear loads, the power quality lagged behind the need for an adequate power system. With a fast response, low loss, low output harmonic current, SVG has become the mainstream of dynamic reactive power compensation devices. The paper introduces a multilevel cascaded H-bridge SVG, featured with DSP+FPGA dual-core control unit and fault-tolerant redundant system, which will enhance the reliability and dynamic response, reduce the switching loss and equipment cost, and increase the efficiency of the reactive power compensation. Through instructing the MATLAB simulation model of SVG and testing model machine, the design correction of medium voltage SVG power circuits and parameters is verified. The model machine is working well.

  18. Novel trophic cascades: apex predators enable coexistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallach, Arian D; Ripple, William J; Carroll, Scott P

    2015-03-01

    Novel assemblages of native and introduced species characterize a growing proportion of ecosystems worldwide. Some introduced species have contributed to extinctions, even extinction waves, spurring widespread efforts to eradicate or control them. We propose that trophic cascade theory offers insights into why introduced species sometimes become harmful, but in other cases stably coexist with natives and offer net benefits. Large predators commonly limit populations of potentially irruptive prey and mesopredators, both native and introduced. This top-down force influences a wide range of ecosystem processes that often enhance biodiversity. We argue that many species, regardless of their origin or priors, are allies for the retention and restoration of biodiversity in top-down regulated ecosystems.

  19. Hadron cascade by the method of characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsui, K.H.; Portella, H.M.; Navia, C.E.; Shigueoka, H. [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica]. E-mails: tsui@if.uff.br; hmport@if.uff.br; gficnoj@if.uff.br; hisa@if.uff.br; Oliveira, L.C.S. de [Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas (CBPF), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: oliveira@cbpf.br

    2005-02-01

    Hadron diffusion equations with energy-dependent interaction mean free paths and inelasticities are solved using the Mellin transform. Instead of using operators on the finite difference terms, the Mellin transformed equations are Taylor expanded into a first order partial differential equation in atmospheric depth t and in the transform parameter s. Then, these equations are solved by the method of residues. For the case of a regularized power law primary spectrum these hadron fluxes are given by simple residues and one, never before mentioned, essential singularities. A comparison of our solutions with the nucleon flux measured at sea level and with the hadron fluxes measured at t = 840 g/cm{sup 2} and at sea level are made. The agreement between them is in general very good, greater than 90%. In order to check the accuracy of our calculations, a comparison between our solution and the simulated nucleon cascades is also made. (author)

  20. Mechanical gating of a mechanochemical reaction cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Junpeng; Kouznetsova, Tatiana B.; Boulatov, Roman; Craig, Stephen L.

    2016-11-01

    Covalent polymer mechanochemistry offers promising opportunities for the control and engineering of reactivity. To date, covalent mechanochemistry has largely been limited to individual reactions, but it also presents potential for intricate reaction systems and feedback loops. Here we report a molecular architecture, in which a cyclobutane mechanophore functions as a gate to regulate the activation of a second mechanophore, dichlorocyclopropane, resulting in a mechanochemical cascade reaction. Single-molecule force spectroscopy, pulsed ultrasonication experiments and DFT-level calculations support gating and indicate that extra force of >0.5 nN needs to be applied to a polymer of gated gDCC than of free gDCC for the mechanochemical isomerization gDCC to proceed at equal rate. The gating concept provides a mechanism by which to regulate stress-responsive behaviours, such as load-strengthening and mechanochromism, in future materials designs.

  1. Electrical derivative measurement of quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dingkai; Cheng, Liwei; Chen, Xing; Choa, Fow-Sen; Fan, Jenyu; Worchesky, Terry

    2011-02-01

    The electrical derivative characteristics of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are investigated to test the QCL threshold, leakage current, and possibly explore carrier transport. QCL thresholds can be identified by searching for the slope peak of the first derivative of the I-V curves and can be further confirmed with its alignment to the peak of the second derivative of the I-V curves. Leakage current in QCLs with oxide-blocked ridge waveguides and buried heterostructure (BH) waveguides are studied and compared. The oxide-blocking structures provide the lowest leakage current although the capped-mesa-BH (CMBH) QCLs provide the toughest durability under highly stressful operations. The leakage current of CMBH QCLs are also compared at different temperatures.

  2. Availability Cascades and the Sharing Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netter, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    As scholars search for a new concept that will provide answers on how modern societies should make sense of and resolve the social and environmental problems linked to our modes of production and consumption, the sharing economy is attracting increased attention. To better understand this emergent...... focus on a sharing economy and associated business and consumption models, this conceptual chapter applies cascade theory to some of the most pronounced narratives , suggesting a win-win scenario, especially as they relate to the claim of sustainability. Given academics, practitioners, and civil society......’s shared history of (too) rapidly embracing new concepts that enable both business opportunities and a clear conscience, this chapter proposes that the implications of the sharing economy should be critically explored before it is actively promoted as the latest best fix....

  3. Free energy cascade in gyrokinetic turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Navarro, A Bañón; Albrecht-Marc, M; Merz, F; Görler, T; Jenko, F; Carati, D

    2010-01-01

    In gyrokinetic theory, the quadratic nonlinearity is known to play an important role in the dynamics by redistributing (in a conservative fashion) the free energy between the various active scales. In the present study, the free energy transfer is analyzed for the case of ion temperature gradient driven turbulence. It is shown that it shares many properties with the energy transfer in fluid turbulence. In particular, one finds a forward (from large to small scales), extremely local, and self-similar cascade of free energy in the plane perpendicular to the background magnetic field. These findings shed light on some fundamental properties of plasma turbulence, and encourage the development of large eddy simulation techniques for gyrokinetics.

  4. Cascading Node Failure with Continuous States in Random Geometric Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Kamran, Khashayar

    2016-01-01

    The increasing complexity and interdependency of today's networks highlight the importance of studying network robustness to failure and attacks. Many large-scale networks are prone to cascading effects where a limited number of initial failures (due to attacks, natural hazards or resource depletion) propagate through a dependent mechanism, ultimately leading to a global failure scenario where a substantial fraction of the network loses its functionality. These cascading failure scenarios often take place in networks which are embedded in space and constrained by geometry. Building on previous results on cascading failure in random geometric networks, we introduce and analyze a continuous cascading failure model where a node has an initial continuously-valued state, and fails if the aggregate state of its neighbors fall below a threshold. Within this model, we derive analytical conditions for the occurrence and non-occurrence of cascading node failure, respectively.

  5. A modeling framework for system restoration from cascading failures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chaoran; Li, Daqing; Zio, Enrico; Kang, Rui

    2014-01-01

    System restoration from cascading failures is an integral part of the overall defense against catastrophic breakdown in networked critical infrastructures. From the outbreak of cascading failures to the system complete breakdown, actions can be taken to prevent failure propagation through the entire network. While most analysis efforts have been carried out before or after cascading failures, restoration during cascading failures has been rarely studied. In this paper, we present a modeling framework to investigate the effects of in-process restoration, which depends strongly on the timing and strength of the restoration actions. Furthermore, in the model we also consider additional disturbances to the system due to restoration actions themselves. We demonstrate that the effect of restoration is also influenced by the combination of system loading level and restoration disturbance. Our modeling framework will help to provide insights on practical restoration from cascading failures and guide improvements of reliability and resilience of actual network systems.

  6. Tolerance of edge cascades with coupled map lattices methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Di; Gao Zi-You; Zheng Jian-Feng

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies the cascading failure on random networks and scale-free networks by introducing the tolerance parameter of edge based on the coupled map lattices methods. The whole work focuses on investigating some indices including the number of failed edges, dynamic edge tolerance capacity and the perturbation of edge. In general, it assumes that the perturbation is attributed to the normal distribution in adopted simulations. By investigating the effectiveness of edge tolerance in scale-free and random networks, it finds that the larger tolerance parameter 位 can more efficiently delay the cascading failure process for scale-free networks than random networks. These results indicate that the cascading failure process can be effectively controlled by increasing the tolerance parameter A. Moreover, the simulations also show that, larger variance of perturbation can easily trigger the cascading failures than the smaller one. This study may be useful for evaluating efficiency of whole traffic systems, and for alleviating cascading failure in such systems.

  7. Signal transduction by MAP kinase cascades in budding yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posas, F; Takekawa, M; Saito, H

    1998-04-01

    Budding yeast contain at least four distinct MAPK (mitogen activated protein kinase) cascades that transduce a variety of intracellular signals: mating-pheromone response, pseudohyphal/invasive growth, cell wall integrity, and high osmolarity adaptation. Although each MAPK cascade contains a conserved set of three protein kinases, the upstream activation mechanisms for these cascades are diverse, including a trimeric G protein, monomeric small G proteins, and a prokaryotic-like two-component system. Recently, it became apparent that there is extensive sharing of signaling elements among the MAPK pathways; however, little undesirable cross-talk occurs between various cascades. The formation of multi-protein signaling complexes is probably centrally important for this insulation of individual MAPK cascades.

  8. Fluctuation sensitivity of a transcriptional signaling cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkiewicz, Kevin R.; Mayo, Michael L.

    2016-09-01

    The internal biochemical state of a cell is regulated by a vast transcriptional network that kinetically correlates the concentrations of numerous proteins. Fluctuations in protein concentration that encode crucial information about this changing state must compete with fluctuations caused by the noisy cellular environment in order to successfully transmit information across the network. Oftentimes, one protein must regulate another through a sequence of intermediaries, and conventional wisdom, derived from the data processing inequality of information theory, leads us to expect that longer sequences should lose more information to noise. Using the metric of mutual information to characterize the fluctuation sensitivity of transcriptional signaling cascades, we find, counter to this expectation, that longer chains of regulatory interactions can instead lead to enhanced informational efficiency. We derive an analytic expression for the mutual information from a generalized chemical kinetics model that we reduce to simple, mass-action kinetics by linearizing for small fluctuations about the basal biological steady state, and we find that at long times this expression depends only on a simple ratio of protein production to destruction rates and the length of the cascade. We place bounds on the values of these parameters by requiring that the mutual information be at least one bit—otherwise, any received signal would be indistinguishable from noise—and we find not only that nature has devised a way to circumvent the data processing inequality, but that it must be circumvented to attain this one-bit threshold. We demonstrate how this result places informational and biochemical efficiency at odds with one another by correlating high transcription factor binding affinities with low informational output, and we conclude with an analysis of the validity of our assumptions and propose how they might be tested experimentally.

  9. Influence of the condensate and inverse cascade on the direct cascade in wave turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Korotkevich, A O

    2009-01-01

    During direct numerical simulation of the isotropic turbulence of surface gravity waves in the framework of Hamiltonian equations formation of the long wave background or condensate was observed. Exponents of the direct cascade spectra at the different levels of an artificial condensate suppression show a tendency to become closer to the prediction of the wave turbulence theory at lower levels of condensate. A simple qualitative explanation of the mechanism of this phenomenon is proposed.

  10. Changes in cAMP and cGMP concentration birefringent fibrils and contractile activity accompanying UV and blue light photoavoidance in plasmodia of an albino strain of Physarum polycephalum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Tetsuo; Mori Yoshihito; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki; Kobatake, Yonosuke

    1988-02-01

    Photoavoidance by plasmodia of an albino strain of Physarum polycephalum was studied. When the organism was irradiated locally, the protoplasm moved away from the irradiated region. The action spectrum for this avoidance showed three peaks at about 260, 370 and 460 nm. The organism was about one hundred times as sensitive to far UV as to near UV and blue light, and high intensity far-UV caused the gelation of the protoplasm. Irradiation with UV or blue light increased the mean level or the amplitude of oscillation in intracellular cAMP and cGMP concentrations. Upon UV irradiation, birefringent fibrils, presumably microfilaments of F-actin, became thick and numerous, and the plasmodial strand generated a strong tensile force. It is postulated that UV or blue light brings about an increased concentration of cyclic nucleotides which leads to an enhanced local development of contractile fibrils which squeeze protoplasmic sol from the area, resulting in photoavoidance.

  11. Molecular characterization of adenosine 5'-monophosphate deaminase--the key enzyme responsible for the umami taste of nori (Porphyra yezoensis Ueda, Rhodophyta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Seiko; Sato, Minoru; Shiraiwa, Yoshihiro; Iwamoto, Koji

    2011-12-01

    The enzyme adenosine 5'-monophosphate deaminase (AMPD, EC 3.5.4.6) catalyzes the conversion of adenosine 5'-monophosphate to inosine 5'-mononucleotide (IMP). IMP is generally known as the compound responsible for the umami taste of the edible red alga Porphyra yezoensis Ueda that is known in Japan as nori. Therefore, we suspect that AMPD plays a key role in providing a favorable nori taste. In this study, we undertake the molecular characterization of nori-derived AMPD. The nori AMPD protein has a molecular mass of 55 kDa as estimated from both gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The calculated molecular mass from the amino acid sequence deduced from cDNA is 57.1 kDa. The isoelectric point is 5.71. The coding region of AMPD consists of 1,566 bp encoding 522 amino acids and possesses a transmembrane domain and two N-glycosylation sites. The sequence identity of nori AMPD in human and yeast AMPDs was found to be less than 50% and 20% in DNA and amino acid sequences, respectively. Proline in the conserved motif of [SA]-[LIVM]-[NGS]-[STA]-D-D-P was found to be converted to glutamate. These results indicate that nori AMPD is a novel type of AMPD.

  12. Application of graphene-ionic liquid-chitosan composite-modified carbon molecular wire electrode for the sensitive determination of adenosine-5'-monophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fan; Gong, Shixing; Xu, Li; Zhu, Huanhuan; Sun, Zhenfan; Sun, Wei

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, a graphene (GR) ionic liquid (IL) 1-octyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate and chitosan composite-modified carbon molecular wire electrode (CMWE) was fabricated by a drop-casting method and further applied to the sensitive electrochemical detection of adenosine-5'-monophosphate (AMP). CMWE was prepared with diphenylacetylene (DPA) as the modifier and the binder. The properties of modified electrode were examined by scanning electron microscopy, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Electrochemical behaviors of AMP was carefully investigated with enhanced responses appeared, which was due to the presence of GR-IL composite on the electrode surface with excellent electrocatalytic ability. A well-defined oxidation peak of AMP appeared at 1.314 V and the electrochemical parameters were calculated by electrochemical methods. Under the selected conditions, the oxidation peak current of AMP was proportional to its concentration in the range from 0.01 μM to 80.0 μM with the detection limit as 3.42 nM (3σ) by differential pulse voltammetry. The proposed method exhibited good selectivity and was applied to the detection of vidarabine monophosphate injection samples with satisfactory results.

  13. Factors Associated with PMTCT Cascade Completion in Four African Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodie Dionne-Odom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Many countries are working to reduce or eliminate mother-to-child transmission (MTCT of HIV. Prevention efforts have been conceptualized as steps in a cascade but cascade completion rates during and after pregnancy are low. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was performed across 26 communities in Cameroon, Cote d’Ivoire, South Africa, and Zambia. Women who reported a pregnancy within two years were enrolled. Participant responses were used to construct the PMTCT cascade with all of the following steps required for completion: at least one antenatal visit, HIV testing performed, HIV testing result received, initiation of maternal prophylaxis, and initiation of infant prophylaxis. Factors associated with cascade completion were identified using multivariable logistic regression modeling. Results. Of 976 HIV-infected women, only 355 (36.4% completed the PMTCT cascade. Although most women (69.2% did not know their partner’s HIV status; awareness of partner HIV status was associated with cascade completion (aOR 1.4, 95% CI 1.01–2.0. Completion was also associated with receiving an HIV diagnosis prior to pregnancy compared with HIV diagnosis during or after pregnancy (aOR 14.1, 95% CI 5.2–38.6. Conclusions. Pregnant women with HIV infection in Africa who were aware of their partner’s HIV status and who were diagnosed with HIV before pregnancy were more likely to complete the PMTCT cascade.

  14. Out of control: Fluctuation of cascading dynamics in networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianwei; Cai, Lin; Xu, Bo; Li, Peng; Sun, Enhui; Zhu, Zhiguo

    2016-11-01

    Applying two preferential selection mechanisms of flow destination, we develop two new methods to quantify the initial load of a node, where the flow is transported along the shortest path between two nodes. We propose a simple cascading model and study cascading dynamics induced by attacking the node with the highest load in some synthetic and actual networks. Surprisingly, we observe the abnormal fluctuation of cascading dynamics, i.e., more damage can be triggered if we spend significantly higher cost to protect a network. In particular, this phenomenon is independent of the initial flow distribution and the preferential selection mechanisms of flow destination. However, it remains unclear which specific structural patterns may affect the fluctuation of cascading dynamics. In this paper, we examine the local evolution of the cascading propagation by constructing some special networks. We show that revivals of some nodes in the double ring structure facilitate the transportation of the flow between two unconnected sub-networks, cause more damage and subsequently lead to the abnormal fluctuation of cascading dynamics. Compared with the traditional definition of the betweenness, we adopt two new proposed methods to further evaluate the resilience of several actual networks. We find that some real world networks reach the strongest resilience level against cascading failures in our preferential selection mechanisms of flow destination. Moreover, we explore how to use the minimum cost to maximize the resilience of the studied networks.

  15. Energy spectra and passive tracer cascades in turbulent flows

    CERN Document Server

    Jolly, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We study the influence of the energy spectrum on the extent of the cascade range of a passive tracer in turbulent flows. The interesting cases are when there are two different spectra over the potential range of the tracer cascade (in 2D when the tracer forcing is in the inverse energy cascade range, and in 3D when the Schmidt number Sc is large). The extent of the tracer cascade range is then limited by the width of the range for the shallower of the two energy spectra. Nevertheless, we show that in dimension $d=2,3$ the tracer cascade range extends (up to a logarithm) to $\\kappa_{d\\text{D}}^{p}$, where $\\kappa_{d\\text{D}}$ is the wavenumber beyond which diffusion should dominate and $p$ is arbitrarily close to 1, provided Sc is larger than a certain power (depending on $p$) of the Grashof number. We also derive estimates which suggest that in 2D, for Sc${}\\sim1$ a wide tracer cascade can coexist with a significant inverse energy cascade at Grashof numbers large enough to produce a turbulent flow.

  16. Energy and carbon balances of wood cascade chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathre, Roger; Gustavsson, Leif [Ecotechnology, Mid Sweden University, SE-831 25 OEstersund (Sweden)

    2006-07-15

    In this study we analyze the energy and carbon balances of various cascade chains for recovered wood lumber. Post-recovery options include reuse as lumber, reprocessing as particleboard, pulping to form paper products, and burning for energy recovery. We compare energy and carbon balances of chains of cascaded products to the balances of products obtained from virgin wood fiber or from non-wood material. We describe and quantify several mechanisms through which cascading can affect the energy and carbon balances: direct cascade effects due to different properties and logistics of virgin and recovered materials, substitution effects due to the reduced demand for non-wood materials when wood is cascaded, and land use effects due to alternative possible land uses when less timber harvest is needed because of wood cascading. In some analyses we assume the forest is a limiting resource, and in others we include a fixed amount of forest land from which biomass can be harvested for use as material or biofuel. Energy and carbon balances take into account manufacturing processes, recovery and transportation energy, material recovery losses, and forest processes. We find that land use effects have the greatest impact on energy and carbon balances, followed by substitution effects, while direct cascade effects are relatively minor. (author)

  17. The Effect of X-radiation on Circadian Rhythms of cAMP and cGMP in Worker's Urine%X射线探伤对操作工人尿cAMP和cGMP昼夜节律的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱金华

    2001-01-01

    [目的] 探讨X射线探伤对操作工人尿液环磷酸腺苷(cAMP)、环磷酸鸟苷(cGMP)昼夜含量的影响。 [方法] 分别测定正常人群和射线探伤工人1天中5个不同时点尿中cAMP和cGMP的含量。 [结果] 正常人群尿液中cAMP、cGMP含量和cAMP/cGMP比值存在昼夜节律变化,其峰值分别位于02∶27时、16∶34时和03∶21时,X射线暴露工人相应节律消失,1天中的16∶00时最易受射线影响。 [结论] X射线可能影响工人尿液中环核苷酸的昼夜节律。%[Objective] The investigation was to study the circadian rhythms of cAMP and cGMP in urine of workers. [Methods] The concentrations of cAMP and cGMP in urine were determined at 5 different time points during a day. [Results] The different circadian rhythms of cAMP,cGMP and cAMP/cGMP were found. The acrophase of cAMP,cGMP and cAMP/cGMP were at 02∶27,16∶34 and 03∶21 in control group,respectively,however,the circadian rhythm disappeared in workers exposed to X-radiation. [Conclusion] Low doses of X-radiation can affect the circadian rhythm of cAMP,cGMP and cAMP/cGMP ratio.

  18. Novel Radioligands for Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterase Imaging with Positron Emission Tomography: An Update on Developments Since 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susann Schröder

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs are a class of intracellular enzymes that inactivate the secondary messenger molecules, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP. Thus, PDEs regulate the signaling cascades mediated by these cyclic nucleotides and affect fundamental intracellular processes. Pharmacological inhibition of PDE activity is a promising strategy for treatment of several diseases. However, the role of the different PDEs in related pathologies is not completely clarified yet. PDE-specific radioligands enable non-invasive visualization and quantification of these enzymes by positron emission tomography (PET in vivo and provide an important translational tool for elucidation of the relationship between altered expression of PDEs and pathophysiological effects as well as (pre-clinical evaluation of novel PDE inhibitors developed as therapeutics. Herein we present an overview of novel PDE radioligands for PET published since 2012.

  19. Revised tephra volumes for Cascade Range volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathenson, Manuel

    2017-07-01

    Isopach maps from tephra eruptions from Mount St. Helens were reported in Carey et al. (1995) and for tephra eruptions from Glacier Peak in Gardner et al. (1998). For exponential thinning, the isopach data only define a single slope on a log thickness versus square root of area plot. Carey et al. (1995) proposed a model that was used to estimate a second slope, and volumes were presented in both studies using this model. A study by Sulpizio (2005) for estimating the second slope and square root of area where the lines intersect involves a systematic analysis of many eruptions to provide correlation equations. The purpose of this paper is to recalculate the volumes of Cascades eruptions and compare results from the two methods. In order to gain some perspective on the methods for estimating the second slope, we use data for thickness versus distance beyond the last isopach that are available for some of the larger eruptions in the Cascades. The thickness versus square root of area method is extended to thickness versus distance by developing an approximate relation between the two assuming elliptical isopachs with the source at one of the foci. Based on the comparisons made between the Carey et al. (1995) and Sulpizio (2005) methods, it is felt that the later method provides a better estimate of the second slope. For Mount St. Helens, the estimates of total volume using the Sulpizio (2005) method are generally smaller than those using the Carey et al. (1995) method. For the volume estimates of Carey et al. (1995), the volume of the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens is smaller than six of the eight previous eruptions. With the new volumes using the Sulpizio (2005) method, the 1980 eruption is smaller in volume than the upper end of the range for only three of the layers (Wn, Ye, and Yn) and is the same size as layer We. Thus the 1980 eruption becomes representative of the mid-range of volumes rather than being in the lower range.

  20. Revised tephra volumes for Cascade Range volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathenson, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Isopach maps from tephra eruptions from Mount St. Helens were reported in Carey et al. (1995) and for tephra eruptions from Glacier Peak in Gardner et al. (1998). For exponential thinning, the isopach data only define a single slope on a log thickness versus square root of area plot. Carey et al. (1995) proposed a model that was used to estimate a second slope, and volumes were presented in both studies using this model. A study by Sulpizio (2005) for estimating the second slope and square root of area where the lines intersect involves a systematic analysis of many eruptions to provide correlation equations. The purpose of this paper is to recalculate the volumes of Cascades eruptions and compare results from the two methods. In order to gain some perspective on the methods for estimating the second slope, we use data for thickness versus distance beyond the last isopach that are available for some of the larger eruptions in the Cascades. The thickness versus square root of area method is extended to thickness versus distance by developing an approximate relation between the two assuming elliptical isopachs with the source at one of the foci. Based on the comparisons made between the Carey et al. (1995) and Sulpizio (2005) methods, it is felt that the later method provides a better estimate of the second slope. For Mount St. Helens, the estimates of total volume using the Sulpizio (2005) method are generally smaller than those using the Carey et al. (1995) method. For the volume estimates of Carey et al. (1995), the volume of the May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens is smaller than six of the eight previous eruptions. With the new volumes using the Sulpizio (2005) method, the 1980 eruption is smaller in volume than the upper end of the range for only three of the layers (Wn, Ye, and Yn) and is the same size as layer We. Thus the 1980 eruption becomes representative of the mid-range of volumes rather than being in the lower range.

  1. Probabilistic analysis of cascade failure dynamics in complex network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ding-Xue; Zhao, Dan; Guan, Zhi-Hong; Wu, Yonghong; Chi, Ming; Zheng, Gui-Lin

    2016-11-01

    The impact of initial load and tolerance parameter distribution on cascade failure is investigated. By using mean field theory, a probabilistic cascade failure model is established. Based on the model, the damage caused by certain attack size can be predicted, and the critical attack size is derived by the condition of cascade failure end, which ensures no collapse. The critical attack size is larger than the case of constant tolerance parameter for network of random distribution. Comparing three typical distributions, simulation results indicate that the network whose initial load and tolerance parameter both follow Weibull distribution performs better than others.

  2. Operation of polarization order of vector beams with cascaded metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xunong; Huang, Panli; Huang, Xiuzhang; Xu, Zhaoxin; Zhang, Chen; Zhao, Jun; Liu, Xiaoqing; Ai, Yuqian; Chen, Huan

    2017-09-01

    Metasurface is an effective tool for smanipulating optical wave and can be used to generate vector beams. In this work, we propose a method to realize the operation of the polarization order of vector beams with cascaded metasurfaces. Employing Jones calculation, we theoretically analyze the transformation of cascaded metasurfaces for linearly polarized incident light. The results show that two directly cascaded metasurfaces can realize the subtraction operation of polarization order of vector beam. When a half-wave plate is inserted between the two metasurfaces, the addition operation of polarization order can be achieved. Lastly, verification experiments are performed. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  3. Cascaded third harmonic generation in hybrid graphene-semiconductor waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Smirnova, Daria A

    2015-01-01

    We study cascaded harmonic generation of hybrid surface plasmons in integrated planar waveguides composed of a graphene layer and a doped-semiconductor slab. We derive a comprehensive model of cascaded third harmonic generation through phase-matched nonlinear interaction of fundamental, second harmonic and third harmonic plasmonic modes supported by the structure. We show that hybrid graphene-semiconductor waveguides can simultaneously phase-match these three interacting harmonics, increasing the total third-harmonic output by a factor of 5 compared to the non-cascaded regime.

  4. Blind Deconvolution in Nonminimum Phase Systems Using Cascade Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqing Zhang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a novel cascade demixing structure for multichannel blind deconvolution in nonminimum phase systems. To simplify the learning process, we decompose the demixing model into a causal finite impulse response (FIR filter and an anticausal scalar FIR filter. A permutable cascade structure is constructed by two subfilters. After discussing geometrical structure of FIR filter manifold, we develop the natural gradient algorithms for both FIR subfilters. Furthermore, we derive the stability conditions of algorithms using the permutable characteristic of the cascade structure. Finally, computer simulations are provided to show good learning performance of the proposed method.

  5. An Improved Phase Disposition SPWM Strategy for Cascaded Multilevel Inverter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinbang Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Carrier Phase Shifted (CPS strategy is conventional for cascaded multilevel inverter, because it can naturally ensure all cascaded cells to output balanced power. However, in point of spectra of the output line voltage, CPS is suboptimal to Phase Disposition (PD strategy, because the latter can not naturally ensure power balance. This paper presents an improved PD strategy, inspiration from the disposition of CPS strategy triangle carriers. Just reconstructing the triangle carriers of PD strategy, it can not only reserve the waveform quality of the line voltage to be optimal, but also naturally ensure the output power of each cascaded cells to be balanced.

  6. Magnetic reconnection from a multiscale instability cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Auna L; Bellan, Paul M

    2012-02-15

    Magnetic reconnection, the process whereby magnetic field lines break and then reconnect to form a different topology, underlies critical dynamics of magnetically confined plasmas in both nature and the laboratory. Magnetic reconnection involves localized diffusion of the magnetic field across plasma, yet observed reconnection rates are typically much higher than can be accounted for using classical electrical resistivity. It is generally proposed that the field diffusion underlying fast reconnection results instead from some combination of non-magnetohydrodynamic processes that become important on the 'microscopic' scale of the ion Larmor radius or the ion skin depth. A recent laboratory experiment demonstrated a transition from slow to fast magnetic reconnection when a current channel narrowed to a microscopic scale, but did not address how a macroscopic magnetohydrodynamic system accesses the microscale. Recent theoretical models and numerical simulations suggest that a macroscopic, two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic current sheet might do this through a sequence of repetitive tearing and thinning into two-dimensional magnetized plasma structures having successively finer scales. Here we report observations demonstrating a cascade of instabilities from a distinct, macroscopic-scale magnetohydrodynamic instability to a distinct, microscopic-scale (ion skin depth) instability associated with fast magnetic reconnection. These observations resolve the full three-dimensional dynamics and give insight into the frequently impulsive nature of reconnection in space and laboratory plasmas.

  7. Astronomical Forcing of Salt Marsh Biogeochemical Cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, J. T.; Sundberg, K.

    2008-12-01

    Astronomically forced changes in the hydroperiod of a salt marsh affect the rate of marsh primary production leading to a biogeochemical cascade. For example, salt marsh primary production and biogeochemical cycles in coastal salt marshes are sensitive to the 18.6-year lunar nodal cycle, which alters the tidal amplitude by about 5 cm. For marshes that are perched high in the tidal frame, a relatively small increase in tidal amplitude and flooding lowers sediment salinity and stimulates primary production. Porewater sulfide concentrations are positively correlated with tidal amplitude and vary on the same cycle as primary production. Soluble reactive phosphate and ammonium concentrations in pore water also vary on this 18.6- year cycle. Phosphate likely responds to variation in the reaction of sulfide with iron-phosphate compounds, while the production of ammonium in sediments is coupled to the activity of diazotrophs that are carbon- limited and, therefore, are regulated by primary productivity. Ammonium also would accumulate when sulfides block nitrification. These dependencies work as a positive feedback between primary production and nutrient supply and are predictive of the near-term effects of sea-level rise.

  8. Optimization Issues in a Harmonic Cascade FEL

    CERN Document Server

    De Ninno, G

    2005-01-01

    Presently there is significant interest by multiple groups (e.g. BNL, ELETTRA, LBNL, BESSY, MIT) to reach short output wavelengths via a harmonic cascade FEL using an external seed laser. In a multistage device, there are a number of "free" parameters such as the nominal power of the input seed, the lengths of the individual modulator and radiator undulators, the strengths (i.e. the R56's) of the dispersive sections, the choice of the actual harmonic numbers to reach a given wavelength, etc., whose optimization is a non-trivial exercise. In particular, one can choose whether to operate predominantly in the "high gain" regime such as was proposed by Yu [1] in which case each radiator undulator is many gain lengths long or, alternatively, in the "low gain" regime in which case all undulators (except possibly the last radiator) are a couple gain lengths or less long and the output from each radiator essentially corresponds to coherent spontaneous emission from a pre-bunched beam. With particular emphasis upon th...

  9. Cascading reminiscence bumps in popular music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumhansl, Carol Lynne; Zupnick, Justin Adam

    2013-10-01

    Autobiographical memories are disproportionately recalled for events in late adolescence and early adulthood, a phenomenon called the reminiscence bump. Previous studies on music have found autobiographical memories and life-long preferences for music from this period. In the present study, we probed young adults' personal memories associated with top hits over 5-and-a-half decades, as well as the context of their memories and their recognition of, preference for, quality judgments of, and emotional reactions to that music. All these measures showed the typical increase for music released during the two decades of their lives. Unexpectedly, we found that the same measures peaked for the music of participants' parents' generation. This finding points to the impact of music in childhood and suggests that these results reflect the prevalence of music in the home environment. An earlier peak occurred for 1960s music, which may be explained by its quality or by its transmission through two generations. We refer to this pattern of musical cultural transmission over generations as cascading reminiscence bumps.

  10. Cascade category-aware visual search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shiliang; Tian, Qi; Huang, Qingming; Gao, Wen; Rui, Yong

    2014-06-01

    Incorporating image classification into image retrieval system brings many attractive advantages. For instance, the search space can be narrowed down by rejecting images in irrelevant categories of the query. The retrieved images can be more consistent in semantics by indexing and returning images in the relevant categories together. However, due to their different goals on recognition accuracy and retrieval scalability, it is hard to efficiently incorporate most image classification works into large-scale image search. To study this problem, we propose cascade category-aware visual search, which utilizes weak category clue to achieve better retrieval accuracy, efficiency, and memory consumption. To capture the category and visual clues of an image, we first learn category-visual words, which are discriminative and repeatable local features labeled with categories. By identifying category-visual words in database images, we are able to discard noisy local features and extract image visual and category clues, which are hence recorded in a hierarchical index structure. Our retrieval system narrows down the search space by: 1) filtering the noisy local features in query; 2) rejecting irrelevant categories in database; and 3) preforming discriminative visual search in relevant categories. The proposed algorithm is tested on object search, landmark search, and large-scale similar image search on the large-scale LSVRC10 data set. Although the category clue introduced is weak, our algorithm still shows substantial advantages in retrieval accuracy, efficiency, and memory consumption than the state-of-the-art.

  11. Depression: An Immuno-Inflammatory Cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Sharma

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Major depressive disorder also known as clinical depression, unipolar depression or depression is associated with significant morbidity, mortality, high suicidal tendencies and deaths. Preclinical and clinical studies suggest that psychiatric illnesses like MDD, are associated with inflammatory processes. While it is unlikely that major depressive disorder is a primary and lsquo;inflammatory' disorder, there is now evidence to suggest that inflammation play a subtle role in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder. The inflammation in depression cascade pin points to the origin from immune hyperactivity and thus a new theory that explains role of immune system mediated inflammation has been accepted and researched upon. widely. This theory states that depression is accompanied by altered immune function and activation of the inflammatory response system. This theory is strengthened form the fact that the current therapeutic options which mainly target neurotransmitters, are not effective in many patients and these patients has been found to be associated with elevated levels of inflammatory mediators specifically cytokines. It is reported more recently that other risk factors for depression, including psychosocial stress, psychological trauma, sleep disturbance and pain, also increases inflammatory processes. Thus the intervention in the immune system originated from inflammatory cytokines seems a therapeutically viable option in the field of depression research. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2016; 25(2.000: 223-240

  12. Transient Rechargeable Batteries Triggered by Cascade Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Kun; Liu, Zhen; Yao, Yonggang; Wang, Zhengyang; Zhao, Bin; Luo, Wei; Dai, Jiaqi; Lacey, Steven D; Zhou, Lihui; Shen, Fei; Kim, Myeongseob; Swafford, Laura; Sengupta, Louise; Hu, Liangbing

    2015-07-08

    Transient battery is a new type of technology that allows the battery to disappear by an external trigger at any time. In this work, we successfully demonstrated the first transient rechargeable batteries based on dissoluble electrodes including V2O5 as the cathode and lithium metal as the anode as well as a biodegradable separator and battery encasement (PVP and sodium alginate, respectively). All the components are robust in a traditional lithium-ion battery (LIB) organic electrolyte and disappear in water completely within minutes due to triggered cascade reactions. With a simple cut-and-stack method, we designed a fully transient device with an area of 0.5 cm by 1 cm and total energy of 0.1 J. A shadow-mask technique was used to demonstrate the miniature device, which is compatible with transient electronics manufacturing. The materials, fabrication methods, and integration strategy discussed will be of interest for future developments in transient, self-powered electronics. The demonstration of a miniature Li battery shows the feasibility toward system integration for all transient electronics.

  13. Particle energy cascade in the intergalactic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, M.; Evoli, C.; Ferrara, A.

    2010-05-01

    We study the development of high-energy (Ein MEDEA (Monte Carlo Energy Deposition Analysis) which includes Bremsstrahlung and inverse Compton (IC) processes, along with H/He collisional ionizations and excitations, and electron-electron collisions. The cascade energy partition into heating, excitations and ionizations depends primarily not only on the IGM ionized fraction, xe, but also on redshift, z, due to IC on cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons. While Bremsstrahlung is unimportant under most conditions, IC becomes largely dominant at energies Ein >= 1 MeV. The main effect of IC at injection energies Ein = 1 GeV CMB photons are preferentially upscattered within the X-ray spectrum (hν > 104 eV) and can free stream to the observer. Complete tables of the fractional energy depositions as a function of redshift, Ein and ionized fraction are given. Our results can be used in many astrophysical contexts, with an obvious application related to the study of decaying/annihilating dark matter (DM) candidates in the high-z Universe.

  14. Quantum cascade laser Kerr frequency comb

    CERN Document Server

    Lecaplain, Caroline; Lucas, Erwan; Jost, John D; Kippenberg, Tobias J

    2015-01-01

    The mid-infrared (mid-IR) regime (typically the wavelength regime of $\\lambda \\sim 2.5-20 \\ \\mathrm{\\mu m}$) is an important spectral range for spectroscopy as many molecules have their fundamental rotational-vibrational absorption in this band. Recently optical frequency combs based on optical microresonators ("Kerr" combs) at the onset of the mid-IR region have been generated using crystalline resonators and integrated planar silicon micro-resonators. Here we extend for the first time Kerr combs deep into the mid-IR i.e. the 'molecular fingerprint' region. This is achieved by combining an ultra high quality (Q) factor mid-IR microresonator based on crystalline $\\mathrm{MgF_{2}}$ with the quantum cascade laser (QCL) technology. Using a tapered chalgogenide (ChG) fiber and a QCL continuous wave pump laser, frequency combs at $\\lambda\\sim 4.4\\ \\mathrm{\\mu m}$ (i.e. 2270cm$^{-1}$) are generated, that span over 600nm (i.e. 300cm$^{-1}$) in bandwidth, with a mode spacing of 14.3GHz (0.5cm$^{-1}$), corresponding t...

  15. Probing the energy cascade of convective turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunnen, R P J; Clercx, H J H

    2014-12-01

    The existence of a buoyancy-dominated scaling range in convective turbulence is a longstanding open question. We investigate this issue by considering the scale-by-scale energy budget in direct numerical simulations of Rayleigh-Bénard convection. We try to minimize the so-called Bolgiano length scale, the length scale at which buoyancy becomes dominant for scaling. Therefore, we deliberately choose modest Rayleigh numbers Ra=2.5×10(6) and 2.5×10(7). The budget reveals that buoyant forcing, turbulent energy transfer, and dissipation are contributing significantly over a wide range of scales. Thereby neither Kolmogorov-like (balance of turbulent transfer and dissipation) nor Bolgiano-Obukhov-like scaling (balance of turbulent transfer and buoyancy) is expected in the structure functions, which indeed reveal inconclusive scaling behavior. Furthermore, we consider the calculation of the Bolgiano length scale. To account for correlations between the dissipation rates of kinetic energy and thermal variance we propose to average the Bolgiano length scale directly. This gives an estimate, which is one order of magnitude larger than the previous estimate, and actually larger than the domain itself. Rather than studying the scaling of structure functions, we propose that the use of scale-by-scale energy budgets resolving anisotropic contributions is appropriate to consider the energy cascade mechanisms in turbulent convection.

  16. Compression-absorption cascade refrigeration system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Seara, Jose; Sieres, Jaime; Vazquez, Manuel [Area de Maquinas y Motores Termicos, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenieros Industriales, Universidade de Vigo, Campus Lagoas-Marcosende, 9, 36200 Vigo (Spain)

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes the study carried out to analyse a refrigeration system in cascade with a compression system at the low temperature stage and an absorption system at the high temperature stage to generate cooling at low temperatures, as well as the possibility of powering it by means of a cogeneration system. CO{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} have been considered as refrigerants in the compression stage and the pair NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O in the absorption stage. The analysis has been realized by means of a mathematical model of the refrigeration system implemented in a computer program and taking into account the characteristic operating conditions of a cogeneration system with gas engines. The paper presents the results obtained regarding the performance of the refrigeration system and the adaptability between the power requirements of the refrigeration system and the power supplied by the cogeneration system taking into account the present Spanish Regulations about the use of cogeneration systems. [Author].

  17. 电针对吗啡戒断大鼠cAMP、cGMP水平的影响%Effect of Electroacupunture on cAMP and cGMP Level of Morphine Withdrawal Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯晓蓉; 张荣军; 宋小鸽; 唐照亮; 许冠荪

    2005-01-01

    目的研究电针吗啡戒断大鼠足三里穴对大鼠环磷鸟苷酸(cyclic guanosine 3′,5′-monophosphate,cGMP)及环磷腺苷酸(cyclic adenosine 3′,5′-monophosphate,cAMP)含量的影响,探讨电针改善戒断症状作用的可能机制.方法建立吗啡依赖大鼠自然戒断模型,采用放射免疫分析法测定血液、脑组织中cGMP、cAMP含量.结果戒断Ⅰ组大鼠血液cAMP含量增高(P<0.01),cGMP含量明显降低(P<0.01),cAMP/cGMP比值显著增高(P<0.01);戒断Ⅱ组大鼠脑中cGMP、cAMP含量均明显减少(P<0.01);电针组cGMP、cAMP含量接近正常水平.结论电针足三里穴改善大鼠吗啡戒断症状可能与调节cGMP、cAMP系统的相互作用有关.

  18. Terahertz Quantum Cascade Laser Based 3D Imaging Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — LongWave Photonics proposes a terahertz quantum-cascade laser based swept-source optical coherence tomography (THz SS-OCT) system for single-sided, 3D,...

  19. Quantum cascade laser infrared spectroscopy of single cancer cells

    KAUST Repository

    Patel, Imran

    2017-03-27

    Quantum cascade laser infrared spectroscopy is a next generation novel imaging technique allowing high resolution spectral imaging of cells. We show after spectral pre-processing, identification of different cancer cell populations within minutes.

  20. Dynamic Modeling of Cascading Failure in Power Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Jiajia; Ghanavati, Goodarz; Hines, Paul D H

    2014-01-01

    The modeling of cascading failure in power systems is difficult because of the many different mechanisms involved; no single model captures all of these mechanisms. Understanding the relative importance of these different mechanisms is an important step in choosing which mechanisms need to be modeled for particular types of cascading failure analysis. This work presents a dynamic simulation model of both power networks and protection systems, which can simulate a wider variety of cascading outage mechanisms, relative to existing quasi-steady state (QSS) models. The model allows one to test the impact of different load models and protections on cascading outage sizes. This paper describes each module of the developed dynamic model and demonstrates how different mechanisms interact. In order to test the model we simulated a batch of randomly selected $N-2$ contingencies for several different static load configurations, and found that the distribution of blackout sizes and event lengths from the proposed dynamic...

  1. Noise properties and cascadability of SOA-EA regenerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, Filip; Bischoff, Svend; Tromborg, Bjarne;

    2002-01-01

    We suggest and analyse a new device containing concatenated pairs of semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) and electroabsorption modulators (EAs). The device has regenerative properties and improves the cascadability of optical fibre links....

  2. Mutually independent cascades in anisotropic soap-film turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chien-Chia; Gioia, Gustavo; Chakraborty, Pinaki

    2015-03-01

    Computational, experimental and field data amassed to date indicate that in 2D turbulence the spectrum of longitudinal velocity fluctuations, E11 (k1) , and the spectrum of transverse velocity fluctuations, E22 (k1) , correspond always to the same cascade, consistent with isotropy, so that E11 (k1) ~k-α and E22 (k1) ~k-α , where the ``spectral exponent'' α is either 5/3 (for the inverse-energy cascade) or 3 (for the enstrophy cascade). Here, we carry out experiments on turbulent 2D soap-film flows in which E11 (k1) ~k - 5 / 3 and E22 (k1) ~k-3 , as if two mutually independent cascades were concurrently active within the same flow. To our knowledge, this species of spectrum has never been observed or predicted theoretically. Our finding might open up new vistas in the understanding of turbulence.

  3. The biogeography of trophic cascades on US oyster reefs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbro, David L; Byers, James E; Grabowski, Jonathan H; Hughes, A Randall; Piehler, Michael F

    2014-07-01

    Predators can indirectly benefit prey populations by suppressing mid-trophic level consumers, but often the strength and outcome of trophic cascades are uncertain. We manipulated oyster reef communities to test the generality of potential causal factors across a 1000-km region. Densities of oyster consumers were weakly influenced by predators at all sites. In contrast, consumer foraging behaviour in the presence of predators varied considerably, and these behavioural effects altered the trophic cascade across space. Variability in the behavioural cascade was linked to regional gradients in oyster recruitment to and sediment accumulation on reefs. Specifically, asynchronous gradients in these factors influenced whether the benefits of suppressed consumer foraging on oyster recruits exceeded costs of sediment accumulation resulting from decreased consumer activity. Thus, although predation on consumers remains consistent, predator influences on behaviour do not; rather, they interact with environmental gradients to cause biogeographic variability in the net strength of trophic cascades.

  4. Statistical analysis of cascading failures in power grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pfitzner, Rene [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turitsyn, Konstantin [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-01

    We introduce a new microscopic model of cascading failures in transmission power grids. This model accounts for automatic response of the grid to load fluctuations that take place on the scale of minutes, when optimum power flow adjustments and load shedding controls are unavailable. We describe extreme events, caused by load fluctuations, which cause cascading failures of loads, generators and lines. Our model is quasi-static in the causal, discrete time and sequential resolution of individual failures. The model, in its simplest realization based on the Directed Current description of the power flow problem, is tested on three standard IEEE systems consisting of 30, 39 and 118 buses. Our statistical analysis suggests a straightforward classification of cascading and islanding phases in terms of the ratios between average number of removed loads, generators and links. The analysis also demonstrates sensitivity to variations in line capacities. Future research challenges in modeling and control of cascading outages over real-world power networks are discussed.

  5. Cascade Structure of Digital Predistorter for Power Amplifier Linearization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. B. Solovyeva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a cascade structure of nonlinear digital predistorter (DPD synthesized by the direct learning adaptive algorithm is represented. DPD is used for linearization of power amplifier (PA characteristic, namely for compensation of PA nonlinear distortion. Blocks of the cascade DPD are described by different models: the functional link artificial neural network (FLANN, the polynomial perceptron network (PPN and the radially pruned Volterra model (RPVM. At synthesis of the cascade DPD there is possibility to overcome the ill conditionality problem due to reducing the dimension of DPD nonlinear operator approximation. Results of compensating nonlinear distortion in Wiener–Hammerstein model of PA at the GSM–signal with four carriers are shown. The highest accuracy of PA linearization is produced by the cascade DPD containing PPN and RPVM.

  6. Enantiomer separation in a cascaded micellar-enhanced ultrafiltration system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Overdevest, P.E.M.; Hoenders, M.H.J.; Riet, van 't K.; Padt, van der A.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.

    2002-01-01

    The increasing demand for optically pure compounds (enantiomers) stimulates the development of new enantiomer separation processes on an industrial scale. The separation of enantiomers by ultrafiltration of enantioselective micelles was studied in a cascaded system. The feasibility of this separatio

  7. Influence of Blade Chordwise Lean on Development of Cascade Losses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HanWanjin; HuangHongyan; 等

    1996-01-01

    An experimetal investigation was carried out on the effect of blade chordwise lean on the losse in highly loaded rectangular turbine cascades,Datailed measurements include 10 traverses from upstream to downstream of the cascades with five-hole spherical probes.Compared with the experimental data of the coventional Straight and pitchwise lean blades under the same conditions,it is shown that the effect of chordwise lean on the development of the cascade losses is similar to that of pitchwise lean.However,the chordwise lean produces smaller streamwise adverse pressure gradients near both endwalls and a smaller spanwise negative one starting from the actute angle side in the first part of the passages in chordwise lean cascade,thereby the saddle point separations and intensities of the passage vortices are weakened and the secondary vorte losses are cut down notably.

  8. On periodic orbits in discrete-time cascade systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huimin Li

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We present some results on existence, minimum period, number of periodic orbits, and stability of periodic orbits in discrete-time cascade systems. Some examples are presented to illustrate these results.

  9. Vulnerability and Cosusceptibility Determine the Size of Network Cascades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Nishikawa, Takashi; Motter, Adilson E.

    2017-01-01

    In a network, a local disturbance can propagate and eventually cause a substantial part of the system to fail in cascade events that are easy to conceptualize but extraordinarily difficult to predict. Here, we develop a statistical framework that can predict cascade size distributions by incorporating two ingredients only: the vulnerability of individual components and the cosusceptibility of groups of components (i.e., their tendency to fail together). Using cascades in power grids as a representative example, we show that correlations between component failures define structured and often surprisingly large groups of cosusceptible components. Aside from their implications for blackout studies, these results provide insights and a new modeling framework for understanding cascades in financial systems, food webs, and complex networks in general.

  10. Cascading failures in local-world evolving networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhe-jing BAO; Yi-jia CAO

    2008-01-01

    The local-world (LW) evolving network model shows a transition for the degree distribution between the exponential and power-law distributions, depending on the LW size. Cascading failures under intentional attacks in LW network models with different LW sizes were investigated using the cascading failures load model. We found that the LW size has a significant impact on the network's robustness against deliberate attacks. It is much easier to trigger cascading failures in LW evolving networks with a larger LW size. Therefore, to avoid cascading failures in real networks with local preferential attachment such as the Internet, the World Trade Web and the multi-agent system, the LW size should be as small as possible.

  11. Electron-positron cascades in multiple-laser optical traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vranic, Marija; Grismayer, Thomas; Fonseca, Ricardo A.; Silva, Luis O.

    2017-01-01

    We present an analytical and numerical study of multiple-laser QED cascades induced with linearly polarised laser pulses. We analyse different polarisation orientations and propose a configuration that maximises cascade multiplicity and favours laser absorption. We generalise the analytical estimate for the cascade growth rate previously calculated in the field of two colliding linearly polarised laser pulses and account for multiple laser interaction. The estimate is verified by a comprehensive numerical study of four-laser QED cascades across a range of different laser intensities with QED PIC module of OSIRIS. We show that by using four linearly polarised 30 fs laser pulses, one can convert more than 50% of the total energy to gamma-rays at laser intensity I≃ {{10}24}~\\text{W}~\\text{c}{{\\text{m}}-2} . In this configuration, the laser conversion efficiency is higher compared with the case with two colliding lasers.

  12. On the polar cap cascade pair multiplicity of young pulsars

    CERN Document Server

    Timokhin, A N

    2015-01-01

    We study the efficiency of pair production in polar caps of young pulsars under a variety of conditions to estimate the maximum possible multiplicity of pair plasma in pulsar magnetospheres. We develop a semi-analytic model for calculation of cascade multiplicity which allows efficient exploration of the parameter space and corroborate it with direct numerical simulations. Pair creation processes are considered separately from particle acceleration in order to assess different factors affecting cascade efficiency, with acceleration of primary particles described by recent self-consistent non-stationary model of pair cascades. We argue that the most efficient cascades operate in the curvature radiation/synchrotron regime, the maximum multiplicity of pair plasma in pulsar magnetospheres is ~few x 10^5. The multiplicity of pair plasma in magnetospheres of young energetic pulsars weakly depends on the strength of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of magnetic field lines and has a stronger dependence ...

  13. PULSE MODULATION POWER AMPLIFIER WITH ENHANCED CASCADE CONTROL METHOD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A digital switching power amplifier with Multivariable Enhanced Cascade Controlled (MECC) includes a modulator, a switching power stage and a low pass filter. In the first preferred embodiment an enhanced cascade control structure local to the switching power stage is added, characterised by havi...... and feedback path A to determine stable self-oscillating conditions. An implemented 250W example MECC digital power amplifier has proven superior performance in terms of audio performance (0.005 % distortion, 115 dB dynamic range) and efficiency (92 %).......A digital switching power amplifier with Multivariable Enhanced Cascade Controlled (MECC) includes a modulator, a switching power stage and a low pass filter. In the first preferred embodiment an enhanced cascade control structure local to the switching power stage is added, characterised by having...

  14. Electron - positron cascades in multiple-laser optical traps

    CERN Document Server

    Vranic, Marija; Fonseca, Ricardo A; Silva, Luis O

    2016-01-01

    We present an analytical and numerical study of multiple-laser QED cascades induced with linearly polarised laser pulses. We analyse different polarisation orientations and propose a configuration that maximises the cascade multiplicity and favours the laser absorption. We generalise the analytical estimate for the cascade growth rate previously calculated in the field of two colliding linearly polarised laser pulses and account for multiple laser interaction. The estimate is verified by a comprehensive numerical study of four-laser QED cascades across a range of different laser intensities with QED PIC module of OSIRIS. We show that by using four linearly polarised 30 fs laser pulses, one can convert more than 50 % of the total energy to gamma-rays already at laser intensity $I\\simeq10^{24}\\ \\mathrm{W/cm^2}$. In this configuration, the laser conversion efficiency is higher compared with the case with two colliding lasers.

  15. Hydrothermal monitoring data from the Cascade Range, northwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Gelwick, Katrina D.; Randolph-Flagg, Noah G.; Crankshaw, Ilana M.; Lundstrom, Elizabeth A.; McCulloch, Callum L.; Murveit, Anna M.; Newman, Alice C.; Mariner, Robert H.; Bergfeld, D.; Tucker, Dave S.; Schmidt, Mariek E.; Spicer, Kurt R.; Mosbrucker, Adam; Evans, William C.

    2013-01-01

    This database serves as a repository for hydrothermal-monitoring data collected at 25 sites in the U.S. portion of the Cascade Range volcanic arc. These data are intended to quantify baseline hydrothermal variability at most (10 of 12) of the highest-risk volcanoes in the Cascades, as defined by the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS’) National Volcanic Early Warning System (NVEWS) report (Ewert and others, 2005).

  16. Terahertz Difference-Frequency Quantum Cascade Laser Sources on Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-22

    Terahertz difference-frequency quantum cascade laser sources on silicon SEUNGYONG JUNG,1,3 JAE HYUN KIM,1 YIFAN JIANG,1 KARUN VIJAYRAGHAVAN,2 AND...revised 24 November 2016; accepted 30 November 2016 (Doc. ID 278379); published 22 December 2016 Terahertz quantum cascade laser sources based on intra...of microwatts of average terahertz power output and wide spectral tunability. However, terahertz radiation outcoupling in these sources is still highly

  17. Synthesis of Pyridoacridines through Anionic Cascade Ring Closure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, I.N.; Kristensen, Jesper Langgaard

    2014-01-01

    A new synthesis of 13-deazaascididemin (AK-37) based on a recently developed anionic cascade ring closure is presented. Although the isolated yields are modest, the approach provides ready access to new substituted derivatives of 13-deazaascididemin. © Georg Thieme Verlag.......A new synthesis of 13-deazaascididemin (AK-37) based on a recently developed anionic cascade ring closure is presented. Although the isolated yields are modest, the approach provides ready access to new substituted derivatives of 13-deazaascididemin. © Georg Thieme Verlag....

  18. Cascaded Soliton Compression of Energetic Femtosecond Pulses at 1030 nm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Zhou, Binbin

    2012-01-01

    We discuss soliton compression with cascaded second-harmonic generation of energetic femtosecond pulses at 1030 nm. We discuss problems encountered with soliton compression of long pulses and show that sub-10 fs compressed pulses can be achieved.......We discuss soliton compression with cascaded second-harmonic generation of energetic femtosecond pulses at 1030 nm. We discuss problems encountered with soliton compression of long pulses and show that sub-10 fs compressed pulses can be achieved....

  19. The CCFM Monte Carlo generator CASCADE 2.2.0

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, H; Deak, M; Grebenyuk, A; Hautmann, F; Hentschinski, M; Knutsson, A; Kraemer, M; Kutak, K; Lipatov, A; Zotov, N

    2010-01-01

    CASCADE is a full hadron level Monte Carlo event generator for ep, \\gamma p and p\\bar{p} and pp processes, which uses the CCFM evolution equation for the initial state cascade in a backward evolution approach supplemented with off - shell matrix elements for the hard scattering. A detailed program description is given, with emphasis on parameters the user wants to change and variables which completely specify the generated events.

  20. Aeroelasticity in Turbomachines. Comparison of Theoretical and Experimental Cascade Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    time: T = t/T o To period of a cycle s t time s v velocity m/s Vre f reference velocity for reduced frequency m/s Vref Y for compresor cascade Vref...or quasi- three-dimensional cascades. Such interesting phenomena as rotor-stator interactions, stalled flutter and fully three-dimensional effects... stall , choke, shockwaves, coupling effects between the steady and unsteady flow fields...). The distribution of the blade surface pressure difference

  1. Linewidth and tuning characteristics of terahertz quantum cascade lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkan, A; Tittel, F K; Mittleman, D M; Dengler, R; Siegel, P H; Scalari, G; Ajili, L; Faist, J; Beere, H E; Linfield, E H; Davies, A G; Ritchie, D A

    2004-03-15

    We have measured the spectral linewidths of three continuous-wave quantum cascade lasers operating at terahertz frequencies by heterodyning the free-running quantum cascade laser with two far-infrared gas lasers. Beat notes are detected with a GaAs diode mixer and a microwave spectrum analyzer, permitting very precise frequency measurements and giving instantaneous linewidths of less than -30 kHz. Characteristics are also reported for frequency tuning as the injection current is varied.

  2. The cascade of HIV care in Russia, 2011–2013

    OpenAIRE

    Anastasia Pokrovskaya; Anna Popova; Natalia Ladnaya; Oleg Yurin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The cascade of HIV care is one of the main tools to assess the individual and public health benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and identify barriers of treatment as prevention (TasP) concept realization. We aimed to characterize the changes in engagement of HIV-positive persons in care in Russia during three years (2011–2013). Methods: We defined seven steps in the cascade of care framework: HIV infected (estimation data), HIV diagnosed, linked to HIV care, retained in HIV...

  3. Power system cascading risk assessment based on complex network theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuoyang; Hill, David J.; Chen, Guo; Dong, Zhao Yang

    2017-09-01

    When a single failure occurs in a vulnerable part of a power system, this may cause a large area cascading event. Therefore, an advanced method that can assess the risks during cascading events is needed. In this paper, an improved complex network model for power system risk assessment is proposed. Risk is defined by consequence and probability of the failures in this model, which are affected by both power factors and network structure. Compared with existing risk assessment models, the proposed one can evaluate the risk of the system comprehensively during a cascading event by combining the topological and electrical information. A new cascading event simulation module is adopted to identify the power grid cascading chain from a system-level view. In addition, simulations are investigated on the IEEE 14 bus system and IEEE 39 bus system respectively to illustrate the performance of the proposed module. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method is effective in a power grid risk assessment during cascading event.

  4. Longitudinal gradients along a reservoir cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, L.E.; Habrat, M.D.; Miyazono, S.

    2008-01-01

    Reservoirs have traditionally been regarded as spatially independent entities rather than as longitudinal segments of a river system that are connected upstream and downstream to the river and other reservoirs. This view has frustrated advancement in reservoir science by impeding adequate organization of available information and by hindering interchanges with allied disciplines that often consider impounded rivers at the basin scale. We analyzed reservoir morphology, water quality, and fish assemblage data collected in 24 reservoirs of the Tennessee River; we wanted to describe longitudinal changes occurring at the scale of the entire reservoir series (i.e., cascade) and to test the hypothesis that fish communities and environmental factors display predictable gradients like those recognized for unimpounded rivers. We used a data set collected over a 7-year period; over 3 million fish representing 94 species were included in the data set. Characteristics such as reservoir mean depth, relative size of the limnetic zone, water retention time, oxygen stratification, thermal stratification, substrate size, and water level fluctuations increased in upstream reservoirs. Conversely, reservoir area, extent of riverine and littoral zones, access to floodplains and associated wetlands, habitat diversity, and nutrient and sediment inputs increased in downstream reservoirs. Upstream reservoirs included few, largely lacustrine, ubiquitous fish taxa that were characteristic of the lentic upper reaches of the basin. Fish species richness increased in a downstream direction from 12 to 67 species/ reservoir as riverine species became more common. Considering impoundments at a basin scale by viewing them as sections in a river or links in a chain may generate insight that is not always available when the impoundments are viewed as isolated entities. Basin-scale variables are rarely controllable but constrain the expression of processes at smaller scales and can facilitate the

  5. Product lifecycle approach to cascade impaction measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tougas, Terrence P; Christopher, Dave; Mitchell, Jolyon; Lyapustina, Svetlana; Van Oort, Michiel; Bauer, Richard; Glaab, Volker

    2011-03-01

    Over the lifecycle of an orally inhaled product (OIP), multi-stage cascade impactor (CI) measurements are used for different purposes and to address different questions. Full-resolution CIs can provide important information during product development and are widely used but are time- and resource-intensive, highly variable, and suboptimal for OIP quality control (QC) testing. By contrast, Efficient Data Analysis (EDA) combined with Abbreviated Impactor Measurement (AIM) systems pertinent either for QC and-possibly-for adult Human Respiratory Tract (pHRT) has been introduced for OIP performance assessment during and post-development. This article summarizes available evidence and discusses a strategy for using either abbreviated or full-resolution CI systems depending on the purpose of the measurement, such that adequate, accurate, and efficient testing of aerodynamic particle size distribution (APSD) of OIPs can be achieved throughout the lifecycle of a product. Under these proposals, a comprehensive testing program should initially be conducted by full-resolution CI in OIP development to ascertain the product's APSD. Subsequently, correlations should be established from the selected AIM CIs to the corresponding full-resolution system, ideally developing specifications common to both techniques. In the commercial phase, it should be possible to release product using AIM/EDA, keeping the full-resolution CI for investigations, change control, and trouble-shooting, thus optimizing resources for APSD characterization throughout the product lifecycle. If an in vitro-in vivo relationship is established and clinically relevant sizes are known, an AIM-pHRT could serve as a quick indicator that clinically relevant fractions have not changed and also, in the management of post-approval changes. © 2011 American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists

  6. Low power-consumption quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsuyama, Tsukuru; Hashimoto, Jun-ichi; Yoshinaga, Hiroyuki; Mori, Hiroki; Tsuji, Yukihiro; Murata, Makoto; Ekawa, Mitsuru; Tanahashi, Toshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are promising light sources for real time high-sensitivity gas sensing in the mid-infrared region. For the practical use of QCLs as a compact and portable gas sensor, their power-consumption needs to be reduced. We report a successful operation of a low power-consumption distributed feedback (DFB) QCL. For the reduction of power consumption, we introduced a vertical-transition structure in a core region to improve carrier transition efficiency and reduced the core volume. DFB-QCL epitaxial structure was grown by low-pressure OMVPE. The core region consists of AlInAs/GaInAs superlattices lattice-matched to InP. A first-order Bragg-grating was formed near the core region to obtain a large coupling coefficiency. A mesa-strip was formed by reactive ion etching and a buried-heterostructure was fabricated by the regrowth of semi-insulating InP. High-reflective facet coatings were also performed to decrease the mirror loss for the reduction of the threshold current. A device (5x500μm) operated with a single mode in the wavelength region from 7.23μm to 7.27μm. The threshold current and threshold voltage under CW operation at 20 °C were 52mA and 8.4V respectively. A very low threshold power-consumption as low as 0.44 W was achieved, which is among the lowest values at room temperature to our knowledge.

  7. Cascadable excitability in optically injected microdisks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Vaerenbergh, Thomas; Alexander, Koen; Fiers, Martin; Mechet, Pauline; Dambre, Joni; Bienstman, Peter

    2014-05-01

    All-optical spiking neural networks would allow high speed parallelized processing of time-encoded information, using the same energy efficient computational principles as our brain. As the neurons in these networks need to be able to process pulse trains, they should be excitable. Using simulations, we demonstrate Class 1 excitability in optically injected microdisk lasers, and propose a cascadable optical spiking neuron design. The neuron has a clear threshold and an integrating behavior. In addition, we show that the optical phase of the input pulses can be used to create inhibitory, as well as excitatory perturbations. Furthermore, we incorporate our optical neuron design in a topology that allows a disk to react on excitations from other disks. Phase tuning of the intermediate connections allows to control the disk response. Additionally, we investigate the sensitivity of the disk circuit to deviations in driving current and locking signal wavelength detuning. Using state-of-the-art fabrication techniques for microdisk laser, the standard deviation of the lasing wavelength is still about one order of magnitude too large. Finally, as the dynamical behavior of the microdisks is identical to the behavior in Semiconductor Ring Lasers (SRL), we compare the excitability mechanism due to optically injection with the previously proposed excitability due to asymmetry in the intermodal coupling in SRLs, as the latter mechanism can also be induced in disks due to, e.g., asymmetry in the external reaction. In both cases, the symmetry between the two counter-propagating modes of the cavity needs to be broken to prevent switching to the other mode, and allow the system to relax to its initial state after a perturbation. However, the asymmetry due to optical injection results in an integrating spiking neuron, whereas the asymmetry in the intermodal coupling is known to result in a resonating spiking neuron.

  8. Functional effects of a pathogenic mutation in Cereblon (CRBN) on the regulation of protein synthesis via the AMPK-mTOR cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwang Min; Yang, Seung-Joo; Choi, Ja-Hyun; Park, Chul-Seung

    2014-08-22

    Initially identified as a protein implicated in human mental deficit, cereblon (CRBN) was recently recognized as a negative regulator of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in vivo and in vitro. Here, we present results showing that CRBN can effectively regulate new protein synthesis through the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, a downstream target of AMPK. Whereas deficiency of Crbn repressed protein translation via activation of the AMPK-mTOR cascade in Crbn-knock-out mice, ectopic expression of the wild-type CRBN increased protein synthesis by inhibiting endogenous AMPK. Unlike the wild-type CRBN, a mutant CRBN found in human patients, which lacks the last 24 amino acids, failed to rescue mTOR-dependent repression of protein synthesis in Crbn-deficient mouse fibroblasts. These results provide the first evidence that Crbn can activate the protein synthesis machinery through the mTOR signaling pathway by inhibiting AMPK. In light of the fact that protein synthesis regulated by mTOR is essential for various forms of synaptic plasticity that underlie the cognitive functions of the brain, the results of this study suggest a plausible mechanism for CRBN involvement in higher brain function in humans, and they may help explain how a specific mutation in CRBN can affect the cognitive ability of patients.

  9. Co-immobilization of multiple enzymes by metal coordinated nucleotide hydrogel nanofibers: improved stability and an enzyme cascade for glucose detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hao; Jiang, Shuhui; Yuan, Qipeng; Li, Guofeng; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Zijie; Liu, Juewen

    2016-03-21

    Preserving enzyme activity and promoting synergistic activity via co-localization of multiple enzymes are key topics in bionanotechnology, materials science, and analytical chemistry. This study reports a facile method for co-immobilizing multiple enzymes in metal coordinated hydrogel nanofibers. Specifically, four types of protein enzymes, including glucose oxidase, Candida rugosa lipase, α-amylase, and horseradish peroxidase, were respectively encapsulated in a gel nanofiber made of Zn(2+) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) with a simple mixing step. Most enzymes achieved quantitative loading and retained full activity. At the same time, the entrapped enzymes were more stable against temperature variation (by 7.5 °C), protease attack, extreme pH (by 2-fold), and organic solvents. After storing for 15 days, the entrapped enzyme still retained 70% activity while the free enzyme nearly completely lost its activity. Compared to nanoparticles formed with AMP and lanthanide ions, the nanofiber gels allowed much higher enzyme activity. Finally, a highly sensitive and selective biosensor for glucose was prepared using the gel nanofiber to co-immobilize glucose oxidase and horseradish peroxidase for an enzyme cascade system. A detection limit of 0.3 μM glucose with excellent selectivity was achieved. This work indicates that metal coordinated materials using nucleotides are highly useful for interfacing with biomolecules.

  10. Muscle A-Kinase Anchoring Protein-α is an Injury-Specific Signaling Scaffold Required for Neurotrophic- and Cyclic Adenosine Monophosphate-Mediated Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurotrophic factor and cAMP-dependent signaling promote the survival and neurite outgrowth of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs after injury. However, the mechanisms conferring neuroprotection and neuroregeneration downstream to these signals are unclear. We now reveal that the scaffold protein muscle A-kinase anchoring protein-α (mAKAPα is required for the survival and axon growth of cultured primary RGCs. Although genetic deletion of mAKAPα early in prenatal RGC development did not affect RGC survival into adulthood, nor promoted the death of RGCs in the uninjured adult retina, loss of mAKAPα in the adult increased RGC death after optic nerve crush. Importantly, mAKAPα was required for the neuroprotective effects of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and cyclic adenosine-monophosphate (cAMP after injury. These results identify mAKAPα as a scaffold for signaling in the stressed neuron that is required for RGC neuroprotection after optic nerve injury.

  11. Electronic band structure and Fermi surfaces of the quasi-two-dimensional monophosphate tungsten bronze, P4W12O44

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, S.; Ghosh, A.; Sato, T.; Sarma, D. D.; Takahashi, T.; Wang, E.; Greenblatt, M.; Raj, S.

    2014-02-01

    The electronic structure of quasi-two-dimensional monophosphate tungsten bronze, P4W12O44, has been investigated by high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theoretical calculations. Experimental electron-like bands around \\Gamma point and Fermi surfaces have similar shapes as predicted by calculations. Fermi surface mapping at different temperatures shows a depletion of density of states at low temperature in certain flat portions of the Fermi surfaces. These flat portions of the Fermi surfaces satisfy the partial nesting condition with incommensurate nesting vectors q_1 and q_2 , which leads to the formation of charge density waves in this phosphate tungsten bronzes. The setting up of charge density wave in these bronzes can well explain the anomaly observed in its transport properties.

  12. Dielectric spectra broadening as a signature for dipole-matrix interaction. III. Water in adenosine monophosphate/adenosine-5'-triphosphate solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzenko, Alexander; Levy, Evgeniya; Shendrik, Andrey; Talary, Mark S; Caduff, Andreas; Feldman, Yuri

    2012-11-21

    In this, the third part of our series on the dielectric spectrum symmetrical broadening of water, we consider the nucleotide aqueous solutions. Where in Parts I [E. Levy et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 114502 (2012)] and II [E. Levy et al., J. Chem. Phys. 136, 114503 (2012)], the dipole-dipole or ion-dipole interaction had a dominant feature, now the interplay between these two types of dipole-matrix interactions will be considered. We present the results of high frequency dielectric measurements of different concentrations of adenosine monophosphate/adenosine-5'-triphosphate aqueous solutions. We observed the Cole-Cole broadening of the main relaxation peak of the solvent in the solutions. Moreover, depending on the nucleotide concentration, we observed both types of dipole-matrix interaction. The 3D trajectory approach (described in detail in Part I) is applied in order to highlight the differences between the two types of interaction.

  13. Effect of dietary fluorine from Araxá rock phosphate on the hepatic production of cyclic-adenosine monophosphate in broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezende M.J.M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The cyclic adenosine 3?, 5?-monophosphate (cAMP production was evaluated in liver thin sections of broiler chicks fed on a experimental diet containing bicalcium phosphate or Araxá rock phosphate (ARP as source of P, with a high content of fluorine, at different ages: from the first to the 42nd and from the 21st to the 42nd day of age. The intake of the ARP formulated diet starting from birth elicited an increase of cAMP production in broiler liver. However, when this diet was offered after the 21st day of age, the hepatic cAMP production in broilers was not significantly (P>0.05 affected, suggesting that the effect of high fluorine present in Araxá rock phosphate, on hepatic cAMP of broiler chicks depends on the age in which the experimental diet is started.

  14. Evolution of coherent collective modes through consecutive charge-density-wave transitions in the (PO2)4(WO3)12 monophosphate tungsten bronze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojchevska, L.; Borovšak, M.; Foury-Leylekian, P.; Pouget, J.-P.; Mertelj, T.; Mihailovic, D.

    2017-07-01

    All-optical femtosecond relaxation dynamics in a single crystal of monophosphate tungsten bronze (PO2)4(WO3)2m with alternate stacking m =6 of WO3 layers was studied through the three consequent charge-density-wave (CDW) transitions. Several transient coherent collective modes associated with the different CDW transitions were observed and analyzed in the framework of the time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau theory. Remarkably, the interference of the modes leads to an apparent rectification effect in the transient reflectivity response. A saturation of the coherent-mode amplitudes with increasing pump fluence well below the CDWs destruction threshold fluence indicates a decoupling of the electronic and lattice parts of the order parameter on the femtosecond timescale.

  15. Behavior of the monophosphate tungsten bronzes (PO{sub 2}){sub 4}(WO{sub 3}){sub 2m} (m=4 and 6) in electrochemical lithium insertion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longoria Rodriguez, F.E.; Martinez-de la Cruz, A.; Lopez Cuellar, E. [Division de Estudios de Posgrado, Facultad de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Pedro de Alba s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, C.P. 66451, San Nicolas de los Garza, NL (Mexico)

    2006-10-06

    The electrochemical lithium insertion process has been studied in the family of monophosphate tungsten bronzes (PO{sub 2}){sub 4}(WO{sub 3}){sub 2m}, where m=4 and 6. Structural changes in the pristine oxides were followed as lithium insertion proceeded. Through potentiostatic intermittent technique, the different processes which take place in the cathode during the discharge of the cell were analysed. The nature of the bronzes Li{sub x}(PO{sub 2}){sub 4}(WO{sub 3}){sub 2m} formed was determined by in situ X-ray diffraction experiments. These results have allowed establishment of a correlation with the reversible/irreversible processes detected during the electrochemical lithium insertion. Measurements of resistivity showed that upon lithium insertion, the metallic pristine oxides become insulating. (author)

  16. Investigation on the occurrence and significance of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate in phytoplankton and natural aquatic communities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francko, D.A.

    1980-01-01

    This study demonstrates, on the basis of several analyanalytical criteria, that the production and extracellular release of cyclic adenosine 3':5'-monophosphate (cAMP) is widespread among phytoplankton species. The production and release of CAMP varied markedly among different species grown under similar environmental conditions, and intraspecifically during the life cycle of a given algal species. This investigation marks the first time cAMP has been investigated in natural aquatic systems. An examination of epilimnetic lakewater samples from Lawrence Lake, a hardwater oligotrophic lake, and Wintergreen Lake, a hardwater hypereutrophic lake, both in southwestern Michigan, demonstrated that cAMP existed in both particulate-associated and dissolved forms in these systems.

  17. Cascaded systems analysis of photon counting detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, J.; Zbijewski, W.; Gang, G.; Stayman, J. W. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Taguchi, K.; Carrino, J. A. [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Lundqvist, M.; Fredenberg, E. [Philips Healthcare, Solna 171 41 (Sweden); Siewerdsen, J. H., E-mail: jeff.siewerdsen@jhu.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States); Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21205 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: Photon counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology with applications in spectral and low-dose radiographic and tomographic imaging. This paper develops an analytical model of PCD imaging performance, including the system gain, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise-power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Methods: A cascaded systems analysis model describing the propagation of quanta through the imaging chain was developed. The model was validated in comparison to the physical performance of a silicon-strip PCD implemented on an experimental imaging bench. The signal response, MTF, and NPS were measured and compared to theory as a function of exposure conditions (70 kVp, 1–7 mA), detector threshold, and readout mode (i.e., the option for coincidence detection). The model sheds new light on the dependence of spatial resolution, charge sharing, and additive noise effects on threshold selection and was used to investigate the factors governing PCD performance, including the fundamental advantages and limitations of PCDs in comparison to energy-integrating detectors (EIDs) in the linear regime for which pulse pileup can be ignored. Results: The detector exhibited highly linear mean signal response across the system operating range and agreed well with theoretical prediction, as did the system MTF and NPS. The DQE analyzed as a function of kilovolt (peak), exposure, detector threshold, and readout mode revealed important considerations for system optimization. The model also demonstrated the important implications of false counts from both additive electronic noise and charge sharing and highlighted the system design and operational parameters that most affect detector performance in the presence of such factors: for example, increasing the detector threshold from 0 to 100 (arbitrary units of pulse height threshold roughly equivalent to 0.5 and 6 keV energy threshold, respectively), increased the f{sub 50} (spatial

  18. Measuring the Turbulent Cascade in the Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacBride, B. T.; Forman, M. A.; Smith, C. W.

    2006-12-01

    Kolmogorov's famous 4/5 law for the Navier-Stokes equation states that in isotropic hydrodynamic (HD) turbulence, the third moment of longitudinal velocity fluctuations at a spatial distance L is (4/5) ɛ ěrt L ěrt where ɛ is the turbulent energy cascade rate = heating rate per unit mass. A definite, signed, third moment is a fundamental property of the turbulent velocity fluctuations arising from the non-linear term in the Navier-Stokes equation, the only direct indicator that a cascade exists, the only measure of what direction that cascade takes (to smaller or larger spatial scales), and the truest indication of the cascade rate. The solar wind is MHD, however, and its turbulence is anisotropic. Dasso et al. (2005) perform a study on the anisotropy in the solar wind as a function of flow speed and find that there exists "quasi-two-dimensional" turbulence in low speed streams and a one dimensional "slab" structure in high speed flow. Politano and Pouquet (1998; PP) have derived an exact expression, valid in anisotropic situations, for the divergence with lag vector L of a certain vector third moment of the fluctuations in the Elsasser variables as a function of L. We perform an analysis of the third-order moment derived by PP. We use 8 years of ACE combine 64-s magnetic field and plasma measurements in variably defined subsets to compute the Elsasser variables in mean-field coordinates for different solar wind conditions (high/low wind speed, yearly, etc.). Most significantly, we attempt to separately resolve parallel and perpendicular cascades relative to the mean magnetic field. We find (1) the third moment structure functions are approximately proportional to lag as expected, (2) the inferred energy dissipation rate for outward-moving waves is larger than for inward-moving waves with many intervals showing evidence of an inverse cascade of the minority component, (3) the total energy-dissipation rate inferred by this method is frequently in disagreement

  19. Up and down cascades: three-dimensional magnetic field model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanter, E M; Shnirman, M G; Le Mouël, J L

    2002-06-01

    In our previous works we already have proposed a two-dimensional model of geodynamo. Now we use the same approach to build a three-dimensional self-excited geodynamo model that generates a large scale magnetic field from whatever small initial field, using the up and down cascade effects of a multiscale turbulent system of cyclones. The multiscale system of turbulent cyclones evolves in six domains of an equatorial cylindrical layer of the core. The appearance of new cyclones is realized by two cascades: a turbulent direct cascade and an inverse cascade of coupling of similar cyclones. The interaction between the different domains is effected through a direct cascade parameter which is essential for the statistics of the long-life symmetry breaking. Generation of the secondary magnetic field results from the interaction of the components of the primary magnetic field with the turbulent cyclones. The amplification of the magnetic field is due to the transfer of energy from the turbulent helical motion to the generated magnetic field. The model demonstrates a phase transition through the parameter characterizing this energy transfer. In the supercritical domain we obtain long-term intervals of constant polarity (chrons) and quick reversals; relevant time constants agree with paleomagnetic observations. Possible application of the model to the study of the geometrical structure of the geomagnetic field (and briefly other planetary fields) is discussed.

  20. Critical assessment and ramifications of a purported marine trophic cascade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, R. Dean; Carlson, John K; Romine, Jason G.; Curtis, Tobey H; McElroy, W. David; McCandless, Camilla T; Cotton, Charles F; Musick, John A.

    2016-01-01

    When identifying potential trophic cascades, it is important to clearly establish the trophic linkages between predators and prey with respect to temporal abundance, demographics, distribution, and diet. In the northwest Atlantic Ocean, the depletion of large coastal sharks was thought to trigger a trophic cascade whereby predation release resulted in increased cownose ray abundance, which then caused increased predation on and subsequent collapse of commercial bivalve stocks. These claims were used to justify the development of a predator-control fishery for cownose rays, the “Save the Bay, Eat a Ray” fishery, to reduce predation on commercial bivalves. A reexamination of data suggests declines in large coastal sharks did not coincide with purported rapid increases in cownose ray abundance. Likewise, the increase in cownose ray abundance did not coincide with declines in commercial bivalves. The lack of temporal correlations coupled with published diet data suggest the purported trophic cascade is lacking the empirical linkages required of a trophic cascade. Furthermore, the life history parameters of cownose rays suggest they have low reproductive potential and their populations are incapable of rapid increases. Hypothesized trophic cascades should be closely scrutinized as spurious conclusions may negatively influence conservation and management decisions.