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  1. Monomeric tartrate resistant acid phosphatase induces insulin sensitive obesity.

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    Pernilla Lång

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is associated with macrophage infiltration of adipose tissue, which may link adipose inflammation to insulin resistance. However, the impact of inflammatory cells in the pathophysiology of obesity remains unclear. Tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP is an enzyme expressed by subsets of macrophages and osteoclasts that exists either as an enzymatically inactive monomer or as an active, proteolytically processed dimer. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using mice over expressing TRAP, we show that over-expression of monomeric, but not the dimeric form in adipose tissue leads to early onset spontaneous hyperplastic obesity i.e. many small fat cells. In vitro, recombinant monomeric, but not proteolytically processed TRAP induced proliferation and differentiation of mouse and human adipocyte precursor cells. In humans, monomeric TRAP was highly expressed in the adipose tissue of obese individuals. In both the mouse model and in the obese humans the source of TRAP in adipose tissue was macrophages. In addition, the obese TRAP over expressing mice exhibited signs of a low-grade inflammatory reaction in adipose tissue without evidence of abnormal adipocyte lipolysis, lipogenesis or insulin sensitivity. CONCLUSION: Monomeric TRAP, most likely secreted from adipose tissue macrophages, induces hyperplastic obesity with normal adipocyte lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity.

  2. Light-induced structural changes in a monomeric bacteriophytochrome

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    Heikki Takala

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Phytochromes sense red light in plants and various microorganism. Light absorption causes structural changes within the protein, which alter its biochemical activity. Bacterial phytochromes are dimeric proteins, but the functional relevance of this arrangement remains unclear. Here, we use time-resolved X-ray scattering to reveal the solution structural change of a monomeric variant of the photosensory core module of the phytochrome from Deinococcus radiodurans. The data reveal two motions, a bend and a twist of the PHY domain with respect to the chromophore-binding domains. Infrared spectroscopy shows the refolding of the PHY tongue. We conclude that a monomer of the phytochrome photosensory core is sufficient to perform the light-induced structural changes. This implies that allosteric cooperation with the other monomer is not needed for structural activation. The dimeric arrangement may instead be intrinsic to the biochemical output domains of bacterial phytochromes.

  3. Allosteric Partial Inhibition of Monomeric Proteases. Sulfated Coumarins Induce Regulation, not just Inhibition, of Thrombin

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    Verespy III, Stephen; Mehta, Akul Y.; Afosah, Daniel; Al-Horani, Rami A.; Desai, Umesh R.

    2016-01-01

    Allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteases can offer major regulatory advantages, but remains a concept on paper to date; although it has been routinely documented for receptors and oligomeric proteins. Thrombin, a key protease of the coagulation cascade, displays significant conformational plasticity, which presents an attractive opportunity to discover small molecule probes that induce sub-maximal allosteric inhibition. We synthesized a focused library of some 36 sulfated coumarins to discover two agents that display sub-maximal efficacy (~50%), high potency (150-fold). Michaelis-Menten, competitive inhibition, and site-directed mutagenesis studies identified exosite 2 as the site of binding for the most potent sulfated coumarin. Stern-Volmer quenching of active site-labeled fluorophore suggested that the allosteric regulators induce intermediate structural changes in the active site as compared to those that display ~80–100% efficacy. Antithrombin inactivation of thrombin was impaired in the presence of the sulfated coumarins suggesting that allosteric partial inhibition arises from catalytic dysfunction of the active site. Overall, sulfated coumarins represent first-in-class, sub-maximal inhibitors of thrombin. The probes establish the concept of allosteric partial inhibition of soluble, monomeric proteins. This concept may lead to a new class of anticoagulants that are completely devoid of bleeding. PMID:27053426

  4. Lyophilization-induced protein denaturation in phosphate buffer systems: monomeric and tetrameric beta-galactosidase.

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    Pikal-Cleland, K A; Carpenter, J F

    2001-09-01

    During freezing in phosphate buffers, selective precipitation of a less soluble buffer component and subsequent pH shifts may induce protein denaturation. Previous reports indicate significantly more inactivation and secondary structural perturbation of monomeric and tetrameric beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) during freeze-thawing in sodium phosphate (NaP) buffer as compared with potassium phosphate (KP) buffer. This observation was attributed to the significant pH shifts (from 7.0 to as low as 3.8) observed during freezing in the NaP buffer (1). In the current study, we investigated the impact of the additional stress of dehydration after freezing on the recovery of active protein on reconstitution and the retention of the native structure in the dried state. Freeze-drying monomeric and tetrameric beta-gal in either NaP or KP buffer resulted in significant secondary structural perturbations, which were greatest for the NaP samples. However, similar recoveries of active monomeric protein were observed after freeze-thawing and freeze-drying, indicating that most dehydration-induced unfolding was reversible on reconstitution of the freeze-dried protein. In contrast, the tetrameric protein was more susceptible to dehydration-induced denaturation as seen by the greater loss in activity after reconstitution of the freeze-dried samples relative to that measured after freeze-thawing. To ensure optimal protein stability during freeze-drying, the protein must be protected from both freezing and dehydration stresses. Although poly(ethylene glycol) and dextran are preferentially excluded solutes and should confer protection during freezing, they were unable to prevent lyophilization-induced denaturation. In addition, Tween did not foster maintenance of native protein during freeze-drying. However, sucrose, which hydrogen bonds to dried protein in the place of lost water, greatly reduced freezing- and drying-induced denaturation, as observed by the high retention of native

  5. Substrate-Induced Dimerization of Engineered Monomeric Variants of Triosephosphate Isomerase from Trichomonas vaginalis.

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    Samuel Lara-Gonzalez

    Full Text Available The dimeric nature of triosephosphate isomerases (TIMs is maintained by an extensive surface area interface of more than 1600 Å2. TIMs from Trichomonas vaginalis (TvTIM are held in their dimeric state by two mechanisms: a ball and socket interaction of residue 45 of one subunit that fits into the hydrophobic pocket of the complementary subunit and by swapping of loop 3 between subunits. TvTIMs differ from other TIMs in their unfolding energetics. In TvTIMs the energy necessary to unfold a monomer is greater than the energy necessary to dissociate the dimer. Herein we found that the character of residue I45 controls the dimer-monomer equilibrium in TvTIMs. Unfolding experiments employing monomeric and dimeric mutants led us to conclude that dimeric TvTIMs unfold following a four state model denaturation process whereas monomeric TvTIMs follow a three state model. In contrast to other monomeric TIMs, monomeric variants of TvTIM1 are stable and unexpectedly one of them (I45A is only 29-fold less active than wild-type TvTIM1. The high enzymatic activity of monomeric TvTIMs contrast with the marginal catalytic activity of diverse monomeric TIMs variants. The stability of the monomeric variants of TvTIM1 and the use of cross-linking and analytical ultracentrifugation experiments permit us to understand the differences between the catalytic activities of TvTIMs and other marginally active monomeric TIMs. As TvTIMs do not unfold upon dimer dissociation, herein we found that the high enzymatic activity of monomeric TvTIM variants is explained by the formation of catalytic dimeric competent species assisted by substrate binding.

  6. Structure/function analysis of PARP-1 in oxidative and nitrosative stress-induced monomeric ADPR formation.

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    Ben Buelow

    Full Text Available Poly adenosine diphosphate-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1 is a multifunctional enzyme that is involved in two major cellular responses to oxidative and nitrosative (O/N stress: detection and response to DNA damage via formation of protein-bound poly adenosine diphosphate-ribose (PAR, and formation of the soluble 2(nd messenger monomeric adenosine diphosphate-ribose (mADPR. Previous studies have delineated specific roles for several of PARP-1's structural domains in the context of its involvement in a DNA damage response. However, little is known about the relationship between the mechanisms through which PARP-1 participates in DNA damage detection/response and those involved in the generation of monomeric ADPR. To better understand the relationship between these events, we undertook a structure/function analysis of PARP-1 via reconstitution of PARP-1 deficient DT40 cells with PARP-1 variants deficient in catalysis, DNA binding, auto-PARylation, and PARP-1's BRCT protein interaction domain. Analysis of responses of the respective reconstituted cells to a model O/N stressor indicated that PARP-1 catalytic activity, DNA binding, and auto-PARylation are required for PARP-dependent mADPR formation, but that BRCT-mediated interactions are dispensable. As the BRCT domain is required for PARP-dependent recruitment of XRCC1 to sites of DNA damage, these results suggest that DNA repair and monomeric ADPR 2(nd messenger generation are parallel mechanisms through which PARP-1 modulates cellular responses to O/N stress.

  7. A monomeric variant of insulin degrading enzyme (IDE loses its regulatory properties.

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    Eun Suk Song

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE is a key enzyme in the metabolism of both insulin and amyloid beta peptides. IDE is unique in that it is subject to allosteric activation which is hypothesized to occur through an oligomeric structure. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: IDE is known to exist as an equilibrium mixture of monomers, dimers, and higher oligomers, with the dimer being the predominant form. Based on the crystal structure of IDE we deleted the putative dimer interface in the C-terminal region, which resulted in a monomeric variant. Monomeric IDE retained enzymatic activity, however instead of the allosteric behavior seen with wild type enzyme it displayed Michaelis-Menten kinetic behavior. With the substrate Abz-GGFLRKHGQ-EDDnp, monomeric IDE retained approximately 25% of the wild type activity. In contrast with the larger peptide substrates beta-endorphin and amyloid beta peptide 1-40, monomeric IDE retained only 1 to 0.25% of wild type activity. Unlike wild type IDE neither bradykinin nor dynorphin B-9 activated the monomeric variant of the enzyme. Similarly, monomeric IDE was not activated by polyphosphates under conditions in which the activity of wild type enzyme was increased more than 50 fold. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings serve to establish the dimer interface in IDE and demonstrate the requirement for an oligomeric form of the enzyme for its regulatory properties. The data support a mechanism where the binding of activators to oligomeric IDE induces a conformational change that cannot occur in the monomeric variant. Since a conformational change from a closed to a more open structure is likely the rate-determining step in the IDE reaction, the subunit induced conformational change likely shifts the structure of the oligomeric enzyme to a more open conformation.

  8. Characterization of monomeric intermediates during VSV glycoprotein structural transition.

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    Aurélie A Albertini

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Entry of enveloped viruses requires fusion of viral and cellular membranes, driven by conformational changes of viral glycoproteins. Crystal structures provide static pictures of pre- and post-fusion conformations of these proteins but the transition pathway remains elusive. Here, using several biophysical techniques, including analytical ultracentrifugation, circular dichroïsm, electron microscopy and small angle X-ray scattering, we have characterized the low-pH-induced fusogenic structural transition of a soluble form of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV glycoprotein G ectodomain (G(th, aa residues 1-422, the fragment that was previously crystallized. While the post-fusion trimer is the major species detected at low pH, the pre-fusion trimer is not detected in solution. Rather, at high pH, G(th is a flexible monomer that explores a large conformational space. The monomeric population exhibits a marked pH-dependence and adopts more elongated conformations when pH decreases. Furthermore, large relative movements of domains are detected in absence of significant secondary structure modification. Solution studies are complemented by electron micrographs of negatively stained viral particles in which monomeric ectodomains of G are observed at the viral surface at both pH 7.5 and pH 6.7. We propose that the monomers are intermediates during the conformational change and thus that VSV G trimers dissociate at the viral surface during the structural transition.

  9. Size separation of analytes using monomeric surfactants

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    Yeung, Edward S.; Wei, Wei

    2005-04-12

    A sieving medium for use in the separation of analytes in a sample containing at least one such analyte comprises a monomeric non-ionic surfactant of the of the general formula, B-A, wherein A is a hydrophilic moiety and B is a hydrophobic moiety, present in a solvent at a concentration forming a self-assembled micelle configuration under selected conditions and having an aggregation number providing an equivalent weight capable of effecting the size separation of the sample solution so as to resolve a target analyte(s) in a solution containing the same, the size separation taking place in a chromatography or electrophoresis separation system.

  10. Monomeric Friction Coefficient of Metalnanodispersible Polymeric Systems

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    B.B. Kolupayev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Influence of a nanodispersible metal excipient in number of 0    5,0 vol.% Cu for the size of a monomeric friction coefficient of polyvinylchloride (PVC systems in temperature range 298  Т  (Tg + 10 K is investigated. It is shown that various types of coordination movements of building blocks are described by a friction coefficient which serves as a measure of influence of external fields and ingredients on viscoelastic behavior of a composite. The analysis of processes of a relaxation on the basis of the theory of flexible chains taking into account power and entropic factors is carried out.

  11. Induction of antibodies against epitopes inaccessible on the HIV type 1 envelope oligomer by immunization with recombinant monomeric glycoprotein 120

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    Schønning, Kristian; Bolmstedt, A; Novotny, J;

    1998-01-01

    An N-glycan (N306) at the base of the V3 loop of HIV-BRU gp120 is shielding a linear neutralization epitope at the tip of the V3 loop on oligomeric Env. In contrast, this epitope is readily antigenic on monomeric gp120. Immunization with recombinant monomeric HIV-BRU gp120 may thus be expected to...... immunogenic structures inaccessible on the envelope oligomer. The limited ability of recombinant gp120 vaccines to induce neutralizing antibodies against primary isolates may thus not exclusively reflect genetic variation.......An N-glycan (N306) at the base of the V3 loop of HIV-BRU gp120 is shielding a linear neutralization epitope at the tip of the V3 loop on oligomeric Env. In contrast, this epitope is readily antigenic on monomeric gp120. Immunization with recombinant monomeric HIV-BRU gp120 may thus be expected...

  12. Ability of m-chloroperoxybenzoic acid to induce the ornithine decarboxylase marker of skin tumor promotion and inhibition of this response by gallotannins, oligomeric proanthocyanidins, and their monomeric units in mouse epidermis in Vivo

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    Guilan Chen; Elisabeth M. Perchellet; Xiao Mei Gao; Steven W. Newell; richard W. Hemingway; Vittorio Bottari; Jean-Pierre Perchellet

    1995-01-01

    m-Chloroperoxybenzoic acid (CPBA) was tested for its ability to induce the ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) marker of skin tumor promotion. In contrast to benzoyl peroxide, dicumyl peroxide, and 2-butanol peroxide, 5 mg of CPBA applied twice at a 72-h interval induce ODC activity at least as much as 3 ug of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). ODC induction peaks...

  13. Labeling Monomeric Insulin with Renal-Clearable Luminescent Gold Nanoparticles.

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    Vinluan, Rodrigo D; Yu, Mengxiao; Gannaway, Melissa; Sullins, Justin; Xu, Jing; Zheng, Jie

    2015-12-16

    In the native physiological environment, inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) often induce nonspecific protein adsorption, which could significantly alter the function of the proteins they labeled. As a result, small fluorescent dyes are still widely used in the imaging of proteins in animals due to their minimal interference with protein function. Here, we used monomeric insulin as a model and compared its bioactivity before and after labeling with renal-clearable near-infrared-emitting gold NPs. These NPs were chosen because they have high resistance to serum protein adsorption and low nonspecific accumulation. We have found that a 1:1 insulin-NP ratio can be achieved, where the insulin-NPs show minimal serum protein binding with fully retained bioactivity comparable to that of unlabeled insulin. These results show a proof of concept that renal-clearable NPs can behave like small molecules in protein labeling without changing the individual protein's function, laying down a foundation for in vivo tracking of proteins with multimodality imaging techniques.

  14. How acidic are monomeric structural units of heparin?

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    Remko, Milan; Broer, Ria; Van Duijnen, Piet Th.

    2013-12-01

    Density functional theory methods with the B3LYP functional have been used to letter the acidity of carboxyl, O-sulfo and N-sulfo groups in six basic monomeric structural units of heparin (1-OMe ΔUA-2S, 1-OMe GlcN-S6S, 1,4-DiOMe GlcA, 1,4-DiOMe GlcN-S3S6S, 1,4-DiOMe IdoA-2S, and 1,4-DiOMe GlcN-S6S). The predicted gas-phase acidity of the acidic functional groups in the monomeric structural units of heparin is: O-sulfo > N-sulfo > carboxyl. The computed pKa values provide the same order of acidity as was observed in water solution. This implies that hydration does not change ordering of acidity of major acidic groups of monomeric structural units of heparin.

  15. Homotropic cooperativity of monomeric cytochrome P450 3A4

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    Baas, Bradley J.; Denisov, Ilia G.; Sligar, Stephen G. (UIUC)

    2010-11-16

    Mechanistic studies of mammalian cytochrome P450s are often obscured by the phase heterogeneity of solubilized preparations of membrane enzymes. The various protein-protein aggregation states of microsomes, detergent solubilized cytochrome or a family of aqueous multimeric complexes can effect measured substrate binding events as well as subsequent steps in the reaction cycle. In addition, these P450 monooxygenases are normally found in a membrane environment and the bilayer composition and dynamics can also effect these catalytic steps. Here, we describe the structural and functional characterization of a homogeneous monomeric population of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP 3A4) in a soluble nanoscale membrane bilayer, or Nanodisc [Nano Lett. 2 (2002) 853]. Cytochrome P450 3A4:Nanodisc assemblies were formed and purified to yield a 1:1 ratio of CYP 3A4 to Nanodisc. Solution small angle X-ray scattering was used to structurally characterize this monomeric CYP 3A4 in the membrane bilayer. The purified CYP 3A4:Nanodiscs showed a heretofore undescribed high level of homotropic cooperativity in the binding of testosterone. Soluble CYP 3A4:Nanodisc retains its known function and shows prototypic hydroxylation of testosterone when driven by hydrogen peroxide. This represents the first functional characterization of a true monomeric preparation of cytochrome P450 monooxygenase in a phospholipid bilayer and elucidates new properties of the monomeric form.

  16. Synthesis and structure of monomeric, trimeric, and mixed phenylcyanamides.

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    Brand, Harald; Mayer, Peter; Schulz, Axel; Soller, Thomas; Villinger, Alexander

    2008-06-02

    In a new synthetic approach phenylcyanamide (Hpca) was synthesized by methylation of phenylthiourea followed by a basic work-up. All products along the synthetic route have been fully characterized by means of NMR, IR, and X-ray studies. The first structural report of neutral mixed crystals of phenylcyanamide containing monomeric and trimeric Hpca is presented. Examination of these intriguing mixed crystals revealed the formation of distinct layers of monomeric and trimeric Hpca. These layers are interconnected by weak hydrogen bonds. The trimer represents triphenylisomelamine, which readily isomerizes to the triphenylmelamine in the melt, in accord with computations at the B3LYP level, indicating an exothermic process (DeltaH = -49.4 kcal mol(-1)). Pure trimeric Hpca (triphenylisomelamine) was obtained either by recrystallization of the mixed crystals from boiling water or by trimerization of monomeric Hpca in isopropanol for 12 h under reflux conditions. For comparison tritylcyanamide (Htca) and potassium phenylcyanamide as an [18]crown-6 complex [K([18]crown-6)pca] have been synthesized, and the solid-state structures were determined using X-ray diffraction techniques. The thermal behavior was studied by thermo-analytical experiments. In agreement with the experimental results, computations predict an exothermic cyclotrimerization process for Hpca (DeltaH = -41.3 kcal mol(-1)).

  17. Slow Unfolding of Monomeric Proteins from Hyperthermophiles with Reversible Unfolding

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    Atsushi Mukaiyama

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the differences in their optimal growth temperatures microorganisms can be classified into psychrophiles, mesophiles, thermophiles, and hyperthermophiles. Proteins from hyperthermophiles generally exhibit greater stability than those from other organisms. In this review, we collect data about the stability and folding of monomeric proteins from hyperthermophilies with reversible unfolding, from the equilibrium and kinetic aspects. The results indicate that slow unfolding is a general strategy by which proteins from hyperthermophiles adapt to higher temperatures. Hydrophobic interaction is one of the factors in the molecular mechanism of the slow unfolding of proteins from hyperthermophiles.

  18. Addition-type polyimides from solutions of monomeric reactants

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    Delvigs, P.; Serafini, T. T.; Lightsey, G. R.

    1972-01-01

    The monomeric reactants approach was used to fabricate addition-type polyimide/graphite fiber composites with improved mechanical properties and thermal stability characteristics over those of composites derived from addition-type amide acid prepolymers. A screening study of 24 different monomer combinations was performed. The results of a more extensive investigation of a selected number of monomer combinations showed that the combination providing the best thermomechanical properties was 5-norbornene-2,3-dicarboxylic acid monomethyl ester/4,4'-methylenedianiline/3,3'4,4'-benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid dimethyl ester at a molar ratio of 2/3.09/2.09.

  19. Extracellular monomeric tau protein is sufficient to initiate the spread of tau protein pathology.

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    Michel, Claire H; Kumar, Satish; Pinotsi, Dorothea; Tunnacliffe, Alan; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Mandelkow, Eckhard; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Kaminski, Clemens F; Kaminski Schierle, Gabriele S

    2014-01-10

    Understanding the formation and propagation of aggregates of the Alzheimer disease-associated Tau protein in vivo is vital for the development of therapeutics for this devastating disorder. Using our recently developed live-cell aggregation sensor in neuron-like cells, we demonstrate that different variants of exogenous monomeric Tau, namely full-length Tau (hTau40) and the Tau-derived construct K18 comprising the repeat domain, initially accumulate in endosomal compartments, where they form fibrillar seeds that subsequently induce the aggregation of endogenous Tau. Using superresolution imaging, we confirm that fibrils consisting of endogenous and exogenous Tau are released from cells and demonstrate their potential to spread Tau pathology. Our data indicate a greater pathological risk and potential toxicity than hitherto suspected for extracellular soluble Tau.

  20. Monomeric GLP-1/GIP/glucagon triagonism corrects obesity, hepatosteatosis, and dyslipidemia in female mice

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    Jall, Sigrid; Sachs, Stephan; Clemmensen, Christoffer

    2017-01-01

    . RESULTS: Our results show that GLP-1/GIP/glucagon triple agonism inhibits food intake and decreases body weight and body fat mass with comparable potency in male and female mice that have been matched for body fat mass. Treatment improved dyslipidemia in both sexes and reversed diet......OBJECTIVE: Obesity is a major health threat that affects men and women equally. Despite this fact, weight-loss potential of pharmacotherapies is typically first evaluated in male mouse models of diet-induced obesity (DIO). To address this disparity we herein determined whether a monomeric peptide...... mice and a cohort of fatmass-matched C57BL/6J male mice were treated for 27 days via subcutaneous injections with either the GLP-1/GIP/glucagon triagonist or PBS. A second cohort of C57BL/6J male mice was included to match the females in the duration of the high-fat, high-sugar diet (HFD) exposure...

  1. Isolation and Characterization of Lewis Base Stabilized Monomeric Parent Stibanylboranes.

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    Marquardt, Christian; Hegen, Oliver; Hautmann, Matthias; Balázs, Gábor; Bodensteiner, Michael; Virovets, Alexander V; Timoshkin, Alexey Y; Scheer, Manfred

    2015-10-26

    The synthesis of the Lewis base stabilized monomeric parent compound of stibanylboranes, "H2 Sb-BH2 ", is reported. Through a salt metathesis route, the silyl-substituted compounds (Me3 Si)2 Sb-BH2 ⋅LB (LB=NMe3 , NHC(Me) ) were synthesized as representatives of derivatives with a Sb-B σ bond. Under very mild conditions, they could be transformed into the target compounds Me3 N⋅H2 B-HSb-BH2 ⋅NMe3 and H2 Sb-BH2 ⋅NHC(Me) , respectively. The products were characterized by X-ray structure analysis, NMR spectroscopy, IR spectroscopy, and mass spectrometry. DFT calculations give further insight into the stability and bonding of these unique compounds.

  2. Characterization of the Partially Folded Monomeric Intermediate of Creatine Kinase

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    朴龙斗; 周海梦

    2002-01-01

    The importance of understanding the protein folding pathway and intermediates is well recognized on the basis of extensive studies of protein folding in vitro and in vivo. Creatine kinase (CK) is a typical model for studying unfolding and refolding of proteins due to several interesting properties. Recent studies on the folding of CK show that its partially folded monomeric intermediate is present kinetically and is stable at equilibrium. The present paper contains 33 References as a mini review to characterize the properties of CK from studies on the CK folding pathway. Characterization of these intermediates is an essential step toward understanding the mechanism of protein folding. Some well-determined schemes are suggested as protein folding models.

  3. Single Molecule Spectroscopy of Monomeric LHCII: Experiment and Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Malý, Pavel; van Grondelle, Rienk; Mančal, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    We derive approximate equations of motion for excited state dynamics of a multilevel open quantum system weakly interacting with light to describe fluorescence detected single molecule spectra. Based on the Frenkel exciton theory, we construct a model for the chlorophyll part of the LHCII complex of higher plants and its interaction with previously proposed excitation quencher in the form of the lutein molecule Lut 1. The resulting description is valid over a broad range of timescales relevant for single molecule spectroscopy, i.e. from ps to minutes. Validity of these equations is demonstrated by comparing simulations of ensemble and single-molecule spectra of monomeric LHCII with experiments. Using a conformational change of the LHCII protein as a switching mechanism, the intensity and spectral time traces of individual LHCII complexes are simulated, and the experimental statistical distributions are reproduced. Based on our model, it is shown that with reasonable assumptions about its interaction with chlo...

  4. mKikGR, a monomeric photoswitchable fluorescent protein.

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    Satoshi Habuchi

    Full Text Available The recent demonstration and utilization of fluorescent proteins whose fluorescence can be switched on and off has greatly expanded the toolkit of molecular and cell biology. These photoswitchable proteins have facilitated the characterization of specifically tagged molecular species in the cell and have enabled fluorescence imaging of intracellular structures with a resolution far below the classical diffraction limit of light. Applications are limited, however, by the fast photobleaching, slow photoswitching, and oligomerization typical for photoswitchable proteins currently available. Here, we report the molecular cloning and spectroscopic characterization of mKikGR, a monomeric version of the previously reported KikGR that displays high photostability and switching rates. Furthermore, we present single-molecule imaging experiments that demonstrate that individual mKikGR proteins can be localized with a precision of better than 10 nanometers, suggesting their suitability for super-resolution imaging.

  5. Computational design and characterization of a monomeric helical dinuclear metalloprotein.

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    Calhoun, Jennifer R; Kono, Hidetoshi; Lahr, Steven; Wang, Wei; DeGrado, William F; Saven, Jeffery G

    2003-12-12

    The de novo design of di-iron proteins is an important step towards understanding the diversity of function among this complex family of metalloenzymes. Previous designs of due ferro (DF) proteins have resulted in tetrameric and dimeric four-helix bundles having crystallographically well-defined structures and active-site geometries. Here, the design and characterization of DFsc, a 114 residue monomeric four-helix bundle, is presented. The backbone was modeled using previous oligomeric structures and appropriate inter-helical turns. The identities of 26 residues were predetermined, including the primary and secondary ligands in the active site, residues involved in active site accessibility, and the gamma beta gamma beta turn between helices 2 and 3. The remaining 88 amino acid residues were determined using statistical computer aided design, which is based upon a recent statistical theory of protein sequences. Rather than sampling sequences, the theory directly provides the site-specific amino acid probabilities, which are then used to guide sequence design. The resulting sequence (DFsc) expresses well in Escherichia coli and is highly soluble. Sedimentation studies confirm that the protein is monomeric in solution. Circular dichroism spectra are consistent with the helical content of the target structure. The protein is structured in both the apo and the holo forms, with the metal-bound form exhibiting increased stability. DFsc stoichiometrically binds a variety of divalent metal ions, including Zn(II), Co(II), Fe(II), and Mn(II), with micromolar affinities. 15N HSQC NMR spectra of both the apo and Zn(II) proteins reveal excellent dispersion with evidence of a significant structural change upon metal binding. DFsc is then a realization of complete de novo design, where backbone structure, activity, and sequence are specified in the design process.

  6. Urea Unfolding Study of E. coli Alanyl-tRNA Synthetase and Its Monomeric Variants Proves the Role of C-Terminal Domain in Stability

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    Baisakhi Banerjee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available E. coli alanyl-tRNA exists as a dimer in its native form and the C-terminal coiled-coil part plays an important role in the dimerization process. The truncated N-terminal containing the first 700 amino acids (1–700 forms a monomeric variant possessing similar aminoacylation activity like wild type. A point mutation in the C-terminal domain (G674D also produces a monomeric variant with a fivefold reduced aminoacylation activity compared to the wild type enzyme. Urea induced denaturation of these monomeric mutants along with another alaRS variant (N461 alaRS was studied together with the full-length enzyme using various spectroscopic techniques such as intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, 1-anilino-8-naphthalene-sulfonic acid binding, near- and far-UV circular dichroism, and analytical ultracentrifugation. Aminoacylation activity assay after refolding from denatured state revealed that the monomeric mutants studied here were unable to regain their activity, whereas the dimeric full-length alaRS gets back similar activity as the native enzyme. This study indicates that dimerization is one of the key regulatory factors that is important in the proper folding and stability of E. coli alaRS.

  7. Urea Unfolding Study of E. coli Alanyl-tRNA Synthetase and Its Monomeric Variants Proves the Role of C-Terminal Domain in Stability

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    Banerjee, Baisakhi; Banerjee, Rajat

    2015-01-01

    E. coli alanyl-tRNA exists as a dimer in its native form and the C-terminal coiled-coil part plays an important role in the dimerization process. The truncated N-terminal containing the first 700 amino acids (1–700) forms a monomeric variant possessing similar aminoacylation activity like wild type. A point mutation in the C-terminal domain (G674D) also produces a monomeric variant with a fivefold reduced aminoacylation activity compared to the wild type enzyme. Urea induced denaturation of these monomeric mutants along with another alaRS variant (N461 alaRS) was studied together with the full-length enzyme using various spectroscopic techniques such as intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, 1-anilino-8-naphthalene-sulfonic acid binding, near- and far-UV circular dichroism, and analytical ultracentrifugation. Aminoacylation activity assay after refolding from denatured state revealed that the monomeric mutants studied here were unable to regain their activity, whereas the dimeric full-length alaRS gets back similar activity as the native enzyme. This study indicates that dimerization is one of the key regulatory factors that is important in the proper folding and stability of E. coli alaRS. PMID:26617997

  8. Properties of monomeric paramyosin using a transient electric birefringence techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaney, D; Krause, S

    1976-01-01

    Paramyosin samples obtained from the chowder clam, Mercenaria mercenaria, by different extraction techniques were studied using transient electric birefringence techniques. The protein remain monomeric (unaggregated) in 1 mM buffer solution at pH 3.1 to 3.8 and near pH 10. At pH 3.2, the molecules obtained by different extraction techniques exhibit rotational diffusion constants that indicate a 5% difference in length between them, with the probable native form of paramyosin being the longer species. This difference in rotational diffusion constant disappears at higher pH, and, in addition, a large difference in dipole moment between the molecules observed at pH 3.2 also disappears at high pH. These results are used to hypothesize that the rodlike native paramyosin molecules have one or two partly flexible portions on their ends; at one end of each molecule this portion probably contains excess basic amino acids which are charged at low pH to account for the higher dipole moment of this form of paramyosin at these low pH values. At pH 3.2, these portions of the macromolecule are not flexible and act as stiff parts of the rodlike molecules, but they gradually become flexible at higher pH. Possible mechanisms for this change in flexibility are discussed.

  9. SGCC successfully developed large-capacity sodium-sulfur monomeric battery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Through many years' cooperation,SGCC and Shanghai Silicate Research Institute of Chinese Academy of Science successfully developed 650 ampere-hours capacity sodium-sulfur monomeric storage battery with the independent intellectual property right

  10. Amphiphile dependency of the monomeric and dimeric forms of acetylcholinesterase from human erythrocyte membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, P; Brodbeck, U

    1984-08-08

    Human erythrocyte membrane-bound acetylcholinesterase was converted to a monomeric species by treatment of ghosts with 2-mercaptoethanol and iodoacetic acid. After solubilization with Triton X-100, the reduced and alkylated enzyme was partially purified by affinity chromatography and separated from residual dimeric enzyme by sucrose density gradient centrifugation in a zonal rotor. Monomeric and dimeric acetylcholinesterase showed full enzymatic activity in presence of Triton X-100 whereas in the absence of detergent, activity was decreased to approx. 20% and 15%, respectively. Preformed egg phosphatidylcholine vesicles fully sustained activity of the monomeric species whereas the dimer was only 80% active. The results suggest that a dimeric structure is not required for manifestation of amphiphile dependency of membrane-bound acetylcholinesterase from human erythrocytes. Furthermore, monomeric enzyme appears to be more easily inserted into phospholipid bilayers than the dimeric species.

  11. Reactivity studies on [Cp'FeI]2: monomeric amido, phenoxo, and alkyl complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Marc D; White, Peter S

    2012-11-05

    A series of monomeric mono(cyclopentadienyl) iron amido, phenoxo, and alkyl complexes were synthesized, and their structure and reactivity are presented. The iron(II) centers in these 14VE one-legged piano stool complexes are high spin (S = 2) in solid state and solution independent of solvent. The silylamide compound [Cp'FeN(SiMe(3))(2)] (2a, Cp' = 1,2,4-(Me(3)C)(3)C(5)H(2)) is an excellent starting material for the reaction with more acidic substrates such as phenols. Sterically encumbered phenols 2,6-(Me(3)C)(2)(4-R)C(6)H(2)OH (R = H, Me, and tBu) were investigated. In all cases monomeric iron phenoxo half-sandwich complexes [Cp'FeOR'] (4-R) are initially formed. Rearrangement of 4-R to the diamagnetic oxocyclohexadienyl complex [Cp'Fe(η(5)-O═C(6)H(2)R'(2)R")] (5-R) is observed for 2,6-(Me(3)C)(2)(4-R)C(6)H(2)OH (R = H and Me) and the Gibbs free enthalpy of activation (ΔG(‡)) was determined. In contrast this rearrangement is inhibited when the 4-position is blocked by a tBu group. Removing the steric bulk from the 2,6-positions leads to the formation of a μ-phenoxo dimer, [Cp'Fe(μ-OC(6)H(3)tBu(2)-3,5)](2) (5). Density functional theory (DFT) was used to further elucidate the structure-reactivity relationship in these molecules. The one-legged piano stool anilido complex [Cp'Fe(NHC(6)H(2)tBu(3)-2,4,6)] (7) is not accessible via acid-base reaction between 2a and H(2)NC(6)H(2)tBu(3)-2,4,6, but can be prepared by conventional salt metathesis reaction from [Cp'FeI](2) and [Li(NHC(6)H(2)tBu(3)-2,4,6)(OEt(2))](2). In contrast, reaction of 2a with Ph(2)NH yields the bimetallic [Cp'Fe(N,C-κ(1),η(5)-C(6)H(5)NPh)Fe(N-κ(1)-NPh(2))Cp'] (8) which combines two iron centers in the same oxidation state (+2), but different spin-states (S = 0 and S = 2) which is reflected in very different Cp(cent)-Fe distances of 1.68 and 2.04 Å, respectively. A monomeric iron alkyl half-sandwich complex [Cp'FeCH(SiMe(3))(2)] (9) was prepared that exhibits no reactivity toward H(2), C

  12. Anthocyanins and their variation in red wines I. Monomeric anthocyanins and their color expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fei; Liang, Na-Na; Mu, Lin; Pan, Qiu-Hong; Wang, Jun; Reeves, Malcolm J; Duan, Chang-Qing

    2012-02-07

    Originating in the grapes, monomeric anthocyanins in young red wines contribute the majority of color and the supposed beneficial health effects related to their consumption, and as such they are recognized as one of the most important groups of phenolic metabolites in red wines. In recent years, our increasing knowledge of the chemical complexity of the monomeric anthocyanins, their stability, together with the phenomena such as self-association and copigmentation that can stabilize and enhance their color has helped to explain their color representation in red wine making and aging. A series of new enological practices were developed to improve the anthocyanin extraction, as well as their color expression and maintenance. This paper summarizes the most recent advances in the studies of the monomeric anthocyanins in red wines, emphasizing their origin, occurrence, color enhancing effects, their degradation and the effect of various enological practices on them.

  13. Anthocyanins and Their Variation in Red Wines I. Monomeric Anthocyanins and Their Color Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Qing Duan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Originating in the grapes, monomeric anthocyanins in young red wines contribute the majority of color and the supposed beneficial health effects related to their consumption, and as such they are recognized as one of the most important groups of phenolic metabolites in red wines. In recent years, our increasing knowledge of the chemical complexity of the monomeric anthocyanins, their stability, together with the phenomena such as self-association and copigmentation that can stabilize and enhance their color has helped to explain their color representation in red wine making and aging. A series of new enological practices were developed to improve the anthocyanin extraction, as well as their color expression and maintenance. This paper summarizes the most recent advances in the studies of the monomeric anthocyanins in red wines, emphasizing their origin, occurrence, color enhancing effects, their degradation and the effect of various enological practices on them.

  14. B22 Glu Des-B30 Insulin: A Novel Monomeric Insulin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hai-Juan DU; Jia-Hao SHI; Da-Fu CUI; You-Shang ZHANG

    2006-01-01

    Studies on monomeric insulin with reduced self-association are important in the development of insulin pharmaceutical preparations with rapid hypoglycemic action on patients with diabetes. Here we report a novel monomeric insulin, B22 Glu des-B30 insulin, prepared from a single chain insulin precursor with B22 Arg mutated to Glu, which was expressed in Pichia pastoris and converted to B22 Glu des-B30 insulin by tryptic digestion. It still retains 50% of the in vivo biological activity of porcine insulin and does not form a dimer even at a concentration of 10 mg/ml, showing that B22 Glu plays a key role in reducing the selfassociation of the insulin molecule without greatly reducing its biological activity. This novel monomeric insulin might have potential applications in the clinic.

  15. A novel method to highly versatile monomeric PNA building blocks by multi component reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dömling, Alexander; Chi, Kai-Zu; Barrère, Mathieux

    1999-01-01

    A novel approach to monomeric PNA building blocks by a solution phase Ugi multi component reaction (MCR) is described. The reaction is easily performed in 96 well plates. The products precipitate from the reaction solution and are thus obtained in high yields and purity. Those products are not amena

  16. Monomeric G-proteins as signal transducers in airway physiology and pathophysiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, Dedmer; Roscioni, Sara S.; Meurs, Herman; Schmidt, Martina

    2008-01-01

    Monomeric G-proteins, also referred to as small GTPases, function as biological hubs being activated by extracellular stimuli and regulate downstream signalling events, which result in different cellular responses. The importance of these mechanisms is mirrored by the fact that several pathological

  17. Self-healing mechanism based on dispersed solid particles of various monomeric bismaleimides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Turkenburg, D.H.; Fischer, H.R.

    2016-01-01

    In view of self-healing materials for high temperature applications we have studied the use of solid monomeric bismaleimide particles as embedded self-healing component dispersed in a host material. Below the self-healing activation temperature, bismaleimides remain inert while above it they may rap

  18. Monomeric red fluorescent protein variants used for imaging studies in different species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller-Taubenberger, Annette; Vos, Michel J.; Boettger, Angelika; Lasi, Margherita; Lai, Frank P. L.; Fischer, Markus; Rottner, Klemens

    2006-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins have proven to be excellent tools for live-cell imaging studies. In addition to green fluorescent protein (GFP) and its variants, recent progress was achieved in the development of monomeric red fluorescent proteins (mRFPs) that show improved properties in respect to maturation

  19. Monomeric and dendritic second generation Grubbs- and Hoveyda-Grubbs-type catalysts for olefin metathesis Metallodendrimers Special Issue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnenburg, Niels J M; Tomás-Mendivil, Eder; Mayland, Kimberley E.; Kleijn, Henk; Lutz, Martin; Spek, Anthony L.; Van Koten, Gerard; Klein Gebbink, Bert

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of monomeric and dendritic Grubbs II and Hoveyda-Grubbs II-based complexes are reported. These complexes were synthesized via a route based on the connection of monomeric or dendritic N-alkyl-N′-mesitylimidazol-2-ylidene pre-ligands to Grubbs I or Hoveyda-Grubbs I

  20. Monomeric yeast PCNA mutants are defective in interacting with and stimulating the ATPase activity of RFC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ionescu, Costin N; Shea, Kathleen A; Mehra, Rajendra; Prundeanu, Lucia; McAlear, Michael A

    2002-10-29

    Yeast PCNA is a homo-trimeric, ring-shaped DNA polymerase accessory protein that can encircle duplex DNA. The integrity of this multimeric sliding DNA clamp is maintained through the protein-protein interactions at the interfaces of adjacent subunits. To investigate the importance of trimer stability for PCNA function, we introduced single amino acid substitutions at residues (A112T, S135F) that map to opposite ends of the monomeric protein. Recombinant wild-type and mutant PCNAs were purified from E. coli, and they were tested for their properties in vitro. Unlike the stable wild-type PCNA trimers, the mutant PCNA proteins behaved as monomers when diluted to low nanomolar concentrations. In contrast to what has been reported for a monomeric form of the beta clamp in E. coli, the monomeric PCNAs were compromised in their ability to interact with their associated clamp loader, replication factor C (RFC). Similarly, monomeric PCNAs were not effective in stimulating the ATPase activity of RFC. The mutant PCNAs were able to form mixed trimers with wild-type subunits, although these mixed trimers were unstable when loaded onto DNA. They were able to function as weak DNA polymerase delta processivity factors in vitro, and when the monomeric PCNA-41 (A112T, S135F double mutant) allele was introduced as the sole source of PCNA in vivo, the cells were viable and healthy. These pol30-41 mutants were, however, sensitive to UV irradiation and to the DNA damaging agent methylmethane sulfonate, implying that DNA repair pathways have a distinct requirement for stable DNA clamps.

  1. Monomeric carbohydrates production from olive tree pruning biomass: modeling of dilute acid hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puentes, Juan G; Mateo, Soledad; Fonseca, Bruno G; Roberto, Inês C; Sánchez, Sebastián; Moya, Alberto J

    2013-12-01

    Statistical modeling and optimization of dilute sulfuric acid hydrolysis of olive tree pruning biomass has been performed using response surface methodology. Central composite rotatable design was applied to assess the effect of acid concentration, reaction time and temperature on efficiency and selectivity of hemicellulosic monomeric carbohydrates to d-xylose. Second-order polynomial model was fitted to experimental data to find the optimum reaction conditions by multiple regression analysis. The monomeric d-xylose recovery 85% (as predicted by the model) was achieved under optimized hydrolysis conditions (1.27% acid concentration, 96.5°C and 138 min), confirming the high validity of the developed model. The content of d-glucose (8.3%) and monosaccharide degradation products (0.1% furfural and 0.04% 5-hydroxymethylfurfural) provided a high quality subtract, ready for subsequent biochemical conversion to value-added products.

  2. The Roles of Monomeric GTP-Binding Proteins in Macroautophagy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Yang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a cellular degradation process that sequesters components into a double-membrane structure called the autophagosome, which then fuses with the lysosome or vacuole for hydrolysis and recycling of building blocks. Bulk phase autophagy, also known as macroautophagy, controlled by specific Atg proteins, can be triggered by a variety of stresses, including starvation. Because autophagy relies extensively on membrane traffic to form the membranous structures, factors that control membrane traffic are essential for autophagy. Among these factors, the monomeric GTP-binding proteins that cycle between active and inactive conformations form an important group. In this review, we summarize the functions of the monomeric GTP-binding proteins in autophagy, especially with reference to experiments in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  3. Multistage modeling of protein dynamics with monomeric Myc oncoprotein as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiaojiao; Dai, Jin; He, Jianfeng; Niemi, Antti J.; Ilieva, Nevena

    2017-03-01

    We propose to combine a mean-field approach with all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) into a multistage algorithm that can model protein folding and dynamics over very long time periods yet with atomic-level precision. As an example, we investigate an isolated monomeric Myc oncoprotein that has been implicated in carcinomas including those in colon, breast, and lungs. Under physiological conditions a monomeric Myc is presumed to be an example of intrinsically disordered proteins that pose a serious challenge to existing modeling techniques. We argue that a room-temperature monomeric Myc is in a dynamical state, it oscillates between different conformations that we identify. For this we adopt the C α backbone of Myc in a crystallographic heteromer as an initial ansatz for the monomeric structure. We construct a multisoliton of the pertinent Landau free energy to describe the C α profile with ultrahigh precision. We use Glauber dynamics to resolve how the multisoliton responds to repeated increases and decreases in ambient temperature. We confirm that the initial structure is unstable in isolation. We reveal a highly degenerate ground-state landscape, an attractive set towards which Glauber dynamics converges in the limit of vanishing ambient temperature. We analyze the thermal stability of this Glauber attractor using room-temperature molecular dynamics. We identify and scrutinize a particularly stable subset in which the two helical segments of the original multisoliton align in parallel next to each other. During the MD time evolution of a representative structure from this subset, we observe intermittent quasiparticle oscillations along the C-terminal α helix, some of which resemble a translating Davydov's Amide-I soliton. We propose that the presence of oscillatory motion is in line with the expected intrinsically disordered character of Myc.

  4. Fine blood vascular casting by monomeric methacrylate injection and microwave treatment

    OpenAIRE

    日根野谷, 仁

    1992-01-01

    A modified injection replica SEM method was introduced. Thorough injection of a resin mixture (monomeric metacrylate containing 1% benzoyl peroxide and 1% N, N-dimethylaniline) prior to the microwave treatment prepares good and fine blood vascular casts or replicas of brain, hypophysis, pineal body, thyroid gland and other organs. These casts sufficiently withstood ionbombardment and were useful for scanning electron microscopy. In this casting, preliminary perfusion fixation prior to the res...

  5. Trapping of Vibrio cholerae cytolysin in the membrane-bound monomeric state blocks membrane insertion and functional pore formation by the toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Anand Kumar; Chattopadhyay, Kausik

    2014-06-13

    Vibrio cholerae cytolysin (VCC) is a potent membrane-damaging cytolytic toxin that belongs to the family of β barrel pore-forming protein toxins. VCC induces lysis of its target eukaryotic cells by forming transmembrane oligomeric β barrel pores. The mechanism of membrane pore formation by VCC follows the overall scheme of the archetypical β barrel pore-forming protein toxin mode of action, in which the water-soluble monomeric form of the toxin first binds to the target cell membrane, then assembles into a prepore oligomeric intermediate, and finally converts into the functional transmembrane oligomeric β barrel pore. However, there exists a vast knowledge gap in our understanding regarding the intricate details of the membrane pore formation process employed by VCC. In particular, the membrane oligomerization and membrane insertion steps of the process have only been described to a limited extent. In this study, we determined the key residues in VCC that are critical to trigger membrane oligomerization of the toxin. Alteration of such key residues traps the toxin in its membrane-bound monomeric state and abrogates subsequent oligomerization, membrane insertion, and functional transmembrane pore-formation events. The results obtained from our study also suggest that the membrane insertion of VCC depends critically on the oligomerization process and that it cannot be initiated in the membrane-bound monomeric form of the toxin. In sum, our study, for the first time, dissects membrane binding from the subsequent oligomerization and membrane insertion steps and, thus, defines the exact sequence of events in the membrane pore formation process by VCC.

  6. Heteroexpression and characterization of a monomeric isocitrate dehydrogenase from the multicellular prokaryote Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ao; Cao, Zheng-Yu; Wang, Peng; Liu, Ai-Min; Pan, Wei; Wang, Jie; Zhu, Guo-Ping

    2011-08-01

    A monomeric NADP-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase from the multicellular prokaryote Streptomyces avermitilis MA-4680 (SaIDH) was heteroexpressed in Escherichia coli, and the His-tagged enzyme was further purified to homogeneity. The molecular weight of SaIDH was about 80 kDa which is typical for monomeric isocitrate dehydrogenases. Structure-based sequence alignment reveals that the deduced amino acid sequence of SaIDH shows high sequence identity with known momomeric isocitrate dehydrogenase, and the coenzyme, substrate and metal ion binding sites are completely conserved. The optimal pH and temperature of SaIDH were found to be pH 9.4 and 45°C, respectively. Heat-inactivation studies showed that heating for 20 min at 50°C caused a 50% loss in enzymatic activity. In addition, SaIDH was absolutely specific for NADP+ as electron acceptor. Apparent Km values were 4.98 μM for NADP+ and 6,620 μM for NAD+, respectively, using Mn2+ as divalent cation. The enzyme performed a 33,000-fold greater specificity (kcat/Km) for NADP+ than NAD+. Moreover, SaIDH activity was entirely dependent on the presence of Mn2+ or Mg2+, but was strongly inhibited by Ca2+ and Zn2+. Taken together, our findings implicate the recombinant SaIDH is a divalent cation-dependent monomeric isocitrate dehydrogenase which presents a remarkably high cofactor preference for NADP+.

  7. Two mechanisms for dissipation of excess light in monomeric and trimeric light-harvesting complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dall' Osto, Luca [Univ. di Verona, Verona (Italy). Dipartimento di Biotecnologie; Cazzaniga, Stefano [Univ. di Verona, Verona (Italy). Dipartimento di Biotecnologie; Bressan, Mauro [Univ. di Verona, Verona (Italy). Dipartimento di Biotecnologie; Paleček, David [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Physics; Židek, Karel [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Physics; Niyogi, Krishna K. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Howard Hughes Medical Inst., Dept. of Plant and Microbial Biology; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division; Fleming, Graham R. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry, Graduate Group in Applied Science and Technology; Zigmantas, Donatas [Lund Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Physics; Bassi, Roberto [Univ. di Verona, Verona (Italy). Dipartimento di Biotecnologie; Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR), Firenze (Italy). Istituto per la Protezione delle Piante (IPP)

    2017-04-10

    Oxygenic photoautotrophs require mechanisms for rapidly matching the level of chlorophyll excited states from light harvesting with the rate of electron transport from water to carbon dioxide. These photoprotective reactions prevent formation of reactive excited states and photoinhibition. The fastest response to excess illumination is the so-called non-photochemical quenching which, in higher plants, requires the luminal pH sensor PsbS and other yet unidentified components of the photosystem II antenna. Both trimeric light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) and monomeric LHC proteins have been indicated as site(s) of the heat-dissipative reactions. Different mechanisms have been proposed: Energy transfer to a lutein quencher in trimers, formation of a zeaxanthin radical cation in monomers. Here, we report on the construction of a mutant lacking all monomeric LHC proteins but retaining LHCII trimers. Its non-photochemical quenching induction rate was substantially slower with respect to the wild type. A carotenoid radical cation signal was detected in the wild type, although it was lost in the mutant. Here, we conclude that non-photochemical quenching is catalysed by two independent mechanisms, with the fastest activated response catalysed within monomeric LHC proteins depending on both zeaxanthin and lutein and on the formation of a radical cation. Trimeric LHCII was responsible for the slowly activated quenching component whereas inclusion in supercomplexes was not required. Finally, this latter activity does not depend on lutein nor on charge transfer events, whereas zeaxanthin was essential.

  8. Peracetic Acid Depolymerization of Biorefinery Lignin for Production of Selective Monomeric Phenolic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ruoshui; Guo, Mond; Lin, Kuan-Ting; Hebert, Vincent R; Zhang, Jinwen; Wolcott, Michael P; Quintero, Melissa; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K; Chen, Xiaowen; Zhang, Xiao

    2016-07-25

    Lignin is the largest source of renewable material with an aromatic skeleton. However, due to the recalcitrant and heterogeneous nature of the lignin polymer, it has been a challenge to effectively depolymerize lignin and produce high-value chemicals with high selectivity. In this study, a highly efficient lignin-to-monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC) conversion method based on peracetic acid (PAA) treatment was reported. PAA treatment of two biorefinery lignin samples, diluted acid pretreated corn stover lignin (DACSL) and steam exploded spruce lignin (SESPL), led to complete solubilization and production of selective hydroxylated monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC-H) and monomeric phenolic acid compounds (MPC-A) including 4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid. The maximized MPC yields obtained were 18 and 22 % based on the initial weight of the lignin in SESPL and DACSL, respectively. However, we found that the addition of niobium pentoxide catalyst to PAA treatment of lignin can significantly improve the MPC yields up to 47 %. The key reaction steps and main mechanisms involved in this new lignin-to-MPC valorization pathway were investigated and elucidated.

  9. Peracetic Acid Depolymerization of Biorefinery Lignin for Production of Selective Monomeric Phenolic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ruoshui [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Guo, Mond [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Lin, Kuan-ting [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Hebert, Vincent R. [Food and Environmental Laboratory, Washington State, University-TriCities, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Zhang, Jinwen [Wood Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Wolcott, Michael P. [Wood Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Quintero, Melissa [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K. [Chemical and Biological Process Development Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Chen, Xiaowen [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Lab, 1617 Cole Blvd Golden CO 80127 USA; Zhang, Xiao [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA

    2016-07-04

    Lignin is the largest source of renewable material with an aromatic skeleton. However, due to the recalcitrant and heterogeneous nature of the lignin polymer as well as its complex side chain structures, it has been a challenge to effectively depolymerize lignin and produce high value chemicals with high selectivity. In this study, a highly efficient lignin-to-monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC) conversion method based on peracetic acid (PAA) treatment was reported. PAA treatment of two biorefinery lignin samples, diluted acid pretreated corn stover lignin (DACSL) and steam exploded spruce lignin (SESPL), led to complete solubilization and production of selective hydroxylated monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC-H) and monomeric phenolic acid compounds (MPC-A) inclduing 4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid. The maximized MPCs yields obtained were 18% and 22% based on the initial weight of the lignin in SESPL and DACSL respectively. However, we found that the addition of niobium pentoxide catalyst to PAA treatment of lignin can significantly improve the MPC yields up to 47%. The key reaction steps and main mechanisms involved in this new lignin-to-MPC valorization pathway were investigated and elucidated.

  10. Peracetic Acid Depolymerization of Biorefinery Lignin for Production of Selective Monomeric Phenolic Compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Ruoshui [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Guo, Mond [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Lin, Kuan-ting [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Hebert, Vincent R. [Food and Environmental Laboratory, Washington State, University-TriCities, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Zhang, Jinwen [Wood Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Wolcott, Michael P. [Wood Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, Pullman WA 99164 USA; Quintero, Melissa [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA; Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K. [Chemical and Biological Process Development Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99354 USA; Chen, Xiaowen [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Lab, 1617 Cole Blvd Golden CO 80127 USA; Zhang, Xiao [Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Bioproducts, Science & Engineering Laboratory, Washington State University, 2710 Crimson Way Richland WA 99354 USA

    2016-07-04

    Lignin is the largest source of renewable material with an aromatic skeleton. However, due to the recalcitrant and heterogeneous nature of the lignin polymer, it has been a challenge to effectively depolymerize lignin and produce high-value chemicals with high selectivity. In this study, a highly efficient lignin-to-monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC) conversion method based on peracetic acid (PAA) treatment was reported. PAA treatment of two biorefinery lignin samples, diluted acid pretreated corn stover lignin (DACSL) and steam exploded spruce lignin (SESPL), led to complete solubilization and production of selective hydroxylated monomeric phenolic compounds (MPC-H) and monomeric phenolic acid compounds (MPC-A) including 4-hydroxy-2-methoxyphenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, vanillic acid, syringic acid, and 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid. The maximized MPC yields obtained were 18 and 22 % based on the initial weight of the lignin in SESPL and DACSL, respectively. However, we found that the addition of niobium pentoxide catalyst to PAA treatment of lignin can significantly improve the MPC yields up to 47 %. The key reaction steps and main mechanisms involved in this new lignin-to-MPC valorization pathway were investigated and elucidated.

  11. First synthesis and structural determination of a monomeric, unsolvated lithium amide, LiNH(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grotjahn, D B; Sheridan, P M; Al Jihad, I; Ziurys, L M

    2001-06-13

    Alkali metal amides typically aggregate in solution and the solid phase, and even in the gas phase. In addition, even in the few known monomeric structures, the coordination number of the alkali metal is raised by binding of Lewis-basic solvent molecules, with concomitant changes in structure. In contrast, the simplest lithium amide LiNH(2) has never been made in a monomeric form, even though its structure has been theoretically predicted several times. Here, the first experimental structural data for a monomeric, unsolvated lithium amide are determined using a combination of gas-phase synthesis and millimeter/submillimeter-wave spectroscopy. All data point to a planar structure for LiNH(2). The r(o) structure of LiNH(2) has a Li-N distance of 1.736(3) A, an N-H distance of 1.022(3) A, and a H-N-H angle of 106.9(1) degrees. These results are compared with theoretical predictions for LiNH(2), and experimental data for oligomeric, solid-phase samples, which could not resolve the question of whether LiNH(2) is planar or not. In addition, comparisons are made with revised gas-phase and solid-phase data and calculated structures of NaNH(2).

  12. The peroxisomal protein import machinery displays a preference for monomeric substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Marta O; Francisco, Tânia; Rodrigues, Tony A; Lismont, Celien; Domingues, Pedro; Pinto, Manuel P; Grou, Cláudia P; Fransen, Marc; Azevedo, Jorge E

    2015-04-01

    Peroxisomal matrix proteins are synthesized on cytosolic ribosomes and transported by the shuttling receptor PEX5 to the peroxisomal membrane docking/translocation machinery, where they are translocated into the organelle matrix. Under certain experimental conditions this protein import machinery has the remarkable capacity to accept already oligomerized proteins, a property that has heavily influenced current models on the mechanism of peroxisomal protein import. However, whether or not oligomeric proteins are really the best and most frequent clients of this machinery remain unclear. In this work, we present three lines of evidence suggesting that the peroxisomal import machinery displays a preference for monomeric proteins. First, in agreement with previous findings on catalase, we show that PEX5 binds newly synthesized (monomeric) acyl-CoA oxidase 1 (ACOX1) and urate oxidase (UOX), potently inhibiting their oligomerization. Second, in vitro import experiments suggest that monomeric ACOX1 and UOX are better peroxisomal import substrates than the corresponding oligomeric forms. Finally, we provide data strongly suggesting that although ACOX1 lacking a peroxisomal targeting signal can be imported into peroxisomes when co-expressed with ACOX1 containing its targeting signal, this import pathway is inefficient.

  13. Treatment of iron deficiency anemia: are monomeric iron compounds suitable for parenteral administration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A; Crumbliss, A L

    2000-11-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional problem worldwide, especially in the developing countries. Oral iron supplementation programs have failed because of noncompliance and gastrointestinal toxicity, thereby necessitating parenteral administration of iron. For parenteral administration, only iron-carbohydrate complexes are currently used, because monomeric iron salts release free iron, thereby causing oxidant injury. However, iron-carbohydrate complexes also have significant toxicity, and they are expensive. We have proposed the hypothesis that monomeric iron salts can be safely administered by the parenteral route if iron is tightly complexed to the ligand, thereby causing clinically insignificant release of free iron, and the kinetic properties of the compound allow rapid transfer of iron to plasma transferrin. A detailed analysis of the physicochemical and kinetic properties reveals that ferric iron complexed to pyrophosphate or acetohydroxamate anions may be suitable for parenteral administration. We have demonstrated that infusion of ferric pyrophosphate into the circulation via the dialysate is safe and effective in maintaining iron balance in patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis. Parenteral administration of monomeric iron compounds is a promising approach to the treatment of iron deficiency in the general population and merits further investigation.

  14. Total allowable concentrations of monomeric inorganic aluminum and hydrated aluminum silicates in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willhite, Calvin C; Ball, Gwendolyn L; McLellan, Clifton J

    2012-05-01

    Maximum contaminant levels are used to control potential health hazards posed by chemicals in drinking water, but no primary national or international limits for aluminum (Al) have been adopted. Given the differences in toxicological profiles, the present evaluation derives total allowable concentrations for certain water-soluble inorganic Al compounds (including chloride, hydroxide, oxide, phosphate and sulfate) and for the hydrated Al silicates (including attapulgite, bentonite/montmorillonite, illite, kaolinite) in drinking water. The chemistry, toxicology and clinical experience with Al materials are extensive and depend upon the particular physical and chemical form. In general, the water solubility of the monomeric Al materials depends on pH and their water solubility and gastrointestinal bioavailability are much greater than that of the hydrated Al silicates. Other than Al-containing antacids and buffered aspirin, food is the primary source of Al exposure for most healthy people. Systemic uptake of Al after ingestion of the monomeric salts is somewhat greater from drinking water (0.28%) than from food (0.1%). Once absorbed, Al accumulates in bone, brain, liver and kidney, with bone as the major site for Al deposition in humans. Oral Al hydroxide is used routinely to bind phosphate salts in the gut to control hyperphosphatemia in people with compromised renal function. Signs of chronic Al toxicity in the musculoskeletal system include a vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia (deranged membranous bone formation characterized by accumulation of the osteoid matrix and reduced mineralization, reduced numbers of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, decreased lamellar and osteoid bands with elevated Al concentrations) presenting as bone pain and proximal myopathy. Aluminum-induced bone disease can progress to stress fractures of the ribs, femur, vertebrae, humerus and metatarsals. Serum Al ≥100 µg/L has a 75-88% positive predictive value for Al bone disease. Chronic Al

  15. Age-dependent preferential dense-core vesicle exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells revealed by newly developed monomeric fluorescent timer protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Takashi; Kitaguchi, Tetsuya; Karasawa, Satoshi; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Miyawaki, Atsushi

    2010-01-01

    Although it is evident that only a few secretory vesicles accumulating in neuroendocrine cells are qualified to fuse with the plasma membrane and release their contents to the extracellular space, the molecular mechanisms that regulate their exocytosis are poorly understood. For example, it has been controversial whether secretory vesicles are exocytosed randomly or preferentially according to their age. Using a newly developed protein-based fluorescent timer, monomeric Kusabira Green Orange (mK-GO), which changes color with a predictable time course, here we show that small GTPase Rab27A effectors regulate age-dependent exocytosis of secretory vesicles in PC12 cells. When the vesicles were labeled with mK-GO-tagged neuropeptide Y or tissue-type plasminogen activator, punctate structures with green or red fluorescence were observed. Application of high [K(+)] stimulation induced exocytosis of new (green) fluorescent secretory vesicles but not of old (red) vesicles. Overexpression or depletion of rabphilin and synaptotagmin-like protein4-a (Slp4-a), which regulate exocytosis positively and negatively, respectively, disturbed the age-dependent exocytosis of the secretory vesicles in different manners. Our results suggest that coordinate functions of the two effectors of Rab27A, rabphilin and Slp4-a, are required for regulated secretory pathway.

  16. Monomeric banana lectin at acidic pH overrules conformational stability of its native dimeric form.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javed M Khan

    Full Text Available Banana lectin (BL is a homodimeric protein categorized among jacalin-related family of lectins. The effect of acidic pH was examined on conformational stability of BL by using circular dichroism, intrinsic fluorescence, 1-anilino-8-napthalene sulfonate (ANS binding, size exclusion chromatography (SEC and dynamic light scattering (DLS. During acid denaturation of BL, the monomerization of native dimeric protein was found at pH 2.0. The elution profile from SEC showed two different peaks (59.65 ml & 87.98 ml at pH 2.0 while single peak (61.45 ml at pH 7.4. The hydrodynamic radii (R h of native BL was 2.9 nm while at pH 2.0 two species were found with R h of 1.7 and 3.7 nm. Furthermore at, pH 2.0 the secondary structures of BL remained unaltered while tertiary structure was significantly disrupted with the exposure of hydrophobic clusters confirming the existence of molten globule like state. The unfolding of BL with different subunit status was further evaluated by urea and temperature mediated denaturation to check their stability. As inferred from high Cm and ΔG values, the monomeric form of BL offers more resistance towards chemical denaturation than the native dimeric form. Besides, dimeric BL exhibited a Tm of 77°C while no loss in secondary structures was observed in monomers even up to 95°C. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on monomeric subunit of lectins showing more stability against denaturants than its native dimeric state.

  17. Conformational equilibria in monomeric alpha-synuclein at the single-molecule level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Sandal

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Human alpha-Synuclein (alphaSyn is a natively unfolded protein whose aggregation into amyloid fibrils is involved in the pathology of Parkinson disease. A full comprehension of the structure and dynamics of early intermediates leading to the aggregated states is an unsolved problem of essential importance to researchers attempting to decipher the molecular mechanisms of alphaSyn aggregation and formation of fibrils. Traditional bulk techniques used so far to solve this problem point to a direct correlation between alphaSyn's unique conformational properties and its propensity to aggregate, but these techniques can only provide ensemble-averaged information for monomers and oligomers alike. They therefore cannot characterize the full complexity of the conformational equilibria that trigger the aggregation process. We applied atomic force microscopy-based single-molecule mechanical unfolding methodology to study the conformational equilibrium of human wild-type and mutant alphaSyn. The conformational heterogeneity of monomeric alphaSyn was characterized at the single-molecule level. Three main classes of conformations, including disordered and "beta-like" structures, were directly observed and quantified without any interference from oligomeric soluble forms. The relative abundance of the "beta-like" structures significantly increased in different conditions promoting the aggregation of alphaSyn: the presence of Cu2+, the pathogenic A30P mutation, and high ionic strength. This methodology can explore the full conformational space of a protein at the single-molecule level, detecting even poorly populated conformers and measuring their distribution in a variety of biologically important conditions. To the best of our knowledge, we present for the first time evidence of a conformational equilibrium that controls the population of a specific class of monomeric alphaSyn conformers, positively correlated with conditions known to promote the formation of

  18. Isolation of monomeric photosystem II that retains the subunit PsbS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haniewicz, Patrycja; De Sanctis, Daniele; Büchel, Claudia; Schröder, Wolfgang P; Loi, Maria Cecilia; Kieselbach, Thomas; Bochtler, Matthias; Piano, Dario

    2013-12-01

    Photosystem II has been purified from a transplastomic strain of Nicotiana tabacum according to two different protocols. Using the procedure described in Piano et al. (Photosynth Res 106:221-226, 2010) it was possible to isolate highly active PSII composed of monomers and dimers but depleted in their PsbS protein content. A "milder" procedure than the protocol reported by Fey et al. (Biochim Biophys Acta 1777:1501-1509, 2008) led to almost exclusively monomeric PSII complexes which in part still bind the PsbS protein. This finding might support a role for PSII monomers in higher plants.

  19. Monomeric CH3: A Small, Stable Antibody Domain with Therapeutic Promise | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Antibody domains are emerging as promising biopharmaceuticals because of their relatively small size compared to full-sized antibodies, which are too large to effectively penetrate tumors and bind to sterically restricted therapeutic targets. In an article published in The Journal of Biological Chemistry, Tianlei Ying, Ph.D., Dimiter Dimitrov, Ph.D., and their colleagues in the Protein Interactions Group, Cancer and Inflammation Program, Center for Cancer Research, reported their design of a novel antibody domain, monomeric CH3 (mCH3).

  20. The Beckman DxI 800 prolactin assay demonstrates superior specificity for monomeric prolactin.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, Brendan

    2010-02-01

    Commercially available prolactin immunoassays detect macroprolactin to variable degrees. Best practice requires laboratories to assess the cross-reactivity of their prolactin assay with macroprolactin, and where appropriate, introduce a screen for the presence of macroprolactin. Our policy has been to reanalyse hyperprolactinaemic samples following polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation and to report the resultant value as the monomeric prolactin content of the sample. The goal of this study was to determine the need to continue PEG precipitation when prolactin measurements with the Wallac AutoDELFIA were replaced by the Beckman DxI 800.

  1. Nortriptyline inhibits aggregation and neurotoxicity of alpha-synuclein by enhancing reconfiguration of the monomeric form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Timothy J; Srivastava, Kinshuk R; Justman, Craig; Grammatopoulous, Tom; Hutter-Paier, Birgit; Prokesch, Manuela; Havas, Daniel; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Liu, Fang; Jock, Kevin; de Oliveira, Patrícia; Stirtz, Georgia L; Dettmer, Ulf; Sortwell, Caryl E; Feany, Mel B; Lansbury, Peter; Lapidus, Lisa; Paumier, Katrina L

    2017-10-01

    The pathology of Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies is characterized by the formation of intracellular inclusions comprised primarily of misfolded, fibrillar α-synuclein (α-syn). One strategy to slow disease progression is to prevent the misfolding and aggregation of its native monomeric form. Here we present findings that support the contention that the tricyclic antidepressant compound nortriptyline (NOR) has disease-modifying potential for synucleinopathies. Findings from in vitro aggregation and kinetics assays support the view that NOR inhibits aggregation of α-syn by directly binding to the soluble, monomeric form, and by enhancing reconfiguration of the monomer, inhibits formation of toxic conformations of the protein. We go on to demonstrate that NOR inhibits the accumulation, aggregation and neurotoxicity of α-syn in multiple cell and animal models. These findings suggest that NOR, a compound with established safety and efficacy for treatment of depression, may slow progression of α-syn pathology by directly binding to soluble, native, α-syn, thereby inhibiting pathological aggregation and preserving its normal functions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Monomeric, Oligomeric and Polymeric Proteins in Huntington Disease and Other Diseases of Polyglutamine Expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guylaine Hoffner

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Huntington disease and other diseases of polyglutamine expansion are each caused by a different protein bearing an excessively long polyglutamine sequence and are associated with neuronal death. Although these diseases affect largely different brain regions, they all share a number of characteristics, and, therefore, are likely to possess a common mechanism. In all of the diseases, the causative protein is proteolyzed, becomes abnormally folded and accumulates in oligomers and larger aggregates. The aggregated and possibly the monomeric expanded polyglutamine are likely to play a critical role in the pathogenesis and there is increasing evidence that the secondary structure of the protein influences its toxicity. We describe here, with special attention to huntingtin, the mechanisms of polyglutamine aggregation and the modulation of aggregation by the sequences flanking the polyglutamine. We give a comprehensive picture of the characteristics of monomeric and aggregated polyglutamine, including morphology, composition, seeding ability, secondary structure, and toxicity. The structural heterogeneity of aggregated polyglutamine may explain why polyglutamine-containing aggregates could paradoxically be either toxic or neuroprotective.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of a monomeric mutant Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase with partially reconstituted enzymic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banci, L; Bertini, I; Chiu, C Y; Mullenbach, G T; Viezzoli, M S

    1995-12-15

    A monomeric analog of human Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (F50E/G51E SOD), previously characterized and found to have reduced enzymic activity, was here further modified by replacing Glu133 with Gln. This substitution does not dramatically affect the coordination geometry at the active site, but enhances enzymic activity, and also increases the affinity for anions at the active site. This behavior parallels earlier published results in which this point mutation was made in the dimeric wild-type enzyme. The analog described here has afforded for the first time a monomeric superoxide dismutase with substantial activity. This point mutation does not significantly influence the protein structure but interactions with anions, including superoxide, are altered with respect to the monomeric form. The present monomeric Glu133Gln mutant has partially restored enzymic activity. The diminished activity of the monomeric analogs is discussed in the light of possible minor structural changes and some of their characteristics are compared with those of naturally occurring mutants associated with various neurological diseases.

  4. Properties and metathesis activity of monomeric and dimeric Mo centres variously located on γ-alumina A DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handzlik, Jarosław

    2007-05-01

    Ethene metathesis proceeding on monomeric and dimeric Mo species on the (1 0 0) and (1 1 0) γ-alumina is investigated by density functional theory, applying the cluster approach. The calculated vibrational frequencies of the surface OH groups are assigned to the experimental IR bands. It is shown that both monomeric and dimeric Mo forms can be the active sites of olefin metathesis. Metathesis activity and stability of the Mo-methylidene centres depend on their location on alumina. The differences in the sites reactivity are explained on the basis of their geometrical and electronic structure parameters. For the monomeric centres, isomerisation of the trigonal bipyramidal intermediate to the stable square pyramidal molybdacyclobutane is kinetically favoured over the cycloreversal step. The situation is opposite in the case of the dimeric species.

  5. Novel Monomeric Phenanthroline—Thallium(Ⅲ) Complexes Multinuclear NMR Characterization in Organic Solvents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GuiBinMA; JuliusGLASER

    2002-01-01

    A novel complex of monomeric thallium (Ⅲ) with the nitrogen donor ligand phenanthroline (phen) has been prepared and characterized by multimuclear NMR(1H,13C,205Tl). The three complexes exist in equilibria in DMSO and acetonitrile solution, which was proved by the 205Tl NMR spectra. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of tris-phen T1(Ⅲ) complex have been measured, where the spin-spin coupling between T1(I=1/2) and 13C or 1H signals were observed with the 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy in acetonitrile. The coupling constants are presented and the chemical shifts of complexes are discussed in detail.

  6. Novel Monomeric Phenanthroline - Thallium(Ⅲ) Complexes Multinuclear NMR Characterization in Organic Solvents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    A novel complex of monomeric thallium(III) with the nitrogen donor ligand phenanthrolinc (phen) has been prepared and characterized by multinuclear NMR (1H, 13C, 205T1).The three complexes exist in equilibria in DMSO and acetonitrile solution, which was proved by the 205Tl NMR spectra. The 1H and 13C NMR spectra of tris-phen Tl(III) complex have been measured, where the spin-spin coupling between TI (1 = 1/2) and 13C or 1H signals were observed with the 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy in acetonitrile. The coupling constants are presented and the chemical shifts of complexes are discussed in detail.

  7. Kinetics of carbon monoxide binding to monomeric hemoproteins. Role of the proximal histidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletta, M; Ascenzi, P; Traylor, T G; Brunori, M

    1985-04-10

    The effect of pH on (i) the second-order rate constant for CO binding and (ii) the spectral properties of the deoxygenated derivative of several monomeric hemoproteins has been investigated in the pH range between 2.3 and 9.0. As in the case of 3-[1-imidazolyl]-propylamide monomethyl ester mesoheme, the rate constant for CO binding to sperm whale, horse, Dermochelys coriacea, Coryphaena hippurus, and Aplysia limacina myoglobins (the latter only in the presence of acetate/acetic acid mixture) increases, as the pH is lowered, to a value at least 1 order of magnitude higher than at pH 7.0. Such an effect is not observed in A. limacina myoglobin (in the absence of the acetate/acetic acid mixture) and Chironomus thummi thummi erythrocruorin. Moreover, the absorption spectrum, in the visible region, of the deoxy derivative of all these monomeric hemoproteins (with the exception of A. limacina myoglobin in the absence of the acetate/acetic acid mixture) undergoes a transition as the pH is lowered, an effect observed previously with 3-[1-imidazolyl]-propylamide monomethyl ester protoheme. On the basis of analogous spectroscopic and kinetic properties of chelated heme model compounds we attribute this behavior to the protonation of the N epsilon of the proximal imidazole involved in the bond with the iron atom. On the basis of this model the movement of the iron atom to the heme plane appears as a crucial step for CO binding, the activation free energy of the process amounting to approximately 2 kcal/mol.

  8. LRP1 Modulates APP Intraneuronal Transport and Processing in Its Monomeric and Dimeric State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus U. Pietrzik

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1, LRP1, interacts with APP and affects its processing. This is assumed to be mostly caused by the impact of LRP1 on APP endocytosis. More recently, also an interaction of APP and LRP1 early in the secretory pathway was reported whereat retention of LRP1 in the ER leads to decreased APP cell surface levels and in turn, to reduced Aβ secretion. Here, we extended the biochemical and immunocytochemical analyses by showing via live cell imaging analyses in primary neurons that LRP1 and APP are transported only partly in common (one third but to a higher degree in distinct fast axonal transport vesicles. Interestingly, co-expression of LRP1 and APP caused a change of APP transport velocities, indicating that LRP1 recruits APP to a specific type of fast axonal transport vesicles. In contrast lowered levels of LRP1 facilitated APP transport. We further show that monomeric and dimeric APP exhibit similar transport characteristics and that both are affected by LRP1 in a similar way, by slowing down APP anterograde transport and increasing its endocytosis rate. In line with this, a knockout of LRP1 in CHO cells and in primary neurons caused an increase of monomeric and dimeric APP surface localization and in turn accelerated shedding by meprin β and ADAM10. Notably, a choroid plexus specific LRP1 knockout caused a much higher secretion of sAPP dimers into the cerebrospinal fluid compared to sAPP monomers. Together, our data show that LRP1 functions as a sorting receptor for APP, regulating its cell surface localization and thereby its processing by ADAM10 and meprin β, with the latter exhibiting a preference for APP in its dimeric state.

  9. LRP1 Modulates APP Intraneuronal Transport and Processing in Its Monomeric and Dimeric State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herr, Uta-Mareike; Strecker, Paul; Storck, Steffen E; Thomas, Carolin; Rabiej, Verena; Junker, Anne; Schilling, Sandra; Schmidt, Nadine; Dowds, C Marie; Eggert, Simone; Pietrzik, Claus U; Kins, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1, LRP1, interacts with APP and affects its processing. This is assumed to be mostly caused by the impact of LRP1 on APP endocytosis. More recently, also an interaction of APP and LRP1 early in the secretory pathway was reported whereat retention of LRP1 in the ER leads to decreased APP cell surface levels and in turn, to reduced Aβ secretion. Here, we extended the biochemical and immunocytochemical analyses by showing via live cell imaging analyses in primary neurons that LRP1 and APP are transported only partly in common (one third) but to a higher degree in distinct fast axonal transport vesicles. Interestingly, co-expression of LRP1 and APP caused a change of APP transport velocities, indicating that LRP1 recruits APP to a specific type of fast axonal transport vesicles. In contrast lowered levels of LRP1 facilitated APP transport. We further show that monomeric and dimeric APP exhibit similar transport characteristics and that both are affected by LRP1 in a similar way, by slowing down APP anterograde transport and increasing its endocytosis rate. In line with this, a knockout of LRP1 in CHO cells and in primary neurons caused an increase of monomeric and dimeric APP surface localization and in turn accelerated shedding by meprin β and ADAM10. Notably, a choroid plexus specific LRP1 knockout caused a much higher secretion of sAPP dimers into the cerebrospinal fluid compared to sAPP monomers. Together, our data show that LRP1 functions as a sorting receptor for APP, regulating its cell surface localization and thereby its processing by ADAM10 and meprin β, with the latter exhibiting a preference for APP in its dimeric state.

  10. Quantification of the predominant monomeric catechins in baking chocolate standard reference material by LC/APCI-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Bryant C; Sharpless, Katherine E

    2003-01-29

    Catechins are polyphenolic plant compounds (flavonoids) that may offer significant health benefits to humans. These benefits stem largely from their anticarcinogenic, antioxidant, and antimutagenic properties. Recent epidemiological studies suggest that the consumption of flavonoid-containing foods is associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. Chocolate is a natural cocoa bean-based product that reportedly contains high levels of monomeric, oligomeric, and polymeric catechins. We have applied solid-liquid extraction and liquid chromatography coupled with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-mass spectrometry to the identification and determination of the predominant monomeric catechins, (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin, in a baking chocolate Standard Reference Material (NIST Standard Reference Material 2384). (+)-Catechin and (-)-epicatechin are detected and quantified in chocolate extracts on the basis of selected-ion monitoring of their protonated [M + H](+) molecular ions. Tryptophan methyl ester is used as an internal standard. The developed method has the capacity to accurately quantify as little as 0.1 microg/mL (0.01 mg of catechin/g of chocolate) of either catechin in chocolate extracts, and the method has additionally been used to certify (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin levels in the baking chocolate Standard Reference Material. This is the first reported use of liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry for the quantitative determination of monomeric catechins in chocolate and the only report certifying monomeric catechin levels in a food-based Standard Reference Material.

  11. Principal component regression analysis of the relation between CIELAB color and monomeric anthocyanins in young Cabernet Sauvignon wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fu-Liang; Zhang, Wen-Na; Pan, Qiu-Hong; Zheng, Cheng-Rong; Chen, Hai-Yan; Duan, Chang-Qing

    2008-11-17

    Color is one of the key characteristics used to evaluate the sensory quality of red wine, and anthocyanins are the main contributors to color. Monomeric anthocyanins and CIELAB color values were investigated by HPLC-MS and spectrophotometry during fermentation of Cabernet Sauvignon red wine, and principal component regression (PCR), a statistical tool, was used to establish a linkage between the detected anthocyanins and wine coloring. The results showed that 14 monomeric anthocyanins could be identified in wine samples, and all of these anthocyanins were negatively correlated with the L*, b* and H*ab values, but positively correlated with a* and C*ab values. On an equal concentration basis for each detected anthocyanin, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside (Cy3-glu) had the most influence on CIELAB color value, while malvidin 3-O-glucoside (Mv3-glu) had the least. The color values of various monomeric anthocyanins were influenced by their structures, substituents on the B-ring, acyl groups on the glucoside and the molecular steric structure. This work develops a statistical method for evaluating correlation between wine color and monomeric anthocyanins, and also provides a basis for elucidating the effect of intramolecular copigmentation on wine coloring.

  12. Principal Component Regression Analysis of the Relation Between CIELAB Color and Monomeric Anthocyanins in Young Cabernet Sauvignon Wines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Qing Duan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Color is one of the key characteristics used to evaluate the sensory quality of red wine, and anthocyanins are the main contributors to color. Monomeric anthocyanins and CIELAB color values were investigated by HPLC-MS and spectrophotometry during fermentation of Cabernet Sauvignon red wine, and principal component regression (PCR, a statistical tool, was used to establish a linkage between the detected anthocyanins and wine coloring. The results showed that 14 monomeric anthocyanins could be identified in wine samples, and all of these anthocyanins were negatively correlated with the L*, b* and H*ab values, but positively correlated with a* and C*ab values. On an equal concentration basis for each detected anthocyanin, cyanidin-3-O-glucoside (Cy3-glu had the most influence on CIELAB color value, while malvidin 3-O-glucoside (Mv3-glu had the least. The color values of various monomeric anthocyanins were influenced by their structures, substituents on the B-ring, acyl groups on the glucoside and the molecular steric structure. This work develops a statistical method for evaluating correlation between wine color and monomeric anthocyanins, and also provides a basis for elucidating the effect of intramolecular copigmentation on wine coloring.

  13. Synthesis and structural characterization of monomeric mercury(II) selenolate complexes derived from 2-phenylbenzamide ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Saket; Meenakshi; Hodage, Ananda S; Verma, Ajay; Agrawal, Shailendra; Yadav, Abhimanyu; Kumar, Sangit

    2016-03-07

    Monomeric Hg(II) selenolate complexes derived from 2-phenylbenzamide ligands were prepared by oxidative addition of diselenides [{C6H4(CONR2)Se}2, R = Me, Et, iPr] to elemental Hg and reductive cleavage of the Se–N bond of isoselenazolone derivatives [(NO2)C6H3(CONSe)R, (R = allyl, nbutyl)] followed by the treatment with HgCl2. The complexes have been characterized by multinuclear NMR (1H, 13C and 77Se) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry which suggest the monomeric form of these in solution. The molecular structures of diselenides [C6H4(CONR2)Se]2 and mercury selenolates [Hg{(NO2)C6H3(CONH-C3H5) Se}2], [Hg{C6H4(CONiPr2)Se}2] and [Hg{C6H4(CONMe2)Se}2] were established by a single crystal X-ray diffraction study. Diselenides show strong intramolecular non-bonded Se⋯O interactions, which are influenced by the nature of C(O)NR̲2 and decrease with the sterically bulky alkyl substituent (Se⋯O =2.823 Å for R = di-Me, 2.760 Å for R = allyl, and 3.157 Å for R = di-iPr). Mercury complexes derived from less bulky 2-phenyl-N,N-dialkylbenzamide ligands associated with poor or no intramolecular nonbonded Hg⋯O interactions (4.91 Å for R = di-Me, 4.199 Å for R = allyl) and instead strong intermolecular Hg⋯O [2.792(3) and 2.820(4) Å] for di-Me and allyl and Hg⋯Se [3.3212(5) and 3.4076(8) Å] interactions were observed which lead to a dimeric form in the crystals. On the other hand, the mercury complex derived from the sterically bulky diisopropyl amide ligand shows a strong intramolecular non-bonded Hg⋯O (2.860 Å) interaction, adopts linear geometry and exists as a monomer. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) of the mercury selenolate complexes revealed two-step decomposition which leads to the formation of HgSe. The mercury selenolate complex 3c derived from the sterically bulky 2-phenyl-N,Ndiisopropylbenzamide ligand decomposed to give HgSe in the range of 220-300 °C.

  14. 11 Efficacy and Tolerability of HDM Injective Immunotherapy With Monomeric Allergoid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compalati, Enrico; Atzeni, Isabella; Cabras, Sergio; Fancello, Paolo; Gaspardini, Giulio; Longo, Rocco; Patella, Vincenzo; Tore, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    Background Subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) is an effective treatment of respiratory allergy and carbamylated monomeric allergoids (monoids), by virtue of their reduced IgE-binding activity, resulted clinically safe by sublingual administration. Purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy and tolerability of immunotherapy with house dust mites (HDM) monoid administered by injective route in patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (AR). Methods A preparation of 0.70 mL of 10 BU/mL containing modified extract with 50% Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus and 50% Dermatophagoides farinae (amount of major allergen: 4 μg of group 1 per milliliter) was delivered monthly for 12 months, following a 5-week build-up induction phase (0.10–0.20–0.30–0.50–0.70 mL), to 58 patients (60% males, mean age 25.1 ± 12.7) suffering from AR due to mites for at least 2 years, whereas 60 patients with similar baseline characteristics were observed as controls. All patients were allowed to assume traditional drug therapy for their condition. At the end of the study changes from baseline in symptoms scores, in number of days with drug assumption, in severity of AR (according to ARIA classification) were compared between the 2 groups; moreover an overall assessment of clinical efficacy and tolerability was based on patients' and physicians' judgements (unsatisfactory, mild, good, optimal). Results In respect to baseline both groups showed, after 1 year, an improvement in symptoms score (P < 0.001) with a significant difference in favour of SCIT group (P < 0.05). Days of drug intake were significantly lower in patients receiving SCIT (P < 0.05). The number of patients with severe AR decreased in the first group while no variation was observed in controls. The subjective clinical overall assessment was optimal in 31 cases and good in 24 according to physicians' and patients' judgements; similarly 38 patients judged tolerability as optimal and 18 as good, whereas according to

  15. Holistic versus monomeric strategies for hydrological modelling of human-modified hydrosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalbantis, I.; Efstratiadis, A.; Rozos, E.; Kopsiafti, M.; Koutsoyiannis, D.

    2011-03-01

    The modelling of human-modified basins that are inadequately measured constitutes a challenge for hydrological science. Often, models for such systems are detailed and hydraulics-based for only one part of the system while for other parts oversimplified models or rough assumptions are used. This is typically a bottom-up approach, which seeks to exploit knowledge of hydrological processes at the micro-scale at some components of the system. Also, it is a monomeric approach in two ways: first, essential interactions among system components may be poorly represented or even omitted; second, differences in the level of detail of process representation can lead to uncontrolled errors. Additionally, the calibration procedure merely accounts for the reproduction of the observed responses using typical fitting criteria. The paper aims to raise some critical issues, regarding the entire modelling approach for such hydrosystems. For this, two alternative modelling strategies are examined that reflect two modelling approaches or philosophies: a dominant bottom-up approach, which is also monomeric and, very often, based on output information, and a top-down and holistic approach based on generalized information. Critical options are examined, which codify the differences between the two strategies: the representation of surface, groundwater and water management processes, the schematization and parameterization concepts and the parameter estimation methodology. The first strategy is based on stand-alone models for surface and groundwater processes and for water management, which are employed sequentially. For each model, a different (detailed or coarse) parameterization is used, which is dictated by the hydrosystem schematization. The second strategy involves model integration for all processes, parsimonious parameterization and hybrid manual-automatic parameter optimization based on multiple objectives. A test case is examined in a hydrosystem in Greece with high complexities

  16. Holistic versus monomeric strategies for hydrological modelling of human-modified hydrosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Nalbantis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The modelling of human-modified basins that are inadequately measured constitutes a challenge for hydrological science. Often, models for such systems are detailed and hydraulics-based for only one part of the system while for other parts oversimplified models or rough assumptions are used. This is typically a bottom-up approach, which seeks to exploit knowledge of hydrological processes at the micro-scale at some components of the system. Also, it is a monomeric approach in two ways: first, essential interactions among system components may be poorly represented or even omitted; second, differences in the level of detail of process representation can lead to uncontrolled errors. Additionally, the calibration procedure merely accounts for the reproduction of the observed responses using typical fitting criteria. The paper aims to raise some critical issues, regarding the entire modelling approach for such hydrosystems. For this, two alternative modelling strategies are examined that reflect two modelling approaches or philosophies: a dominant bottom-up approach, which is also monomeric and, very often, based on output information, and a top-down and holistic approach based on generalized information. Critical options are examined, which codify the differences between the two strategies: the representation of surface, groundwater and water management processes, the schematization and parameterization concepts and the parameter estimation methodology. The first strategy is based on stand-alone models for surface and groundwater processes and for water management, which are employed sequentially. For each model, a different (detailed or coarse parameterization is used, which is dictated by the hydrosystem schematization. The second strategy involves model integration for all processes, parsimonious parameterization and hybrid manual-automatic parameter optimization based on multiple objectives. A test case is examined in a hydrosystem in Greece

  17. Mapping the dynamics and nanoscale organization of synaptic adhesion proteins using monomeric streptavidin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamma, Ingrid; Letellier, Mathieu; Butler, Corey; Tessier, Béatrice; Lim, Kok-Hong; Gauthereau, Isabel; Choquet, Daniel; Sibarita, Jean-Baptiste; Park, Sheldon; Sainlos, Matthieu; Thoumine, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    The advent of super-resolution imaging (SRI) has created a need for optimized labelling strategies. We present a new method relying on fluorophore-conjugated monomeric streptavidin (mSA) to label membrane proteins carrying a short, enzymatically biotinylated tag, compatible with SRI techniques including uPAINT, STED and dSTORM. We demonstrate efficient and specific labelling of target proteins in confined intercellular and organotypic tissues, with reduced steric hindrance and no crosslinking compared with multivalent probes. We use mSA to decipher the dynamics and nanoscale organization of the synaptic adhesion molecules neurexin-1β, neuroligin-1 (Nlg1) and leucine-rich-repeat transmembrane protein 2 (LRRTM2) in a dual-colour configuration with GFP nanobody, and show that these proteins are diffusionally trapped at synapses where they form apposed trans-synaptic adhesive structures. Furthermore, Nlg1 is dynamic, disperse and sensitive to synaptic stimulation, whereas LRRTM2 is organized in compact and stable nanodomains. Thus, mSA is a versatile tool to image membrane proteins at high resolution in complex live environments, providing novel information about the nano-organization of biological structures. PMID:26979420

  18. SuperNova, a monomeric photosensitizing fluorescent protein for chromophore-assisted light inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takemoto, Kiwamu; Matsuda, Tomoki; Sakai, Naoki; Fu, Donald; Noda, Masanori; Uchiyama, Susumu; Kotera, Ippei; Arai, Yoshiyuki; Horiuchi, Masataka; Fukui, Kiichi; Ayabe, Tokiyoshi; Inagaki, Fuyuhiko; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Nagai, Takeharu

    2013-01-01

    Chromophore-assisted light inactivation (CALI) is a powerful technique for acute perturbation of biomolecules in a spatio-temporally defined manner in living specimen with reactive oxygen species (ROS). Whereas a chemical photosensitizer including fluorescein must be added to specimens exogenously and cannot be restricted to particular cells or sub-cellular compartments, a genetically-encoded photosensitizer, KillerRed, can be controlled in its expression by tissue specific promoters or subcellular localization tags. Despite of this superiority, KillerRed hasn't yet become a versatile tool because its dimerization tendency prevents fusion with proteins of interest. Here, we report the development of monomeric variant of KillerRed (SuperNova) by direct evolution using random mutagenesis. In contrast to KillerRed, SuperNova in fusion with target proteins shows proper localization. Furthermore, unlike KillerRed, SuperNova expression alone doesn't perturb mitotic cell division. Supernova retains the ability to generate ROS, and hence promote CALI-based functional analysis of target proteins overcoming the major drawbacks of KillerRed.

  19. Hydrogen production from the monomeric sugars hydrolyzed from hemicellulose by Enterobacter aerogenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Yunli; Wang, Jianji; Liu, Zhen; Ren, Yunlai; Li, Guozhi [School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmaceutics, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang 471039, Henan (China)

    2009-12-15

    Relatively large percentages of xylose with glucose, arabinose, mannose, galactose and rhamnose constitute the hydrolysis products of hemicellulose. In this paper, hydrogen production performance of facultative anaerobe (Enterobacter aerogenes) has been investigated from these different monomeric sugars except glucose. It was shown that the stereoisomers of mannose and galactose were more effective for hydrogen production than those of xylose and arabinose. The substrate of 5 g/l xylose resulted in a relative high level of hydrogen yield (73.8 mmol/l), hydrogen production efficiency (2.2 mol/mol) and a maximum hydrogen production rate (249 ml/l/h). The hydrogen yield, hydrogen production efficiency and the maximum hydrogen production rate reached 104 mmol/l, 2.35 mol/mol and 290 ml/l/h, respectively, on a substrate of 10 g/l galactose. The hydrogen yields and the maximum hydrogen production rates increased with an increase of mannose concentrations and reached 119 mmol/l and 518 ml/l/h on the culture of 25 g/l mannose. However, rhamnose was a relative poor carbon resource for E. aerogenes to produce hydrogen, from which the hydrogen yield and hydrogen production efficiency were about one half of that from the mannose substrate. E. aerogenes was found to be a promising strain for hydrogen production from hydrolysis products of hemicellulose. (author)

  20. Generation of transgenic Wuzhishan miniature pigs expressing monomeric red fluorescent protein by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yue; Kang, Jin-Dan; Li, Suo; Wang, Wei; Jin, Jun-Xue; Hong, Yu; Cui, Cheng-du; Yan, Chang-Guo; Yin, Xi-Jun

    2013-08-01

    Red fluorescent protein and its variants enable researchers to study gene expression, localization, and protein-protein interactions in vitro in real-time. Fluorophores with higher wavelengths are usually preferred since they efficiently penetrate tissues and produce less toxic emissions. A recently developed fluorescent protein marker, monomeric red fluorescent protein (mRFP1), is particularly useful because of its rapid maturation and minimal interference with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and GFP-derived markers. We generated a pCX-mRFP1-pgk-neoR construct and evaluated the ability of mRFP1 to function as a fluorescent marker in transgenic Wuzhishan miniature pigs. Transgenic embryos were generated by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) of nuclei isolated from ear fibroblasts expressing mRFP1. Embryos generated by SCNT developed into blastocysts in vitro (11.65%; 31/266). Thereafter, a total of 685 transgenic embryos were transferred into the oviducts of three recipients, two of which became pregnant. Of these, one recipient had six aborted fetuses, whereas the other recipient gave birth to four offspring. All offspring expressed the pCX-mRFP1-pgk-neoR gene as shown by PCR and fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis. The transgenic pigs expressed mRFP1 in all organs and tissues at high levels. These results demonstrate that Wuzhishan miniature pigs can express mRFP1. To conclude, this transgenic animal represents an excellent model with widespread applications in medicine and agriculture.

  1. Retention mechanism for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in reversed-phase liquid chromatography with monomeric stationary phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, Jake L; Siepmann, J Ilja; Schure, Mark R

    2011-12-23

    Reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RPLC) is the foremost technique for the separation of analytes that have very similar chemical functionalities, but differ only in their molecular shape. This ability is crucial in the analysis of various mixtures with environmental and biological importance including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and steroids. A large amount of effort has been devoted to studying this phenomenon experimentally, but a detailed molecular-level description remains lacking. To provide some insight on the mechanism of shape selectivity in RPLC, particle-based simulations were carried out for stationary phases and chromatographic parameters that closely mimic those in an experimental study by Sentell and Dorsey [J. Chromatogr. 461 (1989) 193]. The retention of aromatic hydrocarbons ranging in size from benzene to the isomeric PAHs of the formula C(18)H(12) was examined for model RPLC systems consisting of monomeric dimethyl octadecylsilane (ODS) stationary phases with surface coverages ranging from 1.6 to 4.2 μmol/m(2) (i.e., stationary phases yielding low to intermediate shape selectivity) in contact with a 67/33 mol% acetonitrile/water mobile phase. The simulations show that the stationary phase acts as a very heterogeneous environment where analytes with different shapes prefer different spatial regions with specific local bonding environments of the ODS chains. However, these favorable retentive regions cannot be described as pre-existing cavities because the chain conformation in these local stationary phase regions adapts to accommodate the analytes.

  2. Contribution of Monomeric Anthocyanins to the Color of Young Red Wine: Statistical and Experimental Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fu Liang; Li, Zheng; Xu, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Monomeric anthocyanin contributions to young red wine color were investigated using partial least square regression (PLSR) and aqueous alcohol solutions in this study. Results showed that the correlation between the anthocyanin concentration and the solution color fitted in a quadratic regression rather than linear or cubic regression. Malvidin-3-O-glucoside was estimated to show the highest contribution to young red wine color according to its concentration in wine, whereas peonidin-3-O-glucoside in its concentration contributed the least. The PLSR suggested that delphinidin-3-O-glucoside and peonidin-3-O-glucoside under the same concentration resulted in a stronger color of young red wine compared with malvidin-3-O-glucoside. These estimates were further confirmed by their color in aqueous alcohol solutions. These results suggested that delphinidin-3-O-glucoside and peonidin-3-O-glucoside were primary anthocyanins to enhance young red wine color by increasing their concentrations. This study could provide an alternative approach to improve young red wine color by adjusting anthocyanin composition and concentration.

  3. Model of a DNA-protein complex of the architectural monomeric protein MC1 from Euryarchaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Françoise Paquet

    Full Text Available In Archaea the two major modes of DNA packaging are wrapping by histone proteins or bending by architectural non-histone proteins. To supplement our knowledge about the binding mode of the different DNA-bending proteins observed across the three domains of life, we present here the first model of a complex in which the monomeric Methanogen Chromosomal protein 1 (MC1 from Euryarchaea binds to the concave side of a strongly bent DNA. In laboratory growth conditions MC1 is the most abundant architectural protein present in Methanosarcina thermophila CHTI55. Like most proteins that strongly bend DNA, MC1 is known to bind in the minor groove. Interaction areas for MC1 and DNA were mapped by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR data. The polarity of protein binding was determined using paramagnetic probes attached to the DNA. The first structural model of the DNA-MC1 complex we propose here was obtained by two complementary docking approaches and is in good agreement with the experimental data previously provided by electron microscopy and biochemistry. Residues essential to DNA-binding and -bending were highlighted and confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. It was found that the Arg25 side-chain was essential to neutralize the negative charge of two phosphates that come very close in response to a dramatic curvature of the DNA.

  4. Crystal structure of monomeric photosystem II from Thermosynechococcus elongatus at 3.6-a resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broser, Matthias; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Kern, Jan; Guskov, Albert; Müh, Frank; Saenger, Wolfram; Zouni, Athina

    2010-08-20

    The membrane-embedded photosystem II core complex (PSIIcc) uses light energy to oxidize water in photosynthesis. Information about the spatial structure of PSIIcc obtained from x-ray crystallography was so far derived from homodimeric PSIIcc of thermophilic cyanobacteria. Here, we report the first crystallization and structural analysis of the monomeric form of PSIIcc with high oxygen evolution capacity, isolated from Thermosynechococcus elongatus. The crystals belong to the space group C222(1), contain one monomer per asymmetric unit, and diffract to a resolution of 3.6 A. The x-ray diffraction pattern of the PSIIcc-monomer crystals exhibit less anisotropy (dependence of resolution on crystal orientation) compared with crystals of dimeric PSIIcc, and the packing of the molecules within the unit cell is different. In the monomer, 19 protein subunits, 35 chlorophylls, two pheophytins, the non-heme iron, the primary plastoquinone Q(A), two heme groups, 11 beta-carotenes, 22 lipids, seven detergent molecules, and the Mn(4)Ca cluster of the water oxidizing complex could be assigned analogous to the dimer. Based on the new structural information, the roles of lipids and protein subunits in dimer formation of PSIIcc are discussed. Due to the lack of non-crystallographic symmetry and the orientation of the membrane normal of PSIIcc perpendicular ( approximately 87 degrees ) to the crystallographic b-axis, further information about the structure of the Mn(4)Ca cluster is expected to become available from orientation-dependent spectroscopy on this new crystal form.

  5. An Intrinsically Disordered Motif Mediates Diverse Actions of Monomeric C-reactive Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hai-Yun; Wang, Jing; Meng, Fan; Jia, Zhe-Kun; Su, Yang; Bai, Qi-Feng; Lv, Ling-Ling; Ma, Fu-Rong; Potempa, Lawrence A; Yan, Yong-Bin; Ji, Shang-Rong; Wu, Yi

    2016-04-15

    Most proinflammatory actions of C-reactive protein (CRP) are only expressed following dissociation of its native pentameric assembly into monomeric form (mCRP). However, little is known about what underlies the greatly enhanced activities of mCRP. Here we show that a single sequence motif, i.e. cholesterol binding sequence (CBS; a.a. 35-47), is responsible for mediating the interactions of mCRP with diverse ligands. The binding of mCRP to lipoprotein component ApoB, to complement component C1q, to extracellular matrix components fibronectin and collagen, to blood coagulation component fibrinogen, and to membrane lipid component cholesterol, are all found to be markedly inhibited by the synthetic CBS peptide but not by other CRP sequences tested. Likewise, mutating CBS in mCRP also greatly impairs these interactions. Functional experiments further reveal that CBS peptide significantly reduces the effects of mCRP on activation of endothelial cells in vitro and on acute induction of IL-6 in mice. The potency and specificity of CBS are critically determined by the N-terminal residues Cys-36, Leu-37, and His-38; while the versatility of CBS appears to originate from its intrinsically disordered conformation polymorphism. Together, these data unexpectedly identify CBS as the major recognition site of mCRP and suggest that this motif may be exploited to tune the proinflammatory actions of mCRP.

  6. Design of monomeric water-soluble β-hairpin and β-sheet peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, M Angeles

    2014-01-01

    Since the first report in 1993 (JACS 115, 5887-5888) of a peptide able to form a monomeric β-hairpin structure in aqueous solution, the design of peptides forming either β-hairpins (two-stranded antiparallel β-sheets) or three-stranded antiparallel β-sheets has become a field of growing interest and activity. These studies have yielded great insights into the principles governing the stability and folding of β-hairpins and antiparallel β-sheets. This chapter provides an overview of the reported β-hairpin/β-sheet peptides focussed on the applied design criteria, reviews briefly the factors contributing to β-hairpin/β-sheet stability, and describes a protocol for the de novo design of β-sheet-forming peptides based on them. Guidelines to select appropriate turn and strand residues and to avoid self-association are provided. The methods employed to check the success of new designed peptides are also summarized. Since NMR is the best technique to that end, NOEs and chemical shifts characteristic of β-hairpins and three-stranded antiparallel β-sheets are given.

  7. Lipoamino acid-based micelles as promising delivery vehicles for monomeric amphotericin B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafim, Cláudia; Ferreira, Inês; Rijo, Patrícia; Pinheiro, Lídia; Faustino, Célia; Calado, António; Garcia-Rio, Luis

    2016-01-30

    Lipoamino acid-based micelles have been developed as delivery vehicles for the hydrophobic drug amphotericin B (AmB). The micellar solubilisation of AmB by a gemini lipoamino acid (LAA) derived from cysteine and its equimolar mixtures with the bile salts sodium cholate (NaC) and sodium deoxycholate (NaDC), as well as the aggregation sate of the drug in the micellar systems, was studied under biomimetic conditions (phosphate buffered-saline, pH 7.4) using UV-vis spectroscopy. Pure surfactant systems and equimolar mixtures were characterized by tensiometry and important parameters were determined, such as critical micelle concentration (CMC), surface tension at the CMC (γCMC), maximum surface excess concentration (Γmax), and minimum area occupied per molecule at the water/air interface (Amin). Rheological behaviour from viscosity measurements at different shear rates was also addressed. Solubilisation capacity was quantified in terms of molar solubilisation ratio (χ), micelle-water partition coefficient (KM) and Gibbs energy of solubilisation (ΔGs°). Formulations of AmB in micellar media were compared in terms of drug loading, encapsulation efficiency, aggregation state of AmB and in vitro antifungal activity against Candida albicans. The LAA-containing micellar systems solubilise AmB in its monomeric and less toxic form and exhibit in vitro antifungal activity comparable to that of the commercial formulation Fungizone.

  8. Monomeric malonate precursors for the MOCVD of HfO2 and ZrO2 thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Milanov, Andrian; Parala, Harish; Winter, Manuela; Fischer, Roland A; Devi, Anjana

    2009-01-28

    New Hf and Zr malonate complexes have been synthesized by the reaction of metal amides with different malonate ligands (L = dimethyl malonate (Hdmml), diethyl malonate (Hdeml), di-tert-butyl malonate (Hdbml) and bis(trimethylsilyl) malonate (Hbsml)). Homoleptic eight-coordinated monomeric compounds of the type ML4 were obtained for Hf with all the malonate ligands employed. In contrast, for Zr only Hdmml and Hdeml yielded the eight-coordinated monomeric compounds of the type ML4, while using the bulky Hdbml and Hbsml ligands resulted into mixed alkoxo-malonato six-coordinated compounds of the type [ML2(OR)2]. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies of all the compounds are presented and discussed, and they are found to be monomeric. The complexes are solids and in solution, they retain their monomeric nature as evidenced by NMR measurements. Compared to the classical beta-diketonate complexes, [M(acac)4] and [M(thd)4] (M = Hf, Zr; acac: acetylacetonate; thd: tetramethylheptadione), the new malonate compounds are more volatile, decompose at lower temperatures and have lower melting points. In particular, the homoleptic diethyl malonate complexes of Hf and Zr melt at temperatures as low as 62 degrees C. In addition, the compounds are very stable in air and can be sublimed quantitatively. The promising thermal properties makes these compounds interesting for metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). This was demonstrated by depositing HfO2 and ZrO2 thin films successfully with two representative Hf and Zr complexes.

  9. Neurodevelopmental Expression Profile of Dimeric and Monomeric Group 1 mGluRs: Relevance to Schizophrenia Pathogenesis and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Jeremy S.; Fernandez, Francesca; Matosin, Natalie; Andrews, Jessica L.; Huang, Xu-Feng; Ooi, Lezanne; Newell, Kelly A.

    2016-01-01

    Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1/mGluR5) play an integral role in neurodevelopment and are implicated in psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia. mGluR1 and mGluR5 are expressed as homodimers, which is important for their functionality and pharmacology. We examined the protein expression of dimeric and monomeric mGluR1α and mGluR5 in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus throughout development (juvenile/adolescence/adulthood) and in the perinatal phencyclidine (PCP) model of schizophrenia. Under control conditions, mGluR1α dimer expression increased between juvenile and adolescence (209–328%), while monomeric levels remained consistent. Dimeric mGluR5 was steadily expressed across all time points; monomeric mGluR5 was present in juveniles, dramatically declining at adolescence and adulthood (−97–99%). The mGluR regulators, Homer 1b/c and Norbin, significantly increased with age in the PFC and hippocampus. Perinatal PCP treatment significantly increased juvenile dimeric mGluR5 levels in the PFC and hippocampus (37–50%) but decreased hippocampal mGluR1α (−50–56%). Perinatal PCP treatment also reduced mGluR1α dimer levels in the PFC at adulthood (−31%). These results suggest that Group 1 mGluRs have distinct dimeric and monomeric neurodevelopmental patterns, which may impact their pharmacological profiles at specific ages. Perinatal PCP treatment disrupted the early expression of Group 1 mGluRs which may underlie neurodevelopmental alterations observed in this model. PMID:27721389

  10. Monomerization of viral entry inhibitor griffithsin elucidates the relationship between multivalent binding to carbohydrates and anti-HIV activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulaei, Tinoush; Shenoy, Shilpa R; Giomarelli, Barbara; Thomas, Cheryl; McMahon, James B; Dauter, Zbigniew; O'Keefe, Barry R; Wlodawer, Alexander

    2010-09-08

    Mutations were introduced to the domain-swapped homodimer of the antiviral lectin griffithsin (GRFT). Whereas several single and double mutants remained dimeric, insertion of either two or four amino acids at the dimerization interface resulted in a monomeric form of the protein (mGRFT). Monomeric character of the modified proteins was confirmed by sedimentation equilibrium ultracentrifugation and by their high resolution X-ray crystal structures, whereas their binding to carbohydrates was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry. Cell-based antiviral activity assays utilizing different variants of mGRFT indicated that the monomeric form of the lectin had greatly reduced activity against HIV-1, suggesting that the antiviral activity of GRFT stems from crosslinking and aggregation of viral particles via multivalent interactions between GRFT and oligosaccharides present on HIV envelope glycoproteins. Atomic resolution crystal structure of a complex between mGRFT and nonamannoside revealed that a single mGRFT molecule binds to two different nonamannoside molecules through all three carbohydrate-binding sites present on the monomer.

  11. Identification of the chromophores involved in aggregation-dependent energy quenching of the monomeric photosystem II antenna protein Lhcb5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballottari, Matteo; Girardon, Julien; Betterle, Nico; Morosinotto, Tomas; Bassi, Roberto

    2010-09-03

    Non-photochemical quenching (NPQ) of excess absorbed light energy is a fundamental process that regulates photosynthetic light harvesting in higher plants. Among several proposed NPQ mechanisms, aggregation-dependent quenching (ADQ) and charge transfer quenching have received the most attention. In vitro spectroscopic features of both mechanisms correlate with very similar signals detected in more intact systems and in vivo, where full NPQ can be observed. A major difference between the models is the proposed quenching site, which is predominantly the major trimeric light-harvesting complex II in ADQ and exclusively monomeric Lhcb proteins in charge transfer quenching. Here, we studied ADQ in both monomeric and trimeric Lhcb proteins, investigating the activities of each antenna subunit and their dependence on zeaxanthin, a major modulator of NPQ in vivo. We found that monomeric Lhcb proteins undergo stronger quenching than light-harvesting complex II during aggregation and that this is enhanced by binding to zeaxanthin, as occurs during NPQ in vivo. Finally, the analysis of Lhcb5 mutants showed that chlorophyll 612 and 613, in close contact with lutein bound at site L1, are important facilitators of ADQ.

  12. Induction of antibodies against epitopes inaccessible on the HIV type 1 envelope oligomer by immunization with recombinant monomeric glycoprotein 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Bolmstedt, A; Novotny, J

    1998-01-01

    An N-glycan (N306) at the base of the V3 loop of HIV-BRU gp120 is shielding a linear neutralization epitope at the tip of the V3 loop on oligomeric Env. In contrast, this epitope is readily antigenic on monomeric gp120. Immunization with recombinant monomeric HIV-BRU gp120 may thus be expected...... to elicit antibodies preferentially neutralizing mutant variants of HIV-BRU lacking the N306 glycan. Therefore, two guinea pigs were immunized with monomeric wild-type HIV-BRU gp120 possessing the N306 glycan and immune sera were tested for neutralization against target viruses HIV-BRU, -A308, and -A308T321....... HIV-A308 and HIV-A308T321 lack the N306 glycan; HIV-A308T321 contains an additional mutation at the tip of V3 rendering it resistant to MAb binding at this epitope. Both immune sera preferentially neutralized the two mutant virus variants lacking the N306 glycan, with a 10- to 20-fold increase...

  13. Induction of antibodies against epitopes inaccessible on the HIV type 1 envelope oligomer by immunization with recombinant monomeric glycoprotein 120

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Bolmstedt, A; Novotny, J

    1998-01-01

    An N-glycan (N306) at the base of the V3 loop of HIV-BRU gp120 is shielding a linear neutralization epitope at the tip of the V3 loop on oligomeric Env. In contrast, this epitope is readily antigenic on monomeric gp120. Immunization with recombinant monomeric HIV-BRU gp120 may thus be expected...... to elicit antibodies preferentially neutralizing mutant variants of HIV-BRU lacking the N306 glycan. Therefore, two guinea pigs were immunized with monomeric wild-type HIV-BRU gp120 possessing the N306 glycan and immune sera were tested for neutralization against target viruses HIV-BRU, -A308, and -A308T321....... HIV-A308 and HIV-A308T321 lack the N306 glycan; HIV-A308T321 contains an additional mutation at the tip of V3 rendering it resistant to MAb binding at this epitope. Both immune sera preferentially neutralized the two mutant virus variants lacking the N306 glycan, with a 10- to 20-fold increase...

  14. Monomeric and gemini surfactants as antimicrobial agents - influence on environmental and reference strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziróg, Anna; Brycki, Bogumił

    2015-01-01

    Quaternary ammonium salts (QAS) belong to surfactant commonly used both, in the household and in different branches of industry, primarily in the process of cleaning and disinfection. They have several positive features inter alia effectively limiting the development of microorganisms on many surfaces. In the present work, two compounds were used as biocides: hexamethylene-1,6-bis-(N,N-dimethyl-N-dodecylammonium bromide) that belongs to the gemini surfactant (GS), and its single analogue - dodecyl(trimethyl)ammonium bromide (DTAB). Two fold dilution method was used to determine the minimum concentration of compounds (MIC) which inhibit the growth of bacteria: Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 6538 and an environmental strain), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 85327 and an environmental strain), and yeast Candida albicans (ATCC 11509 and an environmental strain). The viability of cells in liquid cultures with addition of these substances at ¼ MIC, ½ MIC and MIC concentrations were also determined. The obtained results show that DTAB inhibits the growth of bacteria at the concentration of 0.126-1.010 µM/ml, and gemini surfactant is active at 0.036-0.029 µM/ml. Therefore, GS is active at more than 17-70-fold lower concentrations than its monomeric analogue. Strains isolated from natural environment are less sensitive upon testing biocides than the references strains. Both compounds at the MIC value reduced the number of cells of all strains. The use of too low concentration of biocides can limit the growth of microorganisms, but often only for a short period of time in case of special environmental strains. Later on, they can adapt to adverse environmental conditions and begin to evolve defence mechanisms.

  15. Production of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein monomeric Plum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Masahito; Kobayashi, Mirina; Nagaya, Masaki; Matsunari, Hitomi; Nakano, Kazuaki; Maehara, Miki; Hayashida, Gota; Takayanagi, Shuko; Sakai, Rieko; Umeyama, Kazuhiro; Watanabe, Nobuyuki; Onodera, Masafumi; Nagashima, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Monomeric Plum (Plum), a far-red fluorescent protein with photostability and photopermeability, is potentially suitable for in vivo imaging and detection of fluorescence in body tissues. The aim of this study was to generate transgenic cloned pigs exhibiting systemic expression of Plum using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology. Nuclear donor cells for SCNT were obtained by introducing a Plum-expression vector driven by a combination of the cytomegalovirus early enhancer and chicken beta-actin promoter into porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs). The cleavage and blastocyst formation rates of reconstructed SCNT embryos were 81.0% (34/42) and 78.6% (33/42), respectively. At 36-37 days of gestation, three fetuses systemically expressing Plum were obtained from one recipient to which 103 SCNT embryos were transferred (3/103, 2.9%). For generation of offspring expressing Plum, rejuvenated PFFs were established from one cloned fetus and used as nuclear donor cells. Four cloned offspring and one stillborn cloned offspring were produced from one recipient to which 117 SCNT embryos were transferred (5/117, 4.3%). All offspring exhibited high levels of Plum fluorescence in blood cells, such as lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes. In addition, the skin, heart, kidney, pancreas, liver and spleen also exhibited Plum expression. These observations demonstrated that transfer of the Plum gene did not interfere with the development of porcine SCNT embryos and resulted in the successful generation of transgenic cloned pigs that systemically expressed Plum. This is the first report of the generation and characterization of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein Plum.

  16. Crystal structure of a monomeric thiolase-like protein type 1 (TLP1 from Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelanjana Janardan

    Full Text Available An analysis of the Mycobacterium smegmatis genome suggests that it codes for several thiolases and thiolase-like proteins. Thiolases are an important family of enzymes that are involved in fatty acid metabolism. They occur as either dimers or tetramers. Thiolases catalyze the Claisen condensation of two acetyl-Coenzyme A molecules in the synthetic direction and the thiolytic cleavage of 3-ketoacyl-Coenzyme A molecules in the degradative direction. Some of the M. smegmatis genes have been annotated as thiolases of the poorly characterized SCP2-thiolase subfamily. The mammalian SCP2-thiolase consists of an N-terminal thiolase domain followed by an additional C-terminal domain called sterol carrier protein-2 or SCP2. The M. smegmatis protein selected in the present study, referred to here as the thiolase-like protein type 1 (MsTLP1, has been biochemically and structurally characterized. Unlike classical thiolases, MsTLP1 is a monomer in solution. Its structure has been determined at 2.7 Å resolution by the single wavelength anomalous dispersion method. The structure of the protomer confirms that the N-terminal domain has the thiolase fold. An extra C-terminal domain is indeed observed. Interestingly, it consists of six β-strands forming an anti-parallel β-barrel which is completely different from the expected SCP2-fold. Detailed sequence and structural comparisons with thiolases show that the residues known to be essential for catalysis are not conserved in MsTLP1. Consistent with this observation, activity measurements show that MsTLP1 does not catalyze the thiolase reaction. This is the first structural report of a monomeric thiolase-like protein from any organism. These studies show that MsTLP1 belongs to a new group of thiolase related proteins of unknown function.

  17. Purification and biochemical characterization of a monomeric form of papaya mosaic potexvirus coat protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecours, Katia; Tremblay, Marie-Hélène; Gagné, Marie-Eve Laliberté; Gagné, Stéphane M; Leclerc, Denis

    2006-05-01

    Papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) is a flexuous rod shape virus made of 1400 subunits that assemble around a plus sense genomic RNA. The structure determination of PapMV and of flexuous viruses in general is a major challenge for both NMR and X-ray crystallography. In this report, we present the characterization of a truncated version of the PapMV coat protein (CP) that is suitable for NMR study. The deletion of the N-terminal 26 amino acids of the PapMV CP (CP27-215) generates a monomer that can be expressed to high level and easily purified for production of an adequate NMR sample. The RNA gel shift assay showed that CP27-215 lost its ability to bind RNA in vitro, suggesting that the multimerization of the subunit is important for this function. The fusion of a 6x His tag at the C-terminus improved the solubility of the monomer and allowed its concentration to 0.2 mM. The CD spectra of the truncated and the wild-type proteins were similar, suggesting that both proteins are well ordered and have a similar secondary structure. CP27-215 was 15N labeled for NMR studies and a 2D 1H-15N-HSQC spectrum confirmed the presence of a well-ordered structure and the monomeric form of the protein. These results show that CP27-215 is amenable to a complete and exhaustive NMR study that should lead to the first three-dimensional structure determination of a flexuous rod shape virus.

  18. Production of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein monomeric Plum

    Science.gov (United States)

    WATANABE, Masahito; KOBAYASHI, Mirina; NAGAYA, Masaki; MATSUNARI, Hitomi; NAKANO, Kazuaki; MAEHARA, Miki; HAYASHIDA, Gota; TAKAYANAGI, Shuko; SAKAI, Rieko; UMEYAMA, Kazuhiro; WATANABE, Nobuyuki; ONODERA, Masafumi; NAGASHIMA, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Monomeric Plum (Plum), a far-red fluorescent protein with photostability and photopermeability, is potentially suitable for in vivo imaging and detection of fluorescence in body tissues. The aim of this study was to generate transgenic cloned pigs exhibiting systemic expression of Plum using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology. Nuclear donor cells for SCNT were obtained by introducing a Plum-expression vector driven by a combination of the cytomegalovirus early enhancer and chicken beta-actin promoter into porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs). The cleavage and blastocyst formation rates of reconstructed SCNT embryos were 81.0% (34/42) and 78.6% (33/42), respectively. At 36–37 days of gestation, three fetuses systemically expressing Plum were obtained from one recipient to which 103 SCNT embryos were transferred (3/103, 2.9%). For generation of offspring expressing Plum, rejuvenated PFFs were established from one cloned fetus and used as nuclear donor cells. Four cloned offspring and one stillborn cloned offspring were produced from one recipient to which 117 SCNT embryos were transferred (5/117, 4.3%). All offspring exhibited high levels of Plum fluorescence in blood cells, such as lymphocytes, monocytes and granulocytes. In addition, the skin, heart, kidney, pancreas, liver and spleen also exhibited Plum expression. These observations demonstrated that transfer of the Plum gene did not interfere with the development of porcine SCNT embryos and resulted in the successful generation of transgenic cloned pigs that systemically expressed Plum. This is the first report of the generation and characterization of transgenic cloned pigs expressing the far-red fluorescent protein Plum. PMID:25739316

  19. Structural Analysis of Monomeric RNA-Dependent Polymerases: Evolutionary and Therapeutic Implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Jácome

    Full Text Available The crystal structures of monomeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerases and reverse transcriptases of more than 20 different viruses are available in the Protein Data Bank. They all share the characteristic right-hand shape of DNA- and RNA polymerases formed by the fingers, palm and thumb subdomains, and, in many cases, "fingertips" that extend from the fingers towards the thumb subdomain, giving the viral enzyme a closed right-hand appearance. Six conserved structural motifs that contain key residues for the proper functioning of the enzyme have been identified in all these RNA-dependent polymerases. These enzymes share a two divalent metal-ion mechanism of polymerization in which two conserved aspartate residues coordinate the interactions with the metal ions to catalyze the nucleotidyl transfer reaction. The recent availability of crystal structures of polymerases of the Orthomyxoviridae and Bunyaviridae families allowed us to make pairwise comparisons of the tertiary structures of polymerases belonging to the four main RNA viral groups, which has led to a phylogenetic tree in which single-stranded negative RNA viral polymerases have been included for the first time. This has also allowed us to use a homology-based structural prediction approach to develop a general three-dimensional model of the Ebola virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Our model includes several of the conserved structural motifs and residues described in other viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases that define the catalytic and highly conserved palm subdomain, as well as portions of the fingers and thumb subdomains. The results presented here help to understand the current use and apparent success of antivirals, i.e. Brincidofovir, Lamivudine and Favipiravir, originally aimed at other types of polymerases, to counteract the Ebola virus infection.

  20. Monomeric adiponectin increases cell viability in porcine aortic endothelial cells cultured in normal and high glucose conditions: Data on kinases activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Grossini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We found that monomeric adiponectin was able to increase cell viability in porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAE cultured both in normal and high glucose condition. Moreover, in normal glucose condition monomeric adiponectin increased p38MAPK, Akt, ERK1/2 and eNOS phosphorylation in a dose- and time-dependent way. Also in high glucose condition monomeric adiponectin increased eNOS and above kinases phosphorylation with similar patterns but at lower extent. For interpretation of the data presented in this article, please see the research article “Monomeric adiponectin modulates nitric oxide release and calcium movements in porcine aortic endothelial cells in normal/high glucose conditions” (Grossini et al., in press [1].

  1. A monomeric methyl and hydroxypropyl methacrylate injection medium and its utility in casting blood capillaries and liver bile canaliculi for scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, T; Itoshima, T; Hitomi, K; Ohtsuka, A; Jones, A L

    1984-06-01

    A mixture of 50-60% monomeric methyl methacrylate and 40-50% monomeric 2-hydroxypropyl methacrylate was supplemented with 1.5% benzoyl peroxide (catalyst) and 1.5% N,N-dimethylaniline (accelerator) and injected into glutaraldehyde-perfusion fixed rat hypophyseal and other endocrine organ blood vessels and biliary tracts. This injection medium rapidly polymerized at room temperature and did not require partial polymerization prior to injection. Good casts of blood vessels, including the hypophyseal capillaries, were obtained for scanning electron microscopy. The monomeric methacrylate medium possesses a great advantage over previous ones, as its fluidity enables the casting of very fine vessels such as bile canaliculi. In the case of non-fixed tissues, the monomeric methacrylate medium should be injected carefully, as it is toxic and destructive to the vessels.

  2. Single Enzyme Studies Reveal the Existence of Discrete Functional States for Monomeric Enzymes and How They Are “Selected” upon Allosteric Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatzakis, Nikos S.; Wei, Li; Jørgensen, Sune Klamer

    2012-01-01

    allosteric regulation of monomeric enzymes is poorly understood. Here we monitored for the first time allosteric regulation of enzymatic activity at the single molecule level. We measured single stochastic catalytic turnovers of a monomeric metabolic enzyme (Thermomyces lanuginosus Lipase) while titrating...... its proximity to a lipid membrane that acts as an allosteric effector. The single molecule measurements revealed the existence of discrete binary functional states that could not be identified in macroscopic measurements due to ensemble averaging. The discrete functional states correlate...

  3. Salt bridges regulate both dimer formation and monomeric flexibility in HdeB and may have a role in periplasmic chaperone function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjian; Rasmussen, Tim; Harding, Amanda J; Booth, Nuala A; Booth, Ian R; Naismith, James H

    2012-01-20

    Escherichia coli and Gram-negative bacteria that live in the human gut must be able to tolerate rapid and large changes in environmental pH. Low pH irreversibly denatures and precipitates many bacterial proteins. While cytoplasmic proteins are well buffered against such swings, periplasmic proteins are not. Instead, it appears that some bacteria utilize chaperone proteins that stabilize periplasmic proteins, preventing their precipitation. Two highly expressed and related proteins, HdeA and HdeB, have been identified as acid-activated chaperones. The structure of HdeA is known and a mechanism for activation has been proposed. In this model, dimeric HdeA dissociates at low pH, and the exposed dimeric interface binds exposed hydrophobic surfaces of acid-denatured proteins, preventing their irreversible aggregation. We now report the structure and biophysical characterization of the HdeB protein. The monomer of HdeB shares a similar structure with HdeA, but its dimeric interface is different in composition and spatial location. We have used fluorescence to study the behavior of HdeB as pH is lowered, and like HdeA, it dissociates to monomers. We have identified one of the key intersubunit interactions that controls pH-induced monomerization. Our analysis identifies a structural interaction within the HdeB monomer that is disrupted as pH is lowered, leading to enhanced structural flexibility.

  4. Salt Bridges Regulate Both Dimer Formation and Monomeric Flexibility in HdeB and May Have a Role in Periplasmic Chaperone Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenjian; Rasmussen, Tim; Harding, Amanda J.; Booth, Nuala A.; Booth, Ian R.; Naismith, James H.

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli and Gram-negative bacteria that live in the human gut must be able to tolerate rapid and large changes in environmental pH. Low pH irreversibly denatures and precipitates many bacterial proteins. While cytoplasmic proteins are well buffered against such swings, periplasmic proteins are not. Instead, it appears that some bacteria utilize chaperone proteins that stabilize periplasmic proteins, preventing their precipitation. Two highly expressed and related proteins, HdeA and HdeB, have been identified as acid-activated chaperones. The structure of HdeA is known and a mechanism for activation has been proposed. In this model, dimeric HdeA dissociates at low pH, and the exposed dimeric interface binds exposed hydrophobic surfaces of acid-denatured proteins, preventing their irreversible aggregation. We now report the structure and biophysical characterization of the HdeB protein. The monomer of HdeB shares a similar structure with HdeA, but its dimeric interface is different in composition and spatial location. We have used fluorescence to study the behavior of HdeB as pH is lowered, and like HdeA, it dissociates to monomers. We have identified one of the key intersubunit interactions that controls pH-induced monomerization. Our analysis identifies a structural interaction within the HdeB monomer that is disrupted as pH is lowered, leading to enhanced structural flexibility. PMID:22138344

  5. Use of the quartz crystal microbalance to determine the monomeric friction coefficient of polyimides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, Mary M.

    1995-01-01

    When a thin film of polymer is coated on to a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), the QCM can be used to detect the rate of increase in weight of the polymer film as the volatile penetrant diffuses into the polymer. From this rate information the diffusion coefficient of the penetrant into the polymer can be computed. Calculations requiring this diffusion coefficient lead to values which approximate the monomeric friction coefficient of the polymer. This project has been concerned with the trial of crystal oscillating circuits suitable for driving polymer coated crystals in an atmosphere of penetrant. For these studies done at room temperature, natural rubber was used as an easily applied polymer that is readily penetrated by toluene vapors, qualities anticipated with polyimides when they are tested at T(g) in the presence of toluene. Three quartz crystal oscillator circuits were tested. The simplest circuit used +/- 5 volt dc and had a transistor to transistor logic (TTL) inverter chip that provides a 180 deg phase shift via a feed back loop. This oscillator circuit was stable but would not drive the crystal when the crystal was coated with polymer and subjected to toluene vapors. Removal of a variable resistor from this circuit increased stability but did not otherwise increase performance. Another driver circuit tested contained a two stage differential input, differential output, wide band video amplifier and also contain a feed back loop. The circuit voltage could not be varied and operated at +/- 5 volts dc; this circuit was also stable but failed to oscillate the polymer coated crystal in an atmosphere saturated with toluene vapors. The third oscillator circuit was of similar construction and relied on the same video amplifier but allowed operation with variable voltage. This circuit would drive the crystal when the crystal was submerged in liquid toluene and when the crystal was coated with polymer and immersed in toluene vapors. The frequency readings

  6. Monomeric Cu(Ⅱ) Complex Containing Chiral Phase-transfer Catalyst as Ligand and Its Asymmetrically Catalytic Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QU Zhi-Rong; XIONG Ren-Gen

    2008-01-01

    The thermal treatment of CuCl2 with N-(4'-vinylbenzyl)cinchonidinitim chloride(L1)afforded a monomeric discrete homochiral copper(Ⅱ)complex N-4'-(vinylbenzyl)cinchonidinium trichlorocoprate(Ⅱ)(1).Their applications to the enantioselectively catalytic alkylation reaction of N-(diphenylmethylidene)glycine tert-butyl ester(3)show that the higher ee value observed in catalyst 1 than that in the corresponding free ligand L1 is probably due to the rigidity enhancement after the coordination of N atom of quinoline ring to the copper ion.

  7. Two-dimensional crystallization of monomeric bovine cytochrome c oxidase with bound cytochrome c in reconstituted lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osuda, Yukiho; Shinzawa-Itoh, Kyoko; Tani, Kazutoshi; Maeda, Shintaro; Yoshikawa, Shinya; Tsukihara, Tomitake; Gerle, Christoph

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase utilizes electrons provided by cytochrome c for the active vectorial transport of protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane through the reduction of molecular oxygen to water. Direct structural evidence on the transient cytochrome c oxidase-cytochrome c complex thus far, however, remains elusive and its physiological relevant oligomeric form is unclear. Here, we report on the 2D crystallization of monomeric bovine cytochrome c oxidase with tightly bound cytochrome c at a molar ratio of 1:1 in reconstituted lipid membranes at the basic pH of 8.5 and low ionic strength.

  8. Conditions for homogeneous preparation of stable monomeric and oligomeric forms of activated Vip3A toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunthic, Thittaya; Surya, Wahyu; Promdonkoy, Boonhiang; Torres, Jaume; Boonserm, Panadda

    2016-07-29

    Bacillus thuringiensis vegetative insecticidal proteins like Vip3A have been used for crop protection and to delay resistance to existing insecticidal Cry toxins. However, little is known about Vip3A's behavior or its mechanism of action, and a structural model is required. Herein, in an effort to facilitate future crystallization and functional studies, we have used the orthogonal biophysical techniques of light scattering and sedimentation to analyze the aggregation behavior and stability of trypsin-activated Vip3A toxin in solution. Both scattering and sedimentation data suggest that at pH 10 the toxin is monomeric and adopts an elongated shape, but after overnight incubation aggregation was observed at all pH values tested (5-12). The narrowest size distribution was observed at pH 7, but it was consistent with large oligomers of ~50 nm on average. The addition of β-D-glucopyranoside (OG) helped in achieving preparations that were stable and with a narrower particle size distribution. In this case, scattering was consistent with a 4-nm monomeric globular Vip3A form. After OG dialysis, 40-nm particles were detected, with a molecular weight consistent with homotetramers. Therefore, OG is proposed as the detergent of choice to obtain a Vip3A crystal for structural studies, either before (monomers) or after dialysis (tetramers).

  9. Structural analysis of the bright monomeric yellow-green fluorescent protein mNeonGreen obtained by directed evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavel, Damien; Gotthard, Guillaume; von Stetten, David; De Sanctis, Daniele; Pasquier, Hélène; Lambert, Gerard G; Shaner, Nathan C; Royant, Antoine

    2016-12-01

    Until recently, genes coding for homologues of the autofluorescent protein GFP had only been identified in marine organisms from the phyla Cnidaria and Arthropoda. New fluorescent-protein genes have now been found in the phylum Chordata, coding for particularly bright oligomeric fluorescent proteins such as the tetrameric yellow fluorescent protein lanYFP from Branchiostoma lanceolatum. A successful monomerization attempt led to the development of the bright yellow-green fluorescent protein mNeonGreen. The structures of lanYFP and mNeonGreen have been determined and compared in order to rationalize the directed evolution process leading from a bright, tetrameric to a still bright, monomeric fluorescent protein. An unusual discolouration of crystals of mNeonGreen was observed after X-ray data collection, which was investigated using a combination of X-ray crystallography and UV-visible absorption and Raman spectroscopies, revealing the effects of specific radiation damage in the chromophore cavity. It is shown that X-rays rapidly lead to the protonation of the phenolate O atom of the chromophore and to the loss of its planarity at the methylene bridge.

  10. Processing and storage effects on monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and antioxidant capacity of processed blueberry products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownmiller, C; Howard, L R; Prior, R L

    2008-06-01

    This study evaluated the effects of processing and 6 mo of storage on total monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and antioxidant capacity of blueberries that were canned in syrup (CS), canned in water (CW), pureed, and juiced (clarified and nonclarified). Total monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and oxygen radical absorbing capacity (ORAC) assay using fluorescein (ORAC(FL)) were determined postprocessing after 1 d, and 1, 3, and 6 mo of storage. Thermal processing resulted in marked losses in total anthocyanins (28% to 59%) and ORAC(FL) values (43% to 71%) in all products, with the greatest losses occurring in clarified juices and the least in nonclarified juices. Storage at 25 degrees C for 6 mo resulted in dramatic losses in total anthocyanins, ranging from 62% in berries CW to 85% in clarified juices. This coincided with marked increases in percent polymeric color values of these products over the 6-mo storage. The ORAC(FL) values showed little change during storage, indicating that the formation of polymers compensated for the loss of antioxidant capacity due to anthocyanin degradation. Methods are needed to retain anthocyanins in thermally processed blueberries.

  11. Processing and storage effects on monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and antioxidant capacity of processed black raspberry products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, A; Howard, L R; Prior, R L; Brownmiller, C

    2008-08-01

    This study evaluated the effects of processing and 6 mo of storage on total monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and antioxidant capacity of black raspberries that were individually quick-frozen (IQF), canned-in-syrup, canned-in-water, pureed, and juiced (clarified and nonclarified). Total monomeric anthocyanins, percent polymeric color, and ORAC(FL) were determined 1 d postprocessing and after 1, 3, and 6 mo of storage. Thermal processing resulted in marked losses in total anthocyanins ranging from 37% in puree to 69% to 73% in nonclarified and clarified juices, respectively, but only the juices showed substantial losses (38% to 41%) in ORAC(FL). Storage at 25 degrees C of all thermally processed products resulted in dramatic losses in total anthocyanins ranging from 49% in canned-in-syrup to 75% in clarified juices. This coincided with marked increases in percent polymeric color values of these products over the 6-mo storage. ORAC(FL) values showed little change during storage, indicating that the formation of polymers compensated for the loss of antioxidant capacity due to anthocyanin degradation. Total anthocyanins and ORACFL of IQF berries were well retained during long-term storage at -20 degrees C.

  12. Interaction of Classical Platinum Agents with the Monomeric and Dimeric Atox1 Proteins: A Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolei Wang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We carried out molecular dynamics simulations and free energy calculations for a series of binary and ternary models of the cisplatin, transplatin and oxaliplatin agents binding to a monomeric Atox1 protein and a dimeric Atox1 protein to investigate their interaction mechanisms. All three platinum agents could respectively combine with the monomeric Atox1 protein and the dimeric Atox1 protein to form a stable binary and ternary complex due to the covalent interaction of the platinum center with the Atox1 protein. The results suggested that the extra interaction from the oxaliplatin ligand–Atox1 protein interface increases its affinity only for the OxaliPt + Atox1 model. The binding of the oxaliplatin agent to the Atox1 protein might cause larger deformation of the protein than those of the cisplatin and transplatin agents due to the larger size of the oxaliplatin ligand. However, the extra interactions to facilitate the stabilities of the ternary CisPt + 2Atox1 and OxaliPt + 2Atox1 models come from the α1 helices and α2-β4 loops of the Atox1 protein–Atox1 protein interface due to the cis conformation of the platinum agents. The combinations of two Atox1 proteins in an asymmetric way in the three ternary models were analyzed. These investigations might provide detailed information for understanding the interaction mechanism of the platinum agents binding to the Atox1 protein in the cytoplasm.

  13. Decavanadate induces mitochondrial membrane depolarization and inhibits oxygen consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, S S; Gutiérrez-Merino, C; Aureliano, M

    2007-05-01

    Decavanadate induced rat liver mitochondrial depolarization at very low concentrations, half-depolarization with 39 nM decavanadate, while it was needed a 130-fold higher concentration of monomeric vanadate (5 microM) to induce the same effect. Decavanadate also inhibits mitochondrial repolarization induced by reduced glutathione in vitro, with an inhibition constant of 1 microM, whereas no effect was observed up to 100 microM of monomeric vanadate. The oxygen consumption by mitochondria is also inhibited by lower decavanadate than monomeric vanadate concentrations, i.e. 50% inhibition is attained with 99 M decavanadate and 10 microM monomeric vanadate. Thus, decavanadate is stronger as mitochondrial depolarization agent than as inhibitor of mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Up to 5 microM, decavanadate does not alter mitochondrial NADH levels nor inhibit neither F(O)F(1)-ATPase nor cytochrome c oxidase activity, but it induces changes in the redox steady-state of mitochondrial b-type cytochromes (complex III). NMR spectra showed that decameric vanadate is the predominant vanadate species in decavanadate solutions. It is concluded that decavanadate is much more potent mitochondrial depolarization agent and a more potent inhibitor of mitochondrial oxygen consumption than monomeric vanadate, pointing out the importance to take into account the contribution of higher oligomeric species of vanadium for the biological effects of vanadate solutions.

  14. No need to be HAMLET or BAMLET to interact with histones: binding of monomeric alpha-lactalbumin to histones and basic poly-amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Permyakov, Serge E; Pershikova, Irina V; Khokhlova, Tatyana I; Uversky, Vladimir N; Permyakov, Eugene A

    2004-05-18

    The ability of a specific complex of human alpha-lactalbumin with oleic acid (HAMLET) to induce cell death with selectivity for tumor and undifferentiated cells was shown recently to be mediated by interaction of HAMLET with histone proteins irreversibly disrupting chromatin structure [Duringer, C., et al. (2003) J. Biol. Chem. 278, 42131-42135]. Here we show that monomeric alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA) in the absence of fatty acids is also able to bind efficiently to the primary target of HAMLET, histone HIII, regardless of Ca(2+) content. Thus, the modification of alpha-LA by oleic acid is not required for binding to histones. We suggest that interaction of negatively charged alpha-LA with the basic histone stabilizes apo-alpha-LA and destabilizes the Ca(2+)-bound protein due to compensation for excess negative charge of alpha-LA's Ca(2+)-binding loop by positively charged residues of the histone. Spectrofluorimetric curves of titration of alpha-LA by histone H3 were well approximated by a scheme of cooperative binding of four alpha-LA molecules per molecule of histone, with an equilibrium dissociation constant of 1.0 microM. Such a stoichiometry of binding implies that the binding process is not site-specific with respect to histone and likely is driven by just electrostatic interactions. Co-incubation of positively charged poly-amino acids (poly-Lys and poly-Arg) with alpha-LA resulted in effects which were similar to those caused by histone HIII, confirming the electrostatic nature of the alpha-LA-histone interaction. In all cases that were studied, the binding was accompanied by aggregation. The data indicate that alpha-lactalbumin can be used as a basis for the design of antitumor agents, acting through disorganization of chromatin structure due to interaction between alpha-LA and histone proteins.

  15. Diagnóstico bioquímico de la hiperprolactinemia monomérica Biochemical diagnosis of monomeric hyperprolactinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rivero

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Fundamento. La prolactina se puede presentar bajo varias formas moleculares siendo la forma monomérica (PRLm la biológicamente activa. La presencia de macroprolactina (MPRL puede originar un falso diagnóstico de hiperprolactinemia debido a la interferencia en el procedimiento de medida. El objetivo ha sido desarrollar un protocolo que permita diagnosticar la hiperprolactinemia monomérica, que además sea complementario al procedimiento que detecta MPRL. Material y métodos. La población de referencia para PRLm estaba formada por 122 mujeres y 140 hombres aparentemente sanos a los que se les extrajo sangre para la cuantificación de PRL. Además, se recogieron 49 sueros (33 mujeres y 16 hombres hiperprolactinémicos. Se cuantificó PRL en todas las muestras en un Immulite 2000. La detección de MPRL y de PRLm se realizó tras precipitación con polietilenglicol. Se confirmó el resultado por cromatografía de filtración en gel. Para la obtención de los valores de referencia se siguieron las indicaciones del Panel de Expertos de la IFCC. Resultados. Los valores de referencia de PRLm fueron 3,4-26,6 μg/L y 4,6-16,4 μg/L en mujeres y varones, respectivamente. De los 49 pacientes hiperprolactinémicos, en el 57 % la concentración de PRLm tras PEG se encontraba fuera del intervalo de referencia previamente obtenido, confirmándose la presencia de hiperprolactinemia monomérica. Conclusiones. Se ha desarrollado e implantado un protocolo para la cuantificación de PRLm. La obtención de los valores de referencia de PRLm permite el diagnóstico de la hiperprolactinemia monomérica o activa de forma complementaria a la identificación de MPRL.Background. Prolactin can take several molecular forms of which the most biologically active is the monomeric form (PRLm. The presence of macroprolactin (MPRL can give rise to a false diagnosis of hyperprolactinemia due to interference in the measuring procedure. The aim was to develop a protocol that

  16. A monomeric G protein-coupled receptor isolated in a high-density lipoprotein particle efficiently activates its G protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whorton, Matthew R; Bokoch, Michael P; Rasmussen, Søren Gøgsig Faarup;

    2007-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) respond to a diverse array of ligands, mediating cellular responses to hormones and neurotransmitters, as well as the senses of smell and taste. The structures of the GPCR rhodopsin and several G proteins have been determined by x-ray crystallography, yet...... the organization of the signaling complex between GPCRs and G proteins is poorly understood. The observations that some GPCRs are obligate heterodimers, and that many GPCRs form both homo- and heterodimers, has led to speculation that GPCR dimers may be required for efficient activation of G proteins. However......, technical limitations have precluded a definitive analysis of G protein coupling to monomeric GPCRs in a biochemically defined and membrane-bound system. Here we demonstrate that a prototypical GPCR, the beta2-adrenergic receptor (beta2AR), can be incorporated into a reconstituted high-density lipoprotein...

  17. Synthesis of monomeric and polymeric alkali and alkaline earth metal complexes using a phosphinoselenoic amide ligand in metal coordination sphere

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jayeeta Bhattacharjee; Ravi K Kottalanka; Harinath Adimulam; Tarun K Panda

    2014-09-01

    We report the monomeric complexes of magnesium and calcium of composition [M(THF){2-Ph2P(Se)N(CMe3)}2] [M= Mg (3), n = 1 andM = Ca (4), n = 2)] and polymeric complexes of potassium and barium of composition [K(THF)2{Ph2P(Se)N(CMe3)}] (2) and [K(THF)Ba{Ph2P(Se)N(CMe3)}3](5) respectively. The potassium complex 2 was readily prepared by the reaction of potassium bis(trimethylsilyl)amide with phosphinoselenoic amide ligand (1) at ambient temperature. The calcium complex 4 was prepared by two synthetic routes: in the first method, commonly known as salt metathesis reaction, the potassium complex 2 was made to react with alkaline earth metal diiodide at room temperature to afford the corresponding calcium complex. The metal bis(trimethylsilyl)amides were made to react with protic ligand 1 in the second method to eliminate the volatile bis(trimethyl)silyl amine. The magnesium complex 3 and barium complex 5 were prepared only through the first method. Solid-state structures of all the new complexes were established by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The smaller ionic radii of Mg2+ (0.72Å) and Ca2+ (0.99Å) ions form the monomeric complex, whereas the larger ions K+ (1.38Å) and Ba2+ (1.35Å) were found to form onedimensional polymeric complexes with monoanionic ligand 1. Compound 2 serves an example of magnesium complex with a Mg-Se direct bond.

  18. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of decameric and monomeric forms of C49S mutant thioredoxin-dependent AhpC from Helicobacter pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Supangat [Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Environmental Biotechnology National Core Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Kyung Hye; Furqoni, Ahmad [Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Environmental Biotechnology National Core Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Young-Chul; Cho, Myung-Je; Rhee, Kwang-Ho [Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang Yeol; Lee, Kon Ho, E-mail: lkh@gsnu.ac.kr [Division of Applied Life Science (BK21 Program), Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Environmental Biotechnology National Core Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of); Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology Research Center, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 660-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-01

    Decameric and monomeric forms of recombinant C49S mutant AhpC from H. pylori have been crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.8 and 2.25 Å, respectively. Cys49Ser mutant Helicobacter pylori alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (C49S HpAhpC) was purified under reducing conditions in monomeric and decameric forms. The monomeric form was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals diffracted to 2.25 Å resolution and belonged to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 245.8, b = 140.7, c = 189.5 Å, β = 127°, and contained 20 molecules in the asymmetric unit. A crystal of the decameric form was obtained by the microbatch crystallization method and diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution. It belonged to space group C222, with unit-cell parameters a = 257.5, b = 417.5, c = 95.6 Å. The structure of the monomeric form of C49S HpAhpC has been solved by the molecular-replacement method.

  19. Calcium, acylation, and molecular confinement favor folding of Bordetella pertussis adenylate cyclase CyaA toxin into a monomeric and cytotoxic form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karst, Johanna C; Ntsogo Enguéné, V Yvette; Cannella, Sara E; Subrini, Orso; Hessel, Audrey; Debard, Sylvain; Ladant, Daniel; Chenal, Alexandre

    2014-10-31

    The adenylate cyclase (CyaA) toxin, a multidomain protein of 1706 amino acids, is one of the major virulence factors produced by Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough. CyaA is able to invade eukaryotic target cells in which it produces high levels of cAMP, thus altering the cellular physiology. Although CyaA has been extensively studied by various cellular and molecular approaches, the structural and functional states of the toxin remain poorly characterized. Indeed, CyaA is a large protein and exhibits a pronounced hydrophobic character, making it prone to aggregation into multimeric forms. As a result, CyaA has usually been extracted and stored in denaturing conditions. Here, we define the experimental conditions allowing CyaA folding into a monomeric and functional species. We found that CyaA forms mainly multimers when refolded by dialysis, dilution, or buffer exchange. However, a significant fraction of monomeric, folded protein could be obtained by exploiting molecular confinement on size exclusion chromatography. Folding of CyaA into a monomeric form was found to be critically dependent upon the presence of calcium and post-translational acylation of the protein. We further show that the monomeric preparation displayed hemolytic and cytotoxic activities suggesting that the monomer is the genuine, physiologically active form of the toxin. We hypothesize that the structural role of the post-translational acylation in CyaA folding may apply to other RTX toxins.

  20. Analysis of by-product formation and sugar monomerization in sugarcane bagasse pretreated at pilot plant scale: Differences between autohydrolysis, alkaline and acid pretreatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pol, van der E.C.; Bakker, R.; Zeeland, van A.N.T.; Sanchez Garcia, D.; Punt, A.M.; Eggink, G.

    2015-01-01

    Sugarcane bagasse is an interesting feedstock for the biobased economy since a large fraction is polymerized sugars. Autohydrolysis, alkaline and acid pretreatment conditions combined with enzyme hydrolysis were used on lignocellulose rich bagasse to acquire monomeric. By-products found after pretre

  1. A monomeric protein with hemagglutinating activity from seeds of Vigna mungo (Phaseolus mungo).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S S; Rao, S L

    1991-01-01

    Black gram (Vigna mungo) seeds are shown to contain a lectin with certain unusual features. The lectin agglutinates only trypsinized red cells, and its sugar specificity is complex as none of the common sugars, oligosaccharides or complex polysaccharides exhibit any affinity for the lectin. The purified lectin has a molecular weight of 58 kDa and is a monomer. Unlike other plant lectins, antibodies to the P. mungo lectin do not exhibit any immunological cross reactivity. The clot forming ability of the lectin is unusual in that the clot once formed is rapidly disaggregated indicated that it induces, as yet undefined, certain membrane alterations.

  2. The effect of proteolysis on the induction of cell death by monomeric alpha-lactalbumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brück, Wolfram M; Gibson, Glenn R; Brück, Thomas B

    2014-02-01

    α-Lactalbumin (α-la) is a major whey protein found in milk. Previous data suggested that α-la has antiproliferative effects in human adenocarcinoma cell lines such as Caco-2 and HT-29. However, the cell death inducing α-la was not a naturally occurring monomer but either a multimeric variant or an α-la:oleic acid complex (HAMLET/BAMLET). Proteolysis showed that both human and bovine α-la are susceptible to digestion. ELISA assays assessing cell death with the native undigested α-la fractions showed that undigested protein fractions did have a significant cell death effect on CaCo-2 cells. Bovine α-la was also more effective than human α-la. A reduction in activity corresponded with lower concentrations of the protein and partial digestion and fragmentation of the protein using trypsin and pepsin. This suggests that the tertiary structure is vital for the apoptotic effect.

  3. Functional alteration of a dimeric insecticidal lectin to a monomeric antifungal protein correlated to its oligomeric status.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilanjana Banerjee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL is a 25-kDa homodimeric, insecticidal, mannose binding lectin whose subunits are assembled by the C-terminal exchange process. An attempt was made to convert dimeric ASAL into a monomeric form to correlate the relevance of quaternary association of subunits and their functional specificity. Using SWISS-MODEL program a stable monomer was designed by altering five amino acid residues near the C-terminus of ASAL. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By introduction of 5 site-specific mutations (-DNSNN-, a β turn was incorporated between the 11(th and 12(th β strands of subunits of ASAL, resulting in a stable monomeric mutant ASAL (mASAL. mASAL was cloned and subsequently purified from a pMAL-c2X system. CD spectroscopic analysis confirmed the conservation of secondary structure in mASAL. Mannose binding assay confirmed that molecular mannose binds efficiently to both mASAL and ASAL. In contrast to ASAL, the hemagglutination activity of purified mASAL against rabbit erythrocytes was lost. An artificial diet bioassay of Lipaphis erysimi with mASAL displayed an insignificant level of insecticidal activity compared to ASAL. Fascinatingly, mASAL exhibited strong antifungal activity against the pathogenic fungi Fusarium oxysporum, Rhizoctonia solani and Alternaria brassicicola in a disc diffusion assay. A propidium iodide uptake assay suggested that the inhibitory activity of mASAL might be associated with the alteration of the membrane permeability of the fungus. Furthermore, a ligand blot assay of the membrane subproteome of R. solani with mASAL detected a glycoprotein receptor having interaction with mASAL. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Conversion of ASAL into a stable monomer resulted in antifungal activity. From an evolutionary aspect, these data implied that variable quaternary organization of lectins might be the outcome of defense-related adaptations to diverse situations in plants. Incorporation of m

  4. Functional alteration of a dimeric insecticidal lectin to a monomeric antifungal protein correlated to its oligomeric status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Nilanjana; Sengupta, Subhadipa; Roy, Amit; Ghosh, Prithwi; Das, Kalipada; Das, Sampa

    2011-04-07

    Allium sativum leaf agglutinin (ASAL) is a 25-kDa homodimeric, insecticidal, mannose binding lectin whose subunits are assembled by the C-terminal exchange process. An attempt was made to convert dimeric ASAL into a monomeric form to correlate the relevance of quaternary association of subunits and their functional specificity. Using SWISS-MODEL program a stable monomer was designed by altering five amino acid residues near the C-terminus of ASAL. By introduction of 5 site-specific mutations (-DNSNN-), a β turn was incorporated between the 11(th) and 12(th) β strands of subunits of ASAL, resulting in a stable monomeric mutant ASAL (mASAL). mASAL was cloned and subsequently purified from a pMAL-c2X system. CD spectroscopic analysis confirmed the conservation of secondary structure in mASAL. Mannose binding assay confirmed that molecular mannose binds efficiently to both mASAL and ASAL. In contrast to ASAL, the hemagglutination activity of purified mASAL against rabbit erythrocytes was lost. An artificial diet bioassay of Lipaphis erysimi with mASAL displayed an insignificant level of insecticidal activity compared to ASAL. Fascinatingly, mASAL exhibited strong antifungal activity against the pathogenic fungi Fusarium oxysporum, Rhizoctonia solani and Alternaria brassicicola in a disc diffusion assay. A propidium iodide uptake assay suggested that the inhibitory activity of mASAL might be associated with the alteration of the membrane permeability of the fungus. Furthermore, a ligand blot assay of the membrane subproteome of R. solani with mASAL detected a glycoprotein receptor having interaction with mASAL. Conversion of ASAL into a stable monomer resulted in antifungal activity. From an evolutionary aspect, these data implied that variable quaternary organization of lectins might be the outcome of defense-related adaptations to diverse situations in plants. Incorporation of mASAL into agronomically-important crops could be an alternative method to protect them

  5. Effects of actin-binding proteins on the thermal stability of monomeric actin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivovarova, Anastasia V; Chebotareva, Natalia A; Kremneva, Elena V; Lappalainen, Pekka; Levitsky, Dmitrii I

    2013-01-08

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was applied to investigate the thermal unfolding of rabbit skeletal muscle G-actin in its complexes with actin-binding proteins, cofilin, twinfilin, and profilin. The results show that the effects of these proteins on the thermal stability of G-actin depend on the nucleotide, ATP or ADP, bound in the nucleotide-binding cleft between actin subdomains 2 and 4. Interestingly, cofilin binding stabilizes both ATP-G-actin and ADP-G-actin, whereas twinfilin increases the thermal stability of the ADP-G-actin but not that of the ATP-G-actin. By contrast, profilin strongly decreases the thermal stability of the ATP-G-actin but has no appreciable effect on the ADP-G-actin. Comparison of these DSC results with literature data reveals a relationship between the effects of actin-binding proteins on the thermal unfolding of G-actin, stabilization or destabilization, and their effects on the rate of nucleotide exchange in the nucleotide-binding cleft, decrease or increase. These results suggest that the thermal stability of G-actin depends, at least partially, on the conformation of the nucleotide-binding cleft: the actin molecule is more stable when the cleft is closed, while an opening of the cleft leads to significant destabilization of G-actin. Thus, DSC studies of the thermal unfolding of G-actin can provide new valuable information about the conformational changes induced by actin-binding proteins in the actin molecule.

  6. Monomeric, porous type II collagen scaffolds promote chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaddon, M.; Burrows, M.; Ferreira, S. A.; Dazzi, F.; Apperley, J. F.; Bradshaw, A.; Brand, D. D.; Czernuszka, J.; Gentleman, E.

    2017-03-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common cause of pain and disability and is often associated with the degeneration of articular cartilage. Lesions to the articular surface, which are thought to progress to OA, have the potential to be repaired using tissue engineering strategies; however, it remains challenging to instruct cell differentiation within a scaffold to produce tissue with appropriate structural, chemical and mechanical properties. We aimed to address this by driving progenitor cells to adopt a chondrogenic phenotype through the tailoring of scaffold composition and physical properties. Monomeric type-I and type-II collagen scaffolds, which avoid potential immunogenicity associated with fibrillar collagens, were fabricated with and without chondroitin sulfate (CS) and their ability to stimulate the chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells was assessed. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that cells produced abundant collagen type-II on type-II scaffolds and collagen type-I on type-I scaffolds. Gene expression analyses indicated that the addition of CS – which was released from scaffolds quickly – significantly upregulated expression of type II collagen, compared to type-I and pure type-II scaffolds. We conclude that collagen type-II and CS can be used to promote a more chondrogenic phenotype in the absence of growth factors, potentially providing an eventual therapy to prevent OA.

  7. Monomeric, porous type II collagen scaffolds promote chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaddon, M; Burrows, M; Ferreira, S A; Dazzi, F; Apperley, J F; Bradshaw, A; Brand, D D; Czernuszka, J; Gentleman, E

    2017-03-03

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a common cause of pain and disability and is often associated with the degeneration of articular cartilage. Lesions to the articular surface, which are thought to progress to OA, have the potential to be repaired using tissue engineering strategies; however, it remains challenging to instruct cell differentiation within a scaffold to produce tissue with appropriate structural, chemical and mechanical properties. We aimed to address this by driving progenitor cells to adopt a chondrogenic phenotype through the tailoring of scaffold composition and physical properties. Monomeric type-I and type-II collagen scaffolds, which avoid potential immunogenicity associated with fibrillar collagens, were fabricated with and without chondroitin sulfate (CS) and their ability to stimulate the chondrogenic differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells was assessed. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that cells produced abundant collagen type-II on type-II scaffolds and collagen type-I on type-I scaffolds. Gene expression analyses indicated that the addition of CS - which was released from scaffolds quickly - significantly upregulated expression of type II collagen, compared to type-I and pure type-II scaffolds. We conclude that collagen type-II and CS can be used to promote a more chondrogenic phenotype in the absence of growth factors, potentially providing an eventual therapy to prevent OA.

  8. Differing modes of interaction between monomeric Aβ(1-40) peptides and model lipid membranes: an AFM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Khizar; Giordani, Cristiano; McManus, Jennifer J; Hovgaard, Mads Bruun; Jarvis, Suzanne P

    2012-02-01

    Membrane interactions with β-amyloid peptides are implicated in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease and cholesterol has been shown to be key modulator of this interaction, yet little is known about the mechanism of this interaction. Using atomic force microscopy, we investigated the interaction of monomeric Aβ(1-40) peptides with planar mica-supported bilayers composed of DOPC and DPPC containing varying concentrations of cholesterol. We show that below the bilayer melting temperature, Aβ monomers adsorb to, and assemble on, the surface of DPPC bilayers to form layers that grow laterally and normal to the bilayer plane. Above the bilayer melting temperature, we observe protofibril formation. In contrast, in DOPC bilayers, Aβ monomers exhibit a detergent-like action, forming defects in the bilayer structure. The kinetics of both modes of interaction significantly increases with increasing membrane cholesterol content. We conclude that the mode and rate of the interaction of Aβ monomers with lipid bilayers are strongly dependent on lipid composition, phase state and cholesterol content.

  9. The full-length cell-cell fusogen EFF-1 is monomeric and upright on the membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, Tzviya; Vasishtan, Daven; Siebert, C. Alistair; Grünewald, Kay

    2014-05-01

    Fusogens are membrane proteins that remodel lipid bilayers to facilitate membrane merging. Although several fusogen ectodomain structures have been solved, structural information on full-length, natively membrane-anchored fusogens is scarce. Here we present the electron cryo microscopy three-dimensional reconstruction of the Caenorhabditis elegans epithelial fusion failure 1 (EFF-1) protein natively anchored in cell-derived membrane vesicles. This reveals a membrane protruding, asymmetric, elongated monomer. Flexible fitting of a protomer of the EFF-1 crystal structure, which is homologous to viral class-II fusion proteins, shows that EFF-1 has a hairpin monomeric conformation before fusion. These structural insights, when combined with our observations of membrane-merging intermediates between vesicles, enable us to propose a model for EFF-1 mediated fusion. This process, involving identical proteins on both membranes to be fused, follows a mechanism that shares features of SNARE-mediated fusion while using the structural building blocks of the unilaterally acting class-II viral fusion proteins.

  10. Rational design of a monomeric and photostable far-red fluorescent protein for fluorescence imaging in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dan; Dong, Zhiqiang; Gustafson, William Clay; Ruiz-González, Rubén; Signor, Luca; Marzocca, Fanny; Borel, Franck; Klassen, Matthew P; Makhijani, Kalpana; Royant, Antoine; Jan, Yuh-Nung; Weiss, William A; Guo, Su; Shu, Xiaokun

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FPs) are powerful tools for cell and molecular biology. Here based on structural analysis, a blue-shifted mutant of a recently engineered monomeric infrared fluorescent protein (mIFP) has been rationally designed. This variant, named iBlueberry, bears a single mutation that shifts both excitation and emission spectra by approximately 40 nm. Furthermore, iBlueberry is four times more photostable than mIFP, rendering it more advantageous for imaging protein dynamics. By tagging iBlueberry to centrin, it has been demonstrated that the fusion protein labels the centrosome in the developing zebrafish embryo. Together with GFP-labeled nucleus and tdTomato-labeled plasma membrane, time-lapse imaging to visualize the dynamics of centrosomes in radial glia neural progenitors in the intact zebrafish brain has been demonstrated. It is further shown that iBlueberry can be used together with mIFP in two-color protein labeling in living cells and in two-color tumor labeling in mice.

  11. Zipper-mediated oligomerization of the mixed lineage kinase SPRK/MLK-3 is not required for its activation by the GTPase cdc 42 but Is necessary for its activation of the JNK pathway. Monomeric SPRK L410P does not catalyze the activating phosphorylation of Thr258 of murine MITOGEN-ACTIVATED protein kinase kinase 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacratsis, P O; Gallo, K A

    2000-09-08

    Src homology 3 domain-containing proline-rich kinase (SPRK)/mixed lineage kinase-3 is a serine/threonine kinase that has been identified as an upstream activator of the c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway. SPRK is capable of activating MKK4 by phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues, and mutant forms of MKK4 that lack the phosphorylation sites Ser(254) and Thr(258) block SPRK-induced JNK activation. A region of 63 amino acids following the kinase domain of SPRK is predicted to form a leucine zipper. The leucine zipper domain of SPRK has been shown to be necessary and sufficient for SPRK oligomerization, but its role in regulating activation of SPRK and downstream signaling remains unclear. In this study, we substituted a proposed stabilizing leucine residue in the zipper domain with a helix-disrupting proline to abrogate zipper-mediated SPRK oligomerization. We demonstrate that constitutively activated Cdc42 fully activates this monomeric SPRK mutant in terms of both autophosphorylation and histone phosphorylation activity and induces the same in vivo phosphorylation pattern as wild type SPRK. However, this catalytically active SPRK zipper mutant is unable to activate JNK. Our data show that the monomeric SPRK mutant fails to phosphorylate one of the two activating phosphorylation sites, Thr(258), of MKK4. These studies suggest that zipper-mediated SPRK oligomerization is not required for SPRK activation by Cdc42 but instead is critical for proper interaction and phosphorylation of a downstream target, MKK4.

  12. New strategy for high-level expression and purification of biologically active monomeric TGF-β1/C77S in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yana V; Gasparian, Marine E; Bocharov, Eduard V; Chertkova, Rita V; Tkach, Elena N; Dolgikh, Dmitry A; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail P

    2015-02-01

    Mature transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-β1) is a homodimeric protein with a single disulfide bridge between Cys77 on the respective monomers. The synthetic DNA sequence encoding the mature human TGF-β1/C77S (further termed TGF-β1m) was cloned into plasmid pET-32a downstream to the gene of fusion partner thioredoxin (Trx) immediately after the DNA sequence encoding enteropeptidase recognition site. High-level expression (~1.5 g l(-1)) of Trx/TGF-β1m fusion was achieved in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strain mainly in insoluble form. The fusion was solubilized and refolded in glutathione redox system in the presence of zwitterionic detergent CHAPS. After refolding, Trx/TGF-β1m fusion was cleaved by enteropeptidase, and the carrier protein of TGF-β1m was separated from thioredoxin on Ni-NTA agarose. Separation of monomeric molecules from the noncovalently bounded oligomers was done using cation-exchange chromatography. The structure of purified TGF-β1m was confirmed by circular dichroism analysis. The developed technology allowed purifying biologically active tag-free monomeric TGF-β1m from bacteria with a yield of about 2.8 mg from 100 ml cell culture. The low-cost and easy purification steps allow considering that our proposed preparation of recombinant monomeric TGF-β1 could be employed for in vitro and in vivo experiments as well as for therapeutic intervention.

  13. Recognition profile of Morus nigra agglutinin (Morniga G) expressed by monomeric ligands, simple clusters and mammalian polyvalent glycotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tanuja; Wu, June H; Peumans, Willy J; Rougé, Pierre; Van Damme, Els J M; Wu, Albert M

    2007-01-01

    The carbohydrate binding properties of a novel member of the subfamily of galactose-specific jacalin-related lectin isolated from the bark of black mulberry (Morus nigra) (Morniga G) was studied in detail by enzyme-linked lectinosorbent and inhibition assays using panels of monomeric saccharides, mammalian polyvalent glycotopes and polysaccharides. Among the natural glycans tested for lectin binding, Morniga G reacted best with glycoproteins (gps) presenting a high density of tumor-associated carbohydrate antigens Tn (GalNAcalpha1-Ser/Thr) and Talpha (Galbeta1-3GalNAcalpha1-). Their reactivities, on a nanogram basis, were up to 72.5, 3.9x10(3), 6.0x10(3), 8.8x10(3) and 2.9x10(4) times higher than that of Tn-containing glycopeptides (M.W.Man/Glc, GlcNAc and lFuc; (ii) the mammalian glycotope specificity is Talpha1-benzyl>T>Tn>GalNAcbeta1-3Gal (P), while B/E (Galalpha1-3/4Gal), I/II (Galbeta1-3/4GlcNAc), S (GalNAcbeta1-4Gal), F/A (GalNAcalpha1-3GalNAc/Gal) and L (Galbeta1-4Glc) are inactive; (iii) the most active ligand is T/Tn; (iv) simple clustered Tn or triantennary N-glycans with II termini (Tri-II) have limited impact; (v) high-density polyvalent glycotopes play a prominent role for enhancing Morniga G reactivity. These results provide evidence for the binding of this lectin to dense cell surface T/Tn glycoconjugates and facilitate future usage of this lectin in biotechnological and medical applications.

  14. Pleiotropic benefit of monomeric and oligomeric flavanols on vascular health--a randomized controlled clinical pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antje R Weseler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cardiovascular diseases are expanding to a major social-economic burden in the Western World and undermine man's deep desire for healthy ageing. Epidemiological studies suggest that flavanol-rich foods (e.g. grapes, wine, chocolate sustain cardiovascular health. For an evidenced-based application, however, sound clinical data on their efficacy are strongly demanded. METHODS: In a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled intervention study we supplemented 28 male smokers with 200 mg per day of monomeric and oligomeric flavanols (MOF from grape seeds. At baseline, after 4 and 8 weeks we measured macro- and microvascular function and a cluster of systemic biomarkers for major pathological processes occurring in the vasculature: disturbances in lipid metabolism and cellular redox balance, and activation of inflammatory cells and platelets. RESULTS: In the MOF group serum total cholesterol and LDL decreased significantly (P ≤ 0.05 by 5% (n = 11 and 7% (n = 9, respectively in volunteers with elevated baseline levels. Additionally, after 8 weeks the ratio of glutathione to glutathione disulphide in erythrocytes rose from baseline by 22% (n = 15, P<0.05 in MOF supplemented subjects. We also observed that MOF supplementation exerts anti-inflammatory effects in blood towards ex vivo added bacterial endotoxin and significantly reduces expression of inflammatory genes in leukocytes. Conversely, alterations in macro- and microvascular function, platelet aggregation, plasma levels of nitric oxide surrogates, endothelin-1, C-reactive protein, fibrinogen, prostaglandin F2alpha, plasma antioxidant capacity and gene expression levels of antioxidant defense enzymes did not reach statistical significance after 8 weeks MOF supplementation. However, integrating all measured effects into a global, so-called vascular health index revealed a significant improvement of overall vascular health by MOF compared to placebo (P ≤ 0.05. CONCLUSION: Our

  15. Aggregation of a slow-folding mutant of a beta-clam protein proceeds through a monomeric nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignatova, Zoya; Gierasch, Lila M

    2005-05-17

    Mechanistic understanding of protein aggregation, leading either to structured amyloid fibrils or to amorphous inclusion body-like deposits, should facilitate the identification of potential therapeutic intervention strategies for the devastating amyloid-based diseases. Here we focus on the in vitro aggregation of a slow-folding mutant of the beta-clam protein, cellular retinoic acid-binding protein I (P39A CRABP I), which forms inclusion bodies when expressed in Escherichia coli. Aggregation was monitored by observing the fluorescence of a fluorescein-based biarsenical dye (FlAsH) that ligates to a tetra-Cys motif, here incorporated into a flexible Omega-loop. The fluorescence signal of FlAsH on the tetra-Cys-containing P39A CRABP I is sensitive to whether this protein is native or unfolded, and was used in combination with other techniques to follow aggregate formation. The aggregation time course is compatible with a nucleation-dependent polymerization model, and detailed kinetic analysis showed that the energetically unfavorable nucleus is monomeric. A similar conclusion was reached previously for poly(Gln) species [Chen, S., Ferrone, F. A., and Wetzel, R. (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 11884-11889] and points to an unfavorable equilibrium between the misfolded intermediate and the bulk pool of monomers as causative in aggregation. The P39A mutation, which removes a helix-stop signal, may slow closure of the beta-barrel in P39A CRABP I relative to the wild type, leaving it vulnerable to aggregation. Wide-angle X-ray scattering showed that the amorphous aggregates formed by the aggregation-prone intermediates of P39A CRABP I contain predominantly beta-strands structured in a lamellar fashion with 10.03 A spacing between adjacent beta-sheets.

  16. Occurrence and Speciation of Polymeric Chromium(III), Monomeric Chromium(III) and Chromium(VI) in Environmental Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    HU, LIGANG; CAI, YONG; JIANG, GUIBIN

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory experiments suggest that polymeric Cr(III) could exist in aqueous solution for a relative long period of time. However, the occurrence of polymeric Cr(III) has not been reported in environmental media due partially to the lack of method for speciating polymeric Cr. We observed an unknown Cr species during the course of study on speciation of Cr in the leachates of chromated-copper-arsenate (CCA)-treated wood. Efforts were made to identify structure of the unknown Cr species. Considering the forms of Cr existed in the CCA-treated woods, we mainly focused our efforts to determine if the unknown species were polymeric Cr(III), complex of Cr/As or complex of Cr with dissolved organic matter (DOM). In order to evaluate whether polymeric Cr(III) largely exist in wood leachates, high performance liquid chromatography coupled with inductively coupled mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICPMS was used) for simultaneous speciation of monomeric Cr(III), polymeric Cr(III), and Cr(VI). In addition to wood leachates where polymeric Cr (III) ranged from 39.1 to 67.4 %, occurrence of the unknown Cr species in other environmental matrices, including surface waters, tap and waste waters, was also investigated. It was found that polymeric Cr(III) could exist in environmental samples containing μg/L level of Cr, at a level up to 60% of total Cr, suggesting that polymeric Cr(III) could significantly exist in natural environments. Failure in quantifying polymeric Cr(III) would lead to the underestimation of total Cr and bias in Cr speciation. The environmental implication of the presence of polymeric Cr(III) species in the environment deserves further study. PMID:27156211

  17. Stability, structural and functional properties of a monomeric, calcium–loaded adenylate cyclase toxin, CyaA, from Bordetella pertussis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannella, Sara E.; Ntsogo Enguéné, Véronique Yvette; Davi, Marilyne; Malosse, Christian; Sotomayor Pérez, Ana Cristina; Chamot-Rooke, Julia; Vachette, Patrice; Durand, Dominique; Ladant, Daniel; Chenal, Alexandre

    2017-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis, the causative agent of whooping cough, secretes an adenylate cyclase toxin, CyaA, which invades eukaryotic cells and alters their physiology by cAMP overproduction. Calcium is an essential cofactor of CyaA, as it is the case for most members of the Repeat-in-ToXins (RTX) family. We show that the calcium-bound, monomeric form of CyaA, hCyaAm, conserves its permeabilization and haemolytic activities, even in a fully calcium-free environment. In contrast, hCyaAm requires sub-millimolar calcium in solution for cell invasion, indicating that free calcium in solution is involved in the CyaA toxin translocation process. We further report the first in solution structural characterization of hCyaAm, as deduced from SAXS, mass spectrometry and hydrodynamic studies. We show that hCyaAm adopts a compact and stable state that can transiently conserve its conformation even in a fully calcium-free environment. Our results therefore suggest that in hCyaAm, the C-terminal RTX-domain is stabilized in a high-affinity calcium-binding state by the N-terminal domains while, conversely, calcium binding to the C-terminal RTX-domain strongly stabilizes the N-terminal regions. Hence, the different regions of hCyaAm appear tightly connected, leading to stabilization effects between domains. The hysteretic behaviour of CyaA in response to calcium is likely shared by other RTX cytolysins. PMID:28186111

  18. Production of Monomeric Aromatic Compounds from Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch Fiber Lignin by Chemical and Enzymatic Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Pei-Ling; Hassan, Osman; Maskat, Mohamad Yusof; Badri, Khairiah

    2015-01-01

    In this study, oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFBF) was pretreated with alkali, and lignin was extracted for further degradation into lower molecular weight phenolic compounds using enzymes and chemical means. Efficiency of monomeric aromatic compounds production from OPEFBF lignin via chemical (nitrobenzene versus oxygen) and enzymatic [cutinase versus manganese peroxidase (MnP)] approaches was investigated. The effects of sodium hydroxide concentration (2, 5, and 10% wt.) and reaction time (30, 90, and 180 minutes) on the yield of aromatic compounds were studied. The results obtained indicated that nitrobenzene oxidation produced the highest yield (333.17 ± 49.44 ppm hydroxybenzoic acid, 5.67 ± 0.25 ppm p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, 25.57 ± 1.64 ppm vanillic acid, 168.68 ± 23.23 ppm vanillin, 75.44 ± 6.71 ppm syringic acid, 815.26 ± 41.77 ppm syringaldehyde, 15.21 ± 2.19 ppm p-coumaric acid, and 44.75 ± 3.40 ppm ferulic acid), among the tested methods. High sodium hydroxide concentration (10% wt.) was needed to promote efficient nitrobenzene oxidation. However, less severe oxidation condition was preferred to preserve the hydroxycinnamic acids (p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid). Cutinase-catalyzed hydrolysis was found to be more efficient than MnP-catalyzed oxidation in the production of aromatic compounds. By hydrolyzed 8% wt. of lignin with 0.625 mL cutinase g(-1) lignin at pH 8 and 55°C for 24 hours, about 642.83 ± 14.45 ppm hydroxybenzoic acid, 70.19 ± 3.31 ppm syringaldehyde, 22.80 ± 1.04 ppm vanillin, 27.06 ± 1.20 ppm p-coumaric acid, and 50.19 ± 2.23 ppm ferulic acid were produced.

  19. Characterization of the Sweet Taste Receptor Tas1r2 from an Old World Monkey Species Rhesus Monkey and Species-Dependent Activation of the Monomeric Receptor by an Intense Sweetener Perillartine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chenggu; Jiang, Hua; Li, Lei; Liu, Tianming; Song, Xuejie; Liu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Sweet state is a basic physiological sensation of humans and other mammals which is mediated by the broadly acting sweet taste receptor-the heterodimer of Tas1r2 (taste receptor type 1 member 2) and Tas1r3 (taste receptor type 1 member 3). Various sweeteners interact with either Tas1r2 or Tas1r3 and then activate the receptor. In this study, we cloned, expressed and functionally characterized the taste receptor Tas1r2 from a species of Old World monkeys, the rhesus monkey. Paired with the human TAS1R3, it was shown that the rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could respond to natural sugars, amino acids and their derivates. Furthermore, similar to human TAS1R2, rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could respond to artificial sweeteners and sweet-tasting proteins. However, the responses induced by rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could not be inhibited by the sweet inhibitor amiloride. Moreover, we found a species-dependent activation of the Tas1r2 monomeric receptors of human, rhesus monkey and squirrel monkey but not mouse by an intense sweetener perillartine. Molecular modeling and sequence analysis indicate that the receptor has the conserved domains and ligand-specific interactive residues, which have been identified in the characterized sweet taste receptors up to now. This is the first report of the functional characterization of sweet taste receptors from an Old World monkey species.

  20. Characterization of the Sweet Taste Receptor Tas1r2 from an Old World Monkey Species Rhesus Monkey and Species-Dependent Activation of the Monomeric Receptor by an Intense Sweetener Perillartine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Chenggu; Jiang, Hua; Li, Lei; Liu, Tianming; Song, Xuejie; Liu, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Sweet state is a basic physiological sensation of humans and other mammals which is mediated by the broadly acting sweet taste receptor-the heterodimer of Tas1r2 (taste receptor type 1 member 2) and Tas1r3 (taste receptor type 1 member 3). Various sweeteners interact with either Tas1r2 or Tas1r3 and then activate the receptor. In this study, we cloned, expressed and functionally characterized the taste receptor Tas1r2 from a species of Old World monkeys, the rhesus monkey. Paired with the human TAS1R3, it was shown that the rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could respond to natural sugars, amino acids and their derivates. Furthermore, similar to human TAS1R2, rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could respond to artificial sweeteners and sweet-tasting proteins. However, the responses induced by rhesus monkey Tas1r2 could not be inhibited by the sweet inhibitor amiloride. Moreover, we found a species-dependent activation of the Tas1r2 monomeric receptors of human, rhesus monkey and squirrel monkey but not mouse by an intense sweetener perillartine. Molecular modeling and sequence analysis indicate that the receptor has the conserved domains and ligand-specific interactive residues, which have been identified in the characterized sweet taste receptors up to now. This is the first report of the functional characterization of sweet taste receptors from an Old World monkey species. PMID:27479072

  1. Stable divalent germanium, tin and lead amino(ether)-phenolate monomeric complexes: structural features, inclusion heterobimetallic complexes, and ROP catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingfang; Roşca, Sorin-Claudiu; Poirier, Valentin; Sinbandhit, Sourisak; Dorcet, Vincent; Roisnel, Thierry; Carpentier, Jean-François; Sarazin, Yann

    2014-03-21

    Stable germanium(II) and lead(II) amido complexes {LO(i)}M(N(SiMe3)2) (M = Ge(II), Pb(II)) bearing amino(ether)phenolate ligands are readily available using the proteo-ligands {LO(i)}H of general formula 2-CH2NR2-4,6-tBu2-C6H2OH (i = 1, NR2 = N((CH2)2OCH3)2; i = 2, NR2 = NEt2; i = 3, NR2 = aza-15-crown-5) and M(N(SiMe3)2)2 precursors. The molecular structures of these germylenes and plumbylenes, as well as those of {LO(3)}GeCl, {LO(3)}SnCl and of the congeneric {LO(4)}Sn(II)(N(SiMe3)2) where NR2 = aza-12-crown-4, have been determined crystallographically. All complexes are monomeric, with 3-coordinate metal centres. The phenolate systematically acts as a N^O(phenolate) bidentate ligand, with no interactions between the metal and the O(side-arm) atoms in these cases (for {LO(1)}(-), {LO(3)}(-) and {LO(4)}(-)) where they could potentially arise. For each family, the lone pair of electrons essentially features ns(2) character, and there is little, if any, hybridization of the valence orbitals. Heterobimetallic complexes {LO(3)}M(N(SiMe3)2)·LiOTf, where the Li(+) cation sits inside the tethered crown-ether, were prepared by reaction of {LO(3)}M(N(SiMe3)2) and LiOTf (M = Ge(II), Sn(II)). The inclusion of Li(+) (featuring a close contact with the triflate anion) in the macrocycle bears no influence on the coordination sphere of the divalent tetrel element. In association with iPrOH, the amido germylenes, stannylenes and plumbylenes catalyse the controlled polymerisation of L- and racemic lactide. The activity increases linearly according to Ge(II) ≪ Sn(II) ≪ Pb(II). The simple germylenes generate very sluggish catalysts, but the activity is significantly boosted if the heterobimetallic complex {LO(3)}Ge(N(SiMe3)2)·LiOTf is used instead. On the other hand, with 10-25 equiv. of iPrOH, the plumbylenes afford highly active binary catalysts, converting 1000 or 5000 equiv. of monomer at 60 °C within 3 or 45 min, respectively, in a controlled fashion.

  2. Production of rhesus monkey cloned embryos expressing monomeric red fluorescent protein by interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Hai-Ying; Kang, Jin-Dan; Li, Suo; Jin, Jun-Xue; Hong, Yu; Jin, Long; Guo, Qing; Gao, Qing-Shan; Yan, Chang-Guo; Yin, Xi-Jun, E-mail: yinxj33@msn.com

    2014-02-21

    Highlights: • Rhesus monkey cells were electroporated with a plasmid containing mRFP1, and an mRFP1-expressing cell line was generated. • For the first time, mRFP1-expressing rhesus monkey cells were used as donor cells for iSCNT. • The effect of VPA on the development of embryos cloned using iSCNT was determined. - Abstract: Interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) is a promising method to clone endangered animals from which oocytes are difficult to obtain. Monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1) is an excellent selection marker for transgenically modified cloned embryos during somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). In this study, mRFP-expressing rhesus monkey cells or porcine cells were transferred into enucleated porcine oocytes to generate iSCNT and SCNT embryos, respectively. The development of these embryos was studied in vitro. The percentage of embryos that underwent cleavage did not significantly differ between iSCNT and SCNT embryos (P > 0.05; 71.53% vs. 80.30%). However, significantly fewer iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reached the blastocyst stage (2.04% vs. 10.19%, P < 0.05). Valproic acid was used in an attempt to increase the percentage of iSCNT embryos that developed to the blastocyst stage. However, the percentages of embryos that underwent cleavage and reached the blastocyst stage were similar between untreated iSCNT embryos and iSCNT embryos treated with 2 mM valproic acid for 24 h (72.12% vs. 70.83% and 2.67% vs. 2.35%, respectively). These data suggest that porcine-rhesus monkey interspecies embryos can be generated that efficiently express mRFP1. However, a significantly lower proportion of iSCNT embryos than SCNT embryos reach the blastocyst stage. Valproic acid does not increase the percentage of porcine-rhesus monkey iSCNT embryos that reach the blastocyst stage. The mechanisms underling nuclear reprogramming and epigenetic modifications in iSCNT need to be investigated further.

  3. Production of Monomeric Aromatic Compounds from Oil Palm Empty Fruit Bunch Fiber Lignin by Chemical and Enzymatic Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Ling Tang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, oil palm empty fruit bunch (OPEFBF was pretreated with alkali, and lignin was extracted for further degradation into lower molecular weight phenolic compounds using enzymes and chemical means. Efficiency of monomeric aromatic compounds production from OPEFBF lignin via chemical (nitrobenzene versus oxygen and enzymatic [cutinase versus manganese peroxidase (MnP] approaches was investigated. The effects of sodium hydroxide concentration (2, 5, and 10% wt. and reaction time (30, 90, and 180 minutes on the yield of aromatic compounds were studied. The results obtained indicated that nitrobenzene oxidation produced the highest yield (333.17±49.44 ppm hydroxybenzoic acid, 5.67±0.25 ppm p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, 25.57±1.64 ppm vanillic acid, 168.68±23.23 ppm vanillin, 75.44±6.71 ppm syringic acid, 815.26±41.77 ppm syringaldehyde, 15.21±2.19 ppm p-coumaric acid, and 44.75±3.40 ppm ferulic acid, among the tested methods. High sodium hydroxide concentration (10% wt. was needed to promote efficient nitrobenzene oxidation. However, less severe oxidation condition was preferred to preserve the hydroxycinnamic acids (p-coumaric acid and ferulic acid. Cutinase-catalyzed hydrolysis was found to be more efficient than MnP-catalyzed oxidation in the production of aromatic compounds. By hydrolyzed 8% wt. of lignin with 0.625 mL cutinase g−1 lignin at pH 8 and 55°C for 24 hours, about 642.83±14.45 ppm hydroxybenzoic acid, 70.19±3.31 ppm syringaldehyde, 22.80±1.04 ppm vanillin, 27.06±1.20 ppm p-coumaric acid, and 50.19±2.23 ppm ferulic acid were produced.

  4. Development and characterization of mouse monoclonal antibodies against monomeric dengue virus non-structural glycoprotein 1 (NS1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelanew, Tesfaye; Poole-Smith, B Katherine; Hunsperger, Elizabeth

    2015-09-15

    Dengue virus (DENV) nonstructural-1 (NS1) glycoprotein is useful for diagnosis of DENV infections in the first 8 days of illness with any of the four serotypes (DENV-1, DENV-2, DENV-3 and DENV-4). However, NS1 diagnostics are less sensitive for secondary DENV infections so the utility of NS1 diagnostics in dengue endemic countries where there is predominantly secondary infections is being questioned. Heat-mediated immunecomplex dissociation (ICD) prior to testing serum samples can significantly improve NS1 test sensitivity in secondary infections but requires monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) reactive to heat-denatured NS1. In order to incorporate a simple heat-mediated ICD step, a crucial step was to develop new MAbs with high affinity and specificity to heat-denatured DENV NS1 protein. In the present study, six new MAbs were isolated from BALB/c mice immunized with recombinant monomeric NS1 of DENV-1 and DENV-2. Characterization using three different methods: indirect ELISA, fixed cell ELISA and western blot revealed that all six MAbs are serotype-cross-reactive and capable of recognizing dimeric and hexameric isoforms as well as heat-denatured NS1 from all four DENV serotypes. No cross-reactivity to NS1 of West Nile virus and Yellow fever virus was observed on western blot and indirect ELISA. Five of the six MAbs mapped to the DENV NS1 region of 105-119 amino acids. The remaining MAb mapped to DENV NS1 region of 25-39 amino acids. These two NS1 regions were found to be highly conserved among all four DENV serotypes by sequences analysis and database comparison. These MAbs were used to develop an NS1 capture ELISA and tested using a small panel of clinical specimens. The results from the NS1 capture ELISA indicated at least a three-fold increase in NS1 antigen detection in heat-denatured samples compared to untreated specimens. Furthermore, artificial immunecomplexed results also demonstrated the binding efficiency of these MAbs to heat denatured NS1. Taken together

  5. Unique fluorophores in the dimeric archaeal histones hMfB and hPyA1 reveal the impact of nonnative structure in a monomeric kinetic intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stump, Matthew R; Gloss, Lisa M

    2008-02-01

    Homodimeric archaeal histones and heterodimeric eukaryotic histones share a conserved structure but fold through different kinetic mechanisms, with a correlation between faster folding/association rates and the population of kinetic intermediates. Wild-type hMfB (from Methanothermus fervidus) has no intrinsic fluorophores; Met35, which is Tyr in hyperthermophilic archaeal histones such as hPyA1 (from Pyrococcus strain GB-3A), was mutated to Tyr and Trp. Two Tyr-to-Trp mutants of hPyA1 were also characterized. All fluorophores were introduced into the long, central alpha-helix of the histone fold. Far-UV circular dichroism (CD) indicated that the fluorophores did not significantly alter the helical content of the histones. The equilibrium unfolding transitions of the histone variants were two-state, reversible processes, with DeltaG degrees (H2O) values within 1 kcal/mol of the wild-type dimers. The hPyA1 Trp variants fold by two-state kinetic mechanisms like wild-type hPyA1, but with increased folding and unfolding rates, suggesting that the mutated residues (Tyr-32 and Tyr-36) contribute to transition state structure. Like wild-type hMfB, M35Y and M35W hMfB fold by a three-state mechanism, with a stopped-flow CD burst-phase monomeric intermediate. The M35 mutants populate monomeric intermediates with increased secondary structure and stability but exhibit decreased folding rates; this suggests that nonnative interactions occur from burial of the hydrophobic Tyr and Trp residues in this kinetic intermediate. These results implicate the long central helix as a key component of the structure in the kinetic monomeric intermediates of hMfB as well as the dimerization transition state in the folding of hPyA1.

  6. The impact of single nucleotide polymorphism in monomeric alpha-amylase inhibitor genes from wild emmer wheat, primarily from Israel and Golan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Ze-Hong

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various enzyme inhibitors act on key insect gut digestive hydrolases, including alpha-amylases and proteinases. Alpha-amylase inhibitors have been widely investigated for their possible use in strengthening a plant's defense against insects that are highly dependent on starch as an energy source. We attempted to unravel the diversity of monomeric alpha-amylase inhibitor genes of Israeli and Golan Heights' wild emmer wheat with different ecological factors (e.g., geography, water, and temperature. Population methods that analyze the nature and frequency of allele diversity within a species and the codon analysis method (comparing patterns of synonymous and non-synonymous changes in protein coding sequences were used to detect natural selection. Results Three hundred and forty-eight sequences encoding monomeric alpha-amylase inhibitors (WMAI were obtained from 14 populations of wild emmer wheat. The frequency of SNPs in WMAI genes was 1 out of 16.3 bases, where 28 SNPs were detected in the coding sequence. The results of purifying and the positive selection hypothesis (p Conclusions Great diversity at the WMAI locus, both between and within populations, was detected in the populations of wild emmer wheat. It was revealed that WMAI were naturally selected for across populations by a ratio of dN/dS as expected. Ecological factors, singly or in combination, explained a significant proportion of the variations in the SNPs. A sharp genetic divergence over very short geographic distances compared to a small genetic divergence between large geographic distances also suggested that the SNPs were subjected to natural selection, and ecological factors had an important evolutionary role in polymorphisms at this locus. According to population and codon analysis, these results suggested that monomeric alpha-amylase inhibitors are adaptively selected under different environmental conditions.

  7. Directed evolution of a monomeric, bright and photostable version of Clavularia cyan fluorescent protein: structural characterization and applications in fluorescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al, Hui-wang; Henderson, J. Nathan; Remington, S. James; Campbell, Robert E. (Alberta); (Oregon)

    2008-05-07

    The arsenal of engineered variants of the GFP [green FP (fluorescent protein)] from Aequorea jellyfish provides researchers with a powerful set of tools for use in biochemical and cell biology research. The recent discovery of diverse FPs in Anthozoa coral species has provided protein engineers with an abundance of alternative progenitor FPs from which improved variants that complement or supersede existing Aequorea GFP variants could be derived. Here, we report the engineering of the first monomeric version of the tetrameric CFP (cyan FP) cFP484 from Clavularia coral. Starting from a designed synthetic gene library with mammalian codon preferences, we identified dimeric cFP484 variants with fluorescent brightness significantly greater than the wild-type protein. Following incorporation of dimer-breaking mutations and extensive directed evolution with selection for blue-shifted emission, high fluorescent brightness and photostability, we arrived at an optimized variant that we have named mTFP1 [monomeric TFP1 (teal FP 1)]. The new mTFP1 is one of the brightest and most photostable FPs reported to date. In addition, the fluorescence is insensitive to physiologically relevant pH changes and the fluorescence lifetime decay is best fitted as a single exponential. The 1.19 {angstrom} crystal structure (1 {angstrom}=0.1 nm) of mTFP1 confirms the monomeric structure and reveals an unusually distorted chromophore conformation. As we experimentally demonstrate, the high quantum yield of mTFP1 (0.85) makes it particularly suitable as a replacement for ECFP (enhanced CFP) or Cerulean as a FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer) donor to either a yellow or orange FP acceptor.

  8. Antioxidant effects of phenolic rye (Secale cereale L.) extracts, monomeric hydroxycinnamates, and ferulic acid dehydrodimers on human low-density lipoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Mette Findal; Landbo, A K; Christensen, L P

    2001-01-01

    Dietary antioxidants that protect low-density lipoprotein (LDL) from oxidation may help to prevent atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. The antioxidant activities of purified monomeric and dimeric hydroxycinnamates and of phenolic extracts from rye (whole grain, bran, and flour) were...... investigated using an in vitro copper-catalyzed human LDL oxidation assay. The most abundant ferulic acid dehydrodimer (diFA) found in rye, 8-O-4-diFA, was a slightly better antioxidant than ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid. The antioxidant activity of the 8-5-diFA was comparable to that of ferulic acid...

  9. Antioxidant effects of phenolic rye (Secale cereale L.) extracts, monomeric hydroxycinnamates, and ferulic acid dehydrodimers on human low-density lipoproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, M.F.; Landbo, Anne-Katrine Regel; Christensen, L.P.

    2001-01-01

    Dietary antioxidants that protect low-density lipoprotein (LDL) from oxidation may help to prevent atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. The antioxidant activities of purified monomeric and dimeric hydroxycinnamates and of phenolic extracts from rye (whole grain, bran, and flour) were...... investigated using an in vitro copper-catalyzed human LDL oxidation assay. The most abundant ferulic acid dehydrodimer (diFA) found in rye, 8-O-4- diFA, was a slightly better antioxidant than ferulic acid and p-coumaric acid. The antioxidant activity of the 8-5-diFA was comparable to that of ferulic acid...

  10. Electrophysiological effects of kainic acid on vasopressin-enhanced green fluorescent protein and oxytocin-monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 neurones isolated from the supraoptic nucleus in transgenic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, J; Ohbuchi, T; Yoshimura, M; Maruyama, T; Ishikura, T; Matsuura, T; Suzuki, H; Ueta, Y

    2014-01-01

    The supraoptic nucleus (SON) contains two types of magnocellular neurosecretory cells: arginine vasopressin (AVP)-producing and oxytocin (OXT)-producing cells. We recently generated and characterised two transgenic rat lines: one expressing an AVP-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and the other expressing an OXT-monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1). These transgenic rats enable the visualisation of AVP or OXT neurones in the SON. In the present study, we compared the electrophysiological responses of AVP-eGFP and OXT-mRFP1 neurones to glutamic acid in SON primary cultures. Glutamate mediates fast synaptic transmission through three classes of ionotrophic receptors: the NMDA, AMPA and kainate receptors. We investigated the contributions of the three classes of ionotrophic receptors in glutamate-induced currents. Three different antagonists were used, each predominantly selective for one of the classes of ionotrophic receptor. Next, we focused on the kainate receptors (KARs). We examined the electrophysiological effects of kainic acid (KA) on AVP-eGFP and OXT-mRFP1 neurones. In current clamp mode, KA induced depolarisation and increased firing rates. These KA-induced responses were inhibited by the non-NMDA ionotrophic receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3(1H4H)-dione in both AVP-eGFP and OXT-mRFP1 neurones. In voltage clamp mode, the application of KA evoked inward currents in a dose-dependent manner. The KA-induced currents were significantly larger in OXT-mRFP1 neurones than in AVP-eGFP neurones. This significant difference in KA-induced currents was abolished by the GluK1-containing KAR antagonist UBP302. At high concentrations (250-500 μm), the specific GluK1-containing KAR agonist (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl) propanoic acid (ATPA) induced significantly larger currents in OXT-mRFP1 neurones than in AVP-eGFP neurones. Furthermore, the difference between the AVP-eGFP and OXT-mRFP1 neurones in the ATPA currents

  11. Absorption spectrum of monomeric pseudoisocyanine: A new perspective and its implications for formation and spectral response of J-aggregates in solution and in thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guelen, Demet [Physics Department, Middle East Technical University (METU), 06531 Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: dgul@metu.edu.tr; Ozcelik, Serdar [Chemistry Department, Izmir Institute of Technology, Urla 35430, Izmir (Turkey)

    2008-05-15

    We argued against the current spectral assignment for absorption spectrum of monomeric PIC which is widely accepted since the pioneering works of Scheibe and Jelley [G. Scheibe, Angew. Chem. 49 (1936) 563; E.E. Jelly, Nature 138 (1936) 1009]. A new spectrum is presented along with its conceptual basis. The hypothesized spectrum attributes the previous 0-0 ({approx}525 nm) and 0-1 ({approx}490 nm) assignments, respectively, to intermediates acting as the precursor of J-aggregates and to the 0-0 transition of monomeric PIC and brings the spectrum in accord with the seemingly universal spectral fingerprint of cyanines. The hypothesis is used to analyze and interpret the temperature dependence of the UV-vis absorption of PIC aggregates in saline aqueous solution by incorporating the J-band simulations within frenkel exciton formalism. Its implications for aggregate formation kinetics are given on the basis of current spectroscopic evidence. The hypothesis readily answers several long-standing questions: Why compared to many other cyanines at least an order of magnitude higher dye concentration is needed to form J-aggregates of PIC? Why are there no precursors, since aggregation is expected to be a consecutive process? A large number of observations on steady-state and time-resolved spectral properties, and aggregation kinetics in solution/thin films are likely to find reasonable explanations within this hypothesis.

  12. Binding of the monomeric form of C-reactive protein to enzymatically-modified low-density lipoprotein: effects of phosphoethanolamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjay K.; Suresh, Madathilparambil V.; Hammond, David J.; Rusiñol, Antonio E.; Potempa, Lawrence A.; Agrawal, Alok

    2009-01-01

    Background The 5 subunits of native pentameric C-reactive protein (CRP) are dissociated to generate monomeric form of CRP (mCRP) in some in vitro conditions, both physiological and non-physiological, and also in vivo. Many bioactivities of mCRP generated by urea-treatment of CRP and of mCRP generated by mutating the primary structure of CRP have been reported. The bioactivities of mCRP generated by spontaneous dissociation of CRP are largely unexplored. Methods We purified mCRP generated by spontaneous dissociation of CRP and investigated the binding of mCRP to enzymatically-modified low-density lipoprotein (E-LDL). Results mCRP was approximately 60 times more potent than CRP in binding to E-LDL. In the presence of the small-molecule compound phosphoethanolamine (PEt), at 37°C, the binding of mCRP to E-LDL was enhanced 10-fold. In contrast, PEt inhibited the binding of both CRP and mCRP to pneumococcal C-polysaccharide, another phosphocholine-containing ligand to which CRP and mCRP were found to bind. We have not investigated yet whether PEt alters the structure of CRP at 37°C. Conclusions Combined data suggest that the targeting of CRP with the aim to monomerize CRP in vivo may be an effective approach to capture modified forms of LDL. PMID:19545552

  13. Investigation of monomeric and oligomeric wine stilbenoids in red wines by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Ryan; Mao, Qinyong; Taylor, Dennis; Saucier, Cédric

    2013-08-30

    Stilbenoids are secondary plant metabolites responsible for the protection of multiple plant species including grape vine from bacterial and fungal infection. Red wine has been shown to be a major source of these compounds in the human diet, where they display an array of health benefits. Providing a more complete profile of the stilbenoids present in red wine, this study detects 41 stilbenoid compounds, 23 of which have never before been detected in red wine. Red wine extracts were scanned using an ultra-high-performance liquid chromatograph coupled to a hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass analyzer. Multiple targeted MS/MS precursor ion scan experiments were performed using electrospray ionization operated in negative mode. Precursor ion masses were scanned for the monomeric and oligomeric stilbenoids, as well as modifications such as O-glycosylation, methoxylation and oxidation products of these compounds. Accurate mass precursor and characteristic product ions afforded partial structural elucidation and assignment of these compounds. A total of 41 (both known and novel) stilbenoids were detected in extracted red wine. In addition to the well-known monomeric stilbenes, several resveratrol-resveratrol homodimers (m/z 453.1344), resveratrol-piceatannol heterodimers (m/z 469.1293) and piceatannol-piceatannol homodimers (m/z 485.1236) were detected. Modified dimers of resveratrol including O-glycosylated (m/z 615.1872), methoxylated (m/z 485.1606) and oxidized (m/z 471.1449) dimers were also detected. Multiple trimers of resveratrol (m/z 679.1978) were detected for the first time in red wine, as well as some known and some novel stilbenoid tetramers (m/z 905.2604). In summary, 41 stilbenoids were detected in red wine, 23 for the first time. Both monomeric and oligomeric stilbenoids were partially identified and assigned by their accurate mass precursor ions and characteristic stilbenoid fragmentation patterns. Knowledge gained from these experiments contributes to

  14. Purification, characterization and regulation of a monomeric L-phenylalanine dehydrogenase from the facultative methylotroph Nocardia sp. 239

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, L. de; Rijssel, M. van; Euverink, G.J.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    1989-01-01

    In Nocardia sp. 239 D-phenylalanine is converted into L-phenylalanine by an inducible amino acid racemase. The further catabolism of this amino acid involves an NAD-dependent L-phenylalanine dehydrogenase. This enzyme was detected only in cells grown on L- or D-phenylalanine and in batch cultures hi

  15. Evaluating the effect of wood ultrastructural changes from mechanical treatment on kinetics of monomeric sugars and chemicals production in acid bisulfite treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yalan; Wang, Jinwu; Wolcott, Michael P

    2017-02-01

    Currently, various chemical-mechanical treatments were widely used in biofuel production to achieve high total sugar yields. However, the interaction between two treatments was scarcely investigated. In this study, we employed a ball milling process to create ultrastructural changes for Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) micronized wood powders. The 0, 30, and 60min ball milled wood powders resulted in a crystallinity index of 0.41, 0.21, and 0.10 respectively. It was found that the ultrastructural changes accelerate monomeric sugars production without influencing the yield of sugar degradation products. The optimal acid bisulfite treatment time was substantially decreased from 120min to 40min as the cellulose crystallinity decreased. Meanwhile, total sugar yield increased from 65% to 92% and had a linear relation with a decrease of the cellulose crystallinity.

  16. Corrosion inhibition of aluminum with a series of aniline monomeric surfactants and their analog polymers in 0.5 M HCl solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. El-Deeb

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The inhibition effect of 3-(12-sodiumsulfonate dodecyloxy aniline monomeric surfactant (MC12 and its analog polymer Poly 3-(dodecyloxy sulfonic acid aniline (PC12 on the corrosion of aluminum in 0.5 M HCl solution was investigated using weight loss and potentiodynamic polarization techniques. The presence of these two compounds in 0.5 M HCl inhibits the corrosion of aluminum without modifying the mechanism of corrosion process. It was found that these inhibitors act as mixed-type inhibitors with anodic predominance as well as the inhibition efficiency increases with increasing inhibitor concentration, but decreases with raising temperature. Langmuir and Frumkin adsorption isotherms fit well with the experimental data. Thermodynamic functions for both dissolution and adsorption processes were determined. The obtained results from weight loss and potentiodynamic polarization techniques are in good agreement with contact angle measurements.

  17. Plant small monomeric G-proteins (RAC/ROPs) of barley are common elements of susceptibility to fungal leaf pathogens, cell expansion and stomata development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathuri, Indira Priyadarshini; Eichmann, Ruth; Hückelhoven, Ralph

    2009-02-01

    Small monomeric RAC/ROP GTPases act as molecular switches in signal transduction processes of plant development and stress responses. They emerged as crucial players in plant-pathogen interactions either by supporting susceptibility or resistance. In a recent publication, we showed that constitutively activated (CA) mutants of different barley (Hordeum vulgare) RAC/ROPs regulate susceptibility to barley fungal leaf pathogens of different life style in a contrasting way. This illustrates the distinctive signalling roles of RAC/ROPs for different plant-pathogen combinations. We also reported the involvement of RAC/ROPs in plant epidermis development in a monocotyledonous plant. Here we further discuss a failure of CA HvRAC/ROP-expressing barley to normally develop stomata.

  18. PENGARUH PENGOLAHAN PANAS TERHADAP KONSENTRASI ANTOSIANIN MONOMERIK UBI JALAR UNGU (Ipomoea batatas L (Efect of Heat Processing on Monomeric Anthocyanin of Purple Sweet Potato (Ipomoea batatas L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai Mahmudatussa'adah

    2015-09-01

    content in PSP during heat processing of flakes. The other purpose of this reseach was to observe the order kinetics model of effect temperature and time baking on total anthocyanin monomeric of fresh PSP and rehydration PSP flakes. The experimental applied a completely randomized design with three replications. The color and amount of anthocyanin (L * = 23.38 ± 0.71, C = 9.84 ± 0.98, Hue = 12.25 ± 1.61. Total monomeric anthocyanin in fresh PSP was 1.45 ± 0.00 mg cyanidin equivalent (CyE/g dry basis (db. In general, the color and the amount of PSP anthocyanin changed during the flakes processing. Steamed PSP for 7 minutes turned its color into a bright purple (L * = 25.88 ± 0.47, C = 24.64 ± 0.25, Hue = 348.83 ± 0.33 with the amount of monomeric anthocyanin increased to 3.76 ± 0.01 CyE mg/g db. Flakes PSP was very bright purple (L * = 36.12 ± 0.11, C = 9.97 ± 0.18, Hue = 359.29 ± 0.31 and the amount of monomericanthocyanin was slightly lower than that of steamed sweet potato (3.19 ± 0.12 mg CyE / g db. Total monomeric anthocyanin of fresh PSP and rehydration flakes PSP decrease during baking time. Keywords: Color, anthocyanin, purple sweet potato, flakes, degradation kinetics   ABSTRAK Antosianin merupakan salah satu kelompok zat warna alami yang terdapat pada tanaman, seperti daun, bunga, umbi, buah atau sayur. Salah satu sumber antosianin pada tanaman adalah ubi jalar ungu (UJU yang mengandung lebih dari 98% antosianin terasilasi dari konsentrasi antosianin umbi. Warna antosianin bervariasi mulai dari merah, ungu, biru, sampai kuning. Warna dan konsentrasi antosianin dapat berubah karena pengaruh panas. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mempelajari perubahan warna dan konsentrasi antosianin monomerik sebagai akibat proses pengolahan dalam pembuatan  UJU. Penelitian ini mengkaji juga mengenai model kinetika reaksi pengaruh suhu dan waktu panggang terhadap konsentrasi antosianin UJU segar dan  rehidrasi. Penelitian menggunakan rancangan acak lengkap

  19. Purified monomeric ligand.MD-2 complexes reveal molecular and structural requirements for activation and antagonism of TLR4 by Gram-negative bacterial endotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioannini, Theresa L; Teghanemt, Athmane; Zhang, DeSheng; Esparza, Gregory; Yu, Liping; Weiss, Jerrold

    2014-08-01

    A major focus of work in our laboratory concerns the molecular mechanisms and structural bases of Gram-negative bacterial endotoxin recognition by host (e.g., human) endotoxin-recognition proteins that mediate and/or regulate activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4. Here, we review studies of wild-type and variant monomeric endotoxin.MD-2 complexes first produced and characterized in our laboratories. These purified complexes have provided unique experimental reagents, revealing both quantitative and qualitative determinants of TLR4 activation and antagonism. This review is dedicated to the memory of Dr. Theresa L. Gioannini (1949-2014) who played a central role in many of the studies and discoveries that are reviewed.

  20. Optimization of ultrasound-assisted extraction of total monomeric anthocyanin (TMA) and total phenolic content (TPC) from eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) peel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dranca, Florina; Oroian, Mircea

    2016-07-01

    The present study describes the extraction of total monomeric anthocyanin (TMA) and total phenolic content (TPC) from eggplant peel using ultrasonic treatments and methanol and 2-propanol as extraction solvents. The extraction yields were optimized by varying the solvent concentration, ultrasonic frequency, temperature and time of ultrasonic treatment. Box-Behnken design was used to investigate the effect of process variables on the ultrasound-assisted extraction. The results showed that for TPC extraction the optimal condition were obtained with a methanol concentration of 76.6%, 33.88 kHz ultrasonic frequency, a temperature of 69.4 °C and 57.5 min extraction time. For TMA the optimal condition were the following: 54.4% methanol concentration, 37 kHz, 55.1 °C and process time of 44.85 min. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Zn-bis-glutathionate is the best co-substrate of the monomeric phytochelatin synthase from the photosynthetic heavy metal-hyperaccumulator Euglena gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-García, Jorge D; Girard, Lourdes; Hernández, Georgina; Saavedra, Emma; Pardo, Juan P; Rodríguez-Zavala, José S; Encalada, Rusely; Reyes-Prieto, Adrián; Mendoza-Cózatl, David G; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael

    2014-03-01

    The phytochelatin synthase from photosynthetic Euglena gracilis (EgPCS) was analyzed at the transcriptional, kinetic, functional, and phylogenetic levels. Recombinant EgPCS was a monomeric enzyme able to synthesize, in the presence of Zn(2+) or Cd(2+), phytochelatin2-phytochelatin4 (PC2-PC4) using GSH or S-methyl-GS (S-methyl-glutathione), but not γ-glutamylcysteine or PC2 as a substrate. Kinetic analysis of EgPCS firmly established a two-substrate reaction mechanism for PC2 synthesis with Km values of 14-22 mM for GSH and 1.6-2.5 μM for metal-bis-glutathionate (Me-GS2). EgPCS showed the highest Vmax and catalytic efficiency with Zn-(GS)2, and was inactivated by peroxides. The EgPCS N-terminal domain showed high similarity to that of other PCSases, in which the typical catalytic core (Cys-70, His-179 and Asp-197) was identified. In contrast, the C-terminal domain showed no similarity to other PCSases. An EgPCS mutant comprising only the N-terminal 235 amino acid residues was inactive, suggesting that the C-terminal domain is essential for activity/stability. EgPCS transcription in Euglena cells was not modified by Cd(2+), whereas its heterologous expression in ycf-1 yeast cells provided resistance to Cd(2+) stress. Phylogenetic analysis of the N-terminal domain showed that EgPCS is distant from plants and other photosynthetic organisms, suggesting that it evolved independently. Although EgPCS showed typical features of PCSases (constitutive expression; conserved N-terminal domain; kinetic mechanism), it also exhibited distinct characteristics such as preference for Zn-(GS)2 over Cd-(GS)2 as a co-substrate, a monomeric structure, and ability to solely synthesize short-chain PCs, which may be involved in conferring enhanced heavy-metal resistance.

  2. Resolution of two native monomeric 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins from Shewanella gelidimarina and the sequence of two napA genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Philippa J.L. [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); McKinzie, Audra A. [School of Medical Sciences (Pharmacology) and Bosch Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Codd, Rachel, E-mail: rachel.codd@sydney.edu.au [School of Chemistry, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); School of Medical Sciences (Pharmacology) and Bosch Institute, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2010-07-16

    Research highlights: {yields} Two monomeric 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins from Shewanella gelidimarina. {yields} Sequence of napA from napEDABC-type operon and napA from NapDAGHB-type operon. {yields} Isolation of NAP as NapA or NapAB correlated with NapA P47E amino acid substitution. -- Abstract: The reduction of nitrate to nitrite in the bacterial periplasm occurs in the 90 kDa NapA subunit of the periplasmic nitrate reductase (NAP) system. Most Shewanella genomes contain two nap operons: napEDABC and napDAGHB, which is an unusual feature of this genus. Two native, monomeric, 90 kDa nitrate reductase active proteins were resolved by hydrophobic interaction chromatography from aerobic cultures of Shewanella gelidimarina replete with reduced nitrogen compounds. The 90 kDa protein obtained in higher yield was characterized as NapA by electronic absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies and was identified by LC/MS/MS and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS as NapA from the napEDABC-type operon. The other 90 kDa protein, which was unstable and produced in low yields, was posited as NapA from the napDAGHB-type operon. Two napA genes have been sequenced from the napEDABC-type and napDAGHB-type operons of S. gelidimarina. Native NAP from S. putrefaciens was resolved as one NapA monomer and one NapAB heterodimer. Two amino acid substitutions in NapA correlated with the isolation of NAP as a NapA monomer or a NapAB heterodimer. The resolution of native, redox-active NapA isoforms in Shewanella provides new insight into the respiratory versatility of this genus, which has implications in bioremediation and the assembly of microbial fuel cells.

  3. Salt anions promote the conversion of HypF-N into amyloid-like oligomers and modulate the structure of the oligomers and the monomeric precursor state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campioni, Silvia; Mannini, Benedetta; López-Alonso, Jorge P; Shalova, Irina N; Penco, Amanda; Mulvihill, Estefania; Laurents, Douglas V; Relini, Annalisa; Chiti, Fabrizio

    2012-12-07

    An understanding of the solution factors contributing to the rate of aggregation of a protein into amyloid oligomers, to the modulation of the conformational state populated prior to aggregation and to the structure/morphology of the resulting oligomers is one of the goals of present research in this field. We have studied the influence of six different salts on the conversion of the N-terminal domain of Escherichiacoli HypF (HypF-N) into amyloid-like oligomers under conditions of acidic pH. Our results show that salts having different anions (NaCl, NaClO(4), NaI, Na(2)SO(4)) accelerate oligomerization with an efficacy that follows the electroselectivity series of the anions (SO(4)(2-)≥ ClO(4)(-)>I(-)>Cl(-)). By contrast, salts with different cations (NaCl, LiCl, KCl) have similar effects. We also investigated the effect of salts on the structure of the final and initial states of HypF-N aggregation. The electroselectivity series does not apply to the effect of anions on the structure of the oligomers. By contrast, it applies to their effect on the content of secondary structure and on the exposure of hydrophobic clusters of the monomeric precursor state. The results therefore indicate that the binding of anions to the positively charged residues of HypF-N at low pH is the mechanism by which salts modulate the rate of oligomerization and the structure of the monomeric precursor state but not the structure of the resulting oligomers. Overall, the data contribute to rationalize the effect of salts on amyloid-like oligomer formation and to explain the role of charged biological macromolecules in protein aggregation processes.

  4. Calcitonina monomérica plasmática e hipercalcemia em pacientes portadores de neoplasia pulmonar Monomeric plasmatic calcitonin and hypercalcemia in lung cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Coifman

    1997-06-01

    lung cancer, and its correlation with hypercalcemia, a very common complication in these tumors. METHOD. Blood were sampled from 56 patients with malignant lung disease for the CT and ionized calcium determinations. Calcitonin was measured using a specific radioimmunoassay for the monomeric form of the molecule, in a previous silica extracted serum probe. RESULTS. We did not find elevated levels of monomeric CT in lung cancer. Only 3 patients had mild elevated levels, while in the others CT was normal or undetectable. Hypercalcemia was found in 21.4% of these patients, but only one with supranormal CT levels. CONCLUSION. Monomeric CT serum levels are normal in lung cancer, what makes the latter use an unreliable tumor marker.

  5. The Escherichia coli P and Type 1 Pilus Assembly Chaperones PapD and FimC Are Monomeric in Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarowar, Samema; Hu, Olivia J.; Werneburg, Glenn T.; Thanassi, David G.; Li, Huilin; Christie, P. J.

    2016-06-27

    ABSTRACT

    The chaperone/usher pathway is used by Gram-negative bacteria to assemble adhesive surface structures known as pili or fimbriae. Uropathogenic strains ofEscherichia coliuse this pathway to assemble P and type 1 pili, which facilitate colonization of the kidney and bladder, respectively. Pilus assembly requires a periplasmic chaperone and outer membrane protein termed the usher. The chaperone allows folding of pilus subunits and escorts the subunits to the usher for polymerization into pili and secretion to the cell surface. Based on previous structures of mutant versions of the P pilus chaperone PapD, it was suggested that the chaperone dimerizes in the periplasm as a self-capping mechanism. Such dimerization is counterintuitive because the chaperone G1 strand, important for chaperone-subunit interaction, is buried at the dimer interface. Here, we show that the wild-type PapD chaperone also forms a dimer in the crystal lattice; however, the dimer interface is different from the previously solved structures. In contrast to the crystal structures, we found that both PapD and the type 1 pilus chaperone, FimC, are monomeric in solution. Our findings indicate that pilus chaperones do not sequester their G1 β-strand by forming a dimer. Instead, the chaperones may expose their G1 strand for facile interaction with pilus subunits. We also found that the type 1 pilus adhesin, FimH, is flexible in solution while in complex with its chaperone, whereas the P pilus adhesin, PapGII, is rigid. Our study clarifies a crucial step in pilus biogenesis and reveals pilus-specific differences that may relate to biological function.

    IMPORTANCEPili are critical virulence factors for many bacterial pathogens. UropathogenicE. colirelies on P and type 1 pili assembled by the chaperone/usher pathway to

  6. Folded-back solution structure of monomeric factor H of human complement by synchrotron X-ray and neutron scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation and constrained molecular modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, M; Perkins, S J

    2001-06-22

    Factor H (FH) is a regulatory cofactor for the protease factor I in the breakdown of C3b in the complement system of immune defence, and binds to heparin and other polyanionic substrates. FH is composed of 20 short consensus/complement repeat (SCR) domains, for which the overall arrangement in solution is unknown. As previous studies had shown that FH can form monomeric or dimeric structures, X-ray and neutron scattering was accordingly performed with FH in the concentration range between 0.7 and 14 mg ml(-1). The radius of gyration of FH was determined to be 11.1-11.3 nm by both methods, and the radii of gyration of the cross-section were 4.4 nm and 1.7 nm. The distance distribution function P(r) showed that the overall length of FH was 38 nm. The neutron data showed that FH was monomeric with a molecular mass of 165,000(+/-17,000) Da. Analytical ultracentrifugation data confirmed this, where sedimentation equilibrium curve fits gave a mean molecular mass of 155,000(+/-3,000) Da. Sedimentation velocity experiments using the g*(s) derivative method showed that FH was monodisperse and had a sedimentation coefficient of 5.3(+/-0.1) S. In order to construct a full model of FH for scattering curve and sedimentation coefficient fits, homology models were constructed for 17 of the 20 SCR domains using knowledge of the NMR structures for FH SCR-5, SCR-15 and SCR-16, and vaccinia coat protein SCR-3 and SCR-4. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to generate a large conformational library for each of the 19 SCR-SCR linker peptides. Peptides from these libraries were combined with the 20 SCR structures in order to generate stereochemically complete models for the FH structure. Using an automated constrained fit procedure, the analysis of 16,752 possible FH models showed that only those models in which the 20 SCR domains were bent back upon themselves were able to account for the scattering and sedimentation data. The best-fit models showed that FH had an overall length

  7. The sigma-1 receptors are present in monomeric and oligomeric forms in living cells in the presence and absence of ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Deo R.; Biener, Gabriel; Yang, Jay; Oliver, Julie A.; Ruoho, Arnold; Raicu, Valerică

    2015-01-01

    The sigma-1 receptor (S1R) is a 223-amino-acid membrane protein that resides in the endoplasmic reticulum and the plasma membrane of some mammalian cells. The S1R is regulated by various synthetic molecules including (+)-pentazocine, cocaine and haloperidol and endogenous molecules such as sphingosine, dimethyltryptamine and dehydroepiandrosterone. Ligand-regulated protein chaperone functions linked to oxidative stress and neurodegenerative disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and neuropathic pain have been attributed to the S1R. Several client proteins that interact with S1R have been identified including various types of ion channels and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). When S1R constructs containing C-terminal monomeric GFP2 and YFP fusions were co-expressed in COS-7 cells and subjected to FRET spectrometry analysis, monomers, dimers and higher oligomeric forms of S1R were identified under non-liganded conditions. In the presence of the prototypic S1R agonist, (+)-pentazocine, however, monomers and dimers were the prevailing forms of S1R. The prototypic antagonist, haloperidol, on the other hand, favoured higher order S1R oligomers. These data, in sum, indicate that heterologously expressed S1Rs occur in vivo in COS-7 cells in multiple oligomeric forms and that S1R ligands alter these oligomeric structures. We suggest that the S1R oligomerization states may regulate its function(s). PMID:25510962

  8. Structural and enzymatic insights into Lambda glutathione transferases from Populus trichocarpa, monomeric enzymes constituting an early divergent class specific to terrestrial plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallement, Pierre-Alexandre; Meux, Edgar; Gualberto, José M; Prosper, Pascalita; Didierjean, Claude; Saul, Frederick; Haouz, Ahmed; Rouhier, Nicolas; Hecker, Arnaud

    2014-08-15

    GSTs represent a superfamily of multifunctional proteins which play crucial roles in detoxification processes and secondary metabolism. Instead of promoting the conjugation of glutathione to acceptor molecules as do most GSTs, members of the Lambda class (GSTLs) catalyse deglutathionylation reactions via a catalytic cysteine residue. Three GSTL genes (Pt-GSTL1, Pt-GSTL2 and Pt-GSTL3) are present in Populus trichocarpa, but two transcripts, differing in their 5' extremities, were identified for Pt-GSTL3. Transcripts for these genes were primarily found in flowers, fruits, petioles and buds, but not in leaves and roots, suggesting roles associated with secondary metabolism in these organs. The expression of GFP-fusion proteins in tobacco showed that Pt-GSTL1 is localized in plastids, whereas Pt-GSTL2 and Pt-GSTL3A and Pt-GSTL3B are found in both the cytoplasm and the nucleus. The resolution of Pt-GSTL1 and Pt-GSTL3 structures by X-ray crystallography indicated that, although these proteins adopt a canonical GST fold quite similar to that found in dimeric Omega GSTs, their non-plant counterparts, they are strictly monomeric. This might explain some differences in the enzymatic properties of both enzyme types. Finally, from competition experiments between aromatic substrates and a fluorescent probe, we determined that the recognition of glutathionylated substrates is favoured over non-glutathionylated forms.

  9. Solvent exposure of Tyr10 as a probe of structural differences between monomeric and aggregated forms of the amyloid-β peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aran Terol, Pablo; Kumita, Janet R.; Hook, Sharon C.; Dobson, Christopher M.; Esbjörner, Elin K.

    2015-01-01

    Aggregation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides is a characteristic pathological feature of Alzheimer's disease. We have exploited the relationship between solvent exposure and intrinsic fluorescence of a single tyrosine residue, Tyr10, in the Aβ sequence to probe structural features of the monomeric, oligomeric and fibrillar forms of the 42-residue Aβ1-42. By monitoring the quenching of Tyr10 fluorescence upon addition of water-soluble acrylamide, we show that in Aβ1-42 oligomers this residue is solvent-exposed to a similar extent to that found in the unfolded monomer. By contrast, Tyr10 is significantly shielded from acrylamide quenching in Aβ1-42 fibrils, consistent with its proximity to the fibrillar cross-β core. Furthermore, circular dichroism measurements reveal that Aβ1-42 oligomers have a considerably lower β-sheet content than the Aβ1-42 fibrils, indicative of a less ordered molecular arrangement in the former. Taken together these findings suggest significant differences in the structural assembly of oligomers and fibrils that are consistent with differences in their biological effects. PMID:26551456

  10. Novel DDR Processing of Corn Stover Achieves High Monomeric Sugar Concentrations from Enzymatic Hydrolysis (230 g/L) and High Ethanol Concentration (10% v/v) During Fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaowen; Jennings, Ed; Shekiro, Joe; Kuhn, Erik M.; O' Brien, Marykate; Wang, Wei; Schell, Daniel J.; Himmel, Mike; Elander, Richard T.; Tucker, Melvin P.

    2015-04-03

    Distilling and purifying ethanol, butanol, and other products from second and later generation lignocellulosic biorefineries adds significant capital and operating cost for biofuels production. The energy costs associated with distillation affects plant gate and life cycle analysis costs. Lower titers in fermentation due to lower sugar concentrations from pretreatment increase both energy and production costs. In addition, higher titers decrease the volumes required for enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation vessels. Therefore, increasing biofuels titers has been a research focus in renewable biofuels production for several decades. In this work, we achieved over 200 g/L of monomeric sugars after high solids enzymatic hydrolysis using the novel deacetylation and disc refining (DDR) process on corn stover. The high sugar concentrations and low chemical inhibitor concentrations from the DDR process allowed ethanol titers as high as 82 g/L in 22 hours, which translates into approximately 10 vol% ethanol. To our knowledge, this is the first time that 10 vol% ethanol in fermentation derived from corn stover without any sugar concentration or purification steps has been reported. Techno-economic analysis shows the higher titer ethanol achieved from the DDR process could significantly reduce the minimum ethanol selling price from cellulosic biomass.

  11. Analysis of amino acid residues involved in cold activity of monomeric isocitrate dehydrogenase from psychrophilic bacteria, Colwellia maris and Colwellia psychrerythraea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Wataru; Kobayashi, Miyuki; Takada, Yasuhiro

    2013-11-01

    Monomeric isocitrate dehydrogenases from psychrophilic bacteria, Colwellia maris and Colwellia psychrerythraea (CmIDH-II and CpIDH-M, respectively) are cold-adapted enzymes and show a high degree of amino acid sequential identity to each other (77%). However, maximum activity of CpIDH-M at optimum temperature is much less than that of CmIDH-II. In the C-terminal region 3 of these enzymes, which was suggested from previous study to be responsible for their distinct catalytic ability, several sequential differences of amino acid residue are present. Among them, ten amino acid residues were exchanged between them by site-directed mutagenesis and several properties of the mutated enzymes were examined in this study. The mutated enzymes of CmIDH-II substituted its Gln671, Leu724 and Phe735 residues with the corresponding residues of CpIDH-M (termed Q671K, L724Q and F735L, respectively) showed lower specific activity and thermostability for activity than the wild-type enzyme. Furthermore, the decreased specific activity was also observed in L693F. In contrast, the corresponding mutants of CpIDH-M, F693L, Q724L and L735F, showed the increased specific activity and thermostability for activity. The catalytic efficiency (k(cat)/K(m)) values of these mutated CmIDH-II and CpIDH-M were lower and higher than those of their wild-type IDHs, respectively. These results suggest that the Gln671, Leu693, Leu724 and Phe735 residues of CmIDH-II are important for exerting its high catalytic ability.

  12. Effect of the disulfide bond on the monomeric structure of human amylin studied by combined Hamiltonian and temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laghaei, Rozita; Mousseau, Normand; Wei, Guanghong

    2010-05-27

    The human Islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP or amylin) is a 37-residue peptide hormone that is normally cosecreted with insulin by the pancreatic beta-cells. In patients with type 2 diabetes, hIAPP deposits as amyloid fibrils in the extracellular spaces of the pancreatic islets. Recent experimental studies show that the intramolecular disulfide bond between Cys2 and Cys7 plays a central role in the process of fibril formation. However, the effect of the disulfide bond on the intrinsic structural properties of monomeric hIAPP is yet to be determined. In this study, we characterize the atomic structure and the thermodynamics of full-length hIAPP in the presence and absence of a disulfide bond using extensive combined Hamiltonian and temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations (HT-REMD) with a coarse grained protein force field. Our simulations show that HT-REMD is more efficient in sampling than temperature REMD. On the basis of a total simulation time of 28 mus, we find that, although native hIAPP (in the presence of a disulfide bond) essentially adopts a disordered conformation in solution, consistent with the signal measured by ultraviolet-circular dichroism (UV-CD) spectroscopy, it also transiently samples alpha-helical structure for residues 5-16. In comparison with the N-terminal region, the C-terminal region is highly disordered and populates a much lesser content of isolated beta-strand conformation for residues 22-26 and 30-35. Moreover, the absence of the disulfide bond greatly decreases the extent of helix formed throughout residues 5-9 in favor of random coil and beta-sheet structure. Implications of the stabilization of N-terminal helical structure by disulfide bond on the initialization of hIAPP amyloid formation are discussed.

  13. Monomeric Immunoglobulin A from Plasma Inhibits Human Th17 Responses In Vitro Independent of FcαRI and DC-SIGN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Chaitrali; Das, Mrinmoy; Patil, Veerupaxagouda; Stephen-Victor, Emmanuel; Sharma, Meenu; Wymann, Sandra; Jordi, Monika; Vonarburg, Cédric; Kaveri, Srini V.; Bayry, Jagadeesh

    2017-01-01

    Circulating immunoglobulins including immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgM play a critical role in the immune homeostasis by modulating functions of immune cells. These functions are mediated in part by natural antibodies. However, despite being second most abundant antibody in the circulation, the immunoregulatory function of IgA is relatively unexplored. As Th17 cells are the key mediators of a variety of autoimmune, inflammatory, and allergic diseases, we investigated the ability of monomeric IgA (mIgA) isolated from pooled plasma of healthy donors to modulate human Th17 cells. We show that mIgA inhibits differentiation and amplification of human Th17 cells and the production of their effector cytokine IL-17A. mIgA also suppresses IFN-γ responses under these experimental conditions. Suppressive effect of mIgA on Th17 responses is associated with reciprocal expansion of FoxP3-positive regulatory T cells. The effect of mIgA on Th17 cells is dependent on F(ab′)2 fragments and independent of FcαRI (CD89) and DC-SIGN. Mechanistically, the modulatory effect of mIgA on Th17 cells implicates suppression of phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. Furthermore, mIgA binds to CD4+ T cells and recognizes in a dose-dependent manner the receptors for cytokines (IL-6Rα and IL-1RI) that mediate Th17 responses. Our findings thus reveal novel anti-inflammatory functions of IgA and suggest potential therapeutic utility of mIgA in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases that implicate Th17 cells. PMID:28352269

  14. Monomeric TonB and the Ton box are required for the Formation of a High-Affinity Transporter-TonB Complex†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Daniel M.; Lukasik, Stephen M.; Sikora, Arthur; Mokdad, Audrey; Cafiso, David S.

    2013-01-01

    The energy-dependent uptake of trace nutrients by Gram-negative bacteria involves the coupling of an outer membrane transport protein to the transperiplasmic protein TonB. In the present study, a soluble construct of Escherichia coli TonB (residues 33–239) was used to determine the affinity of TonB to the outer membrane transporters BtuB, FecA and FhuA. Using fluorescence anisotropy, TonB(33–239) was found to bind with high-affinity (tens of nM) to both BtuB and FhuA; however, no high-affinity binding was observed to FecA. In BtuB, the high affinity binding of TonB(33–239) was eliminated by mutations in the Ton box, which yield transport-defective protein, or by the addition of a Colicin E3 fragment, which stabilizes the Ton box in a folded state. These results indicate that transport requires a high-affinity transporter-TonB interaction that is mediated by the Ton box. Characterization of TonB(33–239) using double electron-electron resonance (DEER) demonstrates that a significant population of TonB(33–239) exists as a dimer; moreover, interspin distances are in approximate agreement with interlocked dimers observed previously by crystallography for shorter TonB fragments. When bound to the outer membrane transporter, DEER shows that the TonB(33–239) dimer is converted to a monomeric form, suggesting that a dimer-monomer conversion takes place at the outer membrane during the TonB-dependent transport cycle. PMID:23517233

  15. Monomeric TonB and the Ton box are required for the formation of a high-affinity transporter-TonB complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Daniel M; Lukasik, Stephen M; Sikora, Arthur; Mokdad, Audrey; Cafiso, David S

    2013-04-16

    The energy-dependent uptake of trace nutrients by Gram-negative bacteria involves the coupling of an outer membrane transport protein to the transperiplasmic protein TonB. In this study, a soluble construct of Escherichia coli TonB (residues 33-239) was used to determine the affinity of TonB for outer membrane transporters BtuB, FecA, and FhuA. Using fluorescence anisotropy, TonB(33-239) was found to bind with high affinity (tens of nanomolar) to both BtuB and FhuA; however, no high-affinity binding to FecA was observed. In BtuB, the high-affinity binding of TonB(33-239) was eliminated by mutations in the Ton box, which yield transport-defective protein, or by the addition of a Colicin E3 fragment, which stabilizes the Ton box in a folded state. These results indicate that transport requires a high-affinity transporter-TonB interaction that is mediated by the Ton box. Characterization of TonB(33-239) using double electron-electron resonance (DEER) demonstrates that a significant population of TonB(33-239) exists as a dimer; moreover, interspin distances are in approximate agreement with interlocked dimers observed previously by crystallography for shorter TonB fragments. When the TonB(33-239) dimer is bound to the outer membrane transporter, DEER shows that the TonB(33-239) dimer is converted to a monomeric form, suggesting that a dimer-monomer conversion takes place at the outer membrane during the TonB-dependent transport cycle.

  16. Resolution of two native monomeric 90kDa nitrate reductase active proteins from Shewanella gelidimarina and the sequence of two napA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Philippa J L; McKinzie, Audra A; Codd, Rachel

    2010-07-16

    The reduction of nitrate to nitrite in the bacterial periplasm occurs in the 90kDa NapA subunit of the periplasmic nitrate reductase (NAP) system. Most Shewanella genomes contain two nap operons: napEDABC and napDAGHB, which is an unusual feature of this genus. Two native, monomeric, 90kDa nitrate reductase active proteins were resolved by hydrophobic interaction chromatography from aerobic cultures of Shewanella gelidimarina replete with reduced nitrogen compounds. The 90kDa protein obtained in higher yield was characterized as NapA by electronic absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopies and was identified by LC/MS/MS and MALDI-TOF/TOF MS as NapA from the napEDABC-type operon. The other 90kDa protein, which was unstable and produced in low yields, was posited as NapA from the napDAGHB-type operon. Two napA genes have been sequenced from the napEDABC-type and napDAGHB-type operons of S. gelidimarina. Native NAP from S. putrefaciens was resolved as one NapA monomer and one NapAB heterodimer. Two amino acid substitutions in NapA correlated with the isolation of NAP as a NapA monomer or a NapAB heterodimer. The resolution of native, redox-active NapA isoforms in Shewanella provides new insight into the respiratory versatility of this genus, which has implications in bioremediation and the assembly of microbial fuel cells.

  17. X-ray Crystal Structures of Monomeric and Dimeric Peptide Inhibitors in Complex with the Human Neonatal Fc Receptor, FcRn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mezo, Adam R.; Sridhar, Vandana; Badger, John; Sakorafas, Paul; Nienaber, Vicki (Zenobia); (Biogen)

    2010-10-28

    The neonatal Fc receptor, FcRn, is responsible for the long half-life of IgG molecules in vivo and is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. A family of peptides comprising the consensus motif GHFGGXY, where X is preferably a hydrophobic amino acid, was shown previously to inhibit the human IgG:human FcRn protein-protein interaction (Mezo, A. R., McDonnell, K. A., Tan Hehir, C. A., Low, S. C., Palombella, V. J., Stattel, J. M., Kamphaus, G. D., Fraley, C., Zhang, Y., Dumont, J. A., and Bitonti, A. J. (2008) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A., 105, 2337-2342). Herein, the x-ray crystal structure of a representative monomeric peptide in complex with human FcRn was solved to 2.6 {angstrom} resolution. The structure shows that the peptide binds to human FcRn at the same general binding site as does the Fc domain of IgG. The data correlate well with structure-activity relationship data relating to how the peptide family binds to human FcRn. In addition, the x-ray crystal structure of a representative dimeric peptide in complex with human FcRn shows how the bivalent ligand can bridge two FcRn molecules, which may be relevant to the mechanism by which the dimeric peptides inhibit FcRn and increase IgG catabolism in vivo. Modeling of the peptide:FcRn structure as compared with available structural data on Fc and FcRn suggest that the His-6 and Phe-7 (peptide) partially mimic the interaction of His-310 and Ile-253 (Fc) in binding to FcRn, but using a different backbone topology.

  18. The photophysics of monomeric bacteriochlorophylls c and d and their derivatives: properties of the triplet state and singlet oxygen photogeneration and quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasnovsky, A. A. Jr; Cheng, P.; Blankenship, R. E.; Moore, T. A.; Gust, D.

    1993-01-01

    Measurements of pigment triplet-triplet absorption, pigment phosphorescence and photosensitized singlet oxygen luminescence were carried out on solutions containing monomeric bacteriochlorophylls (Bchl) c and d, isolated from green photosynthetic bacteria, and their magnesium-free and farnesyl-free analogs. The energies of the pigment triplet states fell in the range 1.29-1.34 eV. The triplet lifetimes in aerobic solutions were 200-250 ns; they increased to 280 +/- 70 microseconds after nitrogen purging in liquid solutions and to 0.7-2.1 ms in a solid matrix at ambient or liquid nitrogen temperatures. Rate constants for quenching of the pigment triplet state by oxygen were (2.0-2.5) x 10(9) M-1 s-1, which is close to 1/9 of the rate constant for diffusion-controlled reactions. This quenching was accompanied by singlet oxygen formation. The quantum yields for the triplet state formation and singlet oxygen production were 55-75% in air-saturated solutions. Singlet oxygen quenching by ground-state pigment molecules was observed. Quenching was the most efficient for magnesium-containing pigments, kq = (0.31-1.2) x 10(9) M-1 s-1. It is caused mainly by a physical process of singlet oxygen (1O2) deactivation. Thus, Bchl c and d and their derivatives, as well as chlorophyll and Bchl a, combine a high efficiency of singlet oxygen production with the ability to protect photochemical and photobiological systems against damage by singlet oxygen.

  19. Genetic and spectrally distinct in vivo imaging: embryonic stem cells and mice with widespread expression of a monomeric red fluorescent protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadjantonakis Anna-Katerina

    2005-07-01

    permit deeper tissue imaging. Our work in generating CAG::mRFP1 transgenic ES cells and mice demonstrates the developmental neutrality of mRFP1 in an organismal context. It paves the way for the use of DsRed-based monomeric RFPs in transgenic and gene targeted approaches which often necessitate spatially and/or temporally restricted reporter expression. Moreover animals of the CAG::mRFP1 transgenic strain serve as a source of RFP tagged tissue for the derivation of cell lines and explant, transplant and embryo chimera experiments.

  20. Hue-shifted monomeric variants of Clavularia cyan fluorescent protein: identification of the molecular determinants of color and applications in fluorescence imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davidson Michael W

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the 15 years that have passed since the cloning of Aequorea victoria green fluorescent protein (avGFP, the expanding set of fluorescent protein (FP variants has become entrenched as an indispensable toolkit for cell biology research. One of the latest additions to the toolkit is monomeric teal FP (mTFP1, a bright and photostable FP derived from Clavularia cyan FP. To gain insight into the molecular basis for the blue-shifted fluorescence emission we undertook a mutagenesis-based study of residues in the immediate environment of the chromophore. We also employed site-directed and random mutagenesis in combination with library screening to create new hues of mTFP1-derived variants with wavelength-shifted excitation and emission spectra. Results Our results demonstrate that the protein-chromophore interactions responsible for blue-shifting the absorbance and emission maxima of mTFP1 operate independently of the chromophore structure. This conclusion is supported by the observation that the Tyr67Trp and Tyr67His mutants of mTFP1 retain a blue-shifted fluorescence emission relative to their avGFP counterparts (that is, Tyr66Trp and Tyr66His. Based on previous work with close homologs, His197 and His163 are likely to be the residues with the greatest contribution towards blue-shifting the fluorescence emission. Indeed we have identified the substitutions His163Met and Thr73Ala that abolish or disrupt the interactions of these residues with the chromophore. The mTFP1-Thr73Ala/His163Met double mutant has an emission peak that is 23 nm red-shifted from that of mTFP1 itself. Directed evolution of this double mutant resulted in the development of mWasabi, a new green fluorescing protein that offers certain advantages over enhanced avGFP (EGFP. To assess the usefulness of mTFP1 and mWasabi in live cell imaging applications, we constructed and imaged more than 20 different fusion proteins. Conclusion Based on the results of our

  1. Disruption of oligomerization induces nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of leukemia-associated rho Guanine-nucleotide exchange factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabocka, Elda; Wedegaertner, Philip B

    2007-10-01

    The rgsRhoGEFs comprise a subfamily of three guanine nucleotide exchange factors, which function in linking heterotrimeric G-proteins to the monomeric RhoGTPase. Here, we reveal the novel finding that oligomerization of leukemia-associated RhoGEF (LARG) functions to prevent nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and to retain LARG in the cytoplasm. We establish that oligomerization is mediated by a predicted coiled-coil sequence (amino acids 1507-1520) in the extreme C terminus of LARG and that substitution of isoleucines 1507/1510 with alanines disrupts homo-oligomerization and leads to nucleocytoplasmic shuttling via the CRM1 nuclear transport pathway. In addition, we demonstrate that induced dimerization of an otherwise nuclear monomeric LARG mutant promotes cytoplasmic localization. Furthermore, we establish that nuclear import of monomeric LARG is mediated by the nuclear localization sequence (29)PTDKKQK(35) in the extreme N terminus. We propose that nucleocytoplasmic shuttling provides a mechanism for spatially regulating the activity of LARG toward its cytoplasmic targets and potentially new nuclear targets.

  2. Klotho Regulates 14-3-3ζ Monomerization and Binding to the ASK1 Signaling Complex in Response to Oxidative Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reynolds K Brobey

    Full Text Available The reactive oxygen species (ROS-sensitive apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1 signaling complex is a key regulator of p38 MAPK activity, a major modulator of stress-associated with aging disorders. We recently reported that the ratio of free ASK1 to the complex-bound ASK1 is significantly decreased in Klotho-responsive manner and that Klotho-deficient tissues have elevated levels of free ASK1 which coincides with increased oxidative stress. Here, we tested the hypothesis that: 1 covalent interactions exist among three identified proteins constituting the ASK1 signaling complex; 2 in normal unstressed cells the ASK1, 14-3-3ζ and thioredoxin (Trx proteins simultaneously engage in a tripartite complex formation; 3 Klotho's stabilizing effect on the complex relied solely on 14-3-3ζ expression and its apparent phosphorylation and dimerization changes. To verify the hypothesis, we performed 14-3-3ζ siRNA knock-down experiments in conjunction with cell-based assays to measure ASK1-client protein interactions in the presence and absence of Klotho, and with or without an oxidant such as rotenone. Our results show that Klotho activity induces posttranslational modifications in the complex targeting 14-3-3ζ monomer/dimer changes to effectively protect against ASK1 oxidation and dissociation. This is the first observation implicating all three proteins constituting the ASK1 signaling complex in close proximity.

  3. Deletion of the carboxyl-terminal region of 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid synthase, a key protein in the biosynthesis of ethylene, results in catalytically hyperactive, monomeric enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, N; Mattoo, A K

    1994-03-04

    1-Aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) synthase is a key enzyme regulating biosynthesis of the plant hormone ethylene. The expression of an enzymatically active, wound-inducible tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum L. cv Pik-Red) ACC synthase (485 amino acids long) in a heterologous Escherichia coli system allowed us to study the importance of hypervariable COOH terminus in enzymatic activity and protein conformation. We constructed several deletion mutants of the gene, expressed these in E. coli, purified the protein products to apparent homogeneity, and analyzed both conformation and enzyme kinetic parameters of the wild-type and truncated ACC syntheses. Deletion of the COOH terminus through Arg429 results in complete inactivation of the enzyme. Deletion of 46-52 amino acids from the COOH terminus results in an enzyme that has nine times higher affinity for the substrate S-adenosylmethionine than the wild-type enzyme. The highly efficient, truncated ACC synthase was found to be a monomer of 52 +/- 1.8 kDa as determined by gel filtration, whereas the wild-type ACC synthase, analyzed under similar conditions, is a dimer. These results demonstrate that the non-conserved COOH terminus of ACC synthase affects its enzymatic function as well as dimerization.

  4. Synthesis of novel monomeric graphene quantum dots and corresponding nanocomposite with molecularly imprinted polymer for electrochemical detection of an anticancerous ifosfamide drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bali Prasad, Bhim; Kumar, Anil; Singh, Ragini

    2017-02-20

    This paper reports a typical synthesis of a nanocomposite of functionalized graphene quantum dots and imprinted polymer at the surface of screen-printed carbon electrode using N-acryloyl-4-aminobenzamide, as a functional monomer, and an anticancerous drug, ifosfamide, as a print molecule (test analyte). Herein, graphene quantum dots in nanocomposite practically induced the electrocatalytic activity by lowering the oxidation overpotential of test analyte and thereby amplifying electronic transmission, without any interfacial barrier in between the film and the electrode surface. The differential pulse anodic stripping signal at functionalized graphene quantum dots based imprinted sensor was realized to be about 3- and 7-fold higher as compared to the traditionally made imprinted polymers prepared in the presence and the absence of graphene quantum dots (un-functionalized), respectively. This may be attributed to a pertinent synergism in between the positively charged functionalized graphene quantum dots in the film and the target analyte toward the enhancement of electro-conductivity of the film and thereby the electrode kinetics. In fact, the covalent attachment of graphene quantum dots with N-acryloyl-4-aminobenzamide molecules might exert an extended conjugation at their interface facilitating electro conducting to render the channelized pathways for the electron transport. The proposed sensor is practically applicable to the ultratrace evaluation of ifosfamide in real (biological/pharmaceutical) samples with detection limit as low as 0.11ngmL(-1) (S/N=3), without any matrix effect, cross-reactivity, and false-positives.

  5. Comparison between the efficacy of dimeric and monomeric non-ionic contrast media (iodixanol vs iopromide) in urography in patients with macroscopic haematuria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacul, F.; Cova, M.; Pravato, M. [Department of Radiology, University of Trieste, Cattinara Hospital, Strada di Fiume, 447, 34149 Trieste (Italy); Floriani, I. [Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan (Italy)

    2003-04-01

    Non-ionic dimers induce less diuresis than non-ionic monomers, resulting in increased opacification of the urinary tract in intravenous urography. This trial compared the diagnostic efficacy of iodixanol and iopromide in patients with macroscopic haematuria. One hundred consecutive patients with normal renal function and macroscopic haematuria entered a double blind, comparative, randomised, parallel trial. Contrast media were given with bolus injection in doses of 300 mgI/kg b.w. Radiographs were blindly evaluated by three radiologists who analysed different parameters (calyceal density and filling, papillary blush detection, delineation of collecting ducts, renal pelvis opacification, visualisation of ureters, bladder density, bladder distention) and estimated the diagnostic confidence (whether abnormal findings were definitely absent, probably absent, doubtful, probably present or certainly present). Radiological diagnoses were compared with final diagnoses. Results were summarised as the ratio of the odds of having a worse performance of iopromide vs iodixanol. Iodixanol showed a significantly better calyceal density and filling [odds ratio (OR): 1.96; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.60-2.41], a significantly better pelvis opacification (OR 2.91; CI 2.02-4.18) and a significantly more frequent papillary blush detection (OR 1.95; CI 1.29-2.95). Iopromide showed a significantly better ureteral visualisation (OR 0.67; CI 0.48-0.92) and a significantly higher bladder distention (OR 0.59; CI 0.36-0.99). Iodixanol allowed a significantly higher diagnostic confidence as to calyceal evaluation (OR 1.35; CI 1.01-1.79). No significant differences were found with regard to other parameters. The results confirmed theoretical expectations. The higher opacification provided by iodixanol allowed better results and a higher diagnostic confidence in the upper excretory pathway. (orig.)

  6. Crystal structure and photoluminescence properties of a new monomeric copper(II) complex: bis(3-{[(3-hydroxypropyl)imino]methyl}-4-nitrophenolato-κ(3)O,N,O')copper(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocak, Cagdas; Oylumluoglu, Gorkem; Donmez, Adem; Coban, M Burak; Erkarslan, Ugur; Aygun, Muhittin; Kara, Hulya

    2017-05-01

    Copper(II)-Schiff base complexes have attracted extensive interest due to their structural, electronic, magnetic and luminescence properties. The title novel monomeric Cu(II) complex, [Cu(C10H11N2O4)2], has been synthesized by the reaction of 3-{[(3-hydroxypropyl)imino]methyl}-4-nitrophenol (H2L) and copper(II) acetate monohydrate in methanol, and was characterized by elemental analysis, UV and IR spectroscopies, single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and a photoluminescence study. The Cu(II) atom is located on a centre of inversion and is coordinated by two imine N atoms, two phenoxy O atoms in a mutual trans disposition and two hydroxy O atoms in axial positions, forming an elongated octahedral geometry. In the crystal, intermolecular O-H...O hydrogen bonds link the molecules to form a one-dimensional chain structure and π-π contacts also connect the molecules to form a three-dimensional structure. The solid-state photoluminescence properties of the complex and free H2L have been investigated at room temperature in the visible region. When the complex and H2L are excited under UV light at 349 nm, the complex displays a strong green emission at 520 nm and H2L displays a blue emission at 480 nm.

  7. A major barley allergen associated with baker's asthma disease is a glycosylated monomeric inhibitor of insect alpha-amylase: cDNA cloning and chromosomal location of the gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, M; Sanchez-Monge, R; Gomez, L; Salcedo, G; Carbonero, P

    1992-11-01

    A 14.5 kDa barley endosperm protein that is a major allergen in baker's asthma disease, as previously shown by both in vitro (IgE binding) and in vivo tests, has been identified as a glycosylated monomeric member of the multigene family of inhibitors of alpha-amylase/trypsin from cereals. A cDNA encoding this allergen (renamed BMAI-1) has been isolated and characterized. The deduced sequence for the mature protein, which is 132 residues long, is identical in its N-terminal end to the 20 amino acid partial sequence previously determined from the purified allergen, and fully confirms that it is a member of the multigene family of cereal inhibitors. Southern-blot analysis of wheat/barley addition lines using the insert in the BMAI-1 cDNA clone as a probe, has led to the location of the allergen gene (Iam1) in barley chromosome 2, while another related member of this protein family, the barley dimeric alpha-amylase inhibitor BDAI-1 gene (Iad1) has been located in chromosome 6. Iam1 is the first member of this inhibitor family in cereals to be assigned to chromosome group 2, thus extending the dispersion of genes in the family to five out of the seven homology groups of chromosomes in wheat and barley (chromosomes 2, 3, 4, 6 and 7).

  8. Stereospecific approach to the synthesis of ring-A oxygenated sarpagine indole alkaloids. Total synthesis of the dimeric indole alkaloid P-(+)-dispegatrine and six other monomeric indole alkaloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwankar, Chitra R; Edwankar, Rahul V; Namjoshi, Ojas A; Liao, Xuebin; Cook, James M

    2013-07-05

    The first regio- and stereocontrolled total synthesis of the bisphenolic, bisquaternary alkaloid (+)-dispegatrine (1) has been accomplished in an overall yield of 8.3% (12 reaction vessels) from 5-methoxy-d-tryptophan ethyl ester (17). A crucial late-stage thallium(III) mediated intermolecular oxidative dehydrodimerization was employed in the formation of the C9-C9' biaryl axis in 1. The complete stereocontrol observed in this key biaryl coupling step is due to the asymmetric induction by the natural sarpagine configuration of the monomer lochnerine (6) and was confirmed by both the Suzuki and the oxidative dehydrodimerization model studies on the tetrahydro β-carboline (35). The axial chirality of the lochnerine dimer (40) and in turn dispegatrine (1) was established by X-ray crystallography and was determined to be P(S). Additionally, the first total synthesis of the monomeric indole alkaloids (+)-spegatrine (2), (+)-10-methoxyvellosimine (5), (+)-lochnerine (6), lochvinerine (7), (+)-sarpagine (8), and (+)-lochneram (11) were also achieved via the common pentacyclic intermediate 16.

  9. Differential binding of neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies to native-like soluble HIV-1 Env trimers, uncleaved Env proteins, and monomeric subunits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmeen, Anila; Ringe, Rajesh; Derking, Ronald; Cupo, Albert; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Burton, Dennis R; Ward, Andrew B; Wilson, Ian A; Sanders, Rogier W; Moore, John P; Klasse, Per Johan

    2014-05-29

    The trimeric envelope glycoproteins (Env) on the surface of HIV-1 virions are the targets for neutralizing antibodies (NAbs). No candidate HIV-1 immunogen has yet induced potent, broadly active NAbs (bNAbs). Part of the explanation may be that previously tested Env proteins inadequately mimic the functional, native Env complex. Trimerization and the proteolytic processing of Env precursors into gp120 and gp41 profoundly alter antigenicity, but soluble cleaved trimers are too unstable to serve as immunogens. By introducing stabilizing mutations (SOSIP), we constructed soluble, cleaved Env trimers derived from the HIV-1 subtype A isolate BG505 that resemble native Env spikes on virions both structurally and antigenically. We used surface plasmon resonance (SPR) to quantify antibody binding to different forms of BG505 Env: the proteolytically cleaved SOSIP.664 trimers, cleaved gp120-gp41ECTO protomers, and gp120 monomers. Non-NAbs to the CD4-binding site bound only marginally to the trimers but equally well to gp120-gp41ECTO protomers and gp120 monomers, whereas the bNAb VRC01, directed to the CD4bs, bound to all three forms. In contrast, bNAbs to V1V2 glycan-dependent epitopes bound preferentially (PG9 and PG16) or exclusively (PGT145) to trimers. We also explored the antigenic consequences of three different features of SOSIP.664 gp140 trimers: the engineered inter-subunit disulfide bond, the trimer-stabilizing I559P change in gp41ECTO, and proteolytic cleavage at the gp120-gp41ECTO junction. Each of these three features incrementally promoted native-like trimer antigenicity. We compared Fab and IgG versions of bNAbs and validated a bivalent model of IgG binding. The NAbs showed widely divergent binding kinetics and degrees of binding to native-like BG505 SOSIP.664. High off-rate constants and low stoichiometric estimates of NAb binding were associated with large amounts of residual infectivity after NAb neutralization of the corresponding BG505.T332N pseudovirus

  10. Development of Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies and Their Mapping by Monomeric gp120 in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Infected Humans and Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus SHIVSF162P3N-Infected Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Manxue; Lu, Hong; Markowitz, Martin; Cheng-Mayer, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT To improve our understanding of the similarities and differences between neutralizing antibodies elicited by simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-infected rhesus macaques and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected humans, we examined the plasma of 13 viremic macaques infected with SHIVSF162P3N and 85 HIV-1-infected humans with known times of infection. We identified 5 macaques (38%) from 1 to 2 years postinfection (p.i.) with broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against tier 2 HIV-1. In comparison, only 2 out of 42 (5%) human plasma samples collected in a similar time frame of 1 to 3 years p.i. exhibited comparable neutralizing breadths and potencies, with the number increasing to 7 out of 21 (30%) after 3 years p.i. Plasma mapping with monomeric gp120 identified only 2 out of 9 humans and 2 out of 4 macaques that contained gp120-reactive neutralizing antibodies, indicating distinct specificities in these plasma samples, with most of them recognizing the envelope trimer (including gp41) rather than the gp120 monomer. Indeed, a total of 20 gp120-directed monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) isolated from a human subject (AD358) and a Chinese rhesus macaque (GB40) displayed no or limited neutralizing activity against tier 2 strains. These isolated MAbs, mapped to the CD4-binding site, the V3 loop, the inner domain, and the C5 region of gp120, revealed genetic similarity between the human and macaque immunoglobulin genes used to encode some V3-directed MAbs. These results also support the use of envelope trimer probes for efficient isolation of HIV-1 bnAbs. IMPORTANCE HIV-1 vaccine research can benefit from understanding the development of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) in rhesus macaques, commonly used to assess vaccine immunogenicity and efficacy. Here, we examined 85 HIV-1-infected humans and 13 SHIVSF162P3N-infected macaques for bnAbs and found that, similar to HIV-1-infected humans, bnAbs in SHIV-infected macaques are also rare

  11. Influence of osmolarity of contrast medium and saline flush on computed tomography angiography: Comparison of monomeric and dimeric iodinated contrast media with different iodine concentrations at an identical iodine delivery rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishimoto, Miori, E-mail: miori@mx6.et.tiki.ne.j [Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Nishi 2-11 Inada-cho, Obihiro 080-8555 (Japan); Doi, Shoko, E-mail: s16024@st.obihiro.ac.j [Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Nishi 2-11 Inada-cho, Obihiro 080-8555 (Japan); Shimizu, Junichiro, E-mail: s01163@st.obihiro.ac.j [Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Nishi 2-11 Inada-cho, Obihiro 080-8555 (Japan); Lee, Ki-Ja, E-mail: s01173@st.obihiro.ac.j [Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Nishi 2-11 Inada-cho, Obihiro 080-8555 (Japan); Iwasaki, Toshiroh, E-mail: bpag2180@cc.tuat.ac.j [Department of Veterinary Internal Medicine, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Saiwai-cho, 3-5-8, Fuchu 183-8509 (Japan); Miyake, Yoh-Ichi, E-mail: miyake@obihiro.ac.j [Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Nishi 2-11 Inada-cho, Obihiro 080-8555 (Japan); Yamada, Kazutaka, E-mail: kyamada@obihiro.ac.j [Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, Obihiro University of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Nishi 2-11 Inada-cho, Obihiro 080-8555 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the influence of osmolarity of iodinated contrast media and saline flush on the contrast effect in thoracic computed tomography angiography (CTA) at an identical iodine delivery rate (IDR). Materials and methods: Seven beagles were used in a cross-over experiment. The contrast media used were iohexol 350 mgI/ml (IOH350; osmolarity 844 mmol/kg) and iodixanol 320 mgI/ml (IDX320; osmolarity 290 mmol/kg). Each contrast medium was administered to groups with and without saline flush at 40.0 mgI/kg/s for all experiments. Dynamic CT scanning was performed at the ninth thoracic vertebra level. The peak value, area under the curve (AUC), and time to peak (TTP) were calculated from the time attenuation curves of the pulmonary artery and aorta. Results: There was no significant difference between IOH350 and IDX320 with or without saline flush in the peak values for the pulmonary artery and aorta. AUC was significantly higher in groups with saline flush for both contrast media and arteries (p < 0.05) with no significant difference between contrast media. TTP was significantly longer in groups with saline flush than without saline flush for both contrast media and arteries (p < 0.05), with no significant difference between contrast media. Conclusions: There were no significant differences in the contrast effects of monomeric IOH350 and dimeric IDX320 in thoracic CTA when used at an identical IDR. Moreover, saline flush prolonged the peak duration at 600 mgI/kg.

  12. Fluorescent visualisation of the hypothalamic oxytocin neurones activated by cholecystokinin-8 in rats expressing c-fos-enhanced green fluorescent protein and oxytocin-monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 fusion transgenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, A; Shoguchi, K; Matsuoka, H; Yoshimura, M; Ohkubo, J-I; Matsuura, T; Maruyama, T; Ishikura, T; Aritomi, T; Fujihara, H; Hashimoto, H; Suzuki, H; Murphy, D; Ueta, Y

    2014-05-01

    The up-regulation of c-fos gene expression is widely used as a marker of neuronal activation elicited by various stimuli. Anatomically precise observation of c-fos gene products can be achieved at the RNA level by in situ hybridisation or at the protein level by immunocytochemistry. Both of these methods are time and labour intensive. We have developed a novel transgenic rat system that enables the trivial visualisation of c-fos expression using an enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) tag. These rats express a transgene consisting of c-fos gene regulatory sequences that drive the expression of a c-fos-eGFP fusion protein. In c-fos-eGFP transgenic rats, robust nuclear eGFP fluorescence was observed in osmosensitive brain regions 90 min after i.p. administration of hypertonic saline. Nuclear eGFP fluorescence was also observed in the supraoptic nucleus (SON) and paraventricular nucleus (PVN) 90 min after i.p. administration of cholecystokinin (CCK)-8, which selectively activates oxytocin (OXT)-secreting neurones in the hypothalamus. In double transgenic rats that express c-fos-eGFP and an OXT-monomeric red fluorescent protein 1 (mRFP1) fusion gene, almost all mRFP1-positive neurones in the SON and PVN expressed nuclear eGFP fluorescence 90 min after i.p. administration of CCK-8. It is possible that not only a plane image, but also three-dimensional reconstruction image may identify cytoplasmic vesicles in an activated neurone at the same time.

  13. Hydrogen for fluorine exchange in C6F6 and C6F5H by monomeric [1,3,4-(Me3C)3C5H2]2CeH: experimental and computational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Laurent; Werkema, Evan L; Perrin, Lionel; Eisenstein, Odile; Andersen, Richard A

    2005-01-12

    The net reaction of monomeric Cp'(2)CeH [Cp' = 1,3,4-(Me(3)C)(3)(C(5)H(2))] in C(6)D(6) with C(6)F(6) is Cp'(2)CeF, H(2), and tetrafluorobenzyne. The pentafluorophenylmetallocene, Cp'(2)Ce(C(6)F(5)), is formed as an intermediate that decomposes slowly to Cp'(2)CeF and C(6)F(4) (tetrafluorobenzyne), and the latter is trapped by the solvent C(6)D(6) as a [2+4] cycloadduct. In C(6)F(5)H, the final products are also Cp'(2)CeF and H(2), which are formed from the intermediates Cp'(2)Ce(C(6)F(5)) and Cp'(2)Ce(2,3,5,6-C(6)F(4)H) and from an unidentified metallocene of cerium and the [2+4] cycloadducts of tetra- and trifluorobenzyne with C(6)D(6). The hydride, fluoride, and pentafluorophenylmetallocenes are isolated and characterized by X-ray crystallography. DFT(B3PW91) calculations have been used to explore the pathways leading to the observed products of the exergonic reactions. A key step is a H/F exchange reaction which transforms C(6)F(6) and the cerium hydride into C(6)F(5)H and Cp'(2)CeF. This reaction starts by an eta(1)-F-C(6)F(5) interaction, which serves as a hook. The reaction proceeds via a sigma bond metathesis where the fluorine ortho to the hook migrates toward H with a relatively low activation energy. All products observed experimentally are accommodated by pathways that involve C-F and C-H bond cleavages.

  14. Induced Abortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Induced Abortion Home For Patients Search FAQs Induced Abortion Page ... Induced Abortion FAQ043, May 2015 PDF Format Induced Abortion Special Procedures What is an induced abortion? What ...

  15. Two-photon-induced cycloreversion reaction of chalcone photodimers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Träger, J.; Härtner, S.; Heinzer, J.; Kim, H.-C.; Hampp, N.

    2008-04-01

    The photocleavage reaction of chalcone photodimers has been studied using a two-photon process. For this purpose, a novel chalcone dimer has been synthesized as a low molecular weight model substance for polymer bound chalcones and its photochemistry triggered by two-photon-absorption (2PA) has been investigated using a pulsed frequency-doubled Nd:YAG-laser. The 2PA-induced cycloreversion reaction selectively leads to the cleavage of the chalcone photodimers resulting in the formation of monomeric chalcone molecules. Hence, as an application chalcones can be used as a photosensitive linker which can be cleaved beyond an UV-absorbing barrier. The 2PA cross section of the chalcone photodimer was determined to be of 1.1 × 10 -49 cm 4 s photon -1 (11 GM).

  16. Monomeric, dimeric and multimeric system of RGD peptides radiolabeled with {sup 177}Lu for tumors therapy that expressing αβ integrin s; Sistema monomerico, dimerico y multimerico de peptidos de RGD radiomarcados con {sup 177}Lu para terapia de tumores que expresan integrinas αβ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna G, M. A.

    2014-07-01

    The conjugation of peptides to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) produces biocompatible and stable multimeric systems with target-specific molecular recognition. Peptides based on the cyclic Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence have been reported as high affinity agents for the α(v)β(3) and α(v)β(5) integrin. The aim of this research was to prepare a multimeric system of {sup 177}Lu-labeled gold nanoparticles conjugated to c[RGDfK(C)] [cyclo(Arg-Gly-Asp-Phe-Lys(Cys)] peptides and to compare the radiation absorbed dose with that of {sup 177}Lu-labeled monomeric and dimeric RGD peptides to α(v)β(3) integrin-positive U87MG tumors in mice, as well as, evaluate the in vitro potential {sup 177}Lu-AuNP-c[RGDfK(C)] as a plasmonic photothermal therapy and targeted radiotherapy system in MCF7 breast cancer cells. DOTA-GGC (1,4,7,10-tetraaza cyclododecane-N,N,N-tetraacetic-Gly-Gly-Cys) and c[RGDfK(C)] peptides were synthesized and conjugated to AuNPs by the spontaneous reaction of the thiol groups. Tem, UV-Vis, XP S, Raman and Far-IR spectroscopy techniques demonstrated that AuNPs were functionalized with the peptides. To obtain {sup 177}Lu-AuNP-c[RGDfK(C)], the {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-GGC radio peptide was first prepared and added to a solution of AuNPs followed by c[RGDfK(C)] (25 μL, 5 μM) at 18 grades C for 15 min. {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-GGC, {sup 177}Lu- DOTA-cRGDfK and {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-E-c(RGDfK){sub 2} were prepared by adding {sup 177}LuCl{sub 3} (370 MBq) to 5 μL (1 mg/ml) of the DOTA derivative diluted with 50 μL of 1 M acetate buffer at ph 5. The mixture was incubated at 90 grades C in a block heater for 30 min. Radiochemical purity was determined by ultrafiltration and HPLC analyses. After laser irradiation, the presence of c[RGDfK(C)]-AuNP in cells caused a significant increase in the temperature of the medium (50.5 grades C, compared to 40.3 grades C without AuNPs) resulting in a significant decrease in MCF7 cell viability down to 9 %. After treatment with {sup 177}Lu

  17. Reactions of Cu(I)Br with aziridine derivatives. Synthesis, characterization and crystal structures of monomeric, dimeric and hexameric aziridine (= az) complexes of the formal type [CuBr(az)2]n (n = 1, 2) and [CuBr(az)]6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobka, Roman; Roedel, J Nicolas; Wirth, Stefan; Lorenz, Ingo-Peter

    2010-11-14

    The first syntheses of monomeric and oligomeric aziridine complexes of copper(I) are described. Cu(I)Br (1) reacts with a series of different aziridine derivatives (C(2)H(3)PhNH (2), C(2)H(2)Me(2)NH (3), C(2)H(2)Me(2)NC(2)H(2)Me(2)NH(2) (4)) to give the neutral dimeric complex [CuBr(C(2)H(3)PhNH)(2)](2) (5) and the ionic hexameric complex [Cu(6)Br(5)(C(2)H(2)Me(2)NH)(6)]Br (6) with terminal bound aziridine ligands as well as the neutral monomeric complex [CuBr(C(2)H(2)Me(2)NC(2)H(2)Me(2)NH(2))] (7) where the dimerized aziridine acts as a N,N'-chelating ligand. After purification, all of the complexes were fully characterized and their IR, (1)H and (13)C NMR spectra are reported and discussed. The single crystal structure analysis revealed distorted tetrahedral geometry for the copper(I) centres in the complexes 5 and 6 and a trigonal planar structure for complex 7. In the oligomers the copper centres are bridged by two μ(2)- (5) or two μ(3)- and three μ(4)-bromido ligands (6), respectively.

  18. Inducing labor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labor induction; Pregnancy - inducing labor; Prostaglandin - inducing labor; Oxytocin - inducing labor ... threaten the health of you or your baby. Oxytocin may also be started after a woman's labor has started, but her contractions have not been ...

  19. From Coordination Polymer to Monomeric Complex: Two Cobalt Complexes from a Single Demko-Sharpless's Tetrazole Synthesis Reaction%从配位聚合物到单分子化合物的转化:Demko-Sharpless四唑合成法制备两个新颖的Co(Ⅱ)配合物

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    瞿志荣

    2007-01-01

    The reaction of CoCl2· 6H2O with 4-cyanopyridine N-oxide in the present of NaN3 affords two novel complexes, {[(POTZ)(H2O)2N3]Co(H2O)} (1) and Co(POTZ)2(H2O)4 (2) (POTZ=4-tetrazolyl pyridine N-oxide), which are two different phases yielded at different stages of a single Demko-Sharpless' tetrazole synthesis reaction.Surprisingly the 1D chain coordination polymer 1 is almost completely converted into monomeric complex 2 in this reaction, and, in a separate test, 2 also can be converted into 1. CCDC: 641222, 1; 641223, 2.

  20. Polyamines induce aggregation of LHC II and quenching of fluorescence in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiavos, Theodoros; Ioannidis, Nikolaos E; Kotzabasis, Kiriakos

    2012-05-01

    Dissipation of excess excitation energy within the light-harvesting complex of Photosystem II (LHC II) is a main process in plants, which is measured as the non-photochemical quenching of chlorophyll fluorescence or qE. We showed in previous works that polyamines stimulate qE in higher plants in vivo and in eukaryotic algae in vitro. In the present contribution we have tested whether polyamines can stimulate quenching in trimeric LHC II and monomeric light-harvesting complex b proteins from higher plants. The tetramine spermine was the most potent quencher and induced aggregation of LHC II trimers, due to its highly cationic character. Two transients are evident at 100 μM and 350 μM for the fluorescence and absorbance signals of LHC II respectively. On the basis of observations within this work, some links between polyamines and the activation of qE in vivo is discussed.

  1. Universal laws in the force-induced unraveling of biological bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereverzev, Yuriy V.; Prezhdo, Oleg V.

    2007-01-01

    Universal laws in the force-induced unbinding of receptor-ligand complexes are established for a general functional dependence of the dissociation rate constant on the applied force and are detailed with the two-pathway model that describes the recently discovered biological catch bond. The relationships link the data obtained with constant and time-dependent forces in different regimes, provide common representation for the previously unrelated data sets, and, thereby, greatly facilitate analysis and interpretation of experiments. The universal laws are demonstrated with the monomeric and dimeric catch-slip bonds between P-selectins and P-selectin glycoprotein ligands-1, and the slip bond between E-selectin and sialyl Lewisx antigen.

  2. Methylglyoxal-induced modification causes aggregation of myoglobin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Sauradipta; Maity, Subhajit; Chakraborti, Abhay Sankar

    2016-02-01

    Post-translational modification of proteins by Maillard reaction, known as glycation, is thought to be the root cause of different complications, particularly in diabetes mellitus and age-related disorders. Methylglyoxal (MG), a reactive α-oxoaldehyde, increases in diabetic condition and reacts with proteins to form advanced glycation end products (AGEs) following Maillard-like reaction. We have investigated the in vitro effect of MG (200 μM) on the monomeric heme protein myoglobin (Mb) (100 μM) in a time-dependent manner (7 to 18 days incubation at 25 °C). MG induces significant structural alterations of the heme protein, including heme loss, changes in tryptophan fluorescence, decrease of α-helicity with increased β-sheet content etc. These changes occur gradually with increased period of incubation. Incubation of Mb with MG for 7 days results in formation of the AGE adducts: carboxyethyllysine at Lys-16, carboxymethyllysine at Lys-87 and carboxyethyllysine or pyrraline-carboxymethyllysine at Lys-133. On increasing the period of incubation up to 14 days, additional AGEs namely, carboxyethyllysine at Lys-42 and hydroimidazolone or argpyrimidine at Arg-31 and Arg-139 have been detected. MG also induces aggregation of Mb, which is clearly evident with longer period of incubation (18 days), and appears to have amyloid nature. MG-derived AGEs may thus have an important role as the precursors of protein aggregation, which, in turn, may be associated with physiological complications.

  3. Exacerbation of collagen induced arthritis by Fcγ receptor targeted collagen peptide due to enhanced inflammatory chemokine and cytokine production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szarka E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Eszter Szarka1*, Zsuzsa Neer1*, Péter Balogh2, Monika Ádori1, Adrienn Angyal1, József Prechl3, Endre Kiss1,3, Dorottya Kövesdi1, Gabriella Sármay11Department of Immunology, Eötvös Loránd University, 1117 Budapest, 2Department of Immunology and Biotechnology, University of Pécs, Pécs, 3Immunology Research Group of the Hungarian Academy of Science at Eötvös Loránd University, 1117 Budapest, Hungary*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Antibodies specific for bovine type II collagen (CII and Fcγ receptors play a major role in collagen-induced arthritis (CIA, a mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Our aim was to clarify the mechanism of immune complex-mediated inflammation and modulation of the disease. CII pre-immunized DBA/1 mice were intravenously boosted with extravidin coupled biotinylated monomeric CII-peptide epitope (ARGLTGRPGDA and its complexes with biotinylated FcγRII/III specific single chain Fv (scFv fragment. Disease scores were monitored, antibody titers and cytokines were determined by ELISA, and binding of complexes was detected by flow cytometry and immune histochemistry. Cytokine and chemokine secretion was monitored by protein profiler microarray. When intravenously administered into collagen-primed DBA/1 mice, both CII-peptide and its complex with 2.4G2 scFv significantly accelerated CIA and increased the severity of the disease, whereas the monomeric peptide and monomeric 2.4G2 scFv had no effect. FcγRII/III targeted CII-peptide complexes bound to marginal zone macrophages and dendritic cells, and significantly elevated the synthesis of peptide-specific IgG2a. Furthermore, CII-peptide containing complexes augmented the in vivo secretion of cytokines, including IL-10, IL-12, IL-17, IL-23, and chemokines (CXCL13, MIP-1, MIP-2. These data indicate that complexes formed by the CII-peptide epitope aggravate CIA by inducing the secretion of chemokines and the IL-12/23 family of pro

  4. Lymphoid tumours and leukaemia induced in mice by bone-seeking radionucleides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loutit, J F; Carr, T E

    1978-03-01

    Single intraperitoneal doses of soluble 90Sr and monomeric 239Pu induced generalized lymphomatosis in laboratory mice. Leukaemogenesis due to soluble 226Ra was more uncertain. Clinical expression was variable, but as a generalization the disease was a lymphosarcoma with haematogenous (leukaemic) spread. Only rarely, unlike the commonly recorded forms of natural and X-ray-induced lymphosarcomas, was the thymus apparently the site of onset. The cell-type was lymphoblastic of undifferentiated null form (not T, not B). The average doses of alpha or beta radiation accumulated in the bone-marrow, the presumed site of induction, were at the time of diagnosis usually more than 2500 rad, but, if the cases occurring after radium or low activities of plutonium are accepted as induced, 300-1500 rad of alpha radiation. Mice converted to chimaeras only rarely exhibited any lymphoma, general or local. Abdominal lymphomas were not numerically increased by these radionucleides (perhaps due to shortening of life-span) though some may have been prematurely induced.

  5. Protein-induced photophysical changes to the amyloid indicator dye thioflavin T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, Leslie S.; Calabrese, Matthew F.; Nath, Abhinav; Blaho, Dorottya V.; Miranker, Andrew D.; Xiong, Yong (Yale)

    2010-10-04

    The small molecule thioflavin T (ThT) is a defining probe for the identification and mechanistic study of amyloid fiber formation. As such, ThT is fundamental to investigations of serious diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson disease, and type II diabetes. For each disease, a different protein undergoes conformational conversion to a {beta}-sheet rich fiber. The fluorescence of ThT exhibits an increase in quantum yield upon binding these fibers. Despite its widespread use, the structural basis for binding specificity and for the changes to the photophysical properties of ThT remain poorly understood. Here, we report the co-crystal structures of ThT with two alternative states of {beta}-2 microglobulin ({beta}2m); one monomeric, the other an amyloid-like oligomer. In the latter, the dye intercalates between {beta}-sheets orthogonal to the {beta}-strands. Importantly, the fluorophore is bound in such a manner that a photophysically relevant torsion is limited to a range of angles generally associated with low, not high, quantum yield. Quantum mechanical assessment of the fluorophore shows the electronic distribution to be strongly stabilized by aromatic interactions with the protein. Monomeric {beta}2m gives little increase in ThT fluorescence despite showing three fluorophores, at two binding sites, in configurations generally associated with high quantum yield. Our efforts fundamentally extend existing understanding about the origins of amyloid-induced photophysical changes. Specifically, the {beta}-sheet interface that characterizes amyloid acts both sterically and electronically to stabilize the fluorophore's ground state electronic distribution. By preventing the fluorophore from adopting its preferred excited state configuration, nonradiative relaxation pathways are minimized and quantum yield is increased.

  6. Protein-induced Photophysical Changes to the Amyloid Indicator Dye Thioflavin T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Wolfe; M Calabrese; A Nath; D Blaho; A Miranker; Y Xiong

    2011-12-31

    The small molecule thioflavin T (ThT) is a defining probe for the identification and mechanistic study of amyloid fiber formation. As such, ThT is fundamental to investigations of serious diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson disease, and type II diabetes. For each disease, a different protein undergoes conformational conversion to a {beta}-sheet rich fiber. The fluorescence of ThT exhibits an increase in quantum yield upon binding these fibers. Despite its widespread use, the structural basis for binding specificity and for the changes to the photophysical properties of ThT remain poorly understood. Here, we report the co-crystal structures of ThT with two alternative states of {beta}-2 microglobulin ({beta}2m); one monomeric, the other an amyloid-like oligomer. In the latter, the dye intercalates between {beta}-sheets orthogonal to the {beta}-strands. Importantly, the fluorophore is bound in such a manner that a photophysically relevant torsion is limited to a range of angles generally associated with low, not high, quantum yield. Quantum mechanical assessment of the fluorophore shows the electronic distribution to be strongly stabilized by aromatic interactions with the protein. Monomeric {beta}2m gives little increase in ThT fluorescence despite showing three fluorophores, at two binding sites, in configurations generally associated with high quantum yield. Our efforts fundamentally extend existing understanding about the origins of amyloid-induced photophysical changes. Specifically, the {beta}-sheet interface that characterizes amyloid acts both sterically and electronically to stabilize the fluorophore's ground state electronic distribution. By preventing the fluorophore from adopting its preferred excited state configuration, nonradiative relaxation pathways are minimized and quantum yield is increased.

  7. Inversion of Supramolecular Chirality by Sonication-Induced Organogelation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Sibaprasad; Das, Priyadip; Reches, Meital

    2015-01-01

    Natural helical structures have inspired the formation of well-ordered peptide-based chiral nanostructures in vitro. These structures have drawn much attention owing to their diverse applications in the area of asymmetric catalysts, chiral photonic materials, and nanoplasmonics. The self-assembly of two enantiomeric fluorinated aromatic dipeptides into ordered chiral fibrillar nanostructures upon sonication is described. These fibrils form organogels. Our results clearly indicate that fluorine-fluorine interactions play an important role in self-assembly. Circular dichroism analysis revealed that both peptides (peptides 1 and 2), containing two fluorines, depicted opposite cotton effects in their monomeric form compared with their aggregated form. This shows that supramolecular chirality inversion took place during the stimuli-responsive self-aggregation process. Conversely, peptide 3, containing one fluorine, did not exhibit chirality inversion in sonication-induced organogelation. Therefore, our results clearly indicate that fluorination plays an important role in the organogelation process of these aromatic dipeptides. Our findings may have broad implications regarding the design of chiral nanostructures for possible applications such as chiroptical switches, asymmetric catalysis, and chiral recognitions. PMID:26553508

  8. [Bi3GaS5]2[Ga3Cl10]2[GaCl4]2·S8 containing heterocubane-type [Bi3GaS5]2+, star-shaped [Ga3Cl10]-, monomeric [GaCl4]- and crown-like S8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenmann, Dominic; Feldmann, Claus

    2011-01-14

    By reaction of elemental bismuth, sulfur, bismuth(III) chloride and gallium(III) chloride in the ionic liquid (BMIm)Cl (BMIm: 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium), [Bi(3)GaS(5)](2)[Ga(3)Cl(10)](2)[GaCl(4)](2)·S(8) is obtained as red transparent crystals. According to X-ray structure analysis based on single crystals, the title compound crystallizes with triclinic lattice symmetry and is composed of heterocubane-type [Bi(3)GaS(5)](2+) cations, trimeric star-shaped [Ga(3)Cl(10)](-) anions with three (GaCl(4)) tetrahedra sharing a single central chlorine atom, monomeric [GaCl(4)](-) tetrahedra and neutral, crown-shaped S(8)-rings. Here, the heterocubane [Bi(3)GaS(5)](2+) as well as the star-shaped [Ga(3)Cl(10)](-) are observed as building units for the first time. [Bi(3)GaS(5)](2)[Ga(3)Cl(10)](2)[GaCl(4)](2)·S(8) is further characterized by X-ray powder diffraction as well as by thermogravimetry/differential thermal analysis.

  9. A protein kinase from Colletotrichum trifolii is induced by plant cutin and is required for appressorium formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, M B; Ha, Y S; Yang, Z; Adams, B; Huang, C

    2003-05-01

    When certain phytopathogenic fungi contact plant surfaces, specialized infection structures (appressoria) are produced that facilitate penetration of the plant external barrier; the cuticle. Recognition of this hydrophobic host surface must be sensed by the fungus, initiating the appropriate signaling pathway or pathways for pathogenic development. Using polymerase chain reaction and primers designed from mammalian protein kinase C sequences (PKC), we have isolated, cloned, and characterized a protein kinase from Colletotrichum trifolii, causal agent of alfalfa anthracnose. Though sequence analysis indicated conserved sequences in mammalian PKC genes, we were unable to induce activity of the fungal protein using known activators of PKC. Instead, we show that the C. trifolii gene, designated LIPK (lipid-induced protein kinase) is induced specifically by purified plant cutin or long-chain fatty acids which are monomeric constituents of cutin. PKC inhibitors prevented appressorium formation and, to a lesser extent, spore germination. Overexpression of LIPK resulted in multiple, abnormally shaped appressoria. Gene replacement of lipk yielded strains which were unable to develop appressoria and were unable to infect intact host plant tissue. However, these mutants were able to colonize host tissue following artificial wounding, resulting in typical anthracnose lesions. Taken together, these data indicate a central role in triggering infection structure formation for this protein kinase, which is induced specifically by components of the plant cuticle. Thus, the fungus is able to sense and use host surface chemistry to induce a protein kinase-mediated pathway that is required for pathogenic development.

  10. Inducing autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Lea M; Bunkenborg, Jakob; Andersen, Jens S.

    2014-01-01

    catabolism, which has recently been found to induce autophagy in an MTOR independent way and support cancer cell survival. In this study, quantitative phosphoproteomics was applied to investigate the initial signaling events linking ammonia to the induction of autophagy. The MTOR inhibitor rapamycin was used...

  11. Role for Rab10 in Methamphetamine-Induced Behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott M Vanderwerf

    Full Text Available Lipid rafts are specialized, cholesterol-rich membrane compartments that help to organize transmembrane signaling by restricting or promoting interactions with subsets of the cellular proteome. The hypothesis driving this study was that identifying proteins whose relative abundance in rafts is altered by the abused psychostimulant methamphetamine would contribute to fully describing the pathways involved in acute and chronic effects of the drug. Using a detergent-free method for preparing rafts from rat brain striatal membranes, we identified density gradient fractions enriched in the raft protein flotillin but deficient in calnexin and the transferrin receptor, markers of non-raft membranes. Dopamine D1- and D2-like receptor binding activity was highly enriched in the raft fractions, but pretreating rats with methamphetamine (2 mg/kg once or repeatedly for 11 days did not alter the distribution of the receptors. LC-MS analysis of the protein composition of raft fractions from rats treated once with methamphetamine or saline identified methamphetamine-induced changes in the relative abundance of 23 raft proteins, including the monomeric GTP-binding protein Rab10, whose abundance in rafts was decreased 2.1-fold by acute methamphetamine treatment. Decreased raft localization was associated with a selective decrease in the abundance of Rab10 in a membrane fraction that includes synaptic vesicles and endosomes. Inhibiting Rab10 activity by pan-neuronal expression of a dominant-negative Rab10 mutant in Drosophila melanogaster decreased methamphetamine-induced activity and mortality and decreased caffeine-stimulated activity but not mortality, whereas inhibiting Rab10 activity selectively in cholinergic neurons had no effect. These results suggest that activation and redistribution of Rab10 is critical for some of the behavioral effects of psychostimulants.

  12. Thermodynamics and Structural Evolution during a Reversible Vesicle-Micelle Transition of a Vitamin-Derived Bolaamphiphile Induced by Sodium Cholate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jun-Nan; Ge, Bing-Qiang; Shen, Yun-Feng; He, Yu-Xuan; Chen, Zhong-Xiu

    2016-03-09

    Interaction of endogenous sodium cholate (SC) with dietary amphiphiles would induce structural evolution of the self-assembled aggregates, which inevitably affects the hydrolysis of fat in the gut. Current work mainly focused on the interaction of bile salts with classical double-layered phospholipid vesicles. In this paper, the thermodynamics and structural evolution during the interaction of SC with novel unilamellar vesicles formed from vitamin-derived zwitterionic bolaamphiphile (DDO) were characterized. It was revealed that an increased temperature and the presence of NaCl resulted in narrowed micelle-vesicle coexistence and enlarged the vesicle region. The coexistence of micelles and vesicles mainly came from the interaction of monomeric SC with DDO vesicles, whereas micellar SC contributed to the total solubilization of DDO vesicles. This research may enrich the thermodynamic mechanism behind the structure transition of the microaggregates formed by amphiphiles in the gut. It will also contribute to the design of food formulation and drug delivery system.

  13. Oligosaccharides and monomeric carbohydrates production from olive tree pruning biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Soledad; Puentes, Juan G; Sánchez, Sebastián; Moya, Alberto J

    2013-04-02

    Using the severity factor, it has been possible to study cellulose and hemicellulose fractional conversion, sugar yields change and oligosaccharides variation through olive tree pruning biomass pretreatments with acid or liquid hot water under pressure. The temperatures tested were in the range 180-230°C, operation time varying between 0 and 30min and acid concentration used did not exceed 0.05M. Complete hemicellulose solubilization in autohydrolysis was achieved using severity factors (logR0) close to 3.9 (most sugars are like oligomers), while if sulfuric acid 0.025M is employed, this parameter could be smaller (≥3.4). With these treatments, we have obtained cellulose conversions between 30 and 42% from liquid hot water experiments, 40-51% with sulfuric acid 0.025M and 42-57% when the acid concentration was 0.05M. The best results in terms of maximum yield in total sugars, d-glucose and d-xylose, with a low amount of acetic acid and hydroxymethylfurfural, was obtained at 200°C, 0min (what means that there is no time of temperature maintenance, only heating and cooling) and H2SO4 0.025M.

  14. Ischemic Monomeric Neuropathy in a Woman with Sickle Cell Anaemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Agapidou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell disease is an inherited haemoglobinopathy that can affect multiple organs and systems. The most common neurological complication in sickle cell disease is stroke and silent cerebral infarcts. Peripheral nervous system involvement has been described but is exceedingly rare. Herein, we describe the case of a young woman who presented with acute flaccid paralysis and sensory loss of the left lower extremity in the context of a painful vasoocclusive crisis which resolved rapidly after receiving an emergency automated red cell exchange transfusion.

  15. Clinical characterization of patients with macroprolactinemia and monomeric hyperprolactinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat Can

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Macroprolactinemia is often a cause of misdiagnosis, unnecessary expensive investigation, and unsuitable treatment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the clinical findings and the concentrations of macroprolactin in patients with hyperprolactinemia in our region. Eighty-four female hyperprolactinemic patients were screened for macroprolactinemia. Prolactin was measured by chemiluminesans method on an Immulite 2000 analyzer (Siemens Health Diagnostics, Deerfield, IL, USA. Recoveries less than or equal to 40% after polyethylene glycol precipitation were indicative of macroprolactinemia. Clinical features and biochemical values were compared in true hyperprolactinemic and macroprolactinemic patients. Macroprolactinemia was detected in 31 patients (36.9%, with 84 hyperprolactinemic female patients. There was no difference in frequency of galactorrhea and oligomenorrhea/amenorrhea between the two groups. When we evaluated the clinical features of patients according to prolactin levels, no significant difference was found between the groups. In conclusion, our initial data show that no clinical features could reliably differentiate macroprolactinemic from true hyperprolactinemic patients, but at least one of these symptoms was present in most macroprolactinemic patients.

  16. Micellization of monomeric and poly-ω-methacryloyloxyundecyltrimethylammonium surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, Paul A; Chatjaroenporn, Khwanrat; Zhang, Xiaoli; Warr, Gregory G

    2011-10-04

    We have used small-angle neutron scattering to study how micelle morphology of the tail-polymerizable surfactants MUTAB and MUTAC (ω-methacryloyloxyundecyltrimethylammonium bromide and chloride) is affected by classic self-assembly modifiers such as temperature changes, salt addition, and counterion exchange, as a function of their conversion from monomer into polymer amphiphile in aqueous solution. Contrary to common assumptions about polymerized surfactants, these systems remain in dynamic equilibrium under all conditions examined and at all conversions (except for a small amount of high-molecular-weight precipitation by MUTAC). Counterintuitively, the polymerized methacrylate backbone has little influence on aggregate morphology, except for the formation of rod-like mixed micelles of polymerized and unpolymerized surfactant at intermediate conversions. The addition of salt produces a transition to rod-like micelles at all conversions except in the unpolymerized surfactant, which has some characteristics of an asymmetric bolaform surfactant and retains its spheroidal geometry under almost all conditions.

  17. Structure of the novel monomeric glyoxalase I from Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turra, Gino L; Agostini, Romina B; Fauguel, Carolina M; Presello, Daniel A; Andreo, Carlos S; González, Javier M; Campos-Bermudez, Valeria A

    2015-10-01

    The glyoxalase system is ubiquitous among all forms of life owing to its central role in relieving the cell from the accumulation of methylglyoxal, a toxic metabolic byproduct. In higher plants, this system is upregulated under diverse metabolic stress conditions, such as in the defence response to infection by pathogenic microorganisms. Despite their proven fundamental role in metabolic stresses, plant glyoxalases have been poorly studied. In this work, glyoxalase I from Zea mays has been characterized both biochemically and structurally, thus reporting the first atomic model of a glyoxalase I available from plants. The results indicate that this enzyme comprises a single polypeptide with two structurally similar domains, giving rise to two lateral concavities, one of which harbours a functional nickel(II)-binding active site. The putative function of the remaining cryptic active site remains to be determined.

  18. Mechanism of Processive Movement of Monomeric and Dimeric Kinesin Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Xie

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Kinesin molecules are motor proteins capable of moving along microtubule by hydrolyzing ATP. They generally have several forms of construct. This review focuses on two of the most studied forms: monomers such as KIF1A (kinesin-3 family and dimers such as conventional kinesin (kinesin-1 family, both of which can move processively towards the microtubule plus end. There now exist numerous models that try to explain how the kinesin molecules convert the chemical energy of ATP hydrolysis into the mechanical energy to “power” their proceesive movement along microtubule. Here, we attempt to present a comprehensive review of these models. We further propose a new hybrid model for the dimeric kinesin by combining the existing models and provide a framework for future studies in this subject.

  19. Total Monomeric Anthocyanin and Total Flavonoid Content of Processed Purple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potato Florentina Damşa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that processing change physical and chemical composition of foods, thus affecting the content in bioactive substances. Potatoes are almost always consumed after processing (baked, fried or boiled making it critical to understand the effect of such processing techniques on the containing in bioactive compounds. In order to determine the influence of processing on the content of anthocyanin pigments and flavonoids was achieved the extraction of these compounds from boiled and baked purple potato tuber (Albastru-Violet de Galanesti variety. Also, in order to obtain the maximum amount of anthocyanin pigments and flavonoids from processed potatoes was applied ultrasonic extraction (20 kHz and was performed the mathematical modeling (central composite design using SigmaXL software. The total anthocyanins content were determined spectrophotometrically by the pH differential method and the total flavonoids content were determine colorimetric by AlCl3 method. This study proves that the potato processing decreases the content of anthocyanin pigments and flavonoids.

  20. Catalytic effect of transition metals on microwave-induced degradation of atrazine in mineral micropores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Erdan; Cheng, Hefa

    2014-06-15

    With their high catalytic activity for redox reactions, transition metal ions (Cu(2+) and Fe(3+)) were exchanged into the micropores of dealuminated Y zeolites to prepare effective microporous mineral sorbents for sorption and microwave-induced degradation of atrazine. Due to its ability to complex with atrazine, loading of copper greatly increased the sorption of atrazine. Atrazine sorption on iron-exchanged zeolites was also significantly enhanced, which was attributed to the hydrolysis of Fe(3+) polycations in mineral micropores and electrostatic interactions of protonated atrazine molecules with the negatively charged pore wall surface. Copper and iron species in the micropores also significantly accelerated degradation of the sorbed atrazine (and its degradation intermediates) under microwave irradiation. The catalytic effect was attributed to the easy reducibility and high oxidation activity of Cu(2+) and Fe(3+) species stabilized in the micropores of the zeolites. It was postulated that the surface species of transition metals (monomeric Cu(2+), Cu(2+)-O-Cu(2+) complexes, FeO(+), and dinuclear Fe-O-Fe-like species) in the mineral micropores were thermally activated under microwave irradiation, and subsequently formed highly reactive sites catalyzing oxidative degradation of atrazine. The transition metal-exchanged zeolites, particularly the iron-exchanged ones, were relatively stable when leached under acidic conditions, which suggests that they are reusable in sorption and microwave-induced degradation. These findings offer valuable insights on designing of effective mineral sorbents that can selectively uptake atrazine from aqueous solutions and catalyze its degradation under microwave irradiation.

  1. Inducible nucleosome depletion at OREBP-binding-sites by hypertonic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith H Y Tong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Osmotic Response Element-Binding Protein (OREBP, also known as TonEBP or NFAT5, is a unique transcription factor. It is hitherto the only known mammalian transcription factor that regulates hypertonic stress-induced gene transcription. In addition, unlike other monomeric members of the NFAT family, OREBP exists as a homodimer and it is the only transcription factor known to bind naked DNA targets by complete encirclement in vitro. Nevertheless, how OREBP interacts with target DNA, also known as ORE/TonE, and how it elicits gene transcription in vivo, remains unknown. METHODOLOGY: Using hypertonic induction of the aldose reductase (AR gene activation as a model, we showed that OREs contained dynamic nucleosomes. Hypertonic stress induced a rapid and reversible loss of nucleosome(s around the OREs. The loss of nucleosome(s was found to be initiated by an OREBP-independent mechanism, but was significantly potentiated in the presence of OREBP. Furthermore, hypertonic induction of AR gene was associated with an OREBP-dependent hyperacetylation of histones that spanned the 5' upstream sequences and at least some exons of the gene. Nevertheless, nucleosome loss was not regulated by the acetylation status of histone. SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings offer novel insights into the mechanism of OREBP-dependent transcriptional regulation and provide a basis for understanding how histone eviction and transcription factor recruitment are coupled.

  2. The Open Form Inducer Approach for Structure-Based Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Iida, Maiko; Tabuchi, Toshiyuki; Honma, Teruki; Lee, Nayoung; Hashimoto, Satoshi; Matsuoka, Shigeru; Kuranaga, Takefumi; Sato, Kazuhito; Shiba, Tomoo; Sakamoto, Kimitoshi; Balogun, Emmanuel Oluwadare; Suzuki, Shigeo; Nara, Takeshi; da Rocha, Josmar Rodrigues; Montanari, Carlos Alberto; Tanaka, Akiko; Inoue, Masayuki; Kita, Kiyoshi; Harada, Shigeharu

    2016-01-01

    Many open form (OF) structures of drug targets were obtained a posteriori by analysis of co-crystals with inhibitors. Therefore, obtaining the OF structure of a drug target a priori will accelerate development of potent inhibitors. In addition to its small active site, Trypanosoma cruzi dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (TcDHODH) is fully functional in its monomeric form, making drug design approaches targeting the active site and protein-protein interactions unrealistic. Therefore, a novel a priori approach was developed to determination the TcDHODH active site in OF. This approach consists of generating an "OF inducer" (predicted in silico) to bind the target and cause steric repulsion with flexible regions proximal to the active site that force it open. We provide the first proof-of-concept of this approach by predicting and crystallizing TcDHODH in complex with an OF inducer, thereby obtaining the OF a priori with its subsequent use in designing potent and selective inhibitors. Fourteen co-crystal structures of TcDHODH with the designed inhibitors are presented herein. This approach has potential to encourage drug design against diseases where the molecular targets are such difficult proteins possessing small AS volume. This approach can be extended to study open/close conformation of proteins in general, the identification of allosteric pockets and inhibitors for other drug targets where conventional drug design approaches are not applicable, as well as the effective exploitation of the increasing number of protein structures deposited in Protein Data Bank. PMID:27893848

  3. PNA-induced assembly of fluorescent proteins using DNA as a framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami, Zahra; Brunsveld, Luc; Hanley, Quentin

    2013-08-21

    Controlled alignment of proteins on molecular frameworks requires the development of facile and orthogonal chemical approaches and molecular scaffolds. In this work, protein-PNA conjugates are brought forward as new chemical components allowing efficient assembly and alignment on DNA scaffolds. Site-selective monomeric teal fluorescent protein (mTFP)-peptide nucleic acid (PNA) (mTFP-PNA) conjugation was achieved by covalent linkage of the PNA to the protein through expressed protein ligation (EPL). A DNA beacon, with 6-Fam and Dabcyl at its ends, acts as a framework to create an assembled hetero-FRET system with the mTFP-PNA conjugate. Using fluorescence intensity, frequency domain lifetime measurements, and anisotropy measurements, the system was shown to produce FRET as indicated by decreased donor intensity, decreased donor lifetime, and increased donor anisotropy. Extension of the DNA scaffold allowed for the assembly of multiple mTFP-PNA constructs. Efficient formation of protein dimers and oligomers on the DNA-PNA frameworks could be shown, as visualized via size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Assembly of multiple proteins in a row induced homo-FRET for the mTFP-PNA's assembled on the DNA scaffolds. The oligonucleotide framework allows an induced and controllable assembly of proteins by fusing them to PNAs directed to align on DNA scaffolds.

  4. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions & Treatments ▸ Conditions Dictionary ▸ Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Share | Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) « Back to A to Z Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced ...

  5. Vanadate induces necrotic death in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes through mitochondrial membrane depolarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Sandra Sofia; Henao, Fernando; Aureliano, Manuel; Gutiérrez-Merino, Carlos

    2008-03-01

    Besides the well-known inotropic effects of vanadium in cardiac muscle, previous studies have shown that vanadate can stimulate cell growth or induce cell death. In this work, we studied the toxicity to neonatal rat ventricular myocytes (cardiomyocytes) of two vanadate solutions containing different oligovanadates distribution, decavanadate (containing decameric vanadate, V 10) and metavanadate (containing monomeric vanadate and also di-, tetra-, and pentavanadate). Incubation for 24 h with decavanadate or metavanadate induced necrotic cell death of cardiomyocytes, without significant caspase-3 activation. Only 10 microM total vanadium of either decavanadate (1 microM V 10) or metavanadate (10 microM total vanadium) was needed to produce 50% loss of cell viability after 24 h (assessed with MTT and propidium iodide assays). Atomic absorption spectroscopy showed that vanadium accumulation in cardiomyocytes after 24 h was the same when incubation was done with decavanadate or metavanadate. A decrease of 75% of the rate of mitochondrial superoxide anion generation, monitored with dihydroethidium, and a sustained rise of cytosolic calcium (monitored with Fura-2-loaded cardiomyocytes) was observed after 24 h of incubation of cardiomyocytes with decavanadate or metavanadate concentrations close to those inducing 50% loss of cell viability produced. In addition, mitochondrial membrane depolarization within cardiomyocytes, monitored with tetramethylrhodamine ethyl esther or with 3,3',6,6'-tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethylbenzimidazolcarbocyanine iodide, were observed after only 6 h of incubation with decavanadate or metavanadate. The concentration needed for 50% mitochondrial depolarization was 6.5 +/- 1 microM total vanadium for both decavanadate (0.65 microM V 10) and metavanadate. In conclusion, mitochondrial membrane depolarization was an early event in decavanadate- and monovanadate-induced necrotic cell death of cardiomyocytes.

  6. Selective lowering of synapsins induced by oligomeric α-synuclein exacerbates memory deficits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Megan E; Greimel, Susan J; Amar, Fatou; LaCroix, Michael; Boyle, Gabriel; Sherman, Mathew A; Schley, Hallie; Miel, Camille; Schneider, Julie A; Kayed, Rakez; Benfenati, Fabio; Lee, Michael K; Bennett, David A; Lesné, Sylvain E

    2017-06-06

    Mounting evidence indicates that soluble oligomeric forms of amyloid proteins linked to neurodegenerative disorders, such as amyloid-β (Aβ), tau, or α-synuclein (αSyn) might be the major deleterious species for neuronal function in these diseases. Here, we found an abnormal accumulation of oligomeric αSyn species in AD brains by custom ELISA, size-exclusion chromatography, and nondenaturing/denaturing immunoblotting techniques. Importantly, the abundance of αSyn oligomers in human brain tissue correlated with cognitive impairment and reductions in synapsin expression. By overexpressing WT human αSyn in an AD mouse model, we artificially enhanced αSyn oligomerization. These bigenic mice displayed exacerbated Aβ-induced cognitive deficits and a selective decrease in synapsins. Following isolation of various soluble αSyn assemblies from transgenic mice, we found that in vitro delivery of exogenous oligomeric αSyn but not monomeric αSyn was causing a lowering in synapsin-I/II protein abundance. For a particular αSyn oligomer, these changes were either dependent or independent on endogenous αSyn expression. Finally, at a molecular level, the expression of synapsin genes SYN1 and SYN2 was down-regulated in vivo and in vitro by αSyn oligomers, which decreased two transcription factors, cAMP response element binding and Nurr1, controlling synapsin gene promoter activity. Overall, our results demonstrate that endogenous αSyn oligomers can impair memory by selectively lowering synapsin expression.

  7. Pollutant-induced modulation in conformation and β-lactamase activity of human serum albumin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ejaz Ahmad

    Full Text Available Structural changes in human serum albumin (HSA induced by the pollutants 1-naphthol, 2-naphthol and 8-quinolinol were analyzed by circular dichroism, fluorescence spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering. The alteration in protein conformational stability was determined by helical content induction (from 55 to 75% upon protein-pollutant interactions. Domain plasticity is responsible for the temperature-mediated unfolding of HSA. These findings were compared to HSA-hydrolase activity. We found that though HSA is a monomeric protein, it shows heterotropic allostericity for β-lactamase activity in the presence of pollutants, which act as K- and V-type non-essential activators. Pollutants cause conformational changes and catalytic modifications of the protein (increase in β-lactamase activity from 100 to 200%. HSA-pollutant interactions mediate other protein-ligand interactions, such as HSA-nitrocefin. Therefore, this protein can exist in different conformations with different catalytic properties depending on activator binding. This is the first report to demonstrate the catalytic allostericity of HSA through a mechanistic approach. We also show a correlation with non-microbial drug resistance as HSA is capable of self-hydrolysis of β-lactam drugs, which is further potentiated by pollutants due to conformational changes in HSA.

  8. Astrocyte-derived tissue Transglutaminase affects fibronectin deposition, but not aggregation, during cuprizone-induced demyelination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espitia Pinzon, Nathaly; Sanz-Morello, Berta; Brevé, John J. P.; Bol, John G. J. M.; Drukarch, Benjamin; Bauer, Jan; Baron, Wia; van Dam, Anne-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Astrogliosis as seen in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) develops into astroglial scarring, which is beneficial because it seals off the site of central nervous system (CNS) damage. However, astroglial scarring also forms an obstacle that inhibits axon outgrowth and (re)myelination in brain lesions. This is possibly an important cause for incomplete remyelination in the CNS of early stage MS patients and for failure in remyelination when the disease progresses. In this study we address whether under demyelinating conditions in vivo, tissue Transglutaminase (TG2), a Ca2+ -dependent enzyme that catalyses posttranslational modification of proteins, contributes to extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition and/or aggregation. We used the cuprizone model for de- and remyelination. TG2 immunoreactivity and enzymatic activity time-dependently appeared in astrocytes and ECM, respectively, in the corpus callosum of cuprizone-treated mice. Enhanced presence of soluble monomeric and multimeric fibronectin was detected during demyelination, and fibronectin immunoreactivity was slightly decreased in cuprizone-treated TG2−/− mice. In vitro TG2 overexpression in astrocytes coincided with more, while knock-down of TG2 with less fibronectin production. TG2 contributes, at least partly, to fibronectin production, and may play a role in fibronectin deposition during cuprizone-induced demyelination. Our observations are of interest in understanding the functional implications of TG2 during astrogliosis. PMID:28128219

  9. Notch-induced Asb2 expression promotes protein ubiquitination by forming non-canonical E3 ligase complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Nie; Ying Zhao; Wei Wu; Yuan-Zheng Yang; Hong-Cheng Wang; Xiao-Hong Sun

    2011-01-01

    Notch signaling controls multiple developmental processes, thus demanding versatile functions. We have previously shown that this may be partly achieved by accelerating ubiquitin-mediated degradation of important regulators of differentiation. However, the underlying mechanism was unknown. We now find that Notch signaling transcriptionally activates the gene encoding ankyrin-repeat SOCS box-containing protein 2(Asb2). Asb2 promotes the ubiquidnation of Notch targets such as E2A and Janus kinase(Jak)2, and a dominant-negative(DN)mutant of Asb2blocks Notch-induced degradation of these proteins. Asb2 likely binds Jak2 directly but associates with E2A through Skp2. We next provide evidence to suggest that Asb2 bridges the formation of non-canonical cullin-based complexes through interaction with not only ElonginB/C and Cullin(Cul)5, but also the F-box-containing protein, Skp2, which is known to associate with Skpl and Cull. Consistently, ablating the function of Cull or Cu15 using DN mutants or siRNAs protected both E2A and Jak2 from Asb2-mediated or Notch-induced degradation. By shifting monomeric E3ligase complexes to dimeric forms through activation of Asb2 transcription, Notch could effectively control the turnover of a variety of substrates and it exerts diverse effects on cell proliferation and differentiation.

  10. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Exercise-Induced Asthma KidsHealth > For Parents > Exercise-Induced Asthma A A ... previous continue Tips for Kids With Exercise-Induced Asthma For the most part, kids with exercise-induced ...

  11. Exercise-Induced Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... management of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction: A practice parameter. Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. 2010;105:S1. Krafczyk ... up exercise on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise. 2012;44:383. Asthma ...

  12. Transition from natively unfolded to folded state induced by desiccation in an anhydrobiotic nematode protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Kshamata; Tisi, Laurence; Basran, Amrik; Browne, John; Burnell, Ann; Zurdo, Jesus; Tunnacliffe, Alan

    2003-04-11

    Late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins are associated with desiccation tolerance in resurrection plants and in plant seeds, and the recent discovery of a dehydration-induced Group 3 LEA-like gene in the nematode Aphelenchus avenae suggests a similar association in anhydrobiotic animals. Despite their importance, little is known about the structure of Group 3 LEA proteins, although computer modeling and secondary structure algorithms predict a largely alpha-helical monomer that forms coiled coil oligomers. We have therefore investigated the structure of the nematode protein, AavLEA1, in the first such analysis of a well characterized Group 3 LEA-like protein. Immunoblotting and subunit cross-linking experiments demonstrate limited oligomerization of AavLEA1, but analytical ultracentrifugation and gel filtration show that the vast majority of the protein is monomeric. Moreover, CD, fluorescence emission, and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy indicate an unstructured conformation for the nematode protein. Therefore, in solution, no evidence was found to support structure predictions; instead, AavLEA1 seems to be natively unfolded with a high degree of hydration and low compactness. Such proteins can, however, be induced to fold into more rigid structures by partner molecules or by altered physiological conditions. Because AavLEA1 is associated with desiccation stress, its Fourier transform-infrared spectrum in the dehydrated state was examined. A dramatic but reversible increase in alpha-helix and, possibly, coiled coil formation was observed on drying, indicating that computer predictions of secondary structure may be correct for the solid state. This unusual finding offers the possibility that structural shifts in Group 3 LEA proteins occur on dehydration, perhaps consistent with their role in anhydrobiosis.

  13. Mechanism of membrane fusion induced by vesicular stomatitis virus G protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Irene S; Jenni, Simon; Stanifer, Megan L; Roth, Eatai; Whelan, Sean P J; van Oijen, Antoine M; Harrison, Stephen C

    2017-01-03

    The glycoproteins (G proteins) of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and related rhabdoviruses (e.g., rabies virus) mediate both cell attachment and membrane fusion. The reversibility of their fusogenic conformational transitions differentiates them from many other low-pH-induced viral fusion proteins. We report single-virion fusion experiments, using methods developed in previous publications to probe fusion of influenza and West Nile viruses. We show that a three-stage model fits VSV single-particle fusion kinetics: (i) reversible, pH-dependent, G-protein conformational change from the known prefusion conformation to an extended, monomeric intermediate; (ii) reversible trimerization and clustering of the G-protein fusion loops, leading to an extended intermediate that inserts the fusion loops into the target-cell membrane; and (iii) folding back of a cluster of extended trimers into their postfusion conformations, bringing together the viral and cellular membranes. From simulations of the kinetic data, we conclude that the critical number of G-protein trimers required to overcome membrane resistance is 3 to 5, within a contact zone between the virus and the target membrane of 30 to 50 trimers. This sequence of conformational events is similar to those shown to describe fusion by influenza virus hemagglutinin (a "class I" fusogen) and West Nile virus envelope protein ("class II"). Our study of VSV now extends this description to "class III" viral fusion proteins, showing that reversibility of the low-pH-induced transition and architectural differences in the fusion proteins themselves do not change the basic mechanism by which they catalyze membrane fusion.

  14. Allosteric inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase dimerization discovered via combinatorial chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Kirk; Adler, Marc; Auld, Douglas S.; Baldwin, John J.; Blasko, Eric; Browne, Leslie J.; Chelsky, Daniel; Davey, David; Dolle, Ronald E.; Eagen, Keith A.; Erickson, Shawn; Feldman, Richard I.; Glaser, Charles B.; Mallari, Cornell; Morrissey, Michael M.; Ohlmeyer, Michael H. J.; Pan, Gonghua; Parkinson, John F.; Phillips, Gary B.; Polokoff, Mark A.; Sigal, Nolan H.; Vergona, Ronald; Whitlow, Marc; Young, Tish A.; Devlin, James J.

    2000-01-01

    Potent and selective inhibitors of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) (EC 1.14.13.39) were identified in an encoded combinatorial chemical library that blocked human iNOS dimerization, and thereby NO production. In a cell-based iNOS assay (A-172 astrocytoma cells) the inhibitors had low-nanomolar IC50 values and thus were >1,000-fold more potent than the substrate-based direct iNOS inhibitors 1400W and N-methyl-l-arginine. Biochemical studies confirmed that inhibitors caused accumulation of iNOS monomers in mouse macrophage RAW 264.7 cells. High affinity (Kd ≈ 3 nM) of inhibitors for isolated iNOS monomers was confirmed by using a radioligand binding assay. Inhibitors were >1,000-fold selective for iNOS versus endothelial NOS dimerization in a cell-based assay. The crystal structure of inhibitor bound to the monomeric iNOS oxygenase domain revealed inhibitor–heme coordination and substantial perturbation of the substrate binding site and the dimerization interface, indicating that this small molecule acts by allosterically disrupting protein–protein interactions at the dimer interface. These results provide a mechanism-based approach to highly selective iNOS inhibition. Inhibitors were active in vivo, with ED50 values of <2 mg/kg in a rat model of endotoxin-induced systemic iNOS induction. Thus, this class of dimerization inhibitors has broad therapeutic potential in iNOS-mediated pathologies. PMID:10677491

  15. Extrachromosomal inducible expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, Douwe M; Van Haastert, Peter J M

    2013-01-01

    Inducible expression systems are very convenient for proteins that induce strong side effects such as retardation of growth or development and are essential for the expression of toxic proteins. In this chapter we describe the doxycycline-inducible expression system, optimized for the controlled exp

  16. Interplay of histidine residues of the Alzheimer’s disease Aβ peptide governs its Zn-induced oligomerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istrate, Andrey N.; Kozin, Sergey A.; Zhokhov, Sergey S.; Mantsyzov, Alexey B.; Kechko, Olga I.; Pastore, Annalisa; Makarov, Alexander A.; Polshakov, Vladimir I.

    2016-02-01

    Conformational changes of Aβ peptide result in its transformation from native monomeric state to the toxic soluble dimers, oligomers and insoluble aggregates that are hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Interactions of zinc ions with Aβ are mediated by the N-terminal Aβ1–16 domain and appear to play a key role in AD progression. There is a range of results indicating that these interactions trigger the Aβ plaque formation. We have determined structure and functional characteristics of the metal binding domains derived from several Aβ variants and found that their zinc-induced oligomerization is governed by conformational changes in the minimal zinc binding site 6HDSGYEVHH14. The residue H6 and segment 11EVHH14, which are part of this site are crucial for formation of the two zinc-mediated interaction interfaces in Aβ. These structural determinants can be considered as promising targets for rational design of the AD-modifying drugs aimed at blocking pathological Aβ aggregation.

  17. Study of a synthetic human olfactory receptor 17-4: expression and purification from an inducible mammalian cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Brian L; Ernberg, Karin E; Chung, Hyeyoun; Zhang, Shuguang

    2008-01-01

    In order to begin to study the structural and functional mechanisms of olfactory receptors, methods for milligram-scale purification are required. Here we demonstrate the production and expression of a synthetically engineered human olfactory receptor hOR17-4 gene in a stable tetracycline-inducible mammalian cell line (HEK293S). The olfactory receptor gene was fabricated from scratch using PCR-based gene-assembly, which facilitated codon optimization and attachment of a 9-residue bovine rhodopsin affinity tag for detection and purification. Induction of adherent cultures with tetracycline together with sodium butyrate led to hOR17-4 expression levels of approximately 30 microg per 150 mm tissue culture plate. Fos-choline-based detergents proved highly capable of extracting the receptors, and fos-choline-14 (N-tetradecylphosphocholine) was selected for optimal solubilization and subsequent purification. Analysis by SDS-PAGE revealed both monomeric and dimeric receptor forms, as well as higher MW oligomeric species. A two-step purification method of immunoaffinity and size exclusion chromatography was optimized which enabled 0.13 milligrams of hOR17-4 monomer to be obtained at >90% purity. This high purity of hOR17-4 is not only suitable for secondary structural and functional analyses but also for subsequent crystallization trials. Thus, this system demonstrates the feasibility of purifying milligram quantities of the GPCR membrane protein hOR17-4 for fabrication of olfactory receptor-based bionic sensing device.

  18. Thermal or mechanical stimuli-induced photoluminescence color change of a molecular assembly composed of an amphiphilic anthracene derivative in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagara, Yoshimitsu; Komatsu, Toru; Terai, Takuya; Ueno, Tasuku; Hanaoka, Kenjiro; Kato, Takashi; Nagano, Tetsuo

    2014-08-11

    Molecular assemblies that change photoluminescence color in response to thermal or mechanical stimulation without dissociation into the monomeric states in water are described herein. A dumbbell-shaped amphiphilic compound forms micellar molecular assemblies in water and exhibits yellow photoluminescence derived from excimer formation of the luminescent core, which contains a 2,6-diethynylanthracene moiety. Annealing of the aqueous solution induces a photoluminescence color change from yellow to green (λem, max =558→525 nm). The same photoluminescence color change is also achieved by rubbing the yellow-photoluminescence-emitting molecular assemblies adsorbed on glass substrates with cotton wool in water. The observed green photoluminescence is ascribed to micelles that are distinct from the yellow-photoluminescence-emitting micelles, on the basis of transmission electron microscopy observations, atomic force microscopy observations, and dynamic light scattering measurements. We examined the relationship between the structure of the molecular assemblies and the photophysical properties of the anthracene derivative in water before and after thermal or mechanical stimulation and concluded that thermal or mechanical stimuli-induced slight changes of the molecular-assembled structures in the micelles result in the change in the photoluminescence color from yellow to green in water. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Inhibition of β-amyloid Aggregation By Albiflorin, Aloeemodin And Neohesperidin And Their Neuroprotective Effect On Primary Hippocampal Cells Against β-amyloid Induced Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, See-Lok; Poon, Chung-Yan; Lin, Chengyuan; Yan, Ting; Kwong, Daniel Wai-Jing; Yung, Ken Kin-Lam; Wong, Man S; Bian, Zhaoxiang; Li, Hung-Wing

    2015-01-01

    Being one of the hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease, β-amyloid (Aβ) aggregates induce complicated neurotoxicity. Evidences show that the underlying mechanism of neurotoxicity involves a glutamate receptor subtype, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor, an increase in intracellular calcium(II) ion loading as well as an elevation in oxidation stress. In this work, among the 35 chemical components of Chinese herbal medicines (CHMs) being screened for inhibitors of Aβ aggregation, four of them, namely albiflorin, aloeemodin, neohesperidin and physcion, were found for the first time to exhibit a potent inhibitory effect on Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) aggregation. Their neuroprotective capability on primary hippocampal neuronal cells was also investigated by MTT assay, ROS assay and intracellular calcium(II) ion concentration measurement. It was interesting to find that physcion was rather toxic to neuronal cells while albiflorin, aloeemodin and neohesperidin reduced the toxicity and ROS induced by both monomeric and oligomeric Aβ species. In addition, albiflorin was particularly powerful in maintaining the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration.

  20. Immunization with recombinantly expressed glycan antigens from Schistosoma mansoni induces glycan-specific antibodies against the parasite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanphanich, Nina Salinger; Luyai, Anthony E; Song, Xuezheng; Heimburg-Molinaro, Jamie; Mandalasi, Msano; Mickum, Megan; Smith, David F; Nyame, A Kwame; Cummings, Richard D

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis caused by infection with parasitic helminths of Schistosoma spp. is a major global health problem due to inadequate treatment and lack of a vaccine. The immune response to schistosomes includes glycan antigens, which could be valuable diagnostic markers and vaccine targets. However, no precedent exists for how to design vaccines targeting eukaryotic glycoconjugates. The di- and tri-saccharide motifs LacdiNAc (GalNAcβ1,4GlcNAc; LDN) and fucosylated LacdiNAc (GalNAcβ1,4(Fucα1-3)GlcNAc; LDNF) are the basis for several important schistosome glycan antigens. They occur in monomeric form or as repeating units (poly-LDNF) and as part of a variety of different glycoconjugates. Because chemical synthesis and conjugation of such antigens is exceedingly difficult, we sought to develop a recombinant expression system for parasite glycans. We hypothesized that presentation of parasite glycans on the cell surface would induce glycan-specific antibodies. We generated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) Lec8 cell lines expressing poly-LDN (L8-GT) and poly-LDNF (L8-GTFT) abundantly on their membrane glycoproteins. Sera from Schistosoma mansoni-infected mice were highly cross-reactive with the cells and with cell-surface N-glycans. Immunizing mice with L8-GT and L8-GTFT cells induced glycan-specific antibodies. The L8-GTFT cells induced a sustained booster response, with antibodies that bound to S. mansoni lysates and recapitulated the exquisite specificity of the anti-parasite response for particular presentations of LDNF antigen. In summary, this recombinant expression system promotes successful generation of antibodies to the glycans of S. mansoni, and it can be adapted to study the role of glycan antigens and anti-glycan immune responses in many other infections and pathologies. PMID:24727440

  1. Bromazepam-induced dystonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Trullen, J M; Modrego Pardo, P J; Vázquez André, M; López Lozano, J J

    1992-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are drugs with a good tolerance that are widely used for the treatment of anxiety. Extrapyramidal side-effects are unusual. Diazepam is effective for the treatment of drug-induced dystonias, nevertheless there are some reports of Diazepam-induced dystonia. We report a case history of a patient who developed oromandibular dystonia after taking Bromazepam. The possible mechanisms that cause drug-induced dystonia are described.

  2. Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cryopyrin-Associated Autoinflammatory Syndrome (CAPS) (Juvenile) Dermatomyositis (Juvenile) Familial Mediterranean Fever (Juvenile) Fibromyalgia Giant Cell Arteritis Glucocorticoid-induced Osteoperosis ...

  3. Induced radioactivity at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    1970-01-01

    A description of some of the problems and some of the advantages associated with the phenomenon of induced radioactivity at accelerator centres such as CERN. The author has worked in this field for several years and has recently written a book 'Induced Radioactivity' published by North-Holland.

  4. Diet induced thermogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K.R.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Daily energy expenditure consists of three components: basal metabolic rate, diet-induced thermogenesis and the energy cost of physical activity. Here, data on diet-induced thermogenesis are reviewed in relation to measuring conditions and characteristics of the diet. METHODS: Measuring c

  5. Diet induced thermogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K.R.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Daily energy expenditure consists of three components: basal metabolic rate, diet-induced thermogenesis and the energy cost of physical activity. Here, data on diet-induced thermogenesis are reviewed in relation to measuring conditions and characteristics of the diet. METHODS: Measuring

  6. Mesalamine-Induced Myocarditis

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre-Louis Michel; Richard Dorent; Nadjib Hammoudi; Florence Pontnau; Antoine Khalil; Clement Bailly; Olivier Merceron

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays mesalamine is a common treatment for Crohn's disease and hypersensitive reactions to this product have been reported. Yet there is limited information concerning mesalamine-induced myocarditis and its mechanism is not known. We described a case of mesalamine-induced myocarditis in Crohn's disease of the colon.

  7. Mesalamine-Induced Myocarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Merceron

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays mesalamine is a common treatment for Crohn's disease and hypersensitive reactions to this product have been reported. Yet there is limited information concerning mesalamine-induced myocarditis and its mechanism is not known. We described a case of mesalamine-induced myocarditis in Crohn's disease of the colon.

  8. Diet induced thermogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westerterp KR

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective Daily energy expenditure consists of three components: basal metabolic rate, diet-induced thermogenesis and the energy cost of physical activity. Here, data on diet-induced thermogenesis are reviewed in relation to measuring conditions and characteristics of the diet. Methods Measuring conditions include nutritional status of the subject, physical activity and duration of the observation. Diet characteristics are energy content and macronutrient composition. Results Most studies measure diet-induced thermogenesis as the increase in energy expenditure above basal metabolic rate. Generally, the hierarchy in macronutrient oxidation in the postprandial state is reflected similarly in diet-induced thermogenesis, with the sequence alcohol, protein, carbohydrate, and fat. A mixed diet consumed at energy balance results in a diet induced energy expenditure of 5 to 15 % of daily energy expenditure. Values are higher at a relatively high protein and alcohol consumption and lower at a high fat consumption. Protein induced thermogenesis has an important effect on satiety. In conclusion, the main determinants of diet-induced thermogenesis are the energy content and the protein- and alcohol fraction of the diet. Protein plays a key role in body weight regulation through satiety related to diet-induced thermogenesis.

  9. Bleomycin-induced pneumonitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Sleijfer (Stefan)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe cytotoxic agent bleomycin is feared for its induction of sometimes fatal pulmonary toxicity, also known as bleomycin-induced pneumonitis (BIP). The central event in the development of BIP is endothelial damage of the lung vasculature due to bleomycin-induced cytokin

  10. Diet induced thermogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K.R.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Daily energy expenditure consists of three components: basal metabolic rate, diet-induced thermogenesis and the energy cost of physical activity. Here, data on diet-induced thermogenesis are reviewed in relation to measuring conditions and characteristics of the diet. METHODS: Measuring c

  11. Inflammatory and repair pathways induced in human bronchoalveolar lavage cells with ozone inhalation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale Leroy

    Full Text Available Inhalation of ambient levels of ozone causes airway inflammation and epithelial injury.To examine the responses of airway cells to ozone-induced oxidative injury, 19 subjects (7 with asthma were exposed to clean air (0ppb, medium (100ppb, and high (200ppb ambient levels of ozone for 4h on three separate occasions in a climate-controlled chamber followed by bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL 24h later. BAL cell mRNA expression was examined using Affymetrix GeneChip Microarray. The role of a differentially expressed gene (DEG in epithelial injury was evaluated in an in vitro model of injury [16HBE14o- cell line scratch assay].Ozone exposure caused a dose-dependent up-regulation of several biologic pathways involved in inflammation and repair including chemokine and cytokine secretion, activity, and receptor binding; metalloproteinase and endopeptidase activity; adhesion, locomotion, and migration; and cell growth and tumorigenesis regulation. Asthmatic subjects had 1.7- to 3.8-fold higher expression of many DEGs suggestive of increased proinflammatory and matrix degradation and remodeling signals. The most highly up-regulated gene was osteopontin, the protein level of which in BAL fluid increased in a dose-dependent manner after ozone exposure. Asthmatic subjects had a disproportionate increase in non-polymerized osteopontin with increasing exposure to ozone. Treatment with polymeric, but not monomeric, osteopontin enhanced the migration of epithelial cells and wound closure in an α9β1 integrin-dependent manner.Expression profiling of BAL cells after ozone exposure reveals potential regulatory genes and pathways activated by oxidative stress. One DEG, osteopontin, promotes epithelial wound healing in an in vitro model of injury.

  12. O-Glycosylated IgA Rheumatoid Factor Induces IgA Deposits and Glomerulonephritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Masako; Nakata, Junichiro; Kihara, Masao; Leroy, Valérie; Moll, Solange; Wada, Yoshinao

    2012-01-01

    Structural aberrations of O-linked glycans present in the IgA1 hinge region are associated with IgA nephropathy, but their contribution to its pathogenesis remains incompletely understood. In this study, mice implanted with hybridoma secreting 6-19 IgA anti-IgG2a rheumatoid factor, but not 46-42 IgA rheumatoid factor bearing the same IgA allotype, developed mesangial deposits consisting of IgA, IgG2a, and C3. Studies in immunoglobulin- and C3-deficient mice revealed that the development of these glomerular lesions required the formation of IgA-IgG2a immune complexes and subsequent activation of complement. The proportion of polymeric and monomeric forms, the IgG2a-binding affinity, and the serum levels of IgA-IgG2a immune complexes were similar between 6-19 IgA– and 46-42 IgA–injected mice. In contrast, the analysis of oligosaccharide structures revealed highly galactosylated O-linked glycans in the hinge region of 6-19 IgA and poorly O-glycosylated in the hinge region of 46-42 IgA. Furthermore, the structure of N-linked glycans in the CH1 domain was the complex type in 6-19 IgA and the hybrid type in 46-42 IgA. In summary, this study demonstrates the presence of O-linked glycans in the hinge region of mouse IgA and suggests that 6-19 IgA rheumatoid factor–induced GN could serve as an experimental model for IgA nephropathy. PMID:22193386

  13. Thermal, chemical and pH induced unfolding of turmeric root lectin: modes of denaturation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himadri Biswas

    Full Text Available Curcuma longa rhizome lectin, of non-seed origin having antifungal, antibacterial and α-glucosidase inhibitory activities, forms a homodimer with high thermal stability as well as acid tolerance. Size exclusion chromatography and dynamic light scattering show it to be a dimer at pH 7, but it converts to a monomer near pH 2. Circular dichroism spectra and fluorescence emission maxima are virtually indistinguishable from pH 7 to 2, indicating secondary and tertiary structures remain the same in dimer and monomer within experimental error. The tryptophan environment as probed by acrylamide quenching data yielded very similar data at pH 2 and pH 7, implying very similar folding for monomer and dimer. Differential scanning calorimetry shows a transition at 350.3 K for dimer and at 327.0 K for monomer. Thermal unfolding and chemical unfolding induced by guanidinium chloride for dimer are both reversible and can be described by two-state models. The temperatures and the denaturant concentrations at which one-half of the protein molecules are unfolded, are protein concentration-dependent for dimer but protein concentration-independent for monomer. The free energy of unfolding at 298 K was found to be 5.23 Kcal mol-1 and 14.90 Kcal mol-1 for the monomer and dimer respectively. The value of change in excess heat capacity upon protein denaturation (ΔCp is 3.42 Kcal mol-1 K-1 for dimer. The small ΔCp for unfolding of CLA reflects a buried hydrophobic core in the folded dimeric protein. These unfolding experiments, temperature dependent circular dichroism and dynamic light scattering for the dimer at pH 7 indicate its higher stability than for the monomer at pH 2. This difference in stability of dimeric and monomeric forms highlights the contribution of inter-subunit interactions in the former.

  14. Beta-glucan from Saccharomyces cerevisiae reduces plasma lipid peroxidation induced by haloperidol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich-Muszalska, Anna; Olas, Beata; Kontek, Bogdan; Rabe-Jabłońska, Jolanta

    2011-07-01

    Since oxidative stress observed in schizophrenia may be caused partially by the treatment of patients with various antipsychotics, the aim of the study was to establish the effects of beta-d-glucan, polysaccharide derived from the yeast cell walls of species such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the antipsychotics (the first generation antipsychotic (FGA) - haloperidol and the second generation antipsychotic (SGA) - amisulpride) action on plasma lipid peroxidation in vitro. Lipid peroxidation in human plasma was measured by the level of thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS). The samples of plasma from healthy subjects were incubated with haloperidol or amisulpride in the presence of beta-glucan (4 μg/ml). The action of beta-d-glucan was also compared with the properties of a well characterized commercial monomeric polyphenol - resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene, the final concentration - 4 μg/ml). The two-way analysis variance showed that the differences in TBARS levels were depended on the type of tested drugs (p=7.9 × 10(-6)). We observed a statistically increase of the level of biomarker of lipid peroxidation such as TBARS after 1 and 24h incubation of plasma with haloperidol compared to the control samples (p0.05). We showed that in the presence of beta-glucan, lipid peroxidation in plasma samples treated with haloperidol was significantly decreased. Moreover, we did not observe the synergistic action of beta-glucan and amisulpride on the inhibition of plasma lipid peroxidation. However, the beta-d-glucan was found to be more effective antioxidant, than the solution of pure resveratrol. The presented results indicate that beta-glucan seems to have distinctly protective effects against the impairment of plasma lipid molecules induced by haloperidol.

  15. Chemoprevention by grape seed extract and genistein in carcinogen-induced mammary cancer in rats is diet dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Helen; Hall, Patti; Smith, Michelle; Kirk, Marion; Prasain, Jeevan K; Barnes, Stephen; Grubbs, Clinton

    2004-12-01

    Many popular dietary supplements are enriched in polyphenols such as the soy isoflavones, tea catechins, and resveratrol (from grape skins), each of which has been shown to have chemopreventive activity in cellular models of cancer. The proanthocyanidins, which are oligomers of the catechins, are enriched in grape seeds and form the basis of the dietary supplement grape seed extract (GSE). Evidence suggests that the proanthocyanidins may be metabolized to the monomeric catechins. This study was carried out to determine whether GSE added to rodent diets protected against carcinogen-induced mammary tumorigenesis in rats and whether this was affected by the composition of the whole diet. Female rats were begun on 5%, 1.25%, or 0% (control) GSE-supplemented diets at age 35 d. At age 50 d they were administered 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) in sesame oil at 80 mg/kg body weight. They were weighed and monitored weekly for tumor development until 120 d after DMBA administration. Administration of GSE in AIN-76A diet did not show any protective activity of GSE against DMBA-induced breast cancer. However, administration of GSE in a laboratory dry food diet (Teklad 4% rodent diet) resulted in a 50% reduction in tumor multiplicity. In similar experiments, genistein administered in AIN-76A diet also failed to show chemopreventive activity against the carcinogen N-methyl-N-nitrosourea; however, when administered at the same dose in the Teklad 4% rodent diet, genistein exhibited significant chemopreventive activity (44-61%). These results demonstrate that GSE is chemopreventive in an animal model of breast cancer; moreover, the diet dependency of the chemopreventive activity for both GSE and genistein suggests that whether or not a compound is chemopreventive may depend on the diet in which the agent is administered.

  16. Conditioning of Parsley (Petroselinum crispum L.) Suspension Cells Increases Elicitor-Induced Incorporation of Cell Wall Phenolics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauss, H.; Franke, R.; Krause, K.; Conrath, U.; Jeblick, W.; Grimmig, B.; Matern, U.

    1993-06-01

    The elicitor-induced incorporation of phenylpropanoid derivatives into the cell wall and the secretion of soluble coumarin derivatives (phytoalexins) by parsley (Petroselinum crispum L.) suspension cultures can be potentiated by pretreatment of the cultures with 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid or derivatives of salicylic acid. To investigate this phenomenon further, the cell walls and an extracellular soluble polymer were isolated from control cells or cells treated with an elicitor from Phytophthora megasperma f. sp. glycinea. After alkaline hydrolysis, both fractions from elicited cells showed a greatly increased content of 4-coumaric, ferulic, and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, as well as 4-hydroxybenzaldehyde and vanillin. Two minor peaks were identified as tyrosol and methoxytyrosol. The pretreatment effect is most pronounced at a low elicitor concentration. Its specificity was elaborated for coumarin secretion. When the parsley suspension cultures were preincubated for 1 d with 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic, 4- or 5-chlorosalicylic, or 3,5- dichlorosalicylic acid, the cells exhibited a greatly increased elicitor response. Pretreatment with isonicotinic, salicylic, acetylsalicylic, or 2,6-dihydroxybenzoic acid was less efficient in enhancing the response, and some other isomers were inactive. This increase in elicitor response was also observed for the above-mentioned monomeric phenolics, which were liberated from cell walls upon alkaline hydrolysis and for "lignin-like" cell wall polymers determined by the thioglycolic acid method. It was shown for 5-chlorosalicylic acid that conditioning most likely improves the signal transduction leading to the activation of genes encoding phenylalanine ammonia lyase and 4-coumarate: coenzyme A ligase. The conditioning thus sensitizes the parsley suspension cells to respond to lower elicitor concentrations. If a similar mechanism were to apply to whole plants treated with 2,6-dichloroisonicotinic acid, a known inducer of systemic

  17. Mania induced by opipramol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazhungil Firoz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Antidepressants have propensity to induce manic switch in patients with bipolar disorder. Opipramol is an atypical anxiolytic and antidepressant drug which predominantly acts on sigma receptors. Although structurally resembles tricyclic antidepressant imipramine it does not have inhibitory action on the reuptake of norepinephrine/serotonin and hence it is not presumed to cause manic switch in bipolar depression. Here, we describe a case of mania induced by opipramol, in a patient with bipolar affective disorder who was treated for moderate depressive episode with lithium and opipramol and we discuss neurochemical hypothesis of opipramol-induced mania.

  18. Topological Induced Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Oda, Ichiro

    2016-01-01

    We propose a topological model of induced gravity (pregeometry) where both Newton's coupling constant and the cosmological constant appear as integration constants in solving field equations. The matter sector of a scalar field is also considered, and by solving field equations it is shown that various types of cosmological solutions in the FRW universe can be obtained. A detailed analysis is given of the meaning of the BRST transformations, which make the induced gravity be a topological field theory, by means of the canonical quantization analysis, and the physical reason why such BRST transformations are needed in the present formalism is clarified. Finally, we propose a dynamical mechanism for fixing the Lagrange multiplier fields by following the Higgs mechanism. The present study clearly indicates that the induced gravity can be constructed at the classical level without recourse to quantum fluctuations of matter and suggests an interesting relationship between the induced gravity and the topological qu...

  19. Optomechanically induced transparency

    CERN Document Server

    Weis, S; Deleglise, S; Gavartin, E; Arcizet, O; Schliesser, A; Kippenberg, T J

    2010-01-01

    Coherent interaction of laser radiation with multilevel atoms and molecules can lead to quantum interference in the electronic excitation pathways. A prominent example observed in atomic three-level-systems is the phenomenon of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), in which a control laser induces a narrow spectral transparency window for a weak probe laser beam. The concomitant rapid variation of the refractive index in this spectral window can give rise to dramatic reduction of the group velocity of a propagating pulse of probe light. Dynamic control of EIT via the control laser enables even a complete stop, that is, storage, of probe light pulses in the atomic medium. Here, we demonstrate optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT)--formally equivalent to EIT--in a cavity optomechanical system operating in the resolved sideband regime. A control laser tuned to the lower motional sideband of the cavity resonance induces a dipole-like interaction of optical and mechanical degrees of freedom. Under...

  20. Exercise-induced asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000036.htm Exercise-induced asthma To use the sharing features on this page, ... such as running, basketball, or soccer. Use Your Asthma Medicine Before you Exercise Take your short-acting, ...

  1. Cold-induced metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lichtenbelt, W. van Marken; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose of review Cold response can be insulative (drop in peripheral temperature) or metabolic (increase in energy expenditure). Nonshivering thermogenesis by sympathetic, norepinephrine-induced mitochondrial heat production in brown adipose tissue is a well known component of this metabolic

  2. Glucocorticoid-Induced Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also is approved for treatment of glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis. This manmade form of parathyroid hormone helps stimulate bone formation. Women planning a pregnancy should talk to their doctor about the pros ...

  3. Trauma-induced coagulopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katrancha, Elizabeth D; Gonzalez, Luis S

    2014-08-01

    Coagulopathy is the inability of blood to coagulate normally; in trauma patients, it is a multifactorial and complex process. Seriously injured trauma patients experience coagulopathies during the acute injury phase. Risk factors for trauma-induced coagulopathy include hypothermia, metabolic acidosis, hypoperfusion, hemodilution, and fluid replacement. In addition to the coagulopathy induced by trauma, many patients may also be taking medications that interfere with hemostasis. Therefore, medication-induced coagulopathy also is a concern. Traditional laboratory-based methods of assessing coagulation are being supported or even replaced by point-of-care tests. The evidence-based management of trauma-induced coagulopathy should address hypothermia, fluid resuscitation, blood components administration, and, if needed, medications to reverse identified coagulation disorders.

  4. Cold-induced metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Marken Lichtenbelt, W.D.; Daanen, A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Cold-induced metabolism. van Marken Lichtenbelt WD, Daanen HA. Department of Human Biology, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands. PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Cold response can be insulative (drop in peripheral temperature) or metabolic (increase in energy expenditure). Nonshivering thermogenesi

  5. Drug-induced hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toxic hepatitis ... to get liver damage. Some drugs can cause hepatitis with small doses, even if the liver breakdown ... liver. Many different drugs can cause drug-induced hepatitis. Painkillers and fever reducers that contain acetaminophen are ...

  6. Vitiligo, drug induced (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this person's face have resulted from drug-induced vitiligo. Loss of melanin, the primary skin pigment, occasionally ... is the case with this individual. The typical vitiligo lesion is flat and depigmented, but maintains the ...

  7. Drug-induced catatonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggal, Harpreet S; Singh, Ira

    2005-09-01

    Catatonia is a heterogeneous syndrome that varies in etiology, presentation, course and sequelae. Initially conceptualized as a subtype of schizophrenia, catatonia is now recognized to occur not only with other psychiatric conditions but also with medical conditions and drug-induced and toxic states. While drug-induced catatonia is now a recognized entity, most studies club it with catatonia due to general medical conditions or organic catatonia, thus precluding any meaningful interpretation of such cases. The literature on drug-induced catatonia mostly draws from scattered case reports. This article attempts to review the available literature in this realm and integrate the information in an attempt to explore the epidemiology, etiology, mechanism and treatment of drug-induced catatonia.

  8. Carbamazepine-Induced Diarrhea

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1992-01-01

    Intractable diarrhea induced by carbamazepine (CBZ) in 3 patients and necessitating discontinuation of the drug is reported from the Departments of Neurology and Medicine, University of Louisville School of Medicine, Kentucky.

  9. Lorazepam-induced diplopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucca, Jisha M; Ramesh, Madhan; Parthasarathi, Gurumurthy; Ram, Dushad

    2014-01-01

    Diplopia - seeing double - is a symptom with many potential causes, both neurological and ophthalmological. Benzodiazepine induced ocular side-effects are rarely reported. Lorazepam is one of the commonly used benzodiazepine in psychiatric practice. Visual problems associated with administration of lorazepam are rarely reported and the frequency of occurrence is not established. We report a rare case of lorazepam-induced diplopia in a newly diagnosed case of obsessive compulsive disorder.

  10. Lorazepam-induced diplopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jisha M Lucca

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diplopia - seeing double - is a symptom with many potential causes, both neurological and ophthalmological. Benzodiazepine induced ocular side-effects are rarely reported. Lorazepam is one of the commonly used benzodiazepine in psychiatric practice. Visual problems associated with administration of lorazepam are rarely reported and the frequency of occurrence is not established. We report a rare case of lorazepam-induced diplopia in a newly diagnosed case of obsessive compulsive disorder.

  11. Terahertz field induced electromigration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strikwerda, Andrew; Zalkovskij, Maksim; Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof;

    We report the first observation of THz-field-induced electromigration in sub-wavelength metallic gap structures after exposure to intense single-cycle, sub-picosecond electric field transients of amplitude up to 400 kV/cm.......We report the first observation of THz-field-induced electromigration in sub-wavelength metallic gap structures after exposure to intense single-cycle, sub-picosecond electric field transients of amplitude up to 400 kV/cm....

  12. Paroxetine-induced galactorrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulati, Prannay; Chavan, B S; Das, Subhash

    2014-10-01

    Drug-induced galactorrhea has been reported with agents such as antidopaminergic antiemetics, antipsychotics, etc., with few case reports of galactorrhea with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, including paroxetine, being reported in last few decades. Prolactin levels have been found to be either raised or normal in these cases. We here report a case of paroxetine induced galactorrhea in a 48-year-old female patient of obsessive compulsive disorder, having hyperprolactinemic and euprolactinemic galactorrhea at different time with a pituitary incidentaloma.

  13. Paroxetine-induced galactorrhea

    OpenAIRE

    Gulati, Prannay; Chavan, B.S.; Das, Subhash

    2014-01-01

    Drug-induced galactorrhea has been reported with agents such as antidopaminergic antiemetics, antipsychotics, etc., with few case reports of galactorrhea with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, including paroxetine, being reported in last few decades. Prolactin levels have been found to be either raised or normal in these cases. We here report a case of paroxetine induced galactorrhea in a 48-year-old female patient of obsessive compulsive disorder, having hyperprolactinemic and euprola...

  14. Contrast-induced nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo A. García Hernández

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Contrast-induced nephropathy is an important complication associated with the use of contrast media. Favoring factors for the development of contrast-induced nephronpathy have been widely described, being diabetes mellitus and previous renal disease the greatest risk. The pathophysiology is a complex process where the medullary hypoxia represents the trigger element. Previous hydration and the use of low osmolality contrast are the most recommended measures to prevent its development.

  15. Structural characteristics correlate with immune responses induced by HIV envelope glycoprotein vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Victoria A; Kan, Elaine; Sun, Yide; Lian, Ying; Cisto, Jimna; Frasca, Verna; Hilt, Susan; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Donnelly, John J; Ulmer, Jeffrey B; Barnett, Susan W; Srivastava, Indresh K

    2006-08-15

    HIV envelope glycoprotein (Env) is the target for inducing neutralizing antibodies. Env is present on the virus surface as a trimer, and, upon binding to CD4, a cascade of events leads to structural rearrangement exposing the co-receptor binding site and entry into the CD4+ host target cells. We have designed monomeric and trimeric Env constructs with and without deletion of the variable loop 2 (ΔV2) from SF162, a subtype B primary isolate, and performed biophysical, biochemical and immunological studies to establish a potential structure–functional relationship. We expressed these Envs in CHO cells, purified the proteins to homogeneity and performed biophysical studies to define the binding properties to CD4, structural characteristics and exposure of epitopes recognized by b12 and CD4i mAb (17B) on both full-length and mutant HIV Env proteins. Parameters evaluated include oligomerization state, number and affinity of CD4 binding sites, enthalpy and entropy of the Env–CD4 interaction and affinity for b12 and 17b mAbs. We observed one CD4 binding site per monomer and three active CD4 binding sites per trimer. A40-fold difference in affinity of the gp120 monomer vs. the o-gp140 trimer towards CD4 was observed (Kd = 58 nM and 1.5 nM, respectively),whereas only a 2-fold difference was observed for the V2 deleted Envs (Kd of gp120ΔV2 = 19 nM, Kd of o-gp140DV2 = 9.3 nM). Monomers had 3-fold higher affinity to the mAb 17b and at least 3-fold weaker affinity to b12 compared to trimers, with gp120DV2 having the weakest affinity for b12 (Kd = 446 nM). Affinity of CD4 binding correlated with proportion of the antibodies induced against the conformational epitopes by the corresponding Envs, and changes in mAb binding correlated with the induction of antibodies directed against linear epitopes. Furthermore,biophysical analysis reveals that the V2 deletion has broad structural implications in the monomer not shared by the trimer, and these changes are reflected in the

  16. Recombinant covalently closed circular hepatitis B virus DNA induces prolonged viral persistence in immunocompetent mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zhihua; Li, Gaiyun; Hu, Hao; Yang, Chunhui; Zhang, Xiaoming; Leng, Qibin; Xie, Youhua; Yu, Demin; Zhang, Xinxin; Gao, Yueqiu; Lan, Ke; Deng, Qiang

    2014-07-01

    It remains crucial to develop a laboratory model for studying hepatitis B virus (HBV) chronic infection. We hereby produced a recombinant covalently closed circular DNA (rcccDNA) in view of the key role of cccDNA in HBV persistence. A loxP-chimeric intron was engineered into a monomeric HBV genome in a precursor plasmid (prcccDNA), which was excised using Cre/loxP-mediated DNA recombination into a 3.3-kb rcccDNA in the nuclei of hepatocytes. The chimeric intron was spliced from RNA transcripts without interrupting the HBV life cycle. In cultured hepatoma cells, cotransfection of prcccDNA and pCMV-Cre (encoding Cre recombinase) resulted in accumulation of nuclear rcccDNA that was heat stable and epigenetically organized as a minichromosome. A mouse model of HBV infection was developed by hydrodynamic injection of prcccDNA. In the presence of Cre recombinase, rcccDNA was induced in the mouse liver with effective viral replication and expression, triggering a compromised T-cell response against HBV. Significant T-cell hyporesponsiveness occurred in mice receiving 4 μg prcccDNA, resulting in prolonged HBV antigenemia for up to 9 weeks. Persistent liver injury was observed as elevated alanine transaminase activity in serum and sustained inflammatory infiltration in the liver. Although a T-cell dysfunction was induced similarly, mice injected with a plasmid containing a linear HBV replicon showed rapid viral clearance within 2 weeks. Collectively, our study provides an innovative approach for producing a cccDNA surrogate that established HBV persistence in immunocompetent mice. It also represents a useful model system in vitro and in vivo for evaluating antiviral treatments against HBV cccDNA. Importance: (i) Unlike plasmids that contain a linear HBV replicon, rcccDNA established HBV persistence with sustained liver injury in immunocompetent mice. This method could be a prototype for developing a mouse model of chronic HBV infection. (ii) An exogenous intron was

  17. Fixed drug eruption induced by an iodinated non-ionic X-ray contrast medium: a practical approach to identify the causative agent and to prevent its recurrence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Ingrid; Block, Wolfgang; Schild, Hans H. [University of Bonn, Department of Radiology, Bonn (Germany); Medina, Jesus; Prieto, Pilar [JUSTESA IMAGEN SA, Biological R and D Department, Madrid (Spain)

    2007-02-15

    We describe the case of a 61-year-old physician who developed a fixed drug eruption (FDE) after i.v. administration of a non-ionic monomeric iodinated X-ray contrast medium (CM) (iopromide). During CM injection, a sensation of heat occurred, which was most intense in the right inguinal region. Four hours later, the FDE arose with a red macule of approximately 2 cm in diameter covering a dermal infiltration in the right inguinal region, and enlarged up to a final size of 15 x 8 cm, accompanied by a burning sensation. The patient's history revealed a similar reaction in the same localization and of the same clinical appearance after CM injection 1 year before. Patch testing 4 months later revealed positive reactions to iomeprol and iohexol. Iopamidol injection for another CT examination 23 months later was well tolerated. Based on these results, we suggest patch testing after CM-induced FDE, which could help to select a CM for future CT examinations. Late onset of adverse CM reactions may manifest as FDE. Patch testing within the previous skin reaction area is the diagnostic tool that should be used to confirm the suspected agent, possible cross-reacting agents and well-tolerated agents. (orig.)

  18. CAF-1-induced oligomerization of histones H3/H4 and mutually exclusive interactions with Asf1 guide H3/H4 transitions among histone chaperones and DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wallace H; Roemer, Sarah C; Port, Alex M; Churchill, Mair E A

    2012-12-01

    Anti-silencing function 1 (Asf1) and Chromatin Assembly Factor 1 (CAF-1) chaperone histones H3/H4 during the assembly of nucleosomes on newly replicated DNA. To understand the mechanism of histone H3/H4 transfer among Asf1, CAF-1 and DNA from a thermodynamic perspective, we developed and employed biophysical approaches using full-length proteins in the budding yeast system. We find that the C-terminal tail of Asf1 enhances the interaction of Asf1 with CAF-1. Surprisingly, although H3/H4 also enhances the interaction of Asf1 with the CAF-1 subunit Cac2, H3/H4 forms a tight complex with CAF-1 exclusive of Asf1, with an affinity weaker than Asf1-H3/H4 or H3/H4-DNA interactions. Unlike Asf1, monomeric CAF-1 binds to multiple H3/H4 dimers, which ultimately promotes the formation of (H3/H4)(2) tetramers on DNA. Thus, transition of H3/H4 from the Asf1-associated dimer to the DNA-associated tetramer is promoted by CAF-1-induced H3/H4 oligomerization.

  19. Sulindac Sulfide Induces the Formation of Large Oligomeric Aggregates of the Alzheimer's Disease Amyloid-β Peptide Which Exhibit Reduced Neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prade, Elke; Barucker, Christian; Sarkar, Riddhiman; Althoff-Ospelt, Gerhard; Lopez del Amo, Juan Miguel; Hossain, Shireen; Zhong, Yifei; Multhaup, Gerd; Reif, Bernd

    2016-03-29

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by deposition of the amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) in brain tissue of affected individuals. In recent years, many potential lead structures have been suggested that can potentially be used for diagnosis and therapy. However, the mode of action of these compounds is so far not understood. Among these small molecules, the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) sulindac sulfide received a lot of attention. In this manuscript, we characterize the interaction between the monomeric Aβ peptide and the NSAID sulindac sulfide. We find that sulindac sulfide efficiently depletes the pool of toxic oligomers by enhancing the rate of fibril formation. In vitro, sulindac sulfide forms colloidal particles which catalyze the formation of fibrils. Aggregation is immediate, presumably by perturbing the supersaturated Aβ solution. We find that sulindac sulfide induced Aβ aggregates are structurally homogeneous. The C-terminal part of the peptide adopts a β-sheet structure, whereas the N-terminus is disordered. The salt bridge between D23 and K28 is present, similar as in wild type fibril structures. (13)C-(19)F transferred echo double resonance experiments suggest that sulindac sulfide colocalizes with the Aβ peptide in the aggregate.

  20. A Crystallin Fold in the Interleukin-4-inducing Principle of Schistosoma mansoni Eggs (IPSE/α-1) Mediates IgE Binding for Antigen-independent Basophil Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, N Helge; Mayerhofer, Hubert; Tripsianes, Konstantinos; Blindow, Silke; Barths, Daniela; Mewes, Astrid; Weimar, Thomas; Köhli, Thies; Bade, Steffen; Madl, Tobias; Frey, Andreas; Haas, Helmut; Mueller-Dieckmann, Jochen; Sattler, Michael; Schramm, Gabriele

    2015-09-04

    The IL-4-inducing principle from Schistosoma mansoni eggs (IPSE/α-1), the major secretory product of eggs from the parasitic worm S. mansoni, efficiently triggers basophils to release the immunomodulatory key cytokine interleukin-4. Activation by IPSE/α-1 requires the presence of IgE on the basophils, but the detailed molecular mechanism underlying activation is unknown. NMR and crystallographic analysis of IPSEΔNLS, a monomeric IPSE/α-1 mutant, revealed that IPSE/α-1 is a new member of the βγ-crystallin superfamily. We demonstrate that this molecule is a general immunoglobulin-binding factor with highest affinity for IgE. NMR binding studies of IPSEΔNLS with the 180-kDa molecule IgE identified a large positively charged binding surface that includes a flexible loop, which is unique to the IPSE/α-1 crystallin fold. Mutational analysis of amino acids in the binding interface showed that residues contributing to IgE binding are important for IgE-dependent activation of basophils. As IPSE/α-1 is unable to cross-link IgE, we propose that this molecule, by taking advantage of its unique IgE-binding crystallin fold, activates basophils by a novel, cross-linking-independent mechanism.

  1. Blue Maize Extract Improves Blood Pressure, Lipid Profiles, and Adipose Tissue in High-Sucrose Diet-Induced Metabolic Syndrome in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Gerónimo, Rosa Isela; Alarcón-Zavaleta, Tania Margarita; Oliart-Ros, Rosa María; Meza-Alvarado, José Enrique; Herrera-Meza, Socorro; Chávez-Servia, José Luis

    2017-02-01

    The effect of blue maize extract in factors related to metabolic syndrome (MS) in Wistar rats was investigated. Total polyphenols, monomeric anthocyanins, and antioxidant activity were analyzed in blue maize. MS was induced in Wistar rats fed with high-sucrose (HS) diet for 12 weeks. During a period of 4 weeks, blue maize extract was administrated to HS groups fed with high-sucrose and high-cholesterol-high-sucrose (HS+C) diets. In the blue maize extract administered by orogastric cannulation, the levels of total polyphenols and anthocyanins were 9.97 and 2.92 mg/kg of weight, respectively. HS diet administered during a period of 12 weeks increased significantly systolic blood pressure, serum triglycerides, and decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), alterations related to the MS. Abdominal adipose tissue was only increased in the HS + C group. Blue maize extract administration enhanced HDL-C and decreased systolic blood pressure, serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, and epididymal adipose tissue weight. The blue maize may represent a promising nutraceutical option for the treatment of MS.

  2. An RNA Aptamer Inhibits a Mutation-Induced Inactivating Misfolding of a Serpin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jeppe B; Andersen, Lisbeth M; Dupont, Daniel M

    2016-01-01

    to a more stable state during reaction with the target protease. However, the metastable state also makes serpins vulnerable to mutations, resulting in disease caused by inactive and misfolded monomeric or polymeric forms ("serpinopathy"). Misfolding can occur either intracellularly (type-I serpinopathies...

  3. Optically Induced Transparency

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Yuanlin; Shen, Zhenhua; Cao, Jianjun; Chen, Xianfeng; Liang, Xiaogan; Wan, Wenjie

    2015-01-01

    Light-matter-light interactions serve as the backbone technology of all-optical information processing for both on-chip and long-haul communication purposes. The representative example of electromagnetically induced transparency has its unique ability of optically controlling transparency windows with relative low light in atomic systems, though its practical applications are limited due to rigid experimental requirements. Here we demonstrate a new form of optically induced transparency in a micro-cavity by introducing four-wave mixing gain in order to couple nonlinearly two separated resonances of the micro-cavity in ambient environment. A signature Fano-like resonance is also observed owing to the nonlinear interference of two coupled resonances. Moreover, we show that the unidirectional gain of four-wave mixing can lead to non-reciprocal transmission at the transparency windows. Optically induced transparency may offer a unique platform for a compact, integrated solution to all-optical processing and quant...

  4. [Radiation induced tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez Bayard, L; Delgado López, L; Tirado Bejarano, C; Gómez Puerto, A; García Fernández, J L

    1998-04-01

    Radiations at cellular level produce different effects, depending on type of radiation and irradiated tissue. The radiation-induced cancers are associated to non-letals genetics mutations, and to classify like radiation induced tumors is necessary that appear in the treatment volume, a long latency period (years), histolo-different to the primary lesion, enough doses quantitatively and that exists a greater incidence in the irradiated populations. The genetics mutations affect at tumoral suppressors gen(Gen RB I, p53, BRCA I, BRCA 2) and repressors gen (hMSH 2, hMLH I,...), they could be longer and multifocals mutations, and produce lack of cellular control and a greater predisposition to develop tumors and a probable risk of increment of radiosensitivity. We present some of the more representatives studies about radiation-induced tumors.

  5. Time Domain Induced Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Anders Vest

    2012-01-01

    Time-domain-induced polarization has significantly broadened its field of reference during the last decade, from mineral exploration to environmental geophysics, e.g., for clay and peat identification and landfill characterization. Though, insufficient modeling tools have hitherto limited the use...... of time-domaininduced polarization for wider purposes. For these reasons, a new forward code and inversion algorithm have been developed using the full-time decay of the induced polarization response, together with an accurate description of the transmitter waveform and of the receiver transfer function......%. Furthermore, the presence of low-pass filters in time-domain-induced polarization instruments affects the early times of the acquired decays (typically up to 100 ms) and has to be modeled in the forward response to avoid significant loss of resolution. The developed forward code has been implemented in a 1D...

  6. Crystalglobulin-induced nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vinay; El Ters, Mireille; Kashani, Kianoush; Leung, Nelson; Nasr, Samih H

    2015-03-01

    Crystalline nephropathy refers to renal parenchymal deposition of crystals leading to kidney damage. The most common forms of crystalline nephropathy encountered in renal pathology are nephrocalcinosis and oxalate nephropathy. Less frequent types include urate nephropathy, cystinosis, dihydroxyadeninuria, and drug-induced crystalline nephropathy (e.g., caused by indinavir or triamterene). Monoclonal proteins can also deposit in the kidney as crystals and cause tissue damage. This occurs in conditions such as light chain proximal tubulopathy, crystal-storing histiocytosis, and crystalglobulinemia. The latter is a rare complication of multiple myeloma that results from crystallization of monoclonal proteins in the systemic vasculature, leading to vascular injury, thrombosis, and occlusion. In this report, we describe a case of crystalglobulin-induced nephropathy and discuss its pathophysiology and the differential diagnosis of paraprotein-induced crystalline nephropathy.

  7. Gravitationally induced quantum transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, A.; Paranjape, M. B.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we calculate the probability for resonantly inducing transitions in quantum states due to time-dependent gravitational perturbations. Contrary to common wisdom, the probability of inducing transitions is not infinitesimally small. We consider a system of ultracold neutrons, which are organized according to the energy levels of the Schrödinger equation in the presence of the Earth's gravitational field. Transitions between energy levels are induced by an oscillating driving force of frequency ω . The driving force is created by oscillating a macroscopic mass in the neighborhood of the system of neutrons. The neutron lifetime is approximately 880 sec while the probability of transitions increases as t2. Hence, the optimal strategy is to drive the system for two lifetimes. The transition amplitude then is of the order of 1.06 ×10-5, and hence with a million ultracold neutrons, one should be able to observe transitions.

  8. Gravitationally induced quantum transitions

    CERN Document Server

    Landry, A

    2016-01-01

    In this letter, we calculate the probability for resonantly induced transitions in quantum states due to time dependent gravitational perturbations. Contrary to common wisdom, the probability of inducing transitions is not infinitesimally small. We consider a system of ultra cold neutrons (UCN), which are organized according to the energy levels of the Schr\\"odinger equation in the presence of the earth's gravitational field. Transitions between energy levels are induced by an oscillating driving force of frequency $\\omega$. The driving force is created by oscillating a macroscopic mass in the neighbourhood of the system of neutrons. The neutrons decay in 880 seconds while the probability of transitions increase as $t^2$. Hence the optimal strategy is to drive the system for 2 lifetimes. The transition amplitude then is of the order of $1.06\\times 10^{-5}$ hence with a million ultra cold neutrons, one should be able to observe transitions.

  9. Induced Norm Control Toolbox

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beran, Eric Bengt

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the basic nature of the InducedNorm Control Toolbox (INCT). The toolbox is a set of Matlab-filesusing LMITOOL and the Semidefinite Programming package(SP). Thetoolbox is public domain. The INCT provides a series of analysisand synthesis tools for continuous time-invariant lin......This paper describes the basic nature of the InducedNorm Control Toolbox (INCT). The toolbox is a set of Matlab-filesusing LMITOOL and the Semidefinite Programming package(SP). Thetoolbox is public domain. The INCT provides a series of analysisand synthesis tools for continuous time...

  10. Olmesartan-Induced Enteropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adike, Abimbola; Corral, Juan; Rybnicek, David; Sussman, Daniel; Shah, Samir; Quigley, Eamonn

    2016-01-01

    Olmesartan-induced enteropathy mimics celiac disease clinically and pathologically. As in celiac disease, the pathologic findings are villous atrophy and increased intraepithelial lymphocytes. Clinical presentation of olmesartan-induced enteropathy includes diarrhea, weight loss, and nausea. In contrast to celiac disease, tissue transglutaminase is not elevated and there is no response to a gluten-free diet. Including this entity in the differential diagnosis of sprue-like enteropathy is critical for its early diagnosis since replacing olmesartan with an alternative antihypertensive drug can simplify the diagnostic workup and provide both clinical and histologic improvement.

  11. Rosuvastatin-induced pemphigoid.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murad, Aizuri A

    2012-01-01

    Statins are widely prescribed medications and very well tolerated. Rosuvastatin is another member of this drug used to treat dyslipidaemia. It is a competitive inhibitor of the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase. Immunobullous disease is usually idiopathic but can be drug-induced. Both idiopathic and iatrogenic forms share common clinical and immunohistological features. The authors report a case of pemphigoid induced by rosuvastatin, a commonly prescribed medication. To our knowledge, there is limited report on rosuvastatin associated with pemphigoid in the literature.

  12. Wheat induced urticaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uppal Monica

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Wheat is widely consumed all over India in various forms - flour, daliya, maida, suji and wheat bran. Very few cases of wheat induced urticaria have been reported. This may be due to unusual features of wheat related hypersensitivity. A 35 year old female presented to us with history of chronic urticaria and angioedema. History revealed correlation between wheat intake and urticaria episodes. Prick testing was done with wheat antigen in the standard series and derivatives of raw wheat. Normal saline and histamine were used as controls. Prick testing was positive. Oral challenge induced urticaria within half an hour. This report discusses clinical features of wheat related hypersensitivity.

  13. Mild induced hypothermia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Maria E; Jensen, Jens-Ulrik; Bestle, Morten H

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Coagulopathy associates with poor outcome in sepsis. Mild induced hypothermia has been proposed as treatment in sepsis but it is not known whether this intervention worsens functional coagulopathy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Interim analysis data from an ongoing randomized controlled tr...

  14. Advertising-Induced Embarrassment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puntoni, S.; Hooge, de I.E.; Verbeke, W.J.M.I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Consumer embarrassment is a concern for many advertisers. Yet little is known about ad-induced embarrassment. The authors investigate when and why consumers experience embarrassment as a result of exposure to socially sensitive advertisements. The theory distinguishes between viewing potent

  15. Ergotamine-induced colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörmann, B; Höchter, W; Seib, H J; Ottenjann, R

    1985-07-01

    We report on a 45-year-old woman with ulcerative colitis of the rectum that arose after the use of up to 6 suppositories of a preparation containing ergotamine daily over a period of 6 years. On the basis of a review of the literature the clinical, endoscopic and histological features of the ergotamine-induced colitis are characterized.

  16. Induced Angular Momentum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses, classically and quantum mechanically, the angular momentum induced in the bound motion of an electron by an external magnetic field. Calculates the current density and its magnetic moment, and then uses two methods to solve the first-order perturbation theory equation for the required eigenfunction. (Author/GA)

  17. Amlodipine induced gingival enlargement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shankar Gittaboyina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced gingival overgrowth or enlargement is an abnormal growth of the gingiva due to an adverse drug reaction in patients treated with anticonvulsants, immunosuppressants, and calcium channel blockers (CCBs. CCBs are considered as one of the etiologic factors among patients seeking dental care for drug-induced gingival enlargement or overgrowth. This enlargement can be localized or generalized and can range from mild to extremely severe, affecting patient's appearance, and function. CCBs are one of the most commonly used drugs for the management of cardiovascular disorders and are known for causing gingival over growth. Amlodipine is a new CCB and has been used with increasing frequency in the management of hypertension and angina. Although amlodipine is considered as a safe drug, very rarely it may induce gingival overgrowth. A rare case of amlodipine-induced gingival overgrowth has been reported herein a 45-year-old female patient. The treatment aspect included scaling and root planing, substitution of the drug, the surgical excision, and the maintenance and supportive therapy resulting in an excellent clinical outcome.

  18. Cold-induced metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lichtenbelt, W. van Marken; Daanen, H.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose of review Cold response can be insulative (drop in peripheral temperature) or metabolic (increase in energy expenditure). Nonshivering thermogenesis by sympathetic, norepinephrine-induced mitochondrial heat production in brown adipose tissue is a well known component of this metabolic respon

  19. Geomagnetism and Induced Voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Razzaq, W.; Biller, R. D.

    2010-01-01

    Introductory physics laboratories have seen an influx of "conceptual integrated science" over time in their classrooms with elements of other sciences such as chemistry, biology, Earth science, and astronomy. We describe a laboratory to introduce this development, as it attracts attention to the voltage induced in the human brain as it…

  20. Inducible laryngeal obstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halvorsen, Thomas; Walsted, Emil Schwarz; Bucca, Caterina

    2017-01-01

    Inducible laryngeal obstruction (ILO) describes an inappropriate, transient, reversible narrowing of the larynx in response to external triggers. ILO is an important cause of a variety of respiratory symptoms and can mimic asthma. Current understanding of ILO has been hampered by imprecise nomenc...

  1. Bacteriocin Inducer Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novel peptides produced by bacteriocin-producing bacteria stimulate the production of bacteriocins in vitro. The producer bacteria are cultured in the presence of a novel inducer bacteria and a peptide having a carboxy terminal sequence of VKGLT in order to achieve an increase in bacteriocin produc...

  2. Advertising-Induced Embarrassment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puntoni, S.; Hooge, de I.E.; Verbeke, W.J.M.I.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Consumer embarrassment is a concern for many advertisers. Yet little is known about ad-induced embarrassment. The authors investigate when and why consumers experience embarrassment as a result of exposure to socially sensitive advertisements. The theory distinguishes between viewing potent

  3. Injection-induced earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, William L

    2013-07-12

    Earthquakes in unusual locations have become an important topic of discussion in both North America and Europe, owing to the concern that industrial activity could cause damaging earthquakes. It has long been understood that earthquakes can be induced by impoundment of reservoirs, surface and underground mining, withdrawal of fluids and gas from the subsurface, and injection of fluids into underground formations. Injection-induced earthquakes have, in particular, become a focus of discussion as the application of hydraulic fracturing to tight shale formations is enabling the production of oil and gas from previously unproductive formations. Earthquakes can be induced as part of the process to stimulate the production from tight shale formations, or by disposal of wastewater associated with stimulation and production. Here, I review recent seismic activity that may be associated with industrial activity, with a focus on the disposal of wastewater by injection in deep wells; assess the scientific understanding of induced earthquakes; and discuss the key scientific challenges to be met for assessing this hazard.

  4. Understanding induced seismicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsworth, Derek; Spiers, Christopher J.; Niemeijer, Andre R.

    2016-01-01

    Fluid injection–induced seismicity has become increasingly widespread in oil- and gas-producing areas of the United States (1–3) and western Canada. It has shelved deep geothermal energy projects in Switzerland and the United States (4), and its effects are especially acute in Oklahoma, where seismi

  5. Pyrazinamide induced thrombocytopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kant Surya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thrombocytopenia is an uncommon but potentially life-threatening complication of certain antitubercular drugs and is characterized by rapid destruction of platelets whenever offending drug is taken by a susceptible person. We report a case of pyrazinamide-induced thrombocytopenia in a patient receiving anti tubercular drugs.

  6. Understanding induced seismicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsworth, Derek; Spiers, Christopher J.; Niemeijer, Andre R.

    2016-01-01

    Fluid injection–induced seismicity has become increasingly widespread in oil- and gas-producing areas of the United States (1–3) and western Canada. It has shelved deep geothermal energy projects in Switzerland and the United States (4), and its effects are especially acute in Oklahoma, where

  7. Hyperthermia-induced apoptosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhuis, E.H.A.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis describes a number of studies that investigated several aspects of heat-induced apoptosis in human lymphoid malignancies. Cells harbour both pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins and the balance between these proteins determines whether a cell is susceptible to undergo apoptosis. In this

  8. Calotropis procera -induced keratitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey Nidhi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Calotropis procera produces copious amounts of latex, which has been shown to possess several pharmacological properities. Its local application produces intense inflammatory response. In the 10 cases of Calotropis procera -induced keratitis reported here, the clinical picture showed corneal edema with striate keratopathy without any evidence of intraocular inflammation. The inflammation was reversed by the local application of steroid drops.

  9. Drug-induced uveitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    A number of medications have been associated with uveitis. This review highlights both well-established and recently reported systemic, topical, intraocular, and vaccine-associated causes of drug-induced uveitis, and assigns a quantitative score to each medication based upon criteria originally described by Naranjo and associates. PMID:23522744

  10. Injection-induced earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellsworth, William L.

    2013-01-01

    Earthquakes in unusual locations have become an important topic of discussion in both North America and Europe, owing to the concern that industrial activity could cause damaging earthquakes. It has long been understood that earthquakes can be induced by impoundment of reservoirs, surface and underground mining, withdrawal of fluids and gas from the subsurface, and injection of fluids into underground formations. Injection-induced earthquakes have, in particular, become a focus of discussion as the application of hydraulic fracturing to tight shale formations is enabling the production of oil and gas from previously unproductive formations. Earthquakes can be induced as part of the process to stimulate the production from tight shale formations, or by disposal of wastewater associated with stimulation and production. Here, I review recent seismic activity that may be associated with industrial activity, with a focus on the disposal of wastewater by injection in deep wells; assess the scientific understanding of induced earthquakes; and discuss the key scientific challenges to be met for assessing this hazard.

  11. Drug-induced hyperkalemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salem, Chaker; Badreddine, Atef; Fathallah, Neila; Slim, Raoudha; Hmouda, Houssem

    2014-09-01

    Hyperkalemia is a common clinical condition that can be defined as a serum potassium concentration exceeding 5.0 mmol/L. Drug-induced hyperkalemia is the most important cause of increased potassium levels in everyday clinical practice. Drug-induced hyperkalemia may be asymptomatic. However, it may be dramatic and life threatening, posing diagnostic and management problems. A wide range of drugs can cause hyperkalemia by a variety of mechanisms. Drugs can interfere with potassium homoeostasis either by promoting transcellular potassium shift or by impairing renal potassium excretion. Drugs may also increase potassium supply. The reduction in renal potassium excretion due to inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system represents the most important mechanism by which drugs are known to cause hyperkalemia. Medications that alter transmembrane potassium movement include amino acids, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, suxamethonium, and mannitol. Drugs that impair renal potassium excretion are mainly represented by angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin-II receptor blockers, direct renin inhibitors, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, calcineurin inhibitors, heparin and derivatives, aldosterone antagonists, potassium-sparing diuretics, trimethoprim, and pentamidine. Potassium-containing agents represent another group of medications causing hyperkalemia. Increased awareness of drugs that can induce hyperkalemia, and monitoring and prevention are key elements for reducing the number of hospital admissions, morbidity, and mortality related to drug-induced hyperkalemia.

  12. Mechanistic Insight into Bunyavirus-Induced Membrane Fusion from Structure-Function Analyses of the Hantavirus Envelope Glycoprotein Gc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stettner, Eva; Jeffers, Scott Allen; Pérez-Vargas, Jimena; Pehau-Arnaudet, Gerard; Tortorici, M. Alejandra; Jestin, Jean-Luc; England, Patrick; Tischler, Nicole D.; Rey, Félix A.

    2016-01-01

    Hantaviruses are zoonotic viruses transmitted to humans by persistently infected rodents, giving rise to serious outbreaks of hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) or of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS), depending on the virus, which are associated with high case fatality rates. There is only limited knowledge about the organization of the viral particles and in particular, about the hantavirus membrane fusion glycoprotein Gc, the function of which is essential for virus entry. We describe here the X-ray structures of Gc from Hantaan virus, the type species hantavirus and responsible for HFRS, both in its neutral pH, monomeric pre-fusion conformation, and in its acidic pH, trimeric post-fusion form. The structures confirm the prediction that Gc is a class II fusion protein, containing the characteristic β-sheet rich domains termed I, II and III as initially identified in the fusion proteins of arboviruses such as alpha- and flaviviruses. The structures also show a number of features of Gc that are distinct from arbovirus class II proteins. In particular, hantavirus Gc inserts residues from three different loops into the target membrane to drive fusion, as confirmed functionally by structure-guided mutagenesis on the HPS-inducing Andes virus, instead of having a single “fusion loop”. We further show that the membrane interacting region of Gc becomes structured only at acidic pH via a set of polar and electrostatic interactions. Furthermore, the structure reveals that hantavirus Gc has an additional N-terminal “tail” that is crucial in stabilizing the post-fusion trimer, accompanying the swapping of domain III in the quaternary arrangement of the trimer as compared to the standard class II fusion proteins. The mechanistic understandings derived from these data are likely to provide a unique handle for devising treatments against these human pathogens. PMID:27783711

  13. Gefitinib induces epidermal growth factor receptor dimers which alters the interaction characteristics with ¹²⁵I-EGF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Björkelund

    Full Text Available The tyrosine kinase inhibitor gefitinib inhibits growth in some tumor types by targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR. Previous studies show that the affinity of the EGF-EGFR interaction varies between hosting cell line, and that gefitinib increases the affinity for some cell lines. In this paper, we investigate possible mechanisms behind these observations. Real-time interaction analysis in LigandTracer® Grey revealed that the HER2 dimerization preventing antibody pertuzumab clearly modified the binding of ¹²⁵I-EGF to EGFR on HER2 overexpressing SKOV3 cells in the presence of gefitinib. Pertuzumab did not affect the binding on A431 cells, which express low levels of HER2. Cross-linking measurements showed that gefitinib increased the amount of EGFR dimers 3.0-3.8 times in A431 cells in the absence of EGF. In EGF stimulated SKOV3 cells the amount of EGFR dimers increased 1.8-2.2 times by gefitinib, but this effect was cancelled by pertuzumab. Gefitinib treatment did not alter the number of EGFR or HER2 expressed in tumor cell lines A431, U343, SKOV3 and SKBR3. Real-time binding traces were further analyzed in a novel tool, Interaction Map, which deciphered the different components of the measured interaction and supports EGF binding to multiple binding sites. EGFR and HER2 expression affect the levels of EGFR monomers, homodimers and heterodimers and EGF binds to the various monomeric/dimeric forms of EGFR with unique binding properties. Taken together, we conclude that dimerization explains the varying affinity of EGF-EGFR in different cells, and we propose that gefitinib induces EGFR dimmers, which alters the interaction characteristics with ¹²⁵I-EGF.

  14. Study of a synthetic human olfactory receptor 17-4: expression and purification from an inducible mammalian cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian L Cook

    Full Text Available In order to begin to study the structural and functional mechanisms of olfactory receptors, methods for milligram-scale purification are required. Here we demonstrate the production and expression of a synthetically engineered human olfactory receptor hOR17-4 gene in a stable tetracycline-inducible mammalian cell line (HEK293S. The olfactory receptor gene was fabricated from scratch using PCR-based gene-assembly, which facilitated codon optimization and attachment of a 9-residue bovine rhodopsin affinity tag for detection and purification. Induction of adherent cultures with tetracycline together with sodium butyrate led to hOR17-4 expression levels of approximately 30 microg per 150 mm tissue culture plate. Fos-choline-based detergents proved highly capable of extracting the receptors, and fos-choline-14 (N-tetradecylphosphocholine was selected for optimal solubilization and subsequent purification. Analysis by SDS-PAGE revealed both monomeric and dimeric receptor forms, as well as higher MW oligomeric species. A two-step purification method of immunoaffinity and size exclusion chromatography was optimized which enabled 0.13 milligrams of hOR17-4 monomer to be obtained at >90% purity. This high purity of hOR17-4 is not only suitable for secondary structural and functional analyses but also for subsequent crystallization trials. Thus, this system demonstrates the feasibility of purifying milligram quantities of the GPCR membrane protein hOR17-4 for fabrication of olfactory receptor-based bionic sensing device.

  15. Uterine contraction induced by Tanzanian plants used to induce abortion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nikolajsen, Tine; Nielsen, Frank; Rasch, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    Women in Tanzania use plants to induce abortion. It is not known whether the plants have an effect.......Women in Tanzania use plants to induce abortion. It is not known whether the plants have an effect....

  16. Viral induced demyelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohlman, S A; Hinton, D R

    2001-01-01

    Viral induced demyelination, in both humans and rodent models, has provided unique insights into the cell biology of oligodendroglia, their complex cell-cell interactions and mechanisms of myelin destruction. They illustrate mechanisms of viral persistence, including latent infections in which no infectious virus is readily evident, virus reactivation and viral-induced tissue damage. These studies have also provided excellent paradigms to study the interactions between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS). Although of interest in their own right, an understanding of the diverse mechanisms used by viruses to induce demyelination may shed light into the etiology and pathogenesis of the common demyelinating disorder multiple sclerosis (MS). This notion is supported by the persistent view that a viral infection acquired during adolescence might initiate MS after a long period of quiescence. Demyelination in both humans and rodents can be initiated by infection with a diverse group of enveloped and non-enveloped RNA and DNA viruses (Table 1). The mechanisms that ultimately result in the loss of CNS myelin appear to be equally diverse as the etiological agents capable of causing diseases which result in demyelination. Although demyelination can be a secondary result of axonal loss, in many examples of viral induced demyelination, myelin loss is primary and associated with axonal sparing. This suggests that demyelination induced by viral infections can result from: 1) a direct viral infection of oligodendroglia resulting in cell death with degeneration of myelin and its subsequent removal; 2) a persistent viral infection, in the presence or absence of infectious virus, resulting in the loss of normal cellular homeostasis and subsequent oligodendroglial death; 3) a vigorous virus-specific inflammatory response wherein the virus replicates in a cell type other than oligodendroglia, but cytokines and other immune mediators directly damage the

  17. Topiramate Induced Excessive Sialorrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ersel Dag

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available It is well-known that drugs such as clozapine and lithium can cause sialorrhea. On the other hand, topiramate has not been reported to induce sialorrhea. We report a case of a patient aged 26 who was given antiepileptic and antipsychotic drugs due to severe mental retardation and intractable epilepsy and developed excessive sialorrhea complaint after the addition of topiramate for the control of seizures. His complaints continued for 1,5 years and ended after giving up topiramate. We presented this case since it was a rare sialorrhea case induced by topiramate. Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of sialorrhea development which causes serious hygiene and social problems when they want to give topiramate to the patients using multiple drugs.

  18. Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCluskey, James; Bourgeois, Marie; Harbison, Raymond

    2014-04-01

    Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity is a persistent allergic contact dermatitides documented in floral workers exposed to Alstroemeria and its cultivars.[1] The causative allergen is tulipalin A, a toxic glycoside named for the tulip bulbs from which it was first isolated.[2] The condition is characterized by fissured acropulpitis, often accompanied by hyperpigmentation, onychorrhexis, and paronychia. More of the volar surface may be affected in sensitized florists. Dermatitis and paronychia are extremely common conditions and diagnostic errors may occur. A thorough patient history, in conjunction with confirmatory patch testing with a bulb sliver and tuliposide A exposure, can prevent misdiagnosis. We report a case of Tulipalin A induced phytotoxicity misdiagnosed as an unresolved tinea manuum infection in a patient evaluated for occupational exposure.

  19. Curvature-induced dissipation

    CERN Document Server

    Debus, J -D; Succi, S; Herrmann, H J

    2015-01-01

    By inspecting the effect of curvature on a moving fluid, we find that local sources of curvature not only exert inertial forces on the flow, but also generate viscous stresses as a result of the departure of streamlines from the idealized geodesic motion. The curvature-induced viscous forces are shown to cause an indirect and yet appreciable energy dissipation. As a consequence, the flow converges to a stationary equilibrium state solely by virtue of curvature-induced dissipation. In addition, we show that flow through randomly-curved media satisfies a non-linear transport law, resembling Darcy-Forchheimer's law, due to the viscous forces generated by the spatial curvature. It is further shown that the permeability can be characterized in terms of the average metric perturbation.

  20. Induced Charge Capacitive Deionization

    CERN Document Server

    Rubin, S; Biesheuvel, P M; Bercovici, M

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the phenomenon of induced-charge capacitive deionization (ICCDI) that occurs around a porous and conducting particle immersed in an electrolyte, under the action of an external electrostatic field. The external electric field induces an electric dipole in the porous particle, leading to capacitive charging of its volume by both cations and anions at opposite poles. This regime is characterized both by a large RC charging time and a small electrochemical charge relaxation time, which leads to rapid and significant deionization of ionic species from a volume which is on the scale of the particle. We show by theory and experiment that the transient response around a cylindrical particle results in spatially non-uniform charging and non-steady growth of depletion regions which emerge around the particle's poles. Potentially, ICCDI can be useful in applications where fast concentration changes of ionic species are required over large volumes.

  1. Induced pluripotent stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siddhartha Bhowmik; LI Yong

    2011-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are a recent development which has brought a promise of great therapeutic values. The previous technique of somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been ineffective in humans. Recent discoveries show that human fibroblasts can be reprogrammed by a transient over expression of a small number of genes; they can undergo induced pluripotency. iPS were first produced in 2006. By 2008, work was underway to remove the potential oncogenes from their structure. In 2009, protein iPS (piPS) cells were discovered. Surface markers and reporter genes play an important role in stem cell research. Clinical applications include generation of self renewing stem cells, tissue replacement and many more. Stem cell therapy has the ability to dramatically change the treatment of human diseases.

  2. Ofloxacin induced hypersensitivity reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hari Babu Ramineni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ofloxacin is a commonly used antimicrobial agent to combat various infections. The adverse profile of quinolones includes gastrointestinal symptoms, which are the most frequent, neuropsychiatric symptoms, hematologic abnormalities are less common. We report a rare case of ofloxacin induced hypersensitivity reaction in a 57 year old female patient with complaints of rashes over the axilla, upper limb and back, abdomen, thorax associated with exfoliation of skin all over the axilla associated with severe itching. Based on history and clinical examination patient was diagnosed as ofloxacin induced hypersensitivity reaction and was successfully treated with antihistamines and corticosteroids. Pharmacovigilance should be a part of patient care in order to reduce occurrence of adverse drug reaction and also encourage practitioners in reporting so as to gather more and more data regarding adverse drug reactions. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(1.000: 349-351

  3. Sepsis-induced Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Bermejo, Francisco J; Ruiz-Bailen, Manuel; Gil-Cebrian, Julián; Huertos-Ranchal, María J

    2011-01-01

    Myocardial dysfunction is one of the main predictors of poor outcome in septic patients, with mortality rates next to 70%. During the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, both ventricles can dilate and diminish its ejection fraction, having less response to fluid resuscitation and catecholamines, but typically is assumed to be reversible within 7-10 days. In the last 30 years, It´s being subject of substantial research; however no explanation of its etiopathogenesis or effective treatment have been proved yet. The aim of this manuscript is to review on the most relevant aspects of the sepsis-induced myocardial dysfunction, discuss its clinical presentation, pathophysiology, etiopathogenesis, diagnostic tools and therapeutic strategies proposed in recent years. PMID:22758615

  4. Cyanamide-induced granulocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajima, M; Usuki, K; Igarashi, A; Okazaki, R; Hamano, K; Urabe, A; Totsuka, Y

    1997-09-01

    We report a 64-year-old male with granulocytopenia and dermatitis due to cyanamide treatment. We administered cyanamide for alcoholism. After about one month he suffered from scaly erythema over his whole body and granulocytopenia (granulocyte; 140/microliter) with maturation arrest in bone marrow. After cessation of cyanamide and the start of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor administration, the skin eruption ameliorated gradually, and the peripheral blood granulocyte counts increased. Cyanamide showed positive results in the drug lymphocyte stimulation test (198%) and the patch test led to the diagnosis of granulocytopenia and dermatitis induced by cyanamide. After restarting glibenclamide and diazepam administration, his granulocytopenia did not reoccur. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case with granulocytopenia induced by cyanamide.

  5. Inducement Prizes and Innovation.

    OpenAIRE

    Brunt, Liam; Lerner, Josh; Nicholas, Tom

    2011-01-01

    We examine prizes as an inducement for innovation using a novel dataset of awards for inventiveness offered by the Royal Agricultural Society of England from 1839 to 1939. At annual shows the RASE held competitive trials and awarded medals and monetary prizes (exceeding one million pounds in current prices) to spur technological development. We find large effects of the prizes on contest entries, especially for the Society’s gold medal. Matching award and patent data, we also detect large eff...

  6. Drug-induced diarrhoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chassany, O; Michaux, A; Bergmann, J F

    2000-01-01

    Diarrhoea is a relatively frequent adverse event, accounting for about 7% of all drug adverse effects. More than 700 drugs have been implicated in causing diarrhoea; those most frequently involved are antimicrobials, laxatives, magnesium-containing antacids, lactose- or sorbitol-containing products, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, prostaglandins, colchicine, antineoplastics, antiarrhythmic drugs and cholinergic agents. Certain new drugs are likely to induce diarrhoea because of their pharmacodynamic properties; examples include anthraquinone-related agents, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, lipase inhibitors and cholinesterase inhibitors. Antimicrobials are responsible for 25% of drug-induced diarrhoea. The disease spectrum of antimicrobial-associated diarrhoea ranges from benign diarrhoea to pseudomembranous colitis. Several pathophysiological mechanisms are involved in drug-induced diarrhoea: osmotic diarrhoea, secretory diarrhoea, shortened transit time, exudative diarrhoea and protein-losing enteropathy, and malabsorption or maldigestion of fat and carbohydrates. Often 2 or more mechanisms are present simultaneously. In clinical practice, 2 major types of diarrhoea are seen: acute diarrhoea, which usually appears during the first few days of treatment, and chronic diarrhoea, lasting more than 3 or 4 weeks and which can appear a long time after the start of drug therapy. Both can be severe and poorly tolerated. In a patient presenting with diarrhoea, the medical history is very important, especially the drug history, as it can suggest a diagnosis of drug-induced diarrhoea and thereby avoid multiple diagnostic tests. The clinical examination should cover severity criteria such as fever, rectal emission of blood and mucus, dehydration and bodyweight loss. Establishing a relationship between drug consumption and diarrhoea or colitis can be difficult when the time elapsed between the start of the drug and the onset of symptoms is long, sometimes up to several

  7. Inducement prizes and innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Brunt, Liam; Lerner, Josh; Nicholas, Tom

    2011-01-01

    We examine prizes as an inducement for innovation using a novel dataset of awards for inventiveness offered by the Royal Agricultural Society of England from 1839 to 1939. At annual shows the RASE held competitive trials and awarded medals and monetary prizes (exceeding one million pounds in current prices) to spur technological development. We find large effects of the prizes on contest entries, especially for the Society’s gold medal. Matching award and patent data, we also detect large eff...

  8. Fluoroscopy-induced radionecrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Tchanque-Fossuo, Catherine N.; Kamangar, Faranak; Ho, Baran; Chang, Shurong; Dahle, Sara E.; Schulman, Joshua M.; Isseroff, R Rivkah

    2016-01-01

    Complications from radiation exposure during fluoroscopic guidance of cardiac catheterization may occur. With repeated procedures, the risk for cutaneous injuries increases. Herein, we describe a 59-year-old man with extensive coronary artery disease, who had undergone multiple revascularization procedures and developed a non-healing ulcer on his left inferior scapula. The patient’s medical history, physical exam findings, and histopathology gave clues to a case of radiation-induced dermatiti...

  9. Environment induced incoherent controllability

    OpenAIRE

    Romano, Raffaele; D'Alessandro, Domenico

    2005-01-01

    We prove that the environment induced entanglement between two non interacting, two-dimensional quantum systems S and P can be used to control the dynamics of S by means of the initial state of P. Using a simple, exactly solvable model, we show that both accessibility and controllability of S can be achieved under suitable conditions on the interaction of S and P with the environment.

  10. OXYTOCIN INDUCED NEONATAL HYPERBILIRUBINEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smita S.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Hyperbilirubinemia is one of the most common causes of health problems, observed in 60% of term and 80% of preterm infants in the first week of life . Hyperbilirubinemia leads to neurotoxicity in severe condition. Some studies suggests that liberal use of oxytocin for inducing labour is one of the factor which lead to neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. OBJECTIVE: To compare the effect of oxytocin and neonatal bilirubin levels with spontaneous vaginal delivery . MATERIALS AND METHOD S : 100 full term parturients were selected for this study. The subjects were divided into two groups. 50 healthy babies of women who had oxytocin induced labour and 50 healthy babies of women with normal vaginal delivery following spontaneous onset of labour formed the control group. Neon atal serum bilirubin was measured on day 1, 3 and 5 after delivery. Bilirubin was measured by spectrophotometry. Data was analysed in ms excel sheet using spss 19.0v. Statistical analysis was done by using unpaired‘t’ test. RESULTS: There was significant i ncrease in bilirubin level in oxytocin induced group compared to control group on day 1 and 3. There was insignificant increase in bilirubin level in oxytocin induced group on day 5. However the level of serum bilirubin is within normal limits as bilirubin level normally rises on till 4 th day and decreases thereafter. CONCLUSION: Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia may be due to oxytocin administration by continues IV infusion which results in erythrocyte swell and rupture. Increase in bilirubin level in oxytocin i nduced group is within physiological limits

  11. Cisplatin Induced Nephrotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Seifollah Beladi Mousavi

    2014-02-01

    The standard approach to prevent cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity is the administration of lower doses of cisplatin in combination with the administration of full intravenous isotonic saline before and after cisplatin administration. Although a number of pharmacologic agents including sodium thiosulfate, N-acetylcysteine, theophylline and glycine have been evaluated for prevention of nephrotoxicity, none have proved to have an established role, thus, additional clinical studies will be required to confirm their probable effects.

  12. Polarization induced doped transistor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Huili (Grace); Jena, Debdeep; Nomoto, Kazuki; Song, Bo; Zhu, Mingda; Hu, Zongyang

    2016-06-07

    A nitride-based field effect transistor (FET) comprises a compositionally graded and polarization induced doped p-layer underlying at least one gate contact and a compositionally graded and doped n-channel underlying a source contact. The n-channel is converted from the p-layer to the n-channel by ion implantation, a buffer underlies the doped p-layer and the n-channel, and a drain underlies the buffer.

  13. Ketamine-Induced Hallucinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Albert R; Gancsos, Mark G; Finn, Emily S; Morgan, Peter T; Corlett, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    Ketamine, the NMDA glutamate receptor antagonist drug, is increasingly employed as an experimental model of psychosis in healthy volunteers. At subanesthetic doses, it safely and reversibly causes delusion-like ideas, amotivation and perceptual disruptions reminiscent of the aberrant salience experiences that characterize first-episode psychosis. However, auditory verbal hallucinations, a hallmark symptom of schizophrenia, have not been reported consistently in healthy volunteers even at high doses of ketamine. Here we present data from a set of healthy participants who received moderately dosed, placebo-controlled ketamine infusions in the reduced stimulation environment of the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. We highlight the phenomenological experiences of 3 participants who experienced particularly vivid hallucinations. Participants in this series reported auditory verbal and musical hallucinations at a ketamine dose that does not induce auditory hallucination outside of the scanner. We interpret the observation of ketamine-induced auditory verbal hallucinations in the context of the reduced perceptual environment of the MRI scanner and offer an explanation grounded in predictive coding models of perception and psychosis - the brain fills in expected perceptual inputs, and it does so more in situations of altered perceptual input. The altered perceptual input of the MRI scanner creates a mismatch between top-down perceptual expectations and the heightened bottom-up signals induced by ketamine. Such circumstances induce aberrant percepts, including musical and auditory verbal hallucinations. We suggest that these circumstances might represent a useful experimental model of auditory verbal hallucinations and highlight the impact of ambient sensory stimuli on psychopathology. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... America Information For… Media Policy Makers Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hearing plays ... sounds over an extended period. Preventing Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Hearing loss caused by exposure to loud sound ...

  15. Membrane-lipid therapy in operation: the HSP co-inducer BGP-15 activates stress signal transduction pathways by remodeling plasma membrane rafts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imre Gombos

    Full Text Available Aging and pathophysiological conditions are linked to membrane changes which modulate membrane-controlled molecular switches, causing dysregulated heat shock protein (HSP expression. HSP co-inducer hydroxylamines such as BGP-15 provide advanced therapeutic candidates for many diseases since they preferentially affect stressed cells and are unlikely have major side effects. In the present study in vitro molecular dynamic simulation, experiments with lipid monolayers and in vivo ultrasensitive fluorescence microscopy showed that BGP-15 alters the organization of cholesterol-rich membrane domains. Imaging of nanoscopic long-lived platforms using the raft marker glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored monomeric green fluorescent protein diffusing in the live Chinese hamster ovary (CHO cell plasma membrane demonstrated that BGP-15 prevents the transient structural disintegration of rafts induced by fever-type heat stress. Moreover, BGP-15 was able to remodel cholesterol-enriched lipid platforms reminiscent of those observed earlier following non-lethal heat priming or membrane stress, and were shown to be obligate for the generation and transmission of stress signals. BGP-15 activation of HSP expression in B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells involves the Rac1 signaling cascade in accordance with the previous observation that cholesterol affects the targeting of Rac1 to membranes. Finally, in a human embryonic kidney cell line we demonstrate that BGP-15 is able to inhibit the rapid heat shock factor 1 (HSF1 acetylation monitored during the early phase of heat stress, thereby promoting a prolonged duration of HSF1 binding to heat shock elements. Taken together, our results indicate that BGP-15 has the potential to become a new class of pharmaceuticals for use in 'membrane-lipid therapy' to combat many various protein-misfolding diseases associated with aging.

  16. Dimerization of inositol monophosphatase Mycobacterium tuberculosis SuhB is not constitutive, but induced by binding of the activator Mg2+

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigou Jérôme

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cell wall of Mycobacterium tuberculosis contains a wide range of phosphatidyl inositol-based glycolipids that play critical structural roles and, in part, govern pathogen-host interactions. Synthesis of phosphatidyl inositol is dependent on free myo-inositol, generated through dephosphorylation of myo-inositol-1-phosphate by inositol monophosphatase (IMPase. Human IMPase, the putative target of lithium therapy, has been studied extensively, but the function of four IMPase-like genes in M. tuberculosis is unclear. Results We determined the crystal structure, to 2.6 Å resolution, of the IMPase M. tuberculosis SuhB in the apo form, and analysed self-assembly by analytical ultracentrifugation. Contrary to the paradigm of constitutive dimerization of IMPases, SuhB is predominantly monomeric in the absence of the physiological activator Mg2+, in spite of a conserved fold and apparent dimerization in the crystal. However, Mg2+ concentrations that result in enzymatic activation of SuhB decisively promote dimerization, with the inhibitor Li+ amplifying the effect of Mg2+, but failing to induce dimerization on its own. Conclusion The correlation of Mg2+-driven enzymatic activity with dimerization suggests that catalytic activity is linked to the dimer form. Current models of lithium inhibition of IMPases posit that Li+ competes for one of three catalytic Mg2+ sites in the active site, stabilized by a mobile loop at the dimer interface. Our data suggest that Mg2+/Li+-induced ordering of this loop may promote dimerization by expanding the dimer interface of SuhB. The dynamic nature of the monomer-dimer equilibrium may also explain the extended concentration range over which Mg2+ maintains SuhB activity.

  17. A catechin-enriched green tea extract prevents glucose-induced survival reduction in Caenorhabditis elegans through sir-2.1 and uba-1 dependent hormesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deusing, Dorothé Jenni; Winter, Sarah; Kler, Adolf; Kriesl, Erwin; Bonnländer, Bernd; Wenzel, Uwe; Fitzenberger, Elena

    2015-04-01

    Hyperglycemia is a hallmark of diabetes mellitus which leads to the onset of complications in the long term. Green tea through its high content of polyphenolic catechins, on the other hand, is suggested to prevent or at least delay such detrimental complications. In the present study we fed the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans on a liquid medium supplemented with 10mM glucose in the absence or presence of a catechin-enriched green tea extract (CEGTE). After exposure of young adults for 48h survival was subsequently measured under heat stress at 37°C. Whereas CEGTE at 0.01% did not affect the survival of wild type nematodes, it completely reversed the glucose-induced survival reduction. Those effects were not achieved through the monomeric catechins included in CEGTE. RNA interference (RNAi) for sir-2.1 not only prevented the survival extension by CEGTE under simultaneous glucose exposure but also caused a further reduction of survival. Likewise, the knockdown of uba-1, encoding the only E1-ubiquitin-activating enzyme in C. elegans, proved that UBA-1 is essential for the survival extension by CEGTE and that its loss of function changes CEGTE from a survival extending into a survival reducing extract. Stimulation of the proteasome by CEGTE was finally proven through measurements of the proteolytic cleavage of a fluorogenic peptide substrate. To conclude, our studies provide evidence that CEGTE reverses glucose-induced damage in C. elegans through activation of adaptive responses mediated by SIR-2.1 and proteasomal degradation. The hormetic mode of action is revealed by a reduction of survival once the adaptive processes were blocked.

  18. Induced QCD I: Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, Bastian B; Wettig, Tilo

    2016-01-01

    We explore an alternative discretization of continuum SU(N_c) Yang-Mills theory on a Euclidean spacetime lattice, originally introduced by Budzcies and Zirnbauer. In this discretization the self-interactions of the gauge field are induced by a path integral over N_b auxiliary boson fields, which are coupled linearly to the gauge field. The main progress compared to earlier approaches is that N_b can be as small as N_c. In the present paper we (i) extend the proof that the continuum limit of the new discretization reproduces Yang-Mills theory in two dimensions from gauge group U(N_c) to SU(N_c), (ii) derive refined bounds on N_b for non-integer values, and (iii) perform a perturbative calculation to match the bare parameter of the induced gauge theory to the standard lattice coupling. In follow-up papers we will present numerical evidence in support of the conjecture that the induced gauge theory reproduces Yang-Mills theory also in three and four dimensions, and explore the possibility to integrate out the ga...

  19. Induced QCD I: theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandt, Bastian B. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, Goethe-University of Frankfurt,60438 Frankfurt (Germany); Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Regensburg,93040 Regensburg (Germany); Lohmayer, Robert; Wettig, Tilo [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Regensburg,93040 Regensburg (Germany)

    2016-11-14

    We explore an alternative discretization of continuum SU(N{sub c}) Yang-Mills theory on a Euclidean spacetime lattice, originally introduced by Budzcies and Zirnbauer. In this discretization the self-interactions of the gauge field are induced by a path integral over N{sub b} auxiliary boson fields, which are coupled linearly to the gauge field. The main progress compared to earlier approaches is that N{sub b} can be as small as N{sub c}. In the present paper we (i) extend the proof that the continuum limit of the new discretization reproduces Yang-Mills theory in two dimensions from gauge group U(N{sub c}) to SU(N{sub c}), (ii) derive refined bounds on N{sub b} for non-integer values, and (iii) perform a perturbative calculation to match the bare parameter of the induced gauge theory to the standard lattice coupling. In follow-up papers we will present numerical evidence in support of the conjecture that the induced gauge theory reproduces Yang-Mills theory also in three and four dimensions, and explore the possibility to integrate out the gauge fields to arrive at a dual formulation of lattice QCD.

  20. Ethanol-induced analgesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pohorecky, L.A.; Shah, P.

    1987-09-07

    The effect of ethanol (ET) on nociceptive sensitivity was evaluated using a new tail deflection response (TDR) method. The IP injection of ET (0.5 - 1.5 g/kg) produced raid dose-dependent analgesia. Near maximal effect (97% decrease in TDR) was produced with the 1.5 g/kg dose of ET ten minutes after injection. At ninety minutes post-injection there was still significant analgesia. Depression of ET-induced nociceptive sensitivity was partially reversed by a 1 mg/kg dose of naloxone. On the other hand, morphine (0.5 or 5.0 mg/kg IP) did not modify ET-induced analgesia, while 3.0 minutes of cold water swim (known to produce non-opioid mediated analgesia) potentiated ET-induced analgesic effect. The 0.5 g/kg dose of ET by itself did not depress motor activity in an open field test, but prevented partially the depression in motor activity produced by cold water swim (CWS). Thus, the potentiation by ET of the depression of the TDR produced by CWS cannot be ascribed to the depressant effects of ET on motor activity. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  1. Induced abortion and psychosexuality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi-Demicheli, F; Kulier, R; Perrin, E; Campana, A

    2000-12-01

    Little information exists on the impact of induced abortion on psychosexuality. Negative psychological effects and psychiatric complications due to termination of pregnancy seem to be rare. The objective of this study was to review the impact of induced abortion on sexuality and couple relationships. A systematic search of the literature was performed. Studies had to report a quantitative or qualitative evaluation of sexuality after pregnancy termination. Four studies were included. In the one prospective study using a control group, no difference in sexual functioning between groups after 1 year was reported. In the remaining observational studies, sexual dysfunction was reported in up to 30% of women after termination. Women undergoing abortion had significantly more conflicts in their partnerships. This was similar in all studies. Separation occurred in about one-quarter of all couples. Some studies report sexual dysfunction after termination of pregnancy. In about half of the couples separated after termination, abortion seemed not to have led to the separation. Psychological factors, together with relationship problems, might have played a role in failed contraception. The impact of induced abortion on sexuality needs to be studied in greater detail with rigorous methodology to draw firm conclusions.

  2. Duxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukund Joshi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The survival rate of cancer patients has greatly increased over the last 20 years. However, to achieve this result, a considerable price has been paid in terms of the side-effects associated with the intensive anticancer treatment. Cardiotoxicity of anticancer drugs is a serious problem. It is defined, by the National Cancer Institute, as the and ldquo;toxicity that affects the heart. and rdquo; This definition not only includes a direct effect of the drug on the heart, but also an indirect effect due to enhancement of hemodynamic flow alterations or due to thrombotic events. Cardiotoxicity can develop in a subacute, acute, or chronic manner. The risk for such effects depends upon: cumulative dose, rate of drug administration, mediastinal radiation, advanced age, younger age, female gender, pre-existing heart disease and hypertension. Anthracyclines, such as doxorubicin (DOX, cause serious cardiac side-effects. Acute tachyarrhythmias and acute heart failure (HF may occur after high doses, but these reactions are now rare due to changed dosage schemes (e.g. slower infusion with the aim to prevent this. However, the sub-acute or chronic cardiac effects of anthracyclines remain a clinical problem. Clinically, anthracycline induced cardiotoxicity manifests itself as left ventricular failure, which develops insidiously over months to years after completion of the anthracycline based chemotherapy and may result in congestive HF. The mechanism of anthracyclin induced cardiotoxicity is not totally unraveled. It is likely that the decline in myocardial function is related to apoptosis of cardiac myocytes that occurs apparently at random in the myocardium. Anthracyclin induced formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the presence of intracellular iron, impaired homeostasis of intracellular iron and calcium (that may facilitate the apoptosis induced by the ROS have been put forward as mechanisms. Cardiac protection can be achieved by limitation of the

  3. Swimming pool-induced asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretta, S; Vivaldo, T; Morelli, M; Carlucci, P; Zuccotti, G V

    2011-01-01

    A 13-year-old elite swimmer presented with wheezing after indoor swimming training. On the basis of her clinical history and the tests performed, exercise-induced asthma and mold-induced asthma were ruled out and a diagnosis of chlorine-induced asthma was made.

  4. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  5. Ofloxacin-induced hallucinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urmila Chauhan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced hallucinations are not uncommon, and may be misdiagnosed as psychiatric illness leading to unnecessary treatment with antipsychotics. If a temporal association of use of a drug having the potential to cause hallucinations is present, mere withdrawal of the drug causes complete improvement in the symptoms. There are reports of various untoward central nervous system adverse events following administration of fluoroquinolones, including delirium, hallucinations and psychosis, even after a single dose. We describe a 5-year-old girl who suffered visual hallucinations following ofloxacin use.

  6. Cannabis induced asystole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brancheau, Daniel; Blanco, Jessica; Gholkar, Gunjan; Patel, Brijesh; Machado, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis or marijuana is the most used recreational, and until recently illegal, drug in the United States. Although cannabis has medicinal use, its consumption has been linked to motor vehicle accidents in dose dependent fashion. Marijuana and other cannabinoids produce a multitude of effects on the human body that may result in these motor vehicle accidents. Some of the effects that marijuana has been known to cause include altered sensorium, diminished reflexes, and increased vagal tone. We present a case of cannabis induced asystole from hypervagotonia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. GEMCITABINE-INDUCED RETINOPATHY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Jaclyn L

    2016-10-31

    To report a case of Purtscher-like retinopathy associated with gemcitabine. The author reports a 68-year-old woman who presented with a 4-month history of bilateral vision loss. She had a history of diabetes, hypertension, and leiomyosarcoma, diagnosed 5 months before presentation and had completed 5 cycles of combination treatment with gemcitabine and docetaxel. Clinical examination revealed a Purtscher-like retinopathy that improved after gemcitabine cessation without the development of cystoid macular edema or retinal neovascularization. This case highlights the importance of recognizing gemcitabine-induced ischemic retinopathy that can be associated with life-threatening myocardial or renal ischemia.

  8. Sulphasalazine Induced Hypersensitivity Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatice Şanlı

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS is one of the most dangerous drug reactions. Mortality and morbidity is increased by consequent systemic organ involvement. Maculopapular eruptions are the most common lesions accompanying DIHS, however, the morphology of skin lesions may vary. The most common cause of DIHS is the use of aromatic anticonvulsant drugs. However, one must not forget that other drugs may also cause DIHS. Early recognition of the condition is the most important step in the treatment. Herein, we present a case of DIHS triggered by sulphasalazine and associated with pustular eruption and maculopapular eruption.

  9. Drug-induced gynecomastia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckman, Ari; Dobs, Adrian

    2008-11-01

    Gynecomastia is caused by drugs in 10 - 25% of all cases. The pathophysiologic mechanism for some drugs includes exogenous estrogens exposure, medications that cause hypogonadism, anti-androgenic effects and hyperprolactinemia. This manuscript reviews common examples of drug-induced gynecomastia, discussing the mechanisms and possible treatments. Discontinuing the medication is always the best choice; however, if this is not possible, then testosterone replacement therapy may be needed for hypogonadism. When a man is euogonadal, a trial of the anti-estrogen, tamoxifen or an aromatase inhibitor may be an option.

  10. Sitagliptin-induced hemolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekur Ragini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sitagliptin is a newer oral hypoglycemic drug of the dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitor class. It appears to be a promising newer oral hypoglycemic agent. The advantages are the absence of hypoglycemia when used as monotherapy and they cause less gain weight. We report a case of sitagliptin-induced hemolysis, a rare side effect, not reported in the literature. As sitagliptin is widely used in type 2 diabetes mellitus physicians should be aware of the possibility of this rare but potentially serious adverse drug reaction.

  11. Catatonia induced by disulfiram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HK Goswami

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Catatonia is a clinical syndrome with varieties of psychomotor abnormalities of retardation and excitement. It can occur both in psychiatric and medical conditions. The aetiology of catatonia has not been fully described. Many researchers suggest that catatonia can occur due to deficiency of cortical gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA which is an inhibitory neurotransmitter. Disulfiram is an agent that is being used in the treatment of alcohol dependence by its aversive effect. It has been seen that disulfiram is one of the causes of catatonia. This paper aimed to report a case of catatonia induced by disulfiram with no past history of any psychiatric or medical illness.

  12. Antioxidant-Induced Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert D. Kross

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Antioxidants are among the most popular health-protecting products, sold worldwide without prescription. Indeed, there are many reports showing the benefits of antioxidants but only a few questioning the possible harmful effects of these “drugs”. The normal balance between antioxidants and free radicals in the body is offset when either of these forces prevails. The available evidence on the harmful effects of antioxidants is analyzed in this review. In summary, a hypothesis is presented that “antioxidant-induced stress” results when antioxidants overwhelm the body’s free radicals.

  13. Docetaxel-induced neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckhoff, Lise; Feddersen, Søren; Knoop, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Background. Docetaxel is a highly effective treatment of a wide range of malignancies but is often associated with peripheral neuropathy. The genetic variability of genes involved in the transportation or metabolism of docetaxel may be responsible for the variation in docetaxel-induced peripheral...... neuropathy (DIPN). The main purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of genetic variants in GSTP1 and ABCB1 on DIPN. Material and methods. DNA was extracted from whole blood from 150 patients with early-stage breast cancer who had received adjuvant docetaxel from February 2011 to May 2012. Two...

  14. Xerostomia induced by radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimi D

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available David Alimi Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USAWe read with great interest the excellent review on xerostomia induced by radiotherapy, by Pinna et al.1 The authors should be congratulated for a very detailed review of the physiopathology, clinical symptoms, and therapeutic management of an extremely difficult condition. Although we agree that the use of anticholinergic medication represents treatment, it requires the patient to have residual salivary gland function. Unfortunately, it is well established that in most cases radiotherapy destroys most of the salivary gland and associated salivary secretions.     

  15. Contrast induced nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stacul, Fulvio; van der Molen, Aart J; Reimer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    measures used to reduce the incidence of CIN, and the management of patients receiving metformin. Key Points • Definition, risk factors and prevention of contrast medium induced nephropathy are reviewed. • CIN risk is lower with intravenous than intra-arterial iodinated contrast medium. • eGFR of 45 ml....../min/1.73 m (2) is CIN risk threshold for intravenous contrast medium. • Hydration with either saline or sodium bicarbonate reduces CIN incidence. • Patients with eGFR ≥ 60 ml/min/1.73 m (2) receiving contrast medium can continue metformin normally....

  16. Contrast induced nephropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stacul, Fulvio; van der Molen, Aart J; Reimer, Peter

    2011-01-01

    measures used to reduce the incidence of CIN, and the management of patients receiving metformin. Key Points • Definition, risk factors and prevention of contrast medium induced nephropathy are reviewed. • CIN risk is lower with intravenous than intra-arterial iodinated contrast medium. • eGFR of 45 ml....../min/1.73 m (2) is CIN risk threshold for intravenous contrast medium. • Hydration with either saline or sodium bicarbonate reduces CIN incidence. • Patients with eGFR = 60 ml/min/1.73 m (2) receiving contrast medium can continue metformin normally....

  17. Trauma Induced Coagulopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genét, Gustav Folmer; Johansson, Per; Meyer, Martin Abild Stengaard

    2013-01-01

    It remains debated whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces a different coagulopathy compared to non-TBI. This study investigated traditional coagulation tests, biomarkers of coagulopathy and endothelial damage in trauma patients with and without TBI. Blood from 80 adult trauma patients were...... sampled (median of 68 min (IQR 48-88) post-injury) upon admission to our trauma centre. Plasma/serum were retrospectively analysed for biomarkers reflecting sympathoadrenal activation (adrenaline, noradrenaline), coagulation activation/inhibition and fibrinolysis (protein C, activated protein C, tissue...

  18. Man-Induced Vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jeppe; Hansen, Lars Pilegaard

    1994-01-01

    Human motion can cause various types of periodic or transient dynamic loads. The periodic loads are mainly due to jumping, running, dancing, walking and body rocking. Transient loads primarily result from single impulse loads, such as jumping and falling from elevated positions. The response...... concerned with spectator-induced vertical vibrations on grandstands. The idea is to use impulse response analysis and base the load description on the load impulse. If the method is feasable, it could be used in connection with the formulation of requirements in building codes. During the last two decades...

  19. Fluorine for Hydrogen Exchange in the Hydrofluorobenzene Derivatives C6HxF(6-x), where x = 2, 3, 4 and 5 by Monomeric [1,2,4-(Me3C)3C5H2]2CeH; The Solid State Isomerization of [1,2,4-(Me3C)3C5H2]2Ce(2,3,4,5-C6HF4) to [1,2,4-(Me3C)3C5H2]2Ce(2,3,4,6-C6HF4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Richard; Werkema, Evan L.; Andersen, Richard A.

    2008-04-21

    The reaction between monomeric bis(1,2,4-tri-t-butylcyclopentadienyl)cerium hydride, Cp'2CeH, and several hydrofluorobenzene derivatives is described. The aryl derivatives that are the primary products, Cp'2Ce(C6H5-xFx) where x = 1,2,3,4, are thermally stable enough to be isolated in only two cases, since all of them decompose at different rates to Cp'2CeF and a fluorobenzyne; the latter is trapped by either solvent when C6D6 is used or by a Cp'H ring when C6D12 is the solvent. The trapped products are identified by GCMS analysis after hydrolysis. The aryl derivatives are generated cleanly by reaction of the metallacycle, Cp'((Me3C)2C5H2C(Me2)CH2)Ce, with a hydrofluorobenzene and the resulting arylcerium products, in each case, are identified by their 1H and 19F NMR spectra at 20oC. The stereochemical principle that evolves from these studies is that the thermodynamic isomer is the one in which the CeC bond is flanked by two ortho-CF bonds. This orientation is suggested to arise from the negative charge that is localized on the ipso-carbon atom due to Co(delta+)-Fo(delta-) polarization. The preferred regioisomer is determined by thermodynamic rather than kinetic effects; this is illustrated by the quantitative, irreversible solid-state conversion at 25oC over two months of Cp'2Ce(2,3,4,5-C6HF4) to Cp'2Ce(2,3,4,6-C6HF4), an isomerization that involves a CeC(ipso) for C(ortho)F site exchange.

  20. Fluorine for Hydrogen Exchange in the Hydrofluorobenzene Derivatives C6HxF(6-x), where x = 2, 3, 4 and 5 by Monomeric [1,2,4-(Me3C)3C5H2]2CeH; The Solid State Isomerization of [1,2,4-(Me3C)3C5H2]2Ce(2,3,4,5-C6HF4) to [1,2,4-(Me3C)3C5H2]2Ce(2,3,4,6-C6HF4)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Richard; Werkema, Evan L.; Andersen, Richard A.

    2008-04-21

    The reaction between monomeric bis(1,2,4-tri-t-butylcyclopentadienyl)cerium hydride, Cp'2CeH, and several hydrofluorobenzene derivatives is described. The aryl derivatives that are the primary products, Cp'2Ce(C6H5-xFx) where x = 1,2,3,4, are thermally stable enough to be isolated in only two cases, since all of them decompose at different rates to Cp'2CeF and a fluorobenzyne; the latter is trapped by either solvent when C6D6 is used or by a Cp'H ring when C6D12 is the solvent. The trapped products are identified by GCMS analysis after hydrolysis. The aryl derivatives are generated cleanly by reaction of the metallacycle, Cp'((Me3C)2C5H2C(Me2)CH2)Ce, with a hydrofluorobenzene and the resulting arylcerium products, in each case, are identified by their 1H and 19F NMR spectra at 20oC. The stereochemical principle that evolves from these studies is that the thermodynamic isomer is the one in which the CeC bond is flanked by two ortho-CF bonds. This orientation is suggested to arise from the negative charge that is localized on the ipso-carbon atom due to Co(delta+)-Fo(delta-) polarization. The preferred regioisomer is determined by thermodynamic rather than kinetic effects; this is illustrated by the quantitative, irreversible solid-state conversion at 25oC over two months of Cp'2Ce(2,3,4,5-C6HF4) to Cp'2Ce(2,3,4,6-C6HF4), an isomerization that involves a CeC(ipso) for C(ortho)F site exchange.

  1. Drug-induced lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Robert L

    2005-04-15

    Autoantibodies and, less commonly, systemic rheumatic symptoms are associated with treatment with numerous medications and other types of ingested compounds. Distinct syndromes can be distinguished, based on clinical and laboratory features, as well as exposure history. Drug-induced lupus has been reported as a side-effect of long-term therapy with over 40 medications. Its clinical and laboratory features are similar to systemic lupus erythematosus, except that patients fully recover after the offending medication is discontinued. This syndrome differs from typical drug hypersensitivity reactions in that drug-specific T-cells or antibodies are not involved in induction of autoimmunity, it usually requires many months to years of drug exposure, is drug dose-dependent and generally does not result in immune sensitization to the drug. Circumstantial evidence strongly suggests that oxidative metabolites of the parent compound trigger autoimmunity. Several mechanisms for induction of autoimmunity will be discussed, including bystander activation of autoreactive lymphocytes due to drug-specific immunity or to non-specific activation of lymphocytes, direct cytotoxicity with release of autoantigens and disruption of central T-cell tolerance. The latter hypothesis will be supported by a mouse model in which a reactive metabolite of procainamide introduced into the thymus results in lupus-like autoantibody induction. These findings, as well as evidence for thymic function in drug-induced lupus patients, support the concept that abnormalities during T-cell selection in the thymus initiate autoimmunity.

  2. Interferon induced thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomer, Yaron; Menconi, Francesca

    2009-12-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFNalpha) is used for the treatment of various disorders, most notable chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. One of the commonest side effects of IFNalpha therapy is thyroiditis, with up to 40% of HCV patients on IFNalpha developing clinical or subclinical disease. In some cases interferon induced thyroiditis (IIT) may result in severe symptomatology necessitating discontinuation of therapy. IIT can manifest as clinical autoimmune thyroiditis, presenting with symptoms of classical Hashimoto's thyroiditis or Graves' disease, or as non-autoimmune thyroiditis. Non-autoimmune thyroiditis can manifest as destructive thyroiditis, with early thyrotoxicosis and later hypothyroidism, or as non-autoimmune hypothyroidism. While the epidemiology and clinical presentation of IIT have been well characterized the mechanisms causing IIT are still poorly understood. It is likely that the hepatitis C virus (HCV) itself plays a role in the disease, as the association between HCV infection and thyroiditis is well established. It is believed that IFNalpha induces thyroiditis by both immune stimulatory effects and by direct effects on the thyroid. Early detection and therapy of this condition are important in order to avoid complications of thyroid disease such as cardiac arrhythmias.

  3. [Induced abortion at home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Hilde; Qvigstad, Erik; Jerve, Fridtjof; Melseth, Eldbjørg; Eskild, Anne; Nielsen, Christopher S

    2007-09-20

    Medically induced abortion through week 9 is a well established procedure. The article concerns satisfaction among women who choose to do this at home, and possible associations between satisfaction, socio-demographic--and clinical factors. 110 women with pregnancy duration questionnaires filled in before and 1 and 3 weeks after the abortion. The degree of satisfaction was recorded on a scale from 1 to 10, where 1 was not content and 10 was very content. Follow-up data were available for 105 women. 90 of 105 women were very content (> 7 on the satisfaction scale) with the treatment. Discomfort and pain during the abortion and marital status seemed to influence the results. The degree of pain varied much. No serious complications were observed. The study showed a high degree of satisfaction with medically induced abortion at home early in the pregnancy. The study has a relatively small sample size and no control group, so the results on factors affecting satisfaction are uncertain. Medical abortion at home should be an opportunity for women applying for early pregnancy termination; as long as the women are well informed, are offered sufficient pain relief and a well functioning follow-up programme.

  4. [Gluten induced diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frič, P; Zavoral, M; Dvořáková, T

    2013-05-01

    The introduction of cereals in human nutrition 10 000 years ago caused the occurrence of gluten induced diseases. This protein complex is involved in pathogenesis of wheat allergy, celiac disease, and gluten sensitivity. Wheat allergy and celiac disease are mediated by the system of adaptive immunity. Gluten sensitivity is a recently defined entity induced by innate immune mechanisms. These subjects present various intestinal and particularly extraintestinal symptoms. The differences between celiac disease and gluten intolerance include permeability of the intestinal mucosal barrier, histology of duodenal biopsy, and mucosal gene expression. The symptoms of gluten sensitivity may also have another genetic background of food intolerance independent of the HLADQ2, - DQ8 system and tissue transglutaminase (eg. in some psychiatric disorders). At present, there is no specific bio-marker of gluten sensitivity. The diagnosis is possible only by exclusion of other causes of symptoms and improvement on a glutenfree diet applied in a doubleblind placebo controlled manner with optional sequence of both stages to exclude the placebo effect due to nutritional intervention.

  5. Electromagnetically Induced Entanglement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xihua; Xiao, Min

    2015-08-28

    Quantum entanglement provides an essential resource for quantum computation, quantum communication, and quantum network. How to conveniently and efficiently produce entanglement between bright light beams presents a challenging task to build realistic quantum information processing networks. Here, we present an efficient and convenient way to realize a novel quantum phenomenon, named electromagnetically induced entanglement, in the conventional Λ-type three-level atomic system driven by a strong pump field and a relatively weak probe field. Nearly perfect entanglement between the two fields can be achieved with a low coherence decay rate between the two lower levels, high pump-field intensity, and large optical depth of the atomic ensemble. The physical origin is quantum coherence between the lower doublet produced by the pump and probe fields, similar to the well-known electromagnetically induced transparency. This method would greatly facilitate the generation of nondegenerate narrow-band continuous-variable entanglement between bright light beams by using only coherent laser fields, and may find potential and broad applications in realistic quantum information processing.

  6. Antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostwick, Jolene R; Guthrie, Sally K; Ellingrod, Vicki L

    2009-01-01

    Use of antipsychotic agents has been associated with hyperprolactinemia, or elevated prolactin levels; this hormonal abnormality can interfere with the functioning of reproductive, endocrine, and metabolic systems. As antipsychotic agents are increasingly used for both United States Food and Drug Administration-approved and nonapproved indications, many individuals are at risk for developing antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia. First-generation antipsychotics pose the greatest risk of causing this adverse effect; however, second-generation antipsychotics, particularly risperidone and paliperidone, also often increase prolactin secretion. Hyperprolactinemia has short- and long-term consequences that can seriously affect quality of life: menstrual disturbances, galactorrhea, sexual dysfunction, gynecomastia, infertility, decreased bone mineral density, and breast cancer. Although many of these are definitively connected to elevated prolactin levels, some, such as breast cancer, require further study. Both clinicians and patients should be aware of hyperprolactinemia-associated effects. To prevent or alleviate the condition, tailoring an antipsychotic drug regimen to each individual patient is essential. In addition, the risk of hyperprolactinemia can be minimized by using the lowest effective dose of the antipsychotic agent. If the effects of prolactin are evident, the drug can be changed to another agent that is less likely to affect prolactin levels; alternatively, a dopamine agonist may be added, although this may compromise antipsychotic efficacy. Additional research is needed to clarify the appropriate level of monitoring, the long-term effects, and the optimal treatment of antipsychotic-induced hyperprolactinemia.

  7. Knockdown of CDK2AP1 in primary human fibroblasts induces p53 dependent senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled N Alsayegh

    Full Text Available Cyclin Dependent Kinase-2 Associated Protein-1 (CDK2AP1 is known to be a tumor suppressor that plays a role in cell cycle regulation by sequestering monomeric CDK2, and targeting it for proteolysis. A reduction of CDK2AP1 expression is considered to be a negative prognostic indicator in patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma and also associated with increased invasion in human gastric cancer tissue. CDK2AP1 overexpression was shown to inhibit growth, reduce invasion and increase apoptosis in prostate cancer cell lines. In this study, we investigated the effect of CDK2AP1 downregulation in primary human dermal fibroblasts. Using a short-hairpin RNA to reduce its expression, we found that knockdown of CDK2AP1 in primary human fibroblasts resulted in reduced proliferation and in the induction of senescence associated beta-galactosidase activity. CDK2AP1 knockdown also resulted in a significant reduction in the percentage of cells in the S phase and an accumulation of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Immunocytochemical analysis also revealed that the CDK2AP1 knockdown significantly increased the percentage of cells that exhibited γ-H2AX foci, which could indicate presence of DNA damage. CDK2AP1 knockdown also resulted in increased mRNA levels of p53, p21, BAX and PUMA and p53 protein levels. In primary human fibroblasts in which p53 and CDK2AP1 were simultaneously downregulated, there was: (a no increase in senescence associated beta-galactosidase activity, (b decrease in the number of cells in the G1-phase and increase in number of cells in the S-phase of the cell cycle, and (c decrease in the mRNA levels of p21, BAX and PUMA when compared with CDK2AP1 knockdown only fibroblasts. Taken together, this suggests that the observed phenotype is p53 dependent. We also observed a prominent increase in the levels of ARF protein in the CDK2AP1 knockdown cells, which suggests a possible role of ARF in p53 stabilization following CDK2AP1

  8. Permeability Changes of Manduca sexta Midgut Brush Border Membranes Induced by Oligomeric Structures of Different Cry Toxins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muñoz-Garay, C.; Sánchez, J.; Darszon, A.; Maagd, de R.A.; Bakker, P.; Soberón, M.; Bravo, A.

    2006-01-01

    The pore-formation activity of monomeric and oligomeric forms of different Cry1 toxins (from Cry1A to Cry1G) was analyzed by monitoring ionic permeability across Manduca sexta brush border membrane vesicles. The membrane vesicles were isolated from microvilli structures, showing a high enrichment of

  9. Induced Seismicity Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S. R.; Jarpe, S.; Harben, P.

    2014-12-01

    There are many seismological aspects associated with monitoring of permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in geologic formations. Many of these include monitoring underground gas migration through detailed tomographic studies of rock properties, integrity of the cap rock and micro seismicity with time. These types of studies require expensive deployments of surface and borehole sensors in the vicinity of the CO2 injection wells. Another problem that may exist in CO2 sequestration fields is the potential for damaging induced seismicity associated with fluid injection into the geologic reservoir. Seismic hazard monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields requires a seismic network over a spatially larger region possibly having stations in remote settings. Expensive observatory-grade seismic systems are not necessary for seismic hazard deployments or small-scale tomographic studies. Hazard monitoring requires accurate location of induced seismicity to magnitude levels only slightly less than that which can be felt at the surface (e.g. magnitude 1), and the frequencies of interest for tomographic analysis are ~1 Hz and greater. We have developed a seismo/acoustic smart sensor system that can achieve the goals necessary for induced seismicity monitoring in CO2 sequestration fields. The unit is inexpensive, lightweight, easy to deploy, can operate remotely under harsh conditions and features 9 channels of recording (currently 3C 4.5 Hz geophone, MEMS accelerometer and microphone). An on-board processor allows for satellite transmission of parameter data to a processing center. Continuous or event-detected data is kept on two removable flash SD cards of up to 64+ Gbytes each. If available, data can be transmitted via cell phone modem or picked up via site visits. Low-power consumption allows for autonomous operation using only a 10 watt solar panel and a gel-cell battery. The system has been successfully tested for long-term (> 6 months) remote operations over a wide range

  10. Immobilization of homogeneous monomeric, oligomeric and fibrillar Aβ species for reliable SPR measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenzel, Daniel; Glück, Julian M; Brener, Oleksandr; Oesterhelt, Filipp; Nagel-Steger, Luitgard; Willbold, Dieter

    2014-01-01

    There is strong evidence that the amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ) plays a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this context, a detailed quantitative description of the interactions with different Aβ species is essential for characterization of physiological and artificial ligands. However, the high aggregation propensity of Aβ in concert with its susceptibility to structural changes due to even slight changes in solution conditions has impeded surface plasmon resonance (SPR) studies with homogeneous Aβ conformer species. Here, we have adapted the experimental procedures to state-of-the-art techniques and established novel approaches to reliably overcome the aforementioned challenges. We show that the application of density gradient centrifugation (DGC) for sample purification and the use of a single chain variable fragment (scFv) of a monoclonal antibody directed against the amino-terminus of Aβ allows reliable SPR measurements and quality control of the immobilized Aβ aggregate species at any step throughout the experiment.

  11. Immobilization of homogeneous monomeric, oligomeric and fibrillar Aβ species for reliable SPR measurements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Frenzel

    Full Text Available There is strong evidence that the amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ plays a central role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD. In this context, a detailed quantitative description of the interactions with different Aβ species is essential for characterization of physiological and artificial ligands. However, the high aggregation propensity of Aβ in concert with its susceptibility to structural changes due to even slight changes in solution conditions has impeded surface plasmon resonance (SPR studies with homogeneous Aβ conformer species. Here, we have adapted the experimental procedures to state-of-the-art techniques and established novel approaches to reliably overcome the aforementioned challenges. We show that the application of density gradient centrifugation (DGC for sample purification and the use of a single chain variable fragment (scFv of a monoclonal antibody directed against the amino-terminus of Aβ allows reliable SPR measurements and quality control of the immobilized Aβ aggregate species at any step throughout the experiment.

  12. Improved monomeric red, orange and yellow fluorescent proteins derived from Discosoma sp. red fluorescent protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shaner, Nathan C; Campbell, Robert E; Steinbach, Paul A; Giepmans, Ben N G; Palmer, Amy E; Tsien, Roger Y

    2004-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are genetically encoded, easily imaged reporters crucial in biology and biotechnology. When a protein is tagged by fusion to a fluorescent protein, interactions between fluorescent proteins can undesirably disturb targeting or function. Unfortunately, all wild-type yellow-to-red

  13. Development and validation of analytical methods for monomeric and oligomeric migrants from nylon 12 packaging materials.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoffers, N.H.; Brandl, F.; Linssen, J.P.H.; Franz, R.

    2003-01-01

    Analytical methods for the determination of laurolactam-the monomer of nylon 12-as well as the cyclic dimer and trimer were established. High performance liquid chromatography using ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) and mass spectrometric detection (HPLC-MS) were both found suitable to identify and quantify mon

  14. MONOMERIC ANTHOCYANIN COMPOSITION OF FIVE PHENOTYPES OF COLORED CORN (Zea mays FROM CENTRAL REGION OF COLOMBIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Quiñones

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Colombia cuenta con variedades nativas de maíz (Zea mays L. que lentamente se han ido perdiendo, a pesar de su interés potencial para programas de mejoramiento genético y uso nutracéutico. En Colombia, el maíz coloreado es poco conocido y escasamente aprovechado, el cual si ha sido investigado en otros países. Como parte de nuestros estudios del aprovechamiento de materiales vegetales nativos, cinco accesiones locales de maíz coloreado, provenientes de la región cundiboyacense colombiana, fueron recuperadas y cultivadas en condiciones agroecológicas. Se caracterizaron los extractos metanólicos obtenidos de sus granos, evaluando el contenido de antocianinas totales y la capacidad captadora de radicales DPPH•, cuyos valores estuvieron entre 21-168 mg eq cianidina 3-glucósido/kg grano seco y 195-412 µM Trolox/g grano seco, respectivamente. Se determinaron los perfiles de antocianinas de cada fenotipo mediante HPLC-DAD-MS. Se identificaron tentativamente nueve antocianinas, cuatro de ellas presentes en todos los fenotipos. Tales perfiles permitieron realizar una discriminación de los cinco fenotipos a partir de análisis multivariado. La información estructural se apoyó en el aislamiento y elucidación de cuatro de las antocianinas a partir del extracto enriquecido del fenotipo púrpura.

  15. A de novo designed monomeric, compact three helix bundle protein on a carbohydrate template

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malik, Leila; Nygård, Jesper; Christensen, Niels Johan

    2015-01-01

    De novo design and chemical synthesis of proteins and of other artificial structures, which mimic them, is a central strategy for understanding protein folding and for accessing proteins with novel functions. We have previously described carbohydrates as templates for the assembly of artificial...... proteins, so called carboproteins. The hypothesis is that the template pre-organizes the secondary structure elements and directs the formation of a tertiary structure, thus achieving structural economy in the combination of peptide, linker, and template. We speculate that the structural information from...

  16. Monomeric Amyloid Beta Peptide in Hexafluoroisopropanol Detected by Small Angle Neutron Scattering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhang-Haagen

    Full Text Available Small proteins like amyloid beta (Aβ monomers are related to neurodegenerative disorders by aggregation to insoluble fibrils. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS is a nondestructive method to observe the aggregation process in solution. We show that SANS is able to resolve monomers of small molecular weight like Aβ for aggregation studies. We examine Aβ monomers after prolonged storing in d-hexafluoroisopropanol (dHFIP by using SANS and dynamic light scattering (DLS. We determined the radius of gyration from SANS as 1.0±0.1 nm for Aβ1-40 and 1.6±0.1 nm for Aβ1-42 in agreement with 3D NMR structures in similar solvents suggesting a solvent surface layer with 5% increased density. After initial dissolution in dHFIP Aβ aggregates sediment with a major component of pure monomers showing a hydrodynamic radius of 1.8±0.3 nm for Aβ1-40 and 3.2±0.4 nm for Aβ1-42 including a surface layer of dHFIP solvent molecules.

  17. Single-dose monomeric HA subunit vaccine generates full protection from influenza challenge

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mallajosyula, JK

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant subunit vaccines are an efficient strategy to meet the demands of a possible influenza pandemic, because of rapid and scalable production. However, vaccines made from recombinant hemagglutinin (HA) subunit protein are often of low...

  18. Spin Equilibria in Monomeric Manganocenes: Solid State Magnetic and EXAFS Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, M. D.; Sofield, C. D.; Booth, C. H.; Andersen, R. A.

    2009-02-09

    Magnetic susceptibility measurements and X-ray data confirm that tert-butyl-substituted manganocenes [(Me{sub 3}C){sub n}C{sub 5}H{sub 5?n}]{sub 2}Mn (n = 1, 2) follow the trend previously observed with the methylated manganocenes; that is, electron-donating groups attached to the Cp ring stabilize the low-spin (LS) electronic ground state relative to Cp{sub 2}Mn and exhibit higher spin-crossover (SCO) temperatures. However, introducing three CMe{sub 3} groups on each ring gives a temperature-invariant high-spin (HS) state manganocene. The origin of the high-spin state in [1,2,4-(Me{sub 3}C){sub 3}C{sub 5}H{sub 2}]{sub 2}Mn is due to the significant bulk of the [1,2,4-(Me{sub 3}C){sub 3}C{sub 5}H{sub 2}]{sup -} ligand, which is sufficient to generate severe inter-ring steric strain that prevents the realization of the low-spin state. Interestingly, the spin transition in [1,3-(Me{sub 3}C){sub 2}C{sub 5}H{sub 3}]{sub 2}Mn is accompanied by a phase transition resulting in a significant irreversible hysteresis ({Delta}T{sub c} = 16 K). This structural transition was also observed by extended X-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) measurements. Magnetic susceptibility studies and X-ray diffraction data on SiMe{sub 3}-substituted manganocenes [(Me{sub 3}Si){sub n}C{sub 5}H{sub 5-n}]{sub 2}Mn (n = 1, 2, 3) show high-spin configurations in these cases. Although tetra- and hexasubstituted manganocenes are high-spin at all accessible temperatures, the disubstituted manganocenes exhibit a small low-spin admixture at low temperature. In this respect it behaves similarly to [(Me{sub 3}C)(Me{sub 3}Si)C{sub 5}H{sub 3}]{sub 2}Mn, which has a constant low-spin admixture up to 90 K and then gradually converts to high-spin. Thermal spin-trapping can be observed for [(Me{sub 3}C)(Me{sub 3}Si)C{sub 5}H{sub 3}]{sub 2}Mn on rapid cooling.

  19. Sequence determination and modeling of structural motifs for the smallest monomeric aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase.

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Y M; Shiba, K; Mottes, C; Schimmel, P.

    1991-01-01

    Polypeptide chains of 19 previously studied Escherichia coli aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are as large as 951 amino acids and, depending on the enzyme, have quaternary structures of alpha, alpha 2, alpha 2 beta 2, and alpha 4. These enzymes have been organized into two classes which are defined by sequence motifs that are associated with specific three-dimensional structures. We isolated, cloned, and sequenced the previously uncharacterized gene for E. coli cysteine-tRNA synthetase (EC 6.1.1.16...

  20. Evolution and thermodynamics of the slow unfolding of hyperstable monomeric proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koga Yuichi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The unfolding speed of some hyperthermophilic proteins is dramatically lower than that of their mesostable homologs. Ribonuclease HII from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Thermococcus kodakaraensis (Tk-RNase HII is stabilized by its remarkably slow unfolding rate, whereas RNase HI from the thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus (Tt-RNase HI unfolds rapidly, comparable with to that of RNase HI from Escherichia coli (Ec-RNase HI. Results To clarify whether the difference in the unfolding rate is due to differences in the types of RNase H or differences in proteins from archaea and bacteria, we examined the equilibrium stability and unfolding reaction of RNases HII from the hyperthermophilic bacteria Thermotoga maritima (Tm-RNase HII and Aquifex aeolicus (Aa-RNase HII and RNase HI from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Sulfolobus tokodaii (Sto-RNase HI. These proteins from hyperthermophiles are more stable than Ec-RNase HI over all the temperature ranges examined. The observed unfolding speeds of all hyperstable proteins at the different denaturant concentrations studied are much lower than those of Ec-RNase HI, which is in accordance with the familiar slow unfolding of hyperstable proteins. However, the unfolding rate constants of these RNases H in water are dispersed, and the unfolding rate constant of thermophilic archaeal proteins is lower than that of thermophilic bacterial proteins. Conclusions These results suggest that the nature of slow unfolding of thermophilic proteins is determined by the evolutionary history of the organisms involved. The unfolding rate constants in water are related to the amount of buried hydrophobic residues in the tertiary structure.

  1. Order-disorder transitions govern kinetic cooperativity and allostery of monomeric human glucokinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mioara Larion

    Full Text Available Glucokinase (GCK catalyzes the rate-limiting step of glucose catabolism in the pancreas, where it functions as the body's principal glucose sensor. GCK dysfunction leads to several potentially fatal diseases including maturity-onset diabetes of the young type II (MODY-II and persistent hypoglycemic hyperinsulinemia of infancy (PHHI. GCK maintains glucose homeostasis by displaying a sigmoidal kinetic response to increasing blood glucose levels. This positive cooperativity is unique because the enzyme functions exclusively as a monomer and possesses only a single glucose binding site. Despite nearly a half century of research, the mechanistic basis for GCK's homotropic allostery remains unresolved. Here we explain GCK cooperativity in terms of large-scale, glucose-mediated disorder-order transitions using 17 isotopically labeled isoleucine methyl groups and three tryptophan side chains as sensitive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR probes. We find that the small domain of unliganded GCK is intrinsically disordered and samples a broad conformational ensemble. We also demonstrate that small-molecule diabetes therapeutic agents and hyperinsulinemia-associated GCK mutations share a strikingly similar activation mechanism, characterized by a population shift toward a more narrow, well-ordered ensemble resembling the glucose-bound conformation. Our results support a model in which GCK generates its cooperative kinetic response at low glucose concentrations by using a millisecond disorder-order cycle of the small domain as a "time-delay loop," which is bypassed at high glucose concentrations, providing a unique mechanism to allosterically regulate the activity of human GCK under physiological conditions.

  2. Crystal structure of monomeric photosystem II from Thermosynechococcus elongatus at 3.6-a resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broser, Matthias; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Kern, Jan; Guskov, Albert; Müh, Frank; Saenger, Wolfram; Zouni, Athina

    2010-01-01

    The membrane-embedded photosystem II core complex (PSIIcc) uses light energy to oxidize water in photosynthesis. Information about the spatial structure of PSIIcc obtained from x-ray crystallography was so far derived from homodimeric PSIIcc of thermophilic cyanobacteria. Here, we report the first c

  3. Who is Mr. HAMLET? Interaction of human alpha-lactalbumin with monomeric oleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knyazeva, Ekaterina L; Grishchenko, Valery M; Fadeev, Roman S; Akatov, Vladimir S; Permyakov, Sergei E; Permyakov, Eugene A

    2008-12-09

    A specific state of the human milk Ca(2+) binding protein alpha-lactalbumin (hLA) complexed with oleic acid (OA) prepared using an OA-pretreated ion-exchange column (HAMLET) triggers several cell death pathways in various tumor cells. The possibility of preparing a hLA-OA complex with structural and cytotoxic properties similar to those of the HAMLET but under solution conditions has been explored. The complex was formed by titration of hLA by OA at pH 8.3 up to OA critical micelle concentration. We have shown that complex formation strongly depends on calcium, ionic strength, and temperature; the optimal conditions were established. The spectrofluorimetrically estimated number of OA molecules irreversibly bound per hLA molecule (after dialysis of the OA-loaded preparation against water followed by lyophilization) depends upon temperature: 2.9 at 17 degrees C (native apo-hLA; resulting complex referred to as LA-OA-17 state) and 9 at 45 degrees C (thermally unfolded apo-hLA; LA-OA-45). Intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence measurements revealed substantially decreased thermal stability of Ca(2+)-free forms of HAMLET, LA-OA-45, and OA-saturated protein. The irreversibly bound OA does not affect the Ca(2+) association constant of the protein. Phase plot analysis of fluorimetric and CD data indicates that the OA binding process involves several hLA intermediates. The effective pseudoequilibrium OA association constants for Ca(2+)-free hLA were estimated. The far-UV CD spectra of Ca(2+)-free hLA show that all OA-bound forms of the protein are characterized by elevated content of alpha-helical structure. The various hLA-OA complexes possess similar cytotoxic activities against human epidermoid larynx carcinoma cells. Overall, the LA-OA-45 complex possesses physicochemical, structural, and cytotoxic properties closely resembling those of HAMLET. The fact that the HAMLET-like complex can be formed in aqueous solution makes the process of its preparation more transparent and controllable, opening up opportunities for formation of active complexes with specific properties.

  4. Monomeric α-synuclein binds Congo Red micelles in a disordered manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Alexander S; Grishaev, Alexander; Bax, Ad

    2012-01-17

    The histological dye Congo Red (CR) previously has been shown to inhibit α-synuclein (aS) fibrillation, but the mode of this inhibition remained unclear. Because of favorable exchange kinetics, interaction between CR and aS lends itself to a detailed nuclear magnetic resonance study, and relaxation dispersion measurements yield the bound fraction and time scales for the interaction of aS with CR. We find that at pH 6, CR exists as a micelle, and at a CR:aS molar ratio of ~1, only a small fraction of aS (~2%) is bound to these micelles. Rapid exchange (k(ex) ~ 3000 s(-1)) between the free and CR-bound states broadens and strongly attenuates resonances of aS by two processes: a magnetic field-dependent contribution, caused by the chemical shift difference between the two states, and a nearly field-independent contribution caused by slower tumbling of aS bound to the CR micelle. The salt dependence of the interaction suggests a predominantly electrostatic mechanism for the 60 N-terminal residues, while the weaker interaction between residues 61-100 and CR is mostly hydrophobic. Chemical shift and transferred NOE data indicate that aS becomes slightly more helical but remains largely disordered when bound to CR. Results indicate that inhibition of fibril formation does not result from binding of CR to free aS and, therefore, must result from interaction of aS fibrils or protofibrils with CR micelles.

  5. Single-Step Purification of Monomeric l-Selectin via Aptamer Affinity Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehne, Christian; Wedepohl, Stefanie; Dernedde, Jens

    2017-01-01

    l-selectin is a transmembrane receptor expressed on the surface of white blood cells and responsible for the tethering of leukocytes to vascular endothelial cells. This initial intercellular contact is the first step of the complex leukocyte adhesion cascade that ultimately permits extravasation of leukocytes into the surrounding tissue in case of inflammation. Here we show the binding of a soluble histidine tagged l-selectin to a recently described shortened variant of an l-selectin specific DNA aptamer with surface plasmon resonance. The high specificity of this aptamer in combination with its high binding affinity of ~12 nM, allows for a single-step protein purification from cell culture supernatants. In comparison to the well-established Ni-NTA based technology, aptamer affinity chromatography (AAC) was easier to establish, resulted in a 3.6-fold higher protein yield, and increased protein purity. Moreover, due to target specificity, the DNA aptamer facilitated binding studies directly from cell culture supernatant, a helpful characteristic to quickly monitor successful expression of biological active l-selectin. PMID:28125045

  6. Monomeric Chiral and Achiral Basket-Handle Porphyrins: Synthesis, Structural Features, and Arrested Tautomerism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrold, Andreas C; Bruhn, Torsten; Schneider, Heidi; Radius, Udo; Bringmann, Gerhard

    2015-12-18

    Chiral and achiral basket-handle porphyrins (BHPs) with different p-xylene straps and peripheral solubilizing groups were synthesized using a previously established synthetic approach. Subsequent modification, functionalization, and metalation of the tetrapyrrolic macrocycle yielded more than 80 BHPs. The chiral representatives were resolved into their enantiomers, whose absolute configurations were determined by comparison of their ECD spectra with other experimental or quantum chemically calculated spectra. NMR studies and coupled-cluster calculations proved that the free base BHPs, although highly symmetric, exhibited the phenomenon of "arrested tautomerism". Comparison of the solid-state structures of three metalated BHPs offered detailed insight into their three-dimensional shape. Finally, directly linked dimeric porphyrins with a BHP subunit were synthesized from functionalized BHPs to prove their value as synthetic building blocks.

  7. Spectroscopic Characterization of a Monomeric, Cyclopentadienyl-Based Rhenium(V) Dioxo Complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raju, Suresh; Jastrzebski, Johann T. B. H.; Lutz, Martin

    2015-01-01

    spectrometry. (Cpttt)ReO2 is shown to be the primary product of reduction of the rhenium(VII) complex (Cpttt)ReO3 with PPh3 and demonstrated to react with ethylene glycol significantly faster than its dimeric counterpart, supporting its role as an intermediate in rhenium-catalyzed deoxydehydration reactions....

  8. Engineering an enhanced, thermostable, monomeric bacterial luciferase gene as a reporter in plant protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Boyu; Zhang, Lifeng; Song, Yunhong; Wei, Jinsong; Li, Changfu; Wang, Tietao; Wang, Yao; Zhao, Tianyong; Shen, Xihui

    2014-01-01

    The application of the luxCDABE operon of the bioluminescent bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens as a reporter has been published for bacteria, yeast and mammalian cells. We report here the optimization of fused luxAB (the bacterial luciferase heterodimeric enzyme) expression, quantum yield and its application as a reporter gene in plant protoplasts. The fused luxAB gene was mutated by error prone PCR or chemical mutagenesis and screened for enhanced luciferase activity utilizing decanal as substrate. Positive luxAB mutants with superior quantum yield were subsequently shuffled by DNase I digestion and PCR assembly for generation of recombinants with additional increases in luciferase activity in bacteria. The coding sequence of the best recombinant, called eluxAB, was then optimized further to conform to Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) codon usage. A plant expression vector of the final, optimized eluxAB gene (opt-eluxAB) was constructed and transformed into protoplasts of Arabidopsis and maize (Zea mays). Luciferase activity was dramatically increased for opt-eluxAB compared to the original luxAB in Arabidopsis and maize cells. The opt-eluxAB driven by two copies of the 35S promoter expresses significantly higher than that driven by a single copy. These results indicate that the eluxAB gene can be used as a reporter in plant protoplasts. To our knowledge, this is the first report to engineer the bacterium Photorhabdus luminescens luciferase luxAB as a reporter by directed evolution which paved the way for further improving the luxAB reporter in the future.

  9. Structural characterization suggests models for monomeric and dimeric forms of full-length ezrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phang, Juanita M; Harrop, Stephen J; Duff, Anthony P; Sokolova, Anna V; Crossett, Ben; Walsh, James C; Beckham, Simone A; Nguyen, Cuong D; Davies, Roberta B; Glöckner, Carina; Bromley, Elizabeth H C; Wilk, Krystyna E; Curmi, Paul M G

    2016-09-15

    Ezrin is a member of the ERM (ezrin-radixin-moesin) family of proteins that have been conserved through metazoan evolution. These proteins have dormant and active forms, where the latter links the actin cytoskeleton to membranes. ERM proteins have three domains: an N-terminal FERM [band Four-point-one (4.1) ERM] domain comprising three subdomains (F1, F2, and F3); a helical domain; and a C-terminal actin-binding domain. In the dormant form, FERM and C-terminal domains form a stable complex. We have determined crystal structures of the active FERM domain and the dormant FERM:C-terminal domain complex of human ezrin. We observe a bistable array of phenylalanine residues in the core of subdomain F3 that is mobile in the active form and locked in the dormant form. As subdomain F3 is pivotal in binding membrane proteins and phospholipids, these transitions may facilitate activation and signaling. Full-length ezrin forms stable monomers and dimers. We used small-angle X-ray scattering to determine the solution structures of these species. As expected, the monomer shows a globular domain with a protruding helical coiled coil. The dimer shows an elongated dumbbell structure that is twice as long as the monomer. By aligning ERM sequences spanning metazoan evolution, we show that the central helical region is conserved, preserving the heptad repeat. Using this, we have built a dimer model where each monomer forms half of an elongated antiparallel coiled coil with domain-swapped FERM:C-terminal domain complexes at each end. The model suggests that ERM dimers may bind to actin in a parallel fashion.

  10. The Monomeric GTPase Rab35 Regulates Phagocytic Cup Formation and Phagosomal Maturation in Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Kuldeep; Datta, Sunando

    2017-03-24

    One of the hallmarks of amoebic colitis is the detection of Entamoeba histolytica (Eh) trophozoites with ingested erythrocytes. Therefore, erythrophagocytosis is traditionally considered as one of the most important criteria to identify the pathogenic behavior of the amoebic trophozoites. Phagocytosis is an essential process for the proliferation and virulence of this parasite. Phagocytic cargo, upon internalization, follows a defined trafficking route to amoebic lysosomal degradation machinery. Here, we demonstrated the role of EhRab35 in the early and late phases of erythrophagocytosis by the amoeba. EhRab35 showed large vacuolar as well as punctate vesicular localization. The spatiotemporal dynamics of vacuolar EhRab35 and its exchange with soluble cytosolic pool were monitored by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments. Using extensive microscopy and biochemical methods, we demonstrated that upon incubation with RBCs EhRab35 is recruited to the site of phagocytic cups as well as to the nascent phagosomes that harbor Gal/GalNAc lectin and actin. Overexpression of a dominant negative mutant of EhRab35 reduced phagocytic cup formation and thereby reduced RBC internalization, suggesting a potential role of the Rab GTPase in the cup formation. Furthermore, we also performed a phagosomal maturation assay and observed that the activated form of EhRab35 significantly increased the rate of RBC degradation. Interestingly, this mutant also significantly enhanced the number of acidic compartments in the trophozoites. Taken together, our results suggest that EhRab35 is involved in the initial stage of phagocytosis as well as in the phagolysosomal biogenesis in E. histolytica and thus contributes to the pathogenicity of the parasite. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Conformational equilibria in monomeric alpha-synuclein at the single molecule level

    CERN Document Server

    Sandal, Massimo; Tessari, Isabella; Mammi, Stefano; Bergantino, Elisabetta; Musiani, Francesco; Brucale, Marco; Bubacco, Luigi; Samori', Bruno

    2007-01-01

    Natively unstructured proteins defy the classical "one sequence-one structure" paradigm of protein science. Monomers of these proteins in pathological conditions can aggregate in the cell, a process that underlies socially relevant neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer and Parkinson. A full comprehension of the formation and structure of the so-called misfolded intermediates from which the aggregated states ensue is still lacking. We characterized the folding and the conformational diversity of alpha-synuclein (aSyn), a natively unstructured protein involved in Parkinson disease, by mechanically stretching single molecules of this protein and recording their mechanical properties. These experiments permitted us to directly observe directly and quantify three main classes of conformations that, under in vitro physiological conditions, exist simultaneously in the aSyn sample, including disordered and "beta-like" structures. We found that this class of "beta-like" structures is directly related to aSyn ag...

  12. Binary Toxin Subunits of Lysinibacillus sphaericus Are Monomeric and Form Heterodimers after In Vitro Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyu Surya

    Full Text Available The binary toxin from Lysinibacillus sphaericus has been successfully used for controlling mosquito-transmitted diseases. An activation step shortens both subunits BinA and BinB before their interaction with membranes and internalization in midgut cells, but the precise role of this activation step is unknown. Herein, we show conclusively using three orthogonal biophysical techniques that protoxin subunits form only monomers in aqueous solution. However, in vitro activated toxins readily form heterodimers. This oligomeric state did not change after incubation of these heterodimers with detergent. These results are consistent with the evidence that maximal toxicity in mosquito larvae is achieved when the two subunits, BinA and BinB, are in a 1:1 molar ratio, and directly link proteolytic activation to heterodimerization. Formation of a heterodimer must thus be necessary for subsequent steps, e.g., interaction with membranes, or with a suitable receptor in susceptible mosquito species. Lastly, despite existing similarities between BinB C-terminal domain with domains 3 and 4 of pore-forming aerolysin, no aerolysin-like SDS-resistant heptameric oligomers were observed when the activated Bin subunits were incubated in the presence of detergents or lipidic membranes.

  13. Purification and properties of a monomeric lactate dehydrogenase from yak Hypoderma sinense larva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengfei; Jin, Suyu; Huang, Lin; Liu, Haohao; Huang, Zhihong; Lin, Yaqiu; Zheng, Yucai

    2013-06-01

    The objective of the present study was to study the characteristics of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) from Hypoderma sinense larva. H. sinense larvae were collected from yak (Bos grunniens) and identified by a PCR-RFLP method. Analysis of LDH activity showed that the total LDH activity in H. sinense larva was negatively correlated with the length of larva. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the extracts of H. sinense larvae revealed one band of LDH, which was then purified by affinity chromatography and gel filtration. This enzyme showed an approximately 36 kDa band on SDS-gel under both reducing and non-reducing conditions, in addition, size exclusion chromatography analysis showed that its molecular weight was smaller than bovine serum albumin (67 kDa), indicating that it contains only one subunit. Michaelis constants (Km) values assay revealed that LDH from H. sinense larva showed significantly lower Km for lactate than other animals. LDH of H. sinense larva was stable at 60 °C for 15 min, and also exhibited high catalytic efficiency in a wide range of pH. HgCl₂ at the concentration of 0.1mM significantly decreased the activity of LDH from H. sinense larva but not at the concentration of 0.01 mM. The results of the present study demonstrate that LDH from H. sinense larva is a thermal stable and pH insensitive enzyme suitable for catalyzing both forward and reverse reactions.

  14. Ultrafast polarized fluorescence measurements on monomeric and self-associated melittin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pandit, A.; Larsen, O.F.A.; Stokkum, van I.H.M.; Grondelle, van R.; Kraayenhof, R.; Amerongen, van H.

    2003-01-01

    The anisotropic and magic-angle fluorescence decay of the single tryptophan (Trp) residue of melittin, a bee venom peptide, was investigated by time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy using a streak camera setup. The peptide was dissolved either in distilled water or in Hepes/NaOH buffer containing lo

  15. Stapling monomeric GCN4 peptides allows for DNA binding and enhanced cellular uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Abhishek; Van Lysebetten, Dorien; Ruiz García, Yara; Louage, Benoit; De Geest, Bruno G; Madder, Annemieke

    2015-04-01

    The basic DNA recognition region of the GCN4 protein comprising 23 amino acids has been modified to contain two optimally positioned cysteines which have been linked and stapled using cross-linkers of suitable lengths. This results in stapled peptides with a stabilized α-helical conformation which allows for DNA binding and concurrent enhancement of cellular uptake.

  16. Drug-Induced Hematologic Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintzer, David M.; Billet, Shira N.; Chmielewski, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Drugs can induce almost the entire spectrum of hematologic disorders, affecting white cells, red cells, platelets, and the coagulation system. This paper aims to emphasize the broad range of drug-induced hematological syndromes and to highlight some of the newer drugs and syndromes. Methods. Medline literature on drug-induced hematologic syndromes was reviewed. Most reports and reviews focus on individual drugs or cytopenias. Results. Drug-induced syndromes include hemolytic anemias, methemoglobinemia, red cell aplasia, sideroblastic anemia, megaloblastic anemia, polycythemia, aplastic anemia, leukocytosis, neutropenia, eosinophilia, immune thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic syndromes, hypercoagulability, hypoprothrombinemia, circulating anticoagulants, myelodysplasia, and acute leukemia. Some of the classic drugs known to cause hematologic abnormalities have been replaced by newer drugs, including biologics, accompanied by their own syndromes and unintended side effects. Conclusions. Drugs can induce toxicities spanning many hematologic syndromes, mediated by a variety of mechanisms. Physicians need to be alert to the potential for iatrogenic drug-induced hematologic complications. PMID:19960059

  17. Drug-Induced Hematologic Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M. Mintzer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Drugs can induce almost the entire spectrum of hematologic disorders, affecting white cells, red cells, platelets, and the coagulation system. This paper aims to emphasize the broad range of drug-induced hematological syndromes and to highlight some of the newer drugs and syndromes. Methods. Medline literature on drug-induced hematologic syndromes was reviewed. Most reports and reviews focus on individual drugs or cytopenias. Results. Drug-induced syndromes include hemolytic anemias, methemoglobinemia, red cell aplasia, sideroblastic anemia, megaloblastic anemia, polycythemia, aplastic anemia, leukocytosis, neutropenia, eosinophilia, immune thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic syndromes, hypercoagulability, hypoprothrombinemia, circulating anticoagulants, myelodysplasia, and acute leukemia. Some of the classic drugs known to cause hematologic abnormalities have been replaced by newer drugs, including biologics, accompanied by their own syndromes and unintended side effects. Conclusions. Drugs can induce toxicities spanning many hematologic syndromes, mediated by a variety of mechanisms. Physicians need to be alert to the potential for iatrogenic drug-induced hematologic complications.

  18. Diet-Induced Thermogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE Chang-rong; GAO Si-zheng; JIA Jun-jing; Mark Jois

    2008-01-01

    An immense amount of information has now accrued about the factors that influence the increment of heat and the efficiency with which the energy of food is used by different animal species.Heat increment is one of the major factors that decrease the efficiency of energy utilization.In growing animals,the free energy content of the basal ATP requirement is typically about one-third of dietary basal heat production (thermogenesis).Thermogenesis is an evolutionary and biologically significant mechanism for adaptive,homeostatic heat production in animals,including shivering thermogenesis (ST),nonshivefing thermogenesis (NST),diet-induced thermogenesis (DIT),febrile response (fever),and so on.The main focus of this review is on the effect of DIT on energy metabolism.

  19. Radiation induced pesticidal microbes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Yup; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, S. J.; Lim, D. S

    2001-01-01

    To isolate pesticidal microbes against plant pathogenic fungi, 4 strains of bacteria(K1. K3, K4, YS1) were isolated from mushroom compost and hot spring. K4, K1, K3, YS1 strain showed wide antifungal spectrum and high antifungal activities against 12 kinds of fungi. Specific proteins and the specific transcribed genes were found from the YS1 and its radiation-induced mutants. And knock-out mutants of antifungal activity were derived by transposon mutagenesis. From these knock-out mutants, the antifungal activity related genes and its modification by gamma-ray radiation are going to be studied. These results suggested that radiation could be an useful tool for the induction of functional mutants.

  20. Radiation induced microbial pesticide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ki Yup; Lee, Young Keun; Kim, Jae Sung; Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Sang Jae

    2000-01-01

    To control plant pathogenic fungi, 4 strains of bacteria (K1, K3, K4, YS1) were isolated from mushroom compost and hot spring. K4, K1, K3, YS1 strain showed wide antifungal spectrum and high antifungal activities against 13 kinds of fungi. Mutants of K1 and YS1 strains were induced by gamma-ray radiation and showed promising antifungal activities. These wild type and mutants showed resistant against more than 27 kinds of commercial pesticides among 30 kinds of commercial pesticides test particularly, YS1-1006 mutant strain showed resistant against hydrogen oxide. And mutants had increased antifungal activity against Botryoshaeria dothidea. These results suggested that radiation could be an useful method for the induction of functional mutants. (author)

  1. Tibolone induced Bullous pemphigoid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal. R. Tandon, Annil Mahajan* & Sudhaa Sharma**

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available We present first ever report of Bullous pemphigoid induced by Tibolone, a STEAR (Selective tissueestrogenic activity regulator that has progestogenic, some androgenic as well as estrogenic effects prescribedas an alternative to estrogen replacement therapy for treatment of climacteric symptoms in one ofthe 51 year old postmenopausal women with one and half year duration since menopause with previoushistory of use of estrogen progesterone pills during her active sexual life. The mechanism for this ADR isnot well understood. But possible explanation could be progesterone activity of the drug leading to autoimmunityas reported previously. The present patient was managed by dechallenge of drug, local, oral corticosteroidsand injectable, methotrexate, along with folic acid and antibiotic coverage fearing anemia andsecondary infections.

  2. Radiation induced oral mucositis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Satheesh Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy will receive some degree of oral mucositis The incidence of oral mucositis was especially high in patients: (i With primary tumors in the oral cavity, oropharynx, or nasopharynx; (ii who also received concomitant chemotherapy; (iii who received a total dose over 5,000 cGy; and (iv who were treated with altered fractionation radiation schedules. Radiation-induced oral mucositis affects the quality of life of the patients and the family concerned. The present day management of oral mucositis is mostly palliative and or supportive care. The newer guidelines are suggesting Palifermin, which is the first active mucositis drug as well as Amifostine, for radiation protection and cryotherapy. The current management should focus more on palliative measures, such as pain management, nutritional support, and maintenance, of good oral hygiene

  3. [Cannabis-induced disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soyka, M; Preuss, U; Hoch, E

    2017-03-01

    Use and misuse of cannabis and marihuana are frequent. About 5% of the adult population are current users but only 1.2% are dependent. The medical use of cannabis is controversial but there is some evidence for improvement of chronic pain and spasticity. The somatic toxicity of cannabis is well proven but limited and psychiatric disorders induced by cannabis are of more relevance, e.g. cognitive disorders, amotivational syndrome, psychoses and delusional disorders as well as physical and psychological dependence. The withdrawal symptoms are usually mild and do not require pharmacological interventions. To date there is no established pharmacotherapy for relapse prevention. Psychosocial interventions include psychoeducation, behavioral therapy and motivational enhancement. The CANDIS protocol is the best established German intervention among abstinence-oriented therapies.

  4. Laser induced nuclear reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledingham, Ken; McCanny, Tom; Graham, Paul; Fang, Xiao; Singhal, Ravi; Magill, Joe; Creswell, Alan; Sanderson, David; Allott, Ric; Neely, David; Norreys, Peter; Santala, Marko; Zepf, Matthew; Watts, Ian; Clark, Eugene; Krushelnick, Karl; Tatarakis, Michael; Dangor, Bucker; Machecek, Antonin; Wark, Justin

    1998-12-01

    Dramatic improvements in laser technology since 1984 have revolutionised high power laser technology. Application of chirped-pulse amplification techniques has resulted in laser intensities in excess of 1019W/cm2. In the mid to late eighties, C. K. Rhodes and K. Boyer discussed the possibility of shining laser light of this intensity onto solid surfaces and to cause nuclear transitions. In particular, irradiation of a uranium target could induce electro- and photofission in the focal region of the laser. In this paper it is shown that μCi of 62Cu can be generated via the (γ,n) reaction by a laser with an intensity of about 1019Wcm-2.

  5. Gadolinium-Induced Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Derrick J; Kay, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Gadolinium-based contrast agents (GBCAs), once believed to be safe for patients with renal disease, have been strongly associated with nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF), a severe systemic fibrosing disorder that predominantly afflicts individuals with advanced renal dysfunction. We provide a historical perspective on the appearance and disappearance of NSF, including its initial recognition as a discrete clinical entity, its association with GBCA exposure, and the data supporting a causative relationship between GBCA exposure and NSF. On the basis of this body of evidence, we propose that the name gadolinium-induced fibrosis (GIF) more accurately reflects the totality of knowledge regarding this disease. Use of high-risk GBCAs, such as formulated gadodiamide, should be avoided in patients with renal disease. Restriction of GBCA use in this population has almost completely eradicated new cases of this debilitating condition. Emerging antifibrotic therapies may be useful for patients who suffer from GIF.

  6. Aripiprazole-induced priapism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya K Trivedi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Priapism is a urologic emergency representing a true disorder of penile erection that persists beyond or is unrelated to sexual interest or stimulation. A variety of psychotropic drugs are known to produce priapism, albeit rarely, through their antagonistic action on alpha-1 adrenergic receptors. We report such a case of priapism induced by a single oral dose of 10 mg aripiprazole, a drug with the least affinity to adrenergic receptors among all atypical antipsychotics. Polymorphism of alpha-2A adrenergic receptor gene in schizophrenia patients is known to be associated with sialorrhea while on clozapine treatment. Probably, similar polymorphism of alpha-1 adrenergic receptor gene could contribute to its altered sensitivity and resultant priapism. In future, pharmacogenomics-based approach may help in personalizing the treatment and effectively prevent the emergence of such side effects.

  7. Migraine induced by hypoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arngrim, Nanna; Schytz, Henrik Winther; Britze, Josefine

    2016-01-01

    Migraine with aura is prevalent in high-altitude populations suggesting an association between migraine aura and hypoxia. We investigated whether experimental hypoxia triggers migraine and aura attacks in patients suffering from migraine with aura. We also investigated the metabolic and vascular...... response to hypoxia. In a randomized double-blind crossover study design, 15 migraine with aura patients were exposed to 180 min of normobaric hypoxia (capillary oxygen saturation 70-75%) or sham on two separate days and 14 healthy controls were exposed to hypoxia. Glutamate and lactate concentrations...... in the visual cortex were measured by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The circumference of cranial arteries was measured by 3 T high-resolution magnetic resonance angiography. Hypoxia induced migraine-like attacks in eight patients compared to one patient after sham (P = 0.039), aura in three...

  8. Catatonia induced by levetiracetam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouinard, Marie-Josée; Nguyen, Dang-Khoa; Clément, Jean-François; Bruneau, Marie-Andrée

    2006-02-01

    Levetiracetam (Keppra) is a novel antiepileptic drug approved as adjunctive treatment for adults with partial onset seizures. Although the drug is generally well tolerated, behavioral side effects have been reported in variable frequency. Most behavioral problems are mild in nature (agitation, hostility, anxiety, emotional lability, apathy, depression) and quickly resolve with discontinuation of medication. However, serious psychiatric adverse events may also occur with rare cases of psychosis and suicidal behavior. We report here the case of a 43-year-old woman who developed symptoms compatible with catatonia after being exposed to levetiracetam for the treatment of epilepsy. To our knowledge, it is the first reported case of catatonia induced by levetiracetam. We review the difficulties that may be encountered in the differential diagnosis of medical catatonia.

  9. Vincristine induced cranial polyneuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Ali; Yilmaz, Cahide; Yilmaz, Nebi; Oner, Ahmet Faik

    2006-06-01

    We describe a 5-year-old girl showed recovery of vincristine induced cranial polyneuropathy with pyridoxine and pyridostigmine treatment. A 5-year-old girl was diagnosed preB cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL). She received chemotherapy according to the previously described modified St. Jude total therapy studies XIII. Five days after the fourth dose of vincristine, she presented with bilateral ptosis. Neurological examination revealed bilateral ptosis, and complete external opthalmoplegia with normal pupillary and corneal reflexes. She received 3.8 mg cumulative dose of vincristin before development of ptosis. A neuroprotective and neuroregenerative treatment attempt with pyridoxine and pyridostigmine was initiated. The bilateral ptosis markedly improved after 7 days of pyridoxine and pyridostigmine treatment and completely resolved after two weeks. The both agents were given for 3 weeks and were well tolerated without any side effects. During the follow up period we did not observe residue or recurrence of the ptosis.

  10. Paliperidone palmitate-induced sialorrhoea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cengiz Cengisiz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Extrapyramidal, metabolic, and cardiac side effects were reported for atypical antipsychotics; although a few resources show paliperidone-induced sialorrhea, there are no resources that show paliperidone palmitate-induced sialorrhea. In this paper, we present the paliperidone palmitate-induced sialorrhea side effects of a patient who applied on our clinic [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(0.100: 8-13

  11. Alcohol-Induced Blackout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Jin Kim

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available For a long time, alcohol was thought to exert a general depressant effect on the central nervous system (CNS. However, currently the consensus is that specific regions of the brain are selectively vulnerable to the acute effects of alcohol. An alcohol-induced blackout is the classic example; the subject is temporarily unable to form new long-term memories while relatively maintaining other skills such as talking or even driving. A recent study showed that alcohol can cause retrograde memory impairment, that is, blackouts due to retrieval impairments as well as those due to deficits in encoding. Alcoholic blackouts may be complete (en bloc or partial (fragmentary depending on severity of memory impairment. In fragmentary blackouts, cueing often aids recall. Memory impairment during acute intoxication involves dysfunction of episodic memory, a type of memory encoded with spatial and social context. Recent studies have shown that there are multiple memory systems supported by discrete brain regions, and the acute effects of alcohol on learning and memory may result from alteration of the hippocampus and related structures on a cellular level. A rapid increase in blood alcohol concentration (BAC is most consistently associated with the likelihood of a blackout. However, not all subjects experience blackouts, implying that genetic factors play a role in determining CNS vulnerability to the effects of alcohol. This factor may predispose an individual to alcoholism, as altered memory function during intoxication may affect an individual‟s alcohol expectancy; one may perceive positive aspects of intoxication while unintentionally ignoring the negative aspects. Extensive research on memory and learning as well as findings related to the acute effects of alcohol on the brain may elucidate the mechanisms and impact associated with the alcohol- induced blackout.

  12. Radio-induced brain lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorgan Mircea Radu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Radiotherapy, an important tool in multimodal oncologic treatment, can cause radio-induced brain lesion development after a long period of time following irradiation.

  13. The activation of RhoC in vascular endothelial cells is required for the S1P receptor type 2-induced inhibition of angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Galdo, Sabrina; Vettel, Christiane; Heringdorf, Dagmar Meyer Zu; Wieland, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a multifunctional phospholipid inducing a variety of cellular responses in endothelial cells (EC). S1P responses are mediated by five G protein coupled receptors of which three types (S1P1R-S1P3R) have been described to be of importance in vascular endothelial cells (EC). Whereas the S1P1R regulates endothelial barrier function by coupling to Gαi and the monomeric GTPase Rac1, the signaling pathways involved in the S1P-induced regulation of angiogenesis are ill defined. We therefore studied the sprouting of human umbilical vein EC (HUVEC) in vitro and analyzed the activation of the RhoGTPases RhoA and RhoC. Physiological relevant concentrations of S1P (100-300nM) induce a moderate activation of RhoA and RhoC. Inhibition or siRNA-mediated depletion of the S1P2R preferentially decreased the activation of RhoC. Both manipulations caused an increase of sprouting in a spheroid based in vitro sprouting assay. Interestingly, a similar increase in sprouting was detected after effective siRNA-mediated knockdown of RhoC. In contrast, the depletion of RhoA had no influence on sprouting. Furthermore, suppression of the activity of G proteins of the Gα12/13 subfamily by adenoviral overexpression of the regulator of G protein signaling domain of LSC as well as siRNA-mediated knockdown of the Rho specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor leukemia associated RhoGEF (LARG) inhibited the S1P-induced activation of RhoC and concomitantly increased sprouting of HUVEC with similar efficacy. We conclude that the angiogenic sprouting of EC is suppressed via the S1P2R subtype. Thus, the increase in basal sprouting can be attributed to blocking of the inhibitory action of autocrine S1P stimulating the S1P2R. This inhibitory pathway involves the activation of RhoC via Gα12/13 and LARG, while the simultaneously occurring activation of RhoA is apparently dispensable here.

  14. PNA-induced assembly of fluorescent proteins using DNA as a framework

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Controlled alignment of proteins on molecular frameworks requires the development of facile and orthogonal chemical approaches and molecular scaffolds. In this work, protein−PNA conjugates are brought forward as new chemical components allowing efficient assembly and alignment on DNA scaffolds. Site-selective monomeric teal fluorescent protein (mTFP)−peptide nucleic acid (PNA) (mTFP-PNA) conjugation was achieved by covalent linkage of the PNA to the protein through expressed protein ligation ...

  15. Congruence properties of induced representations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mayer, Dieter; Momeni, Arash; Venkov, Alexei

    In this paper we study representations of the projective modular group induced from the Hecke congruence group of level 4 with Selberg's character. We show that the well known congruence properties of Selberg's character are equivalent to the congruence properties of the induced representations. ...

  16. Orlistat-induced acute pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Drug-induced pancreatitis is a rare but important cause of pancreatic injury. Orlistat is a pancreatic lipase inhibitor licensed for the treatment of obesity. We present a case of orlistat- induced mild acute pancreatitis that developed 8 days after starting treatment.

  17. Chlorpromazine induced ocular myasthenia gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitya S

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Drug induced bilateral ptosis is a very rare adverse drug reaction. Here we report a case of ten year old male child with chlorpromazine induced bilateral ptosis due to ocular myasthenia. [Int J Basic Clin Pharmacol 2013; 2(5.000: 653-654

  18. Sparfloxacin induced toxic epidermal necrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh M

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN is a life-threatening cutaneous adverse drug reaction. TEN is known to occur with the fluoroquinolone class of antibiotics, but only four cases of sparfloxacin induced TEN have been reported to the WHO database. This is another case report of sparfloxacin induced TEN.

  19. PKCε promotes HuD-mediated neprilysin mRNA stability and enhances neprilysin-induced Aβ degradation in brain neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chol Seung Lim

    Full Text Available Amyloid-beta (Aβ peptide accumulation in the brain is a pathological hallmark of all forms of Alzheimer's disease. An imbalance between Aβ production and clearance from the brain may contribute to accumulation of neurotoxic Aβ and subsequent synaptic loss, which is the strongest correlate of the extent of memory loss in AD. The activity of neprilysin (NEP, a potent Aβ-degrading enzyme, is decreased in the AD brain. Expression of HuD, an mRNA-binding protein important for synaptogenesis and neuronal plasticity, is also decreased in the AD brain. HuD is regulated by protein kinase Cε (PKCε, and we previously demonstrated that PKCε activation decreases Aβ levels. We hypothesized that PKCε acts through HuD to stabilize NEP mRNA, modulate its localization, and support NEP activity. Conversely, loss of PKCε-activated HuD in AD leads to decreased NEP activity and accumulation of Aβ. Here we show that HuD is associated with NEP mRNA in cultures of human SK-N-SH cells. Treatment with bryostatin, a PKCε-selective activator, enhanced NEP association with HuD and increased NEP mRNA stability. Activation of PKCε also increased NEP protein levels, increased NEP phosphorylation, and induced cell surface expression. In addition, specific PKCε activation directly stimulated NEP activity, leading to degradation of a monomeric form of Aβ peptide and decreased Aβ neuronal toxicity, as measured by cell viability. Bryostatin treatment also rescued Aβ-mediated inhibition of HuD-NEP mRNA binding, NEP protein expression, and NEP cell membrane translocation. These results suggest that PKCε activation reduces Aβ by up-regulating, via the mRNA-binding protein HuD, Aβ-degrading enzymes such as NEP. Thus, PKCε activation may have therapeutic efficacy for AD by reducing neurotoxic Aβ accumulation as well as having direct anti-apoptotic and synaptogenic effects.

  20. Crystal structure of TNF-α-inducing protein from Helicobacter pylori in active form reveals the intrinsic molecular flexibility for unique DNA-binding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingming Gao

    Full Text Available Tipα (TNF-α-inducing protein from Helicobacter pylori is a carcinogenic effector. Studies on this protein revealed that a homodimer linked by a pair of intermolecular disulfide bridges (Cys25-Cys25 and Cys27-Cys27 was absolutely necessary for its biological functions. The activities of Tipα would be abolished when both disulfide bridges were disrupted. The crystal structures of Tipα reported to date, however, were based on inactive, monomeric mutants with their N-terminal, including residues Cys25 and Cys27, truncated. Here we report the crystal structure of H. pylori Tipα protein, TipαN(25, at 2.2Å resolution, in which Cys25 and Cys27 form a pair of inter-chain disulfide bridges linking an active dimer. The disulfide bridges exhibit structural flexibility in the present structure. A series of structure-based mutagenesis, biochemical assays and molecular dynamic simulations on DNA-Tipα interactions reveal that Tipα utilizes the dimeric interface as the DNA-binding site and that residues His60, Arg77 and Arg81 located at the interface are crucial for DNA binding. Tipα could bind to one ssDNA, two ssDNA or one dsDNA in experiments, respectively, in the native or mutant states. The unique DNA-binding activities of Tipα indicate that the intrinsic flexible nature of disulfide bridges could endow certain elasticity to the Tipα dimer for its unique bioactivities. The results shed light on the possible structural mechanism for the functional performances of Tipα.

  1. Force induced DNA melting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santosh, Mogurampelly; Maiti, Prabal K [Center for Condensed Matter Theory, Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore-12 (India)], E-mail: santosh@physics.iisc.ernet.in, E-mail: maiti@physics.iisc.ernet.in

    2009-01-21

    When pulled along the axis, double-strand DNA undergoes a large conformational change and elongates by roughly twice its initial contour length at a pulling force of about 70 pN. The transition to this highly overstretched form of DNA is very cooperative. Applying a force perpendicular to the DNA axis (unzipping), double-strand DNA can also be separated into two single-stranded DNA, this being a fundamental process in DNA replication. We study the DNA overstretching and unzipping transition using fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and argue that the conformational changes of double-strand DNA associated with either of the above mentioned processes can be viewed as force induced DNA melting. As the force at one end of the DNA is increased the DNA starts melting abruptly/smoothly above a critical force depending on the pulling direction. The critical force f{sub m}, at which DNA melts completely decreases as the temperature of the system is increased. The melting force in the case of unzipping is smaller compared to the melting force when the DNA is pulled along the helical axis. In the case of melting through unzipping, the double-strand separation has jumps which correspond to the different energy minima arising due to sequence of different base pairs. The fraction of Watson-Crick base pair hydrogen bond breaking as a function of force does not show smooth and continuous behavior and consists of plateaus followed by sharp jumps.

  2. Temozolomide-Induced Myelodysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethan A. Natelson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient who had received temozolomide (TMZ as a single agent in treatment of malignant glioma developed therapy-induced myelodysplasia (T-MDS. TMZ is an orally active imidazotetrazine which methylates guanine residues in DNA, ultimately causing single and double-strand DNA breaks leading to apoptotic cell death. TMZ does not chemically cross-link DNA and is considered a nonclassical alkylating agent, similar in structure and activity to dacarbazine. Observations on this patient, and on similarly treated others, suggest that the cumulative dose threshold (CDT for TMZ that predisposes to T-MDS and which may potentially lead to acute myeloid leukemia (T-AML is around 18000 to 20000 mg/sq m. Although the incidence of T-MDS and the predisposing CDT of TMZ may differ from that of other potentially leukemogenic compounds currently and formerly used as chemotherapeutic agents, all alkylating agents, including TMZ, should be considered potentially leukemogenic when administered long term.

  3. Methaemoglobinemia Induced by MDMA?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. W. Verhaert

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Case. A 45-year-old man with a blank medical history presented at the emergency room with dizziness and cyanosis. Physical examination showed cyanosis with a peripheral saturation (SpO2 of 85%, he did not respond to supplemental oxygen. Arterial blood gas analysis showed a striking chocolate brown colour. Based on these data, we determined the arterial methaemoglobin concentration. This was 32%. We gave 100% oxygen and observed the patient in a medium care unit. The next day, patient could be discharged in good condition. Further inquiry about exhibitions and extensive history revealed that the patient used MDMA (3,4- methylenedioxymethamphetamine, the active ingredient of ecstasy. Conclusion. Acquired methaemoglobinemia is a condition that occurs infrequently, but is potentially life threatening. Different nutrients, medications, and chemicals can induce methaemoglobinemia by oxidation of haemoglobin. The clinical presentation of a patient with methaemoglobinemia is due to the impossibility of O2 binding and transport, resulting in tissue hypoxia. Important is to think about methaemoglobin in a patient who presents with cyanosis, a peripheral saturation of 85% that fails to respond properly to the administration of O2. Because methaemoglobin can be reduced physiologically, it is usually sufficient to remove the causative agent, to give O2, and to observe the patient.

  4. Chloroquine-induced pruritus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aghahowa S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chloroquine-induced pruritus remains one of the most common side-effects in the use of chloroquine in the prophylaxis and treatment of uncomplicated malaria before the advent of artemisinin-based combination therapies. It has been reported to vary from a tolerable to intolerable intensity among susceptible individuals resulting in disruption of treatment and development of resistance to the drug thus leading to therapeutic failures as reported. This scourge is quite challenging due to the complex physiologic mechanism that has not been fully elucidated. Factors observed to be responsible in the induction of pruritus such as age, race, heredity, density of parasitaemia; impurities in formulations, plasmodial specie, dosage form and metabolites have been discussed in this review. Efforts to ameliorate this burden have necessitated the use of drugs of diverse pharmacological classes such as antihistamines, corticosteroids and multivitamins either alone or as a combination. This review is to look into the use of chloroquine retrospectively, and consider its re-introduction due to its safety. Efficacy can be attained if the pruritic effect is resolved.

  5. [Swimming-induced asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fjellbirkeland, L; Gulsvik, A; Walløe, A

    1995-06-30

    Swimming is said to have low asthmogeneity especially when compared with other physical activities. Four young athletes who participated in heavy swimming exercise are reported as having symptoms of exercise-induced asthma (EIA). Three of them started to develop the symptoms after several years of training and had no former history of asthma. In the fourth, the asthma was diagnosed in childhood but the EIA-symptoms here exacerbated by swimming. All four experienced more symptoms when the air in the swimming pool was warm, or when there was a strong smell of chlorine. Two of the athletes reported having no symptoms when they swam in outdoor pools and had only minor symptoms, or none at all, when they did other formes of physical exercise, including running. In all four their swimming performance was hampered by their respiratory symptoms. Two of the swimmers improved when they inhaled steroids and adrenerg-beta 2 agonists, and continued their swimming carrier. The cases suggest that an irritant may provoke asthma symptoms in susceptible swimmers. Volatile compounds from chlorination of the pools are suspected as possible irritant agents.

  6. Methaemoglobinemia Induced by MDMA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaert, L L W

    2011-01-01

    Case. A 45-year-old man with a blank medical history presented at the emergency room with dizziness and cyanosis. Physical examination showed cyanosis with a peripheral saturation (SpO(2)) of 85%, he did not respond to supplemental oxygen. Arterial blood gas analysis showed a striking chocolate brown colour. Based on these data, we determined the arterial methaemoglobin concentration. This was 32%. We gave 100% oxygen and observed the patient in a medium care unit. The next day, patient could be discharged in good condition. Further inquiry about exhibitions and extensive history revealed that the patient used MDMA (3,4- methylenedioxymethamphetamine, the active ingredient of ecstasy). Conclusion. Acquired methaemoglobinemia is a condition that occurs infrequently, but is potentially life threatening. Different nutrients, medications, and chemicals can induce methaemoglobinemia by oxidation of haemoglobin. The clinical presentation of a patient with methaemoglobinemia is due to the impossibility of O(2) binding and transport, resulting in tissue hypoxia. Important is to think about methaemoglobin in a patient who presents with cyanosis, a peripheral saturation of 85% that fails to respond properly to the administration of O(2). Because methaemoglobin can be reduced physiologically, it is usually sufficient to remove the causative agent, to give O(2), and to observe the patient.

  7. Ceftazidime-induced thrombocytopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo-Chiva, E; Díaz-Rangel, M; Monsalve-Naharro, J Á; Cuesta-Montero, P; Catalá-Ripoll, J V; García-Martínez, E M

    2017-05-27

    Ceftazidime is an antibiotic belonging to the group of third generation cephalosporins, frequently used in clinical practice for its broad antibacterial spectrum. A case report is presented on a 78-year-old man who entered the intensive care unit due to respiratory failure secondary to nosocomial pneumonia in the postoperative period of a laparoscopic hepatic bisegmentectomy for a hepatocarcinoma. It required invasive mechanical ventilation and was treated with ceftazidime, developing a progressive decrease in platelet count after the onset of this drug and after re-exposure to it, not coinciding with the introduction of other drugs. The adverse reaction was reported to the Spanish pharmacosurveillance system and according to the Naranjo algorithm the causal relationship was probable. Since no case of ceftazidime-induced thrombocytopenia was found in the literature, we consider knowledge of it relevant as an adverse effect to be taken into account given its potential severity, especially when it cannot be explained by other causes. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Geomagnetically Induced Currents: Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Denny M.; Ngwira, Chigomezyo M.

    2017-10-01

    The geospace, or the space environment near Earth, is constantly subjected to changes in the solar wind flow generated at the Sun. The study of this environment variability is called Space Weather. Examples of effects resulting from this variability are the occurrence of powerful solar disturbances, such as coronal mass ejections (CMEs). The impact of CMEs on the Earth's magnetosphere very often greatly perturbs the geomagnetic field causing the occurrence of geomagnetic storms. Such extremely variable geomagnetic fields trigger geomagnetic effects measurable not only in the geospace but also in the ionosphere, upper atmosphere, and on and in the ground. For example, during extreme cases, rapidly changing geomagnetic fields generate intense geomagnetically induced currents (GICs). Intense GICs can cause dramatic effects on man-made technological systems, such as damage to high-voltage power transmission transformers leading to interruption of power supply, and/or corrosion of oil and gas pipelines. These space weather effects can in turn lead to severe economic losses. In this paper, we supply the reader with theoretical concepts related to GICs as well as their general consequences. As an example, we discuss the GIC effects on a North American power grid located in mid-latitude regions during the 13-14 March 1989 extreme geomagnetic storm. That was the most extreme storm that occurred in the space era age.

  9. Carbimazole-induced agranulocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisha Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 47 year old lady with hyperthyroidism for past 1½ years was initially on Carbimazole 20 mg orally then changed to 30 mg (during Hysterectomy but was taking 10 mg for last 1 year. She had intermittent fever with severe B/L bifrontal headache since 3 weeks. Routine investigations showed anaemia, neutropenia, leucopenia and CRP elevation. Peripheral smear showed normocytic normochromic anaemia with Rouleaux formation, leucopenia with 2% atypical cells and mild thrombocytosis. Widal test, RA factor (Rheumatoid factor test, Ig M (Immunoglobulin M dengue, Ig M Lepto, TORCH infections (Toxoplasmosis, Other (Syphilis, varicella-zoster, parvovirus B19, Cytomegalovirus and Herpes infections, ANA (Antinuclear antibody screen cANCA (Cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies and pANCA (Perinuclear Anti-Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibodies tests were negative. Bone marrow aspiration showed normo to hypercellular marrow with 15% atypical cells and plasma cells. Multiple myeloma workup was done. Carbimazole was withheld. Conclusion: Drug induced agranulocytosis occurs with in 1-2 months of taking the antithyroid medication but onset delayed by 1½ year. De-challenge resulted normalization of blood parameters.

  10. Inducible HSP70 Protects Radiation-Induced Salivary Gland Damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hae-June; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Kwon, Hee-Choong; Lee, Su-Jae; Bae, Sang-Woo; Lee, Yun-Sil [Korea Institute of Radiological Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sung-Ho [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    Irradiation (IR) delivered to the head and neck is a common treatment for malignancies. Salivary glands in the irradiation field are severely damaged, and consequently this resulted in marked salivary hypofunction. While the exact mechanism of salivary gland damage remains enigmatic, fluid secreting acinar cells are lost, and saliva output is dramatically reduced. Previously we have reported that inducible heat shock protein 70 (HSP70i) induced radioresistance in vitro. Moreover, HSP70i localized to salivary glands by gene transfer has great potential for the treatment of salivary gland. Herein, we investigated whether HSP70 can use as radio protective molecules for radiation-induced salivary gland damage in vivo.

  11. Immune Vasculitis Induced Atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The relationship between immune vasculitis and atherosclerosis was studied. The experimental model of weanling rabbits for immune vasculitis was reproduced by intravenous injection of 10 % bovine serum albumin. There were 6 groups: group A, 25 weanling rabbits with immune vasculitis subject to coronary arteriography; group B, 10 normal mature rabbits subject to coronary arteriography; group C, 10 weanling rabbits subject to coronary arteriography; group D, 8 weanling rabbits with vasculitis and cholesterol diet; group E, 8 weanling rabbits receiving single cholesterol diet; group F: 8 weanling rabbits receiving basic diet. Four weeks later, coronary arteriography was performed in groups A, B and C. The rabbits in groups D, E and F were sacrificed for the study of pathological changes in the coronary artery after 12 weeks. The results showed that the dilatation of coronary artery occurred in 6 rabbits of group A, but in groups B and C, no dilatation of coronary artery appeared. In comparison with group E, more severe atherosclerosis occurred in group D, showing the thickened plaque, fibrous sclerosis and atherosclerotic lesion. Percentage of plaques covering aortic intima, incidence of atherosclerosis of small coronary arteries and degree of stenosis of coronary arteries were significantly higher in group D than in group E (P<0.01). No atherosclerosis changes were found in group F. It was concluded that in the acute phase, the serum immune vasculitis can induce the dilatation of coronary artery of some weanling rabbits, and aggravate the formation of atherosclerosis in rabbits fed with cholesterol diet. Immune vasculitis is a new risk factor of atherosclerosis and ischemic heart disease.

  12. Laxative-induced rhabdomyolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Merante

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Alfonso Merante1, Pietro Gareri2,3, Norma Maria Marigliano2, Salvatore De Fazio2, Elvira Bonacci1, Carlo Torchia1, Gaetano Russo1, Pasquale Lacroce1, Roberto Lacava3, Alberto Castagna3, Giovambattista De Sarro2, Giovanni Ruotolo11Geriatrist, Geriatric Unit “Pugliese-Ciaccio” Hospital, Catanzaro, Italy; 2Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, University Magna Graecia of Catanzaro, Clinical Pharmacology and Pharmacovigilance Unit, Mater Domini University Hospital, Catanzaro, Italy; 3Geriatrist, Operative Unit Elderly Health Care, Catanzaro, ItalyAbstract: The present study describes a case of laxative-induced rhabdomyolysis in an elderly patient. An 87-year-old woman was hospitalized for the onset of confusion, tremors, an inability to walk, and a fever that she had been experiencing for 36 hours. She often took high dosages of lactulose and sorbitol syrup as a laxative (about 70 g/day. During her physical examination, the patient was confused, drowsy, and she presented hyposthenia in her upper and lower limbs, symmetric and diffuse moderate hyporeflexia, and her temperature was 37.8°C. Laboratory tests revealed severe hyponatremia with hypokalemia, hypocalcemia, hypochloremia, and metabolic alkalosis. Moreover, rhabdomyolysis markers were found. The correction of hydroelectrolytic imbalances with saline, potassium and sodium chlorure, calcium gluconate was the first treatment. During her hospitalization the patient presented acute delirium, treated with haloperidol and prometazine chloridrate intramuscularly. She was discharged 12 days later, after resolution of symptoms, and normalized laboratory tests. Over-the-counter drugs such as laxatives are usually not considered dangerous; on the other hand, they may cause serum electrolytic imbalance and rhabdomyolysis. A careful monitoring of all the drugs taken by the elderly is one of the most important duties of a physician since drug interactions and

  13. Extreme geomagnetically induced currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, Ryuho; Ngwira, Chigomezyo

    2016-12-01

    We propose an emergency alert framework for geomagnetically induced currents (GICs), based on the empirically extreme values and theoretical upper limits of the solar wind parameters and of d B/d t, the time derivative of magnetic field variations at ground. We expect this framework to be useful for preparing against extreme events. Our analysis is based on a review of various papers, including those presented during Extreme Space Weather Workshops held in Japan in 2011, 2012, 2013, and 2014. Large-amplitude d B/d t values are the major cause of hazards associated with three different types of GICs: (1) slow d B/d t with ring current evolution (RC-type), (2) fast d B/d t associated with auroral electrojet activity (AE-type), and (3) transient d B/d t of sudden commencements (SC-type). We set "caution," "warning," and "emergency" alert levels during the main phase of superstorms with the peak Dst index of less than -300 nT (once per 10 years), -600 nT (once per 60 years), or -900 nT (once per 100 years), respectively. The extreme d B/d t values of the AE-type GICs are 2000, 4000, and 6000 nT/min at caution, warning, and emergency levels, respectively. For the SC-type GICs, a "transient alert" is also proposed for d B/d t values of 40 nT/s at low latitudes and 110 nT/s at high latitudes, especially when the solar energetic particle flux is unusually high.

  14. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaikh Nissar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last 7 decades heparin has remained the most commonly used anticoagulant. Its use is increasing, mainly due to the increase in the number of vascular interventions and aging population. The most feared complication of heparin use is heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT. HIT is a clinicopathologic hypercoagulable, procoagulant prothrombotic condition in patients on heparin therapy, and decrease in platelet count by 50% or to less than 100,000, from 5 to 14 days of therapy. This prothrombotic hypercoagulable state in HIT patient is due to the combined effect of various factors, such as platelet activation, mainly the formation of PF4/heparin/IgG complex, stimulation of the intrinsic factor, and loss of anticoagulant effect of heparin. Diagnosis of HIT is done by clinical condition, heparin use, and timing of thrombocytopenia, and it is confirmed by either serotonin release assay or ELISA assay. Complications of HIT are venous/arterial thrombosis, skin gangrene, and acute platelet activation syndrome. Stopping heparin is the basic initial treatment, and Direct Thrombin Inhibitors (DTI are medication of choice in these patients. A few routine but essential procedures performed by using heparin are hemodialysis, Percutaneous Coronary Intervention, and Cardiopulmonary Bypass; but it cannot be used if a patient develops HIT. HIT patients with unstable angina, thromboembolism, or indwelling devices, such as valve replacement or intraaortic balloon pump, will require alternative anticoagulation therapy. HIT can be prevented significantly by keeping heparin therapy shorter, avoiding bovine heparin, using low-molecular weight heparin, and stopping heparin use for flush and heparin lock.

  15. Worsening of memory deficit induced by energy-dense diet in a rat model of early-Alzheimer's disease is associated to neurotoxic Aβ species and independent of neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino Adami, Pamela V; Galeano, Pablo; Wallinger, Marina L; Quijano, Celia; Rabossi, Alejandro; Pagano, Eleonora S; Olivar, Natividad; Reyes Toso, Carlos; Cardinali, Daniel; Brusco, Luis I; Do Carmo, Sonia; Radi, Rafael; Gevorkian, Goar; Castaño, Eduardo M; Cuello, A Claudio; Morelli, Laura

    2017-03-01

    Diet is a modifiable risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the mechanisms linking alterations in peripheral metabolism and cognition remain unclear. Since it is especially difficult to study long-term effects of high-energy diet in individuals at risk for AD, we addressed this question by using the McGill-R-Thy1-APP transgenic rat model (Tg(+/-)) that mimics presymptomatic AD. Wild-type and Tg(+/-) rats were exposed during 6months to a standard diet or a Western diet (WD), high in saturated fat and sugar. Results from peripheral and hippocampal biochemical analysis and in situ respirometry showed that WD induced a metabolic syndrome and decreased presynaptic bioenergetic parameters without alterations in hippocampal insulin signaling or lipid composition. Cognitive tests, ELISA multiplex, Western blot, immunohistochemistry and RT-qPCR indicated that WD worsened cognition in Tg(+/-) rats, increased hippocampal levels of monomeric Aβ isoforms and oligomeric species, promoted deposits of N-Terminal pyroglutamate-Aβ (AβN3(pE)) in CA1 pyramidal neurons and interneurons, decreased transcript levels of genes involved in neuroprotective pathways such as Sirtuin-1 and increased nitrated proteins. Our results support the concept that in the presence of early Aβ pathology, diet-induced metabolic dysfunctions may contribute as a "second hit" to impair cognition. Noteworthy, such effect is not mediated by higher microglia activation or disruption of blood brain barrier. However, it may be attributed to increased amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor protein, generation of AβN3(pE) and dysregulation of pathways governed by Sirtuin-1. This evidence reinforces the implementation of prophylactic interventions in individuals at risk for AD.

  16. Drug-Induced Metabolic Acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Amy Quynh Trang; Xu, Li Hao Richie; Moe, Orson W

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis could emerge from diseases disrupting acid-base equilibrium or from drugs that induce similar derangements. Occurrences are usually accompanied by comorbid conditions of drug-induced metabolic acidosis, and clinical outcomes may range from mild to fatal. It is imperative that clinicians not only are fully aware of the list of drugs that may lead to metabolic acidosis but also understand the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. In this review, we categorized drug-induced metabolic acidosis in terms of pathophysiological mechanisms, as well as individual drugs' characteristics.

  17. Cisplatin-Induced Eosinophilic Pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideharu Ideguchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 67-year-old man suffering from esophageal cancer was admitted to our hospital complaining of dyspnea and hypoxemia. He had been treated with cisplatin, docetaxel, and fluorouracil combined with radiotherapy. Chest computed tomography revealed bilateral ground-glass opacity, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid showed increased eosinophils. Two episodes of transient eosinophilia in peripheral blood were observed after serial administration of anticancer drugs before the admission, and drug-induced lymphocyte stimulation test to cisplatin was positive. Thus cisplatin-induced eosinophilic pneumonia was suspected, and corticosteroid was effectively administered. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of cisplatin-induced eosinophilic pneumonia.

  18. Drug-induced visceral angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth M. Thalanayar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Angioedema associated with angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs is due to the accumulation of bradykinin and its metabolites. Angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs produce anti-hypertensive effects by blocking the angiotensin II AT1 receptor action; hence bradykinin-related side effects are not expected. However, we notice the occurrence of ARB-induced angioedema as not a very rare side effect. Visceral drug-induced angioedema has been reported with ACEIs, not with ARBs. This underlying review will help educate readers on the pathophysiology and recent guidelines pertaining to ACEI- and ARB-induced visceral angioedema.

  19. Noise-induced coherent switch

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Taking the famous genetic toggle switch as an example,we numerically investigated the effect of noise on bistability.We found that extrinsic noise resulting from stochastic fluctuations in synthesis and degradation rates and from the environmental fluctuation in gene regulatory processes can induce coherent switch,and that there is an optimal noise intensity such that the noise not only can induce this switch,but also can amplify a weak input signal.In addition,we found that the intrinsic noise introduced through the Poisson τ-leap algorithm cannot induce such a switch.

  20. Drug-Induced Metabolic Acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Amy Quynh Trang; Xu, Li Hao Richie; Moe, Orson W.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis could emerge from diseases disrupting acid-base equilibrium or from drugs that induce similar derangements. Occurrences are usually accompanied by comorbid conditions of drug-induced metabolic acidosis, and clinical outcomes may range from mild to fatal. It is imperative that clinicians not only are fully aware of the list of drugs that may lead to metabolic acidosis but also understand the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. In this review, we categorized drug-induced metabolic acidosis in terms of pathophysiological mechanisms, as well as individual drugs’ characteristics. PMID:26918138

  1. Does stress induce bowel dysfunction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Ming; El-Zaatari, Mohamad; Kao, John Y

    2014-08-01

    Psychological stress is known to induce somatic symptoms. Classically, many gut physiological responses to stress are mediated by the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis. There is, however, a growing body of evidence of stress-induced corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) release causing bowel dysfunction through multiple pathways, either through the HPA axis, the autonomic nervous systems, or directly on the bowel itself. In addition, recent findings of CRF influencing the composition of gut microbiota lend support for the use of probiotics, antibiotics, and other microbiota-altering agents as potential therapeutic measures in stress-induced bowel dysfunction.

  2. Infrasonic induced ground motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ting-Li

    On January 28, 2004, the CERI seismic network recorded seismic signals generated by an unknown source. Our conclusion is that the acoustic waves were initiated by an explosive source near the ground surface. The meteorological temperature and effective sound speed profiles suggested existence of an efficient near-surface waveguide that allowed the acoustic disturbance to propagate to large distances. An explosion occurring in an area of forest and farms would have limited the number of eyewitnesses. Resolution of the source might be possible by experiment or by detailed analysis of the ground motion data. A seismo-acoustic array was built to investigate thunder-induced ground motions. Two thunder events with similar N-wave waveforms but different horizontal slownesses are chosen to evaluate the credibility of using thunder as a seismic source. These impulsive acoustic waves excited P and S reverberations in the near surface that depend on both the incident wave horizontal slowness and the velocity structure in the upper 30 meters. Nineteen thunder events were chosen to further investigate the seismo-acoustic coupling. The consistent incident slowness differences between acoustic pressure and ground motions suggest that ground reverberations were first initiated somewhat away from the array. Acoustic and seismic signals were used to generate the time-domain transfer function through the deconvolution technique. Possible non-linear interaction for acoustic propagation into the soil at the surface was observed. The reverse radial initial motions suggest a low Poisson's ratio for the near-surface layer. The acoustic-to-seismic transfer functions show a consistent reverberation series of the Rayleigh wave type, which has a systematic dispersion relation to incident slownesses inferred from the seismic ground velocity. Air-coupled Rayleigh wave dispersion was used to quantitatively constrain the near-surface site structure with constraints afforded by near-surface body

  3. Systemic resistance induced by rhizosphere bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loon, L.C. van; Bakker, P.A.H.M.; Pieterse, C.M.J.

    1998-01-01

    Nonpathogenic rhizobacteria can induce a systemic resistance in plants that is phenotypically similar to pathogen-induced systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Rhizobacteria-mediated induced systemic resistance (ISR) has been demonstrated against fungi, bacteria, and viruses in Arabidopsis, bean, carn

  4. Organophosphate induced chronic neurotoxicity: Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Organophosphate induced chronic neurotoxicity: Health, environmental and risk exposure issues in developing nations of the world. ... show that many agents considered toxic and banned in many parts of the industrialized world are still in ...

  5. Eigenvalue Conditions for Induced Subgraphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harant Jochen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Necessary conditions for an undirected graph G to contain a graph H as induced subgraph involving the smallest ordinary or the largest normalized Laplacian eigenvalue of G are presented.

  6. Induced-charge Electrokinetic Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Bazant, M Z; Bazant, Martin Z.; Squires, Todd M.

    2003-01-01

    Motivated by the recent discovery of AC electro-osmosis near micro-electrodes, we predict a broad class of nonlinear electrokinetic phenomena involving induced interfacial charge. By considering various polarizable objects (metals or dielectrics) in DC and AC applied fields, we develop a simple physical picture of `induced-charge electro-osmosis' (ICEO), the fluid slip at a surface due to an electric field acting on the diffuse charge it induces. We also discuss `induced-charge electrophoresis' (ICEP), the analogous motion of a freely-suspended polarizable particle. Both differ significantly from their classical linear counterparts. We present a mathematical theory of ICEO flows in the weakly nonlinear limit of thin double layers. As an example, we calculate the time-dependent ICEO slip around a metallic sphere with a thin dielectric coating in a suddenly-applied DC field. We briefly discuss possible applications of ICEO to microfluidics and of ICEP to colloidal manipulation.

  7. Reading-Induced Absence Seizures

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1995-01-01

    A 12-year-old girl with a 2-year history of absence seizures induced by reading and diagnosed by video EEG is reported from The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, and Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital, Saudi Arabia.

  8. [Medical induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettahar, K; Pinton, A; Boisramé, T; Cavillon, V; Wylomanski, S; Nisand, I; Hassoun, D

    2016-12-01

    Updated clinical recommendations for medical induced abortion procedure. A systematic review of French and English literature, reviewing the evidence relating to the provision of medical induced abortion was carried out on PubMed, Cochrane Library and international scientific societies recommendations. The effectiveness of medical abortion is higher than 95% when the protocols are adjusted to gestational age (EL1). Misoprostol alone is less effective than a combination of mifepristone and misoprostol (EL1). Gemeprost is less effective than misoprostol (EL2). The dose of 200mg of mifepristone should be preferred to 600mg (NP1, Rank A). Mifepristone can be taken at home (professional agreement). The optimum interval between mifepristone and misoprostol intake should be 24 to 48 hours (EL1, grade A). Before 7 weeks LMP, the dose of 400μg misoprostol should be given orally (EL1, grade A) eventually repeated after 3hours if no bleeding occurs. For optimal effectiveness between 7 and 14 LMP, the interval between mifepristone and misoprostol should not be shortened to less than 8hours (grade 1). An interval of 24 to 48hours will not affect the effectiveness of the method provided misoprostol dosage is 800μg (EL1). Vaginal, sublingual or buccal routes of administration are more effective and better tolerated than the oral route, which should be abandoned (EL1). An amount of 800μg sublingual or buccal misoprostol route has the same effectiveness than the vaginal route but more gastrointestinal side effects (EL1, grade A). Between 7 and 9 LMP, it does not seem necessary to repeat misoprostol dose whereas it should be repeated beyond 9 SA (grade B). Between 9 and 14 LMP, the dose of 400μg misoprostol given either vaginally, buccally or sublingually should be repeated every 3hours if needed (with a maximum of 5 doses) (EL2, grade B). There is no strong evidence supporting routine antibiotic prophylaxis for medical abortion (professional agreement). Rare contraindications

  9. Mutations induced in plant breeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga B, P. (Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia. Inst. de Produccion y Sanidad Vegetal)

    1984-10-01

    The most significant aspects of the use of ionizing radiations in plant breeding are reviewed. Aspects such as basic principles of mutation, expression and selection in obtention of mutants, methods for using induced mutations and sucess achieved with this methodology in plant breeding are reviewed. Results obtained in a program of induced mutation on wheat for high content of protein and lysine at the Universidad Austral de Chile are presented.

  10. Methadone Induced Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Chadi Saifan; Daniel Glass; Iskandar Barakat; Suzanne El-Sayegh

    2013-01-01

    Background. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL) caused by opiate abuse or overuse has been well documented in the medical literature. Most documented case reports have involved either heroin or hydrocodone/acetaminophen. Recently, case reposts of methadone induced SSHL have been published. Case Report. We present the case of a 31-year-old man who developed SSHL after a methadone overdose induced stupor. He was subsequently restarted on methadone at his regular dose. On follow-up audiomet...

  11. Holographic Two-Photon Induced Photopolymerization

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Holographic two-photon-induced photopolymerization (HTPIP) offers distinct advantages over conventional one-photon-induced photopolymerization and current techniques...

  12. Victim-induced criminality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fooner, M

    1966-09-02

    about the probable effects on the administration of criminal justice. These are pragmatic problems; there is a third problem which may at this time seem speculative, but is, nevertheless, quite important. 3) To what extent will a particular proposal for victim compensation contribute to a temptation-opportunity pattern in victim behavior? In previous studies it has been pointed out that large numbers of our fellow Americans have tended to acquire casual money-handling habits-generically designated "carelessness"-which contribute to the national growth of criminality. How the victim helps the criminal was sketched in reports of those studies (10). It was made abundantly clear that human beings in our affluent society cannot be assumed to be prudent or self-protective against the hazards of crime. Even when the "victim" is not overtly acting to commit a crime-as in the case of the property owner who hires an arsonist-he often tempts the offender. Among the victims of burglary-statistically the most prevalent crime in the United States-are a substantial number of Americans who keep cash, jewelry, and other valuables carelessly at home or in hotel rooms to which the burglar has easy access through door or window. Victims of automobile theft-one of the fastest growing classes of crime-include drivers who leave the vehicle or its contents invitingly accessible to thieves. And so on with other classes of crime. As pointed out in previous studies, when victim behavior follows a temptation-opportunity pattern, it (i) contributes to a "climate of criminal inducements," (ii) adds to the economic resources available to criminal societies, and (iii) detracts from the ability of lawenforcement agencies to suppress the growth of crime.

  13. Induced airflow in flying insects II. Measurement of induced flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sane, Sanjay P; Jacobson, Nathaniel P

    2006-01-01

    The flapping wings of insects and birds induce a strong flow over their body during flight. Although this flow influences the sensory biology and physiology of a flying animal, there are very little data on the characteristics of this self-generated flow field or its biological consequences. A model proposed in the companion paper estimated the induced flow over flying insects. In this study, we used a pair of hot wire anemometers to measure this flow at two locations near the body of a tethered flapping hawk moth, Manduca sexta. The axial inflow anemometer measured the airflow prior to its entry into the stroke plane, whereas the radial outflow anemometer measured the airflow after it crossed the stroke plane. The high temporal resolution of the hot wire anemometers allowed us to measure not only the mean induced flow but also subtle higher frequency disturbances occurring at 1-4 times the wing beat frequency. These data provide evidence for the predictions of a mathematical model proposed in the companion paper. Specifically, the absolute value of the measured induced flow matches the estimate of the model. Also, as predicted by the model, the induced flow varies linearly with wing beat frequency. Our experiments also show that wing flexion contributes significantly to the observed higher frequency disturbances. Thus, the hot wire anemometry technique provides a useful means to quantify the aerodynamic signature of wing flexion. The phasic and tonic components of induced flow influence several physiological processes such as convective heat loss and gas exchange in endothermic insects, as well as alter the nature of mechanosensory and olfactory stimuli to the sensory organs of a flying insect.

  14. All eyes on the next generation of HIV vaccines: strategies for inducing a broadly neutralizing antibody response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlers, Jeffrey D

    2014-04-01

    HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (BNAbs) develop after several years of infection through a recursive process of memory B cell adaptation and maturation against co-evolving virus quasispecies. Advances in single-cell sorting and memory B cell antibody cloning methods have identified many new HIV BNAbs targeting conserved epitopes on the HIV envelope (env) protein. 3D crystal structures and biophysical analyses of BNAbs bound to invariant virus structures expressed on monomeric gp120, epitope scaffolds, core structures, and native trimers have helped us to visualize unique binding interactions and paratope orientations that have been instrumental in guiding vaccine design. A paradigm shift in the approach to structure-based design of HIV-1 envelope immunogens came recently after several laboratories discovered that native viral envelopes or "env-structures" reverse-engineered to bind with high affinity to a handful of broadly neutralizing antibodies did not in fact bind the predicted germline precursors of these broadly neutralizing antibodies. A major challenge for HIV-1 B cell vaccine development moving forward is the design of new envelope immunogens that can trigger the selection and expansion of germline precursor and intermediate memory B cells to recapitulate B cell ontogenies associated with the maturation of a broadly neutralizing antibody response. Equally important for vaccine development is the identification of delivery systems, prime-boost strategies, and synergistic adjuvant combinations that can induce the magnitude and quality of antigen-specific T follicular helper (TFH) cell responses needed to drive somatic hypermutation (SHM) and B cell maturation against heterologous primary virus envelopes. Finding the combination of multi-protein envelope immunogens and immunization strategies that can evolve a potent broadly neutralizing antibody response portends to require a complex vaccine regimen that might be difficult to implement on any scale

  15. Uterine contraction induced by Ghanaian plants used to induce abortion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Birgitte HV; Soelberg, Jens; Kristiansen, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    Ethnomedicinal observations from the time of the Atlantic slave trade show women in Ghana historically used plants as emmenagogues (menstruation stimulants) and to induce abortion. This study investigates the effect of four of these plants on uterine contraction. The historically used plants were...... response obtained with acetylcholine. Erythrina senegalensis, Ficus sur and Physalis angulata did not show activity. M. cecropioides can thus be used to induce contractions, which coincides well with the historical and extant use of M. cecropioides as emmenagogue/birth stimulant...

  16. Drug-induced cutaneous vasculitides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiga, E; Verdelli, A; Bonciani, D; Bonciolini, V; Quintarelli, L; Volpi, W; Fabbri, P; Caproni, M

    2015-04-01

    Cutaneous vasculitides (CV) can be idiopathic or secondary to several triggers, including drugs, which account for up to 30% of all the cases of CV. Several drugs can induce CV, including some medications commonly used in dermatology, including minocycline, and several new drugs, such as anti-TNF agents. Different pathomecanisms are involved in the development of drug-induced CV, including the formation and deposition of immune complexes, the induction of neutrophil apoptosis, the formation of neoantigens between the drugs and proteins from the host, the shift of the immune response, and others. Although the diagnosis is difficult, because the clinical picture of drug-induced CV is in general indistinguishable from that of other forms of CV, it is important to recognize such entities in order to correctly manage the patient. Anamnesis, diagnostic algorithms to assess the likelihood of the association between a drug and a cutaneous reaction, skin biopsy and laboratory testing (including the search for antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) are useful tools to make a diagnosis of drug-induced CV. About the therapy, while in idiopathic vasculitides the treatment is usually more aggressive and long-lasting, very often requiring a maintenance therapy with immunosuppressive drugs, in drug-induced CV the discontinuation of the suspected drug alone is usually enough to achieve complete remission, making the prognosis usually very good.

  17. Drug-induced lupus erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Carrabba

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Drug-induced lupus is a syndrome which share symptoms and laboratory characteristics with the idiopathic systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. The list of medications implicated as etiologic agents in drug-induced lupus continues to grow. The terms used for this condition are lupus-like syndrome, drug-induced lupus erythematosus (DILE and drug related lupus. More than 80 drugs have been associated with DILE. The first case of DILE was reported in 1945 and associated with sulfadiazin. In 1953 it was reported that DILE was related to the use of hydralazine. Drugs responsible for the development of DILE can divided into three groups, but the list of these drugs is quite long because new drugs are included yearly in the list. The syndrome is characterised by arthralgia, myalgia, pleurisy, rash and fever in association with antinuclear antibodies in the serum. Recognition of DILE is important because it usually reverts within a few weeks after stopping the drug.

  18. Late onset clozapine induced agranulocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajmohan Velayudhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Agranulocytosis is defined as an absolute neutrophil count less than 100/mm 3 in association with infectious disease. The risk of agranulocytosis is 0.38% of all clozapine treated cases and there is a relatively lesser incidence in Indian population. The risk of clozapine-induced agranulocytosis and neutropenia is highest in the first 6 months and higher in the initial 18 months after the onset of treatment. There have been very few reports of neutropenia and agranulocytosis after this period. There have so far been no reports of late onset clozapine induced agranulocytosis has been reported from India. A case of late onset clozapine induced agranulocytosis with possible mechanism of the same is reported.

  19. Static behaviour of induced seismicity

    CERN Document Server

    Mignan, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    The standard paradigm to describe seismicity induced by fluid injection is to apply nonlinear diffusion dynamics in a poroelastic medium. I show that the spatiotemporal behaviour and rate evolution of induced seismicity can, instead, be expressed by geometric operations on a static stress field produced by volume change at depth. I obtain laws similar in form to the ones derived from poroelasticity while requiring a lower description length. Although fluid flow is known to occur in the ground, it is not pertinent to the behaviour of induced seismicity. The proposed model is equivalent to the static stress model for tectonic foreshocks generated by the Non- Critical Precursory Accelerating Seismicity Theory. This study hence verifies the explanatory power of this theory outside of its original scope.

  20. Surface-induced evaporative cooling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke Min; Yan Bo; Cheng Feng; Wang Yu-Zhu

    2009-01-01

    The effects of surface-induced evaporative cooling on an atom chip are investigated. The evolutions of temperature, number and phase-space density of the atom cloud are measured when the atom cloud is brought close to the surface. Rapid decrease of the temperature and number of the atoms is found when the atom-surface distance is < 100 μm. A gain of about a factor of five on the phase-space density is obtained. It is found that the efficiency of the surface-induced evaporative cooling depends on the atom-surface distance and the shape of the evaporative trap. When the atoms are moved very close to the surface, severe heating is observed, which dominates when the holding time is > 8 ms. It is important that the surface-induced evaporative cooling offers novel possibilities for the realization of a continuous condensation, where a spatially varying evaporative cooling is required.

  1. Induced abortion and contraception use

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Prey, Beatrice; Talavlikar, Rachel; Mangat, Rupinder; Freiheit, Elizabeth A.; Drummond, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To determine what proportion of women seeking induced abortion in the Calgary census metropolitan area were immigrants. Design For 2 months, eligible women were asked to complete a questionnaire. Women who refused were asked to provide their country of birth (COB) to assess for selection bias. Setting Two abortion clinics in Calgary, Alta. Participants Women presenting at or less than 15 weeks’ gestational age for induced abortion for maternal indications. Main outcome measures The primary outcome was the proportion of women seeking induced abortion services who were immigrants. Secondary outcomes compared socioeconomic characteristics and contraception use between immigrant and Canadian-born women. Results A total of 752 women either completed a questionnaire (78.6%) or provided their COB (21.4%). Overall, 28.9% of women living in the Calgary census metropolitan area who completed the questionnaire were immigrants, less than the 31.2% background proportion of immigrant women of childbearing age. However, 46.0% of women who provided only COB were immigrants. When these data were combined, 34.2% of women presenting for induced abortion identified as immigrant, a proportion not significantly different from the background proportion (P = .127). Immigrant women presenting for induced abortion tended to be older, more educated, married with children, and have increased parity. They were similar to Canadian-born women in number of previous abortions, income status, and employment status. Conclusion This study suggests that immigrant women in Calgary are not presenting for induced abortion in disproportionately higher numbers, which differs from existing European literature. This is likely owing to differing socioeconomic characteristics among the immigrant women in our study from what have been previously described in the literature (typically lower socioeconomic status). Much still needs to be explored with regard to factors influencing the use of

  2. Validating induced seismicity forecast models - Induced Seismicity Test Bench

    CERN Document Server

    Kiraly-Proag, Eszter; Gischig, Valentin; Wiemer, Stefan; Karvounis, Dimitrios; Doetsch, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Induced earthquakes often accompany fluid injection, and the seismic hazard they pose threatens various underground engineering projects. Models to monitor and control induced seismic hazard with traffic light systems should be probabilistic, forward-looking, and updated as new data arrive. In this study, we propose an Induced Seismicity Test Bench to test and rank such models; this test bench can be used for model development, model selection, and ensemble model building. We apply the test bench to data from the Basel 2006 and Soultz-sous-For\\^ets 2004 geothermal stimulation projects, and we assess forecasts from two models: Shapiro and Smoothed Seismicity (SaSS) and Hydraulics and Seismics (HySei). These models incorporate a different mix of physics-based elements and stochastic representation of the induced sequences. Our results show that neither model is fully superior to the other. Generally, HySei forecasts the seismicity rate better after shut-in, but is only mediocre at forecasting the spatial distri...

  3. Metal-induced crystallization fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Zumin; Mittemeijer, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    Introduction to Metal-Induced CrystallizationAtomic Mechanisms and Interface Thermodynamics of Metal-Induced Crystallization of Amorphous Semiconductors at Low TemperaturesThermodynamics and Kinetics of Layer Exchange upon Low-Temperature Annealing Amorphous Si/Polycrystalline Al Layered StructuresMetal-Induced Crystallization by Homogeneous Insertion of Metallic Species in Amorphous SemiconductorsAluminum-Induced Crystallization: Applications in Photovoltaic TechnologiesApplications of Metal-Induced Crystallization for Advanced Flat-Panel DisplaysLaser-Assisted Meta

  4. Radiation-induced intestinal inflammation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Meritxell Mollà; Julián Panés

    2007-01-01

    Radiation induces an important inflammatory response in the irradiated organs, characterized by leukocyte infiltration and vascular changes that are the main limiting factor in the application of this therapeutic modality for the treatment of cancer. Recently, a considerable investigative effort has been directed at determining the molecular mechanisms by which radiation induces leukocyte recruitment, in order to create strategies to prevent intestinal inflammatory damage. In these review, we consider current available evidence on the factors governing the process of leukocyte recruitment in irradiated organs, mainly derived from experimental studies, with special attention to adhesion molecules, and their value as therapeutic targets.

  5. Bathtub suction-induced purpura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landers, Maeran C; Schroeder, Theresa L

    2004-01-01

    We report two cases of bathtub suction-induced purpura. Two girls, ages 9 and 14 years, developed recurring purpura "spontaneously" in the same lower back location and in the same U-shaped distribution. The patients had similar histopathologic findings, with extravasated erythrocytes and a sparse superficial inflammatory infiltrate. After extensive evaluation, one patient eventually admitted to self-inducing her lesions by creating suction against a bathtub. The second patient denied self-inflicting her lesions; however, her purpura improved when she stopped taking baths.

  6. Anesthetic-Induced Developmental Neurotoxicity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jia-RenLiu; Qian Liu; Jing Li; Sulpicio G. Soriano

    2011-01-01

    1 IntroductionMillions of newborn and infants receive anesthetic,sedative and analgesic drugs for surgery and painful procedures on a daily basis.Recent laboratory reports clearly demonstrate that anesthetic and sedative drugs induced both neuroapoptosis and neurocognitive deficits in laboratory models.This issue is of paramount interest to pediatric anesthesiologists and intensivists because it questions the safety of anesthetics used for fetal and neonatal anesthesia[1-2].In an attempt to summarize the rapidly expanding laboratorybased literature on anesthetic-induced developmental neurotoxicity (AIDN),this review will examine published reports on the characterization,mechanisms and alleviation of this phenomenon.

  7. An induced junction photovoltaic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon solar cells operating with induced junctions rather than diffused junctions have been fabricated and tested. Induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. Measurements of the response of the inversion layer cell to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. The greater sensitivity occurs because of the shallow junction and the strong electric field at the surface.

  8. Traffic forecasts ignoring induced demand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Næss, Petter; Nicolaisen, Morten Skou; Strand, Arvid

    2012-01-01

    Although the phenomenon of induced traffic has been theorized for more than 60 years and is now widely accepted among transport researchers, the traffic-generating effects of road capacity expansion are still often neglected in transport modelling. Such omission can lead to serious bias in the as......Although the phenomenon of induced traffic has been theorized for more than 60 years and is now widely accepted among transport researchers, the traffic-generating effects of road capacity expansion are still often neglected in transport modelling. Such omission can lead to serious bias...

  9. Induced activation in accelerator components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Bungau

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The residual activity induced in particle accelerators is a serious issue from the point of view of radiation safety as the long-lived radionuclides produced by fast or moderated neutrons and impact protons cause problems of radiation exposure for staff involved in the maintenance work and when decommissioning the facility. This paper presents activation studies of the magnets and collimators in the High Energy Beam Transport line of the European Spallation Source due to the backscattered neutrons from the target and also due to the direct proton interactions and their secondaries. An estimate of the radionuclide inventory and induced activation are predicted using the GEANT4 code.

  10. Drug-induced hair loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Hair loss can have major psychological consequences. It can be due to a wide variety of causes, including hormonal disorders, dietary factors, infections, inflammation, trauma, emotional factors, and cancer. Drugs can also induce hair loss, by interacting with the hair growth cycle. Drug-induced hair loss may be immediate or delayed, sudden or gradual, and diffuse or localised. It is usually reversible after drug discontinuation. The drugs most often implicated in hair loss are anticancer agents, interferon, azole antifungals, lithium, immunosuppressants, and many other drugs belonging to a variety of pharmacological classes.

  11. Induced radioactivity in LDEF components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, B. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Parnell, T. A.; Laird, C. E.

    1992-01-01

    A systematic study of the induced radioactivity of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) is being carried out in order to gather information about the low earth orbit radiation environment and its effects on materials. The large mass of the LDEF spacecraft, its stabilized configuration, and long mission duration have presented an opportunity to determine space radiation-induced radioactivities with a precision not possible before. Data presented include preliminary activities for steel and aluminum structural samples, and activation subexperiment foils. Effects seen in the data show a clear indication of the trapped proton anisotropy in the South Atlantic Anomaly and suggest contributions from different sources of external radiation fluxes.

  12. Key aspects governing induced seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buijze, Loes; Wassing, Brecht; Fokker, Peter

    2013-04-01

    In the past decades numerous examples of earthquakes induced by human-induced changes in subsurface fluid pressures have been reported. This poses a major threat to the future development of some of these operations and calls for an understanding and quantification of the seismicity generated. From geomechanical considerations and insights from laboratory experiments the factors controlling induced seismicity may be grouped into 4 categories; the magnitude of the stress disturbance, the pre-existing stress conditions, the reservoir/fault rock properties and the local geometry. We investigated whether the (relative) contributions of these factors and their influence on magnitudes generated could be recognized by looking at the entire dataset of reported cases of induced seismicity as a whole, and what this might imply for future developments. An extensive database has been built out of over a 160 known cases of induced seismicity worldwide, incorporating the relevant geological, seismological and fluid-related parameters. The cases studied include hydrocarbon depletion and secondary recovery, waste water injection, (enhanced) geothermal systems and hydraulic fracturing with observed magnitudes ranging from less than -1.5 to 7. The parameters taken into account were based on the theoretical background of the mechanisms of induced seismicity and include the injection/depletion-related parameters, (spatial) characteristics of seismicity, lithological properties and the local stress situation. Correlations between the seismic response and the geological/geomechanical characteristics of the various sites were investigated. The injected/depleted volumes and the scale of the activities are major controlling factors on the maximum magnitudes generated. Spatial signatures of seismicity such as the depth and lateral spread of the seismicity were observed to be distinct for different activities, which is useful when considering future operations. Where available the local

  13. Snowfall induced by corona discharge

    CERN Document Server

    Ju, Jingjing; Li, Ruxin; Du, Shengzhe; Sun, Haiyi; Liu, Yonghong; Tian, Ye; Bai, Yafeng; Liu, Yaoxiang; Chen, Na; Wang, Jingwei; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Jiansheng; Chin, S L; Xu, Zhizhan

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated for the first time the condensation and precipitation (or snowfall) induced by a corona discharge inside a cloud chamber. Ionic wind was found to have played a more significant role than ions as extra Cloud Condensation Nuclei (CCN). 2.25 g of net snow enhancement was measured after applying a 30 kV corona discharge for 25 min. In comparison with another newly emerging femtosecond laser filamentation method, the snow precipitation induced by the corona discharge has about 4 orders of magnitude higher wall-plug efficiency under similar conditions.

  14. Ceftriaxone-induced toxic hepatitis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Erdal Peker; Eren Cagan; Murat Dogan

    2009-01-01

    Toxic hepatitis or drug-induced liver injury encompasses a spectrum of clinical disease ranging from mild biochemical abnormalities to acute liver failure. The advantages of a long half-life, wide spectrum, high tissue penetration rate, and a good safety profile,make ceftriaxone, a third-generation cephalosporin,a frequent choice in the treatment of childhood infections. Previous studies have reported a few cases of high aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase levels, along with three cases ofhepatitis caused by ceftriaxone. Here, we report a case of drug-induced toxic hepatitis in a patient who was treated with ceftriaxone for acute tonsillitis.

  15. Demand inducement as cheap talk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcott, P

    1999-12-01

    The doctor-patient interaction is analysed in a game of cheap talk. Causes and consequences of imperfect agency are examined. One form of imperfect agency, supplier-induced demand, is a feature of neologism proof equilibria with some parameter values but not with others. The model is used to evaluate two tests that have been used to test for the existence of supplier-induced demand. The analysis suggests that the two tests, which compare the medical utilization of informed and uninformed consumers, are not valid.

  16. 'Popper'-induced vision loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krilis, Matthew; Thompson, Julia; Atik, Alp; Lusthaus, Jed; Jankelowitz, Stacey

    2013-05-01

    Amyl nitrite 'poppers' are recreational drugs, which are a potent source of nitric oxide. The use of 'poppers' can cause psychoactive stimulation, reduced blood pressure, tachycardia and involuntary muscle relaxation. Their use is becoming increasingly common around the world, including approximately 60% of Australia's male homosexual community. We report the first case of 'popper'-induced vision loss in Australasia.

  17. Microcracks and Overpressure- Induced Fractures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ahmed M. Al - QAHTANI

    2001-01-01

    The microfractures and natural fractures studies have a great significance in the hydrocarbon accumulation exploration and can be a good supporter for wide geophysical study on the major structures. This paper is a brief review on microcracks and overpressure- induced fracture. It is to discuss different views on the mechanism of fractures in the subsurface of the earth.

  18. SPS Ion Induced Desorption Experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    This experiment will give a study about the induced desorption from heavy ion (Indium ion run from week 45 in SPS T4-H8 area) impacting LHC type graphite collimator. 4 different samples are located in the 4 chambers 90° one to each other: pure graphite, graphite with copper coating, graphite with NEG coating, 316LN stainless steal (reference).

  19. Hydralazine-induced constrictive pericarditis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, CFC; ElGamal, MIH; Gans, ROB; Hoorntje, SJ

    1996-01-01

    A 59-year-old man was diagnosed as having constrictive pericarditis 17 months after a typical hydralazine-induced autoimmune syndrome, This late complication of hydralazine has been reported only once. Ten years later the patient was found to have anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies directed agai

  20. Drug-induced hepatic injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Henrik; Andreasen, P B

    1992-01-01

    during the last 2 years of the decade. Based on consumption data, the incidence of hepatic injury due to sulindac was estimated to be 18-fold higher than that due to ibuprofen. Paracetamol was reported to induce acute cytotoxic as well as cholestatic reactions in non-alcoholic subjects taking therapeutic...

  1. Adolescents and Exercise Induced Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Pamela; Bickanse, Shanna; Bogenreif, Mike; VanSickle, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    This article defines asthma and exercise induced asthma, and provides information on the triggers, signs, and symptoms of an attack. It also gives treatments for these conditions, along with prevention guidelines on how to handle an attack in the classroom or on the practice field. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

  2. Photobiomodulation on alcohol induced dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zheng-Ping; Liu, Timon C.; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Yan-Fang

    2007-05-01

    Alcohol, which is ubiquitous today, is a major health concern. Its use was already relatively high among the youngest respondents, peaked among young adults, and declined in older age groups. Alcohol is causally related to more than 60 different medical conditions. Overall, 4% of the global burden of disease is attributable to alcohol, which accounts for about as much death and disability globally as tobacco and hypertension. Alcohol also promotes the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or interferes with the body's normal defense mechanisms against these compounds through numerous processes, particularly in the liver. Photobiomodulation (PBM) is a cell-specific effect of low intensity monochromatic light or low intensity laser irradiation (LIL) on biological systems. The cellular effects of both alcohol and LIL are ligand-independent so that PBM might rehabilitate alcohol induced dysfunction. The PBM on alcohol induced human neutrophil dysfunction and rat chronic atrophic gastritis, the laser acupuncture on alcohol addiction, and intravascular PBM on alcoholic coma of patients and rats have been observed. The endonasal PBM (EPBM) mediated by Yangming channel, autonomic nervous systems and blood cells is suggested to treat alcohol induced dysfunction in terms of EPBM phenomena, the mechanism of alcohol induced dysfunction and our biological information model of PBM. In our opinion, the therapeutic effects of PBM might also be achieved on alcoholic myopathy.

  3. Ventilator and viral induced inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennus, M.P.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis expands current knowledge on ventilator induced lung injury and provides insights on the immunological effects of mechanical ventilation during viral respiratory infections. The experimental studies in the first part of this thesis improve our understanding of how mechanical ventilation

  4. Toxic encephalopathy induced by capecitabine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, B; Rochlitz, C; Herrmann, R; Pless, M

    2004-01-01

    Toxic encephalopathy is a rarely described side effect of 5-fluorouracil which usually presents with cerebellar, neuropsychiatric, and focal neurological symptoms. Magnetic resonance imaging findings are described as patchy white matter alterations. We report the 1st case of capecitabine-induced toxic encephalopathy with epilepsy-like symptoms and diffuse white matter alterations on magnetic resonance imaging.

  5. Drug-induced renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, J R

    1979-11-01

    The clinical manifestations of drug-induced renal disease may include all the manifestations attributed to natural or spontaneous renal diseases such as acute renal failure, chronic renal failure, acute nephritic syndrome, renal colic, haematuria, selective tubular defects, obstructive nephropathy, etc. It is therefore vital in any patient with renal disease whatever the clinical manifestations might be, to obtain a meticulous drug and toxin inventory. Withdrawal of the offending drug may result in amelioration or cure of the renal disorder although in the case of severe renal failure it may be necessary to utilise haemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis to tide the patient over the period of acute renal failure. Analgesic nephropathy is an important cause of terminal chronic renal failure and it is therefore vital to make the diagnosis as early as possible. The pathogenesis of some drug-induced renal disorders appears to be immunologically mediated. There are many other pathogenetic mechanisms involved in drug-induced renal disorders and some drugs may under appropriate circumstances be responsible for a variety of different nephrotoxic effects. For example, the sulphonamides have been incriminated in examples of crystalluria, acute interstitial nephritis, acute tubular necrosis, generalised hypersensitivity reactions, polyarteritis nodosa and drug-induced lupus erythematosus.

  6. Plasma generation induced by triboelectrification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kusano, Yukihiro; Singh, Shailendra Vikram; Michelsen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    A gas discharge plasma can be induced by triboelectrification around a sliding contact. The detailed physical mechanism of triboelectrification is unknown, but an empirical classification scheme can be referred to in practice. It is reported that intense ultra-violet emission from a plasma...

  7. Transdermal hyoscine induced unilateral mydriasis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, Breffni

    2012-03-20

    The authors present a case of unilateral mydriasis in a teenager prescribed transdermal hyoscine hydrobromide (scopolamine) for chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting. The authors discuss the ocular side-effects associated with this particular drug and delivery system and the potential use of transdermal hyoscine as an antiemetic agent in this group.

  8. Nodal bradycardia induced by tocainide.

    OpenAIRE

    Mandal, S. K.; Datta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    A case of tocainide-induced nodal bradycardia in standard recommended dose is reported. There was no recurrence when the drug was subsequently reintroduced in a reduced dosage. It is suggested that in the elderly, tocainide should be used in a lower dosage than normally recommended.

  9. Conflict-Induced Perceptual Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Mike; Luna-Rodriguez, Aquiles; Jacobsen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    In a variety of conflict paradigms, target and distractor stimuli are defined in terms of perceptual features. Interference evoked by distractor stimuli tends to be reduced when the ratio of congruent to incongruent trials is decreased, suggesting conflict-induced perceptual filtering (i.e., adjusting the processing weights assigned to stimuli…

  10. Constraint-induced movement therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castellini, Greta; Gianola, Silvia; Banzi, Rita;

    2014-01-01

    on randomized controlled trials (RCTs) included in a Cochrane systematic review on the effectiveness of constraint-induced movement therapy (CIMT) for stroke patients. METHODS: We extracted data on the functional independence measure (FIM) and the action research arm test (ARAT) from RCTs that compared CIMT...

  11. Drug-induced liver injuries

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    most clinicians and is synonymous with drug-induced hepatotoxicity. A succinct ... or herbal medicine resulting in liver test abnormalities or liver dysfunction with a ... and exclusion of other common aetiological factors, e.g. viral hepatitis. .... chronic alcohol use and hepatitis B or C infection. As a combination of drugs is used.

  12. Phentermine induced acute interstitial nephritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Emily Ximin; Wilson, Gregory John; Ranganathan, Dwarakanathan

    2017-03-09

    Acute interstitial nephritis (AIN) has a number of medication-related aetiologies. Antibiotics, proton pump inhibitors and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are common causes; however, any medication has the potential to cause drug-induced AIN. We report the first case of phentermine-induced AIN. A Caucasian woman aged 43 years presented with a 5-week history of lethargy, left-sided lower abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting. She had been taking phentermine for weight loss for 9 months and had recently ceased the medication. The patient underwent a renal biopsy that showed a predominantly lymphohistiocytic interstitial infiltrate with a moderate number of eosinophils consistent with AIN. Phentermine is increasingly used for weight loss in obese patients. This is the first case implicating phentermine as the causative agent for drug-induced AIN. While rare, phentermine-induced AIN is a possible adverse reaction of phentermine. Physicians and patients need to be aware of this risk. 2017 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Late onset startle induced tics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, MAJ; Brown, P; Morris, HR; Lees, A

    1999-01-01

    Three cases of late onset Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome are presented. The motor ties were mainly induced by an unexpected startling stimulus, but the startle reflex was not exaggerated. The ties developed after physical trauma or a period of undue emotional stress. Reflex ties may occur in

  14. Late onset startle induced tics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijssen, MAJ; Brown, P; Morris, HR; Lees, A

    1999-01-01

    Three cases of late onset Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome are presented. The motor ties were mainly induced by an unexpected startling stimulus, but the startle reflex was not exaggerated. The ties developed after physical trauma or a period of undue emotional stress. Reflex ties may occur in Gille

  15. Trainability of cold induced vasodilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Raymann, R.J.E.M.; Stoop, M.

    2007-01-01

    Peripheral cold injuries are often reported in mountaineers. Not only low ambient temperatures, but also the hypobaric circumstances are known to be major environmental risk factors. When the fingers are exposed to extreme cold for several minutes, cold induced vasodilation (CIVD) occurs, that is

  16. Trainability of cold induced vasodilation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Daanen, H.A.M.; Raymann, R.J.E.M.; Stoop, M.

    2007-01-01

    Peripheral cold injuries are often reported in mountaineers. Not only low ambient temperatures, but also the hypobaric circumstances are known to be major environmental risk factors. When the fingers are exposed to extreme cold for several minutes, cold induced vasodilation (CIVD) occurs, that is re

  17. [Readers' position against induced abortion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-25

    Replies to the request by the Journal of Nursing on readers' positions against induced abortion indicate there is a definite personal position against induced abortion and the assistance in this procedure. Some writers expressed an emotional "no" against induced abortion. Many quoted arguments from the literature, such as a medical dictionary definition as "a premeditated criminally induced abortion." The largest group of writers quoted from the Bible, the tenor always being: "God made man, he made us with his hands; we have no right to make the decision." People with other philosophies also objected. Theosophical viewpoint considers reincarnation and the law of cause and effect (karma). This philosophy holds that induced abortion impedes the appearance of a reincarnated being. The fundamental question in the abortion problem is, "can the fetus be considered a human life?" The German anatomist Professor E. Bleckschmidt points out that from conception there is human life, hence the fertilized cell can only develop into a human being and is not merely a piece of tissue. Professional nursing interpretation is that nursing action directed towards killing of a human being (unborn child) is against the nature and the essence of the nursing profession. A different opinion states that a nurse cares for patients who have decided for the operation. The nurse doesn't judge but respects the individual's decision. Some proabortion viewpoints considered the endangering of the mother's life by the unborn child, and the case of rape. With the arguments against abortion the question arises how to help the woman with unwanted pregnancy. Psychological counseling is emphasized as well as responsible and careful assistance. Referral to the Society for Protection of the Unborn Child (VBOK) is considered as well as other agencies. Further reader comments on this subject are solicited.

  18. Interaction of poxvirus intracellular mature virion proteins with the TPR domain of kinesin light chain in live infected cells revealed by two-photon-induced fluorescence resonance energy transfer fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeshtadi, Ananya; Burgos, Pierre; Stubbs, Christopher D; Parker, Anthony W; King, Linda A; Skinner, Michael A; Botchway, Stanley W

    2010-12-01

    Using two-photon-induced fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, we corroborate an interaction (previously demonstrated by yeast two-hybrid domain analysis) of full-length vaccinia virus (VACV; an orthopoxvirus) A36 protein with the cellular microtubule motor protein kinesin. Quenching of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), fused to the C terminus of VACV A36, by monomeric red fluorescent protein (mDsRed), fused to the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain of kinesin, was observed in live chicken embryo fibroblasts infected with either modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) or wild-type fowlpox virus (FWPV; an avipoxvirus), and the excited-state fluorescence lifetime of EGFP was reduced from 2.5 ± 0.1 ns to 2.1 ± 0.1 ns due to resonance energy transfer to mDsRed. FWPV does not encode an equivalent of intracellular enveloped virion surface protein A36, yet it is likely that this virus too must interact with kinesin to facilitate intracellular virion transport. To investigate possible interactions between innate FWPV proteins and kinesin, recombinant FWPVs expressing EGFP fused to the N termini of FWPV structural proteins Fpv140, Fpv168, Fpv191, and Fpv198 (equivalent to VACV H3, A4, p4c, and A34, respectively) were generated. EGFP fusions of intracellular mature virion (IMV) surface protein Fpv140 and type II membrane protein Fpv198 were quenched by mDsRed-TPR in recombinant FWPV-infected cells, indicating that these virion proteins are found within 10 nm of mDsRed-TPR. In contrast, and as expected, EGFP fusions of the IMV core protein Fpv168 did not show any quenching. Interestingly, the p4c-like protein Fpv191, which demonstrates late association with preassembled IMV, also did not show any quenching.

  19. Does a parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia induce vestigial cytoplasmic incompatibility?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraaijeveld, Ken; Reumer, Barbara M.; Mouton, Laurence; Kremer, Natacha; Vavre, Fabrice; van Alphen, Jacques J. M.

    2011-03-01

    Wolbachia is a maternally inherited bacterium that manipulates the reproduction of its host. Recent studies have shown that male-killing strains can induce cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) when introgressed into a resistant host. Phylogenetic studies suggest that transitions between CI and other Wolbachia phenotypes have also occurred frequently, raising the possibility that latent CI may be widespread among Wolbachia. Here, we investigate whether a parthenogenesis-inducing Wolbachia strain can also induce CI. Parthenogenetic females of the parasitoid wasp Asobara japonica regularly produce a small number of males that may be either infected or not. Uninfected males were further obtained through removal of the Wolbachia using antibiotics and from a naturally uninfected strain. Uninfected females that had mated with infected males produced a slightly, but significantly more male-biased sex ratio than uninfected females that had mated with uninfected males. This effect was strongest in females that mated with males that had a relatively high Wolbachia titer. Quantitative PCR indicated that infected males did not show higher ratios of nuclear versus mitochondrial DNA content. Wolbachia therefore does not cause diploidization of cells in infected males. While these results are consistent with CI, other alternatives such as production of abnormal sperm by infected males cannot be completely ruled out. Overall, the effect was very small (9%), suggesting that if CI is involved it may have degenerated through the accumulation of mutations.

  20. Methadone Induced Sensorineural Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chadi Saifan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSHL caused by opiate abuse or overuse has been well documented in the medical literature. Most documented case reports have involved either heroin or hydrocodone/acetaminophen. Recently, case reposts of methadone induced SSHL have been published. Case Report. We present the case of a 31-year-old man who developed SSHL after a methadone overdose induced stupor. He was subsequently restarted on methadone at his regular dose. On follow-up audiometry exams, he displayed persistent moderately severe sensorineural hearing loss bilaterally. Discussion. This case is notable because unlike all but one previously reported case, the patient—who was restated on methadone—did not make a complete recovery. Conclusion. Methadone overuse in rare cases causes SSHL.